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Sample records for hughes medical institute

  1. Howard Hughes Medical Institute dose assessment survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, S.L.; McDougall, M.M.; Barkley, W.E.

    1996-01-01

    Biomedical science researchers often express frustration that health physics practices vary widely between individual institutions. A survey examining both internal and external dose assessment practices was devised and mailed to fifty institutions supporting biomedical science research. The results indicate that health physics dose assessment practices and policies are highly variable. Factors which may contribute to the degree of variation are discussed. 2 tabs

  2. Effect of two Howard Hughes Medical Institute research training programs for medical students on the likelihood of pursuing research careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Di; Meyer, Roger E

    2003-12-01

    To assess the effect of Howard Hughes Medical Institute's (HHMI) two one-year research training programs for medical students on the awardees' research careers. Awardees of the HHMI Cloister Program who graduated between 1987 and 1995 and awardees of the HHMI Medical Fellows Program who graduated between 1991 and 1995 were compared with unsuccessful applicants to the programs and MD-PhD students who graduated during the same periods. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess research career outcomes while controlling for academic and demographic variables that could affect selection to the programs. Participation in both HHMI programs increased the likelihood of receiving National Institutes of Health postdoctoral support. Participation in the Cloister Program also increased the likelihood of receiving a faculty appointment with research responsibility at a medical school. In addition, awardees of the Medical Fellows Program were not significantly less likely than Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP) and non-MSTP MD-PhD program participants to receive a National Institutes of Health postdoctoral award, and awardees of the Cloister Program were not significantly less likely than non-MSTP MD-PhD students to receive a faculty appointment with research responsibility. Women and underrepresented minority students were proportionally represented among awardees of the two HHMI programs whereas they were relatively underrepresented in MD-PhD programs. The one-year intensive research training supported by the HHMI training programs appears to provide an effective imprinting experience on medical students' research careers and to be an attractive strategy for training physician-scientists.

  3. Responses to Hugh Heclo's "On Thinking Institutionally"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, Robert C.; Ascough, Richard S.; Liew, Tat-siong Benny; McLain, Michael; Westfield, Nancy Lynne

    2010-01-01

    Hugh Heclo's recent book "On Thinking Institutionally" (Paradigm Publishers, 2008) analyzes changes that have taken place in the past half century in how North Americans tend to think and act in institutions. The volume is receiving particular attention as it can be applied to higher education and to religious denominations, and so deserves…

  4. Additional Responses to Hugh Heclo's "On Thinking Institutionally"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Timothy D.; Fennell, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Issue 13:3 of this journal (July 2010) included a "Conversation" on Hugh Heclo's recent publication "On Thinking Institutionally" (Paradigm Publishers, 2008) with a book review by Robert Fennell and responses by Richard Ascough, Tat-siong Benny Liew, Michael McLain, and Lynne Westfield. Here we publish two additional responses to this same book.…

  5. 2002 Report to Congress: Evaluating the Consensus Best Practices Developed through the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Collaborative Hazardous Waste Management Demonstration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report discusses a collaborative project initiated by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) to establish and evaluate a performance-based approach to management of hazardous wastes in the laboratories of academic research institutions.

  6. Research Institute for Medical Biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynchank, S.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of ionising and non-ionising radiation on rodent tumours and normal tissue were studied in terms of cellular repair and the relevant biochemical and biophysical changes following radiation. Rodent tumours investigated in vivo were the CaNT adenocarcinoma and a chemically induced transplantable rhabdomyosarcoma. Radiations used were 100KVp of X-Rays, neutron beams, various magnetic fields, and microwave radiation of 2450MHz. The biochemical parameters measured were, inter alia, levels of adenosine-5'-triphoshate (ATP) and the specific activity of hexokinase (HK). Metabolic changes in ATP levels and the activity of HK were observed in tumour and normal tissues following ionising and non-ionising radiation in normoxia and hypoxia. The observation that the effect of radiation and chemotherapeutic treatment of some tumours may be size dependent can possibly now be explained by the variation of ATP content with tumour size. The enhanced tumour HK specific activity implies increased metabolism, possibly a consequence of cellular requirements to maintain homeostasis during repair processes. Other research projects of the Research Institute for Medical Biophysics involved, inter alia, gastroesophageal scintigraphies to evaluate the results of new forms of therapy. 1 ill

  7. National Institute of General Medical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Over Navigation Links National Institute of General Medical Sciences Site Map Staff Search My Order Search the ... NIGMS Website Research Funding Research Training News & Meetings Science Education About NIGMS Feature Slides View All Slides ...

  8. 77 FR 76457 - Howard Hughes Medical Institute, et al.; Notice of Consolidated Decision on Applications for Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... biomaterials such as starches, lignin, and proteins, and compare them with styrenics and petroleum based... reactivity before and after applying a specified pressure and temperature inside a vacuum chamber inside the...

  9. 77 FR 20009 - Howard Hughes Medical Institute, et al.; Notice of Consolidated Decision on Applications for Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-03

    ... Importation Act of 1966 (Pub. L. 89-651, as amended by Pub. L. 106-36; 80 Stat. 897; 15 CFR part 301). Related... instrument. Dated: March 26, 2012. Gregory W. Campbell, Director, Subsidies Enforcement Office, Import...

  10. Recognition of higher medical institutions in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severyanova, L; Lazarev, A

    2005-08-01

    The Russian Federation of higher medical institutions get State accreditation, if their activity conforms to criteria determined by the Ministry of Public Health and the Ministry of Education of the Russian Federation. Kursk State Medical University (KSMU) has a confirmed to requirement of accreditation by the Russian Federation, to conduct annually training of about 5000 students at 12 faculties. KSMU carries out pre-medical undergraduate and postgraduate training in the specialty "Doctor of medicine". For the first time in Russia KSMU was allowed to conduct a 6-year medical training with the use of English as an intermediary language by the Ministry of Public Health and the Ministry of Education. In this relation programmes of training teachers for conducting instruction with the use of an intermediary language (English) and training students Russian with the level necessary for free communication with Russian patients and staff of the clinics have been developed and realized.

  11. [Marketing as a tool in the medical institution management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, N G; Balokhina, S A

    2009-01-01

    The contemporary social economic conditions dictate the necessity to change tactics and strategy of functioning of medical institutions of different property forms. Marketing, alongside with management is to become a leading concept of administration of medical institutions. It should be a framework for systematic collection, registration and analysis of data relevant to the medical services market. The issues of the implementation of marketing concept in the practical everyday activities of commercial medical organization providing cosmetology services to population of metropolis.

  12. Hugh Maaskant : architect van de vooruitgang

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Provoost, M.

    2003-01-01

    Hugh Maaskant (1907–1977) is best known as the architect who made the biggest mark on the post-war reconstruction of Rotterdam with such buildings as the Groothandelsgebouw, the Hilton Hotel and the Lijnbaan flats. Beginning his career in 1937 as the partner of Willem van Tijen, Maaskant embarked on

  13. On the Hughes model and numerical aspects

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Diogo A.; Machado Velho, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    We study a crowd model proposed by R. Hughes in [11] and we describe a numerical approach to solve it. This model comprises a Fokker-Planck equation coupled with an eikonal equation with Dirichlet or Neumann data. First, we establish a priori

  14. Radiological and Medical Sciences Research Institute (RAMSRI) - Annual Report 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The Radiological and Medical Sciences Research Institute (RAMSRI) is the fourth Research and Development Institute of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC), undertaking research in human health and nutrition. This annual report covers the major activities undertaken by RAMSRI for the year 2015. The activities are grouped under the following headings: Establishment; Personnel and Organisation; Major Activities of Centres; Ongoing IAEA TC Projects; Human Resource Development; IAEA Coordinated Meetings Hosted; Publications; Achievements; Challenges; Projections for the Year 2016; and Recommendations.

  15. [Ethic review on clinical experiments of medical devices in medical institutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Wanjun; Chao, Yong; Wang, Ning; Xu, Shining

    2011-07-01

    Clinical experiments are always used to evaluate the safety and validity of medical devices. The experiments have two types of clinical trying and testing. Ethic review must be done by the ethics committee of the medical department with the qualification of clinical research, and the approval must be made before the experiments. In order to ensure the safety and validity of clinical experiments of medical devices in medical institutions, the contents, process and approval criterions of the ethic review were analyzed and discussed.

  16. Time-bound promotions in Indian medical institutes: a mirage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhlecha, Anupama

    2016-01-01

    Incentives, pay hikes and timely promotions enhance the job performance of an employee. In medical institutes, too, satisfied teachers would train students in a better way leading to better equipped doctors and ultimately, greater patient satisfaction. A study in Malaysia links high levels of satisfaction of employees with good salary, promotions, and incentives.

  17. [A Swiss medical-social institution and the Snoezelen concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois-Terrail, Caroline; Kemken, Lucie Marigo; Makamwe, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    In collaboration with six student nurses from the Geneva Haute École de Santé, the Les Franchises medical-social institution in Geneva has launched an innovative project: the integration of the Snoezelen concept into its care programme, which will benefit residents with moderate or advanced dementia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. On the Hughes model and numerical aspects

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Diogo A.

    2017-01-05

    We study a crowd model proposed by R. Hughes in [11] and we describe a numerical approach to solve it. This model comprises a Fokker-Planck equation coupled with an eikonal equation with Dirichlet or Neumann data. First, we establish a priori estimates for the solutions. Second, we study radial solutions and identify a shock formation mechanism. Third, we illustrate the existence of congestion, the breakdown of the model, and the trend to the equilibrium. Finally, we propose a new numerical method and consider two examples.

  19. Sandy ja Hugh - paar või mitte? / Hugh Grant, Sandra Bullock

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Grant, Hugh, 1960-

    2003-01-01

    Romantilises komöödias "Kaks nädalat armumiseks" ("Two Weeks Notice"), režissöör Marc Lawrence, mängivad kaks kuulsat näitlejat. Staarid oma suhetest : Hugh Grant : "Sandra on geenius"; Sandra Bullock : "Oleme temaga nagu kaksikud!"

  20. NIH's National Institute of General Medical Sciences celebrates 45 years of Discovery for Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alison Davis NIH's National Institute of General Medical Sciences celebrates 45 years of Discovery for Health The National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) is the NIH institute that primarily supports ...

  1. Langston Hughes Curriculum Packet: Dig and Be Dug in Return.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Susan

    Designed in a flexible format for use by college instructors, high school teachers, and community education workers, this curriculum packet serves as an introduction to the life and works of black poet Langston Hughes. The major component of the packet is a critical essay that explores the thematic highlights of Hughes's career. The remaining…

  2. Establishment of a Quantitative Medical Technology Evaluation System and Indicators within Medical Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suo-Wei Wu

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: As the two-round questionnaire survey of experts and statistical analysis were performed and credibility of the results was verified through consistency evaluation test, the study established a quantitative medical technology evaluation system model and assessment indicators within medical institutions based on the Delphi method and analytical hierarchy process. Moreover, further verifications, adjustments, and optimizations of the system and indicators will be performed in follow-up studies.

  3. Analysis of occupational doses of radiation workers in medical institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanaye, S.S.; Baburajan, Sujatha; Joshi, V.D.; Pawar, S.G.; Nalawade, S.K.; Raman, N.V.; Kher, R.K.

    2007-01-01

    Routine monitoring of occupational radiation workers is done for controlling the doses to the individuals and to demonstrate the compliance with occupational dose limits. One of the objective of personnel monitoring program is the assessment of the radiation safety of working area and trends of exposure histories of individuals or group of workers. Computerised dose registry of all monitored radiation workers along with their personnel data helps in analyzing these trends. This in turn helps the institutions in management of their radiation safety programs. In India, annual and life time occupational dose records are maintained as National Dose Registry in the Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. This paper presents analysis of occupational dose data of monitored radiation workers in medical institutions in India during last five years (i.e. 2002-2006)

  4. MEDICAL SERVICES OR MEDICAL CARE – AN URGENT ISSUE FOR PUBLIC HEALTH INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Pesennikova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To consider the relationship between the concepts of “medical service” and “medical care” in the work of public medical institutions, based on the analysis of normative legal documents of the modern period.Materials and methods. In the course of the research, more than 18 legal and regulatory documents that were published during the period from 1990 to 2017 were analyzed, an analysis of judicial practice and related literature sources (periodicals was carried out.Results. The analysis made it possible to distinguish the stages in the development of the organizational and legal framework for the provision of paid medical services in the Russian Federation and the dynamics of the relationship between the terms “medical care” and “medical service”. It was revealed that the concept of “medical services” appeared much later and was associated with the development of paid medical services and the need to establish legal aspects of health care. The provision of medical assistance is regulated mainly by public law, and the provision of medical services is governed by private law. The term “medical care” is broader than the “medical service” from the standpoint of the social aspect. At the same time, the concept of “medical service” can be considered more widely than medical care in cases when it is not only about measures aimed at treating the patient, but also about providing additional services to the patient in the process of receiving medical care.Conclusion. Thus, we concluded that the categories of medical care and medical services should not be identified, but also not completely different concepts, but rather enter into a partial intersection relationship. The need to distinguish between the concepts of “medical care” and “medical service” is dictated not only by the category relations or opinion of the population and the medical community, but also by the need for legal support for the process of

  5. Establishment of a Quantitative Medical Technology Evaluation System and Indicators within Medical Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Suo-Wei; Chen, Tong; Pan, Qi; Wei, Liang-Yu; Wang, Qin; Li, Chao; Song, Jing-Chen; Luo, Ji

    2018-06-05

    The development and application of medical technologies reflect the medical quality and clinical capacity of a hospital. It is also an effective approach in upgrading medical service and core competitiveness among medical institutions. This study aimed to build a quantitative medical technology evaluation system through questionnaire survey within medical institutions to perform an assessment to medical technologies more objectively and accurately, and promote the management of medical quality technologies and ensure the medical safety of various operations among the hospitals. A two-leveled quantitative medical technology evaluation system was built through a two-round questionnaire survey of chosen experts. The Delphi method was applied in identifying the structure of evaluation system and indicators. The judgment of the experts on the indicators was adopted in building the matrix so that the weight coefficient and maximum eigenvalue (λ max), consistency index (CI), and random consistency ratio (CR) could be obtained and collected. The results were verified through consistency tests, and the index weight coefficient of each indicator was conducted and calculated through analytical hierarchy process. Twenty-six experts of different medical fields were involved in the questionnaire survey, 25 of whom successfully responded to the two-round research. Altogether, 4 primary indicators (safety, effectiveness, innovativeness, and benefits), as well as 13 secondary indicators, were included in the evaluation system. The matrix is built to conduct the λ max, CI, and CR of each expert in the survey, and the index weight coefficients of primary indicators were 0.33, 0.28, 0.27, and 0.12, respectively, and the index weight coefficients of secondary indicators were conducted and calculated accordingly. As the two-round questionnaire survey of experts and statistical analysis were performed and credibility of the results was verified through consistency evaluation test, the

  6. Distributed deep learning networks among institutions for medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ken; Balachandar, Niranjan; Lam, Carson; Yi, Darvin; Brown, James; Beers, Andrew; Rosen, Bruce; Rubin, Daniel L; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree

    2018-03-29

    Deep learning has become a promising approach for automated support for clinical diagnosis. When medical data samples are limited, collaboration among multiple institutions is necessary to achieve high algorithm performance. However, sharing patient data often has limitations due to technical, legal, or ethical concerns. In this study, we propose methods of distributing deep learning models as an attractive alternative to sharing patient data. We simulate the distribution of deep learning models across 4 institutions using various training heuristics and compare the results with a deep learning model trained on centrally hosted patient data. The training heuristics investigated include ensembling single institution models, single weight transfer, and cyclical weight transfer. We evaluated these approaches for image classification in 3 independent image collections (retinal fundus photos, mammography, and ImageNet). We find that cyclical weight transfer resulted in a performance that was comparable to that of centrally hosted patient data. We also found that there is an improvement in the performance of cyclical weight transfer heuristic with a high frequency of weight transfer. We show that distributing deep learning models is an effective alternative to sharing patient data. This finding has implications for any collaborative deep learning study.

  7. Computer-based literature search in medical institutions in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalita Jayantee

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study the use of computer-based literature search and its application in clinical training and patient care as a surrogate marker of evidence-based medicine. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire comprising of questions on purpose (presentation, patient management, research, realm (site accessed, nature and frequency of search, effect, infrastructure, formal training in computer based literature search and suggestions for further improvement were sent to residents and faculty of a Postgraduate Medical Institute (PGI and a Medical College. The responses were compared amongst different subgroups of respondents. Results: Out of 300 subjects approached 194 responded; of whom 103 were from PGI and 91 from Medical College. There were 97 specialty residents, 58 super-specialty residents and 39 faculty members. Computer-based literature search was done at least once a month by 89% though there was marked variability in frequency and extent. The motivation for computer-based literature search was for presentation in 90%, research in 65% and patient management in 60.3%. The benefit of search was acknowledged in learning and teaching by 80%, research by 65% and patient care by 64.4% of respondents. Formal training in computer based literature search was received by 41% of whom 80% were residents. Residents from PGI did more frequent and more extensive computer-based literature search, which was attributed to better infrastructure and training. Conclusion: Training and infrastructure both are crucial for computer-based literature search, which may translate into evidence based medicine.

  8. THE INFORMATION CONFIDENTIALITY AND CYBER SECURITY IN MEDICAL INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SABAU-POPA CLAUDIA DIANA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The information confidentiality and cyber security risk affects the right to confidentiality and privacy of the patient, as regulated in Romania by the Law 46/2002. The manifestation of the cyber security risk event affects the reputation of the healthcare institution and is becoming more and more complex and often due to the: development of network technology, the medical equipment connected to wifi and the electronic databases. The databases containing medical records were implemented due to automation. Thus, transforming data into medical knowledge contribute to a better understanding of the disease. Due to these factors, the measures taken by the hospital management for this type of risk are adapted to the cyber changes. The hospital objectives aim: the implementation of a robust information system, the early threats identifications and the incident reporting. Neglecting this type of risk can generate financial loss, inability to continue providing health care services for a certain period of time, providing an erroneous diagnosis, medical equipment errors etc. Thus, in a digital age the appropriate risk management for the information security and cyber risk represent a necessity. The main concern of hospitals worldwide is to align with international requirements and obtain credentials in terms of data security from the International Organisation for Standardization, which regulates the management of this type of risk. Romania is at the beginning in terms of concerns regarding the management, avoidance and mitigation of information security, the health system being most highly exposed to its manifestation. The present paper examines the concerns of the health system to the confidentiality of information and cyber security risk and its management arrangements. Thus, a set of key risk indicators is implemented and monitored for 2011-2013, using a user interface, a Dashboard, which acts as an early warning system of the manifestation of the

  9. Síndrome de Hughes-Stovin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Pankl

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome de Hughes-Stovin es una entidad infrecuente caracterizada por trombosis venosa profunda y aneurismas de la arteria pulmonar, siendo su etiología y patogenia desconocida. Algunos autores la consideran una variante de la enfermedad de Behcet. Su curso natural es generalmente fatal. Se presenta con tos, disnea, hemoptisis, dolor torácico y fiebre. El tratamiento es con esteroides y agentes citotóxicos hasta la cirugía. Presentamos el caso de un hombre de 41 años que consultó por disnea, hemoptisis y dolor torácico, llegándose al diagnóstico de trombosis venosa profunda de miembro inferior derecho, trombo-embolismo de pulmón y aneurismas de arterias pulmonares. Recibió tratamiento con corticoides en altas dosis y 6 pulsos de ciclofosfamida de 1 gramo durante 6 meses, con regresión completa de los aneurismas y de la sintomatología.

  10. Hugh Blairs Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schatz-Jakobsen, Claus

    1989-01-01

    Artiklen nærlæser dekonstruktivt dele af den skotske retorikprofessor Hugh Blairs Lecures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres (1783) og påviser splittelsen mellem to vidt forskellige retorik- og liltteraturhistoriske interesser, neoklassicistiske vs. romantiske....

  11. Implementation of radiation safety program in a medical institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palanca, Elena D.

    1999-01-01

    A medical institution that utilizes radiation for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of malignancies develops and implements a radiation safety program to keep occupational exposures of radiation workers and exposures of non-radiation workers and the public to the achievable and a more achievable minimum, to optimize the use of radiation, and to prevent misadministration. The hospital radiation safety program is established by a core medical radiation committee composed of trained radiation safety officers and head of authorized users of radioactive materials and radiation machines from the different departments. The radiation safety program sets up procedural guidelines of the safe use of radioactive material and of radiation equipment. It offers regular training to radiation workers and radiation safety awareness courses to hospital staff. The program has a comprehensive radiation safety information system or radsis that circularizes the radiation safety program in the hospital. The radsis keeps the drafted and updated records of safety guides and policies, radioactive material and equipment inventory, personnel dosimetry reports, administrative, regulatory and licensing activity document, laboratory procedures, emergency procedures, quality assurance and quality control program process, physics and dosimetry procedures and reports, personnel and hospital staff training program. The medical radiation protection committee is tasked to oversee the actual implementation of the radiation safety guidelines in the different radiation facilities in the hospital, to review personnel exposures, incident reports and ALARA actions, operating procedures, facility inspections and audit reports, to evaluate the existing radiation safety procedures, to make necessary changes to these procedures, and make modifications of course content of the training program. The effective implementation of the radiation safety program provides increased confidence that the physician and

  12. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1995. Annex II: PSI life sciences and institute for medical radiobiology newsletter 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaeuenstein, P; Gschwend, B [eds.

    1996-09-01

    The newsletter presents the 1995 progress report of PSI F2-Department and of the Institute for Medical Radiobiology in the fields of radiation medicine, radiopharmacy and radiation hygiene. figs., tabs., refs.

  13. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1995. Annex II: PSI life sciences and institute for medical radiobiology newsletter 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaeuenstein, P.; Gschwend, B.

    1996-01-01

    The newsletter presents the 1995 progress report of PSI F2-Department and of the Institute for Medical Radiobiology in the fields of radiation medicine, radiopharmacy and radiation hygiene. figs., tabs., refs

  14. The financial management of research centers and institutes at U.S. medical schools: findings from six institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallon, William T

    2006-06-01

    To explore three questions surrounding the financial management of research centers and institutes at U.S. medical schools: How do medical schools allocate institutional funds to centers and institutes? How and by whom are those decisions made? What are the implications of these decision-making models on the future of the academic biomedical research enterprise? Using a qualitative research design, the author and associates interviewed over 150 faculty members and administrators at six medical schools and their parent universities in 2004. Interview data were transcribed, coded, and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. This methodology generated rich descriptions and explanations of the six medical schools, which can produce extrapolations to, but not necessarily generalizable findings to, other institutions and settings. An examination of four dimensions of financial decision-making-funding timing, process, structure, and culture-produces two essential models of how medical schools approach the financial management of research centers. In the first, a "charity" model, center directors make hat-in-hand appeals directly to the dean, the result of which may depend on individual negotiation skills and personal relationships. In the second, a "planned-giving" model, the process for obtaining and renewing funds is institutionalized, agreed upon, and monitored. The ways in which deans, administrators, department chairs, and center directors attend to, decide upon, and carry out financial decisions can influence how people throughout the medical school think about interdisciplinary and collaborative activities marshalled though centers and institutes.

  15. 78 FR 66947 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... Person: Robert Horowits, Ph.D., Senior Investigator, National Institute of General Medical Sciences..., Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology...

  16. Obituary: Lawrence Hugh Aller, 1913-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaler, James B.

    2003-12-01

    Michigan, he taught a two-semester course in advanced general astronomy that covered nearly everything, in addition to a remarkable four-semester sequence in astrophysics (general, stellar atmospheres, nebular astrophysics, and stellar interiors). These were backed up by an extraordinary set of books. In 1943, Goldberg and he turned out the seminal toms, Stars, and Nebulae. (A solo third edition was published in 1991.) Then in 1953 arrived "The Atmospheres of the Sun and Stars" (revised a decade later), a tour de force on the physics of stellar plasmas and radiative transfer that became the bible of a generation of astronomers. "Nuclear Transformations, Stellar Interiors, and Nebulae" appeared a year later, and "Gaseous Nebulae" two years after that (rewritten in 1984 as "Physics of Thermal Gaseous Nebulae"). Not having a computer available in the early years, he used his students, creating mammoth "Aller Problems" that solved the equations for results that went into the books. Never formally published were two massive tomes of advanced general astronomy. To those of us lucky enough to have them, they serve as references to this day. His students, both undergraduate and graduate, are everywhere, their own students in turn carrying on Lawrence's ideas and work. In 1941, Lawrence married Rosalind Duncan Hall (who survives), and together they raised three children: Hugh, Gwen, and Raymond. Not only did one son become an astronomer, but so has one granddaughter (a dynasty established). Lawrence was absorbed by news and politics. He hated injustice of any kind, and let you know about it. He could entertain for hours with stories of his youth and of other astronomers, never realizing that he would also be the source of affectionate stories that would be told and retold by his own students. Of beautiful heart, he was a good father, both to his own children and to those he adopted as his students, none of whom, having been taught by him, will ever forget. Incredibly prolific, his

  17. Radiation safety in educational, medical and research institutions. Regulatory guide G-121

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-05-01

    This regulatory guide is intended to help educational, medical and research institutions design and implement radiation protection programs that meed regulatory requirements. This guide applied to educational, medical or research institutions that require a licence from the CNSC to posses or use radioactive materials. It describes programs to assure that radioactive materials are used safely during licensed activities. (author)

  18. Survey of preventable disaster death at medical institutions in areas affected by the Great East Japan Earthquake: a retrospective preliminary investigation of medical institutions in Miyagi Prefecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanouchi, Satoshi; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Tsuruwa, Miho; Ueki, Yuzuru; Kohayagawa, Yoshitaka; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Otomo, Yasuhiro; Koido, Yuichi; Kushimoto, Shigeki

    2015-04-01

    The 2011, magnitude (M) 9, Great East Japan Earthquake and massive tsunami caused widespread devastation and left approximately 18,500 people dead or missing. The incidence of preventable disaster death (PDD) during the Great East Japan Earthquake remains to be clarified; the present study investigated PDD at medical institutions in areas affected by the Great East Japan Earthquake in order to improve disaster medical systems. A total of 25 hospitals in Miyagi Prefecture (Japan) that were disaster base hospitals (DBHs), or had at least 20 patient deaths between March 11, 2011 and April 1, 2011, were selected to participate based on the results of a previous study. A database was created using the medical records of all patient deaths (n=868), and PDD was determined from discussion with 10 disaster health care professionals. A total of 102 cases of PDD were identified at the participating hospitals. The rate of PDD was higher at coastal hospitals compared to inland hospitals (62/327, 19.0% vs 40/541, 7.4%; Pdeath at medical institutions in areas affected by the Great East Japan Earthquake occurred mainly at coastal hospitals. Insufficient resources (at GHs), environmental factors (at coastal hospitals), and delayed medical intervention (at all hospitals) constituted the major potential contributing factors. Further investigation of all medical institutions in Miyagi Prefecture, including those with fewer than 20 patient deaths, is required in order to obtain a complete picture of the details of PDD at medical institutions in the disaster area.

  19. Medical Institutions and Twitter: A Novel Tool for Public Communication in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Yuya; Narimatsu, Hiroto; Tsuya, Atsushi; Tanaka, Atsushi; Fukao, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Twitter is a free social networking and microblogging service on the Internet. Medical professionals and patients have started to use Twitter in medicine. Twitter use by medical institutions can interactively and efficiently provide public health information and education for laypeople. This study examined Twitter usage by medical institutions. We reviewed all Japanese user accounts in which the names of medical institutions were described in the user's Twitter profile. We then classified medical institutions' tweets by content. We extracted 168 accounts for medical institutions with ≥500 followers. The medical specialties of those accounts were dentistry and oral surgery (n=73), dermatology (n=12), cosmetic surgery (n=10), internal medicine (n=10), ophthalmology (n=6), obstetrics and gynecology (n=5), plastic surgery (n=2), and others (n=50). Of these, 21 accounts tweeted medical knowledge and 45 accounts tweeted guidance about medical practice and consultation hours, including advertisements. In the dentistry and oral surgery accounts, individual behavior or thinking was the most frequent (22/71, 31%) content. On the other hand, consultation including advertisements was the most frequent (14/23, 61%) in cosmetic surgery, plastic surgery, and dermatology. Some medical specialties used Twitter for disseminating medical knowledge or guidance including advertisements. This indicates that Twitter potentially can be used for various purposes by different medical specialties.

  20. INTRODUCTION OF SHANGHAI INSTITUTE OF MEDICAL QUALITY(SIMQ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    SIMQ is a non-profit and independent organization,funded by Shanghai Medical Innovation&Development Foundation,to support medical organizations to to develop guidelines and quality standards for disease management,improve hospital management efficiency using business intelligence for hospitals and therefore to improve patient satisfaction.Together with its partners,SIMQ commissions and provides the access

  1. Saving the Dust Bowl: "Big Hugh" Bennett's Triumph over Tragedy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    In the 1930s, years of injudicious cultivation had devastated 100 million acres of Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, Colorado, and New Mexico. This was the Dust Bowl, and it exposed a problem that had silently plagued American agriculture for centuries--soil erosion. Farmers, scientists, and the government alike considered it trivial until Hugh Hammond…

  2. A Haphazard Reading of McHugh and Barlow (2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, R. Kathryn; Barlow, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Replies to comments on Do haphazard reviews provide sound directions for dissemination efforts? by Eileen Gambrill and Julia H. Littell on the current authors' article The dissemination and implementation of evidence-based psychological treatments: A review of current efforts by Kathryn R. McHugh and David H. Barlow. In their commentary, Gambrill…

  3. Ted Hughes: The Development of a Children's Poet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This article looks at how Ted Hughes' poetry for children developed over more than 30 years of publication. It traces the movement from his earlier, more conventional rhyming poems, such as "Meet My Folks!" (1961) and "Nessie the Mannerless Monster" (1964), to the mature, free verse "animal poems" for older readers of "Season Songs" (1976c),…

  4. Hugh Grant's Image Restoration Discourse: An Actor Apologizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, William L.

    1997-01-01

    Examines the strategies used by actor Hugh Grant (in his appearances on talk shows) to help restore his reputation after he was arrested for lewd behavior with a prostitute. Uses this case as a springboard to contrast entertainment image repair with political and corporate image repair, arguing that important situational differences can be…

  5. Unfettered expression and human dignity: Langston Hughes's not ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In literature as in other disciplines, freedom of speech entails the unburdening of one's intent from the innermost recesses of one's mind. It is a great relief and a ventilation of the conscious and sub-conscious being. Langston Hughes and Chinua Achebe are noted human rights proponents in their American and Nigerian ...

  6. Some Numerical Aspects on Crowd Motion - The Hughes Model

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Diogo A.; Machado Velho, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Here, we study a crowd model proposed by R. Hughes in [5] and we describe a numerical approach to solve it. This model comprises a Fokker-Planck equation coupled with an Eikonal equation with Dirichlet or Neumann data. First, we establish a priori

  7. Hugh Hefner - maailma esi-playboy / Neeme Raud

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Raud, Neeme, 1969-

    2004-01-01

    Ajakirja Playboy asutajast Hugh Hefner'ist, tema elufilosoofiast ja põhimõtetest erootikaväljaande sisu kujundamisel. Ärijuhi Christie Hefner'i sõnul on rahvusvahelise multimeedia-meelelahutusfirma praeguseks eesmärgiks brändi sobitamine erinevatesse meediavormidesse. Lisa: Mis on Playboy?

  8. Dr. Vernon W. Hughes, 81, authority on the subatomic

    CERN Multimedia

    Lavietes, S

    2002-01-01

    "Dr. Vernon W. Hughes, a Yale physicist whose investigation of particles called muons poked holes in standard subatomic theory and provided evidence for the existence of previously undetected matter, died at Yale-New Haven Hospital last Tuesday" (1/2 page).

  9. 77 FR 52264 - Airworthiness Directives; Hughes Helicopters, Inc., and McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Systems...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-29

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Hughes Helicopters, Inc., and McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Systems (Type Certificate... Airworthiness Directive (AD): Hughes Helicopters Inc., and McDonnel Douglas Helicopter Systems (Type Certificate...

  10. 78 FR 18226 - Airworthiness Directives; Hughes Helicopters, Inc., and McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Systems...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Hughes Helicopters, Inc., and McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Systems (Type Certificate... directive (AD): 2013-05-16 Hughes Helicopters, Inc., and McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Systems (Type...

  11. Francesca Hughes: Architecture of Error: Matter, Measure and the Misadventure of Precision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foote, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Review of "Architecture of Error: Matter, Measure and the Misadventure of Precision" by Francesca Hughes (MIT Press, 2014)......Review of "Architecture of Error: Matter, Measure and the Misadventure of Precision" by Francesca Hughes (MIT Press, 2014)...

  12. The current situation and development of medical device testing institutes in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofang; Mu, Ruihong; Fan, Yubo; Wang, Chunren; Li, Deyu

    2017-04-01

    This article analyses the current situation and development of Chinese medical device testing institutes from the perspectives of the two most important functions - testing functions and medical device standardization functions. Areas Covered: The objective of the Chinese government regulations for medical device industry is to ensure the safety and effectiveness of medical devices for Chinese patients. To support the regulation system, the Chinese government has established medical device testing institutes at different levels for example, the national, provincial, and municipal levels. These testing institutes also play an important role in technical support during medical device premarket registration and post market surveillance, they are also the vital practitioners of Chinese medical device standardization. Expert Commentary: Chinese medical device testing institutes are technical departments established by government, and serve the regulatory functions of government agency. In recent years, with the rapid development of medical device industry as well as constantly increasing international and domestic medical device market, the importance of medical device testing institute is more prominent, However, there are still some problems unsolved, such as their overall capacity remains to be improved, construction of standardization is to be strengthened, etc.

  13. Sexual behavior of medical students: A single institutional survey ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    %). Condom utilization amongst the sexually active was high (65%) and similar among male and female students (71.3% vs. 51.9% respectively, p = 0.08). Conclusion: There exists safe sexual practice among medical students in our setting.

  14. Differences in the use of outsourcing in public and private institutions providing medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerw, Aleksandra I; Kowalska, Mariola; Religioni, Urszula

    2014-06-29

    The costs of health care in Poland are continuously increasing. Thus, almost every institution providing medical services aims at their limitation. One of the costs rationalisation methods in the health care sector is outsourcing. The study was conducted in 153 randomly selected institutions providing medical activities. The tool was a questionnaire, available via a web browser. Over 30% of public institutions identified the need for financial savings, as the main reason for outsourcing the cleaning function. Among private institutions, the dominant reason for this is too high maintenance cost of the cleaning staff (less than 40% of responses). The huge number of medical institutions use the services of an external company for laundering. Over 30% of public institutions identified as the most common reason for separation of functions laundering lack of resources to upgrade and modernize facilities. Less than 27% of public institutions indicate too high costs of kitchen staff as the main reason for ordering function of feeding. Another reason is the need for financial savings (22% response rate). Some institutions indicate a desire to focus on key areas (20% of responses) and lack of financial resources to upgrade and modernize the kitchen (20% response rate). Public and private institutions exercise control over the quality and method performed by an external service (71% of public institutions and 59% of private institutions). Private institutions often informally exercise external control (difference confirmed - Fisher's exact test). Less than 90% of public institutions indicated satisfaction with the services provided by external companies. The adaptation of outsourcing in medical facilities leads to financial efficiency improvement. Through the separation of some medical functions and entrusting their realisation to external companies, medical institutions can focus on their basic activity that is the provision of health services.

  15. Medical student storytelling on an institutional blog: a case study analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Katherine A; Freberg, Karen

    2014-05-01

    Despite the proclivity and proliferation of blogs on the Internet, the use of blogs at medical institutions is not well documented. In examining the structured stories that medical students share with the digital community, we may better understand how students use institutional blogs to discuss their medical school experiences while maintaining their role as a medical student ambassador for the program. We conducted a case study to analyze the stories within 309 medical student blogs from one medical institution in the United States. In an attempt to communicate their experiences to different benefactors, student bloggers engaged in structured and personal storytelling. Structured stories offered medical school advice to prospective students, while personal stories embodied features of a personal diary where students recounted significant milestones, talked about personal relationships and engaged in emotional reflection and disclosure. Institutional blogs may provide social marketing for medical institutions, as students strategically framed their experiences to reflect a positive attitude about the medical institution and focused on providing advice to prospective students. Although these structured stories limit complete disclosure, students may still achieve benefits by engaging in emotional disclosure and personal reflection.

  16. Medical Institutions and Twitter: A Novel Tool for Public Communication in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Yuya; Tsuya, Atsushi; Tanaka, Atsushi; Fukao, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Background Twitter is a free social networking and microblogging service on the Internet. Medical professionals and patients have started to use Twitter in medicine. Twitter use by medical institutions can interactively and efficiently provide public health information and education for laypeople. Objective This study examined Twitter usage by medical institutions. Methods We reviewed all Japanese user accounts in which the names of medical institutions were described in the user’s Twitter profile. We then classified medical institutions’ tweets by content. Results We extracted 168 accounts for medical institutions with ≥500 followers. The medical specialties of those accounts were dentistry and oral surgery (n=73), dermatology (n=12), cosmetic surgery (n=10), internal medicine (n=10), ophthalmology (n=6), obstetrics and gynecology (n=5), plastic surgery (n=2), and others (n=50). Of these, 21 accounts tweeted medical knowledge and 45 accounts tweeted guidance about medical practice and consultation hours, including advertisements. In the dentistry and oral surgery accounts, individual behavior or thinking was the most frequent (22/71, 31%) content. On the other hand, consultation including advertisements was the most frequent (14/23, 61%) in cosmetic surgery, plastic surgery, and dermatology. Conclusions Some medical specialties used Twitter for disseminating medical knowledge or guidance including advertisements. This indicates that Twitter potentially can be used for various purposes by different medical specialties. PMID:27227154

  17. Survey of Preventable Disaster Deaths at Medical Institutions in Areas Affected by the Great East Japan Earthquake: Retrospective Survey of Medical Institutions in Miyagi Prefecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanouchi, Satoshi; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Mase, Tomohiko; Otomo, Yasuhiro; Koido, Yuichi; Kushimoto, Shigeki

    2017-10-01

    Introduction In 2015, the authors reported the results of a preliminary investigation of preventable disaster deaths (PDDs) at medical institutions in areas affected by the Great East Japan Earthquake (2011). This initial survey considered only disaster base hospitals (DBHs) and hospitals that had experienced at least 20 patient deaths in Miyagi Prefecture (Japan); therefore, hospitals that experienced fewer than 20 patient deaths were not investigated. This was an additional study to the previous survey to better reflect PDD at hospitals across the entire prefecture. Of the 147 hospitals in Miyagi Prefecture, the 14 DBHs and 82 non-DBHs that agreed to participate were included in an on-site survey. A database was created based on the medical records of 1,243 patient deaths that occurred between March 11, 2011 and April 1, 2011, followed by determination of their status as PDDs. A total of 125 cases of PDD were identified among the patients surveyed. The rate of PDD was significantly higher at coastal hospitals than inland hospitals (17.3% versus 6.3%; Pdisaster deaths in non-DBHs were most numerous in facilities with few general beds, especially among patients hospitalized before the disaster in hospitals with fewer than 100 beds. Categorized by area, the most frequent causes of PDD were: insufficient medical resources, disrupted lifelines, delayed medical intervention, and deteriorated environmental conditions in homes and emergency shelters in coastal areas; and were delayed medical intervention and disrupted lifelines in inland areas. Categorized by hospital function, the most frequent causes were: delayed medical intervention, deteriorated environmental conditions in homes and emergency shelters, and insufficient medical resources at DBHs; while those at non-DBHs were disrupted lifelines, insufficient medical resources, delayed medical intervention, and lack of capacity for transport within the area. Preventable disaster death at medical institutions in areas

  18. The essential role of mentors in medical institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Arez Mohamed, Elena Antoni University College London Medical School, University College London, London, UKWe read with great interest the papers written by Al Qahtani¹ and Banu et al.² The former explored the motivation of medical students to engage in mentoring in a place where this was a scarce phenomenon and the other analyzed how mentoring could be successfully implemented and enhance acquisition of knowledge among mentees.  View original paper by Al QahtaniView original paper by Banu et al 

  19. Radioactive Materials in Medical Institutions as a Potential Threat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radalj, Z.

    2007-01-01

    In numerous health institutions ionizing sources are used in everyday practice. Most of these sources are Roentgen machines and accelerators which produce radiation only when in use. However, there are many institutions, e.g., Nuclear medicine units, where radioactive materials are used for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. This institutions store a significant amount of radioactive materials in form of open and closed sources of radiation. Overall activity of open radiation sources can reach over a few hundred GBq. Open sources of radiation are usually so called short-living isotopes. Since they are used on daily basis, a need for a continuous supply of the radioactive materials exists (on weekly basis). Transportation phase is probably the most sensitive phase because of possible accidents or sabotage. Radiological terrorism is a new term. Legislation in the area of radiological safety is considered complete and well defined, and based on the present regulatory mechanism, work safety with radiation sources is considered relatively high. However, from time to time smaller accidents do happen due to mishandling, loose of material (possible stealing), etc. Lately, the safety issue of ionizing sources is becoming more important. In this matter we can expect activities in two directions, one which is going towards stealing and 'smuggling' of radioactive materials, and the other which would work or provoke accidents at the location where the radiation sources are.(author)

  20. Sexual behavior of medical students: A single institutional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniyam, C A; Agaba, P A; Agaba, E I

    2010-06-01

    We investigated the sexual practices of medical students as they are positioned to serve as peer educators in the fight against HIV/AIDS. This was a cross sectional study, where self- administered questionnaires were distributed to consenting 4(th) to 6(th) year medical students in Jos, Nigeria with a view of elucidating information regarding sexual practices and condom utilization. Safe sex practice was defined as the use of condoms and being in a monogamous relationship. Of a total of 400 questionnaires distributed, 365 respondents (249 males and 116 females) had adequate data for analysis. A large proportion (62%) of our students have never had sex before and less than 30% of them are sexually active. Only 6.1% had multiple sexual partners and homosexuality was uncommon (1.9%). Condom utilization amongst the sexually active was high (65%) and similar among male and female students (71.3% vs. 51.9% respectively, p = 0.08). There exists safe sexual practice among medical students in our setting. This group could be recruited as peer educators in the war against HIV/AIDS.

  1. Bifurcaciones del Sistema de FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Ongay Larios

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available La familia paramétrica de los sistemas de FitzHugh-Nagumo es rica en bifurcaciones (Rocsoreanu et al., 2000. En este artículo estudiamos las bifurcaciones silla-nodo y de Hopf desde el punto de vista matemático de esta familia y se describen completamente los conjuntos de bifurcación en el espacio de parámetros.

  2. [The work of Moscow communities of Sisters of Charity in own medical institutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorin, K V

    2011-01-01

    The article analyses the medical activities of Moscow communities of Sisters of Charity in curative and educational institutions organized by the communities themselves. The social ministration of communities on the territory of Moscow is considered.

  3. Medical Students' Perspectives on Implementing Curriculum Change at One Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yengo-Kahn, Aaron M; Baker, Courtney E; Lomis, And Kimberly D

    2017-04-01

    Training physicians to be effective practitioners throughout their careers begins in undergraduate medical education with particular focus on self-directed inquiry, professional and interprofessional development, and competency-based assessment. A select number of medical schools are restructuring their curricula by placing the student at the center of content delivery to enhance the learning experience. While this restructuring may benefit the adult learner, administrators often make assumptions about how students will perceive and respond to such innovative and unfamiliar educational concepts. This can create a disconnect between students and their curriculum. Administrative mindfulness of student experiences is needed to ensure successful implementation of curricular change, facilitate the transition from old to new modalities, and train competent physician graduates.Vanderbilt University School of Medicine (VUSM) recently completed a curriculum update, and student representatives have been essential participants in the transition, from the earliest stages in preplanning to rapid-cycle feedback as the curriculum runs. Two of the authors are members of VUSM's Student Curriculum Committee, which facilitates gathering and relaying student feedback to the administration. Drawing from their experiences, five specific considerations to address and manage when implementing student-centered curricular change are presented: (1) Communicate the rationale, (2) acknowledge anxiety, (3) adjust extracurricular leadership roles, (4) manage "The Bulge" of learners in the clinical environment, and (5) foster ongoing collaboration of students and administrators. For each consideration, examples and proposed solutions are provided.

  4. Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation in Jordanian medical institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Shakhrah, A. I; Hilow, M. H.

    1999-01-01

    This research survey analyses occupational radiation data 214 Jordanian medical workers during the five-year time period 1990-1994 with the objective of identifying any time dose trend and to determine if annual dose variations exist with regard to sex and job or work status. Comparison of radiation status in Joedanian medical field with that of other countries is a second objective of this study. Biological effects of radiation will, however, not be studied in this research. The statistical analysis of the collected data has shown existence of a decreasing annual dose time trend during the five-year period. This year-to-year variation amy indicate that Jordanian radiation workers are becoming more aware of radiation hazards and they have benefited reasonably from the radiation protection training programmes that were held during that period. These workers are then becoming well abiders by the regulations of the Jordanian radiation authorities. analysis of variance has shown as well that the three factors, which are working status, qualifications and sex, contribute significantly to explaining the variability in annual radiation dose. (authors). 10 refs 4 figs., 7 tabs

  5. The function of a medical director in healthcare institutions: a master or a servant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossaify, Antoine; Rasputin, Boris; Lahoud, Jean Claude

    2013-01-01

    The function of a medical director is presented along with features of efficiency and deficiencies from the perspective of healthcare system improvement. A MEDLINE/Pubmed research was performed using the terms "medical director" and "director", and 50 relevant articles were selected. Institutional healthcare quality is closely related to the medical director efficiency and deficiency, and a critical discussion of his or her function is presented along with a focus on the institutional policies, protocols, and procedures. The relationship between the medical director and the executive director is essential in order to implement a successful healthcare program, particularly in private facilities. Issues related to professionalism, fairness, medical records, quality of care, patient satisfaction, medical teaching, and malpractice are discussed from the perspective of institutional development and improvement strategies. In summary, the medical director must be a servant to the institutional constitution and to his or her job description; when his or her function is fully implemented, he or she may represent a local health governor or master, ensuring supervision and improvement of the institutional healthcare system.

  6. The Function of a Medical Director in Healthcare Institutions: A Master or a Servant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Kossaify

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The function of a medical director is presented along with features of efficiency and deficiencies from the perspective of healthcare system improvement. A MEDLINE/Pubmed research was performed using the terms “medical director” and “director”, and 50 relevant articles were selected. Institutional healthcare quality is closely related to the medical director efficiency and deficiency, and a critical discussion of his or her function is presented along with a focus on the institutional policies, protocols, and procedures. The relationship between the medical director and the executive director is essential in order to implement a successful healthcare program, particularly in private facilities. Issues related to professionalism, fairness, medical records, quality of care, patient satisfaction, medical teaching, and malpractice are discussed from the perspective of institutional development and improvement strategies. In summary, the medical director must be a servant to the institutional constitution and to his or her job description; when his or her function is fully implemented, he or she may represent a local health governor or master, ensuring supervision and improvement of the institutional healthcare system.

  7. Regenstrief Institute's Medical Gopher: a next-generation homegrown electronic medical record system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Jon D; Morea, Justin; Mamlin, Burke; Martin, Douglas K; Simonaitis, Linas; Takesue, Blaine Y; Dixon, Brian E; Dexter, Paul R

    2014-03-01

    Regenstrief Institute developed one of the seminal computerized order entry systems, the Medical Gopher, for implementation at Wishard Hospital nearly three decades ago. Wishard Hospital and Regenstrief remain committed to homegrown software development, and over the past 4 years we have fully rebuilt Gopher with an emphasis on usability, safety, leveraging open source technologies, and the advancement of biomedical informatics research. Our objective in this paper is to summarize the functionality of this new system and highlight its novel features. Applying a user-centered design process, the new Gopher was built upon a rich-internet application framework using an agile development process. The system incorporates order entry, clinical documentation, result viewing, decision support, and clinical workflow. We have customized its use for the outpatient, inpatient, and emergency department settings. The new Gopher is now in use by over 1100 users a day, including an average of 433 physicians caring for over 3600 patients daily. The system includes a wizard-like clinical workflow, dynamic multimedia alerts, and a familiar 'e-commerce'-based interface for order entry. Clinical documentation is enhanced by real-time natural language processing and data review is supported by a rapid chart search feature. As one of the few remaining academically developed order entry systems, the Gopher has been designed both to improve patient care and to support next-generation informatics research. It has achieved rapid adoption within our health system and suggests continued viability for homegrown systems in settings of close collaboration between developers and providers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Radiological and Medical Sciences Research Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission: Annual Report 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Radiological and Medical Sciences Research Institute was established in 2009, as the forth research institute of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission. This Annual Report provides an overview of the major activities of the Institutes in the year 2014. Major items covered in the report include: Strategic objectives; Collaborations; Personnel and Organisational Structure; Facilities and Technical Services; Summary of Research and Development Projects; Human Resource Development; Publications and Technical Reports.

  9. 76 FR 19104 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; 2011 NIH Director's Pioneer Awards. Date: May 2-4, 2011. Time: 7:45 a.m...

  10. 75 FR 65363 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-22

    ... Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Review of Minority Biomedical Research Neuro Grant Applications. Date... General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Natcher Building, Room 3AN18J, Bethesda, MD 20892...

  11. 75 FR 63843 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-18

    ... Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Review of Minority Biomedical Research Neuro Grant Applications. Date... General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Natcher Building, Room 3AN18J, Bethesda...

  12. STRATEGIC PROJECT MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES, PROGRAMS AND PORTFOLIOS OF THE MEDICAL INSTITUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Елена Борисовна ДАНЧЕНКО

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article gives a brief overview of the latest research in the direction of the use of the project-based approach to the management of medical institutions. It is shown that medicine today is a project-oriented area, and modern scientific studies suggest the use of not only the project management approach and portfolio management. The various scientific sources proposed the classification of projects of medical institutions, mechanisms of formation of projects portfolios of such institutions. The concept of integrated management of medical institutions, which includes strategic, project, portfolio, program management approach (S3P-concept, is offered. According to this concept, the process of S3P-management of the medical institution will include four stages, which are closely interrelated. For the first time, the pair principles of S3P-management are formulated. The proposed concept and principles of S3P-management of medical institution require further development and creating of models, methods and integrated management tools, as well as the development of a system of indicators verify compliance with the organization's strategy of its projects, projects portfolios and programs. This concept and the proposed integrated management principles are universal and can be applied to any project-oriented area.

  13. The Institute for Safe Medication Practices and Poison Control Centers: Collaborating to Prevent Medication Errors and Unintentional Poisonings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaida, Allen J

    2015-06-01

    This article provides an overview on the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP), the only independent nonprofit organization in the USA devoted to the prevention of medication errors. ISMP developed the national Medication Errors Reporting Program (MERP) and investigates and analyzes errors in order to formulate recommendations to prevent further occurrences. ISMP works closely with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), drug manufacturers, professional organizations, and others to promote changes in package design, practice standards, and healthcare practitioner and consumer education. By collaborating with ISMP to share and disseminate information, Poison Control centers, emergency departments, and toxicologists can help decrease unintentional and accidental poisonings.

  14. Study of sleep habits and sleep problems among medical students of pravara institute of medical sciences loni, Western maharashtra, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Pa; Baviskar, Mp; Phalke, Db

    2013-01-01

    Good quality sleep and adequate amount of sleep are important in order to have better cognitive performance and avoid health problems and psychiatric disorders. The aim of this study was to describe sleep habits and sleep problems in a population of undergraduates, interns and postgraduate students of Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed University), Loni, Maharashtra, India. Sleep habits and problems were investigated using a convenience sample of students from Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed University), Loni, Maharashtra, India. The study was carried out during Oct. to Dec. 2011 with population consisted of total 150 medical students. A self-administered questionnaire developed based on Epworth Daytime Sleepiness Scale and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was used. Data was analyzed by using Statistical Package of Social Sciences (SPSS) version 16.0. In this study, out of 150 medical students, 26/150 (17.3%) students had abnormal levels of daytime sleepiness while 20/150 (13.3%) were border line. Sleep quality in females was better than the male. Disorders related to poor sleep qualities are significant problems among medical students in our institution. Caffeine and alcohol ingestion affected sleep and there was high level of daytime sleepiness. Sleep difficulties resulted in irritability and affected lifestyle and interpersonal relationships.

  15. Analysis of Forensic Autopsy in 120 Cases of Medical Disputes Among Different Levels of Institutional Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lin-Sheng; Ye, Guang-Hua; Fan, Yan-Yan; Li, Xing-Biao; Feng, Xiang-Ping; Han, Jun-Ge; Lin, Ke-Zhi; Deng, Miao-Wu; Li, Feng

    2015-09-01

    Despite advances in medical science, the causes of death can sometimes only be determined by pathologists after a complete autopsy. Few studies have investigated the importance of forensic autopsy in medically disputed cases among different levels of institutional settings. Our study aimed to analyze forensic autopsy in 120 cases of medical disputes among five levels of institutional settings between 2001 and 2012 in Wenzhou, China. The results showed an overall concordance rate of 55%. Of the 39% of clinically missed diagnosis, cardiovascular pathology comprises 55.32%, while respiratory pathology accounts for the remaining 44. 68%. Factors that increase the likelihood of missed diagnoses were private clinics, community settings, and county hospitals. These results support that autopsy remains an important tool in establishing causes of death in medically disputed case, which may directly determine or exclude the fault of medical care and therefore in helping in resolving these cases. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  16. An analysis of the awareness and performance of radiation workers' radiation/radioactivity protection in medical institutions : Focused on Busan regional medical institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Cheol Koo; Hwang, Chul Hwan; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate safety management awareness and behavioral investigation of radiation/radioactivity performance defenses of radiation workers' in medical institutions. Data collection consisted of 267 radiation workers working in medical institutions using structured questionnaires. As a result, it was analyzed that radiation safety management awareness and performance were high in 40s, 50s group and higher education group. The analysis according to the radiation safety management knowledge was analyzed that the 'Know very well' group had higher scores on awareness and performance scores. The analysis according to the degree of safety management effort showed the high awareness scale and the performance scale in the group 'Receiving various education or studying the safety management contents through book'. The correlations between the sub-factors showed the highest positive correlation between perceived practician and personal perspective and perceived by patient and patient's caretaker perspective. Therefore, radiation safety management for workers, patients, and patient's caretaker should be conducted through continuous education of radiation safety management through various routes of radiation workers working at medical institutions

  17. An analysis of the awareness and performance of radiation workers' radiation/radioactivity protection in medical institutions : Focused on Busan regional medical institutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Cheol Koo [Dept. of Radiological Science, Graduate School of Catholic University of Pusan, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Chul Hwan [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Hyun [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Sciences, Catholic University of Pusan, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate safety management awareness and behavioral investigation of radiation/radioactivity performance defenses of radiation workers' in medical institutions. Data collection consisted of 267 radiation workers working in medical institutions using structured questionnaires. As a result, it was analyzed that radiation safety management awareness and performance were high in 40s, 50s group and higher education group. The analysis according to the radiation safety management knowledge was analyzed that the 'Know very well' group had higher scores on awareness and performance scores. The analysis according to the degree of safety management effort showed the high awareness scale and the performance scale in the group 'Receiving various education or studying the safety management contents through book'. The correlations between the sub-factors showed the highest positive correlation between perceived practician and personal perspective and perceived by patient and patient's caretaker perspective. Therefore, radiation safety management for workers, patients, and patient's caretaker should be conducted through continuous education of radiation safety management through various routes of radiation workers working at medical institutions.

  18. Hugh de Wardener - the Man and the Scientist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, M E; de Wardener, S

    2016-02-01

    Hugh de Wardener died on 29th September 2013, ten days before his 98th birthday. He had a diverse upbringing and qualified in Medicine in 1939. He joined the army but was captured in 1942 and imprisoned in Singapore and Thailand until 1945. His clinical care of fellow prisoners was highly regarded. He preserved their clinical records and used them, post-war, to write two Lancet papers. One showed, for the first time, that Wernickes encephalopathy could be caused by severe malnutrition and cured by small doses of vitamin B1. His later academic interests were based on the emphasis he placed on renal physiology. This applied to the topic most associated with his name-Natriuretic Hormone. Whilst de Wardener never isolated this hormone, his early experiments, demonstrating that a third factor other than GFR and aldosterone affected renal sodium transport, were substantiated by others. Hugh had many research interests: pyelonephritis, renal histology, maintenance dialysis and metabolic/renal bone disease. In his later years he researched intensively into the role of sodium and salt in the aetiology of essential hypertension. Hugh was president of the International Society of Nephrology (1969-72) and the UK Renal Association (1975-78). He received many awards and recognitions from across the world, many of them after his (so-called) retirement. Throughout his career he never neglected the care of his patients. As Bob Schrier wrote in his obituary of de Wardener in Kidney International he was a caring physicianwhose dedication to his patients welfare was exemplary.

  19. Some Numerical Aspects on Crowd Motion - The Hughes Model

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes, Diogo A.

    2016-01-06

    Here, we study a crowd model proposed by R. Hughes in [5] and we describe a numerical approach to solve it. This model comprises a Fokker-Planck equation coupled with an Eikonal equation with Dirichlet or Neumann data. First, we establish a priori estimates for the solution. Second, we study radial solutions and identify a shock formation mechanism. Third, we illustrate the existence of congestion, the breakdown of the model, and the trend to the equilibrium. Finally, we propose a new numerical method and consider two numerical examples.

  20. Using Hughes' Salvo Model to Examine Ship Characteristics in Surface Warfare

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haug, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    ...? Using Hughes' Salvo equations, the author conducted combat simulations to investigate the singular and pairwise effects of providing one force an advantage in its offensive power, defensive power...

  1. Results of an Institutional LGBT Climate Survey at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Sean D; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Eckstrand, Kristen L

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the climate and culture experienced by lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) employees and students at one large academic medical center. An anonymous, online institutional climate survey was used to assess the attitudes and experiences of LGBT employees and students. There were 42 LGBT and 14 non-LGBT survey participants. Results revealed that a surprisingly large percentage of LGBT individuals experienced pressure to remain "closeted" and were harassed despite medical center policies of non-discrimination. Continuing training, inclusive policies and practices, and the development of mechanisms to address LGBT-specific harassment are necessary for improving institutional climate.

  2. Marketing aspects of development of medical waste management in health care institutions in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inesa Gurinа

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The concept of marketing approach to medical waste management in health care is suggested.The goal of research was to study the state of marketing activities of health care institutions on medical waste management and development trends of   resolution of outstanding issues.Methods. The methods, which were used in the research, are the methods of mathematical statistics, social studies and scientific knowledge.Results. Environmental marketing institutions of healthcare means perfectly safe for the environment provision of health services. The main directions of environmental marketing concept in health care institutions is the acceptance generally binding legal standards of Use Resources, strict control the formation and licensing of medical waste; economic incentives for workers, aimed at minimizing their interest in the volumes of medical waste; financing of R & D relative to the development of new waste and sound technologies; develop a system of taxes and penalties for polluting the environment and so on.Conclusions. As a result of the implementation of marketing strategies for managing medical waste of healthcare institutions are obtained strategic, social, environmental and economic benefits.

  3. Only for "purely scientific" institutions: the Medical Library Association's Exchange, 1898-1950s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Jennifer J

    2011-04-01

    Centralized exchanges of scientific materials existed by the late nineteenth century, but they did not include medical publications. North American medical leaders therefore formed an association of institutions to run their own exchange: the Medical Library Association (MLA). After providing background to the exchange concept and the importance of institutional members for MLA, this article examines archival MLA correspondence to consider the role of its Exchange in the association's professional development before the 1950s. MLA's membership policy admitted only libraries open to the medical profession with a large number of volumes. But the correspondence of the MLA Executive Committee reveals that the committee constantly adjusted the definition of library membership: personal, public, sectarian, commercial, allied science, and the then-termed "colored" medical school libraries all were denied membership. Study of these decisions, using commercial and sectarian libraries as a focus, uncovers the primary justification for membership exclusions: a goal of operating a scientific exchange. Also, it shows that in this way, MLA shadowed policies and actions of the American Medical Association. Finally, the study suggests that the medical profession enforced its policies of exclusion through MLA, despite a proclaimed altruistic sharing of medical literature.

  4. Only for “purely scientific” institutions: the Medical Library Association's Exchange, 1898–1950s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Jennifer J

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Centralized exchanges of scientific materials existed by the late nineteenth century, but they did not include medical publications. North American medical leaders therefore formed an association of institutions to run their own exchange: the Medical Library Association (MLA). After providing background to the exchange concept and the importance of institutional members for MLA, this article examines archival MLA correspondence to consider the role of its Exchange in the association's professional development before the 1950s. Results: MLA's membership policy admitted only libraries open to the medical profession with a large number of volumes. But the correspondence of the MLA Executive Committee reveals that the committee constantly adjusted the definition of library membership: personal, public, sectarian, commercial, allied science, and the then-termed “colored” medical school libraries all were denied membership. Conclusion: Study of these decisions, using commercial and sectarian libraries as a focus, uncovers the primary justification for membership exclusions: a goal of operating a scientific exchange. Also, it shows that in this way, MLA shadowed policies and actions of the American Medical Association. Finally, the study suggests that the medical profession enforced its policies of exclusion through MLA, despite a proclaimed altruistic sharing of medical literature. PMID:21464849

  5. Transparency When Things Go Wrong: Physician Attitudes About Reporting Medical Errors to Patients, Peers, and Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Sigall K; White, Andrew A; Yi, Jean C; Yi-Frazier, Joyce P; Gallagher, Thomas H

    2017-12-01

    Transparent communication after medical error includes disclosing the mistake to the patient, discussing the event with colleagues, and reporting to the institution. Little is known about whether attitudes about these transparency practices are related. Understanding these relationships could inform educational and organizational strategies to promote transparency. We analyzed responses of 3038 US and Canadian physicians to a medical error communication survey. We used bivariate correlations, principal components analysis, and linear regression to determine whether and how physician attitudes about transparent communication with patients, peers, and the institution after error were related. Physician attitudes about disclosing errors to patients, peers, and institutions were correlated (all P's transparent communication with patients and peers/institution included female sex, US (vs Canadian) doctors, academic (vs private) practice, the belief that disclosure decreased likelihood of litigation, and the belief that system changes occur after error reporting. In addition, younger physicians, surgeons, and those with previous experience disclosing a serious error were more likely to agree with disclosure to patients. In comparison, doctors who believed that disclosure would decrease patient trust were less likely to agree with error disclosure to patients. Previous disclosure education was associated with attitudes supporting greater transparency with peers/institution. Physician attitudes about discussing errors with patients, colleagues, and institutions are related. Several predictors of transparency affect all 3 practices and are potentially modifiable by educational and institutional strategies.

  6. Analysis of drug abuse data reported by medical institutions in Taiwan from 2002 to 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui Hsu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Drug abuse has become a global issue of concern. It affects not only individual users, but also their families and communities. Data were retrieved from the database of the Taiwan Surveillance System of Drug Abuse and Addiction Treatment (SSDAAT from 2002 to 2011, and 147,660 cases reported by medical institutions in Taiwan were reviewed. This study showed that the top five reported abused drugs by medical institutions during the last decade were heroin, methamphetamine, benzodiazepines, ketamine, and zolpidem. Heroin and methamphetamine continued to be the first two abused drugs reported by medical institutions. Heroin abuse was significant, but has shown a downward trend. However, emerging abused drugs, such as ketamine and zolpidem, presented upward trends. 3,4-Methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA abuse seems to have re-emerged and has increased gradually since 2010. Injection without needle sharing has become the most common route of administration of abused drugs since 2002. The majority of causes for these reported drug abuses were drug dependence, followed by peer influence and stress relief. Hepatitis C was the most commonly reported infectious disease, followed by hepatitis B and AIDS in the drug abusers reported by medical institutions. It should be noted that access to drugs via the Internet increased year by year, and this is clearly an area needing constant monitoring.

  7. Relationship between type of medical institutions according to the equipment list and inspection fee computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Cheol; Lim, Cheong Hwan; Joo, Yeong Cheol

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrates holding condition of CT by medical institution classification and by season, and examination fee in Korea currently to quantitatively understand frequency of examination region by change of CT equipment, domestic growing trend and change of distribution and using rate. Recent 10 years of CT holding condition by medical institution classification (Tertiary hospital, General hospital, Hospital, Clinic, Dental hospital, Dental clinic, Hospitalized health center) and by year (2003-2012), and CT examination fee of distribution of medical institution by year is surveyed. The holding ratio of Tertiary hospital level and General hospital level is 32.7% in 2003 and 33.0% in 2012. Whereas, Hospital and Clinic level is 74.2% in 2003 and 66.8% in 2012, which takes approximately 70%. Based on data in 2012, it is 82.2% of total examination fee in Tertiary hospital and General hospital, while 17.5% in hospital and clinic. CT holding rate of Hospital level is increasing, while Clinic level is decreasing. Approximately 80% of CT examination fee is claimed by Tertiary hospital and General hospital. Therefore, there is a significant correlation between CT holding condition of medical institution classification and examination fee. Particularly, correlation between CT holding number of Tertiary hospital and examination fee is significant (p< .001). The more CT holding number, the higher the amount claimed examination fee

  8. Relationship between type of medical institutions according to the equipment list and inspection fee computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Cheol; Lim, Cheong Hwan; Joo, Yeong Cheol [Dept. of Dept. of Health Care, Hanseo University, Seosan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    This study demonstrates holding condition of CT by medical institution classification and by season, and examination fee in Korea currently to quantitatively understand frequency of examination region by change of CT equipment, domestic growing trend and change of distribution and using rate. Recent 10 years of CT holding condition by medical institution classification (Tertiary hospital, General hospital, Hospital, Clinic, Dental hospital, Dental clinic, Hospitalized health center) and by year (2003-2012), and CT examination fee of distribution of medical institution by year is surveyed. The holding ratio of Tertiary hospital level and General hospital level is 32.7% in 2003 and 33.0% in 2012. Whereas, Hospital and Clinic level is 74.2% in 2003 and 66.8% in 2012, which takes approximately 70%. Based on data in 2012, it is 82.2% of total examination fee in Tertiary hospital and General hospital, while 17.5% in hospital and clinic. CT holding rate of Hospital level is increasing, while Clinic level is decreasing. Approximately 80% of CT examination fee is claimed by Tertiary hospital and General hospital. Therefore, there is a significant correlation between CT holding condition of medical institution classification and examination fee. Particularly, correlation between CT holding number of Tertiary hospital and examination fee is significant (p< .001). The more CT holding number, the higher the amount claimed examination fee.

  9. [Investigation of non-ionizing radiation hazards from physiotherapy equipment in 16 medical institutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jia-xi; Zhou, Wei; Qiu, Hai-li; Yang, Guang-tao

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the non-ionizing radiation hazards from physiotherapy equipment in medical institutions and to explore feasible control measures for occupational diseases. On-site measurement and assessment of ultra-high-frequency radiation, high-frequency electromagnetic field, microwave radiation, and laser radiation were carried out in 16 medical institutions using the methods in the Measurement of Physical Agents in Workplace (GBZ/T189-2007). All the investigated medical institutions failed to take effective protective measures against non-ionizing radiation. Of the 17 ultra-short wave therapy apparatus, 70.6%, 47.1%, and 17.64% had a safe intensity of ultra-high-frequency radiation on the head, chest, and abdomen, respectively. Of the 4 external high-frequency thermotherapy apparatus, 100%, 75%, and 75%had a safe intensity of high-frequency electromagnetic field on the head, chest, and abdomen, respectively. In addition, the intensities of microwave radiation and laser radiation produced by the 18 microwave therapy apparatus and 12 laser therapeutic apparatus met national health standards. There are non-ionizing radiation hazards from physiotherapy equipment in medical institutions, and effective prevention and control measures are necessary.

  10. Institutional Variation in the Promotion of Racial/Ethnic Minority Faculty at US Medical Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarleglio, Maria M.; Sandoval-Schaefer, Teresa; Elumn, Johanna; Castillo-Page, Laura; Peduzzi, Peter; Bradley, Elizabeth H.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We compared faculty promotion rates by race/ethnicity across US academic medical centers. Methods. We used the Association of American Medical College's 1983 through 2000 faculty roster data to estimate median institution-specific promotion rates for assistant professor to associate professor and for associate professor to full professor. In unadjusted analyses, we compared medians for Hispanic and Black with White faculty using the Wilcoxon rank sum test. We compared institution-specific promotion rates between racial/ethnic groups with data stratified by institutional characteristic (institution size, proportion racial/ethnic minority faculty, and proportion women faculty) using the χ2 test. Our sample included 128 academic medical centers and 88 432 unique faculty. Results. The median institution-specific promotion rates for White, Hispanic, and Black faculty, respectively, were 30.2%, 23.5%, and 18.8% (P climates that support the successful development of racial/ethnic minority trainees, ultimately improving healthcare access and quality for all patients. PMID:22420820

  11. The workplace satisfaction of Romania’s medical personnel in state and public institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghenu Cristina

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the Romanian medical system is facing changes in terms of qualified personnel. Each year a great number of doctors decide to leave Romania in order to conduct practice in other countries with better working conditions. In this situation where doctors are no longer pleased to work in Romanian institutions, can we question the quality of their working environment? This study aims to determine the workplace satisfaction of Romania’s medical personnel currently working in private as well as state healthcare institutions. In this process, the study also discloses the inside image of Romanian medical units concerning the quality of the working environment, the quality of communications between subordinates belonging to the same section as well as their relations with their „direct superior”, „hierarchic superior” and „senior management”. To construct the current research, Romanian medical personnel completed a survey in order to determine their knowledge and judgment regarding their working environment. The research implied two phases: the first phase lasted one month and a half during which 100 medical personnel from a public hospital were selected to answer a survey; the second phase followed and it targeted the application of the same questions on 100 medical personnel working in a private institution. The survey comprised situations of everyday life in which any employee can be found. The results reveal the present situation of Romanian medical personnel, how often, despite of their unpleasant working conditions, they are forced to give their best in order to provide the quality medical treatment that any patient is entitled to. Therefore, the findings (1 reveal the inside image of Romanian hospital’s system and (2 offer an empirical foundation for subsequent research and improvement of working environments in Romanian hospitals.

  12. Sir Hugh Cairns: The neurosurgeon who introduced crash helmets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahsivadhanan Sundaravadhanan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Statistics prove that more Indians die in Road traffic related accidents than in wars. Prior to World War II, the death toll across the world used to be very high. It was at this juncture that a Military Neurosurgeon named Hugh Cairns introduced the compulsory wearing of crash helmets and brought about a reduction in mortality by more than 50%. Within a decade of introduction of crash helmets in Britain, the entire world followed suit. The results of his efforts are here for all of us to see. This innovative military neurosurgeon is credited as the one who introduced the concept of mobile neurosurgical units during world war and also the first proponent of usage of penicillin in war. His concepts in war surgery are still followed by militaries across the world. This article comes as a tribute to this great Neurosurgeon who helped in saving millions of lives.

  13. A Powerful Friendship: Theodore von Karman and Hugh L. Dryden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorn, Michael

    2003-01-01

    During their long personal friendship and professional association, Theodore von Karman (1882-1963) and Hugh L. Dryden (1898-1965) exercised a pivotal if somewhat elusive influence over American aeronautics and spaceflight. Both decisive figures in organizing scientists and engineers at home and abroad, both men of undisputed eminence in their technical fields, their range of contacts in government, academia, the armed forces, industry, and professional societies spanned the globe to an extent unparalleled then as now. Moreover, because they coordinated their activities closely, their combined influence far exceeded the sum of each one s individual contributions. This paper illustrates their personal origins as well as the foundations of their friendship, how their relationship became a professional alliance, and their joint impact on the world of aeronautics and astronautics during the twentieth century.

  14. The national institute of radiation hygiene and the medical application of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baarli, J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper gives a review of the rules and regulations concerning medical application of radiation in Norway. It discusses the intention of the regulations, the way in which the regulations is applied and how the National Institute of Radiation Hygiene as the competent authority assures the application of the regulations. The paper furthermore gives an indication of the areas of radiation application in medicine and the number of location of X-ray equipment, nuclear medical laboratories, radiation therapy equipment, etc. The number of X-ray examinations in Norway per year are also given, together with their distribution among the various types of examinations. Summary results of a quality assurance investigation of nuclear medical laboratories are given, as well as the results of inspections of the various types of equipment used in medical diagnostics

  15. Principles and practices for keeping occupational radiation exposures at medical institutions as low as reasonably achievable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, A.

    1977-10-01

    Some of the major considerations in establishing management policies, staff, facilities and equipment, and operational procedures to promote radiation safety in medical or hospital care programs using radioactive materials licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are presented. It is a compendium of good practices for establishing adequate radiation safety programs in medical institutions. The information presented is intended to aid the NRC licensee in fulfilling the philosophy of maintaining radiation exposures of employees, patients, visitors, and the public as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Each subsection of this report is designed to include the major radiation safety considerations of interest to the specific type of activity

  16. The ethics of insurance limiting institutional medical care: It's all about the money.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, James W; McCullough, Laurence B

    2016-04-01

    Dr F. Inest practices surgery at a renowned medical center but is concerned because increasing numbers of medical insurers are excluding his institution from coverage. Many of his former referring physicians are beginning to send their patients elsewhere for this reason. The marketing people have been busy increasing their advertising buys and exploring new business models. There is even talk about reducing expensive clinical trials. However, regardless of his affiliation, he has little control over these and other organizational decisions that directly impact his practice clinically and fiscally. What should he do? Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A Model for Protective Behavior against the Harmful Effects of Radiation based on Medical Institution Classifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Eun Ok; Kwon, Deok Mun; Dong, Kyung Rae; Han, Seung Moo

    2010-01-01

    This study surveyed a total of 1,322 radiation technologist in health care institutions throughout Korea. This is a comparative study conducted on the levels of protective behavior against the harmful effects of radiation in heath care institutions which indicated that university hospitals and general hospitals showed higher level of protective behavior than for medical practitioners. This study found university hospitals have the following 7 characteristics to manage protective behavior against the harmful effects of radiation, protective environment, self-efficacy by distinction of task , self-efficacy, expectation of the protective behavior, the number of patients, level of the education related to the protection of the harmful effects of radiation and protective attitude. While general hospitals have the following 3 characteristics protective environment, expectation of the protective behavior and protective attitude. Hospitals have the following 4 characteristics protective environment, expectation of the protective behavior, protective attitude and self-efficacy and medical clinics have characteristics protective environment

  18. A Model for Protective Behavior against the Harmful Effects of Radiation based on Medical Institution Classifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Eun Ok; Kwon, Deok Mun [Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Dong, Kyung Rae [Gwangju Health College University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Han, Seung Moo [Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    This study surveyed a total of 1,322 radiation technologist in health care institutions throughout Korea. This is a comparative study conducted on the levels of protective behavior against the harmful effects of radiation in heath care institutions which indicated that university hospitals and general hospitals showed higher level of protective behavior than for medical practitioners. This study found university hospitals have the following 7 characteristics to manage protective behavior against the harmful effects of radiation, protective environment, self-efficacy by distinction of task , self-efficacy, expectation of the protective behavior, the number of patients, level of the education related to the protection of the harmful effects of radiation and protective attitude. While general hospitals have the following 3 characteristics protective environment, expectation of the protective behavior and protective attitude. Hospitals have the following 4 characteristics protective environment, expectation of the protective behavior, protective attitude and self-efficacy and medical clinics have characteristics protective environment.

  19. Analysis of medical institutions with various organizational forms of rehabilitation treatment and outpatient departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapovalenko T.V.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed organization of the analysis of activity of two medical institutions rendering services in rehabilitation and recovery treatment to adult population, having various organizational forms. Material and Methods. For five years there had been studied practical experience of rendering medical care on recovery treatment and rehabilitation to adult population on the basis of medico-statistical processing of reporting documentation of the Medicine Recovery Center and the rehabilitation, Ministry of Health of Russia functioning on the basis of the "Medical and Rehabilitation Center" — large versatile medical center and the interdistrict center of recovery treatment on the basis of city policlinic of St. Petersburg. Results. As a result it had been established an advisability of rendering this type of specialized medical care by medical institutions with different organizational forms. Conclusion. The interdistrict centers of rehabilitation functioning as a part of city policlinics, are undoubtedly necessary, as the closest medical setting for patients' homes, however such functions as diagnostics of a functional condition of an organism and an objective assessment of a state of health of patients with use of screening techniques; inspection of the organized collectives and groups of the population for the purpose of identification of groups of risk, establishment of extent of influence of environmental factors on a state of health, active supervision over persons with factors of the increased risk of diseases and correction of the revealed functional violations, etc. can be performed only in the centers organized on the basis of modern versatile treatment-and-prophylactic establishments, equipped with the modern diagnostic devices, allowing to supplement traditional methods of drug therapy with new effective techniques of treatment.

  20. Web Implementation of Quality Assurance (QA) for X-ray Units in Balkanic Medical Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urošević, Vlade; Ristić, Olga; Milošević, Danijela; Košutić, Duško

    2015-08-01

    Diagnostic radiology is the major contributor to the total dose of the population from all artificial sources. In order to reduce radiation exposure and optimize diagnostic x-ray image quality, it is necessary to increase the quality and efficiency of quality assurance (QA) and audit programs. This work presents a web application providing completely new QA solutions for x-ray modalities and facilities. The software gives complete online information (using European standards) with which the corresponding institutions and individuals can evaluate and control a facility's Radiation Safety and QA program. The software enables storage of all data in one place and sharing the same information (data), regardless of whether the measured data is used by an individual user or by an authorized institution. The software overcomes the distance and time separation of institutions and individuals who take part in QA. Upgrading the software will enable assessment of the medical exposure level to ionizing radiation.

  1. Developing the professional competence of future doctors in the instructional setting of higher medical educational institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morokhovets, Halyna Yu; Lysanets, Yuliia V

    The main objectives of higher medical education is the continuous professional improvement of physicians to meet the needs dictated by the modern world both at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. In this respect, the system of higher medical education has undergone certain changes - from determining the range of professional competences to the adoption of new standards of education in medicine. The article aims to analyze the parameters of doctor's professionalism in the context of competence-based approach and to develop practical recommendations for the improvement of instruction techniques. The authors reviewed the psycho-pedagogical materials and summarized the acquired experience of teachers at higher medical institutions as to the development of instruction techniques in the modern educational process. The study is based on the results of testing via the technique developed by T.I. Ilyina. Analytical and biblio-semantic methods were used in the paper. It has been found that the training process at medical educational institution should be focused on the learning outcomes. The authors defined the quality parameters of doctors' training and suggested the model for developing the professional competence of medical students. This model explains the cause-and-effect relationships between the forms of instruction, teaching techniques and specific components of professional competence in future doctors. The paper provides practical recommendations on developing the core competencies which a qualified doctor should master. The analysis of existing interactive media in Ukraine and abroad has been performed. It has been found that teaching the core disciplines with the use of latest technologies and interactive means keeps abreast of the times, while teaching social studies and humanities to medical students still involves certain difficulties.

  2. Interdisciplinary and inter-institutional differences in learning preferences among Malaysian medical and health sciences students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Rebecca S Y; Siow, Heng Loke; Kumarasamy, Vinoth; Shaherah Fadhlullah Suhaimi, Nazrila

    2017-10-01

    The learner-centred approach in medical and health sciences education makes the study of learning preferences relevant and important. This study aimed to investigate the interdisciplinary, inter-institutional, gender and racial differences in the preferred learning styles among Malaysian medical and health sciences students in three Malaysian universities, namely SEGi University (SEGi), University of Malaya (UM) and Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman (UTAR). It also investigated the differences in the preferred learning styles of these students between high achievers and non-high achievers. This cross-sectional study was carried out on medical and health sciences students from three Malaysian universities following the approval of the Research and Ethics Committee, SEGi University. Purposive sampling was used and the preferred learning styles were assessed using the VARK questionnaire. The questionnaire was validated prior to its use. Three disciplines (medicine, pharmacy and dentistry) were chosen based on their entry criteria and some similarities in their course structure. The three participating universities were Malaysian universities with a home-grown undergraduate entry medical program and students from a diverse cultural and socioeconomic background. The data were analysed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software, version 22. VARK subscale scores were expressed as mean+standard deviation. Comparisons of the means were carried out using t-test or ANOVA. A p value of 0.05). This study gives an insight into the learner characteristics of more than one medical school in Malaysia. Such multi-institutional studies are lacking in the published literature and this study gives a better representation of the current situation in the learning preferences among medical students in Malaysia.

  3. Awareness and behavior of oncologists and support measures in medical institutions related to ongoing employment of cancer patients in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Koji; Ohtsu, Mayumi; Aizawa, Yoshiharu; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tagaya, Nobumi; Takahashi, Miyako

    2012-04-01

    Improved outcomes of cancer treatment allow patients to undergo treatment while working. However, support from oncologists and medical institutions is essential for patients to continue working. This study aimed to clarify oncologists' awareness and behavior regarding patients who work during treatment, support in medical institutions and their association. A questionnaire was mailed to all 453 diplomates and faculty of the subspecialty board of medical oncology in the Japanese Society of Medical Oncology and all 1016 surgeons certified by the Japanese Board of Cancer Therapy living in the Kanto area. The questionnaire assessed demographics, oncologist awareness and behavior regarding patient employment and support measures at their medical institutions. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association of awareness and behavior of oncologists with support measures at their institutions. A total of 668 individuals participated. The overall response rate was 45.5%. Only 53.6% of respondents advised patients to tell their supervisors about prospects for treatment and ask for understanding. For medical institutions, 28.8% had a nurse-involved counseling program and adjustments in radiation therapy (28.0%) and chemotherapy (41.9%) schedules to accommodate patients' work. There was a significant correlation between awareness and behavior of oncologists and medical institutions' measures to support employed cancer patients. There is room for improvement in awareness and behavior of oncologists and support in medical institutions for cancer patients continuing to work. Oncologists could support working patients by exerting influence on their medical institutions. Conversely, proactive development of support measures by medical institutions could alter the awareness and behavior of oncologists.

  4. Awareness and behavior of oncologists and support measures in medical institutions related to ongoing employment of cancer patients in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Koji; Aizawa, Yoshiharu; Ohtsu, Mayumi; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tagaya, Nobumi; Takahashi, Miyako

    2012-01-01

    Improved outcomes of cancer treatment allow patients to undergo treatment while working. However, support from oncologists and medical institutions is essential for patients to continue working. This study aimed to clarify oncologists' awareness and behavior regarding patients who work during treatment, support in medical institutions and their association. A questionnaire was mailed to all 453 diplomates and faculty of the subspecialty board of medical oncology in the Japanese Society of Medical Oncology and all 1016 surgeons certified by the Japanese Board of Cancer Therapy living in the Kanto area. The questionnaire assessed demographics, oncologist awareness and behavior regarding patient employment and support measures at their medical institutions. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association of awareness and behavior of oncologists with support measures at their institutions. A total of 668 individuals participated. The overall response rate was 45.5%. Only 53.6% of respondents advised patients to tell their supervisors about prospects for treatment and ask for understanding. For medical institutions, 28.8% had a nurse-involved counseling program and adjustments in radiation therapy (28.0%) and chemotherapy (41.9%) schedules to accommodate patients' work. There was a significant correlation between awareness and behavior of oncologists and medical institutions' measures to support employed cancer patients. There is room for improvement in awareness and behavior of oncologists and support in medical institutions for cancer patients continuing to work. Oncologists could support working patients by exerting influence on their medical institutions. Conversely, proactive development of support measures by medical institutions could alter the awareness and behavior of oncologists. (author)

  5. An Integrated Soft Computing Approach to Hughes Syndrome Risk Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilhena, João; Rosário Martins, M; Vicente, Henrique; Grañeda, José M; Caldeira, Filomena; Gusmão, Rodrigo; Neves, João; Neves, José

    2017-03-01

    The AntiPhospholipid Syndrome (APS) is an acquired autoimmune disorder induced by high levels of antiphospholipid antibodies that cause arterial and veins thrombosis, as well as pregnancy-related complications and morbidity, as clinical manifestations. This autoimmune hypercoagulable state, usually known as Hughes syndrome, has severe consequences for the patients, being one of the main causes of thrombotic disorders and death. Therefore, it is required to be preventive; being aware of how probable is to have that kind of syndrome. Despite the updated of antiphospholipid syndrome classification, the diagnosis remains difficult to establish. Additional research on clinically relevant antibodies and standardization of their quantification are required in order to improve the antiphospholipid syndrome risk assessment. Thus, this work will focus on the development of a diagnosis decision support system in terms of a formal agenda built on a Logic Programming approach to knowledge representation and reasoning, complemented with a computational framework based on Artificial Neural Networks. The proposed model allows for improving the diagnosis, classifying properly the patients that really presented this pathology (sensitivity higher than 85%), as well as classifying the absence of APS (specificity close to 95%).

  6. Motivational Profiles of Medical Students of Nepalese Army Institute of Health Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Lochana; Pant, Shambhu Nath

    2018-01-01

    Students enter the medical study with different types of motives. Given the importance of academic motivation for good academic achievement of the students, the present study was designed to reveal the possible relationship between academic motivation and achievement in medical students. In this cross-sectional study medical students (N=364) of Nepalese Army institute of Health Sciences were participated and classified to different subgroups using intrinsic and controlled motivation scores. Cluster membership was used as an independent variable to assess differences in study strategies and academic performance. Four clusters were obtained: High Intrinsic High Controlled, Low Intrinsic High Controlled, High Intrinsic Low Controlled, and Low Intrinsic Low Controlled. High Intrinsic High Controlled and High Intrinsic Low Controlled profile students constituted 36.1%, 22.6% of the population, respectively. No significant differences were observed as regards to deep strategy and surface strategy between high interest status motivated and high interest-motivated students. However, both of the clusters had significantly deeper, surface strategy and better academic performance than status-motivated and low-motivation clusters (p motivated and interest-motivated medical students were associated with good deep and surface study strategy and good academic performance. Low-motivation and status-motivated students were associated with the least academic performance with less interest learning behaviors. This reflected that motivation is important required component for good learning outcomes for medical students Keywords: Academic performance; controlled motivation; clusters; intrinsic motivation; motivation.

  7. Australian Institute of Sport and Australian Medical Association position statement on concussion in sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkington, Lisa J; Hughes, David C

    2017-01-16

    Sport-related concussion is a growing health concern in Australia. Public concern is focused on the incidence and potential long term consequences of concussion. Children may be more prone to concussion and take longer to recover. The Australian Institute of Sport and the Australian Medical Association have collaborated to present the most contemporary evidence-based information in a format appropriate for all stakeholders. This position statement aims to ensure that participant safety and welfare is paramount when dealing with concussion in sport.First aid principles apply in the management of the athlete with suspected concussion, including protection of the cervical spine. Tools exist for use by members of the community, allowing identification of key symptoms and signs that raise the suspicion of concussion. Medical professionals should use the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool 3, in conjunction with clinical assessment for the diagnosis of concussion. Clinical assessment includes mechanism of injury, symptoms and signs, cognitive functioning, and neurological assessment including balance testing. In any situation where concussion is suspected, the athlete must be immediately removed from sport and not be allowed to return to activity until they have been assessed by a medical practitioner. "If in doubt, sit them out."A diagnosis of concussion requires immediate physical and cognitive rest, followed by a structured, graduated return to physical activity. Children require a longer period of recovery from concussion. Algorithms are provided for use by medical and non-medically trained stakeholders in the recognition and management of concussion.

  8. Measuring research impact in medical research institutes: a qualitative study of the attitudes and opinions of Australian medical research institutes towards research impact assessment frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeming, Simon; Reeves, Penny; Ramanathan, Shanthi; Attia, John; Nilsson, Michael; Searles, Andrew

    2018-03-16

    The question of how to measure, assess and optimise the returns from investment in health and medical research (HMR) is a highly policy-relevant issue. Research Impact Assessment Frameworks (RIAFs) provide a conceptual measurement framework to assess the impact from HMR. The aims of this study were (1) to elicit the views of Medical Research Institutes (MRIs) regarding objectives, definitions, methods, barriers, potential scope and attitudes towards RIAFs, and (2) to investigate whether an assessment framework should represent a retrospective reflection of research impact or a prospective approach integrated into the research process. The wider objective was to inform the development of a draft RIAF for Australia's MRIs. Purposive sampling to derive a heterogeneous sample of Australian MRIs was used alongside semi-structured interviews with senior executives responsible for research translation or senior researchers affected by research impact initiatives. Thematic analysis of the interview transcriptions using the framework approach was then performed. Interviews were conducted with senior representatives from 15 MRIs. Participants understood the need for greater research translation/impact, but varied in their comprehension and implementation of RIAFs. Common concerns included the time lag to the generation of societal impacts from basic or discovery science, and whether impact reflected a narrow commercialisation agenda. Broad support emerged for the use of metrics, case study and economic methods. Support was also provided for the rationale of both standardised and customised metrics. Engendering cultural change in the approach to research translation was acknowledged as both a barrier to greater impact and a critical objective for the assessment process. Participants perceived that the existing research environment incentivised the generation of academic publications and track records, and often conflicted with the generation of wider impacts. The potential to

  9. Health research barriers in the faculties of two medical institutions in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alamdari A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A Alamdari,1 S Venkatesh,2 A Roozbehi,3 AT Kannan41Research Center of Factors Affecting Health, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Yasouj University of Medical Sciences, Yasouj, Iran; 2National AIDS Control Organization, Janpath Road, Chandralok Building, New Delhi, India; 3Education Development Office, Yasouj University of Medical Sciences, Yasouj, Iran; 4Department of Community Medicine, University College of Medical Sciences and Guru Tegh Bahadur Hospital, Delhi, IndiaBackground: Health policy formation refers to the design of a conceptual framework to find possibilities, facilitate feasibilities, and identify strong and weak points, as well as insufficiencies, by research. Doing research should clarify qualities and standards for policy and decision-making to enable the success of development of health care in a country. Evaluation of the impact of health interventions is particularly poorly represented in public health research. This study attempted to identify barriers and facilitators of health research among faculty members in two major institutions in India, ie, the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS and the University College of Medical Sciences (UCMS and Guru Tegh Bahadur (GTB Hospital in Delhi.Methods: The participants were asked to fill in a questionnaire that canvassed individual characteristics, ie, years of experience, place of work, academic rank, final educational qualification, work setting, educational group, primary activity, and number of publications in the previous 5 years. Barriers and facilitators were categorized into personal, resources, access, and administration groups. The data were processed using SPSS version 16, independent t-tests, Chi-square tests, and multivariate logistic regression.Results: The total number of faculty members at both institutions was 599, 456 (76% of whom participated in this study. The primary activities reported by faculty at UCMS (teaching and Faculty at AIIMS reported

  10. IN SITU STEAM ENHANCED RECOVERY PROCESS - HUGHES ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS, INC. - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Innovative Technology Evaluation report summarizes the findings of an evaluation of the in situ Steam Enhanced Recovery Process (SERP) operated by Hughes Environmental Systems, Inc. at the Rainbow Disposal facility in Huntington Beach, California. he technology demonstration...

  11. Risk mitigation of shared electronic records system in campus institutions: medical social work practice in singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ow Yong, Lai Meng; Tan, Amanda Wei Li; Loo, Cecilia Lay Keng; Lim, Esther Li Ping

    2014-10-01

    In 2013, the Singapore General Hospital (SGH) Campus initiated a shared electronic system where patient records and documentations were standardized and shared across institutions within the Campus. The project was initiated to enhance quality of health care, improve accessibility, and ensure integrated (as opposed to fragmented) care for best outcomes in our patients. In mitigating the risks of ICT, it was found that familiarity with guiding ethical principles, and ensuring adherence to regulatory and technical competencies in medical social work were important. The need to negotiate and maneuver in a large environment within the Campus to ensure proactive integrative process helped.

  12. Infectious waste management in Japan: A revised regulation and a management process in medical institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, M.; Une, H.

    2005-01-01

    In Japan, the waste management practice is carried out in accordance with the Waste Disposal Law of 1970. The first rule of infectious waste management was regulated in 1992, and infectious wastes are defined as the waste materials generated in medical institutions as a result of medical care or research which contain pathogens that have the potential to transmit infectious diseases. Revised criteria for infectious waste management were promulgated by the Ministry of Environment in 2004. Infectious waste materials are divided into three categories: the form of waste; the place of waste generation; the kind of infectious diseases. A reduction of infectious waste is expected. We introduce a summary of the revised regulation of infectious waste management in this article

  13. Interdisciplinary and inter-institutional differences in learning preferences among Malaysian medical and health sciences students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    REBECCA S.Y. WONG

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The learner-centred approach in medical and health sciences education makes the study of learning preferences relevant and important. This study aimed to investigate the interdisciplinary, interinstitutional, gender and racial differences in the preferred learning styles among Malaysian medical and health sciences students in three Malaysian universities, namely SEGi University (SEGi, University of Malaya (UM and Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman (UTAR. It also investigated the differences in the preferred learning styles of these students between high achievers and non-high achievers. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out on medical and health sciences students from three Malaysian universities following the approval of the Research and Ethics Committee, SEGi University. Purposive sampling was used and the preferred learning styles were assessed using the VARK questionnaire. The questionnaire was validated prior to its use. Three disciplines (medicine, pharmacy and dentistry were chosen based on their entry criteria and some similarities in their course structure. The three participating universities were Malaysian universities with a home-grown undergraduate entry medical program and students from a diverse cultural and socioeconomic background. The data were analysed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS software, version 22. VARK subscale scores were expressed as mean±standard deviation. Comparisons of the means were carried out using t-test or ANOVA. A p value of 0.05. Conclusion: This study gives an insight into the learner characteristics of more than one medical school in Malaysia. Such multi-institutional studies are lacking in the published literature and this study gives a better representation of the current situation in the learning preferences among medical students in Malaysia.

  14. [Development of sanitary microbiology researches at the A. N. Marzeyev Institute for Hygiene and Medical Ecology, Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine (Kiev)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serdiuk, A M; Surmasheva, E V; Korchak, G I

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the main stages of development of sanitary bacteriological studies at the leading hygiene research institute of Ukraine--the A. N Marzeyev Institute for Hygiene and Medical Ecology. These researches have made a substantial contribution to the formation and development of hygiene science in the former Soviet Union. The current and promising areas in sanitary microbiology in Ukraine are considered.

  15. Characteristics and Causes for Non-Accrued Clinical Research (NACR) at an Academic Medical Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Debra G; Carroll, Kelly A; Bhatt, Karishma H; Belknap, Steven M; Mai, David; Gipson, Heather J; West, Dennis P

    2013-06-01

    The impact of non-accrued clinical research (NACR) represents an important economic burden that is under consideration as the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services looks into reforming the regulations governing IRB review. NACR refers to clinical research projects that fail to enroll subjects. A delineation of the issues surrounding NACR is expected to enhance subject accrual and to minimize occurrence of NACR. The authors assessed demographics, characteristics, and reasons for NACR at an academic medical center, including time trends, funding source, research team (principal investigator, department), IRB resource utilization (IRB level of review, number of required IRB reviews, initial IRB turn-around time, and duration of NACR). The authors analyzed data from 848 clinical research study closures during 2010 and 2011 to determine proportion, incidence, and characteristics of NACR. Studies with subject enrollment during the same time period were used as a comparative measure. Data from 704 (83.0%) study closures reported enrollment of 1 or more subjects while 144 (17.0 %) reported NACR (zero enrollment). PI-reported reasons for NACR included: 32 (22.2%) contract or funding issues; 43 (30.0%) insufficient study-dedicated resources; 41 (28.4%) recruitment issues; 17 (11.8%) sponsor-initiated study closure and 11 (7.6%) were "other/reason unreported". NACR is not uncommon, affecting about one in six clinical research projects in the study population and reported to be more common in some other institutions. The complex and fluid nature of research conduct, non-realistic enrollment goals, and delays in both the approval and/or accrual processes contribute to NACR. Results suggest some simple strategies that investigators and institutions may use to reduce NACR, including careful feasibility assessment, reduction of institutional delays, and prompt initiation of subject accrual for multi-center studies using competitive enrollment. Institutional action to

  16. A gender gap in the next generation of physician-scientists: medical student interest and participation in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guelich, Jill M; Singer, Burton H; Castro, Marcia C; Rosenberg, Leon E

    2002-11-01

    For 2 decades, the number of physician-scientists has not kept pace with the overall growth of the medical research community. Concomitantly, the number of women entering medical schools has increased markedly. We have explored the effect of the changing gender composition of medical schools on the present and future pipeline of young physician-scientists. We analyzed data obtained from the Association of American Medical Colleges, the National Institutes of Health, and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute pertaining to the expressed research intentions or research participation of male and female medical students in the United States. A statistically significant decline in the percentage of matriculating and graduating medical students--both men and women-who expressed strong research career intentions occurred during the decade between 1987 and 1997. Moreover, matriculating and graduating women were significantly less likely than men to indicate strong research career intentions. Each of these trends has been observed for medical schools overall and for research-intensive ones. Cohort data obtained by tracking individuals from matriculation to graduation revealed that women who expressed strong research career intentions upon matriculation were more likely than men to decrease their research career intentions during medical school. Medical student participation in research supported the gender gap identified by assessing research intentions. Female medical student participation in the Medical Scientist Training Program and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute/National Institutes of Health-sponsored Cloisters Program has increased but lags far behind the growth in the female population in medical schools. Three worrisome trends in the research career intentions and participation of the nation's medical students (a decade-long decline for both men and women, a large and persistent gender gap, and a negative effect of the medical school experience for women) presage a

  17. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1996. Annex II: PSI life sciences and Institute for Medical Radiobiology Newsletter 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehne, G.; Gschwend, B.

    1997-01-01

    This annex to the PSI Annual Report 1996 reports on the progress achieved by the PSI Department II during 1996 in the fields of radiation medicine, radiopharmacy, radiation hygiene, positron emission tomography and medical radiobiology. figs., tab., refs

  18. Analysis of overexposure cases for female radiation workers in medical and research institutions in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahajan, J.M.; Massand, O.P.; Venkataraman, G.

    1996-01-01

    Radiation Protection Services Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre conducts country wide personnel monitoring service for 40,000 radiation workers, of which about 22,000 radiation workers are from industrial, medical and research institutions. The number of female radiation workers constitute about 5% of the total radiation workers monitored. Basis for control of occupational exposures of women are same as that for men except for pregnant women (foetus). Equivalent dose above 10 mSv in a service period is investigated as to the causes of exposure whether the exposure was really received by the worker (genuine) or only the monitoring badge received the exposure due to other reasons (non-genuine) and necessary remedial actions are taken. Analysis of overexposure cases in female radiation workers as a group has been done for the period of four years (1990-1993) and the conclusions are presented. (author). 2 refs., 4 tabs

  19. Criteria for Determining the Adaptive Capacity of Students of Higher Medical Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M V Yoltukhivskyi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the importance of the adaptive capacity of students of higher medical institutions in the process of their professional training. The criteria for evaluating the adaptive capacity of students depending on their age were determined. The main mechanisms of forming the adaptive capacity at the organism level were found to be: 1 biochemical mechanisms which manifest themselves in the intracellular processes, e.g. the change in enzyme activity or their number; 2 physiological mechanisms, e.g. increased sweating as the body temperature rises; 3 morphofunctional mechanisms, i.e. the features of body structure and functions which are associated with lifestyle; 4 behavioural mechanisms – e.g. the creation of comfortable living conditions, etc.; 5 ontogenetic mechanisms, i.e. the acceleration of individual development or its slowdown contributing to the survival when conditions change.

  20. RESULTS OF THE SURVEY CONDUCTED AMONG OPHTHALMOLOGISTS ON THE ISSUE OF EQUIPMENT OF MEDICAL INSTITUTIONS WITH OPHTHALMOLOGY DEVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Seraphimov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The problem of limited accessibility and quality of ophthalmic medical care remains one of the leading ones in the national healthcare. This article presents results of the survey conducted among ophthalmologists about the effect of large-scale equipment of all medical institutions in the Leningrad Region with modern ophthalmologic devices over the recent years.Objective is to determine the contribution of the health care modernization program to equipping the medical institutions of the Leningrad Region with modern ophthalmologic medical devices, and to identify the main areas for improving the ophthalmologic care for residents of the Leningrad region with cataracts.Materials and methods. According to a specially developed questionnaire, 105 ophthalmologists from the Leningrad Region were interviewed. The survey was conducted among physicians working both in out-patient medical facilities and in medical facilities with in-patient modalities.Results. The results of the study confirmed positive changes that occurred in recent years as a result of equipping medical institutions with modern medical devices. Almost two-thirds (59.9% of respondents noted that equipping with modern medical devices had a significant impact on the quality of the medical and diagnostic measures carried out in healthcare facilities of the region.Conclusions. The equipment had a significant impact on the diagnosis and treatment of all kinds of diseases of the eye and its appendages, especially such eye disease which is so common among the population of the Leningrad Region as cataracts (75.0 per 100 ophthalmologists surveyed. At the same time, in spite of these efforts, the standard for equipping ophthalmologic departments in individual medical institutions has not been fully provided. Only every fifth (20.9% ophthalmologist noted during the survey that the list of available ophthalmic devices was sufficient, and that they all worked properly.

  1. Client satisfaction and quality of health care in a rural medical institute of central Uttar Pradesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Consumer satisfaction is recognized as an important parameter for assessing the quality of patient care services. Satisfaction regarding the attitude of providers toward these services is expected to affect treatment outcome and prognosis. Out Patient Departments (OPDs need to monitor the quality of care and patient satisfaction for continuous quality improvement. A major component of quality of health care is patient satisfaction. Present study has been conducted to assess consumer satisfaction with regard to clinical care in the Out Patient Department of Rural Medical Institute of Central Uttar Pradesh. Materials and Methods: The present study was an Outpatient- based cross sectional study conducted in Out Patient Department of UP Rural Institute of Medical Sciences & Research, Saifai, Etawah (UP between January- June, 2013. A total of 600 patients were selected at random for exit interviews during Out Patients Department hours. Results: The socio-demographic profile of study subjects showed that 57.17% respondents were male and mostly were Hindu (79.67%. A total of 65% were in the age group between 15-59 years. Respondents were patients themselves (86.17% and accompanying relatives for pediatric patients younger than 15 years old (13.83%. Forty percent of respondents were house wife by occupation. For most of the patients (58.83% waiting time for consultation was between 15-30 minutes, in 55.17% patients, doctor spent only 5-10 minutes for consultation. A total of 98.67% of the respondents were satisfied with the outpatient department timings.

  2. Confronting conflict: addressing institutional conflicts of interest in academic medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Bryan A; Mackey, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Individual conflicts of interest are rife in healthcare, and substantial attention has been given to address them. Yet a more substantive concern-institutional conflicts of interest ("ICOIs") in academic medical centers ("AMCs") engaged in research and clinical care-have yet to garner sufficient attention, despite their higher stakes for patient safety and welfare. ICOIs are standard in AMCs, are virtually unregulated, and have led to patient deaths. Upon review of ICOIs, we find a clear absence of substantive efforts to confront these conflicts. We also assess the Jesse Gelsinger case, which resulted in the death of a study participant exemplifying a deep-seated culture of institutional indifference and complicity in unmanaged conflicts. Federal policy, particularly the Bayh-Dole Act, also creates and promotes ICOIs. Efforts to address ICOIs are narrow or abstract, and do not provide for a systemic infrastructure with effective enforcement mechanisms. Hence, in this paper, we provide a comprehensive proposal to address ICOIs utilizing a "Centralized System" model that would proactively review, manage, approve, and conduct assessments of conflicts, and would have independent power to evaluate and enforce any violations via sanctions. It would also manage any industry funds and pharmaceutical samples and be a condition of participation in public healthcare reimbursement and federal grant funding. The ICOI policy itself would provide for disclosure requirements, separate management of commercial enterprise units from academic units, voluntary remediation of conflicts, and education on ICOIs. Finally, we propose a new model of medical education-academic detailing-in place of current marketing-focused "education." Using such a system, AMCs can wean themselves from industry reliance and promote a culture of accountability and independence from industry influence. By doing so, clinical research and treatment can return to a focus on patient care, not profits.

  3. [Analysis of qualifications of medical and health institutions and certified doctors for providing occupational disease diagnosis in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huan-qiang; Li, Tao; Qi, Fang; Wu, Rui; Nie, Wu; Yu, Chen

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the qualifications and current situations of the medical and health institutions and certified doctors for providing occupational disease diagnosis in China and to provide a reference for developing relevant policies. Work reports and questionnaires survey were used to investigate the qualifications of all medical and health institutions and certified doctors for providing occupational disease diagnosis in China and their acceptance and diagnosis of occupational disease cases from 2006 to 2010. The rate for the work reports was 100%, and the response rate for the questionnaires was 71.0%. By the end of 2010, in the 31 provincial-level regions (excluding Hong Kong, Macao, and Taiwan) in China, there had been 503 medical and health institutions which were qualified for providing occupational disease diagnosis, including 207 centers for disease control and prevention, accounting for 41.2%, 145 general hospitals, accounting for 28.8%, 69 enterprise-owned hospitals, accounting for 13.7%, and 64 institutes or centers for occupational disease prevention and control, accounting for 12.7%; 4986 certified doctors got the qualification for providing occupational disease diagnosis, with 9.4 certified doctors on average in each institution, and there was 0.65 certified doctor per 100 000 employees. In addition, 16.5% of the institutions got all the qualifications for diagnosing 9 occupational diseases, and 17.1% of the institutions got the qualification for diagnosing one occupational disease. Each certified doctor accepted diagnosis of 16.8 cases of occupational diseases on average every year. A national occupational disease diagnosis network has been established in China, but the imbalance in regional distribution and specialty programs still exists among the qualified medical and health institutions and certified doctors. It is essential to further strengthen the development of regional qualified medical and health institutions and training of qualified

  4. The First Report on Evaluating the Thoracic Radiology of the Medical Institutions for Pneumoconiosis in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Won Jeong; Chu, Sang Deok; Park, So Young; Choi, Byung Soon; Park, Jai Soung; Kim, Sung Jin; Ko, Kyung Sun

    2010-01-01

    The pnuemoconiotic findings on chest radiograph for pneumoconiosis are affected by the technique, the equipment and the reading environment. We report here on the results of evaluating the thoracic radiology of the Medical Institutions for Pneumoconiosis (MIPs). For the first time, we visited the MIPs to evaluate the thoracic radiography that is used to treat patients with pneumoconiotic complications, and this included evaluating the equipment and the technical parameters for thoracic radiography, the computed tomography, the education for quality assurance health care and the reading environment. We used the guideline published by the Occupational Safety and Health Research Institute (OSHRI). Ten images were randomly picked from the MIPs for evaluating the image quality, and then these were rated by two experienced chest radiologists for pneumoconiosis according to the criteria of the OSHRI. Of the 33 institutions, the failed group (mean<60) scored 36.4% for radiological technique (RT), 30.3% for image quality (IQ) and 21.2% for the reading environment (RE). There were statistically significantly differences between the passed and failed groups for RT (75.8 ± 9.1 vs. 40.8 ± 13.6, p<0.001), for IQ (68.3 ± 5.8 vs. 47.8 ± 9.4, p<0.001) and for RE (78.3 ± 15.8 vs. 18.3 ± 21.9, p<0.001). The group that received education was significantly higher for the RT (68.7 vs. 53.2, p=0.032), the IQ (65.3 vs. 56.6, p=0.039) and the RE (76.2 vs. 47.0, p=0.005) than that for the group that didn't receive education. The MIPs need surveillance and education for improving the quality assurance health care in thoracic radiography for treating patients with pneumoconiosis and who have complications

  5. One Hundred Years of Psychiatry at Johns Hopkins: A Story of Meyer to McHugh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePaulo, J Raymond

    2017-04-01

    This article describes a history of clinical methods and constructs that guide Psychiatry at Johns Hopkins Phipps Clinic today. The contributions of Adolf Meyer and Paul McHugh are central and closely connected. Both emphasize the clinical examination as the central practice of psychiatry as a specialty within medicine. Meyer's comprehensive examination of the patient became the centerpiece of his approach and was the standard for psychiatrists in the English-speaking world. McHugh, with Phillip Slavney, developed a pluralistic and practical framework for interpreting that history and examination. Both argued against the uncritical use of the modern disease construct. McHugh argues that the disease construct, although fundamental, is but one of four useful "perspectives of psychiatry" and is, thus, an insufficient basis for psychiatric practice. The perspectives could be used as an organizing framework by all physicians who seek a practical and truly personalized approach to the care of patients.

  6. On the Hughes' model for pedestrian flow: The one-dimensional case

    KAUST Repository

    Di Francesco, Marco

    2011-02-01

    In this paper we investigate the mathematical theory of Hughes\\' model for the flow of pedestrians (cf. Hughes (2002) [17]), consisting of a non-linear conservation law for the density of pedestrians coupled with an eikonal equation for a potential modelling the common sense of the task. For such an approximated system we prove existence and uniqueness of entropy solutions (in one space dimension) in the sense of Kružkov (1970) [22], in which the boundary conditions are posed following the approach of Bardos et al. (1979) [7]. We use BV estimates on the density ρ and stability estimates on the potential Π in order to prove uniqueness. Furthermore, we analyze the evolution of characteristics for the original Hughes\\' model in one space dimension and study the behavior of simple solutions, in order to reproduce interesting phenomena related to the formation of shocks and rarefaction waves. The characteristic calculus is supported by numerical simulations. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  7. Chlamydia trachomatis-induced Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekabe, Cyril Jabea; Kehbila, Jules; Njim, Tsi; Kadia, Benjamin Momo; Tendonge, Celestine Ntemlefack; Monekosso, Gottlieb Lobe

    2017-01-03

    Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome is defined as perihepatitis associated with pelvic inflammatory disease. Chlamydia trachomatis is one of its most common aetiologies. This syndrome usually presents with right upper quadrant abdominal pain mimicking other hepatobiliary and gastrointestinal pathologies, hence, posing a diagnostic dilemma in settings with limited diagnostic tools. A 32 year old African female presented with acute right upper quadrant abdominal pain and vaginal discharge, for which she had previously received treatment in another health center with no improvement. Clinical and laboratory findings were suggestive of Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome. Five days after treatment with oral doxycycline, the patient showed marked clinical improvement. Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome is a common cause of right upper quadrant pain which is often under diagnosed in poor communities. Hence, it should be included as a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with right upper quadrant pain, especially in females of reproductive age.

  8. A model of sustainable development of scientific research health institutions, providing high-tech medical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Yu. Bedoreva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue of sustainability is relevant for all types of businesses and organizations. Long-term development has always been and remains one of the most difficult tasks faced by organizations. The implementation the provisions of international standards ISO series 9000 has proven to be effective. The ISO standards are concentrated on the global experience for sustainable success of organizations. The standards incorporated all the rational that has been accumulated in this field of knowledge and practice. These standards not only eliminate technical barriers in collaboration and have established standardized approaches, but also serve as a valuable source of international experience and ready management solutions. They became a practical guide for the creation of management systems for sustainable development in organizations of different spheres of activity.Problem and purpose. The article presents the author’s approach to the problem of sustainable development health of the organization. The purpose of this article is to examine the approaches to management for sustainable success of organizations and to describe a model of sustainable development applied in research healthcare institutions providing high-tech medical care.Methodology. The study used general scientific methods of empirical and theoretical knowledge, general logical methods and techniques and methods of system analysis, comparison, analogy, generalization, the materials research for the development of medical organizations.The main results of our work are to first develop the technique of complex estimation of activity of the scientific-research institutions of health and deploy key elements of the management system that allows the level of maturity of the management system of the institution to be set in order to identify its strengths and weaknesses, and to identify areas for improvements and innovation, and to set priorities for determining the sequence of action when

  9. Medical students' perceptions of a novel institutional incident reporting system : A thematic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Morris; Parakh, Dillan

    2017-10-01

    Errors in healthcare are a major patient safety issue, with incident reporting a key solution. The incident reporting system has been integrated within a new medical curriculum, encouraging medical students to take part in this key safety process. The aim of this study was to describe the system and assess how students perceived the reporting system with regards to its role in enhancing safety. Employing a thematic analysis, this study used interviews with medical students at the end of the first year. Thematic indices were developed according to the information emerging from the data. Through open, axial and then selective stages of coding, an understanding of how the system was perceived was established. Analysis of the interview specified five core themes: (1) Aims of the incident reporting system; (2) internalized cognition of the system; (3) the impact of the reporting system; (4) threshold for reporting; (5) feedback on the systems operation. Selective analysis revealed three overriding findings: lack of error awareness and error wisdom as underpinned by key theoretical constructs, student support of the principle of safety, and perceptions of a blame culture. Students did not interpret reporting as a manner to support institutional learning and safety, rather many perceived it as a tool for a blame culture. The impact reporting had on students was unexpected and may give insight into how other undergraduates and early graduates interpret such a system. Future studies should aim to produce interventions that can support a reporting culture.

  10. Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship: Implementation and Evaluation of a Bi-institutional Pilot Curriculum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golden, Daniel W., E-mail: dgolden@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Spektor, Alexander [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Rudra, Sonali; Ranck, Mark C. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Krishnan, Monica S.; Jimenez, Rachel B.; Viswanathan, Akila N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a structured didactic curriculum to complement clinical experiences during radiation oncology clerkships at 2 academic medical centers. Methods and Materials: A structured didactic curriculum was developed to teach fundamentals of radiation oncology and improve confidence in clinical competence. Curriculum lectures included: (1) an overview of radiation oncology (history, types of treatments, and basic clinic flow); (2) fundamentals of radiation biology and physics; and (3) practical aspects of radiation treatment simulation and planning. In addition, a hands-on dosimetry session taught students fundamentals of treatment planning. The curriculum was implemented at 2 academic departments in 2012. Students completed anonymous evaluations using a Likert scale to rate the usefulness of curriculum components (1 = not at all, 5 = extremely). Likert scores are reported as (median [interquartile range]). Results: Eighteen students completed the curriculum during their 4-week rotation (University of Chicago n=13, Harvard Longwood Campus n=5). All curriculum components were rated as extremely useful: introduction to radiation oncology (5 [4-5]); radiation biology and physics (5 [5-5]); practical aspects of radiation oncology (5 [4-5]); and the treatment planning session (5 [5-5]). Students rated the curriculum as “quite useful” to “extremely useful” (1) to help students understand radiation oncology as a specialty; (2) to increase student comfort with their specialty decision; and (3) to help students with their future transition to a radiation oncology residency. Conclusions: A standardized curriculum for medical students completing a 4-week radiation oncology clerkship was successfully implemented at 2 institutions. The curriculum was favorably reviewed. As a result of completing the curriculum, medical students felt more comfortable with their specialty decision and better prepared to begin radiation oncology residency.

  11. Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship: Implementation and Evaluation of a Bi-institutional Pilot Curriculum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, Daniel W.; Spektor, Alexander; Rudra, Sonali; Ranck, Mark C.; Krishnan, Monica S.; Jimenez, Rachel B.; Viswanathan, Akila N.; Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a structured didactic curriculum to complement clinical experiences during radiation oncology clerkships at 2 academic medical centers. Methods and Materials: A structured didactic curriculum was developed to teach fundamentals of radiation oncology and improve confidence in clinical competence. Curriculum lectures included: (1) an overview of radiation oncology (history, types of treatments, and basic clinic flow); (2) fundamentals of radiation biology and physics; and (3) practical aspects of radiation treatment simulation and planning. In addition, a hands-on dosimetry session taught students fundamentals of treatment planning. The curriculum was implemented at 2 academic departments in 2012. Students completed anonymous evaluations using a Likert scale to rate the usefulness of curriculum components (1 = not at all, 5 = extremely). Likert scores are reported as (median [interquartile range]). Results: Eighteen students completed the curriculum during their 4-week rotation (University of Chicago n=13, Harvard Longwood Campus n=5). All curriculum components were rated as extremely useful: introduction to radiation oncology (5 [4-5]); radiation biology and physics (5 [5-5]); practical aspects of radiation oncology (5 [4-5]); and the treatment planning session (5 [5-5]). Students rated the curriculum as “quite useful” to “extremely useful” (1) to help students understand radiation oncology as a specialty; (2) to increase student comfort with their specialty decision; and (3) to help students with their future transition to a radiation oncology residency. Conclusions: A standardized curriculum for medical students completing a 4-week radiation oncology clerkship was successfully implemented at 2 institutions. The curriculum was favorably reviewed. As a result of completing the curriculum, medical students felt more comfortable with their specialty decision and better prepared to begin radiation oncology residency

  12. Factors affecting choice of sponsoring institution for residency among medical students in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chew Lip; Liu, Xuan Dao; Murali Govind, Renuka; Tan, Jonathan Wei Jian; Ooi, Shirley Beng Suat; Archuleta, Sophia

    2018-03-16

    Postgraduate medical education in Singapore underwent major transition recently, from a British-style system and accreditation to a competency-based residency programme modelled after the American system. We aimed to identify the relative importance of factors influencing the choice of residency sponsoring institutions (SIs) among medical students during this transition period. A questionnaire-based cross-sectional study of Singaporean undergraduate medical students across all years of study was performed in 2011. Participants rated 45 factors (including research, academia and education, marketing, reputation of faculty, working conditions, posting experience and influence by peers/seniors) for degree of importance to their choice of SIs on a five-point Likert scale. Differences with respect to gender and seniority were compared. 705 of 1,274 students completed the survey (response rate 55.3%). The top five influencing factors were guidance by mentor (4.48 ± 0.74), reputation for good teaching (4.46 ± 0.76), personal overall experience in SIs (4.41 ± 0.88), quality of mentorship and supervision (4.41 ± 0.75), and quality and quantity of teaching (4.37 ± 0.78). The five lowest-rated factors were social networking (2.91 ± 1.00), SI security (3.01 ± 1.07), open house impact (3.15 ± 0.96), advertising paraphernalia (3.17 ± 0.95) and research publications (3.21 ± 1.00). Female students attributed more importance to security and positive work environment. Preclinical students rated research and marketing aspects more highly while clinical students valued positive work environment more. Quality of education, mentorship, experiences during clerkship and positive working environment were the most important factors influencing the choice of SIs.

  13. Relationship between National Institutes of Health research awards to US medical schools and managed care market penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, E; Mazzaschi, A J; Levin, R J; Blake, D A; Griner, P F

    1997-07-16

    Medical research conducted in academic medical centers is often dependent on support from clinical revenues generated in these institutions. Anecdotal evidence suggests that managed care has the potential to affect research conducted in academic medical centers by challenging these clinical revenues. To examine whether empirical evidence supports a relationship between managed care and the ability of US medical schools to sustain biomedical research. Data on annual extramural research grants awarded to US medical schools by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) from fiscal years 1986 to 1995 were obtained, and each medical school was matched to a market for which information about health maintenance organization (HMO) penetration in 1995 was available. Growth in total NIH awards, traditional research project (R01) awards, R01 awards to clinical and basic science departments, and changes in institutional ranking by NIH awards were compared among schools located in markets with low, medium, and high managed care penetration. Medical schools in all markets had comparable rates of growth in NIH awards from 1986 to 1990. Thereafter, medical schools in markets with high managed care penetration had slower growth in the dollar amounts and numbers of NIH awards compared with schools in markets with low or medium managed care penetration. This slower growth for schools in high managed care markets was associated with loss of share of NIH awards, equal to $98 million in 1995, and lower institutional ranking by NIH awards. Much of this revenue loss can be explained by the slower growth of R01 awards to clinical departments in medical schools in high managed care markets. These findings provide evidence of an inverse relationship between growth in NIH awards during the past decade and managed care penetration among US medical schools. Whether this association is causal remains to be determined.

  14. THE EXPERIENCE OF THE AUTOMATION OF THE STATISTICAL REPORTING FORMATION ON WAGES IN MULTIDISCIPLINARY MEDICAL INSTITUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. E. Karpov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the description of the experience of automation of the processes of statistical reporting on salaries in Federal State Budgetary Institution «NationalPirogovMedicalSurgicalCenter» of Ministry of Health of theRussian Federationwith the use of information systems.According to the current legislation of theRussian Federation, within the framework of the successful implementation of the «Road Map» on a national scale, statistical information about salaries of employees of social institutions is collected in various sections of data reporting. It became necessary to develop a tool to promptly collect, process and analyze data on salaries to provide statistical information to social institutions.The purpose of this article is to familiarize oneself with the concept of multidimensional data representation and to structure information on multidimensional analytical reports within the framework of practical application for solving economic problems related to the formation of statistical reporting on salaries. The algorithm and the procedure for the formation of multidimensional analytical reports are described, both from the methodological and from the practical point of view. As a material for this study, the normative and legal acts of the Russian Federation, statistical and analytical materials of the section «Salaries of certain categories of workers in the social sphere and science» of the Federal State Statistics Service of the Russian Federation, scientific publications and articles of the periodical press, as well as the results of their own research were used.To facilitate the perception, special attention is given to the description of the basic concepts of multidimensional analytical reporting: measure, performance variables, value. The authors not only gave a definition of multidimensional analytical reporting, but also demonstrated a visual representation of the multidimensional information space of

  15. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1994. Annex II: PSI life sciences and institute for medical radiobiology newsletter 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reist, H W [ed.; Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1995-10-01

    This annex reports on the PSI life science division`s progress achieved during 1994 in the fields of radiation medicine, radiopharmacy, magnetic resonance imaging, radiation hygiene, positron emission tomography (PET) and medical radiology. A bibliography of the department`s publications is included. figs., tabs., refs.

  16. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1994. Annex II: PSI life sciences and institute for medical radiobiology newsletter 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reist, H.W.

    1995-01-01

    This annex reports on the PSI life science division's progress achieved during 1994 in the fields of radiation medicine, radiopharmacy, magnetic resonance imaging, radiation hygiene, positron emission tomography (PET) and medical radiology. A bibliography of the department's publications is included. figs., tabs., refs

  17. The hospital doctor in legislation and medical deontology: tension between profession and institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutyser, K

    1998-01-01

    1. Every health policy should make clear the organization of its offer of care; also, more particularly, the role of the individual professionals and their groups, as well as the role of the services and institutions, all within the chosen private, public or mixed framework. 2. Both in public law and in private law as well as in deontology, clear rules will have to be formulated concerning the relationship of doctor-patient and institution-patient; therefore also concerning the relationship of hospital-doctor. 3. It is evident that the lack of clarity frequently encountered in the Belgian and many other national legal systems with respect to these matters is unfortunately also reflected in international health law. 4. The issue of the legal relationships in the patient-doctor-hospital triangle should no longer be delayed until the catastrophic moment when medical liability should be considered. 5. Can we indeed speak of integral quality of a hospital, when it is anything but clear whether it concerns a single integrated enterprise or a roof under which two or more enterprises or entrepreneurs organize their own separate services to the clients? 6. Although the decision is a societal matter, the organisations of institutions and professionals should (continue to) play an important role in the preparation of this debate, which must bring the necessary clarity to the present relations and preferably also about the future options with respect to these relations. 7. A fundamental question, which remains to be solved for the future health policy, appears to be whether hospitals can be integrated institutions and, in the affirmative, whether they should be so. 8. The law, with priority to deontology, should formulate basic rules to clarify all possibilities in the patient-hospital-doctor triangle relationship--which is evolving into a polygon through fusion and group practices--and especially to trace out the consequences of health policy options with regard to the

  18. National Institutes of Health Funding to Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery at U.S. Medical Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Ahn, Jaimo; Levin, L Scott

    2017-01-18

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is the largest supporter of biomedical research in the U.S., yet its contribution to orthopaedic research is poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed the portfolio of NIH funding to departments of orthopaedic surgery at U.S. medical schools. The NIH RePORT (Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools) database was queried for NIH grants awarded to departments of orthopaedic surgery in 2014. Funding totals were determined for award mechanisms and NIH institutes. Trends in NIH funding were determined for 2005 to 2014 and compared with total NIH extramural research funding. Funding awarded to orthopaedic surgery departments was compared with that awarded to departments of other surgical specialties in 2014. Characteristics of NIH-funded principal investigators were obtained from department web sites. In 2014, 183 grants were awarded to 132 investigators at 44 departments of orthopaedic surgery. From 2005 to 2014, NIH funding increased 24.3%, to $54,608,264 (p = 0.030), but the rates of increase seen did not differ significantly from those of NIH extramural research funding as a whole (p = 0.141). Most (72.6%) of the NIH funding was awarded through the R01 mechanism, with a median annual award of $343,980 (interquartile range [IQR], $38,372). The majority (51.1%) of the total funds supported basic science research, followed by translational (33.0%), clinical (10.0%), and educational (5.9%) research. NIH-funded orthopaedic principal investigators were predominately scientists whose degree was a PhD (71.1%) and who were male (79.5%). Eleven NIH institutes were represented, with the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) providing the preponderance (74.2%) of the funding. In 2014, orthopaedic surgery ranked below the surgical departments of general surgery, ophthalmology, obstetrics and gynecology, otolaryngology, and urology in terms of NIH funding received. The percentage increase of NIH

  19. Symposium Festschrift Hughes (Vernon W) to Celebrate his 70th birthday

    CERN Document Server

    1992-01-01

    The contents of this book are derived from a celebration of the 70th birthday of Vernon W Hughes. Professor Hughes' career has touched on several areas in modern physics ranging from precision measurements of the fundamental properties of atoms to measurements of spin structure functions of the proton via deep inelastic muon scattering at the world's highest energy fixed target machines. This observance of his 70th birthday brings together experimental and theoretical physicists who are leaders of the many fields in which he has made contributions.

  20. Synchronization of FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons in external electrical stimulation via nonlinear control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jiang; Zhang Ting; Deng Bin

    2007-01-01

    Synchronization of FitzHugh-Nagumo neural system under external electrical stimulation via the nonlinear control is investigated in this paper. Firstly, the different dynamical behavior of the nonlinear cable model based on the FitzHugh-Nagumo model responding to various external electrical stimulations is studied. Next, using the result of the analysis, a nonlinear feedback linearization control scheme and an adaptive control strategy are designed to synchronization two neurons. Computer simulations are provided to verify the efficiency of the designed synchronization schemes

  1. Patterns of use of medical cannabis among Israeli cancer patients: a single institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waissengrin, Barliz; Urban, Damien; Leshem, Yasmin; Garty, Meital; Wolf, Ido

    2015-02-01

    The use of the cannabis plant (Cannabis sativa L.) for the palliative treatment of cancer patients has been legalized in multiple jurisdictions including Israel. Yet, not much is currently known regarding the efficacy and patterns of use of cannabis in this setting. To analyze the indications for the administration of cannabis among adult Israeli cancer patients and evaluate its efficacy. Efficacy and patterns of use of cannabis were evaluated using physician-completed application forms, medical files, and a detailed questionnaire in adult cancer patients treated at a single institution. Of approximately 17,000 cancer patients seen, 279 (cannabis from an authorized institutional oncologist. The median age of cannabis users was 60 years (range 19-93 years), 160 (57%) were female, and 234 (84%) had metastatic disease. Of 151 (54%) patients alive at six months, 70 (46%) renewed their cannabis permit. Renewal was more common among younger patients and those with metastatic disease. Of 113 patients alive and using cannabis at one month, 69 (61%) responded to the detailed questionnaire. Improvement in pain, general well-being, appetite, and nausea were reported by 70%, 70%, 60%, and 50%, respectively. Side effects were mild and consisted mostly of fatigue and dizziness. Cannabis use is perceived as highly effective by some patients with advanced cancer and its administration can be regulated, even by local authorities. Additional studies are required to evaluate the efficacy of cannabis as part of the palliative treatment of cancer patients. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Principles and practices for keeping occupational radiation exposures at medical institutions as low as reasonably achievable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, A.

    1982-10-01

    This report is a companion document to Regulatory Guide 8.18, Information Relevant to Ensuring that Occupational Radiation Exposures at Medical Institutions Will Be As Low As Reasonably Achievable. Both documents have now been revised to incorporate many good suggestions received after the original documents were published for comment. This report is a compendium of good practices and helpful information derived from the experience of the radiological and health physics professions and is not be construed in any way as additional regulatory requirements of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The information presented, including comprehensive checklists of facilities, equipment, and procedures that should be considered for working with NRC-licensed materials in all types of hospital activities, is intended to aid the NRC licensee in fulfilling the philosophy of maintaining radiation exposures of employees, patients, visitors, and the public as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Each subsection of this report is designed to include the major radiation safety considerations pertaining to the respective hospital function. Thus, the busy health professional will neeed to read only a few pages of this document at any one time to obtain the information needed

  3. SATISFACTION LEVEL OF MEDICAL EDUCATORS WORKING IN TEACHING INSTITUTIONS : A QUESTIONNAIRE BASED CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudeshna Chatterjee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In a resource-limited and high-burden disease setting, satisfied health professional is an asset in terms of maximized productivity, efficiency and quality health care. Job Satisfaction Index is a validated measure to identify the components that influence those issues. A multi-faceted structured questionnaire study was conducted upon a cross-section of medical educators (n=160 serving two tertiary care teaching institutions under different management set-up. Multiple demographic features were independent variables whereas three (3 critical areas of satisfaction index (SI were outcome variables. All participants were interviewed using 15 item Likert response-based, modified job satisfaction scale. It was observed that total SI scores among doctors representing the private group remained marginally higher (P<0.05 while compared to the other group. The comparative analysis of SI scores in critical areas like availability of academic supports and job security remained higher among the private doctors than that of the government ones though not significant. However the private doctors remained marginally satisfied in terms of working environment. The study outcome necessitates appropriate intervention measures at the organizational levels.

  4. "Comments on Greenhow, Robelia, and Hughes": Toward a Creative Social Web for Learners and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianwei

    2009-01-01

    This article commenting on Greenhow, Robelia, and Hughes (2009) examines the potential strengths and weaknesses of Web 2.0 in supporting student collaborative creativity in light of sociocultural conditions of knowledge creation. Weaknesses and challenges are identified related to the embedded and dispersed representation of community knowledge,…

  5. Hugh L. Dryden's Career in Aviation and Space. No. 5; Monographs in Aerospace History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorn, Michael H.

    1996-01-01

    Hugh Latimer Dryden led a life rich in paradox. Born in obsurity, he attained international prominence. Indifferent to self-advancement, he nonetheless rose to the pinnacle of the aeronautics profession and subsequently assumed a pivotal role in the initial period of space exploration. Although a research scientist of the first order, he nurtured within himself a profoundly spiritual outlook.

  6. Blood Brothers: Albert and Allen Hughes in the Belly of the Hollywood Beast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Henry Louis, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Recounts an interview with the Hughes brothers, who are twin black men who produced the film "Menace 2 Society," which is a film about urban delinquency and crime among black adolescents. Their comments include thoughts on racism, media stereotyping, being black in America, and their experiences with Hollywood. (GLR)

  7. On the Hughes' model for pedestrian flow: The one-dimensional case

    KAUST Repository

    Di Francesco, Marco; Markowich, Peter A.; Pietschmann, Jan-Frederik; Wolfram, Marie-Therese

    2011-01-01

    of Bardos et al. (1979) [7]. We use BV estimates on the density ρ and stability estimates on the potential Π in order to prove uniqueness. Furthermore, we analyze the evolution of characteristics for the original Hughes' model in one space dimension

  8. Markov chain Monte Carlo approach to parameter estimation in the FitzHugh-Nagumo model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders Christian; Ditlevsen, Susanne; Kessler, Mathieu

    2012-01-01

    Excitability is observed in a variety of natural systems, such as neuronal dynamics, cardiovascular tissues, or climate dynamics. The stochastic FitzHugh-Nagumo model is a prominent example representing an excitable system. To validate the practical use of a model, the first step is to estimate...

  9. Deciding medical problems in radiation protection for thirty years in the Boris Kidric Institute - Experimental and epidemiological experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojanovic, D; Milivojevic, K; Trajkovic, M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1989-07-01

    This paper deals with some research work carried out in the Medical Protection Laboratory of the Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences - Vinca. Four research fields have been chosen: the analysis of contribution of collaborators Medical Protection Laboratory on symposium Yugoslav Radiation Protection Association (IRPA); from 1963 to 1989 years; the appearance on the meeting IAEA, International seminars, symposium and Congress, including European and international congress IRPA with presentation the most important obtained results; the activity in the frame research projects and contribution for solving important problems in the field of medical aspects of radiation protection in developing and applicable research; the survey current and practical trends in the future (author)

  10. Deciding medical problems in radiation protection for thirty years in the Boris Kidric Institute - Experimental and epidemiological experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stojanovic, D.; Milivojevic, K.; Trajkovic, M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper deals with some research work carried out in the Medical Protection Laboratory of the Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences - Vinca. Four research fields have been chosen: the analysis of contribution of collaborators Medical Protection Laboratory on symposium Yugoslav Radiation Protection Association (IRPA); from 1963 to 1989 years; the appearance on the meeting IAEA, International seminars, symposium and Congress, including European and international congress IRPA with presentation the most important obtained results; the activity in the frame research projects and contribution for solving important problems in the field of medical aspects of radiation protection in developing and applicable research; the survey current and practical trends in the future (author)

  11. Applying the institutional review board data repository approach to manage ethical considerations in evaluating and studying medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, Erin K; Rathkey, Daniel; Miller, Marissa Fuqua; Palmer, Ryan; Mejicano, George C; Pusic, Martin; Kalet, Adina; Gillespie, Colleen; Carney, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Medical educators and educational researchers continue to improve their processes for managing medical student and program evaluation data using sound ethical principles. This is becoming even more important as curricular innovations are occurring across undergraduate and graduate medical education. Dissemination of findings from this work is critical, and peer-reviewed journals often require an institutional review board (IRB) determination. IRB data repositories, originally designed for the longitudinal study of biological specimens, can be applied to medical education research. The benefits of such an approach include obtaining expedited review for multiple related studies within a single IRB application and allowing for more flexibility when conducting complex longitudinal studies involving large datasets from multiple data sources and/or institutions. In this paper, we inform educators and educational researchers on our analysis of the use of the IRB data repository approach to manage ethical considerations as part of best practices for amassing, pooling, and sharing data for educational research, evaluation, and improvement purposes. Fostering multi-institutional studies while following sound ethical principles in the study of medical education is needed, and the IRB data repository approach has many benefits, especially for longitudinal assessment of complex multi-site data.

  12. Build-up forces at Military Institute of Medical Radiology and Oncology for emergency medical response to some eventualities of radiological accidents - some suggestions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho Van Cu; Nguyen Huu Nghia

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, the use of various nuclear sources in some fields of the life has brought many practical advantages in general; especially in the next several years, our country will begin construction of the first nuclear plant. However, if there were user carelessness or objective disadvantageous factors (earthquake, tsunami, etc.), that disadvantages could lead to a radiation accident or nuclear accident which causes damages not only for economy but also for public health. Therefore, the emergency response to radiation accident, especially the emergency medical response that has a great important position. To satisfy this real demand, in 1996, Vietnam Ministry of Defence made the decision to establish Center for Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Protecting (now becomes Military Institute of Medical Radiology and Oncology) with the main missions are research, applying radiation protecting methods and organizing treatments to radiation injured victims. To fulfill above main missions, with the help of Vietnam Atomic Energy Institute (VAEI), Vietnam Agency for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (VARANS), the doctors and staffs of our Institute have been participated in the international training courses and workshops that organized in Vietnam or in regional countries about emergency medical response to radiation accidents, they get valuable information, knowledge and documents from these courses and workshops. Depending on the principles of radiation emergency medical response to nuclear/ radiation accidents that International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) guided, and with the experience learned from other countries in Asia region, our Institute have been gradually improving on organization and curing processes for the radiation victims and also setting the preparedness for emergency medical response to radiation accidents if maybe they could occur. (author)

  13. Accidental autoerotic deaths between 1978 and 1997. Institute of Legal Medicine, Medical School Hannover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitmeier, D; Mansouri, F; Albrecht, K; Böhm, U; Tröger, H D; Kleemann, W J

    2003-10-14

    Between 1978 and 1997 the Institute of Legal Medicine of the Hannover Medical School examined 17 fatal autoerotic deaths. The incidence for the Hannover region was 0.49 cases per million inhabitants per year. The victims included 17 men with an average age of 36.8 years; a peak in the age distribution was seen between 20 and 29 years. Twelve of the men were found by friends or family in a domestic environment, while other situations in which the victims were found included the victim's own car, a hotel room, a canal embankment, a public parking lot as well as the holding cell of the youth detention center. The men were of varying socioeconomic status and held a number of different types of jobs or still attended school. Five of the men were found completely nude, while five were only undressed below the waist. Four men wore women's clothes and two were fully clothed with exposed genitals. Besides women's clothes, other objects found at the scene included various types of sexual aids, including ropes, chains, metal bars, locks, sex magazines, condoms, plastic bags, rubber items, etc. In four cases blood alcohol levels between 0.1 and 2.5 per thousand (urine alcohol levels between 0.2 and 2.5 per thousand ) were found. Toxicologic examination revealed chloroform, ketamine, a propane-butane gas mixture in one case each, and in two cases cocaine and morphine. Causes of death included central paralysis after strangulation (seven cases), asphyxiation (4), subarachnoid hemorrhage (2), intoxication (1), hypothermia (1), left heart failure (1), and drowning (1). The history, findings at scene, and autopsy findings and, in individual cases, other investigations are of utmost importance to accurately reconstruct a fatal autoerotic accident.

  14. Time required for institutional review board review at one Veterans Affairs medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Daniel E; Hanusa, Barbara H; Stone, Roslyn A; Ling, Bruce S; Arnold, Robert M

    2015-02-01

    Despite growing concern that institutional review boards (IRBs) impose burdensome delays on research, little is known about the time required for IRB review across different types of research. To measure the overall and incremental process times for IRB review as a process of quality improvement. After developing a detailed process flowchart of the IRB review process, 2 analysts abstracted temporal data from the records pertaining to all 103 protocols newly submitted to the IRB at a large urban Veterans Affairs medical center from June 1, 2009, through May 31, 2011. Disagreements were reviewed with the principal investigator to reach consensus. We then compared the review times across review types using analysis of variance and post hoc Scheffé tests after achieving normally distributed data through logarithmic transformation. Calendar days from initial submission to final approval of research protocols. Initial IRB review took 2 to 4 months, with expedited and exempt reviews requiring less time (median [range], 85 [23-631] and 82 [16-437] days, respectively) than full board reviews (median [range], 131 [64-296] days; P = .008). The median time required for credentialing of investigators was 1 day (range, 0-74 days), and review by the research and development committee took a median of 15 days (range, 0-184 days). There were no significant differences in credentialing or research and development times across review types (exempt, expedited, or full board). Of the extreme delays in IRB review, 80.0% were due to investigators' slow responses to requested changes. There were no systematic delays attributable to the information security officer, privacy officer, or IRB chair. Measuring and analyzing review times is a critical first step in establishing a culture and process of continuous quality improvement among IRBs that govern research programs. The review times observed at this IRB are substantially longer than the 60-day target recommended by expert panels

  15. Accreditation of medical laboratories in Croatia--experiences of the Institute of Clinical Chemistry, University Hospital "Merkur", Zagreb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegar-Mestrić, Zlata; Nazor, Aida; Perkov, Sonja; Surina, Branka; Kardum-Paro, Mirjana Mariana; Siftar, Zoran; Sikirica, Mirjana; Sokolić, Ivica; Ozvald, Ivan; Vidas, Zeljko

    2010-03-01

    Since 2003 when the international norm for implementation of quality management in medical laboratories (EN ISO 15189, Medical laboratories--Particular requirements for quality and competence) was established and accepted, accreditation has become practical, generally accepted method of quality management and confirmation of technical competence of medical laboratories in the whole world. This norm has been translated into Croatian and accepted by the Croatian Institute for Norms as Croatian norm. Accreditation is carried out on voluntary basis by the Croatian Accreditation Agency that has up to now accredited two clinical medical biochemical laboratories in the Republic of Croatia. Advantages of accredited laboratory lie in its documented management system, constant improvement and training, reliability of test results, establishing users' trust in laboratory services, test results comparability and interlaboratory (international) test results acceptance by adopting the concept of metrological traceability in laboratory medicine.

  16. Complementary and Alternative Medicine use: Influence of Patients’ Satisfaction with Medical Treatment among Breast Cancer Patients at Uganda Cancer Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Kiwanuka

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Use of Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is high among cancer patients especially breast cancer patients. This study sought to evaluate Complementary and alternative medicine use in breast cancer patients and how its use is influencedby patient’s satisfaction with conventional medical treatment among breast cancer patients attending Uganda Cancer Institute. Patients and Methods: A cross-sectional study design was used in this study. Participants who were diagnosed histologically with breast cancer at Uganda Cancer Institute took part in the study. A questionnaire was developed and used to interview the participants and medical records of the respondents were also reviewed. Results: A total of 235 participants completed the study. The prevalence of CAM use was 77%. CAM therapies used included herbal medicines, prayer for health, vitamins/minerals, native healers, Chinese medicines, massage, yoga, Ayurvedic medicine, Acupuncture, reflexolog, Support group attendance, meditation, Magnetic and Bio-fieldmanipulation. Satisfaction with medical treatment was significantlyassociated with CAM use. Patients who are not satisfiedwith medical treatment were more likely to use CAM. Conclusion: There is a high number of breast cancer patients using CAM, various categories of therapies are being used and patients’ satisfaction with medical treatment triggers off a patients decision to use CAM therapies.

  17. Human rights from the Nuremberg Doctors Trial to the Geneva Declaration. Persons and institutions in medical ethics and history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frewer, Andreas

    2010-08-01

    The "Universal Declaration of Human Rights" and the "Geneva Declaration" by the World Medical Association, both in 1948, were preceded by the foundation of the United Nations in New York (1945), the World Medical Association in London (1946) and the World Health Organization in Geneva (1948). After the end of World War II the community of nations strove to achieve and sustain their primary goals of peace and security, as well as their basic premise, namely the health of human beings. All these associations were well aware of the crimes by medicine, in particular by the accused Nazi physicians at the Nuremberg Doctors Trial (1946/47, sentence: August 1947). During the first conference of the World Medical Association (September 1947) issues of medical ethics played a major role: and a new document was drafted concerning the values of the medical profession. After the catastrophe of the War and the criminal activities of scientists, the late 1940s saw increased scrutiny paid to fundamental questions of human rights and medical ethics, which are still highly relevant for today's medicine and morality. The article focuses on the development of medical ethics and human rights reflected in the statement of important persons, codes and institutions in the field.

  18. Solving Winfree's puzzle: The isochrons in the FitzHugh-Nagumo model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langfield, Peter; Krauskopf, Bernd; Osinga, Hinke M.

    2014-01-01

    We consider the FitzHugh-Nagumo model, an example of a system with two time scales for which Winfree was unable to determine the overall structure of the isochrons. An isochron is the set of all points in the basin of an attracting periodic orbit that converge to this periodic orbit with the same asymptotic phase. We compute the isochrons as one-dimensional parametrised curves with a method based on the continuation of suitable two-point boundary value problems. This allows us to present in detail the geometry of how the basin of attraction is foliated by isochrons. They exhibit extreme sensitivity and feature sharp turns, which is why Winfree had difficulties finding them. We observe that the sharp turns and sensitivity of the isochrons are associated with the slow-fast nature of the FitzHugh-Nagumo system; more specifically, it occurs near its repelling (unstable) slow manifold

  19. ACTUALITY OF DIGITAL LIBRARIES CREATION IN THE HIGHER MEDICAL EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS OF UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateryna O. Zhuravska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with an access to methodical materials from the sites of higher medical educational establishments of Ukraine. The tools that provide the process are analyzed. Particular attention is paid to the use of digital libraries in medical universities, the problem of open access to methodological information is considered. The prospects of the use of the latest information technologies in the medical education industry are highlighted. It is noted, that the use of digital libraries will allow medical students to acquire better knowledge and to be competitive specialists, as well as higher establishments will improve their rating.

  20. Radiation Protection in Medical Physics : Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Study Institute on Radiation Protection in Medical Physics Activities

    CERN Document Server

    Lemoigne, Yves

    2011-01-01

    This book introduces the fundamental aspects of Radiation Protection in Medical Physics and covers three main themes: General Radiation Protection Principles; Radiobiology Principles; Radiation Protection in Hospital Medical Physics. Each of these topics is developed by analysing the underlying physics principles and their implementation, quality and safety aspects, clinical performance and recent advances in the field. Some issues specific to the individual techniques are also treated, e.g. calculation of patient dose as well as that of workers in hospital, optimisation of equipment used, shielding design of radiation facilities, radiation in oncology such as use of brachytherapy in gynecology or interventional procedures. All topics are presented with didactical language and style, making this book an appropriate reference for students and professionals seeking a comprehensive introduction to the field as well as a reliable overview of the most recent developments.

  1. What do patients think of medical students during their hospitalization? One institution's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Pinzon, Maria; Lal, Ankita; Edquist, Sarah; Francescatti, Amanda; Hughes, Tasha; Hayden, Dana; Brand, Marc; Saclarides, Theodore

    2013-12-01

    Multiple studies have shown patients have a positive attitude toward medical students in outpatient facilities, but it is unknown whether these results can be extrapolated to inpatients. The purpose of this study is to describe the patients' attitude toward medical students in the inpatient facility and factors that may affect it. A 43-item questionnaire was provided to patients of the general surgery department; it gathered demographics, clinical condition, and patients' opinions regarding the medical students' involvement in their care. Eighty-four patients completed the questionnaire. Forty-three per cent were males and the average age was 56 years old (range, 26 to 86 years). Sixty-one patients (72.6%) felt that having medical students enhanced the care provided. Patients' attitudes toward students were as follows: seven patients (8.3%) refused medical students, 40 (47.6%) accepted a limited involvement, and 37 (44%) offered no objections. Patients who refused medical students or preferred a limited involvement were more likely to 1) consider their health as good or excellent; 2) feel that the rounds were too early; and 3) feel that the residents did not spend enough time with them. More patients prefer that medical students have a limited involvement, especially when referring to minor procedures (e.g., nasogastric tube, intravenous line). Better more thorough communication with patients positively affects their attitudes toward students. More studies are required to confirm these results and to analyze other factors that may improve the patients' attitudes toward medical students.

  2. 76 FR 3918 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-21

    ... General Medical Sciences; Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Advisory General Medical Sciences Council, January 27, 2011, 8:30 a.m. to January 28... of Federal Advisory Committee Policy. [FR Doc. 2011-1198 Filed 1-20-11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4140-01...

  3. The NACA Exceptional Service Medal presented at the NACA High Speed Flight Station. L-R: Hugh Dryden

    Science.gov (United States)

    1956-01-01

    The NASA exceptional Service Medal presented at the NACA High Speed Flight Station. L-R: Hugh Dryden, Joe Walker (X-1A research pilot), Stan Butchart (pilot of the B-29 mothership), Richard Payne (X-1A crew chief).

  4. Challenges of the health research system in a medical research institute in Iran: a qualitative content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Momeni, Khalil; Ravangard, Ramin; Yaghoubi, Maryam; Alimohammazdeh, Khalil; Teymourzadeh, Ehsan; Mehrabi Tavana, Ali

    2014-08-14

    Medical research institute is the main basis for knowledge production through conducting research, and paying attention to the research is one of the most important things in the scientific communities. At present, there is a large gap between knowledge production in Iran compared to that in other countries. This study aimed to identify the challenge of research system in a research institute of medical sciences in Iran. This was a descriptive and qualitative study conducted in the first 6 months of 2013. A qualitative content analysis was conducted on 16 heads of research centers in a research institute of medical sciences. The required data were gathered using semi-structured interviews. The collected data were analyzed using MAXQDA 10.0 software. Six themes identified as challenges of research system. The themes included barriers related to the design and development, and approval of research projects, the implementation of research projects, the administrative and managerial issues in the field of research, the personal problems, publishing articles, and guidelines and recommendations. Based on the results of the present study, the following suggestions can be offered: pushing the research towards solving the problems of society, employing the strong executive and scientific research directors in the field of research, providing training courses for researchers on how to write proposals, implementing administrative reforms in the Deputy of Research and Technology, accelerating the approval of the projects through automating the administrative and peer-reviewing processes.

  5. Educational Research Centre of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research and students training on the 'Medical Physics' speciality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, S.P.; )

    2005-01-01

    The Educational Research Centre (ERC) of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research is the place of joint activity of the JINR, Moscow State University (MSU) and Moscow Engineering Physical Institute (MEFI) on students training by a broadened circle of specialities with introduction of new educational forms. Active application of medical accelerator beams of the JINR Laboratory of Nuclear Beams becomes a reason for implementation of a new training chair in the MEFI on the JINR base - the Physical methods in applied studies in the medicine chair. For the 'medical physics' trend development in 2003 the workshop on discussion both curricula and teaching methodic by the speciality was held. One the Educational Research Centre main activities is both organization and conducting an international scientific schools and training courses. The International student School 'Nuclear-Physical Methods and Accelerators is the most popular and traditional. The principal aim of these schools and courses is familiarization of students and postgraduates with last achievement and and contemporary problems of applied medical physics. The school audience is a students and postgraduates of ERC, MSU, MEFI, and an institutes of Poland, Hungary, Slovakia, France, Czech and Bulgaria

  6. [Investigation of human brucellosis diagnosis and report quality in medical institutions in key areas of Shanxi province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, L J; Yang, W W; Tie, P; Liu, X R; Gao, X R; Li, Z Y; Hou, P; Zhi, Y; Bai, Y F; Geng, M J; Chen, Q L; Cui, B Y; Li, Z J; Wang, L P

    2017-11-10

    Objective: To evaluate the accuracy of human brucellosis diagnosis and reporting in medical institutions in Shanxi province, and understand the performance of clinical doctors to diagnose human brucellosis according to diagnostic criteria. Methods: Field investigation was conducted in 6 medical institutions in the key areas of human brucellosis in Shanxi province. The diagnosis data of the reported brucellosis cases in 2015 were collected and reviewed retrospectively for the evaluation of the diagnosis accuracy with systematic sampling method. The database was established with Excel 2010 and the descriptive analysis and statistical test were conducted with software R 3.3.2. Results: The diagnosis consistent rate of the 377 brucellosis cases reviewed was 70.8% (267/377), the diagnosis consistent rates in medical institutions at city-level and country-level were 77.0% (127/165) and 66.0% (140/212) respectively, the differences had significance ( χ (2)=5.4, P =0.02). Among the reviewed cases, the diagnosis consistent rate of laboratory diagnosis and clinical diagnosis were 87.1% (256/294) and 13.3% (11/83) respectively, and the differences had significance ( χ (2)=170.7, P brucellosis cases within 24 hours after diagnosis. Conclusion: The accuracy of human brucellosis diagnosis in key areas of human brucellosis in Shanxi was low, and the performance of the clinical doctors to diagnose human brucellosis according to diagnostic and case classification criteria was unsatisfied.

  7. Physicians' acceptance of electronic medical records exchange: an extension of the decomposed TPB model with institutional trust and perceived risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Pi-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) exchange improves clinical quality and reduces medical costs. However, few studies address the antecedent factors of physicians' intentions to use EMR exchange. Based on institutional trust and perceived risk integrated with the decomposed theory of planned behavior (TPB) model, we propose a theoretical model to explain the intention of physicians to use an EMR exchange system. We conducted a field survey in Taiwan to collect data from physicians who had experience using the EMR exchange systems. A valid sample of 191 responses was collected for data analysis. To test the proposed research model, we employed structural equation modeling using the partial least squares method. The study findings show that the following five factors have a significant influence on the physicians' intentions to use EMR exchange systems: (a) attitude; (b) subjective norm; (c) perceived behavior control; (d) institutional trust; and (e) perceived risk. These five factors are predictable by perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and compatibility, interpersonal and governmental influence, facilitating conditions and self-efficacy, situational normality and structural assurance, and institutional trust, respectively. The results also indicate that institutional trust and perceived risk integrated with the decomposed TPB model improve the prediction of physician's intentions to use EMR exchange. The results of this study indicate that our research model effectively predicts the intention of physicians to use EMR exchange, and provides valuable implications for academics and practitioners. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 78 FR 70566 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-26

    .... Dunbar, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Institute of General..., and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88...

  9. Transporting radioactive materials and possible radiological consequences from accidents as might be seen by medical institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jefferson, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses how medical personnel faced with treating victims of an accident involving radioactive material should be suspicious concerning possible radiological involvement. At the same time, they should be careful to obtain the necessary information in order to make a rational decision as to the likelihood of such involvement. Having made that decision, it is entirely possible then to approach the problem from a medical standpoint in such a way as to determine the extent of radiological involvement and to apply proper medical treatment consistent with that exposure

  10. Practice and problems in radiation protection in medical institutions in Papua New Guinea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, I.C.

    1984-01-01

    Sources of ionizing radiations employed in medical centres in Papua New Guinea are outlined and the present practice in radiation protection is discussed. Steps being taken or proposed to improve the standard of radiological protection are also considered

  11. The themes, institutions, and people of medical education research 1988-2010: content analysis of abstracts from six journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotgans, Jerome I

    2012-10-01

    The present study aimed at providing an overview of the most common themes of research into medical education. Changes in frequency of occurrence of these themes over time and differences between US and European journals were studied. The most productive institutions and researchers in the field were examined. A content analysis was carried out on 10,168 abstracts extracted from the six most influential journals in medical education published since 1988. Twenty-nine major themes were identified, of which student assessment, clinical and communication skills, clinical clerkships, and problem-based learning were the most prominent ones. Some of these themes, such as multiple-choice examinations or computer-assisted instruction seemed to have had their day, whereas other topics, such as the study of clinical clerkships, clinical reasoning, and scholarship in education were on their way up. Medical education research turned out to be a thoroughly international affair to which both US and European research centers contribute. The medical education literature shows an overwhelming emphasis on the preparation of medical students for professional practice. Moreover, the emphasis is very much on the individual student; most research seems to have been conducted with a psychological perspective in mind. It is argued that medical education research would profit from broadening its scope, including sociological, economical, ecological, and system perspectives. These perspectives might bring answers to new questions relevant to the quality of medical education. It is suggested that medical education is in need of moving beyond the conventional effectiveness-driven research approach to a more theory- and discovery-driven approach.

  12. STRATEGIES FOR ADVANCE IN DEVELOPMENT OF A HEALTH CARE INSTITUTION FOR SPECIALIZED PRE-HOSPITAL MEDICAL AID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desislava Todorova

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available which brings about a competitive environment for an increase of the quality of services offered. The aim of the study is making evident the recommendatory strategies of a health care institution for specialized pre-hospital medical aid in Sofia City for activity performed in the period from the year 2016 to 2018. The task assigned is an analysis of the opportunities for the widening of the activity, products, and markets of "DCC XXIVth-Sofia" EOOD. The chosen healthcare institution is active in a competitive environment in Sofia City, and in the district that it serves. Data from the health care institution, data from the institutions of National Statistics, and scientific literature on the topic were used in connection with the analysis. Some essential approaches of management were applied - analysis of the market share, and SWOT analysis, for determination of strategy. The conclusions of the analysis performed showed four possible strategies of advance in development and opportunities for activity in each of them. The administration of "DCC XXIVth-Sofia" EOOD had opportunities to all practical purposes for minimization of the negative effects, induced by the weaknesses and threats, and to successfully develop the activity - during the period from the year 2016 to 2018. Both the activity of the healthcare institution and the public health services of the population in the corresponding village/town/city depend on the choice of the administration and on its execution by the personnel.

  13. Improving readability of informed consents for research at an academic medical institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, Kristie B; Prince, Latrina Y; Moore, Tina D; James, Laura P; Holland, Jennifer R; Trudeau, Christopher R

    2017-12-01

    The final rule for the protection of human subjects requires that informed consent be "in language understandable to the subject" and mandates that "the informed consent must be organized in such a way that facilitates comprehension." This study assessed the readability of Institutional Review Board-approved informed consent forms at our institution, implemented an intervention to improve the readability of consent forms, and measured the first year impact of the intervention. Readability assessment was conducted on a sample of 217 Institutional Review Board-approved informed consents from 2013 to 2015. A plain language informed consent template was developed and implemented and readability was assessed again after 1 year. The mean readability of the baseline sample was 10th grade. The mean readability of the post-intervention sample (n=82) was seventh grade. Providing investigators with a plain language informed consent template and training can promote improved readability of informed consents for research.

  14. Ethical dilemma of mandated contraception in pharmaceutical research at catholic medical institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Murray Joseph; O'Brien, Richard; Rendell, Marc; Salzman, Todd

    2012-01-01

    The Catholic Church proscribes methods of birth control other than sexual abstinence. Although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recognizes abstinence as an acceptable method of birth control in research studies, some pharmaceutical companies mandate the use of artificial contraceptive techniques to avoid pregnancy as a condition for participation in their studies. These requirements are unacceptable at Catholic health care institutions, leading to conflicts among institutional review boards, clinical investigators, and sponsors. Subjects may feel coerced by such mandates to adopt contraceptive techniques inconsistent with their personal situation and beliefs; women committed to celibacy or who engage exclusively in non-heterosexual activities are negatively impacted. We propose principles to insure informed consent to safeguard the rights of research subjects at Catholic institutions while mitigating this ethical conflict. At the same time, our proposal respects the interests of pharmaceutical research agencies and Catholic moral precepts, and fully abides by regulatory guidance.

  15. SU-F-P-13: NRG Oncology Medical Physics Manpower Survey Quantifying Support Demands for Multi Institutional Clinical Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monroe, J [St. Anthony’s Cancer Center, St. Louis, MO (United States); Case Western Reserve University (United States); Boparai, K [ACR, Reston, VA (United States); Xiao, Y [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Galvin, J [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Newtown, PA (United States); Sohn, J [Case Western University, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A survey was taken by NRG Oncology to assess Full Time Equivalent (FTE) contributions to multi institutional clinical trials by medical physicists.No current quantification of physicists’ efforts in FTE units associated with clinical trials is available. The complexity of multi-institutional trials increases with new technologies and techniques. Proper staffing may directly impact the quality of trial data and outcomes. The demands on physics time supporting clinical trials needs to be assessed. Methods: The NRG Oncology Medical Physicist Subcommittee created a sixteen question survey to obtain this FTE data. IROC Houston distributed the survey to their list of 1802 contact physicists. Results: After three weeks, 363 responded (20.1% response). 187 (51.5%) institutions reporting external beam participation were processed. There was a wide range in number of protocols active and supported at each institution. Of the 187 clinics, 134 (71.7%) participate in 0 to 10 trials, 28 (15%) in 11 to 20 trials, 10 (5.3%) in 21 to 30 trials, 9 (4.8%) had 40 to 75 trials. On average, physicist spent 2.7 hours (SD: 6.0) per week supervising or interacting with clinical trial staff. 1.25 hours (SD: 3.37), 1.83 hours (SD: 4.13), and 0.64 hours(SD: 1.13) per week were spent on patient simulation, reviewing treatment plans, and maintaining a DICOM server, respectively. For all protocol credentialing activities, physicist spent an average of 37.05 hours (SD: 96.94) yearly. To support dosimetrists, clinicians, and therapists, physicist spend on average 2.07 hours (SD: 3.52) per week just reading protocols. Physicist attended clinical trial meetings for on average 1.13 hours (SD: 1.85) per month. Conclusion: Responding physicists spend a nontrivial amount of time: 8.8 hours per week (0.22 FTE) supporting, on average, 9 active multi-institutional clinical trials.

  16. The Institutional Foundations of Medicalization: A Cross-national Analysis of Mental Health and Unemployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffel, Veerle; Beckfield, Jason; Bracke, Piet

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we question (1) whether the relationship between unemployment and mental healthcare use, controlling for mental health status, varies across European countries and (2) whether these differences are patterned by a combination of unemployment and healthcare generosity. We hypothesize that medicalization of unemployment is stronger in countries where a low level of unemployment generosity is combined with a high level of healthcare generosity. A subsample of 36,306 working-age respondents from rounds 64.4 (2005-2006) and 73.2 (2010) of the cross-national survey Eurobarometer was used. Country-specific logistic regression and multilevel analyses, controlling for public disability spending, changes in government spending, economic capacity, and unemployment rate, were performed. We find that unemployment is medicalized, at least to some degree, in the majority of the 24 nations surveyed. Moreover, the medicalization of unemployment varies substantially across countries, corresponding to the combination of the level of unemployment and of healthcare generosity.

  17. 78 FR 50427 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... policies and issues, opening remarks, report of the new Director, NIGMS, and other business of the Council... the interest of security, NIH has instituted stringent procedures for entrance onto the NIH campus. All visitor vehicles, including taxis, hotel, and airport shuttles, will be inspected before being...

  18. "Burnout in Medical Oncology Fellows: a Prospective Multicenter Cohort Study in Brazilian Institutions".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubero, Daniel I G; Fumis, Renata Rego Lins; de Sá, Thiago Hérick; Dettino, Aldo; Costa, Felipe Osório; Van Eyll, Brigitte M R H Adam; Beato, Carlos; Peria, Fernanda Maris; Mota, Augusto; Altino, José; Azevedo, Sérgio Jobim; da Rocha Filho, Duílio Reis; Moura, Melba; Lessa, Álvaro Edson Ramos; Del Giglio, Auro

    2016-09-01

    Burnout syndrome is a common occurrence among oncologists. Doctors enrolled in residency programs in clinical oncology are exposed to similar risk factors; however, few data are available in this population. This study assessed the occurrence of burnout and associated factors among first-year residents at Brazilian institutions. The present prospective, multicenter, cohort study was conducted with doctors enrolled in residency programs in clinical oncology at Brazilian institutions affiliated with the public health system. The participants answered a sociodemographic questionnaire, the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), Lipp's Stress Inventory, and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), upon admission to the program and 6 and 12 months later. Of 37 eligible residency programs in 2009, 11 (30.6 %) agreed to participate in the study. Fifty-four residents, representing 100 % of new admissions to the participating institutions, were included. Most of the participants met the criteria for severe burnout upon admission to the residency programs (emotional exhaustion in 49.0 % and depersonalization in 64.7 %). The scores on MBI domains emotional exhaustion and depersonalization increased significantly (p burnout increased to 88 % at the end of that first year. The present study found a high prevalence of burnout among doctors enrolled in residency programs in clinical oncology at Brazilian institutions. A large fraction of the participants met the criteria for burnout syndrome upon admission to the program, which suggests that the problem began during the course of the previous residency program in internal medicine.

  19. Institutional constraints on strategic maneuvering in shared decision medical decision making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoeck Henkemans, A.F.; Mohammed, D.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper it is first investigated to what extent the institutional goal and basic principles of shared decision making are compatible with the aim and rules for critical discussion. Next, some techniques that doctors may use to present their own treatment preferences strategically in a shared

  20. Reusable Learning Objects for Medical Education: Evolving a Multi-institutional Collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Leeder; T. Davies; A. Hall

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn early 2002 a number of UK HE institutions founded a collaborative project to produce a bank of high quality e-learning resources to support and enhance teaching in the traditionally difficult area of statistics, epidemiology and research skills. Creation of these resources is very

  1. Etiquette for medical students' email communication with faculty members: a single-institution study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Hwan; Yoon, Hyun Bae; Yoo, Dong-Mi; Lee, Sang-Min; Jung, Hee-Yeon; Kim, Seog Ju; Shin, Jwa-Seop; Lee, Seunghee; Yim, Jae-Joon

    2016-04-27

    Email is widely used as a means of communication between faculty members and students in medical education because of its practical and educational advantages. However, because of the distinctive nature of medical education, students' inappropriate email etiquette may adversely affect their learning as well as faculty members' perception of them. Little data on medical students' competency in professional email writing is available; therefore, this study explored the strengths and weaknesses of medical students' email etiquette and factors that contribute to professional email writing. A total of 210 emails from four faculty members at Seoul National University College of Medicine were collected. An evaluation criteria and a scoring rubric were developed based on the various email-writing guidelines. The rubric comprised 10 items, including nine items for evaluation related to the email components and one item for the assessment of global impression of politeness. Three evaluators independently assessed all emails according to the criteria. Students were identified as being 61.0% male and 52.8% were in the undergraduate-entry program. The sum of each component score was 62.21 out of 100 and the mean value for global impression was 2.6 out of 4. The results demonstrated that students' email etiquettes remained low-to-mediocre for most criteria, except for readability and honorifics. Three criteria, salutation (r=0.668), closing (r=0.653), and sign-off (r=0.646), showed a strong positive correlation with the global impression of politeness. Whether a student entered a graduate-entry program or an undergraduate-entry program significantly contributed to professional email writing after other variables were controlled. Although students in the graduate-entry program demonstrated a relatively superior level of email etiquette, the majority of medical students did not write emails professionally. Educating all medical students in email etiquette may well contribute to

  2. Rationing access to care to the medically uninsured: the role of bureaucratic front-line discretion at large healthcare institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Saul J; Laporte, Margaret; Abrams, Richard I; Moswin, Arthur; Warnecke, Richard

    2004-04-01

    Medically uninsured patients seeking nonemergency care are not guaranteed access to services at most healthcare institutions. They must first register with a clerk who could require a deposit and/or payment on an outstanding debt. This study examines the factors that influence whether nonmedical bureaucratic staff sign in or turn away uninsured patients who cannot meet prepayment requirements. The study was conducted at a for-profit, a not-for-profit, and a public healthcare institution in a metropolitan area. The authors explored the relevant policy environment through interviews with senior administrators and a review of documents pertaining to the management of self-pay patients. Then they examined how policies affecting access were implemented through in-depth, semistructured, audiotaped interviews with 55 front-line clerical personnel. At all 3 institutions, policies were ambiguous about what to do when uninsured patients cannot afford required prepayments. Seventy-one percent of staff reported they do not turn patients away; the remainder stated that on occasion they do. A variety of rationales were provided for how decisions are made. Those with the lowest-level positions were significantly more likely to be sympathetic to indigent patients and less likely to report turning patients away. Consistent with other studies of front-line bureaucracies indicating that low-level personnel who interface with clients make discretionary decisions, particularly when organizations pursue potentially conflicting priorities, this preliminary investigation found that nonmedical personnel play a significant role in decisions affecting access to care for medically indigent patients.

  3. Institutional Oversight of Faculty-Industry Consulting Relationships in U.S. Medical Schools: A Delphi Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morain, Stephanie R; Joffe, Steven; Campbell, Eric G; Mello, Michelle M

    2015-01-01

    The conflicts of interest that may arise in relationships between academic researchers and industry continue to prompt controversy. The bulk of attention has focused on financial aspects of these relationships, but conflicts may also arise in the legal obligations that faculty acquire through consulting contracts. However, oversight of faculty members' consulting agreements is far less vigorous than for financial conflicts, creating the potential for faculty to knowingly or unwittingly contract away important rights and freedoms. Increased regulation could prevent this, but it is unclear what forms of oversight universities view as feasible and effective. In this article, we report on a Delphi study to evaluate several approaches for oversight of consulting agreements by medical schools. The panel was comprised of 11 senior administrators with responsibility for oversight of faculty consulting relationships. We found broad agreement among panelists regarding the importance of institutional oversight to protect universities' interests. There was strong support for two specific approaches: providing educational resources to faculty and submitting consulting agreements for institutional review. Notwithstanding the complexities of asserting authority to regulate private consulting agreements between faculty members and companies, medical school administrators reached consensus that several approaches to improving institutional oversight are feasible and useful. © 2015 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  4. Seroprevalence of hepatitis B and C viruses among medical waste handlers at Gondar town Health institutions, Northwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anagaw Belay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viral hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver due to viral infections and there are groups of viruses that affects the liver of which hepatitis B and C viruses are the causative agents of sever form of liver disease with high rate of mortality. Medical waste handlers who undergo collection, transportation, and disposal of medical wastes in the health institutions are at risk of exposure to acquire those infections which transmit mainly as a result of contaminated blood and other body fluids including injury with sharp instruments, splash to the eye or mucous membrane. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of hepatitis B and/or C viruses and associated risk factors among medical waste handlers. Results A cross-sectional study was conducted from April, 2011 to June, 2011 in government health institutions at Gondar town. Socio-demographic and possible risk factors data from medical waste handlers were collected using pre-tested and well structured questionnaires. Venous bloods were collected and the serums were tested for hepatitis B surface antigen and anti-hepatitis C antibody using rapid Immunochromatography assay. Data was entered and analyzed using SPSS software package (version16. Chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used to assess risk of association. A p-value of A total of 100 medical waste handlers and 100 non-clinical waste handlers were examined for HBV and HCV viruses. HBV was detected in 6 (6.0% and 1 (1.0% and HCV in 1 (1.0% and 0 (0.0% of medical waste handlers and non-clinical waste handlers, respectively. Significant differences were observed in the detection rates of HBV (OR = 6.3; X2 = 4.1; P = 0.04 and overall infection rate (HBV + HCV (OR = 7.5; X2 = 5.2; P: 0.02 in medical waste handlers when compared with non-clinical waste handlers. It was found that none of the observed risk factors significantly associated with rate of hepatitis infection compared to others. Conclusions Prevalence of HBV and

  5. Medical Student Perceptions of Global Surgery at an Academic Institution: Identifying Gaps in Global Health Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Ambar; Xu, Tim; Murray, Matthew; Casey, Kathleen M

    2017-12-01

    Robust global health demands access to safe, affordable, timely surgical care for all. The long-term success of global surgery requires medical students to understand and engage with this emerging field. The authors characterized medical students' perceptions of surgical care relative to other fields within global health. An optional, anonymous survey was given to all Johns Hopkins medical students from February to March 2016 to assess perceptions of surgical care and its role in global health. Of 480 students, 365 (76%) completed the survey, with 150 (41%) reporting global health interests. One-third (34%) of responding students felt that surgical care is one of two fields with the greatest potential global health impact in the future, second to infectious disease (49%). A minority (28%) correctly identified that trauma results in more deaths worldwide than obstetric complications or HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria combined. Relative to other examined fields, students perceived surgical care as the least preventive and cost-effective, and few students (3%) considered adequate surgical care the best indicator of a robust health care system. Students believed that practicing in a surgical field was least amenable to pursuing a global health career, citing several barriers. Medical students have several perceptions of global surgery that contradict current evidence and literature, which may have implications for their career choices. Opportunities to improve students' global health knowledge and awareness of global surgery career paths include updating curricula, fostering meaningful international academic opportunities, and creating centers of global surgery and global health consortia.

  6. Utilization of information technology in medical education: a questionnaire survey of students in a Malaysian institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurjahan, M I; Lim, T A; Yeong, S W; Foong, A L S; Ware, J

    2002-12-01

    The objective of this survey was to obtain a self-reported assessment of the use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) by medical students at the International Medical University, Malaysia. Students' perceived skills and extent of usage of ICT were evaluated using a questionnaire. Chi-square analysis were performed to ascertain the association between variables. Further statistical testing using Chi-square test for trend was done when one of the variables was ordered, and Spearman rank correlation when both variables were ordered. Overall, (98%) of students responded to the questionnaire. Twenty seven students (5.7%) did not use a computer either in the university or at home. Most students surveyed reported adequate skills at word processing (55%), e-mailing (78%) and surfing the internet (67%). The results suggests that in order to increase the level of computer literacy among medical students, positive steps would need to be taken, for example the formal inclusion of ICT instruction in the teaching of undergraduate medicine. This will enhance medical students' ability to acquire, appraise, and use information in order to solve clinical and other problems quickly and efficiently in the course of their studies, and more importantly when they graduate.

  7. Medical isotope production experience at the V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solin, L.M.

    2000-01-01

    Radium Institute cyclotron MGC-20 is used since 1990. There are four cyclotrons of such type in Russia and four abroad: in Finland, in Hungary, in North Korea and in Egypt. The Radium institute cyclotron was used in different fields, such as radioisotope production, nuclear physics, physics and engineering. For ten years some improvements of the Radium Institute cyclotron operation have been made. Those are: creation of the automatic control system based on IBM PC, development of a new power supply for the ion source, creation of the deflector electronic protection from discharges, change of the main elements of the cyclotron with high induced radioactivity. Moreover we investigated the possibility of the negative ions acceleration at the MGC-20 cyclotron without ion source exchange. The maximum value of the proton beam current reached was about 30 μA for 10 MeV H - beam energy. To extract the proton beam from the cyclotron after the stripping foil we made an additional output beam line. It was used for determination of the horizontal and vertical emittance. A special device was constructed and used for measurements of emittance. The latter amounted 30 π mm mrad for horizontal direction and 16 π mm mrad for vertical direction

  8. Knowledge of palliative care among medical interns in a tertiary health institution in Northwestern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Chukwunyere Nnadi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Palliative care is the proactive care which seeks to maximize quality of life for people and families facing life-threatening illnesses. Objectives: To ascertain the existing knowledge of palliative care among medical interns and determine the effect of a structured educational intervention on improvement of their knowledge levels. Subjects and Methods: This is a quasi-experimental, interventional study with a one group pre- and post-test design involving medical interns rotating through the various departments of the Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto. The study population was chosen by convenience sampling method. The interns completed a pre- and a post-test assessment following a structured educational intervention for the evaluation of knowledge of palliative care. Knowledge was evaluated by a self-administered structured questionnaire. Results: A total number of 49 medical interns were recruited, among whom were 41 males and 8 females. Their ages ranged from 21 to 36 years with a mean of 27.7 (standard deviation 2.14 years. In the pretest, 11/49 (22.5% of the respondents had poor knowledge level of palliative care; however, in the postintervention, only 2/49 (4.1% of the respondents had poor knowledge. Similarly, good knowledge levels appreciated from 9/49 (18.4% to 14/49 (28.6% while very good knowledge increased from 10/49 (20.4% to 19/49 (38.8%. This effect was statistically significant (Chi-square test 11.655 df = 3, P = 0.009. Conclusion: There is poor knowledge of palliative care among the interns due to ignorance. Following an educational intervention, the knowledge levels appreciated significantly. Palliative care should be part of the medical curriculum.

  9. A collaborative institutional model for integrating computer applications in the medical curriculum.

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman, C. P.; Oxford, G. S.; Juliano, E. L.

    1991-01-01

    The introduction and promotion of information technology in an established medical curriculum with existing academic and technical support structures poses a number of challenges. The UNC School of Medicine has developed the Taskforce on Educational Applications in Medicine (TEAM), to coordinate this effort. TEAM works as a confederation of existing research and support units with interests in computers and education, along with a core of interested faculty with curricular responsibilities. C...

  10. Antibiotictherapy and Self Medication: A Common Practice Among Students of a Biomedicine Course in a Higher Education Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Leone Rossi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Self-medication habit of antibiotics contributes to the bacterial resistance mechanism, which is a global public health problem that must be prevented. The university student, as a future health professional, is summoned to guide a conduct and report on the use of antimicrobials regarding the casual agent, the site of infection and the severity of the disease. In this study, it has been verified, through a questionnaire, the profile of freshmen and academic students who are majoring in Biomedical Science in an institution of higher education, comparing the results obtained. It is a descriptive study with quantitative data approach (relative frequency – % through a self-administered questionnaire, and containing 13 multiple choice questions stored in the database in Excel. The sample consisted of 132 undergraduate students from the Biomedical Science course from this University Center. Among the freshmen, the purchase of antibiotic is mainly influenced by previous experiences with the drug, what is not repeated by the students that are graduating and prefer to seek and follow medical advice. Thus, 91.8% of trainees believe that self-medication may be harmful to health. Regarding the use of anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic before the use of antibiotics, 67% of the entering students said that they take these medications, against 70% of the senior students that also do it. Therefore, we may conclude that information on the danger of self-medication is provided in the disciplines of microbiology and pharmacology, which have not been studied by the freshmen and is unknown by the general population, that appeals to self-medication due to the lack of knowledge. To reverse this situation, it is necessary a greater media exposure on educational practices regarding the risks, the benefits, and elucidation about multi-resistant bacteria.

  11. Learning methods and strategies of anatomy among medical students in two different Institutions in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mohrej, Omar A; Al-Ayedh, Noura K; Masuadi, Emad M; Al-Kenani, Nader S

    2017-04-01

    Anatomy instructors adopt individual teaching methods and strategies to convey anatomical information to medical students for learning. Students also exhibit their own individual learning preferences. Instructional methods preferences vary between both instructors and students across different institutions. In attempt to bridge the gap between teaching methods and the students' learning preferences, this study aimed to identify students' learning methods and different strategies of studying anatomy in two different Saudi medical schools in Riyadh. A cross-sectional study, conducted in Saudi Arabia in April 2015, utilized a three-section questionnaire, which was distributed to a consecutive sample of 883 medical students to explore their methods and strategies in learning and teaching anatomy in two separate institutions in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Medical students' learning styles and preferences were found to be predominantly affected by different cultural backgrounds, gender, and level of study. Many students found it easier to understand and remember anatomy components using study aids. In addition, almost half of the students felt confident to ask their teachers questions after class. The study also showed that more than half of the students found it easier to study by concentrating on a particular part of the body rather than systems. Students' methods of learning were distributed equally between memorizing facts and learning by hands-on dissection. In addition, the study showed that two thirds of the students felt satisfied with their learning method and believed it was well suited for anatomy. There is no single teaching method which proves beneficial; instructors should be flexible in their teaching in order to optimize students' academic achievements.

  12. Factors associated to labour absenteeism due to medical cause in an university institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F. Saldarriaga

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Labor absenteeism due to medical cause has unfavorable implications for everybody. The employee suffers with the disease, the company loses productivity and society suffers delays in its economical and social growth. The study of this problem is obviously necessary in order to achieve an appropriate prevention and control of it. Objective: to explore the behavior of absenteeism by medical causes and its associated factors among the affiliates to the health program in the University of Antioquia, Colombia. Methods: frequency, duration, costs and causes of absenteeism are studied in relation to sex, age and physical activity as a regular behavior. Relative risk and its 95% confidence intervals are estimated. Results: respiratory diseases are the first cause of labor medical handicap. Absenteeism is higher in women. RR 1.65 (CI 95% 1.53-1.77. It has a close relationship to age RR 1.25 (CI 95% 1.12-1.38 and to sedentariness RR 2.17 (IC 95% 1.72-2.73.

  13. Development of Geriatric Mental Health Learning Objectives for Medical Students: A Response to the Institute of Medicine 2012 Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Susan W; Brooks, William B; Popeo, Dennis; Wilkins, Kirsten M; Blazek, Mary C

    2017-10-01

    America is aging as the population of older adults increases. The shortage of geriatric mental health specialists means that most geriatric mental healthcare will be provided by physicians who do not have specialty training in geriatrics. The Institute of Medicine Report of 2012 highlighted the urgent need for development of national competencies and curricula in geriatric mental health for all clinicians. Virtually all physicians can expect to treat older patients with mental health symptoms, yet currently there are no widely accepted learning objectives in geriatric mental health specific for medical students. The authors describe the development of a set of such learning objectives that all medical students should achieve by graduation. The iterative process included initial drafting by content experts from five medical schools with input and feedback from a wider group of geriatric psychiatrists, geriatricians, internists, and medical educators. The final document builds upon previously published work and includes specific knowledge, attitudes and skills in six key domains: Normal Aging, Mental Health Assessment of the Geriatric Patient, Psychopharmacology, Delirium, Depression, and Dementia. These objectives address a pressing need, providing a framework for national standards and curriculum development. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hugh Grady (ed.), Shakespeare and Modernity : Early Modern to Millenium

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeyrol, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    Shakespeare and Modernity : Early Modern to Millenium, publié au tournant du troisième millénaire est un recueil de neuf essais d’universitaires américains et britanniques, précédé d’une introduction de Hugh Grady, auteur par ailleurs de The Modernist Shakespeare (1991), Shakespeare’s Universal Wolf (1996) et plus récemment de Shakespeare and Impure Aesthetics (2009). Ce livre offre à l’étudiant, à l’enseignant et au chercheur un état des lieux stimulant de l’évolution des études shakespearie...

  15. Dynamics of delay-coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo neural rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiaochen; Sun, Jianqiao; Li, Shaofan

    2018-01-01

    This paper studies the dynamical behaviors of a pair of FitzHugh-Nagumo neural networks with bidirectional delayed couplings. It presents a detailed analysis of delay-independent and delay-dependent stabilities and the existence of bifurcated oscillations. Illustrative examples are performed to validate the analytical results and to discover interesting phenomena. It is shown that the network exhibits a variety of complicated activities, such as multiple stability switches, the coexistence of periodic and quasi-periodic oscillations, the coexistence of periodic and chaotic orbits, and the coexisting chaotic attractors.

  16. Howard Hughes and the Cold War Aviation Film Jet Pilot (1957

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Andrew Voeltz

    2016-10-01

    War.  But sexual intimacy, conspicuous consumption, and aviation technology also inserted themselves into the perfect safetly of American domestic bliss. This paper will analyze how the eccentric Cold War romantic comedy Jet Pilot (1957 so associated with the compulsiveness of Howard Hughes, produced and written by Jules Furthman, directed ( partially by Josef von Sternburg and starring John Wayne and Janet Leigh, reflects all these themes making it the paradigmatic Cold Film that remains a camp classic from the American popular cultyre of the 1950s.

  17. Hygiene of nutrition of students of the Medical Institute of North-Eastern Federal University named after M.K. Ammosov

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luginova D.D.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available the article presents the problems of nutrition among students of a medical institute, as well as the quality of nutrition of students. Based on the study, disorders of the digestive tract have been detected.

  18. [Institutional violence, medical authority, and power relations in maternity hospitals from the perspective of health workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Janaina Marques de; d'Oliveira, Ana Flávia Pires Lucas; Schraiber, Lilia Blima

    2013-11-01

    The current article discusses institutional violence in maternity hospitals from the health workers' perspective, based on data from a study in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. Eighteen health workers from the public and private sectors were interviewed, including obstetricians, nurses, and nurse technicians. A semi-structured interview was used with questions on professional experience and the definition of violence. The analysis revealed that these health workers acknowledged the existence of discriminatory and disrespectful practices against women during prenatal care, childbirth, and the postpartum. Examples of such practices cited by interviewees included the use of pejorative slang as a form of "humor", threats, reprimands, and negligence in the management of pain. Such practices are not generally viewed by health workers as violent, but rather as the exercise of professional authority in what is considered a "difficult" context. The institutional violence is thus trivialized, disguised as purportedly good practice (i.e., "for the patient's own good"), and rendered invisible in the daily routine of care provided by maternity services.

  19. The management of radioactive wastes produced by medical institutions in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Akira

    1981-01-01

    The use of radiopharmaceuticals is faced with rather dark prospects. The reason is that the management of radioactive wastes does not work smoothly. In the present management system for low level radioactive wastes in Japan, the Japan Radioisotope Association (JRIA) plays the part of collecting them and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) plays that of treating them. The volume of radioactive wastes collected, however, is far greater than that treated. Correspondingly, JRIA has to store the excessive radioactive wastes. The construction of a new treatment facility is urgently needed and the search for a building lot goes on. All those concerned, the users and suppliers of radiopharmaceuticals, and so on, should be aware of the situation and cooperate to resolve the various problems concerning the management of radioactive wastes generated by themselves. (author)

  20. Diary of an endocrine resident: Recollections from Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sambit Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endocrinology is a relatively newer field in medicine but it has gained tremendous progress in the recent past and is currently one of the most cherished and sought after superspecialty subject. The journey is long and an average of 12 years is spent to complete a superspecialty training starting from Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery career. To get a seat in endocrinology in institutes like PGIMER, Chandigarh is difficult, the training is grueling and the final exit is tough but the vast clinical experience, research oriented teaching and the team work of the closely knit family of faculty members and resident colleagues had made these 3 years of our life as the most enjoyable years to be remembered forever.

  1. A Study of the transport of three dimensional medical images to remote institutions for telediagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Takashi; Takahashi, Katsuhiko; Kaneko, Rumi; Yonezawa, Kazuya; Iwai, Mitsuhiro; Takeda, Satoshi; Tateishi, Toshiki; Ogasawara, Yoko; Hanada, Akiko

    2011-01-01

    Using a 3D-imaging-create-function server and network services by internet protocol-virtual private network (IP-VPN), we began to deliver 3D images to the remote institution. An indication trial of the primary image, a rotary trial of a 3D image, and a reproducibility trial were studied in order to examine the practicality of using the system in a real network between Hakodate and Sapporo (communication distance of about 150 km). In these trials, basic data (time and receiving data volume) were measured for every variation of QF (quality factor) or monitor resolution. Analyzing the results of the system using a 3D image delivery server of our hospital with variations in the setting of QF and monitor resolutions, we concluded that this system has practicality in the remote interpretation-of-radiogram work, even if the access point of the region has a line speed of 6 Mbps. (author)

  2. Survey and analysis of radiation safety management systems at medical institutions. Initial report. Radiation protection supervisor, radiation safety organization, and education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohba, Hisateru; Ogasawara, Katsuhiko; Aburano, Tamio

    2005-01-01

    In this study, a questionnaire survey was carried out to determine the actual situation of radiation safety management systems in Japanese medical institutions with nuclear medicine facilities. The questionnaire consisted of questions concerning the Radiation Protection Supervisor license, safety management organizations, and problems related to education and training in safety management. Analysis was conducted according to region, type of establishment, and number of beds. The overall response rate was 60%, and no significant difference in response rate was found among regions. Medical institutions that performed nuclear medicine practices without a radiologist participating accounted for 10% of the total. Medical institutions where nurses gave patients intravenous injections of radiopharmaceuticals as part of the nuclear medicine practices accounted for 28% of the total. Of these medical institutions, 59% provided education and training in safety management for nurses. The rate of acquisition of Radiation Protection Supervisor licenses was approximately 70% for radiological technologists and approximately 20% for physicians (regional difference, p=0.02). The rate of medical institutions with safety management organizations was 71% of the total. Among the medical institutions (n=208) without safety management organizations, approximately 56% had 300 beds or fewer. In addition, it became clear that 35% of quasi-public organizations and 44% of private organizations did not provide education and training in safety management (p<0.001, according to establishment). (author)

  3. The Use of E-journals by Health Researchers: A Case Study of the Nigerian Institute of Medical Research (NIMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olayemi, Olalekan Moses

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the use of e-journals by health researchers in the Nigerian Institute of Medical Research (NIMR. A descriptive survey method was adopted for the study and a questionnaire was used for data collection. The study population was comprised of fifty-four (54 respondents who are health researchers in the institute. The data collected were presented and analyzed using tables, frequency distribution, simple percentages, and charts. The result of the study revealed that all the respondents are aware of the availability of e-journals and attest to making use of them. The study revealed that electronic journals were mostly used for the purpose of conducting research work and the PDF format was preferred for downloading e-journals. However, it was observed that low Internet connectivity and intermittent electricity supply constitute a major obstacle to the use of e-journals. The study, therefore, recommended that the institute's management invest more resources on network connectivity, particularly its bandwidth, and ensure reliable power supply.

  4. The stationary tower notes on a course by W. Hugh Woodin

    CERN Document Server

    Larson, Paul B

    2004-01-01

    The stationary tower is an important method in modern set theory, invented by Hugh Woodin in the 1980s. It is a means of constructing generic elementary embeddings and can be applied to produce a variety of useful forcing effects. Hugh Woodin is a leading figure in modern set theory, having made many deep and lasting contributions to the field, in particular to descriptive set theory and large cardinals. This book is the first detailed treatment of his method of the stationary tower that is generally accessible to graduate students in mathematical logic. By giving complete proofs of all the main theorems and discussing them in context, it is intended that the book will become the standard reference on the stationary tower and its applications to descriptive set theory. The first two chapters are taken from a graduate course Woodin taught at Berkeley. The concluding theorem in the course was that large cardinals imply that all sets of reals in the smallest model of set theory (without choice) containing the re...

  5. Institutional and technological barriers to the use of open educational resources (OERs) in physiology and medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassall, Christopher; Lewis, David I

    2017-03-01

    Open educational resources (OERs) are becoming increasingly common as a tool in education, particularly in medical and biomedical education. However, three key barriers have been identified to their use: 1) lack of awareness of OERs, 2) lack of motivation to use OERs, and 3) lack of training in the use of OERs. Here, we explore these three barriers with teachers of medical and biomedical science to establish how best to enhance the use of OERs to improve pedagogical outcomes. An online survey was completed by 209 educators, many of whom (68.4%) reported using OERs in their teaching and almost all (99.5%) showing awareness of at least one OER. The results suggest that key problems that prevent educators from adopting OERs in their teaching include suitability for particular classes, time, and copyright. Most (81.8%) educators were somewhat, very, or extremely comfortable with OERs so there is no innate motivational barrier to adoption. A lack of training was reported by 13.9% of respondents, and 40% of respondents stated that there was little or no support from their institutions. OER users were no more comfortable with technology or better supported by departments but tended to be aware of a greater number of sources of OERs. Our study illustrates key opportunities for the expansion of OER use in physiology and medical teaching: increased breadth of awareness, increased institutional support (including time, training, and copyright support), and greater sharing of diverse OERs to suit the range of teaching challenges faced by staff in different subdisciplines. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Medical Sciences Division report for 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, F.; Poston, S.; Engle, J.

    1995-01-01

    The primary mission of the Medical Sciences Division is (1) to conduct basic and applied biomedical research on human health related to energy systems, (2) to provide technical assistance and training in occupational and environmental medicine, and (3) to make related biomedical applications available to others through technology transfer. As can be gleaned from this report, the strengths and capabilities of their staff in carrying out this mission are closely aligned with the four core competencies of ORISE: (1) occupational and environmental health, (2) environmental and safety evaluation and analysis, (3) education and training, and (4) enabling research. Brief descriptions of the various scientific and technical programs and their progress, as well as the staff responsible for the accomplishments made during 1994, are presented in this report. Research programs include the following: biochemistry; cytogenetics; Center for Epidemiologic Research; Center for Human Reliability Studies; occupational medicine; Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site; and Radiation Internal Dose Information Center

  7. Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Medical Sciences Division report for 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, F.; Poston, S.; Engle, J. [eds.

    1995-08-01

    The primary mission of the Medical Sciences Division is (1) to conduct basic and applied biomedical research on human health related to energy systems, (2) to provide technical assistance and training in occupational and environmental medicine, and (3) to make related biomedical applications available to others through technology transfer. As can be gleaned from this report, the strengths and capabilities of their staff in carrying out this mission are closely aligned with the four core competencies of ORISE: (1) occupational and environmental health, (2) environmental and safety evaluation and analysis, (3) education and training, and (4) enabling research. Brief descriptions of the various scientific and technical programs and their progress, as well as the staff responsible for the accomplishments made during 1994, are presented in this report. Research programs include the following: biochemistry; cytogenetics; Center for Epidemiologic Research; Center for Human Reliability Studies; occupational medicine; Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site; and Radiation Internal Dose Information Center.

  8. [The essence of doctor-patient relationship in creating image of a medical institution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworzański, Wojciech; Dworzańska, Anna; Burdan, Franciszek

    2012-01-01

    Irrespective of changing standards and continuous reforms in health service, the patient should always remain the principal focus. The patient is a person who should be treated not only as a customer or a recipient of medical services but also as a person being in a situation which is difficult and often unacceptable. Among the factors affecting patients' satisfaction and contentment in the course of the disease it is profoundly important that he cooperates with his doctor. For years it has been attempted to create an ideal model of doctor-patient relationship which would be mutually beneficial and not violating privacy or welfare of any of them. These attempts focused on various theoretical models, among others paternalistic, informative and interpretive. However, special attention should be paid to adherence to principles which is based on respect for patient autonomy, harmlessness, charity and fairness.

  9. Effect of External Quality Assurance Evaluation for Chest Radiography: 3-Year Follow-Up in the Medical Institution for Pneumoconiosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Won Jeong; Choi, Soon Byung

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of external quality assurance (QA) evaluation for chest radiography in the medical institution for pneumoconiosis (MIP). The chest radiography of the MIPs were evaluated for a radiological technique (RT), image quality (IQ), and reading environment (RE), during a 3-year follow up according to the Korean guidelines. Same methods were implemented each year to ensure that the results are reliable. RT, IQ, and RE were compared between examination and medical care (EMP), and only medical care (MCP) for pneumoconiosis, film-screen (FSR) and digital (DR) radiography. Uneducated and educated for QA during a 3-year follow up referencing with 2008 were realized. RT and IQ of the MIPs showed a significantly higher score in 2009 and 2010 compared with 2008 (p < 0.01). However, RE was not significantly improved. The score of RT, IQ, and RE of the EMPs were higher than those of MCPs every year, and FSR showed a lower score in all evaluations, although, more improvement was seen than the DR. The chest radiography of the MIPs showed a significant effect as a result of a repeated external QA evaluation. However, the MIPs need to transfer from FSR to DR, and maintain a continuous QA evaluation for the MCPs.

  10. Why Not Wait? Eight Institutions Share Their Experiences Moving United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 After Core Clinical Clerkships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Michelle; Fleming, Amy; Grochowski, Colleen O'Conner; Harnik, Vicky; Klimstra, Sibel; Morrison, Gail; Pock, Arnyce; Schwartz, Michael L; Santen, Sally

    2017-11-01

    The majority of medical students complete the United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 after their foundational sciences; however, there are compelling reasons to examine this practice. This article provides the perspectives of eight MD-granting medical schools that have moved Step 1 after the core clerkships, describing their rationale, logistics of the change, outcomes, and lessons learned. The primary reasons these institutions cite for moving Step 1 after clerkships are to foster more enduring and integrated basic science learning connected to clinical care and to better prepare students for the increasingly clinical focus of Step 1. Each school provides key features of the preclerkship and clinical curricula and details concerning taking Steps 1 and 2, to allow other schools contemplating change to understand the landscape. Most schools report an increase in aggregate Step 1 scores after the change. Despite early positive outcomes, there may be unintended consequences to later scheduling of Step 1, including relatively late student reevaluations of their career choice if Step 1 scores are not competitive in the specialty area of their choice. The score increases should be interpreted with caution: These schools may not be representative with regard to mean Step 1 scores and failure rates. Other aspects of curricular transformation and rising national Step 1 scores confound the data. Although the optimal timing of Step 1 has yet to be determined, this article summarizes the perspectives of eight schools that changed Step 1 timing, filling a gap in the literature on this important topic.

  11. [Profile and tasks of a medical university polyclinic in the past and present using as example the Medical Polyclinical Institutes of the Karl Marx University of Leipzig].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambsch, K; Treutler, H; Pietruschka, W D

    1981-03-15

    After a short survey of the historical development of the Medico-Policlinical Institute of the Karl Marx University Leipzig tasks and developmental tendencies of university medical policlinics are described, evaluating hereby the results of the Vth conference of higher education. They are understood as a university representation of ambulatorily working internists and to a large extent of the specialists for general medicine. Their main tasks consist in education and continued professional training of this group of physicians under integrative description of the whole subject internal medicine, a research oriented to practice as well as a guiding and coordination function for the ambulatory internistic care, taking into particular consideration the early recognition of a disease, in primary and secondary prevention as well as in a scientifically based ambulatory therapy of epidemiologically important diseases.

  12. The quality of reports of medical and public health research from Palestinian institutions: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarqouni, Loai; Abu-Rmeileh, Niveen Me; Elessi, Khamis; Obeidallah, Mohammad; Bjertness, Espen; Chalmers, Iain

    2017-06-09

    Over the past decade, there has been an increase in reports of health research from Palestine, but no assessment of their quality. We have assessed the quality of reports of Palestinian health research and factors associated with it. This is a systematic review. We searched Medline and Scopus for reports of original research relevant to human health or healthcare authored by researchers affiliated with Palestinian institutions and published between January 2000 and August 2015 inclusive. We used international guidelines to assess report quality, classifying as adequate those with ≥50% of items completely addressed. Of 2383 reports identified, 497 met our inclusion criteria. Just over half (264; 55%) of these were published after 2010. 354 (71%) of first authors were affiliated with Palestinian institutions; 261 (53%) reports had coauthors from outside Palestine. The majority of the reports in our study were inadequately reported (342; 69%), and none had adequately reported all items. Of 439 observational studies, 11 (2.5%) reports provided adequate descriptions of eligibility criteria and selection procedures; 35 (8%) reported efforts to address potential sources of bias; 50 (11.4%) reported the basis for the study sample size; and funding sources were mentioned in 74 reports (17%). Higher reporting quality was associated with international affiliation of the first author (prevalence ratio (PR) 1.6 (95% CI 1.2 to 2.1)), international collaboration (PR 2.9 (95% CI 1.7 to 5.0)), international funding (PR 1.9 (95% CI1.5 to 2.5)), publication after 2005 (PR 3.9 (95% CI 1.8 to 8.5)) and four or more coauthors (PR 1.5 (95% CI 1.1 to 2.1)). Although the quality of reports of Palestinian research has improved in recent years, it remains well below an acceptable standard. International reporting guidelines should be used to guide research design and improve the quality of reports of research. The systematic review protocol was registered in the International Prospective

  13. The Effect of an Intervention Aimed at Reducing Errors when Administering Medication through Enteral Feeding Tubes in an Institution for Individuals with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idzinga, J. C.; de Jong, A. L.; van den Bemt, P. M. L. A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Previous studies, both in hospitals and in institutions for clients with an intellectual disability (ID), have shown that medication errors at the administration stage are frequent, especially when medication has to be administered through an enteral feeding tube. In hospitals a specially designed intervention programme has proven to…

  14. Cutting Close to the Bone: Student Trauma, Free Speech, and Institutional Responsibility in Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Arno K; Jackson, Brittani; Razack, Saleem

    2017-03-01

    Learning the societal roles and responsibilities of the physician may involve difficult, contentious conversations about topics such as race, gender, sexual orientation, and class, as well as violence, inequities, sexual assault, and child abuse. If not done well, these discussions may be deeply traumatizing to learners for whom these subjects "cut close to the bone." Equally traumatizing is exposure to injustice and mistreatment, as well as to the sights, sounds, and smells of suffering and pain in the clinical years. This potential for iatrogenic educational trauma remains unaddressed, and medical educators must take responsibility for attending to it. Possible solutions include trigger warnings or statements given to students before an educational activity that may cause personal discomfort. The authors of this Perspective assert, however, both that this concept does not distinguish between psychological trauma and discomfort and that well-intentioned trigger warnings target the wrong goal-the avoidance of distress. Exposure to discomfort not only is unavoidable in the practice of medicine but may be crucial to personal and professional moral development. The authors argue that a more appropriate solution is to create safe spaces for dialogues about difficult topics and jarring experiences. This approach places even the notion of free speech under a critical lens-it is not an end in itself but a means to create a professional ethic dedicated to treating all individuals with excellence and justice. Ultimately, this approach aspires to create an inclusive curriculum sensitive to the realities of teaching and learning in increasingly diverse societies.

  15. Simulation Training at a Medical Institute: An integral Part of the Educational Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Ligatyuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to master and practically execute cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR procedural techniques, to acquire skills to use state-of-art equipment, and to teach work in the team. Subjects and methods. Forty-six interns and residents took a simulation course of training in basic CPR and automatic external defibrillation. Three-four days before the course, its participants received the certified translation of the European Resuscitation Council (ERC information material and studied it. The course education program encompasses lectures, lessons on a medical care algorithm in sudden cardiac arrest, and practical works using models, including chest compression, ventilation, and automatic external defibrillator (AED training. The duration of the course is 6—7 hours. Results. All the interns and residents were motivated to learn: to acquire first aid skills to manage sudden cardiac arrest. The ERC algorithm and a 4-stepped model to have practical skills were used. The taken course met expectations in 100% of the participants; all the interns and residents adequately acquired practical CPR skills and successfully completed their training. A questionnaire survey at the end of the course showed the high efficiency of the course. The training enhanced motivation in 29 interns and residents; they obtained an ERC provider degree; 10 interns and residents continue to take a course of training as an ERC instructor. 

  16. Multi-Institutional Survey of Medical Treatment for Late-Onset Hypogonadism in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Hisanori; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2017-03-01

    The adequate criteria for late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) diagnosis, including serum testosterone levels, type (total or free testosterone) and duration of androgen replacement therapy, and evaluations of treatment effectiveness remain controversial. To evaluate the current status of medical treatment for LOH in Japan, the first nationwide survey were performed. A total of 35 questionnaires answered by urologists in high-volume facilities were analyzed. The median numbers of patients with hypogonadism-related symptoms per month were 10. Aging Male Symptom Score, International Index of Erectile Function, and International Prostate Symptom Score questionnaires were widely used for questionnaires. The diagnostic criteria for LOH varied. Among the patients who presented with hypogonadism-related symptoms, the mean proportion of patients undergoing treatment for LOH was 62.3%. In Japan, LOH was treated not only with testosterone enanthate injections or testosterone ointment but also with Kampo medicine. In many facilities, LOH treatment effectiveness was assessed after a 3-month period. Efficacy was assessed in different ways. Treatment effectiveness rate ranged from 30% to 80%. The duration of LOH treatment was not fixed and was established individually by both the patient and treating physician. This study showed that the real clinical practices for LOH are very diverse, and a general consensus is needed.

  17. “And time future contained in time past”: British Modernist Poetry from T.S. Eliot to Ted Hughes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana N. Krasavchenko

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available It seems that T.S. Eliot (1888–1965 and Ted Hughes (1930–1998 are poets of different individual talents and epochs. Hughes, a poet of the second half of the 20 th century, concentrated on the conflict between Nature and the human being destroying Nature and thus preparing the end of the humanity. T.S. Eliot was a poet of urban civilization, a reformer of the Anglophone modernist poetry. In his days, the “poetry of Nature” rooted in the pastoral poetry of the 17 th –18 th centuries and in Romanticism, existed but only at the margins of mainstream poetic trends. Nevertheless, one can find it even in Eliot’s poetry, particularly in his Landscapes — poems written at the beginning of the 1930s. Also, both Eliot and Hughes were modernists. Eliot standing at the beginning of modernism, Hughes at its end; though the latter lived in the time of postmodernism, he was not a postmodernist himself since he was not engaged in the deconstruction and fragmentation of the “world model.” Like Eliot, he was a poet with integral Weltanschauung and a bright individual talent. Like Eliot, he was a traditionalist, though Eliot being an American was a “conscious traditionalist,” while Hughes, an Englishman, was most likely a “born” traditionalist: instead of deconstructing tradition, he was bearing on it. His “great tradition” included Shakespeare, Blake, Coleridge, Kipling, Graves, and Dylan Thomas. Both Eliot and Hughes are poets of eschatological trend and mythologists. However, one will not find Eliot among the authorities enlisted by Hughes in his “great tradition.” In the time of Hughes, Eliot was rejected due to the regular change of mainstreams trends. British poetry in the second half of the 20 th century is “tired” of urban poetry, of “Nature denial,” so it comes back to its track, and the motives that existed in Eliot’s poetry only in the background are now brought to the forefront.

  18. Factors associated with resilience to and recovery from burnout: a prospective, multi-institutional study of US medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrbye, Liselotte N; Power, David V; Massie, F Stanford; Eacker, Anne; Harper, William; Thomas, Matthew R; Szydlo, Daniel W; Sloan, Jeff A; Shanafelt, Tait D

    2010-10-01

    Burnout is prevalent among medical students and is a predictor of subsequent serious consideration of dropping out of medical school and suicide ideation. Understanding of the factors that protect against burnout is needed to guide student wellness programmes. A total of 1321 medical students attending five institutions were studied longitudinally (2006-2007). The surveys included standardised instruments to evaluate burnout, quality of life, fatigue and stress. Additional items explored social support, learning climate, life events, employment status and demographics. Students who did not have burnout at either time-point (resilient students) were compared with those who indicated burnout at one or both time-points (vulnerable students) using a Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test or Fisher's exact test. Similarly, the differences between those who recovered and those who were chronically burned out were also compared in students with burnout at the first time-point. Logistic regression modelling was employed to evaluate associations between the independent variables and resiliency to and recovery from burnout. Overall, 792 (60.0%) students completed the burnout inventory at both time-points. No differences in demographic characteristics were observed between resilient (290/792 [36.6%]) and vulnerable (502/792 [63.4%]) students. Resilient students were less likely to experience depression, had a higher quality of life, were less likely to be employed, had experienced fewer stressful life events, reported higher levels of social support, perceived their learning climate more positively and experienced less stress and fatigue (all p students. On multivariable analysis, perceiving student education as a priority for faculty staff, experiencing less stress, not being employed and being a minority were factors independently associated with recovery from burnout. Modifiable individual factors and learning climate characteristics including employment status, stress level and

  19. Bioassay requirements for 125I and 131I in medical, teaching and research institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    The more widespread use of radioactive isotopes of iodine (collectively referred to as radioiodines) as a research tool, coupled with their diagnostic and therapeutic uses in nuclear medicine, has resulted in an increased number of personnel who are exposed to these radioisotopes and who therefore should be monitored for internal radioiodine contamination. This document describes the minimum acceptable features of a bioassay programme which the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) requires to be available in institutions holding a prescribed substance licence authorising the use of significant quantities of 125 I or 131 I or both. A licensee may submit details of his own proposed bioassay programme to the AECB for approval. If such a programme fails to be approved, the programme described below shall be adhered to. This document does not deal with individuals who are likely to maintain a significant chronic thyroid burden of radioiodine. It is assumed that the radioiodine taken into the body is in a soluble, inorganic form (I 2 , iodide or iodate) or in an organic form (e.g. methyl iodide) which is metabolised in the body with a resultant release of iodide. Radioiodinated organic compounds which are not catabolised to iodide in the body to any significant degree are not the subject of this document, since the metabolism of the radioiodine will be dictated by the metabolism of the compound. This means that individuals whose only exposure to radioiodine is in the form of prepared radioiodinated compounds such as antigens and antibodies (e.g. individuals using radio immuno assay kits in which the antigen or antibody is supplied as radioiodinated material) are not required to participate in this bioassay programme for radioiodine

  20. Evaluation and enhancement of medical knowledge competency by monthly tests: a single institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdur Rahman; Siddiqui, Nauman Saleem; Thotakura, Raja; Hasan, Syed Shafae; Luni, Faraz Khan; Sodeman, Thomas; Hinch, Bryan; Kaw, Dinkar; Hariri, Imad; Khuder, Sadik; Assaly, Ragheb

    2015-01-01

    In-training examination (ITE) has been used as a predictor of performance at the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) certifying examination. ITE however may not be an ideal modality as it is held once a year and represents snapshots of performance as compared with a trend. We instituted monthly tests (MTs) to continually assess the performance of trainees throughout their residency. To determine the predictors of ABIM performance and to assess whether the MTs can be used as a tool to predict passing the ABIM examination. The MTs, core competencies, and ITE scores were analyzed for a cohort of graduates who appeared for the ABIM examination from 2010 to 2013. Logistic regression was performed to identify the predictors of a successful performance at the ABIM examination. Fifty-one residents appeared for the ABIM examination between 2010 and 2013 with a pass rate of 84%. The MT score for the first year (odds ratio [OR] =1.302, CI =1.004-1.687, P=0.04) and second year (OR =1.125, CI =1.004-1.261, P=0.04) were independent predictors of ABIM performance along with the second-year ITE scores (OR =1.248, CI =1.096-1.420, P=0.001). The MT is a valuable tool to predict the performance at the ABIM examination. Not only it helps in the assessment of likelihood of passing the certification examination, it also helps to identify those residents who may require more assistance earlier during their residency. It may also highlight the areas of weakness in program curriculum and guide curriculum development.

  1. Proposing Telecardiology Services on Cloud for Different Medical Institutions: A Model of Reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; Garcia-Zapirain, Begoña; López-Coronado, Miguel; Rodrigues, Joel J P C

    2017-08-01

    For a cloud-based telecardiology solution to be established in any scenario, it is necessary to ensure optimum levels of security, as patient's data will not be in the same place from where access is gained. The main objective of this article is to present a secure, cloud-based solution for a telecardiology service in different scenarios: a hospital, a health center in a city, and a group of health centers in a rural area. iCanCloud software is used to simulate the scenarios. The first scenario will be a city hospital with over 220,000 patients at its emergency services, and ∼1 million outpatient consultations. For the health center in a city, it serves ∼107,000 medical consultations and 16,700 pediatric consultations/year. In the last scenario, a group of health centers in a rural area serve an average 437.08 consultations/month and around 15.6 a day. Each one of the solutions proposed shares common features including the following: secure authentication through smart cards, the use of StorageGRID technology, and load balancers. For all cases, the cloud is private and the estimated price of the solution would cost around 450 €/month. Thanks to the research conducted in this work, it has been possible to provide an adapted solution in the form of a telecardiology service for a hospital, city health center, and rural health centers that offer security, privacy, and robustness, and is also optimum for a large number of cloud requests.

  2. Dosimetry in occupational exposure workers of the medical institutes of the University San Francisco Xavier de Chuquisaca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zambrana Z, A. J.; Castro S, O.; Huanca S, E.; Torrez C, M.; Villca Q, I.

    2014-08-01

    In this work is made a retrospective analysis of the record, of the dosimetric control readings processed by the Dosimetry Laboratory of the Instituto Boliviano de Ciencia y Tecnologia Nuclear, as regulator entity at national level for Occupational Exposed Workers (OEWs) to ionizing radiations, of the Medical Institutes of the Universidad Mayor, Real y Pontificia de San Francisco Xavier de Chuquisaca, by a period of 10 and 15 years. The results showed that in the Nuclear Medicine Institute of Sucre, the Accumulated Occupational Exposure of a total of 393 readings of 15 OEWs was of 20.4 mSv, identifying as maximum value 10.2 mSv, in the official that develops the Radio-pharmacy activities (elution, fractionation, preparation and management). In the Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia Dr. Jose Cupertino Arteaga the dosimetric background registered an Accumulated Occupational Exposure of a total of 1319 readings of 50 OEWs of 309.69 mSv, with a maximum value of 62.30 mSv, corresponding to the worker of the technical area (maintenance, adjustment and calibration). Comparison that allows to infer that the difference is due mainly to the radio-active source type 99m Tc Vs 60 Co utilized in these health centers. (Author)

  3. THE OCCUPATIONAL STRESS ON HEALTH’S PROFESSIONALS TO LEGAL MEDICAL INSTITUTE LEONIDIO RIBEIRO, FEDERAL DISTRICT - BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C. Quaresma

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Occupational stress is defined as a psychological syndrome resulting in chronic interpersonal stressors at work and characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced personal accomplishment. It is observed that the pressures generated by continuous social and economic changes have made the individual more vulnerable to psychosomatic and organic pathologies. As a condition with high incidence rate you have, the stress has a negative impact on occupational life of the individual. This study was conducted on health-care workers of the LMI (Legal Medical Institute of the Federal District, Brazil; who work in the areas of anatomy, nursing, laboratory, radiology and medicine and is justified by the development of professional activities. The methodology used in this article was a descriptive study with a qualitative and quantitative approach as a tool for data collection was used a structured questionnaire with closed questions about the activities that will evoke stress on work activities. Fourty-nine per cent have more than 10 years of service time and 54.7 % (n = 53, rank among medium and high load stress suffering. The answers on the elements that are evocative of stress, 75 % think that 'deal with the pain of the family', with 51 % and 'removal of corpses in hard-to access/dangerous', with 24%, the most important stressors. We can consider that the occupational stress experienced by professionals in DF, Brazil, LMI should not be ignored by the institution , since its employees are subject to a great physical and mental load, which, if ignored even for short periods, may, at some point, lead to depletion of capacity for work, causing losses in the professional quality of life and, consequently, reduced the productivity of the institution as a result of increased absence professional.

  4. Relationship between knowledge, attitude, behavior, and self-efficacy on the radiation safety management of radiation workers in medical institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Eun Ok

    2007-01-01

    Radiation safety managements in medical institutions are needed to protect certain radiation damages as a part of National Coalition. This study investigates the characteristics of self-efficacy that become the major factor on the knowledge, attitude, and behavior on the radiation safety management of radiation workers as an approach of educational aspects and analyzes the relationship between such factors to provide basic materials for improving the activity level of radiation safety managements. In order to implement the goal of this study, a survey was performed for 1,200 workers who were engaged in radiation treatments in medical centers, such as general hospital, university hospital, private hospital, and public health center for 42 days from July 23, 2006. Then, the results of the analysis can be summarized as follows: 1. Average scores on knowledge, attitude, and behavior in the radiation safety management were presented as 75.76±11.20, 90.55±8.59, 80.58±11.70, respectively. Also, the average score of self-efficacy was recorded as 73.55±9.82. 2. Knowledge levels in the radiation safety management showed significant differences according to the sex, age, marriage, education, and experience. Also, males of married, older, highly educated, and largely experienced represented high knowledge levels. Attitude levels in the radiation safety management showed certain significant differences according to the type of medical centers in which private hospitals showed a relatively low level compared to that of high levels in university hospitals. Behavior levels in the radiation safety management also represented significant differences according to the age, marriage, education, experience, and types of medical centers. Factors in married, general hospital, older, highly educated, and largely experienced showed high behavior levels. In addition, the self-efficacy showed certain differences according to the marriage and types of medical centers. Factors in married

  5. Relationship between knowledge, attitude, behavior, and self-efficacy on the radiation safety management of radiation workers in medical institutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Eun Ok [Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    Radiation safety managements in medical institutions are needed to protect certain radiation damages as a part of National Coalition. This study investigates the characteristics of self-efficacy that become the major factor on the knowledge, attitude, and behavior on the radiation safety management of radiation workers as an approach of educational aspects and analyzes the relationship between such factors to provide basic materials for improving the activity level of radiation safety managements. In order to implement the goal of this study, a survey was performed for 1,200 workers who were engaged in radiation treatments in medical centers, such as general hospital, university hospital, private hospital, and public health center for 42 days from July 23, 2006. Then, the results of the analysis can be summarized as follows: 1. Average scores on knowledge, attitude, and behavior in the radiation safety management were presented as 75.76{+-}11.20, 90.55{+-}8.59, 80.58{+-}11.70, respectively. Also, the average score of self-efficacy was recorded as 73.55{+-}9.82. 2. Knowledge levels in the radiation safety management showed significant differences according to the sex, age, marriage, education, and experience. Also, males of married, older, highly educated, and largely experienced represented high knowledge levels. Attitude levels in the radiation safety management showed certain significant differences according to the type of medical centers in which private hospitals showed a relatively low level compared to that of high levels in university hospitals. Behavior levels in the radiation safety management also represented significant differences according to the age, marriage, education, experience, and types of medical centers. Factors in married, general hospital, older, highly educated, and largely experienced showed high behavior levels. In addition, the self-efficacy showed certain differences according to the marriage and types of medical centers. Factors in

  6. Preliminary test results from a telescope of Hughes pixel arrays at FNAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jernigan, J.G.; Arens, J.; Vezie, D.; Collins, T.; Krider, J.; Skubic, P.

    1992-09-01

    In December of 1991 three silicon hybrid pixel detectors each having 2.56 x 2.56 pixels 30 μm square, made by the Hughes Aircraft Company, were placed in a high energy muon beam at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Straight tracks were recorded in these detectors at angles to the normal to the plane of the silicon ranging from 0 to 45 degrees. In this note, preliminary results are presented on the straight through tracks, i.e., those passing through the telescope at normal incidence. Pulse height data, signal-to-noise data, and preliminary straight line fits to the data resulting in residual distributions are presented. Preliminary calculations show spatial resolution of less than 5 μm in two dimensions

  7. Role of Noise in Complex Networks of FitzHugh-Nagumo Neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortuna, Luigi; Frasca, Mattia; La Rosa, Manuela

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with the open question related to the role of noise in complex networks of interconnected FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons. In this paper this problem is faced with extensive simulations of different network topologies. The results show that several topologies behave in an optimal way with respect to the range of noise level leading to an improvement in the stimulus-response coherence, while other with respect to the maximum values of the performance index. The best results in terms of both the suitable noise level and high stimulus response coherence have been obtained when a diversity in neuron characteristic parameters has been introduced and the neurons have been connected in a small-world topology

  8. Chimera states in bipartite networks of FitzHugh-Nagumo oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhi-Min; Cheng, Hong-Yan; Feng, Yuee; Li, Hai-Hong; Dai, Qiong-Lin; Yang, Jun-Zhong

    2018-04-01

    Chimera states consisting of spatially coherent and incoherent domains have been observed in different topologies such as rings, spheres, and complex networks. In this paper, we investigate bipartite networks of nonlocally coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN) oscillators in which the units are allocated evenly to two layers, and FHN units interact with each other only when they are in different layers. We report the existence of chimera states in bipartite networks. Owing to the interplay between chimera states in the two layers, many types of chimera states such as in-phase chimera states, antiphase chimera states, and out-of-phase chimera states are classified. Stability diagrams of several typical chimera states in the coupling strength-coupling radius plane, which show strong multistability of chimera states, are explored.

  9. Hugh Ramsay’s Self-Portrait: Reflections on a Spanish Master Painter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Beatriz Quijano Martínez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The interest in European masters from the past was a phenomenon related to the development of the artistic careers of many artists in Australia at the end of the nineteenth and beginning of the twentieth century. More than that, the copying or emulation of great works of art was seen to be a necessary part of an artist’s training1. This paper looks at Hugh Ramsay and his fascination with the painting Las Meninas (1656 by Velázquez as part of a larger study into understanding how the Spanish in uence was re ected in Australian art. Ramsay introduced elements from Las Meninas into his Portrait of the artist standing before easel, which took him to personify the role of the painter as Velázquez.

  10. Medical School Applicant Characteristics Associated With Performance in Multiple Mini-Interviews Versus Traditional Interviews: A Multi-Institutional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Mark C; Kelly, Carolyn J; Griffin, Erin; Hall, Theodore R; Jerant, Anthony; Peterson, Ellena M; Rainwater, Julie A; Sousa, Francis J; Wofsy, David; Franks, Peter

    2017-10-31

    To examine applicant characteristics associated with multi mini-interview (MMI) or traditional interview (TI) performance at five California public medical schools. Of the five California Longitudinal Evaluation of Admissions Practices (CA-LEAP) consortium schools, three used TIs and two used MMIs. Schools provided the following retrospective data on all 2011-2013 admissions cycle interviewees: age, gender, race/ethnicity (under-represented in medicine [UIM] or not), self-identified disadvantaged (DA) status, undergraduate GPA, Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) score, and interview score (standardized as z-score, mean = 0, SD = 1). Adjusted linear regression analyses, stratified by interview type, examined associations with interview performance. The 4,993 applicants who completed 7,516 interviews included 931 (18.6%) UIM and 962 (19.3%) DA individuals; 3,226 (64.6%) had one interview. Mean age was 24.4 (SD = 2.7); mean GPA and MCAT score were 3.72 (SD = 0.22) and 33.6 (SD = 3.7), respectively. Older age, female gender, and number of prior interviews were associated with better performance on both MMIs and TIs. Higher GPA was associated with lower MMI scores (z-score, per unit GPA = -0.26, 95% CI [-0.45, -0.06]), but unrelated to TI scores. DA applicants had higher TI scores (z-score = 0.17, 95% CI [0.07, 0.28]), but lower MMI scores (z-score = -0.18, 95% CI [-0.28, -.08]) than non-DA applicants. Neither UIM status nor MCAT score were associated with interview performance. These findings have potentially important workforce implications, particularly regarding DA applicants, and illustrate the need for other multi-institutional studies of medical school admissions processes.

  11. THE CURRENT PRACTICES FOR TESTING FOR HYPERGLYCAEMIA IN PREGNANCY (HIP IN THE MEDICAL COLLEGE INSTITUTIONS IN INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hema Divakar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The aim of the study is to determine the current practices in the medical college institutions pan India for testing for Hyperglycaemia in Pregnancy (HIP to detect gestational diabetes and highlight areas that need additional attention in order to ensure adherence to current national guidelines. MATERIALS AND METHODS Questionnaires were used to obtain information regarding the testing strategy for hyperglycaemia in pregnancy. The questionnaires were filled out by the teaching faculty of the OB/GYN departments of 47 medical college institutions in India. The perceptions regarding the prevalence of diabetes in pregnancy in India and the needs for capacity building were assessed. RESULTS Forty seven respondents answered the questionnaires. The majority of respondents (95.83% reported that all pregnant women were offered (universal testing for hyperglycaemia in pregnancy and 37.5% reported that women were screened both in early and midtrimester of pregnancy. Most reported that testing for HIP took place once at booking, irrespective of the gestational age (39.58%. Thirty three (70.21% respondents reported using the single-step nonfasting method to diagnose hyperglycaemia. Furthermore, 21.28% of respondents reported using a glucometer to determine the concentration of blood glucose in plasma, while 68.08% reported using a lab analyser. The instructions for the testing were offered by consultants and postgraduates in a vast majority of cases (87.5%. The staff communicated with the women in a significantly less number of cases (12.5%. 65.96% of respondents felt that all women readily agreed to follow this advice. The majority of respondents (89.35% reported having noticed an increase in the number of women with hyperglycaemia. Furthermore, 91% of all the respondents felt there was a need to train medical personnel to test and manage hyperglycaemia. CONCLUSION Our study confirms the continued wide variability in testing for HIP in India with

  12. Further Issues in Determining the Readability of Self-Report Items: Comment on McHugh and Behar (2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinka, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Issues regarding the readability of self-report assessment instruments, methods for establishing the reading ability level of respondents, and guidelines for development of scales designed for marginal readers have been inconsistently addressed in the literature. A recent study by McHugh and Behar (2009) provided new findings relevant…

  13. Rural-to-Urban Migrants' Experiences with Primary Care under Different Types of Medical Institutions in Guangzhou, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiazhi Zeng

    Full Text Available China is facing the unprecedented challenge of rapidly increasing rural-to-urban migration. Migrants are in a vulnerable state when they attempt to access to primary care services. This study was designed to explore rural-to-urban migrants' experiences in primary care, comparing their quality of primary care experiences under different types of medical institutions in Guangzhou, China.The study employed a cross-sectional survey of 736 rural-to-urban migrants in Guangzhou, China in 2014. A validated Chinese version of Primary Care Assessment Tool--Adult Short Version (PCAT-AS, representing 10 primary care domains was used to collect information on migrants' quality of primary care experiences. These domains include first contact (utilization, first contact (accessibility, ongoing care, coordination (referrals, coordination (information systems, comprehensiveness (services available, comprehensiveness (services provided, family-centeredness, community orientation and culturally competent. These measures were used to assess the quality of primary care performance as reported from patients' perspective. Analysis of covariance was conducted for comparison on PCAT scores among migrants accessing primary care in tertiary hospitals, municipal hospitals, community health centers/community health stations, and township health centers/rural health stations. Multiple linear regression models were used to explore factors associated with PCAT total scores.After adjustments were made, migrants accessing primary care in tertiary hospitals (25.49 reported the highest PCAT total scores, followed by municipal hospitals (25.02, community health centers/community health stations (24.24, and township health centers/rural health stations (24.18. Tertiary hospital users reported significantly better performance in first contact (utilization, first contact (accessibility, coordination (information system, comprehensiveness (service available, and cultural competence

  14. Student-centred learning in Community Medicine: An experience from Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, S S; Premarajan, K C; L, Subitha; Archana, R; Iswarya, S; A, Sujiv

    2014-01-01

    Student-centred learning (SCL) places the student at the centre of policies, practices and decision-making in the teaching-learning process. SCL methodology also advocates active involvement of students in the curriculum planning, selection of teaching-learning methods and assessment process. We planned an education innovation project to assess the perception of fifth semester undergraduate medical students towards implementation of an SCL methodology. The study was done among 87 fifth semester undergraduate medical students (batch of 2010-11) in the noncommunicable disease epidemiology section of Community Medicine at the Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Puducherry. The students divided themselves into seven groups and developed the learning objectives, selected teaching-learning methods and assessment process for each session. The facilitators had 3-5 rounds of interaction with each group before the session. Qualitative analysis of feedback collected from students and external faculty after each session was done. The effect of implementing the SCL methodology was assessed by the reaction level of Kirkpatrick's training evaluation model by using a rating scale Results. Of the 87 eligible students, 73 (83.9%) returned the forms for evaluation. All seven groups were able to formulate the learning objectives. Most of the groups had used PowerPoint slides and videos as a teaching-learning tool. Innovative assessment methods such as crosswords and 'chocopati' were used by some groups. In general, the perception of students was favourable towards SCL compared to conventional methods and they felt that this methodology should be adopted more often. Time management and organization of sessions were the main problems encountered by the students. The mean (SD) score for the items 'sessions were useful', 'sessions were enjoyable' and 'sessions improved my knowledge' were 6.2 (1.8), 7.1 (1.8) and 6.3 (1.9), respectively. The

  15. Proposed full automatic control system for the Medical Small Cyclotron C-30 at the Institute of Nuclear Studies, Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankowski, A.

    1987-01-01

    The computer control system for the C-30 Medical Small Cyclotron, which is currently under construction at the Institute of Nuclear Studies will be presented. The features of this simple and secure system are briefly discussed. Some efforts have been done to make a conversational system easily understandable for operators. The keystone of the control system is an fibre optical link (wireless) between the cyclotron and the computer. The control system is based on the use of an extended configuration of the IBM PC/AT computer. A new system software is used to execute multitask hierarchical programs to control the cyclotron. The comercial adapters for control and data aquisition, connected with the fibre optic communication channels are used to transmit data and control codes. Two colour graphic CRT displays the ongoing status and function of each controlled units so that the operator can monitor the whole system conditions at a glance. The paper gives a general description of the programs which are executed on the computer. It also shows how the cyclotron is controlled by dedicated computer practically without special electronic equipment except of the hardware safety cutout switch. The cyclotron is protected against operating incidents and mistakes by a complex system of interlocks. (author)

  16. Fatal carbon monoxide poisoning: A lesson from a retrospective study at All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi

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    Asit Kumar Sikary

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Carbon monoxide (CO is a colorless, odorless, tasteless, and nonirritating gas which makes it difficult for those who are exposed, to detect it, leading to unexpected death. This study was undertaken to see the pattern of fatal CO poisoning and to discuss preventive aspect. Materials and Methods: It was a retrospective descriptive study of fatal CO cases which were autopsied at All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, from the year 2010 to the year 2015. The cases were analyzed as per age groups, circumstances of death, season of death, and sources of CO formation. Results and Discussion: The study involved 40 cases of fatal CO poisoning. About 80% of cases were reported in winter months. The maximum cases were reported in the month of January followed by November and December. All the cases except one, died with a source of CO nearby and the person was inside a room or some closed space without ventilation. Source of CO was firepot and electric room heater in most of the cases. Some cases were of CO build inside the car with a running engine. Most of the cases occurred accidentally. Conclusion: Clustering of cases is seen in winters. Poisoning can occur in different ways. The study documents the various possibilities of CO poisoning and advocates community education targeting the high-risk groups and masses, especially during the winter season.

  17. Quality Control Review of the Dixon Hughes Goodman LLP FY 2014 Single Audit of Logistics Management Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-29

    assurance , tax, and advisory services to United States and international clients. DHG employs more than 2,000 people in 12 states. DHG maintains...the review of indirect costs for the allowable costs/cost principles compliance requirement that needs to be addressed in future audits (Finding C...before payment when an item or service is received, but it is unclear how this internal control would provide assurance that LMI complied with

  18. Robust Synchronization of Delayed Chaotic FitzHugh-Nagumo Neurons under External Electrical Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Rehan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Synchronization of chaotic neurons under external electrical stimulation (EES is studied in order to understand information processing in the brain and to improve the methodologies employed in the treatment of cognitive diseases. This paper investigates the dynamics of uncertain coupled chaotic delayed FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN neurons under EES for incorporated parametric variations. A global nonlinear control law for synchronization of delayed neurons with known parameters is developed. Based on local and global Lipschitz conditions, knowledge of the bounds on the neuronal states, the Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional, and the L2 gain reduction, a less conservative local robust nonlinear control law is formulated to address the problem of robust asymptotic synchronization of delayed FHN neurons under parametric uncertainties. The proposed local control law guarantees both robust stability and robust performance and provides the L2 bound for uncertainty rejection in the synchronization error dynamics. Separate conditions for single-input and multiple-input control schemes for synchronization of a wide class of FHN systems are provided. The results of the proposed techniques are verified through numerical simulations.

  19. The relaxation time of processes in a FitzHugh-Nagumo neural system with time delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Ailing; Zeng Chunhua; Wang Hua

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we study the relaxation time (RT) of the steady-state correlation function in a FitzHugh-Nagumo neural system under the presence of multiplicative and additive white noises and time delay. The noise correlation parameter λ can produce a critical behavior in the RT as functions of the multiplicative noise intensity D, the additive noise intensity Q and the time delay τ. That is, the RT decreases as the noise intensities D and Q increase, and increases as the time delay τ increases below the critical value of λ. However, above the critical value, the RT first increases, reaches a maximum, and then decreases as D, Q and τ increase, i.e. a noise intensity D or Q and a time delay τ exist, at which the time scales of the relaxation process are at their largest. In addition, the additive noise intensity Q can also produce a critical behavior in the RT as a function of λ. The noise correlation parameter λ first increases the RT of processes, then decreases it below the critical value of Q. Above the critical value, λ increases it.

  20. Dynamical System Approach for Edge Detection Using Coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shaobai; Dasmahapatra, Srinandan; Maharatna, Koushik

    2015-12-01

    The prospect of emulating the impressive computational capabilities of biological systems has led to considerable interest in the design of analog circuits that are potentially implementable in very large scale integration CMOS technology and are guided by biologically motivated models. For example, simple image processing tasks, such as the detection of edges in binary and grayscale images, have been performed by networks of FitzHugh-Nagumo-type neurons using the reaction-diffusion models. However, in these studies, the one-to-one mapping of image pixels to component neurons makes the size of the network a critical factor in any such implementation. In this paper, we develop a simplified version of the employed reaction-diffusion model in three steps. In the first step, we perform a detailed study to locate this threshold using continuous Lyapunov exponents from dynamical system theory. Furthermore, we render the diffusion in the system to be anisotropic, with the degree of anisotropy being set by the gradients of grayscale values in each image. The final step involves a simplification of the model that is achieved by eliminating the terms that couple the membrane potentials of adjacent neurons. We apply our technique to detect edges in data sets of artificially generated and real images, and we demonstrate that the performance is as good if not better than that of the previous methods without increasing the size of the network.

  1. Canards Existence in FitzHugh-Nagumo and Hodgkin-Huxley Neuronal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marc Ginoux

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In a previous paper we have proposed a new method for proving the existence of “canard solutions” for three- and four-dimensional singularly perturbed systems with only one fast variable which improves the methods used until now. The aim of this work is to extend this method to the case of four-dimensional singularly perturbed systems with two slow and two fast variables. This method enables stating a unique generic condition for the existence of “canard solutions” for such four-dimensional singularly perturbed systems which is based on the stability of folded singularities (pseudo singular points in this case of the normalized slow dynamics deduced from a well-known property of linear algebra. This unique generic condition is identical to that provided in previous works. Application of this method to the famous coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo equations and to the Hodgkin-Huxley model enables showing the existence of “canard solutions” in such systems.

  2. Synchronization of Coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo Neurons Using Self-Feedback Time Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Denggui; Song, Xinle; Liao, Fucheng

    Many neurological diseases are characterized by abnormally synchronous oscillations of neuronal populations. However, how the neurons can synchronize with each other is still not fully understood, which may have potentially hampered the understanding and diagnosis for these dynamical diseases. In this paper, the self-feedback time delay (SFTD) and adaptive control theory are employed to control the onset of synchronization in the coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN) neurons. It is found that the larger SFTD can induce the complete synchronization of coupled neuronal system. Further investigation reveals that the reinforcing SFTD can significantly postpone the synchronization onsets. In addition, for the case that synchronization cannot be achieved by adjusting SFTD, the parameter estimation update laws and adaptive controller with respect to SFTD of coupled system are investigated to deduce the sufficient condition for complete synchronization. Simulations are also provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods. In particular, we observed the fascinating dynamical synchronization transitions, such as chaotic synchronization and bursting synchronization transitions, as well as the transition from anti-synchronization to complete synchronization.

  3. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Hughes NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Youngquist, C.A.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Hughes NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form through the Grand Junction Office Information System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs of Zinkl and others into groups of stream sediment and lake sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. In addition, maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses have been included. Further information about the HSSR program in general, or about the LANL portion of the program in particular, can be obtained in quarterly or semiannual program progress reports on open-file at DOE's Technical Library in Grand Junction. Information about the field and analytical procedures used by LANL during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the LANL and will not be included in this report

  4. Adaptable Analytical Vistas Illumine a Touchstone: Langston Hughes as Minor Author/Poet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mzenga A. Wanyama

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The authentic association of spontaneity, as a spur or basis for artistic expression, with the vaunted notion of autonomy in literary creationis nowhere more clearly established than in the work of theorists Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari as they, inter-alia, explicate the unique literary repertoire bestowed upon the world by Franz Kafka. In their acclaimed works: Kafka: Toward a Minor Literature and Anti-Oedipus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia,they offered to literary theory the fascinating and analytically productive constructs of deterritorialization and anti-Oedipus in the context of a compelling portraiture of the ways in which various institutionalized relationships subtly prescribe and reinforce inequity in society’s power mechanics that tendentiously impact, among other realities, the nature and quality of literary products. They offered, in the process, a refreshing definition of minor literature that unequivocally restores to literature its distinctive place and role in the amalgamated adjudications of society’s intergroup dissensions. In this regard, the present paper subscribes to the idea that spontaneity equaled the intrinsic and immutable desire of the gifted literary mind of African-American author/poet Langston Hughes to reach expressivity in accordance, strictly, with his unalloyed literary vision and thus made autonomy the inevitable upshot of his inspiration and practice.

  5. Stakeholder Perspectives on the Optimizing Patient Transfers, Impacting Medical Quality, and Improving Symptoms: Transforming Institutional Care (OPTIMISTIC) Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersek, Mary; Hickman, Susan E; Thomas, Anne C; Bernard, Brittany; Unroe, Kathleen T

    2017-10-17

    The need to reduce burdensome and costly hospitalizations of frail nursing home residents is well documented. The Optimizing Patient Transfers, Impacting Medical Quality, and Improving Symptoms: Transforming Institutional Care (OPTIMISTIC) project achieved this reduction through a multicomponent collaborative care model. We conducted an implementation-focused project evaluation to describe stakeholders' perspectives on (a) the most and least effective components of the intervention; (b) barriers to implementation; and (c) program features that promoted its adoption. Nineteen nursing homes participated in OPTIMISTIC. We conducted semistructured, qualitative interviews with 63 stakeholders: 23 nursing home staff and leaders, 4 primary care providers, 10 family members, and 26 OPTIMISTIC clinical staff. We used directed content analysis to analyze the data. We found universal endorsement of the value of in-depth advance care planning (ACP) discussions in reducing hospitalizations and improving care. Similarly, all stakeholder groups emphasized that nursing home access to specially trained, project registered nurses (RNs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) with time to focus on ACP, comprehensive resident assessment, and staff education was particularly valuable in identifying residents' goals for care. Challenges to implementation included inadequately trained facility staff and resistance to changing practice. In addition, the program sometimes failed to communicate its goals and activities clearly, leaving facilities uncertain about the OPTIMISTIC clinical staff's roles in the facilities. These findings are important for dissemination efforts related to the OPTIMISTIC care model and may be applicable to other innovations in nursing homes. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  6. ELEMENTAL COMPOSITION OF ROSEMARY SHOOTS (ROSMARINUS OFFICINALIS L., INTRODUCED IN THE BOTANICAL GARDEN OF PYATIGORSK MEDICAL-PHARMACEUTICAL INSTITUTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Nikitina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays studying plant objects in the framework of environmental monitoring to improve the quality of herbal remedies is a very important area of research.The aim of the work is to determine the elemental composition and assessment of environmental cleanliness of rosemary shoots (Rosmarinus offi cinalis L., introduced in Botanical garden of Pyatigorsk medical-pharmaceutical Institute (PMPI, Pyatigorsk (Russia.Materials and methods. An experimental study was performed at the Central research laboratories spectral analysis (“Kavkazgeolsyemka” on diffraction spectrograph DFS-8-1 by evaporation from a crater of the carbon electrode. Photometric measurement of spectrograms was performed using the Atlas of spectral lines and spectra of standards with an accuracy of not more than 2% in terms of ash.Results and discussion. For the fi rst time there were 25 elements identifi ed in rosemary shoots introduced in the North Caucasus. The prevailing macro elements were K, Ca, Mg, Na, P and the trace elements were Al, Si and Fe. The toxic elements As, Cd, Hg, Bi, Sb were not detected in the rosemary shoots. Rosemary does not accumulate heavy metals or they are present in trace amounts.Conclusion. The absence of heavy metals or their low content in rosemary shoots can be explained prosperous environmental conditions of Pyatigorsk Botanical garden. The use of rosemary shoots as a source of natural compounds of primary and secondary synthesis and minerals, are involved in the regulation of life processes. This underlines the therapeutic importance of the raw materials and the possibility of creating drugs of combined action on the basis of rosemary for the treatment and prevention of pathologies associated with disorders of mineral metabolism.

  7. [Conceptual foundations of creation of branch database of technology and intellectual property rights owned by scientific institutions, organizations, higher medical educational institutions and enterprises of healthcare sphere of Ukraine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horban', A Ie

    2013-09-01

    The question of implementation of the state policy in the field of technology transfer in the medical branch to implement the law of Ukraine of 02.10.2012 No 5407-VI "On Amendments to the law of Ukraine" "On state regulation of activity in the field of technology transfers", namely to ensure the formation of branch database on technology and intellectual property rights owned by scientific institutions, organizations, higher medical education institutions and enterprises of healthcare sphere of Ukraine and established by budget are considered. Analysis of international and domestic experience in the processing of information about intellectual property rights and systems implementation support transfer of new technologies are made. The main conceptual principles of creation of this branch database of technology transfer and branch technology transfer network are defined.

  8. New type of chimera structures in a ring of bistable FitzHugh-Nagumo oscillators with nonlocal interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepelev, I. A.; Vadivasova, T. E.; Bukh, A. V.; Strelkova, G. I.; Anishchenko, V. S.

    2017-04-01

    We study the spatiotemporal dynamics of a ring of nonlocally coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo oscillators in the bistable regime. A new type of chimera patterns has been found in the noise-free network and when isolated elements do not oscillate. The region of existence of these structures has been explored when the coupling range and the coupling strength between the network elements are varied.

  9. MO-DE-BRA-03: The Ottawa Medical Physics Institute (OMPI): A Practical Model for Academic Program Collaboration in a Multi-Centre City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEwen, M [National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Rogers, D [Carleton University, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Johns, P

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To build a world-class medical physics educational program that capitalizes on expertise distributed over several clinical, government, and academic centres. Few if any of these centres would have the critical mass to solely resource a program. Methods: In order to enable an academic program, stakeholders from five institutions made a proposal to Carleton University for a) a research network with defined membership requirements and a process for accepting new members, and b) a graduate specialization (MSc and PhD) in medical physics. Both proposals were accepted and the program has grown steadily. Our courses are taught by medical physicists from across the collaboration. Our students have access to physicists in: clinical radiotherapy (the Ottawa Cancer Centre treats 4500 new patients/y), radiology, cardiology and nuclear medicine, Canada’s primary standards dosimetry laboratory, radiobiology, and university-based medical physics research. Our graduate courses emphasize the foundational physics plus applied aspects of imaging, radiotherapy, and radiobiology. Active researchers in the city-wide volunteer-run network are appointed as adjunct professors by Physics, giving them access to national funding competitions and partial student funding through teaching assistantships while opening up facilities in their institutions for student thesis research. Results: The medical physics network has grown to ∼40 members from eight institutions and includes five full-time faculty in Physics and 17 adjunct research professors. The graduate student population is ∼20. Our graduates have proceeded to a spectrum of careers. Our alumni list includes a CCPM Past-President, the current COMP President, many clinical physicists, and the heads of at least three major clinical medical physics departments. Our PhD was Ontario’s first CAMPEP-accredited program. Conclusion: A self-governing volunteer network is the foundational element that enables an MSc/PhD medical

  10. MO-DE-BRA-03: The Ottawa Medical Physics Institute (OMPI): A Practical Model for Academic Program Collaboration in a Multi-Centre City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEwen, M; Rogers, D; Johns, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To build a world-class medical physics educational program that capitalizes on expertise distributed over several clinical, government, and academic centres. Few if any of these centres would have the critical mass to solely resource a program. Methods: In order to enable an academic program, stakeholders from five institutions made a proposal to Carleton University for a) a research network with defined membership requirements and a process for accepting new members, and b) a graduate specialization (MSc and PhD) in medical physics. Both proposals were accepted and the program has grown steadily. Our courses are taught by medical physicists from across the collaboration. Our students have access to physicists in: clinical radiotherapy (the Ottawa Cancer Centre treats 4500 new patients/y), radiology, cardiology and nuclear medicine, Canada’s primary standards dosimetry laboratory, radiobiology, and university-based medical physics research. Our graduate courses emphasize the foundational physics plus applied aspects of imaging, radiotherapy, and radiobiology. Active researchers in the city-wide volunteer-run network are appointed as adjunct professors by Physics, giving them access to national funding competitions and partial student funding through teaching assistantships while opening up facilities in their institutions for student thesis research. Results: The medical physics network has grown to ∼40 members from eight institutions and includes five full-time faculty in Physics and 17 adjunct research professors. The graduate student population is ∼20. Our graduates have proceeded to a spectrum of careers. Our alumni list includes a CCPM Past-President, the current COMP President, many clinical physicists, and the heads of at least three major clinical medical physics departments. Our PhD was Ontario’s first CAMPEP-accredited program. Conclusion: A self-governing volunteer network is the foundational element that enables an MSc/PhD medical

  11. [Hygiene and Infection Prevention in Medical Institutions, Kindergartens and Schools - Statutory Basis, Infection Control Practice and Experiences of the Public Health Services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heudorf, U

    2015-07-01

    Infection prevention is one of the main tasks of the public health services. The "Protection against infection act" places all medical institutions and facilities for children (kindergartens and schools) under the obligation to assume responsibility and to cooperate. Duties of the institutions are described, and public health services are obliged to perform hygiene control visits.Regarding medical institutions, the guidelines of the German Commission on Hospital Hygiene and Infection Control have to be observed, and the counties were obliged to publish hygiene enactments. Subsequently, good improvements in hygiene management in medical institutions were achieved. In schools, however, severe hygienic problems (i.e. sanitary hygiene, indoor air hygiene) are detected, without any improvement - obviously due to a missing sense of responsibility in the school community. Causes for poor behaviour prevention (hand hygiene, ventilation) and missing situational prevention (i.e. cleaning) are discussed. Without reversion to the obviously needed but nearly forgotten subject school hygiene, obligatory guidelines and the assuming of responsibility, permanent improvements cannot be achieved. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Characteristics and determinants of knowledge transfer policies at universities and public institutions in medical research--protocol for a systematic review of the qualitative research literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Rosa; Müller, Olaf; Bozorgmehr, Kayvan

    2015-08-19

    Universities, public institutions, and the transfer of knowledge to the private sector play a major role in the development of medical technologies. The decisions of universities and public institutions regarding the transfer of knowledge impact the accessibility of the final product, making it easier or more difficult for consumers to access these products. In the case of medical research, these products are pharmaceuticals, diagnostics, or medical procedures. The ethical dimension of access to these potentially lifesaving products is apparent and distinguishes the transfer of medical knowledge from the transfer of knowledge in other areas. While the general field of technology transfer from academic and public to private actors is attracting an increasing amount of scholarly attention, the specifications of knowledge transfer in the medical field are not as well explored. This review seeks to provide a systematic overview and analysis of the qualitative literature on the characteristics and determinants of knowledge transfer in medical research and development. The review systematically searches the literature for qualitative studies that focus on knowledge transfer characteristics and determinants at medical academic and public research institutions. It aims at identifying and analyzing the literature on the content and context of knowledge transfer policies, decision-making processes, and actors at academic and public institutions. The search strategy includes the databases PubMed, Web of Science, ProQuest, and DiVa. These databases will be searched based on pre-specified search terms. The studies selected for inclusion in the review will be critically assessed for their quality utilizing the Qualitative Research Checklist developed by the Clinical Appraisal Skills Programme. Data extraction and synthesis will be based on the meta-ethnographic approach. This review seeks to further the understanding of the kinds of transfer pathways that exist in medical

  13. [se-atlas - the health service information platform for people with rare diseases : Supporting research on medical care institutions and support groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Johanna; Wagner, Thomas O F; Storf, Holger

    2017-05-01

    se-atlas - the health service information platform for rare diseases - is part of the German National Action Plan for People with Rare Diseases and is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Health. The objective of se-atlas as a web-based platform is to illustrate those medical care institutions that are linked to rare diseases, in a transparent and user-friendly way. The website provides an overview of medical care institutions and support groups focusing on rare diseases in Germany. The primary target groups of se-atlas are affected patients, their relatives and physicians but can also include non-medical professionals and the general public. In order to make it easier to look up medical care institutions or support groups and optimize the search results displayed, various strategies are being developed and evaluated. Hence, the allocation of diseases to appropriate medical care institutions and support groups is currently a main focus. Since its launch in 2015, se-atlas has grown continuously and now incorporates five times more entries than were included 20 months prior. Among this data are the current rare diseases centres in Germany, which play a major role in providing patient-centred healthcare by acting as primary contact points for people with rare diseases. Further expansion and maintenance of the data base raises several organisational and software-related challenges. For one, the data should be completed by adding more high-quality information, while not neglecting the existing entries and maintaining their high level of quality in the long term.

  14. Traumatic injuries of the permanent maxillory incisors at dental department, pakistan institute of medical sciences islamabad: A retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, N.A.; Maxood, A.; Khan, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    The study aims to ascertain the prevalence of traumatic dental injures of the maxillary permanent incisors at Dental Department, Pakistan Institute of Medical Science Islamabad during the years 2003-2005. Information concerning age, sex, cause, type of tooth number of injured teeth and patterns of tooth injury were recorded retrospectively from 33 patients aged between 8-40 years, comprising 498 traumatized teeth. The dental record of all the patients presenting with dental trauma were examined for collection of data relating to age, sex, cause, number of injured teeth, type of tooth and type of tooth trauma. Type of tooth trauma was recorded according to the Andreason classification. The data was subsequently processed and analyzed using the SPSS statistical software programme. The statistical significance level was set at 5%. Of the 336 patients, 227 were males (67.6%) and 109 were female (32.4%). The gender difference was statistically significant (p<0.0001). The patients had a total of 498 traumatized teeth. A large number of dental trauma occurred in patients aged between 9-11 years. Most injuries involved one tooth in 227 patients (67.6%). However two teeth in 90 patients (26.7%), three teeth in 11 patients (3.2%) and only in 8 patients (2.3%) four teeth were involved. Fractures in enamel only occurred in 74 teeth (14.6%). Uncomplicated crown fractures in 208 teeth (41.9%) were the most commonly encountered dental trauma. 137 teeth (27.6%) suffered complicated crown fractures, 44 teeth (8.9%) uncomplicated crown-root fractures, 19 teeth (3.8%) complicated crown-root fractures and avulsion in 16 teeth (3.2%) only. The main causes were falls in 225 patients (66.9%), collision with objects in 40 patients (11.9%), road traffic accident in 31 patients (9.2%) violence in 31 patients (6.2%), and sports in 19 patients (5.6%). The maxillary central incisor was traumatized in 384 teeth showing a high percentage of 77%. Raising public dental awareness regarding the

  15. Stochastic resonance induced by novel random transitions of motion of FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guangjun; Xu Jianxue

    2005-01-01

    In contrast to the previous studies which have dealt with stochastic resonance induced by random transitions of system motion between two coexisting limit cycle attractors in the FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN) neuron model after Hopf bifurcation and which have dealt with the phenomenon of stochastic resonance induced by external noise when the model with periodic input has only one attractor before Hopf bifurcation, in this paper we have focused our attention on stochastic resonance (SR) induced by a novel transition behavior, the transitions of motion of the model among one attractor on the left side of bifurcation point and two attractors on the right side of bifurcation point under the perturbation of noise. The results of research show: since one bifurcation of transition from one to two limit cycle attractors and the other bifurcation of transition from two to one limit cycle attractors occur in turn besides Hopf bifurcation, the novel transitions of motion of the model occur when bifurcation parameter is perturbed by weak internal noise; the bifurcation point of the model may stochastically slightly shift to the left or right when FHN neuron model is perturbed by external Gaussian distributed white noise, and then the novel transitions of system motion also occur under the perturbation of external noise; the novel transitions could induce SR alone, and when the novel transitions of motion of the model and the traditional transitions between two coexisting limit cycle attractors after bifurcation occur in the same process the SR also may occur with complicated behaviors types; the mechanism of SR induced by external noise when FHN neuron model with periodic input has only one attractor before Hopf bifurcation is related to this kind of novel transition mentioned above

  16. Dam safety investigations of the concrete structures of Hugh Keenleyside dam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, A.W.; Nunn, J.O.H.; Cornish, L.; Northcott, P.

    1993-01-01

    The Hugh Keenleyside dam is located on the Columbia River in southeastern British Columbia, and impounds Arrow Lakes Reservoir which has a live storage of 8.8 km 3 and drains an area of 36,000 km 2 . It consists of a number of concrete structures, with a total length of 360 m and a maximum height of 58 m, and an earthfill embankment which spans across the original river channel. The 450 m long zoned earthfill dam is founded on pervious alluvium over 150 m deep. It has a sloping impervious core constructed from glacial till which extends 670 m upstream of the dam. This impervious blanket extends over the full width of the reservoir and is connected to the upstream face of the concrete structures. The results of a dam safety study, which was carried out due to the presence of high uplift pressures at some parts of the foundation, and stability concerns, are presented. The investigation concluded that the high uplift pressures were due to a localized defect in the upstream blanket and did not indicate any general deterioration of the blanket. Techniques that were found to be of particular use in the study for defining the source and nature of the foundation defects were: temperature surveys of flows from piezometers, cells and drains; air injection tests; and pressure response testing of cells, piezometers and drains to establish foundation interconnections. The concrete structures met the stability criteria for all load cases considered except for the navigation lock and the low level outlets. 3 refs., 6 figs

  17. Practices of self-medication with antibiotics among nursing students of Institute of Nursing, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Akbar Shoukat; Ahmed, Javed; Ali, Akbar Shoukat; Sonekhi, Gomand Beekho; Fayyaz, Nargis; Zainulabdin, Zeeshan; Jindani, Rahim

    2016-02-01

    Self-medication practice among nursing students is of growing concern. Access to drugs and handling them in their future practices make nursing students susceptible to self-prescription and self-medication. This cross-sectional study assesses the prevalence and pattern of self-medication with antibiotics among nursing students of Institute of Nursing, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, Pakistan. A random sample of convenience of 160 nursing students underwent a predesigned questionnaire. More than half of nursing students 79 (52.7%) experienced self-medication with antibiotics. It was more prevalent among males 49 (62%) . Knowledge about the drug 59 (74.7%) and convenience 13 (16.5%) were the key reasons to self-medicate. Fever 37 (46.8%) and sore throat 27 (34.2%) were the common symptoms predisposing to self-medication. Beta-lactam group of antibiotics 35 (44.3%) was most frequent used. Only 26 (32.9%) respondents completed the entire antibiotic course. Efforts must be directed towards educating nursing students about responsible and informed self-medication practices.

  18. The vicious circle of patient-physician mistrust in China: health professionals' perspectives, institutional conflict of interest, and building trust through medical professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Jing-Bao; Cheng, Yu; Zou, Xiang; Gong, Ni; Tucker, Joseph D; Wong, Bonnie; Kleinman, Arthur

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the phenomenon of patient-physician mistrust in China, a qualitative study involving 107 physicians, nurses and health officials in Guangdong Province, southern China, was conducted through semi-structured interviews and focus groups. In this paper we report the key findings of the empirical study and argue for the essential role of medical professionalism in rebuilding patient-physician trust. Health professionals are trapped in a vicious circle of mistrust. Mistrust (particularly physicians' distrust of patients and their relatives) leads to increased levels of fear and self-protection by doctors which exacerbate difficulties in communication; in turn, this increases physician workloads, adding to a strong sense of injustice and victimization. These factors produce poorer healthcare outcomes and increasingly discontented and angry patients, escalate conflicts and disputes, and result in negative media coverage, all these ultimately contributing to even greater levels of mistrust. The vicious circle indicates not only the crisis of patient-physician relationship but the crisis of medicine as a profession and institution. Underlying the circle is the inherent conflict of interest in the healthcare system by which health professionals and hospitals have become profit-driven. This institutional conflict of interest seriously compromises the fundamental principle of medical professionalism-the primacy of patient welfare-as well as the traditional Chinese ideal of "medicine as the art of humanity". Patient trust can be restored through rectifying this institutional conflict of interest and promoting medical professionalism via a series of recommended practical measures. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Scientific events of the Turner Scientific And Research Institute for children’s orthopedics as a form of continuous medical education for pediatric traumatologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina S. Solovyova

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The experience of the Turner Scientific and Research Institute for Children's Orthopedics in educational activities for improvement of the professional knowledge of pediatric physicians was represented. The target audience of the continuous medical education include traumatologists, pediatric surgeons, and doctors of related specialties of Russia that are involved in diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of children with injuries, congenital and acquired diseases of the musculoskeletal system. Since 1986, the Institute has organized 28 all-Russian scientific and practical conferences on topical issues of traumatology and orthopedics of pediatric age in 22 different cities across the country. In the interest of the institute, the school of pediatric orthopedists is constantly working for district orthopedists of children's polyclinics of St. Petersburg, and regular monothematic seminars are performed with the participation of leading Russian experts and visiting lecturers from abroad. These scientific and practical activities improve the professional skills of doctors and help them improve the provision of specialized care to children.

  20. Aligning institutional priorities: engaging house staff in a quality improvement and safety initiative to fulfill Clinical Learning Environment Review objectives and electronic medical record Meaningful Use requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Meghan R; Foster, Carolyn C; Schleyer, Anneliese; Peterson, Gene N; Mandell, Samuel P; Rudd, Kristina E; Joyner, Byron D; Payne, Thomas H

    2016-02-01

    House staff quality improvement projects are often not aligned with training institution priorities. House staff are the primary users of inpatient problem lists in academic medical centers, and list maintenance has significant patient safety and financial implications. Improvement of the problem list is an important objective for hospitals with electronic health records under the Meaningful Use program. House staff surveys were used to create an electronic problem list manager (PLM) tool enabling efficient problem list updating. Number of new problems added and house staff perceptions of the problem list were compared before and after PLM intervention. The PLM was used by 654 house staff after release. Surveys demonstrated increased problem list updating (P = .002; response rate 47%). Mean new problems added per day increased from 64 pre-PLM to 125 post-PLM (P house staff in institutional quality and safety initiatives with tangible institutional benefits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. 42 CFR 436.211 - Individuals who would be eligible for cash assistance if they were not in medical institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... PROGRAMS ELIGIBILITY IN GUAM, PUERTO RICO, AND THE VIRGIN ISLANDS Options for Coverage as Categorically... institutions. The agency may provide Medicaid to any group or groups of individuals specified in § 436.201(a...

  2. The Wyss institute: A new model for medical technology innovation and translation across the academic‐industrial interface

    OpenAIRE

    Tolikas, Mary; Antoniou, Ayis; Ingber, Donald E.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University was formed based on the recognition that breakthrough discoveries cannot change the world if they never leave the laboratory. The Institute's mission is to discover the biological principles that Nature uses to build living things, and to harness these insights to create biologically inspired engineering innovations to advance human health and create a more sustainable world. Since its launch in 2009, the ...

  3. Need of Department of General Practice / Family Medicine at AIIMS (All India Institute of Medical Sciences): Why the apex medical institute in India should also contribute towards training and education of general practitioners and family physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Ranabir; Kumar, Raman

    2017-01-01

    Family medicine or general practice is the practicing discipline of the majority doctors in India, however formal academic departments of general practice (or family medicine) do not exist in India, as it is not a mandatory requirement as prescribed by the Medical Council of India; the principal regulator of medical education. Currently India has capacity to produce more than 60,000 medical graduates per year, majority of whom are expected to become general practitoners or primary care doctors without under going any vocational training in general practice or family medicine. The 92 nd parliamentary standing committee report (on health and family welfare) of the Indian Parliament recommended that Government of India in coordination with State Governments should establish robust postgraduate programs in Family Medicine and facilitate introducing Family Medicine discipline in all medical colleges. This will not only minimize the need for frequent referrals to specialist and decrease the load on tertiary care but also provide continuous health care for the individuals and families. The authors concur with the parliament of India and strongly feel that "Family Medicine" (community-based comprehensive clinical practice) deserves dedicated and distinct department at all medical colleges in India in order to availability of qualified medical doctors in the community-based health system. AIIMS, New Delhi, along with other newly established AIIMS, should rise to their foundation mandate of supporting excellence in all disciplines of medical science and to this historic responsibility; and not just remain an ivory tower of tertiary care based fragmented (into sub specialties) hospital culture.

  4. Kinematic analysis of melange fabrics: Examples and applications from the McHugh Complex, Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusky, T.M.; Bradley, D.C.

    1999-01-01

    Permian to Cretaceous melange of the McHugh Complex on the Kenai Peninsula, south-central Alaska includes blocks and belts of graywacke, argillite, limestone, chert, basalt, gabbro, and ultramafic rocks, intruded by a variety of igneous rocks. An oceanic plate stratigraphy is repeated hundreds of times across the map area, but most structures at the outcrop scale extend lithological layering. Strong rheological units occur as blocks within a matrix that flowed around the competent blocks during deformation, forming broken formation and melange. Deformation was noncoaxial, and disruption of primary layering was a consequence of general strain driven by plate convergence in a relatively narrow zone between the overriding accretionary wedge and the downgoing, generally thinly sedimented oceanic plate. Soft-sediment deformation processes do not appear to have played a major role in the formation of the melange. A model for deformation at the toe of the wedge is proposed in which layers oriented at low angles to ??1 are contracted in both the brittle and ductile regimes, layers at 30-45??to ??1 are extended in the brittle regime and contracted in the ductile regime, and layers at angles greater than 45??to ??1 are extended in both the brittle and ductile regimes. Imbrication in thrust duplexes occurs at deeper levels within the wedge. Many structures within melange of the McHugh Complex are asymmetric and record kinematic information consistent with the inferred structural setting in an accretionary wedge. A displacement field for the McHugh Complex on the lower Kenai Peninsula includes three belts: an inboard belt of Late Triassic rocks records west-to-east-directed slip of hanging walls, a central belt of predominantly Early Jurassic rocks records north-south directed displacements, and Early Cretaceous rocks in an outboard belt preserve southwest-northeast directed slip vectors. Although precise ages of accretion are unknown, slip directions are compatible with

  5. [50 years' of the Institute of Sports Medicine at the Charles University Medical School on the 650th anniversary of its founding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotný, V

    1999-01-01

    In an agreeable shadow of the great 650th anniversary of Charles University foundation (1348-1998), arising of the first Institute of Sports Medicine round the world on Medical Faculty in Prague (1948-1998) was commemorated by scientific session. Since J. E. Purkynĕ (1850) have gone idea of favourable effect of body training for human health by representatives of Prague Medical Faculty, till Doctor J. Král, who started lectures for medical students in this discipline in 1933. Rise of Institute of Sports Medicine was approved in 1934, but its realization thanks to Professor Král, was performed after 2nd World War in 1948. From the beginning, students have lectures within the framework of daily study of whole wide of the branche, including practical exercises and closing examine. First text book of sports medicine and first book about clinic in sports medicine was written (J. Král). Members of Institute lectured on many foreign universities and scientific congresses and published more than 2,500 scientific works, some of them have world priority. For example first wireless transmission of heart frequency (V. Seliger, V. Kruta), cardiologic observations during big sports load (J. Král, Z. Hornof), discoveries at biochemical laboratory (J. Král, A. Zenísek), at medical functional anthropologic laboratory (V. Novotný), introducing of remedial exercises in clinical practice (L. Schmid, M. Zintlová, J. Chrástek) etc. In the set out choice of literary citation it is put on only fragment of publications which document scientific activity of jubileeing Institute. For period of duration of Institute more than hundred thousand patients were examined--both sportives and non-sportives, young and old. Contemporary trend goes from classic care about sportsmen towards preventive medicine. Attention is focused first of all to testing of middle aged and older patients in sense of prevention of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases and indication for specific movement load

  6. How Hugh Hampton Young's treatment of President Woodrow Wilson's urinary retention and urosepsis affected the resolution of World War I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogg, Ryan; Kutikov, Alexander; Uzzo, Robert G; Canter, Daniel

    2011-09-01

    President Woodrow Wilson was never able to gain ratification of the Treaty of Versailles, the peace accord to end World War I. Before he could convince the American people of the importance of ratification, Wilson suffered a stroke followed by life threatening urinary sepsis due to urinary retention, and was treated by the father of modern urology, Hugh Hampton Young. The effects of these health problems are examined in the context of their implications on international affairs. Biographical sources and primary documentation of Wilson's physicians were reviewed to determine the effect of Wilson's stroke on his voiding habits. Hugh Hampton Young's evaluation and decision making is examined in depth. In the fall of 1919 President Wilson was recovering from a stroke. Shortly after the stroke his preexisting voiding dysfunction progressed to urinary retention from which urinary sepsis developed. Hugh Hampton Young advised on Wilson's case and counseled patience over surgery. The President began voiding spontaneously and recovered from sepsis. The illness left him severely weakened and unable to mount an aggressive campaign to persuade the U.S. Senate of the importance of ratifying the Treaty of Versailles. His personal physician, Admiral Cary T. Grayson, stated that the President was mentally never the same after the sepsis. Wilson's voiding dysfunction contributed to his inability to win approval for the Treaty of Versailles and the League of Nations. As a result, the United States returned to a policy of isolationism and Europe plunged into 2 decades of upheaval, leading to World War II. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. ROLE OF SPIRITUALITY AS A WAY OF COPING FROM BURNOUT IN MEDICAL STUDENTS OF A TERTIARY CARE INSTITUTE IN INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Sagar Shrikant; Deepika Abhainath

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Medical students are exposed to various stressful conditions in their journey towards becoming a successful doctor leading to burnout. Adoption of faulty coping mechanisms increases the risk further. Spirituality as a way of coping can help to reduce burnout in these students. MATERIALS & METHODS We decided to conduct a study with aims to assess the prevalence of burnout in medical students, to study their socio-demographic profile and to understand the role of spiritualit...

  8. "A good career choice for women": female medical students' mentoring experiences: a multi-institutional qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Rachel B; Mechaber, Hilit F; Reddy, Shalini T; Cayea, Danelle; Harrison, Rebecca A

    2013-04-01

    The career decisions, practice patterns, and approach to patient care of current female students, who make up close to 50% of medical school classes, will have a profound impact on the profession. This study explores the role gender plays in the mentoring experiences of female medical students. In 2011, the authors conducted focus groups with 48 third- and fourth-year female medical students at four U.S. medical schools. Using a template organizing style, they derived themes in an iterative process to explore female medical students' mentoring relationships and the impact of gender on those relationships. The authors identified four major themes: (1) Optimal mentoring relationships are highly relational. Students emphasized shared values, trust, and a personal connection in describing ideal mentoring relationships. (2) Relational mentoring is more important than gender concordance. Students identified a desire for access to female mentors but stated that when a mentor and mentee developed a personal connection, the gender of the mentor was less important. (3) Gender-based assumptions and stereotypes affect mentoring relationships. Students described gender-based assumptions and expectations for themselves and their mentors. (4) Gender-based power dynamics influence students' thinking about mentoring. Students stated that they were concerned about how their mentors might perceive their professional decisions because of their gender, which influenced what they disclosed to male mentors and mentors in positions of power. Gender appears to play a role in female medical students' expectations and experience with mentoring relationships and may influence their decision making around career planning.

  9. What Are Medical Students in the United States Learning About Radiation Oncology? Results of a Multi-Institutional Survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaorsky, Nicholas G.; Shaikh, Talha; Handorf, Elizabeth; Eastwick, Gary; Hesney, Adam; Scher, Eli D.; Jones, Ryan T.; Showalter, Timothy N.; Avkshtol, Vladimir; Rice, Stephanie R.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Meyer, Joshua E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this study were to assess the exposure that medical students (MSs) have to radiation oncology (RO) during the course of their medical school career, as evidenced by 2 time points in current medical training (ie, first vs fourth year; MS1s and MS4s, respectively) and to assess the knowledge of MS1s, MS4s, and primary care physicians (PCPs) about the appropriateness of RT in cancer management in comparison with RO attendings. Methods: We developed and beta tested an electronic survey divided into 3 parts: RO job descriptions, appropriateness of RT, and toxicities of RT. The surveys were distributed to 7 medical schools in the United States. A concordance of >90% (either yes or no) among RO attendings in an answer was necessary to determine the correct answer and to compare with other subgroups using a χ"2 test (P 1 of 5 respondents. Multiple nontoxicities of RT (eg, emitting low-level radiation from the treatment site) were incorrectly identified as toxicities by >1 of 5 respondents. MS4s/PCPs with an RO rotation in medical school had improved scores in all prompts. Conclusions: Although MS knowledge of general RT principles improves from the first to the fourth year, a large knowledge gap still exists between MSs, current PCPs, and ROs. Some basic misconceptions of RT persist among a minority of MSs and PCPs. We recommend implementing formal education in RO fundamentals during the core curriculum of medical school.

  10. Kinematic analysis of mélange fabrics: examples and applications from the McHugh Complex, Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusky, Timothy M.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    1999-12-01

    Permian to Cretaceous mélange of the McHugh Complex on the Kenai Peninsula, south-central Alaska includes blocks and belts of graywacke, argillite, limestone, chert, basalt, gabbro, and ultramafic rocks, intruded by a variety of igneous rocks. An oceanic plate stratigraphy is repeated hundreds of times across the map area, but most structures at the outcrop scale extend lithological layering. Strong rheological units occur as blocks within a matrix that flowed around the competent blocks during deformation, forming broken formation and mélange. Deformation was noncoaxial, and disruption of primary layering was a consequence of general strain driven by plate convergence in a relatively narrow zone between the overriding accretionary wedge and the downgoing, generally thinly sedimented oceanic plate. Soft-sediment deformation processes do not appear to have played a major role in the formation of the mélange. A model for deformation at the toe of the wedge is proposed in which layers oriented at low angles to σ1 are contracted in both the brittle and ductile regimes, layers at 30-45° to σ1 are extended in the brittle regime and contracted in the ductile regime, and layers at angles greater than 45° to σ1 are extended in both the brittle and ductile regimes. Imbrication in thrust duplexes occurs at deeper levels within the wedge. Many structures within mélange of the McHugh Complex are asymmetric and record kinematic information consistent with the inferred structural setting in an accretionary wedge. A displacement field for the McHugh Complex on the lower Kenai Peninsula includes three belts: an inboard belt of Late Triassic rocks records west-to-east-directed slip of hanging walls, a central belt of predominantly Early Jurassic rocks records north-south directed displacements, and Early Cretaceous rocks in an outboard belt preserve southwest-northeast directed slip vectors. Although precise ages of accretion are unknown, slip directions are compatible with

  11. PUBLIC AFFAIRS DIRECTOR HUGH HARRIS SPEAKS AT THE APOLLO/SATURN V CENTER RIBBON-CUTTING CEREMONY

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    NASA/KSC Public Affairs Director Hugh W. Harris gives the welcome and introductions at the ribbon-cutting ceremony to officially open the new Apollo/Saturn V Center, part of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center. The 100,000- square-foot facility includes two theaters, various exhibits and an Apollo-era Saturn V rocket, which formerly was on display outside the Vehicle Assembly Building and is one of only three moon rockets remaining in existence. The new center is located off the Kennedy Parkway at the Banana Creek launch viewing site.

  12. The White goddess, Ariadne and myth of the poetic self: The role of myth in forming creative-destructive relation Ted Hughes - Sylvia Plath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mušović Azra A.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ted Hughes and Sylvia Plath were husband and wife; they were also two of the most remarkable poets of the twentieth century. Both Hughes and Plath were fond of mythic language - their attempts to find meaning in painful events of life took the form of a journey through myth. Just as Song contains a founding image in the work of Ted Hughes, Ariadne can be identified as a founding image in the work of Sylvia Plath. Both of these poems employ mythic language to identify the emotional pattern of each poet's creative stance toward the distinctive subject matter his or her art will seize on. Since Plath was, indeed, the form taken by the White Goddess in Hughes's life, it had been her destiny to inflict devastation on Hughes, as well as release his creative energy. These were the two aspects of her gift, as Robert Graves defined it: creativity and destruction. This paper is concerned with presenting an up-close look at a couple who saw each other as the means to becoming who they wanted to be: writers and mythic figures representing their generation.

  13. WORK EXPERIENCE OF THE OPERA TIVE INFORMATION SUPPORT SERVICE FOR SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH A T THE MEDICAL RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH CENTER NAMED AFTER A.F . TSYB – BRANCH OF THE FEDERAL STATE BUDGET INSTITUTION "NATIONAL MEDICAL RESEARCH RADIOLOGICAL CENTER” OF T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Savina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:The Operative Information Support Service for Scientific Research of the Medical Radiological Research Center named after A. F. Tsyb — Branch of the FSBI «National Medical Research Radiological Center” of the RF Health Ministry presented a report on providing off-budget support for scientific activities over the period from 1993 to 2014 using domestic and foreign information resources. The dynamics of employee activities in institutional sectors with aim to receive financial support for fundamental and applied scientific research on a competitive and non-competitive basis was given. The analysis of the obtained data indicated that a multi-channeling in off-budget funding was formed. It also showed to some extent a situation at the open market of grants in the field of medical radiology, radiobiology, and radiation epidemiology among leading investors in intellectual products.

  14. Effect of educational interventions and medical school policies on medical students' attitudes toward pharmaceutical marketing practices: a multi-institutional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Audiey C; Braddock, Clarence; Clay, Maria; Elliott, Donna; Epstein, Scott K; Filstead, William; Hotze, Tim; May, Win; Reenan, Jennifer

    2011-11-01

    To determine the effect of educational interventions on medical students' attitudes toward pharmaceutical industry marketing practices and whether restrictive medical school policies governing medicine-industry interactions are associated with student support for banning such interactions. Prospective cohort study involving the graduating classes of 2009 (intervention, n=474) and 2010 (control, n=459) at four U.S. medical schools. Intervention students experienced a former pharmaceutical representative's presentation, faculty debate, and a Web-based course. Both groups completed baseline and follow-up attitude surveys about pharmaceutical marketing. A total of 482 students (51.6%) completed both surveys. In regression analyses, intervention students were more likely than control students to think that physicians are strongly or moderately influenced by pharmaceutical marketing (OR, 2.29; 95% CI, 1.46-3.59) and believed they would be more likely to prescribe a company's drug if they accepted that company's gifts and food (OR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.12-2.52). Intervention students were more likely to support banning interactions between pharmaceutical representatives and students (OR, 4.82; 95% CI, 3.02-7.68) and with physicians (OR, 6.88; 95% CI, 4.04-11.70). Students from schools with more restrictive policies were more likely to support banning interactions between pharmaceutical representatives and students (OR, 1.99; 95% CI, 1.26-3.16) and with physicians (OR, 3.44; 95% CI, 2.05-5.79). Education about pharmaceutical marketing practices and more restrictive policies governing medicine-industry interactions seem to increase medical students' skepticism about the appropriateness of such marketing practices and disapproval of pharmaceutical representatives in the learning environment.

  15. 2004-05 Performance Year Ratings Impacting Fiscal Year 2005-06. Medical University of South Carolina. Sector: Research Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    South Carolina Commission on Higher Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This series of documents contains performance scoring information for 2004-2005 for individual institutions of higher education in South Carolina. This information is used in establishing 2005-2006 fiscal year allocations. Data includes: (1) Degrees Awarded; (2) Enrollment; (3) Average SAT score; (4) Faculty; (5) Tuition; and (6) Financial…

  16. What Are Medical Students in the United States Learning About Radiation Oncology? Results of a Multi-Institutional Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaorsky, Nicholas G., E-mail: nicholaszaorsky@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Shaikh, Talha; Handorf, Elizabeth [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Eastwick, Gary [Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Hesney, Adam [Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Scher, Eli D. [Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine, Stratford, New Jersey (United States); Jones, Ryan T.; Showalter, Timothy N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Avkshtol, Vladimir [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); University of Toledo College of Medicine, Toledo, Ohio (United States); Rice, Stephanie R. [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Horwitz, Eric M.; Meyer, Joshua E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this study were to assess the exposure that medical students (MSs) have to radiation oncology (RO) during the course of their medical school career, as evidenced by 2 time points in current medical training (ie, first vs fourth year; MS1s and MS4s, respectively) and to assess the knowledge of MS1s, MS4s, and primary care physicians (PCPs) about the appropriateness of RT in cancer management in comparison with RO attendings. Methods: We developed and beta tested an electronic survey divided into 3 parts: RO job descriptions, appropriateness of RT, and toxicities of RT. The surveys were distributed to 7 medical schools in the United States. A concordance of >90% (either yes or no) among RO attendings in an answer was necessary to determine the correct answer and to compare with other subgroups using a χ{sup 2} test (P<.05 was significant). Results: The overall response rate for ROs, MS1s, MS4s, and PCPs was 26%; n (22 + 315 + 404 + 43)/3004. RT misconceptions decreased with increasing level of training. More than 1 of 10 MSs did not believe that RT alone could cure cancer. Emergent oncologic conditions for RT (eg, spinal cord compression, superior vena cava syndrome) could not be identified by >1 of 5 respondents. Multiple nontoxicities of RT (eg, emitting low-level radiation from the treatment site) were incorrectly identified as toxicities by >1 of 5 respondents. MS4s/PCPs with an RO rotation in medical school had improved scores in all prompts. Conclusions: Although MS knowledge of general RT principles improves from the first to the fourth year, a large knowledge gap still exists between MSs, current PCPs, and ROs. Some basic misconceptions of RT persist among a minority of MSs and PCPs. We recommend implementing formal education in RO fundamentals during the core curriculum of medical school.

  17. A perspective on 10-years HTS experience at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research - eighteen million assays and counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackovic, Kurt; Lessene, Guillaume; Falk, Hendrik; Leuchowius, Karl-Johan; Baell, Jonathan; Street, Ian

    2014-03-01

    The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research (WEHI) is Australia's longest serving medical research institute. WEHI's High Throughput Screening (HTS) Facility was established in 2003 with $5 million of infrastructure funds invested by WEHI, and the Victorian State Government's Strategic Technology Initiative through Bio21 Australia Ltd. The Facility was Australia's first truly academic HTS facility and was one of only a handful operating in publicly funded institutions worldwide at that time. The objectives were to provide access to enabling HTS technologies, such as assay design, liquid handling automation, compound libraries and expertise to promote translation of basic research in a national setting that has a relatively young biotech sector and does not have a big Pharma research presence. Ten years on and the WEHI HTS Facility has participated in over 92 collaborative projects, generated over 18 million data points, and most importantly, projects that began in the Facility have been commercialized successfully (due to strong ties with Business Development and emphasis on intellectual property management) and now have molecules progressing in clinical trials.

  18. Analysis of hepatic capsular enhancement mimicking the Fitz-hugh-curtis syndrome on a multidetector computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ji Sang; Park, Seong Jin; Lee, Hae Kyung; Yi, Boem Ha; Hong, Hyun Sook; Cha, Jang Gyu; Lim, Hoon

    2008-01-01

    To determine the associated diseases causing hepatic capsular enhancement and analyze the relationship of the capsular enhancement patterns as a function of the associated diseases. We retrospectively reviewed 797 patients having undergone arterial phase abdominal CT scans. Among these images, 47 patients showed hepatic capsular enhancement (13 men and 34 women; mean age: 53.1; age range: 5-91 years). We investigated if there was a correlation between the pattern of hepatic capsular enhancement and cause of disease. When the hepatic capsular enhancement was found to persist until the portal phase, the symptom duration was evaluated. Hepatic capsular enhancements were presented in 5.9% (47/797) of the arterial phase abdominal CT scans. Six patients (12.8%) were diagnosed with Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome. The other causes of hepatic capsular enhancement included 20 cases of inflammation, 13 cases of malignancy, and 8 cases of other diseases. The extent of the hepatic capsular enhancement was not significantly different among the causes of disease. In thirty two of 47 patients (68.1%), hepatic capsular enhancement persisted until the portal phase images. Hepatic capsular enhancement on an arterial phase is a nonspecific imaging finding observed in the Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome as well as a variety of other diseases. A CT is useful in finding the hepatic capsular enhancement and determining the accompanying disease

  19. [Family psychotherapy in medical institutions of the Instituto del Servicio de Seguridad Social de los Trabajadores del Estado].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, H

    1977-01-01

    The evolution of family therapy in Mexico is briefly reviewed. It is considered that the reach of this method is limited in institutions due to the lack of qualified psychotherapists with the different orientations of this speciality. The illness, as a sign of family imbalance within the humanistic concept, acquires an even if the treatment is given to the marital couple, the adolescent or the child. Family therapy helps in marital disagreements, behavior problems, anorexia, reactive depression, drug addictions, alcoholism and many other problems. The ISSSTE population has a stable location and is more or less homogeneous; in it family therapy is stimulating and possible; even though the institution imposes certain limitations to family therapy, the enthusiasm for this therapeutic method prevails.

  20. Mode stability analysis in the beam—wave interaction process for a three-gap Hughes-type coupled cavity chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Ji-Run; Zhu Min; Guo Wei; Cui Jian

    2013-01-01

    Based on space-charge wave theory, the formulae of the beam—wave coupling coefficient and the beam-loaded conductance are given for the beam—wave interaction in an N-gap Hughes-type coupled cavity chain. The ratio of the non-beam-loaded quality factor of the coupled cavity chain to the beam quality factor is used to determine the stability of the beam—wave interaction. As an example, the stabilities of the beam—wave interaction in a three-gap Hughes-type coupled cavity chain are discussed with the formulae and the CST code for the operations of the 2π, π, and π/2 modes, respectively. The results show that stable operation of the 2π, π, and π/2 modes may all be realized in an extended-interaction klystron with the three-gap Hughes-type coupled cavity chain

  1. STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT GUIDANCE IN HEALTH INSTITUTIONS MANAGEMENT: DETERMINATION OF MISSIONVISION- STRATEGY SELCUK UNIVERSITY MEDICAL FACULTY HOSPITAL SAMPLE

    OpenAIRE

    GÖKBEL, Hakkı; GÜLEŞ, Hasan Kürşat; ERGEN IŞIKLAR, Zeynep; ŞENER, Tuğba

    2016-01-01

    As the nature of the services they offer and areas in which they operate health care institutions are always in the process of change. Especially with the impact of technological advances, new techniques are constantly emerging in health care presentation, in parallel to innovation in health care change is also becoming necessary in the way of health care management. On the other hand today, research conducted in hospitals has reached a holisticand administrative size with the understanding t...

  2. Faculty Development for Medical School Community-Based Faculty: A Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance Study Exploring Institutional Requirements and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drowos, Joanna; Baker, Suzanne; Harrison, Suzanne Leonard; Minor, Suzanne; Chessman, Alexander W; Baker, Dennis

    2017-08-01

    Community-based faculty play a large role in training medical students nationwide and require faculty development. The authors hypothesized that positive relationships exist between clerkships paying preceptors and requiring faculty development, and between protected clerkship directors' time and delivering face-to-face preceptor training, as well as with the number or length of community-based preceptor visits. Through under standing the quantity, delivery methods, barriers, and institutional support for faculty development provided to community-based preceptors teaching in family medicine clerkships, best practices can be developed. Data from the 2015 Council of Academic Family Medicine's Educational Research Alliance survey of Family Medicine Clerkship Directors were analyzed. The cross-sectional survey of clerkship directors is distributed annually to institutional representatives of U.S. and Canadian accredited medical schools. Survey questions focused on the requirements, delivery methods, barriers, and institutional support available for providing faculty development to community-based preceptors. Paying community-based preceptors was positively correlated with requiring faculty development in family medicine clerkships. The greatest barrier to providing faculty development was community-based preceptor time availability; however, face-to-face methods remain the most common delivery strategy. Many family medicine clerkship directors perform informal or no needs assessment in developing faculty development topics for community-based faculty. Providing payment to community preceptors may allow schools to enhance faculty development program activities and effectiveness. Medical schools could benefit from constructing a formal curriculum for faculty development, including formal preceptor needs assessment and program evaluation. Clerkship directors may consider recruiting and retaining community-based faculty by employing innovative faculty development delivery

  3. Energy and nutritional value of diets used in patients alimentation and their assessment by patients of selected clinical department in the Military Medical Institute in Warsaw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłos, Krzysztof; Bertrandt, Jerzy; Jałocha, Lukasz; Matuszewski, Tomasz; Abramowicz, Michał

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the work was laboratory assessment of energy and nutritional value of general and light diets used in patients of selected clinical department in the Military Medical Institute in Warsaw alimentation. Using questionnaire method the assessment of diets was done by patients too. Meals given to patients in hospital not always fulfilled nutritional requirements. Additional consumption of supplementary products did not always meet the requirements of proper nutrition. Half of examined patients appraised nutrition variety as good but at the same time claimed the there was not enough fruits and vegetables.

  4. [Integration of fundamental and applied medical and technical research made at the department of the biomedical systems, Moscow State Institute of Electronic Engineering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selishchev, S V

    2004-01-01

    The integration results of fundamental and applied medical-and-technical research made at the chair of biomedical systems, Moscow state institute of electronic engineering (technical university--MSIEE), are described in the paper. The chair is guided in its research activity by the traditions of higher education in Russia in the field of biomedical electronics and biomedical engineering. Its activities are based on the extrapolation of methods of electronic tools, computer technologies, physics, biology and medicine with due respect being paid to the requirements of practical medicine and to topical issues of research and design.

  5. [Business, politics, science, and visa versa: an institutional history of Brazilian medical journalism between 1827 and 1843].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Luiz Otávio

    2004-01-01

    This analysis of Brazil's first medical newspapers - Propagador das Ciências Médicas (1827-28); Semanário de Saúde Pública (1831-33); Diário de Saúde (1835-36); Revista Médica Fluminense (1835-41); Revista Médica Brasileira (1841-43) - shows how Rio de Janeiro's socio-cultural context made it possible for this type of publication to emerge within the city's dynamic, troubled environment of the 1820s and 30s. I argue that the distinguishing feature of Brazil's early medical journalism was a symbiosis between business (local publishing houses' commercial interests), politics (struggles for political hegemony during the consolidation of the Imperial State), and science (the movement to institutionalize medicine and affirm it as a science).

  6. [The medical, social and institutional challenges resulting from poliomyelitis: comprehensive rehabilitation in Argentina in the mid-twentieth century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Poliomyelitis on an epidemic scale gave rise to several challenges, one of which was the rehabilitation from the after-effects on many of the people who suffered from the disease. Paralysis and the ways it transformed the concept of physical rehabilitation (where the objective was only to restore the mobility of the affected muscles) and comprehensive rehabilitation that included social, educational and professional aspects in Argentina in the mid-twentieth century are the themes addressed in this article. It uses the methodology of institutional history that interacts in an ongoing manner with the history of health and disease.

  7. The influence of the residency application process on the online social networking behavior of medical students: a single institutional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strausburg, Matthew B; Djuricich, Alexander M; Carlos, W Graham; Bosslet, Gabriel T

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate medical students' behavior regarding online social networks (OSNs) in preparation for the residency matching process. The specific aims were to quantify the use of OSNs by students to determine whether and how these students were changing OSN profiles in preparation for the residency application process, and to determine attitudes toward residency directors using OSNs as a screening method to evaluate potential candidates. An e-mail survey was sent to 618 third- and fourth-year medical students at Indiana University School of Medicine over a three-week period in 2012. Statistical analysis was completed using nonparametric statistical tests. Of the 30.1% (183/608) who responded to the survey, 98.9% (181/183) of students reported using OSNs. More than half, or 60.1% (110/183), reported that they would (or did) alter their OSN profile before residency matching. Respondents' opinions regarding the appropriateness of OSN screening by residency directors were mixed; however, most respondents did not feel that their online OSN profiles should be used in the residency application process. The majority of respondents planned to (or did) alter their OSN profile in preparation for the residency match process. The majority believed that residency directors are screening OSN profiles during the matching process, although most did not believe their OSN profiles should be used in the residency application process. This study implies that the more medical students perceive that residency directors use social media in application screening processes, the more they will alter their online profiles to adapt to protect their professional persona.

  8. Mammographic Screening Provided by the National Health Insurance Corporation: A 1 year Audit in a Secondary Medical Institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Na Mi; Lee, A Lum; Lee, Hae Kyung; Yi, Beom Ha; Cha, Jang Gyu

    2009-01-01

    We performed a medical audit of the mammograms performed as part of the existing public cancer screening program to propose a plan for improving the program. We analyzed the results of 3,317 mammograms performed between March 2006 and February 2007. The American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (ACR BI R ADS) guidelines were used for follow-up and outcome monitoring. Cases in categories 0, 4, and 5 were followed up by a review of the patient's medical records and a phone call survey to determine the reasons for not continuing with follow-up examinations. The mean age of the women enrolled in this study was 51 years. The rate of recall was approximately 6.4% and the cancer detection rate was 2.1 out of every 1000 women examined. Positive predictive values (PPV) of 1, 2 and 3 were observed in 3.3%, 33.3% and 70.0%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 93.8%, respectively. As a result of the phone-call survey to determine the reasons for not following up with additional examinations, 53.8% of cases were 'belittled since there was no subjective symptom,' and 16.3%, 'didn't check the cancer examination notice thoroughly or did not fully understand it'. The result of medical audit indicates that reading and follow-up examinations were conducted in a relatively proper manner. Taking into consideration the characteristics of the objects for public examination, it is thought that active follow-up management as well as a written notice of the results, is necessary for patients who were found to be abnormal

  9. ROLE OF SPIRITUALITY AS A WAY OF COPING FROM BURNOUT IN MEDICAL STUDENTS OF A TERTIARY CARE INSTITUTE IN INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar Shrikant

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Medical students are exposed to various stressful conditions in their journey towards becoming a successful doctor leading to burnout. Adoption of faulty coping mechanisms increases the risk further. Spirituality as a way of coping can help to reduce burnout in these students. MATERIALS & METHODS We decided to conduct a study with aims to assess the prevalence of burnout in medical students, to study their socio-demographic profile and to understand the role of spirituality as a way of coping from burnout. Ethics Committee approval was obtained. It was a cross-sectional study wherein random 100 medical students studying in MBBS were selected. A semi-structured questionnaire to obtain details about socio- demographic profile, Burnout Measure-Short Version Scale and Spiritual attitude inventory were administered. RESULTS The present study shows prevalence of burnout as 64%. According to socio-demographic profile, there was no association of burnout with age. Burnout was significantly more in females (n=48; 75%, hostellers (n=51; 79.69% and students studying in final year (n=22; 34.37% or in internship (n=28; 43.75%. There was no significant difference in burnout and non-burnout Group with respect to rural or urban background and socioeconomic class. On comparing spirituality, it was found that students without burnout were more spiritual when compared to students with burnout, also severity of burnout was negatively correlated with spirituality in all four domains i.e religious spiritual practice, negative religious coping, sense of purpose/connection and sense of hope/control. Thus spirituality as a way of coping acts as a buffer and prevents from burnout.

  10. Mammographic Screening Provided by the National Health Insurance Corporation: A 1 year Audit in a Secondary Medical Institution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Na Mi; Lee, A Lum; Lee, Hae Kyung; Yi, Beom Ha; Cha, Jang Gyu [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-01-15

    We performed a medical audit of the mammograms performed as part of the existing public cancer screening program to propose a plan for improving the program. We analyzed the results of 3,317 mammograms performed between March 2006 and February 2007. The American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (ACR BI{sub R}ADS) guidelines were used for follow-up and outcome monitoring. Cases in categories 0, 4, and 5 were followed up by a review of the patient's medical records and a phone call survey to determine the reasons for not continuing with follow-up examinations. The mean age of the women enrolled in this study was 51 years. The rate of recall was approximately 6.4% and the cancer detection rate was 2.1 out of every 1000 women examined. Positive predictive values (PPV) of 1, 2 and 3 were observed in 3.3%, 33.3% and 70.0%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 93.8%, respectively. As a result of the phone-call survey to determine the reasons for not following up with additional examinations, 53.8% of cases were 'belittled since there was no subjective symptom,' and 16.3%, 'didn't check the cancer examination notice thoroughly or did not fully understand it'. The result of medical audit indicates that reading and follow-up examinations were conducted in a relatively proper manner. Taking into consideration the characteristics of the objects for public examination, it is thought that active follow-up management as well as a written notice of the results, is necessary for patients who were found to be abnormal.

  11. Report of the CIRRPC Executive Committee regarding EPA NESHAP regulations on radionuclides for medical research institutions and radiopharmaceutical manufacturers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-06-01

    There appears to be no compelling public health protection reason for EPA`s promulgation of NESHAP regulations to control air emissions of radioactive materials from NRC-licensed facilities engaged in activities associated with the practice and development of nuclear medicine. The NRC`s existing regulations provide the necessary controls for protection and EPA`s regulations would only add burdensome reporting requirements at substantial cost to medical treatment and diagnosis. Availability of nuclear medicine practice could be impacted and advancements through research delayed.

  12. Nature and frequency of medication errors in a geriatric ward: an Indonesian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernawati DK

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Desak Ketut Ernawati,1,2 Ya Ping Lee,2 Jeffery David Hughes21Faculty of Medicine, Udayana University, Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia; 2School of Pharmacy and Curtin Health Innovation and Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA, AustraliaPurpose: To determine the nature and frequency of medication errors during medication delivery processes in a public teaching hospital geriatric ward in Bali, Indonesia.Methods: A 20-week prospective study on medication errors occurring during the medication delivery process was conducted in a geriatric ward in a public teaching hospital in Bali, Indonesia. Participants selected were inpatients aged more than 60 years. Patients were excluded if they had a malignancy, were undergoing surgery, or receiving chemotherapy treatment. The occurrence of medication errors in prescribing, transcribing, dispensing, and administration were detected by the investigator providing in-hospital clinical pharmacy services.Results: Seven hundred and seventy drug orders and 7,662 drug doses were reviewed as part of the study. There were 1,563 medication errors detected among the 7,662 drug doses reviewed, representing an error rate of 20.4%. Administration errors were the most frequent medication errors identified (59%, followed by transcription errors (15%, dispensing errors (14%, and prescribing errors (7%. Errors in documentation were the most common form of administration errors. Of these errors, 2.4% were classified as potentially serious and 10.3% as potentially significant.Conclusion: Medication errors occurred in every stage of the medication delivery process, with administration errors being the most frequent. The majority of errors identified in the administration stage were related to documentation. Provision of in-hospital clinical pharmacy services could potentially play a significant role in detecting and preventing medication errors.Keywords: geriatric, medication errors, inpatients, medication delivery process

  13. An online spaced-education game to teach and assess medical students: a multi-institutional prospective trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfoot, B Price; Baker, Harley; Pangaro, Louis; Agarwal, Kathryn; Taffet, George; Mechaber, Alex J; Armstrong, Elizabeth G

    2012-10-01

    To investigate whether a spaced-education (SE) game can be an effective means of teaching core content to medical students and a reliable and valid method of assessing their knowledge. This nine-month trial (2008-2009) enrolled students from three U.S. medical schools. The SE game consisted of 100 validated multiple-choice questions-explanations in preclinical/clinical domains. Students were e-mailed two questions daily. Adaptive game mechanics re-sent questions in three or six weeks if answered, respectively, incorrectly or correctly. Questions expired if not answered on time (appointment dynamic). Students retired questions by answering each correctly twice consecutively (progression dynamic). Posting of relative performance fostered competition. Main outcome measures were baseline and completion scores. Seven-hundred thirty-one students enrolled. Median baseline score was 53% (interquartile range [IQR] 16) and varied significantly by year (Pgames. An SE game is an effective and well-accepted means of teaching core content and a reliable and valid method to assess student knowledge. SE games may be valuable tools to identify and remediate students who could benefit from additional educational support.

  14. OPERATION OF THE CALL CENTER AT A HIGH-TECHNOLOGY PEDIATRIC MEDICAL INSTITUTION (WITH COMMENTARY BY A.A. MODESTOV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Chernomurov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction of modern information systems is one of the important objectives of medicine, as it contributes to higher availability of medical services for the population. Public relations of medical organizations involve websites of these organizations, outdoor advertising and other information sources. However, obtainment of competent inquiry answers by telephone remains a problem. People often choose between organizations depending on quality of the obtained information. Apparently, the issue can be resolved by establishing call centers that are not merely communications centers, but are staffed with competent trained personnel, who support the organization’s interaction with patients (or the legal representatives thereof. The article presents the authors’ experience of establishing a call center dedicated to the organization’s public image development, as well as higher demand of the available services and promotion thereof. The fulfilled modernization resulted in a sharp increase in the amount of calls received (1,500‑1,600 within the working hours; 900 – before modernization and reduction in the number of complaints of busy line. 

  15. Low-level radioactive waste management handbook series: Low-level radioactive waste management in medical and biomedical research institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    Development of this handbook began in 1982 at the request of the Radhealth Branch of the California Department of Health Services. California Assembly Bill 1513 directed the DHS to ''evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of (1) reducing the volume, reactivity, and chemical and radioactive hazard of (low-level radioactive) waste and (2) substituting nonradioactive or short-lived radioactive materials for those radionuclides which require long-term isolation from the environment. A contract awarded to the University of California at Irvine-UCI (California Std. Agreement 79902), to develop a document focusing on methods for decreasing low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generation in institutions was a result of that directive. In early 1985, the US Department of Energy, through EG and G Idaho, Inc., contracted with UCI to expand, update, and revise the California text for national release

  16. Family history record and hereditary cancer risk perception according to National Cancer Institute criteria in a Spanish medical oncology service: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Rodas, Iván; López-Trabada, Daniel; Rupérez Blanco, Ana Belén; Custodio Cabello, Sara; Peligros Gómez, María Isabel; Orera Clemente, María; Calvo, Felipe A; Martín, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Identification of patients at risk of hereditary cancer is an essential component of oncology practice, since it enables clinicians to offer early detection and prevention programs. However, the large number of hereditary syndromes makes it difficult to take them all into account in daily practice. Consequently, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has suggested a series of criteria to guide initial suspicion. It was the aim of this study to assess the perception of the risk of hereditary cancer according to the NCI criteria in our medical oncology service. We retrospectively analyzed the recordings of the family history in new cancer patients seen in our medical oncology service from January to November 2009, only 1 year before the implementation of our multidisciplinary hereditary cancer program. The family history was recorded in only 175/621 (28%) patients. A total of 119 (19%) patients met 1 or more NCI criteria (1 criterion, n = 91; 2 criteria, n = 23; 3 criteria, n = 4; and 4 criteria, n = 1), and only 14 (11.4%) patients were referred to genetic counseling. This study shows that few clinicians record the family history. The perception of the risk of hereditary cancer is low according to the NCI criteria in our medical oncology service. These findings can be explained by the lack of a multidisciplinary hereditary cancer program when the study was performed. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. The Hugh Davies Collection: live electronic music and self-built electro-acoustic musical instruments, 1967–1975

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr James Mooney

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The Hugh Davies Collection (HDC at the Science Museum in London comprises 42 items of electronic sound apparatus owned by English experimental musician Hugh Davies (1943–2005, including self-built electro-acoustic musical instruments and modified sound production and manipulation hardware. An early proponent of ‘live electronic music’ (performed live on stage rather than constructed on magnetic tape in a studio, Davies’s DIY approach shaped the development of experimental and improvised musics from the late 1960s onwards. However, his practice has not been widely reported in the literature, hence little information is readily available about the material artefacts that constituted and enabled it. This article provides the first account of the development of Davies’s practice in relation to the objects in the HDC: from the modified electronic sound apparatus used in his early live electronic compositions (among the first of their kind by a British composer; through the ‘instrumental turn’ represented by his first self-built instrument, Shozyg I (1968; to his mature practice, where self-built instruments like Springboard Mk. XI (1974 replaced electronic transformation as the primary means by which Davies explored new and novel sound-worlds. As well as advancing knowledge of Davies’s pioneering work in live electronics and instrument-building and enhancing understanding of the objects in the HDC, this article shows how object biographic and archival methodologies can be combined to provide insight into the ways in which objects (instruments, technologies and practices shape each other over time.

  18. Effects of Rural Mutual Health Care on outpatient service utilization in Chinese village medical institutions: evidence from panel data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhongliang; Gao, Jianmin; Xue, Qinxiang; Yang, Xiaowei; Yan, Ju'e

    2009-07-01

    To solve the problem of 'Kan bing nan, kan bing gui' (medical treatment is difficult to access and expensive), a Harvard-led research team implemented a community-based health insurance scheme known as Rural Mutual Health Care (RMHC) in Chinese rural areas from 2004 to 2006. Two major policies adopted by RMHC included insurance coverage of outpatient services (demand-side policy) and drug policy (supply-side policy). This paper focuses on the effects of these two policies on outpatient service utilization in Chinese village clinics. The data used in this study are from 3-year household follow-up surveys. A generalized negative binomial regression model and a Heckman selection model were constructed using panel data from 2005 to 2007. The results indicate that the price elasticities of demand for outpatient visits and per-visit outpatient expenses were -1.5 and -0.553, respectively. After implementing the supply-side policy, outpatient visits and per-visit outpatient expenses decreased by 94.7 and 55.9%, respectively, controlling for insurance coverage. These findings can be used to make recommendations to the Chinese government on improving the health care system.

  19. Clinical trial of neutron capture therapy for brain tumors at New England Medical Center and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamenhof, R.G.A.; Madoc-Jones, H.; Harling, O.K.; Bernard, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    A proposal is submitted that is based on the conclusions of a NCT expert panel recently convened at BNL by the Department of Energy to evaluate the status of NCT and to recommend what preclinical tasks should be accomplished prior to a clinical study being undertaken. The proposal is for two years of preclinical research and preparations, followed in the third year by a pilot clinical trial of ten patients with grade-IV astrocytoma brain tumors, for whom the prognosis with existing treatment modalities is less than a 5% three-year survival rate. Preclinical tasks would include modifying the MIT Nuclear Reactor medical facility to produce an epithermal as well as the existing and highly thermalized neutron treatment beam; characterizing the transport behavior of these beams in both physical and mathematical models of the human head, and developing a treatment planning scheme for NCT; further development of the neutron-induced alpha-autoradiography track-etch method for measuring macro- and micro-distributions of B-10 uptake in tissues and blood; investigations into the B-10 cellular uptake pattern of human tumors; and examination of the nature of endothelial cell vascular damage in B-10-containing animals undergoing irradiation with neutrons. With the successful completion of the above preclinical tasks we feel we will be in a position to embark in the third year on a pilot clinical evaluation

  20. Goal-oriented incentive payment in CUDAM institution and variation in medical visit indicators in children under one and pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Morales

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available ntroduction: The establishment of National Integrated Health System in Uruguay from 2007 led to changes in the financing of the Collective Health Care Institutions (IAMC. They charge the National Health Fund (FONASA for their partners from social security (SS a health fee consists of: a A risk-adjusted capita (94%b A component for compliance with performance (6%, depending on the fulfillment of three goals of care. Goal 1 is a component of the child under 1 year and a component of the pregnant woman. For both components were established institutional baseline (July 2007-September 2008 in the control patients in both age groups. This motif COMPLIANCE quarterly reports with a fee of $48/user FONASA/month for average baseline compliment. Las for children and pregnant women were monitored for IAMC CUDAM 64% and 59% respectively.This institution has 42,000 users, 95% derived from SS, featuring 45 births, 585 children <1 year and 405 pregnant women tested monthly.Objectives: Evaluate two years (July-September 2010:a The mean percentages of compliance for children and pregnant CUDAM with medical controlb Relationship between income through the FONASA insitucional for goal 1 and children and pregnant women in medical management during the quarter.Methods: a retrospective study of children and pregnant women with medical control CUDAM. In turn, each target has 6 indicators (N: children, F: females. Child: N1 and N2: derivation and acquisition of the newborn, N3: controls as a guideline, N4: current vaccination, N5: ultrasound hip and pregnant, N6: accreditation in good feeding practices for infants and young children and pregnant women. Pregnant woman: M1 controls as a guideline, M2: leaf perinatal information system, M3: HIV and VDRL performed, M4: uptake in 1 st quarter, M5 and M6: dental checkup during pregnancy and postpartum.Results: The mean percentages of compliance for children and pregnant women increased to 92% (164 additional children and 88

  1. Medical care costs incurred by patients with smoking-related non-small cell lung cancer treated at the National Cancer Institute of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Oscar; Quintana-Carrillo, Roger Humberto; Ahumada-Curiel, Gabriel; Corona-Cruz, Jose Francisco; Correa-Acevedo, Elma; Zinser-Sierra, Juan; de la Mata-Moya, Dolores; Mohar-Betancourt, Alejandro; Morales-Oyarvide, Vicente; Reynales-Shigematsu, Luz Myriam

    2014-01-01

    Smoking is a public health problem in Mexico and worldwide; its economic impact on developing countries has not been well documented. The aim of this study was to assess the direct medical costs attributable to smoking incurred by lung cancer patients treated at the National Cancer Institute of Mexico (INCan). The study was conducted at INCan in 2009. We carried out a cost of illness (COI) methodology, using data derived from an expert panel consensus and from medical chart review. A panel of experts developed a diagnostic-therapeutic guide that combined the hospital patient pathways and the infrastructure, human resources, technology, and services provided by the medical units at INCan. Cost estimates in Mexican pesos were adjusted by inflation and converted into US Dollars using the 2013 FIX exchange rate for foreign transactions (1 USD = 13.06 Mexican pesos). A 297 incident cases diagnosed with any type of lung cancer were analyzed. According to clinical stage, the costs per patient were 13,456; 35,648; 106,186; and 144,555 USD, for lung cancer stages I, II, III, and IV respectively. The weighted average annual cost/patient was and 139,801 USD and the average annual cost/patient that was attributable to smoking was 92,269 USD. This cost was independent of the clinical stage, with stage IV representing 96% of the annual cost. The total annual cost of smoking-related lung cancer at INCan was 19,969,781 USD. The medical care costs of lung cancer attributable to smoking represent a high cost both for INCan and the Mexican health sector. These costs could be reduced if all provisions established in the Framework Convention of Tobacco Control of the World Health Organization were implemented in Mexico.

  2. Procedure to evaluate and control efficiently the operations management of medical equipment in the maintenance unit of a health institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrera-Galán Michael

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance management plays a very important role in the success of any company. As a consequence of this, in the year of 2013, a study was carried out in health facilities found in the South Eastern Region of Jamaica with the objective of evaluating the existing Maintenance Management Program for Medical Equipment. Among the results obtained, it showed that there is an inadequacy in the existing program whose principal deficiency is attributed to the operations management. As such, this work proposes a procedure for evaluating and controlling in an efficient manner the operations management within the Biomedical Department which forms part of the South East Regional Health Authority Maintenance Unit (SERHAMU, this latter is found on the premises of the Bustamante Hospital for Children (BHC, Jamaica. The method used to develop the procedure (GOMHO is based fundamentally on the design of: a codification system to identify control registers and to record failures associated with each equipment, a system of placing equipment into categories and further differentiating them based on the potential hazard such pose on the human body in the event of an operational failure. In addition, this procedure gives the SERHAMU at the BHC the opportunity to calculate the amount of human resources needed to carry out efficiently the preventative and corrective maintenance work being demanded on the department. During the implementation phase, the results demonstrated that from the control procedure designed there was an improvement in the planning and carrying out of maintenance work and a better system of monitoring the activities that are executed. Also, it was evidenced that there is a 61.53% of the amount of human resources needed to carry out the maintenance actions.

  3. THE MUTIFACTORIAL PATTERN OF OSTEOPOROSIS: A REVIEW OF THE RESEARCHES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF THERAPY, INSTITUTE OF POSTGRADUATE EDUCATION, YAROSLAVL STATE MEDICAL UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. B. Ershova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis (OP is one of the most common diseases and is characterized by serious clinical manifestations such as low-energy bone fractures that cause severe social consequences. In this connection, OP is now receiving much attention worldwide. In Yaroslavl, the Department of Therapy (Head, Professor N.I. Korshunov, MD, Institute of Postgraduate Education, Yaroslavl State Medical University (Chancellor, Prof. A.V. Pavlov, MD, has been intensively conducting researches into different aspects of OP for more than 20 years. The main areas of the investigations performed are the issues of the epidemiology and outcomes of osteoporotic fractures, the relationship of OP to different diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, cardiovascular diseases, as well as the specific features of the development of OP in fertile men and women and the problem of calcium and vitamin D deficiency in pregnant women. 

  4. The Medical Research Council (UK)/Uganda Virus Research Institute Uganda Research Unit on AIDS--'25 years of research through partnerships'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaleebu, P; Kamali, A; Seeley, J; Elliott, A M; Katongole-Mbidde, E

    2015-02-01

    For the past 25 years, the Medical Research Council/Uganda Virus Research Institute Uganda Research Unit on AIDS has conducted research on HIV-1, coinfections and, more recently, on non-communicable diseases. Working with various partners, the research findings of the Unit have contributed to the understanding and control of the HIV epidemic both in Uganda and globally, and informed the future development of biomedical HIV interventions, health policy and practice. In this report, as we celebrate our silver jubilee, we describe some of these achievements and the Unit's multidisciplinary approach to research. We also discuss the future direction of the Unit; an exemplar of a partnership that has been largely funded from the north but led in the south. © 2014 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Effect of a dedicated oral care program on periodontal status of medically compromised patients at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute Dental Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Robert; Hebbes, Trudy

    2016-01-01

    Medically compromised patients attending the dental clinic at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute have considerable gingival inflammation and breath odor. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of toothbrushing on the periodontal status of these patients and to determine if there were any additional benefit in combining brushing with an application of an antibiotic rinse. During the first 7 days of the study, the teeth of 11 participants were brushed twice a day by a dental hygienist using a soft-bristle suction toothbrush without toothpaste. Soft interproximal brushes were used to clean interproximal surfaces from the facial aspect. During the second week, facial and interproximal cleaning were repeated in the same patients, but the toothbrush and interproximal brush were dipped in 10-mL of a solution consisting of water and 40 mg/mL of metronidazole with nystatin. Each patient underwent an oral examination and biofilm sampling at baseline, after brushing without toothpaste (week 1), and after brushing with antibiotic solution (week 2). After week 1, tissues improved substantially, and there was a notable change in the biofilm on the teeth. The addition of an antibiotic solution increased healing and resulted in a further decrease in oral biofilm. Medically compromised patients would benefit considerably from a treatment regimen of antibiotic solution to decrease oral infection followed by a daily oral care program of brushing and interdental cleaning to maintain healthy oral tissues.

  6. Consensus analysis of sastric formulations used by non-institutionally trained siddha medical practitioners of Virudhunagar and Tirunelveli districts of Tamil Nadu, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutheeswaran, S; Pandikumar, P; Chellappandian, M; Ignacimuthu, S; Duraipandiyan, V; Logamanian, M

    2014-04-11

    Siddha system of traditional medicine has been practiced in Tamil Nadu. This system of medicine has a high number of non-institutionally trained practitioners but studies on their traditional medicinal knowledge are not adequate. The present study is aimed to document and analyze the sastric (traditional) formulations used by the non-institutionally trained siddha medical practitioners in Virudhunagar and Tirunelveli districts of Tamil Nadu, India. After obtaining prior informed consent, interviews were conducted with 115 non-institutionally trained siddha medical practitioners about the sastric formulations used by them for the treatment. Successive free listing method was adopted to collect the data and the data were analyzed by calculating Informant Consensus Factor (Fic) and Informant Agreement Ratio (IAR). The study documented data regarding 194 sastric formulations and they were classified into plant, mineral and animal based formulations. Quantitative analysis showed that 62.5% of the formulations were plant based, while the mineral based formulations had a high mean number of citations and versatile uses. Gastrointestinal (12.0%), kapha (11.3%) and dermatological (10.8%) ailments had a high percentage of citations. Jaundice had a high Fic value (0.750) followed by the dermatological ailments. The illness categories with high Fic values under each type of formulation were as follows: jaundice, aphrodisiac and urinary ailments (plant based); jaundice, cuts & wounds and dermatological ailments (mineral based); and hemorrhoids, kapha ailments and heart ailments (animal based formulations). The scientific studies conducted with important formulations under each illness category are discussed. The present study indicated the importance of some illnesses over the others and inclusion of new illnesses under each formulation. The ingredients used to prepare these formulations have shown varying degrees of scientific evidence; generally limited studies were available

  7. Instituciones de asistencia médica colectiva en el Uruguay: impacto de la regulación Collective medical care institutions in Uruguay: Impact of the regulation

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    M. Buglioli

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Con más de un siglo de historia en el país y brindando cobertura médica a más de la mitad de los uruguayos a través de una modalidad que integra las funciones de seguro y prestador de servicios, las instituciones de asistencia médica colectiva (IAMC han presentado en la última década un déficit persistente: el 52% de los beneficiarios están adscritos a instituciones con un déficit mayor al 4% sobre ingresos. Se trata de analizar cuál ha sido el impacto de la regulación en algunos aspectos relacionados con el comportamiento de la oferta ­concentración y cuotas del mercado, selección de riesgos, fijación de los precios­ y de la demanda ­selección adversa y el efecto de los copagos en la utilización de servicios­. El mensaje desde la regulación no parece haber promovido los incentivos adecuados para un comportamiento eficiente y de calidad por parte de las IAMC, siendo uno de los temas clave a abordar en un contexto de reforma sectorial.Collective medical care institutions have been in existence for more than a century and have provided medical care to more than half of Uruguayans through a modality that integrates insurance and provision of services. In the last decade, these institutions have presented a persistent deficit: 52% of the beneficiaries are members of institutions with a deficit of more than 4%. We analyze the impact of the regulation of certain aspects related to the behavior of supply (market concentration and quotas, risk selection, price fixing and demand (adverse selection and the effect of the co-payments in services utilization. The regulation seems not to have promoted the necessary incentives to efficiency and quality by the IAMC, one of the key aspects to be approached in the context of sectorial reform.

  8. THE MOST COMMON REASONS FOR MEDICAL REFERRALS TO THE REHABILITATION OF THE MOTION ORGAN WITHIN THE PREVENTION OF DISABILITY PENSION OF SOCIAL INSURANCE INSTITUTION

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    Łukasz Polit

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the second half of the twentieth century, there was a significant increase in the incidence of civilisation diseases caused by the increasing pace of life, and a greater degree of industrialization and the ubiquitous stress. This phenomena was accompanied by the problem of unemployment and an aging of a population. An annual increasing number of people staying at long-term sick leave and people who completely lose their ability to work was the reason for the introduction by Social Insurance Institution a system of rehabilitation within the prevention of disability pension which mission is to help people to return to active work. Thanks to the rehabilitation system insured people gain not only the health improvement and functioning of the body but are given a chance to recover or improve ability to work which they lost as a result of the disease. Aim of the study : Finding the most common reasons for medical referrals to rehabilitation of the organ motion within the prevention of disability pension by Social Insurance Institution comparing gender, age, occupation, co-existing illnesses and disease entity which is the basis for referral to rehabilitation. Methodology: There was analysed information about finished rehabilitation among 1529 patients who were rehabilitated to be more efficient within the prevention of disability pension of Social Insurance Institution in Non-Public Health Establishment “Medicus” in Kielce. Results : In the period 2005–2011 there was a group of 1529 patients who were rehabilitated within the prevention of disability pension of Social Insurance Institution, including 549 women (37%, and 980 men (63%. In all age groups both among women and men the basic disease entity was the disorder of roots of the nerves (G54. Overcharging of the spinal structures occurred often within men whose main forms of activity were connected with physical effort and women whose occupation was mainly a clerical work

  9. Product Failures in Respirators and Consumables: Analysis of Field Safety Notices of 2005-2013 Publicized by the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannig, Jürgen; Siekmeier, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    The current European system governed by the three EC directives 93/42/EEC (Medical Device Directive), 98/79/EC (In-Vitro Diagnostic Directive) and 90/385/EEC (Active Implantable Medical Device Directive) regulates marketing and post-market surveillance of medical devices in the European Economic Area (EEA). In cases of incidents raising the field safety corrective actions (FSCA), manufacturers have to inform the responsible Competent Authority (CA; in Germany this is the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices, BfArM) and the public by field safety notices (FSN). In this study we analyzed FSN of respirators and consumables directly required for their function, whereas devices for anesthesia and gas delivery were excluded. FSCA and FSN of 2005-2013 publicized by BfArM for the included products were analyzed with respect to the MEDDEV 2.12-1 rev. 8. In total, 60 FSCA were publicized. German and English FSN were found in 59/53 cases, respectively. FSN were clearly characterized as FSN in 44/38 cases and declaration of the type of action in 45/44 cases, respectively. Product names were provided in all cases. Lot numbers or other information for product characterization were available in 7/7 and 43/40 cases, respectively. Detailed information regarding FSCA and product malfunction was found in all cases. Information on product related risks with previous use of affected devices was provided in 42/38 cases. In 53/53 cases manufacturers provided information to mitigate product related risks. Requests to pass FSN to persons needing awareness in the organization were found in 27/24 cases. Contact data were provided in 53/48 cases, respectively. Confirmation that a CA was informed was found in 28/26 cases and in 19/15 cases a customer confirmation was included. The identified risks were: total loss of function (19/16), short circuit (1/1) and burn (3/3), and inhalation of foreign particles (1/1) which might cause severe risk to patients and users. The most frequent

  10. Synchronization of Coupled Different Chaotic FitzHugh-Nagumo Neurons with Unknown Parameters under Communication-Direction-Dependent Coupling

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    Muhammad Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the chaotic behavior and synchronization of two different coupled chaotic FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN neurons with unknown parameters under external electrical stimulation (EES. The coupled FHN neurons of different parameters admit unidirectional and bidirectional gap junctions in the medium between them. Dynamical properties, such as the increase in synchronization error as a consequence of the deviation of neuronal parameters for unlike neurons, the effect of difference in coupling strengths caused by the unidirectional gap junctions, and the impact of large time-delay due to separation of neurons, are studied in exploring the behavior of the coupled system. A novel integral-based nonlinear adaptive control scheme, to cope with the infeasibility of the recovery variable, for synchronization of two coupled delayed chaotic FHN neurons of different and unknown parameters under uncertain EES is derived. Further, to guarantee robust synchronization of different neurons against disturbances, the proposed control methodology is modified to achieve the uniformly ultimately bounded synchronization. The parametric estimation errors can be reduced by selecting suitable control parameters. The effectiveness of the proposed control scheme is illustrated via numerical simulations.

  11. Synchronization of coupled different chaotic FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons with unknown parameters under communication-direction-dependent coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Muhammad; Rehan, Muhammad; Khaliq, Abdul; Saeed-ur-Rehman; Hong, Keum-Shik

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the chaotic behavior and synchronization of two different coupled chaotic FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN) neurons with unknown parameters under external electrical stimulation (EES). The coupled FHN neurons of different parameters admit unidirectional and bidirectional gap junctions in the medium between them. Dynamical properties, such as the increase in synchronization error as a consequence of the deviation of neuronal parameters for unlike neurons, the effect of difference in coupling strengths caused by the unidirectional gap junctions, and the impact of large time-delay due to separation of neurons, are studied in exploring the behavior of the coupled system. A novel integral-based nonlinear adaptive control scheme, to cope with the infeasibility of the recovery variable, for synchronization of two coupled delayed chaotic FHN neurons of different and unknown parameters under uncertain EES is derived. Further, to guarantee robust synchronization of different neurons against disturbances, the proposed control methodology is modified to achieve the uniformly ultimately bounded synchronization. The parametric estimation errors can be reduced by selecting suitable control parameters. The effectiveness of the proposed control scheme is illustrated via numerical simulations.

  12. Effect of spatially correlated noise on stochastic synchronization in globally coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron systems

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    Yange Shao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of stochastic synchronization in globally coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN neuron system subjected to spatially correlated Gaussian noise is investigated based on dynamical mean-field approximation (DMA and direct simulation (DS. Results from DMA are in good quantitative or qualitative agreement with those from DS for weak noise intensity and larger system size. Whether the consisting single FHN neuron is staying at the resting state, subthreshold oscillatory regime, or the spiking state, our investigation shows that the synchronization ratio of the globally coupled system becomes higher as the noise correlation coefficient increases, and thus we conclude that spatial correlation has an active effect on stochastic synchronization, and the neurons can achieve complete synchronization in the sense of statistics when the noise correlation coefficient tends to one. Our investigation also discloses that the noise spatial correlation plays the same beneficial role as the global coupling strength in enhancing stochastic synchronization in the ensemble. The result might be useful in understanding the information coding mechanism in neural systems.

  13. The Kreek-McHugh-Schluger-Kellogg scale: a new, rapid method for quantifying substance abuse and its possible applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Scott H; McHugh, Pauline F; Bell, Kathy; Schluger, James H; Schluger, Rosemary P; LaForge, K Steven; Ho, Ann; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2003-03-01

    The new Kreek-McHugh-Schluger-Kellogg scale ('KMSK scale') is designed to quantify self-exposure to opiates, cocaine, alcohol, and/or tobacco. Each section of the KMSK scale assesses the frequency, amount, and duration of use of a particular substance during the individual's period of greatest consumption. The scale also assesses the mode of use, whether the substance use is current or past, and whether each substance is the substance of choice. The administration time is under 5 min. In an initial validation study of this scale, 100 human subjects were administered the KMSK scale concurrently with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-I DSM-IV version). The sensitivity and specificity were very good for opiates, cocaine, and alcohol use. In addition, the correlations between KMSK scores and the number of SCID-I criteria items met were excellent for opiates and cocaine and good for alcohol use. Nicotine dependence was not assessed in this study as there is no SCID-I nicotine criteria. These preliminary results show that the KMSK scale may have both construct validity similar to that of other established self-report measures and the potential to be an effective screening instrument for the assessment of a lifetime diagnosis of alcohol, opiate, or cocaine dependence. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.

  14. Nonlinear oscillations of the FitzHugh-Nagumo equations under combined external and two-frequency parametric excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatchim Bemmo, D.; Siewe Siewe, M.; Tchawoua, C.

    2011-01-01

    The continuous FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN for short) model is transformed into modified van der Pol oscillator with asymmetry under external and two-frequency parametric excitations. At the first, the dependence of the solutions on a combined external and two-frequency parametric stimulus forcing is investigated. By using the multiple scale method, ranges of applied current and/or parametric forcing in which nonlinear oscillations are observed are described. Second, when the multiple scale method cannot be used, we numerically prove that in the modified van der Pol oscillator with asymmetry under external and two-frequency parametric excitations, chaos and periodic solution depending on the combination between different frequencies of the model should appear. We also show that the amplitude of the oscillations can be reduced or increased. To do this, we perform the study of the FHN model by choosing a range of parameters exhibiting Hopf bifurcation and two qualitative different regimes in phase portrait. - Highlights: → We model both external and two-frequency parametric excitations in FHN equations. → We examine effects of harmonic forcing on coupled nonlinear oscillator. → Jump and hysteresis phenomena are observed in the dynamical response. → By increasing the constant stimulus we obtain limit cycle. → Some combinations of frequencies produce limit cycle and chaos for other.

  15. Workplace interpersonal conflicts among the healthcare workers: Retrospective exploration from the institutional incident reporting system of a university-affiliated medical center.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jih-Shuin Jerng

    Full Text Available There have been concerns about the workplace interpersonal conflict (WIC among healthcare workers. As healthcare organizations have applied the incident reporting system (IRS widely for safety-related incidents, we proposed that this system might provide a channel to explore the WICs.We retrospectively reviewed the reports to the IRS from July 2010 to June 2013 in a medical center. We identified the WICs and typed these conflicts according to the two foci (task content/process and interpersonal relationship and the three properties (disagreement, interference, and negative emotion, and analyzed relevant data.Of the 147 incidents with WIC, the most common related processes were patient transfer (20%, laboratory tests (17%, surgery (16% and medical imaging (16%. All of the 147 incidents with WIC focused on task content or task process, but 41 (27.9% also focused on the interpersonal relationship. We found disagreement, interference, and negative emotion in 91.2%, 88.4%, and 55.8% of the cases, respectively. Nurses (57% were most often the reporting workers, while the most common encounter was the nurse-doctor interaction (33%, and the majority (67% of the conflicts were experienced concurrently with the incidents. There was a significant difference in the distribution of worker job types between cases focused on the interpersonal relationship and those without (p = 0.0064. The doctors were more frequently as the reporter when the conflicts focused on the interpersonal relationship (34.1% than not on it (17.0%. The distributions of worker job types were similar between those with and without negative emotion (p = 0.125.The institutional IRS is a useful place to report the workplace interpersonal conflicts actively. The healthcare systems need to improve the channels to communicate, manage and resolve these conflicts.

  16. Workplace interpersonal conflicts among the healthcare workers: Retrospective exploration from the institutional incident reporting system of a university-affiliated medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerng, Jih-Shuin; Huang, Szu-Fen; Liang, Huey-Wen; Chen, Li-Chin; Lin, Chia-Kuei; Huang, Hsiao-Fang; Hsieh, Ming-Yuan; Sun, Jui-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    There have been concerns about the workplace interpersonal conflict (WIC) among healthcare workers. As healthcare organizations have applied the incident reporting system (IRS) widely for safety-related incidents, we proposed that this system might provide a channel to explore the WICs. We retrospectively reviewed the reports to the IRS from July 2010 to June 2013 in a medical center. We identified the WICs and typed these conflicts according to the two foci (task content/process and interpersonal relationship) and the three properties (disagreement, interference, and negative emotion), and analyzed relevant data. Of the 147 incidents with WIC, the most common related processes were patient transfer (20%), laboratory tests (17%), surgery (16%) and medical imaging (16%). All of the 147 incidents with WIC focused on task content or task process, but 41 (27.9%) also focused on the interpersonal relationship. We found disagreement, interference, and negative emotion in 91.2%, 88.4%, and 55.8% of the cases, respectively. Nurses (57%) were most often the reporting workers, while the most common encounter was the nurse-doctor interaction (33%), and the majority (67%) of the conflicts were experienced concurrently with the incidents. There was a significant difference in the distribution of worker job types between cases focused on the interpersonal relationship and those without (p = 0.0064). The doctors were more frequently as the reporter when the conflicts focused on the interpersonal relationship (34.1%) than not on it (17.0%). The distributions of worker job types were similar between those with and without negative emotion (p = 0.125). The institutional IRS is a useful place to report the workplace interpersonal conflicts actively. The healthcare systems need to improve the channels to communicate, manage and resolve these conflicts.

  17. OneFlorida Clinical Research Consortium: Linking a Clinical and Translational Science Institute With a Community-Based Distributive Medical Education Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenkman, Elizabeth; Hurt, Myra; Hogan, William; Carrasquillo, Olveen; Smith, Steven; Brickman, Andrew; Nelson, David

    2018-03-01

    Developing a national pragmatic clinical trial infrastructure is central to understanding the effectiveness of interventions applied under usual conditions and where people receive health care. To address this challenge, three Florida universities-the University of Florida Clinical and Translational Science Institute, Florida State University (with its community-based distributive medical education model), and the University of Miami-created (2010-2013) a statewide consortium, the OneFlorida Clinical Research Consortium, to support the conduct of pragmatic clinical trials and provide mentored research experiences for medical and graduate students in real-world practice settings. OneFlorida has four programs, which report to a steering committee with membership from each partner, community members, and the state Medicaid agency and Department of Health to ensure shared governance. The Clinical Research Program provides support to conduct research in the network and uses champions to engage community clinicians. The Citizen Scientist Program has community members who provide input on health topics of importance to them, study design, recruitment and retention strategies, and the interpretation of findings. The Data Trust Program contains electronic health record and health care claims data for 10.6 million Floridians. The Minority Education Program, in collaboration with three historically black colleges and universities, offers minority junior faculty mentoring in pragmatic clinical trials and implementation science. OneFlorida has implemented 27 studies with diverse patient populations and in diverse community practice settings. To identify evidence-based best practices from the clinical trials conducted in the network, foster their implementation, and expand research training opportunities.

  18. Isolamento e caracterização de Pseudomonas maltophilia (Hugh & Ryschenkow, 1960 de material clínico humano, na cidade do Rio de Janeiro Isolating and characterization of Pseudomonas maltophilia (Hugh & Ryschenkow, 1960 from human clinical specimens, in Rio de Janeiro, Guanabara, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altair A. Zebral

    1973-01-01

    Full Text Available Os autores estudaram as propriedades morfo-bioquímicas e a sensibilidade às substâncias antimicrobianas, de uma nova e rara espécie de Pseudomonas, a Pseudomonas maltophilia (Hugh & Ryschenkow, 1960, isolada de secração vaginal. Como características marcantes, dentre mais de 65 testadas, as amostras estudadas mostraram ser: oxidase negativa e lisina descarboxilase positiva; produziram desoxiribonuclease e um pigmento escuro que se difunde no meio; atacaram oxidativamente a maltose tanto em meio complexo nitrogenado como em meio de Hugh & Leifson e hidrolisaram a esculina. As amostras foram sensíveis ao cloranfenicol, gentamicina, kanamicina, colistin e gabromicina.The authors have studied the morpho-biochemical properties and the sensibility at antimicrobial drugs, of specie of Pseudomonas, the Pseudomonas maltophilia, (Hugh & Ryschenkow, 1960, isolated from vaginal secretion. Since important characteristics among more of sixty-five tested, the strains studied show to be: oxidase negative and lysine decarboxylase positive; to present deoxyrononuclease activity and produced a diffusible brown pigment: acid was produced by oxidation of maltose as much in nitrogenous complex medium as in Hugh & Leifson medium and they hydrolise the esculin. the strains was sensible, for the colistin chloranfenicol, gabromycin, gentamycin and nalidix acid.

  19. A framework for an institutional high level security policy for the processing of medical data and their transmission through the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilioudis, C; Pangalos, G

    2001-01-01

    The Internet provides many advantages when used for interaction and data sharing among health care providers, patients, and researchers. However, the advantages provided by the Internet come with a significantly greater element of risk to the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of information. It is therefore essential that Health Care Establishments processing and exchanging medical data use an appropriate security policy. To develop a High Level Security Policy for the processing of medical data and their transmission through the Internet, which is a set of high-level statements intended to guide Health Care Establishment personnel who process and manage sensitive health care information. We developed the policy based on a detailed study of the existing framework in the EU countries, USA, and Canada, and on consultations with users in the context of the Intranet Health Clinic project. More specifically, this paper has taken into account the major directives, technical reports, law, and recommendations that are related to the protection of individuals with regard to the processing of personal data, and the protection of privacy and medical data on the Internet. We present a High Level Security Policy for Health Care Establishments, which includes a set of 7 principles and 45 guidelines detailed in this paper. The proposed principles and guidelines have been made as generic and open to specific implementations as possible, to provide for maximum flexibility and adaptability to local environments. The High Level Security Policy establishes the basic security requirements that must be addressed to use the Internet to safely transmit patient and other sensitive health care information. The High Level Security Policy is primarily intended for large Health Care Establishments in Europe, USA, and Canada. It is clear however that the general framework presented here can only serve as reference material for developing an appropriate High Level Security Policy in a

  20. Pediatrics Department of the Russian Medical Academy of Continuous Professional Education and Moscow Research Clinical Institute of Pediatry and Children Surgery – half century hand in hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Zakharova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The long-term cooperation of the two scientific institutions contributing to the professional development of pediatricians is based on the long-term scientific relations of the Department of Pediatrics of the Russian Medical Academy of Continuing Professional Education and the Moscow Research Institute of Pediatrics and Pediatric Surgery (now the Research Institute of Pediatrics named after Academician Yu.E.Veltischev. The role of remarkable pediatric scientists – G.N. Speransky, Yu.E. Veltstschev, M.S. Ignatova, N.A. Korovina in the development of these links and pediatric science in Russia. 

  1. [Current cases of falsified medicinal products within the competence of the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM) : Case studies and extent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittstock, Marcus; Paeschke, Norbert

    2017-11-01

    The nature of a falsification of a medicinal product can vary a lot. Therefore the means to detect them and the potential risk to patient safety can also be very different. The whole range of falsification will be described using observed cases from the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM).Based on the relatively low number of detected cases of falsified medicines, the legal supply chain can still be regarded as safe. It has to be assumed that in the illegal supply chain, e. g. illegal internet trade, the majority of the offered medicinal products are not only falsifications due to illegal trade but because they are completely falsified. Therefore there is an especially high risk for the consumer to be harmed by medicinal products that do not fulfil the required specifications.The trend indicates that increased efforts will be necessary to keep the legal supply chain safe and to contain illegal trade with falsifications. The higher federal authorities BfArM, PEI and BVL are involved in this task by coordinating and ensuring the flow of information to the concerned authorities and stakeholders as well as informing the public. Increased efforts are also necessary due to the rising involvement of organised crime in the falsification of medicinal products. A package of measures was enacted with the Falsified Medicines Directive 2011/62/EU to protect the legal supply chain from falsified medicinal products.

  2. The P50 Research Center in Perioperative Sciences: How the investment by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences in team science has reduced postburn mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnerty, Celeste C; Capek, Karel D; Voigt, Charles; Hundeshagen, Gabriel; Cambiaso-Daniel, Janos; Porter, Craig; Sousse, Linda E; El Ayadi, Amina; Zapata-Sirvent, Ramon; Guillory, Ashley N; Suman, Oscar E; Herndon, David N

    2017-09-01

    Since the inception of the P50 Research Center in Injury and Peri-operative Sciences (RCIPS) funding mechanism, the National Institute of General Medical Sciences has supported a team approach to science. Many advances in critical care, particularly burns, have been driven by RCIPS teams. In fact, burns that were fatal in the early 1970s, prior to the inception of the P50 RCIPS program, are now routinely survived as a result of the P50-funded research. The advances in clinical care that led to the reduction in postburn death were made by optimizing resuscitation, incorporating early excision and grafting, bolstering acute care including support for inhalation injury, modulating the hypermetabolic response, augmenting the immune response, incorporating aerobic exercise, and developing antiscarring strategies. The work of the Burn RCIPS programs advanced our understanding of the pathophysiologic response to burn injury. As a result, the effects of a large burn on all organ systems have been studied, leading to the discovery of persistent dysfunction, elucidation of the underlying molecular mechanisms, and identification of potential therapeutic targets. Survival and subsequent patient satisfaction with quality of life have increased. In this review article, we describe the contributions of the Galveston P50 RCIPS that have changed postburn care and have considerably reduced postburn mortality.

  3. Medical and sanitation activity of the Institute of Nuclear Safety and Protection of the French Commissariat a l'energie atomic after the Chernobyl' accident within the Soviet-French cooperation frameworks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nenot, J.C.; Pauli, E.

    1990-01-01

    The Institute of Nuclear Safety and Protection intends to help in surveillance of the population subjected to radiation effects, environmental monitoring around the Chernobyl' NPP, organization of works and observations dealing with radioecology. The program of two-side French-Soviet actions including assistance for physicians in professional patient treatments, medical assistant for children and families evacuated to Kiev

  4. Geochemical reanalysis of historical U.S. Geological Survey sediment samples from the Zane Hills, Hughes and Shungnak quadrangles, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werdon, Melanie B.; Granitto, Matthew; Azain, Jaime S.

    2015-01-01

    The State of Alaska’s Strategic and Critical Minerals (SCM) Assessment project, a State-funded Capital Improvement Project (CIP), is designed to evaluate Alaska’s statewide potential for SCM resources. The SCM Assessment is being implemented by the Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys (DGGS), and involves obtaining new airborne-geophysical, geological, and geochemical data. As part of the SCM Assessment, thousands of historical geochemical samples from DGGS, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and U.S. Bureau of Mines archives are being reanalyzed by DGGS using modern, quantitative, geochemical-analytical methods. The objective is to update the statewide geochemical database to more clearly identify areas in Alaska with SCM potential.The USGS is also undertaking SCM-related geologic studies in Alaska through the federally funded Alaska Critical Minerals cooperative project. DGGS and USGS share the goal of evaluating Alaska’s strategic and critical minerals potential and together created a Letter of Agreement (signed December 2012) and a supplementary Technical Assistance Agreement (#14CMTAA143458) to facilitate the two agencies’ cooperative work. Under these agreements, DGGS contracted the USGS in Denver to reanalyze historical USGS sediment samples from Alaska.For this report, DGGS funded reanalysis of 105 historical USGS sediment samples from the statewide Alaska Geochemical Database Version 2.0 (AGDB2; Granitto and others, 2013). Samples were chosen from the Zane Hills area in the Hughes and Shungnak quadrangles, Alaska (fig. 1). The USGS was responsible for sample retrieval from the National Geochemical Sample Archive (NGSA) in Denver, Colorado through the final quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) of the geochemical analyses obtained through the USGS contract lab. The new geochemical data are published in this report as a coauthored DGGS report, and will be incorporated into the statewide geochemical databases of both agencies.

  5. A Study on the Socio demographic Profile of the Attendees at the Integrated Counseling and Testing Centre of Institute of Medical Sciences BHU, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Kumari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV counseling and testing services are a key entry point to the prevention of HIV infection and to the treatment and care of the people who are infected with HIV. The Integrated Counseling and Testing Centre (ICTC services are a cost effective intervention in the prevention of HIV/AIDS.Aims: To study the socio demographic characteristics of the attendees at the ICTC centre.Material and Methods: Setting – ICTC of Institutes of Medical Sciences BHU, Varanasi, Study Design: A cross-sectional, record based study, Study duration: The study population included 41159 clients who attended the ICTC centres from January 2009 to December 2011.Results: An overall 12.85% of the ICTC attendees were HIV Seropositive subjects. During 2009 to 2011. i.e. during past 3 years total males tested for HIV at the ICTC were 23326, out of which 3202 were HIV+ve showing positivity rate of 13.7%, while total females tested were 16671 out of which 2063 were HIV+ve showing positivity rate of about 12.4%. Consecutively in the last three years maximum load of patients was from the age groups 35-49 years (19.13% followed by 25-34 years (15.4%.Conclusion: People’s attitudes towards HIV are changing after the introduction of the ICTC, which plays a major role in the primary and secondary prevention of HIV. There is a more urgent need for the introduction of interventional measures like sex education and preventive education among the general population

  6. [Kidney transplantation: consecutive one thousand transplants at National Institute of Medical Sciences and Nutrition Salvador Zubirán in Mexico City].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino-Vazquez, Lluvia Aurora; Sánchez-Ugarte, Regina; Morales-Buenrostro, Luis Eduardo

    2011-09-01

    The National Institute of Medical Sciences and Nutrition Salvador Zubiran (INCMNSZ) is a specialty hospital for adults and a teaching hospital, which performed the first kidney transplant in 1967; in 1971 it began the formal program of renal transplantation. Recently, it was performed the kidney transplant number 1000, so this article presents the information of these thousand kidney transplants, with special emphasis on survival. Retrospective cohort study which included 1000 consecutive transplants performed at the INCMNSZ between 1967 and June 2011. It describes the general characteristics of kidney transplant recipients, transplant-related variables, initial immunosuppression and complications. Descriptive statistics were used. The survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. It shows the patient survival, graft survival censored for death with functional graft and total graft survival (uncensored). Patient survival at 1, 3, 5, 10, 15, and 20 years was 94.9, 89.6, 86.8, 76.9, 66.1, and 62.2%, respectively. Graft survival censored for death with functional graft at 1, 3, 5, 10, 15, and 20 years was 93.1, 87.1, 83.5, 73.9, 62.7, and 52.5% respectively. Risk factors associated with poorer graft survival were younger age of the recipient, transplant during the first period (1967-1983), and a HLA mismatch. Patient and graft survival have improved over time through the use of better immunosuppression and use of induction therapy. Identification of risk factors affecting graft survival, allows each center to set their strategies to improve the patient's outcome.

  7. Impact of a New Palliative Care Program on Health System Finances: An Analysis of the Palliative Care Program Inpatient Unit and Consultations at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, Sarina R; Lu, Chunhua; McQuade, John; Chan, Kelvin K W; Gill, Natasha; Cardamone, Michael; Torto, Deirdre; Langbaum, Terry; Razzak, Rab; Smith, Thomas J

    2017-05-01

    Palliative care inpatient units (PCUs) can improve symptoms, family perception of care, and lower per-diem costs compared with usual care. In March 2013, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions (JHMI) added a PCU to the palliative care (PC) program. We studied the financial impact of the PC program on JHMI from March 2013 to March 2014. This study considered three components of the PC program: PCU, PC consultations, and professional fees. Using 13 months of admissions data, the team calculated the per-day variable cost pre-PCU (ie, in another hospital unit) and after transfer to the PCU. These fees were multiplied by the number of patients transferred to the PCU and by the average length of stay in the PCU. Consultation savings were estimated using established methods. Professional fees assumed a collection rate of 50%. The total positive financial impact of the PC program was $3,488,863.17. There were 153 transfers to the PCU, 60% with cancer, and an average length of stay of 5.11 days. The daily loss pretransfer to the PCU of $1,797.67 was reduced to $1,345.34 in the PCU (-25%). The PCU saved JHMI $353,645.17 in variable costs, or $452.33 per transfer. Cost savings for PC consultations in the hospital, 60% with cancer, were estimated at $2,765,218. $370,000 was collected in professional fees savings. The PCU and PC program had a favorable impact on JHMI while providing expert patient-centered care. As JHMI moves to an accountable care organization model, value-based patient-centered care and increased intensive care unit availability are desirable.

  8. The Swedish radiation protection institute's regulations on general obligations in medical and dental practices using ionising radiation; issued on April 28, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-04-01

    These regulations are applicable to medical and dental practices with ionising radiation used for medical exposures. The regulations are also applicable to exposures of persons who knowingly and willingly, other than as part of their occupation, support and comfort patients undergoing medical exposure.

  9. The Swedish radiation protection institute's regulations on general obligations in medical and dental practices using ionising radiation; issued on April 28, 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-04-01

    These regulations are applicable to medical and dental practices with ionising radiation used for medical exposures. The regulations are also applicable to exposures of persons who knowingly and willingly, other than as part of their occupation, support and comfort patients undergoing medical exposure

  10. The relationship between social support and health-related quality of life in patients with antiphospholipid (hughes) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgopoulou, Sofia; Efraimidou, Sofia; MacLennan, Sara Jane; Ibrahim, Fowzia; Cox, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Antiphospholipid (Hughes) syndrome (APS) is recognised as a systemic autoimmune disease defined by recurrent thromboembolic events and/or pregnancy morbidity. Little is known about the psychological burden of this long-term condition. This study aims to explore the relationship between social support and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with APS. A total of 270 patients with a clinical diagnosis of APS participated in a cross-sectional online questionnaire survey. Data included demographics, disease-related information, social support and HRQoL. Both perceived and ideal social support were associated with HRQoL in APS. Patients reported receiving insufficient social support. Perceived emotional support was related to physical functioning (B = 7.77, p = .006, 95% CI: 2.25, 13.29); perceived instrumental support was associated with bodily pain (B = 17.52, p support with physical and social functioning (B = -6.30, p = .05, 95% CI: -12.52, -0.08; B = 8.06, p = .02, 95% CI: 1.17, 14.94). Ideal emotional support was related to physical and social functioning (B = 5.80, p = .04, 95% CI: 0.26, 11.34; B = 7.53, p = .04, 95% CI: 0.55, 14.51); ideal instrumental support was associated with mental health (B = 4.73, p = .03, 95% CI: 0.38, 9.07) and ideal informational support with vitality (B = 5.85, p = .01, 95% CI: 1.23, 10.46). Social support was linked to HRQoL in patients with APS. Insufficient social support was associated with limitations in various HRQoL domains. Increasing social support especially through provision of disease-specific education might contribute to improving HRQoL in patients with APS. Patient-tailored interventions addressing psychosocial aspects of living with APS are needed to improve patients' psychological and physical status.

  11. Pre-Medical Education in the Physical Sciences for Tomorrow's Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Sharon

    2009-05-01

    Medical knowledge is being transformed by instrumentation advances and by research results including genomic and population level studies; at the same time, though, the premedical curriculum is constrained by a relatively unchanging overall content in the MCAT examination, which inhibits innovation on undergraduate science education. A committee convened jointly by the Association of American Medical Colleges and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute has examined the science and mathematics competencies that the graduating physician will need, and has asked which of these should be achieved during undergraduate study. The recommendations emphasize competency -- what the learner should be able to ``do'' at the end of the learning experience -- rather than dictating specific courses. Because the scientific content of modern medical practice is evolving, new science competencies are desirable for the entering medical student. An example is statistics, an increasingly prominent foundation for database and genomic analysis but which is not yet uniformly recommended as preparation for medical school. On the other hand, the committee believes that the value of a broad liberal arts education is enduring, and science coursework should not totally consume a premedical student's time. Thus if we recommend new areas of science and mathematics competency for pre-meds, we must find other areas that can be trimmed or combined. Indeed, at present there are some science topics mandated for premedical study, which may not be essential. For these reasons, the committee aims to state premedical recommendations in ways that can be met either through traditional disciplinary courses, or through innovative and/or interdisciplinary courses. Finally, we acknowledge that practice of medicine requires grounding in scientific principles and knowledge and in the practice of critical inquiry. These principles may be learned and practiced in undergraduate study through work in the physical

  12. The relationship between job satisfaction, burnout, and turnover intention among physicians from urban state-owned medical institutions in Hubei, China: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yimin; Feng, Xueshan

    2011-09-24

    Throughout China, a growing number of physicians are leaving or intending to depart from their organizations owing to job dissatisfaction. Little information is available about the role of occupational burnout in this association. We set out to analyze the relationship between job satisfaction, burnout, and turnover intention, and further to determine whether occupational burnout can serve as a mediator among Chinese physicians from urban state-owned medical institutions. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in March 2010 in Hubei Province, central China. The questionnaires assessed sociodemographic characteristics, job satisfaction, burnout, and turnover intention. The job satisfaction and occupational burnout instruments were obtained by modifying the Chinese Physicians' Job Satisfaction Questionnaire (CPJSQ) and the Chinese Maslach Burnout Inventory (CMBI), respectively. Such statistical methods as one-way ANOVA, Pearson correlation, GLM-univariate and structural equation modeling were used. Of the 1600 physicians surveyed, 1451 provided valid responses. The respondents had medium scores (3.18 +/-0.73) on turnover intention, in which there was significant difference among the groups from three urban areas with different development levels. Turnover intention, which significantly and negatively related to all job-satisfaction subscales, positively related to each subscale of burnout syndrome. Work environment satisfaction (b = -0.074, p job rewards satisfaction (b = -0.073, p satisfaction (b = -0.146, p job-itself satisfaction no longer became significant, with the estimated parameter on job rewards satisfaction smaller after burnout syndrome variables were included. As congregated latent concepts, job satisfaction had both significant direct effects (gamma21 = -0.32, p job satisfaction and burnout syndrome are relevant factors affecting physicians' turnover intention, and there may be partial mediation effects of occupational burnout, mainly through

  13. The relationship between job satisfaction, burnout, and turnover intention among physicians from urban state-owned medical institutions in Hubei, China: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yimin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Throughout China, a growing number of physicians are leaving or intending to depart from their organizations owing to job dissatisfaction. Little information is available about the role of occupational burnout in this association. We set out to analyze the relationship between job satisfaction, burnout, and turnover intention, and further to determine whether occupational burnout can serve as a mediator among Chinese physicians from urban state-owned medical institutions. Methods A cross-sectional survey was carried out in March 2010 in Hubei Province, central China. The questionnaires assessed sociodemographic characteristics, job satisfaction, burnout, and turnover intention. The job satisfaction and occupational burnout instruments were obtained by modifying the Chinese Physicians' Job Satisfaction Questionnaire (CPJSQ and the Chinese Maslach Burnout Inventory (CMBI, respectively. Such statistical methods as one-way ANOVA, Pearson correlation, GLM-univariate and structural equation modeling were used. Results Of the 1600 physicians surveyed, 1451 provided valid responses. The respondents had medium scores (3.18 +/-0.73 on turnover intention, in which there was significant difference among the groups from three urban areas with different development levels. Turnover intention, which significantly and negatively related to all job-satisfaction subscales, positively related to each subscale of burnout syndrome. Work environment satisfaction (b = -0.074, p , job rewards satisfaction (b = -0.073, p , organizational management satisfaction (b = -0.146, p , and emotional exhaustion (b = 0.135, p were identified as significant direct predictors of the turnover intention of physicians, with 41.2% of the variance explained unitedly, under the control of sociodemographic variables, among which gender, age, and years of service were always significant. However, job-itself satisfaction no longer became significant, with the estimated

  14. A Study to Develop the Optimal Military Inter-Institutional Patient Referral Systems Model for DoD (Department of Defense) Military Medical Region III

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-01

    I rerr syttemn an do wlon t P ontimal military inter-instittiuonal patient referral systems model for DOD Military Medical Region III. A convenience...Dactin- on the Armed Services Medical Regulating Office and Patient Airlift "lc rcsusl.s of :his study indicated that the single largest breakdown...and the requirement to regulate to the closest medical facility with capability to care for the patient . L! / I Ii I i A STUDY TO DEVELOP THE OPTIMAL

  15. Survey and analysis of radiation safety management systems at medical institutions. Second report. Radiation measurement, calibration of radiation survey meters, and periodic check of installations, equipment, and protection instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohba, Hisateru; Ogasawara, Katsuhiko; Aburano, Tamio

    2006-01-01

    We carried out a questionnaire survey to determine the actual situation of radiation safety management measures in all medical institutions in Japan that had nuclear medicine facilities. The questionnaire consisted of questions concerning the evaluation of shielding capacity; radiation measurement; periodic checks of installations, equipment, and protection instruments; and the calibration of radiation survey meters. The analysis was undertaken according to region, type of establishment, and number of beds. The overall response rate was 60 percent. For the evaluation of shielding capacity, the outsourcing rate was 53 percent of the total. For the radiation measurements of ''leakage radiation dose and radioactive contamination'' and contamination of radioactive substances in the air'', the outsourcing rates were 28 percent and 35 percent of the total, respectively (p<0.001, according to region and establishment). For the periodic check of radiation protection instruments, the implementation rate was 98 percent, and the outsourcing rate was 32 percent for radiation survey meters and 47 percent for lead aprons. The non-implemented rate for calibration of radiation survey meters was 25 percent of the total (p<0.001, according to region and establishment). The outsourcing rate for calibration of radiation survey meters accounted for 87 percent of the total, and of these medical institutions, 72 percent undertook annual calibration. The implementation rate for patient exposure measurement was 20 percent of the total (p<0.001, according to number of beds), and of these medical institutions 46 percent recorded measurement outcome. (author)

  16. Marked improvement in the success rate of medical management of early pregnancy failure following the implementation of a novel institutional protocol and treatment guidelines: a follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colleselli, V; Nell, T; Bartosik, T; Brunner, C; Ciresa-Koenig, A; Wildt, L; Marth, C; Seeber, B

    2016-11-01

    To analyze the success rate, time to passage of tissue and subjective patient experience of a newly implemented protocol for medical management of early pregnancy failure (EPF) over a 2-year period. A retrospective chart review of all patients with early pregnancy failure primarily opting for medical management was performed. 200 mg mifepristone were administered orally, followed by a single vaginal dose of 800 mcg misoprostol after 36-48 h. We followed-up with our patients using a written questionnaire. 167 women were included in the present study. We observed an overall success rate of 92 %, defined as no need for surgical management after medication administration. We could not identify predictive values for success in a multivariate regression analysis. Most patients (84 %) passed tissue within 6 h after misoprostol administration. The protocol was well tolerated with a low incidence of side effects. Pain was managed well with sufficient analgesics. Responders to the questionnaire felt adequately informed prior to treatment and rated their overall experience as positive. The adaption of the institutional medical protocol resulted in a marked improvement of success rate when compared to the previously used protocol (92 vs. 61 %). We credit this increase to the adjusted medication schema as well as to targeted physician education on the expected course and interpretation of outcome measures. Our results underscore that the medical management of EPF is a safe and effective alternative to surgical evacuation in the clinical setting.

  17. Do Identical Polar Diatomic Molecules Form Stacked or Linear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ias

    tractive and repulsive Coulomb interactions balance and cancel. Of course ... life, carbon (group 14), i.e., carbon bonding, has been proposed based ... Medical Institute EXROP program. ..... Hughes Medical Institute for support of this work. CW.

  18. Engineering Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Projects Past Projects Publications NSEC » Engineering Institute Engineering Institute Multidisciplinary engineering research that integrates advanced modeling and simulations, novel sensing systems and new home of Engineering Institute Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 665-0860 Email UCSD EI

  19. Current trends in use of intracanal medications in dental care facilities: questionnaire-based survey on training dental hygienists at educational institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Masahiro; Yoshida, Takashi; Hosokawa, Souhei; Ariizumi, Yuugo

    2013-01-01

    The success of root canal therapy is dependent not only on removal of infected pulp (pulpectomy) followed by root canal enlargement, but also on the pharmacological effects of intracanal medications. Various intracanal medications are used. Formaldehyde preparations such as formocresol were common in the past, but these are no longer used in Europe or the US due to the biological toxicity of formaldehyde. In this study, a questionnaire was used to determine current trends in the use of intracanal medications at dental care facilities where dental hygiene students undergo practical training. The questionnaire comprised questions regarding the types of frequently used intracanal medications and their methods of application at dental care facilities in Saitama and Shizuoka prefectures. The results indicated that calcium hydroxide preparations were more commonly used in Europe or the US. However, these results also revealed that formaldehyde preparations were frequently used, which slightly differs from the scenario in Europe and the US. This study revealed that multiple intracanal medications were used for root canal therapy. Furthermore, it was also observed that cotton plugs were generally used as applicator tips for intracanal medications, whereas the use of absorbent paper points was relatively uncommon. The results suggest that the cost of absorbent paper points needs to be reduced.

  20. [How the patients on sick leave assess the Medical Inspector: The Institut Català d'Avaluacions Mèdiques (ICAM) experience in Catalonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez Hernando, G; Mira Solves, J J; Jardí Lliberia, J; Guilabert Mora, M; Manzanera López, R

    2012-01-01

    To analyse the patient perception of the medical inspector, and to examine whether this perception is related with the outcome of the medical report. A cross-sectional study based on telephone interviews with a random sample of patients visited in Catalonia in 2010 for temporary (TSL) or permanent (PSL) sick leave. The study was conducted in November 2011. A stratified sample considering the time from the consultation and province where patients were visited was used. The scale was assessed by Intraclass Correlation coefficient (0.93, 95% CI; 0.92-0.94) and testing with the Spearman-Brown split-half coefficient (0.93). A total of 609 patients were surveyed. A majority of them (400; 65.7%) had a positive opinion of the medical inspector. When PSL was denied, the assessment was worse (P=.002), this was different when TSL was cancelled. Patients who did not continue in PSL stated that doctor's decisions were determined by non-medical interests, and not oriented to the defence of the patient's rights (odds ratio 2.8, 95% CI; 1.7 to 4.8). When the perceptions were negative, patients focus their criticism on the role of medical inspector (Pcase of TSL. Copyright © 2011 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. [Carl Gustav Carus, the first director of the newly established maternity institute of the Dresden Royal Surgical-Medical Academy 1814-1827].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarembe, B

    1989-01-01

    Carl Gustav Carus was born in 1789 in Leipzig. He studied at the University of Leipzig. His specialization in Gynecology and Obstetrics took place at the Triersches Maternity Hospital. In 1814 he was named Professor for Obstetrics in Dresden at the Royal-Surgical-Medical-Academy. He was the head of the Maternity Hospital till 1827. Under his direction many midwives, students and physicians were educated. He published numerous articles and books on medical and philosophical-psychological topics. He was a talented artist of the Romantic especially in painting landscapes. He was a friend of Caspar David Friedrich and Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. After 1827 he was the physician in ordinary to 3 saxonian kings. He died in 1869. The Medical Academy in Dresden bears his name "Carl Gustav Carus" since its foundation.

  2. 香港与台湾地区医疗机构绩效管理现状研究%A study on the current situation of performance management of medical care institutions in Hong Kong and Taiwan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐小平; 柯冬阁; 蔡晓; 陈志权

    2015-01-01

    The performance management of medical care professionals has been well realized as the key point and difficult point in healthcare reform. As the medical care industry of Hong Kong and Taiwan enjoy a reputation of good performance and high quality, this article aims to explore the status quo and differences of performance management model of medical care institutions in Hong Kong & Taiwan, and analyze their advantages and disadvantages in aspects of fixed compensation system and performance based compensation system, high salary assuring clean hands or institution assuring clean hands, quality and efficiency, staff assessment by director or by 360 circle to provide reference for the reform of public hospital performance management in mainland china.%医疗机构尤其是医务人员绩效管理被认为是医疗改革的重点和难点.通过从薪金制与激励性薪酬制、高薪养廉与制度养廉、质量与效率、主管考核员工与360度考核员工等方面对我国香港与台湾地区医疗机构绩效管理模式的现状与差异进行研究,分析其优缺点,以期为内地公立医院绩效管理改革提供参考.

  3. Relationship of pass/fail grading and curriculum structure with well-being among preclinical medical students: a multi-institutional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Darcy A; Shanafelt, Tait D; Satele, Daniel W; Power, David V; Eacker, Anne; Harper, William; Moutier, Christine; Durning, Steven; Massie, F Stanford; Thomas, Matthew R; Sloan, Jeff A; Dyrbye, Liselotte N

    2011-11-01

    Psychological distress is common among medical students. Curriculum structure and grading scales are modifiable learning environment factors that may influence student well-being. The authors sought to examine relationships among curriculum structures, grading scales, and student well-being. The authors surveyed 2,056 first- and second-year medical students at seven U.S. medical schools in 2007. They used the Perceived Stress Scale, Maslach Burnout Inventory, and Medical Outcomes Study Short Form (SF-8) to measure stress, burnout, and quality of life, respectively. They measured curriculum structure using hours spent in didactic, clinical, and testing experiences. Grading scales were categorized as two categories (pass/fail) versus three or more categories (e.g., honors/pass/fail). Of the 2,056 students, 1,192 (58%) responded. In multivariate analyses, students in schools using grading scales with three or more categories had higher levels of stress (beta 2.65; 95% CI 1.54-3.76, Pstudents in schools using pass/fail grading. There were no relationships between time spent in didactic and clinical experiences and well-being. How students are evaluated has a greater impact than other aspects of curriculum structure on their well-being. Curricular reform intended to enhance student well-being should incorporate pass/fail grading.

  4. A History of Medicine and the Establishment of Medical Institutions in Middlesex County, New Jersey that Transformed Doctor and Patient Relationships during the Early Twentieth Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield-Spinner, Linda

    2011-01-01

    The early twentieth century was a period of tremendous advancements in medicine and technology and as a result experienced a revolutionary change in the delivery of healthcare in America. Modern medicine which encompassed specialized knowledge, technical procedures, and rules of behavior, changed the way medical care was provided in the United…

  5. Methodology development for quantitative optimization of security enhancement in medical information systems -Case study in a PACS and a multi-institutional radiotherapy database-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneda, Kiyofumi; Umeda, Tokuo; Koyama, Tadashi; Harauchi, Hajime; Inamura, Kiyonari

    2002-01-01

    The target of our study is to establish the methodology for analyzing level of security requirements, for searching suitable security measures and for optimizing security distribution to every portion of medical practice. Quantitative expression must be introduced to our study as possible for the purpose of easy follow up of security procedures and easy evaluation of security outcomes or results. Results of system analysis by fault tree analysis (FTA) clarified that subdivided system elements in detail contribute to much more accurate analysis. Such subdivided composition factors very much depended on behavior of staff, interactive terminal devices, kinds of service, and routes of network. As conclusion, we found the methods to analyze levels of security requirements for each medical information systems employing FTA, basic events for each composition factor and combination of basic events. Methods for searching suitable security measures were found. Namely risk factors for each basic event, number of elements for each composition factor and candidates of security measure elements were found. Method to optimize the security measures for each medical information system was proposed. Namely optimum distribution of risk factors in terms of basic events were figured out, and comparison of them between each medical information systems became possible.

  6. The Francis Crick Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Keith; Smith, Jim

    2017-04-01

    The Francis Crick Institute Laboratory, opened in 2016, is supported by the Medical Research Council, Cancer Research UK, the Wellcome Trust, and University College London, King's College London and Imperial College London. The emphasis on research training and early independence of gifted scientists in a multidisciplinary environment provides unique opportunities for UK medical science, including clinical and translational research. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  7. Institutional advantage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, Xavier

    Is there such a thing as institutional advantage—and what does it mean for the study of corporate competitive advantage? In this article, I develop the concept of institutional competitive advantage, as distinct from plain competitive advantage and from comparative institutional advantage. I first

  8. Evolutionary institutionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürstenberg, Dr Kai

    Institutions are hard to define and hard to study. Long prominent in political science have been two theories: Rational Choice Institutionalism (RCI) and Historical Institutionalism (HI). Arising from the life sciences is now a third: Evolutionary Institutionalism (EI). Comparative strengths and weaknesses of these three theories warrant review, and the value-to-be-added by expanding the third beyond Darwinian evolutionary theory deserves consideration. Should evolutionary institutionalism expand to accommodate new understanding in ecology, such as might apply to the emergence of stability, and in genetics, such as might apply to political behavior? Core arguments are reviewed for each theory with more detailed exposition of the third, EI. Particular attention is paid to EI's gene-institution analogy; to variation, selection, and retention of institutional traits; to endogeneity and exogeneity; to agency and structure; and to ecosystem effects, institutional stability, and empirical limitations in behavioral genetics. RCI, HI, and EI are distinct but complementary. Institutional change, while amenable to rational-choice analysis and, retrospectively, to criticaljuncture and path-dependency analysis, is also, and importantly, ecological. Stability, like change, is an emergent property of institutions, which tend to stabilize after change in a manner analogous to allopatric speciation. EI is more than metaphorically biological in that institutional behaviors are driven by human behaviors whose evolution long preceded the appearance of institutions themselves.

  9. Medical Students' Exposure to the Humanities Correlates with Positive Personal Qualities and Reduced Burnout: A Multi-Institutional U.S. Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangione, Salvatore; Chakraborti, Chayan; Staltari, Giuseppe; Harrison, Rebecca; Tunkel, Allan R; Liou, Kevin T; Cerceo, Elizabeth; Voeller, Megan; Bedwell, Wendy L; Fletcher, Keaton; Kahn, Marc J

    2018-05-01

    Literature, music, theater, and visual arts play an uncertain and limited role in medical education. One of the arguments often advanced in favor of teaching the humanities refers to their capacity to foster traits that not only improve practice, but might also reduce physician burnout-an increasing scourge in today's medicine. Yet, research remains limited. To test the hypothesis that medical students with higher exposure to the humanities would report higher levels of positive physician qualities (e.g., wisdom, empathy, self-efficacy, emotional appraisal, spatial skills), while reporting lower levels of negative qualities that are detrimental to physician well-being (e.g., intolerance of ambiguity, physical fatigue, emotional exhaustion, and cognitive weariness). An online survey. All students enrolled at five U.S. medical schools during the 2014-2015 academic year were invited by email to take part in our online survey. Students reported their exposure to the humanities (e.g., music, literature, theater, visual arts) and completed rating scales measuring selected personal qualities. In all, 739/3107 medical students completed the survey (23.8%). Regression analyses revealed that exposure to the humanities was significantly correlated with positive personal qualities, including empathy (p humanities and both a higher level of students' positive qualities and a lower level of adverse traits. These findings may carry implications for medical school recruitment and curriculum design. "[Science and humanities are] twin berries on one stem, grievous damage has been done to both in regarding [them]... in any other light than complemental." (William Osler, Br Med J. 1919;2:1-7).

  10. Advanced data visualization and sensor fusion: Conversion of techniques from medical imaging to Earth science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Richard C.; Chen, Chin-Tu; Pelizzari, Charles; Ramanathan, Veerabhadran

    1993-01-01

    Hughes Aircraft Company and the University of Chicago propose to transfer existing medical imaging registration algorithms to the area of multi-sensor data fusion. The University of Chicago's algorithms have been successfully demonstrated to provide pixel by pixel comparison capability for medical sensors with different characteristics. The research will attempt to fuse GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite), AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer), and SSM/I (Special Sensor Microwave Imager) sensor data which will benefit a wide range of researchers. The algorithms will utilize data visualization and algorithm development tools created by Hughes in its EOSDIS (Earth Observation SystemData/Information System) prototyping. This will maximize the work on the fusion algorithms since support software (e.g. input/output routines) will already exist. The research will produce a portable software library with documentation for use by other researchers.

  11. [Comparison of development and mortality under domestic or institutional care with and without medical rehabilitation : The Hannover morbidity and mortality long-term care study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seger, W; Sittaro, N-A; Lohse, R; Rabba, J

    2013-12-01

    Empirical data, representative of the total population, are necessary for medico-actuarial risk calculations. Our study compares mortalities of long-term care (LTC) patients who are covered by statutory health insurance with regard to age and distribution of care levels when in home or institutional care with a special focus on whether rehabilitative care was performed. The data of 88,575 LTC patients were analyzed longitudinally for 10 years, using routine data analyses on the files of the German Federal Health Insurance fund (average observation period 2.5 years, a total of 221,625 observation years). The numbers of LTC patients and their care levels while in home or institutional care were calculated, as were any changes to another care level or discontinuation of LTC benefits (as a result of the need for care falling below the eligibility criteria for care leveI or to death) during 1-10 years after the onset of LTC, always with respect to whether rehabilitative care had taken place or not. For the evaluation of care factors an indicator was developed. Total mortality was found to decline and reactivation to increase considerably for LTC patients after rehabilitation, basically irrespective of their age or care level and in home or institutional care settings as well. Ten years after the onset of care, 30.7 % of the patients with rehabilitation were still in nursing care, 9.8 % were reactivated and 59.5 % deceased. In contrast, only 9.2 % were still in nursing care, 3.7 % reactivated and 87.1 % deceased without rehabilitation. These results are irrespective of age distribution, care level, and residence in home or institutional care settings. The care status of patients, measured by the percentage in reactivation, care level I-III, and death, substantially depends on age at onset and care level and in addition on rehabilitative procedures. Hypotheses for further research are outlined. Rehabilitation has a clear-cut potential for life extension as

  12. Institutional entrepreneurship:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gretzinger, Susanne

    2018-01-01

    Institutional entrepreneurship pays specific attention to the process and outcomes of agents who are willing and capable of changing institutions. It has some common ground with the political entrepreneur, a concept that proposes change in norms and institutions because of commitment and activities...... of agents or organisations in the policy arena. The present chapter understands institutional entrepreneurship as the process of changing institutionalised practices. Based on a literature review, it describes the triggers, activities and potential effects of institutional entrepreneurs. The chapter...... concludes by tentatively arguing that political entrepreneurs can be institutional entrepreneurs, but institutional entrepreneurship can be considered as the broader concept that incorporates strategies and visions as well as interpretative-discursive power into the conceptual framework....

  13. Forensic medical examinations conducted on complainants of sexual assault in the Forensic Medicine Institute, Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun, between 2006 and 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Engelgardt

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A total of 46 cases of alleged sexual assault were analysed from the years 2006–2013 where forensic medical examinations were conducted. The material was compared with data from literature. All the victims were female. In 9 cases (20% a sexual assault by sexual touching was alleged, 67% of complainants (31 cases had alleged non-consensual sexual intercourse, 6 complainants (13% had no recollection of events. Genital area injuries were reported in 26% of sexual assault victims. Injuries of other parts of the body were found in 73% of victims. None of the subjects were positive for severe injuries such as fractures, wounds, and head trauma with loss of consciousness. The majority of complainants (29 cases, 63% were examined within 24 hours after the incident and 6 examinees (13% were assessed between 24 and 48 hours after the alleged sexual assault. Eleven forensic medical examinations (24% were conducted after the lapse of more than 48 hours since the alleged incident. Twenty nine complainants admitted that they had washed their genital area after the sexual assault. Forensic swabs were taken during all forensic medical examinations.

  14. Why are a quarter of faculty considering leaving academic medicine? A study of their perceptions of institutional culture and intentions to leave at 26 representative U.S. medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pololi, Linda H; Krupat, Edward; Civian, Janet T; Ash, Arlene S; Brennan, Robert T

    2012-07-01

    Vital, productive faculty are critical to academic medicine, yet studies indicate high dissatisfaction and attrition. The authors sought to identify key personal and cultural factors associated with intentions to leave one's institution and/or academic medicine. From 2007 through early 2009, the authors surveyed a stratified random sample of 4,578 full-time faculty from 26 representative U.S. medical schools. The survey asked about advancement, engagement, relationships, diversity and equity, leadership, institutional values and practices, and work-life integration. A two-level, multinomial logit model was used to predict leaving intentions. A total of 2,381 faculty responded (52%); 1,994 provided complete data for analysis. Of these, 1,062 (53%) were female and 475 (24%) were underrepresented minorities in medicine. Faculty valued their work, but 273 (14%) had seriously considered leaving their own institution during the prior year and 421 (21%) had considered leaving academic medicine altogether because of dissatisfaction; an additional 109 (5%) cited personal/family issues and 49 (2%) retirement as reasons to leave. Negative perceptions of the culture-unrelatedness, feeling moral distress at work, and lack of engagement-were associated with leaving for dissatisfaction. Other significant predictors were perceptions of values incongruence, low institutional support, and low self-efficacy. Institutional characteristics and personal variables (e.g., gender) were not predictive. Findings suggest that academic medicine does not support relatedness and a moral culture for many faculty. If these issues are not addressed, academic health centers may find themselves with dissatisfied faculty looking to go elsewhere.

  15. A multi-institutional study exploring the impact of positive mental health on medical students' professionalism in an era of high burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrbye, Liselotte N; Harper, William; Moutier, Christine; Durning, Steven J; Power, David V; Massie, F Stanford; Eacker, Anne; Thomas, Matthew R; Satele, Daniel; Sloan, Jeff A; Shanafelt, Tait D

    2012-08-01

    Although burnout is associated with erosion of professionalism and serious personal consequences, whether positive mental health can enhance professionalism and how it shapes personal experience remain poorly understood. The study simultaneously explores the relationship between positive mental health and burnout with professionalism and personal experience. The authors surveyed 4,400 medical students at seven U.S. medical schools in 2009 to assess mental health (categorized as languishing, moderate, and flourishing) and burnout. Additional items explored professional behaviors, beliefs, suicidal ideation, and serious thoughts of dropping out. A total of 2,682/4,400 (61%) responded. Prevalence of suicidal ideation (55/114 [48.2%], 281/1,128 [24.9%], and 127/1,409 [9.1%]) and serious thoughts of dropping out (15/114 [13.2%], 30/1,128 [2.7%], and 14/1,409 [1.0%]) decreased as mental health improved from languishing, moderate, and flourishing, respectively (all P mental health persisted independent of burnout (all P mental health improved, the prevalence of unprofessional behaviors (i.e., cheating and dishonest behaviors) also declined, whereas students' altruistic beliefs regarding physicians' responsibility toward society improved. For example, 33/113 (29.2%), 426/1,120 (38.0%), and 718/1,391 (51.6%) of students with languishing, moderate, and flourishing mental health endorsed all five altruistic professional beliefs (P mental health persisted among students with burnout, whereas fewer relationships were found among students without burnout. Findings suggest that positive mental health attenuates some adverse consequences of burnout. Medical student wellness programs should aspire to prevent burnout and promote mental health.

  16. Environmental health and safety issues related to the use of low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) at hospitals and medical research institutions and compliance determination with the Clean Air Act standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasinathan, R.; Kanchan, A.

    1995-01-01

    Currently, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has standards for procedures, performance activities and technical specifications on storage of Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) under 10 CFR Part 20. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is proposing environmental standards for the management, storage and disposal of LLRW. The proposed standards, which will become 40 CFR part 193 when finalized, limits the committed effective dose to members of the public from the management and storage of LLRW, committed effective doses resulting from LLRW disposal and levels of radiological contamination of underground sources of drinking water as a result of the activities subject to management, storage and disposal of LLRW. Further, under Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments, radionuclides are required to be inventoried for all generators. For hospitals and medical research institutions, quantities of LLRW are often below the concentrations required under reporting and record keeping requirements of 10 CFR 20. However, in many instances, the facility may require NRC permits and compliance with air quality dispersion modeling requirements. This paper presents the typical radionuclides used in hospitals and medical research institutions, and strategies to evaluate their usage and steps to achieve compliance. Air quality dispersion modeling by use of the COMPLY model is demonstrated to evaluate the fate of radionuclides released from on-site incineration of LLRW. The paper concludes that no significant threat is posed from the incineration of LLRW

  17. Colonial Institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAtackney, Laura; Palmer, Russell

    2016-01-01

    and the USA which reveal that the study of colonial institutions should not be limited to the functional life of these institutions—or solely those that take the form of monumental architecture—but should include the long shadow of “imperial debris” (Stoler 2008) and immaterial institutions....

  18. Change of occurance of type 1 and type 2 decompression sickness of divers treated at the Croatian Naval Medical Institute in the period from 1967 to 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrić, Dejan; Petri, Nadan M; Stipancević, Hrvoje; Petri, Lena Vranjković; Kovacević, Hasan

    2003-01-01

    A significant change of occurrence (p=0.0343) of type 1 and type 2 decompression sickness (DCS) of divers in Croatia was observed in the period from 1991 to 2002 (type 1: n=26, 37.68% and type 2: n=43, 62.32%) compared with the period from 1967 to 1990 (type 1: n=93, 52.84% and type 2: n=83, 47.16%). The change was attributed to the extensive usage of diving computers and artificial gas mixtures which enable extended bottom times and deeper dives, thus putting divers at an increased decompression risk. The importance of the results of this report is in the fact that permanent neurological deficit occurs only after type 2 DCS. Injured divers with permanent loss after type 2 DCS are not fit for diving and require a long term medical care, thus becoming a significant public health problem.

  19. [Prevalence and characteristics of the "burnout syndrome" of the medical staff of cancer and TB institutions of Primorskiĭ Kraĭ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bektasova, M V; Kaptsov, V A; Sheparev, A A

    2012-01-01

    As 50 doctors and 70 nurses in oncologic dispensaries as well 90 doctors and 110 nurses in tuberculosis dispensaries in Primorye have been studied on the basis of voluntary testing methods supposed by C. Maslach and V.V. Boiko. The aim of this study was to estimate the relative prevalence and psychological features of the "burnout syndrome" among doctors and nurses of oncologic and tuberculosis dispensaries in Primorye Territory. "Emotional burnout" in various stages of its development is much more common among nurses (75% of respondents), compared with physicians (less than 50% tested). In nursing professional burnout syndrome developed significantly more frequently in the more severe form, and with less seniority of professional activity. The dependence of burning on the age and professional experience is more common for physicians. There is an urgent need to study the epidemiology of the "burnout syndrome" and identify ways to prevent the formation of social syndrome in medical personnel.

  20. Institutional upbringing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulløv, Eva

    2008-01-01

    In the chapter, I discuss the role day care institutions play in the construction of the idea of proper childhood in Denmark. Drawing on findings from research on ethnic minority children in two Danish day care institutions, I begin with a discussion of how childcare institutions act as civilising...... agents, empowered with the legitimate right to define and control normality and proper ways of behaving oneself. I aim to show how institutions come to define the normal child and proper childhood in accordance with current efforts toward reinventing national culture, exemplified by legislation requiring...... current testing of Danish language fluency levels among pre-school minority children. Testing language skills marks and defines distinctions that reinforce images of deviance that, in turn, legitimize initiatives to enrol children, specifically minority children, in child care institutions....

  1. Contamination monitoring of Na 131 I levels in therapy unit of Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences by indirect method (Wipe test)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiki, D.; Shahhosseini, S.; Eftekhari, M.; Takavar, A.; Fard-Esfahani, A.

    2003-01-01

    Contamination with radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine centres in addition to being a health concern requires time consuming decontamination efforts. According to Nuclear Regulatory Commission Contamination should be monitored in nuclear medicine centers where radiopharmaceuticals are prepared and administrated at the end of each working session; otherwise, contamination spread to other areas not only equipment but also personnel and other people will be expected. The wipe test for the presence of radioactivity is accomplished by wiping the surface over an area approximately 100 cm 2 with an absorbent paper, then counting it in an appropriate radiation detector. In this study, contamination monitoring of patient's rooms (4 rooms), entrance corridor, patient's corridor, waiting room, control room (nursing station), radiopharmaceutical storage room in therapy unit of Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine, Shariati hospital was performed by indirect method. Based on the results, some areas including storage room were contaminated. There was also a direct relationship between dose administrated and levels of contamination in patient's rooms. Regarding high uptake of iodine by thyroid gland and damaging effects of Na 131 I, weekly wipe tests are required to determine the level of contamination. Patient's rooms after discharging the patients and before re hospitalization specially should be checked. If these tests reveal contamination over standard levels, appropriate decontamination procedures should be carried out immediately

  2. Extending professional education to health workers at grass root level: An experience from All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K K Deepak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In India, the opportunities for professional education of the grass root level health workers are grossly inadequate. Capacity building of all categories of health workers is needed for enhancing health outcomes. Objectives: To plan and implement a professional development training program for all categories of allied health workers and to assess its outcomes in terms of knowledge and skills Materials and Method: We planned and organized a ′one week′(15 h training program for 10 categories of allied health workers (1260 working in our hospital. The program included nine generic skills/topics: the prestige of AIIMS, sterilization & infection control, universal precaution, biomedical waste management, public health, life style & healthy nutrition, fire safety, communication skills and office procedure besides subject specific skills. Trainers were drawn from 12 departments. Training methodology included interactive lectures, narratives, demonstrations, videos, PPT slides, and informal discussions with participants. The effectiveness of the program was judged on the basis of participants′ feedback, feedback from the supervisors, and our own observations post training. Results: Feedback from the participants and their supervisors after training was encouraging. The participants described training as a "life time experience". The supervisors reported improvement in confidence, communication skills, and awareness of workers. Conclusion: The success of the program was due to the use of interactive methods, involvement of multidisciplinary team, and commitment from leadership. We recommend that professional education should be linked with career advancement. Academic institutions can play a key role in taking such initiatives.

  3. Decrease in Staphylococcus aureus colonization and hospital-acquired infection in a medical intensive care unit after institution of an active surveillance and decolonization program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Thomas G; Fatica, Cynthia; Scarpelli, Michele; Arroliga, Alejandro C; Guzman, Jorge; Shrestha, Nabin K; Hixson, Eric; Rosenblatt, Miriam; Gordon, Steven M; Procop, Gary W

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate the effects of an active surveillance program for Staphylococcus aureus linked to a decolonization protocol on the incidence of healthcare-associated infection and new nasal colonization due to S. aureus. Retrospective quasi-experimental study. An 18-bed medical intensive care unit at a tertiary care center in Cleveland, Ohio. From January 1, 2006, through December 31, 2007, all patients in the medical intensive care unit were screened for S. aureus nasal carriage at admission and weekly thereafter. During the preintervention period, January 1 through September 30, 2006, only surveillance occurred. During the intervention period, January 1 through December 31, 2007, S. aureus carriers received mupirocin intranasally. Beginning in February 2007, carriers also received chlorhexidine gluconate baths. During the preintervention period, 604 (73.7%) of 819 patients were screened for S. aureus nasal carriage, yielding 248 prevalent carriers (30.3%). During the intervention period, 752 (78.3%) of 960 patients were screened, yielding 276 carriers (28.8%). The incidence of S. aureus carriage decreased from 25 cases in 3,982 patient-days (6.28 cases per 1,000 patient-days) before intervention to 18 cases in 5,415 patient-days (3.32 cases per 1,000 patient-days) (P=.04; relative risk [RR], 0.53 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.28-0.97]) and from 9.57 to 4.77 cases per 1,000 at-risk patient-days (P=.02; RR, 0.50 [95% CI, 0.27-0.91]). The incidence of S. aureus hospital-acquired bloodstream infection during the 2 periods was 2.01 and 1.11 cases per 1,000 patient-days, respectively (P=.28). The incidence of S. aureus ventilator-associated pneumonia decreased from 1.51 to 0.18 cases per 1,000 patient-days (P=.03; RR, 0.12 [95% CI, 0.01-0.83]). The total incidence of S. aureus hospital-acquired infection decreased from 3.52 to 1.29 cases per 1,000 patient-days (P=.03; RR, 0.37 [95% CI, 0.14-0.90]). Active surveillance for S. aureus nasal carriage combined with

  4. Institutional actorhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Christian Uhrenholdt

    In this paper I describe the changing role of intra-organizational experts in the face of institutional complexity of their field. I do this through a qualitative investigation of the institutional and organizational roles of actors in Danish organizations who are responsible for the efforts...... to comply with the Danish work environment regulation. And by doing so I also describe how institutional complexity and organizational responses to this complexity are particular important for the changing modes of governance that characterizes contemporary welfare states....

  5. Long-Term Outcomes of 107 Cases of Primary Thyroid Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma at a Single Medical Institution in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Natsuko; Narimatsu, Hiroto; Noh, Jaeduk Yoshimura; Iwaku, Kenji; Kunii, Yo; Suzuki, Nami; Ohye, Hidemi; Suzuki, Miho; Matsumoto, Masako; Yoshihara, Ai; Kameyama, Kaori; Kobayashi, Kazuhiko; Kami, Masahiro; Sugino, Kiminori; Ito, Koichi

    2018-02-01

    Thyroid mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is a type of extranodal lymphoma with a favorable prognosis. To provide information on long-term outcomes that would facilitate establishment of the optimal management strategy for thyroid lymphoma. Medical records of 107 patients (median age 67 years, 20 males, 87 females) who were diagnosed with localized thyroid MALT lymphoma stage IE or IIE at Ito Hospital were retrospectively reviewed. Overall and event-free survival (EFS). Initial treatments included radiation therapy (RT) alone (n = 58), combined modality therapy (CMT) (n = 48), or chemotherapy alone (n = 1). All 107 patients responded to the treatment, six of whom experienced relapse. Only one patient died of lymphoma. The 5-year overall survival (OS) and EFS rates were 94% [95% confidence interval (CI), 87% to 97%] and 92% (95% CI, 85% to 95%), respectively, and the 10-year OS and EFS rates were 91% (95% CI, 83% to 95%) and 84% (95% CI, 74% to 90%), respectively. Of the 106 patients with information available on adverse events, 71 patients (67%) developed hypothyroidism after primary thyroid lymphoma treatment. The CMT group showed additional chemotherapy-induced adverse reactions in the form of neutropenia, neuropathy, constipation, and pneumonia. The 5-year OS rates of patients treated with CMT and RT were 93% (95% CI, 81% to 98%) and 94% (95% CI, 84% to 98%), respectively. Long-term outcomes of localized thyroid MALT lymphoma are favorable with all initial treatment modalities. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  6. Institutional Investors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkmose, Hanne Søndergaard; Strand, Therese

    Research Question/Issue: Institutional investors are facing increased pressure and threats of legislation from the European Union to abandon passive ownership strategies. This study investigates the prerequisites for – and potential dissimilarities in the practice of, active ownership among...... institutional investors in two Scandinavian countries with diminutive legal and cultural distance in general. Research Findings/Insights: Using data on shareholder proposals from Danish and Swedish annual general meetings from 2006 throughout 2010, we find that institutional investors are approximately....../Policy Implications: Regulators should be aware of the impact by local governance mechanisms, and how shareholders react under different legal and practical prerequisites. The paper also highlights legal elements that differ between Denmark and Sweden, and which might affect institutional activism....

  7. Institutional Controls

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset consists of institutional control data from multiple Superfund sites in U.S. EPA Region 8. These data were acquired from multiple sources at different...

  8. Institutional Assessment

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Many approaches can and have helped research institutions in the developing .... There are many good texts on project and program evaluation, not to ...... has challenged managers and students of organizational development for decades.

  9. Clinical study of burn patients requiring admission: A single center experience at North Eastern Indira Gandhi Regional Institute of Health and Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donkupar Khongwar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although burns are a major problem in health care, a lot of the variation in risk factors exists from region to region which if uncovered correctly could help take effective prevention measures. Aims and Objectives: To assess the 3-year (January 2012 to January 2015 epidemiology of burn injuries admitted to our hospital (primary objective and to find areas of improvement in burn care (secondary objective. Materials and Methods: After obtaining ethical approval data were obtained from the medical record section regarding age, sex, residence, occupation, marital status, socioeconomic status, dates of admission and discharge, circumstances regarding the place, intent, cause, and source of heat. Clinical assessment was done using Wallace's “Rule of Nine” in adult and “Lund and Browder” chart in the pediatric age groups. The interrelationships between clinical and epidemiological variables with burn injury were studied. Results: An increasing trend in the admission rates of burn victims noted in last 3 years males (55.47% outnumbered females (44.52%. The most common age group affected is older children, adolescents, and young adults (between 11 and 30 years. Flame (38.3% and scald (25.3% burns contributed to most of the injuries. Females (52.30% are the major victim of flame burns. Electrical and chemical burns affected only the males suggesting work-related injuries. Trunk (30.8% is the most severely affected site in all cases. Depression (6.8% and power line workers (4.7% seem to be important risk factors in our study. Inability to complete treatment (26.7% was a major concern in our study. Conclusions: This study highlights the need for proper burn care that could be provided at the primary health-care level. The majority of burns were accidental in nature in school going children, young adults, and females. Flame and scald burns were the most common cause. Preventive measures directed toward burn safety and first aid measures

  10. What inhibits working women with mental disorders from returning to their workplace?-A study of systematic re-employment support in a medical institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Karin; Taira, Yoichi; Maeda, Takamitsu; Matsuda, Yumie; Kato, Yuki; Hashi, Kozue; Kuroki, Nobuo; Katsuragawa, Shuichi

    2016-01-01

    It has been customary for working women in Japan to retire when they marry and to devote themselves to household work as well as having children. However, according to a report published by the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications in 2013, the number of working women has increased consistently. As more women are advancing into society, they have more options with respect to lifestyle but may encounter new psychological burdens. Therefore, we reviewed trends among participants in a re-work day care program (hereinafter referred to as "re-work program") to clarify various problems encountered by working women and the prevalence of mental disorders. A total of 454 participants (352 males, mean age 46.5 ± 9.4 years; 102 females, mean age 39.8 ± 9.4 years) who participated in our re-work program were included in this study. We reviewed their basic characteristics: life background, clinical diagnoses, outcomes after use of the re-work program, and reasons for failing to return to the workplace or start working where applicable. The number of female participants was small and accounted for less than one fourth of all participants. As many as 67.3 % of the males succeeded in returning to the workplace, but only 48.0 % of the females were successful. The most common reason for failing to return to the workplace in both sexes was the exacerbation of symptoms; among females, other reasons, such as pregnancy, marriage, and family circumstances, were observed occasionally, but these reasons were not reported by the males. We found that female-specific problems were not the only issue, but rather work-life balance, relationships in the workplace, and gender differences in work roles could also trigger psychiatric disorders. A deeper understanding of the problems encountered by women in the workforce is important for the treatment of their psychiatric disorders. Therefore, it is considered essential for family members, co-workers, medical staff, and

  11. "Violence" in Sport and the Violenti non fit Iniuria Defence: A Perspective on the Death of the Cricket Player Phil Hughes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter Labuschagne

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This article evaluates the defence of violenti non fit inuiria in sport with specific reference to the principle of bonos mores or the “good morals” in society to tolerate injuries in sport. The increased prevalence of serious injuries in sport in the professional era, in which sportsmen earn their livelihood from sport, necessitate a review of the existing situation. The death of the Australian cricket player, Phil Hughes, as a result of fast, short-pitched bowling in cricket, has again put the spotlight on the aggressive and excessive use of "violence" in sport. The malicious intent in sport, to harm or even to kill an opponent, has made it necessary to ask if there should be any difference in the manner in which the perpetrator of violence in sport should be treated as against ordinary criminal law assault and murder offenders. A two-pronged approach is suggested in the article as a possible way of dealing with wrongfulness in cricket.

  12. Dosimetry in occupational exposure workers of the medical institutes of the University San Francisco Xavier de Chuquisaca; Dosimetria en TOEs de los institutos medicos de la Universidad San Francisco Xavier de Chuquisaca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zambrana Z, A. J.; Castro S, O.; Huanca S, E.; Torrez C, M. [Universidad Mayor, Real y Pontificia de San Francisco Xavier de Chuquisaca, Instituto de Medicina Nuclear de Sucre, Plaza Libertad No. 1, Sucre (Bolivia, Plurinational State of); Villca Q, I., E-mail: nuclear_sre@entelnet.bo [Universidad Mayor, Real y Pontificia de San Francisco Xavier de Chuquisaca, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia Dr. Jose Cupertino Arteaga, Plaza Libertad No. 1, Sucre (Bolivia, Plurinational State of)

    2014-08-15

    In this work is made a retrospective analysis of the record, of the dosimetric control readings processed by the Dosimetry Laboratory of the Instituto Boliviano de Ciencia y Tecnologia Nuclear, as regulator entity at national level for Occupational Exposed Workers (OEWs) to ionizing radiations, of the Medical Institutes of the Universidad Mayor, Real y Pontificia de San Francisco Xavier de Chuquisaca, by a period of 10 and 15 years. The results showed that in the Nuclear Medicine Institute of Sucre, the Accumulated Occupational Exposure of a total of 393 readings of 15 OEWs was of 20.4 mSv, identifying as maximum value 10.2 mSv, in the official that develops the Radio-pharmacy activities (elution, fractionation, preparation and management). In the Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia Dr. Jose Cupertino Arteaga the dosimetric background registered an Accumulated Occupational Exposure of a total of 1319 readings of 50 OEWs of 309.69 mSv, with a maximum value of 62.30 mSv, corresponding to the worker of the technical area (maintenance, adjustment and calibration). Comparison that allows to infer that the difference is due mainly to the radio-active source type {sup 99m}Tc Vs {sup 60}Co utilized in these health centers. (Author)

  13. Institutional Awareness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlvik, Carina; Boxenbaum, Eva

    Drawing on dual-process theory and mindfulness research this article sets out to shed light on the conditions that need to be met to create “a reflexive shift in consciousness” argued to be a key foundational mechanism for agency in institutional theory. Although past research has identified...... in consciousness to emerge and argue for how the varying levels of mindfulness in the form of internal and external awareness may manifest as distinct responses to the institutional environment the actor is embedded in....

  14. European Institutions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meacham, Darian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to sketch a phenomenological theory of political institutions and to apply it to some objections and questions raised by Pierre Manent about the project of the European Union and more specifically the question of “European Construction”, i.e. what is the aim of the

  15. Institution Morphisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goguen, Joseph; Rosu, Grigore; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Institutions formalize the intuitive notion of logical system, including both syntax and semantics. A surprising number of different notions of morphisim have been suggested for forming categories with institutions as objects, and a surprising variety of names have been proposed for them. One goal of this paper is to suggest a terminology that is both uniform and informative to replace the current rather chaotic nomenclature. Another goal is to investigate the properties and interrelations of these notions. Following brief expositions of indexed categories, twisted relations, and Kan extensions, we demonstrate and then exploit the duality between institution morphisms in the original sense of Goguen and Burstall, and the 'plain maps' of Meseguer, obtaining simple uniform proofs of completeness and cocompleteness for both resulting categories; because of this duality, we prefer the name 'comorphism' over 'plain map.' We next consider 'theoroidal' morphisms and comorphisims, which generalize signatures to theories, finding that the 'maps' of Meseguer are theoroidal comorphisms, while theoroidal morphisms are a new concept. We then introduce 'forward' and 'semi-natural' morphisms, and appendices discuss institutions for hidden algebra, universal algebra, partial equational logic, and a variant of order sorted algebra supporting partiality.

  16. Institutional obligation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowan, S.S.; Berwager, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    The institutional obligation is to act to meet primary responsibilities in the face of risks. There are risks involved in taking action, both of a quantifiable and unquantifiable nature. This paper explores weighing the risks, choosing approaches that balance primary obligations with broader ones, and presenting ethical philosophies upon which policies and strategies are based. Federal government organizations and utilities--and Bonneville Power Administration qualifies as both--have a variety of responsibilities to the public they serve. The common responsibility is that of service; for Bonneville the primary responsibility is to serve the energy related needs. It is this primary institutional obligation, as it relates to other responsibilities--and the resulting strategy for handling indoor air quality in Bonneville's new homes program--that this paper examines

  17. INSTITUTE OF MEDICAL REPRESENTATIONS: PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Skripko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A growing potential of Russian pharmaceutical market and constant medicinal drugs range widening requires a necessity to search for more effective ways of pharmaceutical product promotion. The purpose of this study is to estimate current marketing spiral of MD promotion from producer to consumer, and revelation of obstacles encountered by means of comparing method.The conducted study about current marketing spiral of MD promotion from producer to the consumer gives evidence about obstacles of ethic and legal, professional and legal, ethics and professional, ethics and marketing, professional and marketing, and professional work-related character. We have pointed the characteristics and substantiated the schemes of "ideal", legally formed, and functioning marketing spiral of MD promotion. Understanding of the factors considered and revelation of obstacles for successful MD promotion from producer to the consumer is important, since it is the ground for practical recommendations on this field optimization.

  18. The Optimizing Patient Transfers, Impacting Medical Quality, andImproving Symptoms:Transforming Institutional Care approach: preliminary data from the implementation of a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services nursing facility demonstration project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unroe, Kathleen T; Nazir, Arif; Holtz, Laura R; Maurer, Helen; Miller, Ellen; Hickman, Susan E; La Mantia, Michael A; Bennett, Merih; Arling, Greg; Sachs, Greg A

    2015-01-01

    The Optimizing Patient Transfers, Impacting Medical Quality, and Improving Symptoms: Transforming Institutional Care (OPTIMISTIC) project aims to reduce avoidable hospitalizations of long-stay residents enrolled in 19 central Indiana nursing facilities. This clinical demonstration project, funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Innovations Center, places a registered nurse in each nursing facility to implement an evidence-based quality improvement program with clinical support from nurse practitioners. A description of the model is presented, and early implementation experiences during the first year of the project are reported. Important elements include better medical care through implementation of Interventions to Reduce Acute Care Transfers tools and chronic care management, enhanced transitional care, and better palliative care with a focus on systematic advance care planning. There were 4,035 long-stay residents in 19 facilities enrolled in OPTIMISTIC between February 2013 and January 2014. Root-cause analyses were performed for all 910 acute transfers of these long stay residents. Of these transfers, the project RN evaluated 29% as avoidable (57% were not avoidable and 15% were missing), and opportunities for quality improvement were identified in 54% of transfers. Lessons learned in early implementation included defining new clinical roles, integrating into nursing facility culture, managing competing facility priorities, communicating with multiple stakeholders, and developing a system for collecting and managing data. The success of the overall initiative will be measured primarily according to reduction in avoidable hospitalizations of long-stay nursing facility residents. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. Institutional practices and policies in acid-base testing: a self reported Croatian survey study on behalf of the Croatian society of medical biochemistry and laboratory medicine Working Group for acid-base balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukić, Lora; Simundić, Ana-Maria

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this survey study was to assess the current practices and policies in use related to the various steps in the blood gas testing process, across hospital laboratories in Croatia. First questionnaire was sent by email to all medical biochemistry laboratories (N = 104) within general, specialized and clinical hospitals and university hospital centres to identify laboratories which perform blood gas analysis. Second questionnaire with detailed questions about sample collection, analysis and quality control procedures, was sent only to 47 laboratories identified by the first survey. Questionnaire was designed as combination of questions and statements with Likert scale. Third questionnaire was sent to all participating laboratories (N=47) for additional clarification for either indeterminate or unclear answers. Blood gas analysis is performed in 47/104 hospital laboratories in Croatia. In 25/41 (0.61) of the laboratories capillary blood gas sampling is the preferred sample type for adult patient population, whereas arterial blood sample is preferentially used in only 5/44 laboratories (0.11). Blood sampling and sample processing for capillary samples is done almost always by laboratory technicians (36/41 and 37/44, respectively), whereas arterial blood sampling is almost always done by the physician (24/29) and only rarely by a nurse (5/28). Sample acceptance criteria and sample analysis are in accordance with international recommendations for majority of laboratories. 43/44 laboratories participate in the national EQA program. POCT analyzers are installed outside of the laboratory in 20/47 (0.43) institutions. Laboratory staff is responsible for education and training of ward personnel, quality control and instrument maintenance in only 12/22, 11/20 and 9/20 institutions, respectively. Practices related to collection and analysis for blood gases in Croatia are not standardised and vary substantially between laboratories. POCT analyzers are not under the

  20. Institutional ethnography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Rebecca; Tienari, Janne

    2016-01-01

    The study of M&As is dominated by positivist and functionalist world views and the use of quantitative methods. Although extant research also uses qualitative and mixed methods, it can be criticized for viewing its subject matter through an abstract and external lens. The researcher is placed in ......, and point to some of the problems in M&A studies identified through this lens. Finally, we argue why institutional ethnography, in comparison with other methods of inquiry, is particularly fruitful in the study of mergers and acquisitions....

  1. The history of creation and study of vitamin D medicines in the Laboratory of Medical Biochemistry of the Palladin Institute of Biochemistry of the NAS of Ukraine for 1990-2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. E. Lugovska

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the main results of inventive activity of the Laboratory of Medical Biochemistry headed by Dr. L. I. Apukhovska of the Palladin Institute of Biochemistry of the NAS of Ukraine. These researches continued the works initiated by Prof. V. P. Vendt and included development of technologies for the production of highly efficient preparations based on vitamin D3, namely “VIDEIN” in several modified forms (for prevention and treatment of rickets and rickets-like diseases in children, osteopathy of various origins, hypovitaminosis D in pregnant, mineral metabolism disorders, etc, water-soluble vitamin D3 (for prevention and treatment of rickets in children from the first months of life, “KALMIVID” and ”KALMIVID-M” (for treatment of bone tissue diseases associated with mineral metabolism disorders, the pharmaceutical composition “MEBIVID” (for treatment of osteoporosis and diseases associated with reduced bone mineral density and therapeutic vitamin-D3-E protein complex (for regulation of metabolic processes, improvement of structural and functional bone quality as well as structure and function of epiphyseal cartilage. All products are characterized by stability of vitamin D3 molecule, and thus, dosing accuracy and reliability, whilst not containing toxic preservatives and stabilizers. The technologies for production as well as analytical and normative documentations have been developed for all preparations.

  2. A Retrospective Comparative Study of Concomitant Chemoradiotherapy followed by Adjuvant Temozolomide Versus Radiotherapy Alone In Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme - An Experience at Radium Institute, Patna Medical College and Hospital, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, S; Pandit, P N; Kishor, K

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (WHO grade IV glioma) still remains a dreadful diagnosis in oncology with the median survival ranging between 12 to 17 months, despite the recent advances in its management. It is the most common malignant primary tumour in adults(13). The standard of care is Maximal Safe Resection followed by Concomitant ChemoRadiotherapy. During the period 2006 to 2010 at Radium Institute, Patna Medical College and Hospital (PMCH) in India, a study was conducted on 37 newly diagnosed GBM cases in which the control-arm (c-arm) received Conventional Radiotherapy (60Gy/30#) only whereas the study arm (s-arm) received Concomitant Chemoradiotherapy followed by Adjuvant Temozolomide. The median survival was 15.4 months in the s-arm as compared to 12.4 months in the c-arm. The OS showed a significant improvement with p-value of 0.05 and PFS also showed a benefit with a p-value of 0.005. The results were encouraging with improvement in OS as well as PFS in the s-arm and were at par with the other similar studies conducted in different parts of the world.

  3. Institute news

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-11-01

    Joining the team A new member of staff has recently joined the Institute of Physics Education Department (Schools and Colleges) team. (Dr) Steven Chapman will have managerial responsibility for physics education issues in the 11 - 16 age range, particularly on the policy side. He will work closely with Mary Wood, who spends much of her time out and about doing the practical things to support physics education pre-16. Catherine Wilson will be spending more of her time working to support the Post-16 Physics Initiative but retains overall responsibility for the department. Steven graduated in Physics and Astronomy and then went on to do his doctorate at Sussex University. He stayed in the research field for a while, including a period at NPL. Then, having decided to train as a teacher, he taught for the last five years, most recently at a brand new school in Sutton where he was Head of Physics. Physics update Dates for `Physics Update' courses in 2000, intended for practising science teachers, are as follows: 1 - 3 April: Malvern College 9 - 10 June: Stirling University 8 - 10 July: York University 8 - 10 December: Oxford University The deadline for applications for the course to be held on 11 - 13 December 1999 at the School of Physics, Exeter University, is 12 November, so any late enquiries should be sent to Leila Solomon at The Institute of Physics, 76 Portland Place, London W1N 3DH (tel: 020 7470 4821) right away. Name that teacher! Late nominations are still welcome for the Teachers of Physics/Teachers of Primary Science awards for the year 2000. Closing date for nominations is `the last week in November'. Further details can be obtained from Catherine Wilson or Barbara Hill in the Institute's Education Department. Forward and back! The Education Group's one-day meeting on 13 November is accepting bookings until almost the last minute, so don't delay your application! The day is entitled `Post-16 physics: Looking forward, learning from the past' and it aims to

  4. Medical advertising: the Family Encyclopaedia of Medicine scandal of 1914.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellinek, E H

    2008-12-01

    The past 100 years have seen a transition from a total ban in Britain on all advertising by doctors to the laity to almost total freedom of medical information, with probable benefit to public health but also a risk of loss of privacy. The Family Encyclopaedia of Medicine, written by Dr Hugh Howard Riddle and published by Lord Northcliffe's Daily Mail in 1914, started a flood of medical journalism in the press and the newer media. The lavishly advertised misattribution of its authorship to 'thirty eminent specialists', including Clifford Allbutt and William Osler, caused a major rumpus in the London Royal College of Physicians, but the fortnightly publication continued and became a four-volume book, popular with a public avid for more and more medical information.

  5. Establishment of a cohort for the long-term clinical follow-up with dose reconstruction under the joint medical research project conducted by Sasakawa Memorial Health Foundation (Japan) and the Research Institute of Radiation Hygiene (Russia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstantinov, Y.O.; Bruk, G.Y.; Ershov, E.B.

    2000-01-01

    The cohort of children in the western districts of the Bryansk Region of Russia exposed to radiation following the Chernobyl accident is described in this paper. The cohort was selected under the Joint Medical Research Project on Dosimetry Associated with the Chernobyl Accident conducted by Sasakawa Memorial Health Foundation (SMHF, Japan) and the Research Institute of Radiation Hygiene (RIRH, Russia). The subjects of the Research Project are those people residing in the most contaminated areas of Russia who was 0 to 10 years old at the time of exposure. At the moment the cohort comprises 1210 subjects, though this number may slightly decrease in course of a follow-up in view of migration of population. Most of cohort subjects were examined on their health status within the framework of the Chernobyl Sasakawa Health and Medical Cooperation Project (CSHMCP) from 1991-1996. In view of the main findings of studies in CSHMCP were thyroid abnormalities, selection of subjects was conducted on the basis of the credible estimates of thyroid dose. Preference for subjects to be included into the cohort was defined by the availability of health examination data from previous study (1991-1996) and individual dosimetry, environmental and social data that may prove useful for reconstruction of individual dose. The primary data analyzed for subjects selection are measurements of iodine-131 in the thyroid in May-June 1986, questionnaire data on individual food habits and early measurements of radiocesium in the body of subjects made by RIRH from May to September 1986. Plausible analytical models were applied to calculate thyroid dose from available data. Previously worked out methods of thyroid dose reconstruction using early measurement data of radiocesium content in the body and questionnaire data on individual consumption of locally produced milk were reevaluated. Basing on these analytical procedures, the individual thyroid dose was ascribed to each member of the cohort. The

  6. Micronutrient Supplementation, Dietary Intervention and Resulting Body Weight Gain of Severe Acute Malnourished Children – A Pilot Project Study of OJUS Medical Institute with Existing ICDS Project in Nasik District, Maharashtra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhasree Ray

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: OJUS Medical Institute in collaboration with Women & Child development department of Nashik District, Maharashtra conducted a target oriented pilot project study to see the improvement in body weight gain of SAM children, supplemented with nutritionally enriched diet and micronutrients. The Egg-DOT project is a target vertical intervention study that involved both Anganwadi workers and Community health workers to bring a fruitful result by working hand-in-hand. Rationale: ICDS is one of the best supplementary nutrition programs to address and eliminate malnutrition from the country. To make it more comprehensive and result oriented the pilot project study is formulated and executed to see if the addition in existing system could eradicate malnutrition in an effective manner and strengthen the Govt. health machinery. Objective: The study aimed at working along with the Govt. to reduce severity of malnutrition. It shouted for a healthy public-private relationship to bring optimum result from the existing Govt. project in reducing burden of malnutrition, spreading health education and behavioural modification in the community members by adopting a systematic micronutrient-diet-health education  intervention strategy. Materials & methods: Along with existing nutritional intervention, a small modification in diet is introduced to fulfill the deficit of 300 Kcal approximately. Good quality fat and protein are added to the Anganwadi meal with daily micronutrient supplementation. The supplementation is continued for 30 days in 25 SAM children of 3 to 5 years. The baseline and end line body weight measurements are taken and compared to see the improvement. Result: After 30 days of intervention the supplemented SAM children showed statistically significant increased body weight (P<0.01 with an overall healthy nutritional status. Conclusion: The study showed that public-private collaborative systematic strategy with proper

  7. The State Institute of Radiation Hygiene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The history and organisation of Statens Institutt for Straalehygiene (State Institute for Radiation Hygiene) are briefly described. The main tasks in the medical and industrial sectors are outlined, and the laboratory facilities at the Institute are described. The Institute's work load in personnel dosimetry and monitoring, both medical and industrial is presented and the dosimetry methods used are outlined. Finally the textbook published by the Institute (INIS RN 116369,117419, 117829,124801,117418,118223,117385,117389,117387,117388,117386,117391, 117201,117197,117198,117199,117200) is mentioned. (JIW)

  8. Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome: A survey on the knowledge, attitude, and practice among medical professionals at a tertiary health-care institution in Uttarakhand, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananya Doda

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Poor knowledge about HIV infection, particularly among the young medical students and paramedics, is evidence of the lacunae in the teaching system, which must be kept in mind while formulating teaching programs. As suggested by the respondents, Information Education Communication activities should be improvised making use of print, electronic, and social media along with interactive awareness sessions, regular continuing medical educations, and seminars to ensure good quality of safe modern medical care.

  9. Investigating the Utility of a GPA Institutional Adjustment Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didier, Thomas; Kreiter, Clarence D.; Buri, Russell; Solow, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    Background: Grading standards vary widely across undergraduate institutions. If, during the medical school admissions process, GPA is considered without reference to the institution attended, it will disadvantage applicants from undergraduate institutions employing rigorous grading standards. Method: A regression-based GPA institutional equating…

  10. La traducción como manipulación historiográfica en el exilio: análisis paratextual e intertextual de La Guerra Civil española de Hugh Thomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanz Gallego, Guillermo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores how the Spanish translation of Hugh Thomas’s The Spanish Civil War was appropriated by Éditions Ruedo ibérico in order to rewrite a series of crucial episodes and details of the conflict, such as the origins of the war, and the estimates of casualties. By drawing an intertextual and paratextual comparison between both versions – in English and Spanish – evidence is provided of how a series of passages have been manipulated in the translation. Such translation shifts follow an ideological pattern that benefits the Republican side. Also, the article shows how the Spanish translation differs from the original text in English in terms of objectivity. The results of the analysis provide evidence of translation shifts and manipulation in the Spanish version of a referential work, such as The Spanish Civil War by Hugh Thomas. Accordingly, a historiographical revision of the conflict is required.El presente artículo examina cómo la editorial Ruedo ibérico hizo uso de la traducción de La Guerra Civil española de Hugh Thomas para reescribir ciertos episodios y detalles trascendentales del conflicto, como los orígenes de la guerra y las cifras de víctimas. Al realizar una comparación intertextual y paratextual entre el original en inglés y la versión española se observa cómo una serie de fragmentos han sido manipulados en la traducción siguiendo un patrón ideológico que favorece los intereses del bando republicano. Además la presente investigación detalla cómo la traducción al español de la obra de Thomas se distancia del original en inglés en una serie de aspectos que influyen en el nivel de objetividad del texto. La condición de referente de la obra de Thomas, junto con los resultados del estudio, donde se aportan pruebas que demuestran manipulación en la traducción al español, exigen una revisión historiográfica del conflicto.

  11. Medical service plans in academic medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, B

    1978-10-01

    Medical service plans are of major importance to academic medical centers and are becoming increasingly so each year as evidenced by growing dependence of medical schools on resulting funds. How these funds are generated and used varies among schools. The procedures may affect the governance of the institution, modifying the authority of the central administration or the clinical departments. Recent developments in federal legislation, such as health maintenance organizations and amendments (Section 227) to the Social Security Act, and the future development of national health insurance will certainly have an effect on how academic medical centers organize their clinical activities. How successfully various medical schools deal with the dynamic problem may well determine their future survival.

  12. Current trends in medical ethics education in Japanese medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosu, Mitsuyasu

    2012-09-01

    The Japanese medical education program has radically improved during the last 10 years. In 1999, the Task Force Committee on Innovation of Medical Education for the 21st Century proposed a tutorial education system, a core curriculum, and a medical student evaluation system for clinical clerkship. In 2001, the Model Core Curriculum of medical education was instituted, in which medical ethics became part of the core material. Since 2005, a nationwide medical student evaluation system has been applied for entrance to clinical clerkship. Within the Japan Society for Medical Education, the Working Group of Medical Ethics proposed a medical ethics education curriculum in 2001. In line with this, the Japanese Association for Philosophical and Ethical Research in Medicine has begun to address the standardization of the curriculum of medical ethics. A medical philosophy curriculum should also be included in considering illness, health, life, death, the body, and human welfare.

  13. As fronteiras da pesquisa antropológica: Ética, Autonomia e Tráfico de Órgãos. Um comentário a The Global Traffic in Human Organs, de Nancy Scheper-Hughes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Diniz

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available O debate sobre os fundamentos éticos da comercialização de partes do corpo humano cresce a cada dia na bioética. Este artigo discute os princípios da ética e da autonomia contidos no mais importante estudo etnográfico sobre o tráfico internacional de órgãos, trabalho coordenado pela antropóloga Nancy Scheper-Hughes. O artigo mostra que a defesa da ética da não-comercialização exige o reconhecimento de fundamentos absolutos e inalienáveis para o ser humano, um pressuposto político cuja legitimidade os antropólogos relativistas resistem em reconhecer.

  14. Conductivity, temperature, depth, fluorescence, optical backscatter, laser in-situ scattering and transmissivity, acoustic zooplankton biomass, net zooplankton counts, and suspended particle data from the RV HUGH R. SHARP in the upper Chesapeake Bay from February 23 through 26, 2007 as part of the Bio-Physical Interaction in the Turbidity Maximum (BITMAX-II) program (NODC Accession 0062884)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data set contains Cruise Reports and CTD data from 8 main cruises in the upper Chesapeake Bay on board the R/V Hugh R. Sharp from February 2007 to October 2008 ....

  15. Institutions as Knowledge Capital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Juul; Garzarelli, Giampaolo

    The paper revisits the socioeconomic theory of the Austrian School economist Ludwig M. Lachmann. By showing that the common claim that Lachmann's idiosyncratic (read: eclectic and multidisciplinary) approach to economics entails nihilism is unfounded, it reaches the following conclusions. (1......) Lachmann held a sophisticated institutional position to economics that anticipated developments in contemporary new institutional economics. (2) Lachmann's sociological and economic reading of institutions offers insights for the problem of coordination. (3) Lachmann extends contemporary new institutional...... theory without simultaneously denying the policy approach of comparative institutional analysis. (90 words.)KeywordsComparative institutional analysis, coordination, expectations, institutionalevolution, interpretative institutionalism.JEL CodesB31, B52, B53, D80....

  16. What are Institutional Logics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg Johansen, Christina; Waldorff, Susanne Boch

    This study presents new insights into the explanatory power of the institutional logics perspective. With outset in a discussion of seminal theory texts, we identify two fundamental topics that frame institutional logics: overarching institutional orders guides by institutional logics, as well...... as change and agency generated by friction between logics. We use these topics as basis for an analysis of selected empirical papers, with the aim of understanding how institutional logics contribute to institutional theory at large, and which social matters institutional logics can and cannot explore...

  17. What are Institutional Logics

    OpenAIRE

    Berg Johansen, Christina; Bock Waldorff, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    This study presents new insights into the explanatory power of the institutional logics perspective. With outset in a discussion of seminal theory texts, we identify two fundamental topics that frame institutional logics: overarching institutional orders guided by institutional logics, as well as change and agency generated by friction between logics. We use these topics as basis for an analysis of selected empirical papers, with the aim of understanding how institutional logics contribute to...

  18. [Interpersonal relationships: perception of the communication, treatment and adverse experiences encountered by users of medical units that belong to the Coordinating Commission of the National Institutes of Health and High Specialty Hospitals (CCINSHAE)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Valerio, América Guadalupe Guadalupe; Cortés-Poza, David; Aguirre Hernández, Rebeca; Fuentes García, Ruth; Ramírez de la Roche, Omar Fernando; Hamui Sutton, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    User's perception with regard to the attention they received in healthcare units is increasingly being taken into account by the health service providers in order to improve the quality of their service. Describe how the users perceive the health services provided by the CCINSHAE with regard to the communication with the physicians, the attention of the staff and the adverse personal and institutional experiences and to explore their relation with user's demographic characteristics, health condition, physical limitations to carry out daily activities and service area. A questionnaire was designed to collect information about the user and his/her opinion with regard to the healthcare units, the communication with the physicians, the attention of the staff and the adverse personal and institutional experiences. The data were analyzed with STATA using sample weights. A total of 2,176 individuals were interviewed after they had received attention and represent a population of 1,457,964 users, over 6 months, of the CCINSAHE. We then calculated four binary variables that reflect the perception of the users. These four variables were significantly associated with the type of health unit where the user received attention, schooling, limitations to carry out daily activities, facilities provided to the relatives, family income, the use of alternative medicine, and the area of attention. A fundamental aspect of the service provided by the healthcare institutions is the communication between the physicians and the users. We found that the perception of the users with regard to the communication with the physician, the attention of the staff, and the adverse personal and institutional experiences was associated with the type of healthcare unit. The federal reference hospitals produced the most unfavorable perception while the regional hospitals produced the most favorable impression. This study enables the decision-making personnel to determine what needs to be modified in

  19. Formalising medical quality indicators to improve guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gendt, Marjolein; Ten Teije, Annette; Serban, Radu; Van Harmelen, Frank

    2005-01-01

    Medical guidelines can significantly improve quality of medical care and reduce costs. But how do we get sound and well-structured guidelines? This paper investigates the use of quality indicators that are formulated by medical institutions to evaluate medical care. The main research questions are

  20. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    F. M. Gakuya, BVM, MSc, M.N.Kyule, BVM, MSc, PhD, P.B. Gathura, BVM, MSc, PhD, Department of Public Health, Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of. Nairobi, P.O. Box 29053, Nairobi, Kenya and S. Kariuki, BVM, MSc, PhD, CentreforMicrobiology Research, Kenya Medical Research Institute, P.O. Box54840, ...

  1. Factors Affecting Medical Service Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosadeghrad, Ali Mohammad

    2014-02-01

    A better understanding of factors influencing quality of medical service can pinpoint better strategies for quality assurance in medical services. This study aimed to identify factors affecting the quality of medical services provided by Iranian physicians. Exploratory in-depth individual interviews were conducted with sixty-four physicians working in various medical institutions in Iran. Individual, organizational and environmental factors enhance or inhibit the quality of medical services. Quality of medical services depends on the personal factors of the physician and patient, and factors pertaining to the healthcare setting and the broader environment. Differences in internal and external factors such as availability of resources, patient cooperation and collaboration among providers affect the quality of medical services and patient outcomes. Supportive leadership, proper planning, education and training and effective management of resources and processes improve the quality of medical services. This article contributes to healthcare theory and practice by developing a conceptual framework for understanding factors that influence medical services quality.

  2. Abortion - medical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therapeutic medical abortion; Elective medical abortion; Induced abortion; Nonsurgical abortion ... A medical, or nonsurgical, abortion can be done within 7 weeks from the first day of the woman's last ...

  3. Costos de atención médica atribuibles al tabaquismo en el IMSS, Morelos Costs of medical care attributable to tobacco consumption at the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS, Morelos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Myriam Reynales-Shigematsu

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estimar los costos de atención médica en el Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS, Delegación Morelos, de las enfermedades mayores atribuibles al consumo de tabaco. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Las estimaciones de costos se realizaron desde la perspectiva del proveedor utilizando la metodología de costeo de enfermedad. Un panel de expertos multidisciplinario caracterizó la atención médica, en términos de la frecuencia de utilización de servicios en el primer y segundo niveles de atención, considerando el grado de severidad de la enfermedad. Los costos unitarios se estimaron en pesos mexicanos del 2001. Para estimar los costos atribuibles al tabaquismo se utilizó la fracción atribuible al consumo de tabaco para cada enfermedad (FA. RESULTADOS: Los costos promedio anuales de atención médica en el primer y segundo niveles de atención en la Delegación Morelos corresponden a 79 530 pesos para infarto agudo del miocardio (IAM, 73 303 pesos para enfermedad pulmonar obstructiva crónica (EPOC y 102 215 pesos para cáncer de pulmón (CP. El costo total anual para la Delegación por estas tres enfermedades asciende a 147 millones 390 mil 688 pesos. Los costos atribuibles al consumo de tabaco corresponden a 124 millones de pesos, lo cual equivale a 7.3% del presupuesto anual de la Delegación. CONCLUSIONES: Estos resultados confirman el alto costo de la atención médica en el IMSS correspondiente a las enfermedades atribuibles al consumo de tabaco. Se recomienda realizar este estudio en el plano nacional, de tal manera que los tomadores de decisiones tengan herramientas para fortalecer las políticas de control del tabaquismo en México.OBJECTIVE: To estimate the cost of medical care for the major diseases attributable to tobacco consumption at the IMSS, Morelos. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cost of illness (COI analysis was carried out from the perspective of the health provider. An expert panel characterized medical care in primary and

  4. Institutional Logics in Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lounsbury, Michael; Boxenbaum, Eva

    2013-01-01

    This double volume presents state-of-the-art research and thinking on the dynamics of actors and institutional logics. In the introduction, we briefly sketch the roots and branches of institutional logics scholarship before turning to the new buds of research on the topic of how actors engage...... institutional logics in the course of their organizational practice. We introduce an exciting line of new works on the meta-theoretical foundations of logics, institutional logic processes, and institutional complexity and organizational responses. Collectively, the papers in this volume advance the very...... prolific stream of research on institutional logics by deepening our insight into the active use of institutional logics in organizational action and interaction, including the institutional effects of such (inter)actions....

  5. Medical muddle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartrell, Nanette

    2014-01-01

    Nanette Gartrell, MD, is a psychiatrist and researcher whose investigations have documented the mental health and psychological well-being of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people over the past four decades. Nanette is the principal investigator of an ongoing longitudinal study of lesbian families in which the children were conceived by donor insemination. Now in its 27th year, this project has been cited internationally in the debates over equality in marriage, foster care, and adoption. Previously on the faculty at Harvard Medical School and the University of California, San Francisco, Nanette is currently a Visiting Distinguished Scholar at the Williams Institute, UCLA School of Law. In 2013, Nanette received the Association of Women Psychiatrists Presidential Commendation Award for "selfless and enduring vision, leadership, wisdom, and mentorship in the fields of women's mental health, ethics, and gender research." At the age of 63, Nanette experienced a 3 ½ month period of intractable, incapacitating dizziness for which there was never a clear diagnosis.

  6. Canadian institute honours Hawking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrani, Matin

    2009-11-01

    The Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Canada, has announced that a major new extension to its campus will be known as the Stephen Hawking Centre. The extension, which is currently being built, is due to open in 2011 and will double the size of the institute. It will also provide a home for the institute's Masters students, the first of whom joined the Perimeter Institute this autumn as part of its Perimeter Scholars international programme.

  7. Multinationals and Institutional Competitiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hull Kristensen, Peer; Morgan, Glenn

    This article discusses how institutional competitiveness and multinationals are mutually enriching concepts. Seen from the perspective of Multinationals, institutional competitiveness becomes expressed at two levels. At the level of corporate HQs institutional competitiveness proves itself...... competitiveness of Liberal Market Economies and Coordinated Markets Economies under the current competitive regime....

  8. Prevalência de constipação intestinal entre estudantes de medicina de uma instituição no Noroeste Paulista Prevalence of constipation among medical students of an institution in Northwestern São Paulo State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caren Trisóglio

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introdução: A constipação intestinal (CI é uma doença altamente prevalente em países ocidentais, apresenta etiologia complexa e multifatorial, e cursa com importantes impactos do ponto de vista médico e socioeconômico; é possível que profissionais da saúde e estudantes de medicina, dada a natureza de suas atividades profissionais e hábitos de vida, apresentem taxas de prevalência mais elevadas da doença, se comparados à população geral. Objetivos: Determinar a taxa de prevalência de CI entre estudantes de medicina de uma instituição de ensino segundo critérios diagnósticos estabelecidos na literatura e compará-la às taxas relatadas entre a população geral. Pacientes e Métodos: Realizou-se estudo transversal através da aplicação de questionários individuais a 360 estudantes de medicina de uma instituição do noroeste paulista, dos quais 150 (42% responderam; a definição de CI se deu através dos critérios de Roma III. Resultados: A taxa geral de prevalência de CI foi de 35%; houve predominância da doença entre o sexo feminino (55%; pIntroduction: Constipation is a highly prevalent disease in the Western world. It has a complex and multifactorial etiology, and courses with important impacts from a medical and socio-economical point of view. It is possible that health professionals and medical students, given the nature of their professional activities, trend to present higher rates of the disease in comparison to the general population. Objectives: To determine the prevalence rates of constipation among students of a single medical school according to diagnostic criteria in the literature, and to compare them with those reported among the general population. Patients and Methods: A transversal study was carried out with a sample of 360 medical students of a single medical school in Northwestern São Paulo State, by means of a self-administered questionnaire; a total of 150 students (42% completed the

  9. Furthering critical institutionalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Dalton Cleaver

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This special issue furthers the study of natural resource management from a critical institutional perspective. Critical institutionalism (CI is a contemporary body of thought that explores how institutions dynamically mediate relationships between people, natural resources and society. It focuses on the complexity of institutions entwined in everyday social life, their historical formation, the interplay between formal and informal, traditional and modern arrangements, and the power relations that animate them. In such perspectives a social justice lens is often used to scrutinise the outcomes of institutional processes. We argue here that critical institutional approaches have potentially much to offer commons scholarship, particularly through the explanatory power of the concept of bricolage for better understanding institutional change.  Critical institutional approaches, gathering momentum over the past 15 years or so, have excited considerable interest but the insights generated from different disciplinary perspectives remain insufficiently synthesised. Analyses emphasising complexity can be relatively illegible to policy-makers, a fact which lessens their reach. This special issue therefore aims to synthesise critical institutional ideas and so to lay the foundation for moving beyond the emergent stage to make meaningful academic and policy impact. In bringing together papers here we define and synthesise key themes of critical institutionalism, outline the concept of institutional bricolage and identity some key challenges facing this school of thought.

  10. Entrepreneurship as institutional change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Toke; Lauring, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    This paper responds to calls to make more explicit linkages between institutional theory and entrepreneurship research through studies on how entrepreneurs navigate and work with institutions. The research examines the micro-strategies and activities through which small-scale entrepreneurs maneuver...... between and exploit the multiple, potentially contradictory institutional logics of the different spheres in which they operate. While much research has elucidated how institutional entrepreneurs effect change, this study illustrates how effective entrepreneurs managing and exploiting institutional...... contradictions engage simultaneously in practices of maintaining and changing institutions to establish a balance between the poles on which their ventures depend. We illustrate this by two cases of small-scale entrepreneurship bridging institutional contradictions from an ethnographic study conducted under...

  11. From Institutional Change to Experimentalist Institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hull Kristensen, Peer; Morgan, Glenn

    2012-01-01

    Institutionalist theory has shown how work and employment relations are shaped by national contexts. Recent developments in these theories have been increasingly concerned with the issue of institutional change. This reflects a shift in the nature of the competitive environment of firms from...... and institutions. In this paper, we emphasize that in the current context of globalization, firms and actors within firms are continuously developing the way in which they organize work and employment to produce goods and services that are competitive in global markets. The paper argues that new market conditions...... lead firms to constant experimentation in work organization as they seek to position themselves within systems of production and innovation that are global in nature. This creates a pressure for institutional change to facilitate the process of firm-level experimentation; it also tends to create...

  12. [Ethical foundations of institutional psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, N

    2006-01-01

    The idea behind this work is to have an ethical examination of the institutional psychotherapy movement which has long influenced French public psychiatry and which has progressively, since the 80s, been subject to growing doubts. In the first part, institutional psychotherapy is presented. It is a model for theoretical development and practice in psychiatric care. It came into being just following the end of the Second World War at the same time as modern medical ethics. Its principles come on the one hand, from recognition of asylums' pathogenic effects--which led to the crushing of the patient's being--and on the other, through recognition of the uniqueness of each person and the subjectivity of mental suffering. These elements gave rise to creativity within the world of medicine and, in the sector, generated the science of psychiatry which advocated for continuity in care (both inpatient and outpatient) and preventive work directed at the population. This movement called for the use of the institution in its dynamic aspect which promotes exchanges and allows patients to situate or resituate themselves in historic and symbolic dimensions. It privileges a high level of transversality, maximum communication, favouring speaking out loud and responsibility. It requires a permanent analysis of the institutional counter transference (emotional reactions of the caregivers involved, their interrelations and the social and material organization of the institution) which determines the therapeutic action itself. THEORICAL BASIS: In a second part, its theoretical foundations and its practice shall be investigated in light of the guiding concepts of medical ethics (justice, autonomy, beneficence, non-malfeasance). Institutional psychotherapy responds to the need for justice by considering the patient as a whole and by conceiving each patient as being like oneself despite the differences (associated with the mode of hospitalization, the social or diagnostic category). The

  13. Institutional Support : Ethiopian Development Research Institute ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Ethiopian Development Research Institute (EDRI) was established in 1999 and became operational in 2003 as a semi-autonomous organization accountable to ... International Water Resources Association, in close collaboration with IDRC, is holding a webinar titled “Climate change and adaptive water management: ...

  14. Medical tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggat, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Medical tourism is a burgeoning industry in our region. It involves patients travelling outside of their home country for medical treatment. This article provides an outline of the current research around medical tourism, especially its impact on Australians. Patients are increasingly seeking a variety of medical treatments abroad, particularly those involving cosmetic surgery and dental treatment, often in countries in South-East Asia. Adverse events may occur during medical treatment abroad, which raises medico-legal and insurance issues, as well as concerns regarding follow-up of patients. General practitioners need to be prepared to offer advice, including travel health advice, to patients seeking medical treatment abroad.

  15. [Involvement of medical representatives in team medical care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirotsu, Misaki; Sohma, Michiro; Takagi, Hidehiko

    2009-04-01

    In recent years, chemotherapies have been further advanced because of successive launch of new drugs, introduction of molecular targeting, etc., and the concept of so-called Team Medical Care ,the idea of sharing interdisciplinary expertise for collaborative treatment, has steadily penetrated in the Japanese medical society. Dr. Naoto Ueno is a medical oncologist at US MD Anderson Cancer Center, the birthplace of the Team Medical Care. He has advocated the concept of ABC of Team Oncology by positioning pharmaceutical companies as Team C. Under such team practice, we believe that medical representatives of a pharmaceutical company should also play a role as a member of the Team Medical Care by providing appropriate drug use information to healthcare professionals, supporting post-marketing surveillance of treated patients, facilitating drug information sharing among healthcare professionals at medical institutions, etc.

  16. Texas Heart Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of seminars and conferences. Resources Texas Heart Institute Journal Scientific Publications Library & Learning Resources Resources for Physicians Fellowships & Residencies School of Perfusion Technology THI Spotlight Check out the ...

  17. Social accountability of medical education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Stefan; Karle, Hans

    2011-01-01

    accountability of medical education must be included in all accreditation processes at all levels. The global standards programme by World Federation for Medical Education (WFME) provides tools for national or regional accreditation but also guidance for reforms and quality improvement. The standards are used......Medical doctors constitute a profession which embraces trust from and accountability to society. This responsibility extends to all medical educational institutions. Social accountability of medical education means a willingness and ability to adjust to the needs of patients and health care systems...... both nationally and globally. But it also implies a responsibility to contribute to the development of medicine and society through fostering competence for research and improvement. Accreditation is a process by which a statutory body evaluates and recognises an educational institution and/or its...

  18. Les interdits hors la loi : la répression institutionnelle et médicale de la sexualité (1850-1930 Interdictions outside the Law: Institutional and Medical Repression of Sexuality (1850-1930

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Pognant

    2009-09-01

    , repressed by all society actors (clerks, members of a league, monks, police officers, judges, teachers, parents and by the medical profession (the first of which psychiatrists. This repressive phenomenon concerned all the Western countries, including the United States, to various degrees (the German criminal code, for example, was much more repressive than the French one on this topic. Many psychiatrists turned into auxiliaries of justice by supporting judicial action against homosexuals and masturbators. Western psychiatry of this period of time is characterised as far as sexuality is concerned as “a psychiatry of error” which will turn into “a psychiatry of horror” by developing a monstrous arsenal both technological (corsets, nightshirts and cages of retention.. and therapeutic (infibulation, cauterisation, circumcision without anesthesia, castration...Our contemporary societies still carry the marks of this dark periodduring which medicine and justice acted together for medicalizing and punishing sexual behaviours deviating from the standard.

  19. Medical Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... org Close Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT) Medical Management Although there’s no cure for CMT, there are ... individualized physical therapy program. For more on medical management of CMT, see Surgery Sometimes, Bracing Often, Caution ...

  20. Medical Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musaeus, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine philosophical stances underpinning medical identity and assess the conceptual relationship between physician, medical practice and culture. Argument: Medical identity is about the ideals and moral positions that physicians take when justifying themselves. Medical identity...... hedonistic versus sentimentalist approaches to medical identity. The sociocultural philosophical analysis of medical identity can shed light on what it means conceptually for a physician to harbor beliefs associated with him/her being taken to be an autonomous professional. It is important because it touches...... on the meaning of being a compassionate, good and skilled physician, making its relevance to person-centered medicine self-evident. Conclusion: Medical identity should be analyzed with reference to literature, philosophy and medical practice in order for the physician to exercise a reflective position...

  1. [Medical negligence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipper, St G

    2016-06-01

    Medical negligence is a matter of growing public interest. This review outlines various aspects of medical negligence: epidemiology, taxonomy, and the risks, causes, psychology, management and prevention of errors.

  2. Medical Illustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as medical books, journals, magazines, pharma or biotech marketing, films, online video, exhibits, posters, wall charts, educational ... of the health career profession with strong communication skills, medical illustrators work closely with clients to interpret ...

  3. Introduction: Institutional corruption and the pharmaceutical policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodwin, Marc A

    2013-01-01

    Today, the goals of pharmaceutical policy and medical practice are often undermined due to institutional corruption - that is, widespread or systemic practices, usually legal, that undermine an institution's objectives or integrity. In this symposium, 16 articles investigate the corruption of pharmaceutical policy, each taking a different look at the sources of corruption, how it occurs, and what is corrupted. We will see that the pharmaceutical industry's own purposes are often undermined. Furthermore, pharmaceutical industry funding of election campaigns and lobbying skews the legislative process that sets pharmaceutical policy. Moreover, certain practices have corrupted medical research, the production of medical knowledge, the practice of medicine, drug safety, the Food and Drug Administration's oversight of the pharmaceutical market, and the trustworthiness of patient advocacy organizations. © 2013 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  4. Organisational fundamentals of medical care in catastrophes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahnefeld, F.W.

    1983-01-01

    The author presents definitions, considerations, and fundamentals of discussion. He starts by listing the institutions, equipment and traning required for medical care and life-saving services in cases of emergency. A central coordination service for medical care and life saving is proposed. The present situation is reviewed, future needs are stated, and the necessary components of a medical service are listed. (DG) [de

  5. 77 FR 72924 - Taxable Medical Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-07

    ... in hospitals, doctors offices and other medical institutions, such as x-ray machines, magnetic... the medical device context include sales to hospitals and other medical service providers. Although... of a taxable article to charity constitutes a taxable use under section 4218. However, the IRS and...

  6. Fundamentals and Optimal Institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Eiras, Martin; Harmon, Nikolaj Arpe; Rossi, Martín

    2016-01-01

    of regulatory institutions such as revenue sharing, salary caps or luxury taxes. We show, theoretically and empirically, that these large differences in adopted institutions can be rationalized as optimal responses to differences in the fundamental characteristics of the sports being played. This provides...

  7. Political institutions since 1820

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foldvari, Peter; Buzasi, Katalin

    2014-01-01

    Political institutions determine the degree of freedom people enjoy and their capacity to influence their social and political environment. This chapter provides historical evidence on the evolution of political institutions drawing upon two major research projects: the PolityIV dataset and the

  8. Astrophysical Institute, Potsdam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Built upon a tradition of almost 300 years, the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam (AIP) is in an historical sense the successor of one of the oldest astronomical observatories in Germany. It is the first institute in the world which incorporated the term `astrophysical' in its name, and is connected with distinguished scientists such as Karl Schwarzschild and Albert Einstein. The AIP constitutes on...

  9. Discipline as Institutional Maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasche, Andreas; Hommel, Ulrich; Cornuel, Eric

    Drawing on the case of business school rankings, we study how institutions are maintained and remain persistent despite their contested nature. We argue that rankings as institutions can be maintained through subtle disciplinary practices that freeze power relations in recipient organizations. Ou...

  10. Institutional investor activism : Introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mc Cahery, Joseph; Bratton, William; Bratton, William; McCahery, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    The increase in institutional ownership of recent decades has been accompanied by an enhanced role played by institutions in monitoring companies’ corporate governance behaviour. Activist hedge funds and private equity firms have achieved a degree of success in actively shaping the business plans of

  11. Institutional Justification in Frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baden, Christian; Schultz, Friederike

    consensus. It extents research on framing in mass communication by applying institutional theory and Boltanski and Thévenot’s (2006) theory on justification in order to explain how the success and failure of proposed interpretations depend on the mobilization of accepted social institutions to justify...

  12. Back surgery: Modern medical pitfall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jc

    2002-01-01

    Medical iatrogenesis is at an all-time high with increasing deaths, disability, and costs compounded by unnecessary and ineffective surgeries despite the warnings from WHO, the US Public Health Service, and the Institute of Medicine. One area in particular, failed back surgeries, has drawn increasing attention by researchers due to disproved medical theories and surgical treatments. Paradoxically, while spinal manipulative therapy has been shown to achieve better results for this epidemic of low back pain in particular, medical and insurance programs often limit or boycott this inexpensive and effective treatment, indicating the solution to lowering medical costs and iatrogenesis now rests with political and economic factors primarily.

  13. The Medical Science DMZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peisert, Sean; Barnett, William; Dart, Eli; Cuff, James; Grossman, Robert L; Balas, Edward; Berman, Ari; Shankar, Anurag; Tierney, Brian

    2016-11-01

    We describe use cases and an institutional reference architecture for maintaining high-capacity, data-intensive network flows (e.g., 10, 40, 100 Gbps+) in a scientific, medical context while still adhering to security and privacy laws and regulations. High-end networking, packet filter firewalls, network intrusion detection systems. We describe a "Medical Science DMZ" concept as an option for secure, high-volume transport of large, sensitive data sets between research institutions over national research networks. The exponentially increasing amounts of "omics" data, the rapid increase of high-quality imaging, and other rapidly growing clinical data sets have resulted in the rise of biomedical research "big data." The storage, analysis, and network resources required to process these data and integrate them into patient diagnoses and treatments have grown to scales that strain the capabilities of academic health centers. Some data are not generated locally and cannot be sustained locally, and shared data repositories such as those provided by the National Library of Medicine, the National Cancer Institute, and international partners such as the European Bioinformatics Institute are rapidly growing. The ability to store and compute using these data must therefore be addressed by a combination of local, national, and industry resources that exchange large data sets. Maintaining data-intensive flows that comply with HIPAA and other regulations presents a new challenge for biomedical research. Recognizing this, we describe a strategy that marries performance and security by borrowing from and redefining the concept of a "Science DMZ"-a framework that is used in physical sciences and engineering research to manage high-capacity data flows. By implementing a Medical Science DMZ architecture, biomedical researchers can leverage the scale provided by high-performance computer and cloud storage facilities and national high-speed research networks while preserving privacy and

  14. Changing institutions of knowing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian; Bertelsen, Niels Haldor

    2014-01-01

    paper is to analyze enablers and barriers for this institutional change. The vocational education system in Denmark is strongly institutionalised with unions, employerÕs associations and the schools in central roles. Drawing on institutional theory contributions on labour market -, educational......In order to reach the EU 2020 goals for the climate, Danish vocational training units are currently in a process of institutional change triggered by the need of providing energy, and new process competences for the skilled and semiskilled workforce active in construction. The aim of the present...... - and professional institutions, the paper presents a study of institutional work inside and across schools and craft disciplines working in SMEs involved in new building and renovation with an energy aspect. Collaboration between four education committees for carpenters, masons, electricians and plumbers...

  15. [Medical technology and medical education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Mallek, D; Biersack, H-J; Mull, R; Wilhelm, K; Heinz, B; Mellert, F

    2010-08-01

    The education of medical professionals is divided into medical studies, postgraduate training leading to the qualification as a specialist, and continuing professional development. During education, all scientific knowledge and practical skills are to be acquired, which enable the physician to practice responsibly in a specialized medical area. In the present article, relevant curricula are analyzed regarding the consideration of medical device-related topics, as the clinical application of medical technology has reached a central position in modern patient care. Due to the enormous scientific and technical progress, this area has become as important as pharmacotherapy. Our evaluation shows that medical device-related topics are currently underrepresented in the course of medical education and training and should be given greater consideration in all areas of medical education. Possible solutions are presented.

  16. Effects of First Diagnosed Diabetes Mellitus on Medical Visits and Medication Adherence in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyeongsu, KIM; Soon-Ae, SHIN; Kunsei, LEE; Jong-Heon, PARK; Tae Hwa, HAN; Minsu, PARK; Eunyoung, Minsu; Hyoseon, JEONG; Jung-Hyun, LEE; Hyemi, AHN; Vitna, KIM

    2018-01-01

    Background: The National Health Insurance Service (NHIS) conducted a screening test to detect chronic diseases such as hypertension and diabetes in Korea. This study evaluated the effects of health screening for DM on pharmacological treatment. Methods: The data from qualification and the General Health Screening in 2012, the insurance claims of medical institutions from Jan 2009 to Dec 2014, and the diabetic case management program extracted from the NHIS administrative system were used. Total 16068 subjects were included. Visiting rate to medical institution, medication possession ratio and the rate of medication adherence of study subjects were used as the indices. Results: The visiting rates to medical institutions were 39.7%. The percentage who received a prescription for a diabetes mellitus medication from a doctor was 80.9%, the medication possession ratio was 70.8%, and the rate of medication adherence was 57.8%. Conclusion: The visiting rate, medication possession ratio and rate of medication adherence for DM medication were not high. In order to increase the visiting rate, medication possession ratio and rate of medication adherence, NHIS should support environment in which medical institutions and DM patients can do the role of each part. PMID:29445630

  17. INTERNAL CONTROL IN PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICES INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila FRUMUSACHI

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Internal control has a special role in the efficient organization of the entity’s management. The components of this control in the institutions of public health service are determined by the specific character of these institutions and National Standards of Internal Control in the Public Sector. The system of internal control in the institutions of public health service has the capacity to canalize the effort of the whole institution for the achievement of proposed objectives, to signalize permanently the dysfunctionalities about the quality of medical services and the deviations and to operate timely corrective measures for eliminating the noticed problems. In this regard the managers are obliged to analyse and to resize the system of internal control when in the organizational structure appear substantial changes.

  18. SMEs, Institutions and Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Camilla; Low, Mei Peng

    2013-01-01

    for combining the resource-based theory with an institutions-based approach towards constructing a more practical and empirical oriented analytical framework. After the preliminary discussion and introduction to the different theories used, the authors then take a focus on the analytical framework used to study......This chapter addresses at the outset the topic of SMEs and economic development from an institutions perspective. The authors argue that the transaction cost theory is not helpful towards understanding the role that institutions play for SME performance for several reasons. Instead, they argue...

  19. [Navy medical academy (to the 75th anniversary of establishment)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernikov, O G; Zaimagov, S V

    2016-02-01

    The article is devoted to the history of the creation in 1940 of the Naval Medical Academy on the basis of the 3rd Leningrad Medical Institute and the Institute for sanitary-chemical protection of the People's Commissariat of the USSR. The structure of this institution included, faculties management staff of the medical service, medical and sanitation, Higher Naval Medical School, the Marine Research Institute Medical, higher courses for officers of the medical service, clinical naval hospital. During the period of its activity (1940-1956), the staff of the Naval Medical Academy made a great contribution to the naval medicine and practical public health. The merit of the Academy is not only a beautifully staged academic, medical, research process, but also in the creation of the spirit of the high sea camaraderie, accomplishment and pride for the work which its graduates have dedicated their lives.

  20. Medical sociology for whom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaska, N L

    1977-12-01

    This article defines the role of a medical sociologist in a medical institution concerned with health care delivery. The role in applied research and teaching is also discussed. The distinction is made between sociology in medicine and sociology of medicine. Five broad areas of research included under the category of sociology of medicine are the consumer of health care; the social, cultural, and economic enviroments as they relate to health and illness; health and illness behavior; patient education; and the evaluation of services provided to the consumer. Research methodologies utilized by sociologists are briefly presented, and research issues of concern in the sociology of medicine are outlined. The knowledge and information provided by a medical sociologist are supplemental to the physician's practice and are expressed ultimately as a benefit for the patient.

  1. Exploring medical identity theft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancilla, Desla; Moczygemba, Jackie

    2009-09-16

    The crime of medical identity theft is a growing concern in healthcare institutions. A mixed-method study design including a two-stage electronic survey, telephone survey follow-up, and on-site observations was used to evaluate current practices in admitting and registration departments to reduce the occurrence of medical identity theft. Survey participants were chief compliance officers in acute healthcare organizations and members of the Health Care Compliance Association. Study results indicate variance in whether or how patient identity is confirmed in healthcare settings. The findings of this study suggest that information systems need to be designed for more efficient identity management. Admitting and registration staff must be trained, and compliance with medical identity theft policies and procedures must be monitored. Finally, biometric identity management solutions should be considered for stronger patient identification verification.

  2. FPG Child Development Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... shows how implicit racial biases are adversely affecting African American students--especially boys... read more Emphasis Areas ... Development, Teaching, and Learning The Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute will partner with Zero to Three ...

  3. Joint Quantum Institute

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Joint Quantum Institute (JQI) is pursuing that goal through the work of leading quantum scientists from the Department of Physics of the University of Maryland...

  4. Contributions to institutional matters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The papers included in this document deal with the institutional aspects and the legal framework of spent fuel management. The international management and storage of plutonium and spent fuel is addressed. Licensing procedures are discussed

  5. Advanced Transportation Institute 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    The seventh version of the Advanced Transportation Institute (ATI-08) was conducted in 2008 to encourage high school students to pursue careers in the field of transportation engineering. The University Transportation Center for Alabama partnered wit...

  6. Advanced Transportation Institute 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    The eighth version of the Advanced Transportation Institute (ATI-09) was conducted in 2009 to encourage high school students to pursue careers in the field of transportation engineering. The University Transportation Center for Alabama partnered with...

  7. Southern Universities Nuclear Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The Southern Universities Nuclear Institute was created in 1961 to provide postgraduate research and teaching facilities for the universities of Cape Town and Stellenbosch. The main research tool is the 6,0 MV Van de Graaff accelerator installed in 1964. Developments and improvements over the years have maintained the Institute's research effectiveness. The work of local research groups has led to a large number of M Sc and doctorate degrees and numerous publications in international journals. Research at the Institute includes front-line studies of basic nuclear and atomic physics, the development and application of nuclear analytical techniques and the application of radioisotope tracers to problems in science, industry and medicine. The Institute receives financial support from the two southern universities, the Department of National Education, the CSIR and the Atomic Energy Board

  8. Institutional profile questionnaire

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    test

    Public (i.e., independent govt. body, corporate owned by govt., etc.) N.B. If you ... If yes, services threshold amount? ... How long is the procurement process? : ... Information on person authorized to sign financial reports on behalf of institution.

  9. Medical marijuana.

    OpenAIRE

    Marmor, J B

    1998-01-01

    Although many clinical studies suggest the medical utility of marijuana for some conditions, the scientific evidence is weak. Many patients in California are self-medicating with marijuana, and physicians need data to assess the risks and benefits. The only reasonable solution to this problem is to encourage research on the medical effects of marijuana. The current regulatory system should be modified to remove barriers to clinical research with marijuana. The NIH panel has identified several...

  10. Corruption, Institutions and Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Breen; Robert Gillanders

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the effects of corruption and institutional quality on the quality of business regulation. Our key findings indicate that corruption negatively aspects the quality of regulation and that general institutional quality is insignificant once corruption is controlled for. These findings hold over a number of specifications which include additional exogenous historical and geographic controls. The findings imply that policy-makers should focus on curbing corruption to improve regulat...

  11. Great Lakes Energy Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, J. Iwan [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-11-18

    The vision of the Great Lakes Energy Institute is to enable the transition to advanced, sustainable energy generation, storage, distribution and utilization through coordinated research, development, and education. The Institute will place emphasis on translating leading edge research into next generation energy technology. The Institute’s research thrusts focus on coordinated research in decentralized power generation devices (e.g. fuel cells, wind turbines, solar photovoltaic devices), management of electrical power transmission and distribution, energy storage, and energy efficiency.

  12. Blogs in cultural institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Kaczyński

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses examples of three blogs of the National Library, both in terms of their structure and content as highlighting elements that impact on the promotion of both the blog and the institutions they lead. Discussed the advantages of one of Poland’s most popular blogging platforms WordPress. It also presents a short briefings to customize the look of your blog based on WordPress platform needs to actuate the institution.

  13. Self-medication practice among undergraduate medical students in a tertiary care medical college, West Bengal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, I; Bhadury, T

    2012-01-01

    Self-medication is a widely prevalent practice in India. It assumes a special significance among medical students as they are the future medical practitioners. To assess the pattern of self-medication practice among undergraduate medical students. Tertiary care medical college in West Bengal, India. A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study was conducted among the undergraduate medical students. Out of 500 students of the institute, 482 consented for the study and filled in the supplied questionnaire. Fourteen incomplete questionnaires were excluded and the remaining 468 analyzed. It was found that 267 (57.05%) respondents practiced self-medication. The principal morbidities for seeking self-medication included cough and common cold as reported by 94 students (35.21%) followed by diarrhea (68 students) (25.47%), fever (42 students) (15.73%), headache (40 students) (14.98%) and pain abdomen due to heartburn/ peptic ulcer (23 students) (8.61%). Drugs/ drug groups commonly used for self-medication included antibiotics (31.09%) followed by analgesics (23.21%), antipyretics (17.98%), antiulcer agents (8.99%), cough suppressant (7.87%), multivitamins (6.37%) and antihelminthics (4.49%). Among reasons for seeking self-medication, 126 students (47.19%) felt that their illness was mild while 76 (28.46%) preferred as it is time-saving. About 42 students (15.73%) cited cost-effectiveness as the primary reason while 23 (8.62%) preferred because of urgency. Our study shows that self-medication is widely practiced among students of the institute. In this situation, faculties should create awareness and educate their students regarding advantages and disadvantages of self-medication.

  14. Self-medication practice among undergraduate medical students in a tertiary care medical college, West Bengal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Banerjee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Self-medication is a widely prevalent practice in India. It assumes a special significance among medical students as they are the future medical practitioners. Aim: To assess the pattern of self-medication practice among undergraduate medical students. Settings and Design: Tertiary care medical college in West Bengal, India. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study was conducted among the undergraduate medical students. Results: Out of 500 students of the institute, 482 consented for the study and filled in the supplied questionnaire. Fourteen incomplete questionnaires were excluded and the remaining 468 analyzed. It was found that 267 (57.05% respondents practiced self-medication. The principal morbidities for seeking self-medication included cough and common cold as reported by 94 students (35.21% followed by diarrhea (68 students (25.47%, fever (42 students (15.73%, headache (40 students (14.98% and pain abdomen due to heartburn/ peptic ulcer (23 students (8.61%. Drugs/ drug groups commonly used for self-medication included antibiotics (31.09% followed by analgesics (23.21%, antipyretics (17.98%, antiulcer agents (8.99%, cough suppressant (7.87%, multivitamins (6.37% and antihelminthics (4.49%. Among reasons for seeking self-medication, 126 students (47.19% felt that their illness was mild while 76 (28.46% preferred as it is time-saving. About 42 students (15.73% cited cost-effectiveness as the primary reason while 23 (8.62% preferred because of urgency. Conclusion: Our study shows that self-medication is widely practiced among students of the institute. In this situation, faculties should create awareness and educate their students regarding advantages and disadvantages of self-medication.

  15. Narrative and Institutional Economics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav V. Volchik

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses a range of questions associated with the occurrence of a new field of study – narrative economics, which is considered in the context of modern institutionalism. Pioneering works of R. Shiller, G. Akerlof and D. Snower spotlighted the importance of analyzing narratives and narrative influence when studying economic processes. In this paper, a qualitative study of narratives is seen through the prism of an answer to the question: «How do prescribed narratives influence institutions and change them? ». Narratives have much in common with institutions since very often, explicitly or implicitly, they contain value judgements about social interactions or normative aspects shaping behavioral patterns. The identification of dominating narratives enables us to understand better how institutions influence economic (social action. Repeated interactions among social actors are structured through understanding and learning the rules. Understanding of social rules comes from the language – we articulate and perceive the rules drawing on common narratives. Narratives and institutions are helpful when actors gain knowledge about various forms of social communication. Digital technologies, mass media and social networking sites facilitate the spread of narratives, values and beliefs; this process is characterized by increasing returns. Studying narratives and institutions is crucial for modern economic theory because it helps to improve qualitative and quantitative methods of analyzing empirical evidence and enables researchers to understand complex economic processes.

  16. Medical assistance in case of nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodig, D.; Tezak, S.; Kasal, B.; Huic, D.; Medvedec, M.; Loncaric, S.; Grosev, D.; Rozman, B.; Popovic, S.

    1996-01-01

    Medical service is a prerequisite for work license of nuclear installation. Every nuclear installation incorporate in their safety procedure also medical emergency plan. Usually the medical emergency plan consists of several degrees of action: 1. First aid, 2. First medical treatment, 3. Treatment in regional hospital, 4. Treatment in special institution (centre for radiation medicine). This paper discusses organization and activities of Centre for Radiation Medicine and Protection - Clinical Hospital Centre Zagreb

  17. Key Success Factors in Medical Tourism Marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Yung-Sheng Yang

    2013-01-01

    The planners in tourism businesses and medical institutes, the evaluation criteria and dimensions for Medical Tourism Marketing are determined by experts through expert interviews. The weights and correlations among the dimensions and criteria are determined by Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) to construct an evaluating indicator model suitable for Medical Tourism Marketing. By organizing the overall weight of the key success factors in Medical Tourism Marketing, the top five indicators conta...

  18. A hugh marketing research task: birth control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, J L

    1968-02-01

    Research in underdeveloped countries to sell family planning is discussed. The article also aims at pinpointing other possible research areas. Census reports were actually the earliest work relevant to birth control. Later came the research on psychosocial factors affecting family size in developed countries. After World War I, client oriented research into family planning began. The history of this type of research is discussed with more emphasis on the surveys of the knowledge, attitude and contraception practices (KAP) in various countries. The author claims the KAP surveys to be the largest worldwide market research job ever done. Propagands campaigns, contraceptive costs, bonuses for contraceptive practices, and effectiveness of persuasion techniques are discussed.

  19. Medical imaging and the Internet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, D.N.; Carr, P.

    1995-01-01

    A brief introduction to the INTERNET and its benefits for those involved in nuclear medical imaging is given. In Australia, depending on the type of institution/department involved, connection to the INTERNET may be obtained via the Australian Academic and Research Network or through a commercial provider. The recent proliferation of WWW servers has also resulted in multiple medical imaging databases and teaching resources becoming available to the user. Some Newsgroups and WWW addresses related to radiology are provided. 3 refs

  20. Institutions and Modernity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Morawski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Modernity consists of many confl icting aspects: It brings many empty promises, yet has resulted in new institutions that create bridges between the values and interests of millions of people who seek freedom, prosperity, quality of life, strengthened democracy and social justice. In this paper I attempt to a gain and loss account against modernity, because institutional rules are not only conducive to cooperative interactions, but to hostile interactions as well. People are not always guided by moral commitment, but rather more often driven by cold calculation or coercion.Methodology: Modernity has at least three defi nitions. The fi rst defi nition is based on ideas that took over the imagination of the era. The second defi nition is based on an analysis of the behavior of people who respond to reason as well as emotion and believe that they act more rationally than their ancestors or the traditional “others”. The third defi nition is the one closest to my heart, consisting of the use of institutional categories. Institutions offer practical ways of connecting ideas and people. The challenge for them is the result of deepening local and national interdependencies, but increasingly often also regional (e.g. European and global. Interdependencies are the result of the scientifi c and technological revolution, global markets, global governance mechanisms, the emergence of new social forces and cultural confl icts (against the background of reconciling identity and differences.Conclusions: The most important task is to identify the mechanisms of complex systems so that people know how to act under conditions of uncertainty, risk and crisis. Hence, the expectations toward institutions often exceed their abilities. Even though new institutions are being created and old ones are being fixed, we are witnessing and participating in, institutional paralysis and the decay (e.g. corruption. In this situation, it is imperative not only to

  1. Medical Terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer County Community Coll., Trenton, NJ.

    This document is one of a series of student workbooks developed for workplace skill development courses or workshops by Mercer County Community College (New Jersey) and its partners. Designed to help employees of medical establishments learn medical terminology, this course provides information on basic word structure, body parts, suffixes and…

  2. Aviation medical examiner 2012 feedback survey : content analysis of recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI), as a component of the Office of Aerospace Medicine (OAM), surveyed the population of aviation medical examiners (AMEs), as federal designees, in 2012 to assess their satisfaction with Federal Aviation Adm...

  3. TTI Phase 2 Institutional Support: The Institute of Economic Affairs ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    TTI Phase 2 Institutional Support: The Institute of Economic Affairs, Ghana ... the Institute of Economic Affairs' (IEA-Ghana) role as a credible public policy ... public policy, facilitate private sector-led economic growth, and strengthen democracy.

  4. NUCOR Institute for Life Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The article discusses the Nucor Institute for Life Sciences. The institute was previously part of Nucor, but is now an autonomous institute of the University of Pretoria. The task of the institute is to promote the application of radioisotopes and radiation techniques in medicine and biology. Research projects of the institute are shortly discussed

  5. John Searle on Institutional Facts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    m Abdullahi

    2010-09-01

    Here we argue that the essence of institutional facts is status functions. Humans recognize these functions which contain a set of deontic powers through collective intentionality. Therefore, institutional facts are ontologically subjective and epistemologically objective. Nevertheless, objectivity of institutional facts totally depends on language which itself is a fundamental institution for other institutions.

  6. Commercial and Institutional Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Fruergaard, Thilde

    2011-01-01

    Commercial and institutional waste is primarily from retail (stores), hotels, restaurants, health care (except health risk waste), banks, insurance companies, education, retirement homes, public services and transport. Within some of these sectors, e.g. retail and restaurants, large variations...... are found in terms of which products and services are offered. Available data on unit generation rates and material composition as well as determining factors are discussed in this chapter. The characterizing of commercial and institutional waste is faced with the problem that often only a part of the waste...... is handled in the municipal waste system, where information is easily accessible. An important part of commercial and institutional waste is packaging waste, and enterprises with large quantities of clean paper, cardboard and plastic waste may have their own facilities for baling and storing their waste...

  7. International Environmental Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiSibio, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    The International Environmental Institute is being established at the Hanford Site to provide training and education in environmental restoration and waste management technologies and to serve as an interface for exchange of information among government laboratories, regional and federal governments, universities, and US industries. Recognized as the flagship of the nation's environmental management effort, the Hanford Site provides a unique living environmental laboratory that represents the most extensive, complex, and diverse cleanup challenges anywhere. An Environmental Institute director has been selected, the organizational structure has been established, and initial phases of operation have begun. The combined resources of the Hanford Site and the Environmental Institute offer unprecedented technological capabilities for dealing with the nation's environmental issues

  8. Institutional control and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bragg, K.

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides several possible principles to be used to guide future discussions and tries to place the need for institutional control into context for the various waste types. The proposed principles would allow institutional control to be used as one method to provide radiation protection in the future without presenting undue burdens to future generations. It also provides advice on how to apply the proposed principles in a practical manner. The key difference in the approach proposed is that institutional control should be viewed as a need to pass on information, knowledge and skills from one generation to the next. This would allow each successive generation to make its own decision as to whether such controls should be maintained. (author)

  9. Financial institutions as an example of institutions of public trust

    OpenAIRE

    Agata Jakubowska

    2013-01-01

    Financial institutions are commonly known as institutions of public trust and they are fundamental for activities of other economic entities. The level of trust determines the competitive position of financial institutions. That is why care about the best standards is the most important task for these institutions. Financial institutions are called institutions of public trust and thus high professionalism and more responsibility is demanded from them. This article presents basic problems con...

  10. Workshop on radioisotope safety issues in medical and academic institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to present current trends and recent initiatives of AECB staff members on issues relating to the regulation of radiation safety at hospitals and universities, and to invite the views of licencees on these matters. This report provides a record of presentations and discussions at this workshop. Presentation overheads are included as well as the results of workshop evaluations and a list of participants

  11. U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... members from biological threats. Our specialized capabilities include Biosafety Level 3 and Level 4 laboratories, world-class ... for the Department of Defense, we set the standard for identification of biological agents. Our customers in ...

  12. Workshop on radioisotope safety issues in medical and academic institutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to present current trends and recent initiatives of AECB staff members on issues relating to the regulation of radiation safety at hospitals and universities, and to invite the views of licencees on these matters. This report provides a record of presentations and discussions at this workshop. Presentation overheads are included as well as the results of workshop evaluations and a list of participants.

  13. Wikipedia and the National Cancer Institute Website Appear to Offer Similar Osteosarcoma Information for Patients. A Review of: Leithner, A., Werner, M., Glehr, M., Friesenbichler, J., Keithner, K., & Windhager R. (2010. Wikipedia and osteosarcoma: A trustworthy patients' information? Journal of the Medical Informatics Association, 17(4, 373-374.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Kelly

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To compare the completeness and accuracy of information about osteosarcoma in Wikipedia to information found on the patient and health professional versions of the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI website.Design – Comparative study, test against 20 item questionnaire and expert opinion.Setting – n/aSubjects – n/aMethods – The authors developed a 20-item questionnaire to test the completeness and accuracy of information on osteosarcoma in Wikipedia and on the "patient version and the health professional version of the National Cancer Institute's website as 'official' reference websites" (p. 373. Three independent observers, two surgeons specializing in musculoskeletal tumour surgery and a medical student, tested the English language version of Wikipedia and the NCI “websites” on April 3, 2009. Answers to the 20 questions found on the websites were scored from zero to three and were discussed with a member of the "German board for guidelines in musculoskeletal surgery" (p. 373 and verified against international guidelines published by the World Health Organization. Data was analyzed using SPSS and group comparisons were performed using Mann-Whitney U test with p-values of less than 0.05 significance. Main Results – The quality of information about osteosarcoma found in the English language version of Wikipedia was good but inferior to the patient information from NCI. Out of a total of 60 points Wikipedia scored 33, NCI patient information 40 and NCI professional information 50. There was no significant difference between the NCI patient information and Wikipedia but a significant difference (p=0.039 between Wikipedia and NCI professional information.Conclusion – Non-peer reviewed websites providing health information, such as Wikipedia, should include links to sites such as NCI and other more definitive sources such as professional and international organizations. Frequent checks should be used to ensure external

  14. Netherlands Interuniversity Reactor Institut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This is the annual report of the Interuniversity Reactor Institute in the Netherlands for the Academic Year 1977-78. Activities of the general committee, the daily committee and the scientific advice board are presented. Detailed reports of the scientific studies performed are given under five subjects - radiation physics, reactor physics, radiation chemistry, radiochemistry and radiation hygiene and dosimetry. Summarised reports of the various industrial groups are also presented. Training and education, publications and reports, courses, visits and cooperation with other institutes in the area of scientific research are mentioned. (C.F.)

  15. Legal and institutional issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Leaving aside the natural desire to avoid the difficulties imposed by the enormously complex siting and certification process, a utility might decide to forego adding new capacity because of a variety of legal and institutional disincentives. Some of these are discussed in this chapter. The addition of new lines to support a competitive generating market also raises unique institutional issues. Perhaps the most important of these is the question of who should pay for the necessary capital expenditures. This issue also is discussed in this section

  16. Navigating Institutions and Institutional Leadership to Address Sexual Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisneros, Kathy; Rivera, Monica

    2018-01-01

    Using an institutional example, this chapter offers strategies to effectively navigate institutional culture, processes, and structures to engage the entire campus community in addressing sexual violence.

  17. Medical Education in Nigeria: Status and travails of medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    plagiarism, duplicate publication, salami slicing and others. Editor / reviewer/ author training programs should be instituted. The use of current technology like etBLAST, Cross-Ref, Plagiarism checker, Google scholar and others to check widespread author sharp practices are recommended. Keyword: medical education ...

  18. Statistics in three biomedical journals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pilčík, Tomáš

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 1 (2003), s. 39-43 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/03/1381 Grant - others:Howard Hughes Medical Institute(US) HHMI55000323 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : statistics * usage * biomedical journals Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 0.939, year: 2003

  19. Genetical genomic determinants of alcohol consumption in rats and humans

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tabakoff, B.; Saba, L.; Printz, M.; Flodman, P.; Hodgkinson, C.; Goldman, D.; Koob, G.; Richardson, H.N.; Kechris, K.; Bell, R.L.; Hübner, N.; Heinig, M.; Pravenec, Michal; Mangion, J.; Legault, L.; Dongier, M.; Conigrave, K.M.; Whitfield, J.B.; Saunders, J.; Grant, B.; Hoffman, P.L.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 7, - (2009), s. 70-70 ISSN 1741-7007 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520 Grant - others:Howard Hughes Medical Institute(US) 55005624 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : alcohol consumption * rat * gene expression profiles Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.636, year: 2009

  20. Nurturing Medical Professionalism in the Surgical Community

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    teaching community in a Kenyan context on how ... buttressed by the Mezirow's theory of transformative learning, especially .... programs with the other institutions, or like other medical ... “A career day where they bring different professionals:.

  1. Medical practice in organized settings. Redefining medical autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrachan, J H; Astrachan, B M

    1989-07-01

    Physicians are perplexed by the ongoing erosion of their individual professional autonomy. While the economic forces underlying such change have received much attention, the evolution of new organizational forms that modify and often diminish medical autonomy is less well understood. The practice of medicine is becoming more organized and more hierarchical. We emphasize the importance of organized medical groups, including the medical staff organization, as structures for appropriate peer monitoring, and for counterbalancing the burgeoning influence of governance and administrative constraints on practice. There is an ongoing tension within organizations between management, governance, and physicians. Over time one or another of these groups achieves some measure of dominance, but good management requires a balance of power. The role of the medical staff, which is poorly represented in some health care institutions and under threat in others, is considered. In general, we find that medical work is becoming more hierarchical, and that physician "leaders" do not substitute for collegial processes.

  2. Digital Repository of Research Institutes – RCIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Kaczyńska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the project of Digital Repository of Scientific Institutes RCIN and presents opportunities for promoting science by digitization and sharing them on the Internet. The Repository has been created by the 16 Scientific Institutes in Warsaw, Krakow and Bialowieza to modernize the science-research and IT infrastructure, to increase digital resources of mathematical, technical, natural and medical sciences, and to popularize and promote of Polish science. That dissemination and popularization of science affects its development and competitiveness in the international arena and it allows transfer of research results to the economy. In addition, Institutes of RCIN providing contemporary and archival materials of science, support the intellectual capital of Polish science and raise awareness of professional literature of search on the Internet. Project RCIN is implemented in the years 2010–2014 and financing is provided by the funds of the European Fund of Regional Development.

  3. The Mid America Heart Institute: part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallister, Ben D; Steinhaus, David M

    2003-01-01

    The Mid America Heart Institute (MAHI) is one of the first and largest hospitals developed and designed specifically for cardiovascular care. The MAHI hybrid model, which is a partnership between the not-for-profit Saint Luke's Health System, an independent academic medical center, and a private practice physician group, has been extremely successful in providing high-quality patient care as well as developing strong educational and research programs. The Heart Institute has been the leader in providing cardiovascular care in the Kansas City region since its inception in 1975. Although challenges in the future are substantial, it is felt that the MAHI is in an excellent position to deal with the serious issues in health care because of the Heart Institute, its facility, organization, administration, dedicated medical and support staff, and its unique business model of physician management. In part I, the authors described the background and infrastructure of the Heart Institute. In part II, cardiovascular research and benefits of physician management are addressed.

  4. The Mid America Heart Institute: part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallister, Ben D; Steinhaus, David M

    2003-01-01

    The Mid America Heart Institute (MAHI) is one of the first and largest hospitals developed and designed specifically for cardiovascular care. The MAHI hybrid model, which is a partnership between the not-for-profit Saint Luke's Health System, an independent academic medical center, and a private practice physician group, has been extremely successful in providing high-quality patient care as well as developing strong educational and research programs. The Heart Institute has been the leader in providing cardiovascular care in the Kansas City region since its inception in 1975. Although challenges in the future are substantial, it is felt that the MAHI is in an excellent position to deal with the serious issues in health care because of the Heart Institute, its facility, organization, administration, dedicated medical and support staff, and its unique business model of physician management. In part I, the authors describe the background and infrastructure of the Heart Institute. In part II, cardiovascular research and benefits of physician management will be addressed.

  5. Institute for Nuclear Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haxton, W.; Bertsch, G.; Henley, E.M.

    1993-01-01

    This report briefly discussion the following programs of the Institute for Nuclear Theory: fundamental interactions in nuclei; strangeness in hadrons and nuclei; microscopic nuclear structure theory; nuclear physics in atoms and molecules; phenomenology and lattice QCD; and large amplitude collective motion

  6. Rescaling or Institutional Flexibility?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Povl Adler; Serin, Göran Folke

    2010-01-01

    -border integration has given rise? Does a process exist whereby the ‘problem' and its solution are readily identified and absorbed by existing institutional structures with actions carried out through ‘selective competence delegation'? Based on two case studies, the integration of the labour market and the creation...

  7. Information for Institutional Renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Richard L.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses a planning, management, and evaluation system, an objective-based planning process, research databases, analytical reports, and transactional data as state-of-the-art tools available to generate data which link research directly to planning for institutional renewal. (RC)

  8. Danish Space Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The present report presents a description of the activities and finances of the Danish Space Reserach Institute during 1989 and 1990. The research deals with infrared astronomy (ISOPHOT), X-ray astronomy (EXPECT/SODART), hard X-ray astronomy (WATCH), satellite projects and sounding rocket experiments. (CLS)

  9. International institutional law

    CERN Document Server

    Schermers, Henry G

    1972-01-01

    In several respects the present study is an enlargement of a former analysis about the specialized agencies of the United Nations to more organisations and into further detail. In particular the creation of the European Communities, adding new aspects to international institutional law, have received attention.

  10. Institute Born of Gratitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Vin

    1980-01-01

    The Wang Institute of Graduate Studies plans to offer a master's degree in software engineering. The development of an academic program to produce superior, technically qualified managers for the computer industry's software production is discussed. (Journal availability: Datamation, 666 Fifth Ave., New York, NY 10103.) (MLW)

  11. Colorado Water Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorado Water Institute Colorado State University header HomeMission StatementGRAD592NewslettersPublications/ReportsCSU Water ExpertsFunding OpportunitiesScholarshipsSubscribeEmploymentAdvisory BoardStaffContact UsCommentsLinks Water Center Logo Water Resources Archive Office of Engagement Ag Water

  12. Global Green Growth Institute

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Anders Riel

    2017-01-01

    Har man fulgt historien om Venstres gruppeformand Lars Løkkes rejser på 1. klasse i forbindelse med formandsposten for Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI) er der sikkert nogle der undrer sig over, hvad GGGI er for en størrelse. Medierne præsenterer GGGI som en international klimaorganisation, der...

  13. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    Osamu Shimomura, Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL), Woods Hole, MA, USA. Boston University Medical School, Massachusetts, MA, USA. Martin Chalfie, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. Roger Y Tsien, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA; Howard Hughes. Medical Institute. Physiology or Medicine.

  14. Cardiac Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cholesterol from circulating in the blood. Watch an animation of how statins work. Reason for Medication Used ... Kindle Fire Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Heart Attack Symptoms ...

  15. Medication Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size Small Text Medium Text Large Text Contrast Dark on Light Light on Dark Donate Search Menu Donate What is Glaucoma? Care ... Low Vision Resources Medication Guide Resources on the Web » See All Articles Where the Money Goes Have ...

  16. Medical Cyclotrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesel, D. L.; Antaya, T. A.

    Particle accelerators were initially developed to address specific scientific research goals, yet they were used for practical applications, particularly medical applications, within a few years of their invention. The cyclotron's potential for producing beams for cancer therapy and medical radioisotope production was realized with the early Lawrence cyclotrons and has continued with their more technically advanced successors — synchrocyclotrons, sector-focused cyclotrons and superconducting cyclotrons. While a variety of other accelerator technologies were developed to achieve today's high energy particles, this article will chronicle the development of one type of accelerator — the cyclotron, and its medical applications. These medical and industrial applications eventually led to the commercial manufacture of both small and large cyclotrons and facilities specifically designed for applications other than scientific research.

  17. Medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loshkajian, A.

    2000-01-01

    This didactical book presents the medical imaging techniques: radiography, scanner, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Examples are given for the most common pathologies in all domains of medicine. (J.S.)

  18. Medical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, M. C. J.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses four main types of medical imaging (x-ray, radionuclide, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance) and considers their relative merits. Describes important recent and possible future developments in image processing. (Author/MKR)

  19. Addressing Medical Errors in Hand Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Shepard P.; Adkinson, Joshua M.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    Influential think-tank such as the Institute of Medicine has raised awareness about the implications of medical errors. In response, organizations, medical societies, and institutions have initiated programs to decrease the incidence and effects of these errors. Surgeons deal with the direct implications of adverse events involving patients. In addition to managing the physical consequences, they are confronted with ethical and social issues when caring for a harmed patient. Although there is...

  20. Medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, P

    1992-01-01

    In theory, the Medical Council of India (MCI) determines the standards and qualifications of medical schools. It also sanctions curricula and ensures standards. Yet no standards exist on the mode of selection in medical schools, duration of study, course content, student stipends or period of internship. It takes 4.5 years to finish medical school. Students undergo preclinical, paraclinical, and clinical training. Most courses are in English which tends to favor the urban elite. Students cannot always communicate with patients in local languages. Textbooks often provide medical examples unrelated to India. Pedagogy consists mainly of lectures and rote learning predominates. Curricula tend not to provide courses in community health. Students pick up on the elitist attitudes of the faculty. For example, faculty do not put much emphasis on community health, individual health, equity in health care delivery, and teamwork. Further the education system is not patient oriented, but hospital or disease oriented. Faculty should train students in creating sanitation programs, knowing local nutritious foods, and in making community diagnoses. Yet they tend to be practitioners 1st then educators. Further faculty are not paid well and are not always invited to take part in improving curriculum, so morale is often low. Moreover experience in health planning and management issues is not required for administrators. In addition, medical schools are not well equipped with learning aids, libraries, or teaching staff. Tax revenues finance medical education. 75% of graduating physicians set up a private practice. Further many physicians go to urban areas. 34-57% emigrate to other countries. The problems of medical education will not be solved until the political and economic system becomes more responsive to the health needs of the people.