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Sample records for huge strike-slip fault

  1. Kinematically Coupled Strike-Slip and Normal Faults in the Lake Mead Strike-Slip Fault System, Southeast Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattenhorn, S. A.; Marshall, S. T.; Cooke, M. L.

    2008-12-01

    The Lake Mead fault system consists of a ~95 km long, northeast-trending zone of strike-slip faults of Miocene age that accommodate a total left-lateral offset of 20-65 km. We use a combination of detailed field mapping and numerical modeling to show that a previously unnamed left-lateral strike-slip segment of the Lake Mead fault system and a dense cluster of dominantly west-dipping normal faults acted in concert to accommodate regional left-lateral offset. We suggest that the strike-slip fault that we refer to as the Pinto Ridge fault: (1) was kinematically related to other faults of the Lake Mead fault system; (2) was responsible for the creation of the normal fault cluster at Pinto Ridge; and (3) utilized these normal faults as linking structures between separate strike-slip fault segments to create a longer, through-going fault. Results from numerical models demonstrate that the observed location and curving strike patterns of the normal fault cluster is consistent with the faults having formed as secondary structures as the result of the perturbed stress field around the slipping Pinto Ridge fault. Comparison of mechanical efficiency of various normal fault geometries within extending terranes suggests that the observed west dip of normal faults reflects a west- dipping anisotropy at depth, such as a detachment. The apparent terminations of numerous strike-slip faults of the Lake Mead fault system into west-dipping normal faults suggest that a west-dipping detachment may be regionally coherent.

  2. Onset of aseismic creep on major strike-slip faults

    KAUST Repository

    Çakir, Ziyadin

    2012-10-02

    Time series analysis of spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data, GPS measurements, and fi eld observations reveal that the central section of the Izmit (Turkey) fault that slipped with a supershear rupture velocity in the A.D. 1999, Mw7.4, Izmit earthquake began creeping aseismically following the earthquake. Rapid initial postseismic afterslip decayed logarithmically with time and appears to have reached a steady rate comparable to the preearthquake full fault-crossing rate, suggesting that it may continue for decades and possibly until late in the earthquake cycle. If confi rmed by future monitoring, these observations identify postseismic afterslip as a mechanism for initiating creep behavior along strike-slip faults. Long-term afterslip and/or creep has signifi cant implications for earthquake cycle models, recurrence intervals of large earthquakes, and accordingly, seismic hazard estimation along mature strike-slip faults, in particular for Istanbul which is believed to lie adjacent to a seismic gap along the North Anatolian fault in the Sea of Marmara. © 2012 Geological Society of America.

  3. San Andreas-sized Strike-slip Fault on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This mosaic of the south polar region of Jupiter's moon Europa shows the northern 290 kilometers (180 miles) of a strike-slip fault named Astypalaea Linea. The entire fault is about 810 kilometers (500 miles) long, about the size of the California portion of the San Andreas fault, which runs from the California-Mexico border north to the San Francisco Bay. In a strike-slip fault, two crustal blocks move horizontally past one another, similar to two opposing lanes of traffic. Overall motion along the fault seems to have followed a continuous narrow crack along the feature's entire length, with a path resembling steps on a staircase crossing zones that have been pulled apart. The images show that about 50 kilometers (30 miles) of displacement have taken place along the fault. The fault's opposite sides can be reconstructed like a puzzle, matching the shape of the sides and older, individual cracks and ridges broken by its movements. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] The red line marks the once active central crack of the fault. The black line outlines the fault zone, including material accumulated in the regions which have been pulled apart. Bends in the fault have allowed the surface to be pulled apart. This process created openings through which warmer, softer ice from below Europa's brittle ice shell surface, or frozen water from a possible subsurface ocean, could reach the surface. This upwelling of material formed large areas of new ice within the boundaries of the original fault. A similar pulling-apart phenomenon can be observed in the geological trough surrounding California's Salton Sea, in Death Valley and the Dead Sea. In those cases, the pulled-apart regions can include upwelled materials, but may be filled mostly by sedimentary and eroded material from above. One theory is that fault motion on Europa is induced by the pull of variable daily tides generated by Jupiter's gravitational tug on Europa. Tidal tension opens the fault and

  4. Strike-slip faults in the southernmost Andes and the development of the Patagonian orocline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, W. Dickson

    1993-02-01

    The Patagonian orocline is the 90° bend in the southernmost Andes between 50°S and 56°S. Paleomagnetic and structural data indicate that the orocline is, at least in part, the product of tectonic rotation. Recent field work in the Beagle Channel region of southernmost Chile provides evidence for widespread left-lateral strike-slip faulting in the internal zones of the mountain belt. Both arms of the Beagle Channel are interpreted to be left-lateral strike-slip faults based on detailed study of mesoscale strike-slip faults (Riedel shears) observed in coastal outcrops. Although much of the evidence indicates Cenozoic brittle strike-slip faulting, other fabric data, including vertical foliation zones containing horizontal quartz stretching lineations and ductile left-lateral kinematic indicators, suggest that Mesozoic ductile strike-slip or oblique-slip shearing also occurred. The implication is that the mid-Cretaceous Andean orogeny involved the transpressional inversion of the Rocas Verdes marginal basin and that transpression has been the dominant deformational regime in the region for the last 120 Ma. Regional left-lateral strike-slip faults are now recognized in all lithotectonic provinces of the southernmost Andes. A statistical study of regional lineament trends using aerial photographs and satellite imagery suggests that many unstudied lineaments are also strike-slip faults. A new model is proposed that integrates the development of strike-slip faulting and the structural evolution and uplift of the southernmost Andes with the rotational development of the orocline. The Patagonian orocline appears to be the product of broad interplate shearing accommodated by strike-slip faulting, block rotation, and contraction and is probably continuing to evolve today.

  5. A note on 2-D lithospheric deformation due to a blind strike-slip fault

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    numerically for different values of the fault-depth and dip angle. 1. Introduction ... fault. Singh and Rani (1994) obtained an analytical solution for the problem of a long inclined strike- slip fault in an elastic layer overlying an elastic half-space. In the model used ... dinate system (x1,x2,x3) at the free boundary and the x3-axis ...

  6. Strike slip faulting inferred from offsetting of drainages: Lower ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The detailed analysis of landforms, drainages and geology of the area between the rivers Amaravati and Karjan was carried out in order to understand the tectonic history of the lower Narmada basin. Movement along the various faults in the area was studied on the basis of the drainage offsetting. Horizontal offsetting of ...

  7. Assemblage of strike-slip faults and tectonic extension and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    12

    Am. 436. Bull. 116(5-6):698-717. 437. Cao X Z, Li S Z, Liu X, Suo Y H, Zhao S J, Xu L Q, Dai L M, Wang P C and Yu S. 438. 2013 The intraplate morphotectonic inversion along the Eastern Taihang. 439 mountain fault zone, North China and its mechanism; Earth Sci. Front. 440. 20(4):88-10 (in Chinese with English abstract).

  8. Geomorphic expression of strike-slip faults: field observations vs. analog experiments: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, S. Y.; Neubauer, F.; Genser, J.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this project is to study the surface expression of strike-slip faults with main aim to find rules how these structures can be extrapolated to depth. In the first step, several basic properties of the fault architecture are in focus: (1) Is it possible to define the fault architecture by studying surface structures of the damage zone vs. the fault core, particularly the width of the damage zone? (2) Which second order structures define the damage zone of strike-slip faults, and how relate these to such reported in basement fault strike-slip analog experiments? (3) Beside classical fault bend structures, is there a systematic along-strike variation of the damage zone width and to which properties relates the variation of the damage zone width. We study the above mentioned properties on the dextral Altyn fault, which is one of the largest strike-slip on Earth with the advantage to have developed in a fully arid climate. The Altyn fault includes a ca. 250 to 600 m wide fault valley, usually with the trace of actual fault in its center. The fault valley is confined by basement highs, from which alluvial fans develop towards the center of the fault valley. The active fault trace is marked by small scale pressure ridges and offset of alluvial fans. The fault valley confining basement highs are several kilometer long and ca. 0.5 to 1 km wide and confined by rotated dextral anti-Riedel faults and internally structured by a regular fracture pattern. Dextral anti-Riedel faults are often cut by Riedel faults. Consequently, the Altyn fault comprises a several km wide damage zone. The fault core zone is a barrier to fluid flow, and the few springs of the region are located on the margin of the fault valley implying the fractured basement highs as the reservoir. Consequently, the southern Silk Road was using the Altyn fault valley. The preliminary data show that two or more orders of structures exist. Small-scale develop during a single earthquake. These finally

  9. Continental strike slip fault zones in geologically complex lithosphere: the North Anatolian Fault, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwell, David; Thompson, David; Papaleo, Elvira; Rost, Sebastian; Houseman, Gregory; Kahraman, Metin; Turkelli, Niyazi; Teoman, Ugur; Altuncu Poyraz, Selda; Gulen, Levent; Utkucu, Murat

    2016-04-01

    As part of the multi-disciplinary Faultlab project, we present new detailed images in a geologically complex region where the crust and upper mantle is bisected by a major continental strike-slip fault system. Our study region samples the north Anatolian fault zone (NAFZ) near the epicentres of two large earthquakes that occurred in 1999 at Izmit (M7.5) and Düzce (M7.2) and where estimates of present day slip rate are 20-25 mm/yr. Using recordings of teleseismic earthquakes from a rectangular seismometer array spanning the NAFZ with 66 stations at a nominal inter-station spacing of 7 km and 7 additional stations further afield, we build a detailed 3-D image of structure and anisotropy using receiver functions, tomography and shear wave splitting and illuminate major changes in the architecture and properties of the upper crust, lower crust and upper mantle, both across and along the two branches of the NAFZ, at length scales of less than 20 km. We show that the northern NAFZ branch depth extent varies from the mid-crust to the upper mantle and it is likely to be less than 10 km wide. A high velocity lower crust and a region of crustal underthrusting appear to add strength to a heterogeneous crust and play a role in dictating the variation in faulting style and postseismic deformation. Sharp changes in lithospheric mantle velocity and anisotropy are constrained as the NAFZ is crossed, whereas crustal structure and anisotropy vary considerably both parallel and perpendicular to the faulting. We use our observations to test current models of the localisation of strike-slip deformation and develop new ideas to explain how narrow fault zones develop in extremely heterogeneous lithosphere.

  10. Strike-slip faulting at Thebes Gap, Missouri and Illinois; implications for New Madrid tectonism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Richard W.; Schultz, Art

    1994-01-01

    Numerous NNE and NE striking strike-slip faults and associated normal faults, folds, and transtensional grabens occur in the Thebes Gap area of Missouri and Illinois. These structures developed along the northwestern margin of the buried Reelfoot rift of Precambrian-Cambrian age at the northern edge of the Mississippi embayment. They have had a long-lived and complex structural history. This is an area of recent moderate seismicity, approximately 45 km north of the New Madrid seismic zone. Stratigraphic evidence suggests that these faults were active during the Middle Ordovician. They were subsequently reactivated between the Early Devonian and Late Cretaceous, probably in response to both the Acadian and Ouachita orogenies. Deformation during this period was characterized by strongly faulted and folded Ordovician through Devonian rocks. In places, these deformed rocks are overlain with angular unconformity by undeformed Cretaceous strata. Fault motion is interpreted as dominantly strike slip. A still younger period of reactivation involved Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic formations as young as the Miocene or Pliocene Mounds Gravel. These formations have experienced both minor high-angle normal faulting and subsequent major, right-lateral strike-slip faulting. En echelon north-south folds, ENE striking normal faults, regional fracture patterns, and drag folds indicate the right-lateral motion for this major episode of faulting which predates deposition of Quaternary loess. Several nondefinitive lines of evidence suggest Quaternary faulting. Similar fault orientations and kinematics, as well as recent seismicity and proximity, clearly suggest a structural relationship between deformation at Thebes Gap and tectonism associated with the New Madrid area.

  11. Propagation of strike-slip faults across Holocene volcano-sedimentary deposits, Pasto, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovida, Andrea; Tibaldi, Alessandro

    2005-10-01

    This study contributes to the understanding of shear failure development on the basis of macroscopic field data collected in latest Pleistocene-Holocene pyroclastic and fluvio-lacustrine deposits in the Pasto Valley, SW Colombia. Here there is a pervasive system of microfaults and joints. Right-lateral strike-slip microfaults strike N065°, whereas left-lateral strike-slip microfaults strike N120°. Three main joint sets strike N, N065° and N020° in decreasing order of frequency. Stress computation gives a horizontal σ1 trending ˜N060° and a horizontal σ3 trending ˜N150°, consistent with earthquake focal mechanisms and stress inversion of main faults. Synthetic shears dominate resulting from nucleation of older cracks. In the basement cropping out northeast of Pasto, the NE- to ENE-striking Buesaco, Aranda and Pasto Faults show evidence of latest Pleistocene-Holocene right-lateral strike-slip motions. The structures in the Pasto Valley can be interpreted as a Mode III damage zone representing the up-dip propagation of the main faults across the young volcano-sedimentary deposits.

  12. Lower Miocene coeval thrusting and strike-slip faulting in the Western Betics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasca, Gianluca; Gueydan, Frédéric; Brun, Jean-Pierre

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the Africa-Europe convergence, the Mediterranean system presents a complex interaction between subduction rollback and upper subduction plate deformation since 30 Ma. The western end of the system shows an arcuate geometry across the Gibraltar arc, the Betico-Rifean belt, in which the relationship between slab dynamics and onshore tectonics is poorly constrained. The present study focuses on the Western Betics, which is characterized by two major thrusts: 1/ the Alboran Front limits the metamorphic domain (Alboran Domain) from the fold-and-thrust belts involving the Mesozoic cover of the Iberian margin (Subbetics Domain); 2/ the Alboran Internal Thrust allows the juxtaposition of a strongly attenuated lithosphere section, containing the large Ronda subcontinental mantle bodies, on top of crustal rocks. New structural data show that two major E-W strike-slip corridors controlled the deformation pattern of the Alboran Domain, in which E-W dextral strike-slip faults, N60° thrusts and N140° normal faults developed simultaneously during dextral strike-slip simple shear. The Alozaina piggy-back Basin, mainly formed by olistotromic deposits of Lower Miocene age, provides an age estimate for the continuous westward translation of the Alboran Domain, with reference to Iberia, that is accommodated mainly by an E-W lateral strike-slip ramp and a N60° frontal thrust ramp. In this context, a thrust sequence led to the piling up of thrust units in the Western Betics and to the crustal emplacement of the Ronda Peridotites bodies.

  13. Analysis of the growth of strike-slip faults using effective medium theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydin, A.; Berryman, J.G.

    2009-10-15

    Increases in the dimensions of strike-slip faults including fault length, thickness of fault rock and the surrounding damage zone collectively provide quantitative definition of fault growth and are commonly measured in terms of the maximum fault slip. The field observations indicate that a common mechanism for fault growth in the brittle upper crust is fault lengthening by linkage and coalescence of neighboring fault segments or strands, and fault rock-zone widening into highly fractured inner damage zone via cataclastic deformation. The most important underlying mechanical reason in both cases is prior weakening of the rocks surrounding a fault's core and between neighboring fault segments by faulting-related fractures. In this paper, using field observations together with effective medium models, we analyze the reduction in the effective elastic properties of rock in terms of density of the fault-related brittle fractures and fracture intersection angles controlled primarily by the splay angles. Fracture densities or equivalent fracture spacing values corresponding to the vanishing Young's, shear, and quasi-pure shear moduli were obtained by extrapolation from the calculated range of these parameters. The fracture densities or the equivalent spacing values obtained using this method compare well with the field data measured along scan lines across the faults in the study area. These findings should be helpful for a better understanding of the fracture density/spacing distribution around faults and the transition from discrete fracturing to cataclastic deformation associated with fault growth and the related instabilities.

  14. The San Andreas Fault and a Strike-slip Fault on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The mosaic on the right of the south polar region of Jupiter's moon Europa shows the northern 290 kilometers (180 miles) of a strike-slip fault named Astypalaea Linea. The entire fault is about 810 kilometers (500 miles) long, the size of the California portion of the San Andreas fault on Earth which runs from the California-Mexico border north to the San Francisco Bay. The left mosaic shows the portion of the San Andreas fault near California's san Francisco Bay that has been scaled to the same size and resolution as the Europa image. Each covers an area approximately 170 by 193 kilometers(105 by 120 miles). The red line marks the once active central crack of the Europan fault (right) and the line of the San Andreas fault (left). A strike-slip fault is one in which two crustal blocks move horizontally past one another, similar to two opposing lanes of traffic. The overall motion along the Europan fault seems to have followed a continuous narrow crack along the entire length of the feature, with a path resembling stepson a staircase crossing zones which have been pulled apart. The images show that about 50 kilometers (30 miles) of displacement have taken place along the fault. Opposite sides of the fault can be reconstructed like a puzzle, matching the shape of the sides as well as older individual cracks and ridges that had been broken by its movements. Bends in the Europan fault have allowed the surface to be pulled apart. This pulling-apart along the fault's bends created openings through which warmer, softer ice from below Europa's brittle ice shell surface, or frozen water from a possible subsurface ocean, could reach the surface. This upwelling of material formed large areas of new ice within the boundaries of the original fault. A similar pulling apart phenomenon can be observed in the geological trough surrounding California's Salton Sea, and in Death Valley and the Dead Sea. In those cases, the pulled apart regions can include upwelled materials, but may

  15. Strike-Slip Faulting Processes on Ganymede: Global Morphological Mapping and Structural Interpretation of Grooved and Transitional Terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhard, L. M.; Cameron, M. E.; Smith-Konter, B. R.; Seifert, F.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Collins, G. C.

    2015-12-01

    Ganymede's fractured surface reveals many large-scale, morphologically distinct regions of inferred distributed shear and strike-slip faulting that may be important to the structural development of its surface and in the transition from dark to light (grooved) materials. To better understand the role of strike-slip tectonism in shaping Ganymede's complex icy surface, we perform a detailed mapping of key examples of strike-slip morphologies (i.e., en echelon structures, strike-slip duplexes, laterally offset pre-existing features, and possible strained craters) from Galileo and Voyager images. We focus on complex structures associated with grooved terrain (e.g. Nun Sulcus, Dardanus Sulcus, Tiamat Sulcus, and Arbela Sulcus) and terrains transitional from dark to light terrain (e.g. the boundary between Nippur Sulcus and Marius Regio, including Byblus Sulcus and Philus Sulcus). Detailed structural interpretations suggest strong evidence of strike-slip faulting in some regions (i.e., Nun and Dardanus Sulcus); however, further investigation of additional strike-slip structures is required of less convincing regions (i.e., Byblus Sulcus). Where applicable, these results are synthesized into a global database representing an inferred sense of shear for many of Ganymede's fractures. Moreover, when combined with existing observations of extensional features, these results help to narrow down the range of possible principal stress directions that could have acted at the regional or global scale to produce grooved terrain on Ganymede.

  16. Strain partitioning and stress perturbation around stepovers and bends of strike-slip faults: Numerical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Liu, Mian; Ye, Jiyang; Cao, Jianling; Jing, Yan

    2017-11-01

    Stepovers and bends along strike-slip faults are where push-up ranges and pull-apart basins are formed. They are also commonly where fault ruptures terminate. Field study and analogue models suggest that the configuration of faults plays a key role in crustal deformation around bends and stepovers, but the related mechanics of stress perturbation, strain partitioning, and fault evolution remains poorly understood. Here we present results of systematical mechanical models of stress changes and strain partitioning around simple stepovers and bends, using three-dimensional viscoelasto-plastic finite element code. Our model predicts elevated deviatoric stress around all stepovers and bends, with higher stresses around the restraining ones. Narrow stepovers localize strain between the fault gaps to form connecting faults, whereas wide stepovers localize strain on the tips of fault segments so the stepovers may evolve into subparallel faults. We explored how various configurations of stepovers and bends change the stress field and strain distribution, and show that these results can help explain some key differences between the pull-apart basins in the Dead Sea Trough and Death Valley, and the push-up ranges along the San Andreas Fault.

  17. Structural setting and kinematics of Nubian fault system, SE Western Desert, Egypt: An example of multi-reactivated intraplate strike-slip faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakran, Shawky; Said, Said Mohamed

    2018-02-01

    Detailed surface geological mapping and subsurface seismic interpretation have been integrated to unravel the structural style and kinematic history of the Nubian Fault System (NFS). The NFS consists of several E-W Principal Deformation Zones (PDZs) (e.g. Kalabsha fault). Each PDZ is defined by spectacular E-W, WNW and ENE dextral strike-slip faults, NNE sinistral strike-slip faults, NE to ENE folds, and NNW normal faults. Each fault zone has typical self-similar strike-slip architecture comprising multi-scale fault segments. Several multi-scale uplifts and basins were developed at the step-over zones between parallel strike-slip fault segments as a result of local extension or contraction. The NNE faults consist of right-stepping sinistral strike-slip fault segments (e.g. Sin El Kiddab fault). The NNE sinistral faults extend for long distances ranging from 30 to 100 kms and cut one or two E-W PDZs. Two nearly perpendicular strike-slip tectonic regimes are recognized in the NFS; an inactive E-W Late Cretaceous - Early Cenozoic dextral transpression and an active NNE sinistral shear.

  18. Left-Lateral Strike-Slip Faulting in the East Alborz, NE Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, J.; Walker, R.; Jackson, J.; Bolourchi, M. J.; Eshraghi, S. A.

    2006-12-01

    The East Alborz mountains of NE Iran are actively deforming as a result of Arabia-Eurasia collision. We combine observations of the geomorphology made using high resolution satellite, topographic and field data, with historical and recent seismicity to map major active faults in this poorly studied region. Deformation on the north side of the range occurs by range-normal shortening on the Khazar thrust fault, which separates Central Iran from the South Caspian. South of the range, deformation involves both left-lateral slip on the previously undocumented Shahrud fault system, which comprises several range-bounding fault segments, and shortening on (probably minor) thrust faults. Faulting south of the range is responsible for major historical earthquakes at Damghan (856AD) and Shahrud (1890). Deformation accommodated across the East Alborz is estimated from the difference in GPS velocities north and south of the range. South of the Alborz, northward GPS velocities across Central Iran decrease eastwards and the strike of the deforming belt changes to become more sub-parallel to the direction of South Caspian- Iran relative motion. This reduces the shortening component across the East Alborz, resulting in lower elevations between 54--57°E. West of 55.5°E, the more arc-normal shortening is achieved by partitioning of deformation onto the Khazar thrust (~1 mm/yr) and the Astaneh and Firuzkuh strike-slip faults (~3 mm/yr). East of 55.5°E, the Khazar fault ends and East Alborz deformation is accommodated primarily on the left-lateral Shahrud fault system, which may slip up to 3~mm/yr. Due to the long gap in seismicity along the eastern Shahrud fault system, the city of Jajarm (15,000 pop.) is considered at high risk from future earthquakes.

  19. Strike-slip faulting in the Inner California Borderlands, offshore Southern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormann, J. M.; Kent, G. M.; Driscoll, N. W.; Harding, A. J.; Sahakian, V. J.; Holmes, J. J.; Klotsko, S.; Kell, A. M.; Wesnousky, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    In the Inner California Borderlands (ICB), offshore of Southern California, modern dextral strike-slip faulting overprints a prominent system of basins and ridges formed during plate boundary reorganization 30-15 Ma. Geodetic data indicate faults in the ICB accommodate 6-8 mm/yr of Pacific-North American plate boundary deformation; however, the hazard posed by the ICB faults is poorly understood due to unknown fault geometry and loosely constrained slip rates. We present observations from high-resolution and reprocessed legacy 2D multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection datasets and multibeam bathymetry to constrain the modern fault architecture and tectonic evolution of the ICB. We use a sequence stratigraphy approach to identify discrete episodes of deformation in the MCS data and present the results of our mapping in a regional fault model that distinguishes active faults from relict structures. Significant differences exist between our model of modern ICB deformation and existing models. From east to west, the major active faults are the Newport-Inglewood/Rose Canyon, Palos Verdes, San Diego Trough, and San Clemente fault zones. Localized deformation on the continental slope along the San Mateo, San Onofre, and Carlsbad trends results from geometrical complexities in the dextral fault system. Undeformed early to mid-Pleistocene age sediments onlap and overlie deformation associated with the northern Coronado Bank fault (CBF) and the breakaway zone of the purported Oceanside Blind Thrust. Therefore, we interpret the northern CBF to be inactive, and slip rate estimates based on linkage with the Holocene active Palos Verdes fault are unwarranted. In the western ICB, the San Diego Trough fault (SDTF) and San Clemente fault have robust linear geomorphic expression, which suggests that these faults may accommodate a significant portion of modern ICB slip in a westward temporal migration of slip. The SDTF offsets young sediments between the US/Mexico border and the

  20. Strike-Slip Fault Patterns on Europa: Obliquity or Polar Wander?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoden, Alyssa Rose; Hurford, Terry A.; Manga, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Variations in diurnal tidal stress due to Europa's eccentric orbit have been considered as the driver of strike-slip motion along pre-existing faults, but obliquity and physical libration have not been taken into account. The first objective of this work is to examine the effects of obliquity on the predicted global pattern of fault slip directions based on a tidal-tectonic formation model. Our second objective is to test the hypothesis that incorporating obliquity can reconcile theory and observations without requiring polar wander, which was previously invoked to explain the mismatch found between the slip directions of 192 faults on Europa and the global pattern predicted using the eccentricity-only model. We compute predictions for individual, observed faults at their current latitude, longitude, and azimuth with four different tidal models: eccentricity only, eccentricity plus obliquity, eccentricity plus physical libration, and a combination of all three effects. We then determine whether longitude migration, presumably due to non-synchronous rotation, is indicated in observed faults by repeating the comparisons with and without obliquity, this time also allowing longitude translation. We find that a tidal model including an obliquity of 1.2?, along with longitude migration, can predict the slip directions of all observed features in the survey. However, all but four faults can be fit with only 1? of obliquity so the value we find may represent the maximum departure from a lower time-averaged obliquity value. Adding physical libration to the obliquity model improves the accuracy of predictions at the current locations of the faults, but fails to predict the slip directions of six faults and requires additional degrees of freedom. The obliquity model with longitude migration is therefore our preferred model. Although the polar wander interpretation cannot be ruled out from these results alone, the obliquity model accounts for all observations with a value

  1. Role of N-S strike-slip faulting in structuring of north-eastern Tunisia; geodynamic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfaoui, Aymen; Soumaya, Abdelkader; Ben Ayed, Noureddine; Delvaux, Damien; Ghanmi, Mohamed; Kadri, Ali; Zargouni, Fouad

    2017-05-01

    Three major compressional events characterized by folding, thrusting and strike-slip faulting occurred in the Eocene, Late Miocene and Quaternary along the NE Tunisian domain between Bou Kornine-Ressas-Msella and Cap Bon Peninsula. During the Plio-Quaternary, the Grombalia and Mornag grabens show a maximum of collapse in parallelism with the NNW-SSE SHmax direction and developed as 3rd order distensives zones within a global compressional regime. Using existing tectonic and geophysical data supplemented by new fault-kinematic observations, we show that Cenozoic deformation of the Mesozoic sedimentary sequences is dominated by first order N-S faults reactivation, this sinistral wrench system is responsible for the formation of strike-slip duplexes, thrusts, folds and grabens. Following our new structural interpretation, the major faults of N-S Axis, Bou Kornine-Ressas-Messella (MRB) and Hammamet-Korbous (HK) form an N-S first order compressive relay within a left lateral strike-slip duplex. The N-S master MRB fault is dominated by contractional imbricate fans, while the parallel HK fault is characterized by a trailing of extensional imbricate fans. The Eocene and Miocene compression phases in the study area caused sinistral strike-slip reactivation of pre-existing N-S faults, reverse reactivation of NE-SW trending faults and normal-oblique reactivation of NW-SE faults, creating a NE-SW to N-S trending system of east-verging folds and overlaps. Existing seismic tomography images suggest a key role for the lithospheric subvertical tear or STEP fault (Slab Transfer Edge Propagator) evidenced below this region on the development of the MRB and the HK relay zone. The presence of extensive syntectonic Pliocene on top of this crustal scale fault may be the result of a recent lithospheric vertical kinematic of this STEP fault, due to the rollback and lateral migration of the Calabrian slab eastward.

  2. Earthquake Activities Along the Strike-Slip Fault System on the Thailand-Myanmar Border

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santi Pailoplee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the present-day seismicity along the strike-slip fault system on the Thailand-Myanmar border. Using the earthquake catalogue the earthquake parameters representing seismic activities were evaluated in terms of the possible maximum magnitude, return period and earthquake occurrence probabilities. Three different hazardous areas could be distinguished from the obtained results. The most seismic-prone area was located along the northern segment of the fault system and can generate earthquakes of magnitude 5.0, 5.8, and 6.8 mb in the next 5, 10, and 50 years, respectively. The second most-prone area was the southern segment where earthquakes of magnitude 5.0, 6.0, and 7.0 mb might be generated every 18, 60, and 300 years, respectively. For the central segment, there was less than 30 and 10% probability that 6.0- and 7.0-mb earthquakes will be generated in the next 50 years. With regards to the significant infrastructures (dams in the vicinity, the operational Wachiralongkorn dam is situated in a low seismic hazard area with a return period of around 30 - 3000 years for a 5.0 - 7.0 mb earthquake. In contrast, the Hut Gyi, Srinakarin and Tha Thung Na dams are seismically at risk for earthquakes of mb 6.4 - 6.5 being generated in the next 50 years. Plans for a seismic-retrofit should therefore be completed and implemented while seismic monitoring in this region is indispensable.

  3. Oblique strike-slip faulting of the Cascadia submarine forearc: The Daisy Bank fault zone off central Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfinger, Chris; Kulm, LaVerne D.; Yeats, Robert S.; Hummon, Cheryl; Huftile, Gary J.; Niem, Alan R.; McNeill, Lisa C.

    The Cascadia submarine forearc off Oregon and Washington is deformed by numerous active WNW-trending, left-lateral strike-slip faults. The kinematics of this set of sub-parallel left-lateral faults suggests clockwise block rotation of the forearc driven by oblique subduction. One major left-lateral strike-slip fault, the 94 km-long Daisy Bank fault, located off central Oregon, was studied in detail using high-resolution AMS 150 kHz and SeaMARC-lA sidescan sonar, swath bathymetry, multichannel seismic reflection profiles and a submersible. The Daisy Bank fault zone cuts the sediments and basaltic basement of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate, and the overriding North American plate, extending from the abyssal plain to the upper slope-outer shelf region. The Daisy Bank fault, a near-vertical left-lateral fault striking 292°, is a wide structural zone with multiple scarps observed in high-resolution sidescan images. From a submersible, we observe that these scarps offset late Pleistocene gray clay and overlying olive green Holocene mud, dating fault activity as post-12 ka on the upper slope. Vertical separation along individual fault scarps ranges from a few centimeters to 130 meters. Using a retrodeformation technique with multichannel reflection records, we calculate a net slip of 2.2±0.5 km. Fault movement commenced at about 380±50 ka near the western fault tip, based upon an analysis of growth strata and correlation with deep-sea drill hole biostratigraphy. We calculate a slip rate of 5.7±2.0 mm/yr. for the Daisy Bank fault at its western end on the Juan de Fuca plate. The motion of the set of oblique faults, including the Daisy Bank fault, may accommodate a significant portion of the oblique component of plate motion along the central Cascadia margin. We propose a block rotation model by which the seawardmost part of the forearc rotates clockwise and translates northward.

  4. Influence of fault trend, bends, and convergence on shallow structure and geomorphology of the Hosgri strike-slip fault, offshore central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Watt, Janet T.

    2012-01-01

    We mapped an ∼94-km-long portion of the right-lateral Hosgri fault zone in offshore central California using a dense network of high-resolution seismic reflection profiles, marine magnetic data, and multibeam bathymetry. These data document the location, length, and continuity of multiple fault strands, highlight fault-zone heterogeneity, and demonstrate the importance of fault trend, fault bends, and fault convergence in the development of shallow structure and tectonic geomorphology along strike-slip faults.

  5. Do mesoscale faults near the tip of an active strike-slip fault indicate regional or local stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaji, Atsushi

    2017-04-01

    Fault-slip analysis is used in Japan after the Great Tohoku Earthquake (2011) to judge the stability of fractures in the foundations of nuclear power plants. In case a fault-slip datum from a fracture surface is explained by the present stress condition, the fracture is thought to have a risk to be activated as a fault. So, it is important to understand the relative significance of regional and local stresses. To answer the question whether mesoscale faults indicate regional or local stress, fault-slip data were collected from the walls of a trenching site of the Nojima Fault in central Japan—an active, dextral, strike-slip fault. The fault gave rise to the 1995 Kobe earthquake, which killed more than 6000 people. The trench was placed near the fault tip, which produced compressional and extensional local stress conditions on the sides of the fault near the tip. A segment of the fault, which ruptured the surface in 1995, bounded Cretaceous granite and latest Pliocene sediments in the trench. As a result, the stress inversion of the data from the mesoscale faults observed in the trench showed both the local stresses. The present WNW-ESE regional compression was found from the compressive side, but was not in the extensional side, probably because local extension surpassed the regional compression. Instead, the regional N-S compression of the Early Pleistocene was found from the extensional side. From this project, we got the lesson that fault-slip analysis reveals regional and local stresses, and that local stress sometimes masks regional one. This work was supported by a science project of "Drilling into Fault Damage Zone" (awarded to A. Lin) of the Secretariat of Nuclear Regulation Authority (Japan).

  6. COMPARISON OF COSEISMIC IONOSPHERIC DISTURBANCE WAVEFORMS REVISITED: STRIKE-SLIP, NORMAL, AND REVERSE FAULT EARTHQUAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhamad Nur Cahyadi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Using Total Electron Content (TEC measurements with Global Positioning System we studied ionospheric responses to three large earthquakes with difference focal mechanism that occurred in the Sumatra Andaman 26 December 2004, North off Sumatra 11 April 2012, and North Japan 7 December 2012. These earthquakes have different focal mechanisms, i.e. high-angle reverse, strike-slip, and normal faulting, respectively. TEC responses to the Sumatra Andaman 2004 and north Japan 2012 events initiated with positive changes. On the other hand, the initial TEC changes in the Sumatra 2012 earthquake showed both positive and negative polarities depending on the azimuth around the focal area. Such a variety may reflect differences in coseismic vertical crustal displacements, which are dominated by uplift and subsidence in the Sumatra 2012 event. This phenomena has same characteristic with 1994 Kuril Arch earthquake. There are three different propagation velocity in the Sumatra 2012 earthquake, within the first 300 km until 430 km, the CID propagation velocity was ~3 km/s, which is equal to the secod sound speed at the height of the ionospheric F-layer. Starting from 380 km until 750 km out from the epicenter, the disturbance seems to divide into two separate perturbations, with each propagating at a different velocity, about 1 km/s for the one and about 0.4 m/s for the other. The apparent velocity in the Sumatra Andaman 2004 and Japan 2012 propagated ~ 1 km/s and ~ 0.3 km/s, consistent with the sound speed at the ionospheric F layer height and internal gravity wave respectively. Resonant oscillation of TEC with a frequency of ~ 3.7 mHZ and ~4.4 mHz have been found in the Sumatra 2012 and Sumatra Andaman 2004 events. Those earthquakes, which occurred during a period of quiet geomagnetic activity, also showed clear preseismic TEC anomalies similar to those before the 2011 Tohoku-Oki and 2007 Bengkulu earthquake.   The positive anomalies started 30-60 minutes

  7. Characteristics of Middle and Deep Crustal Expression of an Arc - Forearc Boundary Strike-Slip Fault System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeske, S.; Mulcahy, S. R.; McClelland, W.; Cain, J.

    2008-12-01

    Strike-slip faults below the seismogenic zone are commonly assumed to widen with depth into broad region of distributed strain or flatten into subhorizontal shear zones within the middle crust. While this may occur in some continental strike-slip systems, we propose that strike-slip faults at a major rheologic boundary, such as an arc-forearc transition, remain relatively narrow at depth, with localized high strain zones separating discrete packages of less-deformed metamorphic rock. Strain localization allows for greater displacements and explains the juxtaposition of significantly different crustal levels exposed in such strike-slip systems. We present metamorphic and geochronologic evidence for the initiation of one such strike slip system in western Argentina. The Valle Fertil, Desaguadero-Bermejo lineament is a prominent high angle lineament which currently accommodates significant shortening in the western Sierra Pampeanas of Argentina. The lineament is characterized geophysically as a high-angle to steeply east-dipping boundary with denser and more magnetic rocks on the east. The fault zone is bounded by the Cambrian-Ordovician Famatina arc, an intermediate composition batholith, to the east and an arc-forearc package of predominantly metasedimentary rocks intruded by Ordovician mafic to intermediate composition plutonic rocks to the west. The two packages currently expose markedly different crustal levels; those to the east expose rocks metamorphosed at 2-8 kbar, while those to the west expose rocks metamorphosed 11-14 kbar. Both units experienced high-grade metamorphism and granulite facies migmatization between ~470-450 Ma. Separate isolated packages within the fault/ shear zone record separate histories from those exposed to the east and west of the lineament. Low grade-limestone as well as 1.1 Ga and 845 Ma granitoids are overprinted by low-grade shear zones and show no significant thermal effect of the Ordovician magmatism and metamorphism. Regional

  8. Interaction between slip events, erosion and sedimentation along an active strike-slip fault: Insights from analog models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatton, M.; Malavieille, J.; Dominguez, S.; Manighetti, I.; Romano, C.; Beauprêtre, S.; Garembois, S.; Larroque, C.

    2012-04-01

    Recovering information on past (i.e., last 102-104 yrs) large earthquakes on faults is a challenge. The classical approach -especially used on strike-slip faults- consists in searching morphological markers such as river channels, streams, alluvial fans, ridges or terrace risers, etc, that would be offset by the fault, and measure these offsets by reconstructing the original position and shape of the markers. Combined with the dating of the offset markers, this morphotectonic paleoseismological approach may provide information on the slips and ages of the most recent earthquakes on the fault under study. Yet, the approach is complex as it depends on the recognition of unambiguous paired markers on either side of the fault. And our capability to recognize similar markers on either side of a fault in turn greatly depends on the 'evolution' that these markers may have sustained subsequently to their very first slip disruption. Did the repeating earthquake slip events modify their surface appearance? Did their morphology and position (ex: burying, destruction, modification, etc) evolve with the sedimentation and erosion that might have occurred during the fault history? Etc. These questions have rarely been approached for they are difficult to address in natural settings. And as we are unable to answer them in the natural cases that we study, the slip reconstructions that we provide are generally uncertain as they are likely based on an incomplete or biased record of the past fault slips. Therefore, the objective of our work is to contribute to better understand and document the nature and 'evolution' of the morphological markers that are commonly used in morphotectonic and paleoseismological analyses, especially along strike-slip faults. We approach these questions experimentally. We have developed an original experimental set-up made to simulate repeated slip events on a strike-slip fault placed in a wet environment sustaining sedimentation and erosion. The fault

  9. Secondary Normal Faulting Near the Terminus of a Strike-Slip Fault Segment in the Lake Mead Fault System, SE Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, S. T.; Kattenhorn, S. A.

    2003-12-01

    The 95 km long Lake Mead Fault System (LMFS), located about 50 km east of Las Vegas and about 100 km west of the relatively undeformed Colorado Plateau, consists of a group of NE/SW-trending Miocene left-lateral strike-slip faults with a total offset of 65-110 km. Previous work suggests that the LMFS acted as a transform zone to accommodate differential extension between the southern Basin and Range to the north and the metamorphic core complexes of the Colorado River extensional corridor to the south. Studies of individual faults of the LMFS have shown that strike-slip faulting was the dominant mode of deformation while normal faulting, pull-apart basins, and push up structures formed as localized secondary structures related to strike-slip faults. This study focuses on the portion of the LMFS west of the Overton Arm of Lake Mead, which consists of the Bitter Spring Valley Fault (BSVF) and the Hamblin Bay Fault (HBF). Both faults have estimated offsets of 20-60 km, but past mapping efforts have been inconsistent with respect to the BSVF trace locations and degree of fault complexity. In order to demonstrate that the apparent complexity of the BSVF is the result of segmentation and secondary normal faults associated with individual segments, we focused field mapping efforts on an apparent segment of the BSVF near Pinto Ridge, located southwest of the Echo Hills and about 5 km NW of the more prominent HBF. We have identified nine normal faults that initiate near the SW tip of a segment of the BSVF and die out to the south before reaching the HBF. The offset on all these faults is a maximum at their northern intersection with the BSVF, then steadily decreases to zero away from the BSVF. These normal faults range from 0.6 km-2.25 km in length and have variable fault trace patterns. The normal fault originating closest to the SW tip of the BSVF segment curves with increasing distance away towards parallelism with the BSVF. The eight other normal faults are all oriented

  10. Analogue Modeling of Oblique Convergent Strike-Slip Faulting and Application to The Seram Island, Eastern Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benyamin Sapiie

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available DOI:10.17014/ijog.v1i3.189Sandbox experiment is one of the types of analogue modeling in geological sciences in which the main purpose is simulating deformation style and structural evolution of the sedimentary basin.  Sandbox modeling is one of the effective ways in conducting physically modeling and evaluates complex deformation of sedimentary rocks. The main purpose of this paper is to evaluate structural geometry and deformation history of oblique convergent deformation using of integrated technique of analogue sandbox modeling applying to deformation of Seram Fold-Thrust-Belt (SFTB in the Seram Island, Eastern Indonesia. Oblique convergent strike-slip deformation has notoriously generated area with structural complex geometry and pattern resulted from role of various local parameters that control stress distributions. Therefore, a special technique is needed for understanding and solving such problem in particular to relate 3D fault geometry and its evolution. The result of four case (Case 1 to 4 modeling setting indicated that two of modeling variables clearly affected in our sandbox modeling results; these are lithological variation (mainly stratigraphy of Seram Island and pre-existing basement fault geometry (basement configuration. Lithological variation was mainly affected in the total number of faults development.  On the other hand, pre-existing basement fault geometry was highly influenced in the end results particularly fault style and pattern as demonstrated in Case 4 modeling.  In addition, this study concluded that deformation in the Seram Island is clearly best described using oblique convergent strike-slip (transpression stress system.

  11. Mountain building, strike-slip faulting, and landscape evolution in the Marlborough Fault System, NZ: Insights from new low-temperature thermochronology and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvall, A. R.; Collett, C.; Flowers, R. M.; Tucker, G. E.; Upton, P.

    2016-12-01

    The 150 km wide Marlborough Fault System (MFS) and adjacent dextral-reverse Alpine Fault accommodate oblique convergence of the Australian and Pacific plates in a broad transform boundary that extends for much of the South Island New Zealand. Understanding the deformation history of the Marlborough region offers the opportunity to study topographic evolution in a strike-slip setting and a fuller picture of the evolving New Zealand plate boundary as the MFS lies at the transition from oceanic Pacific plate subduction to oblique continental collision. Here we present low-temperature thermochronology from the MFS to place new limits on the timing and style of mountain building. We sampled a range of elevations spanning 2 km within and adjacent to the Kaikoura Mountains, which stand high as topographic anomalies above active strike-slip faults. Young apatite (U-Th)/He ages ( 2-5 Ma) on both sides of range-bounding faults are consistent with regional distributed deformation since the Pliocene initiation of strike-slip faulting. However, large differences in both zircon helium and apatite fission track ages, from Paleogene/Neogene ages within hanging walls to unreset >100 Ma ages in footwalls, indicate an early phase of fault-related vertical exhumation. Thermal modeling using the QTQt program reveals two phases of exhumation within the Kaikoura Ranges: rapid cooling at 15-12 Ma localized to hanging wall rocks and regional rapid cooling reflected in all samples starting at 4-5 Ma. These results and landscape evolution models suggest that, despite the presence of active mountain front faults, much of the topographic relief in this region may predate the onset of strike-slip faulting and that portions of the Marlborough Faults are re-activated thrusts that coincide with the early development of the transpressive plate boundary. Regional exhumation after 5 Ma likely reflects increased proximity to the migrating Pacific plate subduction zone and the buoyant Chatham Rise.

  12. Slip rate and slip magnitudes of past earthquakes along the Bogd left-lateral strike-slip fault (Mongolia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, Carol S.; Rizza, M.; Ritz, J.F.; Baucher, R.; Vassallo, R.; Mahan, S.

    2011-01-01

    We carried out morphotectonic studies along the left-lateral strike-slip Bogd Fault, the principal structure involved in the Gobi-Altay earthquake of 1957 December 4 (published magnitudes range from 7.8 to 8.3). The Bogd Fault is 260 km long and can be subdivided into five main geometric segments, based on variation in strike direction. West to East these segments are, respectively: the West Ih Bogd (WIB), The North Ih Bogd (NIB), the West Ih Bogd (WIB), the West Baga Bogd (WBB) and the East Baga Bogd (EBB) segments. Morphological analysis of offset streams, ridges and alluvial fans—particularly well preserved in the arid environment of the Gobi region—allows evaluation of late Quaternary slip rates along the different faults segments. In this paper, we measure slip rates over the past 200 ka at four sites distributed across the three western segments of the Bogd Fault. Our results show that the left-lateral slip rate is∼1 mm yr–1 along the WIB and EIB segments and∼0.5 mm yr–1 along the NIB segment. These variations are consistent with the restraining bend geometry of the Bogd Fault. Our study also provides additional estimates of the horizontal offset associated with the 1957 earthquake along the western part of the Bogd rupture, complementing previously published studies. We show that the mean horizontal offset associated with the 1957 earthquake decreases progressively from 5.2 m in the west to 2.0 m in the east, reflecting the progressive change of kinematic style from pure left-lateral strike-slip faulting to left-lateral-reverse faulting. Along the three western segments, we measure cumulative displacements that are multiples of the 1957 coseismic offset, which may be consistent with a characteristic slip. Moreover, using these data, we re-estimate the moment magnitude of the Gobi-Altay earthquake at Mw 7.78–7.95. Combining our slip rate estimates and the slip distribution per event we also determined a mean recurrence interval of∼2500

  13. Segmentation and step-overs along strike-slip fault systems in the inner California borderlands: Implications for fault architecture and basin formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, J. M.; Driscoll, N. W.; Kent, G.; Brothers, D. S.

    2013-12-01

    Reprocessed, industry multichannel seismic reflection data and high resolution Chirp data were examined to characterize the geometry and recency of faulting in the inner California borderlands (ICB). Two end-member models have been proposed to explain the deformation observed in the ICB. One model invokes reactivation of detachment faults by the Oceanside Blind Thrust (OBT) to explain the deformation and margin architecture (e.g., San Mateo/Carlsbad Trend). In contrast, the other model explains the deformation by step-overs along the strike-slip fault systems. Several observations in both the southern and central portions of the ICB are more consistent with the step-over model than the regional blind thrust model. For example, regions in the ICB exhibit both tensional and compressional structures across the margin, which are more readily explained by the strike-slip model. Localized compression and extension occurs as predicted at fault bends and step-overs. Furthermore, strike slip fault systems that bound extensional regions (i.e., San Diego Bay) exhibit localized normal deformation as they approach the releasing step-overs. In addition, onlapping turbidites reveal that the deformation becomes younger toward the east, an observation not consistent with a westward verging blind thrust fault system. Finally, rotational deformation previously attributed to a splay off the OBT instead appears to be a southward transported gravitational slide deposit. In summary, the nested high-resolution Chirp and MCS data have provided new constraints on ICB tectonic deformation and margin architecture, which are best explained by step-overs on strike slip fault systems.

  14. Strike-slip and extensional tectonics of the Tan-Lu fault zone (eastern China) from the Cretaceous to Cenozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y. Q.; Shi, W.; Dong, S. W.

    2003-04-01

    The Tan-Lu fault zone which extends NNE-SSW more than 3000 km forms conspicuous geological feature along the northeastern margin of the Asia continent. Since its recognition by air-magnetic anomaly in 1957, this fault zone has become the subject of live debate. Most studies were mainly focused on the amount and age of the sinistral offsets along its middle and southern segments. It has been generally thought that the Tan-Lu fault zone was initiated as a transform fault during the Triassic collision between the South and North China Blocks and that it was strongly activated during the Cretaceous and Cenozoic time period. Some authors proposed that the Tan-Lu fault is part of a wide wrench fault system along the north-eastern Asia continent and that sinistral movement along this fault system accommodated oblique convergence between the Pacific oceanic plate and the Asia continent. Some others considered that the Tan-Lu fault belongs to the rifting system of eastern China. Based on field analysis of slip vector data from different rock units of the Cretaceous basins along the middle Tan-Lu fault zone (Shandong Province, eastern China), we document polyphase tectonic stress fields and address the changes in the sense of motion of the Tan-Lu fault zone during the Cretaceous and Cenozoic. The Cretaceous deformation history of the Tan-Lu fault zone can be divided into four main stages. The first stage during the lowermost Cretaceous was dominated by N-S extension, which is responsible for the formation of the Jiaolai basin. We interpret this extension to be related to dextral strike-slip pull-apart opening guided by the Tan-Lu fault zone. The second stage during the middle Early Cretaceous was overwhelmingly rift-dominated, and characterized by widespread intermediate volcanism, normal faulting and basin subsidence. It was at this stage that the Tan-Lu-parallel Yi-Shu Rift was initiated by E-W to WNW-ESE extension. The tectonic regime changed during the late Early

  15. The Iceland Plate Boundary Zone: Propagating Rifts, Migrating Transforms, and Rift-Parallel Strike-Slip Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karson, J. A.

    2017-11-01

    Unlike most of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the North America/Eurasia plate boundary in Iceland lies above sea level where magmatic and tectonic processes can be directly investigated in subaerial exposures. Accordingly, geologic processes in Iceland have long been recognized as possible analogs for seafloor spreading in the submerged parts of the mid-ocean ridge system. Combining existing and new data from across Iceland provides an integrated view of this active, mostly subaerial plate boundary. The broad Iceland plate boundary zone includes segmented rift zones linked by transform fault zones. Rift propagation and transform fault migration away from the Iceland hotspot rearrange the plate boundary configuration resulting in widespread deformation of older crust and reactivation of spreading-related structures. Rift propagation results in block rotations that are accommodated by widespread, rift-parallel, strike-slip faulting. The geometry and kinematics of faulting in Iceland may have implications for spreading processes elsewhere on the mid-ocean ridge system where rift propagation and transform migration occur.

  16. Late Quaternary Activity and Seismogenic Potential of the Gonave Microplate: Plantain Garden Strike-Slip Fault Zone of Eastern Jamaica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, P.; Prentice, C.; King, W.; Demets, C.; Wiggins-Grandison, M.; Benford, B.

    2008-12-01

    At the longitude of Jamaica, Caribbean (Carib)-North America (Noam) plate motion of 19 ± 2 mm/a is carried by two parallel, left-lateral strike-slip faults, the Oriente fault zone, immediately south of Cuba, and the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault zone (EPGFZ), which lies 100-150 km further south. It has been postulated that the lithosphere between these faults constitutes an independent Gonave microplate that has formed in response to the ongoing collision between the leading edge of Carib in Hispaniola and the Bahama carbonate platform. GPS measurements in Jamaica and Hispanola is supportive of the microplate hypothesis and indicates that roughly half of Carib-Noam plate motion (8-14 mm/a) is carried by the EPGFZ of southern Hispaniola and eastern Jamaica. This study applies geomorphic and paleoseismic methods as a direct test of the activity and amount of microplate motion carried on the Plantain Garden fault segment of eastern Hispaniola and how this motion is distributed across a large restraining bend that has formed the island of Jamaica since the late Miocene. The EPFZ curves gently to the northeast and forming a steep mountain front to the Blue Mountains restraining bend with elevations up to 2200 m. Geomorphic fault-related features along the mountain front fault zone include left-laterally deflected rivers and streams, but no small scale features indicative of Holocene activity. River and stream deflections range from 0.1 to 0.5 km. We identified and trenched the most active trace of the mountain front fault at the Morant River where the fault is characterized by a 1.5-m-wide sub-vertical fault zone juxtaposing sheared alluvium and fault Cretaceous basement rocks This section is overlain by a 6-m-thick fluvial terrace. Trenching in the unfaulted terrace immediately overlying the fault trace revealed radiocarbon and OSL ages ranging from 20 to 21 ka that are consistent with a prominent unfaulted alluvial fan along the projection of this fault 1.5 km to

  17. The 2003 Bam (Iran) earthquake: Rupture of a blind strike-slip fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebian, M.; Fielding, E. J.; Funning, G. J.; Ghorashi, M.; Jackson, J.; Nazari, H.; Parsons, B.; Priestley, K.; Rosen, P. A.; Walker, R.; hide

    2004-01-01

    A magnitude 6.5 earthquake devastated the town of Bam in southeast Iran on 26 December 2003. Surface displacements and decorrelation effects, mapped using Envisat radar data, reveal that over 2 m of slip occurred at depth on a fault that had not previously been identified. It is common for earthquakes to occur on blind faults which, despite their name, usually produce long-term surface effects by which their existence may be recognised. However, in this case there is a complete absence of morphological features associated with the seismogenic fault that destroyed Bam.

  18. Strike-slip fault Kinematics and mechanics at the seismic cycle time-scale : Results from new analogue model experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caniven, Yannick; Dominguez, Stéphane; Soliva, Roger; Cattin, Rodolphe; Peyret, Michel; Chéry, Jean; Romano, Christian

    2013-04-01

    The average seismic cycle duration extends from hundred to a few thousands years but geodetic measurements, including trilateration, GPS, Insar and seismological data extend over less than one century. This short time observation scale renders difficult, then, to constrain the role of key parameters such as fault friction and geometry, crust rheology, stress and strain rate that control the kinematics and mechanics of active faults. To solve this time scale issue, we have developed a new experimental set-up that reproduces scaled micro-earthquakes and several hundreds of seismic cycles along a strike-slip fault. The model is constituted by two polyurethane foam plates laterally in contact, lying on a basal silicone layer, which simulate the mechanical behaviour of an elastoplastic upper crust over a ductile lower crust, respectively. To simulate the boundary conditions of a strike-slip fault, a computerized motoreductor system moves the two compartments on an opposite sens and at a constant very low velocity (a few µm/s). The model spatial and temporal scaling, deduces from analog material physical and mechanical parameters, implies that 1 cm in the model represents 2-3 km in the nature and 1 s is equivalent to 5-15 years. Surface-horizontal strain field is quantified by sub-pixel correlation of digital camera pictures recorded every 16 µm of displacement. For each experience about 2000 horizontal-velocity field measurements are recorded. The analysis of model-interseismic and coseismic surface displacements and their comparison to seismogenic natural faults demonstrate that our analog model reproduces correctly both near and far-field surface strains. To compare the experiences, we have developed several algorithms that allow studying the main spatial and temporal evolution of the physical parameters and surface deformation processes that characterise the seismic cycle (magnitudes, stress, strain, friction coefficients, interseismic locking depth, recurrence

  19. Dislocation pileup as a representation of strain accumulation on a strike-slip fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    The conventional model of strain accumulation on a vertical transform fault is a discrete screw dislocation in an elastic half-space with the Burgers vector of the dislocation increasing at the rate of relative plate motion. It would be more realistic to replace that discrete dislocation by a dislocation distribution, presumably a pileup in which the individual dislocations are in equilibrium. The length of the pileup depends upon the applied stress and the amount of slip that has occurred at depth. I argue here that the dislocation pileup (the transition on the fault from no slip to slip at the full plate rate) occupies a substantial portion of the lithosphere thickness. A discrete dislocation at an adjustable depth can reproduce the surface deformation profile predicted by a pileup so closely that it will be difficult to distinguish between the two models. The locking depth (dislocation depth) of that discrete dislocation approximation is substantially (???30%) larger than that (depth to top of the pileup) in the pileup model. Thus, in inverting surface deformation data using the discrete dislocation model, the locking depth in the model should not be interpreted as the true locking depth. Although dislocation pileup models should provide a good explanation of the surface deformation near the fault trace, that explanation may not be adequate at greater distances from the fault trace because approximating the expected horizontally distributed deformation at subcrustal depths by uniform slip concentrated on the fault is not justified.

  20. A Physical Analog Model of Strike-Slip Faulting for Model-Based Inquiry in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curren, I. S.; Glesener, G.

    2013-12-01

    Geoscience educators often use qualitative physical analog models to demonstrate natural processes; while these are effective teaching tools, they often neglect the fundamental scientific practices that make up the core of scientific work. Physical analog models with dynamic properties that can be manipulated and measured quantitatively in real-time, on the other hand, can give students the opportunity to explore, observe and empirically test their own ideas and hypotheses about the relevant target concepts within a classroom setting. Providing classroom content for inquiry, such as a hands-on physical analog model, which fosters students' production and refinement of their mental models in participatory and discursive activities have been argued by many education researchers to help students build a deeper understanding of science and scientific reasoning. We present a physical analog model that was originally developed by UCLA's Modeling and Educational Demonstrations Laboratory (MEDL) for the purpose of engaging students in the study of elastic rebound on a strike-slip fault; it was later modified to accommodate research of complex tectonic processes associated with strike-slip faulting, which are currently debated by scientists in both the geology and geophysics disciplines. During experimentation, it became clear that this new design could be used as a relevant resource for inquiry from which students would be able to make and discuss real-time empirical measurements and observations to help them infer causal accounts of theoretical and/or unobservable dynamic processes within the Earth's crust. In our poster session, we will: 1) demonstrate the physical analog model; 2) describe various real-time data collection tools, as well as quantitative methods students can use to process their data; and 3) describe the surficial, structural and relational similarities between the physical analog model and the target concepts intended for students to explore in the

  1. Late Quaternary strike-slip along the Taohuala Shan-Ayouqi fault zone and its tectonic implications in the Hexi Corridor and the southern Gobi Alashan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing-xing; Zheng, Wen-jun; Zhang, Pei-zhen; Lei, Qi-yun; Wang, Xu-long; Wang, Wei-tao; Li, Xin-nan; Zhang, Ning

    2017-11-01

    The Hexi Corridor and the southern Gobi Alashan are composed of discontinuous a set of active faults with various strikes and slip motions that are located to the north of the northern Tibetan Plateau. Despite growing understanding of the geometry and kinematics of these active faults, the late Quaternary deformation pattern in the Hexi Corridor and the southern Gobi Alashan remains controversial. The active E-W trending Taohuala Shan-Ayouqi fault zone is located in the southern Gobi Alashan. Study of the geometry and nature of slip along this fault zone holds crucial value for better understanding the regional deformation pattern. Field investigations combined with high-resolution imagery show that the Taohuala Shan fault and the E-W trending faults within the Ayouqi fault zone (F2 and F5) are left-lateral strike-slip faults, whereas the NW or WNW-trending faults within the Ayouqi fault zone (F1 and F3) are reverse faults. We collected Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) and cosmogenic exposure age dating samples from offset alluvial fan surfaces, and estimated a vertical slip rate of 0.1-0.3 mm/yr, and a strike-slip rate of 0.14-0.93 mm/yr for the Taohuala Shan fault. Strata revealed in a trench excavated across the major fault (F5) in the Ayouqi fault zone and OSL dating results indicate that the most recent earthquake occurred between ca. 11.05 ± 0.52 ka and ca. 4.06 ± 0.29 ka. The geometry and kinematics of the Taohuala Shan-Ayouqi fault zone enable us to build a deformation pattern for the entire Hexi Corridor and the southern Gobi Alashan, which suggest that this region experiences northeastward oblique extrusion of the northern Tibetan Plateau. These left-lateral strike-slip faults in the region are driven by oblique compression but not associated with the northeastward extension of the Altyn Tagh fault.

  2. Pseudodynamic Source Characterization for Strike-Slip Faulting Including Stress Heterogeneity and Super-Shear Ruptures

    KAUST Repository

    Mena, B.

    2012-08-08

    Reliable ground‐motion prediction for future earthquakes depends on the ability to simulate realistic earthquake source models. Though dynamic rupture calculations have recently become more popular, they are still computationally demanding. An alternative is to invoke the framework of pseudodynamic (PD) source characterizations that use simple relationships between kinematic and dynamic source parameters to build physically self‐consistent kinematic models. Based on the PD approach of Guatteri et al. (2004), we propose new relationships for PD models for moderate‐to‐large strike‐slip earthquakes that include local supershear rupture speed due to stress heterogeneities. We conduct dynamic rupture simulations using stochastic initial stress distributions to generate a suite of source models in the magnitude Mw 6–8. This set of models shows that local supershear rupture speed prevails for all earthquake sizes, and that the local rise‐time distribution is not controlled by the overall fault geometry, but rather by local stress changes on the faults. Based on these findings, we derive a new set of relations for the proposed PD source characterization that accounts for earthquake size, buried and surface ruptures, and includes local rise‐time variations and supershear rupture speed. By applying the proposed PD source characterization to several well‐recorded past earthquakes, we verify that significant improvements in fitting synthetic ground motion to observed ones is achieved when comparing our new approach with the model of Guatteri et al. (2004). The proposed PD methodology can be implemented into ground‐motion simulation tools for more physically reliable prediction of shaking in future earthquakes.

  3. Relationships between along-fault heterogeneous normal stress and fault slip patterns during the seismic cycle: Insights from a strike-slip fault laboratory model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caniven, Yannick; Dominguez, Stéphane; Soliva, Roger; Peyret, Michel; Cattin, Rodolphe; Maerten, Frantz

    2017-12-01

    We use a strike-slip fault analog model to study experimentally the role played by along-fault non-uniform and asymmetric applied normal stress on both coseismic slip and long-term fault behavior. Our model is based on a visco-elasto-plastic multi-layered rheology that allows to produce several hundreds of scaled analog microquakes and associated seismic cycles. Uniform or heterogeneous applied normal stress along the fault plane is imposed and maintained constant during the whole experiment durations. Our results suggest that coseismic slip patterns are strongly controlled by spatial normal stress variations and subsequent accumulated shear stress along fault strike. Major microquakes occur preferentially in zones of major shear stress asperities. Coseismic slip distributions exhibit a pattern similar to the along-fault applied normal stress distribution. The occurrence of isolated low to moderate microquakes where residual stresses persist around secondary stress asperities, indicates that stress conditions along the fault also control the whole variability of fault slip events. Moreover, when fault slip stability conditions are modulated by normal stress distribution, our experiments suggest that the along-fault stress heterogeneity influences the seismic cycle regularity and, consequently, long-term fault slip behavior. Uniform applied normal stress favors irregular seismic cycles and the occurrence of earthquakes clustering, whereas non-uniform normal stress with a single high amplitude stress asperity generates strong characteristic microquake events with stable return periods. Together our results strengthen the assumption that coseismic slip distribution and earthquake variability along an active fault may provide relevant information on long term tectonic stress and could thus improve seismic hazard assessment.

  4. Rapid creation and destruction of sedimentary basins on mature strike-slip faults: an example from the offshore Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Philip M.; Sutherland, Rupert; Davy, Bryan; Delteil, Jean

    2001-11-01

    Seismic reflection profiles and multibeam bathymetric data are integrated to analyse the structure of the 25 km-long strike-slip Dagg Basin associated with the marine section of the Alpine Fault, Fiordland, New Zealand. The basin is developing in almost 3000 m water depth at a releasing bend, whilst contemporaneous transpression results in inversion of its southern end. Fiord-derived glacio-marine sediments flooded the basin during the last glaciation, and provide a stratigraphic framework for structural analysis. Geometrical analysis enables an estimation of 450-1650 m of dextral displacement on the Alpine Fault at the releasing bend since the development of an unconformity estimated to have formed at between 30 and 110 ka. This implies a dextral slip rate ranging from a possible minimum of 4 mm/yr to the maximum of 35 mm/yr constrained by the Pacific-Australian plate motion rate. Despite total dextral displacement of 480 km on the Alpine Fault zone and a growth history spanning 15-20 Myr, this geomorphically well expressed and structurally complex strike-slip basin developed and evolved rapidly during the late Pleistocene, and thus represents only the latest phase in the evolution of the Alpine Fault. Upward splaying structures within the fault zone exhibit a rapid spatial evolution in Pleistocene strata, which may reflect the interactions between high fault slip rate, voluminous sedimentation supply, inherited structural complexities in the basement rocks and deeper cover sequence, and interactions between adjacent faults. The present through-going releasing bend at the northern end of the basin may have evolved from a more complex pull-apart basin that developed between separate segments of the Alpine Fault. The results from Dagg Basin illustrate the rates at which structural complexities and sedimentary basins can develop within highly active, very mature, through-going continental wrench faults. Strike slip basins on the scale of 40-80 km 2 on such faults may

  5. 3D Mechanical Modeling of Earthquake Cycle on a Frictional Strike-Slip Fault Embedded in a Viscoelastic Lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chery, J.; Provost, A.; Hassani, R.

    2002-12-01

    Large earthquakes do not occur regularly. They often happen as sequences or clusters, which are separated by long period of quiescence. For example, the north Anatolian fault, which produced more than ten large eartquakes bewteen 1939 and 1999, has been relatively quiet during the centuries before. Understanding the causes of this behaviour is essential to produce a realistic model of seismic hazard. Three phases have to be accounted for in order to model the seismic cycle 1) the secular loading due to differential plate motion 2) the coseismic motion which is controlled by slip or slip rate weakening 3) the postseismic relaxation which corresponds to deep viscous motion of the crust or to localized fault slip. We present here an attempt to develop such a model for a large strike-slip fault such as the north Anatolian fault or the San Andreas fault. We use a 3D finite element code to in order to obtain both a realistic description of the horizontal motion and of the rheological variation of the lithosphere with depth. We use a linear viscoelastic law for the lithosphere. The viscosity of the upper part is scaled to obtain a realistic stress magnitude in the upper crust. The viscosity of the middle crust decreases according to temperature dependent viscosity. The friction law corresponds to the use of the Coulomb criterion with a static coefficient of friction higher than its dynamic value. The time integration of the mechanical system is done using a finite difference scheme coupled with the dynamic relaxation method. A prescribed velocity is applied laterally and at the base of the model. After a loading phase of stress buildup of the crust, earthquakes of various size and amplitude progressively occur. A fundamental difference with the 2D approach is that earthquake occurrence is not regular, probably due to the supplementary degree of freedom provided in the strike direction. We analyse the behaviour of our system in term of scaling law, and study in which

  6. Structural analysis of S-wave seismics around an urban sinkhole: evidence of enhanced dissolution in a strike-slip fault zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Wadas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In November 2010, a large sinkhole opened up in the urban area of Schmalkalden, Germany. To determine the key factors which benefited the development of this collapse structure and therefore the dissolution, we carried out several shear-wave reflection-seismic profiles around the sinkhole. In the seismic sections we see evidence of the Mesozoic tectonic movement in the form of a NW–SE striking, dextral strike-slip fault, known as the Heßleser Fault, which faulted and fractured the subsurface below the town. The strike-slip faulting created a zone of small blocks ( < 100 m in size, around which steep-dipping normal faults, reverse faults and a dense fracture network serve as fluid pathways for the artesian-confined groundwater. The faults also acted as barriers for horizontal groundwater flow perpendicular to the fault planes. Instead groundwater flows along the faults which serve as conduits and forms cavities in the Permian deposits below ca. 60 m depth. Mass movements and the resulting cavities lead to the formation of sinkholes and dissolution-induced depressions. Since the processes are still ongoing, the occurrence of a new sinkhole cannot be ruled out. This case study demonstrates how S-wave seismics can characterize a sinkhole and, together with geological information, can be used to study the processes that result in sinkhole formation, such as a near-surface fault zone located in soluble rocks. The more complex the fault geometry and interaction between faults, the more prone an area is to sinkhole occurrence.

  7. Fault slip and earthquake recurrence along strike-slip faults — Contributions of high-resolution geomorphic data

    KAUST Repository

    Zielke, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Understanding earthquake (EQ) recurrence relies on information about the timing and size of past EQ ruptures along a given fault. Knowledge of a fault\\'s rupture history provides valuable information on its potential future behavior, enabling seismic hazard estimates and loss mitigation. Stratigraphic and geomorphic evidence of faulting is used to constrain the recurrence of surface rupturing EQs. Analysis of the latter data sets culminated during the mid-1980s in the formulation of now classical EQ recurrence models, now routinely used to assess seismic hazard. Within the last decade, Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) surveying technology and other high-resolution data sets became increasingly available to tectono-geomorphic studies, promising to contribute to better-informed models of EQ recurrence and slip-accumulation patterns. After reviewing motivation and background, we outline requirements to successfully reconstruct a fault\\'s offset accumulation pattern from geomorphic evidence. We address sources of uncertainty affecting offset measurement and advocate approaches to minimize them. A number of recent studies focus on single-EQ slip distributions and along-fault slip accumulation patterns. We put them in context with paleoseismic studies along the respective faults by comparing coefficients of variation CV for EQ inter-event time and slip-per-event and find that a) single-event offsets vary over a wide range of length-scales and the sources for offset variability differ with length-scale, b) at fault-segment length-scales, single-event offsets are essentially constant, c) along-fault offset accumulation as resolved in the geomorphic record is dominated by essentially same-size, large offset increments, and d) there is generally no one-to-one correlation between the offset accumulation pattern constrained in the geomorphic record and EQ occurrence as identified in the stratigraphic record, revealing the higher resolution and preservation potential of

  8. Structural Overview and Morphotectonic Evolution of a Strike-Slip Fault in the Zone of North Almora Thrust, Central Kumaun Himalaya, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalit M. Joshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present research is to provide the base line details of the NNW-SSE trending Raintoli fault (RF which is running parallel to the North Almora Thrust (NAT along the Saryu valley from Seraghat-Naichun to Seri in the central sector of the Uttarakhand Himalaya, India. The RF is characterized as dextral strike slip fault and behaves as a ductile shear zone within the zone of NAT. The dextral sense of shear movement of RF is delineated by the fabric of the shear zone rocks including microscopically observed indicators such as sigma and delta porphyroclasts, quartz c-axis, and the field structural data. Additionally, in the quaternary period the dextral strike slip fault is reactivated with oblique slip component as characterized by various geomorphic indicators, for example, triangular facets, abandoned river channels, unpaired fluvial terraces, and V-shaped valleys with recurrent seismicity. Further, the morphometric parameters including Valley Floor Width to Valley Height (Vf, asymmetry factor (AF, and gradient index (GI further prove active nature of RF as suggested by low values of hypsometric integration, V-shaped valley, higher gradient index, and tilting of Saryu basin.

  9. Fault slip and earthquake recurrence along strike-slip faults - Contributions of high-resolution geomorphic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielke, Olaf; Klinger, Yann; Arrowsmith, J. Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Understanding earthquake (EQ) recurrence relies on information about the timing and size of past EQ ruptures along a given fault. Knowledge of a fault's rupture history provides valuable information on its potential future behavior, enabling seismic hazard estimates and loss mitigation. Stratigraphic and geomorphic evidence of faulting is used to constrain the recurrence of surface rupturing EQs. Analysis of the latter data sets culminated during the mid-1980s in the formulation of now classical EQ recurrence models, now routinely used to assess seismic hazard. Within the last decade, Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) surveying technology and other high-resolution data sets became increasingly available to tectono-geomorphic studies, promising to contribute to better-informed models of EQ recurrence and slip-accumulation patterns. After reviewing motivation and background, we outline requirements to successfully reconstruct a fault's offset accumulation pattern from geomorphic evidence. We address sources of uncertainty affecting offset measurement and advocate approaches to minimize them. A number of recent studies focus on single-EQ slip distributions and along-fault slip accumulation patterns. We put them in context with paleoseismic studies along the respective faults by comparing coefficients of variation CV for EQ inter-event time and slip-per-event and find that a) single-event offsets vary over a wide range of length-scales and the sources for offset variability differ with length-scale, b) at fault-segment length-scales, single-event offsets are essentially constant, c) along-fault offset accumulation as resolved in the geomorphic record is dominated by essentially same-size, large offset increments, and d) there is generally no one-to-one correlation between the offset accumulation pattern constrained in the geomorphic record and EQ occurrence as identified in the stratigraphic record, revealing the higher resolution and preservation potential of the

  10. Tectonic geomorphology and paleoseismology of strike-slip faults in Jamaica: Implications for distribution of strain and seismic hazard along the southern edge of the Gonave microplate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, R. D.; Mann, P.; Brown, L. A.

    2009-12-01

    The east-west, left lateral strike-slip fault system forming the southern edge of the Gonave microplate crosses the110-km-long and 70-km-wide island of Jamaica. GPS measurements in the northeastern Caribbean are supportive of the microplate interpretation and indicate that ~ half of the Caribbean-North America left-lateral plate motion (8-14 mm/yr) is carried by the Plantain Garden (PGFZ) and associated faults in Jamaica. We performed Neotectonic mapping of the Plantain Garden fault along the southern rangefront of the Blue Mountains and conducted a paleoseismic study of the fault at Morant River. Between Holland Bay and Morant River, the fault is characterized by a steep, faceted, linear mountain front, prominent linear valleys and depressions, shutter ridges, and springs. At the eastern end of the island, the PGFZ is characterized by a left-stepping fault geometry that includes a major, active hot spring. The river cut exposure at Morant River exposes a 1.5-m-wide, sub-vertical fault zone juxtaposing sheared alluvium and faulted Cretaceous basement rocks. This section is overlain by an, unfaulted 3-m-thick fluvial terrace inset into a late Pleistocene terrace that is culturally modified. Upward fault terminations indicate the occurrence of three paleoearthquakes that occurred prior to deposition of the flat lying inset terrace around 341-628 cal yr BP. At this time, our radiocarbon results suggest that we can rule out the PGFZ as the source of the 1907 Kingston earthquake 102 years ago, as well as, the 1692 event that destroyed Port Royal 317 years ago and produced a major landslide at Yallahs. Pending OSL ages will constrain the age of the penultimate and most recent ruptures. Gently to steeply dipping rocks as young as Pliocene exposed in roadcuts within the low coastal hills south of and parallel to the Plantain Garden fault may indicate active folding and blind thrust faulting. These structures are poorly characterized and may accommodate an unknown amount of

  11. Analogue modelling on the interaction between shallow magma intrusion and a strike-slip fault: Application on the Middle Triassic Monzoni Intrusive Complex (Dolomites, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michail, Maria; Coltorti, Massimo; Gianolla, Piero; Riva, Alberto; Rosenau, Matthias; Bonadiman, Costanza; Galland, Olivier; Guldstrand, Frank; Thordén Haug, Øystein; Rudolf, Michael; Schmiedel, Tobias

    2017-04-01

    The southwestern part of the Dolomites in Northern Italy has undergone a short-lived Ladinian (Middle Triassic) tectono-magmatic event, forming a series of significant magmatic features. These intrusive bodies deformed and metamorphosed the Permo-Triassic carbonate sedimentary framework. In this study we focus on the tectono-magmatic evolution of the shallow shoshonitic Monzoni Intrusive Complex of this Ladinian event (ca 237 Ma), covering an area of 20 km^2. This NW-SE elongated intrusive structure (5 km length) shows an orogenic magmatic affinity which is in contrast to the tectonic regime at the time of intrusion. Strain analysis shows anorogenic transtensional displacement in accordance with the ENE-WSW extensional pattern in the central Dolomites during the Ladinian. Field interpretations led to a detailed description of the regional stratigraphic sequence and the structural features of the study area. However, the geodynamic context of this magmatism and the influence of the inherited strike-slip fault on the intrusion, are still in question. To better understand the specific natural prototype and the general mechanisms of magma emplacement in tectonically active areas, we performed analogue experiments defined by, but not limited to, first order field observations. We have conducted a systematic series of experiments in different tectonic regimes (static conditions, strike-slip, transtension). We varied the ratio of viscous to brittle stresses between magma and country rock, by injecting Newtonian fluids both of high and low viscosity (i.e. silicone oil/vegetable oil) into granular materials of varying cohesion (sand, silica flour, glass beads). The evolving surface and side view of the experiments were monitored by photogrammetric techniques for strain analyses and topographic evolution. In our case, the combination of the results from field and analogue experiments brings new insights regarding the tectonic regime, the geometry of the intrusive body, and

  12. Shear strain concentration mechanism in the lower crust below an intraplate strike-slip fault based on rheological laws of rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuelei; Sagiya, Takeshi

    2017-06-01

    We conduct a two-dimensional numerical experiment on the lower crust under an intraplate strike-slip fault based on laboratory-derived power-law rheologies considering the effects of grain size and water. To understand the effects of far-field loading and material properties on the deformation of the lower crust on a geological time scale, we assume steady fault sliding on the fault in the upper crust and ductile flow for the lower crust. To avoid the stress singularity, we introduce a yield threshold in the brittle-ductile transition near the down-dip edge of the fault. Regarding the physical mechanisms for shear strain concentration in the lower crust, we consider frictional and shear heating, grain size, and power-law creep. We evaluate the significance of these mechanisms in the formation of the shear zone under an intraplate strike-slip fault with slow deformation. The results show that in the lower crust, plastic deformation is possible only when the stress or temperature is sufficiently high. At a similar stress level, ˜100 MPa, dry anorthite begins to undergo plastic deformation at a depth around 28-29 km, which is about 8 km deeper than wet anorthite. As a result of dynamic recrystallization and grain growth, the grain size in the lower crust may vary laterally and as a function of depth. A comparison of the results with constant and non-constant grain sizes reveals that the shear zone in the lower crust is created by power-law creep and is maintained by dynamically recrystallized material in the shear zone because grain growth occurs in a timescale much longer than the recurrence interval of intraplate earthquakes. Owing to the slow slip rate, shear and frictional heating have negligible effects on the deformation of the shear zone. The heat production rate depends weakly on the rock rheology; the maximum temperature increase over 3 Myr is only about several tens of degrees.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Offset of latest pleistocene shoreface reveals slip rate on the Hosgri strike-slip fault, offshore central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Dartnell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Hosgri fault is the southern part of the regional Hosgri–San Gregorio dextral strike‐slip fault system, which extends primarily in the offshore for about 400 km in central California. Between Morro Bay and San Simeon, high‐resolution multibeam bathymetry reveals that the eastern strand of the Hosgri fault is crossed by an ∼265  m wide slope interpreted as the shoreface of a latest Pleistocene sand spit. This sand spit crossed an embayment and connected a western fault‐bounded bedrock peninsula and an eastern bedrock highland, a paleogeography resembling modern coastal geomorphology along the San Andreas fault. Detailed analysis of the relict shoreface with slope profiles and slope maps indicates a lateral slip rate of 2.6±0.9  mm/yr, considered a minimum rate for the Hosgri given the presence of an active western strand. This slip rate indicates that the Hosgri system takes up the largest share of the strike‐slip fault budget and is the most active strike‐slip fault west of the San Andreas fault in central California. This result further demonstrates the value and potential of high‐resolution bathymetry in characterization of active offshore faults.

  14. The role of thrust faulting in the formation of the eastern Alaska Range: Thermochronological constraints from the Susitna Glacier Thrust Fault region of the intracontinental strike-slip Denali Fault system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccio, Steven J.; Fitzgerald, Paul G.; Benowitz, Jeff A.; Roeske, Sarah M.

    2014-11-01

    Horizontal-slip along restraining bends of strike-slip faults is often partitioned into a vertical component via splay faults. The active Susitna Glacier Thrust Fault (SGTF), as shown by its initiation of the 2002 M7.9 Denali Fault earthquake, lies south of, and intersects the dextral strike-slip Denali Fault. Geochronology and thermochronology data from samples across the SGTF constrain the region's tectonic history and the role of thrusting in the formation of the eastern Alaska Range south of the Denali fault. U-Pb zircon ages indicate intrusion of plutons in the footwall (~57 Ma) and hanging wall (~98 Ma). These U-Pb zircon ages correlate to those from the Ruby Batholith/Kluane Terrane ~400 km east along the Denali Fault, supporting geologic correlations and hence constraints on long-term slip rates. 40Ar/39Ar mica and K-feldspar data from footwall and hanging wall samples (~54 to ~46 Ma) reflect cooling following magmatism and/or regional Eocene metamorphism related to ridge subduction. Combined with apatite fission track data (ages 43-28 Ma) and thermal models, both sides of the SGTF acted as a coherent block during the Eocene and early Oligocene. Contrasting apatite (U-Th)/He ages across the Susitna Glacier (~25 Ma footwall, ~15 Ma hanging wall) suggest initiation of faulting during the middle Miocene. Episodic cooling and exhumation is related to thrusting on known or hypothesized faults that progressively activate due to varying partition of strain along the Denali Fault associated with changing kinematics and plate interaction (Yakutat microplate collision, flat-slab subduction and relative plate motion change) at the southern Alaskan plate margin.

  15. Paleoearthquakes on the Anninghe and Zemuhe fault along the southeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau and implications for fault rupture behavior at fault bends on strike-slip faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hu; Ran, Yongkang; Chen, Lichun; Li, Yanbao

    2017-11-01

    Fault bends can serve as fault segment boundaries and are used in seismic hazard assessment. Recent studies addressing whether rupture propagation would be arrested at such structural complexities have commonly focused on computational modeling. However, multi-cycle paleoseismic rupture observations through fault bends have seldom been reported. In this study, we used trenching and radiocarbon dating to reveal paleoseismic rupture histories on the southern segment of the Anninghe fault (ANHF) along the southeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau to explore multi-cycle surface rupture behavior at an extensional fault bend (with an angle of about 30°) at Xichang between the ANHF and Zemuhe fault (ZMHF). Specifically, nine trenches were opened in a fault depression at Maoheshan site and five paleoseismic events were identified. These have been named E1 through E5 respectively corresponding to events at 1400-935 BCE, 420-875 CE, 830-1360 CE, 1295-1715 CE, and 1790 CE-Present. After comparison with the historical records of earthquakes around Xichang and previous paleoseismic results, we suggest that the five seismic events are constrained at: 1365 BCE-935 BCE, 814 CE, 950 CE- 1145 CE, 1536 CE and 1850 CE, respectively. The average recurrence interval of earthquakes along the southern segment of the ANHF is about 700-800 yr. Furthermore, the evidence indicates that surface-faulting events along the southern segment of the ANHF appear to be unevenly spaced in time. Moreover, based on comparisons of seismic events along the ANHF and ZMHF, we find that two fault segments simultaneous ruptured during the 814 CE and 1850 CE earthquakes, event E3 and the 1536 CE earthquake ruptured the ANHF but not rupture the ZMHF. We suggest that the Xichang fault bend is not a persistent fault boundary, indicating that extensional fault bends with an angle of about 30° may not effectively terminate seismic ruptures on strike-slip faults.

  16. From 2012 HAITI-SIS Survey: thick-skin versus thin-skin tectonics partitioned along offshore strike-slip Faults-Haïti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellouz, N.; Leroy, S. D.; Momplaisir, R.; Mercier de Lepinay, B.

    2013-12-01

    The characterization of the deformation along large strike-slip fault-systems like transpressive boundaries between N. Caribbean/N America is a challenging topic, which requires a multi-scale approach. Thanks to Haiti-sis new data, the precise description of the fault segmentation pattern, the sedimentogical distribution, the uplift/subsidence rates, the along-fault and intra-basin fluids circulations, allows to actualize the evolution of the deformation history up to present-day . All the co-seismic surface to near-surface events, have to be also identified in order to integrate geophysical solutions for the earthquake, within the present-day geological and structural pattern. These two approaches, ranging from geological to instantaneous time-scales have been used during multi-tools Haiti-Sis oceanographic survey, allowing to document and image these different aspects at a large scale. The complex strike-slip North Caribbean boundary registered significative stress partitioning. Oblique convergence is expressed by along-strike evolution; from rifted segments (Cayman Through) to transpressive ones (Haiti, Dominican Rep.), to subduction (Porto Rico). In the Haiti-Sis survey, we acquired new offshore data surrounding the active fault areas, in the Gonâve Bay, the Jamaica Channel and along Southern Peninsula. Mapping the sea-floor, and HR seismic acquisition were our main objectives, in order to characterize the fault and fold architecture, with a new delineation of active segments. Offshore piston cores, have been used as representative of the modern basin sedimentation, and to document the catastrophic events (earthquakes, massive flood or sudden destabilization of the platform ) represented by turbiditic or mass-flow sequences, with the objective to track the time recurrence of seismic events by dating some of these catastrophic sediment deposition. At surface, the other markers of the fault activity are linked with along-fault permeability and fluid circulation

  17. A new multilayered visco-elasto-plastic experimental model to study strike-slip fault seismic cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caniven, Y.; Dominguez, S.; Soliva, R.; Cattin, R.; Peyret, M.; Marchandon, M.; Romano, C.; Strak, V.

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, technological advances in satellite imagery measurements as well as the development of dense geodetic and seismologic networks allow for a detailed analysis of surface deformation associated with active fault seismic cycle. However, the study of earthquake dynamics faces several limiting

  18. Reconstructing the magnitude and timing of late Pleistocene and Holocene strike-slip events within the Marlborough Fault Zone, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Ed; Dolan, James; Van Dissen, Russ; Langridge, Rob; Zinke, Rob; Hatem, Alex; McGuire, Chris; Brown, Nathan

    2017-04-01

    In most instances, information about the timing of pre-historic earthquake events comes from palaeoseismic trenches located within sediments that were deposited gradually and are close to the fault. Earthquake events are recognised by disturbed stratigraphy, and the timing provided by radiocarbon dating of organic materials that constrain the youngest disturbances for each event. In contrast, fault slip rates are typically derived from the dating of geomorphic features that are offset by one or more slip events. In this latter case, it is often hard to locate suitable organic material for dating these features which often comprise fluvial terraces or channels, and a variety of alternative chronological approaches has been taken including the use of terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides (TCNs; 10Be, 36Cl), U-series dating of carbonate overgrowths on pebbles, and/or luminescence dating of sediments. Using luminescence dating based on single grains of K-feldspar and a post-IR IRSL (Infra-Red Stimulated Luminescence) measurement protocol, we have been able to control the age of several offset terrace units from a number of major strike slip faults of the Marlborough Fault Zone, New Zealand. In the past, arguments concerning the selection of which geomorphic terrace feature to date have been presented, and typically a single age estimate, or small number of dates were used to constrain the derived slip rate. In the Marlborough region, we have sampled several locations characterised by multiple fluvial terraces dating from the late Glacial period (c. 16,000 years ago) through the Holocene. By using a high sampling density involving multiple age estimates within each terrace, dating each one of the terraces, and applying a Bayesian statistical approach to constrain the age of deposition and incision events, we are able to approach a situation where we can derive slip-per-event data and event timing from the same dataset. This can overcome problems of relating observed slip

  19. Hydraulic Properties of a Strike-slip Fault Estimated from Periodic Pumping Tests in Borehole GDP-1 at Grimselpass, Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Y.; Renner, J.

    2016-12-01

    Periodic pumping tests were conducted using a double-packer probe placed at four different depth levels in borehole GDP-1 at Grimselpass, Central Swiss Alps, penetrating a hydrothermally active fault. The tests had the objective to assess the use of periodic testing in the context for design and quality control of hydraulically stimulated geothermal reservoirs. We employed periods between 60 and 1080 s and nominal flow rates between 0 and 10 l/min. Amplitude ratio and phase shift between the pressure and flow rate in the pumping interval corrected for the storage capacity of the tubing are compared to analytical predictions of conventional 1D and radial flow models but also to those for bilinear flow and radial flow in a system composed of cylindrical shells with distinct hydraulic properties concentrically arranged around the well (injectivity analysis). The order of magnitude of derived transmissivity values agrees with that gained from conventional hydraulic tests. The field campaign revealed several advantages of the periodic testing, e.g., short testing time since a periodic signal can easily be separated from changing background pressure by detrending and Fourier transformation. The mismatch between test results and the considered analytical models indicates a hydraulically complex and heterogeneous subsurface. Attenuation and phase shift between the periodic pressure signals above or below packers and in the interval (interference analysis) are addressed by an exploratory numerical modelling of the non-radial flow situation. Interference analysis of a single well provides data that are not affected by uncertainties in the timing of flow-rate changes. The exploratory modeling shows consistent results and improves diffusivity estimation. Yet, more comprehensive modeling will be required to take full advantage of all the pressure records typically acquired when using a double-packer probe.

  20. 3D evolution of a pop-up structure above a double basement strike-slip fault : Some insights from analogue modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, W. P.; Nieuwland, D. A.

    2003-01-01

    In analogue modelling, pop-up structures have previously only been described in models of basement-involved strike-slip deformation with a stepover or restraining bend configuration. We describe the results of an analogue experiment with an alternative model configuration to investigate the

  1. The relationship between normal and strike-slip faults in Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada, and its implications for stress rotation and partitioning of deformation in the east-central Basin and Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Atilla; de Joussineau, Ghislain

    2014-06-01

    This study expands on our earlier studies of the evolution of fracturing and faulting in the Jurassic aeolian Aztec Sandstone exposed over a large area in the Valley of Fire State Park, southeastern Nevada. Based on a nearly three-dimensional data set collected from 200-m-high cliff-face exposures with stair-case morphology composed of steep and flat parts, we find that a series of inclined, relatively low-angle normal faults and their splay fractures are precursors of the strike-slip fault network that we previously documented. We discuss the significance of this finding in terms of the tectonics of the broader area, stress rotation, partitioning of deformation, and the development of fracture clusters with compartmentalization of the structures as a function of spatial, depositional and deformational domains.

  2. Spatial variations in focused exhumation along a continental-scale strike-slip fault: The Denali fault of the eastern Alaska Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benowitz, J.A.; Layer, P.W.; Armstrong, P.; Perry, S.E.; Haeussler, P.J.; Fitzgerald, P.G.; VanLaningham, S.

    2011-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar, apatite fission-track, and apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronological techniques were used to determine the Neogene exhumation history of the topographically asymmetric eastern Alaska Range. Exhumation cooling ages range from ~33 Ma to ~18 Ma for 40Ar/39Ar biotite, ~18 Ma to ~6 Ma for K-feldspar minimum closure ages, and ~15 Ma to ~1 Ma for apatite fission-track ages, and apatite (U-Th)/He cooling ages range from ~4 Ma to ~1 Ma. There has been at least ~11 km of exhumation adjacent to the north side of Denali fault during the Neogene inferred from biotite 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology. Variations in exhumation history along and across the strike of the fault are influenced by both far-field effects and local structural irregularities. We infer deformation and rapid exhumation have been occurring in the eastern Alaska Range since at least ~22 Ma most likely related to the continued collision of the Yakutat microplate with the North American plate. The Nenana Mountain region is the late Pleistocene to Holocene (~past 1 Ma) primary locus of tectonically driven exhumation in the eastern Alaska Range, possibly related to variations in fault geometry. During the Pliocene, a marked increase in climatic instability and related global cooling is temporally correlated with an increase in exhumation rates in the eastern Alaska Range north of the Denali fault system.

  3. Strike-slip Fault Structure in the Salton Trough and Deformation During and After the 2010 M7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah Earthquake from Geodetic and Seismic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, E. J.; Sun, J.; Gonzalez-Ortega, A.; González-Escobar, M.; Freed, A. M.; Burgmann, R.; Samsonov, S. V.; Gonzalez-Garcia, J.; Fletcher, J. M.; Hinojosa, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Pacific-North America plate boundary character changes southward from the strike-slip and transpressional configuration along most of California to oblique rifting in the Gulf of California, with a transitional zone of transtension beneath the Salton Trough in southernmost California and northern Mexico. The Salton Trough is characterized by extremely high heat flow and thin lithosphere with a thick fill of sedimentary material delivered by the Colorado River during the past 5-6 million years. Because of the rapid sedimentation, most of the faults in Salton Trough are buried and reveal themselves when they slip either seismically or aseismically. They can also be located by refraction and reflection of seismic waves. The 4 April 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake (Mw 7.2) in Baja California and Sonora, Mexico is probably the largest earthquake in the Salton Trough for at least 120 years, and had primarily right-lateral strike-slip motion. The earthquake ruptured a complex set of faults that lie to the west of the main plate boundary fault, the Cerro Prieto Fault, and shows that the strike-slip fault system in the southern Salton Trough has multiple sub-parallel active faults, similar to southern California. The Cerro Prieto Fault is still likely absorbing the majority of strain in the plate boundary. We study the coseismic and postseismic deformation of the 2010 earthquake with interferometric analysis of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images (InSAR) and pixel tracking by subpixel correlation of SAR and optical images. We combine sampled InSAR and subpixel correlation results with GPS (Global Positioning System) offsets at PBO (Plate Boundary Observatory) stations to estimate the likely subsurface geometry of the major faults that slipped during the earthquake and to derive a static coseismic slip model. We constrained the surface locations of the fault segments to mapped locations in the Sierra Cucapah to the northwest of the epicenter. SAR along-track offsets

  4. Provenance of alluvial fan deposits to constrain the mid-term offsets along a strike-slip active fault: the Elsinore fault in the Coyote Mountains, Imperial Valley, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masana, Eulalia; Stepancikova, Petra; Rockwell, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The lateral variation in rates along a fault and its constancy along time is a matter of discussion. To give light to this discussion, short, mid and long term offset distribution along a fault is needed. Many studies analyze the short-term offset distribution along a strike-slip fault that can be obtained by the analysis of offset features imprinted in the morphology of the near-fault area. We present an example on how to obtain the mid- to long-term offset values based on the composition of alluvial fans that are offset by the fault. The study area is on the southern tip of the Elsinore fault, which controls the mountain front of the Coyote Mountains (California). The Elsinore-Laguna Salada fault is part of the San Andreas fault (SAF) system, extending 250 km from the Los Angeles Basin southeastward into the Gulf of California, in Mexico. The slip-rate on the southern Elsinore fault is believed to be moderate based on recent InSAR observations, although a recent study near Fossil Canyon (southern Coyote Mountains) suggests a rate in the range of 1-2 mm/yr. For this study we processed the airborne LiDAR dataset (EarthScope Southern & Eastern California, SoCal) to map short to mid-term alluvial offsets. We reprocessed the point clouds to produce DEMs with 0.5m and 0.25m grids and we varied the insolation angles to illuminate the various fault strands and the offset features. We identified numerous offset features, such as rills, channel bars, channel walls, alluvial fans, beheaded channels and small erosional basins that varied in displacement from 1 to 350 m. For the mid- to long-term offsets of the alluvial fans we benefited from the diverse petrological composition of their sources. Moreover, we recognized that older alluvium, which is offset by greater amounts, is in some cases buried beneath younger alluvial fan deposits and separated by buried soils. To determine the source canyon of various alluvial elements, we quantified the clast assemblage of each source

  5. Active Strike-Slip Faulting in the Inner Continental Borderland, Southern California: Results From New High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, J. E.; Ryan, H. F.; Sliter, R. W.

    2008-12-01

    The inner Continental Borderland offshore of southern California accommodates about 7 mm/yr of slip between the North American and Pacific plates. Nearly half of this total has previously been thought to be taken up on the Palos Verdes (PV) and Coronado Bank (CB) fault zones, which have been modeled as a single, continuous fault zone in recent seismic hazard assessments for southern California. Although these faults lie roughly on strike with each other, a connection between these faults has not been clearly demonstrated. Newly acquired high-resolution seismic reflection data indicate that the PV fault terminates southwest of Lasuen Knoll in a horsetail splay that becomes progressively buried to the south. The lack of a connection between the PV and CB fault zones implies that a significant amount of slip must be taken up elsewhere in the inner Continental Borderland. Two other significant offshore faults, the San Diego Trough (SDT) and San Pedro Basin (SPB) fault zones, lie about 10-15 km southwest of and sub parallel to the trace of the PV and CB faults. The SDT fault zone extends from south of the Mexican border near Punta Santo Tomas for about 150 km northward to near Crespi Knoll. The SPB fault zone extends northward from off Santa Catalina Island to near Point Dume. The new seismic reflection data reveal a previously unmapped but apparently active fault zone along strike and in the area between the known strands of the SDT and the SPB fault zones. This newly recognized fault links the SDT and SPB faults, forming a continuous, active fault zone that extends about 250 km along the inner Continental Borderland. Although there are no slip rate data available for this fault zone, its overall length, continuity, and active character suggest that a significant portion of the plate motion that occurs offshore is accommodated along the SDT-SPB fault zone, which may pose a more significant seismic hazard than previously recognized.

  6. Analogue modelling of strike-slip fault propagation across a rheological/morphological crustal anisotropy: implications for the morphotectonic evolution of the Gloria Fault - Tore Madeira Rise area in NE Atlantic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás, Ricardo; Rosas, Filipe M.; Duarte, João C.; Terrinha, Pedro; Kullberg, Maria C.; Almeida, Jaime; Barata, Frederico; Carvalho, Bruno; Almeida, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    The Gloria Fault (GF) marks the E-W dextral transcurrent plate boundary between Eurasia and Africa in NE Atlantic, displaying complying high magnitude (historical and instrumental) seismic activity (e.g. M=7.1 in 1939 and M=8.4 in 1941, Bufforn et al., 1988), and cutting across a NNE-SSW 1000 km long bathymetric ridge: the so called Tore-Madeira Rise - TMR (rising in average 3km above the abyssal plain). The precise origin and tectono-magmatic evolution of the TMR is still not fully understood, although reported wide-angle refraction data points to a rheological configuration comprising an isostatically compensated thickened oceanic crust, possibly formed during a period of high accretion in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (Pierce and Barton, 1991). Widespread evidence for volcanic activity has also been recognized, spanning from late Cretaceous to Present (Geldmacher et al. 2006, Merle et al. 2009), noticeably with the most recent volcanism (~500 Ky) occurring as tectonically aligned volcanic plugs, distributed along the E-W tectonic trend of the GF-related structures. To better understand the complex interference at play in this key area between the tectonic structures (essentially determined by the Gloria Fault system), the present and past magmatic activity and the resulting seafloor morphology, a series of dynamically scaled analogue modelling experiments have been conceived and carried out. The main focus of this experimental work was to decipher the potential influence of a rheological vs. morphological anisotropy (accounting for the TMR) on the lateral propagation of a major right-lateral strike-slip fault (representing the GF). The preliminary comparison of the obtained experimental results with the natural morphotectonic pattern in the study area reveals, not only a strong tectonic control of the ongoing volcanism, manifested by the observed preferred directions of aligned volcanic plugs, but also a so far unsuspected deflection/distributed pattern of several

  7. Influencia de un bloque rígido en un sistema de fallas de rumbo: modelamiento análogo Influence of a rigid block in a strike-slip fault system: analogue modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Nalpas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se presenta un estudio de modelamiento análogo sobre la naturaleza, geometría y cinemática de la deformación a lo largo de fallas de rumbo dada la presencia de un bloque rígido en su trayectoria de deformación. Los modelos análogos están apropiadamente escalados considerando las características reológicas de los materiales que se desean contrastar en la deformación. Dos grandes parámetros fueron probados: la configuración del bloque rígido, variando su forma y tamaño, y el monto del desplazamiento. Los resultados experimentales muestran el desarrollo de rotaciones, fallas y pliegues como producto de la presencia de un bloque rígido en la trayectoria de falla. Los diversos casos geométricos probados pueden ser empleados para su comparación con sistemas de fallas de rumbo en los cuales existen diferencias litológicas de comportamiento reológico diferencial, como por ejemplo el caso del 'Núcleo rígido de Limón Verde' al sur de Chuquicamata, ubicado en la trayectoria del sistema de fallas de Domeyko.This work addresses the kinematic effects of a rigid block in strike-slip systems by using analogue models. The experiments (size, behaviour of materials were scaled down in order to represent deformation of the tested rheologic contrast conditions in deformation. Two main parameters were tested: the configuration of the rigid block, changing its form and size, and the amount of displacement. The experiments evidenced the development of rotations, faults and folds along the fault trajectory, as resulting from the presence of the rigid block during the deformation. Testing of diverse geometric situations may be used for comparison to strike-slip fault systems in which different lithologies and rheologic behaviour exist, for example, presence of the 'Limón Verde rigid core' along the Domeyko fault system, just south of Chuquicamata.

  8. Transcurrencia a lo largo de la Falla Sierra de Varas (Sistema de fallas de la Cordillera de Domeyko, norte de Chile Strike-slip along the Sierra de Varas Fault (Cordillera de Domeyko Fault-System, northern Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Niemeyer

    2009-01-01

    Aguada del Hornito-Aguada del Cerro Alto de Varas segment. Upper Paleozoic granitoids of the same composition, internal structure and age were cut and displaced by the fault. A sinistral horizontal separation of 15.6±1 kmwitha vertical componentof 4.9±0.1 km, suggests a sinistral-reverse net displacement of 16.4±1 km. Thisis consistent with the local stratigraphic section that was eroded from the eastern block. A kinematic and dynamic analysis of mesofaults spatially related to the SVF displacements was conducted to identify the different fault populations and to obtain the stress tensor. Two structural systems were identified: an early reverse-strike-slip system and a late dextral superposed system. The first one ocurred during late middle Eocene, and the second is post-Miocene with an horizontal displacement of 0.6 km. The presence of coeval strike-slip displacements along the Sierra de Varas Fault and reverse displacements in a 'reverse flower' in the studied segment show that the structural evolution of the Sierra de Varas was dominated by a bulk transpression during the late middle Eocene. The left-lateral displacement here demonstrated for the Sierra de Varas Fault and its inflection to the SE, south of the Aguada del Cerro Alto de Varas are compatible with the westward vergence of the folds and reverse faults in the El Profeta fault-and-thrust belt, which should be also the result of the transpression.

  9. Pleistocene Brawley and Ocotillo Formations: Evidence for initial strike-slip deformation along the San Felipe and San Jacinto fault zonez, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, S.M.; Janecke, S.U.; Dorsey, R.J.; Housen, B.A.; Langenheim, V.E.; McDougall, K.A.; Steeley, A.N.

    2007-01-01

    We examine the Pleistocene tectonic reorganization of the Pacific-North American plate boundary in the Salton Trough of southern California with an integrated approach that includes basin analysis, magnetostratigraphy, and geologic mapping of upper Pliocene to Pleistocene sedimentary rocks in the San Felipe Hills. These deposits preserve the earliest sedimentary record of movement on the San Felipe and San Jacinto fault zones that replaced and deactivated the late Cenozoic West Salton detachment fault. Sandstone and mudstone of the Brawley Formation accumulated between ???1.1 and ???0.6-0.5 Ma in a delta on the margin of an arid Pleistocene lake, which received sediment from alluvial fans of the Ocotillo Formation to the west-southwest. Our analysis indicates that the Ocotillo and Brawley formations prograded abruptly to the east-northeast across a former mud-dominated perennial lake (Borrego Formation) at ???1.1 Ma in response to initiation of the dextral-oblique San Felipe fault zone. The ???25-km-long San Felipe anticline initiated at about the same time and produced an intrabasinal basement-cored high within the San Felipe-Borrego basin that is recorded by progressive unconformities on its north and south limbs. A disconformity at the base of the Brawley Formation in the eastern San Felipe Hills probably records initiation and early blind slip at the southeast tip of the Clark strand of the San Jacinto fault zone. Our data are consistent with abrupt and nearly synchronous inception of the San Jacinto and San Felipe fault zones southwest of the southern San Andreas fault in the early Pleistocene during a pronounced southwestward broadening of the San Andreas fault zone. The current contractional geometry of the San Jacinto fault zone developed after ???0.5-0.6 Ma during a second, less significant change in structural style. ?? 2007 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

  10. Structural evolution of Cenozoic basins in northeastern Tunisia, in response to sinistral strike-slip movement on the El Alia-Teboursouk Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejaoui, Hamida; Aïfa, Tahar; Melki, Fetheddine; Zargouni, Fouad

    2017-10-01

    This paper resolves the structural complexity of Cenozoic sedimentary basins in northeastern Tunisia. These basins trend NE-SW to ∼ E-W, and are bordered by old fracture networks. Detailed descriptions of the structural features in outcrop and in subsurface data suggest that the El Alia-Teboursouk Fault zone in the Bizerte area evolved through a series of tectonic events. Cross sections, lithostratigraphic correlations, and interpretation of seismic profiles through the basins show evidence for: (i) a Triassic until Jurassic-Early Cretaceous rifting phase that induced lateral variations of facies and strata thicknesses; (ii) a set of faults oriented NE-SW, NW-SE, N-S, and E-W that guided sediment accumulation in pull-apart basins, which were subject to compressive and transpressive deformation during Eocene (Lutetian-Priabonian), Miocene (Tortonian), and Pliocene-Quaternary; and (iii) NNW-SSE to NS contractional events that occurred during the Late Pliocene. Part of the latest phase has been the formation of different synsedimentary folded structures with significant subsidence inversion. Such events have been responsible for the reactivation of inherited faults, and the intrusion of Triassic evaporites, ensuring the role of a slip layer. The combined effects of the different paleoconstraints and halokinetic movements are at the origin of the evolution of these pull-apart basins. The subsurface data suggest that an important fault displacement occurred during the Mesozoic-Cenozoic. The patterns of sediment accumulation in the different basins reflect a high activity of deep ancient faults.

  11. Magma storage in a strike-slip caldera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxby, J; Gottsmann, J; Cashman, K; Gutiérrez, E

    2016-07-22

    Silicic calderas form during explosive volcanic eruptions when magma withdrawal triggers collapse along bounding faults. The nature of specific interactions between magmatism and tectonism in caldera-forming systems is, however, unclear. Regional stress patterns may control the location and geometry of magma reservoirs, which in turn may control the spatial and temporal development of faults. Here we provide new insight into strike-slip volcano-tectonic relations by analysing Bouguer gravity data from Ilopango caldera, El Salvador, which has a long history of catastrophic explosive eruptions. The observed low gravity beneath the caldera is aligned along the principal horizontal stress orientations of the El Salvador Fault Zone. Data inversion shows that the causative low-density structure extends to ca. 6 km depth, which we interpret as a shallow plumbing system comprising a fractured hydrothermal reservoir overlying a magmatic reservoir with vol% exsolved vapour. Fault-controlled localization of magma constrains potential vent locations for future eruptions.

  12. Shell Tectonics: A Mechanical Model for Strike-slip Displacement on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoden, Alyssa Rose; Wurman, Gilead; Huff, Eric M.; Manga, Michael; Hurford, Terry A.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a new mechanical model for producing tidally-driven strike-slip displacement along preexisting faults on Europa, which we call shell tectonics. This model differs from previous models of strike-slip on icy satellites by incorporating a Coulomb failure criterion, approximating a viscoelastic rheology, determining the slip direction based on the gradient of the tidal shear stress rather than its sign, and quantitatively determining the net offset over many orbits. This model allows us to predict the direction of net displacement along faults and determine relative accumulation rate of displacement. To test the shell tectonics model, we generate global predictions of slip direction and compare them with the observed global pattern of strike-slip displacement on Europa in which left-lateral faults dominate far north of the equator, right-lateral faults dominate in the far south, and near-equatorial regions display a mixture of both types of faults. The shell tectonics model reproduces this global pattern. Incorporating a small obliquity into calculations of tidal stresses, which are used as inputs to the shell tectonics model, can also explain regional differences in strike-slip fault populations. We also discuss implications for fault azimuths, fault depth, and Europa's tectonic history.

  13. Strike-slip deformation reflects complex partitioning of strain in the Nankai Accretionary Prism (SE Japan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Marco C.; Alves, Tiago M.; Fonseca, Paulo E.; Moore, Gregory F.

    2018-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested predominant extensional tectonics acting, at present, on the Nankai Accretionary Prism (NAP), and following a parallel direction to the convergence vector between the Philippine Sea and Amur Plates. However, a complex set of thrusts, pop-up structures, thrust anticlines and strike-slip faults is observed on seismic data in the outer wedge of the NAP, hinting at a complex strain distribution across SE Japan. Three-dimensional (3D) seismic data reveal three main families of faults: (1) NE-trending thrusts and back-thrusts; (2) NNW- to N-trending left-lateral strike-slip faults; and (3) WNW-trending to E-W right-lateral strike-slip faults. Such a fault pattern suggests that lateral slip, together with thrusting, are the two major styles of deformation operating in the outer wedge of the NAP. Both styles of deformation reflect a transpressional tectonic regime in which the maximum horizontal stress is geometrically close to the convergence vector. This work is relevant because it shows a progressive change from faults trending perpendicularly to the convergence vector, to a broader partitioning of strain in the form of thrusts and conjugate strike-slip faults. We suggest that similar families of faults exist within the inner wedge of the NAP, below the Kumano Basin, and control stress accumulation and strain accommodation in this latter region.

  14. Neotectonics of a subduction/strike-slip transition: the northeastern Dominican Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winslow, M.A.; McCann, W.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Septentrional fault system in the northeastern Dominican Republic marks the zone where the North American-Carribean plate boundary is evolving from subduction to strike-slip motion, and where terranes appear to be forming and migrating laterally in a subduction complex/forearc region. On the Island of Hispaniola, slip vectors are oblique to the strike of the Puerto Rico trench, and oblique subduction thrusts the upper plate over normal seafloor. The offshore geology and seismicity of the northern Caribbean suggest that uplift, broad crustal warping, thrusting, and strike-slip faulting (ie. collisional tectonics) should be present in the northern part of the Dominican Republic. The high topography (>1000m), high levels of seismicity, and large earthquakes support the hypothesis of contemporary deformation in Hispaniola. In this region, the subduction regime dies out toward the west, and deformation is transferred to onshore, oblique-slip faults. As this change in tectonic style has occurred in Neogene to Recent times, we are investigating the modern evolution of a plate boundary. We have already documented: (1) the presence of a strike-slip faulting in the northeastern Dominican Republic; (2) an anomalous push-up structure; and (3) a region of numerous splay faults. In conclusion, recent seismicity suggest a wide zone of deformation and variations in interplate motions near Hispaniola. This island lies at the western limit of active underthrusting and at the eastern limit of onshore faulting, i.e., at an important transition from a subduction to strike-slip regime.

  15. Recent geodynamics of major strike-slip zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir G. Trifonov

    2015-09-01

    In all of the cases mentioned above, strike-slip deformation was expressed only or mainly during strong earthquakes. At other times, the rate of its accumulation was small and the dominant stress conditions led to transverse shortening, rarely resulting in local lengthening of the tectonic zone. These variations are caused by the tectonic peculiarities of these zones. The sinistral component of the deformation is related to the shift of the Arabian Plate relative to the African one, but also the transverse component is related to the continental slope and is expressed by the Coastal range shortening that exists in the El Ghab segment zone. There is not only a dextral deformation component, but also a transverse component, expressed by shortening of the Fergana and Talas ranges existing in the Talas-Fergana fault zone. In both zones, the shortening component became appreciable or dominant when the strike-slip deformation rate decreased. Similar, but more local, relationships were expressed in the epicentral area of the 2003 Altai earthquake and in the Western Palmyrides.

  16. Significado tectónico y migración de fluidos hidrotermales en una red de fallas y vetas de un Dúplex de rumbo: un ejemplo del Sistema de Falla de Atacama Tectonic significance and hydrothermal fluid migration within a strike-slip duplex fault-vein network: an example from the Atacama Fault System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Olivares

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available El Dúplex Caleta Coloso es una estructura de rumbo desarrollada durante la deformación frágil del Sistema de Falla de Atacama (SFA en el Cretácico Temprano. En su interior hay un sistema de vetas hidrotermales que documentan la naturaleza de la relación entre el transporte de fluidos y el desarrollo del dúplex. El sistema de vetas de orientación dominante NW se localiza en la roca de caja, adyacentes a las zonas de falla. Según su mineralogía dominante hay vetas de clorita, epidota-cuarzo y calcita-limonita, y según las relaciones de corte o su estructura interna, se definieron vetas tempranas (clorita, intermedias (epidota-cuarzo y tardías (calcita-limonitas. Algunas vetas muestran cristales perpendiculares u oblicuos a sus paredes (vetas de extensión y de extensión oblicua o fibras minerales orientadas paralelas a las estrías de las fallas (vetas-fallas. Estas últimas tienen indicadores cinemáticos compatibles con las fallas, evidenciando que fueron sincinemáticas con el desarrollo del dúplex. Según su microestructura, ellas se habrían formado en fracturas abiertas llenas de fluidos, bajo condiciones de presión inferior a la hidrostática, lo cual indicaría que la precipitación mineral ocurrió por caídas abruptas de la presión en una corteza somera (The Caleta Coloso Duplex is a brittle strike-slip structure developed along the Atacama Fault System during the Early Cretaceous. A hydrothermal vein system existing within the duplex documents the nature of the link between fluid transport and progressive structural development. The dominantly NW-striking vein system occurs near or at the damage zone of the duplex fault zones. Veins can be classified according to their composition and crosscutting relationships into early chlorite veins, intermediate epidotic-quartz veins and late calcite-limonite veins. Some of them exhibit minerals with their long axes oriented orthogonally or obliquely with respect to the vein walls

  17. Are "uncharacteristic" earthquakes spatially linked to strike-slip restraining bends?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, P.

    2011-12-01

    On the basis of a compilation of paleoseismological data from the Wasatch and San Andreas faults, Schwartz and Coppersmith (1984) proposed that both plate boundary and intraplate faults tend to generate essentially same size earthquakes having a relatively narrow range of magnitudes near the maximum. They referred to these earthquakes as "characteristic earthquakes". Their hypothesis suggests that the historical record of earthquakes documented for periods of time ranging from centuries to millennia in different parts of the world that could allow predictions of future ruptures. The characteristic earthquake model works surprisingly well for major strike-slip faults like the North Anatolian fault of Turkey and the North Tabriz strike-slip fault in Iran which both show a progressive, uni-direction pattern of rupture starting at one point and "unzippering" over a distance of hundreds of kilometers in a series of earthquakes. This regular periodicity has been attributed to systematic changes in Coulomb failure stress on individual faults or interconnected fault networks defined by distinctive changes in fault strike, or stepover faults, or by the intersection of a neighboring fault. However, studies of the San Andreas, Wasatch, and Dead Sea faults show that earthquake ruptures are not periodic and instead form clusters of events with no obvious "recurrence interval" as predicted by the characteristic earthquake model. Some of these hard-to-forecast "uncharacteristic" earthquakes initiate as blind thrust faults formed at deeper levels in the crust near the brittle-plastic transition zone as illustrated by the 1989 M 6.9 Loma Prieta earthquake of California. Such events would produce little or no surface rupture of the main fault plane so the effects of this type of earthquake would remain impossible for future paleoseismologists to discern (other than from shaking effects and the broad vertical uplift related to vertical motions on deeply buried faults). More recently

  18. Magmatic control along a strike-slip volcanic arc: The central Aeolian arc (Italy)

    KAUST Repository

    Ruch, Joel

    2016-01-23

    The regional stress field in volcanic areas may be overprinted by that produced by magmatic activity, promoting volcanism and faulting. In particular, in strike-slip settings, the definition of the relationships between the regional stress field and magmatic activity remains elusive. To better understand these relationships, we collected stratigraphic, volcanic and structural field data along the strike-slip Central Aeolian arc (Italy): here the islands of Lipari and Vulcano separate the extensional portion of the arc (to the east) from the contractional one (to the west). We collected >500 measurements of faults, extension fractures and dikes at 40 sites. Most structures are NNE-SSW to NNW-SSE oriented, eastward dipping, and show almost pure dip-slip motion; consistent with an E-W extension direction, with minor dextral and sinistral shear. Our data highlight six eruptive periods during the last 55 ka, which allow considering both islands as a single magmatic system, in which tectonic and magmatic activity steadily migrated eastward and currently focus on a 10 km long x 2 km wide active segment. Faulting appears to mostly occur in temporal and spatial relation with magmatic events, supporting that most of the observable deformation derives from transient magmatic activity (shorter-term, days to months), rather than from steady longer-term regional tectonics (102-104 years). More in general, the Central Aeolian case shows how magmatic activity may affect the structure and evolution of volcanic arcs, overprinting any strike-slip motion with magma-induced extension at the surface.

  19. Strike-slip and extrusion tectonics of the Greater Caucasus-Kopetdagh region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, M. L.

    2012-04-01

    In the Paleogene-Early Miocene, the areas of the modern Greater Caucasus and Kopetdagh were occupied by marginal seas (parts of the Paratethys intracontinental sea) inheriting the Cretaceous back-arc basins. In the Early Miocene, a collisional compression of the seas began at the time when the Arabian plate detached from Africa to move northward. The compression proceeded in a good accordance with the Arabia movement that was manifested in a general synchroneity of the Late Alpine orogenies in the Caucasus and Kopetdagh with the rifting and spreading phases in the Aden Gulf and the Red Sea. The earliest orogeny was the Styrian one of the terminal Early Miocene. It corresponds to the initial stage of the rift opening and was mostly pronounced in the east, in Kopetdagh and East Iran, where a recent structure has been formed by the initial Middle Miocene. In the Greater Caucasus, the Styrian deformations occurred in its central part only (i.e., in front of the Arabian plate northern tip) where the main Caucasian thrusts and conjugate asymmetrical megaanticline of the Central Caucasus were formed. An essential feature of the earliest, Styrian, structure of the whole Caucasus-Kopetdagh region was a series of regional right-lateral strike-slip faults. In the Kopetdagh, the strike-slips have no submeridional but northwestern direction although they occurred in the northern continuation of the submeridional right-lateral strike-slip faults framing the Lut block. In the Caucasus, they became even sublatitudinal, in parallel with the North Anatolian fault, thus constituting a single domain with the latter. So, the right-lateral strike-slip faults of East Iran, Kopetdagh, and the Caucasus compose an extensive arc convex to the north and appeared probably as a result of the right-lateral shear caused by the known counterclockwise rotation of the Arabian lithospheric plate. The Middle Miocene was characterized by a tectonic pause both in the Red Sea-Aden rift system and in the

  20. Models of the Evolution of Finite Strain at Strike-Slip Plate Boundaries and Potential Implications for Seismic Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, I.; Roy, M.

    2014-12-01

    While we are aware of the extent and distribution of strain at the surface near the Pacific-North America plate boundary at the San Andreas Fault (SAF) system in California, at depth, our understanding is poor. Recent seismic observations suggest a narrow shear zone throughout the lithosphere corresponding to the narrow plate boundary at the surface. Surrounding the SAF in California, measurements of seismic anisotropy demonstrate orientations which vary depending on the location relative to the fault. Specifically, in northern California, the orientations align along the fault in its proximity, and in the east-west direction elsewhere. We investigate how the finite-strain ellipsoid (FSE) evolves for tracers in a 3D model of the lithosphere and asthenosphere beneath the SAF. The top surface of the mesh has a right-lateral strike-slip velocity boundary condition, and the bottom, a uniform asthenospheric flow velocity condition perpendicular to the strike-slip fault. We calculate the orientations of the FSE for various ratios of strike-slip to asthenospheric velocity and viscosity stratification. The two classes of models which we investigate simulate an asthenospheric channel beneath a uniform-thickness lithosphere and a variable-depth lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). In an isoviscous fluid beneath a uniform-thickness lithosphere, strain rates, and thus FSE orientations, are constant throughout the channel, dependent on the ratio of the velocities but not the viscosity. For a two-layered asthenospheric channel of a higher-viscosity layer overlying a lower-viscosity layer, FSE orientations align with the strike-slip boundary in the upper layer and the drag in the lower layer. When we emulate a lithosphere of variable thickness across the fault by increasing the viscosity of the upper layer, we observe asymmetric FSE orientations across the step in the LAB. The direction of lithospheric thickening across the strike-slip fault govern these orientations

  1. Dextral strike-slip tectonism and arc processes in the Sierra Nevada and Idaho batholiths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikoff, B.; Byerly, A.; Gaschnig, R. M.; Vervoort, J. D.; Kelso, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Both the Sierra Nevada (CA) and Idaho batholiths display clear evidence for magmatism simultaneous with dextral strike-slip movement during the Cretaceous. There is, however, a significant difference between both the style and the timing of the deformation and magmatism in these two magmatic arcs. The Sierra Nevada displays dextral strike-slip tectonism active from 92-80 Ma, as evidenced by a series of dextral shear zones associated with the axis of active magmatism. The concept of the plutons intruding en echelon pull-apart structures in a dextral system has been supported by the recognition of widespread, syn-tectonic shear zones along the axis of the arc. Further, a modern analog can be found in El Salvador, where dextral translation of the forearc has resulted in en echelon dextral shearing in a magmatic arc dominated by arc-perpendicular normal faulting. In contrast, dextral tectonism in Idaho both starts (~103 Ma) and ceases earlier (~90 Ma) than strike-slip motion in the Sierra Nevada batholith. Further, the deformation is better developed, as recorded by the ~5 km thick, dextral transpressional western Idaho shear zone (WISZ). The WISZ deformation affects I-type magmas that are not typically considered part of the Idaho batholith. The main phase of the 85-70 Ma, peraluminous Idaho batholith (Atlanta lobe) only contains local evidence for dextral shearing, such as the NS-oriented Johnson Creek-Profile Gap shear zone. The reasons for this along-strike variation in deformation for Cretaceous magmatic arcs in North America may relate to the collisional and translation histories of offshore terranes.

  2. Experimental modelling of tectonics-erosion-sedimentation interactions in compressional, extensional, and strike-slip settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graveleau, Fabien; Strak, Vincent; Dominguez, Stéphane; Malavieille, Jacques; Chatton, Marina; Manighetti, Isabelle; Petit, Carole

    2015-09-01

    Tectonically controlled landforms develop morphologic features that provide useful markers to investigate crustal deformation and relief growth dynamics. In this paper, we present results of morphotectonic experiments obtained with an innovative approach combining tectonic and surface processes (erosion, transport, and sedimentation), coupled with accurate model monitoring techniques. This approach allows for a qualitative and quantitative analysis of landscape evolution in response to active deformation in the three end-member geological settings: compression, extension, and strike-slip. Experimental results outline first that experimental morphologies evolve significantly at a short time scale. Numerous morphologic markers form continuously, but their lifetime is generally short because erosion and sedimentation processes tend to destroy or bury them. For the compressional setting, the formation of terraces above an active thrust appears mainly controlled by narrowing and incision of the main channel through the uplifting hanging-wall and by avulsion of deposits on fan-like bodies. Terrace formation is irregular even under steady tectonic rates and erosional conditions. Terrace deformation analysis allows retrieving the growth history of the structure and the fault slip rate evolution. For the extensional setting, the dynamics of hanging-wall sedimentary filling appears to control the position of the base level, which in turn controls footwall erosion. Two phases of relief evolution can be evidenced: the first is a phase of relief growth, and the second is a phase of upstream propagation of topographic equilibrium that is reached first in the sedimentary basin. During the phase of relief growth, the formation of triangular facets occurs by degradation of the fault scarp, and their geometry (height) becomes stationary during the phase of upstream propagation of the topographic equilibrium. For the strike-slip setting, the complex morphology of the wrench zone

  3. Strike-slip tectonics within the northernmost Philippine Sea plate in an arc-continent collisional setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Wei; Jiang, Xiaodian; Guo, Yufan; Xing, Junhui; Li, Congying; Sun, Yang

    2017-09-01

    The geological processes in the northernmost Philippine Sea plate, which is bounded by the Suruga and Sagami troughs, are a typical example of an active collision zone. We attempt to illustrate the stress field through seismic estimations and geodetic analysis and propose the kinematic mode of the northernmost tip of the Philippine Sea plate. Seven events (M ≥ 4.0) are chosen for waveform inversion by the ISOLA software to distinguish the stress field. In particular, six of the chosen events, which exhibit strike-slip motion, are distributed in the eastern area, where few focal mechanisms have been reported by previous studies. According to the available focal mechanisms, strike-slip faults with similar P and T axes are widely distributed in the study area. The stress inversion suggests that the northern area is characterized by a NW-SE compression and a NE-SW extension stress regime, although some spatial differences exist. As indicated by an analysis of the geodesy, epicenters, focal mechanisms, gravity anomalies and velocity structure, the deformation in the northernmost tip is mainly accommodated by several conjugate strike-slip fault systems with steep dips that center on the Izu volcanic line. Generally, the maximum principal stress of the kinematics is derived from the collision between the Philippine Sea plate and Central Japan. Because of the different subduction angles, rates and directions of the down-going plate, diverging slab-pull forces along the Suruga and Sagami troughs may be causing the NE-NNE extension in most of the areas that are bounded by the two troughs. The extension propagates southwards along the Izu volcanic line and reaches the area adjacent to Miyake-jima.

  4. Co-seismic strike-slip surface rupture and displacement produced by the 2010 Mw 6.9 Yushu earthquake, China, and implications for Tibetan tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, A.; Rao, G.; Jia, D.; Wu, X.; Yan, B.; Ren, Z.

    2010-12-01

    The magnitude (Mw) 6.9 (Ms 7.1) Yushu earthquake occurred on 14 April 2010 in the Yushu area, central Tibetan Plateau, killing approximately 3000 people (including 270 missing) and causing widespread damage in the high mountain regions of the central Tibetan Plateau. The Yushu earthquake is comparable with the 1997 Mw 7.6 Manyi earthquake, the 2001 Mw 7.8 Kunlun earthquake, and the 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan earthquake, which all occurred in the northern and eastern Tibetan Plateau, in terms of their magnitude and seismotectonic environment, related to the eastward extrusion of the Tibetan Plateau in response to continental collision between the Indian and Eurasian plates. Although some prompt reports related to ground deformation and the focal mechanism were published in the Chinese literature soon after the Yushu earthquake, there are scarce data related to the nature of co-seismic strike-slip rupturing structures and displacement distributions because the co-seismic surface ruptures were produced mainly in remote, high mountain regions of the Tibetan Plateau (average elevation >4000 m) and roads to the epicentral area were damaged, which made it difficult to gain access to the area and to undertake fieldwork immediately after the earthquake. Field investigations reveal that the earthquake produced a 33-km-long surface rupture zone, with dominantly left-lateral strike-slip along the Yushu Fault of the pre-existing strike-slip Ganzi-Yushu Fault Zone. The co-seismic surface ruptures are characterized by discontinuous shear faults, right-stepping en echelon tensional cracks, and left-stepping mole track structures that indicate a left-lateral strike-slip shear sense for the seismic fault. Field measurements indicate co-seismic left-lateral strike-slip displacements of approximately 0.3-3.2 m (typically 1-2 m), accompanied by a minor vertical component of <0.6 m. The present results show that (i) the Yushu earthquake occurred upon the pre-existing active Ganzi-Yushu Fault

  5. Strike-Slip Deformation at the Ocean-Continent Boundary of the Algerian Continental Margin : Surface Expression of a STEP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badji, R.; Beslier, M. O.; Bracene, R.; Charvis, P.; Mercier De Lepinay, B. F.; Galve, A.; Badsi, M.; Graindorge, D.; Benaissa, Z.; Aidi, C.

    2014-12-01

    The complex geodynamic evolution of westernmost Mediterranean during Tertiary suggests the occurrence of STEPs (Subduction-Transform Edge Propagators) along the south-east Iberian-Balearic and the west Algerian margins, in relation to the westward roll-back of the Tethyan slab. Conceptual and numerical modelings of STEP predict strike-slip deformation above the deep tear of the slab, which has not been evidenced so far. We present here the first structural evidence of strike-slip deformation offshore Algeria likely associated to a STEP. New deep multichannel seismic lines of the Algerian-French SPIRAL cruise (September 2009, R/V Atalante) and complementary industrial lines from Sonatrach on the westernmost Algerian margin display a narrow and straight asymmetric basin, bounded by two steep conjugate faults parallel to the margin toe. This basin is divided in two main segments following the change in direction of the margin in the Tenes area. The downward offset of the base of the Messinian salt layer in the basin attests of a thick-skin tectonics. The overall geometry of this basin is in favor of a Miocene to Plio-Quaternary crustal strike-slip deformation, with a transtensional component in the eastern segment, and possibly a dextral shear sense. Wide-angle SPIRAL seismic data modeling indicates that the basin is located at the ocean-continent transition (OCT). Although less clearly expressed in the Khayr-al-Din segment, a comparable basin is also present eastward in the central part of the margin offshore Great Kabylia. Its geometry there is similar to the one observed offshore Tenes, or with a transpressional component at its easternmost end northward of Tigzirt. It is also located at the OCT that is further north in this area. We discuss the interpretation of this more than 400 km-long basin as the surface expression of a STEP offshore Algeria and the implications for the geodynamic evolution of Western Mediterranean.

  6. States of stress and slip partitioning in a continental scale strike-slip duplex: Tectonic and magmatic implications by means of finite element modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturrieta, Pablo Cristián; Hurtado, Daniel E.; Cembrano, José; Stanton-Yonge, Ashley

    2017-09-01

    Orogenic belts at oblique convergent subduction margins accommodate deformation in several trench-parallel domains, one of which is the magmatic arc, commonly regarded as taking up the margin-parallel, strike-slip component. However, the stress state and kinematics of volcanic arcs is more complex than usually recognized, involving first- and second-order faults with distinctive slip senses and mutual interaction. These are usually organized into regional scale strike-slip duplexes, associated with both long-term and short-term heterogeneous deformation and magmatic activity. This is the case of the 1100 km-long Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System in the Southern Andes, made up of two overlapping margin-parallel master faults joined by several NE-striking second-order faults. We present a finite element model addressing the nature and spatial distribution of stress across and along the volcanic arc in the Southern Andes to understand slip partitioning and the connection between tectonics and magmatism, particularly during the interseismic phase of the subduction earthquake cycle. We correlate the dynamics of the strike-slip duplex with geological, seismic and magma transport evidence documented by previous work, showing consistency between the model and the inferred fault system behavior. Our results show that maximum principal stress orientations are heterogeneously distributed within the continental margin, ranging from 15° to 25° counter-clockwise (with respect to the convergence vector) in the master faults and 10-19° clockwise in the forearc and backarc domains. We calculate the stress tensor ellipticity, indicating simple shearing in the eastern master fault and transpressional stress in the western master fault. Subsidiary faults undergo transtensional-to-extensional stress states. The eastern master fault displays slip rates of 5 to 10 mm/yr, whereas the western and subsidiary faults show slips rates of 1 to 5 mm/yr. Our results endorse that favorably oriented

  7. Stress history controls the spatial pattern of aftershocks: case studies from strike-slip earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utkucu, Murat; Durmuş, Hatice; Nalbant, Süleyman

    2017-09-01

    Earthquake ruptures perturb stress within the surrounding crustal volume and as it is widely accepted now these stress perturbations strongly correlates with the following seismicity. Here we have documented five cases of the mainshock-aftershock sequences generated by the strike-slip faults from different tectonic environments of world in order to demonstrate that the stress changes resulting from large preceding earthquakes decades before effect spatial distribution of the aftershocks of the current mainshocks. The studied mainshock-aftershock sequences are the 15 October 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake ( Mw = 6.4) in southern California, the 27 November 1979 Khuli-Boniabad ( Mw = 7.1), the 10 May 1997 Qa'enat ( Mw = 7.2) and the 31 March 2006 Silakhor ( Mw = 6.1) earthquakes in Iran and the 13 March 1992 Erzincan earthquake ( Mw = 6.7) in Turkey. In the literature, we have been able to find only these mainshocks that are mainly characterized by dense and strong aftershock activities along and beyond the one end of their ruptures while rare aftershock occurrences with relatively lower magnitude reported for the other end of their ruptures. It is shown that the stress changes resulted from earlier mainshock(s) that are close in both time and space might be the reason behind the observed aftershock patterns. The largest aftershocks of the mainshocks studied tend to occur inside the stress-increased lobes that were also stressed by the background earthquakes and not to occur inside the stress-increased lobes that fall into the stress shadow of the background earthquakes. We suggest that the stress shadows of the previous mainshocks may persist in the crust for decades to suppress aftershock distribution of the current mainshocks. Considering active researches about use of the Coulomb stress change maps as a practical tool to forecast spatial distribution of the upcoming aftershocks for earthquake risk mitigation purposes in near-real time, it is further suggested

  8. Tsunamis from strike-slip earthquakes in the Wharton Basin, northeast Indian Ocean: March 2016 Mw7.8 event and its relationship with the April 2012 Mw 8.6 event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidarzadeh, Mohammad; Harada, Tomoya; Satake, Kenji; Ishibe, Takeo; Takagawa, Tomohiro

    2017-12-01

    The Wharton Basin, off southwest Sumatra, ruptured to a large intraplate left-lateral strike-slip Mw 7.8 earthquake on 2016 March 2. The epicentre was located ∼800 km to the south of another similar-mechanism intraplate Mw 8.6 earthquake in the same basin on 2012 April 11. Small tsunamis from these strike-slip earthquakes were registered with maximum amplitudes of 0.5-1.5 cm on DARTs and 1-19 cm on tide gauges for the 2016 event, and the respective values of 0.5-6 and 6-40 cm for the 2012 event. By using both teleseismic body waves and tsunami observations of the 2016 event, we obtained optimum slip models with rupture velocity (Vr) in the range of 2.8-3.6 km s-1 belonging to both EW and NS faults. While the EW fault plane cannot be fully ruled out, we chose the best model as the NS fault plane with a Vr of 3.6 km s-1, a maximum slip of 7.7 m and source duration of 33 s. The tsunami energy period bands were 4-15 and 7-24 min for the 2016 and 2012 tsunamis, respectively, reflecting the difference in source sizes. Seismicity in the Wharton Basin is dominated by large strike-slip events including the 2012 (Mw 8.6 and 8.2) and 2016 (Mw 7.8) events, indicating that these events are possible tsunami sources in the Wharton Basin. Cumulative number and cumulative seismic-moment curves revealed that most earthquakes are of strike-slip mechanisms and the largest seismic-moment is provided by the strike-slip earthquakes in this basin.

  9. Strike-slip earthquakes in the oceanic lithosphere: Observations of exceptionally high apparent stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, George; McGarr, A.

    2002-01-01

    The radiated energies, ES, and seismic moments, M0, for 942 globally distributed earthquakes that occurred between 1987 to 1998 are examined to find the earthquakes with the highest apparent stresses (τa=μES/M0, where μ is the modulus of rigidity). The globally averaged τa for shallow earthquakes in all tectonic environments and seismic regions is 0.3 MPa. However, the subset of 49 earthquakes with the highest apparent stresses (τa greater than about 5.0 MPa) is dominated almost exclusively by strike-slip earthquakes that occur in oceanic environments. These earthquakes are all located in the depth range 7–29 km in the upper mantle of the young oceanic lithosphere. Many of these events occur near plate-boundary triple junctions where there appear to be high rates of intraplate deformation. Indeed, the small rapidly deforming Gorda Plate accounts for 10 of the 49 high-τa events. The depth distribution of τa, which shows peak values somewhat greater than 25 MPa in the depth range 20–25 km, suggests that upper bounds on this parameter are a result of the strength of the oceanic lithosphere. A recently proposed envelope for apparent stress, derived by taking 6 per cent of the strength inferred from laboratory experiments for young (less than 30 Ma) deforming oceanic lithosphere, agrees well with the upper-bound envelope of apparent stresses over the depth range 5–30 km. The corresponding depth-dependent shear strength for young oceanic lithosphere attains a peak value of about 575 MPa at a depth of 21 km and then diminishes rapidly as the depth increases. In addition to their high apparent stresses, which suggest that the strength of the young oceanic lithosphere is highest in the depth range 10–30 km, our set of high-τa earthquakes show other features that constrain the nature of the forces that cause interplate motion. First, our set of events is divided roughly equally between intraplate and transform faulting with similar depth distributions

  10. 3D deformation in strike-slip systems: Analogue modelling and numerical restoration Deformación 3D en sistemas de rumbo: modelación analógica y restauración numérica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel González

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Regional and local strike-slip systems in Chile are complex and pose interesting questions, such as the interaction between strike-slip and reverse faults, how they evolve, and the relationship between shortening, rotation and uplift. Within this context, we developed a new analytical method based on analogue and numerical modelling applied to 3D, pure and transtensional-transpressional strike-slip systems. Analogue modelling results indicate that in restraining stepovers of strike-slip fault systems, where antiformal pop-up structures are usually formed, pre-existent basement structures with a high angle to the main strike-slip fault will generate a higher rotation of blocks. However, when these structures are oriented at a high angle with respect to the main stress convergence vector, the rotation will be less and therefore a higher tendency to uplift will be produced. These results were applied to NW- and SE-striking basement faults oblique to N-S mega-thrust faults in central Chile (32°-35°S, for which we propose a simultaneous development based on the analogue model results. Moreover, we propose that strike-slip movement occurred on thrust faults in central Chile. Furthermore, we performed a numerical restoration of an analogue experiment which modeled a pure strike-slip system, and concluded that the restoration is very sensitive to shortening data as well as to rotational data. These results are extremely important for future numerical and regional analysis of strike-slip systems.Los sistemas de rumbo regionales y locales en Chile son complejos y plantean interesantes preguntas, tales como la interacción entre fallas de rumbo y fallas inversas, cómo evolucionan ellas, y la relación entre acortamiento, rotación y alzamiento. En este contexto, desarrollamos un nuevo método analítico basado en modelamiento analógico y numérico de sistemas de rumbo de cizalle puro y sistemas transpresionales-trantensionales en 3D. Los resultados del

  11. Palaeozoic oolitic ironstone of the French Armorican Massif: a chemical and structural trap for orogenic base metal-As-Sb-Au mineralisation during Hercynian strike-slip deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloaguen, Eric; Branquet, Yannick; Boulvais, Philippe; Moëlo, Yves; Chauvel, Jean-Jacques; Chiappero, Pierre-Jacques; Marcoux, Eric

    2007-04-01

    In the Saint-Aubin-des-Châteaux quarry (Armorican Hercynian belt, western France), an epigenetic hydrothermal alteration affects an oolitic ironstone layer intercalated within the Lower Ordovician Grès armoricain Formation. The hydrothermal overprint produced pervasive and massive sulphidation with stratoid pyritised lenticular bodies within the oolitic ironstone layer. These sulphide lenses are spatially associated with strike-slip faults and extend laterally from them. After the massive sulphidation stage (Fe-As, stage 1), subsequent fracturing allowed the deposition of base metals (stage 2) and Pb-Sb-Au (stage 3) parageneses in veins. The dominant brittle structures are vertical extension veins, conjugate shear veins and strike-slip faults of various orders. All these structures are filled with the same paragenetic sequence. Deformation analysis allows the identification of structures that developed incrementally via right-lateral simple shear compatible with bulk strain affecting the Central Armorican Domain. Each increment corresponds to a fracture set filled with specific parageneses. Successive hydrothermal pulses reflect clockwise rotation of the horizontal shortening direction. Geothermometry on chlorite and arsenopyrite shows an input of hot hydrothermal fluids (maximum of 390-350°C) during the main sulphide stage 1. The subsequent stages present a marked temperature drop (300-275°C). Lead isotopes suggest that the lead source is similar for all hydrothermal stages and corresponds to the underlying Neo-Proterozoic basement. Lead isotope data, relative ages of deformation and comparison with neighbouring deposits suggest that large-scale fluid pulses occurred during the whole Hercynian orogeny rather than pulses restricted to the late Hercynian period. The vicinity of the Hercynian internal domain appears as a key control for deformation and fluid flow in the oolitic ironstones, which acted as a chemical and structural trap for the hydrothermal fluids

  12. Source characteristics of the 2015 Mw6.5 Lefkada, Greece, strike-slip earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgar, Diego; Ganas, Athanassios; Geng, Jianghui; Liang, Cunren; Fielding, Eric J.; Kassaras, Ioannis

    2017-03-01

    We present a kinematic slip model from the inversion of 1 Hz GPS, strong motion, and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data for the 2015 Mw6.5 Lefkada, Greece, earthquake. We will show that most of the slip during this event is updip of the hypocenter (10.7 km depth) with substantial slip (>0.5 m) between 5 km depth and the surface. The peak slip is 1.6 m, and the inverted rake angles show predominantly strike-slip motion. Slip concentrates mostly to the south of the hypocenter, and the source time function indicates a total duration of 17 s with peak moment rate at 6 s. We will show that a 65° dipping geometry is the most plausible due to a lack of polarity reversals in the InSAR data and good agreement with Coulomb stress modeling, aftershock locations, and regional moment tensors. We also note that there was an 20 cm peak-to-peak tsunami observed at one tide gauge station 300 km away from the earthquake. We will discuss tsunami modeling results and study the possible source of the amplitude discrepancy between the modeled and the observed data at far-field tide gauges.

  13. Spatial and temporal relationships between compression, strike-slip and extension in the Central Venezuelan Andes: Clues for Plio-Quaternary tectonic escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backé, Guillaume; Dhont, Damien; Hervouët, Yves

    2006-10-01

    The geometry of tectonic structures, attributed to the Neogene-Quaternary time interval, is described in the active setting of the Venezuelan Andes. Our methodology is based on the analysis of radar satellite and Digital Elevation Model imagery, complemented by structural fieldwork and the compilation of seismotectonic data to make a structural analysis on a regional scale. Radar images provide first class data for morphostructural analysis in areas of dense vegetation and frequent cloud covering, like the Venezuelan Andes. We focused our analysis in the Burbusay-Río Momboy and Boconó faults corner located in the central part of the belt. We have described three stages of deformation during the Neogene-Quaternary. The first one, Mio-Pliocene in age, is a NW-SE compression responsible for the uplift of the Venezuelan Andes. The second tectonic stage corresponds to a strike-slip regime of deformation marked by shearing along the Boconó, Burbusay and Valera faults, which separates two triangular wedges in the larger Trujillo block. This strike-slip faulting-dominated compressional-extensional tectonic regime allowed the Trujillo crustal block to move towards the NE. Wrenching has therefore started at some point between the Pliocene and the Quaternary. These two tectonic events are consistent with ongoing strain partitioning in the Venezuelan Andes. The third stage corresponds to extensional deformation limited to the Trujillo block and is still active today. Extension is associated with the motion of crustal blocks moving relative to each other, probably above the upper-lower crust boundary. Such extensional deformation can be understood considering that the crust extends and stretches at the same time as it moves towards the NE. The combination of both horizontal lateral motion and extension is characteristic of a tectonic escape process. The northeastward escape of the Trujillo block, which belongs to the larger North Andes block, occurs as a result of the

  14. Crustal thickening in Gansu-Qinghai, lithospheric mantle subduction, and oblique, strike-slip controlled growth of the Tibet plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, B.; Tapponnier, P.; Bourjot, L.; Métivier, F.; Gaudemer, Y.; Peltzer, G.; Shunmin, Guo; Zhitai, Chen

    1998-10-01

    Late-Cenozoic crustal shortening on NE sections between the Kunlun fault and the Hexi corridor are estimated to range between 100 and 200 km. In keeping with the inference of a deep crustal décollement and with the existence of Mid-Miocene to Pliocene plutonism and volcanism south of the Kunlun range, such values suggest that the lithospheric mantle of the Qaidam plunged obliquely into the asthenosphere south of that range to minimum depths of the order of 200-300 km. A minimum of ~150 km of shortening in the last ~10 Ma, consistent with the average age of the earliest volcanic-plutonic rocks just south of the Kunlun (~10.8 Ma) would imply average Late-Cenozoic rates of shortening and regional uplift in NE Tibet of at least ~15 mm yr-1 and ~0.2 mm yr-1, respectively. Such numbers are consistent with a cumulative sinistral offset and slip rate of at least ~200 km and ~2 cm yr-1, respectively, on the Altyn Tagh fault east of 88°E. The fault may have propagated more than 1000 km, to 102°E, in the last 10 Ma. Our study of ongoing tectonics in northeast Tibet is consistent with a scenario in which, while the Himalayas-Gangdese essentially `stagnated' above India's subducting mantle, much of Tibet grew by thickening of the Asian crust, as propagation of large, lithospheric, strike-slip shear zones caused the opposite edge of the plateau to migrate far into Asia. The Asian lithospheric mantle, decoupled from the crust, appears to have subducted southwards along the two Mesozoic sutures that cut Tibet north of the Gangdese, rather than to have thickened. The Bangong-Nujiang suture was probably reactivated earlier than the Jinsha-Kunlun suture, located farther north. Overall, the large-scale deformation bears a resemblance to plate tectonics at obliquely convergent margins, including slip-partioning along large strike-slip faults such as the Altyn Tagh and Kunlun faults. Simple mechanisms at the level of the lithospheric mantle are merely hidden by the broader distribution

  15. Syntectonic granites in thrust and strike slip regimes: the history of the Carmo and Cindacta plutons (southeastern Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanner, Bernd G.; Kruhl, Jörn H.

    2002-09-01

    The Carmo and Cindacta plutons (SE Brazil) represent syntectonic intrusions during the late-Proterozoic Brasiliano orogeny (700-500 Ma) in the southern Ribeira belt. A first magma pulse (the Carmo pluton) intruded as a thin lenticular body along a low-angle WSW-directed overthrust plane, which probably formed during the collision of the Congo and São Francisco cratons. The magma crystallized at a depth of ˜22 km. In a later stage of the Brasiliano orogeny, large-scale strike-slip shear zones developed. Along these zones, two successive compositionally different magma pulses (the Cindacta pluton) intruded. The first of these pulses probably intruded into a pull-apart structure, and the second was emplaced parallel to a strike-slip shear zone at a depth of ˜19 km. Both magmas cooled under the same deformation regime to the lower amphibolite facies. The two plutons exemplify the sheet-like intrusions of granitic magmas during thrust and strike-slip tectonics under conditions of continent collision.

  16. E–W strike slip shearing of Kinwat granitoid at South East Deccan ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R D Kaplay

    2017-07-21

    Jul 21, 2017 ... sabbatical for the year 2017 provided by IIT Bom- bay. Dr Surajit Misra and an anonymous reviewer are thanked along with the Handling Editor Prof. Saibal Gupta for intense critical comments in two rounds. References. Anderson E M 1905 The dynamics of faulting; Trans. Edinb. Geol. Soc. 8 387–402.

  17. High-rate GPS results for the April 2012 Sumatra earthquake sequence, an unusual, complex, and very large intraplate strike-slip event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, E. M.; Hermawan, I.; Lay, T.; Yue, H.; Banerjee, P.; Qiu, Q.; Macpherson, K. A.; Feng, L.; Tsang, L. L.; Lubis, A.; Tapponnier, P.; Sieh, K. E.

    2012-12-01

    The 11 April 2012 Mw 8.6 Sumatra earthquake was one of the largest strike-slip earthquakes ever recorded, and also one of the largest intraplate earthquakes. It was followed 2 hours later by another great earthquake, of Mw 8.2, in a similar location. The events occurred ~400 km from northern Sumatra, on the oceanic side of the Sunda megathrust. The event was recorded by high-rate GPS stations from our 50-station Sumatra GPS Array (SuGAr). We will present the coseismic displacements and constraints on slip obtained from this network. The location of the events is very interesting. Scientists have long been puzzled by the nature and location of the boundary between the Indian and Australian plates in the depths of the Indian Ocean. Because of the resistance provided by the collision of India with Tibet far to the north, the Indian plate is moving relatively northwards at about 1 cm/yr slower than the Australian plate; this difference in velocity causes strain between the Indian and Australian plates. These earthquakes provide important new evidence that this strain is reactivating a system of faults on the seafloor that were inherited from an older geological epoch, and bring up questions about why this deformation appears to be diffuse, rather than behaving as a proper plate boundary. The events also highlight a back-and-forth interaction between the intraplate faults and the Sunda megathrust; the 2004 megathrust event brought these earthquakes ahead in time, but these earthquakes will in turn have stressed the megathrust. Published seismological results have indicated great complexity in the rupture patterns for these events, with a cascading failure of multiple conjugate faults. Surprisingly, the majority of slip seems to have occurred on the WNW-trending, right-lateral faults, rather than the NNE-trending left-lateral faults that are prominent features of the seafloor. The seismological results also show that the ruptures are likely to have extended from the

  18. Slip events propagating along a ductile mid-crustal strike-slip shear zone (Malpica-Lamego line, Variscan Orogen, NW Iberia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llana-Fúnez, Sergio; de Paola, Nicola; Pozzi, Giacomo; Lopez-Sanchez, Marco Antonio

    2017-04-01

    The current level of erosion in NW Iberian peninsula exposes Variscan mid-crustal depths, where widespread deformation during orogenesis produced dominantly ductile structures. It constitutes an adequate window for the observation of structures close to the brittle-plastic transition in the continental crust. The shear zone object of this work is the Malpica-Lamego line (MLL), a major Variscan structure formed in the late stages of the Variscan collision. The MLL is a mostly strike-slip major structure that offsets laterally by several kilometres the assembly of allochthonous complexes, that contain a sub-horizontal suture zone, which are the remnants of the plate duplication during the Variscan convergence. The shear zone is exposed along the northern coast of Galicia (NW Spain). It is characterized by phyllonites and quartz-mylonites in a zone which is tens of meters in thickness. Within the phyllonites, a few seams of cataclastic rocks have been found in bands along the main fabric. Their cohesive character, the parallelism between the different bands, the fact that host rocks maintain mineral assemblage and that no cross-cutting relations in the field were identified, are considered indicative of these brittle structures forming coetaneously with the ductile shearing producing the phyllonites. Samples from the phyllonites, also from quartz-mylonites, were prepared and powdered to characterize friction properties in a rotary shear apparatus at high, seismic velocities (m/s). Preliminary experiments run at room temperature and effective normal stresses between 10 to 25 MPa, show that friction coefficients µ are relatively high and a limited drop in friction coefficient occurs after 10-20 cm of slip, with µ decreasing from 0.7 to 0.5. Fracturing seems coetaneous with dominant ductile shearing within the shear zone, however, given the frictional properties of the phyllonites, it is unlikely that brittle deformation nucleates within these fault rocks. Instead, it

  19. Seismic intensity assignments for the 2008 Andravida (NW Peloponnese, Greece strike-slip event (June 8, Mw=6.4 based on the application of the Environmental Seismic Intensity scale (ESI 2007 and the European Macroseismic scale (EMS-98

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyridon D. Mavroulis

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available On June 8, 2008, a strike-slip earthquake (Mw=6.4 was generated NE of the Andravida town (NW Peloponnese, western Greece due to the activation of the previously unknown western Achaia strike-slip fault zone (WAFZ. Extensive structural damage and earthquake environmental effects (EEE were induced in the NW Peloponnese, offering the opportunity to test and compare the ESI 2007 and the EMS-98 intensity scales in a moderate strike-slip event. No primary EEE were induced, while secondary EEE including seismic fractures, liquefaction phenomena, slope movements and hydrological anomalies were widely observed covering an area of about 800 km2. The lack of primary effects and the relatively small surface deformation with respect to the earthquake magnitude is due to the thick Gavrovo flysch layer in the affected area that isolated and absorbed the subsurface deformation from the surface. According to the application of the EMS-98 scale, damage to masonry buildings ranged from grade 3 to 5, while damage in most of R/C buildings ranged from grade 1 to 3. A maximum ESI 2007 intensity VIII-IX is recorded, while the maximum EMS-98 intensity is IX. For all the sites where intensity VIII has been recorded the ESI 2007 and the EMS-98 agree, but for others the ESI 2007 intensities values are lower by one or two degrees than the corresponding EMS-98 ones, as it is clearly concluded from the comparison of the produced isoseismals. An exception to this rule is the Valmi village, where considerable structural damage occurs (IXEMS-98 along with the lack of significant EEE (VESI 2007. This variability between the ESI 2007 and the EMS-98 intensity values is predominantly attributed to the vulnerability of old masonry buildings constructed with no seismic resistance design. Correlation of all existing data shows that the geological structure, the active tectonics, and the geotechnical characteristics of the alpine and post-alpine formations along with the construction

  20. Interactions between strike-slip earthquakes and the subduction interface near the Mendocino Triple Junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jianhua; McGuire, Jeffrey J.

    2018-01-01

    The interactions between the North American, Pacific, and Gorda plates at the Mendocino Triple Junction (MTJ) create one of the most seismically active regions in North America. The earthquakes rupture all three plate boundaries but also include considerable intraplate seismicity reflecting the strong internal deformation of the Gorda plate. Understanding the stress levels that drive these ruptures and estimating the locking state of the subduction interface are especially important topics for regional earthquake hazard assessment. However owing to the lack of offshore seismic and geodetic instruments, the rupture process of only a few large earthquakes near the MTJ have been studied in detail and the locking state of the subduction interface is not well constrained. In this paper, first, we use the second moments inversion method to study the rupture process of the January 28, 2015 Mw 5.7 earthquake on the Mendocino transform fault that was unusually well recorded by both onshore and offshore strong motion instruments. We estimate the rupture dimension to be approximately 6 km by 3 km corresponding to a stress drop of ∼4 MPa for a crack model. Next we investigate the frictional state of the subduction interface by simulating the afterslip that would be expected there as a result of the stress changes from the 2015 earthquake and a 2010 Mw 6.5 intraplate earthquake within the subducted Gorda plate. We simulate afterslip scenarios for a range of depths of the downdip end of the locked zone defined as the transition to velocity strengthening friction and calculate the corresponding surface deformation expected at onshore GPS monuments. We can rule out a very shallow downdip limit owing to the lack of a detectable signal at onshore GPS stations following the 2010 earthquake. Our simulations indicate that the locking depth on the slab surface is at least 14 km, which suggests that the next M8 earthquake rupture will likely reach the coastline and strong shaking

  1. Onshore-offshore seismic reflection profiling across the southern margin of the Sea of Japan: back-arc opening, shortening and active strike-slip deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroshi; Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Kato, Naoko; Toda, Shigeru; Kawasaki, Shinji; Fujiwara, Akira; Tanaka, Yasuhisa; Abe, Susumu

    2017-04-01

    Pliocene to early Pleistocene along the limited fault system. The change in the direction of the motion of PHS at 1 Ma produced major change in stress regime from NS compression to EW compression in the back-arc. Following the change of stress regime, former reverse faults reactivated as strike-slip fault. Reuse of pre-existing faults are common, and crustal deformation concentrates relatively narrow zone in the back-arc failed rifts. Two-months after from our survey, Mw 6.2 Tottoriken-chubu earthquake occurred just beneath the onshore part of the seismic line. The source fault corresponds to the boundary of abrupt change in P-wave velocity, however there were no surface ruptures and distinctive geologic faults. The bottom of seismogenic layer corresponds to TWT 4.5 sec., which is almost the top horizon of reflective middle crust.

  2. The tsunami-like sea level disturbance in Crotone harbor, Italy, after the Mw6.5 strike-slip earthquake of 17 November 2015 in Lefkada Isl., Ionian Sea, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikova, Tatyana; Annunziato, Alessandro; Charalampakis, Marinos; Romano, Fabrizio; Volpe, Manuela; Tonini, Roberto; Gerardinger, Andrea; Papadopoulos, Gerassimos A.

    2016-04-01

    On 17 November 2015 an Mw6.5 earthquake ruptured offshore Lefkada Isl. in Ionian Sea, Greece, causing two human victims, minor damage and several ground failures including coastal landslides. Fault plane solutions released by CMT/Harvard, NOA and other institutes have indicated that the faulting style was strike-slip right-lateral, which is quite typical for the area, as for example, the Mw6.3 event that occurred on August 14, 2003, in exactly the same fault zone. In spite of the very low tsunami potential commonly associated to this faulting mechanism, a tsunami-like sea level change was recorded after the earthquake by one tide-gauge in the Crotone harbor, Italy. Preliminary tsunami numerical simulations were performed to reproduce the observed signal. The spectral analysis of the synthetic mareograms close to the entrance of the harbor shows the presence of some peaks that could justify the relation between the natural port resonance and the observed wave amplification. Of particular interest is the coupling between the tsunami energy and the natural modes of basin oscillation enhancing tsunami wave amplitude in harbors through resonance, as shown in some historical events in the Mediterranean Sea and elsewhere. This research is a contribution to the EU-FP7 tsunami research project ASTARTE (Assessment, Strategy And Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe), grant agreement no: 603839, 2013-10-30.

  3. Excitation of tsunami by a pure strike-slip earthquake. ; Izu Oshima kinkai earthquake tsunami on Feb. 20, 1990. Yokozure danso jishin ni yoru tsunami no reiki. ; 1990 nen 2 gatsu 20 nichi Izu Oshima kinkai jishin tsunami

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, K. (Nippon Dental University, Tokyo (Japan). Niigata Junior College); Okada, M. (Meteorological Research Institute, Tsukuba (Japan))

    1993-06-24

    A numerical experiment was performed to reproduce the tsunami from the Izu-Oshima Kinkai Earthquake which occurred on February 20, 1990, using a tsunami excited by a pure strike-slip fault. An existence of a vertical fault with a length of 15 km and a width of 12 km was hypothesized in the south-north direction on the ocean bottom around the focal region. Then, a tsunami was assumed to have been excited when the fault was given a side-slip movement to create discrepancies of 1 m in the fault. Water level change for one hour after onset of the tsunami was calculated in one-second interval in each unit square with a side length of 1 km over an ocean area of 200 km from east to west and 150 km from north to south centering on the wave source. The results obtained from the calculation were harmonious with tsunami waveforms observed at five stations in the subject region and their spectral analytic results. Reproduced were the two predominant frequencies commonly observed at more than two stations, and difference in predominant cycles that appear according to azimuths of the observation points to the epicenter. These facts endorse the reasonability of the above hypothesis. 9 refs., 11 figs.

  4. New active faults on Eurasian-Arabian collision zone: Tectonic activity of Özyurt and Gülsünler faults (Eastern Anatolian Plateau, Van-Turkey)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dicle, S.; Üner, S.

    2017-11-01

    The Eastern Anatolian Plateau emerges from the continental collision between Arabian and Eurasian plates where intense seismicity related to the ongoing convergence characterizes the southern part of the plateau. Active deformation in this zone is shared by mainly thrust and strike-slip faults. The Özyurt thrust fault and the Gülsünler sinistral strike-slip fault are newly determined fault zones, located to the north of Van city centre. Different types of faults such as thrust, normal and strike-slip faults are observed on the quarry wall excavated in Quaternary lacustrine deposits at the intersection zone of these two faults. Kinematic analysis of fault-slip data has revealed coeval activities of transtensional and compressional structures for the Lake Van Basin. Seismological and geomorphological characteristics of these faults demonstrate the capability of devastating earthquakes for the area.

  5. Fault kinematics and active tectonics at the southeastern boundary of the eastern Alborz (Abr and Khij fault zones): geodynamic implications for NNE Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Javidfakhr, Bita; Bellier, Olivier; Shabanian, Esmaeil; Siame, Lionel; Léanni, Laëtitia; Bourlès, Didier; Ahmadian, Seiran

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The Alborz is a region of active deformation within the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone. The Abr and the Khij Faults are two NE-trending left-lateral strike-slip faults in the eastern Alborz that correspond to the Shahrud fault system extended through an area of about 95?55 km2. Tectonic landforms typically associated with active strike-slip faults, such as deflected stream channels, offset ridges and fault scarps are documented along the mentioned faults. Detailed analyses ...

  6. Insights on the seismotectonics of the western part of northern Calabria (southern Italy) by integrated geological and geophysical data: Coexistence of shallow extensional and deep strike-slip kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferranti, L.; Milano, G.; Pierro, M.

    2017-11-01

    We assess the seismotectonics of the western part of the border area between the Southern Apennines and Calabrian Arc, centered on the Mercure extensional basin, by integrating recent seismicity with a reconstruction of the structural frame from surface to deep crust. The analysis of low-magnitude (ML ≤ 3.5) events occurred in the area during 2013-2017, when evaluated in the context of the structural model, has revealed an unexpected complexity of seismotectonics processes. Hypocentral distribution and kinematics allow separating these events into three groups. Focal mechanisms of the shallower (< 9 km) set of events show extensional kinematics. These results are consistent with the last kinematic event recorded on outcropping faults, and with the typical depth and kinematics of normal faulting earthquakes in the axial part of southern Italy. By contrast, intermediate ( 9-17 km) and deep ( 17-23 km) events have fault plane solutions characterized by strike- to reverse-oblique slip, but they differ from each other in the orientation of the principal axes. The intermediate events have P axes with a NE-SW trend, which is at odds with the NW-SE trend recorded by strike-slip earthquakes affecting the Apulia foreland plate in the eastern part of southern Italy. The intermediate events are interpreted to reflect reactivation of faults in the Apulia unit involved in thrust uplift, and appears aligned along an WNW-ESE trending deep crustal, possibly lithospheric boundary. Instead, deep events beneath the basin, which have P-axis with a NW-SE trend, hint to the activity of a deep overthrust of the Tyrrhenian back-arc basin crust over the continental crust of the Apulia margin, or alternatively, to a tear fault in the underthrust Apulia plate. Results of this work suggest that extensional faulting, as believed so far, does not solely characterizes the seismotectonics of the axial part of the Southern Apennines.

  7. Evidence for early miocene wrench faulting in the Marlborough fault system, New Zealand: structural implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audru, Jean-Christophe; Delteil, Jean

    1998-10-01

    In New Zealand, the Marlborough strike-slip faults link the Hikurangi subduction zone to the Alpine fault collision zone. Stratigraphic and structural analysis in the Marlborough region constrain the inception of the current strike-slip tectonics. Six major Neogene basins are investigated. Their infill is composed of marine and freshwater sediments up to 3 km thick; they are characterised by coarse facies derived from the basins bounding relief, high sedimentation rates and asymmetric geometries. Proposed factors that controlled the basins' generation are the initial geometry of the strike-slip faults and the progressive strike-slip motion. Two groups of basins are presented: the early Miocene (23 My) basins were generated under wrench tectonics above releasing-jogs between basement faults. The late Miocene (11 My) basins were initiated by halfgrabens tilted along straighter faults during a transtensive stage. Development of faults during Cretaceous to Oligocene times facilitated the following propagation of wrench tectonics. The Pliocene (5 My) to current increasing convergence has shortened the basins and distorted the Miocene array of faults. This study indicates that the Marlborough Fault System is an old feature that connected part of the Hikurangi margin to the Alpine fault since the subduction and collision initiation.

  8. Strong paleoearthquakes along the Talas-Fergana Fault, Kyrgyzstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Korzhenkov

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The Talas-Fergana Fault, the largest strike-slip structure in Centred. Asia, forms an obliquely oriented boundary between the northeastern and southwestern parts of the Tianshan mountain belt. The fault underwent active right-lateral strike-slip during the Paleozoic, with right-lateral movements being rejuvenated in the Late Cenozoic. Tectonic movements along the intracontinental strike-slip faults contribute to absorb part of the regional crustal shortening linked to the India-Eurasia collision; knowledge of strike-slip motions along the Talas-Fergana Fault are necessary for a complete assessment of the active deformation of the Tianshan orogen. To improve our understanding of the intracontinental deformation of the Tianshan mountain belt and the occurrence of strong earthquakes along the whole length of the Talas-Fergana Fault, we identify features of relief arising during strong paleoearthquakes along the Talas-Fergana Fault, fault segmentation, the length of seismogenic ruptures, and the energy and age of ancient catastrophes. We show that during neotectonic time the fault developed as a dextral strike-slip fault, with possible dextral displacements spreading to secondary fault planes north of the main fault trace. We determine rates of Holocene and Late Pleistocene dextral movements, and our radiocarbon dating indicates tens of strong earthquakes occurring along the fault zone during arid interval of 15800 years. The reoccurrence of strong earthquakes along the Talas-Fergana Fault zone during the second half of the Holocene is about 300 years. The next strong earthquake along the fault will most probably occur along its southeastern chain during the next several decades. Seismotectonic deformation parameters indicate that M > 7 earthquakes with oscillation intensity I > IX have occurred.

  9. Fault Rock Variation as a Function of Host Rock Lithology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagereng, A.; Diener, J.

    2013-12-01

    Fault rocks contain an integrated record of the slip history of a fault, and thereby reflect the deformation processes associated with fault slip. Within the Aus Granulite Terrane, Namibia, a number of Jurassic to Cretaceous age strike-slip faults cross-cut Precambrian high grade metamorphic rocks. These strike-slip faults were active at subgreenschist conditions and occur in a variety of host rock lithologies. Where the host rock contains significant amounts of hydrous minerals, representing granulites that have undergone retrogressive metamorphism, the fault rock is dominated by hydrothermal breccias. In anhydrous, foliated rocks interlayered with minor layers containing hydrous phyllosilicates, the fault rock is a cataclasite partially cemented by jasper and quartz. Where the host rock is an isotropic granitic rock the fault rock is predominantly a fine grained black fault rock. Cataclasites and breccias show evidence for multiple deformation events, whereas the fine grained black fault rocks appear to only record a single slip increment. The strike-slip faults observed all formed in the same general orientation and at a similar time, and it is unlikely that regional stress, strain rate, pressure and temperature varied between the different faults. We therefore conclude that the type of fault rock here depended on the host rock lithology, and that lithology alone accounts for why some faults developed a hydrothermal breccia, some cataclasite, and some a fine grained black fault rock. Consequently, based on the assumption that fault rocks reflect specific slip styles, lithology was also the main control on different fault slip styles in this area at the time of strike-slip fault activity. Whereas fine grained black fault rock is inferred to represent high stress events, hydrothermal breccia is rather related to events involving fluid pressure in excess of the least stress. Jasper-bearing cataclasites may represent faults that experienced dynamic weakening as seen

  10. Analogue modelling of different angle thrust-wrench fault interference in a brittle medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosas, F.M.; Duarte, João C.; Schellart, W. P.; Tomás, R.; Grigorova, V.; Terrinha, P.

    2015-01-01

    Analogue modelling experiments of thrust-wrench fault interference in a brittle medium are presented and discussed. Simultaneous reactivation of confining strike-slip and thrust faults bounding a (corner) zone of interference defined by the angle between the two fault systems is simulated, instead

  11. The last interglacial period at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and an estimate of late Quaternary tectonic uplift rate in a strike-slip regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweig, E. S.; Muhs, D. R.; Simmons, K. R.; Halley, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Guantanamo Bay, Cuba is an area dominated by a strike-slip tectonic regime and is therefore expected to have very low Quaternary uplift rates. We tested this hypothesis by study of an unusually well preserved emergent reef terrace around the bay. Up to 12 m of unaltered, growth-position reef corals are exposed at about 40 sections examined around ˜40 km of coastline. Maximum reef elevations in the protected, inner part of the bay are ˜11-12 m, whereas outer-coast shoreline angles of wave-cut benches are as high as ˜14 m. Fifty uranium-series analyses of unrecrystallized corals from six localities yield ages ranging from ˜134 ka to ˜115 ka, when adjusted for small biases due to slightly elevated initial 234U/238U values. Thus, ages of corals correlate this reef to the peak of the last interglacial period, marine isotope stage (MIS) 5.5. Previously, we dated the Key Largo Limestone to the same high-sea stand in the tectonically stable Florida Keys. Estimates of paleo-sea level during MIS 5.5 in the Florida Keys are ~6.6 to 8.3 m above present. Assuming a similar paleo-sea level in Cuba, this yields a long-term tectonic uplift rate of 0.04-0.06 m/ka over the past ~120 ka. This estimate supports the hypothesis that the tectonic uplift rate should be low in this strike-slip regime. Nevertheless, on the southeast coast of Cuba, east of our study area, we have observed flights of multiple marine terraces, suggesting either (1) a higher uplift rate or (2) an unusually well-preserved record of pre-MIS 5.5 terraces not observed at Guantanamo Bay.

  12. Evidence for distributed clockwise rotation of the crust in the northwestern United States from fault geometries and focal mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocher, Thomas M.; Wells, Ray E.; Lamb, Andrew P.; Weaver, Craig S.

    2017-05-01

    Paleomagnetic and GPS data indicate that Washington and Oregon have rotated clockwise for the past 16 Myr. Late Cenozoic and Quaternary fault geometries, seismicity lineaments, and focal mechanisms provide evidence that this rotation is accommodated by north directed thrusting and right-lateral strike-slip faulting in Washington, and SW to W directed normal faulting and right-lateral strike-slip faulting to the east. Several curvilinear NW to NNW trending high-angle strike-slip faults and seismicity lineaments in Washington and NW Oregon define a geologic pole (117.7°W, 47.9°N) of rotation relative to North America. Many faults and focal mechanisms throughout northwestern U.S. and southwestern British Columbia have orientations consistent with this geologic pole as do GPS surface velocities corrected for elastic Cascadia subduction zone coupling. Large Quaternary normal faults radial to the geologic pole, which appear to accommodate crustal rotation via crustal extension, are widespread and can be found along the Lewis and Clark zone in Montana, within the Centennial fault system north of the Snake River Plain in Idaho and Montana, to the west of the Wasatch Front in Utah, and within the northern Basin and Range in Oregon and Nevada. Distributed strike-slip faults are most prominent in western Washington and Oregon and may serve to transfer slip between faults throughout the northwestern U.S.

  13. Recurring extensional and strike-slip tectonics after the Neoproterozoic collisional events in the southern Mantiqueira province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato P. Almeida

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In Eastern South America, a series of fault-bounded sedimentary basins that crop out from Southern Uruguay to Southeastern Brazil were formed after the main collisional deformation of the Brasiliano Orogeny and record the tectonic events that affected the region from the Middle Ediacaran onwards. We address the problem of discerning the basin-forming tectonics from the later deformational events through paleostress analysis of more than 600 fault-slip data, mainly from the Camaquã Basin (Southern Brazil, sorted by stratigraphic level and cross-cutting relationships of superposed striations, and integrated with available stratigraphic and geochronological data. Our results show that the Camaquã Basin was formed by at least two distinct extensional events, and that rapid paleostress changes took place in the region a few tens of million years after the major collision (c.a. 630 Ma, probably due to the interplay between local active extensional tectonics and the distal effects of the continued amalgamation of plates and terranes at the margins of the still-forming Gondwana Plate. Preliminary paleostress data from the Castro Basin and published data from the Itajaí Basin suggest that these events had a regional nature.No Leste da América do Sul, um conjunto de bacias sedimentares que afloram do sul do Uruguai ao sudeste do Brasil formou-se após os eventos colisionais da Orogenia Brasiliana, registrando os eventos tectônicos que afetaram a região a partir do Mesoediacarano. O problema da distinção entre a tectônica formadora das bacias e os eventos deformacionais posteriores é aqui abordado através da análise de paleotensões de mais de 600 dados de falhas com estrias, obtidos principalmente na Bacia Camaquã (Sul do Brasil, que foram classificados por nível estratigráfico e relações de corte entre estrias sobrepostas, e intergrados a dados estratigráficos e geocronológicos disponíveis. Nossos resultados revelam que a Bacia Camaqu

  14. New insights into the distribution and evolution of the Cenozoic Tan-Lu Fault Zone in the Liaohe sub-basin of the Bohai Bay Basin, eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lei; Liu, Chi-yang; Xu, Chang-gui; Wu, Kui; Wang, Guang-yuan; Jia, Nan

    2018-01-01

    As the largest strike-slip fault system in eastern China, the northeast-trending Tan-Lu Fault Zone (TLFZ) is a significant tectonic element contributing to the Mesozoic-Cenozoic regional geologic evolution of eastern Asia, as well as to the formation of ore deposits and oilfields. Because of the paucity of data, its distribution and evolutionary history in the offshore Liaohe sub-basin of the northern Bohai Bay Basin (BBB) are still poorly understood. Investigations of the strike-slip fault system in the western portion of the offshore Liaohe sub-basin via new seismic data provide us with new insights into the characteristics of the Cenozoic TLFZ. Results of this study show that Cenozoic dextral strike-slip faults occurred near the center of the Liaoxi graben in the offshore Liaohe sub-basin; these strike-slip faults connect with their counterparts to the north, the western part of the onshore Liaohe sub-basin, and have similar characteristics to those in other areas of the BBB in terms of kinematics, evolutionary history, and distribution; consequently, these faults are considered as the western branch of the TLFZ. All strike-slip faults within the Liaoxi graben merge at depth with a central subvertical basement fault induced by the reactivation of a pre-existing strike-slip basement fault, the pre-Cenozoic TLFZ. Data suggest that the TLFZ across the whole Liaohe sub-basin comprises two branches and that the Cenozoic distribution of this system was inherited from the pre-Cenozoic TLFZ. This characteristic distribution might be possessed by the whole TLFZ, thus the new understandings about the distribution and evolutionary model of the TLFZ in this study can be inferred in many research fields along the whole fault zone, such as regional geology, ore deposits, petroleum exploration and earthquake hazard.

  15. Fault kinematics and active tectonics at the southeastern boundary of the eastern Alborz (Abr and Khij fault zones): Geodynamic implications for NNE Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javidfakhr, Bita; Bellier, Olivier; Shabanian, Esmaeil; Siame, Lionel; Léanni, Laëtitia; Bourlès, Didier; Ahmadian, Seiran

    2011-10-01

    The Alborz is a region of active deformation within the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone. The Abr and the Khij Faults are two NE-trending left-lateral strike-slip faults in the eastern Alborz that correspond to the Shahrud fault system extended through an area of about 95 km × 55 km. Tectonic landforms typically associated with active strike-slip faults, such as deflected stream channels, offset ridges and fault scarps are documented along the mentioned faults. Detailed analyses of satellite images and digital topographic data accompanied by field surveys allowed us to measure horizontal offsets of about 420 ± 50 m and 400 ± 50 m for the Abr and Khij Faults, respectively. A total of 8 quartz-rich samples were sampled and dated from two different fan surfaces using in situ-produced 10Be cosmogenic dating method. Minimum exposure ages for the abandonment of the alluvial fan surfaces of 115 ± 14 kyr along the Abr Fault and of 230 ± 16 kyr along the Khij Fault imply that both faults are active with slip rates of about 3-4 mm yr -1 and 1-3 mm yr -1, respectively. The results of our study provide the first direct quantitative geological estimates of slip rate along these two active faults and place a new constraint on slip distribution between the faults in the eastern Alborz. Fault kinematic studies (from fault slip data) indicate a N35°E-trending maximum stress axis comprising a dominant strike-slip regime in agreement with the geomorphological analyses. The left-lateral strike-slip faulting along the Abr and Khij Faults and their associated fault zones in the eastern Alborz can be due to the westward component of motion of the South Caspian Basin with respect to Eurasia and Central Iran.

  16. Inversion of the moment-tensor Mrr components of the 2012 Sumatra strike-slip double earthquake using radial normal modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zábranová, Eliška; Matyska, Ctirad

    2017-01-01

    On April 11, 2012, two strike-slip Sumatra earthquakes with moment magnitudes higher than 8 generated strong, preferentially horizontal, motions. If only body and surface waves are inverted, their centroid-moment-tensor (CMT) parameters producing vertical motions, in particular the Mrr components, are poorly resolved. Independent constraints can be obtained from observations of the radial free-oscillation modes. The signal of radial modes is acquired from four unperturbed superconducting gravimeter records with low noise levels in submillihertz frequency range. We show that the observed signal substantially differs from the synthetic calculations for most of the published CMTs except for the Global CMT solution, which agrees better. We perform modal inversions considering uncertainties in centroid times and calculate marginal posterior probability density function of the Mrr components. The amplitude-spectrum inversion is robust enough to estimate the intervals of admissible Mrr values. Finally, we incorporate also a phase information and reduce the trade-off between the Mrr components of the two studied events.

  17. Fault slip rates from three-dimensional models of the Los Angeles metropolitan area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Michele L.; Marshall, Scott T.

    2006-11-01

    We present results from the first mechanical model of active tectonics in the Los Angeles region to use non-planar, geologically representative fault surfaces compiled by the Southern California Earthquake Center Community Fault Model. The fault slip rates from our three-dimensional model match well the available geologic slip rates. Discrepancies in reverse slip along the Upper Elysian Park fault and strike-slip along the Raymond fault may reflect imprecise knowledge of local fault geometry. Discrepancy in the average dip slip rate along the Palos Verdes fault reveals variations in dip slip along that surface; model predictions at the location of the geological investigation have good match to geologic data. The validated model is used to estimate dip and strike slip rates for 26 active faults in the Los Angeles metropolitan region, many of which are otherwise unconstrained by geologic evidence.

  18. Fethiye-Burdur Fault Zone (SW Turkey): a myth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaymakci, Nuretdin; Langereis, Cornelis; Özkaptan, Murat; Özacar, Arda A.; Gülyüz, Erhan; Uzel, Bora; Sözbilir, Hasan

    2017-04-01

    Fethiye Burdur Fault Zone (FBFZ) is first proposed by Dumont et al. (1979) as a sinistral strike-slip fault zone as the NE continuation of Pliny-Strabo trench in to the Anatolian Block. The fault zone supposed to accommodate at least 100 km sinistral displacement between the Menderes Massif and the Beydaǧları platform during the exhumation of the Menderes Massif, mainly during the late Miocene. Based on GPS velocities Barka and Reilinger (1997) proposed that the fault zone is still active and accommodates sinistral displacement. In order to test the presence and to unravel its kinematics we have conducted a rigorous paleomagnetic study containing more than 3000 paleomagnetic samples collected from 88 locations and 11700 fault slip data collected from 198 locations distributed evenly all over SW Anatolia spanning from Middle Miocene to Late Pliocene. The obtained rotation senses and amounts indicate slight (around 20°) counter-clockwise rotations distributed uniformly almost whole SW Anatolia and there is no change in the rotation senses and amounts on either side of the FBFZ implying no differential rotation within the zone. Additionally, the slickenside pitches and constructed paleostress configurations, along the so called FBFZ and also within the 300 km diameter of the proposed fault zone, indicated that almost all the faults, oriented parallel to subparallel to the zone, are normal in character. The fault slip measurements are also consistent with earthquake focal mechanisms suggesting active extension in the region. We have not encountered any significant strike-slip motion in the region to support presence and transcurrent nature of the FBFZ. On the contrary, the region is dominated by extensional deformation and strike-slip components are observed only on the NW-SE striking faults which are transfer faults that accommodated extension and normal motion. Therefore, we claim that the sinistral Fethiye Burdur Fault (Zone) is a myth and there is no tangible

  19. Slip distribution of the 2015 Lefkada earthquake and its implications for fault segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bie, Lidong; González, Pablo J.; Rietbrock, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    It is widely accepted that fault segmentation limits earthquake rupture propagations and therefore earthquake size. While along-strike segmentation of continental strike-slip faults is well observed, direct evidence for segmentation of off-shore strike-slip faults is rare. A comparison of rupture behaviours in multiple earthquakes might help reveal the characteristics of fault segmentation. In this work, we study the 2015 Lefkada earthquake, which ruptured a major active strike slip fault offshore Lefkada Island, Greece. We report ground deformation mainly on the Lefkada Island measured by interferometric synthetic radar (InSAR), and infer a coseismic distributed slip model. To investigate how the fault location affects the inferred displacement based on our InSAR observations, we conduct a suite of inversions by taking various fault location from different studies as a prior. The result of these test inversions suggests that the Lefkada fault trace is located just offshore Lefkada Island. Our preferred model shows that the 2015 earthquake main slip patches are confined to shallow depth (Lefkada fault, we suggest that the 2015 earthquake closed the seismic gap, at least partially, left by the 2003 earthquake by rupturing the shallow part of the Lefkada fault. The spatial variation in slip distributions for the two earthquakes reveals segmentation along strike, and possibly downdip of the Lefkada fault. A comparison of aftershock locations and coseismic slip distribution shows that most aftershocks appear near the edge of main coseismic slip patches.

  20. Pore fluid chemistry of the North Anatolian Fault Zone in the Sea of Marmara: A diversity of sources and processes

    OpenAIRE

    Tryon, M. D.; Henry, P.; Cagatay, M. N.; Zitter, T. A. C.; Geli, Louis; Gasperini, L.; Burnard, P.; Bourlange, S.; Grall, Celine

    2010-01-01

    As part of the 2007 Marnaut cruise in the Sea of Marmara, an investigation of the pore fluid chemistry of sites along the Main Marmara Fault zone was conducted. The goal was to define the spatial relationship between active faults and fluid outlets and to determine the sources and evolution of the fluids. Sites included basin bounding transtensional faults and strike-slip faults cutting through the topographic highs. The basin pore fluids are dominated by simple mixing of bottom water with a ...

  1. Constraints on the rheology of the lower crust in a strike-slip plate boundary: evidence from the San Quintín xenoliths, Baja California, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Werf, Thomas; Chatzaras, Vasileios; Marcel Kriegsman, Leo; Kronenberg, Andreas; Tikoff, Basil; Drury, Martyn R.

    2017-12-01

    The rheology of lower crust and its transient behavior in active strike-slip plate boundaries remain poorly understood. To address this issue, we analyzed a suite of granulite and lherzolite xenoliths from the upper Pleistocene-Holocene San Quintín volcanic field of northern Baja California, Mexico. The San Quintín volcanic field is located 20 km east of the Baja California shear zone, which accommodates the relative movement between the Pacific plate and Baja California microplate. The development of a strong foliation in both the mafic granulites and lherzolites, suggests that a lithospheric-scale shear zone exists beneath the San Quintín volcanic field. Combining microstructural observations, geothermometry, and phase equilibria modeling, we estimated that crystal-plastic deformation took place at temperatures of 750-890 °C and pressures of 400-560 MPa, corresponding to 15-22 km depth. A hot crustal geotherm of 40 ° C km-1 is required to explain the estimated deformation conditions. Infrared spectroscopy shows that plagioclase in the mafic granulites is relatively dry. Microstructures are interpreted to show that deformation in both the uppermost lower crust and upper mantle was accommodated by a combination of dislocation creep and grain-size-sensitive creep. Recrystallized grain size paleopiezometry yields low differential stresses of 12-33 and 17 MPa for plagioclase and olivine, respectively. The lower range of stresses (12-17 MPa) in the mafic granulite and lherzolite xenoliths is interpreted to be associated with transient deformation under decreasing stress conditions, following an event of stress increase. Using flow laws for dry plagioclase, we estimated a low viscosity of 1.1-1.3×1020 Pa ṡ s for the high temperature conditions (890 °C) in the lower crust. Significantly lower viscosities in the range of 1016-1019 Pa ṡ s, were estimated using flow laws for wet plagioclase. The shallow upper mantle has a low viscosity of 5.7×1019 Pa ṡ s

  2. Influence of fault asymmetric dislocation on the gravity changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan Hurong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A fault is a planar fracture or discontinuity in a volume of rock, across which there has been significant displacement along the fractures as a result of earth movement. Large faults within the Earth’s crust result from the action of plate tectonic forces, with the largest forming the boundaries between the plates, energy release associated with rapid movement on active faults is the cause of most earthquakes. The relationship between unevenness dislocation and gravity changes was studied on the theoretical thought of differential fault. Simulated observation values were adopted to deduce the gravity changes with the model of asymmetric fault and the model of Okada, respectively. The characteristic of unevennes fault momentum distribution is from two end points to middle by 0 according to a certain continuous functional increase. However, the fault momentum distribution in the fault length range is a constant when the Okada model is adopted. Numerical simulation experiments for the activities of the strike-slip fault, dip-slip fault and extension fault were carried out, respectively, to find that both the gravity contours and the gravity variation values are consistent when either of the two models is adopted. The apparent difference lies in that the values at the end points are 17. 97% for the strike-slip fault, 25. 58% for the dip-slip fault, and 24. 73% for the extension fault.

  3. Identification of Lembang fault, West-Java Indonesia by using controlled source audio-magnetotelluric (CSAMT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanny, Teuku A.

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this study is to determine boundary and how to know surrounding area between Lembang Fault and Cimandiri fault. For the detailed study we used three methodologies: (1). Surface deformation modeling by using Boundary Element method and (2) Controlled Source Audiomagneto Telluric (CSAMT). Based on the study by using surface deformation by using Boundary Element Methods (BEM), the direction Lembang fault has a dominant displacement in east direction. The eastward displacement at the nothern fault block is smaller than the eastward displacement at the southern fault block which indicates that each fault block move in left direction relative to each other. From this study we know that Lembang fault in this area has left lateral strike slip component. The western part of the Lembang fault move in west direction different from the eastern part that moves in east direction. Stress distribution map of Lembang fault shows difference between the eastern and western segments of Lembang fault. Displacement distribution map along x-direction and y-direction of Lembang fault shows a linement oriented in northeast-southwest direction right on Tangkuban Perahu Mountain. Displacement pattern of Cimandiri fault indicates that the Cimandiri fault is devided into two segment. Eastern segment has left lateral strike slip component while the western segment has right lateral strike slip component. Based on the displacement distribution map along y-direction, a linement oriented in northwest-southeast direction is observed at the western segment of the Cimandiri fault. The displacement along x-direction and y-direction between the Lembang and Cimandiri fault is nearly equal to zero indicating that the Lembang fault and Cimandiri Fault are not connected to each others. Based on refraction seismic tomography that we know the characteristic of Cimandiri fault as normal fault. Based on CSAMT method th e lembang fault is normal fault that different of dip which formed as

  4. Basement Fault Reactivation by Fluid Injection into Sedimentary Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Eichhubl; Fan, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Cheng

    2017-04-01

    Many suspected injection-induced earthquakes occur in crystalline basement rather than in the overlying sedimentary injection reservoir. To address why earthquakes nucleate in the basement rather than the injection layer we investigate the relationship between pore pressure diffusion, rock matrix deformation, and induced fault reactivation through 3D fully coupled poroelastic finite element models. These models simulate the temporal and spatial perturbation of pore pressure and solid stresses within a basement fault that extends into overlying sedimentary layers and that is conductive for flow along the fault but a barrier for flow across. We compare the effects of direct pore pressure communication and indirect poroelastic stress transfer from the injection reservoir to the fault on increasing the Coulomb failure stress that could reactivate the basement fault for normal, reverse, and strike-slip faulting stress regimes. Our numerical results demonstrate that volumetric expansion of the reservoir causes a bending of the fault near the injector and induces shear tractions along the downdip direction of the fault in the basement. These induced shear tractions act to increase the Coulomb failure stress for a normal faulting stress regime, and decrease the Coulomb failure stress for a reverse faulting regime. For a strike-slip faulting stress regime, the induced shear tractions increase the Coulomb failure stress both in the reservoir and basement. The induced normal traction on the fault reduces the Coulomb failure stress in all three tectonic regimes, but is larger in the reservoir than in the basement due to the more pronounced poroelastic effect in the reservoir. As a result, strike-slip stress regimes favor fault reactivation in the basement. Whereas the magnitude of the direct pore pressure increase exceeds the magnitude of induced poroelastic stress change, the poroelastic stress change increases the Coulomb failure stress in the basement fault for the normal

  5. New insights on Southern Coyote Creek Fault and Superstition Hills Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zandt, A. J.; Mellors, R. J.; Rockwell, T. K.; Burgess, M. K.; O'Hare, M.

    2007-12-01

    Recent field work has confirmed an extension of the southern Coyote Creek (CCF) branch of the San Jacinto fault in the western Salton trough. The fault marks the western edge of an area of subsidence caused by groundwater extraction, and field measurements suggest that recent strike-slip motion has occurred on this fault as well. We attempt to determine whether this fault connects at depth with the Superstition Hills fault (SHF) to the southeast by modeling observed surface deformation between the two faults measured by InSAR. Stacked ERS (descending) InSAR data from 1992 to 2000 is initially modeled using a finite fault in an elastic half-space. Observed deformation along the SHF and Elmore Ranch fault is modeled assuming shallow (< 5 km) creep. We test various models to explain surface deformation between the two faults.

  6. Faults

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Through the study of faults and their effects, much can be learned about the size and recurrence intervals of earthquakes. Faults also teach us about crustal...

  7. Map and Database of Probable and Possible Quaternary Faults in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruleman, C.A.; Crone, A.J.; Machette, M.N.; Haller, K.M.; Rukstales, K.S.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) with support from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) mission in Afghanistan, has prepared a digital map showing the distribution of probable and suspected Quaternary faults in Afghanistan. This map is a key component of a broader effort to assess and map the country's seismic hazards. Our analyses of remote-sensing imagery reveal a complex array of tectonic features that we interpret to be probable and possible active faults within the country and in the surrounding border region. In our compilation, we have mapped previously recognized active faults in greater detail, and have categorized individual features based on their geomorphic expression. We assigned mapped features to eight newly defined domains, each of which contains features that appear to have similar styles of deformation. The styles of deformation associated with each domain provide insight into the kinematics of the modern tectonism, and define a tectonic framework that helps constrain deformational models of the Alpine-Himalayan orogenic belt. The modern fault movements, deformation, and earthquakes in Afghanistan are driven by the collision between the northward-moving Indian subcontinent and Eurasia. The patterns of probable and possible Quaternary faults generally show that much of the modern tectonic activity is related to transfer of plate-boundary deformation across the country. The left-lateral, strike-slip Chaman fault in southeastern Afghanistan probably has the highest slip rate of any fault in the country; to the north, this slip is distributed onto several fault systems. At the southern margin of the Kabul block, the style of faulting changes from mainly strike-slip motion associated with the boundary between the Indian and Eurasian plates, to transpressional and transtensional faulting. North and northeast of the Kabul block, we recognized a complex pattern of potentially active strike-slip, thrust, and normal faults that form a

  8. Constraints from Mesozoic siliciclastic cover rocks and satellite image analysis on the slip history of regional E-W faults in the southeast Western Desert, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewksbury, Barbara J.; Mehrtens, Charlotte J.; Gohlke, Steven A.; Tarabees, Elhamy A.; Hogan, John P.

    2017-12-01

    In the southeast Western Desert of Egypt, a prominent set of E-W faults and co-located domes and basins involve sedimentary cover rock as young as the early Eocene. Although earlier Mesozoic slip on faults in southern Egypt has been widely mentioned in the literature and attributed to repeated reactivation of basement faults, evidence is indirect and based on the idea that regional stresses associated with tectonic events in the Syrian Arc would likely have reactivated basement faults in south Egypt in dextral strike slip during the Mesozoic as well as the Cenozoic. Here, we present direct evidence from the rock record for the sequence of development of features along these faults. Southwest of Aswan, a small structural dome in Mesozoic Nubia facies rocks occurs where the Seiyal Fault bends northward from west to east. The dome is cut by strands of the Seiyal Fault and a related set of cataclastic deformation bands showing dominantly right lateral strike slip, as well as by younger calcite veins with related patchy poikilotopic cement. High resolution satellite image analysis of the remote southwest Kharga Valley shows a similar sequence of events: older structural domes and basins located where E-W faults bend northward from west to east, right lateral offset of domes and basins along the E-W faults, and two sets of deformation band faults that lack co-located domes and basins. We suggest that field data, image analysis, and burial depth estimates are best explained by diachronous development of features along the E-W fault system. We propose that Late Mesozoic right lateral strike slip produced domes and basins in Nubia facies rocks in stepover regions above reactivated basement faults. We further suggest that the extensively linked segments of the E-W fault system in Nubia facies rocks, plus the deformation band systems, formed during the late Eocene when basement faults were again reactivated in dominantly right lateral strike slip.

  9. The Quaternary Silver Creek Fault Beneath the Santa Clara Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentworth, Carl M.; Williams, Robert A.; Jachens, Robert C.; Graymer, Russell W.; Stephenson, William J.

    2010-01-01

    The northwest-trending Silver Creek Fault is a 40-km-long strike-slip fault in the eastern Santa Clara Valley, California, that has exhibited different behaviors within a changing San Andreas Fault system over the past 10-15 Ma. Quaternary alluvium several hundred meters thick that buries the northern half of the Silver Creek Fault, and that has been sampled by drilling and imaged in a detailed seismic reflection profile, provides a record of the Quaternary history of the fault. We assemble evidence from areal geology, stratigraphy, paleomagnetics, ground-water hydrology, potential-field geophysics, and reflection and earthquake seismology to determine the long history of the fault in order to evaluate its current behavior. The fault formed in the Miocene more than 100 km to the southeast, as the southwestern fault in a 5-km-wide right step to the Hayward Fault, within which the 40-km-long Evergreen pull-apart basin formed. Later, this basin was obliquely cut by the newly recognized Mt. Misery Fault to form a more direct connection to the Hayward Fault, although continued growth of the basin was sufficient to accommodate at least some late Pliocene alluvium. Large offset along the San Andreas-Calaveras-Mt Misery-Hayward Faults carried the basin northwestward almost to its present position when, about 2 Ma, the fault system was reorganized. This led to near abandonment of the faults bounding the pull-apart basin in favor of right slip extending the Calaveras Fault farther north before stepping west to the Hayward Fault, as it does today. Despite these changes, the Silver Creek Fault experienced a further 200 m of dip slip in the early Quaternary, from which we infer an associated 1.6 km or so of right slip, based on the ratio of the 40-km length of the strike-slip fault to a 5-km depth of the Evergreen Basin. This dip slip ends at a mid-Quaternary unconformity, above which the upper 300 m of alluvial cover exhibits a structural sag at the fault that we interpret as

  10. Tectonic and gravity-induced deformation along the active Talas-Fergana Fault, Tien Shan, Kyrgyzstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibaldi, A.; Corazzato, C.; Rust, D.; Bonali, F. L.; Pasquarè Mariotto, F. A.; Korzhenkov, A. M.; Oppizzi, P.; Bonzanigo, L.

    2015-08-01

    This paper shows, by field palaeoseismological data, the Holocene activity of the central segment of the intracontinental Talas-Fergana Fault (TFF), and the relevance of possible future seismic shaking on slope stability around a large water reservoir. The fault, striking NW-SE, is marked by a continuous series of scarps, deflected streams and water divides, and prehistoric earthquakes that offset substrate and Holocene deposits. Fault movements are characterised by right-lateral strike-slip kinematics with a subordinate component of uplift of the NE block. Structural, geological and geomorphological field data indicate that shallow and deep landslides are aligned along the TFF, and some of them are active. Where the TFF runs close to the reservoir, the fault trace is obscured by a series of landslides, affecting rock and soil materials and ranging in size from small slope instabilities to deep-seated gravity-induced slope deformations (DGSDs). The largest of these, which does not show clear evidence of present-day activity, involves a volume of about 1 km3 and is associated with smaller but active landslides in its lower part, with volumes in the order of 2.5 × 104 m3 to 1 × 106 m3. Based on the spatial and temporal relations between landslides and faults, we argue that at least some of these slope failures may have a coseismic character. Stability analyses by means of limit equilibrium methods (LEMs), and stress-strain analysis by finite difference numerical modelling (FDM), were carried out to evaluate different hazard scenarios linked to these slope instabilities. The results indicate concern for the different threats posed, ranging from the possible disruption of the M-41 highway, the main transportation route in central Asia, to the possible collapse of huge rock masses into the reservoir, possibly generating a tsunami.

  11. Westward extension of the Levantine Basin to the Eratosthenes Seamount and the Cyprus Arc - no evidence for strike-slip motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimke, Jennifer; Ehrhardt, Axel

    2013-04-01

    The Eastern Mediterranean represents a complex pattern of micro plates. A side by side distribution of diverse tectonic situations like collision, subduction, obduction and shear makes this area a very interesting spot on earth. Whereas subduction of Neo-Tethys oceanic crust is still ongoing at the Hellenic Arc, a collision occurred eastward when the Eratosthenes Seamount (ESM) entered the Cyprus Arc. If subduction is still active further east towards the Syrian coast remains unclear. The collision related deformation of the ESM and the adjacent Levantine Basin will be discussed in this paper. We present a new set of 2D multichannel seismic data, acquired in 2010 with the RV Maria S Merian, which is a dense line grid with NW-SE and NE-SW trending profiles crossing the ESM and the western part of the Levantine Basin south of Cyprus. We show first results of the profiles that were processed up to Pre-Stack Depth Migration. Based on the dense line grid with distances of not more than 5 nautical miles, we picked the key horizons in the Levantine Basin and generated reliable 3D-grids of the horizons. With this dense line grid, it was possible to trace the western extension of the Levantine Basin sometimes also referred to as Baltim Hecataeus Line (BHL), which is a fault lineament of Mesozoic age separating the Levantine Basin from the ESM. This extension is observed on every NW-SE and NE-SW trending profile and we were able to trace it even further north and south of the ESM. The BHL is believed to be reactivated as a linear sinistral transform fault that compensates the northward motion of the African-Arabian plate with respect to the blocked ESM. With our data we can show that the western extension of the Levantine Basin does not coincide with a sinistral transform fault and that it is rather a normal fault with a meandering NNE-SSW trending strike.

  12. Connecting slow earthquakes to huge earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Kazushige; Kato, Aitaro

    2016-07-15

    Slow earthquakes are characterized by a wide spectrum of fault slip behaviors and seismic radiation patterns that differ from those of traditional earthquakes. However, slow earthquakes and huge megathrust earthquakes can have common slip mechanisms and are located in neighboring regions of the seismogenic zone. The frequent occurrence of slow earthquakes may help to reveal the physics underlying megathrust events as useful analogs. Slow earthquakes may function as stress meters because of their high sensitivity to stress changes in the seismogenic zone. Episodic stress transfer to megathrust source faults leads to an increased probability of triggering huge earthquakes if the adjacent locked region is critically loaded. Careful and precise monitoring of slow earthquakes may provide new information on the likelihood of impending huge earthquakes. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. Constraining Basin Geometry and Fault Kinematics on the Santo Tomas Segment of the Agua Blanca Fault Through a Combined Geophysical and Structural Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, A.; Wetmore, P.; Fletcher, J.; Connor, C. B.; Callihan, S.; Beeson, J.; Wilson, J.

    2008-12-01

    The Santo Tomas basin, located in northern Baja California, formed at a right step in the dextral Agua Blanca fault (ABF). The ABF extends for more than 120km east from Punta Banda, with an east-west strike, and represents the southernmost fault in the San Andreas system of faulting. The basin is located roughly 40km south of Ensenada where the Agua Blanca fault intersects the Maximos fault. A detailed geophysical analysis defines the basin geometry, and helps to constrain the distribution and offset of mapped and concealed faults. Geophysical and structural data sets are combined to constrain the kinematic evolution of the Santo Tomas basin, including determining the relative amount of dip-slip and strike-slip motion on basin-bounding faults. Gravity data was collected over seven transects across and along the axis of the basin at 500 meter intervals, with 200 meter intervals at locations of known or inferred faults. Magnetic data were taken over the same lines, and are used in conjunction with gravity data to constrain the locations, geometries and displacements of intrabasinal faults. The combined gravity and magnetic data are modeled using Geosoft Oasis montaj software to create 2 3/4D models along profiles across the study area. Modeling of the geophysical data combined with structural mapping indicates that the Santo Tomas basin is bound by two major strike-slip faults, the ABF on the northeastern side and the Maximos fault on south, Based on offset markers, most of the strike-slip motion appears to be concentrated on the ABF on the north side of the basin. The ABF fault is characterized by multiple subparallel fault strands that appear to coalesce into single strands to the northwest and southeast of the basin. The Maximos is characterized by a single strand throughout the basin and it exhibits a minor dip-slip component. Basin sediments thicken slightly against the Maximos fault to as much as 1km. A third fault, cutting across the basin southeast of the

  14. Kinematics of the East Anatolian Fault Zone between Turkoglu (Kahramanmaras) and Celikhan (Adiyaman), eastern Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, H.; Over, S.; Ozden, S.

    2006-11-01

    In this study we determined the stress regime acting along the East Anatolian Fault Zone between Turkoglu (Kahramanmaras) and Celikhan (Adiyaman), from the Neocene to present-day, based on the inversion of striations measured on faults and on the focal mechanisms of earthquakes having magnitudes greater than 5.0. The inversions yield a strike-slip stress regime with a reverse component (i.e., transpression) operative in the Neocene to present with a consistent N-to NW-trending σ1 axis 156 ± 11° and an E- to NE-trending σ3 axis, 67 ± 9°σ3, producing left-lateral motion along the East Anatolian Fault Zone. The inversions of focal mechanisms yield a strike-slip stress deviator characterized by an approximately N-S (N1°W)-trending σ1 and an approximately E-W (N89°E)-trending σ3 axis. Both the kinematic analysis and structural observations indicate that the stress regime operating in the study area has had a transpressional character, giving rise to the Mio-Pliocene compressive structures (reverse faults, thrusts and folds) observed in the study area. Field observations allow estimation of a Pliocene age for the strike-slip East Anatolian Fault Zone.

  15. Paleoseismic study of the South Lajas fault: First documentation of an onshore Holocene fault in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, C.S.; Mann, P.

    2005-01-01

    The island of Puerto Rico is located within the complex boundary between the North America and Caribbean plates. The relative motion along this boundary is dominantly left-lateral strike slip, but compression and extension are locally significant. Although tectonic models proposed for the region suggest the presence of onshore active faults in Puerto Rico, no faults with Holocene displacement have been documented on the island before this study. Current seismic hazard assessments primarily consider only the impact of distant, offshore seismic sources because onshore fault hazard is unknown. Our mapping and trenching studies demonstrate Holocene surface rupture on a previously undocumented fault in southwestern Puerto Rico. We excavated a trench across a scarp near the southern edge of the Lajas Valley that exposed a narrow fault zone disrupting alluvial deposits. Structural relations indicate valley-side-down fault slip, with a component of strike-slip motion. Radiocarbon analyses of organic material collected from the sediments suggest that the most recent surface rupture occurred during the past 5000 yr, but no minimum age has yet been established. This fault may be part of a larger fault zone that extends from the western end of the Lajas Valley toward Ponce, the second largest city in Puerto Rico. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  16. Huge intrathoracic desmoid tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Majdi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Desmoid tumors are soft-tissue neoplasms arising from fascial or musculo-aponeurotic structures. Most reported thoracic desmoid tumors originate from the chest wall. However, intrathoracic desmoid tumors are rare. We present a case of a 35-year-old male patient complaining of mild shortness of breath. The patient was diagnosed to have a huge intrathoracic desmoid tumor, which was successfully resected.

  17. Fracture density and spacing along Washita Valley fault, Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferebee, C.D.; Tapp, J.B. (Univ. of Tulsa, OK (USA))

    1989-08-01

    The authors document fracture density and spacing associated with the Washita Valley fault, a major strike-slip fault. The Washita Valley fault strikes northwest-southeast with up to 80 mi of exposure in southern Oklahoma and may be an early bounding fault of the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen (Ardmore/Marietta basins). Horizontal displacement on the fault has been estimated to be up to 40 mi, with vertical displacement on the order of 10,000 ft. Samples collected from traverses across the Washita Valley fault have been analyzed. The traverses cross the fault at different stratigraphic levels from Proterozoic igneous basement, through the Cambrian-Ordovician Arbuckle Group, Ordovician Simpson and Viola Groups, to the Silurian-Devonian Hunton Group. Several types of fracture systems are documented that reflect mechanical stratigraphy, burial depth during deformation, and episodic movement on the fault. The fractures in the study area include open fracture systems, calcite-filled fractures, tension gashes, and fractures related to pressure solution. The samples were cut parallel to the strike of the fault, vertical-normal to the fault, and horizontal-normal to the fault. These cuts allow examination of the total fracture strain, characterization of the fractures, and statistical analysis of fracture density. From these data, fracture density is shown to decrease exponentially moving away from the primary fault zone. The increased understanding of fracture patterns and characteristics will assist future exploration and development programs involving carbonate reservoirs associated with strike-slip systems.

  18. Ductile bookshelf faulting: A new kinematic model for Cenozoic deformation in northern Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuza, A. V.; Yin, A.

    2013-12-01

    It has been long recognized that the most dominant features on the northern Tibetan Plateau are the >1000 km left-slip strike-slip faults (e.g., the Atyn Tagh, Kunlun, and Haiyuan faults). Early workers used the presence of these faults, especially the Kunlun and Haiyuan faults, as evidence for eastward lateral extrusion of the plateau, but their low documented offsets--100s of km or less--can not account for the 2500 km of convergence between India and Asia. Instead, these faults may result from north-south right-lateral simple shear due to the northward indentation of India, which leads to the clockwise rotation of the strike-slip faults and left-lateral slip (i.e., bookshelf faulting). With this idea, deformation is still localized on discrete fault planes, and 'microplates' or blocks rotate and/or translate with little internal deformation. As significant internal deformation occurs across northern Tibet within strike-slip-bounded domains, there is need for a coherent model to describe all of the deformational features. We also note the following: (1) geologic offsets and Quaternary slip rates of both the Kunlun and Haiyuan faults vary along strike and appear to diminish to the east, (2) the faults appear to kinematically link with thrust belts (e.g., Qilian Shan, Liupan Shan, Longmen Shan, and Qimen Tagh) and extensional zones (e.g., Shanxi, Yinchuan, and Qinling grabens), and (3) temporal relationships between the major deformation zones and the strike-slip faults (e.g., simultaneous enhanced deformation and offset in the Qilian Shan and Liupan Shan, and the Haiyuan fault, at 8 Ma). We propose a new kinematic model to describe the active deformation in northern Tibet: a ductile-bookshelf-faulting model. With this model, right-lateral simple shear leads to clockwise vertical axis rotation of the Qaidam and Qilian blocks, and left-slip faulting. This motion creates regions of compression and extension, dependent on the local boundary conditions (e.g., rigid

  19. Probabilistic Risk Assessment: Piping Fragility due to Earthquake Fault Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bu Seog Ju

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A lifeline system, serving as an energy-supply system, is an essential component of urban infrastructure. In a hospital, for example, the piping system supplies elements essential for hospital operations, such as water and fire-suppression foam. Such nonstructural components, especially piping systems and their subcomponents, must remain operational and functional during earthquake-induced fires. But the behavior of piping systems as subjected to seismic ground motions is very complex, owing particularly to the nonlinearity affected by the existence of many connections such as T-joints and elbows. The present study carried out a probabilistic risk assessment on a hospital fire-protection piping system’s acceleration-sensitive 2-inch T-joint sprinkler components under seismic ground motions. Specifically, the system’s seismic capacity, using an experimental-test-based nonlinear finite element (FE model, was evaluated for the probability of failure under different earthquake-fault mechanisms including normal fault, reverse fault, strike-slip fault, and near-source ground motions. It was observed that the probabilistic failure of the T-joint of the fire-protection piping system varied significantly according to the fault mechanisms. The normal-fault mechanism led to a higher probability of system failure at locations 1 and 2. The strike-slip fault mechanism, contrastingly, affected the lowest fragility of the piping system at a higher PGA.

  20. A Huge Thing

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    The fiction of the world is a huge thing because it is in Derrida's words ‘the only thing that can make it possible that I can live and have or let you live, enjoy or have or let you enjoy, to carry you for a few minutes without anything happening,’ in a movement of farewell without beginning, without mourning, with the irresistible force of a whirlpool, or a maelstrom: what Poe calls ‘the immense sweeps and swelters of the whirl.’ The maelstrom sweeps, it is an immense sweep, a sweeping away...

  1. Connecting slow earthquakes to huge earthquakes

    OpenAIRE

    Obara, Kazushige; Kato, Aitaro

    2016-01-01

    Slow earthquakes are characterized by a wide spectrum of fault slip behaviors and seismic radiation patterns that differ from those of traditional earthquakes. However, slow earthquakes and huge megathrust earthquakes can have common slip mechanisms and are located in neighboring regions of the seismogenic zone. The frequent occurrence of slow earthquakes may help to reveal the physics underlying megathrust events as useful analogs. Slow earthquakes may function as stress meters because of th...

  2. Moment tensors, state of stress and their relation to faulting processes in Gujarat, western India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Sandeep Kumar; Khan, Prosanta Kumar; Mohanty, Sarada Prasad; Roumelioti, Zafeiria

    2016-10-01

    Time domain moment tensor analysis of 145 earthquakes (Mw 3.2 to 5.1), occurring during the period 2006-2014 in Gujarat region, has been performed. The events are mainly confined in the Kachchh area demarcated by the Island belt and Kachchh Mainland faults to its north and south, and two transverse faults to its east and west. Libraries of Green's functions were established using the 1D velocity model of Kachchh, Saurashtra and Mainland Gujarat. Green's functions and broadband displacement waveforms filtered at low frequency (0.5-0.8 Hz) were inverted to determine the moment tensor solutions. The estimated solutions were rigorously tested through number of iterations at different source depths for finding reliable source locations. The identified heterogeneous nature of the stress fields in the Kachchh area allowed us to divide this into four Zones 1-4. The stress inversion results indicate that the Zone 1 is dominated with radial compression, Zone 2 with strike-slip compression, and Zones 3 and 4 with strike-slip extensions. The analysis further shows that the epicentral region of 2001 MW 7.7 Bhuj mainshock, located at the junction of Zones 2, 3 and 4, was associated with predominant compressional stress and strike-slip motion along ∼ NNE-SSW striking fault on the western margin of the Wagad uplift. Other tectonically active parts of Gujarat (e.g. Jamnagar, Talala and Mainland) show earthquake activities are dominantly associated with strike-slip extension/compression faulting. Stress inversion analysis shows that the maximum compressive stress axes (σ1) are vertical for both the Jamnagar and Talala regions and horizontal for the Mainland Gujarat. These stress regimes are distinctly different from those of the Kachchh region.

  3. Late Pleistocene dip-slip faulting along the Dunajec Fault, West Carpathians: Insights from alluvial sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszak, Janusz

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents vertical movement along the Dunajec Fault during the Late Pleistocene and suggests Quaternary tectonic reactivation of diagonal strike-slip faults and their transformation into dip-slip faults in the West Carpathians. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of Pleistocene alluvial sediments of the Dunajec and the Ochotnica rivers was employed to determine the time range of deposition of these sediments. Vertical and spatial distribution of the obtained OSL ages imply that the alluvial sediments were affected by the Dunajec Fault, which appears to have acted as a scissor fault during the Late Pleistocene. The results contribute to the discussion on the recent evolution of the Carpathians, and may support the concept of extensional collapse of the orogen.

  4. The Cottage Grove fault system (Illinois Basin): Late Paleozoic transpression along a Precambrian crustal boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchek, A.B.; McBride, J.H.; Nelson, W.J.; Leetaru, H.E.

    2004-01-01

    The Cottage Grove fault system in southern Illinois has long been interpreted as an intracratonic dextral strike-slip fault system. We investigated its structural geometry and kinematics in detail using (1) outcrop data, (2) extensive exposures in underground coal mines, (3) abundant borehole data, and (4) a network of industry seismic reflection profiles, including data reprocessed by us. Structural contour mapping delineates distinct monoclines, broad anticlines, and synclines that express Paleozoic-age deformation associated with strike slip along the fault system. As shown on seismic reflection profiles, prominent near-vertical faults that cut the entire Paleozoic section and basement-cover contact branch upward into outward-splaying, high-angle reverse faults. The master fault, sinuous along strike, is characterized along its length by an elongate anticline, ???3 km wide, that parallels the southern side of the master fault. These features signify that the overall kinematic regime was transpressional. Due to the absence of suitable piercing points, the amount of slip cannot be measured, but is constrained at less than 300 m near the ground surface. The Cottage Grove fault system apparently follows a Precambrian terrane boundary, as suggested by magnetic intensity data, the distribution of ultramafic igneous intrusions, and patterns of earthquake activity. The fault system was primarily active during the Alleghanian orogeny of Late Pennsylvanian and Early Permian time, when ultramatic igneous magma intruded along en echelon tensional fractures. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  5. High-resolution seismic profiling reveals faulting associated with the 1934 Ms 6.6 Hansel Valley earthquake (Utah, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Pier Paolo G.; Duross, Christopher; Kokkalas, Sotirios

    2017-01-01

    The 1934 Ms 6.6 Hansel Valley, Utah, earthquake produced an 8-km-long by 3-km-wide zone of north-south−trending surface deformation in an extensional basin within the easternmost Basin and Range Province. Less than 0.5 m of purely vertical displacement was measured at the surface, although seismologic data suggest mostly strike-slip faulting at depth. Characterization of the origin and kinematics of faulting in the Hansel Valley earthquake is important to understand how complex fault ruptures accommodate regions of continental extension and transtension. Here, we address three questions: (1) How does the 1934 surface rupture compare with faults in the subsurface? (2) Are the 1934 fault scarps tectonic or secondary features? (3) Did the 1934 earthquake have components of both strike-slip and dip-slip motion? To address these questions, we acquired a 6.6-km-long, high-resolution seismic profile across Hansel Valley, including the 1934 ruptures. We observed numerous east- and west-dipping normal faults that dip 40°−70° and offset late Quaternary strata from within a few tens of meters of the surface down to a depth of ∼1 km. Spatial correspondence between the 1934 surface ruptures and subsurface faults suggests that ruptures associated with the earthquake are of tectonic origin. Our data clearly show complex basin faulting that is most consistent with transtensional tectonics. Although the kinematics of the 1934 earthquake remain underconstrained, we interpret the disagreement between surface (normal) and subsurface (strike-slip) kinematics as due to slip partitioning during fault propagation and to the effect of preexisting structural complexities. We infer that the 1934 earthquake occurred along an ∼3-km wide, off-fault damage zone characterized by distributed deformation along small-displacement faults that may be alternatively activated during different earthquake episodes.

  6. Paleomagnetic, structural, and stratigraphic constraints on transverse fault kinematics during basin inversion: The Pamplona Fault (Pyrenees, north Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    LarrasoañA, Juan Cruz; ParéS, Josep MaríA.; MilláN, HéCtor; Del Valle, JoaquíN.; Pueyo, Emilio Luis

    2003-12-01

    The Pamplona Fault in the Pyrenees is a major transverse structure that has been classically interpreted as a strike-slip fault. However, lack of consensus concerning the sense of movement casts doubt on its actual kinematics and, as a consequence, its role in the Cenozoic evolution of the Pyrenees remains controversial. In order to assess its kinematics, we have conducted a paleomagnetic, structural, and stratigraphic study focused on the Mesozoic and Tertiary sedimentary rocks that outcrop around the southern segment of the fault. Restoration of balanced cross sections allows us to examine the present-day spatial relationship of the sedimentary sequences on both sides of the fault and to reconstruct the geometry of the extensional basins formed during Mesozoic rifting episodes in the Bay of Biscay and Pyrenean domains. Paleomagnetic results indicate that no significant tectonic rotations occurred around the fault during Tertiary inversion of the Pyrenees. The lack of tectonic rotations and revaluation of previous hypotheses argues against a strike-slip movement of the fault. We propose a new model in which the Pamplona Fault is treated as a large-scale "hanging wall drop" fault whose kinematics was determined by variations in the geometry and thickness of Mesozoic sequences on both sides of the fault. These variations influenced the geometry of the thrust sheet developed during Tertiary compression. We are unaware of any other transverse fault that has been interpreted in this fashion; thus the Pamplona Fault serves as a case study for the evolution of transverse faults involved in basin inversion processes.

  7. Local Stress fields and paleo-fluid distribution within a transtensional duplex: An example from the northern termination of the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Flores, P.; Cembrano, J. M.; Sanchez-Alfaro, P.

    2014-12-01

    The northern termination of Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System (LOFS) is characterized by major NNE-striking dextral strike-slip faults and several second and third-order NE-to-ENE-striking oblique-slip faults. This geometry forms a transtensional duplex structure. The LOFS has a complex crosscutting relationship with inherited NW-striking structures of the Arc-oblique long-lived Fault System (ALFS). We conducted a structural mapping of fault and vein populations at key structural sites representative of each regional structural system. Field observations were combined with different methods of inversion of fault-slip heterogeneous data and with the use of different open-source computer programs that calculate resolved stress tensors and P-T axes for each structural site in order to unravel the significance of this complex architecture. The results of the inversion of fault-slip analysis show that a transtensional strike-slip regime, with NE-SW-trending subhorizontal σ1, predominate in the first and second order faults in the northern termination of the duplex. A more local tensional regime was calculated for the same area. The inversion solutions are compatible with NE-trending subvertical veins system and dilational jogs and breccia. In contrast, within the central area of the duplex fault slip inversion of fault populations shows both transpressional and compressional regimes. The first tectonic regime is compatible with ENE-striking veins and dikes. In the southern part of the duplex, fault populations are compatible with either a local transtensional stress field with an ESE-trending subhorizontal σ1 or with a tensional regime with a SW-trending, steeply plunging σ1. Our results show the complexity in the nature and spatial distribution of stress fields within strike-slip duplexes and its role in the geometrical distribution of paleo-fluid flow, part of which may account for the reactivation of inherited faults or strain incompatibilities at fault intersections.

  8. Structural controls on Eocene to Pliocene tectonic and metallogenic evolution of the southernmost Lesser Caucasus, Armenia: paleostress field reconstruction and fault-slip analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovakimyan, Samvel; Moritz, Robert; Tayan, Rodrik

    2017-04-01

    The Cenozoic evolution of the central segment of the Tethyan belt is dominated by oblique convergence and final collision of Gondwana-derived terranes and the Arabian plate with Eurasia, which created a favorable setting for the formation of the highly mineralized Meghri-Ordubad pluton in the southernmost Lesser Caucasus. Regional strike-slip faults played an important role in the control of the porphyry Cu-Mo and epithermal systems hosted by the Meghri-Ordubad pluton. In this contribution we discuss the paleostress and the kinematic environment of the major strike-slip and oblique-slip ore-controlling faults throughout the Eocene subduction to Mio-Pliocene post-collisional tectonic evolution of the Meghri-Ordubad pluton based on detailed structural field mapping of the ore districts, stereonet compilation of ore-bearing fractures and vein orientations in the major porphyry and epithermal deposits, and the paleostress reconstructions. Paleostress reconstructions indicate that during the Eocene and Early Oligocene, the main paleostress axe orientations reveal a dominant NE-SW-oriented compression, which is compatible with the subduction geometry of the Neotethys along Eurasia. This tectonic setting was favorable for dextral displacements along the two major, regional NNW-oriented Khustup-Giratakh and Salvard-Ordubad strike-slip faults. This resulted in the formation of a NS-oriented transrotational basin, known as the Central magma and ore- controlling zone (Tayan, 1998). It caused a horizontal clockwise rotation of blocks. The EW-oriented faults separating the blocks formed as en-échelon antithetic faults (Voghji, Meghrasar, Bughakyar and Meghriget-Cav faults). The Central zone consists of a network of EW-oriented sinistral and NS-oriented subparallel strike-slip faults (Tashtun, Spetry, Tey, Meghriget and Terterasar faults). They are active since the Eocene and were reactivated during the entire tectonic evolution of the pluton, but with different behaviors

  9. Stress transfer to the Denali and other regional faults from the M 9.2 Alaska earthquake of 1964

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufe, C.G.

    2004-01-01

    Stress transfer from the great 1964 Prince William Sound earthquake is modeled on the Denali fault, including the Denali-Totschunda fault segments that ruptured in 2002, and on other regional fault systems where M 7.5 and larger earthquakes have occurred since 1900. The results indicate that analysis of Coulomb stress transfer from the dominant earthquake in a region is a potentially powerful tool in assessing time-varying earthquake hazard. Modeled Coulomb stress increases on the northern Denali and Totschunda faults from the great 1964 earthquake coincide with zones that ruptured in the 2002 Denali fault earthquake, although stress on the Susitna Glacier thrust plane, where the 2002 event initiated, was decreased. A southeasterlytrending Coulomb stress transect along the right-lateral Totschunda-Fairweather-Queen Charlotte trend shows stress transfer from the 1964 event advancing slip on the Totschunda, Fairweather, and Queen Charlotte segments, including the southern Fairweather segment that ruptured in 1972. Stress transfer retarding right-lateral strike slip was observed from the southern part of the Totschunda fault to the northern end of the Fairweather fault (1958 rupture). This region encompasses a gap with shallow thrust faulting but with little evidence of strike-slip faulting connecting the segments to the northwest and southeast. Stress transfer toward failure was computed on the north-south trending right-lateral strike-slip faults in the Gulf of Alaska that ruptured in 1987 and 1988, with inhibitory stress changes at the northern end of the northernmost (1987) rupture. The northern Denali and Totschunda faults, including the zones that ruptured in the 2002 earthquakes, follow very closely (within 3%), for about 90??, an arc of a circle of radius 375 km. The center of this circle is within a few kilometers of the intersection at depth of the Patton Bay fault with the Alaskan megathrust. This inferred asperity edge may be the pole of counterclockwise

  10. Large seismic faults in the Hellenic arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Papazachos

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Using information concerning reliable fault plane solutions, spatial distribution of strong earthquakes (Ms³ 6.0 as well as sea bottom and coastal topography, properties of the seismic faults (orientation, dimension, type of faulting were determined in seven shallow (h < 40 km seismogenic regions along the convex part of thc Hellenic arc (Hellenic trench and in four seismogenic regions of intermediate depth earthquakes (h = 40-100 km along the concave part of this arc. Except for the northwesternmost part of the Hellenic trench, where the strike-slip Cephalonia transform fault dominates, all other faults along this trench are low angle thrust faults. III thc western part of the trench (Zante-west Crete faults strike NW-SE and dip NE, while in its eastern part (east Crete-Rhodos faults strike WNW-ESE and dip NNE. Such system of faulting can be attributed to an overthrust of the Aegean lithosphere on the eastern Mediterranean lithosphere. The longest of these faults (L = 300 km is that which produced the largest known shallow earthquake in the Mediterranean area (21 July 365, Ms = 8.3 which is located near the southwestern coast of Crete. The second longest such fault (L = l 70 km is that which produced a large earthquake (December 1303, Ms = 8.0 in the easternmost part of the trench (east of Rhodos island. Both earthquakes were associated with gigantic tsunamis which caused extensive damage in the coast of many Eastern Mediterranean countries. Seismic faults of the intermediate depth earthquakes in the shallow part of the Benioff zone (h = 40- 100 km are of strike-slip type, with a thrust component. The orientations of these faults vary along the concave part of the arc in accordance with a subduction of remnants of all old lithospheric slab from the convex side (Mediterranean to the concave side (Aegean of thc Hellenic arc. The longest of these faults (L = 220 km is that which produced the largest known intermediate depth earthquake in the

  11. Rheological weakening of high-grade mylonites during low-temperature retrogression: The exhumed continental Ailao Shan-Red River fault zone, SE Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shuyun; Neubauer, Franz; Liu, Junlai; Bernroider, Manfred; Cheng, Xuemei; Li, Junyu; Yu, Zunpu; Genser, Johann

    2017-05-01

    We present a detailed case study of an exhumed continental strike-slip fault zone, the Ailao Shan-Red River (ASRR) strike-slip fault zone, to investigate how deformation promotes strain localization, and how the weak second phases and fluids trigger rheological weakening during retrogression near the ductile to brittle transition during exhumation. Along the ASRR strike-slip fault zone, in the Diancang Shan (DCS) metamorphic massif, high-temperature ductile deformation (D1) pervasively occurred during shearing and exhumation since late Oligocene. The high-temperature microstructures and textures are in part or entirely altered by subsequent low-temperature shearing (D2) since late Miocene, which is under the conditions of frictional-viscous transition of K-feldspar (ca. 450 °C) during further exhumation to the upper crustal levels. The formation of D2 microstructures and shear bands overprinted high-temperature intracrystalline plasticity phases (D1) in mylonitic rocks. Depending on the main rock-forming minerals, the results also demonstrate that the brittle-ductile transition involves a combination of different deformation mechanisms and possible rheological paths. In quartz-rich rocks, quartz was deformed in the dislocation creep regime and records transition of microfabrics and slip systems during decreasing temperature, which lasted until retrogression related to exhumation. As a result, grain-size reduction associated with fluids circulating within the ASRR strike-slip fault zone at brittle-ductile transition leads to reaction and texture weakening. Rheological weakening is the consequence of the syntectonic deformation, fluid flow, reaction softening, reaction creep and textural softening. The hydrous fluids resulted in hydration of silicates. Decompression occurred during shearing and as a result of tectonic exhumation. All these results demonstrate that the exhumation through the ductile to ductile-brittle transition involves a combination of different

  12. Central Asia Active Fault Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohadjer, Solmaz; Ehlers, Todd A.; Kakar, Najibullah

    2014-05-01

    The ongoing collision of the Indian subcontinent with Asia controls active tectonics and seismicity in Central Asia. This motion is accommodated by faults that have historically caused devastating earthquakes and continue to pose serious threats to the population at risk. Despite international and regional efforts to assess seismic hazards in Central Asia, little attention has been given to development of a comprehensive database for active faults in the region. To address this issue and to better understand the distribution and level of seismic hazard in Central Asia, we are developing a publically available database for active faults of Central Asia (including but not limited to Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, northern Pakistan and western China) using ArcGIS. The database is designed to allow users to store, map and query important fault parameters such as fault location, displacement history, rate of movement, and other data relevant to seismic hazard studies including fault trench locations, geochronology constraints, and seismic studies. Data sources integrated into the database include previously published maps and scientific investigations as well as strain rate measurements and historic and recent seismicity. In addition, high resolution Quickbird, Spot, and Aster imagery are used for selected features to locate and measure offset of landforms associated with Quaternary faulting. These features are individually digitized and linked to attribute tables that provide a description for each feature. Preliminary observations include inconsistent and sometimes inaccurate information for faults documented in different studies. For example, the Darvaz-Karakul fault which roughly defines the western margin of the Pamir, has been mapped with differences in location of up to 12 kilometers. The sense of motion for this fault ranges from unknown to thrust and strike-slip in three different studies despite documented left-lateral displacements of Holocene and late

  13. Seismic and geodetic signatures of fault slip at the Slumgullion Landslide Natural Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, J.; Schulz, W.; Bodin, P.; Kean, J.

    2011-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the Slumgullion landslide is a useful natural laboratory for observing fault slip, specifically that slip along its basal surface and side-bounding strike-slip faults occurs with comparable richness of aseismic and seismic modes as along crustal- and plate-scale boundaries. Our study provides new constraints on models governing landslide motion. We monitored landslide deformation with temporary deployments of a 29-element prism array surveyed by a robotic theodolite and an 88-station seismic network that complemented permanent extensometers and environmental instrumentation. Aseismic deformation observations show that large blocks of the landslide move steadily at approximately centimeters per day, possibly punctuated by variations of a few millimeters, while localized transient slip episodes of blocks less than a few tens of meters across occur frequently. We recorded a rich variety of seismic signals, nearly all of which originated outside the monitoring network boundaries or from the side-bounding strike-slip faults. The landslide basal surface beneath our seismic network likely slipped almost completely aseismically. Our results provide independent corroboration of previous inferences that dilatant strengthening along sections of the side-bounding strike-slip faults controls the overall landslide motion, acting as seismically radiating brakes that limit acceleration of the aseismically slipping basal surface. Dilatant strengthening has also been invoked in recent models of transient slip and tremor sources along crustal- and plate-scale faults suggesting that the landslide may indeed be a useful natural laboratory for testing predictions of specific mechanisms that control fault slip at all scales.

  14. Constraints on the rheology of the lower crust in a strike-slip plate boundary: evidence from the San Quintín xenoliths, Baja California, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. van der Werf

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The rheology of lower crust and its transient behavior in active strike-slip plate boundaries remain poorly understood. To address this issue, we analyzed a suite of granulite and lherzolite xenoliths from the upper Pleistocene–Holocene San Quintín volcanic field of northern Baja California, Mexico. The San Quintín volcanic field is located 20 km east of the Baja California shear zone, which accommodates the relative movement between the Pacific plate and Baja California microplate. The development of a strong foliation in both the mafic granulites and lherzolites, suggests that a lithospheric-scale shear zone exists beneath the San Quintín volcanic field. Combining microstructural observations, geothermometry, and phase equilibria modeling, we estimated that crystal-plastic deformation took place at temperatures of 750–890 °C and pressures of 400–560 MPa, corresponding to 15–22 km depth. A hot crustal geotherm of 40 ° C km−1 is required to explain the estimated deformation conditions. Infrared spectroscopy shows that plagioclase in the mafic granulites is relatively dry. Microstructures are interpreted to show that deformation in both the uppermost lower crust and upper mantle was accommodated by a combination of dislocation creep and grain-size-sensitive creep. Recrystallized grain size paleopiezometry yields low differential stresses of 12–33 and 17 MPa for plagioclase and olivine, respectively. The lower range of stresses (12–17 MPa in the mafic granulite and lherzolite xenoliths is interpreted to be associated with transient deformation under decreasing stress conditions, following an event of stress increase. Using flow laws for dry plagioclase, we estimated a low viscosity of 1.1–1.3×1020 Pa ⋅ s for the high temperature conditions (890 °C in the lower crust. Significantly lower viscosities in the range of 1016–1019 Pa ⋅ s, were estimated using flow laws for wet plagioclase. The

  15. Reply to discussion by M. C. Alçiçek et al. on ;Neogene-Quaternary evolution of the Tefenni basin on the Fethiye-Burdur fault zone, SW Anatolia-Turkey;, Journal of African Earth Sciences, 118, 137-148, by R. Aksoy and S. Aksarı

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Rahmi; Aksarı, Süleyman

    2017-10-01

    In their discussion on the Aksoy and Aksarı (2016) article, Alçiçek et al. (2017) claim that our stratigraphic interpretation, age assignment for the rock units and kinematic analysis depended on incorrect data. They also claim that there is no evidence for a NE-trending fault zone (Fethiye-Burdur Fault Zone) from Fethiye to Burdur with left-lateral strike-slip movement. Our opposing views on the above-mentioned issues are given below.

  16. Dating the Transition from Reverse to Sinistral Slip on the Haiyuan Fault, NE Tibetan Plateau, Using Magnetostratigraphy from the Ganyanchi Pull-apart Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, S.; Ran, Y.; Li, Y.; Cowgill, E.; Gao, S.

    2016-12-01

    The 1000-km long, active, left-slip Haiyuan fault is a first-order boundary fault along the northeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau. As such, its tectonic evolution provides insight into the northeastward growth process of the plateau. The Haiyuan fault shows a two-stage Late Cenozoic evolution, with initial reverse faulting followed by sinistral strike-slip. However, the time of this transition and initiation of strike slip has been long debated. Here we report a detailed paleomagnetic study of a 328m-long core from the 3km wide by 8km long Ganyanchi (Salt Lake) pull-apart basin, which is the biggest basin located in the central part of the Haiyuan fault. The magnetostratigraphic results indicate that the Ganyanchi pull-apart basin was formed about 2.70±0.05 Ma ago. Because formation of pull-apart basin follows a period of initial fault growth and linkage, this date likely postdates initiation of the bounding strike-slip faults. Using the total offset and fault slip rates determined by geological methods and GPS, we deduced this lag period was on the order of 0.1-0.3 Myr. Therefore, initiation of left slip on the Haiyuan fault was about 2.8-3Ma. The Late Pliocene change in kinematics of the Haiyuan fault may result from the northeastward growth of the Tibetan Plateau. At the same time, around 3.4 Ma, some other places in the NE margin of Tibetan Plateau reported lithological change, rapid increase in grain size and accumulation rate, although the actual mechanism is still controversial.

  17. Thrust-wrench fault interference in a brittle medium: new insights from analogue modelling experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Filipe; Duarte, Joao; Schellart, Wouter; Tomas, Ricardo; Grigorova, Vili; Terrinha, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    We present analogue modelling experimental results concerning thrust-wrench fault interference in a brittle medium, to try to evaluate the influence exerted by different prescribed interference angles in the formation of morpho-structural interference fault patterns. All the experiments were conceived to simulate simultaneous reactivation of confining strike-slip and thrust faults defining a (corner) zone of interference, contrasting with previously reported discrete (time and space) superposition of alternating thrust and strike-slip events. Different interference angles of 60°, 90° and 120° were experimentally investigated by comparing the specific structural configurations obtained in each case. Results show that a deltoid-shaped morpho-structural pattern is consistently formed in the fault interference (corner) zone, exhibiting a specific geometry that is fundamentally determined by the different prescribed fault interference angle. Such angle determines the orientation of the displacement vector shear component along the main frontal thrust direction, determining different fault confinement conditions in each case, and imposing a complying geometry and kinematics of the interference deltoid structure. Model comparison with natural examples worldwide shows good geometric and kinematic similarity, pointing to the existence of matching underlying dynamic process. Acknowledgments This work was sponsored by the Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia (FCT) through project MODELINK EXPL/GEO-GEO/0714/2013.

  18. Characteristics of block strain and fault movement in the Sichuan-Yunnan region before and after Wenchuan earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Jing

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Deformation characteristics of the Sichuan-Yunnan region during the two periods 1999—2007 and 2007—2009 are analyzed with a block deformation model and GPS velocity profiles. The results show that the direction of the principal compressive strain rate of the Northwest-Sichuan block - the Mid-Yunnan block - the Southwest-Yunnan block was characterized by a clockwise rotation from north to south. The Anninghe and the Zemuhe faults had some shear-strain accumulation. The southern segment of the Xiaojiang fault had mainly strike-slip movement, while the northern segment was mainly accumulating strain. The 2008 Ms8. 0 Wenchuan earthquake had some influence on the mid-southern segment of the Lijiang-Xiaojinhe fault, the Anninghe fault and the Jinshajiang fault, but not the Zemuhe fault, the Xiaojiang fault and the Red River fault as much.

  19. Kinematic Analysis of Fault-Slip Data in the Central Range of Papua, Indonesia

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    Benyamin Sapiie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available DOI:10.17014/ijog.3.1.1-16Most of the Cenozoic tectonic evolution in New Guinea is a result of obliquely convergent motion that ledto an arc-continent collision between the Australian and Pacific Plates. The Gunung Bijih (Ertsberg Mining District(GBMD is located in the Central Range of Papua, in the western half of the island of New Guinea. This study presentsthe results of detailed structural mapping concentrated on analyzing fault-slip data along a 15-km traverse of theHeavy Equipment Access Trail (HEAT and the Grasberg mine access road, providing new information concerning thedeformation in the GBMD and the Cenozoic structural evolution of the Central Range. Structural analysis indicatesthat two distinct stages of deformation have occurred since ~12 Ma. The first stage generated a series of en-echelonNW-trending (π-fold axis = 300° folds and a few reverse faults. The second stage resulted in a significant left-lateralstrike-slip faulting sub-parallel to the regional strike of upturned bedding. Kinematic analysis reveals that the areasbetween the major strike-slip faults form structural domains that are remarkably uniform in character. The changein deformation styles from contractional to a strike-slip offset is explained as a result from a change in the relativeplate motion between the Pacific and Australian Plates at ~4 Ma. From ~4 - 2 Ma, transform motion along an ~ 270°trend caused a left-lateral strike-slip offset, and reactivated portions of pre-existing reverse faults. This action had aprofound effect on magma emplacement and hydrothermal activity.

  20. New High-Resolution 3D Imagery of Fault Deformation and Segmentation of the San Onofre and San Mateo Trends in the Inner California Borderlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, J. J.; Driscoll, N. W.; Kent, G. M.; Bormann, J. M.; Harding, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Inner California Borderlands (ICB) is situated off the coast of southern California and northern Baja. The structural and geomorphic characteristics of the area record a middle Oligocene transition from subduction to microplate capture along the California coast. Marine stratigraphic evidence shows large-scale extension and rotation overprinted by modern strike-slip deformation. Geodetic and geologic observations indicate that approximately 6-8 mm/yr of Pacific-North American relative plate motion is accommodated by offshore strike-slip faulting in the ICB. The farthest inshore fault system, the Newport-Inglewood Rose Canyon (NIRC) fault complex is a dextral strike-slip system that extends primarily offshore approximately 120 km from San Diego to the San Joaquin Hills near Newport Beach, California. Based on trenching and well data, the NIRC fault system Holocene slip rate is 1.5-2.0 mm/yr to the south and 0.5-1.0 mm/yr along its northern extent. An earthquake rupturing the entire length of the system could produce an Mw 7.0 earthquake or larger. West of the main segments of the NIRC fault complex are the San Mateo and San Onofre fault trends along the continental slope. Previous work concluded that these were part of a strike-slip system that eventually merged with the NIRC complex. Others have interpreted these trends as deformation associated with the Oceanside Blind Thrust fault purported to underlie most of the region. In late 2013, we acquired the first high-resolution 3D P-Cable seismic surveys (3.125 m bin resolution) of the San Mateo and San Onofre trends as part of the Southern California Regional Fault Mapping project aboard the R/V New Horizon. Analysis of these volumes provides important new insights and constraints on the fault segmentation and transfer of deformation. Based on the new 3D sparker seismic data, our preferred interpretation for the San Mateo and San Onofre fault trends is they are transpressional features associated with westward

  1. Postseismic deformation associated with the 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan earthquake, China: Constraining fault geometry and investigating a detailed spatial distribution of afterslip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhongshan; Yuan, Linguo; Huang, Dingfa; Yang, Zhongrong; Chen, Weifeng

    2017-12-01

    We reconstruct two types of fault models associated with the 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan earthquake, one is a listric fault connecting a shallowing sub-horizontal detachment below ∼20 km depth (fault model one, FM1) and the other is a group of more steeply dipping planes further extended to the Moho at ∼60 km depth (fault model two, FM2). Through comparative analysis of the coseismic inversion results, we confirm that the coseismic models are insensitive to the above two type fault geometries. We therefore turn our attention to the postseismic deformation obtained from GPS observations, which can not only impose effective constraints on the fault geometry but also, more importantly, provide valuable insights into the postseismic afterslip. Consequently, FM1 performs outstandingly in the near-, mid-, and far-field, whether considering the viscoelastic influence or not. FM2 performs more poorly, especially in the data-model consistency in the near field, which mainly results from the trade-off of the sharp contrast of the postseismic deformation on both sides of the Longmen Shan fault zone. Accordingly, we propose a listric fault connecting a shallowing sub-horizontal detachment as the optimal fault geometry for the Wenchuan earthquake. Based on the inferred optimal fault geometry, we analyse two characterized postseismic deformation phenomena that differ from the coseismic patterns: (1) the postseismic opposite deformation between the Beichuan fault (BCF) and Pengguan fault (PGF) and (2) the slightly left-lateral strike-slip motions in the southwestern Longmen Shan range. The former is attributed to the local left-lateral strike-slip and normal dip-slip components on the shallow BCF. The latter places constraints on the afterslip on the southwestern BCF and reproduces three afterslip concentration areas with slightly left-lateral strike-slip motions. The decreased Coulomb Failure Stress (CFS) change ∼0.322 KPa, derived from the afterslip with viscoelastic influence

  2. New Attenuation Relationship for Peak Ground and Pseudo-Spectral Acceleration of Normal-Faulting Earthquakes in Offshore Northeast Taiwan

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    Yu-Ju Wang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ground motions from normal-faulting earthquakes are generally considered to be smaller than those of strike-slip and thrust events. On 11 April 2011 a crustal normal-faulting earthquake [the Fukushima earthquake (Mw 6.6] occurred in Eastern Japan. The peak ground acceleration (PGA observed was considerably higher than the predictions of several ground-motion prediction equations (GMPEs, which were derived mainly from thrust or strike-slip earthquakes. In northeast Taiwan, the tectonic structure of the Ryukyu Arc and the Okinawa Trough typically entail normal-faulting earthquakes. Because of the normal-faulting earthquakes relevance to ground motions and nuclear power plant sites in northeast Taiwan, we evaluated the impact of the ground motion of normal-faulting earthquakes in offshore northeast Taiwan using a newly constructed attenuation relationship for PGA and pseudo-spectral acceleration (Sa. We collected 832 records from 13 normal-faulting earthquakes with focal depths of less than 50 km. The moment magnitude (Mw of the 13 events was between 4 - 6. The Sa and PGA of normal-faulting earthquakes offshore northeast Taiwan determined with the newly constructed attenuation relationship were higher and lower, respectively, than those obtained using attenuation equations commonly used in the Taiwan subduction zone.

  3. A bottom-driven mechanism for distributed faulting in the Gulf of California rift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persaud, Patricia; Tan, Eh; Contreras, Juan; Lavier, Luc

    2017-11-01

    Observations of active faulting in the continent-ocean transition of the Northern Gulf of California show multiple oblique-slip faults distributed in a 200 × 70 km2 area developed some time after a westward relocation of the plate boundary at 2 Ma. In contrast, north and south of this broad pull-apart structure, major transform faults accommodate Pacific-North America plate motion. Here we propose that the mechanism for distributed brittle deformation results from the boundary conditions present in the Northern Gulf, where basal shear is distributed between the Cerro Prieto strike-slip fault (southernmost fault of the San Andreas fault system) and the Ballenas Transform Fault. We hypothesize that in oblique-extensional settings whether deformation is partitioned in a few dip-slip and strike-slip faults, or in numerous oblique-slip faults may depend on (1) bottom-driven, distributed extension and shear deformation of the lower crust or upper mantle, and (2) the rift obliquity. To test this idea, we explore the effects of bottom-driven shear on the deformation of a brittle elastic-plastic layer with the help of pseudo-three dimensional numerical models that include side forces. Strain localization results when the basal shear abruptly increases in a step-function manner while oblique-slip on numerous faults dominates when basal shear is distributed. We further explore how the style of faulting varies with obliquity and demonstrate that the style of delocalized faulting observed in the Northern Gulf of California is reproduced in models with an obliquity of 0.7 and distributed basal shear boundary conditions, consistent with the interpreted obliquity and boundary conditions of the study area.

  4. Ground Motions Due to Earthquakes on Creeping Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R.; Abrahamson, N. A.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the peak ground motions from the largest well-recorded earthquakes on creeping strike-slip faults in active-tectonic continental regions. Our goal is to evaluate if the strong ground motions from earthquakes on creeping faults are smaller than the strong ground motions from earthquakes on locked faults. Smaller ground motions might be expected from earthquakes on creeping faults if the fault sections that strongly radiate energy are surrounded by patches of fault that predominantly absorb energy. For our study we used the ground motion data available in the PEER NGA-West2 database, and the ground motion prediction equations that were developed from the PEER NGA-West2 dataset. We analyzed data for the eleven largest well-recorded creeping-fault earthquakes, that ranged in magnitude from M5.0-6.5. Our findings are that these earthquakes produced peak ground motions that are statistically indistinguishable from the peak ground motions produced by similar-magnitude earthquakes on locked faults. These findings may be implemented in earthquake hazard estimates for moderate-size earthquakes in creeping-fault regions. Further investigation is necessary to determine if this result will also apply to larger earthquakes on creeping faults. Please also see: Harris, R.A., and N.A. Abrahamson (2014), Strong ground motions generated by earthquakes on creeping faults, Geophysical Research Letters, vol. 41, doi:10.1002/2014GL060228.

  5. Origin and model of transform faults in the Okinawa Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Li, Sanzhong; Jiang, Suhua; Suo, Yanhui; Guo, Lingli; Wang, Yongming; Zhang, Huixuan

    2017-06-01

    Transform faults in back-arc basins are the key to revealing the opening and development of marginal seas. The Okinawa Trough (OT) represents an incipient and active back-arc or marginal sea basin oriented in a general NE-SW direction. To determine the strikes and spatial distribution of transform faults in the OT, this paper dissects the NW- and NNE-SN-trending fault patterns on the basis of seismic profiles, gravity anomalies and region geological data. There are three main NW-trending transpressional faults in the OT, which are the seaward propagation of NW-trending faults in the East China Continent. The NNE-SN-trending faults with right-stepping distribution behave as right-lateral shearing. The strike-slip pull-apart process or transtensional faulting triggered the back-arc rifting or extension, and these faults evolved into transform faults with the emergence of oceanic crust. Thus, the transform fault patterns are inherited from pre-existing oblique transtensional faults at the offsets between rifting segments. Therefore, the OT performs the oblique spreading mechanism similar to nascent oceans such as the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden.

  6. Marine Geomorphology and Gravity Flow Modelling in Transient Pull-Apart Basins of the Offshore Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, L. J.; Bostock, H. C.; Barnes, P.; Neil, H.

    2015-12-01

    The offshore component of the dextral strike-slip Alpine Fault has one of highest slip rates on Earth (~27-32 mm/yr). As it passes offshore, the Alpine Fault becomes segmented, with the formation of several rapidly deforming pull-apart basins. Here we focus on the detailed quantification of the 3 northern-most basins, all located Holocene (Holocene gravity flows in nearshore pull-apart basins. Excellent core coverage over the study area allow us to interpret gravity flow types and behaviours. We use these interpretations along with basin geomorphological boundary conditions to model turbidity current flow behaviours.

  7. Active faults and related Late Quaternary deformation along the Northwestern Himalayan Frontal Zone, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Nakata

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous newly-identified traces of active faults in the Himalayan foothill zone along the HFF around Chandigarh, in Pinjore Dun, along the piedmont zone of the Lower Siwalik hill front and within the Lower Tertiary hill range reveal the pattern of thrust and strike-slip faulting, striking parallel to the principal structural trend (NNW-SSE of the orogenic belt. The active Chandigarh Fault, Pinjore Garden Fault and Barsar thrust have vertically dislocated, warped and backtilted fluvial and alluvial-fan surfaces made up of Late Pleistocene-Holocene sediments. West- and southwest-facing fault scarplets with heights ranging from 12 to 50 m along these faults suggest continued tectonic movement through Late Pleistocene to recent times. Gentle warping and backtilting of the terraces on the hanging wall sides of the faults indicate fault-bend folding. These active faults are the manifestation of north-dipping imbricated thrust faults branching out from the major fault systems like the Main Boundary Fault (MBF and Himalayan Frontal Fault (HFF, probably merging down northward into a décollement. The Taksal Fault, striking NNW-SSE, shows prominent right-lateral movement marked by lateral offset of streams and younger Quaternary terraces and occupies a narrow deep linear valley along the fault trace. Right stepping along this fault has resulted in formation of a small pull-apart basin. Fault scarplets facing ENE and WSW are the manifestation of dip-slip movement. This fault is an example of slip-partitioning between the strike-slip and thrust faults, suggesting ongoing oblique convergence of the Indian plate and northward migration of a tectonic sliver. Slip rate along the Taksal Fault has been calculated as 2.8 mm/yr. Preliminary trench investigation at the base of the Chandigarh Fault Scarp has revealed total displacement of 3.5 m along a low angle thrust fault with variable dip of 20° to 46° due northeast, possibly the result of one

  8. Late Quaternary Deformation Along the Wairarapa Fault, North Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermer, E. R.; Little, T. A.

    2006-12-01

    The Wairarapa fault, one of the largest active faults in the hanging wall of the Hikurangi subduction margin, New Zealand, averaged 16m dextral slip during the M >8.1 1855 earthquake. Previous workers inferred that uplift of 2.7m at the coast, observed by a surveyor in 1855, occurred on the southern continuation of the Wairarapa fault, the Wharekauhau (WH) thrust. New mapping, stratigraphic, and paloseismologic results from the WH thrust suggest the pattern of surface rupture in 1855 and earlier earthquakes was significantly different than previously inferred, requiring a more complex model for seismic hazard and tectonic evolution of the region. Detailed mapping indicates that the coastal segment of the WH thrust did not rupture the surface in 1855. The thrust, a major range-bounding fault, emplaces Mesozoic graywacke over ~80-100 ka last- interglacial marine, and lacustrine rocks, and in part coeval to younger alluvial gravels. Fault activity is indicated by facies and thickness changes. This older sequence is tilted and overlapped unconformably by a silt layer and much less deformed alluvial fan gravels that range in age from >22ka to ages record a period of fault inactivity from 14 - 9 ka (calib yrs BP). The abandoned, overlapping fan surface is slightly deformed across the fault (15 m of folding- related throw). We infer that the thrust has propagated eastward in the subsurface, uplifting the abandoned WH fault, an inference that is supported by the pattern of Holocene incision. The only recent faulting consists of subvertical en echelon segments that have undergone minor dip-slip and dextral slip. A trench excavated across the fault scarp in late Holocene gravels suggests that the only fault along the trace of the WH thrust that broke within 3 m of the surface in 1855 was a minor strike-slip fault splay. New14C ages are consistent with the most recent event occurring in 1855 and suggest one earlier event. The range-bounding trace of the WH thrust appears to

  9. A Case Study on Uruk Sulcus, Ganymede: How Variations in Fault Strike and Stress Distribution can Affect Shear Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, M. E.; Smith-Konter, B. R.; Burkhard, L. M.; Collins, G. C.; Pappalardo, R. T.

    2016-12-01

    Ganymede's fractured surface reveals many morphologically distinct regions of inferred distributed shear and strike-slip faulting that may be important to the structural development of its surface. To better understand the role of strike-slip tectonism in shaping Ganymede's complex icy surface, we perform a detailed mapping of key examples of strike-slip morphologies from Galileo and Voyager imagery. We investigate the role of tidal stresses using the numerical code SatStress to calculate both diurnal and non-synchronous rotation (NSR) tidal stresses at Ganymede's surface. We then compute Coulomb failure conditions, which are a function of fault strike and regional stress magnitudes, for the mapped regions. Previous work at Dardanus Sulcus, Tiamat Sulcus, and Uruk Sulcus, regions with an inferred right-lateral sense of slip, suggests that global tidal stress models of both diurnal and NSR stress contributions readily generate shear and normal stress magnitudes ( 1.1 MPa) that could give rise to shear failure at depth ( 2 km). While models for both Dardanus and Tiamat Sulcus accurately predict right-lateral motion, stresses at Uruk Sulcus suggest a left-lateral sense of slip for the current fault strike orientation. This presents an opportunity to examine the role of temporal fault strike variations, as well as changes in the distribution of stresses, on shear failure and sense of slip. We find that models with a 10 - 40° clockwise rotation of Uruk's fault strike predict the expected right-lateral slip. Strain ellipses derived from morphological mapping efforts suggest as much as 50° of rotation may have occurred here. Such a rotation may be plausible if the feature formed in a different orientation than it presently possesses due to migration of the ice shell. Further investigation of changes in distribution of stress, perhaps due to a NSR bulge shift or true polar wander, help provide insight into how features on Ganymede may have evolved through time.

  10. Two-stage evolution of the Cenozoic Kunbei fault system and its control of deposition in the SW Qaidam Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wen; Wu, Chaodong; Wang, Jialin; Fang, Ya'nan; Wang, Chuanwu; Chen, Qilin; Liu, Huaqing

    2017-09-01

    The structural relationship between the Qaidam Basin and Qimen Tagh-Eastern Kunlun Range holds important implications for evaluating the formation mechanism of the Tibetan Plateau. Various models have been proposed to reveal the structural relationship, although controversies remain. To address these issues, we analysed the seismic and lithologic data of the Kunbei fault system (i.e. the Kunbei, Arlar and Hongliuquan faults), which lies to the north of the Qimen Tagh-Eastern Kunlun Range within the SW Qaidam Basin. Based on the regional geological framework and our kinematic analyses, we propose that the Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the Kunbei fault system can be divided into two stages. From the Early Eocene to the Middle Miocene, the system was characterized by left-lateral strike-slip faults and weak south-dipping thrust faults based on the flower structure in the seismic section, which is an apparent strike-slip deformation that was identified in the -1510-ms time slice and the root-mean-square amplitude attribute slice. This strike-slip motion was generated by the uplift of the Tibetan Plateau caused by the onset of the Indian-Eurasian collision. Since the Middle Miocene, the Kunbei fault system has undergone intense south-dipping thrusting, and a nearly 2.2-km uplift has been observed in the hanging wall in the Arlar fault. The south-dipping thrusting is the far-field effect of the full collision that occurred between the Indian-Eurasian plates. The lake area in the SW Qaidam Basin has been shrinking since the Middle Miocene and presents widespread delta and fluvial deposits, which are consistent with the proposed tectonic evolution.

  11. Active tectonic deformation of the western Indian plate boundary: A case study from the Chaman Fault System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crupa, Wanda E.; Khan, Shuhab D.; Huang, Jingqiu; Khan, Abdul S.; Kasi, Aimal

    2017-10-01

    Collision of the Eurasian and Indian plates has resulted in two spatially offset subduction zones, the Makran subduction zone to the south and the Himalayan convergent margin to the north. These zones are linked by a system of left-lateral strike-slip faults known as the Chaman Fault System, ∼1200 km, which spans along western Pakistan. Although this is one of the greatest strike-slip faults, yet temporal and spatial variation in displacement has not been adequately defined along this fault system. This study conducted geomorphic and geodetic investigations along the Chaman Fault in a search for evidence of spatial variations in motion. Four study areas were selected over the span of the Chaman Fault: (1) Tarnak-Rud area over the Tarnak-Rud valley, (2) Spinatizha area over the Spinatizha Mountain Range, (3) Nushki area over the Nushki basin, and (4) Kharan area over the northern tip of the Central Makran Mountains. Remote sensing data allowed for in depth mapping of different components and faults within the Kohjak group. Wind and water gap pairs along with offset rivers were identified using high-resolution imagery and digital-elevation models to show displacement for the four study areas. The mountain-front-sinuosity ratio, valley height-to-width-ratio, and the stream-length-gradient index were calculated and used to determine the relative tectonic activity of each area. These geomorphic indices suggest that the Kharan area is the most active and the Tarnak-Rud area is the least active. GPS data were processed into a stable Indian plate reference frame and analyzed. Fault parallel velocity versus fault normal distance yielded a ∼8-10 mm/yr displacement rate along the Chaman Fault just north of the Spinatizha area. InSAR data were also integrated to assess displacement rates along the fault system. Geodetic data support that ultra-slow earthquakes similar to those that strike along other major strike-slip faults, such as the San Andreas Fault System, are

  12. Steroid induced huge mediastinal lipomatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jang Min; Chung, Suk Tae; Kang, Eun Young; Suh, Won Hyuck [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-04-15

    Mediastinal lipomatosis induced by steroid is an unusual byproduct of such therapy and has been reported after prolonged and large doses of steroid therapy. The radiologic findings of mediastinal lipomatosis in simple chest film are nonspecific, but with the advent of CT scan, differentiation the fatty lesion from other mediastinal decreases can be made easily. Recently we expended steroid induced huge mediastinal lipomatosis and report the case with review including radiologic findings.

  13. Implications of Fault Curvature for Slip Distributions, Opening, and Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, E.; Pollard, D. D.; Griffith, W. A.

    2010-12-01

    In his seminal 1905 paper on the dynamics of faulting, E.M. Anderson idealized faults as planar structures. Although the theory of fault mechanics has developed from this idealization, abundant evidence from geological and geophysical investigations shows that fault surfaces exhibit geometric irregularities on many scales. Understanding the mechanical behavior of non-planar fault surfaces is a fundamental problem for scientists working on the brittle deformation of Earth’s crust and is of practical importance to disciplines such as rock mechanics, geotechnical engineering, and earthquake science. Geologic observations of exhumed meter-scale strike-slip faults in the Bear Creek drainage, Sierra Nevada, CA, provide insights into the relationship between non-planar fault geometry and frictional slip at depth. These faults have smoothly curving surface expressions which may be approximated as sinusoidal curves. We numerically investigate both the natural fault geometries and model sinusoidal faults. Earlier models for the stress and deformation near a sinusoidal fault assume boundary conditions and fault characteristics that are not observed in nature. The 2D displacement discontinuity boundary element method is combined with a complementarity algorithm to model quasi-static slip on non-planar faults, and the resulting deformation of the nearby rock. This numerical technique can provide an accurate solution for any boundary value problem regarding crack-like features in an otherwise homogeneous and isotropic elastic material. Both field and numerical investigations indicate that non-planar fault geometry perturbs the along-fault slip form the distribution predicted for planar faults. In addition, both field observations and numerical modeling show that sliding along curved faults at depth may lead to localized fault opening, affecting local permeability and fluid migration.

  14. Active faulting and folding along the Jumilla Fault Zone, northeastern Betics, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Balen, R. T.; Forzoni, A.; Van Dam, J. A.

    2015-05-01

    The Jumilla Fault Zone (JFZ) is an ENE-WSW topographic lineament in the external part of the eastern Betic Cordillera. It represents an active fault. Three small basins are aligned along the JFZ, the La Celia-, Alqueria- and Jumilla basins. The tectonic geomorphology of the La Celia- and Alqueria basins consists of folds, a set of normal fault scarps, strike-slip lineaments, fault-springs, tectonically-modified drainage lines and elevated gypsum/anhydrite diapirs. Two of the scarps are normal faults generated by the extensional collapse of one of the folds. The other scarps are secondary normal faults generated by transtensional left-lateral motions along the JFZ. Normal fault scarps that developed on conglomerates are considerably steeper (~ 30°) than those affecting softer marly materials (post-Messinian deposits in the studied basins. The discrepancy between the age of the tectonic landforms and the late Neogene age of the basin infill can be explained by an endo- to exhorheic change in the drainage system, due to the capture of the ancient basin lake system by tributaries of the nearby Segura river. The cessation of sedimentation in the basins resulted in the preservation of tectonic landforms.

  15. (U-Th)/He thermochronometry reveals Pleistocene punctuated deformation and synkinematic hematite mineralization in the Mecca Hills, southernmost San Andreas Fault zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Amy C.; Evans, James P.; Ault, Alexis K.; Janecke, Susanne U.; Bradbury, Kelly K.

    2017-10-01

    The timing, tempo, and processes of punctuated deformation in strike-slip fault systems are challenging to resolve in the rock record. Faults in the Mecca Hills, adjacent to the southernmost San Andreas Fault, California, accommodate active deformation and exhumation in the Plio-Pleistocene sedimentary rocks and underlying crystalline basement. We document the spatiotemporal patterns of San Andreas Fault-related deformation as recorded in crystalline basement rocks of the Mecca Hills using fault microstructural observations, geochemical data, and hematite (n = 24) and apatite (n = 44) (U-Th)/He (hematite He, apatite He) thermochronometry data. Reproducible mean hematite He dates from minor hematite-coated fault surfaces in the Painted Canyon Fault damage zone range from ∼0.7-0.4 Ma and are younger than ∼1.2 Ma apatite He dates from adjacent crystalline basement host rock. These data reveal concomitant Pleistocene pulses of fault slip, fluid flow, and synkinematic hematite mineralization. Hematite textures, crystal morphology, and hematite He data patterns imply some damage zone deformation occurred via cyclic crack-seal and creep processes. Apatite He data from crystalline basement define distinct date-eU patterns and indicate cooling across discrete fault blocks in the Mecca Hills. Uniform ∼1.2 Ma apatite He dates regardless of eU are located exclusively between the Painted Canyon and Platform faults. Outside of this fault block, samples yield individual apatite He dates from ∼30-1 Ma that define a positive apatite He date-eU correlation. These patterns reveal focused exhumation away from the main trace of the San Andreas Fault at ∼1.2 Ma. Low-temperature thermochronometry of fault-related rocks provides an unprecedented window into the 105-106-yr record of San Andreas Fault-related deformation in the Mecca Hills and documents hematite deformation mechanisms that may be operative in other strike-slip faults world-wide.

  16. Explaining the current geodetic field with geological models: A case study of the Haiyuan fault system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daout, S.; Jolivet, R.; Lasserre, C.; Doin, M. P.; Barbot, S.; Peltzer, G.; Tapponnier, P.

    2015-12-01

    Oblique convergence across Tibet leads to slip partitioning with the co-existence of strike-slip, normal and thrust motion in major fault systems. While such complexity has been shown at the surface, the question is to understand how faults interact and accumulate strain at depth. Here, we process InSAR data across the central Haiyuan restraining bend, at the north-eastern boundary of the Tibetan plateau and show that the surface complexity can be explained by partitioning of a uniform deep-seated convergence rate. We construct a time series of ground deformation, from Envisat radar data spanning from 2001-2011 period, across a challenging area because of the high jump in topography between the desert environment and the plateau. To improve the signal-to-noise ratio, we used the latest Synthetic Aperture Radar interferometry methodology, such as Global Atmospheric Models (ERA Interim) and Digital Elevation Model errors corrections before unwrapping. We then developed a new Bayesian approach, jointly inverting our InSAR time series together with published GPS displacements. We explore fault system geometry at depth and associated slip rates and determine a uniform N86±7E° convergence rate of 8.45±1.4 mm/yr across the whole fault system with a variable partitioning west and east of a major extensional fault-jog. Our 2D model gives a quantitative understanding of how crustal deformation is accumulated by the various branches of this thrust/strike-slip fault system and demonstrate the importance of the geometry of the Haiyuan Fault, controlling the partitioning or the extrusion of the block motion. The approach we have developed would allow constraining the low strain accumulation along deep faults, like for example for the blind thrust faults or possible detachment in the San Andreas "big bend", which are often associated to a poorly understood seismic hazard.

  17. FOP 2012 stop, Honey Lake fault, Doyle, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Ryan; Briggs, Richard W.; Crone, Anthony; Angster, Steve; Seitz, Gordon G.

    2012-01-01

    The Honey Lake fault system (HLFS) strikes north-northwestward across Long Valley near Doyle, CA and is part of a network of active, dextral strike-slip faults in the northern Walker Lane (Figure 1). Geologic investigations of a right-laterally offset terrace riser along the north bank of Long Valley Creek, which we refer to as site 1 (Figure 2), indicate a latest Quaternary slip rate of 1.1-2. 6 mm/yr [Wills and Borchardt, 1993] and 1.7 ± 0.6 mm/yr [Turner and others, 2008] (Table 1). These studies also document evidence of at least four post-6.8 ka surface-rupturing earthquakes at this site.

  18. The Cephalonia Transform Fault and its extension to western Lefkada Island (Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louvari, E.; Kiratzi, A. A.; Papazachos, B. C.

    1999-07-01

    The central area of the Ionian Islands is dominated by the existence of a major tectonic structure called the Cephalonia Transform Fault (CTF). Its main part (Cephalonia segment) has been identified by previous work based on the spatial distribution of earthquake foci, fault plane solutions of strong earthquakes, active tectonics, structural studies and geodetic measurements. This part (Cephalonia segment) which exhibits strike-slip motion with a thrust component, strikes in a northeast direction, dips to the southeast and has a length of ˜90 km. In the present paper information concerning new fault plane solutions, orientation of isoseismals, sea bottom topography and recent GPS results are used to further check the properties of this southern part of the CTF and to explore its northeastward prolongation to Lefkada Island. It is shown that the CTF is extended to the western coast of Lefkada. This northern branch (Lefkada segment) of the CTF which is also characterized by strike-slip motion with a thrust component, strikes in a north-northeast direction, dips to the east-southeast and has a length of ˜40 km. These two segments of the CTF form a major kinematic boundary where the slip rate is 2-3 cm/yr.

  19. Active faults paragenesis and the state of crustal stresses in the Late Cenozoic in Central Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Sankov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Active faults of the Hangay-Hentiy tectonic saddle region in Central Mongolia are studied by space images interpretation, relief analysis, structural methods and tectonic stress reconstruction. The study results show that faults activation during the Late Cenozoic stage was selective, and a cluster pattern of active faults is typical for the study region. Morphological and genetic types and the kinematics of faults in the Hangay-Hentiy saddle region are related the direction of the ancient inherited structural heterogeneities. Latitudinal and WNW trending faults are left lateral strike-slips with reverse or thrust component (Dzhargalantgol and North Burd faults. NW trending faults are reverse faults or thrusts with left lateral horizontal component. NNW trending faults have right lateral horizontal component. The horizontal component of the displacements, as a rule, exceeds the vertical one. Brittle deformations in fault zones do not conform with the Pliocene and, for the most part, Pleistocene topography. With some caution it may be concluded that the last phase of revitalization of strike slip and reverse movements along the faults commenced in the Late Pleistocene. NE trending disjunctives are normal faults distributed mainly within the Hangay uplift. Their features are more early activation within the Late Cenozoic and the lack of relation to large linear structures of the previous tectonic stages. According to the stress tensor reconstructions of the last phase of deformation in zones of active faults of the Hangay-Hentiy saddle using data on tectonic fractures and fault displacements, it is revealed that conditions of compression and strike-slip with NNE direction of the axis of maximum compression were dominant. Stress tensors of extensional type with NNW direction of minimum compression are reconstructed for the Orkhon graben. It is concluded that the activation of faults in Central Mongolia in the Pleistocene-Holocene, as well as

  20. Active faults paragenesis and the state of crustal stresses in the Late Cenozoic in Central Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Sankov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Active faults of the Hangay-Hentiy tectonic saddle region in Central Mongolia are studied by space images interpretation, relief analysis, structural methods and tectonic stress reconstruction. The study results show that faults activation during the Late Cenozoic stage was selective, and a cluster pattern of active faults is typical for the study region. Morphological and genetic types and the kinematics of faults in the Hangay-Hentiy saddle region are related the direction of the ancient inherited structural heterogeneities. Latitudinal and WNW trending faults are left lateral strike-slips with reverse or thrust component (Dzhargalantgol and North Burd faults. NW trending faults are reverse faults or thrusts with left lateral horizontal component. NNW trending faults have right lateral horizontal component. The horizontal component of the displacements, as a rule, exceeds the vertical one. Brittle deformations in fault zones do not conform with the Pliocene and, for the most part, Pleistocene topography. With some caution it may be concluded that the last phase of revitalization of strike slip and reverse movements along the faults commenced in the Late Pleistocene. NE trending disjunctives are normal faults distributed mainly within the Hangay uplift. Their features are more early activation within the Late Cenozoic and the lack of relation to large linear structures of the previous tectonic stages. According to the stress tensor reconstructions of the last phase of deformation in zones of active faults of the Hangay-Hentiy saddle using data on tectonic fractures and fault displacements, it is revealed that conditions of compression and strike-slip with NNE direction of the axis of maximum compression were dominant. Stress tensors of extensional type with NNW direction of minimum compression are reconstructed for the Orkhon graben. It is concluded that the activation of faults in Central Mongolia in the Pleistocene-Holocene, as well as

  1. Microseismicity at the North Anatolian Fault in the Sea of Marmara offshore Istanbul, NW Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulut, Fatih; Bohnhoff, Marco; Ellsworth, William L.; Aktar, Mustafa; Dresen, Georg

    2009-01-01

    The North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) below the Sea of Marmara forms a “seismic gap” where a major earthquake is expected to occur in the near future. This segment of the fault lies between the 1912 Ganos and 1999 İzmit ruptures and is the only NAFZ segment that has not ruptured since 1766. To monitor the microseismic activity at the main fault branch offshore of Istanbul below the Çınarcık Basin, a permanent seismic array (PIRES) was installed on the two outermost Prince Islands, Yassiada and Sivriada, at a few kilometers distance to the fault. In addition, a temporary network of ocean bottom seismometers was deployed throughout the Çınarcık Basin. Slowness vectors are determined combining waveform cross correlation and P wave polarization. We jointly invert azimuth and traveltime observations for hypocenter determination and apply a bootstrap resampling technique to quantify the location precision. We observe seismicity rates of 20 events per month for M aster fault below ∼17 km depth. On the basis of a cross-correlation technique we group closely spaced earthquakes and determine composite focal mechanisms implementing recordings of surrounding permanent land stations. Fault plane solutions have a predominant right-lateral strike-slip mechanism, indicating that normal faulting along this part of the NAFZ plays a minor role. Toward the west we observe increasing components of thrust faulting. This supports the model of NW trending, dextral strike-slip motion along the northern and main branch of the NAFZ below the eastern Sea of Marmara.

  2. Fault creep rates of the Chaman fault (Afghanistan and Pakistan) inferred from InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, William D.

    2017-01-01

    The Chaman fault is the major strike-slip structural boundary between the India and Eurasia plates. Despite sinistral slip rates similar to the North America-Pacific plate boundary, no major (>M7) earthquakes have been documented along the Chaman fault, indicating that the fault either creeps aseismically or is at a late stage in its seismic cycle. Recent work with remotely sensed interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) time series documented a heterogeneous distribution of fault creep and interseismic coupling along the entire length of the Chaman fault, including an 125 km long creeping segment and an 95 km long locked segment within the region documented in this study. Here I present additional InSAR time series results from the Envisat and ALOS radar missions spanning the southern and central Chaman fault in an effort to constrain the locking depth, dip, and slip direction of the Chaman fault. I find that the fault deviates little from a vertical geometry and accommodates little to no fault-normal displacements. Peak-documented creep rates on the fault are 9-12 mm/yr, accounting for 25-33% of the total motion between India and Eurasia, and locking depths in creeping segments are commonly shallower than 500 m. The magnitude of the 1892 Chaman earthquake is well predicted by the total area of the 95 km long coupled segment. To a first order, the heterogeneous distribution of aseismic creep combined with consistently shallow locking depths suggests that the southern and central Chaman fault may only produce small to moderate earthquakes (

  3. Fault Coupling, Slip Rate Deficit and Strain Accumulation of the Haiyuan-Liupanshan Fault Zone in the Northeastern Margin of the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Shan, X.; Qu, C.; Song, X.; Jiang, Y.; Gong, W.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-12-01

    The Haiyuan-Liupanshan fault is one of the main left-lateral fault system in the northeastern edge of the Tibetan Plateau, which contributes to the rising and eastward extrusion of lithospheric blocks. It is a particularly well-suited area to understand the mechanisms of deformation which led to the growth and rise of the Tibet. Besides, the unbroken section (the Tianzhu seismic gap), which was bracketed by two M8 earthquakes (1920 and 1927), was interpreted with high seismic potential. Based on the GPS and geology (slip rate and fault slip vector azimuth) data, we invert for the fault coupling, the slip rate deficit and the strain rate accumulation along the Haiyuan-Liupanshan fault. It's of great importance for a better understanding of interseismic deformation, strain loading and seismic potential assessment. Along the Haiyuan fault, the results show 3.2-6.2 mm/yr of left-lateral strike-slip, and the strike-slip transformed into thrusting deformation (2.8-3.5 mm/yr) along the Liupanshan fault. The results suggest full coupling down to 10 km along the Haiyuan fault. Significant portions from the Jinqianghe fault to the Maomaoshan fault, however, are locked to 23 km depth. The abrupt change in fault coupling coincides with the Tianzhu seismic gap. High slip rate deficit (3.0-4.5 mm/yr) and seismic moment accumulation rate are also interpreted along the seismic gap. The Liupanshan fault is locked to 15-20 km depth. A high seismic moment accumulation rate but low slip rate deficit (2.0-3.2 mm/yr) are inverted along the fault. The fault locking depth is negatively correlated with the coulomb stress accumulation rate and the second invariant of the strain rate tensor. That is, low strain accumulation rates are inverted along the seismic gap and the Liupanshan fault. A possible explanation is that the total amount of the elastic strain along the fault may have reached a high level, but with a low accumulation rate. High seismic hazard are interpreted considering the

  4. Lateral Offset Quality Rating along Low Slip Rate Faults: Application to the Alhama de Murcia Fault (SE Iberian Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Ferrater

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Seismic hazard assessment of strike-slip faults is based partly on the identification and mapping of landforms laterally offset due to fault activity. The characterization of these features affected by slow-moving faults is challenging relative to studies emphasizing rapidly slipping faults. We propose a methodology for scoring fault offsets based on subjective and objective qualities. We apply this methodology to the Alhama de Murcia fault (SE Iberian Peninsula where we identify 138 offset features that we mapped on a high-resolution (0.5 × 0.5 m pixel size Digital Elevation Model (DEM. The amount of offset, the uncertainty of the measurement, the subjective and objective qualities, and the parameters that affect objective quality are independent variables, suggesting that our methodological scoring approach is good. Based on the offset measurements and qualifications we calculate the Cumulative Offset Probability Density (COPD for the entire fault and for each fault segment. The COPD for the segments differ from each other. Tentative interpretation of the COPDs implies that the slip rate varies from one segment to the other (we assume that channels with the same amount of offset were incised synchronously. We compare the COPD with climate proxy curves (aligning using the very limited age control to test if entrenchment events are coincident with climatic changes. Channel incision along one of the traces in Lorca-Totana segment may be related to transitions from glacial to interglacial periods.

  5. Effects of active fault types on earthquake-induced deep-seated landslides: A study of historical cases in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Wen; Iida, Tomoyuki; Yamada, Ryuji

    2017-10-01

    We investigated the relationship between the distribution of deep-seated landslides (DSLs; landslide volume > 105 m3) induced by inland earthquakes as well as the distribution of corresponding active faults by compiling preexisting documents on historical DSL occurrence records. The following points are found: (1) The DSLs induced by reverse fault earthquakes tend to occur equally within a wide range of about 20 km from the faults, whilst > 80% of DSLs induced by strike-slip fault earthquakes are concentrated within a small range of about 5 km from the faults. (2) Most of the DSLs are distributed on the hanging wall side of the active faults. (3) The distribution of some historical DSLs may reflect the directivity of the seismic waves of the historical earthquakes. The minimum peak ground velocity (PGV) and peak ground acceleration (PGA) during earthquakes that can induce DSLs are estimated to be 15-20 cm s- 1 and 300-400 cm s- 2, although most of the DSLs examined were induced by strike-slip fault earthquakes with PGV > 60 cm s- 1 and PGA > 900 cm s- 2. This discrepancy may be attributed to a possible limitation of the proposed equation, which was established mainly for cases of reverse fault earthquakes. It is implied that the type of fault, the side of the epicenter location (hanging wall/footwall side), and the directivity of seismic waves should be considered for assessing the distribution of ground motion in terms of DSL occurrence, and that these factors may reflect the level of risk for earthquake-induced landslides around active faults.

  6. Structural Evolution of the India-Arabia Plate Boundary from Miocene to Present-Day (NW Indian Ocean) and Comparison with the Dead Sea Fault (Eastern Mediterranean Sea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, M.; Huchon, P.; Chamot Rooke, N.; Fournier, M.; Delescluse, M.; Ben Avraham, Z.; Ten Brink, U. S.

    2014-12-01

    Arabia is bounded by the Dead Sea Transform (DST) to the west and by the Owen Fracture Zone (OFZ) to the east. These present-day major strike-slip fault systems activated during the Plio-Pleistocene, which contrasts with the age of inception of strike-slip motion, assumed to begin around 13-18 Ma for the DST and around 20 Ma at the edge of the Owen-Murray Ridge (OMR) for the India-Arabia plate boundary. This discrepancy between the age of the active strike-slip systems and the age of inception of strike-slip motion raises the question of the kinematic driver for the transition between successive generations of strike-slip faults. Using a recent mutibeam and seismic dataset crossing the OFZ and the OMR, we provide a new geodynamic framework for the Miocene to present-day structural evolution of the India-Arabia plate boundary, and highlight some similarities with the structural evolution of the DST. We first document a Late Miocene episode of uplift of the OMR uplift along the Miocene India-Arabia plate boundary. The onset of this uplift is coeval with a plate reorganization event marked by the onset of intra-plate deformation in the Central Indian Ocean. The OFZ emplaced around 3 Ma, with major pull-apart basins opening (20°N Basin, Dalrymple Trough) dated at 2.4 Ma by far-field correlation with ODP Sites. The opening of pull-apart basins is coeval with the last structural reorganization of the Makran accretionnary wedge, marked by the regional M-unconformity, and with a major intensification of the Indian monsoon. A Late Miocene episode of folding is also recognized at the Lebanon ranges prior to the onset of the present-day DST, which occurred in the Late Pliocene-Early Pleistocene. The similarities between the geological history of the India-Arabia plate boundary and the DST in the Late Miocene and the Late Pliocene-Early Pleistocene suggest that both plate boundaries recorded the same kinematic changes. Late Miocene (i.e. Tortonian) deformation is widely

  7. Deformation Monitoring of AN Active Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostapchuk, A.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of low frequency earthquakes, slow slip events and other deformation phenomena, new for geophysics, change our understanding of how the energy accumulated in the Earth's crust do release. The new geophysical data make one revise the underlying mechanism of geomechanical processes taking place in fault zones. Conditions for generating different slip modes are still unclear. The most vital question is whether a certain slip mode is intrinsic for a fault or may be controlled by external factors. This work presents the results of two and a half year deformation monitoring of a discontinuity in the zone of the Main Sayanskiy Fault. Main Sayanskiy Fault is right-lateral strike-slip fault. Observations were performed in the tunnel of Talaya seismic station (TLY), Irkutsk region, Russia. Measurements were carried out 70 m away from the entrance of the tunnel, the thickness of overlying rock was about 30 m. Inductive sensors of displacement were mounted at the both sides of a discontinuity, which recorded three components of relative fault side displacement with the accuracy of 0.2 mcm. Temperature variation inside the tunnel didn't exceed 0.5oC during the all period of observations. Important information about deformation properties of an active fault was obtained. A pronounced seasonality of deformation characteristics of discontinuity is observed in the investigated segment of rock. A great number of slow slip events with durations from several hours to several weeks were registered. Besides that alterations of fault deformation characteristics before the megathrust earthquake M9.0 Tohoku Oki 11 March 2011 and reaction to the event itself were detected. The work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation (grant no. 14-17-00719).

  8. Analysis of the impact of fault mechanism radiation patterns on macroseismic fields in the epicentral area of 1998 and 2004 Krn Mountains earthquakes (NW Slovenia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosar, Andrej

    2014-01-01

    Two moderate magnitude (Mw = 5.6 and 5.2) earthquakes in Krn Mountains occurred in 1998 and 2004 which had maximum intensity VII-VIII and VI-VII EMS-98, respectively. Comparison of both macroseismic fields showed unexpected differences in the epicentral area which cannot be explained by site effects. Considerably, different distribution of the highest intensities can be noticed with respect to the strike of the seismogenic fault and in some localities even higher intensities have been estimated for the smaller earthquake. Although hypocentres of both earthquakes were only 2 km apart and were located on the same seismogenic Ravne fault, their focal mechanisms showed a slight difference: almost pure dextral strike-slip for the first event and a strike-slip with small reverse component on a steep fault plane for the second one. Seismotectonically the difference is explained as an active growth of the Ravne fault at its NW end. The radiation patterns of both events were studied to explain their possible impact on the observed variations in macroseismic fields and damage distribution. Radiation amplitude lobes were computed for three orthogonal directions: radial P, SV, and SH. The highest intensities of both earthquakes were systematically observed in directions of four (1998) or two (2004) large amplitude lobes in SH component (which corresponds mainly to Love waves), which have significantly different orientation for both events. On the other hand, radial P direction, which is almost purely symmetrical for the strike-slip mechanism of 1998 event, showed for the 2004 event that its small reverse component of movement has resulted in a very pronounced amplitude lobe in SW direction where two settlements are located which expressed higher intensities in the case of the 2004 event with respect to the 1998 one. Although both macroseismic fields are very complex due to influences of multiple earthquakes, retrofitting activity after 1998, site effects, and sparse

  9. Faulting mechanisms and stress regime at the European HDR site of Soultz-sous-Forets, France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuenot, Nicolas; Charlety, Jean; Haessler, Henri [Institut de Physique du Globe de Strasbourg, Ecole et Observatoire des Sciences de la Terre (IPGS-EOST), 5 rue Rene Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Dorbath, Louis [Institut de Physique du Globe de Strasbourg, Ecole et Observatoire des Sciences de la Terre (IPGS-EOST), 5 rue Rene Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement, Laboratoire des Mecanismes et Transferts en Geologie (IRD, LMTG), 14 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France)

    2006-10-15

    The state of stress and its implications for shear on fault planes during fluid injection are crucial issues for the HDR (Hot Dry Rock) or EGS (Enhanced or Engineered Geothermal System) concept. This is especially true for hydraulic stimulation experiments, aimed at enhancing the connectivity of a borehole to the natural fracture network, since they tend to induce the shearing of fractures, which is controlled by the local stress regime. During the 2000 and 2003 stimulation tests at Soultz-sous-Forets, France, about 10,000 microearthquakes were located with a surface seismological network. Hundreds of double-couple (DC) focal mechanisms were automatically determined from first-motion polarities using the FPFIT program [Reasenberg, P.A., Oppenheimer, D., 1985. FPFIT, FPPLOT and FPPAGE: Fortran computer programs for calculating and displaying earthquake fault-plane solutions. US Geological Survey Open-File Report 85-739, 25 pp.]. The majority of these mechanisms indicate normal-faulting movement with a more or less pronounced strike-slip component. Some quasi-pure strike-slip events also occurred, especially in the deeper part of the stimulated rock volume, at more than 5 km depth. Although we found a double-couple solution for all events, we tried to observe and quantify the proportion of the non-double-couple (NDC) component in the seismic moment tensor for several microseisms from the 2003 data. The study shows that the NDC is higher for the events in the vicinity of the injection well than for the events far from the well. We used the method of Rivera and Cisternas [Rivera, L., Cisternas, A., 1990. Stress tensor and fault-plane solutions for a population of earthquakes. Bull. Seismol. Soc. Am. 80, 600-614.] to perform the inversion of the deviatoric part of the stress tensor from P-wave polarities. This method was applied to different datasets from the 2000 test, taken from the shallower and deeper parts of the stimulated region. The results show a stable

  10. The Geomorphological Developments Along the East Anatolian Fault Zone, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saber, R.; Caglayan, A.; Isik, V.; Seyitoglu, G.

    2014-12-01

    The collision of Eurasia with Arabia has given rise to intracontinental shortening in SE Turkey and development of large scale fault zones. The East Anatolian Fault Zone (EAFZ), a major active fault zone over 700 km in length with NE-striking, defines the boundary zone between Eurasia plate and Anatolian micro-plate. Although the northeastern continuation of the zone merges into the North Anatolian Fault Zone at Karliova region, the southwestern continuation has been the subject of some debate. The zone is characterized by numerous, complex faults and segmented surface ruptures. It cuts and offsets several distinctive units in east and southeast Turkey. The portion of the EAFZ examined in this study extends from Celikhan to Turkoglu. Active fault strands in this portion of the EAFZ is termed the Erkenek and Golbasi segments. The zone is made of several NE-SW closely spaced strands cut across Mesozoic-to-Tertiary variable rock units and structures, indicating inception of strike-slip motion in Quaternary and characterized by a series of basins. Fault-related several morphological features have been mapped are within the study area, suggesting the left-lateral motion of fault strands along this part of the EAFZ. Offset streams, beheaded channels, pressure and shutter ridges, linear valleys and ridges and sag ponds are prominent morpho-tectonic features. Offset streams have been measured as few meters to hundreds of meters and show sinistral displacement along the fault zone. Fault scarps, several tens of metres high, are developed in fan deposits along the length of the fault strands. Forming the set of linear sag ponds in Golbasi reveals extentional activity of the EAFZ in this area. Motion of fault strands formed linear valleys and ridges parallel to the faults which is most remarkable features. Our geomorphic studies demonstrated the ongoing activity of the the EAFZ between Celikhan to Turkoglu regions.

  11. The evolution of faults formed by shearing across joint zones in sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Rodrick; Aydin, Atilla

    2004-05-01

    The evolution of strike-slip and normal faults formed by slip along joint zones is documented by detailed field studies in the Jurassic Aztec Sandstone in the Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada, USA. Zones of closely spaced planar sub-parallel joints arranged en échelon are sheared, forming faults. Fracturing occurs as a result of shearing, forming new joints. Later shearing along these joints leads to successively formed small faults and newer joints. This process is repeated through many generations of fracturing with increasing fault slip producing a hierarchical array of structures. Strain localization produced by shearing of joint zones at irregularities in joint traces, fracture intersections, and in the span between adjacent sheared joints results in progressive fragmentation of the weakened sandstone, which leads to the formation of gouge along the fault zone. The length and continuity of the gouge and associated slip surfaces is related to the slip magnitude and fault geometry with slip ranging from several millimeters to about 150 m. Distributed damage in a zone surrounding the gouge core is related to the original joint zone configuration (step sense, individual sheared joint overlaps and separation), shear sense, and slip magnitude. Our evolutionary model of fault development helps to explain some outstanding issues concerning complexities in faulting such as, the variability in development of fault rock and fault related fractures, and the failure processes in faults.

  12. Transpressional inversion in an extensional transfer zone (the Saltacaballos fault, northern Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Luís; Alonso, Juan Luís; Pulgar, Javier A.; Rodríguez-Fernández, Luís Roberto

    2006-11-01

    This paper deals with an extensional transfer zone and its main structure, the Saltacaballos fault, developed during Early Cretaceous times, and obliquely inverted during the Alpine shortening. Geological mapping and structural analysis were carried out to determine the kinematic history of the deformation. The Saltacaballos ridge is the relay zone between two major and conjugate normal fault systems: the Bilbao and the La Granja-Samano fault systems. Three distinct phases in the structural evolution of this transfer zone can be identified. (1) During the initial stages of extensional deformation, shallow-water marine limestones were deposited on the relay ridge and deep-water marls on the flanking depocenters. At the same time, submarine landslides developed on paleoslope generated either by normal drag or by a fault-propagation fold related to the Saltacaballos normal fault. (2) With increasing displacement, normal faults antithetic to the Saltacaballos fault were developed probably in response to the collapse of its hanging-wall. (3) During the subsequent Alpine compressional stage, these normal faults were reactivated as dextral strike-slip faults as a result of transpressional inversion, whereas previous extensional fault-related folds were tightened. At the same time, some normal faults were overturned as a consequence of passive rotation in fold limbs.

  13. Latest extension of the Laujar fault in a convergence setting (Sierra Nevada, Betic Cordillera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Martos, Manuel; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesus; Sanz de Galdeano, Carlos; García-Tortosa, Francisco Juan; Martínez-Moreno, Francisco José; Ruano, Patricia; González-Castillo, Lourdes; Azañón, José Miguel

    2017-02-01

    The present-day relief of the Betic Cordillera formed since the Late Miocene through the regional N-S to NW-SE Africa-Eurasia convergence that developed large folds. The Laujar Fault Zone is a south-dipping E-W oriented structure located at the northern boundary of the Alpujarran Corridor Neogene intramontane basin, which separates Sierra Nevada and Sierra de Gador antiforms, in the Internal Zones of the Betic Cordillera. The fault zone acted in a first stage as a dextral strike-slip fault. Currently it moves as a normal fault evidenced by striated calcretes, also in agreement with regional continuous GPS (CGPS) data that support the hypothesis of an active N-S extension in the fault area. In order to analyse the deep geometry of the Laujar Fault Zone, we combined several geophysical techniques (gravity, magnetic, electric resistivity tomography and audio-magnetotelluric data) with field geological observations. Fault surfaces seem to join at a southward-dipping shallow detachment level, including faults covered by the sedimentary infill. The fault zone was developed in a previously weakened area by wrench faults parallel to the Alpujarran Corridor. The recent normal activity of this fault zone may be a consequence of a change in the Africa-Eurasia convergence orientation, which implies a decrease in the N-S compression component. This structure along the southern limb of Sierra Nevada antiform evidences the gravitational collapse of previously thickened crust in a regional compressional context simultaneous to metamorphic core uplift.

  14. Transition Fault and the Yakutat-Pacific-North American Triple Junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulick, S. P.; Christeson, G. L.; Norton, I. O.; Pavlis, T. L.; Reece, R.; van Avendonk, H.; Worthington, L. L.

    2011-12-01

    In the Gulf of Alaska the Pacific Plate, Yakutat Terrane, and North American Plate interact in a complexly deformed zone on the continental slope near Kayak Island. This zone can be viewed as a fault-trench-trench (FTT) triple junction that can only be stable if the two trench segments are aligned. In this case the trench segments are: the deformation front along which the Pacific Plate subducts beneath North America (the Aleutian Trench) and the deformation front along which the Yakutat Terrane subducts at a more westerly direction (when compared to the Pacific subduction) beneath North America (the Pamplona Zone). These two deformation fronts are, to a first order, locally aligned. The complex member of the system is the Transition Fault which is a long-lived strike-slip fault separating the 15-30 km thick Yakutat oceanic plateau crust from the 5-7 km thick Pacific Plate crust, which is itself deforming along the north-south trending Gulf of Alaska Shear Zone (GASZ). A series of seismic reflection profiles crossing the Transition Fault allow us to examine the evolution of deformation as a function of proximity to the triple junction. East of the triple junction and the GASZ, the Transition Fault is a single near vertical strike-slip zone. Moving west to the area where the GASZ interacts with the Transition Fault, three seismic profiles show that the Fault bifurcates into a southern transpressional strand with a few 100 meters of seafloor relief and a northern strike-slip dominated strand. West of the GASZ and within the region proximal to the triple junction, two seismic lines show that the Transition Fault is expressed as a southern transpressional structure with significant amounts shortening (seafloor expression increased to ~1.8 km) and a northern dominantly strike-slip fault with minor transpression. Mapping the top of basement shows that the southern arm lies within and deforms the Pacific oceanic crust with the top of ocean crust reflection to the north

  15. Paleoseismic record obtained by coring a sag-pond along the North Anatolian Fault (Turkey

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    Aurelia Hubert-Ferrari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Shallow lakes along minor structural bends or discontinuities of strike-slip faults are not usually paleoseismological target sites. In the present study, we show that a 2-m-deep, 700-m-long lake that is cross-cut by the North Anatolian Fault contains a reliable paleoseimological record that can be obtained through coring. The North Anatolian Fault is a major strike-slip fault in Turkey, and it last ruptured across the Aşağıtepecik Lake in 1939, with a slip of about 6 m. Seismic lines still show remains of the fault rupture in the form of minor scarps across the lake. Collected short cores show a set of sedimentary sequences. Each sequence is composed of similar organic-rich sedimentary units. The lower unit is dark and fibrous, and is similar to the present sedimentation at the top of the core. The upper unit is disturbed and has anomalous organic matter content, grain size and mineralogy. It is interpreted as an earthquake-induced sedimentary event. The 2.5-m-long AT2007LG core comprises four sequences, and four sedimentary events. Radiogenic 210Pb and 137Cs data obtained previously imply that the shallowest event 1 was triggered by the 1939 M = 7.9 Erzincan earthquake. Radiocarbon dating and correlation to a reference varved record suggest that events 2 and 4 were initiated by the 1668 and 1254 historical earthquakes. Event 3 does not correspond to a large historical earthquake on the North Anatolian Fault.

  16. Investigation of the Relationship Between Ionospheric TEC Anomaly Variations and Fault Types Before the Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulukavak, M.; Yalçınkaya, M.

    2017-11-01

    Earthquakes are natural phenomena that shake the earth and cause many damage. Since the time of arrival of the earthquakes cannot be determined directly, some signs before the earthquake should be examined and interpreted by examining the environmental changes. One of the methods used for this is monitoring the ionospheric total electron content (TEC) changes in total electron content unit (TECU). GPS satellites have begun to be used as a means of monitoring ionospheric TEC anomalies before earthquakes since they began to be used as sensors around the world. In this study, three fault type (normal, thrust and strike-slip faulting) of 28 earthquakes with a magnitude greater than 7 (Mw) and the percentage changes of TEC anomalies before the earthquakes were investigated. The ionospheric TEC anomalies before the earthquake were calculated according to the 15-day running median statistical analysis method. Different solar and geomagnetic indices have been investigated to determine the active space weather conditions and quiet days before and after the earthquake. The TEC anomalies were determined during the quiet days before the earthquake by comparing the ionospheric anomalies that occurred before the earthquake after the determination of quiet days with the indices of the space weather conditions. The results show that there is a relationship between fault type and the earthquake precursor percentage changes and were determined as 47.6 % TECU for regions where normal faulting, 50.4 % TECU for regions where thrust faulting, and 44.2 % TECU for regions where strike-slip faulting occurred, respectively.

  17. Slip partitioning on the Enriquillo and Lamentin faults during the 2010 Haiti earthquake

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    Saint Fleur, Newdeskarl; Feuillet, Nathalie; Grandin, Raphaël; Jacques, Éric; Weil-Accardo, Jennifer; Klinger, Yann

    2014-05-01

    A general consensus has emerged from the study of the 12 January 2010, Mw 7.0 Haiti earthquake: the coseismic rupture was complex, portraying both reverse and strike-slip motion, but lacking unambiguous surface break. Based on seismological, geodetic and geologic data, numerous slip models have been proposed for that event. However, using an incomplete fault map, the latter models were preliminary, proposing a rupture on unmapped buried faults. Here, using bathymetric data offshore Port-au-Prince along with a digital elevation model derived from LiDAR on-land, we identified the south-dipping Lamentin thrust in the Bay of Port-au-Prince. The fault prolongs on-land where it deforms active alluvial fans in the city of Carrefour. The geometry and distribution of the aftershocks of the 2010 earthquake and the analysis of the regional geology allow us to place constraints on the connection at depth between the Lamentin thrust and the sinistral strike-slip Enriquillo -Plantain Garden Fault (EPGF). Inversion of geodetic data suggests that both faults may have broken in 2010, consistently with the regional geodynamical setting. The rupture initiated along the Lamentin thrust and further propagated along the EPGF due to instantaneous unclamping at depth. The corals uplifted around the Léogâne Delta Fan, contributing to the build-up of long-term topography between the Lamentin thrust and the EPGF. The 2010 earthquake increased the stress toward failure on unruptured EPGF segments as well as on the thrust fault sitting in the middle of the city of Carrefour, in the direct vicinity of Port-au-Prince, thereby increasing the seismic hazard in these areas.

  18. Highly Variable Latest Pleistocene-Holocene Incremental Slip Rates on the Awatere Fault at Saxton River, South Island, New Zealand, Revealed by Lidar Mapping and Luminescence Dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinke, Robert; Dolan, James F.; Rhodes, Edward J.; Van Dissen, Russ; McGuire, Christopher P.

    2017-11-01

    Geomorphic mapping using high-resolution lidar imagery and luminescence dating reveal highly variable incremental Holocene-latest Pleistocene slip rates at the well-known Saxton River site along the Awatere fault, a dextral strike-slip fault in the Marlborough Fault System, South Island, New Zealand. Using lidar and field observations, we measured seven fault offsets recorded by fluvial terraces and bedrock markers. Improved dating of the offsets is provided by post-IR-IRSL225 luminescence ages. Incremental slip rates varied from 15 mm/yr over intervals of thousands of years and tens of meters of slip, demonstrating order-of-magnitude temporal variations in rate at a single site. These observations have basic implications for earthquake fault behavior, lithospheric mechanics, discrepancies between geodetic and geologic slip rates, and probabilistic seismic hazard assessment.

  19. Pulsed strain release on the Altyn Tagh fault, northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Ryan D.; Cowgill, Eric; Arrowsmith, J. Ramón; Friedrich, Anke M.

    2017-01-01

    Earthquake recurrence models assume that major surface-rupturing earthquakes are followed by periods of reduced rupture probability as stress rebuilds. Although purely periodic, time- or slip-predictable rupture models are known to be oversimplifications, a paucity of long records of fault slip clouds understanding of fault behavior and earthquake recurrence over multiple ruptures. Here, we report a 16 kyr history of fault slip—including a pulse of accelerated slip from 6.4 to 6.0 ka—determined using a Monte Carlo analysis of well-dated offset landforms along the central Altyn Tagh strike-slip fault (ATF) in northwest China. This pulse punctuates a median rate of 8.1+1.2/−0.9 mm/a and likely resulted from either a flurry of temporally clustered ∼Mw 7.5 ground-rupturing earthquakes or a single large >Mw 8.2 earthquake. The clustered earthquake scenario implies rapid re-rupture of a fault reach >195 km long and indicates decoupled rates of elastic strain energy accumulation versus dissipation, conceptualized as a crustal stress battery. If the pulse reflects a single event, slip-magnitude scaling implies that it ruptured much of the ATF with slip similar to, or exceeding, the largest documented historical ruptures. Both scenarios indicate fault rupture behavior that deviates from classic time- or slip-predictable models.

  20. Structural Inversion of the Palos Verdes Fault, Southern California, and its Implications for Seismic Hazards Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brankman, C. M.; Shaw, J. H.

    2004-12-01

    The Palos Verdes Fault (PVF) defines the western margin of the Los Angeles basin, and is regarded as a likely source of moderate to large earthquakes that would affect the coastal metropolitan regions of southern California. In most hazard compilations, the PVF is generally considered to be a vertical, predominantly right-lateral, strike-slip fault system that extends continuously from the Santa Monica thrust southward across Santa Monica Bay, crossing the Palos Verdes Peninsula and continuing southeast across the Inner Borderlands to the area of Coronado Banks. A restraining bend where the fault dips steeply to the southwest generates uplift and folding of the Palos Verdes Peninsula. However, previous studies documenting the activity, slip rate, and slip sense of the PVF have used shallow subsurface excavations and high-frequency seismic data, which have generally limited observations to the upper kilometer of the crust. We use an extensive grid of petroleum industry seismic reflection data and well logs to define the three-dimensional subsurface geometry of the PVF in the region south of the Palos Verdes Peninsula. Our seismic data cover the complete offshore extent of the fault, from Santa Monica Bay to the Coronado Banks, and provide direct constraints on the fault geometry extending down to about 5km depth. We use the shapes of folded strata imaged in the seismic data and penetrated by wells to invert for permissible geometries of the fault as it extends to the base of the seismogenic crust. Our data and structural analyses indicate that the PVF developed by Pliocene inversion of a Miocene normal fault system. The fault has a significant component of reverse slip and southwesterly dip at depth along its extent. Oblique displacement on the fault appears to be partitioned at shallow levels into nearly pure right-lateral strike slip on near-vertical faults and contractional folding above gently to moderately dipping blind-thrust fault splays. These observations

  1. New High-Resolution 3D Seismic Imagery of Deformation and Fault Architecture Along Newport-Inglewood/Rose Canyon Fault in the Inner California Borderlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, J. J.; Bormann, J. M.; Driscoll, N. W.; Kent, G.; Harding, A. J.; Wesnousky, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    The tectonic deformation and geomorphology of the Inner California Borderlands (ICB) records the transition from a convergent plate margin to a predominantly dextral strike-slip system. Geodetic measurements of plate boundary deformation onshore indicate that approximately 15%, or 6-8 mm/yr, of the total Pacific-North American relative plate motion is accommodated by faults offshore. The largest near-shore fault system, the Newport-Inglewood/Rose Canyon (NI/RC) fault complex, has a Holocene slip rate estimate of 1.5-2.0 mm/yr, according to onshore trenching, and current models suggest the potential to produce an Mw 7.0+ earthquake. The fault zone extends approximately 120 km, initiating from the south near downtown San Diego and striking northwards with a constraining bend north of Mt. Soledad in La Jolla and continuing northwestward along the continental shelf, eventually stepping onshore at Newport Beach, California. In late 2013, we completed the first high-resolution 3D seismic survey (3.125 m bins) of the NI/RC fault offshore of San Onofre as part of the Southern California Regional Fault Mapping project. We present new constraints on fault geometry and segmentation of the fault system that may play a role in limiting the extent of future earthquake ruptures. In addition, slip rate estimates using piercing points such as offset channels will be explored. These new observations will allow us to investigate recent deformation and strain transfer along the NI/RC fault system.

  2. Structural characteristics of the Yilan-Yitong and Dunhua-Mishan faults as northern extensions of the Tancheng-Lujiang Fault Zone: New deep seismic reflection results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming; Li, Yalin; Hou, Hesheng; Wang, Chengshan; Gao, Rui; Wang, Haiyan; Han, Zhongpeng; Zhou, Aorigele

    2017-06-01

    The Tancheng-Lujiang Fault Zone (TLFZ) can be subdivided into three segments that exhibit sharp contrasts in their deep structures. A deep seismic reflection profile (length 600 km) across the north part of the TLFZ, which provides new constraints on the structural styles of the northern TLFZ, was recently completed by the Chinese Sinoprobe Project. Here, the TLFZ branches into the Yilan-Yitong Fault (YYF) to the west and the Dunhua-Mishan Fault (DMF) to the east. The YYF developed as an internal fault in the Songnen-Zhangguangcai massif, while the DMF serves as the tectonic boundary between the Nadanhada terrane and the Khanka massif. Both faults developed large-scale flower structures, with that of the YYF being negative and that of the DMF being positive with reverse faults. The Moho in the profile is at a depth of 25-39 km and is offset by the faults. The north part of the TLFZ extends into the upper mantle as thin shear zones with the reflectors truncated in the middle/lower crust. This feature differs from most crustal-scale strike-slip faults that distribute over a discrete shear zone in the lower crust, such as the San Andreas Fault.

  3. Eastern Denali Fault surface trace map, eastern Alaska and Yukon, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Adrian M.; Haeussler, Peter J.

    2017-05-04

    We map the 385-kilometer (km) long surface trace of the right-lateral, strike-slip Denali Fault between the Totschunda-Denali Fault intersection in Alaska, United States and the village of Haines Junction, Yukon, Canada. In Alaska, digital elevation models based on light detection and ranging and interferometric synthetic aperture radar data enabled our fault mapping at scales of 1:2,000 and 1:10,000, respectively. Lacking such resources in Yukon, we developed new structure-from-motion digital photogrammetry products from legacy aerial photos to map the fault surface trace at a scale of 1:10,000 east of the international border. The section of the fault that we map, referred to as the Eastern Denali Fault, did not rupture during the 2002 Denali Fault earthquake (moment magnitude 7.9). Seismologic, geodetic, and geomorphic evidence, along with a paleoseismic record of past ground-rupturing earthquakes, demonstrate Holocene and contemporary activity on the fault, however. This map of the Eastern Denali Fault surface trace complements other data sets by providing an openly accessible digital interpretation of the location, length, and continuity of the fault’s surface trace based on the accompanying digital topography dataset. Additionally, the digitized fault trace may provide geometric constraints useful for modeling earthquake scenarios and related seismic hazard.

  4. The effect of fault segmentation on the dynamics of fast-slipping oceanic transform faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, P. M.; Behn, M. D.; Lin, J.; Grove, T. L.; Montési, L. G.

    2007-12-01

    The majority of oceanic transform faults (OTFs) systems along the fast-spreading equatorial East Pacific Rise are segmented into two or more strike-slip fault strands as a result of plate motion reorganization. Fresh basaltic lava sampled from these locations (e.g., the Siqueiros and Garrett OTFs) indicate that active crustal accretion is occurring within these transform systems. New Residual Mantle Bouguer gravity Anomalies (RMBA) calculated along fast-slipping OTFs are found to be more negative than the RMBA values along adjacent ridge segments. One possible explanation for these observations is enhanced magmatic upwelling and crustal accretion at intra- transform spreading centers (ITSC) and within the transform valley of the fast-slipping OTFs. In this study, we examine two end-member 3-D thermal models (constant viscosity rheology versus visco-plastic rheology) to explore mantle flow and melt extraction beneath segmented transform faults. Melt fraction is calculated using the parameterized fractional melting model of Kinzler and Grove (JGR, 1992a, 1992b, and 1993), and the fractional crystallization models of Yang et al. (Cont. Min. Pet., 1996). We evaluate the sensitivity of these models to various parameters including transform fault geometry, mantle potential temperature, and initial mantle composition. Preliminary results for a 100 km-long transform fault, slipping at 100 mm/yr, segmented by a single 10 km-long ITSC indicate that incorporating a visco-plastic rheology results in an approximately 35 percent decrease in the brittle fault area (Siqueiros transform fault and make direct comparisons between predicted crustal thickness and melt composition with gravity-derived crustal thickness variations and major element analyses of glass samples recovered from the Siqueiros transform fault domain.

  5. Seismostratigraphy and tectonic architecture of the Carboneras Fault offshore based on multiscale seismic imaging: Implications for the Neogene evolution of the NE Alboran Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Ximena; Gràcia, Eulàlia; Bartolomé, Rafael; Martínez-Loriente, Sara; Perea, Héctor; de la Peña, Laura Gómez; Iacono, Claudio Lo; Piñero, Elena; Pallàs, Raimon; Masana, Eulàlia; Dañobeitia, Juan José

    2016-10-01

    In the SE Iberian Margin, which hosts the convergent boundary between the European and African Plates, Quaternary faulting activity is dominated by a large left-lateral strike-slip system referred to as the Eastern Betic Shear Zone. This active fault system runs along more than 450 km and it is characterised by low to moderate magnitude shallow earthquakes, although large historical events have also occurred. The Carboneras Fault is the longest structure of the Eastern Betic Shear Zone, and its southern termination extends further into the Alboran Sea. Previously acquired high-resolution data (i.e. swath-bathymetry, TOBI sidescan sonar and sub-bottom profiler) show that the offshore Carboneras Fault is a NE-SW-trending upwarped zone of deformation with a length of 90 km long and a width of 0.5 to 2 km, which shows geomorphic features typically found in subaerial strike-slip faults, such as deflected drainage, pressure ridges and "en echelon" folds. However, the neotectonic, depth architecture, and Neogene evolution of Carboneras Fault offshore are still poorly known. In this work we present a multiscale seismic imaging of the Carboneras Fault (i.e. TOPAS, high-resolution multichannel-seismic reflection, and deep penetration multichannel-seismic reflection) carried out during three successive marine cruises, from 2006 to 2010. The new dataset allowed us to define a total of seven seismostratigraphic units (from Tortonian to Late Quaternary) above the basement, to characterise the tectonic architecture and structural segmentation of the Carboneras Fault, and to estimate its maximum seismic potential. We finally discuss the role of the basement in the present-day tectonic evolution of the Carboneras Fault, and explore the northern and southern terminations of the fault and how the strain is transferred to nearby structures.

  6. Deformation characteristics and history along the Ilkwang Fault, SE Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, K.; Kim, Y.; Yang, S.; Choi, J.

    2009-12-01

    The NNE-SSW trending Ilkwang Fault is one of the major structural features around SE Korea. It is a high angle, right-lateral strike-slip fault with a displacement of about 1.2 km. The basement around the fault is Cretaceous sedimentary and volcanic rocks forming a part of the Gyeongsang Basin in SE Korea, and it is intruded by later igneous rocks. The fault has not been studied intensively due to poor exposure along the fault. However, understanding the characteristics of the Ilkwang Fault is important because three nuclear power plants and one nuclear waste disposal site are located around the fault. We have mainly investigated along the new road-cut sections of the Busan-Ulsan Highway. Many geologic structures such as dykes, folds, and faults are measured in several studied sites. The analyzed structural patterns indicate multi-deformation including reactivation of pre-existing faults. In this study, we analyzed variation patterns of attitude on the beddings and fractures around some parts of the Ilkwang Fault. The strike/dip variation from the general attitude of the structural elements (e.g. beddings) is here used as an indicator of deformation intensity across the fault. This analysis indicates that respect distances (highly deformed area affected by faulting) along the Ilkwang Fault is about 1 km in sedimentary rocks and 200 m in volcanic rocks, respectively. It indicates that the Ilkwang Fault is a relatively big fault, and layered sedimentary rock is relatively weaker than massive volcanic rock under brittle deformation. Deformation history in the studied area, based on kinematic analysis of faults, joints and dykes, is as follows: 1) NNE-SSW trending reverse fault and fold. 2) E-W trending reverse fault and N-S trending acidic dykes. 3) ENE-WSW trending left-lateral fault, NNE-SSW trending right-lateral fault, and NE-SW trending basic dykes. 4) E-W trending normal fault. 5) N-S or NNE-SSW trending reverse fault.

  7. 2001 Bhuj-Kachchh earthquake: surface faulting and its relation with neotectonics and regional structures, Gujarat, Western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Thakkar

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary and secondary surface deformation related to the 2001 Bhuj-Kachchh earthquake suggests that thrusting movement took place along an E-W fault near the western extension of the South Wagad Fault, a synthetic fault of the Kachchh Mainland Fault (KMF. Despite early reconnaissance reports that concluded there was no primary surface faulting, we describe an 830 m long, 15-35 cm high, east-west-trending thrust fault scarp near where the seismogenic fault plane would project to the surface, near Bharodiya village (between 23°34.912'N, 70°23.942'E and 23°34.304'N, 70°24.884'E. Along most of the scarp Jurassic bedrock is thrust over Quaternary deposits, but the fault scarp also displaces Holocene alluvium and an earth dam, with dips of 13° to 36° south. Secondary co-seismic features, mainly liquefaction and lateral spreading, dominate the area south of the thrust. Transverse right-lateral movement along the «Manfara Fault» and a parallel fault near Bharodiya suggests segmentation of the E-W master faults. Primary (thrust surface rupture had a length of 0.8 km, maximum displacement of about 35 cm, and average displacement of about 15 cm. Secondary (strike-slip faulting was more extensive, with a total end-to-end length of 15 km, maximum displacement of 35 cm, and average displacement of about 20 cm.

  8. Paleoseismology of the 1966 Varto Earthquake (Ms 6.8) and Structure of the Varto Fault Zone, Eastern Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, V.; Caglayan, A.; Saber, R.; Yesilyurt, N.

    2014-12-01

    Turkey is a region of active faulting and contains several strike-slip fault zones, which have generated both historical and recent large earthquakes. Two active fault zones in Turkey, the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) and the East Anatolian Fault Zone (EAFZ), divide the area into the Anatolian micro-plate accommodating WSW-directed movement. The southeastern continuation of the NAFZ is often referred to the Varto Fault Zone (VFZ). The VFZ cuts mainly Pliocene volcano-sedimentary units and/or Quaternary deposits and is characterized by multiple fault strands and multiple, closely spaced, active seismogenic zones. Fault motions in the zone are primarily right-lateral, with a subordinate component of NNW-SSE shortening. Study area is Varto region in which indications of active faulting are very well preserved. We recognized three coseismic ruptures from five trench exposures. It is referred to these as events 1 (youngest) through 3 (oldest). The best evidence of event 3 comes from fault traces and its upward terminations. The major components of this fault are fault core and damage zone. The fault is not just one plane of discontinuity and bifurcates and creates additional slip surfaces, which propagate out of the plane of the original fault. Event 2 and event 1, referring to 1946 and 1966 earthquakes, are characterized primarily by discrete, regularly spaced normal faults with and 55-80 cm and 105-270 cm throws, respectively and geometry of growth strata. The VFZ in the study area include typical structures of strike-slip fault zone. It forms a number of parallel and slightly sub-parallel strands striking N50°-72°W including contractional and extensional brittle structures. Several meters to tens of meters wavelength active folds with ENE-WSW and WNW-ESE trending fold axis. These folds deform the Plio-Quaternary units and show classic asymmetry associated with both a south- and north-vergent fault propagation fold. Meso-scale normal faults are also well

  9. Structure of the Newport-Inglewood/Rose Canyon and Palos Verdes Fault Zones and Implications for Current Fault Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahakian, V. J.; Bormann, J. M.; Klotsko, S.; Holmes, J. J.; Driscoll, N. W.; Harding, A. J.; Kent, G.; Wesnousky, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Faulting in the Inner California Borderlands is complex. In the past, this region has undergone various deformational events such as extensional and rotational deformation to variable strike-slip deformation; this has imparted the geomorphology and fault structures observed offshore Southern California. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the current fault structures and the hazards they pose to populated coastal regions. The geometry and architecture of these structures can have significant implications for ground motions in the event of a rupture, and therefore impact working models of hazard assessment. Here, focusing on the Newport-Inglewood/Rose Canyon (NI/RC) and Palos Verdes (PV) fault zones, we use new and existing multibeam, CHIRP and Multi-Channel Seismic (MCS) data to describe the geometry of the fault system. We interpret reprocessed (prestack time migration) MCS data collected in 1979, 1986, and 2006 as well as newly acquired high-res MCS datasets collected offshore San Diego County. Combining these high and intermediate resolution datasets with very high resolution CHIRP data, we define structures that show distinct changes in the style of deformation through time, and place constraints on the segmentation of faults in this system. The timing of the most recent deformation on the NI/RC appears to vary along-strike. Likewise, the NI/RC fault's dip direction and angle appears to vary along-strike, and these changes in dip seem to mark the boundaries of restraining and releasing bends. Additionally, the NI/RC fault appears to die away to the north, possibly partitioning its strain on to the PV fault. We will present interpretations of the faults' current deformational activity as well as likelihood of rupture propagating across releasing/restraining bends, and discuss how this impacts current fault models that are employed for hazard assessment for Los Angeles and San Diego counties.

  10. The Evergreen basin and the role of the Silver Creek fault in the San Andreas fault system, San Francisco Bay region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jachens, Robert C.; Wentworth, Carl M.; Graymer, Russell W.; Williams, Robert; Ponce, David A.; Mankinen, Edward A.; Stephenson, William J.; Langenheim, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    The Evergreen basin is a 40-km-long, 8-km-wide Cenozoic sedimentary basin that lies mostly concealed beneath the northeastern margin of the Santa Clara Valley near the south end of San Francisco Bay (California, USA). The basin is bounded on the northeast by the strike-slip Hayward fault and an approximately parallel subsurface fault that is structurally overlain by a set of west-verging reverse-oblique faults which form the present-day southeastward extension of the Hayward fault. It is bounded on the southwest by the Silver Creek fault, a largely dormant or abandoned fault that splays from the active southern Calaveras fault. We propose that the Evergreen basin formed as a strike-slip pull-apart basin in the right step from the Silver Creek fault to the Hayward fault during a time when the Silver Creek fault served as a segment of the main route by which slip was transferred from the central California San Andreas fault to the Hayward and other East Bay faults. The dimensions and shape of the Evergreen basin, together with palinspastic reconstructions of geologic and geophysical features surrounding it, suggest that during its lifetime, the Silver Creek fault transferred a significant portion of the ∼100 km of total offset accommodated by the Hayward fault, and of the 175 km of total San Andreas system offset thought to have been accommodated by the entire East Bay fault system. As shown previously, at ca. 1.5–2.5 Ma the Hayward-Calaveras connection changed from a right-step, releasing regime to a left-step, restraining regime, with the consequent effective abandonment of the Silver Creek fault. This reorganization was, perhaps, preceded by development of the previously proposed basin-bisecting Mount Misery fault, a fault that directly linked the southern end of the Hayward fault with the southern Calaveras fault during extinction of pull-apart activity. Historic seismicity indicates that slip below a depth of 5 km is mostly transferred from the Calaveras

  11. Geological and geomorphological evidence for the southwestern extension of the East Anatolian Fault Zone, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yönlü, Önder; Altunel, Erhan; Karabacak, Volkan

    2017-07-01

    The left lateral strike slip East Anatolian Fault Zone (EAFZ) is the main structural link between the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) in north and subduction in the Mediterranean Sea and the transform Dead Sea Fault Zone (DSFZ) in south. We studied the southwestern continuation of the EAFZ using combined field investigations including geomorphology, geology and paleoseismology. Mapping of offset drainages, lineaments, shutter ridges and fault planes in young geological units suggests existence of active faults between the Mediterranean coast and Türkoğlu where it intersects with the DSFZ. Yumurtalık and Toprakkale faults are the main tectonic structures and detailed examination of geological and geomorphological evidences suggest their Quaternary activity. Paleoseismic trenching on these faults provided evidence for at least two surface rupturing events in the last 9,000 yr. Detailed examination of paleo-valleys of the Ceyhan River suggests that the course of the river migrated due to the activity of the Toprakkale Fault. Obtained geological and geomorphological data indicates that the EAFZ continues across the Amanos Mountains and the slip transfer is mainly accommodated by the Toprakkale and Yumurtalık faults.

  12. Spatio-temporal evolution of fault networks: implications for deep radioactive waste disposal sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardacre, K.; Scotti, O. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire

    2001-07-01

    The objective of this work is to provide estimates of both vertical and lateral propagation rates, on time scales of 100 000 years, for the faults systems known to be present today in the region of Bure, the site of an underground rock laboratory. The project is divided into three parts: 1) literature review (fault growth processes and data), 2) benchmarking against data a numerical code that allows for spontaneous development and growth of faults and 3) application to the Bure site. A brief overview of fault growth processes and observed fault propagation rates shows that non-negligible values (20-50 mm/yrs or roughly 5 km in 100 000 years) can be reached. Preliminary results obtained from two numerical simulations 1) fault growth of a pre-existing weaknesses and 2) fault growth of a spontaneously generated fault system, provide encouraging results with values that are comparable with those observed in nature for the growth of normal fault systems. The application to strike-slip system that characterizes the Bure site is still underway. (authors)

  13. Precambrian crustal evolution and Cretaceous–Palaeogene faulting in West Greenland: Faults and fractures in central West Greenland: onshore expression of continental break-up and sea-floor spreading in the Labrador – Baffin Bay Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalmers, James A.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The complex Ungava fault zone lies in the Davis Strait and separates failed spreading centres in the Labrador Sea and Baffin Bay. This study focuses on coastal exposures east of the fault-bound Sisimiut basin, where the onshore expressions of these fault systems and the influence of pre-existing basement are examined. Regional lineament studies identify five main systems: N–S, NNE–SSW, ENE–WSW, ESE–WNW and NNW–SSE. Field studies reveal that strike-slip movements predominate, and are consistent with a ~NNE–SSW-oriented sinistral wrench system. Extensional faults trending N–S and ENE–WSW (basement-parallel, and compressional faults trending E–W, were also identified. The relative ages of these fault systems have been interpreted using cross-cutting relationships and by correlation with previously identified structures. A two-phase model for fault development fits the development of both the onshore fault systems observed in this study and regional tectonic structures offshore. The conclusions from this study show that the fault patterns and sense of movement on faults onshore reflect the stress fields that govern the opening of the Labrador Sea – Davis Strait – Baffin Bay seaway, and that the wrench couple on the Ungava transform system played a dominant role in the development of the onshore fault patterns

  14. Three dimensional modelling of earthquake rupture cycles on frictional faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Guy; May, Dave

    2017-04-01

    We are developing an efficient MPI-parallel numerical method to simulate earthquake sequences on preexisting faults embedding within a three dimensional viscoelastic half-space. We solve the velocity form of the elasto(visco)dynamic equations using a continuous Galerkin Finite Element Method on an unstructured pentahedral mesh, which thus permits local spatial refinement in the vicinity of the fault. Friction sliding is coupled to the viscoelastic solid via rate- and state-dependent friction laws using the split-node technique. Our coupled formulation employs a picard-type non-linear solver with a fully implicit, first order accurate time integrator that utilises an adaptive time step that efficiently evolves the system through multiple seismic cycles. The implementation leverages advanced parallel solvers, preconditioners and linear algebra from the Portable Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computing (PETSc) library. The model can treat heterogeneous frictional properties and stress states on the fault and surrounding solid as well as non-planar fault geometries. Preliminary tests show that the model successfully reproduces dynamic rupture on a vertical strike-slip fault in a half-space governed by rate-state friction with the ageing law.

  15. Refining fault slip rates using multiple displaced terrace risers—An example from the Honey Lake fault, NE California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Ryan D.; Briggs, Richard; Crone, Anthony J.; Duross, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Faulted terrace risers are semi-planar features commonly used to constrain Quaternary slip rates along strike-slip faults. These landforms are difficult to date directly and therefore their ages are commonly bracketed by age estimates of the adjacent upper and lower terrace surfaces. However, substantial differences in the ages of the upper and lower terrace surfaces (a factor of 2.4 difference observed globally) produce large uncertainties in the slip-rate estimate. In this investigation, we explore how the full range of displacements and bounding ages from multiple faulted terrace risers can be combined to yield a more accurate fault slip rate. We use 0.25-m cell size digital terrain models derived from airborne lidar data to analyze three sites where terrace risers are offset right-laterally by the Honey Lake fault in NE California, USA. We use ages for locally extensive subhorizontal surfaces to bracket the time of riser formation: an upper surface is the bed of abandoned Lake Lahontan having an age of 15.8 ± 0.6 ka and a lower surface is a fluvial terrace abandoned at 4.7 ± 0.1 ka. We estimate lateral offsets of the risers ranging between 6.6 and 28.3 m (median values), a greater than fourfold difference in values. The amount of offset corresponds to the riser's position relative to modern stream meanders: the smallest offset is in a meander cutbank position, whereas the larger offsets are in straight channel or meander point-bar positions. Taken in isolation, the individual terrace-riser offsets yield slip rates ranging from 0.3 to 7.1 mm/a. However, when the offset values are collectively assessed in a probabilistic framework, we find that a uniform (linear) slip rate of 1.6 mm/a (1.4–1.9 mm/a at 95% confidence) can satisfy the data, within their respective uncertainties. This investigation demonstrates that integrating observations of multiple offset elements (crest, midpoint, and base) from numerous faulted and dated terrace risers at closely spaced

  16. Refining fault slip rates using multiple displaced terrace risers-An example from the Honey Lake fault, NE California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Ryan D.; Briggs, Richard W.; Crone, Anthony J.; DuRoss, Christopher B.

    2017-11-01

    Faulted terrace risers are semi-planar features commonly used to constrain Quaternary slip rates along strike-slip faults. These landforms are difficult to date directly and therefore their ages are commonly bracketed by age estimates of the adjacent upper and lower terrace surfaces. However, substantial differences in the ages of the upper and lower terrace surfaces (a factor of 2.4 difference observed globally) produce large uncertainties in the slip-rate estimate. In this investigation, we explore how the full range of displacements and bounding ages from multiple faulted terrace risers can be combined to yield a more accurate fault slip rate. We use 0.25-m cell size digital terrain models derived from airborne lidar data to analyze three sites where terrace risers are offset right-laterally by the Honey Lake fault in NE California, USA. We use ages for locally extensive subhorizontal surfaces to bracket the time of riser formation: an upper surface is the bed of abandoned Lake Lahontan having an age of 15.8 ± 0.6 ka and a lower surface is a fluvial terrace abandoned at 4.7 ± 0.1 ka. We estimate lateral offsets of the risers ranging between 6.6 and 28.3 m (median values), a greater than fourfold difference in values. The amount of offset corresponds to the riser's position relative to modern stream meanders: the smallest offset is in a meander cutbank position, whereas the larger offsets are in straight channel or meander point-bar positions. Taken in isolation, the individual terrace-riser offsets yield slip rates ranging from 0.3 to 7.1 mm/a. However, when the offset values are collectively assessed in a probabilistic framework, we find that a uniform (linear) slip rate of 1.6 mm/a (1.4-1.9 mm/a at 95% confidence) can satisfy the data, within their respective uncertainties. This investigation demonstrates that integrating observations of multiple offset elements (crest, midpoint, and base) from numerous faulted and dated terrace risers at closely spaced

  17. New mapping and structural constraints on the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather Fault system, southeast Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levoir, M. A.; Roland, E. C.; Gulick, S. P.; Haeussler, P. J.; Christeson, G. L.; Van Avendonk, H. J.

    2013-12-01

    The dextral Queen Charlotte-Fairweather Fault lies along the western margin of Canada and southeastern Alaska, a transform plate boundary accommodating motion between the North American and Pacific Plates. The Fairweather Fault is the northern extension of the Queen Charlotte Fault and has numerous and complex splays, including the Chichagof-Baranof Fault, the Peril Strait Fault, the Chatham Strait Fault, and the Icy Point-Lituya Bay Fault. Except for a few small areas, these fault systems have not been mapped in detail. We present updated geometries and fault maps of the entirety of the strike-slip system using seismic reflection and bathymetric data, including a 2004 seismic reflection survey (EW0408), 2005 United Nations Commission on Law of the Sea multibeam bathymetry, and legacy data from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Geophysical Data Center. This work is highly relevant for earthquake hazard research and mitigation in southeast Alaska. Several large (> Mw 7.0) earthquakes have occurred along this margin in the last century, impacting communities of southeastern Alaska and western Canada. Two large, recent events include 1) a Mw 7.7 earthquake that took place on 28 October 2012 near the Haida Gwaii Islands offshore of western Canada, and 2) a Mw 7.5 event which occurred on 05 January 2013, 330 km to the northwest and offshore of Craig, Alaska. Interestingly, the Haida Gwaii earthquake ruptured as a thrust event and the Craig earthquake ruptured with a near-vertical dextral strike-slip mechanism. Since a change in Pacific Plate motion around 4 million years ago, the southern Queen Charlotte Fault system has been obliquely converging at a rate of 20 mm/year, with the boundary accommodating about 80 km of perpendicular motion over that time. This convergence explains the Haida Gwaii thrust earthquake, but leaves questions about the along-strike fault structure. Two opposing end-member theories suggest convergence is accommodated by either: 1

  18. Quaternary basin formation along the Dien Bien Phu fault zone and its neotectonic implication of northwestern Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, K.; Chen, Y.; Chung, L.; Li, P.; Lam, D.

    2006-12-01

    The Dien Bien Phu (DBP) fault zone is one of the most conspicuous fault systems in the Indochina, extending over a distance of 150 km from Yunnan, China through the NW Vietnam into Laos. Recent Global Positioning system (GPS) data in China yielded that the present clockwise rotation of the southeastern Tibet block geologically corresponds to a region of left-lateral strike-slip faults, such as the Xianshuihe-Xiaojang fault and Dien Bien Phu fault, which appear to have accommodated clockwise rotation; whereas other GPS data from the network of Southeast Asia proposed that Indochina constitutes a stable tectonic block moving approximately east with respect to Eurasia. Although above GPS data show insignificant differential motion along DBP fault, active sinistral slip can be identified by clear geomorphic features, focal solutions and seismicity distribution in a NNE-striking zone parallel to the fault zone. Mapping of surface fault traces along the DBP fault zone using field outcrops, geophysical data, and geomorphologic features recognized by the aerial photos, SRTM, ASTER imageries and derived digital elevation models shows that virtually all active faults are reactivated structures sub-parallel to chronostratigraphic boundary. Along the DBF fault, three larger basins have been developed by different kinematics from north to south. The northern one at Chan Nua is rhomboidal in shape with a dimension of 2.5 km?.5 km, which can be defined as a pull-apart basin resulted by the strike-slip motion of the DBP fault. The fault configuration associated with the central one changes to two parallel sinistral and sinistral-normal faults forming a narrow subsiding weak zone (10 km?.5 km) filled with Quaternary deposits. The southern one is, however, created by that the main DBP fault bends the strike from NNE to NE where branches out a sinistral- normal fault with N-striking controlling a half-graben basin (17 km? km) filled with Quaternary deposits about 200 m in depth above

  19. Neotectonic study of the Santa Marta Fault System, Western foothills of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idárraga-García, J.; Romero, J.

    2010-10-01

    These structures are consistent with a model of a left-lateral shear zone striking NNW. An unlithified ruditic deposit of probable Quaternary age exhibiting tectonic deformation crops out at the Riofrío site. It consists of a series of debris slope layers that make up a colluvial cone. The documented deformation in this outcrop is characterized by a backtilting of the sequence to the NE and by the presence of apparent dip-slip faulting. This is thought to be the side view expression of predominantly strike-slip movement. A minimum magnitude (Mw) of 6.4 was estimated for an identified faulting event based on outcrop measurements of fault displacement.

  20. Incremental Holocene slip rates from the Hope fault at Hossack Station, Marlborough fault zone, South Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatem, A. E.; Dolan, J. F.; Langridge, R.; Zinke, R. W.; McGuire, C. P.; Rhodes, E. J.; Van Dissen, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Marlborough fault system, which links the Alpine fault with the Hikurangi subduction zone within the complex Australian-Pacific plate boundary zone, partitions strain between the Wairau, Awatere, Clarence and Hope faults. Previous best estimates of dextral strike-slip along the Hope fault are ≤ ~23 mm/yr± 4 mm/year. Those rates, however, are poorly constrained and could be improved using better age determinations in conjunction with measurements of fault offsets using high-resolution imagery. In this study, we use airborne lidar- and field-based mapping together with the subsurface geometry of offset channels at the Hossack site 12 km ESE of Hanmer Springs to more precisely determine stream offsets that were previously identified by McMorran (1991). Specifically, we measured fault offsets of ~10m, ~75 m, and ~195m. Together with 65 radiocarbon ages on charcoal, peat, and wood and 25 pending post-IR50-IRSL225 luminescence ages from the channel deposits, these offsets yield three different fault slip rates for the early Holocene, the late Holocene, and the past ca. 500-1,000 years. Using the large number of age determinations, we document in detail the timing of initiation and abandonment of each channel, enhancing the geomorphic interpretation at the Hossack site as channels deform over many earthquake cycles. Our preliminary incremental slip rate results from the Hossack site may indicate temporally variable strain release along the Hope fault. This study is part of a broader effort aimed at determining incremental slip rates and paleo-earthquake ages and displacements from all four main Marlborough faults. Collectively, these data will allow us to determine how the four main Marlborough faults have work together during Holocene-late Pleistocene to accommodate plate-boundary deformation in time and space.

  1. Complex Paleotopography and Faulting near the Elsinore Fault, Coyote Mountains, southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenneman, M. J.; Bykerk-Kauffman, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Coyote Mountains of southern California are bounded on the southwest by the Elsinore Fault, an active dextral fault within the San Andreas Fault zone. According to Axen and Fletcher (1998) and Dorsey and others (2011), rocks exposed in these mountains comprise a portion of the hanging wall of the east-vergent Salton Detachment Fault, which was active from the late Miocene-early Pliocene to Ca. 1.1-1.3 Ma. Detachment faulting was accompanied by subsidence, resulting in deposition of a thick sequence of marine and nonmarine sedimentary rocks. Regional detachment faulting and subsidence ceased with the inception of the Elsinore Fault, which has induced uplift of the Coyote Mountains. Detailed geologic mapping in the central Coyote Mountains supports the above interpretation and adds some intriguing details. New discoveries include a buttress unconformity at the base of the Miocene/Pliocene section that locally cuts across strata at an angle so high that it could be misinterpreted as a fault. We thus conclude that the syn-extension strata were deposited on a surface with very rugged topography. We also discovered that locally-derived nonmarine gravel deposits exposed near the crest of the range, previously interpreted as part of the Miocene Split Mountain Group by Winker and Kidwell (1996), unconformably overlie units of the marine Miocene/Pliocene Imperial Group and must therefore be Pliocene or younger. The presence of such young gravel deposits on the crest of the range provides evidence for its rapid uplift. Additional new discoveries flesh out details of the structural history of the range. We mapped just two normal faults, both of which were relatively minor, thus supporting Axen and Fletcher's assertion that the hanging wall block of the Salton Detachment Fault had not undergone significant internal deformation during extension. We found abundant complex synthetic and antithetic strike-slip faults throughout the area, some of which offset Quaternary alluvial

  2. Contradicting Estimates of Location, Geometry, and Rupture History of Highly Active Faults in Central Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, K.

    2011-12-01

    Accurate location and geometry of seismic sources are critical to estimate strong ground motion. Complete and precise rupture history is also critical to estimate the probability of the future events. In order to better forecast future earthquakes and to reduce seismic hazards, we should consider over all options and choose the most likely parameter. Multiple options for logic trees are acceptable only after thorough examination of contradicting estimates and should not be a result from easy compromise or epoche. In the process of preparation and revisions of Japanese probabilistic and deterministic earthquake hazard maps by Headquarters for Earthquake Research Promotion since 1996, many decisions were made to select plausible parameters, but many contradicting estimates have been left without thorough examinations. There are several highly-active faults in central Japan such as Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line active fault system (ISTL), West Nagano Basin fault system (WNBF), Inadani fault system (INFS), and Atera fault system (ATFS). The highest slip rate and the shortest recurrence interval are respectively ~1 cm/yr and 500 to 800 years, and estimated maximum magnitude is 7.5 to 8.5. Those faults are very hazardous because almost entire population and industries are located above the fault within tectonic depressions. As to the fault location, most uncertainties arises from interpretation of geomorphic features. Geomorphological interpretation without geological and structural insight often leads to wrong mapping. Though non-existent longer fault may be a safer estimate, incorrectness harm reliability of the forecast. Also this does not greatly affect strong motion estimates, but misleading to surface displacement issues. Fault geometry, on the other hand, is very important to estimate intensity distribution. For the middle portion of the ISTL, fast-moving left-lateral strike-slip up to 1 cm/yr is obvious. Recent seismicity possibly induced by 2011 Tohoku

  3. Deformation rates across the San Andreas Fault system, central California determined by geology and geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, Sarah J.

    The San Andreas fault system is a transpressional plate boundary characterized by sub-parallel dextral strike-slip faults separating internally deformed crustal blocks in central California. Both geodetic and geologic tools were used to understand the short- and long-term partitioning of deformation in both the crust and the lithospheric mantle across the plate boundary system. GPS data indicate that the short-term discrete deformation rate is ˜28 mm/yr for the central creeping segment of the San Andreas fault and increases to 33 mm/yr at +/-35 km from the fault. This gradient in deformation rates is interpreted to reflect elastic locking of the creeping segment at depth, distributed off-fault deformation, or some combination of these two mechanisms. These short-term fault-parallel deformation rates are slower than the expected geologic slip rate and the relative plate motion rate. Structural analysis of folds and transpressional kinematic modeling were used to quantify long-term distributed deformation adjacent to the Rinconada fault. Folding accommodates approximately 5 km of wrench deformation, which translates to a deformation rate of ˜1 mm/yr since the start of the Pliocene. Integration with discrete offset on the Rinconada fault indicates that this portion of the San Andreas fault system is approximately 80% strike-slip partitioned. This kinematic fold model can be applied to the entire San Andreas fault system and may explain some of the across-fault gradient in deformation rates recorded by the geodetic data. Petrologic examination of mantle xenoliths from the Coyote Lake basalt near the Calaveras fault was used to link crustal plate boundary deformation at the surface with models for the accommodation of deformation in the lithospheric mantle. Seismic anisotropy calculations based on xenolith petrofabrics suggest that an anisotropic mantle layer thickness of 35-85 km is required to explain the observed shear wave splitting delay times in central

  4. Neotectonic fault structures in the Lake Thun area (Switzerland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Stefano C.; Herwegh, Marco; Schlunegger, Fritz; Hübscher, Christian; Weiss, Benedikt J.; Schmelzbach, Cédric; Horstmeyer, Heinrich; Merz, Kaspar; Anselmetti, Flavio S.

    2016-04-01

    Strong historic earthquakes (i.e. intensities I0 ≥ V) in Switzerland are well documented by the earthquake catalogue of Switzerland ECOS-09 (e.g. Frutigen, 1729 AD, Mw=5.2, I0=VI). Many of these strong events can be recognized paleoseismically by large subaquatic, earthquake-triggered mass movements that occur frequently in Swiss Lakes. Some of these represent the occasional occurrence of even stronger earthquakes (i.e. Mw ˜6.5) in the Alpine region (Strasser et al., 2013), which are expected to produce noticeable surface ruptures. However, convincing evidence for Quaternary displacements with offset surface expressions have scarcely been found (e.g., Wiemer et al., 2009). Applying a multi-disciplinary approach, this study presents potential candidates for such faults in the larger Lake Thun area at the edge of the Alps. The overdeepened basin of Lake Thun is situated at the northern Alpine front, which extends orthogonally to the general strike direction of the Alpine nappe front. The northern shoreline is predominantly shaped by the front of the Subalpine Molasse, which is in strong contrast to the south western shore built by the structurally higher units of the Middle and Lower Penninic nappes. This pattern with obvious differences of both lake sides suggests a major fault along the lake axis and high tectonic activity during nappe emplacement, i.e. from Eocene times throughout the Late Miocene. The area is dominated today by a strike-slip stress regime with a slight normal faulting component (Kastrup et al., 2004). As part of a multi-disciplinary study, attempting to find potential neotectonically active fault structures in the Lake Thun area, a 2D ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey was conducted. The aim of the GPR survey was to link observations from a multichannel reflection seismic survey and a multibeam bathymetric survey carried out in Lake Thun with findings in a nearby gravel quarry revealing suspicious deformation features such as rotated gravel

  5. Motion in the north Iceland volcanic rift zone accommodated by bookshelf faulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert G.; White, Robert S.; Greenfield, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Along mid-ocean ridges the extending crust is segmented on length scales of 10-1,000km. Where rift segments are offset from one another, motion between segments is accommodated by transform faults that are oriented orthogonally to the main rift axis. Where segments overlap, non-transform offsets with a variety of geometries accommodate shear motions. Here we use micro-seismic data to analyse the geometries of faults at two overlapping rift segments exposed on land in north Iceland. Between the rift segments, we identify a series of faults that are aligned sub-parallel to the orientation of the main rift. These faults slip through left-lateral strike-slip motion. Yet, movement between the overlapping rift segments is through right-lateral motion. Together, these motions induce a clockwise rotation of the faults and intervening crustal blocks in a motion that is consistent with a bookshelf-faulting mechanism, named after its resemblance to a tilting row of books on a shelf. The faults probably reactivated existing crustal weaknesses, such as dyke intrusions, that were originally oriented parallel to the main rift and have since rotated about 15° clockwise. Reactivation of pre-existing, rift-parallel weaknesses contrasts with typical mid-ocean ridge transform faults and is an important illustration of a non-transform offset accommodating shear motion between overlapping rift segments.

  6. Relationship between displacement and gravity change of Uemachi faults and surrounding faults of Osaka basin, Southwest Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, N.; Kitada, N.; Kusumoto, S.; Itoh, Y.; Takemura, K.

    2011-12-01

    The Osaka basin surrounded by the Rokko and Ikoma Ranges is one of the typical Quaternary sedimentary basins in Japan. The Osaka basin has been filled by the Pleistocene Osaka group and the later sediments. Several large cities and metropolitan areas, such as Osaka and Kobe are located in the Osaka basin. The basin is surrounded by E-W trending strike slip faults and N-S trending reverse faults. The N-S trending 42-km-long Uemachi faults traverse in the central part of the Osaka city. The Uemachi faults have been investigated for countermeasures against earthquake disaster. It is important to reveal the detailed fault parameters, such as length, dip and recurrence interval, so on for strong ground motion simulation and disaster prevention. For strong ground motion simulation, the fault model of the Uemachi faults consist of the two parts, the north and south parts, because of the no basement displacement in the central part of the faults. The Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology started the project to survey of the Uemachi faults. The Disaster Prevention Institute of Kyoto University is carried out various surveys from 2009 to 2012 for 3 years. The result of the last year revealed the higher fault activity of the branch fault than main faults in the central part (see poster of "Subsurface Flexure of Uemachi Fault, Japan" by Kitada et al., in this meeting). Kusumoto et al. (2001) reported that surrounding faults enable to form the similar basement relief without the Uemachi faults model based on a dislocation model. We performed various parameter studies for dislocation model and gravity changes based on simplified faults model, which were designed based on the distribution of the real faults. The model was consisted 7 faults including the Uemachi faults. The dislocation and gravity change were calculated based on the Okada et al. (1985) and Okubo et al. (1993) respectively. The results show the similar basement displacement pattern to the

  7. 3D Dynamic Rupture Simulations Across Interacting Faults: the Mw7.0, 2010, Haiti Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douilly, R.; Aochi, H.; Calais, E.; Freed, A. M.; Aagaard, B.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanisms controlling rupture propagation between fault segments during an earthquake are key to the hazard posed by fault systems. Rupture initiation on a fault segment sometimes transfers to a larger fault, resulting in a significant event (e.g.i, 2002 M7.9Denali and 2010 M7.1 Darfield earthquakes). In other cases rupture is constrained to the initial segment and does not transfer to nearby faults, resulting in events of moderate magnitude. This is the case of the 1989 M6.9 Loma Prieta and 2010 M7.0 Haiti earthquakes which initiated on reverse faults abutting against a major strike-slip plate boundary fault but did not propagate onto it. Here we investigatethe rupture dynamics of the Haiti earthquake, seeking to understand why rupture propagated across two segments of the Léogâne fault but did not propagate to the adjacenent Enriquillo Plantain Garden Fault, the major 200 km long plate boundary fault cutting through southern Haiti. We use a Finite Element Model to simulate the nucleation and propagation of rupture on the Léogâne fault, varying friction and background stress to determine the parameter set that best explains the observed earthquake sequence. The best-fit simulation is in remarkable agreement with several finite fault inversions and predicts ground displacement in very good agreement with geodetic and geological observations. The two slip patches inferred from finite-fault inversions are explained by the successive rupture of two fault segments oriented favorably with respect to the rupture propagation, while the geometry of the Enriquillo fault did not allow shear stress to reach failure. Although our simulation results replicate well the ground deformation consistent with the geodetic surface observation but convolving the ground motion with the soil amplification from the microzonation study will correctly account for the heterogeneity of the PGA throughout the rupture area.

  8. Active faulting in the Inner California Borderlands: new constraints from high-resolution multichannel seismic and multibeam bathymetric data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormann, J. M.; Holmes, J. J.; Sahakian, V. J.; Klotsko, S.; Kent, G.; Driscoll, N. W.; Harding, A. J.; Wesnousky, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Geodetic data indicate that faults offshore of Southern California accommodate 6-8 mm/yr of dextral Pacific-North American relative plate motion. In the Inner California Borderlands (ICB), modern strike-slip deformation is overprinted on topography formed during plate boundary reorganization 30-15 Ma. Despite its proximity to urban Southern California, the hazard posed by active faults in the ICB remains poorly understood. We acquired a 4000-line-km regional grid of high-resolution, 2D multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection data and multibeam bathymetry to examine the fault architecture and tectonic evolution of the ICB. We interpret the MCS data using a sequence stratigraphic approach to establish a chronostratigraphy and identify discrete episodes of deformation. We present our results in a regional fault model that distinguishes active deformation from older structures. Significant differences exist between our model of ICB deformation and existing models. Mounting evidence suggests a westward temporal migration of slip between faults in the ICB. In the eastern ICB, slip on the Newport-Inglewood/Rose Canyon fault and the neighboring Coronado Bank fault (CBF) diminishes to the north and appears to decrease over time. Undeformed Late Pliocene sediments overlie the northern extent of the CBF and the breakaway zone of the purported Oceanside Blind Thrust. Therefore, CBF slip rate estimates based on linkage with the Palos Verdes fault to the north are unwarranted. Deformation along the San Mateo, San Onofre, and Carlsbad trends is best explained as localized deformation resulting from geometrical complexities in a dextral strike-slip fault system. In the western ICB, the San Diego Trough fault (SDTF) offsets young sediments between the US/Mexico border and the eastern margin of Avalon Knoll, where the fault is spatially coincident with the San Pedro Basin fault (SPBF). Farther west, the San Clemente fault (SCF) has a strong linear bathymetric expression. The length

  9. Detecting Possible Fault Zone Head Waves Along the Longmenshan Fault Zone Using Aftershocks of the 2013 Mw6.7 Lushan Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, C.; Peng, Z.; Li, Z.; Ross, Z. E.; Wu, J.; Su, J.; Zhang, H.; Pei, S.

    2016-12-01

    Fault zone head waves (FZHWs) are subtle refracted waves propagated along bi-material fault interfaces and recorded at stations at slower side of the fault. FZHWs are typically observed in association with mature strike-slip faults or subduction zones, where two sides exhibit a noticeable P-wave velocity difference. So far FZHWs have not been observed along continental thrust faults. In this study we search for possible FZHWs using abundant aftershock observations following the 2013 Mw6.7 Lushan earthquake. This event occurred along the southern portion of the Longmenshan Fault Zone that separated the Tibetan Plateau and Sichuan Basin in Western China. Recent P-wave tomographic studies have found clear velocity contrasts along this fault, suggesting that events occurred at the fault boundary are capable of producing FZHW-like signals. We are in the process of analyzing 4100 aftershocks recorded by 28 temporary stations deployed between April 24 to May 19 2013. We use both visual inspections and automatic FZHW pickers to identify weak precursory-type signals before sharp direct P wave arrivals. Next, we align them on the P-wave onset, and examine the moveout between the time delays of P and weak arrivals and distance along the fault strike. So far we find that many stations on both sides of the fault recorded possible evidence of FZHWs, but we do not find clear moveout with along-strike distances. Our next step is to combine this dataset with another larger dataset recorded by both permanent and temporary stations, and use automatic FZHW pickers to quantify the existences of FZHWs in this region. A systematic detection of FZHW along continental thrust faults could provide new insights on the fault geometry and high-resolution fault interface properties at seismogenic depth.

  10. Fault Zone Architecture and Mineralogy: Implications in Fluid Flow and Permeability in Crustal Scale Fault Zones in the Southern Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roquer, T.; Terrón, E.; Perez-Flores, P.; Arancibia, G.; Cembrano, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Fluid flow in the upper crust is controlled by the permeability and interconnection of fractures in the fault zones. The permeability within the fault zone is determined by its activity, architecture and, in particular, by the mineralogy of the core and the damage zone. Whereas the permeability structure of a fault zone can be defined by the volume proportion of the core with respect to the damage zone, the relationship between the mineralogy and permeability along fault zones still remains obscure. This work examines structural and mineralogical data to show the relationship between the mineral composition of the fault zone with its permeability in the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System (LOFS) and the Arc-oblique Long-lived Fault Systems (ALFS), Southern Chile. The LOFS is an active ca. 1200 km long strike-slip Cenozoic intra-arc structure that strikes NNE in its master traces and NE in its subsidiary traces, with dextral and dextral-normal movement mostly developed in the last 6 My. Although the LOFS and the ALFS cross-cut each other, the ALFS is an apparently older basement fault system where seismic and field evidences record sinistral, sinistral-normal and sinistral-reverse movements. One 22-m-long NE transect was mapped orthogonal to a segment of the ALFS, where host rocks are Miocene andesitic rocks. Structural and XRD sampling were conducted in the core and damage zone. Structural mapping shows a multiple core, NW-striking fault zone with foliated gouge and an asymmetric damage zone, where the hanging wall has significantly higher mesoscopic fracture density than the footwall. The hanging wall is characterized by NW-striking, steeply dipping veins. Preliminary XRD results indicate the presence of homogenously distributed Ca-rich zeolite (mainly laumontite) in the core and the veins of the damage zone, which could indicate that the core acted as a conduit for low-temperature (ca. 220°C) fluids.

  11. Kinematics of long lived faults in intraplate settings: case study of the Río Grío Fault (Iberian Range).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcén, Marcos; Román-Berdiel, Teresa; Casas, Antonio; Calvín-Ballester, Pablo; Oliva-Urcia, Belen; García-Lasanta, Cristina

    2015-04-01

    This study is based on the comparison of structural analysis and AMS data of Río Grío Fault, associated with the Datos Fault System, in the Iberian Chain (Northeastern Iberian Plate, Spain). The Río Grío Fault, with NW-SE strike, has a tectonic evolution of probably Mesozoic extension and Tertiary transpressive dextral movement, and it is characterized by the presence of a well-developed cataclastic zone 200m width. The structure of the core is characterized by elongated along strike and narrow lenses separated by subvertical fault planes with well-developed fault breccias and gouges. The lenses usually conserve intact stratification, and it may be recognized several lithologies, including Ordovician quartzites, slates and clay, and red-colored Permo-triassic clay and sandstones. The internal structure of these lenses shows folds, brechified zones, and localized foliation in clay lenses. Cinematic indicators (striations, S/C structures…) show strong reverse dip-slip and dextral strike-slip components, indicating strain partitioning between the different lenses, and it is interpreted as the result of the reactivation of previous normal faults, like a strike-slip shear, during the NNE-SSW to NE-SW Cenozoic compression of the NE Iberian Plate. Samples of AMS study were collected from two areas (SG and RG) of the fault zone, separated by 4.5km along strike. Samples provide a magnetic susceptibility highly dependent on lithology, between ±5*10-5 [SI] in the white fault gouge and ±20*10-5 [SI] in red-colored clay. The low susceptibility in several sites results in high imprecise AMS measurements. AMS results for the first area (SG), obtained in red and black colored clays, show the same magnetic fabric in all sites. K-min axis of the magnetic ellipsoid corresponds to the pole of the fault planes measured in the outcrop, and the magnetic lineation is nearly horizontal, probably related to strike-slip movements. In the second area (RG), the AMS shows a grater

  12. Character and Implications of a Newly Identified Creeping Strand of the San Andreas fault NE of Salton Sea, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecke, S. U.; Markowski, D.

    2015-12-01

    The overdue earthquake on the Coachella section, San Andreas fault (SAF), the model ShakeOut earthquake, and the conflict between cross-fault models involving the Extra fault array and mapped shortening in the Durmid Hill area motivate new analyses at the southern SAF tip. Geologic mapping, LiDAR, seismic reflection, magnetic and gravity datasets, and aerial photography confirm the existence of the East Shoreline strand (ESS) of the SAF southwest of the main trace of the SAF. We mapped the 15 km long ESS, in a band northeast side of the Salton Sea. Other data suggest that the ESS continues N to the latitude of the Mecca Hills, and is >35 km long. The ESS cuts and folds upper Holocene beds and appears to creep, based on discovery of large NW-striking cracks in modern beach deposits. The two traces of the SAF are parallel and ~0.5 to ~2.5 km apart. Groups of east, SE, and ENE-striking strike-slip cross-faults connect the master dextral faults of the SAF. There are few sinistral-normal faults that could be part of the Extra fault array. The 1-km wide ESS contains short, discontinuous traces of NW-striking dextral-oblique faults. These en-echelon faults bound steeply dipping Pleistocene beds, cut out section, parallel tight NW-trending folds, and produced growth folds. Beds commonly dip toward the ESS on both sides, in accord with persistent NE-SW shortening across the ESS. The dispersed fault-fold structural style of the ESS is due to decollements in faulted mud-rich Pliocene to Holocene sediment and ramps and flats along the strike-slip faults. A sheared ladder-like geometric model of the two master dextral strands of the SAF and their intervening cross-faults, best explains the field relationships and geophysical datasets. Contraction across >40 km2 of the southernmost SAF zone in the Durmid Hills suggest that interaction of active structures in the SAF zone may inhibit the nucleation of large earthquakes in this region. The ESS may cross the northern Coachella

  13. Novel Coupled Thermochronometric and Geochemical Investigation of Blind Geothermal Resources in Fault-Controlled Dilational Corners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockli, Daniel [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2017-02-17

    Geothermal plays in extensional and transtensional tectonic environments have long been a major target in the exploration of geothermal resources and the Dixie Valley area has served as a classic natural laboratory for this type of geothermal plays. In recent years, the interactions between normal faults and strike-slip faults, acting either as strain relay zones have attracted significant interest in geothermal exploration as they commonly result in fault-controlled dilational corners with enhanced fracture permeability and thus have the potential to host blind geothermal prospects. Structural ambiguity, complications in fault linkage, etc. often make the selection for geothermal exploration drilling targets complicated and risky. Though simplistic, the three main ingredients of a viable utility-grade geothermal resource are heat, fluids, and permeability. Our new geological mapping and fault kinematic analysis derived a structural model suggest a two-stage structural evolution with (a) middle Miocene N -S trending normal faults (faults cutting across the modern range), - and tiling Olio-Miocene volcanic and sedimentary sequences (similar in style to East Range and S Stillwater Range). NE-trending range-front normal faulting initiated during the Pliocene and are both truncating N-S trending normal faults and reactivating some former normal faults in a right-lateral fashion. Thus the two main fundamental differences to previous structural models are (1) N-S trending faults are pre-existing middle Miocene normal faults and (2) these faults are reactivated in a right-later fashion (NOT left-lateral) and kinematically linked to the younger NE-trending range-bounding normal faults (Pliocene in age). More importantly, this study provides the first constraints on transient fluid flow through the novel application of apatite (U-Th)/He (AHe) and 4He/3He thermochronometry in the geothermally active Dixie Valley area in Nevada.

  14. Tectonic reversal of the western Doruneh Fault System: Implications for Central Asian tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, Hamid Reza; Esterabi Ashtiani, Marzieh; Guest, Bernard; Yassaghi, Ali; Ghassemi, Mohammad Reza; Shahpasandzadeh, Majid; Naeimi, Amir

    2015-10-01

    The left-lateral Doruneh Fault System (DFS) bounds the north margin of the Central Iranian microplate and has played an important role in the structural evolution of the Turkish-Iranian plateau. The western termination of the DFS is a sinistral synthetic branch fault array that shows clear kinematic evidence of having undergone recent slip sense inversion from a dextral array to a sinistral array in the latest Neogene or earliest Quaternary. Similarly, kinematic evidence from the Anarak Metamorphic complex suggests that this complex initially developed at a transpressive left-stepping termination of the DFS and that it was inverted in the latest Neogene to a transtensional fault termination. The recognition that the DFS and other faults in NE Iran were inverted from dextral to sinistral strike slip in the latest Neogene and the likely connection between the DFS and the Herat Fault of Afghanistan suggests that prior to the latest Miocene, all of the north Iranian and northern Afghan ranges were part of a distributed dextral fault network that extended from the west Himalayan syntaxes to the western Alborz. Also, the recognition that regional slip sense inversion occurred across northern and northeastern Iran after the latest Miocene invalidates tectonic models that extrapolate Pleistocene to recent fault slip kinematics and rates back beyond this time.

  15. Upliftment Estimation of the Zagros Transverse Fault in Iran Using Geoinformatics Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswajeet Pradhan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The Izeh fault zone is a transverse fault zone with dextral strike slip (and some reverse component in the Zagros Mountains (Iran. It causes some structural deformations. This fault zone is acting as eastern boundary of Dezful Embayment and forms subsidence of the embayment. The fault has been recognized using remote sensing techniques in conjunction with surface and subsurface analyses. The stratigraphic columns have been prepared in 3D form using Geographical Information System (GIS tools on the basis of structural styles and thickness of lithologic units. Height differences for erosion levels have been calculated in stratigraphic columns with respect to the subsidence in the Dezful Embayment, which is related to Izeh zone. These height differences have been estimated to be 5,430 m in the central part (and 5,844 m in the northern part from the Eocene to recent times. This study shows that comparison of the same erosion levels in Asmari-Pabdeh formation boundaries for interior and eastern block of the Izeh fault zone with the absolute uplifting due to the fault activity which is about 533 m per million years in the Izeh zone. The present study reveals that subtracting the absolute uplifting from total subsidence; the real subsidence of Dezful embayment from Eocene to Recent is 0.13 mm/year. The mean rate of uplifting along the Izeh fault zone is 0.015 mm/year.

  16. Neogene folding and faulting in southern Monterey Bay, Central California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner-Taggart, J. M.; Greene, H. Gary; Ledbetter, M.T.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the Neogene structural history of southern Monterey Bay by mapping and correlating the shallow tectonic structures with previously identified deeper occurring structures. Side scan sonographs and Uniboom seismic reflection profiles collected in the region suggest that deformation associated with both compressional and transcurrent movement is occurring. Strike-slip movement between the North American and Pacific plates started as subduction ceased 21 Ma, creating the San Andreas fault system. Clockwise rotation of the Pacific plate occurred between 3.4 and 3.9 Ma causing orthogonal convergence between the two plates. This plate rotation is responsible for compressional Neogene structures along the central California coast. Structures exhibit transpressional tectonic characteristics such as thrust faulting, reverse faulting and asymmetrical folding. Folding and faulting are confined to middle Miocene and younger strata. Shallow Mesozoic granitic basement rocks either crop out or lie near the surface in most of the region and form a possible de??collement along which the Miocene Monterey Formation has decoupled and been folded. Over 50% of the shallow faults strike normal (NE-SW) to the previously identified faults. Wrench fault tectonics complicated by compression, gradual uplift of the basement rocks, and a change in plate convergence direction are responsible for the observed structures in southern Monterey Bay. ?? 1993.

  17. Electromagnetic field generated by a finite fault due to electrokinetic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hengshan; Gao, Yongxin

    2011-08-01

    This work investigates surface electromagnetic wavefields generated by a finite fault due to electrokinetic effect with Pride's theory as the governing equations. A finite fault is discretized into a series of small subfaults, each of which is taken as a point source with different initiation time. The wavefields generated by the whole fault are then synthesized by stacking those generated by all the subfaults. Numerical simulations of a vertical strike-slip fault with a constant rupturing velocity are then conducted on the basis of the derived formalism. Simulation results show that the rupturing fault generates observable permanent ground motions and electromagnetic field disturbances. Two types of electric field characters are observed in simulations: the coseismic oscillatory variation and the postseismic decaying variation. When the fault rupturing stops and the seismic waves pass far away, the magnetic field vanishes while the electric field remains, decaying slowly and lasting for hundreds of seconds. Adjacent to the free surface the vertical electric field is about 100 times larger than the horizontal one. When the receiving depth increases, the amplitudes of the horizontal electric fields in both the oscillatory and decaying components increase while those of the vertical electric fields decrease. It is also shown that there is no horizontal electric field remnant right at the free surface after the seismic perturbations decay away. The near-fault electric fields simulated in this paper hold similar features to some field observations in literature.

  18. Fault complexity associated with the 14 August 2003 Mw6.2 Lefkada, Greece, aftershock sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakostas, Vassilios; Papadimitriou, Eleftheria

    2010-10-01

    The M w6.2 Lefkada earthquake occurred on 14 August 2003 beneath the western coastline of Lefkada Island. The main shock was followed by an intense aftershock activity, which formed a narrow band extending over the western coast of the Island and the submarine area between Lefkada and Kefalonia Islands, whereas additional off fault aftershocks formed spatial clusters on the central and northwestern part of the Island. The aftershock spatial distribution revealed the activation of along-strike adjacent fault segment as well as of secondary faults close to the main rupture. The properties of the activated segments were illuminated by the precisely located aftershocks, fault plane solutions determination and the cross sections performed parallel and normal to their strike. The aftershock focal mechanisms exhibited mainly strike slip faulting throughout the activated area, although deviation of the dominant stress pattern is also observed. The results help to emphasize the importance of the identification of activated nearby fault segments possibly triggered by the main rupture. Because such segments are capable to produce moderate events causing appreciable damage, they should be viewed with caution in seismic hazard assessment in addition to the major regional faults.

  19. Development of acceleration time histories for Semarang, Indonesia, due to shallow crustal fault earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partono, Windu; Irsyam, Masyhur; Wardani, Sri Prabandiyani Retno

    2017-11-01

    Research on seismic, microzonation of Semarang is still ongoing. Following the research conducted by Team for Revision of Hazard Maps of Indonesia 2010, Lasem fault was the only fault that should be taken into account for seismic mitigation of Semarang. New research conducted by Team for Updating of Seismic Hazard Maps of Indonesia 2016 suggesting four new and closest shallow crustal fault sources (Rawapening, Weleri, Demak and Semarang Faults) which should be taken into account for seismic hazard mitigation of this city. Those four new seismic sources are typical reverse mechanism seismic sources. However Lasem fault is a typical strike slip mechanism seismic source. This paper presents the development of surface acceleration time histories due to three shallow crustal fault (Lasem, Semarang and Demak) earthquake sources with average magnitude 6.5 Mw. This research was performed by implementing de-aggregation hazard analysis, response spectral matching and site response analysis to obtain modified acceleration time histories. The modified acceleration time histories were developed due to inadequate data caused by those three fault sources. Surface acceleration time histories were calculated at 288 boring locations and then separated into three different time histories based on site class soil conditions (hard, medium and soft soil classes).

  20. Static stress transfer within the Cephalonia Transfer Fault Zone (CTFZ) during the 2014 seismic sequence in Cephalonia and the 2015 earthquake in Lefkada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sboras, Sotiris; Chatzipetros, Alexandros; Pavlides, Spyros; Karastathis, Vassilis; Papadopoulos, Gerassimos

    2017-04-01

    The 2014 seismic sequence in Cephalonia and the following 2015 earthquake in Lefkada Islands, Greece, showed that the Cephalonia Transfer Fault Zone (CTFZ), which runs along the western coasts of both islands, comprises a wide fault zone of parallel to sub-parallel fault segments. The January-February 2014 sequence of Cephalonia consisted of three moderate to strong events. According to published focal mechanisms, the first strongest shock (January 26, Mw 6.1) was produced by a W-dipping, oblique (right-lateral reverse) fault, the second (January 26, Mw 5.3) by a ENE-dipping, pure reverse fault and the third by a ESE-dipping, almost pure right-lateral strike slip fault. The November 17 2015 (Mw 6.4) Lefkada earthquake was produced by a WNW-dipping, roughly vertical, almost pure right-lateral strike-slip fault. None of the shocks above produced any direct coseismic ground rupture, while published relocated hypocentral locations for the Cephalonia sequence revealed various depths indicating a complex fault pattern. Based on published seismological, geological and satellite data (i.e. InSAR), the respective seismic sources were modelled in order to calculate the static stress changes i) during the Cephalonia and Lefkada sequences, and ii) after the sequences for the surrounding faults from the Greek Database of Seismogenic Sources (GreDaSS). Results showed that the February 3 2014 Cephalonia fault was variously affected by the rupture of the two January 26 faults. Stress change distribution on the fault plane showed that both stress drop and rise occurred. The November 17 2015 Lefkada fault was slightly loaded after the rupture of the whole Cephalonia fault system due to the great distance. The post-sequence stress changes variously affect the surrounding faults: the southern segment of the CTFZ is relieved from stresses, while the central ones show a mixed situation. The large northern segment, offshore from Lefkada Island, is mainly under stress drop. Stress drop is

  1. Stress evolution and fault stability during the Weichselian glacial cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, Bjoern; Schmidt, Peter; Hieronymus, Christoph (Dept. of Earth Sciences, Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden))

    2009-10-15

    layered models tend to fit the data better than the few models with laterally varying lithosphere thickness, where especially the horizontal velocities vary significantly between models and between the models and the data. The regional patterns of stress distribution and stress directions are remarkably similar for all earth models, while the magnitude of the induced stresses vary significantly between models, mainly due to variations in the stiffness of the uppermost layer. The temporal stress evolution at 500 m depth in Forsmark and Oskarshamn is determined by the ice sheet evolution whereas the magnitude of the induced stresses depend on the earth model. For models with realistic stiffness distributions, the induced horizontal stresses both in Forsmark and in Oskarshamn are similar to the magnitude of the vertical stress of the ice load. Stress histories for the Paervie fault, which is located close to the western edge of the ice sheet, show that although the Paervie fault is the largest known endglacial fault, the induced stress magnitudes are not very high, which is due to the relatively modest thickness of the ice sheet here all through the glacial history. In the fault stability analysis we use mainly two synthetic background stress fields, one reverse and one strike-slip. In agreement with previous studies we find that the background stress field is important for the resulting stability field. We show that in a reverse state of stress at 9.5 km depth, with a glacially induced pore pressure head of 50% of the local ice weight, both Forsmark and Oskarshamn would experience fault instability at the end of glaciation. In a strike-slip stress state, the stability field is more sensitive to variations in the direction of the background field, but for our reference field both Forsmark and Oskarshamn show mostly stable conditions. Stability analysis at the Paervie fault shows that in a strike-slip background field the Paervie fault would be stable all through the

  2. Mitigation of Bias in Inversion of Complex Earthquake without Prior Information of Detailed Fault Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, A.; Yagi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Rupture process of earthquake derived from geophysical observations is important information to understand nature of earthquake and assess seismic hazard. Finite fault inversion is a commonly applied method to construct seismic source model. In conventional inversion, fault is approximated by a simple fault surface even if rupture of real earthquake should propagate along non-planar complex fault. In the conventional inversion, complex rupture kinematics is approximated by limited model parameters that only represent slip on a simple fault surface. This over simplification may cause biased and hence misleading solution. MW 7.7 left-lateral strike-slip earthquake occurred in southwestern Pakistan on 2013-09-24 might be one of exemplar event to demonstrate the bias. For this earthquake, northeastward rupture propagation was suggested by a finite fault inversion of teleseismic body and long period surface waves with a single planer fault (USGS). However, surface displacement field measured from cross-correlation of optical satellite images and back-projection imaging revealed that rupture was unilaterally propagated toward southwest on a non-planer fault (Avouac et.al., 2014). To mitigate the bias, more flexible source parameterization should be employed. We extended multi-time window finite fault method to represent rupture kinematics on a complex fault. Each spatio-temporal knot has five degrees of freedom and is able to represent arbitrary strike, dip, rake, moment release rate and CLVD component. Detailed fault geometry for a source fault is not required in our method. The method considers data covariance matrix with uncertainty of Green's function (Yagi and Fukahata, 2011) to obtain stable solution. Preliminary results show southwestward rupture propagation and focal mechanism change that is consistent with fault trace. The result suggests usefulness of the flexible source parameterization for inversion of complex events.

  3. Seismic constraints on the architecture of the Newport-Inglewood/Rose Canyon fault: Implications for the length and magnitude of future earthquake ruptures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahakian, Valerie; Bormann, Jayne; Driscoll, Neal; Harding, Alistair; Kent, Graham; Wesnousky, Steve

    2017-03-01

    The Newport-Inglewood/Rose Canyon (NIRC) fault zone is an active strike-slip fault system within the Pacific-North American plate boundary in Southern California, located in close proximity to populated regions of San Diego, Orange, and Los Angeles counties. Prior to this study, the NIRC fault zone's continuity and geometry were not well constrained. Nested marine seismic reflection data with different vertical resolutions are employed to characterize the offshore fault architecture. Four main fault strands are identified offshore, separated by three main stepovers along strike, all of which are 2 km or less in width. Empirical studies of historical ruptures worldwide show that earthquakes have ruptured through stepovers with this offset. Models of Coulomb stress change along the fault zone are presented to examine the potential extent of future earthquake ruptures on the fault zone, which appear to be dependent on the location of rupture initiation and fault geometry at the stepovers. These modeling results show that the southernmost stepover between the La Jolla and Torrey Pines fault strands may act as an inhibitor to throughgoing rupture due to the stepover width and change in fault geometry across the stepover; however, these results still suggest that rupture along the entire fault zone is possible.

  4. Huge Pyogenic Granuloma of the Penis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Akbulut

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyogenic granulomas are benign vascular disorders of the skin and mucose membranes, generally developed by trauma and irritation. The lesions are generally small. They are most commonly seen in the skin and oral mucosa and rarely seen on penis. We present the case of a huge pyogenic granuloma on the penis.

  5. Reactivated faulting near Cushing, Oklahoma: Increased potential for a triggered earthquake in an area of United States strategic infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, D. E.; Hayes, G. P.; Benz, H. M.; Williams, R. A.; McMahon, N. D.; Aster, R. C.; Holland, A.; Sickbert, T.; Herrmann, R.; Briggs, R.; Smoczyk, G.; Bergman, E.; Earle, P.

    2015-10-01

    In October 2014 two moderate-sized earthquakes (Mw 4.0 and 4.3) struck south of Cushing, Oklahoma, below the largest crude oil storage facility in the world. Combined analysis of the spatial distribution of earthquakes and regional moment tensor focal mechanisms indicate reactivation of a subsurface unnamed and unmapped left-lateral strike-slip fault. Coulomb failure stress change calculations using the relocated seismicity and slip distribution determined from regional moment tensors, allow for the possibility that the Wilzetta-Whitetail fault zone south of Cushing, Oklahoma, could produce a large, damaging earthquake comparable to the 2011 Prague event. Resultant very strong shaking levels (MMI VII) in the epicentral region present the possibility of this potential earthquake causing moderate to heavy damage to national strategic infrastructure and local communities.

  6. A new conceptual model for damage zone evolution with fault growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Joussineau, G.; Aydin, A.

    2006-12-01

    Faults may either impede or enhance fluid flow in the subsurface, which is relevant to a number of economic issues (hydrocarbon migration and entrapment, formation and distribution of mineral deposits) and environmental problems (movement of contaminants). Fault zones typically comprise a low-permeability core made up of intensely deformed fault rock and a high-permeability damage zone defined by fault-related fractures. The geometry, petrophysical properties and continuity of both the fault core and the damage zone have an important influence on the mechanical properties of the fault systems and on subsurface fluid flow. Information about fault components from remote seismic methods is limited and is available only for large faults (slip larger than 20-100m). It is therefore essential to characterize faults and associated damage zones in field analogues, and to develop conceptual models of how faults and related structures form and evolve. Here we present such an attempt to better understand the evolution of fault damage zones in the Jurassic Aztec Sandstone of the Valley of Fire State Park (SE Nevada). We document the formation and evolution of the damage zone associated with strike-slip faults through detailed field studies of faults of increasing slip magnitudes. The faults initiate as sheared joints with discontinuous pockets of damage zone located at fault tips and fault surface irregularities. With increasing slip (slip >5m), the damage zone becomes longer and wider by progressive fracture infilling, and is organized into two distinct components with different geometrical and statistical characteristics. The first component of the damage zone is the inner damage zone, directly flanking the fault core, with a relatively high fracture frequency and a thickness that scales with the amount of fault slip. Parts of this inner zone are integrated into the fault core by the development of the fault rock, contributing to the core's progressive widening. The second

  7. Fault on–off versus coseismic fluids reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Doglioni

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The fault activation (fault on interrupts the enduring fault locking (fault off and marks the end of a seismic cycle in which the brittle-ductile transition (BDT acts as a sort of switch. We suggest that the fluid flow rates differ during the different periods of the seismic cycle (interseismic, pre-seismic, coseismic and post-seismic and in particular as a function of the tectonic style. Regional examples indicate that tectonic-related fluids anomalies depend on the stage of the tectonic cycle and the tectonic style. Although it is difficult to model an increasing permeability with depth and several BDT transitions plus independent acquicludes may occur in the crust, we devised the simplest numerical model of a fault constantly shearing in the ductile deeper crust while being locked in the brittle shallow layer, with variable homogeneous permeabilities. The results indicate different behaviors in the three main tectonic settings. In tensional tectonics, a stretched band antithetic to the normal fault forms above the BDT during the interseismic period. Fractures close and fluids are expelled during the coseismic stage. The mechanism reverses in compressional tectonics. During the interseismic stage, an over-compressed band forms above the BDT. The band dilates while rebounding in the coseismic stage and attracts fluids locally. At the tip lines along strike-slip faults, two couples of subvertical bands show different behavior, one in dilation/compression and one in compression/dilation. This deformation pattern inverts during the coseismic stage. Sometimes a pre-seismic stage in which fluids start moving may be observed and could potentially become a precursor.

  8. Geometry and kinematics of the eastern Lake Mead fault system in the Virgin Mountains, Nevada and Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Sue; Campagna, David J.; Anderson, R. Ernest

    2010-01-01

    blocks and south-directed for strike-slip faults. Strike-slip faults are oblique to the extension direction due to structural inheritance from NE-striking fabrics in Proterozoic crystalline basement rocks.We hypothesize that (1) during early phases of deformation oblique extension was partitioned to form east-west–extended domains bounded by left-lateral faults of the Lake Mead fault system, from ca. 16 to 14 Ma. (2) Beginning ca. 13 Ma, increased south-directed shortening impinged on the Virgin Mountains and forced uplift, faulting, and overturning along the north and west side of the Virgin Mountains. (3) By ca. 10 Ma, initiation of the younger Hen Spring to Hamblin Bay fault segment of the Lake Mead fault system accommodated westward tectonic escape, and the focus of south-directed shortening transferred to the western Lake Mead region. The shift from early partitioned oblique extension to south-directed shortening may have resulted from initiation of right-lateral shear of the eastern Walker Lane to the west coupled with left-lateral shear along the eastern margin of the Great Basin.

  9. Geophysical Finite-Element Simulation Tool (GeoFEST): Algorithms and Validation for Quasistatic Regional Faulted Crust Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jay; Lyzenga, Gregory; Norton, Charles; Zuffada, Cinzia; Glasscoe, Margaret; Lou, John; Donnellan, Andrea

    2008-04-01

    GeoFEST (Geophysical Finite Element Simulation Tool) is a two- and three-dimensional finite element software package for the modeling of solid stress and strain in geophysical and other continuum domain applications. It is one of the featured high-performance applications of the NASA QuakeSim project. The program is targeted to be compiled and run on UNIX systems, and is running on diverse systems including sequential and message-passing parallel systems. Solution to the elliptical partial differential equations is obtained by finite element basis sampling, resulting in a sparse linear system primarily solved by conjugate gradient iteration to a tolerance level; on sequential systems a Crout factorization for the direct inversion of the linear system is also supported. The physics models supported include isotropic linear elasticity and both Newtonian and power-law viscoelasticity, via implicit quasi-static time stepping. In addition to triangular, quadrilateral, tetrahedral and hexahedral continuum elements, GeoFEST supports split-node faulting, body forces, and surface tractions. This software and related mesh refinement strategies have been validated on a variety of test cases with rigorous comparison to analytical solutions. These include a box-shaped domain with imposed motion on one surface, a pair of strike slip faults in stepover arrangement, and two community-agreed benchmark cases: a strike slip fault in an enclosing box, and a quarter-domain circular fault problem. Scientific applications of the code include the modeling of static and transient co- and post-seismic earth deformation, Earth response to glacial, atmospheric and hydrological loading, and other scenarios involving the bulk deformation of geologic media.

  10. Paleoseismicity on the Dense Network of Holocene Submarine Faults in Beppu Bay, Southwest Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazaki, K.; Matsuoka, H.; Okamura, M.; Chida, N.

    2003-12-01

    Beppu Bay, approximately 30 km by 15 km in size, contains a complex network of Holocene submarine faults whose total length amounts to 230km. They are normal dip-slip fault with left-lateral strike-slip component. The maximum vertical offset accumulated in the past 7,300 years exceeds 20 m. A detailed study on paleoseismicity on one of the faults shows a feature of the time-predictable recurrence, i.e., the larger the vertical offset, the longer the following inter-event time. Branching features can be often recognized near the end of fault and the consistency in branching direction of neighboring faults suggest repeated rupture propagation in the same direction. A detailed examination of high-resolution seismic profiling of branch indicates a repeat of branching and a slow transition of rupture from an old branch to a new one. The central Beppu-Bay fault running WNW to ESE in the center of the bay forms the northern boundary of the major graben structure of the bay. The Asamigawa fault in the west of the bay, running parallel to the central Beppu-Bay fault, has been considered as the southern boundary, but its eastern continuation was not clear. Recent seismic profiling carried out by Chida et al. (2003) showed an existence of Holocene normal fault beneath the city of Oita whose population is 440,000 and interpreted it as a part of the southern boundary. Our high-resolution shallow-water profiling survey revealed the submarine portion of the southern boundary fault, filling a gap between two subaerial faults. We continuously sample marine sediments down to a subbottom depth of 20m by piston coring and correlate specific features of sediment, 20 volcanic ash layers, a few features of magnetic susceptibility and coarse fraction together with C-14 ages of echinoids, pelecypods, and plant remains on the both sides of a targe fault to estimate the date and vertical offset of paleoearthquakes.

  11. Pinpoint core sampling at active faults in the Nankai subduction zone by new ROV "NSS"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashi, J.; Shirai, M.; Tokuyama, H.; Soh, W.; Kinoshita, M.; Machiyama, H.; Kanamatsu, T.; Hirono, T.; Ikehara, K.; Arai, K.; Omura, A.

    2004-12-01

    Piston coring across active faults in shallow water depth, as well as drilling or trenching of fault zone on land, provides us with information about earthquake timing, recurrence of fault activity and fault displacement. In contrast, it is not easy to take samples from deep-sea with pinpoint accuracy. In order to identify the position of the core sampler and approach the target for sampling, a transponder is recently installed on the cable just above the sampler. The pilot vehicle of new ROV "NSS" (Navigable Sampling System) can move by four thrusters, observe seafloor by video cameras, release samplers and measurement tools by command from a mother ship, and real time geophysical or geochemical monitoring through an armored cable. The whole system including winches is removal. The ship with large deck can be equipped with NSS system. Depth capability of the pilot vehicle is 4000m and maximum payload weight is 1.5 Tons. First cruise using NSS was conducted in the Nankai Trough and the Sagami Trough using JAMSTEC R/V "Kaiyo" in 2003. Piston cores were taken from active faults off the Central Japan in the Nankai Trough, and the cold seep sites along the blind fault off Hatsushima, Sagami Bay. NSS using seafloor video camera and thrusters has accuracy of pinpoint sampling within 2m, and allows us to take samples from narrow fault zone or small clam colony. Core samples derived from active fault zones show different sedimentation histories; lack of strata and differences of layer thickness across dip-slip faults and lithological changes with time across strike-slip faults near submarine canyon, and provide information about recurrence time and fault displacement. NSS is one of tools that break through difficulties of pinpoint sampling in deep-sea and will proceed studies of active submarine faults.

  12. Incremental slip rate and paleoseismic data from the eastern Hope fault, New Zealand: the Hossack and Green Burn sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatem, A. E.; Dolan, J. F.; Langridge, R.; Zinke, R. W.; McGuire, C. P.; Rhodes, E.; Van Dissen, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    We present incremental slip rate and paleo-earthquake data from the Conway segment of the eastern Hope fault, within the Marlborough Fault System (MFS) in the northern South Island of New Zealand. Our incremental slip rate site at Hossack Station is located near the western boundary of the Conway segment (near the Hanmer pull-apart basin), and preserves four offsets of the Hossack Stream channel that range in size from c. 11 to 190 m. Channel cut and fill deposits were exposed in several fault-parallel (channel perpendicular) trenches, and the initiation and abandonment of these offset channels are constrained by >60 radiocarbon ages, yielding four incremental slip rates spanning the Holocene. Our paleoseismologic trench at Green Burn, at the eastern end of the Conway segment near Kaikoura, was excavated across the 5-m-high fault scarp into the adjacent bog deposits. This fault-perpendicular trench revealed evidence for at least four paleo-earthquakes with age constraints provided by >40 radiocarbon dates. These results add to a growing body of slip rate and paleo-earthquake age and displacement data from all four main strike-slip faults that comprise the MFS. Collectively, these observations from the Hope fault are beginning to reveal the detailed system-level behavior of the four main faults in the MFS, with fundamental implications for, among other things, earthquake occurrence and behavior, as well as seismic hazard assessment.

  13. Three-dimensional dynamic rupture simulations across interacting faults: The Mw7.0, 2010, Haiti earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douilly, R.; Aochi, H.; Calais, E.; Freed, A. M.

    2015-02-01

    The mechanisms controlling rupture propagation between fault segments during a large earthquake are key to the hazard posed by fault systems. Rupture initiation on a smaller fault sometimes transfers to a larger fault, resulting in a significant event (e.g., 2002 M7.9 Denali USA and 2010 M7.1 Darfield New Zealand earthquakes). In other cases rupture is constrained to the initial fault and does not transfer to nearby faults, resulting in events of more moderate magnitude. This was the case of the 1989 M6.9 Loma Prieta and 2010 M7.0 Haiti earthquakes which initiated on reverse faults abutting against a major strike-slip plate boundary fault but did not propagate onto it. Here we investigate the rupture dynamics of the Haiti earthquake, seeking to understand why rupture propagated across two segments of the Léogâne fault but did not propagate to the adjacent Enriquillo Plantain Garden Fault, the major 200 km long plate boundary fault cutting through southern Haiti. We use a finite element model to simulate propagation of rupture on the Léogâne fault, varying friction and background stress to determine the parameter set that best explains the observed earthquake sequence, in particular, the ground displacement. The two slip patches inferred from finite fault inversions are explained by the successive rupture of two fault segments oriented favorably with respect to the rupture propagation, while the geometry of the Enriquillo fault did not allow shear stress to reach failure.

  14. Enriquillo–Plantain Garden fault zone in Jamaica: paleoseismology and seismic hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, R.D.; Mann, P.; Prentice, Carol S.; Brown, L.; Benford, B.; Grandison-Wiggins, M.

    2013-01-01

    The countries of Jamaica, Haiti, and the Dominican Republic all straddle the Enriquillo–Plantain Garden fault zone ( EPGFZ), a major left-lateral, strike-slip fault system bounding the Caribbean and North American plates. Past large earthquakes that destroyed the capital cities of Kingston, Jamaica (1692, 1907), and Port-au-Prince, Haiti (1751, 1770), as well as the 2010 Haiti earthquake that killed more than 50,000 people, have heightened awareness of seismic hazards in the northern Caribbean. We present here new geomorphic and paleoseismic information bearing on the location and relative activity of the EPGFZ, which marks the plate boundary in Jamaica. Documentation of a river bank exposure and several trenches indicate that this fault is active and has the potential to cause major destructive earthquakes in Jamaica. The results suggest that the fault has not ruptured the surface in at least 500 yr and possibly as long as 28 ka. The long period of quiescence and subdued geomorphic expression of the EPGFZ indicates that it may only accommodate part of the ∼7–9 mm=yr plate deformation rate measured geodetically and that slip may be partitioned on other undocumented faults. Large uncertainties related to the neotectonic framework of Jamaica remain and more detailed fault characterization studies are necessary to accurately assess seismic hazards.

  15. Complex fragmentation and silicification structures in fault zones: quartz mineralization and repeated fragmentation along the Fountain Range Fault (Mt. Isa Inlier, Australia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seybold, Lina; Blenkinsop, Tom; Heuss, Soraya; Ord, Alison; Kruhl, Jörn H.

    2015-04-01

    In large-scale fault zones fracture networks are commonly generated by high volumes of pressurized fluids, followed by quartz precipitation. In this way large amounts of quartz are formed as microcrystalline masses and as complex vein systems, with partly highly different textures, as a result of different formation processes. Based on field and microstructural data and the quantification of vein patterns, the spatial and temporal connection between fragmentation, quartz crystallization and fluid and material flow along the Fountain Range Fault at Fountain Springs was investigated. Dextral strike-slip led to up to 25 km horizontal displacement along the fault. Due to various fragmentation and quartz formation processes, a ca. 100 m high, 80 - 100 m wide and km-long quartz ridge with numerous vein systems and variable microfabrics was formed. Locally, lenses of highly altered metamorphic wall-rocks occur in the quartz zone. Where exposed, the contact to wall rocks is sharp. Millimetre- to decimetre-thick quartz veins penetrate the wall-rocks only within metre distance from the contact. Several clearly distinguishable fine-grained reddish, brownish to dark and pigment-rich quartz masses form up to 50 m wide and up to several 100 m long steep lenses that build the major part of the silicified fault zone. A chronology can be established. Some of these lenses are oriented slightly oblique to the general trend of the quartz zone, in agreement with the supposed dextral strike slip along the fault. Numerous generations of typically µm-cm thick quartz veins transect the microcrystalline quartz masses and, locally, form anisotropic networks. In the quartz masses, angular fragments often composed of quartz with, again, internal fragmentation structures, indicate earlier fracturing and silicification events. Within the veins, quartz forms geodes, locally filled with fine-grained reddish quartz and palisade structures with feathery textures and fluid-inclusion zoning

  16. Measuring slip in paleoearthquakes using high-resolution aerial lidar data: Combined analysis of the Wairau, Awatere, Clarence, and Hope faults, South Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinke, R. W.; Dolan, J. F.; Hatem, A. E.; Van Dissen, R. J.; Langridge, R.; Grenader, J.; McGuire, C. P.; Rhodes, E. J.; Nicol, A., , Prof

    2016-12-01

    Analysis of a large new high-resolution aerial lidar microtopographic data set provides > 500 measured fault offsets from sections of the four primary right-lateral strike-slip faults of the Marlborough Fault System (MFS), in northern South Island, New Zealand. With a shot density of >12 shots/m2 (and locally up to 18 shots/m2) these high-quality data allow us to resolve topographically defined geomorphic offsets with decimeter precision along 250 km of combined fault length. The measured offsets range in size from 2 m to > 100 m, and allow us to constrain displacements in the past one to several surface ruptures along stretches of the Wairau, Awatere, Clarence, and Hope faults. Our results reveal a number of important details of the rupture history of these faults, including: (1) the amount of slip and spatial variability (along and across strike) of strain released in the most recent event along sections of each of the four faults; (2) the consistency of slip throughout the past several ruptures on specific faults; and (3) suggestions of potential linkages and segment boundaries along each fault. The lidar data also facilitate precise measurements of larger offsets that, when combined with age data collected as part of our broader collaborative analyses of incremental fault slip rates and paleoearthquake ages, help to constrain the broader spatial and temporal patterns of strain release across the MFS during Holocene and latest Pleistocene time.

  17. Flat-slab subduction, whole crustal faulting, and geohazards in Alaska: Targets for Earthscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulick, S. P.; Pavlis, T. L.; Bruhn, R. L.; Christeson, G. L.; Freymueller, J. T.; Hansen, R. A.; Koons, P. O.; Pavlis, G. L.; Roeske, S.; Reece, R.; van Avendonk, H. J.; Worthington, L. L.

    2010-12-01

    Crustal structure and evolution illuminated by the Continental Dynamics ST. Elias Erosion and tectonics Project (STEEP) highlights some fundamental questions about active tectonics processes in Alaska including: 1) what are the controls on far field deformation and lithospheric stabilization, 2) do strike slip faults extend through the entire crust and upper mantle and how does this influence mantle flow, and 3) how does the transition from “normal” subduction of the Pacific along the Aleutians to flat slab subduction of the Yakutat Terrane beneath southeast and central Alaska to translation of the Yakutat Terrane past North American in eastern Alaska affect geohazard assessment for the north Pacific? Active and passive seismic studies and geologic fieldwork focusing on the Yakutat Terrane show that the Terrane ranges from 15-35 km thick and is underthrusting the North American plate from the St. Elias Mountains to the Alaska Range (~500 km). Deformation of the upper plate occurs within the offshore Pamplona Zone fold and thrust belt, and onshore throughout the Robinson Mountains. Deformation patterns, structural evolution, and the sedimentary products of orogenesis are fundamentally influenced by feedbacks with glacial erosion. The Yakutat megathrust extends beneath Prince William Sound such that the 1964 Mw 9.2 great earthquake epicenter was on this plate boundary and jumped to the adjacent Aleutian megathrust coseismically; this event illuminates the potential for transitional tectonic systems to enhance geohazards. The northern, southern, and eastern limits of the Yakutat microplate are strike-slip faults that, where imaged, appear to cut the entire crustal section and may allow for crustal extrusion towards the Bering Sea. Yakutat Terrane effects on mantle flow, however, have been suggested to cross these crustal features to allow for far-field deformation in the Yukon, Brooks Range, and Amerasia Basin. From the STEEP results it is clear that the Yakutat

  18. A huge presacral Tarlov cyst. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kazuhiko; Yuzurihara, Masahito; Asamoto, Shunji; Doi, Hiroshi; Kubota, Motoo

    2007-08-01

    Perineural cysts have become a common incidental finding during lumbosacral magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Only some of the symptomatic cysts warrant treatment. The authors describe the successful operative treatment of a patient with, to the best of their knowledge, the largest perineural cyst reported to date. A 29-year-old woman had been suffering from long-standing constipation and low-back pain. During an obstetric investigation for infertility, the clinician discovered a huge presacral cystic mass. Computed tomography myelography showed the lesion to be a huge Tarlov cyst arising from the left S-3 nerve root and compressing the ipsilateral S-2 nerve. The cyst was successfully treated by ligation of the cyst neck together with sectioning of the S-3 nerve root. Postoperative improvement in her symptoms and MR imaging findings were noted. Identification of the nerve root involved by the cyst wall, operative indication, operative procedure, and treatment of multiple cysts are important preoperative considerations.

  19. From tiny microalgae to huge biorefineries

    OpenAIRE

    Gouveia, L.

    2014-01-01

    Microalgae are an emerging research field due to their high potential as a source of several biofuels in addition to the fact that they have a high-nutritional value and contain compounds that have health benefits. They are also highly used for water stream bioremediation and carbon dioxide mitigation. Therefore, the tiny microalgae could lead to a huge source of compounds and products, giving a good example of a real biorefinery approach. This work shows and presents examples of experimental...

  20. Development of Hydrologic Characterization Technology of Fault Zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Onishi, Tiemi; Wu, Yu-Shu

    2008-03-31

    Through an extensive literature survey we find that there is very limited amount of work on fault zone hydrology, particularly in the field using borehole testing. The common elements of a fault include a core, and damage zones. The core usually acts as a barrier to the flow across it, whereas the damage zone controls the flow either parallel to the strike or dip of a fault. In most of cases the damage zone isthe one that is controlling the flow in the fault zone and the surroundings. The permeability of damage zone is in the range of two to three orders of magnitude higher than the protolith. The fault core can have permeability up to seven orders of magnitude lower than the damage zone. The fault types (normal, reverse, and strike-slip) by themselves do not appear to be a clear classifier of the hydrology of fault zones. However, there still remains a possibility that other additional geologic attributes and scaling relationships can be used to predict or bracket the range of hydrologic behavior of fault zones. AMT (Audio frequency Magneto Telluric) and seismic reflection techniques are often used to locate faults. Geochemical signatures and temperature distributions are often used to identify flow domains and/or directions. ALSM (Airborne Laser Swath Mapping) or LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) method may prove to be a powerful tool for identifying lineaments in place of the traditional photogrammetry. Nonetheless not much work has been done to characterize the hydrologic properties of faults by directly testing them using pump tests. There are some uncertainties involved in analyzing pressure transients of pump tests: both low permeability and high permeability faults exhibit similar pressure responses. A physically based conceptual and numerical model is presented for simulating fluid and heat flow and solute transport through fractured fault zones using a multiple-continuum medium approach. Data from the Horonobe URL site are analyzed to demonstrate the

  1. Pliocene Quaternary faulting in the Lycian Taurides - new insights into the neotectonic evolution of SW Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Veen, J.; Huibregtse, J.; Zwart, L.

    2003-04-01

    The submarine Anaximander Mountains connect the Hellenic and Cyprus Arcs and form a zone that accommodates the different tectonic regimes along these arcs. The Lycian Tauride Mountains in southwestern Turkey are situated just north of the Anaximander Mts. and likely have a comparable neotectonic evolution. The Lycian Taurides comprise the Bey Daglari positioned between the Lycian Nappes in the west and the Antalya Nappe Complex in the east. Here we focus on two tectonic basins, the Kasaba and Esen Çay basins, that are located in the Bey Daglari and Lycian Nappes respectively. Until the Langhian, NW-SW compression associated with the emplacement of the Lycian Nappes, caused (ductile) folding of the Bey Daglari autochthon and syntectonic sedimentation in a NE-SW trending foreland-type basin. After foreland deposition of Upper Miocene (Langhian-Serravallian) conglomerates, a phase of S-vergent thrusting and reverse faulting started, probably related to the late Miocene - Early Pliocene Aksu phase. Fault data from the Kasaba basin show that the Pliocene-Recent tectonic evolution is characterized by extension, although no sedimentary basins formed. From slickensides, striae and other kinematic indicators, in combination with stratigraphical and geomorphological information, 3 extensional fault phases are inferred: (1) ?Pliocene (post Miocene) WNW-ESE extension, forming approximately N-S trending asymmetrical grabens. (2) More recent (?Pleistocene) NE-SW extension that resulted in large 135^o tilt-block basins that are cut by less pronounced 070^o left lateral strike-slip faults. The Pleistocene - Recent period is dominated by N-S extension that resulted in formation of 90^o -100^o normal faults and reactivation of older (normal) faults. Although extension prevails, exhumation and lowering of base level, evident from crosscutting scree, point at relative uplift. From the structural data of the Esen Çay Basin, 2 extensional phases are inferred: (1) Pliocene E

  2. The Finne fault zone (central Germany): structural analysis of a partially inverted extensional fault zone by balanced cross-sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malz, Alexander; Kley, Jonas

    2012-11-01

    The Finne fault zone, located in central Germany to the southwest of the Harz mountains, was studied by means of detailed map analysis, investigations of fault displacement and balanced cross-sections for the most strongly deformed area in the center of the fault zone (ca. 50 % of total fault zone length). The system of the Finne fault zone shows a nearly 100-km-long straight flexure that symbolizes the morphological and geological northeastern border of the Thuringian basin. In the central part, which should be surveyed here, the fault zone corresponds to a distinctive narrow band of highly deformed Triassic sedimentary rocks. The northwestern and especially the southeastern parts of the research area are developed as several parallel branch faults. In the southeastern elongation of the fault zone, which is not part of our survey, the sedimentary cover is missing. Here, it is possible to gain insight to the fact that the basement is also involved to the kinematics of the fault zone. Based on our results, we propose a subdivision of the fault zone into four sectors. From the northwest to the southeast, we interpret the structure of these sectors to reflect (1) a compressional flexure, (2) an overthrust graben, and (3) a partially inverted and folded half graben. In the extreme southeast (4), the fault zone is characterized by an anticline with some strike-slip movement parallel to the fold axis. This segmentation is caused by a thrust fault system whose strike direction deviates slightly from that of the earlier formed graben system. The structural configuration can be explained by a two-phase deformation, in which the contractional strain exceeded the preceding extensional deformation. In the investigated area, the horizontal shortening attains a maximum of ca. 1 km. The present study confirms many earlier hypotheses, presents new results on the deformation history of the fault zone, and attempts to evaluate the deformation in a regional geological context. The

  3. Active fault characterization throughout the Caribbean and Central America for seismic hazard modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styron, Richard; Pagani, Marco; Garcia, Julio

    2017-04-01

    The region encompassing Central America and the Caribbean is tectonically complex, defined by the Caribbean plate's interactions with the North American, South American and Cocos plates. Though active deformation over much of the region has received at least cursory investigation the past 50 years, the area is chronically understudied and lacks a modern, synoptic characterization. Regardless, the level of risk in the region - as dramatically demonstrated by the 2010 Haiti earthquake - remains high because of high-vulnerability buildings and dense urban areas home to over 100 million people, who are concentrated near plate boundaries and other major structures. As part of a broader program to study seismic hazard worldwide, the Global Earthquake Model Foundation is currently working to quantify seismic hazard in the region. To this end, we are compiling a database of active faults throughout the region that will be integrated into similar models as recently done in South America. Our initial compilation hosts about 180 fault traces in the region. The faults show a wide range of characteristics, reflecting the diverse styles of plate boundary and plate-margin deformation observed. Regional deformation ranges from highly localized faulting along well-defined strike-slip faults to broad zones of distributed normal or thrust faulting, and from readily-observable yet slowly-slipping structures to inferred faults with geodetically-measured slip rates >10 mm/yr but essentially no geomorphic expression. Furthermore, primary structures such as the Motagua-Polochic Fault Zone (the strike-slip plate boundary between the North American and Caribbean plates in Guatemala) display strong along-strike slip rate gradients, and many other structures are undersea for most or all of their length. A thorough assessment of seismic hazard in the region will require the integration of a range of datasets and techniques and a comprehensive characterization of epistemic uncertainties driving

  4. Temporal evolution of fault systems in the Upper Jurassic of the Central German Molasse Basin: case study Unterhaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budach, Ingmar; Moeck, Inga; Lüschen, Ewald; Wolfgramm, Markus

    2017-08-01

    The structural evolution of faults in foreland basins is linked to a complex basin history ranging from extension to contraction and inversion tectonics. Faults in the Upper Jurassic of the German Molasse Basin, a Cenozoic Alpine foreland basin, play a significant role for geothermal exploration and are therefore imaged, interpreted and studied by 3D seismic reflection data. Beyond this applied aspect, the analysis of these seismic data help to better understand the temporal evolution of faults and respective stress fields. In 2009, a 27 km2 3D seismic reflection survey was conducted around the Unterhaching Gt 2 well, south of Munich. The main focus of this study is an in-depth analysis of a prominent v-shaped fault block structure located at the center of the 3D seismic survey. Two methods were used to study the periodic fault activity and its relative age of the detected faults: (1) horizon flattening and (2) analysis of incremental fault throws. Slip and dilation tendency analyses were conducted afterwards to determine the stresses resolved on the faults in the current stress field. Two possible kinematic models explain the structural evolution: One model assumes a left-lateral strike slip fault in a transpressional regime resulting in a positive flower structure. The other model incorporates crossing conjugate normal faults within a transtensional regime. The interpreted successive fault formation prefers the latter model. The episodic fault activity may enhance fault zone permeability hence reservoir productivity implying that the analysis of periodically active faults represents an important part in successfully targeting geothermal wells.

  5. Integrated near-surface refraction and reflection profiling across the Carlsberg Fault, Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, M. I.; Nielsen, L.; Thybo, H.; Fallesen, J.

    2003-04-01

    An integrated refraction and normal-incidence reflection seismic experiment has been conducted in order to resolve the near-surface part of the Carlsberg Fault in the easternmost part of the Danish basin. The primary objectives of the seismic experiment are to: 1) determine the fault structure; 2) image possible velocity contrasts across the fault; and 3) estimate how much the fault offsets the individual sedimentary layers at the different depth levels. The upper sedimentary strata in the study area consist of Cretaceous and Danian chalk and younger sediments dominated by sand and clay. The Carlsberg Fault is a NNW-SSE striking fault, which offsets the different sedimentary lithologies. It was probably created due to extensional stresses in a strike-slip system of the Sorgenfrei-Tornquist Zone, which is situated approximately 50 km east of the study area. Geodetic measurements indicate that the Carlsberg Fault may have been active during the last 100 years. The 1100 m long seismic reflection section, which was collected in 1995, shows a pronounced flower structure across the Carlsberg Fault, indicative of lateral movements along the fault plane. The seismic experiments were conducted in the SE part of Copenhagen, and urban noise was a major obstacle during collection of the refraction data in 2002. Nevertheless, both first arrivals and wide-angle reflections are prominent along the 3000 m long refraction line. From seismic travel time modelling we find that the P-wave velocity structure changes across the fault zone. The P-wave velocities in the chalk layers are relatively high (typically more than 3.0 km/s) compared to velocities from well log data of similar rock types elsewhere in the Danish area. The estimated velocity structure allows us to depth convert the reflection seismic sections. Vertical offsets of up to 90 m are observed for layers across the fault zone.

  6. Structural geometry and gravity constraints on the Palos Verdes and Cabrillo faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengelcik, Yeliz

    The thesis presents and evaluates five new gravity constrained structural cross-sections about the Palos Verdes and Cabrillo faults of southern California. They both have been active since the Miocene, however the Palos Verdes fault zone is considered to be a greater seismic hazard. Using geologic, gravity and seismic data we present new interpretations about the geometry of the Palos Verdes and Cabrillo faults. In the San Pedro and Los Angeles Harbor region approximately125 new gravity data were collected with a Worden gravimeter and new structural cross-sections were constructed by using data of our gravity surveying. The collected data displays a Simple Bouguer gravity anomaly high near the Cabrillo fault and northwards toward the Palos Verdes fault there is an approximately 30 mGal decrease. The Palos Verdes fault itself is characterized by an inflection in the gravity data and a relatively flat zone immediately to the north. This shelf in the gravity data is important because the highly productive Wilmington Oil Field is located in this area and it is likely a product of the particular geometry in the region. The Palos Verdes fault also forms the edge of the larger Los Angeles Basin. Our basic interpretation is that the Palos Verdes and Cabrillo faults are primarily strike slip faults. However, a horst-like block between the two faults has been uplifted and horizontally shortened. Our main interpretation is that Catalina Schist basement uplift and subsequent basin fill to the north is responsible for the large negative gravity anomalies associated with the Palos Verdes fault.

  7. Multiple Generations of Faulting: A Kinematic Analysis of the Lagarfljót Region, Northeast Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runnals, K.; Karson, J. A.; Fiorentino, A. J., II

    2014-12-01

    The North American/Eurasian plate boundary in Iceland is structurally diverse with oblique rifts, volcanic fissure swarms, and transform zones. Lagarfljót is a lake located in the Tertiary flood basalts of East Iceland that range in age from ~7 to 3 Ma. The lake is approximately 50 km E of the actively spreading, NS-trending, Northern Rift Zone (NVZ), and occupies a northeast-trending depression in an area of strong NS lineaments. A flexure zone runs N-S across the southern part of the lake, and predates an angular unconformity in the regional lava pile. Exposures in cliffs along the lakeshore and stream cuts above unveil a series of dikes and faults that can be correlated with the lineaments, and indicate a complicated tectonic history. Fault zones are characterized by fault breccia, cataclasite and gouge with well-developed slickenlines and clear shear-sense indicators. Fault gouge in individual shear zones ranges from centimeters to meters in thickness. Cross cutting relationships define the relative ages of 2 families of structures, with both post-dating the flexure. The older generation of faults are NS-striking, dextral, strike-slip faults. These are cut by NE-striking, normal faults. The normal faults are almost exclusively located along or near the margins of large dikes or swarms of dikes ranging from 1 - 5 m wide. Displacements along individual normal faults range from centimeters up to 8 m. Some faults cut the lavas above the unconformity and locally rotated structures suggest that limited tilting of the lava pile occurred during faulting. These findings may be related to larger scale processes of propagation and relocation of the NVZ.

  8. Recent volcanism in the Siqueiros transform fault: picritic basalts and implications for MORB magma genesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfit, M. R.; Fornari, D. J.; Ridley, W. I.; Kirk, P. D.; Casey, J.; Kastens, K. A.; Reynolds, J. R.; Edwards, M.; Desonie, D.; Shuster, R.; Paradis, S.

    1996-06-01

    Small constructional volcanic landforms and very fresh-looking lava flows are present along one of the inferred active strike-slip faults that connect two small spreading centers (A and B) in the western portion of the Siqueiros transform domain. The most primitive lavas (picritic and olivine-phyric basalts), exclusively recovered from the young-looking flows within the A-B strike-slip fault, contain millimeter-sized olivine phenocrysts (up to 20 modal%) that have a limited compositional range (Fo 91.5-Fo 89.5) and complexly zoned CrAl spinels. High-MgO (9.5-10.6 wt%) glasses sampled from the young lava flows contain 1-7% olivine phenocrysts (Fo 90.5-Fo 89) that could have formed by equilibrium crystallization from basaltic melts with Mg# values between 71 and 74. These high MgO (and high Al 2O 3) glasses may be near-primary melts from incompatible-element depleted oceanic mantle and little modified by crustal mixing and/or fractionation processes. Phase chemistry and major element systematics indicate that the picritic basalts are not primary liquids and formed by the accumulation of olivine and minor spinel from high-MgO melts (10% Siqueiros lavas are more primitive and depleted in incompatible elements. Phase equilibria calculations and comparisons with experimental data and trace element modeling support this hypothesis. They indicate such primary mid-ocean ridge basalt magmas formed by 10-18% accumulative decompression melting in the spinel peridotite field (but small amounts of melting in the garnet peridotite field are not precluded). The compositional variations of the primitive magmas may result from the accumulation of different small batch melt fractions from a polybaric melting column.

  9. Direct Observation of Depth Variation in Fault Zone Structure Through and Below the Seismogenic Crust: Preliminary Results From the SEMP Fault System in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, E. K.; Dolan, J.; Sammis, C.; Hacker, B.; Ratschbacher, L.

    2004-12-01

    One of the most exciting and important frontiers in earthquake science is the linkage between the internal structure and the mechanical behavior of fault zones. In particular, little is known about how fault-zone structure varies as a function of depth, from near-surface conditions down through the seismogenic crust and into the ductile lower crust. Such understanding is vital if we are to understand the mechanical instabilities that control the nucleation and propagation of seismic ruptures. This imperative has led us to the Oligo-Miocene Salzach-Ennstal-Mariazell-Puchberg [SEMP] fault zone in Austria. The SEMP system is an extremely rare example of a major strike-slip fault that has been exhumed differentially such that it exposes a continuum of structural levels along strike. This exhumed fault system thus provides a unique opportunity to systematically examine depth-dependent changes in fault-zone geometry and structure along a single fault. Our ongoing field studies focus on structural transects across the SEMP fault zone at exhumation levels ranging from the near-surface at the eastern end of the fault (Vienna pull-apart basin), within the seismogenic crust (central Austria), and down into the ductile lower crust exposed in the Tauern window of western Austria. In addition to detailed field mapping of structural fabrics, fluid-rock interactions, relative timing relationships, and variations in fault geometry, we are also conducting detailed analyses of fault-zone rocks designed to explore deformation at a wide range of scales using petrographic microscopy, cathodoluminescence microscopy, fluid-inclusion studies, scanning-electron microscopy, and transmission/analytical-electron microscopy. Preliminary results from one of our first detailed study sites, at Gesäuse in central Austria, reveal strikingly asymmetric damage across the fault. The limestones exposed south of the fault are fractured, but relatively coherent to within a few meters of the main fault

  10. InSAR velocity field across the North Anatolian Fault (eastern Turkey): Implications for the loading and release of interseismic strain accumulation

    KAUST Repository

    Cakir, Ziyadin

    2014-10-01

    We use the Persistent Scatterer Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PS-InSAR) technique with the European Space Agency\\'s Envisat and ERS SAR data acquired on three neighboring descending tracks (T350, T078, and T307) to map the interseismic strain accumulation along a ~225 km long, NW-SE trending section of the North Anatolian Fault that ruptured during the 1939, 1942, and 1943 earthquakes in eastern Turkey. We derive a line-of-sight velocity map of the region with a high spatial resolution and accuracy which, together with the maps of earthquake surface ruptures, shed light on the style of continental deformation and the relationships between the loading and release of interseismic strain along segmented continental strike-slip faults. In contrast with the geometric complexities at the ground surface that appear to control rupture propagation of the 1939 event, modeling of the high-resolution PS-InSAR velocity field reveals a fairly linear and narrow throughgoing shear zone with an overall 20 ± 3 mm/yr slip rate above an unexpectedly shallow 7 ± 2 km locking depth. Such a shallow locking depth may result from the postseismic effects following recent earthquakes or from a simplified model that assumes a uniform degree of locking with depth on the fault. A narrow throughgoing shear zone supports the thick lithosphere model in which continental strike-slip faults are thought to extend as discrete shear zones through the entire crust. Fault segmentation previously reported from coseismic surface ruptures is thus likely inherited from heterogeneities in the upper crust that either preexist and/or develop during coseismic rupture propagation. The geometrical complexities that apparently persist for long periods may guide the dynamic rupture propagation surviving thousands of earthquake cycles.

  11. High-resolution, Two-Dimensional Geophysical Investigation of several small faults at the northern end of the Hat Creek graben, Shasta, Californi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozaci, O.; O'Connell, D. R. H.; Page, W. D.

    2014-12-01

    Several faults were identified as Quaternary in age near the Pit River at the northern end of the Hat Creek graben based on their geomorphic expression. Preliminary paleoseismic trenching confirmed that Fault 3432 had displacements in the late Quaternary indicating that it is with long recurrence, but the style of faulting and its role within the greater geologic context remains unresolved. Detailed site-specific geophysical investigations were performed in order to help characterize the Fault 3432 and plan future paleoseismic investigations. Seven two-dimensional seismic reflection lines were acquired using a distributed networked recording configuration. Standard seismic reflection processing and surface wave processing using IMASW were performed to resolve shallow stratigraphy within Camp Shasta Basin and Burney Mountain Hillside Basin locations. Using this data combined with geomorphology facilitated our mapping and interpretation of fault zone architecture within the study area. In both Camp Shasta and Burney Mountain locations, seismic reflection data helped locate discrete fault strands extending near surface. In addition, our interpretation of seismic profiles show that near-vertical steep faults merge at depth indicating negative flower structure. This fault structure suggests that the dominant style of faulting in the study area is strike slip with a normal component.

  12. Finding the lost segment of the North Anatolian Fault in the Bursa Basin, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutoglu, S. H.; Deguchi, T.; Gundogdu, O.; Seker, D. Z.; Kuscu, S.

    2011-12-01

    After the 1999 Golcuk Mw=7.4, the seismic stress of the North Anatolian Fault has been transferred onto the segments in the Marmara Sea. The NAF is separated to three branches around the Marmara region; one branch runs into the Marmara Sea from the Yalova-Cinarcik location in the north, the second branch runs into the Marmara Sea from the Gemlik location in the south, and the last one goes toward the Bursa basin from the Sakarya-Pamukova location in the lower south. Some researchers consider that the south branch, which experienced the last major earthquake in the year 1064, poses a danger as much as the north branch.For that reason, this study has been conducted for monitoring the fault activities around the Bursa basin. In this respect, the four Palsar data having the best baseline condition have been obtained between the years 2007-2010. The processing of these data have been resulted in significant deformation interferograms for the data pairs of 31st Oct 2007-8th May 2010 and 31st Jan. 2008-24th Dec. 2010. There are seen deformation anomalies in the Bursa basin along 33 km long in E-W direction and 4.5 km long in N-S direction. The shape of the deformation fringes points out that there is a right lateral strike slip fault line passing through the Bursa basin. The geomorphologic characteristics in the region make us think this fault line may connect to the Sakarya-Geyve branch of the North Anatolian Fault system. The maximum amount of the deformation around the fault line has been determined 18 cm in three years. This amount is too much in comparison to 2.2 cm/yr slip rate of the NAF. As the deformation anomalies are investigated in detail a contraction draws attention, overlapping with a right lateral strike slip motion. Consequently, it can precociously be sad that there exits an uplifting combining with the lateral motion. In addition, significant deformation anomalies have been detected on the Gemlik location where the Iznik fault segment reaches the

  13. Huge music archives on mobile devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blume, H.; Bischl, B.; Botteck, M.

    2011-01-01

    and difficult to tackle on mobile platforms. Against this background, we provided an overview of algorithms for music classification as well as their computation times and other hardware-related aspects, such as power consumption on various hardware architectures. For mobile platforms such as smartphones......The availability of huge nonvolatile storage capacities such as flash memory allows large music archives to be maintained even in mobile devices. With the increase in size, manual organization of these archives and manual search for specific music becomes very inconvenient. Automated dynamic......, a careful balance of algorithm complexity, hardware architecture, and classification accuracy has to be found to provide a high quality user experience....

  14. Deformation and Quaternary Faulting in Southeast Missouri across the Commerce Geophysical Lineament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, W.J.; Odum, J.K.; Williams, R.A.; Pratt, T.L.; Harrison, R.W.; Hoffman, D.

    1999-01-01

    High-resolution seismic-reflection data acquired at three sites along the surface projection of the Commerce geophysical lineament in southeast Missouri reveal a complex history of post-Cretaceous faulting that has continued into the Quaternary. Near Qulin, Missouri, approximately 20 m of apparent vertical fault displacement has occurred in the Quaternary. Reflection data collected at Idalia Hill, about 45 km to the northeast, reveal a series of reverse and possibly right-lateral strike-slip faults with Quaternary displacement. In the Benton Hills, 45 km northeast of Idalia Hill, seismic data image a complicated series of anticlinal and synclinal fault-bounded blocks immediately north of the Commerce fault. We infer that most of the deformation imaged in the upper 400 m of these three data sets occurred since post-Cretaceous time, and a significant portion of it occurred during Quaternary time. Collectively, these seismic data along with geomorphic and surface-geologic evidence suggest (1) the existence of at least one potential seismogenic structure in southeastern Missouri outside the main zones of New Madrid seismicity, and (2) these structures have been active during the Quaternary. The geographic location of the imaged deformation suggests it is related to structures along with the Commerce geophysical lineament.

  15. Tectonic geomorphology of large normal faults bounding the Cuzco rift basin within the southern Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, C.; Mann, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Cuzco basin forms a 80-wide, relatively flat valley within the High Andes of southern Peru. This larger basin includes the regional capital of Cuzco and the Urubamba Valley, or "Sacred Valley of the Incas" favored by the Incas for its mild climate and broader expanses of less rugged and arable land. The valley is bounded on its northern edge by a 100-km-long and 10-km-wide zone of down-to-the-south systems of normal faults that separate the lower area of the down-dropped plateau of central Peru and the more elevated area of the Eastern Cordillera foldbelt that overthrusts the Amazon lowlands to the east. Previous workers have shown that the normal faults are dipslip with up to 600 m of measured displacements, reflect north-south extension, and have Holocene displacments with some linked to destructive, historical earthquakes. We have constructed topographic and structural cross sections across the entire area to demonstrate the normal fault on a the plateau peneplain. The footwall of the Eastern Cordillera, capped by snowcapped peaks in excess of 6 km, tilts a peneplain surface northward while the hanging wall of the Cuzco basin is radially arched. Erosion is accelerated along the trend of the normal fault zone. As the normal fault zone changes its strike from east-west to more more northwest-southeast, normal displacement decreases and is replaced by a left-lateral strike-slip component.

  16. Systematic assessment of fault stability in the Northern Niger Delta Basin, Nigeria: Implication for hydrocarbon prospects and increased seismicities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewole, E. O.; Healy, D.

    2017-03-01

    Accurate information on fault networks, the full stress tensor, and pore fluid pressures are required for quantifying the stability of structure-bound hydrocarbon prospects, carbon dioxide sequestration, and drilling prolific and safe wells, particularly fluid injections wells. Such information also provides essential data for a proper understanding of superinduced seismicities associated with areas of intensive hydrocarbon exploration and solid minerals mining activities. Pressure and stress data constrained from wells and seismic data in the Northern Niger Delta Basin (NNDB), Nigeria, have been analysed in the framework of fault stability indices by varying the maximum horizontal stress direction from 0° to 90°, evaluated at depths of 2 km, 3.5 km and 4 km. We have used fault dips and azimuths interpreted from high resolution 3D seismic data to calculate the predisposition of faults to failures in three faulting regimes (normal, pseudo-strike-slip and pseudo-thrust). The weighty decrease in the fault stability at 3.5 km depth from 1.2 MPa to 0.55 MPa demonstrates a reduction of the fault strength by high magnitude overpressures. Pore fluid pressures > 50 MPa have tendencies to increase the risk of faults to failure in the study area. Statistical analysis of stability indices (SI) indicates faults dipping 50°-60°, 80°-90°, and azimuths ranging 100°-110° are most favourably oriented for failure to take place, and thus likely to favour migrations of fluids given appropriate pressure and stress conditions in the dominant normal faulting regime of the NNDB. A few of the locally assessed stability of faults show varying results across faulting regimes. However, the near similarities of some model-based results in the faulting regimes explain the stability of subsurface structures are greatly influenced by the maximum horizontal stress (SHmax) direction and magnitude of pore fluid pressures.

  17. Laparoscopic Management of Huge Ovarian Cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Alobaid

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Huge ovarian cysts are conventionally managed by laparotomy. We present 5 cases with huge ovarian cysts managed by laparoscopic endoscopic surgery without any complications. Materials and Methods. We describe five patients who had their surgeries conducted in a tertiary care center in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia (King Fahad Medical City. Results. Patients age ranged between 19 and 69 years. Tumor markers were normal for all patients. The maximum diameter of all cysts ranged between 18 and 42 cm as measured by ultrasound. The cysts were unilocular; in some patients, there were fine septations. All patients had open-entry laparoscopy. After evaluation of the cyst capsule, the cysts were drained under laparoscopic guidance, 1–12 liters were drained from the cysts (mean 5.2 L, and then laparoscopic oophorectomy was done. The final histopathology reports confirmed benign serous cystadenoma in four patients and one patient had a benign mucinous cystadenoma. There was minimal blood loss during surgeries and with no complications for all patients. Conclusion. There is still no consensus for the size limitation of ovarian cysts decided to be a contraindication for laparoscopic management. With advancing techniques, proper patients selection, and availability of experts in gynecologic endoscopy, it is possible to remove giant cyst by laparoscopy.

  18. Astronomical background of global huge earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hui; Han, Yan-Ben

    2006-03-01

    This paper analyzes the astronomical background of the global huge earthquakes with M≥8.5. The result shows that most of the earthquakes has occurred in the seismic belts (regions) where is being corresponding seismic active period with the lunar path, solar active falling period and accelerating period of earth rotation. This is as for the variation of long period of astronomical factors. For the variation of short period of astronomical factors, whether for local time or local sidereal time and lunar phase there is the phenomenon of occurrence of concentrating a interval time for the earthquakes. For the short variation of earth rotation this phenomenon is clear; either the earthquakes occur in most fast or in lowest of earth rotation. The above-mentioned results indicate that the eartquakes occurrence is affected by astronomical factors. The astronomical factors are one of motive force causing earthquake from external world. The astronomical factors with long period may act as modulation for the earthquake-pregnant process. And the astronomical factors with short period will causing huge fluctuations of the system and earthquake occur when it act on seismic structure of away from balance state.

  19. Transpressional rupture of an unmapped fault during the 2010 Haiti earthquake

    KAUST Repository

    Calais, Éric

    2010-10-24

    On 12 January 2010, a Mw7.0 earthquake struck the Port-au-Prince region of Haiti. The disaster killed more than 200,000 people and caused an estimated $8 billion in damages, about 100% of the country?s gross domestic product. The earthquake was initially thought to have ruptured the Enriquillog-Plantain Garden fault of the southern peninsula of Haiti, which is one of two main strike-slip faults inferred to accommodate the 2cmyr -1 relative motion between the Caribbean and North American plates. Here we use global positioning system and radar interferometry measurements of ground motion to show that the earthquake involved a combination of horizontal and contractional slip, causing transpressional motion. This result is consistent with the long-term pattern of strain accumulation in Hispaniola. The unexpected contractional deformation caused by the earthquake and by the pattern of strain accumulation indicates present activity on faults other than the Enriquillog-Plantain Garden fault. We show that the earthquake instead ruptured an unmapped north-dipping fault, called the Léogâne fault. The Léogâne fault lies subparallel tog-but is different fromg-the Enriquillog-Plantain Garden fault. We suggest that the 2010 earthquake may have activated the southernmost front of the Haitian fold-and-thrust belt as it abuts against the Enriquillog-Plantain Garden fault. As the Enriquillog-Plantain Garden fault did not release any significant accumulated elastic strain, it remains a significant seismic threat for Haiti and for Port-au-Prince in particular. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  20. Carlsbad, San Onofre, and San Mateo Fault Zones: Possible Right-Lateral Offset Along the Slope-Basin Transition, Offshore Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, J. E.; Dartnell, P.; Sliter, R. W.; Ryan, H. F.; Maier, K. L.; Brothers, D. S.

    2014-12-01

    Several poorly understood faults are exposed along the mid- and lower slope offshore southern California from Encinitas to San Clemente. From south to north, these faults have been referred to as the Carlsbad, San Onofre, and San Mateo fault zones, which are generally characterized as nearly vertical to steeply east-dipping faults with a reverse slip component. The U.S. Geological Survey collected high-resolution seismic reflection and bathymetric data from 2009-2012 to better characterize these faults. From offshore Encinitas to Oceanside, these data reveal a complex and variable fault zone that structurally controls the slope-basin transition. In this area, the faults show both reverse as well as normal offset, but may also include an unknown amount of strike-slip offset. North of Oceanside, however, faulting shows clear evidence of right-lateral slip, offsetting submarine channels near the base of the slope by approximately 60 m. North of these offset channels, the base of the slope bends about 30° to the west, following the trend of the San Mateo fault zone, but fault strands on strike with those that offset the channels trend obliquely up slope, appearing to merge with the Newport-Inglewood fault zone (NIFZ) on the shelf. These fault strands consist of several en echelon left-stepping segments separated by "pop-up" structures, which imply a significant component of right-lateral offset along this fault zone, and thus may serve to transfer right-lateral slip from faults along the base of the slope to the NIFZ. This fault zone also separates structures associated with the San Mateo fold and thrust belt to the west from undeformed slope sediments to the east. The existence of significant right-lateral slip on faults along the slope and slope-basin transition has implications for assessing seismic hazards associated with the NIFZ, and also provides constraints on possible reverse motion on the hypothesized Oceanside Thrust.

  1. Detailed Northern Anatolian Fault Zone crustal structure from receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwell, D. G.; Kahraman, M.; Thompson, D. A.; Houseman, G. A.; Rost, S.; Turkelli, N.; Teoman, U.; Altuncu Poyraz, S.; Gülen, L.; Utkucu, M.

    2013-12-01

    We present high resolution images derived from receiver functions of the continental crust in Northern Turkey that is dissected by two fault strands of the Northern Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ). The NAFZ is a major continental strike-slip fault system that is comparable in length and slip rate to the San Andreas Fault Zone. Recent large earthquakes occurred towards the western end of the NAFZ in 1999 at Izmit (M7.5) and Düzce (M7.2). As part of the multi-disciplinary Faultlab project, we aim to develop a model of NAFZ crustal structure and locate deformation by constraining variations in seismic properties and anisotropy in the upper and lower crust. The crustal model will be an input to test deformation scenarios in order to match geodetic observations from different phases of the earthquake loading cycle. We calculated receiver functions from teleseismic earthquakes recorded by a rectangular seismometer array spanning the NAFZ with 66 stations at a nominal inter-station spacing of 7 km and 7 additional stations further afield. This Dense Array for North Anatolia (DANA) was deployed from May 2012 until September 2013 and we selected large events (Mw>5.5) from the high quality seismological dataset to analyze further. Receiver functions were calculated for different frequency bands then collected into regional stacks before being inverted for crustal S-wave velocity structure beneath the entire DANA array footprint. In addition, we applied common conversion point (CCP) migration using a regional velocity model to construct a migrated 3D volume of P-to-S converted and multiple energy in order to identify the major crustal features and layer boundaries. We also performed the CCP migration with transverse receiver functions in order to identify regions of anisotropy within the crustal layers. Our preliminary results show a heterogeneous crust above a flat Moho that is typically at a depth of 33 km. We do not observe a prominent step in the Moho beneath the surface

  2. Huge Tongue Lipoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Damghani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lipomas are among the most common tumors of the human body. However, they are uncommon in the oral cavity and are observed as slow growing, painless, and asymptomatic yellowish submucosal masses. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice and recurrence is not expected.    Case Report: The case of a 30-year-old woman with a huge lipoma on the tip of her tongue since 3 years, is presented. She had difficulty with speech and mastication because the tongue tumor was filling the oral cavity. Clinical examination revealed a yellowish lesion, measuring 8 cm in maximum diameter, protruding from the lingual surface. The tumor was surgically excised with restoration of normal tongue function and histopathological examination of the tumor confirmed that it was a lipoma.   Conclusion:  Tongue lipoma is rarely seen and can be a cause of macroglossia. Surgical excision for lipoma is indicated for symptomatic relief and exclusion of associated malignancy.

  3. Cenozoic faults and faulting phases in the western Tarim Basin (NW China): Effects of the collisions on the southern margin of the Eurasian Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue-Jun; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Guang-Ya; Tian, Zuo-Ji; Peng, Geng-Xin; Qiu, Bin; Huang, Zhi-Bin; Luo, Jun-Cheng; Wen, Lei; Zhao, Yan; Jia, Tie-Gan

    2016-12-01

    The Bachu Rise in the western Tarim Basin is the fore-bulge of the Kunlun late Cenozoic intra-continental foreland basin system formed under the far-field effect of India-Asia collision. Cenozoic faults and faulting are abnormally developed in the Bachu Rise and its adjacent area. Taking the Niaoshan-Gudongshan area on the southern boundary of the Bachu Rise as the key study area, 5 Cenozoic faulting phases were identified in the Bachu Rise and its adjacent area after careful seismic interpretation. They are end Cretaceous ∼ beginning Paleogene (ca. 65 Ma) décollement-thrusting, end Paleogene ∼ beginning Neogene (ca. 23 Ma) décollement-thrusting, end Miocene ∼ beginning Pliocene (ca. 5 Ma) basement-involved thrusting, late Pliocene ∼ early Pleistocene (ca. 3-2 Ma) normal faulting, middle Pleistocene ∼ Holocene (ca. <1.5 Ma) décollement-thrusting and strike-slip faulting. The Middle Cambrian and Paleogene gypsum-salt layers serve as the two main décollement layers in the study area. Thrusting of ca. 65 Ma was under the far-field effect of the collision between Lhasa (part of the Cimmerian Continent) and Asia; and the other 4 Cenozoic faulting phases were all under the far-field effect of the India-Asia collision. The late Cenozoic faulting is characterized by pulse thrust. There is one tectonic pause between each two successive thrust pulses. The compressive tectonic stress is weaker and even evolved into a slight tensional tectonic stress and forms normal fault in the tectonic pauses.

  4. Variation in aseismic slip and fault normal strain along the creeping section of the San Andreas fault from GPS, InSAR and trilateration data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolandone, F.; Johanson, I.; Bürgmann, R.; Agnew, D.

    2004-12-01

    In central California most of the relative motion between the Pacific and North American plates is accommodated by strike slip along the San Andreas fault system. However, a small amount of convergence is accommodated by compressional structures in the California Coast Ranges on both sides of the fault. Recent examples of such activity are the Coalinga and the 2003 San Simeon earthquakes. Along the central San Andreas fault (CSAF), from San Juan Bautista to Parkfield, almost all the slip along the CSAF in the brittle upper crust is accommodated aseismically. We use GPS, InSAR and trilateration data to resolve both the distribution of aseismic slip along the CSAF, and the deformation across adjacent, secondary fault structures. In 2003 and 2004, we conducted several GPS surveys along the CSAF. We resurveyed 15 stations of the San Benito triangulation and trilateration network, which extends 40 km to the northeast of the creeping segment. We combine these measurements with old EDM measurements and data from a GPS campaign in 1998. We also occupied 13 sites along the creeping segment, for which previous data exist in the SCEC archive. These dense GPS measurements, along with data from permanent GPS stations in the area, allow us to constrain the regional strain distribution and contributions from adjacent faults. With the addition of InSAR data, we can also better resolve active strain accumulation and aseismic slip along the CSAF. We use a stack of about 10 interferograms from ERS-1 and ERS-2 satellites spanning 8 years. InSAR is well suited to monitoring details of the shallow slip along the CSAF and, in concert with the broadly spaced GPS velocities, to resolving the distribution of deformation along and across the plate boundary. The results are the basis for determining the kinematics of spatially variable fault slip on the CSAF, and help to better constrain the fault's constitutive properties, and fault interaction processes.

  5. The 2011 Hawthorne, Nevada, Earthquake Sequence; Shallow Normal Faulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K. D.; Johnson, C.; Davies, J. A.; Agbaje, T.; Knezevic Antonijevic, S.; Kent, G.

    2011-12-01

    Range front fault at this latitude. At least two faults have been imaged within the sequence; these structures are at shallow depth (3-6 km), strike NE, and dip ~NW. Prior to temporary station installation event depths were poorly constrained, with the nearest network station 25 km from the source area. Early sequence moment tensor solutions show depths are on the order of 2-6 km and locations using the near source stations also confirm the shallow depths of the Hawthorne sequence. S-P times of 0.5 sec and less have been observed on a near-source station, illustrating extremely shallow source depths for some events. Along with the 2011 Hawthorne activity, very shallow depths in Nevada have been observed from near source stations in the 2008 west Reno earthquake sequence (primarily strike-slip faulting; main shock Mw 5.0) and the 1993 Rock Valley sequence in southern NNSS (strike-slip faulting; main shock Mw 4.0). These shallow sequences tend to include high rates of low magnitude earthquakes continuing over several months duration.

  6. Near-Surface Fault Structures of the Seulimuem Segment Based on Electrical Resistivity Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Nazli; Yanis, Muhammad; Idris, Syafrizal; Abdullah, Faisal; Hanafiah, Bukhari

    2017-05-01

    The Great Sumatran Fault (GSF) system is arc-parallel strike-slip fault system along the volcanic front related to the oblique subduction of the oceanic Indo-Australian plate. Large earthquakes along the southern GSF since 1892 have been reported, but the Seulimuem segment at the northernmost Sumatran has not produced large earthquakes in the past 100 years. The 200-km-long segment is considered to be a seismic gap. Detailed geological study of the fault and thus its surface trace locations, late Quaternary slip rate, and rupture history are urgently needed for earthquake disaster mitigation in the future. However, finding a suitable area for paleoseismic trenching is an obstacle when the fault traces are not clearly shown on the surface. We have conducted geoelectrical measurement in Lamtamot area of Aceh Besar District in order to locate the fault line for paleoseismic excavation. Apparent resistivity data were collected along 40 m profile parallel to the planned trenching site. The 2D electrical resistivity model provided evidence of some resistivity anomalies by high lateral contrast. This anomaly almost coincides with the topographic scarp which is modified by agriculture on the surface at the northern part of Lamtamot. The steep dipping electrical contrast may correspond to a fault. However, the model does not resolve well evidences from minor faults that can be related to the presence of surface ruptures. A near fault paleoseismic investigation requires trenching across the fault in order to detect and analyze the geological record of the past large earthquakes along the Seulimuem segment.

  7. Fine-scale delineation of the location of and relative ground shaking within the San Andreas Fault zone at San Andreas Lake, San Mateo County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catchings, R.D.; Rymer, M.J.; Goldman, M.R.; Prentice, C.S.; Sickler, R.R.

    2013-01-01

    The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission is seismically retrofitting the water delivery system at San Andreas Lake, San Mateo County, California, where the reservoir intake system crosses the San Andreas Fault (SAF). The near-surface fault location and geometry are important considerations in the retrofit effort. Because the SAF trends through highly distorted Franciscan mélange and beneath much of the reservoir, the exact trace of the 1906 surface rupture is difficult to determine from surface mapping at San Andreas Lake. Based on surface mapping, it also is unclear if there are additional fault splays that extend northeast or southwest of the main surface rupture. To better understand the fault structure at San Andreas Lake, the U.S. Geological Survey acquired a series of seismic imaging profiles across the SAF at San Andreas Lake in 2008, 2009, and 2011, when the lake level was near historical lows and the surface traces of the SAF were exposed for the first time in decades. We used multiple seismic methods to locate the main 1906 rupture zone and fault splays within about 100 meters northeast of the main rupture zone. Our seismic observations are internally consistent, and our seismic indicators of faulting generally correlate with fault locations inferred from surface mapping. We also tested the accuracy of our seismic methods by comparing our seismically located faults with surface ruptures mapped by Schussler (1906) immediately after the April 18, 1906 San Francisco earthquake of approximate magnitude 7.9; our seismically determined fault locations were highly accurate. Near the reservoir intake facility at San Andreas Lake, our seismic data indicate the main 1906 surface rupture zone consists of at least three near-surface fault traces. Movement on multiple fault traces can have appreciable engineering significance because, unlike movement on a single strike-slip fault trace, differential movement on multiple fault traces may exert compressive and

  8. Fault Trends and the Evolution of the Pacific-North America Transform in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, M. R.; Kamerling, M. J.

    2004-12-01

    The Pacific-North America (PAC-NOAM) transform boundary evolved during the past 30 Ma, lengthening more than 1000 km and spanning a zone exceeding 200-km across southern California. The relative plate motion vector has been estimated using seafloor magnetic anomaly patterns. Orientations of major transform fault segments within this boundary provide direct evidence of the relative motion at the time these faults formed, where the faults preserve their original orientations. Avoiding areas of known vertical-axis block rotations, we find at least three major fault trends that document past and present tectonic kinematics. A northwest trend of 330 degrees is related to subduction trends in the forearc region that defined the late Mesozoic and early Tertiary coastline and has subsequently controlled the orientation of oblique rifting during the Neogene initiation and growth of the PAC-NOAM transform. This trend is manifest in the San Diego Trough and adjacent coastal rifts and associated fault zones including the Coronado Bank and Newport-Inglewood. The middle Miocene transform orientation appears to be 300-310 degrees, which imparted extensional character to faults reactivated with older subduction trends. Major faults inferred to represent Neogene transform fault segments with this trend include the Whittier, Palos Verdes Hills, Santa Cruz-Catalina Ridge, Catalina Escarpment, and possibly the Mojave segment of the San Andreas fault. In late Miocene time, the plate motion vector rotated clockwise eventually achieving its modern orientation of about 320 degrees. Active faulting showing pure strike-slip character on the San Clemente - San Isidro fault zone and the Imperial Fault show this trend, as do transform faults in the northern Gulf of California. An intermediate trend is apparent in some areas along the San Clemente fault zone in the Borderland, and along the Elsinore and San Jacinto fault zones, which transect the Peninsular Ranges. The intermediate trends may

  9. Space- and Time-Dependent Probabilities for Earthquake Fault Systems from Numerical Simulations: Feasibility Study and First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aalsburg, Jordan; Rundle, John B.; Grant, Lisa B.; Rundle, Paul B.; Yakovlev, Gleb; Turcotte, Donald L.; Donnellan, Andrea; Tiampo, Kristy F.; Fernandez, Jose

    2010-08-01

    In weather forecasting, current and past observational data are routinely assimilated into numerical simulations to produce ensemble forecasts of future events in a process termed "model steering". Here we describe a similar approach that is motivated by analyses of previous forecasts of the Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities (WGCEP). Our approach is adapted to the problem of earthquake forecasting using topologically realistic numerical simulations for the strike-slip fault system in California. By systematically comparing simulation data to observed paleoseismic data, a series of spatial probability density functions (PDFs) can be computed that describe the probable locations of future large earthquakes. We develop this approach and show examples of PDFs associated with magnitude M > 6.5 and M > 7.0 earthquakes in California.

  10. Umbilicoplasty in children with huge umbilical hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komlatsè, Akakpo-Numado Gamedzi; Anani, Mihluedo-Agbolan Komlan; Azanledji, Boume Missoki; Komlan, Adabra; Komla, Gnassingbe; Hubert, Tekou

    2014-01-01

    Huge umbilical hernias (HUH) are voluminous umbilical hernia (UH) that are frequent in black African children. Several surgical techniques are used in their treatment for umbilical reconstruction, but techniques using skin flaps provide better aesthetic results. In this study, we presented our technique of umbilicoplasty in HUH, and its results. It is a retrospective study on children treated for HUH, from January 2012 to December 2013. The UH was called HUH when its basis diameter (BD) exceeds 3 cm. Every HUH was characterised by its height, BD and morphology. Our technique was a two lateral flaps technique; the flaps are symmetrical and drawn so as to reconstitute the different parts of the umbilicus. The results were appreciated with criteria, including the peripheral ring and the central depression of the neo-umbilicus. Twelve children were concerned (7 boys and 5 girls). Their mean age was 5 years and 6 months. The mean BD was 5.6 cm (extremes 3 and 8 cm), and the mean height of the HUH was 7.45 cm (extremes 3 and 9 cm). All underwent umbilicoplasty. In early post-operative period, two children presented a transitory subcutaneous hematoma. Late complications were granulation tissue with two children, and cheloid scar with one. With a mean follow-up of 10 months, we had 10 excellent results and two fair results according to our criteria. Our two lateral flaps umbilicoplasty is well-adapted to HUH in children. It is simple and assures a satisfactory anatomical and cosmetic result.

  11. The East Anatolian Fault Zone: Seismotectonic setting and spatiotemporal characteristics of seismicity based on precise earthquake locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulut, F.; Bohnhoff, M.; Eken, T.; Janssen, C.; Kilic, T.; Dresen, G. H.

    2013-12-01

    The East Anatolian Fault Zone (EAFZ) represents a plate boundary extending over approx. 500 km between the Arabian and Anatolian plates. Relative plate motion occurs with slip rates ranging from 6 to 10 mm/yr and has resulted in destructive earthquakes in eastern Turkey as documented by historical records. In this study, we investigate the seismic activity along the EAFZ and fault kinematics based on recordings from a densified regional seismic network providing the best possible azimuthal coverage for the target region. We optimize a reference 1-D velocity model using a grid-search approach and re-locate hypocenters using the Double-Difference earthquake relocation technique. The refined hypocenter catalog provides insights into the kinematics and internal deformation of the fault zone down to a resolution ranging typically between 100 and 200 m. The distribution of hypocenters suggests that the EAFZ is characterized by NE-SW and E-W oriented sub-segments that are sub-parallel to the overall trend of the fault zone. Faulting mechanisms are predominantly left-lateral strike-slip and thus in good correlation with the deformation pattern derived from regional GPS data. However, we also observe local clusters of thrust and normal faulting events, respectively. While normal faulting events typically occur on NS-trending subsidiary faults, thrust faulting is restricted to EW-trending structures. This observation is in good accordance with kinematic models proposed for evolving shear zones. The observed spatiotemporal evolution of hypocenters indicates a systematic migration of micro- and moderate-sized earthquakes from the main fault into adjacent fault segments within several days documenting progressive interaction between the major branch of the EAFZ and its secondary structures. Analyzing the pre versus post-seismic phase for M > 5 events we find that aftershock activities are initially spread to the entire source region for several months but start to cluster at

  12. Structural Analysis of the Exhumed SEMP Fault Zone, Austria: Towards an Understanding of Fault Zone Architecture Throughout the Seismogenic Crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, E. K.; Dolan, J. F.; Sammis, C.; Hacker, B.; Ratschbacher, L.

    2006-12-01

    One of the most exciting and important frontiers in earthquake science is the linkage between the internal structure and the mechanical behavior of fault zones. In particular, little is known about how fault-zone structure varies as a function of depth, from near-surface conditions down through the seismogenic crust and into the ductile lower crust. Such understanding is vital if we are to understand the mechanical instabilities that control the nucleation and propagation of seismic ruptures. This imperative has led us to the Oligo-Miocene Salzach-Ennstal-Mariazell-Puchberg [SEMP] fault zone in Austria, a major left-lateral strike-slip fault that has been exhumed differentially such that it exposes a continuum of structural levels along strike. This exhumed fault system provides a unique opportunity to systematically examine depth-dependent changes in fault-zone geometry and structure along a single fault. In order to establish the structure of the fault zone in the seismogenic crust, we are studying exposures of this fault at a variety of exhumation levels, from <1 km near the eastern end of the fault, downward through the seismogenic crust, across the brittle-ductile transition, and into the uppermost part of the lower crust in western Austria. Here we present our results from one of these study sites, a spectacular exposure of the fault zone near the town of Gstatterboden in central Austria. The fault, which at this location has been exhumed from a depth of ~ 2-3 km, juxtaposes limestone of the Wettersteinkalk on the south with dolomite of the Ramsaudolomit on the north. We conducted two detailed structural traverses over a fault-perpendicular width of over 200 m. Analysis of the density and orientation of outcrop scale features, such as faults and fractures, reveals a highly asymmetric pattern of fault zone damage. Dolomite to the north of the fault is extensively shattered, while the limestone unit to the south shows only minor evidence of fault damage

  13. Lithospheric Structure of the Western North Anatolian Fault Zone from 3-D Teleseismic Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaleo, E.

    2015-12-01

    The North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) is a 1500 km long active strike-slip fault that spans northern Turkey. During the past century a series of migrating earthquakes have sequentially activated different segments of the fault. The last major events of this sequence are the 1999 Izmit and Düzce earthquakes, which are consistent with a gradual westward migration in seismicity. The next active segment of the fault may be close to the city of Istanbul, posing a major risk for its population. Historically, the NAFZ exhibits a recurrent migrating sequence of high magnitude earthquakes along the fault zone, suggesting that it accommodates most of the plate motion between Anatolian and Eurasian plates in a narrow shear zone. From GPS studies following the Izmit and Düzce events, this motion does not appear to be constrained to the upper crust, and may extend at least to the lower crust. However, the geometry of the fault in the lower crust and upper mantle is at present poorly understood and previous tomographic studies do not provide a consistent picture of the velocity structure in this region. To better constrain the geometry of the shear zone at depth, in particular beneath the most recently active segment of the fault, an array of 70 temporary seismic stations with a 7 km spacing was deployed for 18 months as part of the FaultLab project. Amongst all the events recorded, those of magnitude ≥ 5 and situated between 27 and 98 degrees from the centre of the array were selected to perform 3D teleseismic tomography. Synthetic resolution tests indicate that structures as small as the average station spacing can be recovered to a depth of approximately 80 km. The work aims to provide a higher resolution image of the velocity structure beneath the western segment of the NAFZ, leading to a better understanding of the shear zone in the lower crust and upper mantle.

  14. Testing Pixel Translation Digital Elevation Models to Reconstruct Slip Histories: An Example from the Agua Blanca Fault, Baja California, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J.; Wetmore, P. H.; Malservisi, R.; Ferwerda, B. P.; Teran, O.

    2012-12-01

    We use recently collected slip vector and total offset data from the Agua Blanca fault (ABF) to constrain a pixel translation digital elevation model (DEM) to reconstruct the slip history of this fault. This model was constructed using a Perl script that reads a DEM file (Easting, Northing, Elevation) and a configuration file with coordinates that define the boundary of each fault segment. A pixel translation vector is defined as a magnitude of lateral offset in an azimuthal direction. The program translates pixels north of the fault and prints their pre-faulting position to a new DEM file that can be gridded and displayed. This analysis, where multiple DEMs are created with different translation vectors, allows us to identify areas of transtension or transpression while seeing the topographic expression in these areas. The benefit of this technique, in contrast to a simple block model, is that the DEM gives us a valuable graphic which can be used to pose new research questions. We have found that many topographic features correlate across the fault, i.e. valleys and ridges, which likely have implications for the age of the ABF, long term landscape evolution rates, and potentially provide conformation for total slip assessments The ABF of northern Baja California, Mexico is an active, dextral strike slip fault that transfers Pacific-North American plate boundary strain out of the Gulf of California and around the "Big Bend" of the San Andreas Fault. Total displacement on the ABF in the central and eastern parts of the fault is 10 +/- 2 km based on offset Early-Cretaceous features such as terrane boundaries and intrusive bodies (plutons and dike swarms). Where the fault bifurcates to the west, the northern strand (northern Agua Blanca fault or NABF) is constrained to 7 +/- 1 km. We have not yet identified piercing points on the southern strand, the Santo Tomas fault (STF), but displacement is inferred to be ~4 km assuming that the sum of slip on the NABF and STF is

  15. Umbilicoplasty in children with huge umbilical hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akakpo-Numado Gamedzi Komlatsè

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Huge umbilical hernias (HUH are voluminous umbilical hernia (UH that are frequent in black African children. Several surgical techniques are used in their treatment for umbilical reconstruction, but techniques using skin flaps provide better aesthetic results. In this study, we presented our technique of umbilicoplasty in HUH, and its results. Patients and Methods: It is a retrospective study on children treated for HUH, from January 2012 to December 2013. The UH was called HUH when its basis diameter (BD exceeds 3 cm. Every HUH was characterised by its height, BD and morphology. Our technique was a two lateral flaps technique; the flaps are symmetrical and drawn so as to reconstitute the different parts of the umbilicus. The results were appreciated with criteria, including the peripheral ring and the central depression of the neo-umbilicus. Results : Twelve children were concerned (7 boys and 5 girls. Their mean age was 5 years and 6 months. The mean BD was 5.6 cm (extremes 3 and 8 cm, and the mean height of the HUH was 7.45 cm (extremes 3 and 9 cm. All underwent umbilicoplasty. In early post-operative period, two children presented a transitory subcutaneous hematoma. Late complications were granulation tissue with two children, and cheloid scar with one. With a mean follow-up of 10 months, we had 10 excellent results and two fair results according to our criteria. Conclusion: Our two lateral flaps umbilicoplasty is well-adapted to HUH in children. It is simple and assures a satisfactory anatomical and cosmetic result.

  16. A 3000-year record of surface-rupturing earthquakes at Günalan: variable fault-rupture lengths along the 1939 Erzincan earthquake-rupture segment of the North Anatolian Fault, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey George Fraser

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The North Anatolian Fault is a ca. 1200-km-long, right-lateral, strike-slip fault that forms the northern boundary of the Anatolian plate. A damaging sequence of earthquakes ruptured almost the entire fault in the twentieth century. This study adds to the growing number of paleoseismic investigations of the 350-km-long 1939 Erzincan earthquake-rupture segment, which is towards the eastern end of the North Anatolian Fault in Turkey. Using three paleoseismic trenches located along ca. 2 km of the principal fault strand, this study determines the timing of five earthquakes prior to the 1939 earthquake. The first three of these earthquakes are correlated to historical earthquakes in A.D. 1668, 1254 and 499, and two further events were identified as occurring from 881-673 B.C. and from 1406-1291 B.C. (2v age ranges. By comparing the earthquake timing determined in this study to results from other paleoseismic investigations of the 1939 rupture segment, it becomes clear that this historical rupture segment does not always rupture in unison. This analysis indicates that the A.D. 499 earthquake was the last time the 1939 rupture segment ruptured in unison; partial ruptures of the 1939 rupture segment occur more frequently, and can also produce large magnitude earthquakes (MW >7.

  17. Faulting and strain partitioning in Jamaica from GPS and structural data: Implications for Gonave and Hispaniola microplate kinematics, northern Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benford, Bryn

    A series of small microplates separate the Caribbean and North America plates in the northern Caribbean. My dissertation focuses on understanding the structural evolution and neotectonic deformation of Jamaica, and how it relates to the overall microplates and tectonics of the northern Caribbean. Jamaica, which lies along the same seismically active plate boundary as Haiti, has had twelve earthquakes with Modified Mercalli intensities of VII to X since 1667. However, remarkably little is known about which faults presently constitute the most significant seismic hazards. This research provides insight into tectonic processes and facilitates mitigation of geological hazards in the region. Two chapters focus on characterizing deformation in Jamaica through modeling GPS velocities and through field mapping. The best-fitting models based on GPS velocities place most strike-slip motion on faults in central Jamaica and suggest that faults in northern Jamaica have minimal motion. I estimate 4--5 mm yr-1 of slip for faults near the capital city of Kingston of southeastern Jamaica, implying significant seismic hazard. Field mapping combined with present-day topography, focal mechanisms, geology, gravity, and well and borehole data indicate that east-west contraction is accommodated by reactivated, NNW-striking reverse faults, which are bound by E-striking strike-slip faults in southern Jamaica. The other two chapters of my thesis focuses on understanding the behavior of the microplates along the Caribbean-North America plate boundary: I model GPS velocities and use shear-wave splitting to understand the crustal and mantle behaviors, respectively of the microplates. The GPS data require an independently moving Hispaniola microplate between the Mona Passage and a likely diffuse boundary just west of or within western Hispaniola. The new microplate angular velocities predict 6.8+/-1.0 mm yr-1 of left-lateral slip and 5.7+/-1 mm yr-1 of convergent motion surrounding the

  18. Application of Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility to large-scale fault kinematics: an evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Antonio M.; Roman-Berdiel, Teresa; Marcén, Marcos; Oliva-Urcia, Belen; Soto, Ruth; Garcia-Lasanta, Cristina; Calvin, Pablo; Pocovi, Andres; Gil-Imaz, Andres; Pueyo-Anchuela, Oscar; Izquierdo-Llavall, Esther; Vernet, Eva; Santolaria, Pablo; Osacar, Cinta; Santanach, Pere; Corrado, Sveva; Invernizzi, Chiara; Aldega, Luca; Caricchi, Chiara; Villalain, Juan Jose

    2017-04-01

    be observed within the same fault zone, depending on the proximity to the core zone. The transition between them is usually defined by oblate fabrics, with the long and intermediate axes contained within the main foliation plane in SC-like structures. The faults studied in this work are located in Northeast Iberia; most of them were formed during the Late-Variscan fracturing stage and constitute first-order structures controlling the Mesozoic and Cenozoic evolution of the Iberian plate. They include (i) large-scale (Cameros-Demanda) and plurikilometric (Monroyo, Rastraculos), thrusts resulting from basement thrusting and Mesozoic basin inversion, and (ii) strike-slip to transpressional structures in the Iberian Chain (Río Grío and Daroca faults, Aragonian Branch) and the Catalonian Range (Vallès fault). Application of AMS in combination with structural analysis has allowed us a deeper approach into the kinematics of these fault zones and namely to (i) accurately define the transport direction of Cenozoic thrusts (NNW to NE-SW for the studied E-W segments) and the flow directions of décollements and to evaluate the representativity of small-scale structures linked to thrusting; (ii) to assess the transpressional character of deformation for the main NW-SE and NE-SW Late-Variscan faults in NE Iberia during the Cenozoic (horizontal to intermediate-plunging transport directions) and (iii) to define the strain partitioning between different thrust sheets and strike-slip faults to finally establish the pattern of displacements in this intra-plate setting.

  19. Rupture propagation speed during earthquake faulting reproduced by large-scale biaxial friction experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoguchi, K.; Fukuyama, E.; Yamashita, F.; Takizawa, S.; Kawakata, H.

    2013-12-01

    Earthquakes are generated by unstable frictional slip along pre-existing faults. Both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations have shown that the rupture process involves an initial quasi-static phase, a subsequent accelerating phase and a main dynamic rupture phase. During the main phase, the rupture front propagates at either subshear or supershear velocity, which affects the seismic wave radiation pattern. An examination on what controls the speed is crucial for improvement of earthquake hazard mitigation. Thus We conducted stick-slip experiments on meter-scale Indian gabbro rocks to observe the rupture process of the unstable periodic slip events and to measure the rupture speed along the fault. The simulated fault plane is 1.5m in length and 0.1m in width and ground by #200-300. The fault is applied at a constant normal stress of 6.7MPa and sheared parallel to the longitudinal direction of the fault at a slip rate of 0.1mm/s and up to a displacement of 40cm. The long, narrow fault geometry leads to in-plane shear rupture (mode II). in which the rupture front propagates in the direction of slip, which mimics large strike-slip earthquake faulting. Compressional-(Vp) and shear-(Vs) wave velocities of the rock sample are calculated to be 6.92km/s and 3.62km/s, respectively, based on the elastic properties (Young's modulus, 103GPa; Poisson's ratio, 0.331; Shear modulus, 38GPa). 32 biaxial strain gauges for shear strain and 16 single-axis strain gauges for normal strain were attached along the longitudinal direction of the fault at intervals of 5cm and 10cm, respectively. The local strain data were recorded at a sampling rate of 1MHz within 16 bit resolution. Load calls attached outside the fault plane measured the whole normal and shear forces applied on the fault plane, which was recorded by the same recording system. We have confirmed that the rupture process of unstable slip events consistsing of 1) an initial quasi-static phase where the slipped area

  20. Geochemistry, mineralization, structure, and permeability of a normal-fault zone, Casino mine, Alligator Ridge district, north central Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, K. Jill; Evans, James P.

    2003-05-01

    We examine the geochemical signature and structure of the Keno fault zone to test its impact on the flow of ore-mineralizing fluids, and use the mined exposures to evaluate structures and processes associated with normal fault development. The fault is a moderately dipping normal-fault zone in siltstone and silty limestone with 55-100 m of dip-slip displacement in north-central Nevada. Across-strike exposures up to 180 m long, 65 m of down-dip exposure and 350 m of along-strike exposure allow us to determine how faults, fractures, and fluids interact within mixed-lithology carbonate-dominated sedimentary rocks. The fault changes character along strike from a single clay-rich slip plane 10-20 mm thick at the northern exposure to numerous hydrocarbon-bearing, calcite-filled, nearly vertical slip planes in a zone 15 m wide at the southern exposure. The hanging wall and footwall are intensely fractured but fracture densities do not vary markedly with distance from the fault. Fault slip varies from pure dip-slip to nearly pure strike-slip, which suggests that either slip orientations may vary on faults in single slip events, or stress variations over the history of the fault caused slip vector variations. Whole-rock major, minor, and trace element analyses indicate that Au, Sb, and As are in general associated with the fault zone, suggesting that Au- and silica-bearing fluids migrated along the fault to replace carbonate in the footwall and adjacent hanging wall rocks. Subsequent fault slip was associated with barite and calcite and hydrocarbon-bearing fluids deposited at the southern end of the fault. No correlation exists at the meter or tens of meter scale between mineralization patterns and fracture density. We suggest that the fault was a combined conduit-barrier system in which the fault provides a critical connection between the fluid sources and fractures that formed before and during faulting. During the waning stages of deposit formation, the fault behaved as

  1. Imaging the North Anatolian Fault using the scattered teleseismic wavefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. A.; Rost, S.; Houseman, G. A.; Cornwell, D. G.; Turkelli, N.; Teoman, U.; Kahraman, M.; Altuncu Poyraz, S.; Gülen, L.; Utkucu, M.; Frederiksen, A. W.; Rondenay, S.

    2013-12-01

    The North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) is a major continental strike-slip fault system, similar in size and scale to the San Andreas system, that extends ˜1200 km across Turkey. In 2012, a new multidisciplinary project (FaultLab) was instigated to better understand deformation throughout the entire crust in the NAFZ, in particular the expected transition from narrow zones of brittle deformation in the upper crust to possibly broader shear zones in the lower crust/upper mantle and how these features contribute to the earthquake loading cycle. This contribution will discuss the first results from the seismic component of the project, a 73 station network encompassing the northern and southern branches of the NAFZ in the Sakarya region. The Dense Array for North Anatolia (DANA) is arranged as a 6×11 grid with a nominal station spacing of 7 km, with a further 7 stations located outside of the main grid. With the excellent resolution afforded by the DANA network, we will present images of crustal structure using the technique of teleseismic scattering tomography. The method uses a full waveform inversion of the teleseismic scattered wavefield coupled with array processing techniques to infer the properties and location of small-scale heterogeneities (with scales on the order of the seismic wavelength) within the crust. We will also present preliminary results of teleseismic scattering migration, another powerful method that benefits from the dense data coverage of the deployed seismic network. Images obtained using these methods together with other conventional imaging techniques will provide evidence for how the deformation is distributed within the fault zone at depth, providing constraints that can be used in conjunction with structural analyses of exhumed fault segments and models of geodetic strain-rate across the fault system. By linking together results from the complementary techniques being employed in the FaultLab project, we aim to produce a comprehensive

  2. Present-day strain partitioning and strain transfer across the Fairweather and Denali Faults in SW Yukon - SE Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotti, S.; Marechal, A.; Elliott, J.; Freymueller, J. T.; Schmidt, M.

    2012-12-01

    In SW Yukon - SE Alaska, the present-day Pacific - North America relative motion is highly oblique to the main plate boundary, resulting in strong strain partitioning tectonics that link the Aleutian subduction to the west to Queen-Charlotte transform to the south. This transition region is also the site of present-day orogeny and accretion of the allochthonous Yakutat Terrane to the Northern Cordillera. We present results from new campaign and permanent GPS stations deployed in SW Yukon, combined with STEEP data from SE Alaska, straddling the Fairweather and Denali Faults. GPS data are processed with the NRCan PPP software to derive long-term velocities and are corrected for transient effects primarily due to Glacial Isostatic Adjustment to recent ice mass loss. In the southern region (from Yakutat, AK to Whitehorse, YK), our preferred model gives slip rates of 49.9 +/- 2.6 mm/a on the Fairweather Fault and 1.1 +/- 1.0 mm/a on the Denali Fault; i.e., over 95% the Pacific - North America strike-slip motion is accommodated on the main plate-boundary fault. However, the fault-normal component is strongly partitioned, with ~25% of the Pacific - North America convergence transferred inland, into the Yukon and Northern Cordillera. This strain transfer could explain the seismicity observed in the Mackenzie Mountains 500 - 800 km from the coast. In the northern region (from Yakutat, AK to Beaver Creek, YK), the Pacific - North America convergence is strongly partitioned, with less than ~60% accommodated on the Chugach-St. Elias Fault and the residual motion distributed between the Pamplona thrust zone to the south (~15%) and internal shortening of the St. Elias Mountains to the north (~25%), where few faults and little seismicity are observed. The new GPS data also helps address the activity and slip rate of a potential "Connector Fault" that would link the Fairweather and Totschunda Faults, bypassing the Denali Fault in SW Yukon.

  3. Unraveling the deformational history of faults from AMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvín, Pablo; Casas-Sainz, Antonio; Román-Berdiel, Teresa; Oliva-Urcía, Belén; García-Lasanta, Cristina; Pocoví, Andrés; Gil-Imaz, Andrés; Pueyo-Anchuela, Oscar; Izquierdo-Llavall, Esther; Osácar, Cinta; José Villalaín, Juan; Corrado, Sveva; Invernizzi, Chiara; Aldega, Luca; Caricchi, Chiara; Antolín-Tomás, Borja

    2014-05-01

    The faults chosen for this study belong to the Iberian Chain (Northeastern Iberian Plate) and include two kinematically different kinds of structures (thrusts and strike-slip), with well-developed fault gouges several tens or hundreds of meters thick (Datos Fault System and Daroca Fault) and thinner clayey layers linked to thrust surfaces (Cameros-Demanda Thrust). The Cameros-Demanda Thrust has a relatively simple history of Mesozoic extension and Tertiary inversion. Along the thrust several areas with fault rocks include weakly oriented breccias, deformed conglomerates and clayey fault gouge with S/C structures. The Datos and Daroca faults show a more complex history of movement and are of key importance in the Variscan and Alpine evolution of the Iberian microplate. They show fault rocks with thickness of up to hundreds of meters, consisting of fault gouges, microbreccias and fault breccias with large blocks of stratified Paleozoic and Mesozoic blocks. Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) can be an useful tool in order to discriminate the tectonic evolution of such faults, remembering the different behaviors as part of different stages in northern Gondwana (Variscan cycle) and the Iberian microplate (Alpine cycle). Samples for the AMS study were collected from 56 sites, 29 (434 specimens) belonging to three areas of the Cameros-Demanda Thrust, 17 (196 specimens) in the Datos Fault System, and 10 (114 specimens) at the Daroca Fault. AMS results at the Cameros-Demanda Thrust show a main NW-SE magnetic lineation (Matute and Prejano areas), a secondary NE-SW magnetic lineation (Matute area) and a girdle distribution from NE to SW in the Panzares area. These results suggest a main NW movement for the Cameros-Demanda Thrust, consistent with kinematic indicators, but also evidence a NE-directed minor contribution, especially in the easternmost outcrops. Daroca and Datos Faults show a grater variability, both in plunge and azimuth, and magnetic lineation can be

  4. Floor-age constraining of a tectonic paroxysm of the Pyrenean orogen. Late Middle Eocene mammal age of a faulted karstic filling of the Quercy phosphorites, south-western France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astruc, Jean Guy; Escarguel, Gilles; Marandat, Bernard; Simon-Coinçon, Régine; Sigé, Bernard

    Breaking effects of a Pyrenean compressive tectonic phase are recognised in northern Pyrenean foreland, such as in the Quercy Jurassic limestone platform. The age of this phase still remains poorly constrained. In the so-called Quercy phosphorites area, within the Prajoux-Mémerlin paleokarst system near the city of Cajarc, a clay filling shows a strike slip fault effect, close to N-S direction. According to an analysis of the mammal fauna and inferred chronology of the polyphased paleokarst infilling, the age of the faulted clay is late Middle Eocene, with a mammal age estimate of 41.5 Ma. This provides reliable precise floor-age constraining for the involved sismo-tectonic paroxysm, seemingly related to the Pyrenean tectonic compressive phase.

  5. Superimposed basin formation during Neogene-Quaternary extensional tectonics in SW-Anatolia (Turkey): Insights from the kinematics of the Dinar Fault Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alçiçek, M. Cihat; Brogi, Andrea; Capezzuoli, Enrico; Liotta, Domenico; Meccheri, Marco

    2013-11-01

    In the extensional province of SW-Anatolia, the cross-cutting relationship between the NW- and NE-oriented Neogene and Quaternary basins is an ongoing debate in the understanding of the tectonic evolution of this area. In order to contribute to this issue, we carried out a structural and kinematic study along the seismogenic NW-trending Dinar Fault Zone (DFZ). This structure was initially controlled by the sedimentary and tectonic evolution of the NE-oriented Neogene Baklan, Acıgöl and Burdur basins and, later, by the NW-oriented Quaternary Dinar Basin. On the basis of > 1000 structural and kinematic data, in conjunction with basin stratigraphy, the DFZ can be divided into three almost parallel and continuous bands, that are: (a) the Hangingwall where Quaternary sediments are deformed by normal faults with mechanical striations; (b) the Inner Zone, corresponding to the present Dinar fault scarp, where NW-trending normal faults with mechanical striations are dominant, and (c) the Outer Zone, located in the footwall of the structure comprising the area between the fault scarp and undeformed bedrock, where faults exhibit variable orientation and kinematics, from strike-slip to normal dip-slip. These kinematics are mainly indicated by calcite shear veins and superimposed mechanical striations, respectively. This suggests that the DFZ changed kinematics over time, i.e., the DFZ initiated as dominant dextral strike-slip to oblique-slip fault system and continued with a dominant normal movement. Therefore, we hypothesize that the NW-trending DFZ was initially a transfer zone during the late Miocene-Pliocene, coeval to the sedimentary and structural evolution of the NE-trending Baklan, Acigöl and Burdur basins. During the Quaternary the DFZ, representing an already weakened crustal sector, played the role of a normal fault system providing the accommodation space for the Quaternary Dinar Basin. Hydrothermal circulation and volcanism at NE-/NW-trending faults

  6. Strain accumulation on faults beneath Los Angeles: a geodesy-based picture accounting for the effects of sedimentary basins and anthropogenic surface deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, C.; Argus, D. F.; Landry, W.; Barbot, S.; Avouac, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    The Los Angeles region is contracting at 8 mm/yr in the N 5° E direction due to the misalignment of the Mojave section of the San Andreas Fault with the direction of relative Pacific-North American plate motion. This contraction is accommodated by the accumulation of strain on thrust faults such as the Sierra Madre, Puente Hills and other systems and the release of that strain in damaging earthquakes such as the 1971 San Fernando, 1987 Whittier Narrows and 1994 Northridge shocks. A larger earthquake on one of these systems could constitute a worst-case-scenario event for Los Angeles, and so it is essential to use geodetic data to constrain where, and how quickly, tectonic strain is accumulating on these faults. This estimation problem is affected by 1) anthropogenic surface deformation that overprints tectonic contraction in geodetic data, 2) the complex 3D geometries of the relevant faults, and 3) the soft sedimentary basin underlying Los Angeles, which affects the elastostatic Green's functions that map slip rates on faults to velocities at the surface. Using 1) a GPS velocity field corrected for anthropogenic motions [Argus et al, 2005, and in prep.], 2) a detailed quadrilateral mesh of fault geometry based on an updated version of that in Marshall et al [2009] and on the SCEC CFM5.0 [Shaw et al, 2015], and 3) elastostatic Green's functions that incorporate the lateral and vertical heterogeneities in elastic properties represented by the SCEC CVM-H15.1, we obtain the most accurate geodesy-based picture of strain accumulation beneath Los Angeles to date. Among other results, we find that strain accumulation on strike-slip faults such as the Palos Verdes, Whittier-Elsinore and Raymond-Hollywood systems may cause an apparent N-S contractional gradient of 2 mm/yr across Los Angeles that is unrelated to thrust faulting, and that inferred strain accumulation rates on thrust faults are more readily reconciled with geologic slip rates when this strike-slip motion is

  7. Statistical analysis of submarine fault populations associated with oceanic transform boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, T. A.; Mittelstaedt, E. L.; Harpp, K.; Soule, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Oceanic transform boundaries exhibit fault populations with strikingly different morphologies. Statistical analysis of these fault populations is a useful tool for investigating crustal strain, fault growth, and the regional stress field of the lithosphere (i.e., transpressional, transtensional, or strike slip). Achieving reliable statistics, however, requires the identification of numerous fault traces followed by accurate and precise measurements of the length, throw, and heave along each member of the fault set. Current methodologies for fault measurement from bathymetric data often require picking the tops and bottoms of digitized fault scarps by hand. This method is time-consuming for large fault populations and may be subject to expectation bias in measurements; consequently, it is difficult to make consistent interpretations of fault lineaments, particularly when dealing with large fault populations. Another method for gathering fault statistics from the seafloor uses binarized sidescan sonar data to identify fault traces and to measure fault heave. Fault throw is then calculated using a regional average fault dip, assuming that local variations in fault geometries are small. Sidescan methods are limited by the instrument's look direction, which can place fault scarps in shadow, producing significant variability in the apparent heave. We present a new computational method that measures observable fault heave and throw from high-resolution multibeam bathymetric data. The code first constructs a series of linear bathymetric transects orthogonal to fault strike. The top and bottom of each fault scarp are defined along these transects as the nearest local minima in the absolute value of the bathymetric gradient. Finally, a median filter is applied to the locations of the resulting fault bounding points to remove noise and erroneous values. Our method improves on previous techniques by allowing an automated, unbiased measure of heave and throw along every

  8. Integrated Seismic Imaging of the Carlsberg Fault in the Copenhagen City Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, L.; Thybo, H.; Jorgensen, M. I.

    2003-12-01

    Images of the Carlsberg Fault in the area of the Copenhagen city center, Denmark, are obtained from normal incidence and refraction seismic data collected along a 3 km long E-W trending profile, which is oriented approximately perpendicular to the strike of the fault. The integrated seismic data set provides the most detailed images to 500 m depth so far obtained of this fault. The fault zone appears as a flower structure in the normal incidence section, and an abrupt change in the P-wave velocity structure across the fault zone further indicates that significant lateral movements have taken place along the fault. Vertical movements of up to 90 m are evident in the fault zone. Even the shallowest layers that can be imaged by the seismic data (approximately 30 m depth) are clearly vertically offset by the fault. In order to constrain the strike of the fault zone through the Copenhagen area we use shots detonated inside the fault zone, which are recorded by geophones distributed along arcs of circles situated up to 7 km away from the shots. Ground penetrating radar measurements are conducted to image the fault structures in the topmost 10 m. Geodetic measurements conducted in the Copenhagen area during the last 165 years indicate that the fault may still be active with horizontal displacements of about 5 cm over a 73-year period. Small cracks in walls and displacements of buildings may further indicate that the fault is still playing an active role in forming the Copenhagen area. However, no earthquakes are detected along the fault, and the seismicity of the study area is very weak. The formation of the Carlsberg Fault may be related to extensional stresses in a strike-slip system associated with the Sorgenfrei-Tornquist zone, which is situated only 40 km east of the study area. The Sorgenfrei-Tornquist zone is a major tectonic element in southern Scandinavia where it is situated close to the boarder between the Danish Basin to the southwest and the Baltic Shield to

  9. Coulomb stress changes imparted by simulated M>7 earthquakes to major fault surfaces in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, J. C.; Ely, G. P.; Jordan, T. H.

    2011-12-01

    To study static stress interactions between faults in southern California and identify cases where one large earthquake could trigger another, we select fourteen M>7 events simulated by the SCEC/CME CyberShake project and calculate the Coulomb stress changes those events impart to major fault surfaces in the UCERF2 fault model for the region. CyberShake simulates between 6 and 32 slip distributions for each event at a slip sampling resolution of 1 km, and we calculate stress changes on fault surfaces at the same resolution, a level of detail which is unprecedented in studies of stress transfer and which allows us to study the way that variabilities in slip on the source can affect imparted stress changes. We find that earthquakes rupturing the southern San Andreas fault generally decrease Coulomb stress on right-lateral faults in the Los Angeles basin, while M>7 events on the San Jacinto, Elsinore, Newport-Inglewood and Palos Verdes faults generally decrease stress on parallel right-lateral faults but increase Coulomb stress on the Mojave or San Bernardino sections of the San Andreas. Stress interactions between strike-slip and thrust faults and between the San Andreas and Garlock faults depend on the rupture area of the source. Coulomb stress changes imparted by simulated SAF events to locations on the San Jacinto and Garlock faults within ~8 km of the San Andreas appear to be influenced more by the nearby distribution of high and low slip on the San Andreas than by the overall slip distribution across the entire rupture. Using a simplified model, we calculate that an area of no slip surrounded by high slip on a rupture imparts strong Coulomb stress increases ≤7 km to either side of the source fault, possibly explaining the apparent ~8-km range of influence of local slip on the San Andreas. Additionally, we devise a method for evaluating uncertainty values in Coulomb stress changes caused by uncertainties in the strike, dip and rake of the receiver fault. These

  10. Multi-method Feasibility Study of Geophysical Methods to Accurately Delineate the Mt. General Fault in Hinkley, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, J. J.; Grannell, R.; Martin, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    Barstow, California is in the immediate vicinity of the dextral Mt. General, Lenwood and Harper Lake faults.These faults exhibit a lack of surface expression common to faults in the Central Mojave, in which the faults are occluded by Quaternary alluvial fill resulting in large sections of the fault strand to be inferred near high risk localities. The three quaternary right-lateral strike slip faults belong to the Lenwood-Lockhart and Harper Lake fault zones. These fault zones associated with the Eastern California Shear Zone, a predominantly discontinuous northwest striking dextral shear zone that accommodates approximately 25% of interplate motion along the Pacific and North American plate boundary from the San Andreas bend on the south and Walker Lane shear zone to the northwest. The proximity of the inferred fault to high density population centers and critical infrastructure pose considerable risk to the inhabitants of Southern California, where precise knowledge of fault locations is critical. A feasibility study using various complementary geophysical methods was conducted to assess which, if any, provide the highest likelihood in accurately delineating a fault trace in the subsurface. The study focused on the Mt. General fault in Hinkley, CA. Two-dimensional gravity, magnetic, seismic refraction, and electrical resistivity along the same bounded location were collected, modeled, and interpreted. Gravity and magnetic results revealed anomalies across the inferred fault. Likewise, a seismic refraction model show a clear velocity contrast. Additionally, the electrical resistivity model showed a decrease in resistivity across the fault zone implying a groundwater barrier, complementing results from the other methods. Furthermore, overlaying the profiles shows clear evidence of a fault scarp. The success of the feasibility study in delineating the Mt. General fault zone shows that adopting a multi-method approach to the Lenwood-Lockhart and Harper Lake fault zone

  11. Slow Active Intraplate Faults: The Paleoseismology Of The Irtysh Fault Zone, Eastern Kazakhstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baize, S.; Reicherter, K. R.; Avagyan, A.; Belyashov, A.; Pestov, E.; Eutizio, V.; Arakelyan, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Asian plate interiors are known to host strong earthquakes with magnitudes up to M 8, especially around the border area between Mongolia, Russia, Kazakhstan and China. Their recurrence times are long, because of the low slip rates of faults smaller than 1 mm/yr. Geodynamically, our study region in eastern Kazakhstan is set in the frame of the Indian-Eurasian collision zone situated on the Eurasian craton. Major plate tectonic forces are induced by the indentation of the Indian plate into Eurasia. As a consequence, in the foreland a set of very long and large strike-slip fault zones developed, the western of which all have in common a dextral sense of shear. The more than 250 km long Irtysh Fault Zone (IFZ) marks a major tectonic block boundary separating two different units with granitoid intrusions, Silurian-Devonian magmatic rocks, and, thick deposits of Late Paleozoic age with coal measures of the Carboniferous and Permian. The formation of the IFZ probably dates back into Paleozoic times, it was repeatedly reactivated in later times. The IFZ is one potential source of large earthquakes in easternmost Kazakhstan. Tectonic-morphological analyses revealed the occurrence of a set of lineaments offsetting or deflecting streamlets and lithology. Geophysical data (GPR and seismics) helped to identify fault strands and trenching sites. Across three main segments, all longer than 50 km, a series of paleoseismic trenches was excavated. Within the trenches, faulted Holocene-Late Pleistocene deposits with organic soils, loess layers and colluvium directly overlying the Paleozoic rocks were encountered and 14C-dated. Astonishingly, no older Pleistocene rocks have been found suggesting complete erosion during/after glacial periods. Our findings lead to the conclusions that the IFZ and all segments are clearly active during the Holocene with surface ruptures displacements of around 2.0±0.2 meters, suggesting events with a magnitude around M≈7 along the individual

  12. Simulating Spatio-Temporal Slip Evolution of Fault Zones at Different Evolutionary Stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillers, G.; Mai, M.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2004-12-01

    Previous studies of spatio-temporal evolution of slip on a fault governed by rate-and-state friction (e.g., Rice, 1993; Ben-Zion and Rice, 1995, 1997; Tullis, 1996; Lapusta et al., 2000) employed frictional properties corresponding to fairly homogeneous faults. In most cases, the only types of heterogeneities were the lab-based depth-variations of the parameters a and b that produce transitions between stable velocity-strengthening and unstable velocity-weakening regimes. In this study we use a constant a-b profile and a depth-dependent distribution of the critical slip distance parameter L. In addition, correlated heterogeneities of L along strike are used to model geometrical heterogeneities on faults related to roughness. More specifically, we will perform 3D quasi-static and quasi-dynamic simulations of slip on a strike-slip fault using a family of 2D anisotropic correlated distributions of L having different correlation lengths along strike and downdip. The depth-variation of L over the depth range 3km histories. The 3D code with various cases of anisotropic correlated distributions of L will be used to study many issues related to observed complex behavior of seismogenic faults including: (1) Nucleation and arrest properties of failure episodes on a heterogeneous fault governed by RSD friction. (2) Comparison between properties of final simulated slip histories and those of the inverted slip histories. (3) Frequency-size and temporal statistics of simulated earthquakes on a heterogeneous fault governed by rate-and-state friction.

  13. Geothermal induced seismicity: What links source mechanics and event magnitudes to faulting regime and injection rates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Garzon, Patricia; Kwiatek, Grzegorz; Bohnhoff, Marco; Dresen, Georg

    2017-04-01

    Improving estimates of seismic hazard associated to reservoir stimulation requires advanced understanding of the physical processes governing induced seismicity, which can be better achieved by carefully processing large datasets. To this end, we investigate source-type processes (shear/tensile/compaction) and rupture geometries with respect to the local stress field using seismicity from The Geysers (TG) and Salton Sea geothermal reservoirs, California. Analysis of 869 well-constrained full moment tensors (MW 0.8-3.5) at TG reveals significant non-double-couple (NDC) components (>25%) for 65% of the events and remarkably diversity in the faulting mechanisms. Volumetric deformation is clearly governed by injection rates with larger NDC components observed near injection wells and during high injection periods. The overall volumetric deformation from the moment tensors increases with time, possibly reflecting a reservoir pore pressure increase after several years of fluid injection with no significant production nearby. The obtained source mechanisms and fault orientations are magnitude-dependent and vary significantly between faulting regimes. Normal faulting events (MW dilatancy, and they occur on varying fault orientations. In contrast, strike-slip events dominantly reveal a double-couple source, larger magnitudes (MW > 2) and mostly occur on optimally oriented faults with respect to the local stress field. NDC components indicating closure of cracks and pore spaces in the source region are found for reverse faulting events with MW > 2.5. Our findings from TG are generally consistent with preliminary source-type results from a reduced subset of well-recorded seismicity at the Salton Sea geothermal reservoir. Combined results imply that source processes and magnitudes of geothermal-induced seismicity are strongly affected by and systematically related to the hydraulic operations and the local stress state.

  14. Faulting and groundwater in a desert environment: constraining hydrogeology using time-domain electromagnetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedrosian, Paul A.; Burgess, Matthew K.; Nishikawa, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    Within the south-western Mojave Desert, the Joshua Basin Water District is considering applying imported water into infiltration ponds in the Joshua Tree groundwater sub-basin in an attempt to artificially recharge the underlying aquifer. Scarce subsurface hydrogeological data are available near the proposed recharge site; therefore, time-domain electromagnetic (TDEM) data were collected and analysed to characterize the subsurface. TDEM soundings were acquired to estimate the depth to water on either side of the Pinto Mountain Fault, a major east-west trending strike-slip fault that transects the proposed recharge site. While TDEM is a standard technique for groundwater investigations, special care must be taken when acquiring and interpreting TDEM data in a twodimensional (2D) faulted environment. A subset of the TDEM data consistent with a layered-earth interpretation was identified through a combination of three-dimensional (3D) forward modelling and diffusion time-distance estimates. Inverse modelling indicates an offset in water table elevation of nearly 40 m across the fault. These findings imply that the fault acts as a low-permeability barrier to groundwater flow in the vicinity of the proposed recharge site. Existing production wells on the south side of the fault, together with a thick unsaturated zone and permeable near-surface deposits, suggest the southern half of the study area is suitable for artificial recharge. These results illustrate the effectiveness of targeted TDEM in support of hydrological studies in a heavily faulted desert environment where data are scarce and the cost of obtaining these data by conventional drilling techniques is prohibitive.

  15. Geodetic Network Design and Optimization on the Active Tuzla Fault (Izmir, Turkey for Disaster Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haluk Ozener

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Both seismological and geodynamic research emphasize that the Aegean Region, which comprises the Hellenic Arc, the Greek mainland and Western Turkey is the most seismically active region in Western Eurasia. The convergence of the Eurasian and African lithospheric plates forces a westward motion on the Anatolian plate relative to the Eurasian one. Western Anatolia is a valuable laboratory for Earth Science research because of its complex geological structure. Izmir is a large city in Turkey with a population of about 2.5 million that is at great risk from big earthquakes. Unfortunately, previous geodynamics studies performed in this region are insufficient or cover large areas instead of specific faults. The Tuzla Fault, which is aligned trending NE–SW between the town of Menderes and Cape Doganbey, is an important fault in terms of seismic activity and its proximity to the city of Izmir. This study aims to perform a large scale investigation focusing on the Tuzla Fault and its vicinity for better understanding of the region's tectonics. In order to investigate the crustal deformation along the Tuzla Fault and Izmir Bay, a geodetic network has been designed and optimizations were performed. This paper suggests a schedule for a crustal deformation monitoring study which includes research on the tectonics of the region, network design and optimization strategies, theory and practice of processing. The study is also open for extension in terms of monitoring different types of fault characteristics. A one-dimensional fault model with two parameters – standard strike-slip model of dislocation theory in an elastic half-space – is formulated in order to determine which sites are suitable for the campaign based geodetic GPS measurements. Geodetic results can be used as a background data for disaster management systems.

  16. Monitoring of micro-deformations along Idrija and Raša faults in W Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Gosar

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of tectonic movements along two active faults of Dinaric (NW-SE trending fault system in W Slovenia using TM 71 extensiometers was set up in 2004. After two years ob measurements some clear trends of displacement were developed. The average left-lateral displacement along a crack in the inner fault zone of the Idrija fault in Učja valley is 0.38 mm/year. Short term (10 months rates were even greater and reached the value of 0.54 mm/year. Since the Idrija fault is considered as dextral strike-slip, is the observedleft-lateral displacement explained by local permutation of principle stress axis. In the Ra{a fault monitoring site at the foot of Vremščica Mt. at Košana the average reverse uplift of hanging wall (SW block of 0.24 mm/years and left-lateral displacement of 0.16 mm/year were established. Short term (9 months vertical displacements reached the value of 0.53 mm/year. The oblique sense of displacement is in agreement with geological and seismological observations. Since there were no stronger earthquakes in the vicinity and time span of monitoring, no correlations were established with seismic activity. The observed displacement rates along monitored faults of up to 0.5 mm/year are consistent with the regional deformation rate in W Slovenia established from GPS measurements which is of the order of 2 mm/year.

  17. Structure of a shear zone at the base of the seismogenic zone, Norumbega fault system, Maine; Potential for comparison with upper-crustal fault structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, N. A.; Johnson, S. E.; Gerbi, C. C.; Koons, P. O.

    2011-12-01

    Studies of large strike-slip faults provide a detailed picture of the upper crustal structure of a seismogenic fault system (e.g. Chester et al., 1993; Ben-Zion and Sammis, 2003; Wibberley et al., 2008). Few studies have provided that same degree of detail for such faults at greater depths. Because of this, it is not well understood how the structure of the fault at the surface correlates with the structure of a fault with depth, particularly across the frictional-to-viscous transition. Our study of the Sandhill Corner shear zone (SCSZ) within the Norumbega fault system (a long-lived, subvertical, seismogenic fault system in Maine, USA) focuses on this depth level and provides an informative view of across and along strike variations within a shear zone from the base of the seismogenic zone. We suggest that the structure of this shear zone correlates with the structure of modern strike slip faults like the San Andreas. The SCSZ is a 300-500m wide shear zone exhumed from depths of ~10-15km that preserves mutually-overprinting pseudotachylyte and mylonite. Using over 100 samples from 6 transects, we considered the spatial variation in (1) quartz fabric intensity, grain size, and CPO data; (2) the prevalence of mineral-filled fractures and shattered porphyroclasts; and (3) the amount of pseudotachylyte (deformed and undeformed). We find a focused shear zone core (1-7m) that contains ultramylonite and phyllonite nearly devoid of porphyroclasts and rich in deformed pseudotachylyte with the finest sizes of quartz new grains. This core region is comparable to the focused core region of upper crustal faults rich in foliated gauge where most of the slip is thought to occur. The core of the SCSZ is surrounded by a wider zone of quartzofeldspathic mylonite and protomylonite, mylonitized calc-silicates, and sheared schist (~100-500m). There is an increased incidence of shattered porphyroclasts and deformed pseudotachylyte in these rocks with proximity to the fault core but

  18. Fault geometry inversion and slip distribution of the 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake from geodetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mong-Han; Fielding, Eric J.; Dickinson, Haylee; Sun, Jianbao; Gonzalez-Ortega, J. Alejandro; Freed, Andrew M.; Bürgmann, Roland

    2017-01-01

    The 4 April 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah (EMC) earthquake in Baja, California, and Sonora, Mexico, had primarily right-lateral strike-slip motion and a minor normal-slip component. The surface rupture extended about 120 km in a NW-SE direction, west of the Cerro Prieto fault. Here we use geodetic measurements including near- to far-field GPS, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), and subpixel offset measurements of radar and optical images to characterize the fault slip during the EMC event. We use dislocation inversion methods and determine an optimal nine-segment fault geometry, as well as a subfault slip distribution from the geodetic measurements. With systematic perturbation of the fault dip angles, randomly removing one geodetic data constraint, or different data combinations, we are able to explore the robustness of the inferred slip distribution along fault strike and depth. The model fitting residuals imply contributions of early postseismic deformation to the InSAR measurements as well as lateral heterogeneity in the crustal elastic structure between the Peninsular Ranges and the Salton Trough. We also find that with incorporation of near-field geodetic data and finer fault patch size, the shallow slip deficit is reduced in the EMC event by reductions in the level of smoothing. These results show that the outcomes of coseismic inversions can vary greatly depending on model parameterization and methodology.

  19. SW-NE extensional low-angle faults in Mallorca, key for integrating the Balearic Promontory in the Miocene tectonic evolution of the western Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth-Rea, Guillermo; Moragues, Lluis; Azañón, Jose Miguel; Roldán, Francisco J.; Pérez-Peña, Jose Vicente

    2017-04-01

    Mallorca forms part of the external thrust belt of the Betics. However, presently, it is surrounded by thin crust of the Valencia Trough and the Algero-balearic basin and is disconnected from the Internal Betic domains. The main tectonic structures described in the island correspond to thrusts that structured the Tramuntana and Llevant Serres during the Late Oligocene to Middle Miocene. Meanwhile, normal faults with NW-SE transport determined the development of Serravallian to Tortonian basins. Here we present a preliminary tectonic model for Mallorca after revising the contacts between supposed thrusts in Tramuntana and Serres de Llevant. This analysis shows the existence of important low-angle extensional faults with SW-NE transport, older than the high-angle NW-SE directed extensional system. Extensional deformation is more pervasive towards the Serres de Llevant where normal faults represent most of the contacts between units. This extensional gradient is favored by ENE-WSW strike-slip transfer faults, and probably, by the faults that bound the southeastern margin of Mallorca. These faults produced the extensional collapse of Mallorca during the Late Langhian-Serravallian, dismembering the external from the internal zones, which now occupy a more westerly position in the core of the Betics.

  20. How does the 2010 El Mayor - Cucapah Earthquake Rupture Connect to the Southern California Plate Boundary Fault System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnellan, A.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Arrowsmith, R.

    2016-12-01

    The Pacific - North American plate boundary in southern California is marked by several major strike slip faults. The 2010 M7.2 El Mayor - Cucapah earthquake ruptured 120 km of upper crust in Baja California to the US-Mexico border. The earthquake triggered slip along an extensive network of faults in the Salton Trough from the Mexican border to the southern end of the San Andreas fault. Earthquakes >M5 were triggered in the gap between the Laguna Salada and Elsinore faults at Ocotillo and on the Coyote Creek segment of the San Jacinto fault 20 km northwest of Borrego Springs. UAVSAR observations, collected since October of 2009, measure slip associated with the M5.7 Ocotillo aftershock with deformation continuing into 2014. The Elsinore fault has been remarkably quiet, however, with only M5.0 and M5.2 earthquakes occurring on the Coyote Mountains segment of the fault in 1940 and 1968 respectively. In contrast, the Imperial Valley has been quite active historically with numerous moderate events occurring since 1935. Moderate event activity is increasing along the San Jacinto fault zone (SJFZ), especially the trifurcation area, where 6 of 12 historic earthquakes in this 20 km long fault zone have occurred since 2000. However, no recent deformation has been detected using UAVSAR measurements in this area, including the recent M5.2 June 2016 Borrego earthquake. Does the El Mayor - Cucapah rupture connect to and transfer stress primarily to a single southern California fault or several? What is its role relative to the background plate motion? UAVSAR observations indicate that the southward extension of the Elsinore fault has recently experienced the most localized deformation. Seismicity suggests that the San Jacinto fault is more active than neighboring major faults, and geologic evidence suggests that the Southern San Andreas fault has been the major plate boundary fault in southern California. Topographic data with 3-4 cm resolution using structure from motion from

  1. Subsurface Constraints on Late Cenozoic Basin Geometry in Northern Fish Lake Valley and Displacement Transfer Along the Northern Fish Lake Valley Fault Zone, Western Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, N.; Kerstetter, S. R.; Katopody, D. T.; Oldow, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    The NW-striking, right-oblique Fish Lake Valley fault zone (FLVFZ) forms the northern segment of the longest active structure in the western Great Basin; the Death Valley - Furnace Creek - Fish Lake Valley fault system. Since the mid-Miocene, 50 km of right-lateral displacement is documented on the southern FLVFZ and much of that displacement was and is transferred east and north on active WNW left-lateral faults. Prior to the Pliocene, displacement was transferred east and north on a low-angle detachment. Displacement on the northern part of the FLVFZ continues and is transferred to a fanned array of splays striking (west to east) WNW, NNW, ENE and NNE. To determine the displacement budget on these structures, we conducted a gravity survey to determine subsurface basin morphology and its relation to active faults. Over 2450 stations were collected and combined with existing PACES and proprietary data for a total of 3388 stations. The data were terrain corrected and reduced to a 2.67 g/cm3 density to produce a residual complete Bouguer anomaly. The eastern part of northern Fish Lake Valley is underlain by several prominent gravity lows forming several sub-basins with maximum RCBA values ranging from -24 to -28 mGals. The RCBA was inverted for depth using Geosoft Oasis Montaj GM-SYS 3D modeling software. Density values for the inversion were constrained by lithologic and density logs from wells that penetrate the entire Cenozoic section into the Paleozoic basement. Best fitting gravity measurements taken at the wellheads yielded an effective density of 2.4 g/cm3 for the basin fill. Modeled basement depths range between 2.1 to 3 km. The sub-basins form an arc opening to the NW and are bounded by ENE and NNE faults in the south and NS to NNW in the north. At the northern end of the valley, the faults merge with ENE left-lateral strike slip faults of the Mina deflection, which carries displacement to NW dextral strike-slip faults of the central Walker Lane.

  2. Fault zone architecture of a major oblique-slip fault in the Rawil depression, Western Helvetic nappes, Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasser, D.; Mancktelow, N. S.

    2009-04-01

    solution seams and veins and in the sandstones of coarse breccia and veins. Later, straight, sharp fault planes cross-cut all these features. In all lithologies, common veins and calcite-cemented fault rocks indicate the strong involvement of fluids during faulting. Today, the southern Rawil depression and the Rhone Valley belong to one of the seismically most active regions in Switzerland. Seismogenic faults interpreted from earthquake focal mechanisms strike ENE-WSW to WNW-ESE, with dominant dextral strike-slip and minor normal components and epicentres at depths of < 15 km. All three Neogene fault sets (2-4) could have been active under the current stress field inferred from the current seismicity. This implies that the same mechanisms that formed these fault zones in the past may still persist at depth. The Rezli fault zone allows the detailed study of a fossil fault zone that can act as a model for processes still occurring at deeper levels in this seismically active region.

  3. Faults Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Through the study of faults and their effects, much can be learned about the size and recurrence intervals of earthquakes. Faults also teach us about crustal...

  4. Structure and topography of the Siqueiros transform fault system: Evidence for the development of intra-transform spreading centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornari, Daniel J.; Gallo, David G.; Edwards, Margo H.; Madsen, John A.; Perfit, Michael R.; Shor, Alexander N.

    1989-12-01

    The Siqueiros transform fault system, which offsets the East Pacific Rise between 8°20'N 8°30'N, has been mapped with the Sea MARC II sonar system and is found to consist of four intra-transform spreading centers and five strike-slip faults. The bathymetric and side-looking sonar data define the total width of the transform domain to be ≈20km. The transform domain includes prominent topographic features that are related to either seafloor spreading processes at the short spreading centers or shearing along the bounding faults. The spreading axes and the seafloor on the flanks of each small spreading center comprise morphological and structural features which suggest that the two western spreading centers are older than the eastern spreading centers. Structural data for the Clipperton, Orozco and Siqueiros transforms, indicate that the relative plate motion geometry of the Pacific-Cocos plate boundary has been stable for the past ≈1.5 Ma. Because the seafloor spreading fabric on the flanks of the western spreading centers is ≈500 000 years old and parallels the present EPR abyssal hill trend (350°) we conclude that a small change in plate motion was not the cause for intra-transform spreading center development in Siqueiros. We suggest that the impetus for the development of intra-transform spreading centers along the Siqueiros transform system was provided by the interaction of small melt anomalies in the mantle (SMAM) with deepseated, throughgoing lithospheric fractures within the shear zone. Initially, eruption sites may have been preferentially located along strike-slip faults and/or along cross-faults that eventually developed into pull-apart basins. Spreading centers C and D in the eastern portion of Siqueiros are in this initial pull-apart stage. Continued intrusion and volcanism along a short ridge within a pull-apart basin may lead to the formation of a stable, small intra-transform spreading center that creates a narrow swath of ridge

  5. A three-dimensional study of fault zone architecture: Results from the SEMP fault system, Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, E. K.; Dolan, J. F.; Sammis, C. G.; Hacker, B.; Cole, J.; Ratschbacher, L.

    2008-12-01

    One of the most exciting frontiers in earthquake science is the linkage between the internal structure and mechanical behavior of fault zones. Little is known about how fault-zone structure varies as a function of depth, yet such understanding is vital if we are to understand the mechanical instabilities that control the nucleation and propagation of seismic ruptures. This has led us to the Salzach-Ennstal-Mariazell-Puchberg [SEMP] fault system in Austria, a major left-lateral strike-slip fault that has accommodated ~ 60 km of displacement during Oligo-Miocene time. Differential exhumation of the SEMP has resulted in a fault zone that reveals a continuum of structural levels along strike. This provides us with a unique opportunity to directly observe how fault-zone properties change with depth, from near-surface levels, down through the seismogenic crust, across the brittle-ductile transition, and into the uppermost part of the lower crust in western Austria. Here we present results from four key outcrops and discuss the mechanical implications of these new data. Our brittle outcrop at Gstatterboden has been exhumed from at least 4 km depth. Here the SEMP juxtaposes limestone of the Wettersteinkalk on the south against Rauwacken dolomite to the north. Faulting has produced extremely asymmetric damage, extensively shattering and shearing the dolomite while leaving the limestone largely intact. Measurements of outcrop-scale faults and fractures in the dolomite, combined with analysis of grain-size-distributions, suggest that strain has progressively localized to a zone ~ 10 m wide. These findings are compared to those from two outcrops (Kitzlochklamm and Liechtensteinklamm) that bracket the brittle-ductile transition, exhumed from depths of = 10 km. Here, the SEMP juxtaposes Greywacke Zone rocks on the north against carbonate mylonites of the Klammkalk to the south. We calculate the strain gradient in the ductile Klammkalk rocks by analyzing the lattice preferred

  6. Fault Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, H.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a range of optimization based approaches to fault diagnosis. A variety of fault diagnosis prob-lems are reformulated in the so-called standard problem setup introduced in the literature on robust control. Once the standard problem formulations are given, the fault diagnosis pr...

  7. The 2016 Kaikōura earthquake: Simultaneous rupture of the subduction interface and overlying faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Teng; Wei, Shengji; Shi, Xuhua; Qiu, Qiang; Li, Linlin; Peng, Dongju; Weldon, Ray J.; Barbot, Sylvain

    2018-01-01

    The distribution of slip during an earthquake and how it propagates among faults in the subduction system play a major role in seismic and tsunami hazards, yet they are poorly understood because offshore observations are often lacking. Here we derive the slip distribution and rupture evolution during the 2016 Mw 7.9 Kaikōura (New Zealand) earthquake that reconcile the surface rupture, space geodetic measurements, seismological and tsunami waveform records. We use twelve fault segments, with eleven in the crust and one on the megathrust interface, to model the geodetic data and match the major features of the complex surface ruptures. Our modeling result indicates that a large portion of the moment is distributed on the subduction interface, making a significant contribution to the far field surface deformation and teleseismic body waves. The inclusion of local strong motion and teleseismic waveform data in the joint inversion reveals a unilateral rupture towards northeast with a relatively low averaged rupture speed of ∼1.5 km/s. The first 30 s of the rupture took place on the crustal faults with oblique slip motion and jumped between fault segments that have large differences in strike and dip. The peak moment release occurred at ∼65 s, corresponding to simultaneous rupture of both plate interface and the overlying splay faults with rake angle changes progressively from thrust to strike-slip. The slip on the Papatea fault produced more than 2 m of offshore uplift, making a major contribution to the tsunami at the Kaikōura station, while the northeastern end of the rupture can explain the main features at the Wellington station. Our inversions and simulations illuminate complex up-dip rupture behavior that should be taken into consideration in both seismic and tsunami hazard assessment. The extreme complex rupture behavior also brings new challenges to the earthquake dynamic simulations and understanding the physics of earthquakes.

  8. Comparison of fault-related folding algorithms to restore a fold-and-thrust-belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandes, Christian; Tanner, David

    2017-04-01

    Fault-related folding means the contemporaneous evolution of folds as a consequence of fault movement. It is a common deformation process in the upper crust that occurs worldwide in accretionary wedges, fold-and-thrust belts, and intra-plate settings, in either strike-slip, compressional, or extensional regimes. Over the last 30 years different algorithms have been developed to simulate the kinematic evolution of fault-related folds. All these models of fault-related folding include similar simplifications and limitations and use the same kinematic behaviour throughout the model (Brandes & Tanner, 2014). We used a natural example of fault-related folding from the Limón fold-and-thrust belt in eastern Costa Rica to test two different algorithms and to compare the resulting geometries. A thrust fault and its hanging-wall anticline were restored using both the trishear method (Allmendinger, 1998; Zehnder & Allmendinger, 2000) and the fault-parallel flow approach (Ziesch et al. 2014); both methods are widely used in academia and industry. The resulting hanging-wall folds above the thrust fault are restored in substantially different fashions. This is largely a function of the propagation-to-slip ratio of the thrust, which controls the geometry of the related anticline. Understanding the controlling factors for anticline evolution is important for the evaluation of potential hydrocarbon reservoirs and the characterization of fault processes. References: Allmendinger, R.W., 1998. Inverse and forward numerical modeling of trishear fault propagation folds. Tectonics, 17, 640-656. Brandes, C., Tanner, D.C. 2014. Fault-related folding: a review of kinematic models and their application. Earth Science Reviews, 138, 352-370. Zehnder, A.T., Allmendinger, R.W., 2000. Velocity field for the trishear model. Journal of Structural Geology, 22, 1009-1014. Ziesch, J., Tanner, D.C., Krawczyk, C.M. 2014. Strain associated with the fault-parallel flow algorithm during kinematic fault

  9. Huge Symptomatic Brenner Tumour Simulating Uterine Fibroid: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alasia Datonye

    Background. Brenner tumours are rare ovarian neoplasms which are frequently so small and symptomless as to be incidental findings at laparotomies for other conditions. The occurrence of a huge symptomatic Brenner tumour is even rarer in our environment. Our objective is to report a case of huge symptomatic Brenner ...

  10. Combined UAVSAR and GPS Estimates of Fault Slip for the M 6.0 South Napa Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnellan, A.; Parker, J. W.; Hawkins, B.; Hensley, S.; Jones, C. E.; Owen, S. E.; Moore, A. W.; Wang, J.; Pierce, M. E.; Rundle, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Combined UAVSAR and GPS Estimates of Fault Slip for the M 6.0 South Napa Earthquake Andrea Donnellan, Jay Parker, Brian Hawkins, Scott Hensley, Cathleen Jones, Susan Owen, Angelyn Moore Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology Marlon Pierce, Jun Wang Indiana University John Rundle University of California, Davis The South Napa to Santa Rosa area has been observed with NASA's UAVSAR since late 2009 as part of an experiment to monitor areas identified as having a high probability of an earthquake. The M 6.0 South Napa earthquake occurred on 24 August 2014. The area was flown 29 May 2014 preceeding the earthquake, and again on 29 August 2014, five days after the earthquake. The UAVSAR results show slip on a single fault at the south end of the rupture near the epicenter of the event. The rupture branches out into multiple faults further north near the Napa area. A combined inversion of rapid GPS results and the unwrapped UAVSAR interferogram indicate nearly pure strike slip motion. Using this assumption, the UAVSAR data show horizontal right-lateral slip across the fault of 19 cm at the south end of the rupture and increasing to 70 cm northward over a distance of 6.5 km. The joint inversion indicates slip of ~30 cm on a network of sub-parallel faults is concentrated in a zone about 17 km long. The lower depths of the faults are 5-8.5 km. The eastern two sub-parallel faults break the surface, while three faults to the west are buried at depths ranging from 2-6 km with deeper depths to the north and west. The geodetic moment release is equivalent to a M 6.1 event. Additional ruptures are observed in the interferogram, but the inversions suggest that they represent superficial slip that does not contribute to the overall moment release.

  11. Shallow Subsurface Resistivity Profiles Across the San Jose Fault As It Transects the Cal Poly Pomona Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantrapornlert, K. J.; Polet, J.; Colin, H.

    2015-12-01

    The San Jose fault is a left-lateral strike-slip fault located in the San Gabriel Valley in Southern California. The 1988 (M4.6) and 1990 (M5.2) Upland earthquakes have been attributed to this fault and it has been suggested that it is capable of producing a magnitude M6.0-6.5 earthquake. Sections of the fault are considered to run through the campus of California State Polytechnic University, Pomona as inferred from a 2001 geotechnical engineering report (Geocon, 2001). As it cuts across the campus, the geotechnical engineering report concluded that it has a reverse component of motion. Ascertaining the precise location of the San Jose fault traces on campus is crucial as the university plans its future buildings. Resistivity surveys were conducted across several suggested traces of the fault. The surveys consisted of 24 electrodes in a Wenner electrode configuration with an electrode spacing that varies between 1-5m. An IRIS Instruments Syscal KID switcher unit provided the power source and data recording hardware. The data was processed using IRIS Prosys II software suite before using Geotomo's Res2Dinv software to obtain 2D images of subsurface resistivity for these profiles. A total of 23 surveys were conducted throughout the campus. Surveys were performed before and after rainfall to compensate for the variation of water content and its effect on resistivity. Preliminary results indicate shallow, north-dipping contrasts in resistivity across many of the areas where the fault was previously identified in the Geocon 2001 report. More data will be analyzed to present an enhanced understanding of the San Jose fault in the vicinity of the Cal Poly Pomona campus at AGU.

  12. NW transverse fault system in Southern Bogota, Colombia: New seismologic and structural evidences derived from focal mechanisms and stress field determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel Amaya, J.; Fierro Morales, J.; Ordoñez Potes, M.; Blanco, M.

    2012-12-01

    We present new seismological, morphotectonic and structural data of the Southern Bogota area. The goals of the study were to characterize the NW transverse fault system and to evaluate its effect on seismic wave's generation and propagation. The data set included epicenters of the RSNC (Red Sismologica Nacional de Colombia) catalog over the period 1993-2012, historical description of seismic events (period 1644-1921), structural field data (scale 1:100000) and remote sensors interpretation. The methodology included the structural analysis of over 476 faults having a known sense of offset by using a least squares iterative inversion outlined by Angelier (1984) to determinate the mean deviatoric principal stress tensor. Preliminary conclusions showed that both propagation medium and direction are determined by the structural and mechanic conditions of the Southern Bogota Shear Zone (SBSZ) defined by Fierro & Angel, (2008) as a NW-SE oblique-slip fault zone within sinistral and normal regimes. Based on both data sources (focal mechanism and field structural data) we attempted to reconstruct the stress field starting with a strike slip faulting stress regime (S2 vertical), the solution yielded a ENE-WSW orientation for horizontal principal stress (S1). It is hypothesized that the NW oblique-slip fault zone may generate and/or propagate seismic waves, as a local source, implying local hazard to Bogota the capital city of Colombia with over 8 million habitants.

  13. Marine and land active-source seismic imaging of mid-Miocene to Holocene-aged faulting near geothermal prospects at Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisses, A.; Kell, A.; Kent, G. [UNR; Driscoll, N. [UCSD; Karlin, R.; Baskin, R. [USGS; Louie, J. [UNR; Pullammanappallil, S. [Optim

    2016-08-01

    Amy Eisses, Annie Kell, Graham Kent, Neal Driscoll, Robert Karlin, Rob Baskin, John Louie, and Satish Pullammanappallil, 2011, Marine and land active-source seismic imaging of mid-Miocene to Holocene-aged faulting near geothermal prospects at Pyramid Lake, Nevada: Geothermal Resources Council Transactions, 35, 7 pp. Preprint at http://crack.seismo.unr.edu/geothermal/Eisses-GRCpaper-sm.pdf The Pyramid Lake fault zone lies within a vitally important area of the northern Walker Lane where not only can transtension can be studied through a complex arrangement of strike-slip and normal faults but also geothermal activity can be examined in the extensional regime for productivity. This study used advanced and economical seismic methods in attempt to develop the Paiute Tribe’s geothermal reservoir and to expand upon the tectonics and earthquake hazard knowledge of the area. 500 line-kilometers of marine CHIRP data were collected on Pyramid Lake combined with 27 kilometers of vibrator seismic on-land data from the northwest side of the basin were collected in 2010 that highlighted two distinct phases of faulting. Preliminary results suggest that the geothermal fluids in the area are controlled by the late Pleistoceneto Holocene-aged faults and not through the mid-Miocene-aged conduits as originally hypothesized.

  14. 3D Dynamic Rupture Simulation Across a Complex Fault System: the Mw7.0, 2010, Haiti Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douilly, R.; Aochi, H.; Calais, E.; Freed, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Earthquakes ruptures sometimes take place on a secondary fault and surprisingly do not activate an adjacent major one. The 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake is a classic case where rupture occurred on a blind thrust while the adjacent San Andreas Fault was not triggered during the process. Similar to Loma Prieta, the Mw7.0, January 12 2010, Haiti earthquake also ruptured a secondary blind thrust, the Léogâne fault, adjacent to the main plate boundary, the Enriquillo Plantain Garden Fault, which did not rupture during this event. Aftershock relocalizations delineate the Léogâne rupture with two north dipping segments with slightly different dip, where the easternmost segment had mostly dip-slip motion and the westernmost one had mostly strike-slip motion. In addition, an offshore south dipping structure inferred from the aftershocks to the west of the rupture zone coincides with the offshore Trois Baies reverse fault, a region of increase in Coulomb stress increase. In this study, we investigate the rupture dynamics of the Haiti earthquake in a complex fault system of multiple segments identified by the aftershock relocations. We suppose a background stress regime that is consistent with the type of motion of each fault and with the regional tectonic regime. We initiate a nucleation on the east segment of the Léogâne fault by defining a circular region with a 2 km radius where shear stress is slightly greater than the yield stress. By varying friction on faults and background stress, we find a range of plausible scenarios. In the absence of near-field seismic records of the event, we score the different models against the static deformation field derived from GPS and InSAR at the surface. All the plausible simulations show that the rupture propagates from the eastern to the western segment along the Léogâne fault, but not on the Enriquillo fault nor on the Trois Baies fault. The best-fit simulation shows a significant increase of shear stresses on the Trois Baies

  15. SPECIALIZED MAPPING OF CRUSTAL FAULT ZONES. PART 1: BASIC THEORETICAL CONCEPTS AND PRINCIPLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Zh. Seminsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term studies of shear zones have included collection of data on fractures showing no indication of displacement which are termed as 'blank' fractures. A method aimed at mapping fault structures and stress fields has been developed on the basis of results of paragenetic analysis of measurements of abundant fractures. The method is termed as 'specialized mapping', firstly, due to its specific structural goal so that to distinguish it from the conventional geological mapping of regions in nature, and, secondly, because of the specific procedure applied to refer to fractures as references to decipher fault-block patterns of natural regions. In Part 1, basic theoretical concepts and principles of specialized mapping are described. Part 2 is being prepared for publication in one of the next issues of the journal; it will cover stages of the proposed method and describe some of the cases of its application.In terms of general organizational principles, specialized mapping is similar to other methods based on structural paragenetic analysis and differs from such methods in types of paragenesises viewed as references to reveal crustal fault zones. Such paragenesises result from stage-by-stage faulting (Fig 2 and Fig. 7 during which stress fields of the 2nd order are regularly changeable within the shear zone. According to combined experimental and natural data, a complete paragenesis of fractures in the shear zone includes a major (1st order fault plane and fractures of other seven types, R, R’, n, n’, t, t’ and T (2nd order (Fig. 4 and Fig 8. At the fracture level, each of them corresponds to a paragenesis including three nearly perpendicular systems of early ruptures (Fig. 1, which are based on two classical patterns of conjugated fractures, one of which is consistent with the position of the fault plane (Fig. 3. Taking into account that strike-slip, reverse and normal faults are similar in terms of mechanics (i.e. they are formed due to

  16. SPECIALIZED MAPPING OF CRUSTAL FAULT ZONES. PART 1: BASIC THEORETICAL CONCEPTS AND PRINCIPLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Zh. Seminsky

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Long-term studies of shear zones have included collection of data on fractures showing no indication of displacement which are termed as 'blank' fractures. A method aimed at mapping fault structures and stress fields has been developed on the basis of results of paragenetic analysis of measurements of abundant fractures. The method is termed as 'specialized mapping', firstly, due to its specific structural goal so that to distinguish it from the conventional geological mapping of regions in nature, and, secondly, because of the specific procedure applied to refer to fractures as references to decipher fault-block patterns of natural regions. In Part 1, basic theoretical concepts and principles of specialized mapping are described. Part 2 is being prepared for publication in one of the next issues of the journal; it will cover stages of the proposed method and describe some of the cases of its application.In terms of general organizational principles, specialized mapping is similar to other methods based on structural paragenetic analysis and differs from such methods in types of paragenesises viewed as references to reveal crustal fault zones. Such paragenesises result from stage-by-stage faulting (Fig 2 and Fig. 7 during which stress fields of the 2nd order are regularly changeable within the shear zone. According to combined experimental and natural data, a complete paragenesis of fractures in the shear zone includes a major (1st order fault plane and fractures of other seven types, R, R’, n, n’, t, t’ and T (2nd order (Fig. 4 and Fig 8. At the fracture level, each of them corresponds to a paragenesis including three nearly perpendicular systems of early ruptures (Fig. 1, which are based on two classical patterns of conjugated fractures, one of which is consistent with the position of the fault plane (Fig. 3. Taking into account that strike-slip, reverse and normal faults are similar in terms of mechanics (i.e. they are formed due to

  17. A Pore Fluid Study in the Transform Fault System of Western Haiti: Investigating Geochemical Processes and Hydrologic Pathways of the Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battani, A.; Monnin, C.; Ruffine, L.; Ellouz, N.; Leroy, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    The area of Western Haiti is located between the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden Fault (EPGF) and Ciabao-Oriente Septentrional fault systems. It has been investigated during the Haiti-SIS cruise (November-December 2012) by heat flow measurements and coring. These two strike-slip fault systems accommodate the relative motion between the Caribbean and North American plates. An aftershock study of the MW= 7, 12 January 2010 earthquake indicated that this event originated along the EPGF fault, while the septentrional fault has not been ruptured for about a century. We focused coring operations on specific zones; faults, basin margins, ridge, deep basins delimated using structural/sedimentological surface data. The objective of the pore-fluid study was to determine both the pathways of the fluids and their origin in relation with the fault activity. A total of 14 Kullenberg cores were collected for fluid sampling and sedimentological analyses. Overall, 99 pore fluids were extracted, using Rhizon® samplers. Major and minor dissolved elements were analyzed. The resulting dataset allows us to identify several diagenetic processes occurring within the upper section of the sedimentary column. For the fault-crossing zones, the vertical chloride and sulphate profiles where the dissolved-element concentrations are close to that of normal seawater suggest seawater downward flow (infiltration). There the faults would then act as recharge zones for fluid circulation. On the opposite, for cores recovered in the basins, dissolved element profiles exhibit variable shapes with sulfate concentration decreasing with depth (indicating organic matter oxydation or anaerobic oxidation of methane) These results will be combined with those from the emerged segment of the EPGF (that can be observed on land in Haiti) in order to have a picture of the hydrologic regime of the fault system, its capacity to act as a recharge zone and conversely to supply deep-seated fluids to the surface (discharge

  18. Near-Surface Seismic Profiling Across the Active Carlsberg Fault, Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, M. I.; Nielsen, L.; Fallesen, J.; Thybo, H.

    2002-12-01

    An integrated near-surface normal-incidence and wide-angle seismic experiment has been conducted across the active Carlsberg Fault in the easternmost part of the Danish basin, just east of Copenhagen. The purpose of the seismic experiment is to: 1) determine the fault structure; 2) image possible seismic velocity contrasts across the fault; and 3) estimate how much the fault offsets the individual sedimentary layers at the different depth levels. The origin of the Carlsberg Fault is probably related to extensional stresses in a strike-slip system caused by movements in the Sorgenfrei-Tornquist Zone, which is a 20-50 km wide fault zone located approximately 50 km east of Copenhagen. In the study area, the upper sedimentary strata consist of Cretaceous and Danian chalk layers as well as younger sediments, which predominantly consist of sand and clay. The fault runs in an overall NNW-SSE direction, and it penetrates the various sedimentary strata. Geodetic measurements show that the fault has been active within the last 100 years. The normal-incidence data were collected along an 1100 m long line perpendicular to the strike of the fault with a shot spacing of 12 m and a receiver spacing of 6 m. The reflection image reveals a clear flower structure in the upper 400 ms of the section indicating that substantial horizontal movement has taken place along the Carlsberg Fault. This flower structure is relatively narrow at 350 ms depth, whereas it unfolds to a width of about 300 m in the uppermost layers. The wide-angle data were collected along a 2000 m long line with shot and receiver spacings of 100 m and 10 m, respectively. They provide good velocity control of the sedimentary layers and allow for depth conversion of the reflection seismic image. Furthermore the wide-angle data have the potential of providing back-scattered reflections from the fault planes. GPR measurements have been planned in order to constrain the very shallow and recent movements along the fault.

  19. Late Quaternary slip rate determination by CRN dating on the Haiyuan fault, China, and implication for complex geometry fault systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrau, Rémi; Klinger, Yann; Van der Woerd, Jérôme; Liu-Zeng, Jing; Li, Zhanfei; Xu, Xiwei

    2017-04-01

    Late Quaternary slip rate determination by CRN dating on the Haiyuan fault, China, and implication for complex geometry fault systems Matrau Rémi, Klinger Yann, Van der Woerd Jérôme, Liu-Zeng Jing, Li Zhanfei, Xu Xiwei The Haiyuan fault in Gansu Province, China, is a major left-lateral strike-slip fault forming the northeastern boundary of the Tibetan plateau and accommodating part of the deformation from the India-Asia collision. Geomorphic and geodetic studies of the Haiyuan fault show slip rates ranging from 4 mm/yr to 19 mm/yr from east to west along 500 km of the fault. Such discrepancy could be explained by the complex geometry of the fault system, leading to slip distribution on multiple branches. Combining displacement measurements of alluvial terraces from high-resolution Pléiades images and 10Be - 26Al cosmogenic radionuclides (CRN) dating, we bracket the late Quaternary slip rate along the Hasi Shan fault segment (37°00' N, 104°25' E). At our calibration site, terrace riser offsets for 5 terraces ranging from 6 m to 227 m and CRN ages ranging from 6.5±0.6 kyr to 41±4 kyr - yield geological left-lateral slip rates from 2.0 mm/yr to 4.4 mm/yr. We measured consistent terrace riser offset values along the entire 25 km-long segment, which suggests that some external forcing controls the regional river-terrace emplacement, regardless of each specific catchment. Hence, we extend our slip rate determination to the entire Hasi Shan fault segment to be 4.0±1.0 mm/yr since the last 40 kyr. This rate is consistent with other long-term rates of 4 mm/yr to 5 mm/yr east and west of Hasi Shan - as well as geodetic rates of 4 mm/yr to 6 mm/yr west of Hasi Shan. However, Holocene terraces and moraines offsets have suggested higher rates of 15 to 20 mm/yr further west. Such disparate rates may be explained by slip distribution on multiple branches. In particular, the Zhongwei fault splay in the central part of the Haiyuan fault, with a slip rate of 4-5 mm/yr could

  20. Deep Reaching Gas-permeable Tectonic Faults of the Early Earth as Habitats for the Origin of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, U.; Mayer, C.

    2012-04-01

    The discussion on the origin of life encounters difficulties when it comes to estimate the conditions of the early earth and to define plausible environments for the development of the first complex organic molecules. Until now, the role of the earth's crust has been more or less ignored. First continental crustal cores may have been developed some tens to hundreds of million years after formation of earth. Due to tectonic stress the proto continents were sheared by vertical strike-slip faults at an early stage. These deep-reaching open, interconnected tectonic faults may provide possible reaction habitats ranging from nano- to centimetre and even larger dimensions that sum up to several cubic kilometres for the formation of prebiotic molecules. Their fillings consist of supercritical and subcritical waters and supercritical and subcritical gases. Here, all necessary raw materials including phosphate for the development of prebiotic molecules exist in variable concentrations and in sufficient quantities. Furthermore, there are periodically changing pressure and temperature conditions, varying pH-values, metallic surfaces, clay minerals and a large number of catalysts. While cosmic and UV-radiation are excluded, nuclear radiation intervenes the chemical evolution of the molecules inside the crust. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is of crucial importance. It can be present in an almost pure form as a supercritical fluid (scCO2) in a crustal depth less than 1 km (critical point of pure CO2: 74 bar; 31°C). Inside strike-slip faults, a two-phase system formed by supercritical CO2 in liquid water provides the environment for condensation and polymerisation of hydrogen cyanide, nucleobases, nucleotides and amino acids. ScCO2 is a non-polar solvent that is widely used in "green chemistry" (Anastas and Kirchhoff 2002) and enables the dissolution of non-polar reactants and their reactions normally occurring in the absence of water. Under the influence of periodically changing

  1. Reevaluation of 1935 M 7.0 earthquake fault, Miaoli-Taichung Area, western Taiwan: a DEM and field study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y. N.; Chen, Y.; Ota, Y.

    2003-12-01

    A large earthquake (M 7.0) took place in Miaoli area, western Taiwan on April 21st, 1935. Right to its south is the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake fault, indicating it is not only tectonically but seismically active. As the previous study, the study area is located in the mature zone of a tectonic collision that occurred between Philippine sea Plate and Eurasia continental Plate. The associated surface ruptures of 1935 earthquake daylighted Tungtsichiao Fault, a tear fault trending NE in the south and Chihhu Fault, a back thrust trending N-S in the north, but no ruptures occurred in between. Strike-slip component was identified by the horizontal offset observed along Tungtsichiao Fault; however, there are still disputes on the reported field evidence. Our purposes are (1) to identify the structural behaviors of these two faults, (2) to find out what the seismogenic structure is, and (3) to reconstruct the regional geology by information given by this earthquake. By DEM interpretation and field survey, we can clearly recognize a lot of the 1935 associated features. In the west of Chihhu Fault, a series of N-S higher terraces can be identified with eastward tilted surfaces and nearly 200 m relative height. Another lower terrace is also believed being created during the 1935 earthquake, showing an east-facing scarp with a height of ca. 1.5~2 m. Outcrop investigation reveals that the late-Miocene bedrock has been easterly thrusted over the Holocene conglomerates, indicating a west-dipping fault plane. The Tungtsichiao Fault cuts through a lateritic terrace at Holi, which is supposed developed in Pleistocene. The fault scarp is only discernible in the northeastern ending. Other noticeable features are the fault related antiforms that line up along the surface rupture. There is no outcrop to show the fault geometry among bedrocks. We re-interpret the northern Chihhu Fault as the back thrust generated from a main subsurface detachment, which may be the actual seismogenic fault

  2. Source Rupture Process and Near-Fault Ground Motions of the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake Sequence Estimated from Strong Motion Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, K.; Iwata, T.

    2016-12-01

    The 2016 Kumamoto earthquake sequence started with an MJMA 6.5 foreshock on April 14, 2016 occurring along the northern part of the Hinagu fault, central Kyushu, Japan, and the MJMA 7.3 mainshock occurred just 28 h after the foreshock. Both events brought severe ground motions to the near-source region. We analyzed the kinematic source rupture processes of the foreshock and mainshock by the multiple time window linear waveform inversion using strong motion data (e.g., Hartzell and Heaton, 1983). The foreshock (Mw 6.1) was characterized by right-lateral strike-slip occurring on a nearly vertical fault plane along the northern part of the Hinagu fault, and it had two large-slip areas: one near the hypocenter and another at a shallow depth. These two large-slip areas mainly contribute ground motions in the near-source area. For the analysis of the mainshock, we assumed a fault geometry changing strike and dip angles along the Hinagu and Futagawa faults in accordance with the surface ruptures mapped by emergency field surveys (Kumahara et al., 2016). We assigned point sources densely with an interval of 0.2 km on the assumed fault planes in order to reproduce appropriately near-fault ground motions, and estimated spatiotemporal slip history, which was discretized with an interval of 1.8 km on the fault planes. The estimated source model reveals that the rupture of the mainshock started at a northwest-dipping fault plane along the Hinagu fault, which is close to the vertical fault plane of the foreshock, and almost continuously propagated across the junction of the Hinagu and Futagawa faults. Then the rupture propagated northeastward along the Futagawa fault, and stopped to rupture in the western part of the Aso caldera. The significant slip with 3-5 m were observed on the Futagawa fault, and shallowest part has slip ranging from 1 to 2 m. We also tried to reproduce ground motions observed at some near-fault strong motion stations, which recorded significant coseismic

  3. A possible link between faulting, cryptodomes and lateral collapses at Vesuvius Volcano (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milia, Alfonsa; Torrente, Maurizio Maria; Bellucci, Francesca

    2012-06-01

    Vesuvius is an active volcano that has been affected by late Quaternary lateral collapses and tectonic faults. Cryptodomes and two debris avalanche, 18 ka-old DA1 and 3.5 ka-old DA2, were previously documented off Vesuvius and for the younger avalanche a link between onshore and offshore stratigraphy was reconstructed. The interpretation of seismic reflection profiles off Vesuvius, borehole stratigraphies, onshore and geomorphological data allowed to recognise the relationships among debris avalanches, criptodomes and faulting. Stratigraphic data reveal a remarkable difference between the architecture of the northern and southern volcano sectors that is compatible with the occurrence of the DA1 debris avalanche in the southern volcano sector. A contour map and a three-dimensional model of a surface merging the morphology of the top of the Somma lavas, in the northern volcano sector, with that of the top of the DA1 debris avalanche, in the southern volcano sector, were reconstructed. We present a new lateral collapse model of Vesuvius Volcano and document the relevance of inherited tectonic faults in guiding collapse geometry. It is possible that the SW-directed collapse (DA1) was driven towards the hangingwall blocks of NW-SE normal faults, while the propagation of the W-directed collapse (DA2) can be ascribed to the activity of the E-W strike-slip fault. Because of their distal location a minor role of cryptodome intrusion on collapses of Vesuvius can be postulated. The detailed analysis of substrate and edifice structure presented here establishes clear connexion between substrate tectonics and lateral collapse. This approach broadens the horizons of volcanic hazard assessment of Vesuvius.

  4. Modeling the Interaction between Fluid Pressure and Faulting in an Earthquake Swarm at Long Valley Caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, P. A.; Shelly, D. R.; Hill, D. P.

    2016-12-01

    Rapid migration of hypocenters during the 2014 Long Valley Caldera, California, earthquake swarm suggests that the activity was initiated and sustained by fluids, composed primarily of water and carbon dioxide, exsolved from underlying magma (Shelly et al., 2016, JGR, doi:10.1002/2015JB012719). To investigate how fluid pressure and faulting may co-evolve, we develop a simulation model that couples fluid flow with mechanical stress, while treating earthquakes with the "static/dynamic friction" approach developed by McClure and Horne (2010, Geotherm. Resour. Counc. Trans., 34, 381-396). We set up the model to represent a vertical, permeable fault (divided into a grid of elements) bounded by impermeable rock in a strike-slip tectonic environment. At the start of the simulation, a high-pressure source is introduced at depth to represent the injection of magmatic-derived fluids along the fault. The fluid flow component of the model simulates diffusion of the source pressure into the fault, and halts when the pressure increase at a fault element is sufficient to cause failure (slip). Next, the mechanical stress component of the model calculates the stress changes that result from the slip. Because these stress changes could induce surrounding elements to slip, the model iterates through this chain-reaction process until a stable configuration is achieved (i.e., slipped elements do not induce further slips).The patch of slipped elements represents an earthquake in the model. The permeability of the patch is increased to represent the effect of shear displacement, and the pressure diffusion simulation resumes. Although this model implements a simplified representation of the earthquake mechanism, it is able to mimic (using reasonable rock properties) the overall character of a local swarm of approximately 1000 earthquakes (-0.9 < M < 2.8) that occurred during 7 July 2014 in Long Valley Caldera.

  5. Geometry of the Nojima fault at Nojima-Hirabayashi, Japan - II. Microstructures and their implications for permeability and strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Diane E.; Lockner, D.A.; Ito, H.; Ikeda, R.; Tanaka, H.; Omura, K.

    2009-01-01

    Samples of damage-zone granodiorite and fault core from two drillholes into the active, strike-slip Nojima fault zone display microstructures and alteration features that explain their measured present-day strengths and permeabilities and provide insight on the evolution of these properties in the fault zone. The least deformed damage-zone rocks contain two sets of nearly perpendicular (60-90?? angles), roughly vertical fractures that are concentrated in quartz-rich areas, with one set typically dominating over the other. With increasing intensity of deformation, which corresponds generally to increasing proximity to the core, zones of heavily fragmented rock, termed microbreccia zones, develop between prominent fractures of both sets. Granodiorite adjoining intersecting microbreccia zones in the active fault strands has been repeatedly fractured and locally brecciated, accompanied by the generation of millimeter-scale voids that are partly filled with secondary minerals. Minor shear bands overprint some of the heavily deformed areas, and small-scale shear zones form from the pairing of closely spaced shear bands. Strength and permeability measurements were made on core collected from the fault within a year after a major (Kobe) earthquake. Measured strengths of the samples decrease regularly with increasing fracturing and fragmentation, such that the gouge of the fault core and completely brecciated samples from the damage zone are the weakest. Permeability increases with increasing disruption, generally reaching a peak in heavily fractured but still more or less cohesive rock at the scale of the laboratory samples. Complete loss of cohesion, as in the gouge or the interiors of large microbreccia zones, is accompanied by a reduction of permeability by 1-2 orders of magnitude below the peak values. The core samples show abundant evidence of hydrothermal alteration and mineral precipitation. Permeability is thus expected to decrease and strength to increase somewhat

  6. Regional methods for mapping major faults in areas of uniform low relief, as used in the London Basin, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, Richard; Aldiss, Donald

    2013-04-01

    Most of the London Basin, south-eastern UK, is underlain by the Palaeogene London Clay Formation, comprising a succession of rather uniform marine clay deposits up to 150 m thick, with widespread cover of Quaternary deposits and urban development. Therefore, in this area faults are difficult to delineate (or to detect) by conventional geological surveying methods in the field, and few are shown on the geological maps of the area. However, boreholes and excavations, especially those for civil engineering works, indicate that faults are probably widespread and numerous in the London area. A representative map of fault distribution and patterns of displacement is a pre-requisite for understanding the tectonic development of a region. Moreover, faulting is an important influence on the design and execution of civil engineering works, and on the hydrogeological characteristics of the ground. This paper reviews methods currently being used to map faults in the London Basin area. These are: the interpretation of persistent scatterer interferometry (PSI) data from time-series satellite-borne radar measurements; the interpretation of regional geophysical fields (Bouguer gravity anomaly and aeromagnetic), especially in combination with a digital elevation model; and the construction and interpretation of 3D geological models. Although these methods are generally not as accurate as large-scale geological field surveys, due to the availability of appropriate data in the London Basin they provide the means to recognise and delineate more faults, and with more confidence, than was possible using traditional geological mapping techniques. Together they reveal regional structures arising during Palaeogene crustal extension and subsidence in the North Sea, followed by inversion of a Mesozoic sedimentary basin in the south of the region, probably modified by strike-slip fault motion associated with the relative northward movement of the African Plate and the Alpine orogeny. This

  7. Extreme multi-millennial slip rate variations on the Garlock fault, California: geomorphology and geochronology of slip rate constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Edward; Dolan, James; McGill, Sally; McAuliffe, Lee; Zinke, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Combining existing paleoseismology with new geomorphic constraints for the same part of the Central Garlock fault in California, USA, allows us to demonstrate pronounced variations in slip rate during the Holocene for this left-lateral strike-slip system. Our results have basic implications for understanding how faults store and release strain energy in large earthquakes, and for Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Assessment (PSHA). A series of well-preserved fluvial terraces within alluvial fans provide offset markers, and newly developed single grain K-feldspar IRSL dating allows us to constrain depositional ages and subsequent erosion of terrace risers with good precision, using multiple samples from several different locations. This new dating approach has wide applicability for paleoseismology and slip rate studies, besides understanding environmental response to climatic events; agreement with independent age control provided by C-14 and Be-10 profiles comes from sites in the USA, Mexico, Tibet and Mongolia. Sediments dominated by a range of grain sizes from silt to boulders can be dated, and the technique is often applicable in locations where quartz OSL does not work well. We examine the interplay and coupling between climate and tectonics at millennial timescales, along with sedimentary and geomorphic responses, and consider how our understanding of fault dynamics can be improved with the benefit of these new approaches.

  8. Finding faults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, J.; Duke, J. [Surpac Minex Group (Australia)

    2005-04-01

    The Surpac Minex Group has been building a geologic model to represent the coal seam structure at the Carbones del Cerrejon LLC mine in north eastern Colombia which is bonded by major reserve and normal faults. This is being achieved through a new software faulting tool. The tool combines existing Minex modelling with new fault interpretation tools. New software that permits 3-D photogrammetry and seismic data can also be incorporated. 6 figs.

  9. Oblique transfer of extensional strain between basins of the middle Rio Grande rift, New Mexico: Fault kinematic and paleostress constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Scott A.; Hudson, Mark R.; Caine, Jonathan S.; Thompson, Ren A.

    2013-01-01

    The structural geometry of transfer and accommodation zones that relay strain between extensional domains in rifted crust has been addressed in many studies over the past 30 years. However, details of the kinematics of deformation and related stress changes within these zones have received relatively little attention. In this study we conduct the first-ever systematic, multi-basin fault-slip measurement campaign within the late Cenozoic Rio Grande rift of northern New Mexico to address the mechanisms and causes of extensional strain transfer associated with a broad accommodation zone. Numerous (562) kinematic measurements were collected at fault exposures within and adjacent to the NE-trending Santo Domingo Basin accommodation zone, or relay, which structurally links the N-trending, right-stepping en echelon Albuquerque and Española rift basins. The following observations are made based on these fault measurements and paleostresses computed from them. (1) Compared to the typical northerly striking normal to normal-oblique faults in the rift basins to the north and south, normal-oblique faults are broadly distributed within two merging, NE-trending zones on the northwest and southeast sides of the Santo Domingo Basin. (2) Faults in these zones have greater dispersion of rake values and fault strikes, greater dextral strike-slip components over a wide northerly strike range, and small to moderate clockwise deflections of their tips. (3) Relative-age relations among fault surfaces and slickenlines used to compute reduced stress tensors suggest that far-field, ~E-W–trending σ3 stress trajectories were perturbed 45° to 90° clockwise into NW to N trends within the Santo Domingo zones. (4) Fault-stratigraphic age relations constrain the stress perturbations to the later stages of rifting, possibly as late as 2.7–1.1 Ma. Our fault observations and previous paleomagnetic evidence of post–2.7 Ma counterclockwise vertical-axis rotations are consistent with increased

  10. Insights into the 3D architecture of an active caldera ring-fault at Tendürek volcano through modeling of geodetic data

    KAUST Repository

    Vasyura-Bathke, Hannes

    2015-04-28

    The three-dimensional assessment of ring-fault geometries and kinematics at active caldera volcanoes is typically limited by sparse field, geodetic or seismological data, or by only partial ring-fault rupture or slip. Here we use a novel combination of spatially dense InSAR time-series data, numerical models and sand-box experiments to determine the three-dimensional geometry and kinematics of a sub-surface ring-fault at Tendürek volcano in Turkey. The InSAR data reveal that the area within the ring-fault not only subsides, but also shows substantial westward-directed lateral movement. The models and experiments explain this as a consequence of a ‘sliding-trapdoor’ ring-fault architecture that is mostly composed of outward-inclined reverse segments, most markedly so on the volcano\\'s western flanks but includes inward-inclined normal segments on its eastern flanks. Furthermore, the model ring-fault exhibits dextral and sinistral strike-slip components that are roughly bilaterally distributed onto its northern and southern segments, respectively. Our more complex numerical model describes the deformation at Tendürek better than an analytical solution for a single rectangular dislocation in a half-space. Comparison to ring-faults defined at Glen Coe, Fernandina and Bárðarbunga calderas suggests that ‘sliding-trapdoor’ ring-fault geometries may be common in nature and should therefore be considered in geological and geophysical interpretations of ring-faults at different scales worldwide.

  11. Late Quaternary paleoearthquakes along the northern segment of the Nantinghe fault on the southeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haoyue; He, Honglin; Wei, Zhanyu; Shi, Feng; Gao, Wei

    2017-05-01

    The strong earthquake behaviors of faults are significant for learning crustal deformation mechanisms and for assessing regional seismic risk. To date, faults that bound tectonic blocks have attracted considerable concern and many studies; however, scant attention has been paid to faults within blocks that can also host devastating earthquakes. The Nantinghe fault is a left-lateral strike-slip fault within the Southwestern Yunnan Block, and it slips at ∼4 mm/yr suggesting strong activity in the late Quaternary. Nevertheless, no earthquake greater than 6 has ever been recorded along it, except for the 1941 M ∼7 earthquake near the Myanmar-China border region. In contrast, many earthquakes have occurred in the near region, delineating a seismic gap near the Nantinghe fault. Although several studies have been conducted upon it, the activity of its northern segment is confusing, and whether this fault segment has loaded sufficient stress to fail remains debatable. Furthermore, previous work failed to conduct any paleoseismological studies bringing out great uncertainty in learning its activity and faulting behavior, as well as in assessing the regional seismic risk. To solve these problems, we mapped the fault traces utilizing high-resolution satellite images and aerial photographs, and conducted three paleoseismological trenches along the northern segment of the Nantinghe fault. The trench excavations revealed a ∼45,000-year incomplete paleoearthquake history and confirmed that this fault segment has been active since the late Pleistocene but was not ruptured during the 1941 earthquake. Additionally, at least five paleoearthquakes are identified with their respective age ranges of before 39,030 BCE; 38,500-37,220 BCE; 28,475-5445 BCE; 3535 BCE-800 CE; and 1320-1435 CE based on radiocarbon dating. Among the paleoearthquakes, the latest is suggested to have generated a surface rupture much longer than 14 km with a magnitude likely up to Ms 7.0. Furthermore, based

  12. Source mechanisms and faulting analysis of the aftershocks in the Lake Erçek area (Eastern Anatolia, Turkey) during the 2011 Van event (Mw 7.1): Implications for the regional stress field and ongoing deformation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toker, M.; Pınar, A.; Tur, H.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we analysed the source mechanisms and faulting pattern of the aftershocks in the Lake Erçek area, Eastern Anatolia, during the 2011 Van event (Mw 7.1). The fault plane solutions of the aftershocks were used to derive a stress tensor acting around Lake Erçek. The estimated seismological parameters (focal mechanism solutions, stress tensor, and fault focal analyses) were integrated with field surveys and high resolution seismic reflection data so as to better understand the main faulting patterns and deformational features which are the causatives of the observed geomorphological features within and around Lake Erçek. The focal parameters of the 56 aftershocks with magnitude range 3.5 ≤ Mw ≤ 5.5 were obtained using the regional broadband seismic data from the network of Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute (KOERI) through the Centroid Moment Tensor (CMT) inversion of locally observed broadband-waves. The implications for the lateral variation of the stress field in the lake area were based on information derived from integration of seismicity and stress tensor inversion results. The major outcomes of our analyses were as follows: (a) The maximum principal stress axis is close to horizontal and aligned in NNW-SSE direction, the minimum compressional stress axis is close to vertical and aligned in an ENE-WSW direction, the intermediate stress axis is close to horizontal and is parallel to the strike of the ruptured fault plane, while the stress ratio is (R = 0.6); (b) the lake basin is mostly deformed by dip-slip faults (dips ≥ 45-60°) in and along its margins where the various folds, basement highs with eroded surfaces and several low-angle normal faults are evident; (c) the majority of the aftershocks have reverse-thrust mechanism with some strike-slip components in the Lake Erçek area (N- and S-margins). Strike-slip and normal faulting events are also evident (E- and W-margins, respectively); (d) the normal and reverse

  13. Quantification of Fault-Zone Plasticity Effects with Spontaneous Rupture Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roten, D.; Olsen, K. B.; Day, S. M.; Cui, Y.

    2017-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that plastic yielding in crustal rocks in the fault zone may impose a physical limit to extreme ground motions. We explore the effects of fault-zone non-linearity on peak ground velocities (PGVs) by simulating a suite of surface-rupturing strike-slip earthquakes in a medium governed by Drucker-Prager plasticity using the AWP-ODC finite-difference code. Our simulations cover magnitudes ranging from 6.5 to 8.0, three different rock strength models, and average stress drops of 3.5 and 7.0 MPa, with a maximum frequency of 1 Hz and a minimum shear-wave velocity of 500 m/s. Friction angles and cohesions in our rock models are based on strength criteria which are frequently used for fractured rock masses in civil and mining engineering. For an average stress drop of 3.5 MPa, plastic yielding reduces near-fault PGVs by 15-30% in pre-fractured, low strength rock, but less than 1% in massive, high-quality rock. These reductions are almost insensitive to magnitude. If the stress drop is doubled, plasticity reduces near-fault PGVs by 38-45% and 5-15% in rocks of low and high strength, respectively. Because non-linearity reduces slip rates and static slip near the surface, plasticity acts in addition to, and may partially be emulated by, a shallow velocity-strengthening layer. The effects of plasticity are exacerbated if a fault damage zone with reduced shear-wave velocities and reduced rock strength is present. In the linear case, fault-zone trapped waves result in higher near-surface peak slip rates and ground velocities compared to simulations without a low-velocity zone. These amplifications are balanced out by fault-zone plasticity if rocks in the damage zone exhibit low-to-moderate strength throughout the depth extent of the low-velocity zone (˜5 km). We also perform dynamic non-linear simulations of a high stress drop (8 MPa) M 7.8 earthquake rupturing the southern San Andreas fault along 250 km from Indio to Lake Hughes. Non-linearity in the

  14. Development of Hydrologic Characterization Technology of Fault Zones -- Phase I, 2nd Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasaki, Kenzi; Onishi, Tiemi; Black, Bill; Biraud, Sebastien

    2009-03-31

    This is the year-end report of the 2nd year of the NUMO-LBNL collaborative project: Development of Hydrologic Characterization Technology of Fault Zones under NUMO-DOE/LBNL collaboration agreement, the task description of which can be found in the Appendix 3. Literature survey of published information on the relationship between geologic and hydrologic characteristics of faults was conducted. The survey concluded that it may be possible to classify faults by indicators based on various geometric and geologic attributes that may indirectly relate to the hydrologic property of faults. Analysis of existing information on the Wildcat Fault and its surrounding geology was performed. The Wildcat Fault is thought to be a strike-slip fault with a thrust component that runs along the eastern boundary of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It is believed to be part of the Hayward Fault system but is considered inactive. Three trenches were excavated at carefully selected locations mainly based on the information from the past investigative work inside the LBNL property. At least one fault was encountered in all three trenches. Detailed trench mapping was conducted by CRIEPI (Central Research Institute for Electric Power Industries) and LBNL scientists. Some intriguing and puzzling discoveries were made that may contradict with the published work in the past. Predictions are made regarding the hydrologic property of the Wildcat Fault based on the analysis of fault structure. Preliminary conceptual models of the Wildcat Fault were proposed. The Wildcat Fault appears to have multiple splays and some low angled faults may be part of the flower structure. In parallel, surface geophysical investigations were conducted using electrical resistivity survey and seismic reflection profiling along three lines on the north and south of the LBNL site. Because of the steep terrain, it was difficult to find optimum locations for survey lines as it is desirable for them to be as

  15. Fault plane modelling of the 2003 August 14 Lefkada Island (Greece) earthquake based on the analysis of ENVISAT SAR interferograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilieva, M.; Briole, P.; Ganas, A.; Dimitrov, D.; Elias, P.; Mouratidis, A.; Charara, R.

    2016-12-01

    On 2003 August 14, a Mw = 6.2 earthquake occurred offshore the Lefkada Island in the eastern Ionian Sea, one of the most seismically active areas in Europe. The earthquake caused extended damages in the island, and a number of ground failures, especially along the north-western coast. Seven ascending ENVISAT/ASAR images are used to process six co-seismic interferograms. The ROI-PAC package is used for interferogram generation with the SRTM DEM applied in a two-pass method. The formation of the co-seismic pairs is limited due to the existence of one pre-seismic image only. Dense vegetation is covering the island, which is an obstacle in getting good coherence, since C-band images are used. Nevertheless, ground deformation, of > 56 mm (two fringes) in the line of sight of the satellite, is detected in all six co-seismic interferograms. By inversion of the data from the observed fringes, a best fitting model of the activated fault is calculated assuming a dislocation in an elastic half space. The inferred fault is a pure dextral strike-slip fault, dipping 59 ± 5° eastward, 16 ± 2 km long and 10 ± 2 km wide. It is located north of the fault of the Mw = 6.5 2015 November 17 earthquake, and a 10-15 km gap remains between the two faults. The 2003 fault does not reach the surface and its upper edge is at a depth of 3.5 ± 1 km. No evidence is found of slip south of the Lefkada Island as suggested by some seismological studies.

  16. Pleistocene slip rates on the Boconó fault along the North Andean Block plate boundary, Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pousse-Beltran, Lea; Vassallo, Riccardo; Audemard, Franck; Jouanne, François; Carcaillet, Julien; Pathier, Erwan; Volat, Matthieu

    2017-07-01

    The Boconó fault is a strike-slip fault lying between the North Andean Block and the South American plate which has triggered at least five Mw > 7 historical earthquakes in Venezuela. The North Andean Block is currently moving toward NNE with respect to a stable South American plate. This relative displacement at 12 mm yr-1 in Venezuela (within the Maracaibo Block) was measured by geodesy, but until now the distribution and rates of Quaternary deformation have remained partially unclear. We used two alluvial fans offset by the Boconó fault (Yaracuy Valley) to quantify slip rates, by combining 10Be cosmogenic dating with measurements of tectonic displacements on high-resolution satellite images (Pleiades). Based upon a fan dated at >79 ka and offset by 1350-1580 m and a second fan dated at 120-273 ka and offset by 1236-1500 m, we obtained two Pleistocene rates of 5.0-11.2 and <20.0 mm yr-1, consistent with the regional geodesy. This indicates that the Boconó fault in the Yaracuy Valley accommodates 40 to 100% of the deformation between the South American plate and the Maracaibo Block. As no aseismic deformation was shown by interferometric synthetic aperture radar analysis, we assume that the fault is locked since the 1812 event. This implies that there is a slip deficit in the Yaracuy Valley since the last earthquake ranging from 1 to 4 m, corresponding to a Mw 7-7.6 earthquake. This magnitude is comparable to the 1812 earthquake and to other historical events along the Boconó fault.

  17. Elastic block and strain modeling of GPS data around the Haiyuan-Liupanshan fault, northeastern Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanchuan; Shan, Xinjian; Qu, Chunyan; Zhang, Yingfeng; Song, Xiaogang; Jiang, Yu; Zhang, Guohong; Nocquet, Jean-Mathieu; Gong, Wenyu; Gan, Weijun; Wang, Chisheng

    2017-12-01

    Based on the dense GPS velocity field in the northeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau from 1999 to 2016, we have produced the deformation and strain characteristics of the Haiyuan fault and the Liupanshan fault. Estimated long-term slip rate along the Haiyuan-Liupanshan fault zones show a gradual decrease from 6.4 ± 1.6 mm/yr at the Tuolaishan fault to 2.9 ± 1.2 mm/yr at the Southern Liupanshan fault. Left-lateral thrusting movement was inverted for the Xiangshan-Tianjingshan fault (XS-TJS), which has an average slip rate of 2.1 ± 3.4 mm/yr during the study period. We also calculated the heterogeneous distribution of interseismic coupling along the fault zones. Our result also shows the locking depth of the Tianzhu seismic gap is ∼22 km. The slip rate deficit, the seismic moment accumulation rate, and the Coulomb stress accumulation rate are high on the fault planes, whereas the second invariant of the strain rate is low at the surface. The Liupanshan fault is locked to a depth of ∼23 km, and the corresponding seismic moment accumulation rate on the fault plane is high, while the strain rate at the surface is low. The accumulated strain along the Tianzhu seismic gap and the Liupanshan fault could be balanced by earthquakes with magnitudes of Mw7.9 and Mw7.4, considering the absence of large earthquakes over the last 1000 years and 1400 years respectively. The Haiyuan segments had ruptured during 1920 Haiyuan earthquake, and the estimated locking depth for period 1999-2016 is 5-10 km. Its seismic moment accumulation rate at depth is low and the strain rate at the surface is high. Our result indicates that 70% of the strike-slip along the Haiyuan segments transforms into thrusting along the Liupanshan fault, while the remaining 30% is related to the orogeny of the Liupanshan. For slip between the Haiyuan fault and the XS-TJS, about 27-34% of the slip is partitioned on the XS-TJS.

  18. Structure of the San Andreas Fault at SAFOD (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, J. S.; Chester, F. M.; Sills, D. W.; Heron, B.; Almeida, R. V.; Guillemette, R. N.

    2010-12-01

    clay- and serpentinite, 2) microscale particle fracture, inter-particle slip, and abrasive wear are important deformation processes in the gouge layer at this depth, and 3) the contrast in cohesion between the incohesive foliated gouge of the SDZ and the bounding foliated cataclasite reflects a marked contrast in strain-rate and strain. All spot-core taken during Phases 1 and 3, except that capturing the CDZ, have been oriented in the geographic reference frame by aligning fractures and layering observed in the spot-core with that imaged in geophysical logs. Kinematic indicators in the SDZ gouge, including the shape preferred orientation of mesoscopic clasts and striated slip-surfaces, are consistent with almost pure strike-slip movement. Fabrics in the foliated cataclasite and damaged arkosic sandstone host rocks indicate nearly fault-normal contraction with strike- and dip-parallel extension. The contacts of the gouge with bounding units display variable orientations consistent with a mesoscopic and macroscopic corrugated fault surface morphology. Compared to exhumed traces of the SAF and other drilled seismic faults, the structure at SAFOD is unique in that it contains thick layers of incohesive foliated gouge that record distributed flow at the mesoscopic scale.

  19. Faulting and Mud Volcano Eruptions Inside of the Coastal Range During the 2003 Mw = 6.8 Chengkung Earthquake in Eastern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Jang Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Field investigations following the 2003 Mw = 6.8 Chengkung earthquake in eastern Taiwan revealed some interesting observations of surface geological processes closely related to the co-seismic deformation. We discovered that the Tama Fault, which is about 15 km east of the causative Chihshang Fault, underwent shortening of about 15.5 mm locally in 2001 - 2006, particularly during the 2003 earthquake. This shows that ESE-WNW compression affects the upper crust of the Coastal Range and produces significant shortening in addition to that of the major Chihshang Fault. On the hanging wall of the Chihshang Fault, we also found vigorous activities of the two major mud volcanoes during the main shock, lasting several days. To the north, the Luoshan Mud Volcano, a large mud basin, erupted noisily with water and gases during the earthquake. To the south, in the Leikunghuo Mud Volcano, two sets of fractures, one aligned with the N16¢XE right-lateral fault and the other with the N80¢XE left-lateral fault, occurred during the earthquake. This conjugate system revealed a strike-slip stress regime with NE-SW compression and NW-SE extension. We interpret it to be the result of local stress permutation rather than regional tectonic stress. We conclude that deformation did occur inside of the Coastal Range, especially during the co-seismic event. Therefore, a better understanding of the internal deformation of the Coastal Range is an important target for future studies, particularly across three mapped faults: the Yungfeng, Tuluanshan and Tama faults. We also want to draw attention to the stress analysis in the mud volcanoes area, where the local stress perturbation plays an important role.

  20. Assessing the seismic coupling of shallow continental faults and its impact on seismic hazard estimates: a case-study from Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carafa, Michele M. C.; Valensise, Gianluca; Bird, Peter

    2017-04-01

    We propose an objective and reproducible algorithmic path to forecast seismicity in Italy from long-term deformation models. These models are appropriate for Italy and its neighbouring countries and seas thanks to the availability of rich, reliable and regularly updated historical earthquake and seismogenic fault databases, and to the density of permanent GPS stations. However, so far little has been done to assess the seismic coupling of Italian active faults, that is to quantify their ability to release earthquakes. This must be determined in order to use geodetic and active faulting observations in alternative seismicity models, to overcome possible limitations of the earthquake record for the assessment of seismic hazard. We use a probabilistic method to assign upper crustal earthquakes from the historical catalogue to their presumed causative faults, then collect all the events into three subcatalogues corresponding to the compressional, extensional and strike-slip faulting classes. We then determine the parameters of their Gutenberg-Richter frequency/magnitude relations using maximum-likelihood methods and integrate these distributions to estimate the long-term seismic moment rate for each class. Finally, we compare these seismicity rates to the long-term tectonic deformation based on GPS data, thus determining the coupled thickness (and estimating seismic coupling) for each fault class. We find that in our study region the seismic coupling and the related coupled thickness is on average two times larger for extensional than for compressional faults. As for the spatial distribution of earthquake rates, a larger number of events is predicted for the extensional settings of the Apennines chain, in agreement with the inferred seismic coupling but also with the long-term strain rates. We also find that the frequency/magnitude distributions indicate that the largest earthquakes occur in extensional settings, whereas compressional faults are expected to host

  1. Plate boundary behaviour, recent uplift, and seismic hazard along the Central Alpine Fault near the Whataroa River, South Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pascale, G. P.; Davies, T. R.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding plate boundary behaviour is a major objective in seismotectonics to better understand and mitigate seismic hazards. Field- and light detection and ranging (lidar)-derived topographic mapping, geological characterisation, and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of on-fault sediments were used to better constrain rangefront deformation of the Southern Alps at the Alpine Fault near the Whataroa River. The Alpine Fault, which forms the plate boundary in the South Island of New Zealand, is thought to rupture in large to great earthquakes (most recently in 1717 AD). Here the fault is dextral-reverse, although primarily strike-slip with clear fault traces cutting across older surfaces of varying elevations and ages. Deformational bulges are observed along these traces that are likely thrust-bounded. A terrace of Whataroa River sediments on the hanging wall of the fault approximately ~ 55-75 m (when considering uncertainties) above the floodplain of the Whataroa. OSL ages for hanging wall sediments of ~ 11 ka in this terrace, ~ 2.8 ka for Whataroa River terrace deposits in a deformational bulge, and ~ 11.1 ka for a rangefront-derived fan and aggradation along the rangefront and Holocene hanging wall uplift rates of ~6.0 + or - 1 mm/yr at the fault. These Whataroa River-sourced terrace deposits suggest that the adjacent bounding faults are steeply-dipping, with no geometries in the shallow subsurface that would tend to cause rotation and tilting. Because GPS-derived "interseismic" vertical uplift rates are new outcrop mapping that demonstrates other important sources of seismic hazard exist near this plate boundary.

  2. The role of E-W basement faults in the Mesozoic geodynamic evolution of the Gafsa and Chotts basins, south-central Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amri, Dorra Tanfous; Dhahri, Ferid; Soussi, Mohamed; Gabtni, Hakim; Bédir, Mourad

    2017-10-01

    The Gafsa and Chotts intracratonic basins in south-central Tunisia are transitional zones between the Atlasic domain to the north and the Saharan platform to the south. The principal aim of this paper is to unravel the geodynamic evolution of these basins following an integrated approach including seismic, well log and gravity data. These data are used to highlight the tectonic control on the deposition of Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous series and to discuss the role of the main faults that controlled the basin architecture and Cretaceous-Tertiary inversion. The horizontal gravity gradient map of the study area highlights the pattern of discontinuities within the two basins and reveals the presence of deep E-W basement faults. Primary attention is given to the role played by the E-W faults system and that of the NW-SE Gafsa fault which was previously considered active since the Jurassic. Facies and thickness analyses based on new seismic interpretation and well data suggest that the E-W-oriented faults controlled the subsidence distribution especially during the Jurassic. The NW-SE faults seem to be key structures that controlled the basins paleogeography during Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic time. The upper Triassic evaporite bodies, which locally outline the main NW-SE Gafsa fault, are regarded as intrusive salt bodies rather than early diapiric extrusions as previously interpreted since they are rare and occurred only along main strike-slip faults. In addition, seismic lines show that Triassic rocks are deep and do not exhibit true diapiric features.

  3. High resolution images of the mid- to lower-crust beneath the North Anatolian Fault obtained using the scattered seismic wavefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. A.; Rost, S.; Houseman, G.; Cornwell, D. G.; Turkelli, N.; Teoman, U.; Kahraman, M.; Altuncu Poyraz, S.; Gülen, L.; Utkucu, M.; Rondenay, S.; Frederiksen, A. W.

    2014-12-01

    Deformation along major strike-slip faults is typically focussed into narrow damage zones at the surface, but the distribution at greater depths is more enigmatic. For instance, deformation in the lower crust beneath these faults is often attributed to much broader ductile shear zones. Deciphering how strain is distributed throughout the crust and lithospheric mantle is important because it has ramifications on the earthquake loading cycle. In order to better understand the structure of these systems at depth, we investigate the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) as part of a multidisciplinary project entitled FaultLab. This fault system extends ~1200km across Turkey and has shown a clear west-east progression in seismicity over the last century, culminating in 2 catastrophic earthquakes located close to the population centers of Izmit and Duzce in 1999. In this contribution, we will present new data from a dense seismic array (Dense Array for North Anatolia, DANA, a 6x11 grid with a nominal station spacing of 7km) located across a part of the ruptured segment of the Izmit earthquake. Using the techniques of teleseismic scattering tomography and scattering migration, the excellent resolution afforded by DANA highlights sharp (< 5km) lateral variations in structure at mid- to lower-crustal depths (~20-25 km) across two branches of the NAFZ. This suggests that deformation zones between distinct crustal blocks remain narrow at these depths. Integrating complementary results from other parts of the FaultLab project (satellite geodesy, geodynamical modelling, structural geology), the results appear to be consistent with postseismic deformation being accommodated through afterslip on the deep extension of a narrow fault zone as opposed to a broad ductile region beneath the seismogenic extent of the fault.

  4. Coulomb stress change on surrounding faults by the January 12, 2010, Haiti earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symithe, S. J.; Calais, E.; Freed, A. M.; Haase, J. S.

    2011-12-01

    The M7 January 12, 2010, Haiti earthquake occurred on the previously unmapped Léogâne Fault, a transpressional fault located very close to the Enriquillo Plantain Garden Fault (EPGF), the major fault system and primary seismic hazard in southern Haiti. How the rupture of the Léogâne fault influenced stresses on the Enriquillo Fault - especially toward Port-au-Prince - as well as on other regional faults is critical to understanding how seismic hazard in this heavily populated region has been altered as a result of the devastating 2010 earthquake. We calculated Coulomb Failure Stress (CFS) changes in the region surrounding the M7 January 12, 2010, Haiti earthquake using dislocation theory, assuming elastic properties for the region. We considered two possible slip models, the simple single-fault slip model proposed by Calais et al. (2010) and the more complex model by Hayes et al. (2010), which involves three subfaults. We resolve CFS changes on the Léogâne rupture plane itself, as well as on regional faults such as the Enriquillo, Neiba-Matheux, and Trois Baies faults. We find that the aftershock distribution is well explained by CFS changes caused by the coseismic rupture, in particular the cluster of reverse faulting events to the west of the rupture, offshore, coincident with the Trois Baies fault. This fault therefore appears to have been triggered by the January 2010 event. The aftershock distribution in the rupture area clearly outlines the Léogâne fault (see Douilly et al., this meeting) but shows no clear evidence of activity on the other subfaults suggested by Hayes et al. (2010). Both slip models imply a ~1 bar increase of CFS bar on the Enriquillo fault to the west and east of the January 2010 rupture. For the Calais et al. (2010) model, CFS changes are higher to the east if the Enriquillo Fault is modeled with a dip of 65° and a rake 20°, as suggested by some geological observations, compared to a purely strike-slip vertical fault, as often

  5. Semi-automatic mapping of fault rocks on a Digital Outcrop Model, Gole Larghe Fault Zone (Southern Alps, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittempergher, Silvia; Vho, Alice; Bistacchi, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    A quantitative analysis of fault-rock distribution in outcrops of exhumed fault zones is of fundamental importance for studies of fault zone architecture, fault and earthquake mechanics, and fluid circulation. We present a semi-automatic workflow for fault-rock mapping on a Digital Outcrop Model (DOM), developed on the Gole Larghe Fault Zone (GLFZ), a well exposed strike-slip fault in the Adamello batholith (Italian Southern Alps). The GLFZ has been exhumed from ca. 8-10 km depth, and consists of hundreds of individual seismogenic slip surfaces lined by green cataclasites (crushed wall rocks cemented by the hydrothermal epidote and K-feldspar) and black pseudotachylytes (solidified frictional melts, considered as a marker for seismic slip). A digital model of selected outcrop exposures was reconstructed with photogrammetric techniques, using a large number of high resolution digital photographs processed with VisualSFM software. The resulting DOM has a resolution up to 0.2 mm/pixel. Most of the outcrop was imaged using images each one covering a 1 x 1 m2 area, while selected structural features, such as sidewall ripouts or stepovers, were covered with higher-resolution images covering 30 x 40 cm2 areas.Image processing algorithms were preliminarily tested using the ImageJ-Fiji package, then a workflow in Matlab was developed to process a large collection of images sequentially. Particularly in detailed 30 x 40 cm images, cataclasites and hydrothermal veins were successfully identified using spectral analysis in RGB and HSV color spaces. This allows mapping the network of cataclasites and veins which provided the pathway for hydrothermal fluid circulation, and also the volume of mineralization, since we are able to measure the thickness of cataclasites and veins on the outcrop surface. The spectral signature of pseudotachylyte veins is indistinguishable from that of biotite grains in the wall rock (tonalite), so we tested morphological analysis tools to discriminate

  6. Fault diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Kathy

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the research in this area of fault management is to develop and implement a decision aiding concept for diagnosing faults, especially faults which are difficult for pilots to identify, and to develop methods for presenting the diagnosis information to the flight crew in a timely and comprehensible manner. The requirements for the diagnosis concept were identified by interviewing pilots, analyzing actual incident and accident cases, and examining psychology literature on how humans perform diagnosis. The diagnosis decision aiding concept developed based on those requirements takes abnormal sensor readings as input, as identified by a fault monitor. Based on these abnormal sensor readings, the diagnosis concept identifies the cause or source of the fault and all components affected by the fault. This concept was implemented for diagnosis of aircraft propulsion and hydraulic subsystems in a computer program called Draphys (Diagnostic Reasoning About Physical Systems). Draphys is unique in two important ways. First, it uses models of both functional and physical relationships in the subsystems. Using both models enables the diagnostic reasoning to identify the fault propagation as the faulted system continues to operate, and to diagnose physical damage. Draphys also reasons about behavior of the faulted system over time, to eliminate possibilities as more information becomes available, and to update the system status as more components are affected by the fault. The crew interface research is examining display issues associated with presenting diagnosis information to the flight crew. One study examined issues for presenting system status information. One lesson learned from that study was that pilots found fault situations to be more complex if they involved multiple subsystems. Another was pilots could identify the faulted systems more quickly if the system status was presented in pictorial or text format. Another study is currently under way to

  7. SPECIALIZED MAPPING OF CRUSTAL FAULT ZONES. PART 2: MAIN STAGES AND PROSPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Zh. Seminsky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is to complete the description of the special mapping method which theoretical basis and principles were published in [Seminsky, 2014]. With reference to data on the Ulirba site located in Priolkhonie (Western Pribaikalie, the content of special mapping is reviewed in detail. The method is based on paragenetical analysis of abundant jointing which specific feature is the lack of any visible displacement indicators. There are three stages in the special mapping method (Fig. 3 as follows:Stage I: Preparation and analysis of previously published data on the regional fault structure (Fig. 1, А–Г, establishment of a networks of stations to conduct structural geological monitoring and mass measurements of joints, re­cord of rock data (Fig. 2, А, general state of the fault network (Fig. 1, Д–З, fracture density (Fig. 2, Б and, if any, structures of the above-jointing level (Fig. 1, Е, З; Fig. 2, А.Stage II is aimed at processing of field data and includes activities in four groups (II.1–II.4 as follows: Group II.1: construction of circle diagrams, specification of characteristics of joint systems and their typical scatters (Fig. 4, А, identification of simple (generally tipple paragenesises, and determination of dynamic settings of their formation (translocal rank (Table 1, evaluation of densities and complexity of the joint networks, analysis of their spacial patterns within the site under mapping, and identification of the most intensively destructed zones in the rock massif (Fig. 2, Б–В. Group II.2: comparison of jointing diagrams with reference ones showing joint poles (Fig. 4, Б–В; Е–З; Л–Н, and, in case of their satisfactory correlation, making a conclusion of potential formation of a specific joint pattern in the local zone of strike-slip, normal faulting or reverse faulting (Fig. 4,  Г–Д, И–К, О–П; Fig. 5; Fig. 7, Б, and determination of relative age relationships between such zones on

  8. Deep-seated landslides and seismic triggering along major transcurrent faults in central Asia and California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, Derek; Korjenkov, Andrey; Bobrovskii, Alexander; Mamyrov, Ernes

    2010-05-01

    The Tien Shan mountains of central Asia, the northernmost expression of India-Eurasia collision, are characterised by active deformation (GPS measured contraction rates of ~20 mm a-1), rapid uplift and steep slopes prone to landsliding. In addition to seismogenic structures associated with contraction, the mountain belt is bisected by the Talas-Fergana fault, a poorly-known, historically aseismic, 700-km-long dextral strike-slip structure displaying active faulting and landslide features similar to those along the San Andreas fault in the Transverse Ranges of southern California. In both cases uplift along fault traces making up the fault zones has produced a deep central trough occupied by landslide and reworked landslide deposits, bordered by mountain ridges dominated by high to medium grade metamorphic bedrock and acting as landslide source areas. Moreover, palaeoseismic evidence suggests both fault zones may be regarded as seismic gaps characterised by relatively infrequent large-magnitude earthquakes. The numerous deep-seated landslides along both fault zones record a long history of landsliding based on: 1) radiocarbon dating; 2) sequences of lacustrine deposits containing apparent seismites and formed in landslide-dammed lakes now breached and drained; 3) recorded offsets and entrenchment of drainage features and deposits, associated with a characteristic cycle of fluvial reworking of landslide masses; 4) perched gravels preserved high on central trough walls and interpreted as related to reworking of landslide deposits; 5) degree of erosional and depositional degradation, including a time-series of landslide mass - lacustrine deposit assemblages. Together, these features suggest a landslide history characterised by large-volume failures, a pattern thought to mirror that of seismic strain release along these apparently locked fault systems. It seems likely that deep-seated landslides are effectively only triggered by major faulting events in these settings

  9. Huge mucinous cystadenoma of the pancreas mistaken for a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cystic tumors of the pancreas are rare and can be confused with pseudocysts.We present a 50 year old woman with a huge mucinous cystadenoma of the pancreas initially diagnosed and managed with a cystojejunostomy and cyst wall biopsy. She required another laparotomy and tumor excision after histological ...

  10. Smart Cities as Support and Legacy of Huge Sport Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAURION, C.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss the concept of a smart city and the importance of huge Sport events as an incentive to the creation of the infrastructure necessary for the development of cities that provide quality of life for all its citizens using information technology.

  11. A huge polypoid uterine myoma causing severe primary postpartum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One of such was diagnosed in a 36-year old para 2+0 who had successful gestation to term delivery in co-existence with a huge fibroid polyp and had spontaneous vaginal delivery of a life baby. She however developed severe primary postpartum haemorrhage prompting emergency postpartum digital vaginal myomectomy ...

  12. Huge Mesenteric Lymphangioma – A Rare Cause of Acute Abdomen

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lymphangiomas are benign congenital masses which occur most commonly in head and neck of children and incidence of mesenteric lymphangiomas is very rare. We report such a case of huge mesenteric lymphangioma in a 20 year old male who presented to us with acute abdomen. Pre-operative diagnosis is difficult ...

  13. Seismotectonics of southern Haiti: A new faulting model for the 12 January 2010 M7.0 earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint Fleur, Newdeskarl; Feuillet, Nathalie; Grandin, Raphaël.; Jacques, Eric; Weil-Accardo, Jennifer; Klinger, Yann

    2015-12-01

    The prevailing consensus is that the 2010 Mw7.0 Haiti earthquake left the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden strike-slip fault (EPGF) unruptured but broke unmapped blind north dipping thrusts. Using high-resolution topography, aerial images, bathymetry, and geology, we identified previously unrecognized south dipping NW-SE striking active thrusts in southern Haiti. One of them, Lamentin thrust, cuts across the crowded city of Carrefour, extends offshore into Port-au-Prince Bay, and connects at depth with the EPGF. We propose that both faults broke in 2010. The rupture likely initiated on the thrust and propagated further along the EPGF due to unclamping. This scenario is consistent with geodetic, seismological, and field data. The 2010 earthquake increased the stress toward failure on the unruptured segments of the EPGF and on neighboring thrusts, significantly increasing the seismic hazard in the Port-au-Prince urban area. The numerous active thrusts recognized in that area must be considered for future evaluation of the seismic hazard.

  14. Seismological and geophysical study across the active segment of the Ventaniella fault: understanding its role during the Cantabrian Mountains building up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Viejo, Gabriela; Pulgar, Javier A.; Lopez-Fernandez, Carlos; Olona, Javier; Llana-funez, Sergio

    2017-04-01

    The Ventaniella fault is a crustal structure that runs NW-SE through the Cantabrian mountains and margin in the Northern Iberian Peninsula. The fault has a very long cartographic expression exceeding 300 km onshore and 150 offshore, where it is also called the Cantabrian fault. The current structure inland acts mainly as a strike-slip structure with some reverse component elevating the northern block. In some parts along its trace it reworks Mesozoic normal faults that are suitably oriented to accommodate north-south shortening during the alpine cycle. However, its role in the development of the Cantabrian mountain chain is not fully understood. The existence of lingering seismicity at two segments, one offshore and another one onshore, and the suggestion that separates different geodynamical domains offshore, provides good arguments for further investigation of this fault. A focused seismic network of 10 stations within 20 km of radius from the fault trace inland has been deployed within the seismically active southern segment to analyze seismicity, ambient noise and integrate with other neighboring seismic networks and former deep geophysical studies. More than 25 small events (magnitude <1.5) have been registered and located since the network was deployed within a period of 18 months. The events occur mostly at mid-crustal depths. Ambient noise analysis from more than 3 months will also be incorporated in the tomography to unravel the structure of the fault zone at depth. The aim of the study is to propose a model for the continental crust in this part of the Cantabrian mountains.

  15. Tectonic controls of the North Anatolian Fault System (NAFS) on the geomorphic evolution of the alluvial fans and fan catchments in Erzincan pull-apart basin; Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarp, Gulcan

    2015-02-01

    The Erzincan pull-apart basin is located in the eastern section of the North Anatolian Fault System (NAFS). The tectonic evolution of this basin is mostly controlled by strike slip master faults of the NAFS. This study examines the topography-structure relationships in an effort to evaluate the tectonic signatures in the landscape, paying special attention to recent tectonic activity. In the study, the main focus is on the tectonic controls of the NAFS on the geomorphic evolution of alluvial fans and fan catchments in the Erzincan pull-apart basin. The observations of the amount of tilting of the alluvial fans (β) and its relation with morphometric (Asymmetry Factor (AF), Hypsometric Integral (HI), Fractal analysis of drainage networks (D)) properties of the fan catchments provide valuable information about the tectonic evolution of the basin area. The results of the analyses showed that the alluvial fan and fan catchment morphology in the pull-apart basin are mainly controlled by the ongoing tectonic activity of the NAFS. The fault system in the basin has controlled the accommodation space by causing differential subsidence of the basin, and aggradation processes by causing channel migration, channel incision and tilting the alluvial fans.

  16. Geomorphology, denudation rates, and stream channel profiles reveal patterns of mountain building adjacent to the San Andreas fault in northern California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLong, Stephen B.; Hilley, George E.; Prentice, Carol S.; Crosby, Christopher J.; Yokelson, Intan N.

    2017-01-01

    Relative horizontal motion along strike-slip faults can build mountains when motion is oblique to the trend of the strike-slip boundary. The resulting contraction and uplift pose off-fault seismic hazards, which are often difficult to detect because of the poor vertical resolution of satellite geodesy and difficulty of locating offset datable landforms in active mountain ranges. Sparse geomorphic markers, topographic analyses, and measurement of denudation allow us to map spatiotemporal patterns of uplift along the northern San Andreas fault. Between Jenner and Mendocino, California, emergent marine terraces found southwest of the San Andreas fault record late Pleistocene uplift rates between 0.20 and 0.45 mm yr–1 along much of the coast. However, on the northeast side of the San Andreas fault, a zone of rapid uplift (0.6–1.0 mm yr–1) exists adjacent to the San Andreas fault, but rates decay northeastward as the coast becomes more distant from the San Andreas fault. A newly dated 4.5 Ma shallow-marine deposit located at ∼500 m above sea level (masl) adjacent to the San Andreas fault is warped down to just 150 masl 15 km northeast of the San Andreas fault, and it is exposed at just 60–110 masl to the west of the fault. Landscape denudation rates calculated from abundance of cosmogenic radionuclides in fluvial sediment northeast of, and adjacent to, the San Andreas fault are 0.16–0.29 mm yr–1, but they are only 0.03–0.07 mm yr–1 west of the fault. Basin-average channel steepness and the denudation rates can be used to infer the erosive properties of the underlying bedrock. Calibrated erosion rates can then be estimated across the entire landscape using the spatial distribution of channel steepness with these erosive properties. The lower-elevation areas of this landscape that show high channel steepness (and hence calibrated erosion rate) are distinct from higher-elevation areas with systematically lower channel steepness and denudation rates

  17. Pliocene onset of widespread normal faulting in the southern Puna Plateau, southern central Andes, NW Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero Lopez, M. C.; Hongn, F. D.; Marrett, R.; Seggiaro, R.; Strecker, M. R.

    2009-12-01

    Normal faults are often observed in many compressional Cenozoic mountain belts and paleotectonic settings and have been associated with a late-stage development in orogen evolution. Often, such normal faults are found in high-elevation sectors in the orogen interior and may form graben, closely spaced arrays or they are kinematically linked with strike-slip faults. In contrast, at lower elevations and in the adjacent foreland regions coeval shortening may be sustained. This situation typifies the active tectonics of the southern central Andes of NW Argentina characterized by the Puna Plateau (22° to 27° S lat), the world’s second largest orogenic plateau with an average elevation of 3.7 km and the adjacent Andean foreland. The Puna contains neotectonic landforms that host widespread active normal faults, closely associated with mafic centres. In contrast, the shortening continued in the foreland. The onset of the extensional kinematic in the Puna has been inferred to be Quaternary in age as many mafic volcanic manifestations were generated during the ultimate 2 Ma. However, our new structural observations and Ar/Ar dating of volcanic deposits and dykes suggests that widespread extension in the Puna started much earlier. We are able to show that the southern margin of the Puna is characterized by extensional structures at different length scales, including extensional fractures, sometimes hosting dykes, as well as normal fault arrays that cut volcanic edifices and flows, visible on satellite imagery. Fault kinematic analysis and an assessment of dyke and fracture orientations documents that the region at about 27°S lat is affected by N-S extension. This must be a regional phenomenon as similar observations can be made in areas farther north as well. Our geochronology work on lava flows and dykes in this region suggests that an extensional regime may have been in existence by 7-6 Ma and extensional processes were well underway by 4 Ma. The often observed

  18. Southern East Siberia Pliocene–Quaternary faults: Database, analysis and inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana V. Lunina

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the first release of an Informational System (IS devoted to the systematic collection of all available data relating to Pliocene–Quaternary faults in southern East Siberia, their critical analysis and their seismotectonic parameterization. The final goal of this project is to form a new base for improving the assessment of seismic hazard and other natural processes associated with crustal deformation. The presented IS has been exploited to create a relational database of active and conditionally active faults in southern East Siberia (between 100°–114° E and 50°–57° N whose central sector is characterized by the highly seismic Baikal rift zone. The information within the database for each fault segment is organized as distinct but intercorrelated sections (tables, texts and pictures, etc. and can be easily visualized as HTML pages in offline browsing. The preliminary version of the database distributed free on disk already highlights the general fault pattern showing that the Holocene and historical activity is quite uniform and dominated by NE–SW and nearly E–W trending faults; the former with a prevailing dip-slip normal kinematics, while the latter structures are left-lateral strike-slip and oblique-slip (with different proportion of left-lateral and normal fault slip components. These faults are mainly concentrated along the borders of the rift basins and are the main sources of moderate-to-strong (M ≥ 5.5 earthquakes on the southern sectors of East Siberia in recent times. As a whole, based on analyzing the diverse fault kinematics and their variable spatial distribution with respect to the overall pattern of the tectonic structures formed and/or activated during the late Pliocene–Quaternary, we conclude they were generated under a regional stress field mainly characterized by a relatively uniform NW–SE tension, but strongly influenced by the irregular hard boundary of the old Siberian craton. The

  19. Submarine Neotectonic Investigations of the Bahia Soledad Fault, off Northern Baja California Near the US - Mexico Border

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, K.; Lundsten, E. M.; Paull, C. K.; Caress, D. W.; Thomas, H. J.; Maier, K. L.; McGann, M.; Herguera, J. C.; Gwiazda, R.; Arregui, S.; Barrientos, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) conducted detailed surveys at selected sites on the seafloor along the Bahia Soledad Fault offshore of Northern Baja California, Mexico, during a two-ship expedition in the spring of 2015. The Bahia Soledad Fault is a NNW-trending strike-slip fault that is likely continuous with the San Diego Trough Fault offshore of San Diego, California. Constraining the style of deformation, continuity, and slip rate along this fault system is critical to characterizing the seismic hazards to the adjacent coastal areas extending from Los Angeles to Ensenada. Detailed morphologic surveys were conducted using an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) to provide ultra high-resolution multibeam bathymetry (vertical precision of 0.15 m and horizontal resolution of 1.0 m). The AUV also carried a 2-10 kHz chirp sub-bottom profiler and an Edgetech 110kHz and 410kHz sidescan. The two sites along the Bahia Soledad Fault each run ~6 km along the fault with ~1.8 km wide footprint. The resulting bathymetry shows these fault zones are marked with distinct lineations that are flanked by ~1 km long elongated ridges and depressions which are interpreted to be transpressional pop-up structures and transtensional pull-apart basins up to 100 m of relief. Offset seismic reflectors that extend to near the seafloor confirm that these lineations are fault scarps. The detailed bathymetric maps and sub-bottom profiles were used to locate key sites where deformed stratigraphic horizons along the fault are within 1.5 m of the seafloor. These areas were sampled using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) equipped with a vibracoring system capable of collecting precisely located cores that are up to 1.5 m long. The coupled use of multibeam imagery and surgically-collected stratigraphic samples will enable to constrain the frequency and timing of recent movements on this fault which will be useful to incorporated into future seismic hazard assessment.

  20. Validation of meter-scale surface faulting offset measurements from high-resolution topographic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Barrett; Haddad, D.E.; Rockwell, T.K.; Arrowsmith, R.; Madugo, C.; Zielke, O.; Scharer, Katherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of active fault zones have flourished with the availability of high-resolution topographic data, particularly where airborne light detection and ranging (lidar) and structure from motion (SfM) data sets provide a means to remotely analyze submeter-scale fault geomorphology. To determine surface offset at a point along a strike-slip earthquake rupture, geomorphic features (e.g., stream channels) are measured days to centuries after the event. Analysis of these and cumulatively offset features produces offset distributions for successive earthquakes that are used to understand earthquake rupture behavior. As researchers expand studies to more varied terrain types, climates, and vegetation regimes, there is an increasing need to standardize and uniformly validate measurements of tectonically displaced geomorphic features. A recently compiled catalog of nearly 5000 earthquake offsets across a range of measurement and reporting styles provides insight into quality rating and uncertainty trends from which we formulate best-practice and reporting recommendations for remote studies. In addition, a series of public and beginner-level studies validate the remote methodology for a number of tools and emphasize considerations to enhance measurement accuracy and precision for beginners and professionals. Our investigation revealed that (1) standardizing remote measurement methods and reporting quality rating schemes is essential for the utility and repeatability of fault-offset measurements; (2) measurement discrepancies often involve misinterpretation of the offset geomorphic feature and are a function of the investigator’s experience; (3) comparison of measurements made by a single investigator in different climatic regions reveals systematic differences in measurement uncertainties attributable to variation in feature preservation; (4) measuring more components of a displaced geomorphic landform produces more consistently repeatable estimates of offset; and (5

  1. Validation of meter-scale surface faulting offset measurements from high-resolution topographic data

    KAUST Repository

    Salisbury, J. Barrett

    2015-10-24

    Studies of active fault zones have flourished with the availability of high-resolution topographic data, particularly where airborne light detection and ranging (lidar) and structure from motion (SfM) data sets provide a means to remotely analyze submeter- scale fault geomorphology. To determine surface offset at a point along a strike-slip earthquake rupture, geomorphic features (e.g., stream channels) are measured days to centuries after the event. Analysis of these and cumulatively offset features produces offset distributions for successive earthquakes that are used to understand earthquake rupture behavior. As researchers expand studies to more varied terrain types, climates, and vegetation regimes, there is an increasing need to standardize and uniformly validate measurements of tectonically displaced geomorphic features. A recently compiled catalog of nearly 5000 earthquake offsets across a range of measurement and reporting styles provides insight into quality rating and uncertainty trends from which we formulate best-practice and reporting recommendations for remote studies. In addition, a series of public and beginner-level studies validate the remote methodology for a number of tools and emphasize considerations to enhance measurement accuracy and precision for beginners and professionals. Our investigation revealed that (1) standardizing remote measurement methods and reporting quality rating schemes is essential for the utility and repeatability of fault-offset measurements; (2) measurement discrepancies often involve misinterpretation of the offset geomorphic feature and are a function of the investigator\\'s experience; (3) comparison of measurements made by a single investigator in different climatic regions reveals systematic differences in measurement uncertainties attributable to variation in feature preservation; (4) measuring more components of a displaced geomorphic landform produces more consistently repeatable estimates of offset; and (5

  2. New insights into the rupture history of the Hope fault, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajavi, N.; Langridge, R. M.; Quigley, M.

    2012-12-01

    The ENE-striking Hope fault traverses the northern part of the South Island, New Zealand and is the fastest-slipping and southernmost fault of the strike-slip Marlborough Fault System (MFS). The Hope fault is a well-segmented, short recurrence interval fault that has only recorded one large rupture event in the last 170 yr. This event occurred in 1888 on the Hope River segment of the fault. In this study we have focused on the eastern end of the Hurunui segment of the fault (close to the western end of the Hope River segment) in an area where it is uncertain whether the 1888 rupture extended to. We used a 1-m lidar DEM that covered 29 km of the 42 km long Hurunui segment to map the fault in detail. Where the two segments overlap we have extended the mapping to the east by developing a 5-m DEM using SOCET GXP software and the newest aerial images. Many geomorphic surfaces and fault traces have been mapped along the combined swath of 34 km. In the east a c. 850 m wide right stepover in the fault associated with a 30 degree fault bend was discovered. We surmise that this bend and stepover could be important in terms of rupture termination, e.g. in 1888. To investigate this hypothesis, we excavated a trench on an abandoned channel crossing the fault scarp at c.3 km west of the fault bend, where a swamp was formed behind the scarp. At this site, the fault has cut a Holocene alluvial fan and a late Holocene rockfall on the fan surface and displaced the edge of that rockfall by 2.6±0.3 m. Stratigraphic and structural evidence in the trench reveal that four to five events occurred in last 1600 yr, making potentially the longest record of paleoearthquakes along any part of the Hope fault. An unconformity that separates two differently deformed sequences near the base of the trench displays evidence for the oldest event. Radiocarbon dates that bracket this unconformity suggest that this event occurred around 390-536 AD. The most recent and penultimate events were

  3. Huge tumor-like subacromial bursitis associated with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, M; Wakitani, S; Yamamoto, T

    2001-09-01

    Abstract We report a rare case of a huge subacromial bursitis in rheumatoid arthritis. A solid tumor was initially suspected because it was very large with no apparent local sign of inflammation, and because no fluid retention was observed. We performed radiograms, a plain computed tomogram, a (99)mTc-MDP bone scintigram, a (67)Ga-citrate scintigram, and a digital subtraction arteriogram, which all indicated no evidence of tumor. Finally, a bursogram proved the mass to be a huge enlarged subacromial bursa. Surgical exploration revealed that the bursa contained 450 g of a yellowish, jelly-like substance, which was considered to be a thick collection of fibrin. No recurrence was noted at a follow-up 16 years after surgery.

  4. Hemifacial spasm caused by a huge tentorial meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hun; Hwang, Sun-Chul; Kim, Bum-Tae; Shin, Won-Han

    2009-09-01

    A rare case of hemifacial spasm caused by an ipsilateral tentorial meningioma is described. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a huge tumor in the right cerebellar hemisphere, distant to the cerebello-pontine cistern. The facial-vestibulocochlear nerve complex was stretched by the shift of the brainstem and the right cerebello-pontine cistern was effaced. After removing the tumor, the hemifacial spasm resolved completely. We review our case with the pertinent literature regarding the etiological mechanism.

  5. Hemifacial Spasm Caused by a Huge Tentorial Meningioma

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Hun; Hwang, Sun-Chul; Kim, Bum-Tae; Shin, Won-Han

    2009-01-01

    A rare case of hemifacial spasm caused by an ipsilateral tentorial meningioma is described. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a huge tumor in the right cerebellar hemisphere, distant to the cerebello-pontine cistern. The facial-vestibulocochlear nerve complex was stretched by the shift of the brainstem and the right cerebello-pontine cistern was effaced. After removing the tumor, the hemifacial spasm resolved completely. We review our case with the pertinent literature regarding the etiologic...

  6. Using a Geophysical Model to Estimate the Static Coefficient of Friction and Cohesion on a Central Portion of the North Anatolian Fault East of the Marmara Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, B.; McQuarrie, N.

    2012-12-01

    On August 17th, 1999, a magnitude 7.4 earthquake shook Kocaeli (Izmit), Turkey killing over 17,000 people. The epicenter was 100-km east of Turkey's largest city, Istanbul, along the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) system. This 1600-km long, strike-slip boundary divides the Anatolian plate and the Eurasian plate. The NAF slips at an average rate of 2-3-cm/y, and has an estimated earthquake recurrence interval of approximately 300 years. To further understand the NAF system and its dynamics, a simplified 2-D mesh model was developed to evaluate the fault friction coefficient for various low cohesion values along an ~85-km stretch of the NAF system east of the Marmara Sea containing the Mudurnu valley between the cities of Izmit and Bolu (where the NAF splits). The NAF, in the region of interest, exhibits shorter recurrence intervals of 100-150 years over the last four centuries. In this region, two sets of faults within the NAF system converge and then diverge; one set diverges to the NW to bound the northern rim of the Marmara Sea, while the second set continues to the SW along the southern rim of the Marmara Sea. A 100 year seismic record of earthquakes between M3.0 and M9.0 supports the claim that the two sets of strike-slip faults near one another in the center of the region of interest, but do not intersect, thus defining three distinct geology provinces. A representational 2-D mesh separates the study area into three geologic provinces separated by these faults. The mesh was processed using PyLith, a finite element code tectonic deformation software. The PyLith software allows us to assign rock physics parameters of the surface geology, and relative plate motions as velocity boundary conditions. Surface geology was simplified into the three rock types, and rock physics parameters were assigned using general physical parameters for each rock type and extrapolating further data from the Canadian Rock Physics Database. An average value for density and P-wave velocity

  7. Strain partitioning in Southeastern Alaska: Is the Chatham Strait Fault active?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, Daniel S.; Elliott, Julie L.; Conrad, James E.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Kluesner, Jared W.

    2018-01-01

    A 1200 km-long transform plate boundary passes through southeastern Alaska and northwestern British Columbia and represents one of the most seismically active, but poorly understood continental margins of North America. Although most of the plate motion is accommodated by the right-lateral Queen Charlotte-Fairweather Fault (QCFF) System, which has produced at least six M > 7 earthquakes since 1920, seismic hazard assessments also include the Chatham Strait Fault (CSF) as a potentially active, 400 km-long strike slip fault that cuts northward through southeastern Alaska, connecting with the Eastern Denali Fault. Nearly the entire length of the CSF is submerged beneath Chatham Strait and Lynn Canal and has never been systematically imaged using high-resolution marine geophysical approaches. In this study we present an integrated analysis of new marine seismic reflection data acquired across Lynn Canal and tectonic block modeling constrained by data from continuous and campaign GPS sites. Seismic profiles cross the CSF at twelve locations spanning ∼50 km of fault length; they reveal thick (up to 300 m) packages of glaciomarine sedimentary facies emplaced on an unconformity surface that formed during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Localized warping of post-LGM stratigraphy (∼13.9 kyr B.P. to present) appears to correlate with sediment drape on basement topography and current-controlled deposition. There is no evidence for an active fault along the axis of Lynn Canal in the seismic reflection data. Crustal block models constrained by GPS data allow, but do not require, a maximum slip rate of 2-3 mm/yr along the CSF; higher slip rates on the CSF result in significant misfit to GPS data in the surrounding region. Based on the combined marine geophysical and GPS observations, it is plausible that the CSF has not generated resolvable coseismic deformation in the last ∼13 ka and that the modern slip-rate is <1 mm/yr. We propose that models for strain transfer between

  8. Constructing an Alpine Fault Paleoseismicity Record from Slumped Lacustrine Deposits in the Cascade River Valley, South Westland, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, G.; Moy, C. M.; Toy, V. G.; Ohneiser, C.; Howarth, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    The Alpine Fault is a major structure in New Zealand capable of producing earthquakes of magnitude 7 or greater, which delineates the boundary between the Australian and Pacific plates. Paleoseismic records of these earthquakes indicate recurrence intervals of 300 - 400 years over the last 1,300 years. However, there are no pre-Holocene records. Documenting the late Pleistocene record of magnitude, timing, and frequency of earthquakes would significantly reduce uncertainty in hazard analyses. The tectonically complex Cascade River Valley follows the Southern Alpine Fault, where the fault dominantly accommodates strike-slip motion. Two ~7m outcrops of proglacial lacustrine silt are exposed along the river in which, deformed rhythmites bounded by planar laminated rhythmites have been identified. These exhibit a variety of fold geometries in outcrop and x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans, all of which show some degree of asymmetry. Initial radiocarbon ages of 14,400 and 13,300 14C yr BP have been obtained from terrestrial plant material isolated from samples near the base of one outcrop. Given the age range and laminae density, these dates suggest that the rhythmites are varves, but additional radiocarbon dates and CT-scans will be used to confirm this. The deformed horizons are interpreted to be seismites formed by slumping. Earthquake shaking triggers an increase in pore fluid pressure, which destabilises the sublacustrine slope causing failure and the release of silt into the sedimentary system. As silt is transported by downslope shear it is deformed in distinct layers. Displacement of volumes of silt also causes the formation of seiche waves that apply shear stress to lake floor sediments causing further deformation. Deviations in magnetic susceptibility and the declination of magnetic remanence observed underneath and within deformed horizons are interpreted to be a response of earthquake shaking. Data from these different proxies will be presented and

  9. Coseismic deformation, field observations and seismic fault of the 17 November 2015 M = 6.5, Lefkada Island, Greece earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganas, Athanassios; Elias, Panagiotis; Bozionelos, George; Papathanassiou, George; Avallone, Antonio; Papastergios, Asterios; Valkaniotis, Sotirios; Parcharidis, Issaak; Briole, Pierre

    2016-09-01

    On November 17, 2015 07:10:07 UTC a strong, shallow Mw6.5 earthquake, occurred on the island of Lefkada along a strike-slip fault with right-lateral sense of slip. The event triggered widespread environmental effects at the south and western part of the island while, the intensity and severity of these earthquake-induced deformations is substantially decreased towards the eastern part of the island. Relocation of seismicity and inversion of geophysical (GPS, InSAR) data indicate that the seismic fault runs parallel to the west coast of Lefkada, along the Aegean - Apulia plate boundary. The fault plane strikes N20 ± 5°E and dips to east with an angle of about 70 ± 5°. Coseismic deformation was measured in the order of tens of centimeters of horizontal motion by continuous GPS stations of NOANET (the NOA GPS network) and by InSAR (Sentinel 1 A image pairs). A coseismic uniform-slip model was produced from inversion of InSAR data and permanent GPS stations. The earthquake measured Mw = 6.5 using both the geodetic moment produced by the slip model, as well as the PGD relation of Melgar et al. (2015, GRL). In the field we observed no significant vertical motion of the shoreline or surface expression of faulting, this is consistent with the predictions of the model. The interferograms show a large decorrelation area that extends almost along all the western coast of Lefkada. This area correlates well with the mapped landslides. The 2003-2015 pattern of seismicity in the Ionian Sea region indicates the existence of a 15-km seismic gap offshore NW Cephalonia.

  10. Latest Quaternary paleoseismology and evidence of distributed dextral shear along the Mohawk Valley fault zone, northern Walker Lane, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Ryan D.; Briggs, Richard W.; Personius, Stephen F.; Crone, Anthony J.; Mahan, Shannon A.; Angster, Stephen J.

    2014-06-01

    The dextral-slip Mohawk Valley fault zone (MVFZ) strikes northwestward along the eastern margin of the Sierra Nevada in the northern Walker Lane. Geodetic block modeling indicates that the MVFZ may accommodate ~3 mm/yr of regional dextral strain, implying that it is the highest slip-rate strike-slip fault in the region; however, only limited geologic data are available to constrain the system's slip rate and earthquake history. We mapped the MVFZ using airborne lidar data and field observations and identified a site near Sulphur Creek for paleoseismic investigation. At this site, oblique dextral-normal faulting on the steep valley margin has created a closed depression that floods annually during spring snowmelt to form an ephemeral pond. We excavated three fault-perpendicular trenches at the site and exposed pond sediment that interfingers with multiple colluvial packages eroded from the scarp that bounds the eastern side of the pond. We documented evidence for four surface-rupturing earthquakes on this strand of the MVFZ. OxCal modeling of radiocarbon and luminescence ages indicates that these earthquakes occurred at 14.0 ka, 12.8 ka, 5.7 ka, and 1.9 ka. The mean ~4 kyr recurrence interval is inconsistent with slip rates of ~3 mm/yr; these rates imply surface ruptures of more than 10 m per event, which is geologically implausible for the subdued geomorphic expression and 60 km length of the MVFZ. We propose that unidentified structures not yet incorporated into geodetic models may accommodate significant dextral shear across the northern Walker Lane, highlighting the role of distributed deformation in this region.

  11. Age and isotopic systematics of Cretaceous borehole and surface samples from the greater Los Angeles Basin region: Implications for the types of crust that might underlie Los Angeles and their distribution along late Cenozoic fault systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premo, Wayne R.; Morton, Douglas M.; Kistler, Ronald W.

    2014-01-01

    Nine U-Pb zircon ages were determined on plutonic rocks sampled from surface outcrops and rock chips of drill core from boreholes within the greater Los Angeles Basin region. In addition, lead-strontium-neodymium (Pb-Sr-Nd) whole-rock isotopic data were obtained for eight of these samples. These results help to characterize the crystalline basement rocks hidden in the subsurface and provide information that bears on the tectonic history of the myriad of fault systems that have dissected the Los Angeles region over the past 15 m.y. Seven of the nine samples have U-Pb ages ranging from 115 to 103 Ma and whole-rock Pb-Sr-Nd isotopic characteristics that indicate the crystalline basement underneath the greater Los Angeles Basin region is mostly part of the Peninsular Ranges batholith. Furthermore, these data are interpreted as evidence for (1) the juxtaposition of mid-Cretaceous, northern Peninsular Ranges batholith plutonic rocks against Late Cretaceous plutonic rocks of the Transverse Ranges in the San Fernando Valley, probably along the Verdugo fault; (2) the juxtaposition of older northwestern Peninsular Ranges batholith rocks against younger northeastern Peninsular Ranges batholith rocks in the northern Puente Hills, implying transposition of northeastern Peninsular Ranges batholith rocks to the west along unrecognized faults beneath the Chino Basin; and (3) juxtaposition of northern Peninsular Ranges batholith plutonic rocks against Late Cretaceous plutonic rocks of the Transverse Ranges along the San Jose fault in the northern San Jose Hills at Ganesha Park. These mainly left-lateral strike-slip faults of the eastern part of the greater Los Angeles Basin region could be the result of block rotation within the adjacent orthogonal, right-lateral, Elsinore-Whittier fault zone to the west and the subparallel San Jacinto fault zone to the east. The San Andreas fault system is the larger, subparallel, driving force further to the east.

  12. Analyzing huge pathology images with open source software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deroulers, Christophe; Ameisen, David; Badoual, Mathilde; Gerin, Chloé; Granier, Alexandre; Lartaud, Marc

    2013-06-06

    Digital pathology images are increasingly used both for diagnosis and research, because slide scanners are nowadays broadly available and because the quantitative study of these images yields new insights in systems biology. However, such virtual slides build up a technical challenge since the images occupy often several gigabytes and cannot be fully opened in a computer's memory. Moreover, there is no standard format. Therefore, most common open source tools such as ImageJ fail at treating them, and the others require expensive hardware while still being prohibitively slow. We have developed several cross-platform open source software tools to overcome these limitations. The NDPITools provide a way to transform microscopy images initially in the loosely supported NDPI format into one or several standard TIFF files, and to create mosaics (division of huge