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Sample records for huge coronal mass

  1. Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooker, Nancy; Joselyn, Jo Ann; Feynman, Joan

    The early 1970's can be said to mark the beginning of The Enlightenment in the history of the Space Age, literally as well as by analogy to European history. Instruments blinded by Earth's atmosphere were lifted above and, for the first time, saw clearly and continuously the ethereal white light and sparkling x-rays from the solar corona. From these two bands of the light spectrum came images of coronal mass ejections and coronal holes, respectively. But whereas coronal holes were immediately identified as the source of high-speed solar wind streams, at first coronal mass ejections were greeted only by a sense of wonder. It took years of research to identify their signatures in the solar wind before the fastest ones could be identified with the well-known shock disturbances that cause the most violent space storms.

  2. Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Kunow, H; Linker, J. A; Schwenn, R; Steiger, R

    2006-01-01

    It is well known that the Sun gravitationally controls the orbits of planets and minor bodies. Much less known, however, is the domain of plasma fields and charged particles in which the Sun governs a heliosphere out to a distance of about 15 billion kilometers. What forces activates the Sun to maintain this power? Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and their descendants are the troops serving the Sun during high solar activity periods. This volume offers a comprehensive and integrated overview of our present knowledge and understanding of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and their descendants, Interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs). It results from a series of workshops held between 2000 and 2004. An international team of about sixty experimenters involved e.g. in the SOHO, ULYSSES, VOYAGER, PIONEER, HELIOS, WIND, IMP, and ACE missions, ground observers, and theoreticians worked jointly on interpreting the observations and developing new models for CME initiations, development, and interplanetary propagation. The book provides...

  3. Coronal Mass Ejections: Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F. Webb

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Solar eruptive phenomena embrace a variety of eruptions, including flares, solar energetic particles, and radio bursts. Since the vast majority of these are associated with the eruption, development, and evolution of coronal mass ejections (CMEs, we focus on CME observations in this review. CMEs are a key aspect of coronal and interplanetary dynamics. They inject large quantities of mass and magnetic flux into the heliosphere, causing major transient disturbances. CMEs can drive interplanetary shocks, a key source of solar energetic particles and are known to be the major contributor to severe space weather at the Earth. Studies over the past decade using the data sets from (among others the SOHO, TRACE, Wind, ACE, STEREO, and SDO spacecraft, along with ground-based instruments, have improved our knowledge of the origins and development of CMEs at the Sun and how they contribute to space weather at Earth. SOHO, launched in 1995, has provided us with almost continuous coverage of the solar corona over more than a complete solar cycle, and the heliospheric imagers SMEI (2003 – 2011 and the HIs (operating since early 2007 have provided us with the capability to image and track CMEs continually across the inner heliosphere. We review some key coronal properties of CMEs, their source regions and their propagation through the solar wind. The LASCO coronagraphs routinely observe CMEs launched along the Sun-Earth line as halo-like brightenings. STEREO also permits observing Earth-directed CMEs from three different viewpoints of increasing azimuthal separation, thereby enabling the estimation of their three-dimensional properties. These are important not only for space weather prediction purposes, but also for understanding the development and internal structure of CMEs since we view their source regions on the solar disk and can measure their in-situ characteristics along their axes. Included in our discussion of the recent developments in CME

  4. Huge Coronal Structure and Heating Constraints Determined from Serts Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, D. A.; Davila, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    Intensities of the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) spectral lines were measured as a function of radius off the solar limb by two flights of the Goddard's Solar Extreme-Ultraviolet Rocket Telescope and Spectrograph (SERTS) for three quiet-Sun regions. Density scale heights were determined for the different spectral lines. Limits on the filling factor were determined. In the one case where an upper limit was determined it was much less than unity. coronal heating above 1.15 solar radii is required for all three regions studied. For reasonable filling factors, local heating is needed.

  5. Coronal Mass Ejections An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    In times of growing technological sophistication and of our dependence on electronic technology, we are all affected by space weather. In its most extreme form, space weather can disrupt communications, damage and destroy spacecraft and power stations, and increase radiation exposure to astronauts and airline passengers. Major space weather events, called geomagnetic storms, are large disruptions in the Earth’s magnetic field brought about by the arrival of enormous magnetized plasma clouds from the Sun. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) contain billions of tons of plasma and hurtle through space at speeds of several million miles per hour. Understanding coronal mass ejections and their impact on the Earth is of great interest to both the scientific and technological communities. This book provides an introduction to coronal mass ejections, including a history of their observation and scientific revelations, instruments and theory behind their detection and measurement, and the status quo of theories describing...

  6. Kinematical properties of coronal mass ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Temmer, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most dynamic phenomena in our solar system. They abruptly disrupt the continuous outflow of solar wind by expelling huge clouds of magnetized plasma into interplanetary space with velocities enabling to cross the Sun-Earth distance within a few days. Earth-directed CMEs may cause severe geomagnetic storms when their embedded magnetic fields and the shocks ahead compress and reconnect with the Earth's magnetic field. The transit times and impacts in detail depend on the initial CME velocity, size, and mass, as well as on the conditions and coupling processes with the ambient solar wind flow in interplanetary space. The observed CME parameters may be severly affected by projection effects and the constant changing environmental conditions are hard to derive. This makes it difficult to fully understand the physics behind CME evolution, preventing to do a reliable forecast of Earth-directed events. This short review focusing on observational data, shows recent methods which w...

  7. Coronal Mass Ejections travel time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Carlos Roberto; Souza de Mendonça, Rafael Rodrigues; Dal Lago, Alisson; Echer, Ezequiel

    2017-10-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the main source of intense geomagnetic storms when they are earthward directed. Studying their travel time is a key-point to understand when the disturbance will be observed at Earth. In this work, we study the CME that originated the interplanetary disturbance observed on 2013/10/02. According to the observations, the CME that caused the interplanetary disturbance was ejected on 2013/09/29. We obtained the CME speed and estimate of the time of arrival at the Lagrangian Point L1 using the concept of expansion speed. We found that observed and estimated times of arrival of the shock differ between 2 and 23 hours depending on method used to estimate the radial speed.

  8. Space weather and coronal mass ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Space weather has attracted a lot of attention in recent times. Severe space weather can disrupt spacecraft, and on Earth can be the cause of power outages and power station failure. It also presents a radiation hazard for airline passengers and astronauts. These ""magnetic storms"" are most commonly caused by coronal mass ejections, or CMES, which are large eruptions of plasma and magnetic field from the Sun that can reach speeds of several thousand km/s. In this SpringerBrief, Space Weather and Coronal Mass Ejections, author Timothy Howard briefly introduces the coronal mass ejection, its sc

  9. Characteristics of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukder, F.; Marchese, A. K.; Tulsee, T.

    2014-12-01

    A coronal mass ejection (CME) is a release of charged particles resulting from solar activity. These charged particles can affect electronics on spacecraft, airplanes, global positioning systems, and communication satellites. The purpose of this research was to study CME data from satellites and correlate these to other properties. Solar wind data collected by STEREO A/B and ACE satellites were analyzed. The data consisted of solar wind flux for various elements (helium through iron), as well as the components of the interplanetary magnetic field. CME events are known to cause a surge in the helium flux, as well as other particles. It is hypothesized that a CME event will cause an increase in the number of lighter elements relative to heavier particles. This is because for a given input of energy, lighter elements are expected to be accelerated to a greater extent than heavier elements. A significant increase was observed in the ratio between helium to oxygen (He/O) prior to intense CMEs. A CME event on November 4, 2003 caused an eleven-fold increase in the He/O ratio, while for another event on April 2, 2001 the He/O ratio increased from 80 to 700. A significant increase in He/O ratio is not observed during weaker CMEs. Furthermore, it was also observed that not all increases in the ratio were accompanied by CMEs. The increase in He/O ratio prior to the CME arrival might be used as a way to predict future events.

  10. A Solar Coronal Jet Event Triggers A Coronal Mass Ejection

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jiajia; Shen, Chenglong; Liu, Kai; Pan, Zonghao; Wang, S

    2015-01-01

    We present the multi-point and multi-wavelength observation and analysis on a solar coronal jet and coronal mass ejection (CME) event in this paper. Employing the GCS model, we obtained the real (three-dimensional) heliocentric distance and direction of the CME and found it propagate in a high speed over 1000 km/s . The jet erupted before and shared the same source region with the CME. The temporal and spacial relation- ship between them guide us the possibility that the jet triggered the CME and became its core. This scenario could promisingly enrich our understanding on the triggering mechanism of coronal mass ejections and their relations with coronal large-scale jets. On the other hand, the magnetic field configuration of the source region observed by the SDO/HMI instrument and the off- limb inverse Y-shaped configuration observed by SDO/AIA 171 A passband, together provide the first detailed observation on the three-dimensional reconnection process of large-scale jets as simulated in Pariat et al. 2009. ...

  11. Coronal ``Wave'': Magnetic Footprint of a Coronal Mass Ejection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attrill, Gemma D. R.; Harra, Louise K.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Démoulin, Pascal

    2007-02-01

    We investigate the properties of two ``classical'' EUV Imaging Telescope (EIT) coronal waves. The two source regions of the associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) possess opposite helicities, and the coronal waves display rotations in opposite senses. We observe deep core dimmings near the flare site and also widespread diffuse dimming, accompanying the expansion of the EIT wave. We also report a new property of these EIT waves, namely, that they display dual brightenings: persistent ones at the outermost edge of the core dimming regions and simultaneously diffuse brightenings constituting the leading edge of the coronal wave, surrounding the expanding diffuse dimmings. We show that such behavior is consistent with a diffuse EIT wave being the magnetic footprint of a CME. We propose a new mechanism where driven magnetic reconnections between the skirt of the expanding CME magnetic field and quiet-Sun magnetic loops generate the observed bright diffuse front. The dual brightenings and the widespread diffuse dimming are identified as innate characteristics of this process.

  12. Huge pelvic mass secondary to wear debris causing ureteral obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hananouchi, Takehito; Saito, Masanobu; Nakamura, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Yonenobu, Kazuo

    2005-10-01

    We report an unusual granulomatous reaction of wear debris that produced a huge pelvic mass causing ureteral obstruction. A 72-year-old woman, who received a cemented total hip arthroplasty 30 years ago, was referred to the department of gynecology for examination of a pelvic mass. A computed tomography scan revealed a huge homogenous mass, measuring approximately 20 x 16 x 12 cm, including extensive osteolysis of the left pelvis around the acetabular component. Intravenous pyelogram revealed complete obstruction of the left ureter resulting in hydronephrosis of the left kidney. Histological examination from the biopsy specimen detected polyethylene wear debris in the mass.

  13. A SOLAR CORONAL JET EVENT TRIGGERS A CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jiajia; Wang, Yuming; Shen, Chenglong; Liu, Kai; Pan, Zonghao; Wang, S. [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Earh and Space Science School, University of Science and Technology of China, No. 96, JinZhai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2015-11-10

    In this paper, we present multi-point, multi-wavelength observations and analysis of a solar coronal jet and coronal mass ejection (CME) event. Employing the GCS model, we obtained the real (three-dimensional) heliocentric distance and direction of the CME and found it to propagate at a high speed of over 1000 km s{sup −1}. The jet erupted before the CME and shared the same source region. The temporal and spacial relationship between these two events lead us to the possibility that the jet triggered the CME and became its core. This scenario hold the promise of enriching our understanding of the triggering mechanism of CMEs and their relations to coronal large-scale jets. On the other hand, the magnetic field configuration of the source region observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/HMI instrument along with the off-limb inverse Y-shaped configuration observed by SDO/AIA in the 171 Å passband provide the first detailed observation of the three-dimensional reconnection process of a large-scale jet as simulated in Pariat et al. The eruption process of the jet highlights the importance of filament-like material during the eruption of not only small-scale X-ray jets, but likely also of large-scale EUV jets. Based on our observations and analysis, we propose the most probable mechanism for the whole event, with a blob structure overlaying the three-dimensional structure of the jet, to describe the interaction between the jet and the CME.

  14. Coronal Mass Ejections of Solar Cycle 23

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nat Gopalswamy

    2006-06-01

    I summarize the statistical, physical, and morphological properties of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) of solar cycle 23, as observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission. The SOHO data is by far the most extensive data, which made it possible to fully establish the properties of CMEs as a phenomenon of utmost importance to Sun–Earth connection as well as to the heliosphere. I also discuss various subsets of CMEs that are of primary importance for their impact on Earth.

  15. Coronal Structure of Low-Mass Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Pauline; Donati, Jean-Francois; Morin, Julien; Vidotto, Aline

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the change in stellar magnetic topology across the fully-convective boundary and its effects on coronal properties. We consider both the magnitude of the open flux that influences angular momentum loss in the stellar wind and X-ray emission measure. We use reconstructed maps of the radial magnetic field at the stellar surface and the potential-field source surface method to extrapolate a 3D coronal magnetic field for a sample of early-to-mid M dwarfs. During the magnetic reconstruction process it is possible to force a solution towards field geometries that are symmetric or antisymmetric about the equator but we demonstrate that this has only a modest impact on the coronal tracers mentioned above. We find that the dipole component of the field, which governs the large-scale structure, becomes increasingly strong as the stellar mass decreases, while the magnitude of the open (wind-bearing) magnetic flux is proportional to the magnitude of the reconstructed magnetic flux. By assuming a hydrostati...

  16. Energetics of Solar Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Subramanian, P; Subramanian, Prasad; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2007-01-01

    Aims: To investigate if solar coronal mass ejections are driven mainly by coupling to the ambient solar wind, or through the release of internal magnetic energy. Methods: We examine the energetics of 39 flux-rope like coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from the Sun using data in the distance range $\\sim$ 2--20 $R_{{\\o}dot}$ from the Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronograph (LASCO) aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). This comprises a complete sample of the best examples of flux-rope CMEs observed by LASCO in 1996-2001. Results: We find that 69% of the CMEs in our sample experience a clearly identifiable driving power in the LASCO field of view. For these CMEs which are driven, we examine if they might be deriving most of their driving power by coupling to the solar wind. We do not find conclusive evidence in favor of this hypothesis. On the other hand, we find that their internal magnetic energy is a viable source of the required driving power. We have estimated upper and lower limits on the power th...

  17. Relationship of EUV Irradiance Coronal Dimming Slope and Depth to Coronal Mass Ejection Speed and Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, James Paul; Webb, David F; Thompson, Barbara J; Colaninno, Robin C; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2016-01-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) coronal dimmings are often observed in response to solar eruptive events. These phenomena can be generated via several different physical processes. For space weather, the most important of these is the temporary void left behind by a coronal mass ejection (CME). Massive, fast CMEs tend to leave behind a darker void that also usually corresponds to minimum irradiance for the cooler coronal emissions. If the dimming is associated with a solar flare, as is often the case, the flare component of the irradiance light curve in the cooler coronal emission can be isolated and removed using simultaneous measurements of warmer coronal lines. We apply this technique to 37 dimming events identified during two separate two-week periods in 2011, plus an event on 2010 August 7 analyzed in a previous paper, to parameterize dimming in terms of depth and slope. We provide statistics on which combination of wavelengths worked best for the flare-removal method, describe the fitting methods applied to t...

  18. Coronal Mass Ejections: From Sun to Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsourakos, S.

    2016-06-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are gigantic expulsions of magnetized plasmas from the solar corona into the interplanetary (IP) space. CMEs spawn ~ 1015 gr of mass and reach speeds ranging between several hundred to a few thousand km/s (e.g., Gopalswamy et al. 2009; Vourlidas et al. 2010). It takes 1-5 days for a CME to reach Earth. CMEs are one of the most energetic eruptive manifestations in the solar system and are major drivers of space weather via their magnetic fields and energetic particles, which are accelerated by CME-driven shocks. In this review we give a short account of recent, mainly observational, results on CMEs from the STEREO and SDO missions which include the nature of their pre-eruptive and eruptive configurations and the CME propagation from Sun to Earth. We conclude with a discussion of the exciting capabilities in CME studies that will soon become available from new solar and heliospheric instrumentation.

  19. Relationship of EUV Irradiance Coronal Dimming Slope and Depth to Coronal Mass Ejection Speed and Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, James Paul; Woods, Thomas N.; Webb, David F.; Thompson, Barbara J.; Colaninno, Robin C.; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2016-10-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) coronal dimmings are often observed in response to solar eruptive events. These phenomena can be generated via several different physical processes. For space weather, the most important of these is the temporary void left behind by a coronal mass ejection (CME). Massive, fast CMEs tend to leave behind a darker void that also usually corresponds to minimum irradiance for the cooler coronal emissions. If the dimming is associated with a solar flare, as is often the case, the flare component of the irradiance light curve in the cooler coronal emission can be isolated and removed using simultaneous measurements of warmer coronal lines. We apply this technique to 37 dimming events identified during two separate two-week periods in 2011 plus an event on 2010 August 7, analyzed in a previous paper to parameterize dimming in terms of depth and slope. We provide statistics on which combination of wavelengths worked best for the flare-removal method, describe the fitting methods applied to the dimming light curves, and compare the dimming parameters with corresponding CME parameters of mass and speed. The best linear relationships found are \\begin{eqnarray*}{v}{CME} ≤ft[\\displaystyle \\frac{{km}}{{{s}}}\\right] & ≈ & 2.36× {10}6 ≤ft[\\displaystyle \\frac{{km}}{ % }\\right]× {s}\\dim ≤ft[\\displaystyle \\frac{ % }{{{s}}}\\right]\\ {m}{CME} [{{g}}] & ≈ & 2.59× {10}15≤ft[\\displaystyle \\frac{g}{ % }\\right]× \\sqrt{{d}\\dim } [ % ].\\end{eqnarray*} These relationships could be used for space weather operations of estimating CME mass and speed using near-real-time irradiance dimming measurements.

  20. Magnetic structure of Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2012-01-01

    We present several models of the magnetic structure of solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs). First, we model CMEs as expanding force-free magnetic structures. While keeping the internal magnetic field structure of the stationary solutions, expansion leads to complicated internal velocities and rotation, while the field structures remain force-free. Second, expansion of a CME can drive resistive dissipation within the CME changing the ionization states of different ions. We fit in situ measurements of ion charge states to the resistive spheromak solutions. Finally, we consider magnetic field structures of fully confined stable magnetic clouds containing both toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields and having no surface current sheets. Expansion of such clouds may lead to sudden onset of reconnection events.

  1. Periodicities in Solar Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Lou, Y Q; Fan, Z; Wang, S; Wang, J

    2003-01-01

    Mid-term quasi-periodicities in solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) during the most recent solar maximum cycle 23 are reported here for the first time using the four-year data (February 5, 1999 to February 10, 2003) of the Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). In parallel, mid-term quasi-periodicities in solar X-ray flares (class >M5.0) from the Geosynchronous Operational Environment Satellites (GOES) and in daily averages of Ap index for geomagnetic disturbances from the World Data Center (WDC) at the International Association for Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) are also examined for the same four-year time span. Several conceptual aspects of possible equatorially trapped Rossby-type waves at and beneath the solar photosphere are discussed.

  2. Solar Eruptions: Coronal Mass Ejections and Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2012-01-01

    This lecture introduces the topic of Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares, collectively known as solar eruptions. During solar eruptions, the released energy flows out from the Sun in the form of magnetized plasma and electromagnetic radiation. The electromagnetic radiation suddenly increases the ionization content of the ionosphere, thus impacting communication and navigation systems. Flares can be eruptive or confined. Eruptive flares accompany CMEs, while confined flares hav only electromagnetic signature. CMEs can drive MHD shocks that accelerate charged particles to very high energies in the interplanetary space, which pose radiation hazard to astronauts and space systems. CMEs heading in the direction of Earth arrive in about two days and impact Earth's magnetosphere, producing geomagnetic storms. The magnetic storms result in a number of effects including induced currnts that can disrupt power grids, railroads, and underground pipelines

  3. Stealthy but Geoeffective Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Nariaki; Mulligan, Tamitha

    2017-08-01

    We have long known about the existence of "problem" geomagnetic storms whose origins are elusive. In more general terms, not all the 1 AU disturbances can be clearly attributed to coronal mass ejections (CMEs), high speed streams (HSSs) or corotation interaction regions (CIRs.) When interplanetary CME (ICME) signatures are found in in situ data, there is not always a flare or filament eruption on the Sun or even an obvious CME observed close to the Sun that correlates with the ICME within a reasonable time range. These ICMEs sometimes result in intense storms. Furthermore, there is a possibility that some of the more severe storms could be partly contributed by such ICMEs of unclear origin. Therefore space weather prediction will remain incomplete without properly understanding these ICMEs. Even if the ICME is paired with a CME, it is sometimes difficult to find where the latter comes from. This is often called the “stealth CME” that apparently lacks low coronal signatures (LCSs). STEREO's second and third view points have tremendously helped us determine its front-side origin and find when and where it forms and accelerates, which is important for isolating possible LCSs. Although SDO/AIA has been continuously taking full-disk EUV images in a wide temperature range since 2010, there are still a number of stealthy CMEs whose LCSs are unclear or ambiguous. It is assumed that they start at high altitudes, leaving weak or negligible LCSs. Some of them seem to involve multiple magnetic domains, and weak or open field regions. We present AIA observations of several stealthy CMEs, including recent ones, that were responsible for geomagnetic storms, emphasizing the need to compare images with long time differences and to find the periods at which the CME forms and accelerates. We also discuss uncertainties in interpreting in situ data as to whether a CME is present when data are dominated by other solar wind features, such as HSS and CIR.

  4. Potential Method of Predicting Coronal Mass Ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imholt, Timothy

    2001-10-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CME) may be described as a blast of gas and highly charged solar mass fragments ejected into space. These ejections, when directed toward Earth, have many different effects on terrestrial systems ranging from the Aurora Borealis to changes in wireless communication. The early prediction of these solar events cannot be overlooked. There are several models currently accepted and utilized to predict these events, however, with earlier prediction of both the event and the location on the sun where the event occurs allows us to have earlier warnings as to when they will affect man-made systems. A better prediction could perhaps be achieved by utilizing low angular resolution radio telescope arrays to catalog data from the sun at different radio frequencies on a regular basis. Once this data is cataloged a better predictor for these CME’s could be found. We propose a model that allows a prediction to be made that appears to be longer than 24 hours.

  5. Radio-quiet Fast Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Kaiser, M. L.; Howard, R. A.

    2004-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) drive shocks in the interplanetary medium that produce type II radio emission. These CMEs are faster and wider on the average, than the general population of CMEs. However, when we start from fast (speed > 900 km/s) and wide (angular width > 60 degrees), more than half of them are not associated with radio bursts. In order to understand why these CMEs are radio quiet, we collected all the fast and wide (FW) CMEs detected by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission's Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) and isolated those without associated type II radio bursts. The radio bursts were identified in the dynamic spectra of the Radio and Plasma Wave (WAVES) Experiment on board the Wind spacecraft. We also checked the list against metric type II radio bursts reported in Solar Geophysical Data and isolated those without any radio emission. This exercise resulted in about 140 radio-quiet FW CMEs. We identified the source regions of these CMEs using the Solar Geophysical Data listings, cross-checked against the eruption regions in the SOHO/EIT movies. We explored a number of possibilities for the radio-quietness: (i) Source region being too far behind the limb, (ii) flare size, (iii) brightness of the CME, and (iv) the density of the ambient medium. We suggest that a combination of CME energy and the Alfven speed profile of the ambient medium is primarily responsible for the radio-quietness of these FW CMEs.

  6. Anatomy of Depleted Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocher, M.; Lepri, S. T.; Landi, E.; Zhao, L.; Manchester, W. B., IV

    2017-01-01

    We report a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) containing distinct periods of anomalous heavy-ion charge state composition and peculiar ion thermal properties measured by ACE/SWICS from 1998 to 2011. We label them “depleted ICMEs,” identified by the presence of intervals where C6+/C5+ and O7+/O6+ depart from the direct correlation expected after their freeze-in heights. These anomalous intervals within the depleted ICMEs are referred to as “Depletion Regions.” We find that a depleted ICME would be indistinguishable from all other ICMEs in the absence of the Depletion Region, which has the defining property of significantly low abundances of fully charged species of helium, carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen. Similar anomalies in the slow solar wind were discussed by Zhao et al. We explore two possibilities for the source of the Depletion Region associated with magnetic reconnection in the tail of a CME, using CME simulations of the evolution of two Earth-bound CMEs described by Manchester et al.

  7. Why are halo coronal mass ejections faster?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Min Zhang; Yang Guo; Peng-Fei Chen; Ming-De Ding; Cheng Fang

    2010-01-01

    Halo coronal mass ejections(CMEs)have been to be significantly faster than normal CMEs,which is a long-standing puzzle.In order to solve the puzzle,we first investigate the observed properties of 31 limb CMEs that clearly display loopshaped frontal loops.The observational results show a strong tendency that slower CMEs are weaker in white-light intensity.Then,we perform a Monte Carlo simulation of 20000 artificial limb CMEs that have an average velocity of~523 km s-1.The Thomson scattering of these events is calculated when they are assumed to be observed as limb and halo events,respectively.It is found that the white-light intensity of many slow CMEs becomes remarkably reduced when they turn from being viewed as a limb event to being viewed as a halo event.When the intensity is below the background solar wind fluctuation,it is assumed that they would be missed by coronagraphs.The average velocity of"detectable"halo CMEs is~922 km s-1,very close to the observed value.This also indicates that wider events are more likely to be recorded.The results soundly suggest that the higher average velocity of halo CMEs is due to that a majority of slow events and some of narrow fast events carrying less material are so faint that they are blended with the solar wind fluctuations,and therefore are not observed.

  8. Active Longitude and Coronal Mass Ejection Occurrences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyenge, N.; Singh, T.; Kiss, T. S.; Srivastava, A. K.; Erdélyi, R.

    2017-03-01

    The spatial inhomogeneity of the distribution of coronal mass ejection (CME) occurrences in the solar atmosphere could provide a tool to estimate the longitudinal position of the most probable CME-capable active regions in the Sun. The anomaly in the longitudinal distribution of active regions themselves is often referred to as active longitude (AL). In order to reveal the connection between the AL and CME spatial occurrences, here we investigate the morphological properties of active regions. The first morphological property studied is the separateness parameter, which is able to characterize the probability of the occurrence of an energetic event, such as a solar flare or CME. The second morphological property is the sunspot tilt angle. The tilt angle of sunspot groups allows us to estimate the helicity of active regions. The increased helicity leads to a more complex buildup of the magnetic structure and also can cause CME eruption. We found that the most complex active regions appear near the AL and that the AL itself is associated with the most tilted active regions. Therefore, the number of CME occurrences is higher within the AL. The origin of the fast CMEs is also found to be associated with this region. We concluded that the source of the most probably CME-capable active regions is at the AL. By applying this method, we can potentially forecast a flare and/or CME source several Carrington rotations in advance. This finding also provides new information for solar dynamo modeling.

  9. Nanodust dynamics during a coronal mass ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czechowski, Andrzej; Kleimann, Jens

    2017-09-01

    The dynamics of nanometer-sized grains (nanodust) is strongly affected by electromagnetic forces. High-velocity nanodust was proposed as an explanation for the voltage bursts observed by STEREO. A study of nanodust dynamics based on a simple time-stationary model has shown that in the vicinity of the Sun the nanodust is trapped or, outside the trapped region, accelerated to high velocities. We investigate the nanodust dynamics for a time-dependent solar wind and magnetic field configuration in order to find out what happens to nanodust during a coronal mass ejection (CME). The plasma flow and the magnetic field during a CME are obtained by numerical simulations using a 3-D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code. The equations of motion for the nanodust particles are solved numerically, assuming that the particles are produced from larger bodies moving in near-circular Keplerian orbits within the circumsolar dust cloud. The charge-to-mass ratios for the nanodust particles are taken to be constant in time. The simulation is restricted to the region within 0.14 AU from the Sun. We find that about 35 % of nanodust particles escape from the computational domain during the CME, reaching very high speeds (up to 1000 km s-1). After the end of the CME the escape continues, but the particle velocities do not exceed 300 km s-1. About 30 % of all particles are trapped in bound non-Keplerian orbits with time-dependent perihelium and aphelium distances. Trapped particles are affected by plasma ion drag, which causes contraction of their orbits.

  10. Observational Properties of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    2003. Peameis, D.V., Magntetic topology of imspumlsive assd gradutal solar energetic particle Xic. H., L. Ofmran, and G. Lawvrence, Cone model for...425, 1097, 2004. Yashiro, S., N. Gopalssvamy, G. Michalek, assd R.A. Hosvard, Properties of narrow coronal Sltatstnigara~jU, A., Y.-i. Mootn, M. Dryer...G.M.,’FTit relatiomtslip hetwseen prominence ermtptions assd coronal mnass ejections.. 107(A8), 1223, doi: 10. 1029/2001 JAOO9 143, 2002. .1. Atssnn.s

  11. Genesis Solar Wind Interstream, Coronal Hole and Coronal Mass Ejection Samples: Update on Availability and Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allton, J. H.; Gonzalez, C. P.; Allums, K. K.

    2017-01-01

    Recent refinement of analysis of ACE/SWICS data (Advanced Composition Explorer/Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer) and of onboard data for Genesis Discovery Mission of 3 regimes of solar wind at Earth-Sun L1 make it an appropriate time to update the availability and condition of Genesis samples specifically collected in these three regimes and currently curated at Johnson Space Center. ACE/SWICS spacecraft data indicate that solar wind flow types emanating from the interstream regions, from coronal holes and from coronal mass ejections are elementally and isotopically fractionated in different ways from the solar photosphere, and that correction of solar wind values to photosphere values is non-trivial. Returned Genesis solar wind samples captured very different kinds of information about these three regimes than spacecraft data. Samples were collected from 11/30/2001 to 4/1/2004 on the declining phase of solar cycle 23. Meshik, et al is an example of precision attainable. Earlier high precision laboratory analyses of noble gases collected in the interstream, coronal hole and coronal mass ejection regimes speak to degree of fractionation in solar wind formation and models that laboratory data support. The current availability and condition of samples captured on collector plates during interstream slow solar wind, coronal hole high speed solar wind and coronal mass ejections are de-scribed here for potential users of these samples.

  12. Anticipating the Geoeffectiveness of Coronal Mass Ejections Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are responsible for some of the most severe space weather at Earth. Major geomagnetic storms arise when CMEs carry large amounts of...

  13. Forecasting Coronal Mass Ejections from Vector Magnetograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Gary, G. A.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In a 17 vector magnetogram study of 12 bipolar active regions (Falconer, Moore, & Gary, 2002, ApJ in press), we correlated four quantitative global magnetic measures with the Coronal Mass Ejections (CME) productivity of the active region. The global measures included a measure of active region size, the total magnetic flux phi and three measures of an active region global nonpotentiality 1) the net current (I (sub N)), 2) the length of the strong-shear, strong-field main neutral line (L(sub SS)) and 3) and the normalized twist (alpha = muIN/PHI). The CME productivity was determined from YOHKOH/SXT observations, Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), and when possible Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment (SOHO/LASCO) observations within 12 days of the day of the magnetogram. We found that the three measures of global nonpotentiality (I(sub N), L(sub SS), alpha) were all well correlated (greater than 99% confidence level) with an active region's CME productivity. The sample size was to small to confirm if there was a statistical significant correlation of the globally nonscientist measures with future CME activity (i.e. from the date of the magnetogram forward). We are doubling our sample, and will report on the statistical significance of global nonpotentiality as a predictor of future CME productivity. The new active regions are all from the first year of the upgraded MSFC vector magnetograms. This work, is funded by NSF through the Space Weather Program, by NASA through the Living with the Star, Targeted Research and Technology, and by NASA Solar Physics Supporting Research and Technology Program. The upgrade to the MSFC vector magnetograph was supported by the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI) mission.

  14. The Search for Stellar Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villadsen, Jacqueline Rose

    2017-05-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) may dramatically impact habitability and atmospheric composition of planets around magnetically active stars, including young solar analogs and many M dwarfs. Theoretical predictions of such effects are limited by the lack of observations of stellar CMEs. This thesis addresses this gap through a search for the spectral and spatial radio signatures of CMEs on active M dwarfs. Solar CMEs produce radio bursts with a distinctive spectral signature, narrow-band plasma emission that drifts to lower frequency as a CME expands outward. To search for analogous events on nearby stars, I worked on system design, software, and commissioning for the Starburst project, a wideband single-baseline radio interferometry backend dedicated to stellar observations. In addition, I led a survey of nearby active M dwarfs with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), detecting coherent radio bursts in 13 out of 23 epochs, over a total of 58 hours. This survey's ultra-wide bandwidth (0.23-6.0 GHz) dynamic spectroscopy, unprecedented for stellar observations, revealed diverse behavior in the time-frequency plane. Flare star UV Ceti produced complex, luminous events reminiscent of brown dwarf aurorae; AD Leo sustained long-duration, intense, narrow-band "storms"; and YZ CMi emitted a burst with substructure with rapid frequency drift, resembling solar Type III bursts, which are attributed to electrons moving at speeds of order 10% of the speed of light. To search for the spatial signature of CMEs, I led 8.5-GHz observations with the Very Long Baseline Array simultaneous to 24 hours of the VLA survey. This program detected non-thermal continuum emission from the stars in all epochs, as well as continuum flares on AD Leo and coherent bursts on UV Ceti, enabling measurement of the spatial offset between flaring and quiescent emission. These observations demonstrate the diversity of stellar transients that can be expected in time-domain radio surveys, especially

  15. The Search for Stellar Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villadsen, Jacqueline; Hallinan, Gregg; Monroe, Ryan; Bourke, Stephen; Starburst Program Team

    2017-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) may dramatically impact habitability and atmospheric composition of planets around magnetically active stars, including young solar analogs and many M dwarfs. Theoretical predictions of such effects are limited by the lack of observations of stellar CMEs. My thesis addresses this gap through a search for the spectral and spatial radio signatures of CMEs on active M dwarfs.Solar CMEs produce radio bursts with a distinctive spectral signature, narrow-band plasma emission that drifts to lower frequency as a CME expands outward. To search for analogous events on nearby stars, I worked on system design, software, and commissioning for the Starburst project, a wideband single-baseline radio interferometry backend dedicated to stellar observations. In addition, I led a survey of nearby active M dwarfs with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA), detecting 12 bright (>10 mJy) radio bursts in 58 hours. This survey’s ultra-wide bandwidth (0.23-6.0 GHz) dynamic spectroscopy, unprecedented for stellar observations, revealed diverse behavior in the time-frequency plane. Flare star UV Ceti produced complex, luminous events reminiscent of brown dwarf aurorae; AD Leo sustained long-duration, intense, narrow-band "storms"; and YZ CMi emitted a burst with substructure with rapid frequency drift, resembling solar Type III bursts, which are attributed to electrons moving at speeds of order 10% of the speed of light.To search for the spatial signature of CMEs, I led 8.5-GHz observations with the Very Long Baseline Array simultaneous to 24 hours of the JVLA survey. This program detected non-thermal continuum emission from the stars in all epochs, as well as continuum flares on AD Leo and coherent bursts on UV Ceti, enabling measurement of the spatial offset between flaring and quiescent emission.These observations demonstrate the diversity of stellar transients that can be expected in time-domain radio surveys, especially with the advent of large low

  16. Earth-Affecting Coronal Mass Ejections Without Obvious Low Coronal Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Nariaki V.; Mulligan, Tamitha

    2017-09-01

    We present a study of the origin of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that were not accompanied by obvious low coronal signatures (LCSs) and yet were responsible for appreciable disturbances at 1 AU. These CMEs characteristically start slowly. In several examples, extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images taken by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory reveal coronal dimming and a post-eruption arcade when we make difference images with long enough temporal separations, which are commensurate with the slow initial development of the CME. Data from the EUV imager and COR coronagraphs of the Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation onboard the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, which provide limb views of Earth-bound CMEs, greatly help us limit the time interval in which the CME forms and undergoes initial acceleration. For other CMEs, we find similar dimming, although only with lower confidence as to its link to the CME. It is noted that even these unclear events result in unambiguous flux rope signatures in in situ data at 1 AU. There is a tendency that the CME source regions are located near coronal holes or open field regions. This may have implications for both the initiation of the stealthy CME in the corona and its outcome in the heliosphere.

  17. Photospheric magnetic field of an eroded-by-solar-wind coronal mass ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, J.; Cid, C.; Saiz, E.; Guerrero, A.

    2017-10-01

    We have investigated the case of a coronal mass ejection that was eroded by the fast wind of a coronal hole in the interplanetary medium. When a solar ejection takes place close to a coronal hole, the flux rope magnetic topology of the coronal mass ejection (CME) may become misshapen at 1 AU as a result of the interaction. Detailed analysis of this event reveals erosion of the interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) magnetic field. In this communication, we study the photospheric magnetic roots of the coronal hole and the coronal mass ejection area with HMI/SDO magnetograms to define their magnetic characteristics.

  18. Solar jet-coronal hole collision and a related coronal mass ejection

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Du, Guohui; Li, Chuanyang

    2016-01-01

    Jets are defined as impulsive, well-collimated upflows, occurring in different layers of the solar atmosphere with different scales. Their relationship with coronal mass ejections (CMEs), another type of solar impulsive events, remains elusive. Using the high-quality imaging data of AIA/SDO, here we show a well-observed coronal jet event, in which part of the jets, with the embedding coronal loops, runs into a nearby coronal hole (CH) and gets bounced towards the opposite direction. This is evidenced by the flat-shape of the jet front during its interaction with the CH and the V-shaped feature in the time-slice plot of the interaction region. About a half-hour later, a CME initially with a narrow and jet-like front is observed by the LASCO C2 coronagraph, propagating along the direction of the post-collision jet. We also observe some 304 A dark material flowing from the jet-CH interaction region towards the CME. We thus suggest that the jet and the CME are physically connected, with the jet-CH collision and t...

  19. SOLAR JET–CORONAL HOLE COLLISION AND A CLOSELY RELATED CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Chen, Yao; Du, Guohui; Li, Chuanyang, E-mail: ruishengzheng@sdu.edu.cn [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, and Institute of Space Sciences, Shandong University, 264209, Weihai (China)

    2016-03-10

    Jets are defined as impulsive, well-collimated upflows, occurring in different layers of the solar atmosphere with different scales. Their relationship with coronal mass ejections (CMEs), another type of solar impulsive events, remains elusive. Using high-quality imaging data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly/Solar Dynamics Observatory, we show a well-observed coronal jet event, in which the part of the jet with embedding coronal loops runs into a nearby coronal hole (CH) and gets bounced in the opposite direction. This is evidenced by the flat shape of the jet front during its interaction with the CH and the V-shaped feature in the time-slice plot of the interaction region. About a half-hour later, a CME with an initially narrow and jet-like front is observed by the LASCO C2 coronagraph propagating along the direction of the post-collision jet. We also observe some 304 Å dark material flowing from the jet–CH interaction region toward the CME. We thus suggest that the jet and the CME are physically connected, with the jet–CH collision and the large-scale magnetic topology of the CH being important in defining the eventual propagating direction of this particular jet–CME eruption.

  20. Flux Rope Formation Preceding Coronal Mass Ejection Onset

    CERN Document Server

    Green, L M

    2009-01-01

    We analyse the evolution of a sigmoidal (S shaped) active region toward eruption, which includes a coronal mass ejection (CME) but leaves part of the filament in place. The X-ray sigmoid is found to trace out three different magnetic topologies in succession: a highly sheared arcade of coronal loops in its long-lived phase, a bald-patch separatrix surface (BPSS) in the hours before the CME, and the first flare loops in its major transient intensity enhancement. The coronal evolution is driven by photospheric changes which involve the convergence and cancellation of flux elements under the sigmoid and filament. The data yield unambiguous evidence for the existence of a BPSS, and hence a flux rope, in the corona prior to the onset of the CME.

  1. Simulations of Emerging Magnetic Flux. II. The Formation of Unstable Coronal Flux Ropes and the Initiation of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, James E.; Linton, Mark G.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2014-01-01

    We present results from three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the emergence of a twisted convection zone flux tube into a pre-existing coronal dipole field. As in previous simulations, following the partial emergence of the sub-surface flux into the corona, a combination of vortical motions and internal magnetic reconnection forms a coronal flux rope. Then, in the simulations presented here, external reconnection between the emerging field and the pre-existing dipole coronal field allows further expansion of the coronal flux rope into the corona. After sufficient expansion, internal reconnection occurs beneath the coronal flux rope axis, and the flux rope erupts up to the top boundary of the simulation domain (approximately 36 Mm above the surface).We find that the presence of a pre-existing field, orientated in a direction to facilitate reconnection with the emerging field, is vital to the fast rise of the coronal flux rope. The simulations shown in this paper are able to self-consistently create many of the surface and coronal signatures used by coronal mass ejection (CME) models. These signatures include surface shearing and rotational motions, quadrupolar geometry above the surface, central sheared arcades reconnecting with oppositely orientated overlying dipole fields, the formation of coronal flux ropes underlying potential coronal field, and internal reconnection which resembles the classical flare reconnection scenario. This suggests that proposed mechanisms for the initiation of a CME, such as "magnetic breakout," are operating during the emergence of new active regions.

  2. Coronal Mass Ejections and Non-recurrent Forbush Decreases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, A.; Abunin, A.; Abunina, M.; Eroshenko, E.; Oleneva, V.; Yanke, V.; Papaioannou, A.; Mavromichalaki, H.; Gopalswamy, N.; Yashiro, S.

    2014-10-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and their interplanetary counterparts (interplanetary coronal mass ejections, ICMEs) are responsible for large solar energetic particle events and severe geomagnetic storms. They can modulate the intensity of Galactic cosmic rays, resulting in non-recurrent Forbush decreases (FDs). We investigate the connection between CME manifestations and FDs. We used specially processed data from the worldwide neutron monitor network to pinpoint the characteristics of the recorded FDs together with CME-related data from the detailed online catalog based upon the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/ Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) data. We report on the correlations of the FD magnitude to the CME initial speed, the ICME transit speed, and the maximum solar wind speed. Comparisons between the features of CMEs (mass, width, velocity) and the characteristics of FDs are also discussed. FD features for halo, partial halo, and non-halo CMEs are presented and discussed.

  3. The Relationship of Coronal Mass Ejections to Streamers

    CERN Document Server

    Subramanian, P; Rich, N B; Howard, R A; Subramanian, Prasad

    1999-01-01

    We have examined images from the Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) to study the relationship of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) to coronal streamers. We wish to test the suggestion (Low 1996) that CMEs arise from flux ropes embedded in a streamer erupting, thus disrupting the streamer. The data span a period of two years near sunspot minimum through a period of increased activity as sunspot numbers increased. We have used LASCO data from the C2 coronagraph which records Thomson scattered white light from coronal electrons at heights between 1.5 and 6R_sun. Maps of the coronal streamers have been constructed from LASCO C2 observations at a height of 2.5R_sun at the east and west limbs. We have superposed the corresponding positions of CMEs observed with the C2 coronagraph onto the synoptic maps. We identified the different kinds of signatures CMEs leave on the streamer structure at this height (2.5R_sun). We find four types of CMEs with respect to their effect on streamers: 1. CMEs that disrupt the s...

  4. EUV and Coronagraphic Observations of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Durgesh Tripathi

    2006-06-01

    The Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) and Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) onboard Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) provide us with unprecedented multi-wavelength observations helping us to understand different dynamic phenomena on the Sun and in the corona. In this paper we discuss the association between post-eruptive arcades (PEAs) detected by EIT and white-light coronal mass ejections (CMEs) detected by LASCO/C2 telescope.

  5. Physical properties of erupting plasma associated with coronal mass ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.; Raymond, J. C.; Reeves, K. K.; Moon, Y.; Kim, K.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the physical properties (temperature, density, and mass) of erupting plasma observed in X-rays and EUV, which are all associated with coronal mass ejections observed by SOHO/LASCO. The erupting plasmas are observed as absorption or emission features in the low corona. The absorption feature provides a lower limit to the cold mass while the emission feature provides an upper limit to the mass of observed plasma in X-ray and EUV. We compare the mass constraints for each temperature response and find that the mass estimates in EUV and XRT are smaller than the total mass in the coronagraph. Several events were observed by a few passbands in the X-rays, which allows us to determine the temperature of the eruptive plasma using a filter ratio method. The temperature of one event is estimated at about 8.6 MK near the top of the erupting plasma. This measurement is possibly an average temperature for higher temperature plasma because the XRT is more sensitive at higher temperatures. In addition, a few events show that the absorption features of a prominence or a loop change to emission features with the beginning of their eruptions in all EUV wavelengths of SDO/AIA, which indicates the heating of the plasma. By estimating the physical properties of the erupting plasmas, we discuss the heating of the plasmas associated with coronal mass ejections in the low corona.

  6. Huge mass in right side of the heart: A rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Reza; Ghanei-Motlagh, Fahimeh; Nazari, Susan; Yaghubi, Mohsen

    2016-11-01

    The presence of primary intracardiac tumors are scarce, and most of them are myxomas. We reported, in this paper, a case with huge mass in the right side of the heart. A 45-year-old man, with a complaint of bilateral lower limbs edema and exertional dyspnea, was admitted to intensive cardiac care unit. Cardiac auscultation revealed soft grade systolic murmur without any evidence of "tumor plop." Echocardiography showed a huge mobile mass in right side of the heart that suggested myxoma. Our patient underwent cardiac surgery with excision of 13 cm mass. Histopathological study was confirmed the diagnosis of mass type. In this case report, it shows that in the differential diagnosis of right-sided heart failure, the right sided myxoma must be considered. The preferable approach in patient with cardiac myxomas is surgical excision to alleviate symptoms, early identification, and removal.

  7. Huge Neck Masses Causing Respiratory Distress in Neonates: Two Cases of Congenital Cervical Teratoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gezer, Hasan Özkan; Oğuzkurt, Pelin; Temiz, Abdulkerim; Bolat, Filiz Aka; Hiçsönmez, Akgün

    2016-12-01

    Congenital cervical teratomas are rare and usually large enough to cause respiratory distress in the neonatal period. We present two cases of congenital huge cystic neck masses in which distinguishing cervical cystic hygroma and congenital cystic teratoma was not possible through radiologic imaging techniques. Experience with the first case, which was initially diagnosed and treated as cystic hygroma by injection sclerotherapy, led to early suspicion and surgery in the second case. The masses were excised completely and histopathologic diagnoses were congenital teratoma in both patients. Our aim is to review congenital huge neck masses causing respiratory distress in early neonatal life to highlight this dilemma briefly with these interesting cases. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Global Energetics in Solar Flares and Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2017-08-01

    We present a statistical study of the energetics of coronal mass ejections (CME) and compare it with the magnetic, thermal, and nonthermal energy dissipated in flares. The physical parameters of CME speeds, mass, and kinetic energies are determined with two different independent methods, i.e., the traditional white-light scattering method using LASCO/SOHO data, and the EUV dimming method using AIA/SDO data. We analyze all 860 GOES M- and X-class flare events observed during the first 7 years (2010-2016) of the SDO mission. The new ingredients of our CME modeling includes: (1) CME geometry in terms of a self-similar adiabatic expansion, (2) DEM analysis of CME mass over entire coronal temperature range, (3) deceleration of CME due to gravity force which controls the kinetic and potentail CME energy as a function of time, (4) the critical speed that controls eruptive and confined CMEs, (5) the relationship between the center-of-mass motion during EUV dimming and the leading edge motion observed in white-light coronagraphs. Novel results are: (1) Physical parameters obtained from both the EUV dimming and white-light method can be reconciled; (2) the equi-partition of CME kinetic and thermal flare energy; (3) the Rosner-Tucker-Vaiana scaling law. We find that the two methods in EUV and white-light wavelengths are highly complementary and yield more complete models than each method alone.

  9. ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE CORONAL MAGNETIC DECAY INDEX AND CORONAL MASS EJECTION SPEED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Yan; Liu Chang; Jing Ju; Wang Haimin, E-mail: yx2@njit.edu [Space Weather Research Lab, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Boulevard, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States)

    2012-12-10

    Numerical simulations suggest that kink and torus instabilities are two potential contributors to the initiation and prorogation of eruptive events. A magnetic parameter called the decay index (i.e., the coronal magnetic gradient of the overlying fields above the eruptive flux ropes) could play an important role in controlling the kinematics of eruptions. Previous studies have identified a threshold range of the decay index that distinguishes between eruptive and confined configurations. Here we advance the study by investigating if there is a clear correlation between the decay index and coronal mass ejection (CME) speed. Thirty-eight CMEs associated with filament eruptions and/or two-ribbon flares are selected using the H{alpha} data from the Global H{alpha} Network. The filaments and flare ribbons observed in H{alpha} associated with the CMEs help to locate the magnetic polarity inversion line, along which the decay index is calculated based on the potential field extrapolation using Michelson Doppler Imager magnetograms as boundary conditions. The speeds of CMEs are obtained from the LASCO C2 CME catalog available online. We find that the mean decay index increases with CME speed for those CMEs with a speed below 1000 km s{sup -1} and stays flat around 2.2 for the CMEs with higher speeds. In addition, we present a case study of a partial filament eruption, in which the decay indices show different values above the erupted/non-erupted part.

  10. Geoeffectiveness of Coronal Mass Ejections in the SOHO Era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dumbovic, M.; Devos, A.; Vrsnak, B.;

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of the study is to determine the probability distributions of the geomagnetic Dst index as a function of the coronal mass ejection (CME) and solar flare parameters for the purpose of establishing a probabilistic forecast tool for the geomagnetic storm intensity. Several CME...... and flare parameters as well as the effect of successive-CME occurrence in changing the probability for a certain range of Dst index values, were examined. The results confirm some of already known relationships between remotely-observed properties of solar eruptive events and geomagnetic storms, namely...

  11. Full Halo Coronal Mass Ejections: Arrival at the Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Chenglong; Pan, Zonghao; Miao, Bin; Ye, Pinzhong; Wang, S

    2014-01-01

    A geomagnetic storm is mainly caused by a front-side coronal mass ejection (CME) hitting the Earth and then interacting with the magnetosphere. However, not all front-side CMEs can hit the Earth. Thus, which CMEs hit the Earth and when they do so are important issues in the study and forecasting of space weather. In our previous work (Shen et al., 2013), the de-projected parameters of the full-halo coronal mass ejections (FHCMEs) that occurred from 2007 March 1 to 2012 May 31 were estimated, and there are 39 front-side events could be fitted by the GCS model. In this work, we continue to study whether and when these front-side FHCMEs (FFHCMEs) hit the Earth. It is found that 59\\% of these FFHCMEs hit the Earth, and for central events, whose deviation angles $\\epsilon$, which are the angles between the propagation direction and the Sun-Earth line, are smaller than 45 degrees, the fraction increases to 75\\%. After checking the deprojected angular widths of the CMEs, we found that all of the Earth-encountered CM...

  12. Forbush decreases associated to Stealth Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heber, B.; Wallmann, C.; Galsdorf, D.; Herbst K.; Kühl, P.; Dumbovic, M.; Vršnak, B.; Veronig, A.; Temmer, M.; Möstl, C.; Dalla, S.

    Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) are structures in the solar wind that are the counterparts of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) at the Sun. It is commonly believed that enhanced magnetic fields in interplanetary shocks and solar ejecta as well as the increased turbulence in the solar wind sheath region are the cause of Forbush decreases (FDs) representing decreases of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensities. Recently, stealth CMEs i.e.~CMEs with no apparent solar surface association have become a subject in recent studies of solar activity. Whether all of such stealth CMEs can drive a FD is difficult to investigate on the basis of neutron monitor NM measurements because these measurements not only reflect the GCR intensity variation in interplanetary space but also the variation of the geomagnetic field as well as the conditions in the Earth atmosphere. Single detector counter from spacecraft instrumentation, here SOHO and Chandra EPHIN, exceed counting statistic of NMs allowing to determine intensity variation of less than 1 permil in interplanetary space on the basis of 30 minute count rate averages. Here we present the ongoing analysis of eleven stealth CMEs.

  13. The 3D structure of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsourakos, Spiros

    2016-07-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) represent one of the most powerful energy release phenomena in the entire solar system and are a major driver of space weather. Prior to 2006, our observational access to CMEs was limited to single viewpoint remote sensing observations in the inner/outer corona, and in-situ observations further away, e.g. at 1 AU. Taking all these factors together, turned out to be a major obstacle in our understanding and characterizing of the 3D structure and evolution of CMEs. The situation improved dramatically with the availability of multi-viewpoint imaging observations of CMEs, all way through from the Sun to 1 AU, from the STEREO mission since 2006, combined with observations from other missions (SOHO, Hinode, SDO, IRIS). With this talk we will discuss several key recent results in CME science resulting from the analysis of multi-viewpoint observations. This includes: (1) shape and structure; (2) kinematics and energetics; (3) trajectories, deflections and rotations; (4) arrival times and velocities at 1 AU; (5) magnetic field structure; (6) relationships with coronal and interplanetary shocks and solar energetic particles. The implications of these results in terms of CME theories and models will be also addressed. We will conclude with a discussion of important open issues in our understanding of CMEs and how these could be addressed with upcoming (Solar Orbiter, Solar Probe Plus) and under-study missions (e.g., L5).

  14. A Type II Radio Burst without a Coronal Mass Ejection

    CERN Document Server

    Su, W; Ding, M D; Chen, P F; Sun, J Q

    2015-01-01

    Type II radio bursts are thought to be a signature of coronal shocks. In this paper, we analyze a short-lived type II burst that started at 07:40 UT on 2011 February 28. By carefully checking white-light images, we find that the type II radio burst is not accompanied by a coronal mass ejection, only with a C2.4 class flare and narrow jet. However, in the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images provided by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), we find a wave-like structure that propagated at a speed of $\\sim$ 600 km s$^{-1}$ during the burst. The relationship between the type II radio burst and the wave-like structure is in particular explored. For this purpose, we first derive the density distribution under the wave by the differential emission measure (DEM) method, which is used to restrict the empirical density model. We then use the restricted density model to invert the speed of the shock that produces the observed frequency drift rate in the dynamic spectrum. The ...

  15. A Study of Fast Flareless Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Song, H Q; Ye, D D; Han, G Q; Du, G H; Li, G; Zhang, J; Hu, Q

    2013-01-01

    Two major processes have been proposed to convert the coronal magnetic energy into the kinetic energy of a coronal mass ejection (CME): resistive magnetic reconnection and ideal macroscopic magnetohydrodynamic instability of magnetic flux rope. However, it remains elusive whether both processes play a comparable role or one of them prevails during a particular eruption. To shed light on this issue, we carefully studied energetic but flareless CMEs, \\textit{i.e.}, fast CMEs not accompanied by any flares. Through searching the Coordinated Data Analysis Workshops (CDAW) database of CMEs observed in Solar Cycle 23, we found 13 such events with speeds larger than 1000 km s$^{-1}$. Other common observational features of these events are: (1) none of them originated in active regions; they were associated with eruptions of well-developed long filaments in quiet-Sun regions, (2) no apparent enhancement of flare emissions was present in soft X-ray, EUV and microwave data. Further studies of two events reveal that (1) ...

  16. On interplanetary coronal mass ejection identification at 1 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, T.; Russell, C. T.; Gosling, J. T.

    1999-06-01

    Coronal mass ejections are believed to be produced in the corona from closed magnetic regions not previously participating in the solar wind expansion. At 1 AU their interplanetary counterparts (ICMEs) generally have a number of distinct plasma and field signatures that distinguish them from the ambient solar wind. These include heat flux dropouts, bi-directional streaming, enhanced alpha particle events, times of depressed proton temperatures, intervals of distorted or enhanced magnetic field, and times of large magnetic field rotations characteristic of magnetic clouds. The first three of these signatures are phenomena that occur at some point within the ICME, but do not necessarily persist throughout the entire ICME. The large scale magnetic field rotations, distortions and enhancements, and the proton temperature depressions tend to mark more accurately the beginning and end of the ICME proper. We examine herein the reliability with which each of these markers identifies ICMEs utilizing ISEE-3 data from 1978-1980.

  17. An ice-cream cone model for coronal mass ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, X. H.; Wang, C. B.; Dou, X. K.

    2005-08-01

    In this study, we use an ice-cream cone model to analyze the geometrical and kinematical properties of the coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Assuming that in the early phase CMEs propagate with near-constant speed and angular width, some useful properties of CMEs, namely the radial speed (v), the angular width (α), and the location at the heliosphere, can be obtained considering the geometrical shapes of a CME as an ice-cream cone. This model is improved by (1) using an ice-cream cone to show the near real configuration of a CME, (2) determining the radial speed via fitting the projected speeds calculated from the height-time relation in different azimuthal angles, (3) not only applying to halo CMEs but also applying to nonhalo CMEs.

  18. On Sun-to-Earth Propagation of Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ying D; Lugaz, Noé; Möstl, Christian; Davies, Jackie A; Bale, Stuart D; Lin, Robert P

    2013-01-01

    We investigate how coronal mass ejections (CMEs) propagate through, and interact with, the inner heliosphere between the Sun and Earth, a key question in CME research and space weather forecasting. CME Sun-to-Earth kinematics are constrained by combining wide-angle heliospheric imaging observations, interplanetary radio type II bursts and in situ measurements from multiple vantage points. We select three events for this study, the 2012 January 19, 23, and March 7 CMEs. Different from previous event studies, this work attempts to create a general picture for CME Sun-to-Earth propagation and compare different techniques for determining CME interplanetary kinematics. Key results are obtained concerning CME Sun-to-Earth propagation. Our comparison between different techniques (and data sets) also has important implications for CME observations and their interpretations. Future CME observations and space weather forecasting are discussed based on these results. See detail in the PDF.

  19. MHD Remote Numerical Simulations: Evolution of Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez-Cervantes, L; Gonzalez-Ponce, A R

    2008-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are solar eruptions into interplanetary space of as much as a few billion tons of plasma, with embedded magnetic fields from the Sun's corona. These perturbations play a very important role in solar--terrestrial relations, in particular in the spaceweather. In this work we present some preliminary results of the software development at the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico to perform Remote MHD Numerical Simulations. This is done to study the evolution of the CMEs in the interplanetary medium through a Web-based interface and the results are store into a database. The new astrophysical computational tool is called the Mexican Virtual Solar Observatory (MVSO) and is aimed to create theoretical models that may be helpful in the interpretation of observational solar data.

  20. The Kinematics and Morphology of Solar Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Byrne, Jason P

    2012-01-01

    Solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are large-scale eruptions of plasma and magnetic field from the Sun into the corona and interplanetary space. They are the most significant drivers of adverse space weather at Earth and other locations in the heliosphere, so it is important to understand the physics governing their eruption and propagation. However the diffuse morphology and transient nature of CMEs makes them difficult to identify and track using traditional image processing techniques. In this thesis the implementation of multiscale image processing techniques to identify and track the CME front through coronagraph images is detailed. An ellipse characterisation of the CME front is used to determine the CME kinematics and morphology with increased precision as compared to techniques used in current CME catalogues, and efforts are underway to automate this procedure for applying to a large number of CME observations for future analysis. It was found that CMEs do not simply undergo constant acceleration, bu...

  1. Plasma Heating Suring a Coronal Mass Ejection Observed by SOHO

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, N A; Korreck, K E

    2011-01-01

    We perform a time-dependent ionization analysis to constrain plasma heating requirements during a fast partial halo coronal mass ejection (CME) observed on 2000 June 28 by the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). We use two methods to derive densities from the UVCS measurements, including a density sensitive O V line ratio at 1213.85 and 1218.35 Angstroms, and radiative pumping of the O VI 1032,1038 doublet by chromospheric emission lines. The most strongly constrained feature shows cumulative plasma heating comparable to or greater than the kinetic energy, while features observed earlier during the event show cumulative plasma heating comparable to or less than the kinetic energy. SOHO Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) observations are used to estimate the active region magnetic energy. We consider candidate plasma heating mechanisms and provide constraints when possible. Because this CME was associated with a relatively weak flare, the contribution b...

  2. Geoeffectiveness of Coronal Mass Ejections in the SOHO era

    CERN Document Server

    Dumbovic, Mateja; Vrsnak, Bojan; Sudar, Davor; Rodriguez, Luciano; Ruzdjak, Domagoj; Leer, Kristoffer; Vennerstrom, Susanne; Veronig, Astrid

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of the study is to determine the probability distributions of the geomagnetic Dst index as a function of the coronal mass ejection (CME) and solar flare parameters for the purpose of establishing a probabilistic forecast tool for the geomagnetic storm intensity. Several CME and flare parameters as well as the effect of successive-CME occurrence in changing the probability for a certain range of Dst index values, were examined. The results confirm some of already known relationships between remotely-observed properties of solar eruptive events and geomagnetic storms, namely the importance of initial CME speed, apparent width, source position, and the associated solar flare class. In this paper we quantify these relationships in a form to be used for space weather forecasting in future. The results of the statistical study are employed to construct an empirical statistical model for predicting the probability of the geomagnetic storm intensity based on remote solar observations of CMEs and fl...

  3. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections observed by MESSENGER and Venus Express

    CERN Document Server

    Good, S W

    2015-01-01

    Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) observed by the MESSENGER (MES) and Venus Express (VEX) spacecraft have been catalogued and analysed. The ICMEs were identified by a relatively smooth rotation of the magnetic field direction consistent with a flux rope structure, coinciding with a relatively enhanced magnetic field strength. A total of 35 ICMEs were found in the surveyed MES data (primarily from March 2007 to April 2012), and 84 ICMEs in the surveyed VEX data (from May 2006 to December 2013). The ICME flux rope configurations have been determined. Ropes with northward leading edges were about four times more common than ropes with southward leading edges, in agreement with a previously established solar cycle dependence. Ropes with low inclinations to the solar equatorial plane were about four times more common than ropes with high inclinations, possibly an observational effect. Left and right-handed ropes were observed in almost equal numbers. In addition, data from MES, VEX, STEREO-A, STEREO-B ...

  4. Predicting Coronal Mass Ejections Using Machine Learning Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Bobra, Monica G

    2016-01-01

    Of all the activity observed on the Sun, two of the most energetic events are flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). Usually, solar active regions that produce large flares will also produce a CME, but this is not always true (Yashiro et al., 2005). Despite advances in numerical modeling, it is still unclear which circumstances will produce a CME (Webb & Howard, 2012). Therefore, it is worthwhile to empirically determine which features distinguish flares associated with CMEs from flares that are not. At this time, no extensive study has used physically meaningful features of active regions to distinguish between these two populations. As such, we attempt to do so by using features derived from [1] photospheric vector magnetic field data taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatory's Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrument and [2] X-ray flux data from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite's X-ray Flux instrument. We build a catalog of active regions that either produced both a flare and a...

  5. A Filament-Associated Halo Coronal Mass Ejection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    There are only a few observations published so far that show the initiation of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and illustrate the magnetic changes in the surface origin of a CME. Any attempt to connect a CME with its local solar activities is meaningful. In this paper we present a clear instance of a halo CME initiation. A careful analysis of magnetograms shows that the only obvious magnetic changes in the surface region of the CME is a magnetic flux cancellation underneath a quiescent filament. The early disturbance was seen as the slow upward motion in segments of the quiescent filament. Four hours later, the filament was accelerated to about 50 km s-1 and erupted. While a small part of the material in the filament was ejected into the upper corona, most of the mass was transported to a nearby region. About forty minutes later, the transported mass was also ejected partially to the upper corona. The eruption of the filament triggered a two-ribbon flare, with post-flare loops connecting the flare ribbons. A halo CME, which is inferred to be associated with the eruptive filament, was observed from LASCO/C2 and C3. The halo CME contained two CME events, each event corresponded to a partial mass ejection of the filament. We suggest that the magnetic reconnection at the lower atmosphere is responsible for the filament eruption and the halo CME.

  6. Global Energetics of Solar Flares: IV. Coronal Mass Ejection Energetics

    CERN Document Server

    Aschwanden, Markus J

    2016-01-01

    This study entails the fourth part of a global flare energetics project, in which the mass $m_{\\mathrm{cme}}$, kinetic energy $E_{\\mathrm{kin}}$, and the gravitational potential energy $E_{\\mathrm{grav}}$ of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is measured in 399 M and X-class flare events observed during the first 3.5 yrs of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission, using a new method based on the EUV dimming effect. The EUV dimming is modeled in terms of a radial adiabatic expansion process, which is fitted to the observed evolution of the total emission measure of the CME source region. The model derives the evolution of the mean electron density, the emission measure, the bulk plasma expansion velocity, the mass, and the energy in the CME source region. The EUV dimming method is truly complementary to the Thomson scattering method in white light, which probes the CME evolution in the heliosphere at $r > 2 R_{\\odot}$, while the EUV dimming method tracks the CME launch in the corona. We compare the CME paramet...

  7. Direct observations of magnetic flux rope formation during a solar coronal mass ejection

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Hongqiang; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Yao; Cheng, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most spectacular eruptive phenomena in the solar atmosphere. It is generally accepted that CMEs are results of eruptions of magnetic flux ropes (MFRs). However, a heated debate is on whether MFRs pre-exist before the eruptions or they are formed during the eruptions. Several coronal signatures, \\textit{e.g.}, filaments, coronal cavities, sigmoid structures and hot channels (or hot blobs), are proposed as MFRs and observed before the eruption, which suppor...

  8. Magnetic reconnection in the interior of interplanetary coronal mass ejections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermo, R L; Opher, M; Drake, J F

    2014-07-18

    Recent in situ observations of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) found signatures of reconnection exhausts in their interior or trailing edge. Whereas reconnection on the leading edge of an ICME would indicate an interaction with the coronal or interplanetary environment, this result suggests that the internal magnetic field reconnects with itself. In light of this data, we consider the stability properties of flux ropes first developed in the context of astrophysics, then further elaborated upon in the context of reversed field pinches (RFPs). It was shown that the lowest energy state of a flux rope corresponds to ∇ × B = λB with λ a constant, the so-called Taylor state. Variations from this state will result in the magnetic field trying to reorient itself into the Taylor state solution, subject to the constraints that the toroidal flux and magnetic helicity are invariant. In reversed field pinches, this relaxation is mediated by the reconnection of the magnetic field, resulting in a sawtooth crash. If we likewise treat the ICME as a flux rope, any deviation from the Taylor state will result in reconnection within the interior of the flux tube, in agreement with the observations by Gosling et al. Such a departure from the Taylor state takes place as the flux tube cross section expands in the latitudinal direction, as seen in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of flux tubes propagating through the interplanetary medium. We show analytically that this elongation results in a state which is no longer in the minimum energy Taylor state. We then present magnetohydrodynamic simulations of an elongated flux tube which has evolved away from the Taylor state and show that reconnection at many surfaces produces a complex stochastic magnetic field as the system evolves back to a minimum energy state configuration.

  9. Automatic Determination of the Conic Coronal Mass Ejection Model Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulkkinen, A.; Oates, T.; Taktakishvili, A.

    2009-01-01

    Characterization of the three-dimensional structure of solar transients using incomplete plane of sky data is a difficult problem whose solutions have potential for societal benefit in terms of space weather applications. In this paper transients are characterized in three dimensions by means of conic coronal mass ejection (CME) approximation. A novel method for the automatic determination of cone model parameters from observed halo CMEs is introduced. The method uses both standard image processing techniques to extract the CME mass from white-light coronagraph images and a novel inversion routine providing the final cone parameters. A bootstrap technique is used to provide model parameter distributions. When combined with heliospheric modeling, the cone model parameter distributions will provide direct means for ensemble predictions of transient propagation in the heliosphere. An initial validation of the automatic method is carried by comparison to manually determined cone model parameters. It is shown using 14 halo CME events that there is reasonable agreement, especially between the heliocentric locations of the cones derived with the two methods. It is argued that both the heliocentric locations and the opening half-angles of the automatically determined cones may be more realistic than those obtained from the manual analysis

  10. Coronal mass ejections and geomagnetic storms: Seasonal variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J.L.; Gosling, J.T.; McComas, D.J.

    1992-07-01

    The well-established semiannual geomagnetic cycle, with peak activity near the equinoxes, has been attributed to the angle between the solar rotation axis and the geomagnetic dipole, which modulates the GSM Bz component in the interplanetary magnetic field (MF). This effect is predicted to be accentuated in the shocked plasma ahead of fast coronal mass ejections (CMESs); its relevance to the internal fields of the ejecta is unclear. CMEs, particularly fast events driving interplanetary shocks, are the cause of almost all large geomagnetic storms near solar maximum. We use a set of CMEs identified by ISEE-3 observations of bidirectional electron streaming, plus IMF and geomagnetic data, to investigate the semiannual geomagnetic variation and its relation to CMEs. We find that the geomagnetic effectiveness of CMEs and post-shock solar wind is well-ordered by speed and by the southward component of the IMF in GSM coordinates, as well as by preexisting geomagnetic conditions. The post-shock seasonal effect, with geomagnetic effectiveness maximizing near April 5 for negative GSEQ By and near October 5 for positive GSEQ By, is identifiable in shock and shock/CME events, but not for CME events without leading shocks. When used to complement the more fundamental causal parameter of CME speed, the seasonal effect appears to have value for prediction of geomagnetic storms.

  11. Coronal mass ejections and geomagnetic storms: Seasonal variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J.L.; Gosling, J.T.; McComas, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    The well-established semiannual geomagnetic cycle, with peak activity near the equinoxes, has been attributed to the angle between the solar rotation axis and the geomagnetic dipole, which modulates the GSM Bz component in the interplanetary magnetic field (MF). This effect is predicted to be accentuated in the shocked plasma ahead of fast coronal mass ejections (CMESs); its relevance to the internal fields of the ejecta is unclear. CMEs, particularly fast events driving interplanetary shocks, are the cause of almost all large geomagnetic storms near solar maximum. We use a set of CMEs identified by ISEE-3 observations of bidirectional electron streaming, plus IMF and geomagnetic data, to investigate the semiannual geomagnetic variation and its relation to CMEs. We find that the geomagnetic effectiveness of CMEs and post-shock solar wind is well-ordered by speed and by the southward component of the IMF in GSM coordinates, as well as by preexisting geomagnetic conditions. The post-shock seasonal effect, with geomagnetic effectiveness maximizing near April 5 for negative GSEQ By and near October 5 for positive GSEQ By, is identifiable in shock and shock/CME events, but not for CME events without leading shocks. When used to complement the more fundamental causal parameter of CME speed, the seasonal effect appears to have value for prediction of geomagnetic storms.

  12. On interplanetary coronal mass ejection identification at 1 AU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulligan, T.; Russell, C.T. [Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics and the Department of Earth and Space Sciences University of California Los Angeles (United States); Gosling, J.T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (United States)

    1999-06-01

    Coronal mass ejections are believed to be produced in the corona from closed magnetic regions not previously participating in the solar wind expansion. At 1 AU their interplanetary counterparts (ICMEs) generally have a number of distinct plasma and field signatures that distinguish them from the ambient solar wind. These include heat flux dropouts, bi-directional streaming, enhanced alpha particle events, times of depressed proton temperatures, intervals of distorted or enhanced magnetic field, and times of large magnetic field rotations characteristic of magnetic clouds. The first three of these signatures are phenomena that occur at some point within the ICME, but do not necessarily persist throughout the entire ICME. The large scale magnetic field rotations, distortions and enhancements, and the proton temperature depressions tend to mark more accurately the beginning and end of the ICME proper. We examine herein the reliability with which each of these markers identifies ICMEs utilizing ISEE-3 data from 1978{endash}1980. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Large Geomagnetic Storms Associated with Limb Halo Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Xie, Hong; Akiyama, Sachiko; Makela, Pertti

    2009-01-01

    Solar cycle 23 witnessed the observation of hundreds of halo coronal mass ejections (CMEs), thanks to the high dynamic range and extended field of view of the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission. More than two thirds of halo CMEs originating on the front side of the Sun have been found to be geoeffective (Dst = 45deg) have a 20% shorter delay time on the average. It was suggested that the geomagnetic storms due to limb halos must be due to the sheath portion of the interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs) so that the shorter delay time can be accounted for. We confirm this suggestion by examining the sheath and ejecta portions of ICMEs from Wind and ACE data that correspond to the limb halos. Detailed examination showed that three pairs of limb halos were interacting events. Geomagnetic storms following five limb halos were actually produced by other disk halos. The storms followed by four isolated limb halos and the ones associated with interact...

  14. A numerical study of two interacting coronal mass ejections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Schmidt

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The interaction in the solar wind between two coronal mass ejections (CMEs is investigated using numerical simulations. We show that the nature of the interaction depends on whether the CME magnetic structures interact, but in all cases the result is an equilisation of the speed of the two CMEs. In the absence of magnetic interaction, the forward shock of the faster trailing CME interacts with the slow leading CME, and accelerates it. When the two CMEs have magnetic fields with the same sense of rotation, magnetic reconnection occurs between the two CMEs, leading to the formation of a single magnetic structure: in the most extreme cases, one CME "eats" the other. When the senses of rotation are opposite, reconnection does not occur, but the CMEs collide in a highly non-elastic manner, again forming a single structure. The possibility of enhanced particle acceleration in such processes is assessed. The presence of strong magnetic reconnection provides excellent opportunities for the acceleration of thermal particles, which then form a seed population for further acceleration at the CME shocks. The presence of a large population of seed particles will thus lead to an overall increase in energetic particle fluxes, as suggested by some observations.

  15. Regarding the detectability and measurement of coronal mass ejections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review I discuss the problems associated with the detection and measurement of coronal mass ejections (CMEs. CMEs are important phenomena both scientifically, as they play a crucial role in the evolution of the solar corona, and technologically, as their impact with the Earth leads to severe space weather activity in the form of magnetic storms. I focus on the observation of CMEs using visible white light imagers (coronagraphs and heliospheric imagers, as they may be regarded as the binding agents between different datasets and different models that are used to reconstruct them. Our ability to accurately measure CMEs observed by these imagers is hampered by many factors, from instrumental to geometrical to physical. Following a brief review of the history of CME observation and measurement, I explore the impediments to our ability to measure them and describe possible means for which we may be able to mitigate those impediments. I conclude with a discussion of the claim that we have reached the limit of the information that we can extract from the current generation of white light imagers, and discuss possible ways forward regarding future instrument capabilities.

  16. The initiation of coronal mass ejections by magnetic flux emergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, G.; van der Holst, B.; Poedts, S.

    2006-12-01

    Aims.The initiation of solar Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) is studied in the framework of computational Magneto-Hydro-Dynamics (MHD). Methods: .The initial configuration includes a magnetic flux rope that is embedded in a gravitationally stratified solar atmosphere with a background dipole magnetic field in spherical, axi-symmetric geometry. The flux rope is in equilibrium due to an image current below the photosphere. An emerging magnetic flux triggering mechanism is used to make this equilibrium configuration unstable. Results: . When the magnetic flux emerges within the filament below the flux rope this results in a catastrophic behavior similar to earlier, more simple models. As a result, the flux rope rises and a current sheet forms below it. It is shown that the magnetic reconnection in the current sheet below the flux rope in combination with the outward curvature forces results in a fast ejection of the flux rope as observed for solar CMEs. We have done a parameter study of the effect of the flux emergence rate on the velocity and the acceleration of the resulting CMEs.

  17. Data Constrained Coronal Mass Ejections in A Global Magnetohydrodynamics Model

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, M; van der Holst, B; Sokolov, I; Toth, G; Mullinix, R E; Taktakishvili, A; Chulaki, A; Gombosi, T I

    2016-01-01

    We present a first-principles-based coronal mass ejection (CME) model suitable for both scientific and operational purposes by combining a global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) solar wind model with a flux rope-driven CME model. Realistic CME events are simulated self-consistently with high fidelity and forecasting capability by constraining initial flux rope parameters with observational data from GONG, SOHO/LASCO, and STEREO/COR. We automate this process so that minimum manual intervention is required in specifying the CME initial state. With the newly developed data-driven Eruptive Event Generator Gibson-Low (EEGGL), we present a method to derive Gibson-Low (GL) flux rope parameters through a handful of observational quantities so that the modeled CMEs can propagate with the desired CME speeds near the Sun. A test result with CMEs launched with different Carrington rotation magnetograms are shown. Our study shows a promising result for using the first-principles-based MHD global model as a forecasting tool, wh...

  18. The coronal mass ejection waiting-time distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Wheatland, M S

    2003-01-01

    The distribution of times $\\Delta t$ between coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) CME catalog for the years 1996-2001 is examined. The distribution exhibits a power-law tail $\\propto (\\Delta t)^{\\gamma}$ with an index $\\gamma\\approx -2.36\\pm 0.11$ for large waiting times ($\\Delta t>10 {\\rm hours}$). The power-law index of the waiting-time distribution varies with the solar cycle: for the years 1996-1998 (a period of low activity), the power-law index is $\\gamma\\approx-1.86\\pm 0.14$, and for the years 1999-2001 (a period of higher activity), the index is $\\gamma\\approx-2.98\\pm 0.20$. The observed CME waiting-time distribution, and its variation with the cycle, may be understood in terms of CMEs occurring as a time-dependent Poisson process. The CME waiting-time distribution is compared with that for greater than C1 class solar flares in the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) catalog for the same years. The flare and CME waiting-time distri...

  19. Ensemble Modeling of the 23 July 2012 Coronal Mass Ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, M. D.; Biesecker, D. A.; Pizzo, V.; Koning, C. A.; Millward, G.; Arge, C. N.; Henney, C. J.; Odstrcil, D.

    2015-10-01

    On 23 July 2012 a significant and rapid coronal mass ejection (CME) was detected in situ by the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) A. This CME was unusual due to its extremely brief Sun-to-1 AU transit time of less than 21 h and its exceptionally high impact speed of 2246 km/s. If this CME had been Earth directed, it would have produced a significant geomagnetic storm with potentially serious consequences. To protect our ground- and space-based assets, there is a clear need to accurately forecast the arrival times of such events using realistic input parameters and models run in near real time. Using Wang-Sheely-Arge (WSA)-Enlil, the operational model currently employed at the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center, we investigate the sensitivity of the 23 July CME event to model input parameters. Variations in the initial CME speed, angular width, and direction, as well as the ambient solar wind background, are investigated using an ensemble approach to study the effect on the predicted arrival time of the CME at STEREO A. Factors involved in the fast transit time of this large CME are discussed, and potential improvements to modeling such events with the WSA-Enlil model are presented.

  20. VLA Measurements of Faraday Rotation through Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Kooi, Jason E; Buffo, Jacob J; Spangler, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are large-scale eruptions of plasma from the Sun that play an important role in space weather. Faraday rotation (FR) is the rotation of the plane of polarization that results when a linearly polarized signal passes through a magnetized plasma such as a CME. FR observations of a source near the Sun can provide information on the plasma structure of a CME shortly after launch. We report on simultaneous white-light and radio observations made of three CMEs in August 2012. We made sensitive Very Large Array (VLA) full-polarization observations using 1 - 2 GHz frequencies of a "constellation" of radio sources through the solar corona at heliocentric distances that ranged from 6 - 15 solar radii. Of the nine sources observed, three were occulted by CMEs: two sources (0842+1835 and 0900+1832) were occulted by a single CME and one source (0843+1547) was occulted by two CMEs. In addition to our radioastronomical observations, which represent one of the first active hunts for CME Faraday r...

  1. Synovial sarcoma presenting with huge mediastinal mass: a case report and review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Synovial sarcoma presenting in the mediastinum is exceedingly rare. Furthermore, data addressing optimal therapy is limited. Herein we present a case where an attempt to downsize the tumor to a resectable state with chemotherapy was employed. Case presentation A 32 year female presented with massive pericardial effusion and unresectable huge mediastinal mass. Computed axial tomography scan - guided biopsy with adjunctive immunostains and molecular studies confirmed a diagnosis of synovial sarcoma. Following three cycles of combination Ifosfamide and doxorubicin chemotherapy, no response was demonstrated. The patient refused further therapy and had progression of her disease 4 months following the last cycle. Conclusion Synovial sarcoma presenting with unresectable mediastinal mass carry a poor prognosis. Up to the best of our knowledge there are only four previous reports where primary chemotherapy was employed, unfortunately; none of these cases had subsequent complete surgical resection. Identification of the best treatment strategy for patients with unresectable disease is warranted. Our case can be of benefit to medical oncologists and thoracic surgeons who might be faced with this unique and exceedingly rare clinical scenario. PMID:23800262

  2. Coronal Mass Ejections and Dimmings: A Comparative Study using MHD Simulations and SDO Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Meng; Cheung, Mark; DeRosa, Marc L.; Nitta, Nariaki; Schrijver, Karel

    2017-08-01

    Solar coronal dimmings have been observed extensively in the past two decades. Due to their close association with coronal mass ejections (CMEs), there is a critical need to improve our understanding of the physical processes that cause dimmings and determine their relationship with CMEs. In this study, we investigate coronal dimmings by combining simulation and observational efforts. By utilizing a data-driven global magnetohydrodynamics model (AWSoM: Alfven-wave Solar Model), we simulate coronal dimmings resulting from different CME energetics and flux rope configurations. We synthesize the emissions of different EUV spectral bands/lines and compare with SDO/AIA and EVE observations. A detailed analysis of simulation and observation data suggests that the “core” dimming is mainly caused by the mass loss from the CME, while the “remote” dimming could have a different origin (e.g., plasma heating). Moreover, the interaction between the erupting flux rope with different orientations and the global solar corona could significantly influence the coronal dimming patterns. Using metrics such as dimming depth, dimming slope, and recovery time, we investigate the relationship between dimmings and CME properties (e.g., CME mass, CME speed) in the simulation. Our result suggests that coronal dimmings encode important information about CMEs. We also discuss how our knowledge about solar coronal dimmings could be extended to the study of stellar CMEs.

  3. Implications of mass and energy loss due to coronal mass ejections on magnetically-active stars

    CERN Document Server

    Drake, Jeremy J; Yashiro, Seiji; Gopalswamy, Nat

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of a database of solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and associated flares over the period 1996-2007 finds well-behaved power law relationships between the 1-8 AA flare X-ray fluence and CME mass and kinetic energy. We extrapolate these relationships to lower and higher flare energies to estimate the mass and energy loss due to CMEs from stellar coronae, assuming that the observed X-ray emission of the latter is dominated by flares with a frequency as a function of energy dn/dE=kE^-alpha. For solar-like stars at saturated levels of X-ray activity, the implied losses depend fairly weakly on the assumed value of alpha and are very large: M_dot ~ 5x10^-10 M_sun/yr and E_dot ~ 0.1L_sun. In order to avoid such large energy requirements, either the relationships between CME mass and speed and flare energy must flatten for X-ray fluence >~ 10^31 erg, or the flare-CME association must drop significantly below 1 for more energetic events. If active coronae are dominated by flares, then the total coronal energ...

  4. ON SUN-TO-EARTH PROPAGATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ying D. [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Luhmann, Janet G.; Moestl, Christian; Bale, Stuart D.; Lin, Robert P. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lugaz, Noe [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Davies, Jackie A., E-mail: liuxying@ssl.berkeley.edu [Space Science and Technology Department, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-20

    We investigate how coronal mass ejections (CMEs) propagate through, and interact with, the inner heliosphere between the Sun and Earth, a key question in CME research and space weather forecasting. CME Sun-to-Earth kinematics are constrained by combining wide-angle heliospheric imaging observations, interplanetary radio type II bursts, and in situ measurements from multiple vantage points. We select three events for this study, the 2012 January 19, 23, and March 7 CMEs. Different from previous event studies, this work attempts to create a general picture for CME Sun-to-Earth propagation and compare different techniques for determining CME interplanetary kinematics. Key results are obtained concerning CME Sun-to-Earth propagation: (1) the Sun-to-Earth propagation of fast CMEs can be approximately formulated into three phases: an impulsive acceleration, then a rapid deceleration, and finally a nearly constant speed propagation (or gradual deceleration); (2) the CMEs studied here are still accelerating even after the flare maximum, so energy must be continuously fed into the CME even after the time of the maximum heating and radiation has elapsed in the corona; (3) the rapid deceleration, presumably due to interactions with the ambient medium, mainly occurs over a relatively short timescale following the acceleration phase; and (4) CME-CME interactions seem a common phenomenon close to solar maximum. Our comparison between different techniques (and data sets) has important implications for CME observations and their interpretations: (1) for the current cases, triangulation assuming a compact CME geometry is more reliable than triangulation assuming a spherical front attached to the Sun for distances below 50-70 solar radii from the Sun, but beyond about 100 solar radii we would trust the latter more; (2) a proper treatment of CME geometry must be performed in determining CME Sun-to-Earth kinematics, especially when the CME propagation direction is far away from the

  5. Why does the apparent mass of a coronal mass ejection increase?

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Li; Shen, Fang; Shen, Chenglong; Inhester, Bernd; Lu, Lei; Gan, Weiqun

    2015-01-01

    Mass is one of the most fundamental parameters characterizing the dynamics of a coronal mass ejection (CME). It has been found that CME apparent mass measured from the brightness enhancement in coronagraph images shows an increasing trend during its evolution in the corona. However, the physics behind it is not clear. Does the apparent mass gain come from the mass outflow from the dimming regions in the low corona, or from the pileup of the solar wind plasma around the CME when it propagates outwards from the Sun? We analyzed the mass evolution of six CME events. Their mass can increase by a factor of 1.6 to 3.2 from 4 to 15 Rs in the field of view (FOV) of the coronagraph on board the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO). Over the distance about 7 to 15 Rs, where the coronagraph occulting effect can be negligible, the mass can increase by a factor of 1.3 to 1.7. We adopted the `snow-plough' model to calculate the mass contribution of the piled-up solar wind in the height range from about 7 to 15 ...

  6. IMPLICATIONS OF MASS AND ENERGY LOSS DUE TO CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS ON MAGNETICALLY ACTIVE STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, Jeremy J.; Cohen, Ofer [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Yashiro, Seiji [Interferometrics Inc., Herndon, VA 20171 (United States); Gopalswamy, Nat, E-mail: jdrake@cfa.harvard.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-02-20

    Analysis of a database of solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and associated flares over the period 1996-2007 finds well-behaved power-law relationships between the 1-8 A flare X-ray fluence and CME mass and kinetic energy. We extrapolate these relationships to lower and higher flare energies to estimate the mass and energy loss due to CMEs from stellar coronae, assuming that the observed X-ray emission of the latter is dominated by flares with a frequency as a function of energy dn/dE = kE {sup -{alpha}}. For solar-like stars at saturated levels of X-ray activity, the implied losses depend fairly weakly on the assumed value of {alpha} and are very large: M-dot {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and E-dot {approx}0.1 L{sub sun}. In order to avoid such large energy requirements, either the relationships between CME mass and speed and flare energy must flatten for X-ray fluence {approx}> 10{sup 31} erg, or the flare-CME association must drop significantly below 1 for more energetic events. If active coronae are dominated by flares, then the total coronal energy budget is likely to be up to an order of magnitude larger than the canonical 10{sup -3} L {sub bol} X-ray saturation threshold. This raises the question of what is the maximum energy a magnetic dynamo can extract from a star? For an energy budget of 1% of L {sub bol}, the CME mass loss rate is about 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} M {sub Sun} yr{sup -1}.

  7. The role of aerodynamic drag in propagation of interplanetary coronal mass ejections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vršnak, B.; Žic, T.; Falkenberg, Thea Vilstrup;

    2010-01-01

    Context. The propagation of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and the forecast of their arrival on Earth is one of the central issues of space weather studies. Aims. We investigate to which degree various ICME parameters (mass, size, take-off speed) and the ambient solar-wind paramete...

  8. Coronal Mass Ejections, Interplanetary Shocks In Relation With Forbush Decreases Associated With Intense Geomagnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, P. L.; Patel, Nand Kumar; Prajapati, Mateswari

    2014-05-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs} are the most energetic solar events in which large amount of solar plasma materials are ejected from the sun into heliosphere, causing major disturbances in solar wind plasma, Interplanetary shocks, Forbush decrease(Fds) in cosmic ray intensity and geomagnetic storms. We have studied Forbush decreases associated with intense geomagnetic storms observed at Oulu super neutron monitor, during the period of May 1998-Dec 2006 with coronal mass ejections (CMEs), X-ray solar flares and interplanetary shocks. We have found that all the (100%) Forbush decreases associated with intense geomagnetic storms are associated with halo and partial halo coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The association rate between halo and partial halo coronal mass ejections are found 96.00%and 04.00% respectively. Most of the Forbush decreases associated with intense geomagnetic storms (96.29%) are associated with X-ray solar flares of different categories . The association rates for X-Class, M-Class, and C- Class X -ray solar flares are found 34.62%, 50.00% and 15.38% respectively .Further we have concluded that majority of the Forbush decrease associated with intense geomagnetic storms are related to interplanetary shocks (92.30 %) and the related shocks are forward shocks. We have found positive co-relation with co-relation co-efficient .7025 between magnitudes of Forbush decreases associated with intense geomagnetic storms and speed of associated coronal mass ejections. Positive co-relation with co-relation co-efficient 0.48 has also been found between magnitudes of intense geomagnetic storms and speed of associated coronal mass ejections.

  9. The Coronal Temperatures of Low-Mass Main-Sequence Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Johnstone, Colin P

    2015-01-01

    Aims. We study the X-ray emission of low-mass main-sequence stars to derive a reliable general scaling law between coronal temperature and the level of X-ray activity. Methods. We collect ROSAT measurements of hardness ratios and X-ray luminosities for a large sample of stars to derive which stellar X-ray emission parameter is most closely correlated with coronal temperature. We calculate average coronal temperatures for a sample of 24 low-mass main-sequence stars with measured emission measure distributions (EMDs) collected from the literature. These EMDs are based on high-resolution X-ray spectra measured by XMM-Newton and Chandra. Results. We confirm that there is one universal scaling relation between coronal average temperature and surface X-ray flux, Fx, that applies to all low-mass main-sequence stars. We find that coronal temperature is related to Fx by Tcor=0.11 Fx^0.26, where Tcor is in MK and Fx is in erg/s/cm^2.

  10. The coronal temperatures of low-mass main-sequence stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, C. P.; Güdel, M.

    2015-06-01

    Aims: We study the X-ray emission of low-mass main-sequence stars to derive a reliable general scaling law between coronal temperature and the level of X-ray activity. Methods: We collect ROSAT measurements of hardness ratios and X-ray luminosities for a large sample of stars to derive which stellar X-ray emission parameter is most closely correlated with coronal temperature. We calculate average coronal temperatures for a sample of 24 low-mass main-sequence stars with measured emission measure distributions (EMDs) collected from the literature. These EMDs are based on high-resolution X-ray spectra measured by XMM-Newton and Chandra. Results: We confirm that there is one universal scaling relation between coronal average temperature and surface X-ray flux, FX, that applies to all low-mass main-sequence stars. We find that coronal temperature is related to FX by T̅cor = 0.11 FX0.26, where T̅cor is in MK and FX is in erg s-1 cm-2.

  11. An estimate of the coronal magnetic field near a solar coronal mass ejection from low-frequency radio observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hariharan, K.; Ramesh, R.; Kishore, P.; Kathiravan, C. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, II Block, Koramangala, Bangalore 560 034 (India); Gopalswamy, N., E-mail: khariharan@iiap.res.in [Solar Physics Laboratory, NASA/GSFC, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    2014-11-01

    We report ground-based, low-frequency (<100 MHz) radio imaging, spectral, and polarimeter observations of the type II radio burst associated with the solar coronal mass ejection (CME) that occurred on 2013 May 2. The spectral observations indicate that the burst has fundamental (F) and harmonic (H) emission components with split-band and herringbone structures. The imaging observations at 80 MHz indicate that the H component of the burst was located close to leading edge of the CME at a radial distance of r ≈ 2 R {sub ☉} in the solar atmosphere. The polarimeter observations of the type II burst, also at 80 MHz, indicate that the peak degree of circular polarization (dcp) corresponding to the emission generated in the corona ahead of and behind the associated MHD shock front are ≈0.05 ± 0.02 and ≈0.1 ± 0.01, respectively. We calculated the magnetic field B in the above two coronal regions by adopting the empirical relationship between the dcp and B for the harmonic plasma emission and the values are ≈(0.7-1.4) ± 0.2 G and ≈(1.4-2.8) ± 0.1 G, respectively.

  12. Redefining the boundaries of interplanetary coronal mass ejections from observations at the ecliptic plane

    CERN Document Server

    Cid, C; Saiz, E; Guerrero, A

    2016-01-01

    On 2015 January 6-7, an interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) was observed at L1. This event, which can be associated with a weak and slow coronal mass ejection, allows us to discuss on the differences between the boundaries of the magnetic cloud and the compositional boundaries. A fast stream from a solar coronal hole surrounding this ICME offers a unique opportunity to check the boundaries' process definition and to explain differences between them. Using Wind and ACE data, we perform a complementary analysis involving compositional, magnetic, and kinematic observations providing relevant information regarding the evolution of the ICME as travelling away from the Sun. We propose erosion, at least at the front boundary of the ICME, as the main reason for the difference between the boundaries, and compositional signatures as the most precise diagnostic tool for the boundaries of ICMEs.

  13. Stellar winds, dead zones, and coronal mass ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Keppens, R

    1999-01-01

    Axisymmetric stellar wind solutions are presented, obtained by numerically solving the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. Stationary solutions are critically analysed using the knowledge of the flux functions. These flux functions enter in the general variational principle governing all axisymmetric stationary ideal MHD equilibria. The magnetized wind solutions for (differentially) rotating stars contain both a `wind' and a `dead' zone. We illustrate the influence of the magnetic field topology on the wind acceleration pattern, by varying the coronal field strength and the extent of the dead zone. This is evident from the resulting variations in the location and appearance of the critical curves where the wind speed equals the slow, Alfven, and fast speed. Larger dead zones cause effective, fairly isotropic acceleration to super-Alfvenic velocities as the polar, open field lines are forced to fan out rapidly with radial distance. A higher field strength moves the Alfven transition outwards. In the ecl...

  14. Self-Consistent MHD Modeling of a Coronal Mass Ejection, Coronal Dimming, and a Giant Cusp-Shaped Arcade Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Shiota, D; Chen, P F; Yamamoto, T T; Sakajiri, T; Shibata, K; Shiota, Daikou; Isobe, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Tetsuya T.; Sakajiri, Takuma; Shibata, Kazunari

    2005-01-01

    We performed magnetohydrodynamic simulation of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and associated giant arcade formations, and the results suggested new interpretations of observations of CMEs. We performed two cases of the simulation: with and without heat conduction. Comparing between the results of the two cases, we found that reconnection rate in the conductive case is a little higher than that in the adiabatic case and the temperature of the loop top is consistent with the theoretical value predicted by the Yokoyama-Shibata scaling law. The dynamical properties such as velocity and magnetic fields are similar in the two cases, whereas thermal properties such as temperature and density are very different.In both cases, slow shocks associated with magnetic reconnectionpropagate from the reconnection region along the magnetic field lines around the flux rope, and the shock fronts form spiral patterns. Just outside the slow shocks, the plasma density decreased a great deal. The soft X-ray images synthesized from t...

  15. The Solar Atmosphere at Three Temperatures During a Coronal Mass Ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhitnik, I.; Pertzov, A.; Oparin, S.; Oraevsky, V.; Slemzin, V.; Sobelman, I.; Feynman, J.; Goldstein, B.

    1998-01-01

    On April 14, 1994 a major coronal mass ejection (CME) occured while the solar atmosphere was being observed in XUV by the Terek C instrument aboard the CORONAS spacecraft. We here compare the TEREK data before and after the CME with the Yohkoh soft x-ray data and the National Solar Observatory He I 10830 data from April 13 and 14.

  16. The classification of ambiguity in polarimetric reconstruction of coronal mass ejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Xinghua; Wang, Huaning; Huang, Xin; Du, Zhanle; He, Han, E-mail: xhdai@nao.cas.cn [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2014-01-10

    The Thomson scattering theory indicates that there exist explicit and implicit ambiguities in polarimetric analyses of coronal mass ejection (CME) observations. We suggest a classification for these ambiguities in CME reconstruction. Three samples, including double explicit, mixed, and double implicit ambiguity, are shown with the polarimetric analyses of STEREO CME observations. These samples demonstrate that this classification is helpful for improving polarimetric reconstruction.

  17. Observation of two coronal mass ejections on April 7, 2011 by radio telescope URAN-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazhenko, A.; Melnik, V.; Konovalenko, A.; Dorovskyy, V.; Vashchishin, V.; Franzusenko, A.; Rucker, H.

    2012-09-01

    Two CME's (coronal mass ejection) were registered by SOHO and STEREO on April 7, 2011. The results of observations obtained by radio telescope URAN-2 of different CME manifestations in radio emission at decameter wavelengths are discussed in this paper. Particularly we report about registration of new type of fine structure of type II bursts.

  18. Investigation of the Large Scale Evolution and Topology of Coronal Mass Ejections in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Peter

    1999-12-01

    This investigation is concerned with the large-scale evolution and topology of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) in the solar wind. During this reporting period we have analyzed a series of low density intervals in the ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer) plasma data set that bear many similarities to CMEs. We have begun a series of 3D, MHD (Magnetohydrodynamics) coronal models to probe potential causes of these events. We also edited two manuscripts concerning the properties of CMEs in the solar wind. One was re-submitted to the Journal of Geophysical Research.

  19. Solar Coronal Mass Ejection as a Result of Magnetic Helicity Accumulation in the Corona

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Mei

    2011-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are a major form of solar activities. A CME takes away 10^15-16 g of plasma from solar low corona, to disturb the near-Earth space if the CME direction is favorable. Here we summarize our understandings and reasoning that lead us to conclude that CMEs are the unavoidable products of magnetic helicity accumulation in the corona. Our study puts the formation of magnetic flux ropes and CME eruptions as natural and unavoidable results of coronal evolution.

  20. A spectacular coronal mass ejection event and associated phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuan; Li, Chun-Sheng; Song, Qian

    Based on the data taken from S. G. D. and relevant simultaneous observations of solar radio bursts, gamma-ray emission and geophysical effects on June 15, 1991 the relationships among these phenomena are discussed in this paper. Through the analyses it is considered that proton events and GLE events occurred on June 15 in 1991, which were the geophysic responses caused by CME (V>=750 km/s). Simultaneous observation of the bursts at the centimetric and decimetric wavelengths can obtain the U-shape spectrum of speak fluxes, which is still one of the effective tools for predicting proton events and its production mechanism can be explained by using the acceleration of the direct current field parallel to the magnetic field in the electric current sheet formed in the process of the production of spray prominences. However, the process in which electrons are accelerated up to the high energy state remains to be explained. The whole event of June 15 1991, from the coronal matter ejection (or the spray prominences in active regions) to the production of various geophysic effects, has explained and verified.

  1. Observing the Unobservable: identification and Characterization of Stealth Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Huys, Elke

    2016-01-01

    In this doctoral thesis we study stealth CMEs: solar coronal mass ejections that are clearly observed in coronagraph data but do not show significant low-coronal or on-disk signatures of eruption. This lack of coronal signatures makes it challenging to determine their source region and predict their trajectory throughout interplanetary space. Combining PROBA2/SWAP data with that of other instruments, we identify 40 such events and investigate their properties both observationally and statistically. We find that our sample size is insufficient to determine the scaling law for the CME angular width reliably. We therefore analyze in general what the effect is of a limited sample size on the estimation of a power law parameter. Armed with this knowledge, we return to our sample of stealth CMEs, re-analyze the power law for their angular widths and compare the results to the power law found for normal CMEs.

  2. Observing the Unobservable: Identification and Characterisation of Stealth Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Huys, Elke; Seaton, Daniel B.; Poedts, Stefaan; Berghmans, David

    2016-05-01

    I will present my doctoral thesis research on stealth CMEs: solar coronal mass ejections that are clearly observed in coronagraph data but do not show significant low-coronal or on-disk signatures of eruption. This lack of coronal signatures makes it challenging to determine their source region and predict their trajectory throughout interplanetary space. We identified 40 such events and investigated their properties both observationally and statistically. We found that our sample size was insufficient to determine the scaling law for the CME angular width reliably. We therefore analyzed in general what the effect is of a limited sample size on the estimation of a power law parameter. Armed with this knowledge, we returned to our sample of stealth CMEs, re-analyzed the power law for their angular widths and compared the results to the power law found for normal CMEs.

  3. Chronoastrobiology の視点から見た高所住民の健康 : CME(coronal mass ejection)とラダークの洪水

    OpenAIRE

    中岡, 隆志; 川崎, 孝広; Norboo, Tsering; 松林, 公蔵; 大塚, 邦明; 奥宮, 清人

    2013-01-01

    Background: On 1 August 2010, an entire hemisphere of the sun erupted. Filaments of magnetism snapped and exploded, shock waves raced across the stellar surface, and billion-ton clouds of hot gas billowed into space. A coronal mass ejection (CME) headed directly for Earth. The huge solar storm triggered unusual northern and southern auroras appearing on the night of August 3. Geomagnetic turbulence in Japan was observed on 4 August. The CME could have driven disastrous flooding occurring in L...

  4. What can we learn about solar coronal mass ejections, coronal dimmings, and Extreme-Ultraviolet jets through spectroscopic observations?

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Hui; Xia, Lidong; He, Jiansen; Wang, Xin

    2012-01-01

    We analyze several data sets obtained by Hinode/EIS and find various types of flows during CMEs and EUV jet eruptions. CME-induced dimming regions are found to be characterized by significant blueshift and enhanced line width by using a single Gaussian fit. While a red-blue (RB) asymmetry analysis and a RB-guided double Gaussian fit of the coronal line profiles indicate that these are likely caused by the superposition of a strong background emission component and a relatively weak (~10%) high-speed (~100 km s-1) upflow component. This finding suggests that the outflow velocity in the dimming region is probably of the order of 100 km s-1, not ~20 km s-1 as reported previously. Density and temperature diagnostics suggest that dimming is primarily an effect of density decrease rather than temperature change. The mass losses in dimming regions as estimated from different methods are roughly consistent with each other and they are 20%-60% of the masses of the associated CMEs. With the guide of RB asymmetry analys...

  5. A huge reservoir of ionized gas around the Milky Way: Accounting for the Missing Mass?

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, A; Krongold, Y; Nicastro, F; Galeazzi, M

    2012-01-01

    Most of the baryons from galaxies have been "missing" and several studies have attempted to map the circumgalactic medium (CGM) of galaxies in their quest. Recent studies with the Hubble Space Telescope have shown that many galaxies contain a large reservoir of ionized gas with temperatures of about 10^5 K. Here we report on X-ray observations made with the Chandra X-ray Observatory probing an even hotter phase of the CGM of our Milky Way at about 10^6 K. We show that this phase of the CGM is massive, extending over a large region around the Milky Way, with a radius of over 100 kpc. The mass content of this phase is over ten billion solar masses, many times more than that in cooler gas phases and comparable to the total baryonic mass in the disk of the Galaxy. The missing mass of the Galaxy appears to be in this warm-hot gas phase.

  6. Exceptions to the rule: the X-flares of AR 2192 Lacking Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalmann, J. K.; Su, Y.; Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.

    2016-04-01

    NOAA Active region (AR) 2192, that was present on the Sun in October 2014, was the largest region which occurred since November 1990 (see Figure 1). The huge size accompanied by a very high activity level, was quite unexpected as it appeared during the unusually weak solar cycle 24. Nevertheless, the AR turned out to be one of the most prolific flaring ARs of cycle 24. It produced in total 6 X, 29 M, 79 C flares during its disk passage from October 18-29, 2014 (see Figure 2). Surprisingly, all flares greater than GOES class M5 and X were confined, i.e. had no coronal mass ejections (CME) associated. All the flare events had some obvious similarity in morphology, as they were located in the core of the AR and revealed only minor separation motion away from the neutral line but a large initial separation of the conjugate flare ribbons. In the paper by Thalmann et al. (2015) we describe the series of flares and give details about the confined X1.6 flare event from October 22, 2014 as well as the single eruptive M4.0 flare event from October 24, 2014. The study of the X1.6 flare revealed a large initial separation of flare ribbons together with recurrent flare brightenings, which were related to two episodes of enhanced hard X-ray emission as derived from RHESSI observations. This suggests that magnetic field structures connected to specific regions were repeatedly involved in the process of reconnection and energy release. Opposite to the central location of the sequence of confined events within the AR, a single eruptive (M4.0) event occurred on the outskirt of the AR in the vicinity of open magnetic fields. Our investigations revealed a predominantly north-south oriented magnetic system of arcade fields overlying the AR that could have preserved the magnetic arcade to erupt, and consequently kept the energy release trapped in a localized volume of magnetic field high up in the corona (as supported by the absence of a lateral motion of the flare ribbons and the

  7. Direct observations of magnetic flux rope formation during a solar coronal mass ejection

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Hongqiang; Chen, Yao; Cheng, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most spectacular eruptive phenomena in the solar atmosphere. It is generally accepted that CMEs are results of eruptions of magnetic flux ropes (MFRs). However, a heated debate is on whether MFRs pre-exist before the eruptions or they are formed during the eruptions. Several coronal signatures, \\textit{e.g.}, filaments, coronal cavities, sigmoid structures and hot channels (or hot blobs), are proposed as MFRs and observed before the eruption, which support the pre-existing MFR scenario. There is almost no reported observation about MFR formation during the eruption. In this letter, we present an intriguing observation of a solar eruptive event occurred on 2013 November 21 with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the \\textit{Solar Dynamic Observatory}, which shows a detailed formation process of the MFR during the eruption. The process started with the expansion of a low-lying coronal arcade, possibly caused by the flare magnetic reconnection underneath. The newly-fo...

  8. Comparison of a Global Magnetic Evolution Model with Observations of Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Yeates, A R; Nandy, Dibyendu; Mackay, D H; Martens, P C H; van Ballegooijen, A A

    2009-01-01

    The relative importance of different initiation mechanisms for coronal mass ejections (CMEs) on the Sun is uncertain. One possible mechanism is the loss of equilibrium of coronal magnetic flux ropes formed gradually by large-scale surface motions. In this paper, the locations of flux rope ejections in a recently-developed quasi-static global evolution model are compared with observed CME source locations over a 4.5-month period in 1999. Using EUV data, the low-coronal source locations are determined unambiguously for 98 out of 330 CMEs. Despite the incomplete observations, positive correlation (with coefficient up to 0.49) is found between the distributions of observed and simulated ejections, but only when binned into periods of one month or longer. This binning timescale corresponds to the time interval at which magnetogram data are assimilated into the coronal simulations, and the correlation arises primarily from the large-scale surface magnetic field distribution; only a weak dependence is found on the m...

  9. Predicting the magnetic vectors within coronal mass ejections arriving at Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Savani, N P; Szabo, A; Mays, M L; Thompson, B J; Richardson, I G; Evans, R; Pulkkinen, A; Nieves-Chinchilla, T

    2015-01-01

    The process by which the Sun affects the terrestrial environment on short timescales is predominately driven by the amount of magnetic reconnection between the solar wind and Earth's magnetosphere. Reconnection occurs most efficiently when the solar wind magnetic field has a southward component. The most severe impacts are during the arrival of a coronal mass ejection (CME) when the magnetosphere is both compressed and magnetically connected to the heliospheric environment, leading to disruptions to, for example, power grids and satellite navigation. Unfortunately, forecasting magnetic vectors within coronal mass ejections remains elusive. Here we report how, by combining a statistically robust helicity rule for a CME's solar origin with a simplified flux rope topology the magnetic vectors within the Earth-directed segment of a CME can be predicted. In order to test the validity of this proof-of-concept architecture for estimating the magnetic vectors within CMEs, a total of eight CME events (between 2010 and...

  10. Understanding the Global Structure and Evolution of Coronal Mass Ejections in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Pete

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes the technical progress made during the first six months of the second year of the NASA Living with a Star program contract Understanding the global structure and evolution of coronal mass ejections in the solar wind, between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation, and covers the period November 18, 2003 - May 17,2004. Under this contract SAIC has conducted numerical and data analysis related to fundamental issues concerning the origin, intrinsic properties, global structure, and evolution of coronal mass ejections in the solar wind. During this working period we have focused on a quantitative assessment of 5 flux rope fitting techniques. In the following sections we summarize the main aspects of this work and our proposed investigation plan for the next reporting period. Thus far, our investigation has resulted in 6 refereed scientific publications and we have presented the results at a number of scientific meetings and workshops.

  11. Real-Time Analysis of Global Waves Accompanying Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-30

    tions and modelling to conclude that a solar eruption must have sufficient energy and downward pressure on the chromosphere before it can produce a...intensity of the wave relative to the background chromosphere. Upon completion of the code, it was applied to a series of solar flares observed by both...wave-like features seen in H observations of the solar chromosphere. They are strongly associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and can cover a

  12. Computation and Prediction of plasma drag on Orbiting Satellites due to Space Environmental Perturbation by Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwankwo, Victor U. J.; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    2012-07-01

    Certain earth pointing Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) induce geomagnetic storms, which significantly affect human activities. Satellites orbiting earth are particularly vulnerable to blasts of solar energy resulting from this phenomenon. It is known that the huge amount of energetic ultraviolet radiation from this space environmental disturbance can heat up the outer atmosphere, causing it to expand. This can cause a significant drag on Earth-Orbiting satellites and even degrade the precision of Global Positioning Systems (GPS) measurements. However, CMEs are more damaging. They are more frequent during the active (solar maximum) Phase of the sun's approximately 11-year cycle. As we approach another maximum in 2012-2013, it is instructive to make an estimate of average daily production of energetic proton flux based on GOES data on earth-pointing CMEs in the past solar cycle. We also compute the drag on satellites due to atmospheric perturbations by CMEs and make predictions of how the existing satellite orbits could be affected near the peak of next solar cycle maximum.

  13. Evolution of Magnetic Helicity During Eruptive Flares and Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Priest, Eric; Janvier, Miho

    2016-01-01

    During eruptive solar flares and coronal mass ejections, a non-pot{\\-}ential magnetic arcade with much excess magnetic energy goes unstable and reconnects. It produces a twisted erupting flux rope and leaves behind a sheared arcade of hot coronal loops. We suggest that: the twist of the erupting flux rope can be determined from conservation of magnetic flux and magnetic helicity and equipartition of magnetic helicity. It depends on the geometry of the initial pre-eruptive structure. Two cases are considered, in the first of which a flux rope is not present initially but is created during the eruption by the reconnection. In the second case, a flux rope is present under the arcade in the pre-eruptive state, and the effect of the eruption and reconnection is to add an amount of magnetic helicity that depends on the fluxes of the rope and arcade and the geometry.

  14. Evidence for shock generation in the solar corona in the absence of coronal mass ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eselevich, V. G.; Eselevich, M. V.; Zimovets, I. V.; Sharykin, I. N.

    2017-09-01

    The solar event SOL2012-10-23T03:13, which was associated with a X1.8 flare without an accompanying coronal mass ejection (CME) and with a Type II radio burst, is analyzed. A method for constructing the spatial and temporal profiles of the difference brightness detected in the AIA/SDOUVand EUV channels is used together with the analysis of the Type II radio burst. The formation and propagation of a region of compression preceded by a collisional shock detected at distances R shock could be due to a transient (impulsive) action exerted on the surrounding plasma by an eruptive, high-temperature magnetic rope. The initial instability and eruption of this rope could be initiated by emerging magnetic flux, and its heating from magnetic reconnection. The cessation of the eruption of the rope could result from its interaction with surrounding magnetic structures (coronal loops).

  15. Investigating the Kinematics of Coronal Mass Ejections with the Automated CORIMP Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Byrne, Jason P

    2015-01-01

    Studying coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in coronagraph data can be challenging due to their diffuse structure and transient nature, compounded by the variations in their dynamics, morphology, and frequency of occurrence. The large amounts of data available from missions like the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) make manual cataloging of CMEs tedious and prone to human error, and so a robust method of detection and analysis is required and often preferred. A new coronal image processing catalog called CORIMP has been developed in an effort to achieve this, through the implementation of a dynamic background separation technique and multiscale edge detection. These algorithms together isolate and characterise CME structure in the field-of-view of the Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard SOHO. CORIMP also applies a Savitzky-Golay filter, along with quadratic and linear fits, to the height-time measurements for better revealing the true CME speed and acceleration profiles across the plane-...

  16. Microwave radio emissions as a proxy for coronal mass ejection speed in arrival predictions of interplanetary coronal mass ejections at 1 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matamoros, Carolina Salas; Klein, Karl Ludwig; Trottet, Gerard

    2017-01-01

    The propagation of a coronal mass ejection (CME) to the Earth takes between about 15 h and several days. We explore whether observations of non-thermal microwave bursts, produced by near-relativistic electons via the gyrosynchrotron process, can be used to predict travel times of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) from the Sun to the Earth. In a first step, a relationship is established between the CME speed measured by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (SoHO/LASCO) near the solar limb and the fluence of the microwave burst. This relationship is then employed to estimate speeds in the corona of earthward-propagating CMEs. These speeds are fed into a simple empirical interplanetary acceleration model to predict the speed and arrival time of the ICMEs at Earth. The predictions are compared with observed arrival times and with the predictions based on other proxies, including soft X-rays (SXR) and coronographic measurements. We found that CME speeds estimated from microwaves and SXR predict the ICME arrival at the Earth with absolute errors of 11 ± 7 and 9 ± 7 h, respectively. A trend to underestimate the interplanetary travel times of ICMEs was noted for both techniques. This is consistent with the fact that in most cases of our test sample, ICMEs are detected on their flanks. Although this preliminary validation was carried out on a rather small sample of events (11), we conclude that microwave proxies can provide early estimates of ICME arrivals and ICME speeds in the interplanetary space. This method is limited by the fact that not all CMEs are accompanied by non-thermal microwave bursts. But its usefulness is enhanced by the relatively simple observational setup and the observation from ground, which makes the instrumentation less vulnerable to space weather hazards.

  17. Sizes and locations of coronal mass ejections - SMM observations from 1980 and 1984-1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundhausen, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    A statistical description of the sizes and locations of 1209 mass ejections observed with the SMM coronagraph/polarimeter in 1980 and 1984-1989 is presented. The average width of the coronal mass ejections detected with this instrument was close to 40 deg in angle for the entire period of SMM observations. No evidence was found for a significant change in mass ejection widths as reported by Howard et al. (1986). There is clear evidence for changes in the latitude distribution of mass ejections over this epoch. Mass ejections occurred over a much wider range of latitudes at the times of high solar activity (1980 and 1989) than at times of low activity (1985-1986).

  18. Activity associated with coronal mass ejections at solar minimum - SMM observations from 1984-1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Cyr, O. C.; Webb, D. F.

    1991-01-01

    Seventy-three coronal mass ejections (CMEs) observed by the coronagraph aboard SMM between 1984 and 1986 were examined in order to determine the distribution of various forms of solar activity that were spatially and temporally associated with mass ejections during solar minimum phase. For each coronal mass ejection a speed was measured, and the departure time of the transient from the lower corona estimated. Other forms of solar activity that appeared within 45 deg longitude and 30 deg latitude of the mass ejection and within +/-90 min of its extrapolated departure time were explored. The statistical results of the analysis of these 73 CMEs are presented, and it is found that slightly less than half of them were infrequently associated with other forms of solar activity. It is suggested that the distribution of the various forms of activity related to CMEs does not change at different phases of the solar cycle. For those CMEs with associations, it is found that eruptive prominences and soft X-rays were the most likely forms of activity to accompany the appearance of mass ejections.

  19. Magnetic Properties of Metric Noise Storms Associated with Coronal Mass Ejections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-Yuan Wen; Jing-Xiu Wang; Yu-Zong Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Using Nan(c)ay Radioheliograph (NRH) imaging observations, combined with SOHO/Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) magnetogram observations and coronal magnetic field extrapolation, we studied the magnetic nature of metric noise storms that are associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Four events are selected: the events of 2000 July 14,2001 April 26, 2002 August 16 and 2001 March 28. The identified noise storm sources cover or partially cover the active regions (ARs), but the centers of storm sources are offset from the ARs. Using extrapolated magnetic field lines, we find that the noise storm sources trace the boundary between the open and closed field lines. We demonstrate that the disappearance of noise storm source is followed by the appearance of the burst source. The burst sources spread on the solar disk and their distributions correspond to the extent of the CME in LASCO C2 field of view. All the SOHO/Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) dimmings associated with noise storm sources are located at the periphery of noise storms where the magnetic lines of force were previously closed and low-lying. When the closed field becomes partially or fully open, the basic configurations of noise storm sources are changed, then the noise storm sources are no longer observed. These observations provide the information that the variations of noise storms manifest the restructuring or reconfiguring of the coronal magnetic field.

  20. FLARE-GENERATED TYPE II BURST WITHOUT ASSOCIATED CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magdalenic, J.; Marque, C.; Zhukov, A. N. [Solar-Terrestrial Center of Excellence, SIDC, Royal Observatory of Belgium, Avenue Circulaire 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Vrsnak, B. [Hvar Observatory, Faculty of Geodesy, Kaciceva 26, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Veronig, A., E-mail: Jasmina.Magdalenic@oma.be [IGAM/Kanzelhoehe Observatory, Institut of Physics, Universitaet Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2012-02-20

    We present a study of the solar coronal shock wave on 2005 November 14 associated with the GOES M3.9 flare that occurred close to the east limb (S06 Degree-Sign E60 Degree-Sign ). The shock signature, a type II radio burst, had an unusually high starting frequency of about 800 MHz, indicating that the shock was formed at a rather low height. The position of the radio source, the direction of the shock wave propagation, and the coronal electron density were estimated using Nancay Radioheliograph observations and the dynamic spectrum of the Green Bank Solar Radio Burst Spectrometer. The soft X-ray, H{alpha}, and Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager observations show that the flare was compact, very impulsive, and of a rather high density and temperature, indicating a strong and impulsive increase of pressure in a small flare loop. The close association of the shock wave initiation with the impulsive energy release suggests that the impulsive increase of the pressure in the flare was the source of the shock wave. This is supported by the fact that, contrary to the majority of events studied previously, no coronal mass ejection was detected in association with the shock wave, although the corresponding flare occurred close to the limb.

  1. DIRECT OBSERVATIONS OF MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE FORMATION DURING A SOLAR CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, H. Q.; Chen, Y. [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment and Institute of Space Sciences, Shandong University, Weihai, Shandong 264209 (China); Zhang, J. [School of Physics, Astronomy and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Cheng, X., E-mail: hqsong@sdu.edu.cn [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210093 (China)

    2014-09-10

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most spectacular eruptive phenomena in the solar atmosphere. It is generally accepted that CMEs are the results of eruptions of magnetic flux ropes (MFRs). However, there is heated debate on whether MFRs exist prior to the eruptions or if they are formed during the eruptions. Several coronal signatures, e.g., filaments, coronal cavities, sigmoid structures, and hot channels (or hot blobs), are proposed as MFRs and observed before the eruption, which support the pre-existing MFR scenario. There is almost no reported observation of MFR formation during the eruption. In this Letter, we present an intriguing observation of a solar eruptive event that occurred on 2013 November 21 with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory, which shows the formation process of the MFR during the eruption in detail. The process began with the expansion of a low-lying coronal arcade, possibly caused by the flare magnetic reconnection underneath. The newly formed ascending loops from below further pushed the arcade upward, stretching the surrounding magnetic field. The arcade and stretched magnetic field lines then curved in just below the arcade vertex, forming an X-point. The field lines near the X-point continued to approach each other and a second magnetic reconnection was induced. It is this high-lying magnetic reconnection that led to the formation and eruption of a hot blob (∼10 MK), presumably an MFR, producing a CME. We suggest that two spatially separated magnetic reconnections occurred in this event, which were responsible for producing the flare and the hot blob (CME)

  2. Energy of coronal mass ejections and large-scale structure of solar magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, E. V.

    2016-12-01

    The relationship between variations of the energy and linear velocity of coronal mass ejections (CME) and the typical dimensions of structural elements of the large-scale solar magnetic field structure (LSMFS) is investigated for the period of 1996-2014. It is shown that the maximum linear velocity and maximum energy of CME correspond to the values of the effective solar multipole index n 4.0-4.4. These values determine the maximum size of the complexes of active regions, which, together with the observed maximum values of magnetic field intensity in the complexes, limit the possible maximum CME energy.

  3. Latitudinal Distribution of Solar Flares and Their Association with Coronal Mass Ejections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pankaj K. Shrivastava; Neelam Singh

    2005-01-01

    Major solar flare events have been utilised to study the latitudinal frequency distribution of solar flares in northern and southern hemispheres for the period of 1986 to 2003. A statistical analysis has been performed to obtain the correlation between Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and Forbush decrease (Fds)of cosmic ray intensity. Almost the same flares distribution in both hemispheres is found in association with CMEs. In a further analysis, it is noted that a larger number of CME-associated solar flares located in the northern hemisphere are found to be more effective in producing Forbush decreases.

  4. The role of aerodynamic drag in propagation of interplanetary coronal mass ejections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vršnak, B.; Žic, T.; Falkenberg, Thea Vilstrup;

    2010-01-01

    Context. The propagation of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and the forecast of their arrival on Earth is one of the central issues of space weather studies. Aims. We investigate to which degree various ICME parameters (mass, size, take-off speed) and the ambient solar-wind paramete...... streams. We apply the model to the Sun-Earth event associated with the CME of 25 July 2004 and compare the results with the outcome of the numerical MHD modeling....... (density and velocity) affect the ICME Sun-Earth transit time. Methods. We study solutions of a drag-based equation of motion by systematically varying the input parameters. The analysis is focused on ICME transit times and 1 AU velocities. Results. The model results reveal that wide ICMEs of low masses...

  5. The Strength and Radial Profile of the Coronal Magnetic Field from the Standoff Distance of a Coronal Mass Ejection-driven Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Yashiro, Seiji

    2011-07-01

    We determine the coronal magnetic field strength in the heliocentric distance range 6-23 solar radii (Rs) by measuring the shock standoff distance and the radius of curvature of the flux rope during the 2008 March 25 coronal mass ejection imaged by white-light coronagraphs. Assuming the adiabatic index, we determine the Alfvén Mach number, and hence the Alfvén speed in the ambient medium using the measured shock speed. By measuring the upstream plasma density using polarization brightness images, we finally get the magnetic field strength upstream of the shock. The estimated magnetic field decreases from ~48 mG around 6 Rs to 8 mG at 23 Rs. The radial profile of the magnetic field can be described by a power law in agreement with other estimates at similar heliocentric distances.

  6. The Strength and Radial Profile of the Coronal Magnetic Field from the Standoff Distance of a Coronal Mass Ejection-Driven Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Yashiro, Seiji

    2011-01-01

    We determine the coronal magnetic field strength in the heliocentric distance range 6-23 solar radii (Rs) by measuring the shock standoff distance and the radius of curvature of the flux rope during the 2008 March 25 coronal mass ejection imaged by white-light coronagraphs. Assuming the adiabatic index, we determine the Alfven Mach number, and hence the Alfven speed in the ambient medium using the measured shock speed. By measuring the upstream plasma density using polarization brightness images, we finally get the magnetic field strength upstream of the shock. The estimated magnetic field decreases from approximately 48 mG around 6 Rs to 8 mG at 23 Rs. The radial profile of the magnetic field can be described by a power law in agreement with other estimates at similar heliocentric distances.

  7. COMPOSITION STRUCTURE OF INTERPLANETARY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS FROM MULTISPACECRAFT OBSERVATIONS, MODELING, AND COMPARISON WITH NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinard, Alysha A. [University of Colorado/Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Space Weather Prediction Center, Boulder, CO 80505 (United States); Lynch, Benjamin J. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Mulligan, Tamitha, E-mail: alysha.reinard@noaa.gov, E-mail: blynch@ssl.berkeley.edu, E-mail: tamitha.mulligan@aero.org [Space Sciences Department, Aerospace Corporation, Los Angeles, CA 90009 (United States)

    2012-12-20

    We present an analysis of the ionic composition of iron for two interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) observed on 2007 May 21-23 by the ACE and STEREO spacecraft in the context of the magnetic structure of the ejecta flux rope, sheath region, and surrounding solar wind flow. This analysis is made possible due to recent advances in multispacecraft data interpolation, reconstruction, and visualization as well as results from recent modeling of ionic charge states in MHD simulations of magnetic breakout and flux cancellation coronal mass ejection (CME) initiation. We use these advances to interpret specific features of the ICME plasma composition resulting from the magnetic topology and evolution of the CME. We find that, in both the data and our MHD simulations, the flux ropes centers are relatively cool, while charge state enhancements surround and trail the flux ropes. The magnetic orientations of the ICMEs are suggestive of magnetic breakout-like reconnection during the eruption process, which could explain the spatial location of the observed iron enhancements just outside the traditional flux rope magnetic signatures and between the two ICMEs. Detailed comparisons between the simulations and data were more complicated, but a sharp increase in high iron charge states in the ACE and STEREO-A data during the second flux rope corresponds well to similar features in the flux cancellation results. We discuss the prospects of this integrated in situ data analysis and modeling approach to advancing our understanding of the unified CME-to-ICME evolution.

  8. Alfvenic Fluctuations in an Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection Observed Near 1 AU

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁浩明; 肖池阶; 周桂萍; 濮祖荫; 王红刚; 王晓钢

    2012-01-01

    As for the present situation of coronal mass ejection (CME) triggering models, the distributions of Alfv@n waves in flux ropes are different from model to model, and thus examining those distributions in interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) is an effective way to connect ICME observations with these theoretical models of CME triggering. However, previous observations of Alfv@nic fluctuations in ICMEs were rare with locations ranging from 0.3 AU to 0.68 AU only, which is usually explained as rapid dissipation of those remnant waves. Here we present an observation of Alfv@n waves in a magnetic cloud (MC) near 1 AU, in situ detected by WIND in February 17,-~20, 2011. The MC was generated by a CME accompanied with the first X-class flare in the 24th solar cycle. The slope of the power spectral densities of magnetic fluctuation in the MC, are similar to those modes in ambient solar wind, but more anisotropic. The results will also be helpful for studies of CME theories and ICME thermodynamics.

  9. Solar Radio Emission as a Prediction Technique for Coronal Mass Ejections' registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheiner, Olga; Fridman, Vladimir

    2016-07-01

    The concept of solar Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) as global phenomenon of solar activity caused by the global magnetohydrodynamic processes is considered commonly accepted. These processes occur in different ranges of emission, primarily in the optical and the microwave emission being generated near the surface of the sun from a total of several thousand kilometers. The usage of radio-astronomical data for CMEs prediction is convenient and promising. Actually, spectral measurements of solar radio emission cover all heights of solar atmosphere, sensitivity and accuracy of measurements make it possible to record even small energy changes. Registration of the radio emission is provided by virtually all-weather ground-based observations, and there is the relative cheapness to obtain the corresponding information due to a developed system of monitoring observations. On the large statistical material there are established regularities of the existence of sporadic radio emission at the initial stage of CMEs' formation and propagation in the lower layers of the solar atmosphere during the time interval from 2-3 days to 2 hours before registration of CMEs on coronagraph. In this report we present the prediction algorithm and scheme of short-term forecasting developed on the base of statistical analysis regularities of solar radio emission data prior to "isolated" solar Coronal Mass Ejections registered in 1998, 2003, 2009-2013.

  10. Automated detection of coronal mass ejections in three-dimensions using multi-viewpoint observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, J.; Morgan, H.

    2017-03-01

    A new, automated method of detecting coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in three dimensions for the LASCO C2 and STEREO COR2 coronagraphs is presented. By triangulating isolated CME signal from the three coronagraphs over a sliding window of five hours, the most likely region through which CMEs pass at 5 R⊙ is identified. The centre and size of the region gives the most likely direction of propagation and approximate angular extent. The Automated CME Triangulation (ACT) method is tested extensively using a series of synthetic CME images created using a wireframe flux rope density model, and on a sample of real coronagraph data; including halo CMEs. The accuracy of the angular difference (σ) between the detection and true input of the synthetic CMEs is σ = 7.14°, and remains acceptable for a broad range of CME positions relative to the observer, the relative separation of the three observers and even through the loss of one coronagraph. For real data, the method gives results that compare well with the distribution of low coronal sources and results from another instrument and technique made further from the Sun. The true three dimension (3D)-corrected kinematics and mass/density are discussed. The results of the new method will be incorporated into the CORIMP database in the near future, enabling improved space weather diagnostics and forecasting.

  11. RADIAL AND AZIMUTHAL OSCILLATIONS OF HALO CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS IN THE SUN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Harim; Moon, Y.-J.; Nakariakov, V. M., E-mail: harim@khu.ac.kr, E-mail: moonyj@khu.ac.kr, E-mail: V.Nakariakov@warwick.ac.uk [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-10

    We present the first observational detection of radial and azimuthal oscillations in full halo coronal mass ejections (HCMEs). We analyze nine HCMEs well-observed by the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) from 2011 February to June. Using the LASCO C3 running difference images, we estimated the instantaneous apparent speeds of the HCMEs in different radial directions from the solar disk center. We find that the development of all these HCMEs is accompanied by quasi-periodic variations of the instantaneous radial velocity with the periods ranging from 24 to 48 minutes. The amplitudes of the instant speed variations reach about a half of the projected speeds. The amplitudes are found to anti-correlate with the periods and correlate with the HCME speed, indicating the nonlinear nature of the process. The oscillations have a clear azimuthal structure in the heliocentric polar coordinate system. The oscillations in seven events are found to be associated with distinct azimuthal wave modes with the azimuthal wave number m = 1 for six events and m = 2 for one event. The polarization of the oscillations in these seven HCMEs is broadly consistent with those of their position angles with the mean difference of 43°. The oscillations may be connected with natural oscillations of the plasmoids around a dynamical equilibrium, or self-oscillatory processes, e.g., the periodic shedding of Alfvénic vortices. Our results indicate the need for an advanced theory of oscillatory processes in coronal mass ejections.

  12. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection (ICME) and Cosmic rays transmission during Forbush decreases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okpala, K. C.

    2015-12-01

    Forbush decrease (FD) is an observed reduction in galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity as measured by ground neutron monitors often associated energetic events on the Sun such as coronal mass ejections (CME). FD is associated with increased activity of the sun as reflected in the size of the interplanetary coronal mass ejections passing around the Earth and the corotating regions in the Heliosphere. Since the interplanetary anisotropy evolves itself during a geomagnetic storm in addition to the reconfiguration of external magnetospheric currents, it is expected that changes in transmissivity of cosmic rays of galactic origin will occur during Geomagnetic storms. In this study we examine sixty-three (63) FD events and associated geomagnetic storms over the last three solar cycles from 1970 to 2013. The negative peaks of the FDs and the Dst coincided for most of the events (~70%). There was good correlation (>0.67) between the FDs and Dst. Signatures of influence of external magnetospheric currents on the count rates of the neutron monitors stations during periods of Forbush decreases (FDs) is provided. This evidence is observed as sudden increases in the count rates during the main phase of simultaneous FD. The magnitude of the sudden rise in the count rates of Neutron monitors and peak dst correlated well (>0.50) both for high latitude and mid latitude stations.

  13. Losses of Energetic Electrons in Earth's Outer Radiation Belt During Unusual Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugaz, Noé; Huang, Chia-Lin; Schwadron, Nathan; Spence, Harlan; Farrugia, Charles; Winslow, Reka

    2016-07-01

    The most extreme changes in solar wind parameters important for the coupling between the solar wind and the magnetosphere (dynamic pressure, dawn-to-dusk electric field, Alfven Mach number, plasma beta, …) occur during the passage at Earth of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). While the response of Earth's radiation belts to CMEs and CME-driven shocks has been investigated in great details, few studies have focused on what makes some CMEs and their shocks especially effective in driving losses of energetic electrons in the outer radiation belt. Here, we present specific examples of losses during the passage at Earth of a coronal mass ejection. In particular, we discuss the conditions which may result in the magnetopause to retreat earthward up to geosynchronous orbit, resulting in significant losses of energetic electrons due to magnetopause shadowing. We also present the result of a low-density magnetic ejecta which impacted Earth in January 2013. Combining interplanetary, magnetosheath, outer magnetosphere and radiation belt measurements by more than ten satellites, including the Van Allen Probes, THEMIS and Cluster, we show how a period of extremely low Mach number and dynamic pressure during the passage of the magnetic cloud resulted in dramatic losses in the outer radiation belt and a large-scale reorganization of the entire day-side magnetosphere.

  14. Automated Detection of coronal mass ejections in three-dimensions using multi-viewpoint observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Joseph; Morgan, Huw

    2016-10-01

    A new, automated method of detecting Solar Wind transients such as Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) in three dimensions for the LASCO C2 and STEREO COR2 coronagraphs is presented. By triangulating isolated CME signal from the three coronagraphs over a sliding window of five hours, the most likely region through which CMEs pass at 5 solar radii is identified. The centre and size of the region gives the most likely direction of propagation and angular extent. The Automated CME Triangulation (ACT) method is tested extensively using a series of synthetic CME images created using a flux rope density model, and on a sample of real coronagraph data; including Halo CMEs. The accuracy of the detection remains acceptable regardless of CME position relative to the observer, the relative separation of the three observers, and even through the loss of one coronagraph. By comparing the detection results with the input parameters of the synthetic CMEs, and the low coronal sources of the real CMEs, it is found that the detection is on average accurate to within 7.14 degrees. All current CME catalogues (CDAW, CACTus, SEEDS, ARTEMIS and CORIMP) rely on plane-of-sky measurements for key parameters such as height and velocity. Estimating the true geometry using the new method gains considerable accuracy for kinematics and mass/density. The results of the new method will be incorporated into the CORIMP database in the near future, enabling improved space weather diagnostics and forecasting.

  15. On Understanding the Nature of Collision of Coronal Mass Ejections Observed by \\textit{STEREO}

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, Wageesh; Srivastava, Nandita

    2016-01-01

    Our study attempts to understand the collision characteristics of two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) launched successively from the Sun on 2013 October 25. The estimated kinematics, from three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction techniques applied to observations of CMEs by SECCHI/Coronagraphic (COR) and Heliospheric Imagers (HIs), reveal their collision around 37 $R_\\sun$ from the Sun. In the analysis, we take into account the propagation and expansion speeds, impact direction, angular size as well as the masses of the CMEs. These parameters are derived from imaging observations, but may suffer from large uncertainties. Therefore, by adopting head-on as well as oblique collision scenarios, we have quantified the range of uncertainties involved in the calculation of the coefficient of restitution for expanding magnetized plasmoids. Our study shows that the comparatively large expansion speed of the following CME than that of the preceding CME, results in a higher probability of super-elastic collision. We also inf...

  16. The Role of Overlying Magnetic Field in Modeling Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedo, Oscar; Zhang, J.

    2009-05-01

    Recent models and observations have revealed that the magnetic fields overlying active regions play an important role in the eruption or confinement of flux ropes due to the torus instability. Flux ropes are now generally accepted to be the magnetic configuration of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) but their initiation is still not clear. In this study the external magnetic field profile of the well-developed flux rope model as proposed by James Chen (see J.Chen 1989, 1996) is examined. This external magnetic field represents overlying coronal loops, that may be of bipolar or complex topology with footpoints assumed to originate from an active region, and it is assumed that the only magnetic field component that affects the flux rope evolution is the one that is perpendicular to the flux ropes major axis. In this type of flux rope model, it has been suggested that the flux ropes initiation is driven by poloidal flux injection either of photospheric or coronal origin. Several test profiles are investigated, such as a power law profile, and a polynomial profile that could be thought of as a summation of magnetic multipoles. The gradient index for the prescribed magnetic field profile is studied and it is found that above a critical value the flux rope is eruptive and below this value it is confined, in agreement with observations and simulations. Implications of the results are that the torus instability is the most likely candidate in driving the eruption of flux rope CMEs, and that the distribution of magnetic field has a significant effect on the initiation and acceleration of CMEs.

  17. SIMULATIONS OF THE KELVIN–HELMHOLTZ INSTABILITY DRIVEN BY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS IN THE TURBULENT CORONA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez, Daniel O.; DeLuca, Edward E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Mininni, Pablo D. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires and Instituto de Física de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2016-02-20

    Recent high-resolution Atmospheric Imaging Assembly/Solar Dynamics Observatory images show evidence of the development of the Kelvin–Helmholtz (KH) instability, as coronal mass ejections (CMEs) expand in the ambient corona. A large-scale magnetic field mostly tangential to the interface is inferred, both on the CME and on the background sides. However, the magnetic field component along the shear flow is not strong enough to quench the instability. There is also observational evidence that the ambient corona is in a turbulent regime, and therefore the criteria for the development of the instability are a priori expected to differ from the laminar case. To study the evolution of the KH instability with a turbulent background, we perform three-dimensional simulations of the incompressible magnetohydrodynamic equations. The instability is driven by a velocity profile tangential to the CME–corona interface, which we simulate through a hyperbolic tangent profile. The turbulent background is generated by the application of a stationary stirring force. We compute the instability growth rate for different values of the turbulence intensity, and find that the role of turbulence is to attenuate the growth. The fact that KH instability is observed sets an upper limit on the correlation length of the coronal background turbulence.

  18. Deflections of Fast Coronal Mass Ejections and the Properties of Associated Solar Energetic Particle Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, S. W.; Akiyama, S.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2012-01-01

    The onset times and peak intensities of solar energetic particle (SEP) events at Earth have long been thought to be influenced by the open magnetic fields of coronal holes (CHs). The original idea was that a CH lying between the solar SEP source region and the magnetic footpoint of the 1 AU observer would result in a delay in onset and/or a decrease in the peak intensity of that SEP event. Recently, Gopalswamy et al. showed that CHs near coronal mass ejection (CME) source regions can deflect fast CMEs from their expected trajectories in space, explaining the appearance of driverless shocks at 1 AU from CMEs ejected near solar central meridian (CM). This suggests that SEP events originating in CME-driven shocks may show variations attributable to CH deflections of the CME trajectories. Here, we use a CH magnetic force parameter to examine possible effects of CHs on the timing and intensities of 41 observed gradual E approx 20 MeV SEP events with CME source regions within 20 deg. of CM. We find no systematic CH effects on SEP event intensity profiles. Furthermore, we find no correlation between the CME leading-edge measured position angles and SEP event properties, suggesting that the widths of CME-driven shock sources of the SEPs are much larger than the CMEs. Independently of the SEP event properties, we do find evidence for significant CME deflections by CH fields in these events

  19. Solar signatures and eruption mechanism of the August 14, 2010 coronal mass ejection (CME)

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Huys, Elke; Seaton, Daniel B.; De Groof, Anik; Berghmans, David; Poedts, Stefaan

    2017-03-01

    On August 14, 2010 a wide-angled coronal mass ejection (CME) was observed. This solar eruption originated from a destabilized filament that connected two active regions and the unwinding of this filament gave the eruption an untwisting motion that drew the attention of many observers. In addition to the erupting filament and the associated CME, several other low-coronal signatures that typically indicate the occurrence of a solar eruption were associated with this event. However, contrary to what was expected, the fast CME (v > 900 km s-1) was accompanied by only a weak C4.4 flare. We investigate the various eruption signatures that were observed for this event and focus on the kinematic evolution of the filament in order to determine its eruption mechanism. Had this solar eruption occurred just a few days earlier, it could have been a significant event for space weather. The risk of underestimating the strength of this eruption based solely on the C4.4 flare illustrates the need to include all eruption signatures in event analyses in order to obtain a complete picture of a solar eruption and assess its possible space weather impact.

  20. Challenging Some Contemporary Views of Coronal Mass Ejections. II. The Case for Absent Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, T. A.; DeForest, C. E.; Schneck, U. G.; Alden, C. R.

    2017-01-01

    When a coronal mass ejection (CME) appears in a coronagraph it often exhibits three parts. This “classic” three-part configuration consists of a bright leading edge, a dark circular- or teardrop-shaped cavity, and a bright core within the cavity. It is generally accepted that these are manifestations of coronal plasma pileup, the driving magnetic flux rope, and the associated eruptive filament, respectively. The latter has become accepted by the community since coronagraph CMEs have been commonly associated with eruptive filaments for over 40 years. In this second part of our series challenging views on CMEs, we present the case that the inner core of the three-part coronagraph CME may not be, and in the most common cases is not, a filament. We present our case in the form of four exhibits showing that most of the CMEs in a broad survey are not associated with an eruptive filament at the Sun, and that the cores of those CMEs that are filament-associated do not geometrically resemble or consist of material from the associated filament. We conclude with a discussion on the possible causes of the bright CME core and what happens to the filament material postlaunch. We discuss how the CME core could arise spontaneously from the eruption of a flux rope from the Sun, or could be the result of a mathematical caustic produced by the geometric projection of a twisted flux rope.

  1. Composition Structure of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections From Multispacecraft Observations, Modeling, and Comparison with Numerical Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Reinard, Alysha; Mulligan, Tamitha

    2012-01-01

    We present an analysis of the ionic composition of iron for two interplanetary coronal mass ejections observed in May 21-23 2007 by the ACE and STEREO spacecraft in the context of the magnetic structure of the ejecta flux rope, sheath region, and surrounding solar wind flow. This analysis is made possible due to recent advances in multispacecraft data interpolation, reconstruction, and visualization as well as results from recent modeling of ionic charge states in MHD simulations of magnetic breakout and flux cancellation CME initiation. We use these advances to interpret specific features of the ICME plasma composition resulting from the magnetic topology and evolution of the CME. We find that in both the data and our MHD simulations, the flux ropes centers are relatively cool, while charge state enhancements surround and trail the flux ropes. The magnetic orientation of the ICMEs are suggestive of magnetic breakout-like reconnection during the eruption process which could explain the spatial location of the...

  2. Anomalous Expansion of Coronal Mass Ejections During Solar Cycle 24 and Its Space Weather Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Akiyama, Sachiko; Yashiro, Seiji; Xie, Hong; Makela, Pertti; Michalek, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    The familiar correlation between the speed and angular width of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is also found in solar cycle 24, but the regression line has a larger slope: for a given CME speed, cycle 24 CMEs are significantly wider than those in cycle 23. The slope change indicates a significant change in the physical state of the heliosphere, due to the weak solar activity. The total pressure in the heliosphere (magnetic + plasma) is reduced by approximately 40%, which leads to the anomalous expansion of CMEs explaining the increased slope. The excess CME expansion contributes to the diminished effectiveness of CMEs in producing magnetic storms during cycle 24, both because the magnetic content of the CMEs is diluted and also because of the weaker ambient fields. The reduced magnetic field in the heliosphere may contribute to the lack of solar energetic particles accelerated to very high energies during this cycle.

  3. Coronal Mass Ejections Observed at the Total Solar Eclipse on 13 November 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Hanaoka, Yoichiro; Ohgoe, Osamu; Sakai, Yoshiaki; Shiota, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    We carried out white-light observations of the total solar eclipse on 13 November 2012 at two sites, where the totality occurred 35 minutes apart. We caught an ongoing coronal mass ejection (CME) and a pre-CME loop structure just before the eruption in the height range between 1-2 R_sun. The source region of CMEs was revealed to be in this height range, where the material and the magnetic field of CMEs were located before the eruption. This height range includes the gap between the extreme ultraviolet observations of the low corona and the spaceborne white-light observations of the high corona, but the eclipse observation shows that this height range is essentially important to study the CME initiation. The eclipse observation is basically just a snapshot of CMEs, but it indicates that future continuous observations of CMEs within this height range are promising.

  4. First Simultaneous Views of the Axial and Lateral Perspectives of a Coronal Mass Ejection

    CERN Document Server

    Cabello, I; Balmaceda, L; Dohmen, I

    2016-01-01

    The different appearances exhibited by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are believed to be in part the result of different orientations of their main axis of symmetry, consistent with a flux-rope configuration. There are observational reports of CMEs seen along their main axis (axial perspective) and perpendicular to it (lateral perspective), but no simultaneous observations of both perspectives from the same CME have been reported to date. The stereoscopic views of the telescopes onboard the $Solar$-$Terrestrial$ $Relations$ $Observatory$ (STEREO) twin spacecraft, in combination with the views from the $Solar$ $and$ $Heliospheric$ $Observatory$ (SOHO) and the $Solar$ $Dynamics$ $Observatory$ (SDO), allow us to study the axial and lateral perspectives of a CME simultaneously for the first time. In addition, this study shows that the lateral angular extent ($L$) increases linearly with time, while the angular extent of the axial perspective ($D$) presents this behavior only from the low corona to $\\approx\\,$5 $R_...

  5. Statistical Evidence for Contributions of Flares and Coronal Mass Ejections to Major Solar Energetic Particle Events

    CERN Document Server

    Trottet, G; Klein, K -L; de Wit, T Dudok; Miteva, R

    2014-01-01

    Solar energetic particle (SEP) events are related to flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). This work is a new investigation of statistical relationships between SEP peak intensities - deka-MeV protons and near-relativistic electrons - and characteristic quantities of the associated solar activity. We consider the speed of the CME and quantities describing the flare-related energy release: peak flux and fluence of soft X-ray (SXR) emission, fluence of microwave emission. The sample comprises 38 SEP events associated with strong SXR bursts (classes M and X) in the western solar hemisphere between 1997 and 2006, and where the flare-related particle acceleration is accompanied by radio bursts indicating electron escape to the interplanetary space. The main distinction of the present statistical analysis from earlier work is that besides the classical Pearson correlation coefficient the partial correlation coefficients are calculated in order to disentangle the effects of correlations between the solar paramet...

  6. On the enhanced coronal mass ejection detection rate since the solar cycle 23 polar field reversal

    CERN Document Server

    Petrie, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) with angular width $> 30^{\\circ}$ have been observed to occur at a higher rate during solar cycle 24 compared to cycle 23, per sunspot number. This result is supported by data from three independent databases constructed using Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment (LASCO) coronagraph images, two employing automated detection techniques and one compiled manually by human observers. According to the two databases that cover a larger field of view, the enhanced CME rate actually began shortly after the cycle 23 polar field reversal, in 2004, when the polar fields returned with a 40\\% reduction in strength and interplanetary radial magnetic field became $\\approx 30\\%$ weaker. This result is consistent with the link between anomalous CME expansion and heliospheric total pressure decrease recently reported by Gopalswamy et al.

  7. MAVEN observations of the response of Mars to an interplanetary coronal mass ejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakosky, B M; Grebowsky, J M; Luhmann, J G; Connerney, J; Eparvier, F; Ergun, R; Halekas, J; Larson, D; Mahaffy, P; McFadden, J; Mitchell, D F; Schneider, N; Zurek, R; Bougher, S; Brain, D; Ma, Y J; Mazelle, C; Andersson, L; Andrews, D; Baird, D; Baker, D; Bell, J M; Benna, M; Chaffin, M; Chamberlin, P; Chaufray, Y-Y; Clarke, J; Collinson, G; Combi, M; Crary, F; Cravens, T; Crismani, M; Curry, S; Curtis, D; Deighan, J; Delory, G; Dewey, R; DiBraccio, G; Dong, C; Dong, Y; Dunn, P; Elrod, M; England, S; Eriksson, A; Espley, J; Evans, S; Fang, X; Fillingim, M; Fortier, K; Fowler, C M; Fox, J; Gröller, H; Guzewich, S; Hara, T; Harada, Y; Holsclaw, G; Jain, S K; Jolitz, R; Leblanc, F; Lee, C O; Lee, Y; Lefevre, F; Lillis, R; Livi, R; Lo, D; Mayyasi, M; McClintock, W; McEnulty, T; Modolo, R; Montmessin, F; Morooka, M; Nagy, A; Olsen, K; Peterson, W; Rahmati, A; Ruhunusiri, S; Russell, C T; Sakai, S; Sauvaud, J-A; Seki, K; Steckiewicz, M; Stevens, M; Stewart, A I F; Stiepen, A; Stone, S; Tenishev, V; Thiemann, E; Tolson, R; Toublanc, D; Vogt, M; Weber, T; Withers, P; Woods, T; Yelle, R

    2015-11-01

    Coupling between the lower and upper atmosphere, combined with loss of gas from the upper atmosphere to space, likely contributed to the thin, cold, dry atmosphere of modern Mars. To help understand ongoing ion loss to space, the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) spacecraft made comprehensive measurements of the Mars upper atmosphere, ionosphere, and interactions with the Sun and solar wind during an interplanetary coronal mass ejection impact in March 2015. Responses include changes in the bow shock and magnetosheath, formation of widespread diffuse aurora, and enhancement of pick-up ions. Observations and models both show an enhancement in escape rate of ions to space during the event. Ion loss during solar events early in Mars history may have been a major contributor to the long-term evolution of the Mars atmosphere.

  8. Automated Detection of Coronal Mass Ejections in STEREO Heliospheric Imager data

    CERN Document Server

    Pant, V; Rodriguez, L; Mierla, M; Banerjee, D; Davies, J A

    2016-01-01

    We have performed, for the first time, the successful automated detection of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) in data from the inner heliospheric imager (HI-1) cameras on the STEREO A spacecraft. Detection of CMEs is done in time-height maps based on the application of the Hough transform, using a modified version of the CACTus software package, conventionally applied to coronagraph data. In this paper we describe the method of detection. We present the result of the application of the technique to a few CMEs that are well detected in the HI-1 imagery, and compare these results with those based on manual cataloging methodologies. We discuss in detail the advantages and disadvantages of this method.

  9. A test of magnetic field draping induced Bz perturbations ahead of fast coronal mass ejecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccomas, D. J.; Gosling, J. T.; Bame, S. J.; Smith, E. J.; Cane, H. V.

    1989-01-01

    ICE plasma and magnetic field data are examined to look for observational evidence of IMF draping ahead of fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The utility of the draping model for predicting the Bz perturbations and hence geomagnetic activity associated with the sheath regions ahead of such CMEs is also examined. A simple prediction scheme based on the upstream radial field component is developed and a set of interplanetary shock events previously associated with interplanetary type II bursts, and hence solar source locations, is used. Of 17 events the radial component predictor developed here correctly predicts the direction considered of the Bz perturbations for 13 events (76 percent). While this result is certainly not conclusive, it is considered to be supportive of the draping scenario.

  10. Self-similar expansion of solar coronal mass ejections: Implications for Lorentz self-force driving

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, Prasad; Arunbabu, K. P.; Mauriya, Adwiteey [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Dr. Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411008 (India); Vourlidas, Angelos, E-mail: p.subramanian@iiserpune.ac.in [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We examine the propagation of several coronal mass ejections (CMEs) with well-observed flux rope signatures in the field of view of the SECCHI coronagraphs on board the STEREO satellites using the graduated cylindrical shell fitting method of Thernisien et al. We find that the manner in which they propagate is approximately self-similar; i.e., the ratio (κ) of the flux rope minor radius to its major radius remains approximately constant with time. We use this observation of self-similarity to draw conclusions regarding the local pitch angle (γ) of the flux rope magnetic field and the misalignment angle (χ) between the current density J and the magnetic field B. Our results suggest that the magnetic field and current configurations inside flux ropes deviate substantially from a force-free state in typical coronagraph fields of view, validating the idea of CMEs being driven by Lorentz self-forces.

  11. An analysis of interplanetary solar radio emissions associated with a coronal mass ejection

    CERN Document Server

    Krupar, Vratislav; Kruparova, Oksana; Santolik, Ondrej; Soucek, Jan; Magdalenic, Jasmina; Vourlidas, Angelos; Maksimovic, Milan; Bothmer, Volker; Mrotzek, Niclas; Pluta, Adam; Barnes, David; Davies, Jackie; Oliveros, Juan Carlos Martinez; Bale, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are large-scale eruptions of magnetized plasma that may cause severe geomagnetic storms if Earth-directed. Here we report a rare instance with comprehensive in situ and remote sensing observa- tions of a CME combining white-light, radio, and plasma measurements from four different vantage points. For the first time, we have successfully applied a radio direction-finding technique to an interplanetary type II burst detected by two identical widely separated radio receivers. The derived locations of the type II and type III bursts are in general agreement with the white light CME recon- struction. We find that the radio emission arises from the flanks of the CME, and are most likely associated with the CME-driven shock. Our work demon- strates the complementarity between radio triangulation and 3D reconstruction techniques for space weather applications.

  12. Investigations of the sensitivity of a coronal mass ejection model (ENLIL) to solar input parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkenberg, Thea Vilstrup; Vršnak, B.; Taktakishvili, A.;

    2010-01-01

    investigate the parameter space of the ENLILv2.5b model using the CME event of 25 July 2004. ENLIL is a time‐dependent 3‐D MHD model that can simulate the propagation of cone‐shaped interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) through the solar system. Excepting the cone parameters (radius, position...... (CMEs), but in order to predict the caused effects, we need to be able to model their propagation from their origin in the solar corona to the point of interest, e.g., Earth. Many such models exist, but to understand the models in detail we must understand the primary input parameters. Here we......, and initial velocity), all remaining parameters are varied, resulting in more than 20 runs investigated here. The output parameters considered are velocity, density, magnetic field strength, and temperature. We find that the largest effects on the model output are the input parameters of upper limit...

  13. Modeling Coronal Mass Ejections with the Multi-Scale Fluid-Kinetic Simulation Suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelov, N. V.; Borovikov, S. N.; Kryukov, I. A.; Wu, S. T.; Yalim, M. S.; Colella, P. C.; Van Straalen, B.

    2017-05-01

    The solar eruptions and interacting solar wind streams are key drivers of geomagnetic storms and various related space weather disturbances that may have hazardous effects on the space-borne and ground-based technological systems as well as on human health. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and their interplanetary counterparts, interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs), belong to the strongest disturbances and therefore are of great importance for the space weather predictions. In this paper we show a few examples of how adaptive mesh refinement makes it possible to resolve the complex CME structure and its evolution in time while a CME propagates from the inner boundary to Earth. Simulations are performed with the Multi-Scale Fluid-Kinetic Simulation Suite (MS-FLUKSS).

  14. Associations of decimetric type Ⅲ bursts with coronal mass ejections and Hα flares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Ma; De-Yu Wang; Jun Lin; Shuo Dai; Xue-Fei Zhang

    2010-01-01

    We present a statistical study of decimetric type Ⅲ radio bursts,coronal mass ejections(CMEs),and Hα flares observed in the period from July 2000 to March2005.In total,we investigated 395 decimetric type Ⅲ radio burst events,21% of which showed apparent correlation to CMEs that were associated with Hα flares.We noticed that the Hα flares which were strongly associated with CMEs were gradual events,and82% of them took place before CMEs appeared in the field of view of LASCO C2;that most of the CME-associated radio bursts started in the frequency range around750 MHz with a frequency drifting rate of several hundred MHz s-1,of which both positive and negative ones were recognized; and that the correlation of type Ⅲ radio bursts to CMEs without associated flares is fairly vague,less than 9%.

  15. Coronal Mass Ejections propagating towards Mars and the consequent Forbush decreases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jingnan; Banerjee, Dipankar; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Pant, Vaibhav

    2016-07-01

    In order to study the impact of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) on planet Mars, we explore the CME lists observed by coronagraphic images at Earth location heading towards Mars, i.e., the separation of the two planets are about 90 degrees. This is realized by the application of CACTus which detects CMEs in image sequences from LASCO/SOHO at Earth's L1 location. The properties of these ICMEs and their propagation towards Mars are modeled and compared with in-situ observations of Forbush decreases at the surface of Mars by the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) onboard of Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). This helps us to understand the contributions of ICMEs towards the onset of Forbush decreases at Mars as well as the evolution and propagation ICMEs in the inter-planetary space.

  16. Automated Detection of Coronal Mass Ejections in STEREO Heliospheric Imager Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, V.; Willems, S.; Rodriguez, L.; Mierla, M.; Banerjee, D.; Davies, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    We have performed, for the first time, the successful automated detection of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in data from the inner heliospheric imager (HI-1) cameras on the STEREO-A spacecraft. Detection of CMEs is done in time-height maps based on the application of the Hough transform, using a modified version of the CACTus software package, conventionally applied to coronagraph data. In this paper, we describe the method of detection. We present the results of the application of the technique to a few CMEs, which are well detected in the HI-1 imagery, and compare these results with those based on manual-cataloging methodologies. We discuss, in detail, the advantages and disadvantages of this method.

  17. Coronal Mass Ejections Near the Sun and in the Interplanetary Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2012-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most energetic phenomenon in the heliosphere. During solar eruptions, the released energy flows out from the Sun in the form of magnetized plasma and electromagnetic radiation. The electromagnetic radiation suddenly increases the ionization content of the ionosphere, thus impacting communication and navigation systems. The plasma clouds can drive shocks that accelerate charged particles to very high energies in the interplanetary space, which pose radiation hazard to astronauts and space systems. The plasma clouds also arrive at Earth in about two days and impact Earth's magnetosphere, producing geomagnetic storms. The magnetic storms result in a number of effects including induced currents that can disrupt power grids, railroads, and underground pipelines. This lecture presents an overview of the origin, propagation, and geospace consequences of CMEs and their interplanetary counterparts.

  18. Coronal Mass Ejections and their Implications for the Corona and Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2008-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the largest and most energetic form of transients that connect the Sun to the heliosphere. They are critically important both for understanding the physical mechanisms of explosive solar activity and for predicting space weather. Furthermore they are an extreme example of how cross-scale coupling can play a critical role in determining the properties of a large-scale dynamical system. In this presentation CME theories are reviewed and the latest results from 3D numerical modeling of CME initiation propagation to the heliosphere are presented. In particular the focus is on the breakout model, but many of the results hold for the flux rope models as well. The implications of these results for understanding heliospheric structure and dynamics and for upcoming space missions will be discussed.

  19. Speeds of coronal mass ejections: SMM observations from 1980 and 1984-1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundhausen, A. J.; Burkepile, J. T.; St. Cyr, O. C.

    1994-01-01

    The speeds of 936 features in 673 coronal mass ejections have been determined from trajectories observed with the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) coronagraph in 1980 and 1984 to 1989. The distribution of observed speeds has a range (from 5th to 95th percentile) of 35 to 911 km/s; the average and median speeds are 349 and 285 km/s. The speed distributions of some selected classes of mass ejections are significantly different. For example, the speeds of 331 'outer loops' range from 80 to 1042 km/s; the average and median speeds for this class of ejections are 445 and 372 km/s. The speed distributions from each year of SMM observations show significant changes, with the annual average speeds varying from 157 (1984) to 458 km/s (1985). These variations are not simply related to the solar activity cycle; the annual averages from years near the sunspot maxima and minimum are not significantly different. The widths, latitudes, and speeds of mass ejections determined from the SMM observations are only weakly correlated. In particular, mass ejection speeds vary only slightly with the heliographic latitudes of the ejection. High-latitude ejections, which occur well poleward of the active latitudes, have speeds similar to active latitude ejections.

  20. Kinematic and Energetic Properties of the 2012 March 12 Polar Coronal Mass Ejection

    CERN Document Server

    Gopalswamy, N; Akiyama, S

    2015-01-01

    We report on the energetics of the 2012 March 12 polar coronal mass ejection (CME) originating from a southern latitude of ~60o. The polar CME is similar to low-latitude CMEs in almost all respects: three-part morphology, post eruption arcade (PEA), CME and filament kinematics, CME mass and kinetic energy, and the relative thermal energy content of the PEA. From polarized brightness images, we estimate the CME mass, which is close to the average mass of low-latitude CMEs. The CME kinetic energy (3.3x1030 erg) is also typical of the general population of CMEs. From photospheric magnetograms, we estimate the free energy (1.8x1031 erg) in the polar crown source region, which we find is sufficient to power the CME and the PEA. About 19% of the free energy went into the CME kinetic energy. We compute the thermal energy content of the PEA (2.3x1029 erg) and find it to be a small fraction (6.8%) of the CME kinetic energy. This fraction is remarkably similar to that in active region CMEs associated with major flares....

  1. IS SOLAR CYCLE 24 PRODUCING MORE CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS THAN CYCLE 23?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.-M.; Colaninno, R., E-mail: yi.wang@nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: robin.colaninno@nrl.navy.mil [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Although sunspot numbers are roughly a factor of two lower in the current cycle than in cycle 23, the rate of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) appears to be at least as high in 2011-2013 as during the corresponding phase of the previous cycle, according to three catalogs that list events observed with the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO). However, the number of CMEs detected is sensitive to such factors as the image cadence and the tendency (especially by human observers) to under-/overcount small or faint ejections during periods of high/low activity. In contrast to the total number, the total mass of CMEs is determined mainly by larger events. Using the mass measurements of 11,000 CMEs given in the manual CDAW catalog, we find that the mass loss rate remains well correlated with the sunspot number during cycle 24. In the case of the automated CACTus and SEEDS catalogs, the large increase in the number of CMEs during cycle 24 is almost certainly an artifact caused by the near-doubling of the LASCO image cadence after mid-2010. We confirm that fast CMEs undergo a much stronger solar-cycle variation than slow ones, and that the relative frequency of slow and less massive CMEs increases with decreasing sunspot number. We conclude that cycle 24 is not only producing fewer CMEs than cycle 23, but that these ejections also tend to be slower and less massive than those observed one cycle earlier.

  2. Anomalous-plasmoid-ejection-induced secondary magnetic reconnection: modeling solar flares and coronal mass ejections by laser–plasma experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quanli; Dong; Dawei; Yuan; Shoujun; Wang; Xun; Liu; Yutong; Li; Xiaoxuan; Lin; Huigang; Wei; Jiayong; Zhong; Shaoen; Jiang; Yongkun; Ding; Bobin; Jiang; Kai; Du; Yongjian; Tang; Mingyang; Yu; Xiantu; He; Neng; Hua; Zhanfeng; Qiao; Kuixi; Huang; Ming; Chen; Jianqiang; Zhu; Gang; Zhao; Zhengming; Sheng; Jie; Zhang

    2013-01-01

    The driving mechanism of solar flares and coronal mass ejections is a topic of ongoing debate, apart from the consensus that magnetic reconnection plays a key role during the impulsive process. While present solar research mostly depends on observations and theoretical models, laboratory experiments based on high-energy density facilities provide the third method for quantitatively comparing astrophysical observations and models with data achieved in experimental settings.In this article, we show laboratory modeling of solar flares and coronal mass ejections by constructing the magnetic reconnection system with two mutually approaching laser-produced plasmas circumfused of self-generated megagauss magnetic fields. Due to the Euler similarity between the laboratory and solar plasma systems, the present experiments demonstrate the morphological reproduction of flares and coronal mass ejections in solar observations in a scaled sense,and confirm the theory and model predictions about the current-sheet-born anomalous plasmoid as the initial stage of coronal mass ejections, and the behavior of moving-away plasmoid stretching the primary reconnected field lines into a secondary current sheet conjoined with two bright ridges identified as solar flares.

  3. Evidence for a current sheet forming in the wake of a Coronal Mass Ejection from multi-viewpoint coronagraph observations

    OpenAIRE

    Patsourakos, S.; Vourlidas, A.

    2010-01-01

    Ray-like features observed by coronagraphs in the wake of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are sometimes interpreted as the white light counterparts of current sheets (CSs) produced by the eruption. The 3D geometry of these ray-like features is largely unknown and its knowledge should clarify their association to the CS and place constraints on CME physics and coronal conditions. With this study we test these important implications for the first time. An example of such a post-CME ray was observ...

  4. ARE DECAYING MAGNETIC FIELDS ABOVE ACTIVE REGIONS RELATED TO CORONAL MASS EJECTION ONSET?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, J. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Welsch, B. T.; Li, Y. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States)

    2012-10-10

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are powered by magnetic energy stored in non-potential (current-carrying) coronal magnetic fields, with the pre-CME field in balance between outward magnetic pressure of the proto-ejecta and inward magnetic tension from overlying fields that confine the proto-ejecta. In studies of global potential (current-free) models of coronal magnetic fields-Potential Field Source Surface (PFSS) models-it has been reported that model field strengths above flare sites tend to be weaker when CMEs occur than when eruptions fail to occur. This suggests that potential field models might be useful to quantify magnetic confinement. One straightforward implication of this idea is that a decrease in model field strength overlying a possible eruption site should correspond to diminished confinement, implying an eruption is more likely. We have searched for such an effect by post facto investigation of the time evolution of model field strengths above a sample of 10 eruption sites. To check if the strengths of overlying fields were relevant only in relatively slow CMEs, we included both slow and fast CMEs in our sample. In most events we study, we find no statistically significant evolution in either (1) the rate of magnetic field decay with height, (2) the strength of overlying magnetic fields near 50 Mm, or (3) the ratio of fluxes at low and high altitudes (below 1.1 R{sub Sun }, and between 1.1 and 1.5 R{sub Sun }, respectively). We did observe a tendency for overlying field strengths and overlying flux to increase slightly, and their rates of decay with height to become slightly more gradual, consistent with increased confinement. The fact that CMEs occur regardless of whether the parameters we use to quantify confinement are increasing or decreasing suggests that either (1) the parameters that we derive from PFSS models do not accurately characterize the actual large-scale field in CME source regions, (2) systematic evolution in the large-scale magnetic

  5. The formation and launch of a coronal mass ejection flux rope: a narrative based on observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, T. A.; DeForest, C. E., E-mail: howard@boulder.swri.edu [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

    2014-11-20

    We present a data-driven narrative of the launch and early evolution of the magnetic structure that gave rise to the coronal mass ejection (CME) on 2008 December 12. The structure formed on December 7 and launched early on December 12. We interpret this structure as a flux rope based on prelaunch morphology, postlaunch magnetic measurements, and the lack of large-scale magnetic reconnection signatures at launch. We ascribe three separate onset mechanisms to the complete disconnection of the flux rope from the Sun. It took 19 hr for the flux rope to be fully removed from the Sun, by which time the segment that first disconnected was around 40 R {sub ☉} away. This implies that the original flux rope was stretched or broken; we provide evidence for a possible bisection. A transient dark arcade was observed on the Sun that was later obscured by a bright arcade, which we interpret as the strapping field stretching and magnetically reconnecting as it disconnected from the coronal field. We identify three separate structures in coronagraph images to be manifestations of the same original flux rope, and we describe the implications for CME interpretation. We cite the rotation in the central flux rope vector of the magnetic clouds observed in situ by ACE/Wind and STEREO-B as evidence of the kink instability of the eastern segment of the flux rope. Finally, we discuss possible alternative narratives, including multiple prelaunch magnetic structures and the nonflux rope scenario. Our results support the view that, in at least some CMEs, flux rope formation occurs before launch.

  6. Ensemble Forecasting of Coronal Mass Ejections Using the WSA-ENLIL with CONED Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, D.; Acebal, A.; Pulkkinen, A.; Taktakishvili, A.; MacNeice, P.; Odstricil, D.

    2013-01-01

    The combination of the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) coronal model, ENLIL heliospherical model version 2.7, and CONED Model version 1.3 (WSA-ENLIL with CONED Model) was employed to form ensemble forecasts for 15 halo coronal mass ejections (halo CMEs). The input parameter distributions were formed from 100 sets of CME cone parameters derived from the CONED Model. The CONED Model used image processing along with the bootstrap approach to automatically calculate cone parameter distributions from SOHO/LASCO imagery based on techniques described by Pulkkinen et al. (2010). The input parameter distributions were used as input to WSA-ENLIL to calculate the temporal evolution of the CMEs, which were analyzed to determine the propagation times to the L1 Lagrangian point and the maximum Kp indices due to the impact of the CMEs on the Earth's magnetosphere. The Newell et al. (2007) Kp index formula was employed to calculate the maximum Kp indices based on the predicted solar wind parameters near Earth assuming two magnetic field orientations: a completely southward magnetic field and a uniformly distributed clock-angle in the Newell et al. (2007) Kp index formula. The forecasts for 5 of the 15 events had accuracy such that the actual propagation time was within the ensemble average plus or minus one standard deviation. Using the completely southward magnetic field assumption, 10 of the 15 events contained the actual maximum Kp index within the range of the ensemble forecast, compared to 9 of the 15 events when using a uniformly distributed clock angle.

  7. Investigating the kinematics of coronal mass ejections with the automated CORIMP catalog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byrne Jason P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Studying coronal mass ejections (CMEs in coronagraph data can be challenging due to their diffuse structure and transient nature, compounded by the variations in their dynamics, morphology and frequency of occurrence. The large amounts of data available from missions like the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO make manual cataloging of CMEs tedious and prone to human error, and so a robust method of detection and analysis is required and often preferred. A new coronal image processing catalog called CORIMP has been developed in an effort to achieve this, through the implementation of a dynamic background separation technique and multiscale edge detection. These algorithms together isolate and characterise CME structure in the field-of-view of the Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO onboard SOHO. CORIMP also applies a Savitzky-Golay filter, along with quadratic and linear fits, to the height-time measurements for better revealing the true CME speed and acceleration profiles across the plane-of-sky. Here we present a sample of new results from the CORIMP CME catalog, and directly compare them with the other automated catalogs of Computer Aided CME Tracking (CACTus and Solar Eruptive Events Detection System (SEEDS, as well as the manual CME catalog at the Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop (CDAW Data Center and a previously published study of the sample events. We further investigate a form of unsupervised machine learning by using a k-means clustering algorithm to distinguish detections of multiple CMEs that occur close together in space and time. While challenges still exist, this investigation and comparison of results demonstrate the reliability and robustness of the CORIMP catalog, proving its effectiveness at detecting and tracking CMEs throughout the LASCO dataset.

  8. Development of a Full Ice-cream Cone Model for Halo Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Hyeonock; Moon, Y.-J.; Lee, Harim

    2017-04-01

    It is essential to determine three-dimensional parameters (e.g., radial speed, angular width, and source location) of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) for the space weather forecast. In this study, we investigate which cone type represents a halo CME morphology using 29 CMEs (12 Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) halo CMEs and 17 Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/Sun-Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation COR2 halo CMEs) from 2010 December to 2011 June. These CMEs are identified as halo CMEs by one spacecraft (SOHO or one of STEREO A and B) and limb ones by the other spacecraft (One of STEREO A and B or SOHO). From cone shape parameters of these CMEs, such as their front curvature, we find that the CME observational structures are much closer to a full ice-cream cone type than a shallow ice-cream cone type. Thus, we develop a full ice-cream cone model based on a new methodology that the full ice-cream cone consists of many flat cones with different heights and angular widths to estimate the three-dimensional parameters of the halo CMEs. This model is constructed by carrying out the following steps: (1) construct a cone for a given height and angular width, (2) project the cone onto the sky plane, (3) select points comprising the outer boundary, and (4) minimize the difference between the estimated projection speeds with the observed ones. By applying this model to 12 SOHO/LASCO halo CMEs, we find that 3D parameters from our method are similar to those from other stereoscopic methods (i.e., a triangulation method and a Graduated Cylindrical Shell model).

  9. The Heliocentric Distance Where the Deflections and Rotations of Solar Coronal Mass Ejections Occur

    CERN Document Server

    Kay, C

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the trajectory of a coronal mass ejection (CME), including any deflection from a radial path, and the orientation of its magnetic field is essential for space weather predictions. Kay et al. (2015b) developed a model, Forecasting a CME's Altered Trajectory (ForeCAT), of CME deflections and rotation due to magnetic forces, not including the effects of reconnection. ForeCAT is able to reproduce the deflection of observed CMEs (Kay et al. 2015a). The deflecting CMEs tend to show a rapid increase of their angular momentum close to the Sun, followed by little to no increase at farther distances. Here we quantify the distance at which the CME deflection is "determined," which we define as the distance after which the background solar wind has negligible influence on the total deflection. We consider a wide range in CME masses and radial speeds and determine that the deflection and rotation of these CMEs can be well-described by assuming they propagate with constant angular momentum beyond 10 Rs. The a...

  10. On the autonomous detection of coronal mass ejections in heliospheric imager data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappin, S. J.; Howard, T. A.; Hampson, M. M.; Thompson, R. N.; Burns, C. E.

    2012-05-01

    We report on the development of an Automatic Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) Detection tool (AICMED) for the Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI). CMEs observed with heliospheric imagers are much more difficult to detect than those observed by coronagraphs as they have a lower contrast compared with the background light, have a larger range of intensity variation and are easily confused with other transient activity. CMEs appear in SMEI images as very faint often-fragmented arcs amongst a much brighter and often variable background. AICMED operates along the same lines as Computer Aided CME Tracking (CACTus), using the Hough Transform on elongation-time J-maps to extract straight lines from the data set. We compare AICMED results with manually measured CMEs on almost three years of data from early in SMEI operations. AICMED identified 83 verifiable events. Of these 46 could be matched with manually identified events, the majority of the non-detections can be explained. The remaining 37 AICMED events were newly discovered CMEs. The proportion of false identification was high, at 71% of the autonomously detected events. We find that AICMED is very effective as a region of interest highlighter, and is a promising first step in autonomous heliospheric imager CME detection, but the SMEI data are too noisy for the tool to be completely automated.

  11. THE HELIOCENTRIC DISTANCE WHERE THE DEFLECTIONS AND ROTATIONS OF SOLAR CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS OCCUR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kay, C.; Opher, M., E-mail: ckay@bu.edu [Astronomy Department, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the trajectory of a coronal mass ejection (CME), including any deflection from a radial path, and the orientation of its magnetic field is essential for space weather predictions. Kay et al. developed a model, Forecasting a CME’s Altered Trajectory (ForeCAT), of CME deflections and rotation due to magnetic forces, not including the effects of reconnection. ForeCAT is able to reproduce the deflection of observed CMEs. The deflecting CMEs tend to show a rapid increase of their angular momentum close to the Sun, followed by little to no increase at farther distances. Here we quantify the distance at which the CME deflection is “determined,” which we define as the distance after which the background solar wind has negligible influence on the total deflection. We consider a wide range in CME masses and radial speeds and determine that the deflection and rotation of these CMEs can be well-described by assuming they propagate with constant angular momentum beyond 10 R{sub ⊙}. The assumption of constant angular momentum beyond 10 R{sub ⊙} yields underestimates of the total deflection at 1 AU of only 1%–5% and underestimates of the rotation of 10%. Since the deflection from magnetic forces is determined by 10 R{sub ⊙}, non-magnetic forces must be responsible for any observed interplanetary deflections or rotations where the CME has increasing angular momentum.

  12. Primary cutaneous Ewing's sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor manifesting numerous small and huge ulcerated masses: its complete remission by chemotherapy and magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahk, Won-Jong [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Uijeongbu St. Mary' s Hospital, Uijeongbu (Korea); Chang, Eun-Deok; Lee, An-Hee [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Pathology, Uijeongbu St. Mary' s Hospital, Uijeongbu (Korea); Bae, Jung Min; Kim, Jin Woo [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Dermatology, Uijeongbu St. Mary' s Hospital, Uijeongbu (Korea); Chun, Kyung-Ah [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, Uijeongbu St. Mary' s Hospital, Uijeongbu (Korea); Rho, Sang-Young [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Hemato-oncology, Uijeongbu St. Mary' s Hospital, Uijeongbu (Korea)

    2010-06-15

    Extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma (ES) and primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) are widely regarded as clinically and histologically identical tumors which consist of small blue round cells. Extraskeletal ESs/PNETs usually occur in the deep soft tissues of the paraspinal region, chest wall, or lower extremities. However, superficially located cases, so-called cutaneous ESs/PNETs, are exceedingly rare, and the vast majority of the reported cases present as a single small mass. We present magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and clinical course of a unique case of primary cutaneous ES/PNET presenting as numerous huge masses with severe ulceration on them. (orig.)

  13. Statistical study of coronal mass ejection source locations: Understanding CMEs viewed in coronagraphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuming; Chen, Caixia; Gui, Bin; Shen, Chenglong; Ye, Pinzhong; Wang, S.

    2011-04-01

    How to properly understand coronal mass ejections (CMEs) viewed in white light coronagraphs is crucial to many relative researches in solar and space physics. The issue is now particularly addressed in this paper through studying the source locations of all the 1078 Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) CMEs listed in Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop (CDAW) CME catalog during 1997-1998 and their correlation with CMEs' apparent parameters. By manually checking LASCO and Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) movies of these CMEs, we find that, except 231 CMEs whose source locations cannot be identified due to poor data, there are 288 CMEs with location identified on the frontside solar disk, 234 CMEs appearing above solar limb, and 325 CMEs without evident eruptive signatures in the field of view of EIT. On the basis of the statistical results of CMEs' source locations, there are four physical issues: (1) the missing rate of CMEs by SOHO LASCO and EIT, (2) the mass of CMEs, (3) the causes of halo CMEs, and (4) the deflections of CMEs in the corona, are exhaustively analyzed. It is found that (1) about 32% frontside CMEs cannot be recognized by SOHO, (2) the brightness of a CME at any heliocentric distance is roughly positively correlated with its speed, and the CME mass derived from the brightness is probably overestimated, (3) both projection effect and violent eruption are the major causes of halo CMEs, and especially for limb halo CMEs the latter is the primary one, and (4) most CMEs deflected toward equator near the solar minimum; these deflections can be classified into three types: the asymmetrical expansion, the nonradial ejection, and the deflected propagation.

  14. Quantitative analysis of bidirectional electron fluxes within coronal mass ejections at 1 AU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J.L.; Gosling, J.T.; McComas, D.J.; Bame, S.J.; Feldman, W.C.

    1991-01-01

    The solar wind electron heat flux is carried primarily by suprathermal halo'' electrons beamed antisunward along the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), indicating magnetic connection to the Sun only in one direction. However, electron observations at 1 AU show that counterstreaming halo beams, suggesting closed magnetic structures, prevail within coronal mass ejections (CMEs). These structures might be magnetic tongues'', tied to the Sun at both ends, magnetically detached plasmoids, or complex flux rope structures. Here we present first results of analysis of ISEE-3 observations within 39 CMEs, including the asymmetry between the counterstreaming beams and its control by the IMF orientation, and the variation of the electron distributions as CMEs convect past the spacecraft. We find that some CMEs contain nearly symmetric electron beams, while others are strongly asymmetric, and that the antisunward beam is generally dominant. The more nearly radial the IMF, the greater is the asymmetry between outward and inward beams. We present an example of a distinctive strahl-on-strahl'' distribution, suggesting continued magnetic connection to the corona, in which a narrow antisunward beam is superimposed on a broader beam. Taken as a whole, our results appear to favor a tongue or flux rope scenario rather than a fully detached plasmoid. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Maximum Coronal Mass Ejection Speed as an Indicator of Solar and Geomagnetic Activities

    CERN Document Server

    Kilcik, A; Abramenko, V; Goode, P R; Gopalswamy, N; Ozguc, A; Rozelot, J P; 10.1088/0004-637X/727/1/44

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between the monthly averaged maximal speeds of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), international sunspot number (ISSN), and the geomagnetic Dst and Ap indices covering the 1996-2008 time interval (solar cycle 23). Our new findings are as follows. (1) There is a noteworthy relationship between monthly averaged maximum CME speeds and sunspot numbers, Ap and Dst indices. Various peculiarities in the monthly Dst index are correlated better with the fine structures in the CME speed profile than that in the ISSN data. (2) Unlike the sunspot numbers, the CME speed index does not exhibit a double peak maximum. Instead, the CME speed profile peaks during the declining phase of solar cycle 23. Similar to the Ap index, both CME speed and the Dst indices lag behind the sunspot numbers by several months. (3) The CME number shows a double peak similar to that seen in the sunspot numbers. The CME occurrence rate remained very high even near the minimum of the solar cycle 23, when both the sunspot ...

  16. Comparison of Asymmetric and Ice-cream Cone Models for Halo Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, H.; Moon, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Halo coronal mass ejections (HCMEs) are major cause of the geomagnetic storms. To minimize the projection effect by coronagraph observation, several cone models have been suggested: an ice-cream cone model, an asymmetric cone model etc. These models allow us to determine the three dimensional parameters of HCMEs such as radial speed, angular width, and the angle between sky plane and central axis of the cone. In this study, we compare these parameters obtained from different models using 48 well-observed HCMEs from 2001 to 2002. And we obtain the root mean square error (RMS error) between measured projection speeds and calculated projection speeds for both cone models. As a result, we find that the radial speeds obtained from the models are well correlated with each other (R = 0.86), and the correlation coefficient of angular width is 0.6. The correlation coefficient of the angle between sky plane and central axis of the cone is 0.31, which is much smaller than expected. The reason may be due to the fact that the source locations of the asymmetric cone model are distributed near the center, while those of the ice-cream cone model are located in a wide range. The average RMS error of the asymmetric cone model (85.6km/s) is slightly smaller than that of the ice-cream cone model (87.8km/s).

  17. Geometric Triangulation of Imaging Observations to Track Coronal Mass Ejections Continuously Out to 1 AU

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ying; Luhmann, Janet G; Vourlidas, Angelos; Bale, Stuart D; Lin, Robert P

    2010-01-01

    We describe a geometric triangulation technique, based on time-elongation maps constructed from imaging observations, to track coronal mass ejections (CMEs) continuously in the heliosphere and predict their impact on the Earth. Taking advantage of stereoscopic imaging observations from STEREO, this technique can determine the propagation direction and radial distance of CMEs from their birth in the corona all the way to 1 AU. The efficacy of the method is demonstrated by its application to the 2008 December 12 CME, which manifests as a magnetic cloud (MC) from in situ measurements at the Earth. The predicted arrival time and radial velocity at the Earth are well confirmed by the in situ observations around the MC. Our method reveals non-radial motions and velocity changes of the CME over large distances in the heliosphere. It also associates the flux-rope structure measured in situ with the dark cavity of the CME in imaging observations. Implementation of the technique, which is expected to be a routine possi...

  18. Constraining the Kinematics of Coronal Mass Ejections in the Inner Heliosphere with In Situ Signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Rollett, T; Temmer, M; Veronig, A M; Farrugia, C J; Biernat, H K

    2011-01-01

    We present a new approach to combine remote observations and in situ data by STEREO/HI and Wind, respectively, to derive the kinematics and propagation directions of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). We used two methods, Fixed-{\\phi} (F{\\phi}) and Harmonic Mean (HM), to convert ICME elongations into distance, and constrained the ICME direction such that the ICME time-distance and time-velocity profiles are most consistent with in situ measurements of the arrival time and velocity. The derived time-velocity functions from the Sun to 1 AU for the three events under study (1-6 June 2008, 13-18 February 2009, 3-5 April 2010) do not show strong differences for the two extreme geometrical assumptions of a wide ICME with a circular front (HM) or an ICME of small spatial extent in the ecliptic (F{\\phi}). Due to the geometrical assumptions, HM delivers the propagation direction further away from the observing spacecraft with a mean difference of ~25\\circ.

  19. Thermosphere and geomagnetic response to interplanetary coronal mass ejections observed by ACE and GRACE: Statistical results

    CERN Document Server

    Krauss, S; Veronig, A M; Baur, O; Lammer, H

    2015-01-01

    For the period July 2003 to August 2010, the interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) catalogue maintained by Richardson and Cane lists 106 Earth-directed events, which have been measured in-situ by plasma and field instruments onboard the ACE satellite. We present a statistical investigation of the Earth's thermospheric neutral density response by means of accelerometer measurements collected by the GRACE satellites, which are available for 104 ICMEs in the data set, and its relation to various geomagnetic indices and characteristic ICME parameters such as the impact speed, southward magnetic field strength (Bz). The majority of ICMEs causes a distinct density enhancement in the thermosphere, with up to a factor of eight compared to the pre-event level. We find high correlations between ICME Bz and thermospheric density enhancements (~0.9), while the correlation with the ICME impact speed is somewhat smaller (~0.7). The geomagnetic indices revealing the highest correlations are Dst and SYM-H (~0.9), the l...

  20. Propagation of the 2012 March Coronal Mass Ejections from the Sun to Heliopause

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ying D; Wang, Chi; Luhmann, Janet G

    2014-01-01

    In 2012 March the Sun exhibited extraordinary activities. In particular, the active region NOAA AR 11429 emitted a series of large coronal mass ejections (CMEs) which were imaged by STEREO as it rotated with the Sun from the east to west. These sustained eruptions are expected to generate a global shell of disturbed material sweeping through the heliosphere. A cluster of shocks and interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs) were observed near the Earth, and are propagated outward from 1 AU using an MHD model. The transient streams interact with each other, which erases memory of the source and results in a large merged interaction region (MIR) with a preceding shock. The MHD model predicts that the shock and MIR would reach 120 AU around 2013 April 22, which agrees well with the period of radio emissions and the time of a transient disturbance in galactic cosmic rays detected by Voyager 1. These results are important for understanding the "fate" of CMEs in the outer heliosphere and provide confidence that the heliopause is ...

  1. Predicting Coronal Mass Ejections transit times to Earth with neural network

    CERN Document Server

    Sudar, D; Dumbović, M

    2015-01-01

    Predicting transit times of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) from their initial parameters is a very important subject, not only from the scientific perspective, but also because CMEs represent a hazard for human technology. We used a neural network to analyse transit times for 153 events with only two input parameters: initial velocity of the CME, $v$, and Central Meridian Distance, CMD, of its associated flare. We found that transit time dependence on $v$ is showing a typical drag-like pattern in the solar wind. The results show that the speed at which acceleration by drag changes to deceleration is $v\\approx$500 km s$^{-1}$. Transit times are also found to be shorter for CMEs associated with flares on the western hemisphere than those originating on the eastern side of the Sun. We attribute this difference to the eastward deflection of CMEs on their path to 1 AU. The average error of the NN prediction in comparison to observations is $\\approx$12 hours which is comparable to other studies on the same subject.

  2. Observations of an extreme storm in interplanetary space caused by successive coronal mass ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ying D; Kajdič, Primož; Kilpua, Emilia K J; Lugaz, Noé; Nitta, Nariaki V; Möstl, Christian; Lavraud, Benoit; Bale, Stuart D; Farrugia, Charles J; Galvin, Antoinette B

    2014-01-01

    Space weather refers to dynamic conditions on the Sun and in the space environment of the Earth, which are often driven by solar eruptions and their subsequent interplanetary disturbances. It has been unclear how an extreme space weather storm forms and how severe it can be. Here we report and investigate an extreme event with multi-point remote-sensing and in-situ observations. The formation of the extreme storm showed striking novel features. We suggest that the in-transit interaction between two closely launched coronal mass ejections resulted in the extreme enhancement of the ejecta magnetic field observed near 1 AU at STEREO A. The fast transit to STEREO A (in only 18.6 hours), or the unusually weak deceleration of the event, was caused by the preconditioning of the upstream solar wind by an earlier solar eruption. These results provide a new view crucial to solar physics and space weather as to how an extreme space weather event can arise from a combination of solar eruptions.

  3. UVCS/SoHO Catalog of Coronal Mass Ejections from 1996 to 2005: Spectroscopic Proprieties

    CERN Document Server

    Giordano, Silvio; Raymond, John; Ko, Yuan-Kuen; Suleiman, Raid

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectra of the extended solar corona have been routinely obtained by SoHO/UVCS since 1996. Sudden variations of spectral parameters are mainly due to the detection of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) crossing the instrumental slit. We present a catalog of CME ultraviolet spectra based upon a systematic search of events in the LASCO CME catalog, and we discuss their statistical properties. Our catalog includes 1059 events through the end of 2005, covering nearly a full solar cycle. It is online available at the URL $\\rm http://solarweb.oato.inaf.it/UVCS\\_CME$ and embedded in the online LASCO CME catalog ($\\rm http://cdaw.gsfc.nasa.gov/CME\\_list$). The emission lines observed provide diagnostics of CME plasma parameters, such as the light-of-sight velocity, density and temperature and allow to link the CME onset data to the extended corona white-light images. The catalog indicates whether there are clear signatures of features such as shock waves, current sheets, O VI flares, helical motions and which ...

  4. History and Development of Coronal Mass Ejections as a Key Player in Solar Terrestrial Relationship

    CERN Document Server

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2016-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are relatively a recently-discovered phenomenon, in 1971, some fifteen years into the Space Era. It took another two decades to realize that CMEs are the most important players in solar terrestrial relationship as the root cause of severe weather in Earth's space environment. CMEs are now counted among the major natural hazards because they cause large solar energetic particle (SEP) events and major geomagnetic storms, both of which pose danger to humans and their technology in space and ground. Geomagnetic storms discovered in the 1700s, solar flares discovered in the 1800s, and SEP events discovered in the1900s are all now found to be closely related to CMEs via various physical processes occurring at various locations in and around CMEs, when they interact with the ambient medium. This article identifies a number of key developments that preceded the discovery of white-light CMEs suggesting that CMEs were waiting to be discovered. The last two decades witnessed an explosion of...

  5. Stationarity and periodicities of linear speed of coronal mass ejection: a statistical signal processing approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Anirban; Khondekar, Mofazzal Hossain; Bhattacharjee, Anup Kumar

    2017-09-01

    In this paper initiative has been taken to search the periodicities of linear speed of Coronal Mass Ejection in solar cycle 23. Double exponential smoothing and Discrete Wavelet Transform are being used for detrending and filtering of the CME linear speed time series. To choose the appropriate statistical methodology for the said purpose, Smoothed Pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution (SPWVD) has been used beforehand to confirm the non-stationarity of the time series. The Time-Frequency representation tool like Hilbert Huang Transform and Empirical Mode decomposition has been implemented to unearth the underneath periodicities in the non-stationary time series of the linear speed of CME. Of all the periodicities having more than 95% Confidence Level, the relevant periodicities have been segregated out using Integral peak detection algorithm. The periodicities observed are of low scale ranging from 2-159 days with some relevant periods like 4 days, 10 days, 11 days, 12 days, 13.7 days, 14.5 and 21.6 days. These short range periodicities indicate the probable origin of the CME is the active longitude and the magnetic flux network of the sun. The results also insinuate about the probable mutual influence and causality with other solar activities (like solar radio emission, Ap index, solar wind speed, etc.) owing to the similitude between their periods and CME linear speed periods. The periodicities of 4 days and 10 days indicate the possible existence of the Rossby-type waves or planetary waves in Sun.

  6. Filaments disappearance in relation to coronal mass ejections during the solar cycle 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawad, R.; Shaltout, Mosalam; Yousef, M.; Yousef, S.; Ewaida, M.

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the relationship between filament disappearances with CMEs during solar period 1996-2010. We used the observed disappearing filaments in Hα data from Meudon given in NOAA, and coronal mass ejections data (CMEs) from SOHO/LASCO. We obtained 278 CME events (14%) contemporary filament disappearances and CME ejections (from a total of 2018 filament disappearance events and 15,874 CME events during 1996-2010). We found that the number of associated CME-filament disappearance events increased with the increase of the solar activity and significantly decreased with quiet sun. The longer filament disappearances have activity and ability to contemporary association with CMEs more than shorter filament disappearances. The filament disappearance powers the associated CMEs. CMEs which are associated with filament disappearance are ejected with higher speeds, massive, more energetic, and smaller angular width compared to non-associated CME events. In addition, the associated filament disappearance CMEs have two types depending on their duration; short-lived (9 h).

  7. Heliospheric Propagation of Coronal Mass Ejections: Drag-Based Model Fitting

    CERN Document Server

    Žic, T; Temmer, M

    2015-01-01

    The so-called drag-based model (DBM) simulates analytically the propagation of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in interplanetary space and allows the prediction of their arrival times and impact speeds at any point in the heliosphere ("target"). The DBM is based on the assumption that beyond a distance of about 20 solar radii from the Sun, the dominant force acting on CMEs is the "aerodynamic" drag force. In the standard form of DBM, the user provisionally chooses values for the model input parameters, by which the kinematics of the CME over the entire Sun--"target" distance range is defined. The choice of model input parameters is usually based on several previously undertaken statistical studies. In other words, the model is used by ad hoc implementation of statistics-based values of the input parameters, which are not necessarily appropriate for the CME under study. Furthermore, such a procedure lacks quantitative information on how well the simulation reproduces the coronagraphically observed kinematics of ...

  8. On the 3-D reconstruction of Coronal Mass Ejections using coronagraph data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mierla

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronal Mass ejections (CMEs are enormous eruptions of magnetized plasma expelled from the Sun into the interplanetary space, over the course of hours to days. They can create major disturbances in the interplanetary medium and trigger severe magnetic storms when they collide with the Earth's magnetosphere. It is important to know their real speed, propagation direction and 3-D configuration in order to accurately predict their arrival time at the Earth. Using data from the SECCHI coronagraphs onboard the STEREO mission, which was launched in October 2006, we can infer the propagation direction and the 3-D structure of such events. In this review, we first describe different techniques that were used to model the 3-D configuration of CMEs in the coronagraph field of view (up to 15 R⊙. Then, we apply these techniques to different CMEs observed by various coronagraphs. A comparison of results obtained from the application of different reconstruction algorithms is presented and discussed.

  9. Coronal mass ejection initiation: On the nature of the Flux Cancellation Model

    CERN Document Server

    Amari, Tahar; Mikic, Zoran; Linker, Jon A

    2010-01-01

    We consider a three-dimensional bipolar force-free magnetic field with non zero magnetic helicity, occupying a half-space, and study the problem of its evolution driven by an imposed photospheric flux decrease. For this specific setting of the Flux Cancellation Model describing coronal mass ejections occuring in active regions, we address the issues of the physical meaning of flux decrease, of the influence on field evolution of the size of the domain over which this decrease is imposed, and of the existence of an energetic criterion characterizing the possible onset of disruption of the configuration. We show that: (1) The imposed flux disappearance can be interpreted in terms of transport of positive and negative fluxes towards the inversion line, where they get annihilated. (2) For the particular case actually computed, in which the initial state is quite sheared, the formation of a twisted flux rope and the subsequent global disruption of the configuration are obtained when the flux has decreased by only ...

  10. High Energy Solar Particle Events and their Associated Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Manoharan, P K

    2010-01-01

    Intense solar energetic particle (SEP) events data, associated with ground level enhancements (GLEs), occurred during 1989 to 2006 have been obtained from the spectrometers on board GOES spacecraft in the energy range 10-100 MeV. The interplanetary effects of these events and their associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) have been provided by the LASCO/SOHO coronagraph images in the field of view of 2-30 {\\rsun} and the interplanetary scintillation images from the Ooty Radio Telescope in the heliocentric distance range of $\\sim$40-250 R$_\\odot$. The comparison between the radial evolution of the CME and its associated particle spectrum shows that the spectrum is soft at the onset of the particle event. A flat spectrum is observed at the peak of the particle event and the spectrum becomes steeper as the CME moves farther out into the inner heliosphere. However, the magnitude of change in spectral slopes differs from one CME to the other, suggesting the difference in energy available within the CME to drive th...

  11. On the Propagation of a Geoeffective Coronal Mass Ejection during March 15 -- 17, 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yuming; Liu, Jiajia; Shen, Chenglong; Shen, Fang; Yang, Zicai; Zic, T; Vrsnak, B; Webb, D F; Liu, Rui; Wang, S; Zhang, Jie; Hu, Qiang; Zhuang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The largest geomagnetic storm so far in the solar cycle 24 was produced by a fast coronal mass ejection (CME) originating on 2015 March 15. It was an initially west-oriented CME and expected to only cause a weak geomagnetic disturbance. Why did this CME finally cause such a large geomagnetic storm? We try to find some clues by investigating its propagation from the Sun to 1 AU. First, we reconstruct the CME's kinematic properties in the corona from the SOHO and SDO imaging data with the aid of the graduated cylindrical shell (GCS) model. It is suggested that the CME propagated to the west $\\sim$$33^\\circ$$\\pm$$10^\\circ$ away from the Sun-Earth line with a speed of about 817 km s$^{-1}$ before leaving the field of view of the SOHO/LASCO C3 camera. A magnetic cloud (MC) corresponding to this CME was measured in-situ by the Wind spacecraft two days later. By applying two MC reconstruction methods, we infer the configuration of the MC as well as some kinematic information, which implies that the CME possibly expe...

  12. The Interaction of Two Coronal Mass Ejections: Influence of Relative Orientation

    CERN Document Server

    Lugaz, N; Manchester, W B; Schwadron, N

    2013-01-01

    We report on a numerical investigation of two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) which interact as they propagate in the inner heliosphere. We focus on the effect of the orientation of the CMEs relative to each other by performing four different simulations with the axis of the second CME rotated by 90 degrees from one simulation to the next. Each magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulation is performed in three dimensions (3-D) with the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) in an idealized setting reminiscent of solar minimum conditions. We extract synthetic satellite measurements during and after the interaction and compare the different cases. We also analyze the kinematics of the two CMEs, including the evolution of their widths and aspect ratios. We find that the first CME contracts radially as a result of the interaction in all cases, but the amount of subsequent radial expansion depends on the relative orientation of the two CMEs. Reconnection between the two ejecta and between the ejecta and the interplanetary...

  13. Interplanetary Propagation Behavior of the Fast Coronal Mass Ejection from 23 July 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Temmer, Manuela

    2014-01-01

    The fast coronal mass ejection (CME) from 23 July 2012 raised attention due to its extremely short transit time from Sun to 1 AU of less than 21 h. In-situ data from STEREO-A revealed the arrival of a fast forward shock with a speed of more than 2200 km s$^{-1}$ followed by a magnetic structure moving with almost 1900 km s$^{-1}$. We investigate the propagation behavior of the CME shock and magnetic structure with the aim to reproduce the short transit time and high impact speed as derived from in-situ data. We carefully measure the 3D kinematics of the CME using the graduated cylindrical shell model, and obtain a maximum speed of 2580$\\pm$280 km s$^{-1}$ for the CME shock and of 2270$\\pm$420 km s$^{-1}$ for its magnetic structure. Based on the 3D kinematics, the drag-based model (DBM) reproduces the observational data reasonably well. To successfully simulate the CME shock, we find that the ambient flow speed should be of average value close to the slow solar wind speed (450 km s$^{-1}$), and the initial sho...

  14. Properties of the Fast Forward Shock Driven by the July 23 2012 Extreme Coronal Mass Ejection

    CERN Document Server

    Riley, Pete; Giacalone, Joe; Lario, David; Liu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Late on July 23, 2012, the STEREO-A spacecraft encountered a fast forward shock driven by a coronal mass ejection launched from the Sun earlier that same day. The estimated travel time of the disturbance ($\\sim 20$ hrs), together with the massive magnetic field strengths measured within the ejecta ($> 100$nT), made it one of the most extreme events observed during the space era. In this study, we examine the properties of the shock wave. Because of an instrument malfunction, plasma measurements during the interval surrounding the CME were limited, and our approach has been modified to capitalize on the available measurements and suitable proxies, where possible. We were able to infer the following properties. First, the shock normal was pointing predominantly in the radial direction (${\\bf n} = 0.97 {\\bf e}_r -0.09 {\\bf e}_t -0.23 {\\bf e}_n$). Second, the angle between ${\\bf n}$ and the upstream magnetic field, $\\theta_{Bn}$, was estimated to be $\\approx 34^{\\circ}$, making the shock "quasi-parallel," and sup...

  15. Data-constrained Coronal Mass Ejections in a Global Magnetohydrodynamics Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, M.; Manchester, W. B.; van der Holst, B.; Sokolov, I.; Tóth, G.; Mullinix, R. E.; Taktakishvili, A.; Chulaki, A.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2017-01-01

    We present a first-principles-based coronal mass ejection (CME) model suitable for both scientific and operational purposes by combining a global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) solar wind model with a flux-rope-driven CME model. Realistic CME events are simulated self-consistently with high fidelity and forecasting capability by constraining initial flux rope parameters with observational data from GONG, SOHO/LASCO, and STEREO/COR. We automate this process so that minimum manual intervention is required in specifying the CME initial state. With the newly developed data-driven Eruptive Event Generator using Gibson–Low configuration, we present a method to derive Gibson–Low flux rope parameters through a handful of observational quantities so that the modeled CMEs can propagate with the desired CME speeds near the Sun. A test result with CMEs launched with different Carrington rotation magnetograms is shown. Our study shows a promising result for using the first-principles-based MHD global model as a forecasting tool, which is capable of predicting the CME direction of propagation, arrival time, and ICME magnetic field at 1 au (see the companion paper by Jin et al. 2016a).

  16. A Numerical Study of Long-Range Magnetic Impacts during Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, M; Cheung, M C M; DeRosa, M L; Nitta, N V; Title, A M

    2016-01-01

    With the global view and high-cadence observations from SDO/AIA and STEREO, many spatially separated solar eruptive events appear to be coupled. However, the mechanisms for "sympathetic" events are still largely unknown. In this study, we investigate the impact of an erupting flux rope on surrounding solar structures through large-scale magnetic coupling. We build a realistic environment of the solar corona on 2011 February 15 using a global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model and initiate coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in active region (AR) 11158 by inserting Gibson-Low analytical flux ropes. We show that a CME's impact on the surrounding structures depends not only on the magnetic strength of these structures and their distance to the source region, but also on the interaction between the CME with the large-scale magnetic field. Within the CME expansion domain where the flux rope field directly interacts with the solar structures, expansion-induced reconnection often modifies the overlying field, thereby increa...

  17. Periodicity in the most violent solar eruptions: recent observations of coronal mass ejections and flares revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng-Xin Gao; Jing-Lan Xie; Hong-Fei Liang

    2012-01-01

    Using the Hilbert-Huang Transform method,we investigate the periodicity in the monthly occurrence numbers and monthly mean energy of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) observed by the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment on board the Solar and Heliographic Observatory from 1999 March to 2009 December.We also investigate the periodicity in the monthly occurrence numbers of Hα flares and monthly mean flare indices from 1996 January to 2008 December.The results show the following.(1) The period of 5.66 yr is found to be statistically significant in the monthly occurrence numbers of CMEs; the period of 10.5 yr is found to be statistically significant in the monthly mean energy of CMEs.(2) The periods of 3.05 and 8.70 yr are found to be statistically significant in the monthly occurrence numbers of Hα flares; the period of 9.14yr is found to be statistically significant in the monthly mean flare indices.

  18. Enhancement of Terrestrial Diffuse X-ray Emission Associated With Coronal Mass Ejection and Geomagnetic Storm

    CERN Document Server

    Ezoe, Yuichiro; Yoshitake, Hiroshi; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Terada, Naoki; Oishi, Shihoko; Ohashi, Takaya

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of a Suzaku observation taken during the geomagnetic storm of 2005 August 23-24. We found time variation of diffuse soft X-ray emission when a coronal mass ejection hit Earth and caused a geomagnetic storm. The diffuse emission consists of fluorescent scattering of solar X-rays and exospheric solarwind charge exchange. The former is characterized by a neutral oxygen emission line due to strong heating of the upper atmosphere during the storm time, while the latter is dominated by a sum of C V, C VI, N VI, N VII, O VII, and O VIII emission lines due to the enhanced solar wind flux in the vicinity of the exosphere. Using the solar wind data taken with the ACE and WIND satellites,a time correlation between the solar wind and the strong O VII line flux were investigated. We estimated necessary column densities for the solar X-ray scattering and exospheric SWCX. From these results, we argue that a part of the solar wind ions enter inside the magnetosphere and cause the SWCX reaction.

  19. Interplanetary coronal mass ejections at Mercury: Database and effects on the magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Reka; Anderson, Brian J.; Schwadron, Nathan; Lugaz, Noé; Farrugia, Charles; Philpott, Lydia; Paty, Carol

    2016-07-01

    We use observations from the MESSENGER spacecraft, in orbit around Mercury, to investigate interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) near 0.3 AU. MESSENGER is the first spacecraft since Helios 1 and 2 in the 1980s to make in situ measurements of the interplanetary medium at heliocentric distances < 0.5 AU. Because extensive observations, both remote sensing and in-situ, are available throughout the MESSENGER mission, these data present a unique opportunity for observing the innermost heliosphere and the development of the solar wind and interplanetary transients. We catalog ICME events observed by the MESSENGER Magnetometer between 2011 and 2015 and present statistical analyses of ICME properties at Mercury. In addition, using existing data sets of ICMEs at 1 AU, we investigate key ICME property changes from Mercury to 1 AU. Using our database of nearly 70 ICMEs, we also statistically characterize Mercury's magnetosphere during times of ICMEs, when Mercury's magnetosphere becomes significantly altered. We conduct a systematic investigation of the large-scale processes in Mercury's magnetosphere during extreme solar wind conditions, by studying the motion of the bow shock and magnetopause boundaries, erosion of the dayside magnetosphere, the size, extent, and plasma pressure of the cusp region, and the plasma precipitation to the surface.

  20. Multi-viewpoint Coronal Mass Ejection Catalog Based on STEREO COR2 Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vourlidas, Angelos; Balmaceda, Laura A.; Stenborg, Guillermo; Dal Lago, Alisson

    2017-04-01

    We present the first multi-viewpoint coronal mass ejection (CME) catalog. The events are identified visually in simultaneous total brightness observations from the twin SECCHI/COR2 coronagraphs on board the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory mission. The Multi-View CME Catalog differs from past catalogs in three key aspects: (1) all events between the two viewpoints are cross-linked, (2) each event is assigned a physics-motivated morphological classification (e.g., jet, wave, and flux rope), and (3) kinematic and geometric information is extracted semi-automatically via a supervised image segmentation algorithm. The database extends from the beginning of the COR2 synoptic program (2007 March) to the end of dual-viewpoint observations (2014 September). It contains 4473 unique events with 3358 events identified in both COR2s. Kinematic properties exist currently for 1747 events (26% of COR2-A events and 17% of COR2-B events). We examine several issues, made possible by this cross-linked CME database, including the role of projection on the perceived morphology of events, the missing CME rate, the existence of cool material in CMEs, the solar cycle dependence on CME rate, speeds and width, and the existence of flux rope within CMEs. We discuss the implications for past single-viewpoint studies and for Space Weather research. The database is publicly available on the web including all available measurements. We hope that it will become a useful resource for the community.

  1. Radial Speed Evolution of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections during Solar Cycle 23

    CERN Document Server

    Iju, Tomoya; Fujiki, Ken'ichi

    2013-01-01

    We report radial speed evolution of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) detected by the SOHO/LASCO coronagraph, interplanetary scintillation (IPS) at 327 MHz, and in-situ observations. In this study, we analyze solar wind disturbance factor (g-value) data derived from IPS observations during 1997-2009 covering nearly whole period of Solar Cycle 23. By comparing observations from the SOHO/LASCO, IPS, and in-situ, we then identify 39 ICMEs that could be analyzed carefully. Here, we define two speeds VSOHO and Vbg that are initial speed of ICME and the speed of background solar wind, respectively. Examinations for them yield the following results; 1) Fast ICMEs (with VSOHO - Vbg > 500 km/s) rapidly decelerate, moderate ICMEs (with 0 km/s < VSOHO - Vbg < 500 km/s) show either gradually decelerating or uniform motion, and slow ICMEs (with VSOHO - Vbg < 0 km/s) accelerate. The radial speeds converge on the speed of background solar wind during their outward propagation. We subsequently find; 2) b...

  2. Propagation of Solar Energetic Particles during Multiple Coronal Mass Ejection Events

    CERN Document Server

    Pohjolainen, Silja; Valtonen, Eino

    2015-01-01

    We study solar energetic particle (SEP) events during multiple solar eruptions. The analysed sequences, on 24-26 November 2000, 9-13 April 2001, and 22-25 August 2005, consisted of halo-type coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that originated from the same active region and were associated with intense flares, EUV waves, and interplanetary (IP) radio type II and type III bursts. The first two solar events in each of these sequences showed SEP enhancements near Earth, but the third in the row did not. We observed that in these latter events the type III radio bursts were stopped at much higher frequencies than in the earlier events, indicating that the bursts did not reach the typical plasma density levels near Earth. To explain the missing third SEP event in each sequence, we suggest that the earlier-launched CMEs and the CME-driven shocks either reduced the seed particle population and thus led to inefficient particle acceleration, or that the earlier-launched CMEs and shocks changed the propagation paths or preve...

  3. Statistical Analysis of Periodic Oscillations in LASCO Coronal Mass Ejection Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalek, G.; Shanmugaraju, A.; Gopalswamy, N.; Yashiro, S.; Akiyama, S.

    2016-12-01

    A large set of coronal mass ejections (CMEs, 3463) has been selected to study their periodic oscillations in speed in the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission's Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) field of view. These events, reported in the SOHO/LASCO catalog in the period of time 1996 - 2004, were selected based on having at least 11 height-time measurements. This selection criterion allows us to construct at least ten-point speed-distance profiles and evaluate kinematic properties of CMEs with a reasonable accuracy. To identify quasi-periodic oscillations in the speed of the CMEs a sinusoidal function was fitted to speed-distance profiles and the speed-time profiles. Of the considered events 22 % revealed periodic velocity fluctuations. These speed oscillations have on average amplitude equal to 87 km s^{-1} and period 7.8 R _{⊙}/241 min (in distance/time). The study shows that speed oscillations are a common phenomenon associated with CME propagation implying that all the CMEs have a similar magnetic flux-rope structure. The nature of oscillations can be explained in terms of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves excited during the eruption process. More accurate detection of these modes could, in the future, enable us to characterize magnetic structures in space (space seismology).

  4. Is flux rope a necessary condition for the progenitor of coronal mass ejections?

    CERN Document Server

    Ouyang, Y; Chen, P F

    2015-01-01

    A magnetic flux rope structure is believed to exist in most coronal mass ejections (CMEs). However, it has been long debated whether the flux rope exists before eruption or is formed during eruption via magnetic reconnection. The controversy has been continuing because of our lack of routine measurements of the magnetic field in the pre-eruption structure, such as solar filaments. However, recently an indirect method was proposed to infer the magnetic field configuration based on the sign of helicity and the bearing direction of the filament barbs. In this paper, we apply this method to two erupting filament events, one on 2014 September 2 and the other on 2011 March 7, and find that the first filament is supported by a magnetic flux rope and the second filament is supported by a sheared arcade, i.e., the first one is an inverse-polarity filament and the second one is a normal-polarity filament. With the identification of the magnetic configurations in these two filaments, we stress that a flux rope is not a ...

  5. Ensemble prediction model of solar proton events associated with solar flares and coronal mass ejections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Huang; Hua-Ning Wang; Le-Ping Li

    2012-01-01

    An ensemble prediction model of solar proton events (SPEs),combining the information of solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs),is built.In this model,solar flares are parameterized by the peak flux,the duration and the longitude.In addition,CMEs are parameterized by the width,the speed and the measurement position angle.The importance of each parameter for the occurrence of SPEs is estimated by the information gain ratio.We find that the CME width and speed are more informative than the flare's peak flux and duration.As the physical mechanism of SPEs is not very clear,a hidden naive Bayes approach,which is a probability-based calculation method from the field of machine learning,is used to build the prediction model from the observational data.As is known,SPEs originate from solar flares and/or shock waves associated with CMEs.Hence,we first build two base prediction models using the properties of solar flares and CMEs,respectively.Then the outputs of these models are combined to generate the ensemble prediction model of SPEs.The ensemble prediction model incorporating the complementary information of solar flares and CMEs achieves better performance than each base prediction model taken separately.

  6. Solar flare associated coronal mass ejections causing geo-effectiveness and Forbush decreases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Beena; Chandra, Harish

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, we have selected 35 halo Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) associated with solar flares, Geomagnetic Storms (GSs) and Forbush decrease (Fd) chosen from 1st January 2000 to 31st December 2007 (i.e., the descending phase of solar cycle 23) observed by the Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) on board the SOHO spacecraft. Statistical analyses are performed to look at the distribution of solar flares associated with halo CMEs causing GSs and Fd and investigated the relationship between solar flare and halo CME parameters with GSs and Fd. Forbush decrease is the phenomenon of rapid decrease in cosmic ray intensity following the CME. Our analysis indicates that during 2000 to 2007 the northern region produced 44 % of solar flares associated with halo CMEs, GSs, and Fd, whereas 56 % solar flares associated with halo CMEs, GSs, and Fd were produced in the southern region. The northern and the southern hemispheres between 10° to 20° latitudinal belts are found to be more effective in producing events leading to Fd. From our selected events, we found that about 60 % of super-intense storms (Dst ≤ -200 nT) caused by halo CMEs are associated with X-class flares. Fast halo CMEs associated with X-class flares originating from 0° to 25° latitudes are better potential candidates in producing super-intense GSs than the slow halo CMEs associated with other classes of flares.

  7. OBSERVATION OF HEATING BY FLARE-ACCELERATED ELECTRONS IN A SOLAR CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glesener, Lindsay; Bain, Hazel M. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Krucker, Säm [Also at Institute of 4-D Technologies, School of Engineering, University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, 5210 Windisch, Switzerland. (Switzerland); Lin, Robert P., E-mail: glesener@ssl.berkeley.edu [Also at Physics Department, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. (United States)

    2013-12-20

    We report a Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observation of flare-accelerated electrons in the core of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and examine their role in heating the CME. Previous CME observations have revealed remarkably high thermal energies that can far surpass the CME's kinetic energy. A joint observation by RHESSI and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly of a partly occulted flare on 2010 November 3 allows us to test the hypothesis that this excess energy is collisionally deposited by flare-accelerated electrons. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images show an ejection forming the CME core and sheath, with isothermal multifilter analysis revealing temperatures of ∼11 MK in the core. RHESSI images reveal a large (∼100 × 50 arcsec{sup 2}) hard X-ray (HXR) source matching the location, shape, and evolution of the EUV plasma, indicating that the emerging CME is filled with flare-accelerated electrons. The time derivative of the EUV emission matches the HXR light curve (similar to the Neupert effect observed in soft and HXR time profiles), directly linking the CME temperature increase with the nonthermal electron energy loss, while HXR spectroscopy demonstrates that the nonthermal electrons contain enough energy to heat the CME. This is the most direct observation to date of flare-accelerated electrons heating a CME, emphasizing the close relationship of the two in solar eruptive events.

  8. Numerical research on the interaction between coronal mass ejection and streamer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶占银; 魏奉思; 冯学尚; 石勇; 姚久胜

    2002-01-01

    By proposing a two-dimensional triggering model with concentrically circular closed magnetic field line structure,numerical research is made on the asymmetric propagation feature of coronal mass ejection (CME) in two cases emerging at the solar northern latitudes 10° and 45° respectively.The numerical results can qualitatively explain some features of CME event observed by the spacecraft SOHO and show that:(i) In these two cases,the triggering model can initiate CME with an asymmetric closed magnetic field structure.(ii) Closed magnetic structure of CME event will keep deflecting to the current sheet when it propagates away from the sun and this deflecting effect mostly happens within tens of solar radii before CME travels finally along the current sheet.(iii) The triggering model emerging at different locations can introduce CME events with different magnetic shapes.This shape happens to be circular and crescent when the triggering model emerges at the northern latitudes 10° and 45°,respectively.``

  9. Detection of Coronal Mass Ejections Using Multiple Features and Space-Time Continuity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Yin, Jian-qin; Lin, Jia-ben; Feng, Zhi-quan; Zhou, Jin

    2017-07-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) release tremendous amounts of energy in the solar system, which has an impact on satellites, power facilities and wireless transmission. To effectively detect a CME in Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) C2 images, we propose a novel algorithm to locate the suspected CME regions, using the Extreme Learning Machine (ELM) method and taking into account the features of the grayscale and the texture. Furthermore, space-time continuity is used in the detection algorithm to exclude the false CME regions. The algorithm includes three steps: i) define the feature vector which contains textural and grayscale features of a running difference image; ii) design the detection algorithm based on the ELM method according to the feature vector; iii) improve the detection accuracy rate by using the decision rule of the space-time continuum. Experimental results show the efficiency and the superiority of the proposed algorithm in the detection of CMEs compared with other traditional methods. In addition, our algorithm is insensitive to most noise.

  10. Thermodynamic Structure of Collision-Dominated Expanding Plasma: Heating of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Richardson, J. D.; Belcher, J. W.; Kasper, J. C.; Elliott, H. A.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the thermodynamic structure of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) using combined surveys of the ejecta between 0.3 and 20 AU. ICMEs are shown to have a moderate expansion in the solar wind compared with theoretical predictions. The expansion seems to be governed by a polytrope with gamma approx. 1.3 in this distance range. We find that Coulomb collisions are important contributors to the ion-ion equilibration process in the ICME plasma. The alpha-proton differential speed quickly drops to below 10 km/s due to strong Coulomb collisions. However, the two species of particles are far from thermal equilibrium with a temperature ratio T(sub alpha/T(sub p) = 4-6, suggestive of a preferential heating of alpha particles. The plasma heating rate as a function of heliocentric &stance required for the temperature profile is deduced by taking into account the expansion and energy transfer between protons and alphas via Coulomb collisions. The turbulence dissipation rate is also inferred from the inertial range power spectrum of magnetic fluctuations within ICMEs. Comparison of the turbulence dissipation rate with the required heating rate shows that turbulence dissipation seems sufficient to explain the ICME heating. Sources powering the turbulence are also investigated by examining the instabilities induced by temperature anisotropies and energy deposition by pickup ions.

  11. Pseudo-automatic Determination of Coronal Mass Ejections’ Kinematics in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Carlos Roberto; Dal Lago, Alisson; Echer, Ezequiel; Stenborg, Guillermo; Rodrigues Souza de Mendonça, Rafael

    2017-06-01

    Coronal mass ejection (CME) events are among the main drivers of geomagnetic disturbances, and hence play a central role in the Sun-Earth system. Their monitoring and, in particular, the determination of their speed and direction of propagation are key issues for the forecasting of space weather near to Earth. We have implemented a method to track CME events in three dimensions by combining triangulation and tie-pointing analysis with a supervised computer vision algorithm. This novel approach does not rely on any geometric constraint, and eliminates the need for visual identification of the CME boundaries. We applied our method to 17 CME events observed simultaneously by the twin Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) COR2 coronagraph imagers from 2008 December to 2011 November in order to obtain their 3D kinematical characterization (i.e., the velocity vector) along with their morphological properties. About ten of these events have already been analyzed using other methodologies. In these cases, we carried out a thorough comparison with our results and found that, in spite of the different nature and spatial coverage range of the other methods with respect to CORSET3D, the majority of the results agree. We found, however, that three events exhibited discrepancies in the magnitude of the velocity vector, four in the longitudinal direction of propagation, and in only one case was there a discrepancy in latitude. The discrepancies appeared in those cases where quasi-simultaneous, quasi-co-located events were observed in the coronagraphs’ fields of view.

  12. Linking remote imagery of a coronal mass ejection to its in situ signatures at 1 AU

    CERN Document Server

    Möstl, Christian; Temmer, Manuela; Miklenic, Christiane; Veronig, Astrid M; Galvin, Antoinette B; Leitner, Martin; Biernat, Helfried K

    2009-01-01

    In a case study (June 6-7, 2008) we report on how the internal structure of a coronal mass ejection (CME) at 1 AU can be anticipated from remote observations of white-light images of the heliosphere. Favorable circumstances are the absence of fast equatorial solar wind streams and a low CME velocity which allow us to relate the imaging and in-situ data in a straightforward way. The STEREO-B spacecraft encountered typical signatures of a magnetic flux rope inside an interplanetary CME (ICME) whose axis was inclined at 45 degree to the solar equatorial plane. Various CME direction-finding techniques yield consistent results to within 15 degree. Further, remote images from STEREO-A show that (1) the CME is unambiguously connected to the ICME and can be tracked all the way to 1 AU, (2) the particular arc-like morphology of the CME points to an inclined axis, and (3) the three-part structure of the CME may be plausibly related to the in situ data. This is a first step in predicting both the direction of travel and...

  13. Interactions between Coronal Mass Ejections Viewed in Coordinated Imaging and In Situ Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ying D; Mostl, Christian; Martinez-Oliveros, Juan C; Bale, Stuart D; Lin, Robert P; Harrison, Richard A; Temmer, Manuela; Webb, David F; Odstrcil, Dusan

    2012-01-01

    The successive coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from 2010 July 30 - August 1 present us the first opportunity to study CME-CME interactions with unprecedented heliospheric imaging and in situ observations from multiple vantage points. We describe two cases of CME interactions: merging of two CMEs launched close in time and overtaking of a preceding CME by a shock wave. The first two CMEs on August 1 interact close to the Sun and form a merged front, which then overtakes the July 30 CME near 1 AU, as revealed by wide-angle imaging observations. Connections between imaging observations and in situ signatures at 1 AU suggest that the merged front is a shock wave, followed by two ejecta observed at Wind which seem to have already merged. In situ measurements show that the CME from July 30 is being overtaken by the shock at 1 AU and is significantly compressed, accelerated and heated. The interaction between the preceding ejecta and shock also results in variations in the shock strength and structure on a global scal...

  14. Near-Sun and 1 AU magnetic field of coronal mass ejections: A parametric study

    CERN Document Server

    Patsourakos, S

    2016-01-01

    Aims. The magnetic field of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) determines their structure, evolution, and energetics, as well as their geoeffectiveness. However, we currently lack routine diagnostics of the near-Sun CME magnetic field, which is crucial for determining the subsequent evolution of CMEs. Methods. We recently presented a method to infer the near-Sun magnetic field magnitude of CMEs and then extrapolate it to 1 AU. This method uses relatively easy to deduce observational estimates of the magnetic helicity in CME-source regions along with geometrical CME fits enabled by coronagraph observations. We hereby perform a parametric study of this method aiming to assess its robustness. We use statistics of active region (AR) helicities and CME geometrical parameters to determine a matrix of plausible near-Sun CME magnetic field magnitudes. In addition, we extrapolate this matrix to 1 AU and determine the anticipated range of CME magnetic fields at 1 AU representing the radial falloff of the magnetic field in t...

  15. The spectroscopic imprint of the pre-eruptive configuration resulting into two major coronal mass ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Syntelis, Petros; Patsourakos, Spiros; Tsinganos, Kanaris

    2016-01-01

    We present a spectroscopic analysis of the pre-eruptive configuration of active region NOAA 11429, prior to two very fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) on March 7, 2012 that are associated with this active region. We study the thermal components and the dynamics associated with the ejected flux ropes. Using differential emission measure (DEM) analysis of Hinode/EIS and SDO/AIA observations, we identify the emission components of both the flux rope and the host active region. We then follow the time evolution of the flux rope emission components by using AIA observations. The plasma density and the Doppler and non-thermal velocities associated with the flux ropes are also calculated from the EIS data. The eastern and western parts of the active region, in which the two different fast CMEs originated during two X-class flares, were studied separately. In both regions we identified an emission component in the temperature range of $\\log T=6.8 - 7.1$ associated with the presence of flux ropes. The time evolution ...

  16. Tether-cutting Reconnection between Two Solar Filaments Triggering Outflows and a Coronal Mass Ejection

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Huadong; Li, Leping; Ma, Suli

    2016-01-01

    Triggering mechanisms of solar eruptions have long been a challenge. A few previous case studies have indicated that preceding gentle filament merging via magnetic reconnection may launch following intense eruption, according with the tether-cutting (TC) model. However, detailed process of TC reconnection between filaments has not been exhibited yet. In this work, we report the high resolution observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrometer (IRIS) of TC reconnection between two sheared filaments in NOAA active region 12146. The TC reconnection commenced since 15:35 UT on 2014 August 29 and triggered an eruptive GOES C4.3-class flare 8 minutes later. An associated coronal mass ejection appeared in the field of view of SOHO/LASCO C2 about 40 minutes later. Thanks to the high spatial resolution of IRIS data, bright plasma outflows generated by the TC reconnection are clearly observed, which moved along the subarcsecond fine-scale flux tube structures in the erupting filament. Based on the imaging and...

  17. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS VIEWED IN COORDINATED IMAGING AND IN SITU OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ying D.; Luhmann, Janet G.; Moestl, Christian; Martinez-Oliveros, Juan C.; Bale, Stuart D.; Lin, Robert P. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Harrison, Richard A. [Space Science and Technology Department, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom); Temmer, Manuela [Institute of Physics, University of Graz (Austria); Webb, David F. [Institute for Scientific Research, Boston College, Newton, MA 02459 (United States); Odstrcil, Dusan, E-mail: liuxying@ssl.berkeley.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-02-20

    The successive coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from 2010 July 30 to August 1 present us the first opportunity to study CME-CME interactions with unprecedented heliospheric imaging and in situ observations from multiple vantage points. We describe two cases of CME interactions: merging of two CMEs launched close in time and overtaking of a preceding CME by a shock wave. The first two CMEs on August 1 interact close to the Sun and form a merged front, which then overtakes the July 30 CME near 1 AU, as revealed by wide-angle imaging observations. Connections between imaging observations and in situ signatures at 1 AU suggest that the merged front is a shock wave, followed by two ejecta observed at Wind which seem to have already merged. In situ measurements show that the CME from July 30 is being overtaken by the shock at 1 AU and is significantly compressed, accelerated, and heated. The interaction between the preceding ejecta and shock also results in variations in the shock strength and structure on a global scale, as shown by widely separated in situ measurements from Wind and STEREO B. These results indicate important implications of CME-CME interactions for shock propagation, particle acceleration, and space weather forecasting.

  18. Interactions between Coronal Mass Ejections Viewed in Coordinated Imaging and In Situ Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying D.; Luhmann, Janet G.; Moestl, Christian; Martinez-Oliveros, Juan C.; Bale, Stewart D.; Lin, Robert P.; Harrison, Richard A.; Temmer, Manuela; Webb, David F.; Odstrcil, Dusan

    2013-01-01

    The successive coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from 2010 July 30 - August 1 present us the first opportunity to study CME-CME interactions with unprecedented heliospheric imaging and in situ observations from multiple vantage points. We describe two cases of CME interactions: merging of two CMEs launched close in time and overtaking of a preceding CME by a shock wave. The first two CMEs on August 1 interact close to the Sun and form a merged front, which then overtakes the July 30 CME near 1 AU, as revealed by wide-angle imaging observations. Connections between imaging observations and in situ signatures at 1 AU suggest that the merged front is a shock wave, followed by two ejecta observed at Wind which seem to have already merged. In situ measurements show that the CME from July 30 is being overtaken by the shock at 1 AU and is significantly compressed, accelerated and heated. The interaction between the preceding ejecta and shock also results in variations in the shock strength and structure on a global scale, as shown by widely separated in situ measurements from Wind and STEREO B. These results indicate important implications of CME-CME interactions for shock propagation, particle acceleration and space weather forecasting.

  19. PROPAGATION OF THE 2012 MARCH CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS FROM THE SUN TO HELIOPAUSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ying D.; Wang, Chi [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Richardson, John D. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Luhmann, Janet G., E-mail: liuxying@spaceweather.ac.cn [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2014-06-20

    In 2012 March the Sun exhibited extraordinary activities. In particular, the active region NOAA AR 11429 emitted a series of large coronal mass ejections (CMEs) which were imaged by the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory as it rotated with the Sun from the east to west. These sustained eruptions are expected to generate a global shell of disturbed material sweeping through the heliosphere. A cluster of shocks and interplanetary CMEs were observed near the Earth, and are propagated outward from 1 AU using an MHD model. The transient streams interact with each other, which erases memory of the source and results in a large merged interaction region (MIR) with a preceding shock. The MHD model predicts that the shock and MIR would reach 120 AU around 2013 April 22, which agrees well with the period of radio emissions and the time of a transient disturbance in galactic cosmic rays detected by Voyager 1. These results are important for understanding the ''fate'' of CMEs in the outer heliosphere and provide confidence that the heliopause is located around 120 AU from the Sun.

  20. Solar filament eruptions and their physical role in triggering Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Schmieder, B; Aulanier, G

    2012-01-01

    Solar filament eruptions play a crucial role in triggering coronal mass ejections (CMEs). More than 80 % of eruptions lead to a CME. This correlation has been studied extensively during the past solar cycles and the last long solar minimum. The statistics made on events occurring during the rising phase of the new solar cycle 24 is in agreement with this finding. Both filaments and CMEs have been related to twisted magnetic fields. Therefore, nearly all the MHD CME models include a twisted flux tube, called a flux rope. Either the flux rope is present long before the eruption, or it is built up by reconnection of a sheared arcade from the beginning of the eruption. In order to initiate eruptions, different mechanisms have been proposed: new emergence of flux, and/or dispersion of the external magnetic field, and/or reconnection of field lines below or above the flux rope. These mechanisms reduce the downward magnetic tension and favor the rise of the flux rope. Another mechanism is the kink instability when t...

  1. Exploring a Threat to Foreign Worlds: Detecting Coronal Mass Ejections on Nearby Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villadsen, Jackie; Hallinan, Gregg; Bourke, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) likely play a significant role in the mass loss and angular momentum evolution of active stars, and may significantly affect exoplanetary magnetospheres and atmospheres. It is difficult to quantitatively predict the magnitude of these effects because there have been no definitive detections of CMEs outside our own solar system. Dynamic radio spectroscopy of stellar flares offers the potential to make such detections. Broadband dynamic spectroscopy has long been used to study coherent radio emission associated with solar CMEs (known as Type II bursts), but such emission has not yet been detected from other stars. Type II bursts sweep downwards in frequency on timescales of tens of minutes, tracing the motion of a CME outwards through the stellar atmosphere into progressively lower plasma densities. I will present JVLA active M dwarf observations showing coherent stellar radio bursts that are extremely bright, comparable in luminosity to the brightest solar Type II bursts ever recorded. These stellar radio bursts are morphologically similar to solar Type II bursts except that the stellar bursts sweep upwards in frequency over time. We interpret these bursts as either bulk plasma motion downwards into the stellar atmosphere or polar auroral radiation modulated by rotation. I will also present progress on the Starburst program, a 3-year nightly observing program using two 27-meter telescopes at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (the equivalent of a JVLA baseline). The Starburst program will survey stellar coherent radio bursts in order to characterize the rate and energetics of CMEs on nearby stars, combined with complementary observations to image and characterize the detected CMEs.

  2. Constraining the Mass and the Non-Radial Drag Coefficient of a Solar Coronal Mass Ejection

    CERN Document Server

    Kay, C; Opher, M

    2015-01-01

    Decades of observations show that CMEs can deflect from a purely radial trajectory yet no consensus exists as to the cause of these deflections. Many of theories attribute the CME deflection to magnetic forces. We developed ForeCAT (Kay et al. 2013, Kay et al. 2015), a model for CME deflections based solely on magnetic forces, neglecting any reconnection effects. Here we compare ForeCAT predictions to the observed deflection of the 2008 December 12 CME and find that ForeCAT can accurately reproduce the observations. Multiple observations show that this CME deflected nearly 30{\\deg} in latitude (Byrne et al. 2010, Gui et al. 2011) and 4.4{\\deg} in longitude (Gui et al. 2011). From the observations, we are able to constrain all of the ForeCAT input parameters (initial position, radial propagation speed, and expansion) except the CME mass and the drag coefficient that affects the CME motion. By minimizing the reduced chi-squared, $\\chi^2_{\

  3. On the Origin of Coronal Mass Ejections: How Does the Emergence of a Magnetic Flux Rope Reorganize the Solar Corona?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussev, I. I.; Galsgaard, K.; Lugaz, N.; Sokolov, I.

    2010-12-01

    The physical causes leading to the occurrence of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) on the Sun have been debated for almost four decades now. One of the leading mechanisms suggests that a CME may occur as the result of the emergence of a twisted magnetic flux rope from the convection zone into the solar corona. This process have been investigated by a number of researchers over the years, and it has been demonstrated that an eruption of the coronal magnetic field can in principle occur. The majority of these studies, however, involve some ad-hoc prescription of the electric field at the photosphere resembling flux emergence, and they neglect the ambient coronal magnetic field. In addition, most of these flux-emergence simulations are performed in a Cartesian domain, which extends only to a few dozen pressure scale-heights into the corona. Thus, it is difficult to assess the role of boundary driving and limited computational domain on the resulting evolution of the erupting coronal magnetic field. In this paper, we present a new model of CMEs that mitigates these two effects. To achieve this, we couple the "local" magnetic-flux-emergence (MFE) model of Archontis et al. (2004) with a global MHD model of the solar corona and solar wind. The model coupling is performed using the Space Weather Modeling Framework. In the coupled model, the MFE simulation provides time-dependent boundary conditions for all MHD quantities into the global model, where the physical coupling is done at the photospheric boundary. The physical evolution of the system is followed using the BATS-R-US "ideal" MHD code well beyond the complete emergence of the magnetic flux from the convection zone. We discuss the dynamics of the flux emergence process and the related response of the pre-existing coronal magnetic field in the context of CME production.

  4. Propagation of Coronal Mass Ejections Observed During the Rising Phase of Solar Cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed Ibrahim, M.; Manoharan, P. K.; Shanmugaraju, A.

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we investigate the interplanetary consequences and travel time details of 58 coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the Sun-Earth distance. The CMEs considered are halo and partial halo events of width {>} 120°. These CMEs occurred during 2009 - 2013, in the ascending phase of the Solar Cycle 24. Moreover, they are Earth-directed events that originated close to the centre of the solar disk (within about ±30° from the Sun's centre) and propagated approximately along the Sun-Earth line. For each CME, the onset time and the initial speed have been estimated from the white-light images observed by the LASCO coronagraphs onboard the SOHO space mission. These CMEs cover an initial speed range of {˜} 260 - 2700 km s^{-1}. For these CMEs, the associated interplanetary shocks (IP shocks) and interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs) at the near-Earth environment have been identified from in-situ solar wind measurements available at the OMNI data base. Most of these events have been associated with moderate to intense IP shocks. However, these events have caused only weak to moderate geomagnetic storms in the Earth's magnetosphere. The relationship of the travel time with the initial speed of the CME has been compared with the observations made in the previous Cycle 23, during 1996 - 2004. In the present study, for a given initial speed of the CME, the travel time and the speed at 1 AU suggest that the CME was most likely not much affected by the drag caused by the slow-speed dominated heliosphere. Additionally, the weak geomagnetic storms and moderate IP shocks associated with the current set of Earth-directed CMEs indicate magnetically weak CME events of Cycle 24. The magnetic energy that is available to propagate CME and cause geomagnetic storm could be significantly low.

  5. Coronal mass ejections and other extreme characteristics of the 2003 October-November solar eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Yashiro, S.; Liu, Y.; Michalek, G.; Vourlidas, A.; Kaiser, M. L.; Howard, R. A.

    2005-09-01

    Fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs), X-class flares, solar energetic particle (SEP) events, and interplanetary shocks were abundantly observed during the episode of intense solar activity in late October and early November 2003. Most of the 80 CMEs originated from three active regions (NOAA ARs 484, 486, and 488). We compare the statistical properties of these CMEs with those of the general population of CMEs observed during cycle 23. We find that (1) the 2003 October-November CMEs were fast and wide on the average and hence were very energetic, (2) nearly 20 percent of the ultrafast CMEs (speed ≥2000 km s-1) of cycle 23 occurred during the October-November interval, including the fastest CME of the study period (˜2700 km s-1 on 4 November 2003 at 1954 UT), (3) the rate of full-halo CMEs was nearly four times the average rate during cycle 23, (4) at least sixteen shocks were observed near the Sun, while eight of them were intercepted by spacecraft along the Sun-Earth line, (5) the CMEs were highly geoeffective: the resulting geomagnetic storms were among the most intense of cycle 23, (6) the CMEs were associated with very large SEP events, including the largest event of cycle 23. These extreme properties were commensurate with the size and energy of the associated active regions. This study suggests that the speed of CMEs may not be much higher than ˜3000 km s-1, consistent with the free energy available in active regions. An important practical implication of such a speed limit is that the Sun-Earth travel times of CME-driven shocks may not be less than ˜0.5 day. Two of the shocks arrived at Earth in documented cases of such events since 1859.

  6. TETHER-CUTTING RECONNECTION BETWEEN TWO SOLAR FILAMENTS TRIGGERING OUTFLOWS AND A CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Huadong; Zhang, Jun; Li, Leping [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Ma, Suli, E-mail: hdchen@nao.cas.cn [College of Science, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao 266580 (China)

    2016-02-20

    Triggering mechanisms of solar eruptions have long been a challenge. A few previous case studies have indicated that preceding gentle filament merging via magnetic reconnection may launch following intense eruption, according to the tether-cutting (TC) model. However, the detailed process of TC reconnection between filaments has not been exhibited yet. In this work, we report the high-resolution observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrometer (IRIS) of TC reconnection between two sheared filaments in NOAA active region 12146. The TC reconnection commenced on ∼15:35 UT on 2014 August 29 and triggered an eruptive GOES C4.3-class flare ∼8 minutes later. An associated coronal mass ejection appeared in the field of view of the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/LASCO C2 about 40 minutes later. Thanks to the high spatial resolution of IRIS data, bright plasma outflows generated by the TC reconnection are clearly observed, which moved along the subarcsecond fine-scale flux tube structures in the erupting filament. Based on the imaging and spectral observations, the mean plane-of-sky and line-of-sight velocities of the TC reconnection outflows are separately measured to be ∼79 and 86 km s{sup −1}, which derives an average real speed of ∼120 km s{sup −1}. In addition, it is found that spectral features, such as peak intensities, Doppler shifts, and line widths in the TC reconnection region are evidently enhanced compared to those in the nearby region just before the flare.

  7. ARE HALO-LIKE SOLAR CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS MERELY A MATTER OF GEOMETRIC PROJECTION EFFECTS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Ryun-Young; Zhang, Jie [School of Physics, Astronomy and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, MSN 6A2, Fairfax, VA 22030, USA. (United States); Vourlidas, Angelos, E-mail: ryunyoung.kwon@gmail.com [The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723, USA. (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the physical nature of halo coronal mass ejections (CMEs) based on the stereoscopic observations from the two STEREO spacecraft, Ahead and Behind (hereafter A and B), and the SOHO spacecraft. Sixty-two halo CMEs occurred as observed by SOHO LASCO C2 for the three-year period from 2010 to 2012 during which the separation angles between SOHO and STEREO were nearly 90°. In such quadrature configuration, the coronagraphs of STEREO, COR2-A and -B, showed the side view of those halo CMEs seen by C2. It has been widely believed that the halo appearance of a CME is caused by the geometric projection effect, i.e., a CME moves along the Sun-observer line. In other words, it would appear as a non-halo CME if viewed from the side. However, to our surprise, we found that 41 out of 62 events (66%) were observed as halo CMEs by all coronagraphs. This result suggests that a halo CME is not just a matter of the propagating direction. In addition, we show that a CME propagating normal to the line of sight can be observed as a halo CME due to the associated fast magnetosonic wave or shock front. We conclude that the apparent width of CMEs, especially halos or partial halos is driven by the existence and the extent of the associated waves or shocks and does not represent an accurate measure of the CME ejecta size. This effect needs to be taken into careful consideration in space weather predictions and modeling efforts.

  8. Three-dimensional stereoscopic analysis of a coronal mass ejection and comparison with UV spectroscopic data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susino, Roberto; Bemporad, Alessandro [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, via Osservatorio 20, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Dolei, Sergio, E-mail: susino@oato.inaf.it, E-mail: sdo@oact.inaf.it [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, via S. Sofia 78, I-95123 Catania (Italy)

    2014-07-20

    A three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the 2007 May 20 partial-halo coronal mass ejection (CME) has been made using STEREO/EUVI and STEREO/COR1 coronagraphic images. The trajectory and kinematics of the erupting filament have been derived from Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) image pairs with the 'tie-pointing' triangulation technique, while the polarization ratio technique has been applied to COR1 data to determine the average position and depth of the CME front along the line of sight. This 3D geometrical information has been combined for the first time with spectroscopic measurements of the O VI λλ1031.91, 1037.61 line profiles made with the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. Comparison between the prominence trajectory extrapolated at the altitude of UVCS observations and the core transit time measured from UVCS data made possible a firm identification of the CME core observed in white light and UV with the prominence plasma expelled during the CME. Results on the 3D structure of the CME front have been used to calculate synthetic spectral profiles of the O VI λ1031.91 line expected along the UVCS slit, in an attempt to reproduce the measured line widths. Observed line widths can be reproduced within the uncertainties only in the peripheral part of the CME front; at the front center, where the distance of the emitting plasma from the plane of the sky is greater, synthetic widths turn out to be ∼25% lower than the measured ones. This provides strong evidence of line broadening due to plasma heating mechanisms in addition to bulk expansion of the emitting volume.

  9. Two-step forecast of geomagnetic storm using coronal mass ejection and solar wind condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, R-S; Moon, Y-J; Gopalswamy, N; Park, Y-D; Kim, Y-H

    2014-01-01

    To forecast geomagnetic storms, we had examined initially observed parameters of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and introduced an empirical storm forecast model in a previous study. Now we suggest a two-step forecast considering not only CME parameters observed in the solar vicinity but also solar wind conditions near Earth to improve the forecast capability. We consider the empirical solar wind criteria derived in this study (Bz ≤ −5 nT or Ey ≥ 3 mV/m for t≥ 2 h for moderate storms with minimum Dst less than −50 nT) and a Dst model developed by Temerin and Li (2002, 2006) (TL model). Using 55 CME-Dst pairs during 1997 to 2003, our solar wind criteria produce slightly better forecasts for 31 storm events (90%) than the forecasts based on the TL model (87%). However, the latter produces better forecasts for 24 nonstorm events (88%), while the former correctly forecasts only 71% of them. We then performed the two-step forecast. The results are as follows: (i) for 15 events that are incorrectly forecasted using CME parameters, 12 cases (80%) can be properly predicted based on solar wind conditions; (ii) if we forecast a storm when both CME and solar wind conditions are satisfied (∩), the critical success index becomes higher than that from the forecast using CME parameters alone, however, only 25 storm events (81%) are correctly forecasted; and (iii) if we forecast a storm when either set of these conditions is satisfied (∪), all geomagnetic storms are correctly forecasted. PMID:26213515

  10. Statistical Study of the Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections from 1995 to 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Yutian; Shen, Chenglong; Wang, Yuming; Xu, Mengjiao; Ye, Pinzhong; Wang, Shui

    2016-10-01

    We establish a catalog of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) during the period from 1995 to 2015 using the in-situ observations from the Wind and ACE spacecraft. Based on this catalog, we extend the statistical properties of ICMEs to the maximum phase of Solar Cycle 24. We confirm previous results that the yearly occurrence frequencies of ICMEs and shocks, the ratios of ICMEs driving shocks are correlated with the sunspot numbers. For the magnetic cloud (MC), we confirm that the yearly occurrence frequencies of MCs do not show any correlation with sunspot numbers. The highest MC ratio of ICME occurred near the solar minimum. In addition, we analyzed the yearly variation of the ICME parameters. We found that the ICME velocities, the magnetic-field strength, and their related parameters are varied in pace with solar-cycle variation. At the solar maximum, ICMEs move faster and carry a stronger magnetic field. By comparing the parameters between MCs and non-MC ejecta, we confirm the result that the magnetic-field intensities of MC are higher than those in non-MC ejecta. Furthermore, we also discuss the forward shocks driven by ICMEs. We find that one half of the ICMEs have upstream shocks and ICMEs with shocks have faster speed and higher magnetic-field strength than the ICMEs without shocks. The magnetic-field parameters and solar-wind plasma parameters in the shock sheath regions are higher than those in the ejecta regions of ICMEs from a statistical point of view.

  11. Do interacting coronal mass ejections play a role in solar energetic particle events?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahler, S. W. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate, 3550 Aberdeen Avenue, Kirtland AFB, NM 87117 (United States); Vourlidas, A., E-mail: stephen.kahler@kirtland.af.mil [Space Sciences Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2014-03-20

    Gradual solar energetic (E > 10 MeV) particle (SEP) events are produced in shocks driven by fast and wide coronal mass ejections (CMEs). With a set of western hemisphere 20 MeV SEP events, we test the possibility that SEP peak intensities, Ip, are enhanced by interactions of their associated CMEs with preceding CMEs (preCMEs) launched during the previous 12 hr. Among SEP events with no, 1, or 2 or more (2+) preCMEs, we find enhanced Ip for the groups with preCMEs, but no differences in TO+TR, the time from CME launch to SEP onset and the time from onset to SEP half-peak Ip. Neither the timings of the preCMEs relative to their associated CMEs nor the preCME widths W {sub pre}, speeds V {sub pre}, or numbers correlate with the SEP Ip values. The 20 MeV Ip of all the preCME groups correlate with the 2 MeV proton background intensities, consistent with a general correlation with possible seed particle populations. Furthermore, the fraction of CMEs with preCMEs also increases with the 2 MeV proton background intensities. This implies that the higher SEP Ip values with preCMEs may not be due primarily to CME interactions, such as the 'twin-CME' scenario, but are explained by a general increase of both background seed particles and more frequent CMEs during times of higher solar activity. This explanation is not supported by our analysis of 2 MeV proton backgrounds in two earlier preCME studies of SEP events, so the relevance of CME interactions for larger SEP event intensities remains unclear.

  12. Planar magnetic structures in coronal mass ejection-driven sheath regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmerio, Erika; Kilpua, Emilia K.J. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics; Savani, Neel P. [Maryland Univ., Baltimore County, MD (United States). Goddard Planetary Heliophysics Inst. (GPHI); NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Planar magnetic structures (PMSs) are periods in the solar wind during which interplanetary magnetic field vectors are nearly parallel to a single plane. One of the specific regions where PMSs have been reported are coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven sheaths. We use here an automated method to identify PMSs in 95 CME sheath regions observed in situ by the Wind and ACE spacecraft between 1997 and 2015. The occurrence and location of the PMSs are related to various shock, sheath, and CME properties. We find that PMSs are ubiquitous in CME sheaths; 85% of the studied sheath regions had PMSs with the mean duration of 6 h. In about one-third of the cases the magnetic field vectors followed a single PMS plane that covered a significant part (at least 67 %) of the sheath region. Our analysis gives strong support for two suggested PMS formation mechanisms: the amplification and alignment of solar wind discontinuities near the CME-driven shock and the draping of the magnetic field lines around the CME ejecta. For example, we found that the shock and PMS plane normals generally coincided for the events where the PMSs occurred near the shock (68% of the PMS plane normals near the shock were separated by less than 20 from the shock normal), while deviations were clearly larger when PMSs occurred close to the ejecta leading edge. In addition, PMSs near the shock were generally associated with lower upstream plasma beta than the cases where PMSs occurred near the leading edge of the CME. We also demonstrate that the planar parts of the sheath contain a higher amount of strong southward magnetic field than the non-planar parts, suggesting that planar sheaths are more likely to drive magnetospheric activity.

  13. Statistical properties of solar flares and coronal mass ejections through the solar cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telloni, Daniele; Antonucci, Ester [INAF-Astrophysical Observatory of Torino, Via Osservatorio 20, 10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Carbone, Vincenzo [University of Calabria, Department of Physics, Ponte P. Bucci Cubo 31C, 87036 Rende (Italy); CNR-Institute for Chemical-Physical Processes, Ponte P. Bucci Cubo 33B, 87036 Rende (Italy); Lepreti, Fabio [University of Calabria, Department of Physics, Ponte P. Bucci Cubo 31C, 87036 Rende (Italy)

    2016-03-25

    Waiting Time Distributions (WTDs) of solar flares are investigated all through the solar cycle. The same approach applied to Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) in a previous work is considered here for flare occurrence. Our analysis reveals that flares and CMEs share some common statistical properties, which result dependent on the level of solar activity. Both flares and CMEs seem to independently occur during minimum solar activity phases, whilst their WTDs significantly deviate from a Poisson function at solar maximum, thus suggesting that these events are correlated. The characteristics of WTDs are constrained by the physical processes generating those eruptions associated with flares and CMEs. A scenario may be drawn in which different mechanisms are actively at work during different phases of the solar cycle. Stochastic processes, most likely related to random magnetic reconnections of the field lines, seem to play a key role during solar minimum periods. On the other hand, persistent processes, like sympathetic eruptions associated to the variability of the photospheric magnetism, are suggested to dominate during periods of high solar activity. Moreover, despite the similar statistical properties shown by flares and CMEs, as it was mentioned above, their WTDs appear different in some aspects. During solar minimum periods, the flare occurrence randomness seems to be more evident than for CMEs. Those persistent mechanisms generating interdependent events during maximum periods of solar activity can be suggested to play a more important role for CMEs than for flares, thus mitigating the competitive action of the random processes, which seem instead strong enough to weaken the correlations among flare event occurrence during solar minimum periods. However, it cannot be excluded that the physical processes at the basis of the origin of the temporal correlation between solar events are different for flares and CMEs, or that, more likely, more sophisticated effects are

  14. A Numerical Study of Long-range Magnetic Impacts during Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, M.; Schrijver, C. J.; Cheung, M. C. M.; DeRosa, M. L.; Nitta, N. V.; Title, A. M.

    2016-03-01

    With the global view and high-cadence observations from Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory, many spatially separated solar eruptive events appear to be coupled. However, the mechanisms for “sympathetic” events are still largely unknown. In this study, we investigate the impact of an erupting flux rope on surrounding solar structures through large-scale magnetic coupling. We build a realistic environment of the solar corona on 2011 February 15 using a global magnetohydrodynamics model and initiate coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in active region 11158 by inserting Gibson-Low analytical flux ropes. We show that a CME’s impact on the surrounding structures depends not only on the magnetic strength of these structures and their distance to the source region, but also on the interaction between the CME and the large-scale magnetic field. Within the CME expansion domain where the flux rope field directly interacts with the solar structures, expansion-induced reconnection often modifies the overlying field, thereby increasing the decay index. This effect may provide a primary coupling mechanism underlying the sympathetic eruptions. The magnitude of the impact is found to depend on the orientation of the erupting flux rope, with the largest impacts occurring when the flux rope is favorably oriented for reconnecting with the surrounding regions. Outside the CME expansion domain, the influence of the CME is mainly through field line compression or post-eruption relaxation. Based on our numerical experiments, we discuss a way to quantify the eruption impact, which could be useful for forecasting purposes.

  15. A NUMERICAL STUDY OF LONG-RANGE MAGNETIC IMPACTS DURING CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, M.; Schrijver, C. J.; Cheung, M. C. M.; DeRosa, M. L.; Nitta, N. V.; Title, A. M., E-mail: jinmeng@lmsal.com [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2016-03-20

    With the global view and high-cadence observations from Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory, many spatially separated solar eruptive events appear to be coupled. However, the mechanisms for “sympathetic” events are still largely unknown. In this study, we investigate the impact of an erupting flux rope on surrounding solar structures through large-scale magnetic coupling. We build a realistic environment of the solar corona on 2011 February 15 using a global magnetohydrodynamics model and initiate coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in active region 11158 by inserting Gibson–Low analytical flux ropes. We show that a CME’s impact on the surrounding structures depends not only on the magnetic strength of these structures and their distance to the source region, but also on the interaction between the CME and the large-scale magnetic field. Within the CME expansion domain where the flux rope field directly interacts with the solar structures, expansion-induced reconnection often modifies the overlying field, thereby increasing the decay index. This effect may provide a primary coupling mechanism underlying the sympathetic eruptions. The magnitude of the impact is found to depend on the orientation of the erupting flux rope, with the largest impacts occurring when the flux rope is favorably oriented for reconnecting with the surrounding regions. Outside the CME expansion domain, the influence of the CME is mainly through field line compression or post-eruption relaxation. Based on our numerical experiments, we discuss a way to quantify the eruption impact, which could be useful for forecasting purposes.

  16. Core and Wing Densities of Asymmetric Coronal Spectral Profiles: Implications for the Mass Supply of the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsourakos, S.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Young, P. R.

    2014-01-01

    Recent solar spectroscopic observations have shown that coronal spectral lines can exhibit asymmetric profiles, with enhanced emissions at their blue wings. These asymmetries correspond to rapidly upflowing plasmas at speeds exceeding approximately equal to 50 km per sec. Here, we perform a study of the density of the rapidly upflowing material and compare it with that of the line core that corresponds to the bulk of the plasma. For this task, we use spectroscopic observations of several active regions taken by the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer of the Hinode mission. The density sensitive ratio of the Fe(sub XIV) lines at 264.78 and 274.20 Angstroms is used to determine wing and core densities.We compute the ratio of the blue wing density to the core density and find that most values are of order unity. This is consistent with the predictions for coronal nanoflares if most of the observed coronal mass is supplied by chromospheric evaporation driven by the nanoflares. However, much larger blue wing-to-core density ratios are predicted if most of the coronal mass is supplied by heated material ejected with type II spicules. Our measurements do not rule out a spicule origin for the blue wing emission, but they argue against spicules being a primary source of the hot plasma in the corona. We note that only about 40% of the pixels where line blends could be safely ignored have blue wing asymmetries in both Fe(sub XIV) lines. Anticipated sub-arcsecond spatial resolution spectroscopic observations in future missions could shed more light on the origin of blue, red, and mixed asymmetries.

  17. Coronal Holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven R. Cranmer

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Coronal holes are the darkest and least active regions of the Sun, as observed both on the solar disk and above the solar limb. Coronal holes are associated with rapidly expanding open magnetic fields and the acceleration of the high-speed solar wind. This paper reviews measurements of the plasma properties in coronal holes and how these measurements are used to reveal details about the physical processes that heat the solar corona and accelerate the solar wind. It is still unknown to what extent the solar wind is fed by flux tubes that remain open (and are energized by footpoint-driven wave-like fluctuations, and to what extent much of the mass and energy is input intermittently from closed loops into the open-field regions. Evidence for both paradigms is summarized in this paper. Special emphasis is also given to spectroscopic and coronagraphic measurements that allow the highly dynamic non-equilibrium evolution of the plasma to be followed as the asymptotic conditions in interplanetary space are established in the extended corona. For example, the importance of kinetic plasma physics and turbulence in coronal holes has been affirmed by surprising measurements from the UVCS instrument on SOHO that heavy ions are heated to hundreds of times the temperatures of protons and electrons. These observations point to specific kinds of collisionless Alfvén wave damping (i.e., ion cyclotron resonance, but complete theoretical models do not yet exist. Despite our incomplete knowledge of the complex multi-scale plasma physics, however, much progress has been made toward the goal of understanding the mechanisms ultimately responsible for producing the observed properties of coronal holes.

  18. Are We Observing Coronal Mass Ejections in OH/IR AGB Stars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiles, Carl

    2017-05-01

    Solar Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are magnetic electron clouds that are violently ejected by the same magnetic reconnection events that produce Solar flares. CMEs are the major driving source of the hazardous space weather environments near the Earth. In exoplanet systems, the equivalent of Solar wind and CMEs can affect a planet's atmosphere, and in extreme cases can erode it, as probably happened with Mars, or disrupt the cosmic-ray shielding aspect of the planet's magnetic field.We (Jensen et al. 2013SoPh..285...83J, 2016SoPh..291..465J) have developed a new way to observe the electron column density and magnetic field of CMEs, namely to measure the frequency change and Faraday rotation of a spacecraft downlink carrier produced by propagation effects in the plasma. Surprisingly, this can work on other stars if they have the equivalent of the spacecraft carrier, as do OH/IR stars.OH/IR stars are Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars, which are red giant stars burning He in their final stages of stellar evolution. They have highly convective surfaces and large mass-ejection rates in the form of expanding dense shells of molecular gas and obscuring dust, which were ejected from the star by chaotic turbulent motions and then accelerated by radiation pressure. OH masers reside in these shells, pumped by the IR emission from the dust. The OH masers on the far side of the star (i.e., the positive-velocity masers) are the surrogate for the Solar-case spacecraft signal.The big question: Can we see CMEs in OH/IR stars? We have observed six OH/IR stars with the Arecibo Observatory for a total of about 150 hours over the past 1.5 years. We see changes in OH maser frequency and in the position angle of linear polarization. Both can be produced by electron clouds moving across the line of sight. We will present statistical summaries of the variability and interpret them in terms of CME models.

  19. Kinematic and morphological evolution and dynamics of coronal mass ejections in interplanetary space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poomvises, Watanachak

    2010-12-01

    Studies of Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are scientifically intriguing and practically important. CMEs are the main driver of space weather that specifies plasma, magnetic and particle conditions in near-Earth space. When CMEs pass through and interact with the Earth's magnetosphere, they can cause significant disruption in space and produce a variety of harmful effects on human's technological systems from space to the ground. Many studies have been carried out to understand their evolution. However, their kinematic and morphological evolution as they pass from Sun to Earth is still poorly understood, largely due to the lack of direct observations. Since the launch of the twin-STEREO spacecraft in 2006, tracking of CMEs in interplanetary space was made available for the first time. Further, one could make unprecedented 3-D measurement of CMEs, thanks to the simultaneous observations from two vantage points in space. In this dissertation, I make use of STEREO observations to study the kinematic and morphological evolution of CMEs in interplanetary space. The Raytrace model is utilized as a powerful tool to measure CMEs evolution in 3D. I find that CME leading edge (LE) velocity converges from an initial range between 400 km/s and 1500 km/s at 5 to 10 RS to a narrow range between 500 km/s and 750 km/s at 50 RS. The expansion velocity is also found to converge into a narrow range between 75 km/s and 175 km/s. Both LE and expansion velocities are nearly constant after 50 RS. I further find that the acceleration of CMEs in the inner heliosphere from ˜ 10 to 90 RS can be described by an exponential function, with an initial value as large as ˜ 80 m/s2 but exponentially decreasing to almost zero (more precisely, less than +/- 5 m/s2 considering the uncertainty of measurements). These results are important for constructing accurate space weather prediction models. In addition to the observational study, I have used the theoretical flux rope model to explain the

  20. BRIGHT RAY-LIKE FEATURES IN THE AFTERMATH OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS: WHITE LIGHT VERSUS ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciaravella, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, P.za Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Webb, D. F. [Institute for Scientific Research, Boston College, Newton, MA 02459 (United States); Giordano, S. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, via Osservatorio 20, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Raymond, J. C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-03-20

    Current sheets (CSs) are important signatures of magnetic reconnection in the eruption of confined solar magnetic structures. Models of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) involve formation of a CS connecting the ejected flux rope with the post-eruption magnetic loops. CSs have been identified in white light (WL) images of CMEs as narrow rays trailing the outward moving CME core, and in ultraviolet spectra as narrow bright features emitting the [Fe XVIII] line. In this work, samples of rays detected in WL images or in ultraviolet spectra have been analyzed. Temperatures, widths, and line intensities of the rays have been measured, and their correlation to the CME properties has been studied. The samples show a wide range of temperatures with hot, coronal, and cool rays. In some cases, the UV spectra support the identification of rays as CSs, but they show that some WL rays are cool material from the CME core. In many cases, both hot and cool material are present, but offset from each other along the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer slit. We find that about 18% of the WL rays show very hot gas consistent with the CS interpretation, while about 23% show cold gas that we attribute to cool prominence material draining back from the CME core. The remaining events have ordinary coronal temperatures, perhaps because they have relaxed back to a quiescent state.

  1. A trial placement of a prophylactic ureteral catheter during the excision of a huge pelvic mass with incidental cystotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Warda

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Ureteral injuries are one of the major complications following gynecologic surgeries. They are serious, troublesome, often associated with significant morbidity, and are one of the most common causes for legal action against gynecologic surgeons. The reported rates of injury depend on the vigilance of diagnosis, type of surgery and other risk factors. We present a case of a 48 year old obese Caucasian femalewith no significant past medical history who came in with back pain and progressive abdominal swelling for the past three months and was found to have a very large pelvic mass. After preoperative evaluation, including: medical history, physical exam, and imaging studies showing a heterogenous mass 24.6 x 33.0 x 43.1, we predicted that the risk of urinary tract injuries was very high. We used preoperativeprophylactic bilateral ureteral catheters to prevent injury. A surgical oncologist was consulted and an exploratory laparotomy was performed with removal of the large multi–lobulated pelvic mass + total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo–oophorectomy, and appendectomy all performed at the same time. Patient had an incidental cystotomy during the procedure, which was repaired intra–operatively. The ureters remained intact with no injuries. The importance of thorough preoperative identification, evaluation and anticipation of ureteral injuries will be discussed in detail.

  2. Automatically Detecting and Tracking Coronal Mass Ejections. I. Separation of Dynamic and Quiescent Components in Coronagraph Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Huw; Byrne, Jason P.; Habbal, Shadia Rifai

    2012-06-01

    Automated techniques for detecting and tracking coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in coronagraph data are of ever increasing importance for space weather monitoring and forecasting. They serve to remove the biases and tedium of human interpretation, and provide the robust analysis necessary for statistical studies across large numbers of observations. An important requirement in their operation is that they satisfactorily distinguish the CME structure from the background quiescent coronal structure (streamers, coronal holes). Many studies resort to some form of time differencing to achieve this, despite the errors inherent in such an approach—notably spatiotemporal crosstalk. This article describes a new deconvolution technique that separates coronagraph images into quiescent and dynamic components. A set of synthetic observations made from a sophisticated model corona and CME demonstrates the validity and effectiveness of the technique in isolating the CME signal. Applied to observations by the LASCO C2 and C3 coronagraphs, the structure of a faint CME is revealed in detail despite the presence of background streamers that are several times brighter than the CME. The technique is also demonstrated to work on SECCHI/COR2 data, and new possibilities for estimating the three-dimensional structure of CMEs using the multiple viewing angles are discussed. Although quiescent coronal structures and CMEs are intrinsically linked, and although their interaction is an unavoidable source of error in any separation process, we show in a companion paper that the deconvolution approach outlined here is a robust and accurate method for rigorous CME analysis. Such an approach is a prerequisite to the higher-level detection and classification of CME structure and kinematics.

  3. Successive Homologous Coronal Mass Ejections Driven by Shearing and Converging Motions in Solar Active Region NOAA 12371

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemareddy, P.

    2017-08-01

    We study the magnetic field evolution in AR 12371, related to its successive eruptive nature. During the disk transit of seven days, the active region (AR) launched four sequential fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which are associated with long duration M-class flares. Morphological study delineates a pre-eruptive coronal sigmoid structure above the polarity inversion line (PIL) similar to Moore et al.’s study. The velocity field derived from tracked magnetograms indicates persistent shear and converging motions of polarity regions about the PIL. While these shear motions continue, the crossed arms of two sigmoid elbows are being brought to interaction by converging motions at the middle of the PIL, initiating the tether-cutting reconnection of field lines and the onset of the CME explosion. The successive CMEs are explained by a cyclic process of magnetic energy storage and release referred to as “sigmoid-to-arcade-to-sigmoid” transformation driven by photospheric flux motions. Furthermore, the continued shear motions inject helicity flux with a dominant negative sign, which contributes to core field twist and its energy by building a twisted flux rope (FR). After a limiting value, the excess coronal helicity is expelled by bodily ejection of the FR, which is initiated by some instability as realized by intermittent CMEs. This AR is in contrast with the confined AR 12192 with a predominant negative sign and larger helicity flux, but much weaker (-0.02 turns) normalized coronal helicity content. While predominant signed helicity flux is a requirement for CME eruption, our study suggests that the magnetic flux normalized helicity flux is a necessary condition accommodating the role of background flux and appeals to a further study of a large sample of ARs.

  4. Two-Step Forecast of Geomagnetic Storm Using Coronal Mass Ejection and Solar Wind Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, R.-S.; Moon, Y.-J.; Gopalswamy, N.; Park, Y.-D.; Kim, Y.-H.

    2014-01-01

    To forecast geomagnetic storms, we had examined initially observed parameters of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and introduced an empirical storm forecast model in a previous study. Now we suggest a two-step forecast considering not only CME parameters observed in the solar vicinity but also solar wind conditions near Earth to improve the forecast capability. We consider the empirical solar wind criteria derived in this study (Bz = -5 nT or Ey = 3 mV/m for t = 2 h for moderate storms with minimum Dst less than -50 nT) (i.e. Magnetic Field Magnitude, B (sub z) less than or equal to -5 nanoTeslas or duskward Electrical Field, E (sub y) greater than or equal to 3 millivolts per meter for time greater than or equal to 2 hours for moderate storms with Minimum Disturbance Storm Time, Dst less than -50 nanoTeslas) and a Dst model developed by Temerin and Li (2002, 2006) (TL [i.e. Temerin Li] model). Using 55 CME-Dst pairs during 1997 to 2003, our solar wind criteria produce slightly better forecasts for 31 storm events (90 percent) than the forecasts based on the TL model (87 percent). However, the latter produces better forecasts for 24 nonstorm events (88 percent), while the former correctly forecasts only 71 percent of them. We then performed the two-step forecast. The results are as follows: (i) for 15 events that are incorrectly forecasted using CME parameters, 12 cases (80 percent) can be properly predicted based on solar wind conditions; (ii) if we forecast a storm when both CME and solar wind conditions are satisfied (n, i.e. cap operator - the intersection set that is comprised of all the elements that are common to both), the critical success index becomes higher than that from the forecast using CME parameters alone, however, only 25 storm events (81 percent) are correctly forecasted; and (iii) if we forecast a storm when either set of these conditions is satisfied (?, i.e. cup operator - the union set that is comprised of all the elements of either or both

  5. Coronal mass ejection-related particle acceleration regions during a simple eruptive event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Matamoros, Carolina; Klein, Karl-Ludwig; Rouillard, Alexis P.

    2016-05-01

    An intriguing feature of many solar energetic particle (SEP) events is the detection of particles over a very extended range of longitudes in the heliosphere. This may be due to peculiarities of the magnetic field in the corona, to a broad accelerator, to cross-field transport of the particles, or to a combination of these processes. The eruptive flare on 26 April 2008 provided an opportunity to study relevant processes under particularly favourable conditions since it occurred in a very quiet solar and interplanetary environment. This enabled us to investigate the physical link between a single well-identified coronal mass ejection (CME), electron acceleration as traced by radio emission, and the production of SEPs. We conduct a detailed analysis, which combines radio observations (Nançay Radio Heliograph and Nançay Decametre Array, Wind/Waves spectrograph) with remote-sensing observations of the corona in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and white light, as well as in situ measurements of energetic particles near 1AU (SoHO and STEREO spacecraft). By combining images taken from multiple vantage points, we were able to derive the time-dependent evolution of the 3D pressure front that was developing around the erupting CME. Magnetic reconnection in the post-CME current sheet accelerated electrons, which remained confined in closed magnetic fields in the corona, while the acceleration of escaping particles can be attributed to the pressure front ahead of the expanding CME. The CME accelerated electrons remotely from the parent active region, owing to the interaction of its laterally expanding flank, which was traced by an EUV wave, with the ambient corona. SEPs detected at one STEREO spacecraft and SoHO were accelerated later, when the frontal shock of the CME intercepted the spacecraft-connected interplanetary magnetic field line. The injection regions into the heliosphere inferred from the radio and SEP observations are separated in longitude by about 140°. The

  6. Global Energetics of Solar Flares. V. Energy Closure in Flares and Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Caspi, Amir; Cohen, Christina M. S.; Holman, Gordon; Jing, Ju; Kretzschmar, Matthieu; Kontar, Eduard P.; McTiernan, James M.; Mewaldt, Richard A.; O’Flannagain, Aidan; Richardson, Ian G.; Ryan, Daniel; Warren, Harry P.; Xu, Yan

    2017-02-01

    In this study we synthesize the results of four previous studies on the global energetics of solar flares and associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which include magnetic, thermal, nonthermal, and CME energies in 399 solar M- and X-class flare events observed during the first 3.5 yr of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission. Our findings are as follows. (1) The sum of the mean nonthermal energy of flare-accelerated particles ({E}{nt}), the energy of direct heating ({E}{dir}), and the energy in CMEs ({E}{CME}), which are the primary energy dissipation processes in a flare, is found to have a ratio of ({E}{nt}+{E}{dir}+{E}{CME})/{E}{mag}=0.87+/- 0.18, compared with the dissipated magnetic free energy {E}{mag}, which confirms energy closure within the measurement uncertainties and corroborates the magnetic origin of flares and CMEs. (2) The energy partition of the dissipated magnetic free energy is: 0.51 ± 0.17 in nonthermal energy of ≥slant 6 {keV} electrons, 0.17 ± 0.17 in nonthermal ≥slant 1 {MeV} ions, 0.07 ± 0.14 in CMEs, and 0.07 ± 0.17 in direct heating. (3) The thermal energy is almost always less than the nonthermal energy, which is consistent with the thick-target model. (4) The bolometric luminosity in white-light flares is comparable to the thermal energy in soft X-rays (SXR). (5) Solar energetic particle events carry a fraction ≈ 0.03 of the CME energy, which is consistent with CME-driven shock acceleration. (6) The warm-target model predicts a lower limit of the low-energy cutoff at {e}c≈ 6 {keV}, based on the mean peak temperature of the differential emission measure of T e = 8.6 MK during flares. This work represents the first statistical study that establishes energy closure in solar flare/CME events.

  7. Solar flares, coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particle event characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papaioannou Athanasios

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new catalogue of 314 solar energetic particle (SEP events extending over a large time span from 1984 to 2013 has been compiled. The properties as well as the associations of these SEP events with their parent solar sources have been thoroughly examined. The properties of the events include the proton peak integral flux and the fluence for energies above 10, 30, 60 and 100 MeV. The associated solar events were parametrized by solar flare (SF and coronal mass ejection (CME characteristics, as well as related radio emissions. In particular, for SFs: the soft X-ray (SXR peak flux, the SXR fluence, the heliographic location, the rise time and the duration were exploited; for CMEs the plane-of-sky velocity as well as the angular width were utilized. For radio emissions, type III, II and IV radio bursts were identified. Furthermore, we utilized element abundances of Fe and O. We found evidence that most of the SEP events in our catalogue do not conform to a simple two-class paradigm, with the 73% of them exhibiting both type III and type II radio bursts, and that a continuum of event properties is present. Although, the so-called hybrid or mixed events are found to be present in our catalogue, it was not possible to attribute each SEP event to a mixed/hybrid sub-category. Moreover, it appears that the start of the type III burst most often precedes the maximum of the SF and thus falls within the impulsive phase of the associated SF. At the same time, type III bursts take place within ≈5.22 min, on average, in advance from the time of maximum of the derivative of the SXR flux (Neupert effect. We further performed a statistical analysis and a mapping of the logarithm of the proton peak flux at E > 10 MeV, on different pairs of the parent solar source characteristics. This revealed correlations in 3-D space and demonstrated that the gradual SEP events that stem from the central part of the visible solar disk constitute a significant radiation

  8. Solar and interplanetary activities of isolated and non-isolated coronal mass ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendict Lawrance, M.; Shanmugaraju, A.; Moon, Y.-J.; Umapathy, S.

    2017-07-01

    We report our results on comparison of two halo Coronal Mass Ejections (CME) associated with X-class flares of similar strength (X1.4) but quite different in CME speed and acceleration, similar geo-effectiveness but quite different in Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) intensity. CME1 (non-isolated) was associated with a double event in X-ray flare and it was preceded by another fast halo CME of speed = 2684 km/s (pre-CME) associated with X-ray flare class X5.4 by 1 h from the same location. Since this pre-CME was more eastern, interaction with CME1 and hitting the earth were not possible. This event (CME1) has not suffered the cannibalism since pre-CME has faster speed than post-CME. Pre-CME plays a very important role in increasing the intensity of SEP and Forbush Decrease (FD) by providing energetic seed particles. So, the seed population is the major difference between these two selected events. CME2 (isolated) was a single event. We would like to address on the kinds of physical conditions related to such CMEs and their associated activities. Their associated activities such as, type II bursts, SEP, geomagnetic storm and FD are compared. The following results are obtained from the analysis. (1) The CME leading edge height at the start of metric/DH type II bursts are 2 R⊙/ 4 R⊙ for CME1, but 2 R⊙/ 2.75 R⊙ for CME2. (2) Peak intensity of SEP event associated with the two CMEs are quite different: 6530 pfu for CME1, but 96 pfu for CME2. (3) The Forbush decrease occurred with a minimum decrease of 9.98% in magnitude for CME1, but 6.90% for CME2. (4) These two events produced similar intense geomagnetic storms of intensity of Dst index -130 nT. (5) The maximum southward magnetic fields corresponding to Interplanetary CME (ICME) of these two events are nearly the same, but there is difference in Sheath Bz maximum (-14.2, -6.9 nT). (6) The time-line chart of the associated activities of two CMEs show some difference in the time delay between the onsets of

  9. Solar flares, coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particle event characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, Athanasios; Sandberg, Ingmar; Anastasiadis, Anastasios; Kouloumvakos, Athanasios; Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Tziotziou, Kostas; Tsiropoula, Georgia; Jiggens, Piers; Hilgers, Alain

    2016-12-01

    A new catalogue of 314 solar energetic particle (SEP) events extending over a large time span from 1984 to 2013 has been compiled. The properties as well as the associations of these SEP events with their parent solar sources have been thoroughly examined. The properties of the events include the proton peak integral flux and the fluence for energies above 10, 30, 60 and 100 MeV. The associated solar events were parametrized by solar flare (SF) and coronal mass ejection (CME) characteristics, as well as related radio emissions. In particular, for SFs: the soft X-ray (SXR) peak flux, the SXR fluence, the heliographic location, the rise time and the duration were exploited; for CMEs the plane-of-sky velocity as well as the angular width were utilized. For radio emissions, type III, II and IV radio bursts were identified. Furthermore, we utilized element abundances of Fe and O. We found evidence that most of the SEP events in our catalogue do not conform to a simple two-class paradigm, with the 73% of them exhibiting both type III and type II radio bursts, and that a continuum of event properties is present. Although, the so-called hybrid or mixed events are found to be present in our catalogue, it was not possible to attribute each SEP event to a mixed/hybrid sub-category. Moreover, it appears that the start of the type III burst most often precedes the maximum of the SF and thus falls within the impulsive phase of the associated SF. At the same time, type III bursts take place within ≈5.22 min, on average, in advance from the time of maximum of the derivative of the SXR flux (Neupert effect). We further performed a statistical analysis and a mapping of the logarithm of the proton peak flux at E > 10 MeV, on different pairs of the parent solar source characteristics. This revealed correlations in 3-D space and demonstrated that the gradual SEP events that stem from the central part of the visible solar disk constitute a significant radiation risk. The velocity of

  10. Testing ElEvoHI on a multi-point in situ detected Coronal Mass Ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amerstorfer, Tanja; Möstl, Christian; Hess, Phillip; Mays, M. Leila; Temmer, Manuela

    2017-04-01

    The Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) has provided us a deep insight into the interplanetary propagation of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Especially the wide-angle heliospheric imagers (HI) enabled the development of a multitude of methods for analyzing the evolution of CMEs through interplanetary (IP) space. Methods able to forecast arrival times and speeds at Earth (or other targets) use the advantage of following a CME's path of propagation up to 1 AU. However, these methods were not able to reduce today's errors in arrival time forecasts to less than ±6 hours, arrival speeds are mostly overestimated by some 100 km s-1. One reason for that is the assumption of constant propagation speed, which is clearly incorrect for most CMEs—especially for those being faster than the ambient solar wind. ElEvoHI, the Ellipse Evolution model (ElEvo) based on HI observations, is a new prediction tool, which uses the benefits of different methods and observations. It provides the possibility to adjust the CME frontal shape (angular width, ellipse aspect ratio) and the direction of motion for each CME event individually. This information can be gained from Graduated Cylindrical Shell (GCS) flux-rope fitting within coronagraph images. Using the Ellipse Conversion (ElCon) method, the observed HI elongation angle is converted into a unit of distance, which reveals the kinematics of the event. After fitting the time-distance profile of the CME using the drag-based equation of motion, where real-time in situ solar wind speed from 1 AU is used as additional input, we receive all input parameters needed to run a forecast using the ElEvo model and to predict arrival times and speeds at any target of interest in IP space. Here, we present a test on a slow CME event of 3 November 2010, in situ detected by the lined-up spacecraft MESSENGER and STEREO Behind. We gain the shape of the CME front from a cut of the 3D GCS CME shape with the ecliptic plane, resulting in an

  11. An estimate of the magnetic field strength associated with a solar coronal mass ejection from low frequency radio observations

    CERN Document Server

    Raja, K Sasikumar; Hariharan, K; Kathiravan, C; Wang, T J

    2016-01-01

    We report ground based, low frequency heliograph (80 MHz), spectral (85-35 MHz) and polarimeter (80 and 40 MHz) observations of drifting, non-thermal radio continuum associated with the `halo' coronal mass ejection (CME) that occurred in the solar atmosphere on 2013 March 15. The magnetic field strengths ($B$) near the radio source were estimated to be $B \\approx 2.2 \\pm 0.4$ G at 80 MHz and $B \\approx 1.4 \\pm 0.2$ G at 40 MHz. The corresponding radial distances ($r$) are $r \\approx 1.9~R_{\\odot}$ (80 MHz) and $r \\approx 2.2~R_{\\odot}$ (40 MHz).

  12. Coronal Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Cranmer, Steven R

    2009-01-01

    Coronal holes are the darkest and least active regions of the Sun, as observed both on the solar disk and above the solar limb. Coronal holes are associated with rapidly expanding open magnetic fields and the acceleration of the high-speed solar wind. This paper reviews measurements of the plasma properties in coronal holes and how these measurements are used to reveal details about the physical processes that heat the solar corona and accelerate the solar wind. It is still unknown to what extent the solar wind is fed by flux tubes that remain open (and are energized by footpoint-driven wave-like fluctuations), and to what extent much of the mass and energy is input intermittently from closed loops into the open-field regions. Evidence for both paradigms is summarized in this paper. Special emphasis is also given to spectroscopic and coronagraphic measurements that allow the highly dynamic non-equilibrium evolution of the plasma to be followed as the asymptotic conditions in interplanetary space are establish...

  13. A huge renormalization of transport effective mass in the magnetic-polaronic state of EuB{sub 6}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glushkov, V. [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of RAS, 38 Vavilov Street, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: glushkov@lt.gpi.ru; Bogach, A.; Demishev, S.; Gon' kov, K.; Ignatov, M.; Khayrullin, Eu.; Samarin, N.; Shubin, A. [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of RAS, 38 Vavilov Street, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Shitsevalova, N. [Institute for Problems of Materials Science NAS, 3 Krzhizhanovsky Street, 03680 Kiev (Ukraine); Flachbart, K. [Centre of Low Temperature Physics, IEP SAS and IPS FS UPJS, SK-04001 Kosice (Slovakia); Sluchanko, N. [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of RAS, 38 Vavilov Street, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2008-04-01

    The comprehensive study of galvanomagnetic, thermoelectric and magnetic properties was carried out on the single crystals of low carrier density ferromagnetic metal EuB{sub 6} (T{sub C}{approx}13.9 K, T{sub m}=15.8 K) in a wide range of temperatures (1.8-300 K) and magnetic fields (up to 80 kOe). The analysis of the microscopic characteristics estimated from the data revealed a giant renormalization of the charge carriers' effective mass m{sub eff}, which is observed in the paramagnetic state of this compound with strong electron correlations. The gradual decrease of m{sub eff} from the maximum of m{sub eff}{approx}30m{sub eff} detected at T*{approx}80 K to the low temperature values of m{sub eff} (T{<=}T{sub C}){approx}0.2-1m{sub 0} is discussed in terms of the phase separation with the formation of low resistive ferromagnetic nano-sized regions (ferrons) in the dielectric magnetic polaronic state (T>T{sub m}). The observed unusual behavior of m{sub eff} favors recent explanation of the genesis of the metal-insulator transition scenario proposed for La-doped EuB{sub 6} systems [U. Yu, B.I. Min, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 (2005) 117202.].

  14. A huge renormalization of transport effective mass in the magnetic-polaronic state of EuB 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glushkov, V.; Bogach, A.; Demishev, S.; Gon'kov, K.; Ignatov, M.; Khayrullin, Eu.; Samarin, N.; Shubin, A.; Shitsevalova, N.; Flachbart, K.; Sluchanko, N.

    2008-04-01

    The comprehensive study of galvanomagnetic, thermoelectric and magnetic properties was carried out on the single crystals of low carrier density ferromagnetic metal EuB 6 ( TC≈13.9 K, Tm=15.8 K) in a wide range of temperatures (1.8-300 K) and magnetic fields (up to 80 kOe). The analysis of the microscopic characteristics estimated from the data revealed a giant renormalization of the charge carriers’ effective mass meff, which is observed in the paramagnetic state of this compound with strong electron correlations. The gradual decrease of meff from the maximum of meff∼30 meff detected at T*≈80 K to the low temperature values of meff ( T⩽ TC)∼0.2-1 m0 is discussed in terms of the phase separation with the formation of low resistive ferromagnetic nano-sized regions (ferrons) in the dielectric magnetic polaronic state ( T> Tm). The observed unusual behavior of meff favors recent explanation of the genesis of the metal-insulator transition scenario proposed for La-doped EuB 6 systems [U. Yu, B.I. Min, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 (2005) 117202.].

  15. Heights of Coronal Mass Ejections and Shocks Inferred from Metric and DH Type II Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugaraju, A.; Bendict Lawrance, M.; Moon, Y. J.; Lee, Jae-Ok; Suresh, K.

    2017-09-01

    A set of 27 continuous events that showed extension of metric Type-II radio bursts (m-Type IIs) into the deca-hectometric (DH) domain is considered. The coronal mass ejections (CMEs) associated with this type of continuous event supply more energy to produce space-weather effects than the CMEs that produce Type-II bursts in any one region. Since the heights of shock formation at the start of m-Type IIs were not available from observations, they were estimated using kinematic modeling in previous studies. In the present study, the heights of shock formation during metric and DH Type-II bursts are determined using two methods: i) the CME leading-edge method and ii) a method employing known electron-density models and start/end frequencies. In the first method, assuming that the shocks are generated by the associated CMEs at the leading edge, the height of the CME leading edge (LE) is calculated at the onset and end of m-Type IIs using the kinematic equation with constant acceleration or constant speed. The LE heights of CMEs that are assumed to be the heights of shock formation/end of nearly 79% of m-Type IIs are found to be within the acceptable range of 1 - 3 R_{⊙}. For other events, the heights are beyond this range, for which the shocks might either have been generated at the CME flanks/flare-blast waves, or the initial CME height might have been different. The CME/shock height at the onset and end of 17 DH Type IIs are found to be in the range of 2 - 6 R_{⊙} and within 30 R_{⊙}, respectively. In addition, the CME LE heights from observations at the onset and end of metric/DH Type IIs are compared with the heights corresponding to the observed frequency that is determined using the known electron-density models, and they are in agreement with the model results. The heights are also estimated using the space speed available for 15 halo CMEs, and it is found that the difference is smaller at the m-Type II start/end (0.02 to 0.66 R_{⊙}) and slightly greater

  16. Connecting speeds, directions and arrival times of 22 coronal mass ejections from the Sun to 1 AU

    CERN Document Server

    Möstl, C; Hall, J R; Liewer, P C; De Jong, E M; Colaninno, R C; Veronig, A M; Rollett, T; Temmer, M; Peinhart, V; Davies, J A; Lugaz, N; Liu, Y D; Farrugia, C J; Luhmann, J G; Vršnak, B; Harrison, R A; Galvin, A B

    2014-01-01

    Forecasting the in situ properties of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from remote images is expected to strongly enhance predictions of space weather, and is of general interest for studying the interaction of CMEs with planetary environments. We study the feasibility of using a single heliospheric imager (HI) instrument, imaging the solar wind density from the Sun to 1 AU, for connecting remote images to in situ observations of CMEs. We compare the predictions of speed and arrival time for 22 CMEs (in 2008-2012) to the corresponding interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) parameters at in situ observatories (STEREO PLASTIC/IMPACT, Wind SWE/MFI). The list consists of front- and backsided, slow and fast CMEs (up to $2700 \\: km \\: s^{-1}$). We track the CMEs to $34.9 \\pm 7.1$ degrees elongation from the Sun with J-maps constructed using the SATPLOT tool, resulting in prediction lead times of $-26.4 \\pm 15.3$ hours. The geometrical models we use assume different CME front shapes (Fixed-$\\Phi$, Harmonic Mean, S...

  17. Formation of Magnetic Flux Ropes during Confined Flaring Well Before the Onset of a Pair of Major Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Chintzoglou, Georgios; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2015-01-01

    NOAA Active Region (AR) 11429 was the source of twin super-fast Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). The CMEs took place within a hour from each other, with the onset of the first taking place in the beginning of March 7, 2012. This AR fulfills all the requirements for a "super active region"; namely, Hale's law incompatibility and a $\\delta$-spot magnetic configuration. One of the biggest storms of Solar Cycle 24 to date ($D_{st}=-143$ nT) was associated with one of these events. Magnetic Flux Ropes (MFRs) are twisted magnetic structures in the corona, best seen in $\\sim$10 MK hot plasma emission and are often considered the core of erupting structures. However, their "dormant" existence in the solar atmosphere (i.e. prior to eruptions), is an open question. Aided by multi-wavelength observations (SDO/HMI/AIA and STEREO EUVI B) and a Non-Linear Force-Free (NLFFF) model for the coronal magnetic field, our work uncovers two separate, weakly-twisted magnetic flux systems which suggest the existence of pre-eruption MF...

  18. Coronal mass ejections from the same active region cluster: Two different perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Cremades, Hebe; Schmieder, Brigitte; Crescitelli, Alberto Maximiliano

    2015-01-01

    The cluster formed by active regions (ARs) NOAA 11121 and 11123, approximately located on the solar central meridian on 11 November 2010, is of great scientific interest. This complex was the site of violent flux emergence and the source of a series of Earth-directed events on the same day. The onset of the events was nearly simultaneously observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) telescope aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imagers (EUVI) on the Sun-Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation (SECCHI) suite of telescopes onboard the Solar-Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) twin spacecraft. The progression of these events in the low corona was tracked by the Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraphs (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the SECCHI/COR coronagraphs on STEREO. SDO and SOHO imagers provided data from the Earth's perspective, whilst the STEREO twin instruments procured images from the orthogonal directions....

  19. Coronal dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakariakov, V. M.

    2007-07-01

    The lectures present the foundation of solar coronal physics with the main emphasis on the MHD theory and on wave and oscillatory phenomena. We discuss major challenges of the modern coronal physics; the main plasma structures observed in the corona and the conditions for their equilibrium; phenomenology of large scale long period oscillatory coronal phenomena and their theoretical modelling as MHD waves. The possibility of the remote diagnostics of coronal plasmas with the use of MHD oscillations is demonstrated.

  20. Dystrophic calcinosis with both a huge calcified mass in the cervical spine and calcification in the chest wall in a patient with rheumatoid overlap syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tadashi; Hirakawa, Kei; Takaoka, Hirokazu; Iyama, Ken-Ichi

    2016-05-01

    Dystrophic calcinosis in soft tissue occurs in damaged or devitalized tissues in the presence of normal calcium and phosphorous metabolism. It is often noted in subcutaneous tissues in patients with collagen vascular diseases and may involve a relatively localized area or be widespread. A 74-year-old Japanese woman with an overlap of rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome, and systemic sclerosis developed a huge tumor-like mass at the atlanto-axial vertebral joint region that caused severe cervical pain and difficulty in activities of daily living. She also had subcutaneous dystrophic calcification in the soft tissue of the chest wall. Calcinosis associated with systemic sclerosis is a well-recognized phenomenon, but a destructive paraspinal tumor in the cervical spine associated with overlap syndrome is extremely unique. Because calcinosis in spinal locations can be complicated by neurological involvement, patients with progressive symptoms may require surgical intervention. Surgical resection and biological therapy improved this patient's life and activities of daily living. Calcinosis is common in the conditions reviewed here, and different agents have been used for treatment. However, calcinosis management is poorly organized and lacks an accepted classification, systematic studies, and clinical therapeutic trials. The association of calcinosis and collagen vascular diseases is clinically and etiologically important. Although a combination of calcinosis and rheumatoid overlap syndrome is rare, various collagen vascular diseases may occur simultaneously. A perceptive diagnostic approach toward these diseases is critical, and early diagnosis and treatment are needed to prevent dystrophic calcinosis.

  1. New Frontiers/Hale Prize Lecture: Coronal Mass Ejections, the Most Powerful Drivers of the Sun-Earth System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, S. K.

    2005-05-01

    A large Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) can consist of billions of tonnes of matter, along with entangled magnetic field, erupting from the Sun at speeds well over 1,000 km/s. These giant disruptions of the solar atmosphere drive the most destructive space weather at Earth and throughout the solar system. Furthermore, CMEs are the most dramatic example of how slowly-evolving processes on the Sun can conspire to produce explosive activity. Understanding their origin has long been a central objective for space physics research. This talk will present some of the latest observations and theories for CMEs and discuss the outstanding challenges to modeling and predicting their initiation. This work was supported in part by NASA and ONR.

  2. THE VERY UNUSUAL INTERPLANETARY CORONAL MASS EJECTION OF 2012 JULY 23: A BLAST WAVE MEDIATED BY SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, C. T. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 (United States); Mewaldt, R. A.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Leske, R. A. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Luhmann, J. G. [University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Mason, G. M. [Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Von Rosenvinge, T. T. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Gomez-Herrero, R. [University of Alcala, E-28871 Alcala de Henares (Spain); Klassen, A. [Kiel University, D-24118 Kiel (Germany); Galvin, A. B.; Simunac, K. D. C., E-mail: ctrussell@igpp.ucla.edu [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    The giant, superfast, interplanetary coronal mass ejection, detected by STEREO A on 2012 July 23, well away from Earth, appears to have reached 1 AU with an unusual set of leading bow waves resembling in some ways a subsonic interaction, possibly due to the high pressures present in the very energetic particles produced in this event. Eventually, a front of record high-speed flow reached STEREO. The unusual behavior of this event is illustrated using the magnetic field, plasma, and energetic ion observations obtained by STEREO. Had the Earth been at the location of STEREO, the large southward-oriented magnetic field component in the event, combined with its high speed, would have produced a record storm.

  3. Connecting speeds, directions and arrival times of 22 coronal mass ejections from the sun to 1 AU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Möstl, C.; Veronig, A. M.; Rollett, T.; Temmer, M.; Peinhart, V. [Kanzelhöhe Observatory-IGAM, Institute of Physics, University of Graz (Austria); Amla, K.; Hall, J. R.; Liewer, P. C.; De Jong, E. M. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Colaninno, R. C. [Space Sciences Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States); Davies, J. A.; Harrison, R. A. [RAL Space, Harwell Oxford, Didcot (United Kingdom); Lugaz, N.; Farrugia, C. J.; Galvin, A. B. [Space Science Center and Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Liu, Y. D. [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Luhmann, J. G. [Space Science Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Vršnak, B., E-mail: christian.moestl@uni-graz.at [Hvar Observatory, Faculty of Geodesy, University of Zagreb, Kačićeva 26, HR-10000, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2014-06-01

    Forecasting the in situ properties of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from remote images is expected to strongly enhance predictions of space weather and is of general interest for studying the interaction of CMEs with planetary environments. We study the feasibility of using a single heliospheric imager (HI) instrument, imaging the solar wind density from the Sun to 1 AU, for connecting remote images to in situ observations of CMEs. We compare the predictions of speed and arrival time for 22 CMEs (in 2008-2012) to the corresponding interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) parameters at in situ observatories (STEREO PLASTIC/IMPACT, Wind SWE/MFI). The list consists of front- and backsided, slow and fast CMEs (up to 2700 km s{sup –1}). We track the CMEs to 34.9 ± 7.1 deg elongation from the Sun with J maps constructed using the SATPLOT tool, resulting in prediction lead times of –26.4 ± 15.3 hr. The geometrical models we use assume different CME front shapes (fixed-Φ, harmonic mean, self-similar expansion) and constant CME speed and direction. We find no significant superiority in the predictive capability of any of the three methods. The absolute difference between predicted and observed ICME arrival times is 8.1 ± 6.3 hr (rms value of 10.9 hr). Speeds are consistent to within 284 ± 288 km s{sup –1}. Empirical corrections to the predictions enhance their performance for the arrival times to 6.1 ± 5.0 hr (rms value of 7.9 hr), and for the speeds to 53 ± 50 km s{sup –1}. These results are important for Solar Orbiter and a space weather mission positioned away from the Sun-Earth line.

  4. MHD simulation of solar wind and multiple coronal mass ejections with internal magnetic flux ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Daiko

    2017-08-01

    Solar wind and CMEs are the main drivers of various types of space weather disturbance. The profile of IMF Bz is the most important parameter for space weather forecasts because various magnetospheric disturbances are caused by the southward IMF brought on the Earth. Recently, we have developed MHD simulation of the solar wind, including a series of multiple CMEs with internal spheromak-type magnetic fields on the basis of observations of photospheric magnetic fields and coronal images. The MHD simulation is therefore capable of predicting the time profile of the IMF at the Earth, in relation to the passage of a magnetic cloud within a CME. In order to evaluate the current ability of our simulation, we demonstrate a test case: the propagation and interaction process of multiple CMEs associated with the highly complex active region NOAA 10486 in October to November 2003. The results of a simulation successfully reproduced the arrival at the Earth’s position of a large amount of southward magnetic flux, which is capable of causing an intense magnetic storm, and provided an implication of the observed complex time profile of the solar wind parameters at the Earth as a result of the interaction of a few specific CMEs.

  5. Energetics and Propagation of Coronal Mass Ejections in Different Plasma Environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on previous work, we investigate the propagation of CMEs in amore realistic plasma environment than the isothermal atmosphere, and find thatMach number MA for the inflow into the reconnection site has to be at least 0.013in order to give a plausible eruption (compared to MA = 0.005 for the isothermalatmosphere). Taking MA = 0.1, we find that the energy output and the electricfield induced inside the current sheet match the temporal behavior inferred fromthe energetic, long duration, CME-associated X-ray events. The results indicatethat catastrophic loss of equilibrium in the coronal magnetic field provides the mostpromising mechanism for major solar eruptions, and that the more energetic theeruption is, the earlier the associated flare peaks. The variation of the output powerwith the background field strength revealed by our calculations implies the poor cor-relation between slow CMEs and solar flares. This work also further confirms theexplanation we proposed for the peculiar motion of giant X-ray arches and anoma-lous post-flare loops. Their kinematic pattern and observed heights are determined by the local Alfven speed and its variation with height.

  6. Sigmoid-to-Flux-Rope Transition Leading to A Loop-Like Coronal Mass Ejection

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Rui; Wang, Shuo; Deng, Na; Wang, Haimin

    2010-01-01

    Sigmoids are one of the most important precursor structures for solar eruptions. In this Letter, we study a sigmoid eruption on 2010 August 1 with EUV data obtained by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). In AIA 94 \\AA\\ (Fe XVIII; 6 MK), topological reconfiguration due to tether-cutting reconnection is unambiguously observed for the first time, i.e., two opposite J-shaped loops reconnect to form a continuous S-shaped loop, whose central portion is dipped and aligned along the magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL), and a compact loop crossing the PIL. A causal relationship between photospheric flows and coronal tether-cutting reconnections is evidenced by the detection of persistent converging flows toward the PIL using line-of-sight magnetograms obtained by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board SDO. The S-shaped loop remains in quasi-equilibrium in the lower corona for about 50 minutes, with the central dipped portion rising slowly at ~10 km s-1. ...

  7. The Influence of Coronal Mass Ejections on the Gas Dynamics of the Atmosphere of a "Hot~Jupiter" Exoplanet

    CERN Document Server

    Bisikalo, D V

    2016-01-01

    The results of three-dimensional numerical simulations of the gas dynamics of the atmosphere of a "hot Jupiter" exoplanet during the passage of a coronal mass ejection (CME) from the central star are presented. These computations assumed the parameters for the stellar wind and the CME to be typical of the solar values. The characteristic variations of the flow pattern are considered for quasi-closed and closed (but appreciably distorted by the gravitational influence of the star) gaseous envelopes of the exoplanet. It is shown that a typical CME is sufficient to tear off the outer part of an asymmetric envelope that is located beyond the Roche lobe and carry it away from the exoplanet. This leads to a substantial increase in the mass-loss rate from the exoplanet envelope during the passage of CMEs. The mass-loss rate grows by about a factor of 11 for a closed envelope, and by about a factor of 14 for a quasi-closed envelope. Possible evolutionary consequences of the loss of part of the atmosphere during the p...

  8. Chromosphere to 1 AU Simulation of the 2011 March 7th Event: A Comprehensive Study of Coronal Mass Ejection Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, M.; Manchester, W. B.; van der Holst, B.; Sokolov, I.; Tóth, G.; Vourlidas, A.; de Koning, C. A.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2017-01-01

    We perform and analyze the results of a global magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the fast coronal mass ejection (CME) that occurred on 2011 March 7. The simulation is made using the newly developed Alfvén Wave Solar Model (AWSoM), which describes the background solar wind starting from the upper chromosphere and extends to 24 R⊙. Coupling AWSoM to an inner heliosphere model with the Space Weather Modeling Framework extends the total domain beyond the orbit of Earth. Physical processes included in the model are multi-species thermodynamics, electron heat conduction (both collisional and collisionless formulations), optically thin radiative cooling, and Alfvén-wave turbulence that accelerates and heats the solar wind. The Alfvén-wave description is physically self-consistent, including non-Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin reflection and physics-based apportioning of turbulent dissipative heating to both electrons and protons. Within this model, we initiate the CME by using the Gibson-Low analytical flux rope model and follow its evolution for days, in which time it propagates beyond STEREO A. A detailed comparison study is performed using remote as well as in situ observations. Although the flux rope structure is not compared directly due to lack of relevant ejecta observation at 1 au in this event, our results show that the new model can reproduce many of the observed features near the Sun (e.g., CME-driven extreme ultraviolet [EUV] waves, deflection of the flux rope from the coronal hole, “double-front” in the white light images) and in the heliosphere (e.g., shock propagation direction, shock properties at STEREO A).

  9. Predictions of the arrival time of Coronal Mass Ejections at 1AU: an analysis of the causes of errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Owens

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Three existing models of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection (ICME transit between the Sun and the Earth are compared to coronagraph and in situ observations: all three models are found to perform with a similar level of accuracy (i.e. an average error between observed and predicted 1AU transit times of approximately 11h. To improve long-term space weather prediction, factors influencing CME transit are investigated. Both the removal of the plane of sky projection (as suffered by coronagraph derived speeds of Earth directed CMEs and the use of observed values of solar wind speed, fail to significantly improve transit time prediction. However, a correlation is found to exist between the late/early arrival of an ICME and the width of the preceding sheath region, suggesting that the error is a geometrical effect that can only be removed by a more accurate determination of a CME trajectory and expansion. The correlation between magnetic field intensity and speed of ejecta at 1AU is also investigated. It is found to be weak in the body of the ICME, but strong in the sheath, if the upstream solar wind conditions are taken into account.

    Key words. Solar physics, astronomy and astrophysics (flares and mass ejections – Interplanetary physics (interplanetary magnetic fields; sources of the solar wind

  10. Initiation and early evolution of the Coronal Mass Ejection on May 13, 2009 from EUV and white-light observations

    CERN Document Server

    Reva, Anton; Bogachev, Sergey; Kuzin, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of the observations of a coronal mass ejection (CME), which occurred on May 13, 2009. The most important feature of these observations is that the CME was observed from the very early stage (the solar surface) up to a distance of 15 solar radii ($R_\\odot$). Below 2 $R_\\odot$, we used the data from the TESIS EUV telescopes obtained in the Fe 171 A and He 304 A lines, and above 2 $R_\\odot$, we used the observations of the LASCO C2 and C3 coronagraphs. The CME was formed at a distance of 0.2-0.5 $R_\\odot$from the Sun's surface as a U-shaped structure, which was observed both in the 171 A images and in white-light. Observations in the He 304 A line showed that the CME was associated with an erupting prominence, which was located not above-as predicts the standard model-but in the lowest part of the U-shaped structure close to the magnetic X-point. The prominence location can be explained with the CME breakout model. Estimates showed that CME mass increased with time. The CME trajectory was ...

  11. Coronal Partings

    CERN Document Server

    Nikulin, Igor F

    2015-01-01

    The basic observational properties of the 'coronal partings'--the special type of the coronal magnetic structures, identified by a comparison of the coronal X-ray images and solar magnetograms--are considered. They represent channels inside the unipolar large-scale magnetic fields, formed by the rows of magnetic arcs directed to the neighboring fields of opposite polarity. The most important characteristics of the partings are revealed. It is found that--from the evolutionary and spatial point of view--the partings can transform to the coronal holes and visa versa. The classes of global, intersecting, and complex partings are identified.

  12. The Formation and Early Evolution of a Coronal Mass Ejection and its Associated Shock Wave on 2014 January 8

    CERN Document Server

    Wan, Linfeng; Shi, Tong; Su, Wei; Ding, M D

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study the formation and early evolution of a limb coronal mass ejection (CME) and its associated shock wave that occurred on 2014 January 8. The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images provided by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board \\textit{Solar Dynamics Observatory} disclose that the CME first appears as a bubble-like structure. Subsequently, its expansion forms the CME and causes a quasi-circular EUV wave. Interestingly, both the CME and the wave front are clearly visible at all of the AIA EUV passbands. Through a detailed kinematical analysis, it is found that the expansion of the CME undergoes two phases: a first phase with a strong but transient lateral over-expansion followed by a second phase with a self-similar expansion. The temporal evolution of the expansion velocity coincides very well with the variation of the 25--50 keV hard X-ray flux of the associated flare, which indicates that magnetic reconnection most likely plays an important role in driving the expansion. Moreover...

  13. Predicting the Arrival Time of Coronal Mass Ejections with the Graduated Cylindrical Shell and Drag Force Model

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Tong; Wan, Linfeng; Cheng, Xin; Ding, Mingde; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Accurately predicting the arrival of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) at the Earth based on remote images is of critical significance in the study of space weather. In this paper, we make a statistical study of 21 Earth directed CMEs, exploring in particular the relationship between CME initial speeds and transit times. The initial speed of a CME is obtained by fitting the CME with the Graduated Cylindrical Shell model and is thus free of projection effects. We then use the drag force model to fit results of the transit time versus the initial speed. By adopting different drag regimes, i.e., the viscous, aerodynamics, and hybrid regimes, we get similar results, with the least mean estimation error of the hybrid model of 12.9 hours. CMEs with a propagation angle (the angle between the propagation direction and the Sun-Earth line) larger than its half angular width arrive at the Earth with an angular deviation caused by factors other than the radial solar wind drag. The drag force model cannot be well applied to s...

  14. Distribution of Latitudes and Speeds of Coronal Mass Ejections in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres in Cycle 23

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P. X. Gao; Q. X. Li; S. H. Zhong

    2007-12-01

    Distribution of latitudes and speeds of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) in the northern and southern hemispheres in cycle 23, from September 1996 to December 2006, have been analyzed. By calculating the actual probability of the hemispheric distribution of the activity of the CME, we find that a southern dominance of the activity of the CME is shown to occur in cycle 23 from September 1996 to December 2006. The CME activity occurs at all latitudes and is most common at low latitudes. This should furnish evidence to support that CMEs are associated with source magnetic structures on a large spatial scale, even with transequatorial source magnetic structures on a large spatial scale. The latitudinal distribution of CMEs in the northern and southern hemispheres are no different from a statistical point of view. The speed distribution in the northern and southern hemispheres are nearly identical and to a good approximation they can be fitted with a single lognormal distribution. This finding implies that, statistically, there is no physical distinction between the CME events in the southern and northern hemispheres and the same mechanism of a nonlinear nature acting in both the CME events in the northern and southern hemispheres. Our conclusions seem to suggest that the northern–southern asymmetry of the CME events is related to the northern–southern asymmetry in solar dynamo theory (Jiang et al. 2007).

  15. Effects of Plasma Drag on Low Earth Orbiting Satellites due to Heating of Earth's Atmosphere by Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Nwankwo, Victor U J

    2013-01-01

    Solar events, such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares, heat up the upper atmosphere and near-Earth space environment. Due to this heating and expansion of the outer atmosphere by the energetic ultraviolet, X-ray and particles expelled from the sun, the low Earth-Orbiting satellites (LEOS) become vulnerable to an enhanced drag force by the ions and molecules of the expanded atmosphere. Out of various types of perturbations, Earth directed CMEs play the most significant role. They are more frequent and intense during the active (solar maximum) phase of the sun's approximately 11-year cycle. As we are approaching another solar maximum later in 2013, it may be instructive to analyse the effects of the past solar cycles on the orbiting satellites using the archival data of space environment parameters as indicators. In this paper, we compute the plasma drag on a model LEOS due to the atmospheric heating by CMEs and other solar events as a function of the solar parameters. Using the current forecast ...

  16. Chromosphere to 1 AU Simulation of the 2011 March 7th Event: A Comprehensive Study of Coronal Mass Ejection Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, M; van der Holst, B; Sokolov, I; Toth, G; Vourlidas, A; de Koning, C A; Gombosi, T I

    2016-01-01

    We perform and analyze results of a global magnetohydrodyanmic (MHD) simulation of the fast coronal mass ejection (CME) that occurred on 2011 March 7. The simulation is made using the newly developed Alfv\\'en Wave Solar Model (AWSoM), which describes the background solar wind starting from the upper chromosphere and extends to 24 R$_{\\odot}$. Coupling AWSoM to an inner heliosphere (IH) model with the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) extends the total domain beyond the orbit of Earth. Physical processes included in the model are multi-species thermodynamics, electron heat conduction (both collisional and collisionless formulations), optically thin radiative cooling, and Alfv\\'en-wave turbulence that accelerates and heats the solar wind. The Alfv\\'en-wave description is physically self-consistent, including non-Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) reflection and physics-based apportioning of turbulent dissipative heating to both electrons and protons. Within this model, we initiate the CME by using the Gibson...

  17. A Space Weather Information Service Based Upon Remote and In-Situ Measurements of Coronal Mass Ejections Heading for Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Ritter, Birgit; Miles, Oscar; Rußwurm, Michael; Scully, Stephen; Roldán, Andrés; Hartkorn, Oliver; Jüstel, Peter; Réville, Victor; Lupu, Sorina; Ruffenach, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's magnetosphere is formed as a consequence of interaction between the planet's magnetic field and the solar wind, a continuous plasma stream from the Sun. A number of different solar wind phenomena have been studied over the past forty years with the intention of understanding and forecasting solar behavior. One of these phenomena in particular, Earth-bound interplanetary coronal mass ejections (CMEs), can significantly disturb the Earth's magnetosphere for a short time and cause geomagnetic storms. This publication presents a mission concept consisting of six spacecraft that are equally spaced in a heliocentric orbit at 0.72 AU. These spacecraft will monitor the plasma properties, the magnetic field's orientation and magnitude, and the 3D-propagation trajectory of CMEs heading for Earth. The primary objective of this mission is to increase space weather (SW) forecasting time by means of a near real-time information service, that is based upon in-situ and remote measurements of the aforementioned CM...

  18. Multi-wave band SMM-VLA observations of an M2 flare and an associated coronal mass ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Robert F.; Lang, Kenneth R.; Schmelz, Joan T.; Gonzalez, Raymond D.; Smith, Kermit L.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of observations of an M2 flare and an associated coronal mass ejection CME by instruments on the SMM as well as by the VLA and other ground-based observatories on September 30, 1988. The multiwave band data show a gradual slowly changing event which lasted several hours. The microwave burst emission was found to originate in compact moderately circularly polarized sources located near the sites of bright H-alpha and soft X-ray emission. These data are combined with estimates of an electron temperature of 1.5 x 10 to the 7th K and an emission measure of about 2.0 x 10 to the 49th/cu cm obtained from Ca XIX and Fe XXV spectra to show that the microwave emission can be attributed to thermal gyrosynchrotron radiation in regions where the magnetic field strength is 425-650 G. The CME acceleration at low altitudes is measured on the basis of ground- and space-based coronagraphs.

  19. Sun-to-Earth Characteristics of the 2012 July 12 Coronal Mass Ejection and Associated Geo-effectiveness

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Huidong; Wang, Rui; Möstl, Christian; Yang, Zhongwei

    2016-01-01

    We analyze multi-spacecraft observations associated with the 2012 July 12 Coronal Mass Ejection (CME), covering the source region on the Sun from SDO, stereoscopic imaging observations from STEREO, magnetic field characteristics at MESSENGER, and type II radio burst and in situ measurements from Wind. A triangulation method based on STEREO stereoscopic observations is employed to determine the kinematics of the CME, and the outcome is compared with the result derived from the type II radio burst with a solar wind electron density model. A Grad-Shafranov technique is applied to Wind in situ data to reconstruct the flux-rope structure and compare it with the observation of the solar source region, which helps understand the geo-effectiveness associated with the CME structure. Conclusions are as follows: (1) the CME undergoes an impulsive acceleration, a rapid deceleration before reaching MESSENGER, and then a gradual deceleration out to 1 AU, which should be noticed in CME kinematics models; (2) the type II rad...

  20. CHARACTERISTICS OF KINEMATICS OF A CORONAL MASS EJECTION DURING THE 2010 AUGUST 1 CME-CME INTERACTION EVENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temmer, Manuela; Rollett, Tanja; Bein, Bianca; Moestl, Christian; Veronig, Astrid M.; Flor, Olga [Kanzelhoehe Observatory-IGAM, Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Vrsnak, Bojan; Zic, Tomislav [Hvar Observatory, Faculty of Geodesy, University of Zagreb, Kaciceva 26, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); De Koning, Curt A. [NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Liu, Ying [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bosman, Eckhard [Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, A-8042 Graz (Austria); Davies, Jackie A.; Bothmer, Volker [Institut fuer Astrophysik, Goettingen University, Friedrich-Hund Platz 1, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany); Harrison, Richard [RAL Space, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Nitta, Nariaki [Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Centre, Palo Alto, CA 94304-1191 (United States); Bisi, Mario [Institute of Mathematics and Physics, Aberystwyth University, Ceredigion SY23 3BZ (United Kingdom); Eastwood, Jonathan; Forsyth, Robert [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Odstrcil, Dusan, E-mail: mat@igam.uni-graz.at [Computational and Data Sciences, George Mason University/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 674, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-04-10

    We study the interaction of two successive coronal mass ejections (CMEs) during the 2010 August 1 events using STEREO/SECCHI COR and heliospheric imager (HI) data. We obtain the direction of motion for both CMEs by applying several independent reconstruction methods and find that the CMEs head in similar directions. This provides evidence that a full interaction takes place between the two CMEs that can be observed in the HI1 field of view. The full de-projected kinematics of the faster CME from Sun to Earth is derived by combining remote observations with in situ measurements of the CME at 1 AU. The speed profile of the faster CME (CME2; {approx}1200 km s{sup -1}) shows a strong deceleration over the distance range at which it reaches the slower, preceding CME (CME1; {approx}700 km s{sup -1}). By applying a drag-based model we are able to reproduce the kinematical profile of CME2, suggesting that CME1 represents a magnetohydrodynamic obstacle for CME2 and that, after the interaction, the merged entity propagates as a single structure in an ambient flow of speed and density typical for quiet solar wind conditions. Observational facts show that magnetic forces may contribute to the enhanced deceleration of CME2. We speculate that the increase in magnetic tension and pressure, when CME2 bends and compresses the magnetic field lines of CME1, increases the efficiency of drag.

  1. Magnetic topology of coronal mass ejection events out of the ecliptic: Ulysses/HI-SCALE energetic particle observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. E. Malandraki

    Full Text Available Solar energetic particle fluxes (Ee > 38 keV observed by the ULYSSES/HI-SCALE experiment are utilized as diagnostic tracers of the large-scale structure and topology of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF embedded within two well-identified Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs detected at 56° and 62° south heliolatitudes by ULYSSES during the solar maximum southern high-latitude pass. On the basis of the energetic solar particle observations it is concluded that: (A the high-latitude ICME magnetic structure observed in May 2000 causes a depression in the solar energetic electron intensities which can be accounted for by either a detached or an attached magnetic field topology for the ICME; (B during the traversal of the out-of-ecliptic ICME event observed in July 2000 energetic electrons injected at the Sun are channeled by the ICME and propagate freely along the ICME magnetic field lines to 62° S heliolatitude.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (energetic particles; interplanetary magnetic fields

  2. The effects of coronal mass ejection on galactic cosmic rays in the high latitude heliosphere: Observations from Ulysses` first orbit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bothmer, V.; Heber, B.; Kunow, H.; Mueller-Mellin, R.; Wibberenz, G. [Univ. of Kiel (Germany). Institut fuer Kernphysik; Gosling, J.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Balogh, A. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Blackett Lab.; Raviart, A. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service d`Astrophysique; Paizis, C. [Univ. di Milano (Italy). Istituto di Fisica Cosmica CNR

    1997-10-01

    During its first solar orbit the Ulysses spacecraft detected several coronal mass ejections (CMEs) at high heliographic latitudes. The authors present first observations on the effects of these high latitude CMEs on galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) using measurements from the Kiel Electron Telescope (KET) which is part of the Cosmic Ray and Solar Particle Investigation (COSPIN) experiment, the Los Alamos SWOOPS (Solar Wind Observations Over the Poles of the Sun) experiment and the magnetic field experiments. They find the passage of these CMEs over the spacecraft to be associated with short term decreases of GCR intensities The relatively weak shocks in these events, driven by the CMEs` over-expansion, had no strong influence on the GCRs. The intensity minimums of GCRs occurred on closed magnetic field lines inside the CMEs themselves as indicated by bidirectional fluxes of suprathermal electrons. Short episodes of intensity increases of GCRs inside CMEs at times when the bidirectional fluxes of suprathermal electrons disappeared, can be interpreted as evidence that GCRs can easily access the interior of those CMEs in which open magnetic field lines are embedded.

  3. Combined Multipoint Remote and In Situ Observations of the Asymmetric Evolution of a Fast Solar Coronal Mass Ejection

    CERN Document Server

    Rollett, T; Temmer, M; Frahm, R A; Davies, J A; Veronig, A M; Vrsnak, B; Amerstorfer, U V; Farrugia, C J; Zic, T; Zhang, T L

    2014-01-01

    We present an analysis of the fast coronal mass ejection (CME) of 2012 March 7, which was imaged by both STEREO spacecraft and observed in situ by MESSENGER, Venus Express, Wind and Mars Express. Based on detected arrivals at four different positions in interplanetary space, it was possible to strongly constrain the kinematics and the shape of the ejection. Using the white-light heliospheric imagery from STEREO-A and B, we derived two different kinematical profiles for the CME by applying the novel constrained self-similar expansion method. In addition, we used a drag-based model to investigate the influence of the ambient solar wind on the CME's propagation. We found that two preceding CMEs heading in different directions disturbed the overall shape of the CME and influenced its propagation behavior. While the Venus-directed segment underwent a gradual deceleration (from ~2700 km/s at 15 R_sun to ~1500 km/s at 154 R_sun), the Earth-directed part showed an abrupt retardation below 35 R_sun (from ~1700 to ~900...

  4. Plasma and Magnetic Field Characteristics of Solar Coronal Mass Ejections in Relation to Geomagnetic Storm Intensity and Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ying D; Wang, Rui; Yang, Zhongwei; Zhu, Bei; Liu, Yi A; Luhmann, Janet G; Richardson, John D

    2015-01-01

    The largest geomagnetic storms of solar cycle 24 so far occurred on 2015 March 17 and June 22 with $D_{\\rm st}$ minima of $-223$ and $-195$ nT, respectively. Both of the geomagnetic storms show a multi-step development. We examine the plasma and magnetic field characteristics of the driving coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in connection with the development of the geomagnetic storms. A particular effort is to reconstruct the in situ structure using a Grad-Shafranov technique and compare the reconstruction results with solar observations, which gives a larger spatial perspective of the source conditions than one-dimensional in situ measurements. Key results are obtained concerning how the plasma and magnetic field characteristics of CMEs control the geomagnetic storm intensity and variability: (1) a sheath-ejecta-ejecta mechanism and a sheath-sheath-ejecta scenario are proposed for the multi-step development of the 2015 March 17 and June 22 geomagnetic storms, respectively; (2) two contrasting cases of how the CM...

  5. Forecast of Solar Energetic Particles Depending on Magnetic Connectivity and Coronal Mass Ejection Properties Using Multi-Spacecraft Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinhye; Moon, Yong-Jae; Lee, Harim; Kahler, Stephen W.

    2017-08-01

    For the forecast of solar energetic particles (SEPs), we study the relationships between the peak fluxes of 18 SEP events and associated coronal mass ejection (CME) 3D parameters (speed, angular width and separation angle) obtained from SOHO, STEREO-A and/or B for the period from 2010 August to 2013 June. We apply the STEREO CME Analysis Tool (StereoCAT) to the SEP-associated CMEs to obtain 3D speeds and 3D angular widths. The separation angles are determined as the longitudinal angle between flaring regions and magnetic footpoints of the spacecraft, which are calculated by the assumption of Parker spiral field. The main results are as follows. 1) We find the dependence of the SEP peak fluxes on CME 3D speed and 3D angular width from multi-spacecraft. 2) There is a noticeable anti-correlation (r=-0.62) between SEP peak flux and separation angle. 3) We predict the SEP peak fluxes using a multiple regression method considering longitudinal separation angle, CME 3D speed and 3D angular width. It shows that the separation angle is the most important parameter, and the CME 3D speed is secondary on SEP peak flux.

  6. Observational Tracking of the 2D Structure of Coronal Mass Ejections Between the Sun and 1 AU

    CERN Document Server

    Savani,; Davies,; A., J; Davis,; J., C; Shiota,; D.,; Rouillard,; P., A; Owens,; J., M; Kusano,; K.,; Bothmer,; V.,; Bamford,; P., S; Lintott,; J., C; Smith,; A,

    2015-01-01

    The Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) provides high cadence and high resolution images of the structure and morphology of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the inner heliosphere. CME directions and propagation speeds have often been estimated through the use of time-elongation maps obtained from the STEREO Heliospheric Imager (HI) data. Many of these CMEs have been identified by citizen scientists working within the SolarStormWatch project ( www.solarstormwatch.com ) as they work towards providing robust real-time identification of Earth-directed CMEs. The wide field of view of HI allows scientists to directly observe the two-dimensional (2D) structures, while the relative simplicity of time-elongation analysis means that it can be easily applied to many such events, thereby enabling a much deeper understanding of how CMEs evolve between the Sun and the Earth. For events with certain orientations, both the rear and front edges of the CME can be monitored at varying heliocentric distances (R) bet...

  7. Determination of Coronal Mass Ejection physical parameters from combination of polarized visible light and UV Lyman-$\\alpha$ observations

    CERN Document Server

    Susino, R

    2016-01-01

    Visible-light observations of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) performed with coronagraphs and heliospheric imagers (in primis on board the SOHO and STEREO missions) have offered so far the best way to study the kinematics and geometrical structure of these fundamental events. Nevertheless, it has been widely demonstrated that only combination of multi-wavelength data (including X-ray spectra, EUV images, EUV-UV spectra, and radio dynamic spectra) can provide complete information on the plasma temperature and density distributions, non-thermal motions, magnetic fields, and other physical parameters, for both CMEs and CME-related phenomena. In this work, we analyze three CMEs by combining simultaneous data acquired in the polarized visible light by the LASCO-C2 coronagraph and in the UV H I Lyman-$\\alpha$ line (1216 \\AA) by the UVCS spectrometer, in order to estimate the CME plasma electron density (using the polarization-ratio technique to infer the 3D structure of the CME) and temperature (from the comparison b...

  8. Direct evidence of an eruptive, filament-hosting magnetic flux rope leading to a fast solar coronal mass ejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Bin; Gary, D. E. [Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States); Bastian, T. S., E-mail: bin.chen@cfa.harvard.edu [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

    2014-10-20

    Magnetic flux ropes (MFRs) are believed to be at the heart of solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs). A well-known example is the prominence cavity in the low corona that sometimes makes up a three-part white-light (WL) CME upon its eruption. Such a system, which is usually observed in quiet-Sun regions, has long been suggested to be the manifestation of an MFR with relatively cool filament material collecting near its bottom. However, observational evidence of eruptive, filament-hosting MFR systems has been elusive for those originating in active regions. By utilizing multi-passband extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) observations from Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, we present direct evidence of an eruptive MFR in the low corona that exhibits a hot envelope and a cooler core; the latter is likely the upper part of a filament that undergoes a partial eruption, which is later observed in the upper corona as the coiled kernel of a fast, WL CME. This MFR-like structure exists more than 1 hr prior to its eruption, and displays successive stages of dynamical evolution, in which both ideal and non-ideal physical processes may be involved. The timing of the MFR kinematics is found to be well correlated with the energy release of the associated long-duration C1.9 flare. We suggest that the long-duration flare is the result of prolonged energy release associated with the vertical current sheet induced by the erupting MFR.

  9. The Properties of Solar Energetic Particle Event-Associated Coronal Mass Ejections Reported in Different CME Catalogs

    CERN Document Server

    Richardson, Ian G; Cane, Hilary V

    2015-01-01

    We compare estimates of the speed and width of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in several catalogs for the CMEs associated with ~200 solar energetic particle (SEP) events in 2006-2013 that included 25 MeV protons. The catalogs used are: CDAW, CACTUS, SEEDS and CORIMP, all derived from observations by the LASCO coronagraphs on the SOHO spacecraft, the CACTUS catalog derived from the COR2 coronagraphs on the STEREO-A and -B spacecraft, and the DONKI catalog, which uses observations from SOHO and the STEREO spacecraft. We illustrate how, for this set of events, CME parameters can differ considerably in each catalog. The well-known correlation between CME speed and proton event intensity is shown to be similar for most catalogs, but this is largely because it is determined by a few large particle events associated with fast CMEs, and small events associated with slow CMEs. Intermediate particle events "shuffle" in position when speeds from different catalogs are used. Quadrature spacecraft CME speeds do not improve...

  10. Height of Shock Formation in the Solar Corona Inferred from Observations of Type II Radio Bursts and Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Xie, H.; Makela, P.; Yashiro, S.; Akiyama, S.; Uddin, W.; Srivastava, A. K.; Joshi, N. C.; Chandra, R.; Manoharan, P. K.

    2013-01-01

    Employing coronagraphic and EUV observations close to the solar surface made by the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) mission, we determined the heliocentric distance of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) at the starting time of associated metric type II bursts. We used the wave diameter and leading edge methods and measured the CME heights for a set of 32 metric type II bursts from solar cycle 24. We minimized the projection effects by making the measurements from a view that is roughly orthogonal to the direction of the ejection. We also chose image frames close to the onset times of the type II bursts, so no extrapolation was necessary. We found that the CMEs were located in the heliocentric distance range from 1.20 to 1.93 solar radii (Rs), with mean and median values of 1.43 and 1.38 Rs, respectively. We conclusively find that the shock formation can occur at heights substantially below 1.5 Rs. In a few cases, the CME height at type II onset was close to 2 Rs. In these cases, the starting frequency of the type II bursts was very low, in the range 25-40 MHz, which confirms that the shock can also form at larger heights. The starting frequencies of metric type II bursts have a weak correlation with the measured CME/shock heights and are consistent with the rapid decline of density with height in the inner corona.

  11. On Sun-to-Earth Propagation of Coronal Mass Ejections: 2. Slow Events and Comparison with Others

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ying D; Wang, Chi; Luhmann, Janet G; Richardson, John D; Yang, Zhongwei; Wang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    As a follow-up study on Sun-to-Earth propagation of fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs), we examine the Sun-to-Earth characteristics of slow CMEs combining heliospheric imaging and in situ observations. Three events of particular interest, the 2010 June 16, 2011 March 25 and 2012 September 25 CMEs, are selected for this study. We compare slow CMEs with fast and intermediate-speed events, and obtain key results complementing the attempt of \\citet{liu13} to create a general picture of CME Sun-to-Earth propagation: (1) the Sun-to-Earth propagation of a typical slow CME can be approximately described by two phases, a gradual acceleration out to about 20-30 solar radii, followed by a nearly invariant speed around the average solar wind level, (2) comparison between different types of CMEs indicates that faster CMEs tend to accelerate and decelerate more rapidly and have shorter cessation distances for the acceleration and deceleration, (3) both intermediate-speed and slow CMEs would have a speed comparable to the a...

  12. Low Frequency (30-110 MHz) Radio Imaging Observations Of Solar Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, R.

    Ground based radio imaging observations play an useful role in the study of mass ejections from the solar corona since they do not have the limitation of an occulter and both the disk/limb events can be detected early in their development, particularly via the thermal bremmstrahlung emission from the frontal loop of the CME. I present here some of the recent results on the above topic using data obtained with the Gauribidanur radioheliograph, near Bangalore in India.

  13. Treatment of Viscosity in the Shock Waves Observed After Two Consecutive Coronal Mass Ejection Activities CME08/03/2012 and CME15/03/2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavus, Huseyin

    2016-11-01

    A coronal mass ejection (CME) is one of the most the powerful activities of the Sun. There is a possibility to produce shocks in the interplanetary medium after CMEs. Shock waves can be observed when the solar wind changes its velocity from being supersonic nature to being subsonic nature. The investigations of such activities have a central place in space weather purposes, since; the interaction of shocks with viscosity is one of the most important problems in the supersonic and compressible gas flow regime (Blazek in Computational fluid dynamics: principles and applications. Elsevier, Amsterdam 2001). The main aim of present work is to achieve a search for the viscosity effects in the shocks occurred after two consecutive coronal mass ejection activities in 2012 (i.e. CME08/03/2012 and CME15/03/2012).

  14. A shocked-Bz event caused by fast steady flow-slow transient flow interaction. [with coronal mass ejection in interplanetary space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, X.

    1992-01-01

    We show that the 25 November 1978 shock pair was caused by the interaction of a fast steady flow with a slow coronal mass ejection in interplanetary space (ICME). It is suggested that the slow ICME may be disconnected from the sun. In addition, a new method to infer the shock angle and Mach number from the observed upstream plasma beta and the jump ratios of proton density and magnetic flux density across a shock is described.

  15. ERNE observations of energetic particles associated with Earth-directed coronal mass ejections in April and May, 1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Anttila

    Full Text Available Two Earth-directed coronal mass ejections (CMEs, which were most effective in energetic (~1–50 MeV particle acceleration during the first 18 months since the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO launch, occurred on April 7 and May 12, 1997. In the analysis of these events we have deconvoluted the injection spectrum of energetic protons by using the method described by Anttila et al. In order to apply the method developed earlier for data of a rotating satellite (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites, GOES, we first had to develop a method to calculate the omnidirectional energetic particle intensities from the observations of Energetic and Relativistic Nuclei and Electrons (ERNE, which is an energetic particle detector onboard the three-axis stabilized SOHO spacecraft. The omnidirectional intensities are calculated by fitting an exponential pitch angle distribution from directional information of energetic protons observed by ERNE. The results of the analysis show that, compared to a much faster and more intensive CMEs observed during the previous solar maximum, the acceleration efficiency decreases fast when the shock propagates outward from the Sun. The particles injected at distances <0.5 AU from the Sun dominate the particle flux during the whole period, when the shock propagates to the site of the spacecraft. The main portion of particles injected by the shock during its propagation further outward from the Sun are trapped around the shock, and are seen as an intensity increase at the time of the shock passage.

    Key words: Interplanetary physics (interplanetary shocks – Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy (energetic particles; flares and mass ejections

  16. MANAGEMENT OF HUGE ENCEPHALOCELE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Among all neural tube defects, encephalocele incidents are 1 in 5000 live births. (1 Newborn with encephalocele may be associated with other congenital malformations. Encephalocele patient’s management pose many challenge to neurosurgeon due to other associated anomalies that may present like ventriculocele, Dandy Walker and Arnold-Chiari malformation, and difficult positioning airway management to anaesthesiologist. We discuss a case of huge encephalocele and its management

  17. Morphological and Kinematic Evolution of Three Interacting Coronal Mass Ejections of 2011 February 13-15

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, Wageesh

    2014-01-01

    During 2011 February 13 to 15, three Earth-directed CMEs launched in successively were recorded as limb CMEs by coronagraphs (COR) of STEREO. These CMEs provided an opportunity to study their geometrical and kinematic evolution from multiple vantage points. In this paper, we examine the differences in geometrical evolution of slow and fast speed CMEs during their propagation in the heliosphere. We also study their interaction and collision using STEREO/SECCHI COR and Heliospheric Imager (HI) observations. We have found evidence of interaction and collision between the CMEs of February 15 and 14 in COR2 and HI1 FOV, respectively, while the CME of February 14 caught the CME of February 13 in HI2 FOV. By estimating the true mass of these CMEs and using their pre and post-collision dynamics, the momentum and energy exchange between them during collision phase are studied. We classify the nature of observed collision between CME of February 14 and 15 as inelastic, reaching close to elastic regime. Relating imaging...

  18. Scaling Relations in Coronal Mass Ejections and Energetic Proton Events associated with Solar Superflares

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, Takuya; Shibata, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    In order to discuss the potential impact of solar 'superflares' on space weather, we investigated statistical relations among energetic proton peak flux with energy higher than $ 10 \\rm MeV$ ($F_p$), CME speed near the Sun ($V_{CME}$) obtained by {\\it SOHO}/LASCO coronagraph and flare soft X-ray peak flux in 1-8\\AA band ($F_{SXR}$) during 110 major solar proton events (SPEs) recorded from 1996 to 2014. The linear regression fit results in the scaling relations $V_{CME} \\propto F_{SXR}^\\alpha$, $F_p\\propto F_{SXR}^\\beta$ and $F_p\\propto V_{CME}^\\gamma$ with $\\alpha = 0.30\\pm 0.04$, $\\beta = 1.19 \\pm 0.08$ and $\\gamma = 4.35 \\pm 0.50$, respectively. On the basis of simple physical assumptions, on the other hand, we derive scaling relations expressing CME mass ($M_{CME}$), CME speed and energetic proton flux in terms of total flare energy ($E_{flare}$) as, $M_{CME}\\propto E_{flare}^{2/3}$, $V_{CME}\\propto E_{flare}^{1/6}$ and $F_{p}\\propto E_{flare}^{5/6}\\propto V_{CME}^5$, respectively. We then combine the deri...

  19. COMBINED MULTIPOINT REMOTE AND IN SITU OBSERVATIONS OF THE ASYMMETRIC EVOLUTION OF A FAST SOLAR CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rollett, T.; Möstl, C.; Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.; Amerstorfer, U. V. [IGAM-Kanzelhöhe Observatory, Institute of Physics, University of Graz, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Frahm, R. A. [Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78238 (United States); Davies, J. A. [RAL Space, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Vršnak, B.; Žic, T. [Hvar Observatory, Faculty of Geodesy, University of Zagreb, 1000 Zagreb (Croatia); Farrugia, C. J. [Space Science Center and Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Zhang, T. L., E-mail: tanja.rollett@gmx.at [Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, A-8042 Graz (Austria)

    2014-07-20

    We present an analysis of the fast coronal mass ejection (CME) of 2012  March 7, which was imaged by both STEREO spacecraft and observed in situ by MESSENGER, Venus Express, Wind, and Mars Express. Based on detected arrivals at four different positions in interplanetary space, it was possible to strongly constrain the kinematics and the shape of the ejection. Using the white-light heliospheric imagery from STEREO-A and B, we derived two different kinematical profiles for the CME by applying the novel constrained self-similar expansion method. In addition, we used a drag-based model to investigate the influence of the ambient solar wind on the CME's propagation. We found that two preceding CMEs heading in different directions disturbed the overall shape of the CME and influenced its propagation behavior. While the Venus-directed segment underwent a gradual deceleration (from ∼2700 km s{sup –1} at 15 R {sub ☉} to ∼1500 km s{sup –1} at 154 R {sub ☉}), the Earth-directed part showed an abrupt retardation below 35 R {sub ☉} (from ∼1700 to ∼900 km s{sup –1}). After that, it was propagating with a quasi-constant speed in the wake of a preceding event. Our results highlight the importance of studies concerning the unequal evolution of CMEs. Forecasting can only be improved if conditions in the solar wind are properly taken into account and if attention is also paid to large events preceding the one being studied.

  20. Sun-to-Earth Characteristics of the 2012 July 12 Coronal Mass Ejection and Associated Geo-effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Huidong; Liu, Ying D.; Wang, Rui; Möstl, Christian; Yang, Zhongwei

    2016-10-01

    We analyze multi-spacecraft observations associated with the 2012 July 12 coronal mass ejection (CME), covering the source region on the Sun from the Solar Dynamics Observatory, stereoscopic imaging observations from the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO), magnetic field characteristics from Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER), and type II radio burst and in situ measurements from Wind. A triangulation method based on STEREO stereoscopic observations is employed to determine the kinematics of the CME, and the outcome is compared with the results derived from the type II radio burst using a solar wind electron density model. A Grad-Shafranov technique is applied to Wind in situ data to reconstruct the flux-rope structure and compare it with the observations of the solar source region, which helps in understanding the geo-effectiveness associated with the CME structure. Our conclusions are as follows: (1) the CME undergoes an impulsive acceleration, a rapid deceleration before reaching MESSENGER, and then a gradual deceleration out to 1 au, which should be considered in CME kinematics models; (2) the type II radio burst was probably produced from a high-density interaction region between the CME-driven shock and a nearby streamer or from the shock flank with lower heights, which implies uncertainties in the determination of CME kinematics using solely type II radio bursts; (3) the flux-rope orientation and chirality deduced from in situ reconstructions at Wind agree with those obtained from solar source observations; (4) the prolonged southward magnetic field near the Earth is mainly from the axial component of the largely southward inclined flux rope, which indicates the importance of predicting both the flux-rope orientation and magnetic field components in geomagnetic activity forecasting.

  1. Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections Resulting from Earth-Directed CMEs Using SOHO and ACE Combined Data During Solar Cycle 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paouris, Evangelos; Mavromichalaki, Helen

    2017-02-01

    In this work a total of 266 interplanetary coronal mass ejections observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/ Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (SOHO/LASCO) and then studied by in situ observations from Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft, are presented in a new catalog for the time interval 1996 - 2009 covering Solar Cycle 23. Specifically, we determine the characteristics of the CME which is responsible for the upcoming ICME and the associated solar flare, the initial/background solar wind plasma and magnetic field conditions before the arrival of the CME, the conditions in the sheath of the ICME, the main part of the ICME, the geomagnetic conditions of the ICME's impact at Earth and finally we remark on the visual examination for each event. Interesting results revealed from this study include the high correlation coefficient values of the magnetic field Bz component against the Ap index (r = 0.84), as well as against the Dst index (r = 0.80) and of the effective acceleration against the CME linear speed (r = 0.98). We also identify a north-south asymmetry for X-class solar flares and an east-west asymmetry for CMEs associated with strong solar flares (magnitude ≥ M1.0) which finally triggered intense geomagnetic storms (with Ap ≥179). The majority of the geomagnetic storms are determined to be due to the ICME main part and not to the extreme conditions which dominate inside the sheath. For the intense geomagnetic storms the maximum value of the Ap index is observed almost 4 hours before the minimum Dst index. The amount of information makes this new catalog the most comprehensive ICME catalog for Solar Cycle 23.

  2. An unusual giant spiral arc in the polar cap region during the northward phase of a Coronal Mass Ejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Rosenqvist

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The shock arrival of an Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection (ICME at ~09:50 UT on 22 November 1997 resulted in the development of an intense (Dst<−100 nT geomagnetic storm at Earth. In the early, quiet phase of the storm, in the sheath region of the ICME, an unusual large spiral structure (diameter of ~1000 km was observed at very high latitudes by the Polar UVI instrument. The evolution of this structure started as a polewardly displaced auroral bulge which further developed into the spiral structure spreading across a large part of the polar cap. This study attempts to examine the cause of the chain of events that resulted in the giant auroral spiral. During this period the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF was dominantly northward (Bz>25 nT with a strong duskward component (By>15 nT resulting in a highly twisted tail plasma sheet. Geotail was located at the equatorial dawnside magnetotail flank and observed accelerated plasma flows exceeding the solar wind bulk velocity by almost 60%. These flows are observed on the magnetosheath side of the magnetopause and the acceleration mechanism is proposed to be typical for strongly northward IMF. Identified candidates to the cause of the spiral structure include a By induced twisted magnetotail configuration, the development of magnetopause surface waves due to the enhanced pressure related to the accelerated magnetosheath flows aswell as the formation of additional magnetopause deformations due to external solar wind pressure changes. The uniqeness of the event indicate that most probably a combination of the above effects resulted in a very extreme tail topology. However, the data coverage is insufficient to fully investigate the physical mechanism behind the observations.

  3. Determination of Coronal Mass Ejection Physical Parameters from a Combination of Polarized Visible Light and UV Lyα Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susino, R.; Bemporad, A.

    2016-10-01

    Visible-light observations of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) performed with coronagraphs and heliospheric imagers (in primis on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and STEREO missions) have offered the best way to study the kinematics and geometrical structure of these fundamental events so far. Nevertheless, it has been widely demonstrated that only combination of multi-wavelength data (including X-ray spectra, EUV images, EUV-UV spectra, and radio dynamic spectra) can provide complete information on the plasma temperature and density distributions, non-thermal motions, magnetic fields, and other physical parameters, for both CMEs and CME-related phenomena. In this work, we analyze three CMEs by combining simultaneous data acquired in the polarized visible light by the LASCO-C2 coronagraph and in the UV H i Lyα line (1216 Å) by the UVCS spectrometer, in order to estimate the CME plasma electron density (using the polarization-ratio technique to infer the 3D structure of the CME) and temperature (from the comparison between the expected and measured Lyα intensities) along the UVCS field of view. This analysis is primarily aimed at testing the diagnostic methods that will be applied to coronagraphic observations of CMEs delivered by the Metis instrument on board the next ESA-Solar Orbiter mission. We find that CME cores are usually associated with cooler plasma (T∼ {10}6 K), and that a significant increase of the electron temperatures is observed from the core to the front of the CME (where T\\gt {10}6.3 K), which seems to be correlated, in all cases, with the morphological structure of the CME as derived from visible-light images.

  4. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF CORONAL MASS EJECTION ON 2011 MARCH 7: ONE-TEMPERATURE AND TWO-TEMPERATURE MODEL COMPARISON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, M.; Manchester, W. B.; Van der Holst, B.; Oran, R.; Sokolov, I.; Toth, G.; Gombosi, T. I. [Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Liu, Y.; Sun, X. D., E-mail: jinmeng@umich.edu [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, CA 94305 (United States)

    2013-08-10

    During Carrington rotation (CR) 2107, a fast coronal mass ejection (CME; >2000 km s{sup -1}) occurred in active region NOAA 11164. This event is also associated with a solar energetic particle event. In this study, we present simulations of this CME with one-temperature (1T) and two-temperature (2T: coupled thermodynamics of the electron and proton populations) models. Both the 1T and 2T models start from the chromosphere with heat conduction and radiative cooling. The background solar wind is driven by Alfven-wave pressure and heated by Alfven-wave dissipation in which we have incorporated the balanced turbulence at the top of the closed field lines. The magnetic field of the inner boundary is set up using a synoptic map from Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. The Titov-Demoulin flux-rope model is used to initiate the CME event. We compare the propagation of fast CMEs and the thermodynamics of CME-driven shocks in both the 1T and 2T CME simulations. Also, the synthesized white light images are compared with the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph observations. Because there is no distinction between electron and proton temperatures, heat conduction in the 1T model creates an unphysical temperature precursor in front of the CME-driven shock and makes the shock parameters (e.g., shock Mach number, compression ratio) incorrect. Our results demonstrate the importance of the electron heat conduction in conjunction with proton shock heating in order to produce the physically correct CME structures and CME-driven shocks.

  5. Remote and In Situ Observations of an Unusual Earth-Directed Coronal Mass Ejection from Multiple Viewpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Colaninno, R.; Vourlidas, A.; Szabo, A.; Lepping, R. P.; Boardsen, S. A.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.

    2012-01-01

    During June 16-21, 2010, an Earth-directed Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) event was observed by instruments onboard STEREO, SOHO, MESSENGER and Wind. This event was the first direct detection of a rotating CME in the middle and outer corona. Here, we carry out a comprehensive analysis of the evolution of the CME in the interplanetary medium comparing in-situ and remote observations, with analytical models and three-dimensional reconstructions. In particular, we investigate the parallel and perpendicular cross section expansion of the CME from the corona through the heliosphere up to 1 AU. We use height-time measurements and the Gradual Cylindrical Shell (GCS) technique to model the imaging observations, remove the projection effects, and derive the 3-dimensional extent of the event. Then, we compare the results with in-situ analytical Magnetic Cloud (MC) models, and with geometrical predictions from past works. We nd that the parallel (along the propagation plane) cross section expansion agrees well with the in-situ model and with the Bothmer & Schwenn [1998] empirical relationship based on in-situ observations between 0.3 and 1 AU. Our results effectively extend this empirical relationship to about 5 solar radii. The expansion of the perpendicular diameter agrees very well with the in-situ results at MESSENGER ( 0:5 AU) but not at 1 AU. We also find a slightly different, from Bothmer & Schwenn [1998], empirical relationship for the perpendicular expansion. More importantly, we find no evidence that the CME undergoes a significant latitudinal over-expansion as it is commonly assumed

  6. Symmetric or asymmetric energy transfer from Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections to the magnetosphere depending on the solar dipole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranyi, T.; Ludmány, A.

    The annual behaviour of monthly number of hours spent by the Earth in domains of either positive or negative By component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) was studied. We used the hourly OMNI data in the cases of Kp > 3. The study was confined to the ascending phases of the four recent sunspot cycles when Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) dominate among the sources of geoeffectiveness. Definite differences were found between the annual variations of the hourly sums. When the solar dipole is opposite to the terrestrial one, the sums exhibit the the combined effect of Rosenberg-Coleman and Russell-McPherron effects. Thus, in the geomagnetically active hours the negative By dominates during the first half of the year and the positive By dominates during the second half of the year. However, these effects can not be detected in the occurrence of the negative and positive GSM By values when the solar and terrestrial dipoles are parallel. In this case one can see polarity-independent semiannual variations instead of the polarity-dependent opposite annual variations. It is well-known that the By component modulates the energy transfer from the solar wind to the magnetosphere causing marked asymmetries in magnetospheric convective flow patterns at high latitudes. Our results hint that the occurrences of these asymmetries related to the ICMEs depend on the solar dipole cycle. In the antiparallel years one of them dominates during half a year causing asymmetric energy transfer to the magnetosphere. In the parallel years the occurrences of the two kind of asymmetries are equal on monthly time scale, thus the energy transfer is symmetric within a monthly and yearly time interval.

  7. USING MULTIPLE-VIEWPOINT OBSERVATIONS TO DETERMINE THE INTERACTION OF THREE CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS OBSERVED ON 2012 MARCH 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colaninno, Robin C. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Vourlidas, Angelos, E-mail: robin.colaninno@nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: angelos.vourlidas@jhuapl.edu [The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States)

    2015-12-10

    We examine the interaction of three coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that took place on 2012 March 5 at heights less than 20 R{sub ⊙} in the corona. We used a forward fitting model to reconstruct the three-dimensional trajectories and kinematics of the CMEs and determine their interaction in the observations from three viewpoints: Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), STEREO-A, and STEREO-B. The first CME (CME-1), a slow-rising eruption near disk center, is already in progress at 02:45 UT when the second CME (CME-2) erupts from AR 11429 on the east limb. These two CMEs are present in the corona not interacting when a third CME (CME-3) erupts from AR 11429 at 03:34 UT. CME-3 has a constant velocity of 1456[±31] km s{sup −1} and drives a shock that is observed as a halo from all viewpoints. We find that the shock driven by CME-3 passed through CME-1 with no observable change in the geometry, trajectory, or velocity of CME-1. However, the elevated temperatures detected in situ when CME-1 reached Earth indicate that the plasma inside CME-1 may have been heated by the passage of the shock. CME-2 is accelerated by CME-3 to more than twice its initial velocity and remains a separate structure ahead of the CME-3 front. CME-2 is deflected 24° northward by CME-3 for a total deflection of 40° from its source region. These results suggest that the collision of CME-2 and CME-3 is superelastic. This work demonstrates the capability and utility of fitting forward models to complex and interacting CMEs observed in the corona from multiple viewpoints.

  8. Interplanetary journey of a coronal mass ejection to Mars and to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witasse, Olivier; Kajdic, Primoz; Sanchez-Cano, Beatriz; Mays, Leila; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Espley, Jared; Goetz, Charlotte; Richter, Ingo; Koenders, Christoph; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Nilsson, Hans; Opgenoorth, Hermann; Andrews, David; Lester, Mark; Edberg, Niklas; Zouganelis, Yannis; Intzekara, Dimitra; Kuulkers, Erik; Turc, Lucile; Odstrcil, Dusan

    2016-04-01

    We discuss observations of a large coronal mass ejection (CME) ejected on 14 October 2014, which hit Mars on 17 October 2014, 1.5 days before the Mars close encounter with the Siding Spring comet. Clear disturbances of the Mars' upper atmosphere are identified in the Mars Express and MAVEN data sets. Interestingly, comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko was perfectly aligned with the Sun and Mars at 1.7 AU behind Mars, with the Rosetta spacecraft orbiting at 10 km above the cometary surface. The Rosetta plasma package and the radiation monitor detected the event on 22 October 2014. We describe the propagation of this CME from the Sun to Rosetta and show comparison with dedicated WSA-ENLIL (large-scale, physics-based prediction model of the heliosphere) simulations. CME effects on the Mars and comet 67P environments are reported. In particular, large and similar Forbush effects - a transient decrease followed by a gradual recovery in the observed galactic cosmic ray intensity- were observed at both places, as recorded by the MSL RAD instrument aboard the Curiosity rover at the surface of Mars and by the Radiation Environment Monitor aboard Rosetta. Fortuitously, the New Horizons spacecraft was also along the propagation direction of the CME, which can take 3-5 months to reach the distance of 31.7 AU. By the time the solar wind travels that far from the Sun, the fast solar wind parcels have interacted with slower wind parcels emitted at an earlier time along the same radial line. We investigate if the CME observed at Mars and Rosetta has a unique signature at New Horizons. This presents a challenge since many solar structures can either be worn down as they propagate, or they can merge into larger ones. We present also preliminary 3D WSA-ENLIL simulations out to 40 AU showing the evolution of the CME, including other CMEs during this period.

  9. Physics of erupting solar flux ropes: Coronal mass ejections (CMEs)—Recent advances in theory and observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, James

    2017-09-01

    Solar eruptions, observed as flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), are the most energetic visible plasma phenomena in the solar system. CMEs are the central component of solar eruptions and are detected as coherent magnetized plasma structures expanding in the solar wind (SW). If they reach the Earth, their magnetic fields can drive strong disturbances in the ionosphere, causing deleterious effects on terrestrial technological systems. The scientific and practical importance of CMEs has led to numerous satellite missions observing the Sun and SW. This has culminated in the ability to continuously observe CMEs expanding from the Sun to 1 AU, where the magnetic fields and plasma parameters of the evolved structures ("ejecta") can be measured in situ. Until recently, the physical mechanisms responsible for eruptions were major unanswered questions in solar and by extension stellar physics. New observations of CME dynamics and associated eruptive phenomena are now providing more stringent constraints on models, and quantitative theory-data comparisons are helping to establish the correct mechanism of solar eruptions, particularly the driving force of CMEs and the evolution of their magnetic fields in three dimensions. Recent work has demonstrated that theoretical results can simultaneously replicate the observed CME position-time data, temporal profiles of associated solar flare soft X-ray emissions, and the magnetic field and plasma parameters of CME ejecta measured at 1 AU. Thus, a new theoretical framework with testable predictions is emerging to model eruptions and the coupling of CME ejecta to geomagnetic disturbances. The key physics in CME dynamics is the Lorentz hoop force acting on toroidal "flux ropes," scalable from tokamaks and similar laboratory plasma structures. The present paper reviews the latest advances in observational and theoretical understanding of CMEs with the emphasis on quantitative comparisons of theory and observation.

  10. ON SUN-TO-EARTH PROPAGATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS: II. SLOW EVENTS AND COMPARISON WITH OTHERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ying D.; Hu, Huidong; Wang, Chi; Yang, Zhongwei; Wang, Rui [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Luhmann, Janet G. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Richardson, John D., E-mail: liuxying@spaceweather.ac.cn [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    As a follow-up study on Sun-to-Earth propagation of fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs), we examine the Sun-to-Earth characteristics of slow CMEs combining heliospheric imaging and in situ observations. Three events of particular interest, the 2010 June 16, 2011 March 25, and 2012 September 25 CMEs, are selected for this study. We compare slow CMEs with fast and intermediate-speed events, and obtain key results complementing the attempt of Liu et al. to create a general picture of CME Sun-to-Earth propagation: (1) the Sun-to-Earth propagation of a typical slow CME can be approximately described by two phases, a gradual acceleration out to about 20–30 solar radii, followed by a nearly invariant speed around the average solar wind level; (2) comparison between different types of CMEs indicates that faster CMEs tend to accelerate and decelerate more rapidly and have shorter cessation distances for the acceleration and deceleration; (3) both intermediate-speed and slow CMEs would have speeds comparable to the average solar wind level before reaching 1 au; (4) slow CMEs have a high potential to interact with other solar wind structures in the Sun–Earth space due to their slow motion, providing critical ingredients to enhance space weather; and (5) the slow CMEs studied here lack strong magnetic fields at the Earth but tend to preserve a flux-rope structure with an axis generally perpendicular to the radial direction from the Sun. We also suggest a “best” strategy for the application of a triangulation concept in determining CME Sun-to-Earth kinematics, which helps to clarify confusions about CME geometry assumptions in the triangulation and to improve CME analysis and observations.

  11. The Eruption of a Small-scale Emerging Flux Rope as the Driver of an M-class Flare and of a Coronal Mass Ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X. L.; Jiang, C. W.; Xue, Z. K.; Wang, J. C.; Priest, E. R.; Yang, L. H.; Kong, D. F.; Cao, W. D.; Ji, H. S.

    2017-08-01

    Solar flares and coronal mass ejections are the most powerful explosions in the Sun. They are major sources of potentially destructive space weather conditions. However, the possible causes of their initiation remain controversial. Using high-resolution data observed by the New Solar Telescope of Big Bear Solar Observaotry, supplemented by Solar Dynamics Observatory observations, we present unusual observations of a small-scale emerging flux rope near a large sunspot, whose eruption produced an M-class flare and a coronal mass ejection. The presence of the small-scale flux rope was indicated by static nonlinear force-free field extrapolation as well as data-driven magnetohydrodynamics modeling of the dynamic evolution of the coronal three-dimensional magnetic field. During the emergence of the flux rope, rotation of satellite sunspots at the footpoints of the flux rope was observed. Meanwhile, the Lorentz force, magnetic energy, vertical current, and transverse fields were increasing during this phase. The free energy from the magnetic flux emergence and twisting magnetic fields is sufficient to power the M-class flare. These observations present, for the first time, the complete process, from the emergence of the small-scale flux rope, to the production of solar eruptions.

  12. STEREO卫星的CME观测研究进展%Progress in the Observations of Coronal Mass Ejections by STEREO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张雪飞; 刘煜; 申远灯; 田占军

    2012-01-01

    We briefly review the important observational results for CMEs based on the stereoscopic data by STEREO, including: (1) the study of the structural characteristic of CMEs evolution, by the determination of their mass from the EUV dimming observed by the two EUVI (EUV Imager) telescopes; (2) the study of the propagating characteristic of CMEs in three dimensions, by analyzing the stereo image pairs from the two coronagraphs on board STEREO; (3) the study of the ICMEs as well as their evolution and dynamics through the inner heliosphere to the Earth, by tracking their source regions on the solar surface and the following propagations in the heliosphere from the two HI (Heliospheric Imager) telescopes. Finally, we introduce the new methods for measuring the parameters of CMEs using triangulation techniques.%简要回顾利用“日地关系天文台”(Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory,STEREO)卫星的立体观测资料在日冕物质抛射(Coronal Mass Ejection,CME)研究方面已取得的一些重要进展,主要包括:(1)通过极紫外成像仪观测到的日冕极紫外暗化来更准确地估计CME质量,研究CME演化的结构特征;(2)利用STEREO卫星日冕仪的双角度观测,在CME立体传播特征方面取得的新进展;(3)STEREO卫星日球成像仪具有广阔的视场范围,可以跟踪研究CME从太阳表面爆发到形成行星际日冕物质抛射(Interplanetary CME,ICME),及其在内日球层和近地空间的演化特征以及运动特征等.同时,也介绍了利用三角测量技术测定CME特征物理量的新方法.

  13. Global Coronal Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, P F

    2016-01-01

    After the {\\em Solar and Heliospheric Observatory} ({\\em SOHO}) was launched in 1996, the aboard Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) observed a global coronal wave phenomenon, which was initially named "EIT wave" after the telescope. The bright fronts are immediately followed by expanding dimmings. It has been shown that the brightenings and dimmings are mainly due to plasma density increase and depletion, respectively. Such a spectacular phenomenon sparked long-lasting interest and debates. The debates were concentrated on two topics, one is about the driving source, and the other is about the nature of this wavelike phenomenon. The controversies are most probably because there may exist two types of large-scale coronal waves that were not well resolved before the {\\em Solar Dynamics Observatory} ({\\em SDO}) was launched: one is a piston-driven shock wave straddling over the erupting coronal mass ejection (CME), and the other is an apparently propagating front, which may correspond to the CME frontal...

  14. Modeling the Initiation of the 2006 December 13 Coronal Mass Ejection in AR 10930: The Structure and Dynamics of the Erupting Flux Rope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuhong

    2016-06-01

    We carry out a 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulation to model the initiation of the coronal mass ejection (CME) on 2006 December 13 in the emerging δ-sunspot active region NOAA 10930. The setup of the simulation is similar to a previous simulation by Fan, but with a significantly widened simulation domain to accommodate the wide CME. The simulation shows that the CME can result from the emergence of a east-west oriented twisted flux rope whose positive, following emerging pole corresponds to the observed positive rotating sunspot emerging against the southern edge of the dominant pre-existing negative sunspot. The erupting flux rope in the simulation accelerates to a terminal speed that exceeds 1500 km s-1 and undergoes a counter-clockwise rotation of nearly 180° such that its front and flanks all exhibit southward directed magnetic fields, explaining the observed southward magnetic field in the magnetic cloud impacting the Earth. With continued driving of flux emergence, the source region coronal magnetic field also shows the reformation of a coronal flux rope underlying the flare current sheet of the erupting flux rope, ready for a second eruption. This may explain the build up for another X-class eruptive flare that occurred the following day from the same region.

  15. A Space weather information service based upon remote and in-situ measurements of coronal mass ejections heading for Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritter Birgit

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Earth’s magnetosphere is formed as a consequence of interaction between the planet’s magnetic field and the solar wind, a continuous plasma stream from the Sun. A number of different solar wind phenomena have been studied over the past 40 years with the intention of understanding and forecasting solar behavior. One of these phenomena in particular, Earth-bound interplanetary coronal mass ejections (CMEs, can significantly disturb the Earth’s magnetosphere for a short time and cause geomagnetic storms. This publication presents a mission concept consisting of six spacecraft that are equally spaced in a heliocentric orbit at 0.72 AU. These spacecraft will monitor the plasma properties, the magnetic field’s orientation and magnitude, and the 3D-propagation trajectory of CMEs heading for Earth. The primary objective of this mission is to increase space weather forecasting time by means of a near real-time information service, that is based upon in-situ and remote measurements of the aforementioned CME properties. The obtained data can additionally be used for updating scientific models. This update is the mission’s secondary objective. In-situ measurements are performed using a Solar Wind Analyzer instrumentation package and fluxgate magnetometers, while for remote measurements coronagraphs are employed. The proposed instruments originate from other space missions with the intention to reduce mission costs and to streamline the mission design process. Communication with the six identical spacecraft is realized via a deep space network consisting of six ground stations. They provide an information service that is in uninterrupted contact with the spacecraft, allowing for continuous space weather monitoring. A dedicated data processing center will handle all the data, and then forward the processed data to the SSA Space Weather Coordination Center which will, in turn, inform the general public through a space weather forecast. The data

  16. Mass fatality preparedness among medical examiners/coroners in the United States: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, Robyn R M; Orr, Mark G; Zhi, Qi; Merrill, Jacqueline A; Chen, Daniel Y; Riley, Halley E M; Sherman, Martin F

    2014-12-15

    In the United States (US), Medical Examiners and Coroners (ME/Cs) have the legal authority for the management of mass fatality incidents (MFI). Yet, preparedness and operational capabilities in this sector remain largely unknown. The purpose of this study was twofold; first, to identify appropriate measures of preparedness, and second, to assess preparedness levels and factors significantly associated with preparedness. Three separate checklists were developed to measure different aspects of preparedness: MFI Plan Elements, Operational Capabilities, and Pre-existing Resource Networks. Using a cross-sectional study design, data on these and other variables of interest were collected in 2014 from a national convenience sample of ME/C using an internet-based, anonymous survey. Preparedness levels were determined and compared across Federal Regions and in relation to the number of Presidential Disaster Declarations, also by Federal Region. Bivariate logistic and multivariable models estimated the associations between organizational characteristics and relative preparedness. A large proportion (42%) of respondents reported that less than 25 additional fatalities over a 48-hour period would exceed their response capacities. The preparedness constructs measured three related, yet distinct, aspects of preparedness, with scores highly variable and generally suboptimal. Median scores for the three preparedness measures also varied across Federal Regions and as compared to the number of Presidential Declared Disasters, also by Federal Region. Capacity was especially limited for activating missing persons call centers, launching public communications, especially via social media, and identifying temporary interment sites. The provision of staff training was the only factor studied that was significantly (positively) associated (p < .05) with all three preparedness measures. Although ME/Cs ranked local partners, such as Offices of Emergency Management, first responders, and

  17. Using Statistical Multivariable Models to Understand the Relationship Between Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejecta and Magnetic Flux Ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, P.; Richardson, I. G.

    2012-01-01

    In-situ measurements of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) display a wide range of properties. A distinct subset, "magnetic clouds" (MCs), are readily identifiable by a smooth rotation in an enhanced magnetic field, together with an unusually low solar wind proton temperature. In this study, we analyze Ulysses spacecraft measurements to systematically investigate five possible explanations for why some ICMEs are observed to be MCs and others are not: i) An observational selection effect; that is, all ICMEs do in fact contain MCs, but the trajectory of the spacecraft through the ICME determines whether the MC is actually encountered; ii) interactions of an erupting flux rope (PR) with itself or between neighboring FRs, which produce complex structures in which the coherent magnetic structure has been destroyed; iii) an evolutionary process, such as relaxation to a low plasma-beta state that leads to the formation of an MC; iv) the existence of two (or more) intrinsic initiation mechanisms, some of which produce MCs and some that do not; or v) MCs are just an easily identifiable limit in an otherwise corntinuous spectrum of structures. We apply quantitative statistical models to assess these ideas. In particular, we use the Akaike information criterion (AIC) to rank the candidate models and a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) to uncover any intrinsic clustering of the data. Using a logistic regression, we find that plasma-beta, CME width, and the ratio O(sup 7) / O(sup 6) are the most significant predictor variables for the presence of an MC. Moreover, the propensity for an event to be identified as an MC decreases with heliocentric distance. These results tend to refute ideas ii) and iii). GMM clustering analysis further identifies three distinct groups of ICMEs; two of which match (at the 86% level) with events independently identified as MCs, and a third that matches with non-MCs (68 % overlap), Thus, idea v) is not supported. Choosing between ideas i) and

  18. Coronal magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jie; Bastian, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    This volume is a collection of research articles on the subject of the solar corona, and particularly, coronal magnetism. The book was motivated by the Workshop on Coronal Magnetism: Connecting Models to Data and the Corona to the Earth, which was held 21 - 23 May 2012 in Boulder, Colorado, USA. This workshop was attended by approximately 60 researchers. Articles from this meeting are contained in this topical issue, but the topical issue also contains contributions from researchers not present at the workshop. This volume is aimed at researchers and graduate students active in solar physics. Originally published in Solar Physics, Vol. 288, Issue 2, 2013 and Vol. 289, Issue 8, 2014.

  19. Multi-point shock and flux rope analysis of multiple interplanetary coronal mass ejections around 2010 August 1 in the inner heliosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Möstl, C; Kilpua, E K J; Jian, L K; Liu, Y; Eastwood, J; Harrison, R A; Webb, D F; Temmer, M; Odstrcil, D; Davies, J A; Rollett, T; Luhmann, J G; Nitta, N; Mulligan, T; Jensen, E A; Forsyth, R; Lavraud, B; De Koning, C A; Veronig, A M; Galvin, A B; Zhang, T L; Anderson, B J

    2012-01-01

    We present multi-point in situ observations of a complex sequence of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) which may serve as a benchmark event for numerical and empirical space weather prediction models. On 2010 August 1, instruments on various space missions (Solar Dynamics Observatory/ Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar-TErrestrial-RElations-Observatory) monitored several CMEs originating within tens of degrees from solar disk center. We compare their imprints on four widely separated locations, spanning 120 degree in heliospheric longitude, with radial distances from the Sun ranging from MESSENGER (0.38 AU) to Venus Express (VEX, at 0.72 AU) to Wind, ACE and ARTEMIS near Earth, and STEREO-B close to 1 AU. Calculating shock and flux rope parameters at each location points to a non-spherical shape of the shock, and shows the global configuration of the interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), which have interacted, but do not seem to have merged. VEX and STEREO-B observed similar magnetic flux ropes (MF...

  20. A rare clinic entity: Huge trichobezoar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidayatullah Hamidi, Dr, MD

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Trichobezoars should be suspected in young females with long standing upper abdominal masses; as the possibility of malignancy is not very common in this age group. While USG is inconclusive, trichobezoar can be accurately diagnosed with CT. In patient with huge trichobezoar, laparotomy can be performed firstly because of big size and location of mass, and psychiatric recommendation should be made to prevent relapse of this entity.

  1. MULTI-POINT SHOCK AND FLUX ROPE ANALYSIS OF MULTIPLE INTERPLANETARY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS AROUND 2010 AUGUST 1 IN THE INNER HELIOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moestl, C.; Liu, Y.; Luhmann, J. G. [Space Science Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Farrugia, C. J. [Space Science Center and Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Kilpua, E. K. J. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, FI-00560 Helsinki (Finland); Jian, L. K. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Eastwood, J. P.; Forsyth, R. [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Harrison, R. A.; Davies, J. A. [RAL Space, Harwell Oxford, Didcot (United Kingdom); Webb, D. F. [Institute for Scientific Research, Boston College, Newton, MA (United States); Temmer, M.; Rollett, T.; Veronig, A. M. [Kanzelhoehe Observatory-IGAM, Institute of Physics, University of Graz, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Odstrcil, D. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Nitta, N. [Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Mulligan, T. [Space Science Applications Laboratory, The Aerospace Corporation, El Segundo, CA (United States); Jensen, E. A. [ACS Consulting, Houston, TX (United States); Lavraud, B. [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, Universite de Toulouse (UPS), F-31400 Toulouse (France); De Koning, C. A., E-mail: christian.moestl@uni-graz.at [NOAA/SWPC, Boulder, Colorado (United States); and others

    2012-10-10

    We present multi-point in situ observations of a complex sequence of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) which may serve as a benchmark event for numerical and empirical space weather prediction models. On 2010 August 1, instruments on various space missions, Solar Dynamics Observatory/Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar-TErrestrial-RElations-Observatory (SDO/SOHO/STEREO), monitored several CMEs originating within tens of degrees from the solar disk center. We compare their imprints on four widely separated locations, spanning 120 Degree-Sign in heliospheric longitude, with radial distances from the Sun ranging from MESSENGER (0.38 AU) to Venus Express (VEX, at 0.72 AU) to Wind, ACE, and ARTEMIS near Earth and STEREO-B close to 1 AU. Calculating shock and flux rope parameters at each location points to a non-spherical shape of the shock, and shows the global configuration of the interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), which have interacted, but do not seem to have merged. VEX and STEREO-B observed similar magnetic flux ropes (MFRs), in contrast to structures at Wind. The geomagnetic storm was intense, reaching two minima in the Dst index ( Almost-Equal-To - 100 nT), and was caused by the sheath region behind the shock and one of two observed MFRs. MESSENGER received a glancing blow of the ICMEs, and the events missed STEREO-A entirely. The observations demonstrate how sympathetic solar eruptions may immerse at least 1/3 of the heliosphere in the ecliptic with their distinct plasma and magnetic field signatures. We also emphasize the difficulties in linking the local views derived from single-spacecraft observations to a consistent global picture, pointing to possible alterations from the classical picture of ICMEs.

  2. A Tool for Empirical Forecasting of Major Flares, Coronal Mass Ejections, and Solar Particle Events from a Proxy of Active-Region Free Magnetic Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghouty, A. F.; Falconer, D. A.; Adams, J. H., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation describes a new forecasting tool developed for and is currently being tested by NASA s Space Radiation Analysis Group (SRAG) at JSC, which is responsible for the monitoring and forecasting of radiation exposure levels of astronauts. The new software tool is designed for the empirical forecasting of M and X-class flares, coronal mass ejections, as well as solar energetic particle events. Its algorithm is based on an empirical relationship between the various types of events rates and a proxy of the active region s free magnetic energy, determined from a data set of approx.40,000 active-region magnetograms from approx.1,300 active regions observed by SOHO/MDI that have known histories of flare, coronal mass ejection, and solar energetic particle event production. The new tool automatically extracts each strong-field magnetic areas from an MDI full-disk magnetogram, identifies each as an NOAA active region, and measures a proxy of the active region s free magnetic energy from the extracted magnetogram. For each active region, the empirical relationship is then used to convert the free magnetic energy proxy into an expected event rate. The expected event rate in turn can be readily converted into the probability that the active region will produce such an event in a given forward time window. Descriptions of the datasets, algorithm, and software in addition to sample applications and a validation test are presented. Further development and transition of the new tool in anticipation of SDO/HMI is briefly discussed.

  3. A tool for empirical forecasting of major flares, coronal mass ejections, and solar particle events from a proxy of active-region free magnetic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, David; Barghouty, Abdulnasser F.; Khazanov, Igor; Moore, Ron

    2011-04-01

    This paper describes a new forecasting tool developed for and currently being tested by NASA's Space Radiation Analysis Group (SRAG) at Johnson Space Center, which is responsible for the monitoring and forecasting of radiation exposure levels of astronauts. The new software tool is designed for the empirical forecasting of M- and X-class flares, coronal mass ejections, and solar energetic particle events. For each type of event, the algorithm is based on the empirical relationship between the event rate and a proxy of the active region's free magnetic energy. Each empirical relationship is determined from a data set of ˜40,000 active-region magnetograms from ˜1300 active regions observed by SOHO/Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) that have known histories of flare, coronal mass ejection, and solar energetic particle event production. The new tool automatically extracts each strong-field magnetic area from an MDI full-disk magnetogram, identifies each as a NOAA active region, and measures the proxy of the active region's free magnetic energy from the extracted magnetogram. For each active region, the empirical relationship is then used to convert the free-magnetic-energy proxy into an expected event rate. The expected event rate in turn can be readily converted into the probability that the active region will produce such an event in a given forward time window. Descriptions of the data sets, algorithm, and software in addition to sample applications and a validation test are presented. Further development and transition of the new tool in anticipation of SDO/HMI are briefly discussed.

  4. Heliocentric Distance of Coronal Mass Ejections at the Time of Energetic Particle Release: Revisiting the Ground Level Enhancement Events of Solar Cycle 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk

    2011-01-01

    Using the kinematics of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), onset time of soft X-ray flares, and the finite size of the pre-eruption CME structure, we derive the heliocentric distane at which the energetic particles during the ground level enhancement (GLE) events of Solar Cycle 23. We find that the GLE particles are released when the CMEs reach an average heliocentric distance of approx.3.25 solar radii (Rs). From this we infer that the shocks accelerating the particles are located at similar heights. Type II radio burst observations indicate that the CMEs are at much lower distances (average approx.1.4 Rs) when the CME-driven shock first forms. The shock seems to travel approx.1.8 Rs over a period of approox.30 min on the average before releasing the GLE particles. In deriving these results, we made three assumptions that have observational support: (i) the CME lift off occurs from an initial distance of about 1.25 Rs; (ii) the flare onset and CME onset are one and the same because these are two different manifestations of the same eruption; and (iii) the CME has positive acceleration from the onset to the first appearance in the coronagraphic field of view (2.5 to 6 Rs). Observations of coronal cavities in eclipse pictures and in coronagraphic images justify the assumption (i). The close relationship between the flare reconnection magnetic flux and the azimuthal flux of interplanetary magnetic clouds justify assumption (ii) consistent with the standard model (CSHKP) of solar eruption. Coronagraphic observations made close to the solar surface indicate a large positive acceleration of CMEs to a heliocentric distance of approx.3 Rs before they start slowing down due to the drag force. The inferred acceleration (approx.1.5 km/s/s) is consistent with reported values in the literature.

  5. A huge presacral Tarlov cyst. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kazuhiko; Yuzurihara, Masahito; Asamoto, Shunji; Doi, Hiroshi; Kubota, Motoo

    2007-08-01

    Perineural cysts have become a common incidental finding during lumbosacral magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Only some of the symptomatic cysts warrant treatment. The authors describe the successful operative treatment of a patient with, to the best of their knowledge, the largest perineural cyst reported to date. A 29-year-old woman had been suffering from long-standing constipation and low-back pain. During an obstetric investigation for infertility, the clinician discovered a huge presacral cystic mass. Computed tomography myelography showed the lesion to be a huge Tarlov cyst arising from the left S-3 nerve root and compressing the ipsilateral S-2 nerve. The cyst was successfully treated by ligation of the cyst neck together with sectioning of the S-3 nerve root. Postoperative improvement in her symptoms and MR imaging findings were noted. Identification of the nerve root involved by the cyst wall, operative indication, operative procedure, and treatment of multiple cysts are important preoperative considerations.

  6. The interplanetary mass ejections behaviour in the heliosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Dumitrache, Cristiana

    2014-01-01

    We present here an overview of an important solar phenomenon with major implication for space weather and planetary life. The coronal mass ejections (CMEs) come from the Sun and expand in the heliosphere, becoming interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). They represent huge clouds of plasma and magnetic fields that travel with velocities reaching even 2000 km/s and perturbing the planetary and interplanetary field. The magnetic clouds (MC) are a special class of ICMEs. We summarize some aspects as the ICMEs identification, propagation and track back to the Sun, where the solar source could be found. We notice here few known catalogs of the ICMEs and magnetic clouds.

  7. Exploring Coronal Structures with SOHO

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Μ. Karovska; Β. Wood; J. Chen; J. Cook; R. Howard

    2000-09-01

    We applied advanced image enhancement techniques to explore in detail the characteristics of the small-scale structures and/or the low contrast structures in several Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) observed by SOHO. We highlight here the results from our studies of the morphology and dynamical evolution of CME structures in the solar corona using two instruments on board SOHO: LASCO and EIT.

  8. Arrival time calculation for interplanetary coronal mass ejections with circular fronts and application to STEREO observations of the 2009 February 13 eruption

    CERN Document Server

    Möstl, C; Lugaz, N; Farrugia, C J; Davies, J A; Temmer, M; Veronig, A M; Harrison, R; Crothers, S; Luhmann, J G; Galvin, A B; Zhang, T L; Baumjohann, W; Biernat, H K

    2011-01-01

    A goal of the NASA STEREO mission is to study the feasibility of forecasting the direction, arrival time and internal structure of solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from a vantage point outside the Sun-Earth line. Through a case study, we discuss the arrival time calculation of interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs) in the ecliptic plane using data from STEREO/SECCHI at large elongations from the Sun in combination with different geometric assumptions about the ICME front shape (Fixed-\\Phi (FP): a point and harmonic Mean (HM): a circle). These forecasting techniques use single-spacecraft imaging data and are based on the assumptions of constant velocity and direction. We show that for the slow (350 km/s) ICME on 2009 February 13-18, observed at quadrature by the two STEREO spacecraft, the results for the arrival time given by the HM approximation are more accurate by 12 hours than those for FP in comparison to in situ observations of solar wind plasma and magnetic field parameters by STEREO/IMPACT/PLASTIC, and by 6 ho...

  9. Stereoscopic study of the kinematic evolution of a coronal mass ejection and its driven shock from the sun to the earth and the prediction of their arrival times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, Phillip; Zhang, Jie, E-mail: phess4@gmu.edu [School of Physics, Astronomy and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    We present a detailed study of the complete evolution of a coronal mass ejection (CME). We have tracked the evolution of both the ejecta and its shock, and further fit the evolution of the fronts to a simple but physics-based analytical model. This study focuses on the CME initiated on the Sun on 2012 July 12 and arriving at the Earth on 2012 July 14. Shock and ejecta fronts were observed by white light images, as well as in situ by the Advanced Composition Explorer satellite. We find that the propagation of the two fronts is not completely dependent upon one another, but can each be modeled in the heliosphere with a drag model that assumes the dominant force of affecting CME evolution to be the aerodynamic drag force of the ambient solar wind. Results indicate that the CME ejecta front undergoes a more rapid deceleration than the shock front within 50 R {sub ☉} and therefore the propagation of the two fronts is not completely coupled in the heliosphere. Using the graduated cylindrical shell model, as well as data from time-elongation stack plots and in situ signatures, we show that the drag model can accurately describe the behavior of each front, but is more effective with the ejecta. We also show that without the in situ data, based on measurements out to 80 R {sub ☉} combined with the general values for drag model parameters, the arrival of both the shock and ejecta can be predicted within four hours of arrival.

  10. On the Relationship between Solar Wind Speed, Earthward-Directed Coronal Mass Ejections, Geomagnetic Activity, and the Sunspot Cycle Using 12-Month Moving Averages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.

    2008-01-01

    For 1996 .2006 (cycle 23), 12-month moving averages of the aa geomagnetic index strongly correlate (r = 0.92) with 12-month moving averages of solar wind speed, and 12-month moving averages of the number of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) (halo and partial halo events) strongly correlate (r = 0.87) with 12-month moving averages of sunspot number. In particular, the minimum (15.8, September/October 1997) and maximum (38.0, August 2003) values of the aa geomagnetic index occur simultaneously with the minimum (376 km/s) and maximum (547 km/s) solar wind speeds, both being strongly correlated with the following recurrent component (due to high-speed streams). The large peak of aa geomagnetic activity in cycle 23, the largest on record, spans the interval late 2002 to mid 2004 and is associated with a decreased number of halo and partial halo CMEs, whereas the smaller secondary peak of early 2005 seems to be associated with a slight rebound in the number of halo and partial halo CMEs. Based on the observed aaM during the declining portion of cycle 23, RM for cycle 24 is predicted to be larger than average, being about 168+/-60 (the 90% prediction interval), whereas based on the expected aam for cycle 24 (greater than or equal to 14.6), RM for cycle 24 should measure greater than or equal to 118+/-30, yielding an overlap of about 128+/-20.

  11. Non-linear force-free field modeling of a solar active region around the time of a major flare and coronal mass ejection

    CERN Document Server

    Schrijver, C J; Metcalf, T; Barnes, G; Lites, B; Tarbell, T; McTiernan, J; Valori, G; Wiegelmann, T; Wheatland, M S; Amari, T; Aulanier, G; Demoulin, P; Fuhrmann, M; Kusano, K; Régnier, S; Thalmann, J K

    2007-01-01

    Solar flares and coronal mass ejections are associated with rapid changes in field connectivity and powered by the partial dissipation of electrical currents in the solar atmosphere. A critical unanswered question is whether the currents involved are induced by the motion of pre-existing atmospheric magnetic flux subject to surface plasma flows, or whether these currents are associated with the emergence of flux from within the solar convective zone. We address this problem by applying state-of-the-art nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) modeling to the highest resolution and quality vector-magnetographic data observed by the recently launched Hinode satellite on NOAA Active Region 10930 around the time of a powerful X3.4 flare. We compute 14 NLFFF models with 4 different codes and a variety of boundary conditions. We find that the model fields differ markedly in geometry, energy content, and force-freeness. We discuss the relative merits of these models in a general critique of present abilities to model the ...

  12. Modeling the initiation of the 2006 December 13 coronal mass ejection in AR 10930: the structure and dynamics of the erupting flux rope

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Yuhong

    2016-01-01

    We carry out a three-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulation to model the initiation of the coronal mass ejection (CME) on 13 December 2006 in the emerging {\\delta}-sunspot active region NOAA 10930. The setup of the simulation is similar to a previous simulation by Fan (2011), but with a significantly widened simulation domain to accommodate the wide CME. The simulation shows that the CME can result from the emergence of a east-west oriented twisted flux rope whose positive, following emerging pole corresponds to the observed positive rotating sunspot emerging against the southern edge of the dominant pre-existing negative sunspot. The erupting flux rope in the simulation accelerates to a terminal speed that exceeds 1500 km/s and undergoes a counter-clockwise rotation of nearly 180 degrees such that its front and flanks all exhibit southward directed magnetic fields, explaining the observed southward magnetic field in the magnetic cloud impacting the Earth. With continued driving of flux emergence, ...

  13. A Robust Method to Predict the Near-Sun and Interplanetary Magnetic Field Strength of Coronal Mass Ejections: Parametric and Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsourakos, Spiros; Georgoulis, Manolis K.

    2016-07-01

    Predicting the near-Sun, and particularly the Interplanetary (IP), magnetic field structure of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and interplanetary counterparts (ICMEs) is a topic of intense research activity. This is because Earth-directed CMEs with strong southward magnetic fields are responsible for the most powerful geomagnetic storms. We have recently developed a simple two-tier method to predict the magnetic field strength of CMEs in the outer corona and in the IP medium, using as input the magnetic-helicity budget of the source solar active region and stereoscopic coronagraphic observations. Near-Sun CME magnetic fields are obtained by utilizing the principle of magnetic helicity conservation of flux-rope CMEs for coronagraphic observations. Interplanetary propagation of the inferred values is achieved by employing power-law prescriptions of the radial evolution of the CME-ICME magnetic fields. We hereby present a parametric study of our method, based on the observed statistics of input parameters, to infer the anticipated range of values for the near-Sun and interplanetary CME-ICME magnetic fields. This analysis is complemented by application of our method to several well-observed major CME-ICME events.

  14. Geoeffectiveness (D (sub st) and K (sub p)) of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections During 1995-2009 and Implications for Storm Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.

    2011-01-01

    We summarize the geoeffectiveness (based on the Dst and Kp indices) of the more than 300 interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) that passed the Earth during 1996-2009, encompassing solar cycle 23. We subsequently estimate the probability that an ICME will generate geomagnetic activity that exceeds certain thresholds of Dst or Kp, including the NOAA "G" storm scale, based on maximum values of the southward magnetic field component (Bs), the solar wind speed (V), and the y component (Ey) of the solar wind convective electric field E = -V x B, in the ICME or sheath ahead of the ICME. Consistent with previous studies, the geoeffectiveness of an ICME is correlated with Bs or Ey approx.= VBs in the ICME or sheath, indicating that observations from a solar wind monitor upstream of the Earth are likely to provide the most reliable forecasts of the activity associated with an approaching ICME. There is also a general increase in geoeffectiveness with ICME speed, though the overall event-to-event correlation is weaker than for Bs and Ey. Nevertheless, using these results, we suggest that the speed of an ICME approaching the Earth inferred, for example, from routine remote sensing by coronagraphs on spacecraft well separated from the Earth or by all-sky imagers, could be used to estimate the likely geoeffectiveness of the ICME (our "comprehensive" ICME database provides a proxy for ICMEs identified in this way) with a longer lead time than may be possible using an upstream monitor

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation of the X2.2 Solar Flare on 2011 February 15: II. A Dynamics Connecting the Solar Flare and the Coronal Mass Ejection

    CERN Document Server

    Inoue, S; Magara, T; Choe, G S; Park, Y D

    2015-01-01

    We clarify a relationship of the dynamics of a solar flare and a growing Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) by investigating the dynamics of magnetic fields during the X2.2-class flare taking place in the solar active region 11158 on 2011 February 15, based on simulation results obtained from Inoue et al. 2014. We found that the strongly twisted lines formed through the tether-cutting reconnection in the twisted lines of a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) can break the force balance within the magnetic field, resulting in their launch from the solar surface. We further discover that a large-scale flux tube is formed during the eruption as a result of the tether-cutting reconnection between the eruptive strongly twisted lines and these ambient weakly twisted lines. Then the newly formed large flux tube exceeds the critical height of the torus instability. The tether-cutting reconnection thus plays an important role in the triggering a CME. Furthermore, we found that the tangential fields at the solar surface illust...

  16. Three-dimensional Geometry of a Current Sheet in the High Solar Corona: Evidence for Reconnection in the Late Stage of the Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ryun-Young; Vourlidas, Angelos; Webb, David

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by the standard flare model, ray-like structures in the wake of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) have been often interpreted as proxies of the reconnecting current sheet connecting the CME with the postflare arcade. We present the three-dimensional properties of a post-CME ray derived from white light images taken from three different viewing perspectives on 2013 September 21. By using a forward modeling method, the direction, cross section, and electron density are determined within the heliocentric distance range of 5-9 R ⊙. The width and depth of the ray are 0.42 ± 0.08 R ⊙ and 1.24 ± 0.35 R ⊙, respectively, and the electron density is (2.0 ± 0.5) × 104 cm-3, which seems to be constant with height. Successive blobs moving outward along the ray are observed around 13 hr after the parent CME onset. We model the three-dimensional geometry of the parent CME with the Gradual Cylindrical Shell model and find that the CME and ray are coaxial. We suggest that coaxial post-CME rays, seen in coronagraph images, with successive formation of blobs could be associated with current sheets undergoing magnetic reconnection in the late stage of CMEs.

  17. A Self-Consistent Numerical Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Model of Helmet Streamer and Flux-Rope Interactions: Initiation and Propagation of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. T.; Guo, W. P.

    1997-01-01

    We present results for an investigation of the interaction of a helmet streamer arcade and a helical flux-rope emerging from the sub-photosphere. These results are obtained by using a three-dimensional axisymmetric, time-dependent ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. Because of the physical nature of the flux-rope, we investigate two types of flux-ropes; (1) high density flux-rope (i.e. flux-rope without cavity), and (2) low density flux rope (i.e. flux-rope with cavity). When the streamer is disrupted by the flux-rope, it will evolve into a configuration resembling the typical observed loop-like Coronal Mass Ejection (CMES) for both cases. The streamer-flux rope system with cavity is easier to be disrupted and the propagation speed of the CME is faster than the streamer-flux rope system without cavity. Our results demonstrate that magnetic buoyancy force plays an important role in disrupting the streamer.

  18. Sun-to-Earth Characteristics of Two Coronal Mass Ejections Interacting near 1 AU: Formation of a Complex Ejecta and Generation of a Two-Step Geomagnetic Storm

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ying D; Wang, Rui; Luhmann, Janet G; Richardson, John D; Lugaz, Noé

    2014-01-01

    On 2012 September 30 - October 1 the Earth underwent a two-step geomagnetic storm. We examine the Sun-to-Earth characteristics of the coronal mass ejections (CMEs) responsible for the geomagnetic storm with combined heliospheric imaging and in situ observations. The first CME, which occurred on 2012 September 25, is a slow event and shows an acceleration followed by a nearly invariant speed in the whole Sun-Earth space. The second event, launched from the Sun on 2012 September 27, exhibits a quick acceleration, then a rapid deceleration and finally a nearly constant speed, a typical Sun-to-Earth propagation profile for fast CMEs \\citep{liu13}. These two CMEs interacted near 1 AU as predicted by the heliospheric imaging observations and formed a complex ejecta observed at Wind, with a shock inside that enhanced the pre-existing southward magnetic field. Reconstruction of the complex ejecta with the in situ data indicates an overall left-handed flux rope-like configuration, with an embedded concave-outward shoc...

  19. SUN-TO-EARTH CHARACTERISTICS OF TWO CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS INTERACTING NEAR 1 AU: FORMATION OF A COMPLEX EJECTA AND GENERATION OF A TWO-STEP GEOMAGNETIC STORM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ying D.; Yang, Zhongwei; Wang, Rui [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Luhmann, Janet G. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Richardson, John D. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Lugaz, Noé, E-mail: liuxying@spaceweather.ac.cn [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    On 2012 September 30-October 1 the Earth underwent a two-step geomagnetic storm. We examine the Sun-to-Earth characteristics of the coronal mass ejections (CMEs) responsible for the geomagnetic storm with combined heliospheric imaging and in situ observations. The first CME, which occurred on 2012 September 25, is a slow event and shows an acceleration followed by a nearly invariant speed in the whole Sun-Earth space. The second event, launched from the Sun on 2012 September 27, exhibits a quick acceleration, then a rapid deceleration, and finally a nearly constant speed, a typical Sun-to-Earth propagation profile for fast CMEs. These two CMEs interacted near 1 AU as predicted by the heliospheric imaging observations and formed a complex ejecta observed at Wind, with a shock inside that enhanced the pre-existing southward magnetic field. Reconstruction of the complex ejecta with the in situ data indicates an overall left-handed flux-rope-like configuration with an embedded concave-outward shock front, a maximum magnetic field strength deviating from the flux rope axis, and convex-outward field lines ahead of the shock. While the reconstruction results are consistent with the picture of CME-CME interactions, a magnetic cloud-like structure without clear signs of CME interactions is anticipated when the merging process is finished.

  20. First High-resolution Spectroscopic Observations of an Erupting Prominence Within a Coronal Mass Ejection by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS)

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Wei; Vial, Jean-Claude; Title, Alan M; Carlsson, Mats; Uitenbroek, Han; Okamoto, Takenori J; Berger, Thomas E; Antolin, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of prominence eruptions associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs), although relatively rare, can provide valuable plasma and 3D geometry diagnostics. We report the first observations by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) mission of a spectacular fast CME/prominence eruption associated with an equivalent X1.6 flare on 2014 May 9. The maximum plane-of-sky and Doppler velocities of the eruption are 1200 and 460 km/s, respectively. There are two eruption components separated by ~200 km/s in Doppler velocity: a primary, bright component and a secondary, faint component, suggesting a hollow, rather than solid, cone-shaped distribution of material. The eruption involves a left-handed helical structure undergoing counter-clockwise (viewed top-down) unwinding motion. There is a temporal evolution from upward eruption to downward fallback with less-than-free-fall speeds and decreasing nonthermal line widths. We find a wide range of Mg II k/h line intensity ratios (less than ...

  1. A rare clinic entity: Huge trichobezoar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi, Hidayatullah; Muhammadi, Marzia; Saberi, Bismillah; Sarwari, Mohammad Arif

    2016-01-01

    Trichobezoar is a rare clinical entity in which a ball of hair amasses within the alimentary tract. It can either be found as isolated mass in the stomach or may extend into the intestine. Trichobezoars mostly occur in young females with psychiatric disorders such as trichophagia and trichotillomania. Authors present a giant trichobezoar in an 18year old female presented with complaints of upper abdominal mass, epigastric area pain, anorexia and weight loss. The patient underwent trans-abdominal ultrasonography (USG), Computed tomography (CT), upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and subsequently laparotomy. USG was inconclusive due to non-specific findings. It revealed a thick echogenic layer with posterior dirty shadowing extending from the left sub-diaphragmatic area to the right sub hepatic region obscuring the adjacent structures. Abdominal CT images revealed a huge, well defined, multi-layered, heterogeneous, solid appearing, non-enhancing mass lesion in the gastric lumen extending from the gastric fundus to the pyloric canal. An endoscopic attempt was performed for removal of this intraluminal mass, but due to its large size, and hard nature, the endoscopic removal was unsuccessful. Finally the large trichobezoar was removed with open laparotomy. Trichobezoars should be suspected in young females with long standing upper abdominal masses; as the possibility of malignancy is not very common in this age group. While USG is inconclusive, trichobezoar can be accurately diagnosed with CT. In patient with huge trichobezoar, laparotomy can be performed firstly because of big size and location of mass, and psychiatric recommendation should be made to prevent relapse of this entity. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Geometry of solar coronal rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, B. P.; Martsenyuk, O. V.; Platov, Yu. V.; Den, O. E.

    2016-02-01

    Coronal helmet streamers are the most prominent large-scale elements of the solar corona observed in white light during total solar eclipses. The base of the streamer is an arcade of loops located above a global polarity inversion line. At an altitude of 1-2 solar radii above the limb, the apices of the arches sharpen, forming cusp structures, above which narrow coronal rays are observed. Lyot coronagraphs, especially those on-board spacecrafts flying beyond the Earth's atmosphere, enable us to observe the corona continuously and at large distances. At distances of several solar radii, the streamers take the form of fairly narrow spokes that diverge radially from the Sun. This radial direction displays a continuous expansion of the corona into the surrounding space, and the formation of the solar wind. However, the solar magnetic field and solar rotation complicate the situation. The rotation curves radial streams into spiral ones, similar to water streams flowing from rotating tubes. The influence of the magnetic field is more complex and multifarious. A thorough study of coronal ray geometries shows that rays are frequently not radial and not straight. Coronal streamers frequently display a curvature whose direction in the meridional plane depends on the phase of the solar cycle. It is evident that this curvature is related to the geometry of the global solar magnetic field, which depends on the cycle phase. Equatorward deviations of coronal streamers at solar minima and poleward deviations at solar maxima can be interpreted as the effects of changes in the general topology of the global solar magnetic field. There are sporadic temporal changes in the coronal rays shape caused by remote coronal mass ejections (CMEs) propagating through the corona. This is also a manifestation of the influence of the magnetic field on plasma flows. The motion of a large-scale flux rope associated with a CME away from the Sun creates changes in the structure of surrounding field

  3. Blind Stereoscopy of the Coronal Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Aschwanden, Markus J; Malanushenko, Anna

    2015-01-01

    We test the feasibility of 3D coronal-loop tracing in stereoscopic EUV image pairs, with the ultimate goal of enabling efficient 3D reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field that drives flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We developed an automated code designed to perform triangulation of coronal loops in pairs (or triplets) of EUV images recorded from different perspectives. The automated (or blind) stereoscopy code includes three major tasks: (i) automated pattern recognition of coronal loops in EUV images, (ii) automated pairing of corresponding loop patterns from two different aspect angles, and (iii) stereoscopic triangulation of 3D loop coordinates. We perform tests with simulated stereoscopic EUV images and quantify the accuracy of all three procedures. In addition we test the performance of the blind stereoscopy code as a function of the spacecraft-separation angle and as a function of the spatial resolution. We also test the sensitivity to magnetic non-potentiality. The automated code develo...

  4. The X-Ray Luminosity Function of M37 and the Evolution of Coronal Activity in Low-mass Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Alejandro; Agüeros, Marcel A.

    2016-10-01

    We use a 440.5 ks Chandra observation of the ≈500 Myr old open cluster M37 to derive the X-ray luminosity functions of its ≤1.2 {M}ȯ stars. Combining detections of 162 M37 members with upper limits for 160 non-detections, we find that its G, K, and M stars have a similar median (0.5–7 keV) X-ray luminosity {L}{{X}}={10}29.0 {erg} {{{s}}}-1, whereas the {L}{{X}}-to-bolometric-luminosity ratio ({L}{{X}}/{L}{bol}) indicates that M stars are more active than G and K stars by ≈ 1 order of magnitude at 500 Myr. To characterize the evolution of magnetic activity in low-mass stars over their first ≈ 600 {{Myr}}, we consolidate X-ray and optical data from the literature for stars in six other open clusters: from youngest to oldest they are, the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), NGC 2547, NGC 2516, the Pleiades, NGC 6475, and the Hyades. For these, we homogenize the conversion of instrumental count rates to {L}{{X}} by applying the same one-temperature emission model as for M37, and obtain masses using the same empirical mass-absolute magnitude relation (except for the ONC). We find that for G and K stars X-ray activity decreases ≈ 2 orders of magnitude over their first 600 Myr, and for M stars, ≈1.5. The decay rate of the median {L}{{X}} follows the relation {L}{{X}}\\propto {t}b, where b=-0.61+/- 0.12 for G stars, ‑0.82 ± 0.16 for K stars, and ‑0.40 ± 0.17 for M stars. In {L}{{X}}/{L}{bol} space, the slopes are ‑0.68 ± 0.12, ‑0.81 ± 0.19, and ‑0.61 ± 0.12, respectively. These results suggest that for low-mass stars the age-activity relation steepens after ≈ 625 {{Myr}}, consistent with the faster decay in activity observed in solar analogs at t\\gt 1 {{Gyr}}.

  5. Initiation and Early Evolution of the Coronal Mass Ejection on 2009 May 13 from Extreme-ultraviolet and White-light Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, A. A.; Ulyanov, A. S.; Bogachev, S. A.; Kuzin, S. V.

    2014-10-01

    We present the results of the observations of a coronal mass ejection (CME) that occurred on 2009 May 13. The most important feature of these observations is that the CME was observed from the very early stage (the solar surface) up to a distance of 15 solar radii (R ⊙). Below 2 R ⊙, we used the data from the TESIS extreme-ultraviolet telescopes obtained in the Fe 171 Å and He 304 Å lines, and above 2 R ⊙, we used the observations of the LASCO C2 and C3 coronagraphs. The CME was formed at a distance of 0.2-0.5R ⊙ from the Sun's surface as a U-shaped structure, which was observed both in the 171 Å images and in the white light. Observations in the He 304 Å line showed that the CME was associated with an erupting prominence, which was not located above—as the standard model predicts—but rather in the lowest part of the U-shaped structure close to the magnetic X point. The prominence location can be explained with the CME breakout model. Estimates showed that CME mass increased with time. The CME trajectory was curved—its heliolatitude decreased with time. The CME started at a latitude of 50° and reached the ecliptic plane at distances of 2.5 R ⊙. The CME kinematics can be divided into three phases: initial acceleration, main acceleration, and propagation with constant velocity. After the CME, onset GOES registered a sub-A-class flare.

  6. Initiation and early evolution of the coronal mass ejection on 2009 May 13 from extreme-ultraviolet and white-light observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reva, A. A.; Ulyanov, A. S.; Bogachev, S. A.; Kuzin, S. V., E-mail: reva.antoine@gmail.com [Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 53 Leninskij Prospekt, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-01

    We present the results of the observations of a coronal mass ejection (CME) that occurred on 2009 May 13. The most important feature of these observations is that the CME was observed from the very early stage (the solar surface) up to a distance of 15 solar radii (R {sub ☉}). Below 2 R {sub ☉}, we used the data from the TESIS extreme-ultraviolet telescopes obtained in the Fe 171 Å and He 304 Å lines, and above 2 R {sub ☉}, we used the observations of the LASCO C2 and C3 coronagraphs. The CME was formed at a distance of 0.2-0.5R {sub ☉} from the Sun's surface as a U-shaped structure, which was observed both in the 171 Å images and in the white light. Observations in the He 304 Å line showed that the CME was associated with an erupting prominence, which was not located above—as the standard model predicts—but rather in the lowest part of the U-shaped structure close to the magnetic X point. The prominence location can be explained with the CME breakout model. Estimates showed that CME mass increased with time. The CME trajectory was curved—its heliolatitude decreased with time. The CME started at a latitude of 50° and reached the ecliptic plane at distances of 2.5 R {sub ☉}. The CME kinematics can be divided into three phases: initial acceleration, main acceleration, and propagation with constant velocity. After the CME, onset GOES registered a sub-A-class flare.

  7. The X-ray luminosity function of M37 and the evolution of coronal activity in low-mass stars

    CERN Document Server

    Núñez, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    We use a 440.5 ks Chandra observation of the $\\approx$500-Myr-old open cluster M37 to derive the X-ray luminosity functions of its $\\leq1.2$ $M_{\\odot}$ stars. Combining detections of 162 M37 members with upper limits for 160 non-detections, we find that its G, K, and M stars have a similar median (0.5$-$7 keV) X-ray luminosity L$_X =10^{29.0}$ erg/s, whereas the L$_X$-to-bolometric-luminosity ratio (L$_X$/L$_{bol}$) indicates that M stars are more active than G and K stars by $\\approx$1 order of magnitude at 500 Myr. To characterize the evolution of magnetic activity in low-mass stars over their first $\\approx$600 Myr, we consolidate X-ray and optical data from the literature for stars in six other open clusters: from youngest to oldest, the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), NGC 2547, NGC 2516, the Pleiades, NGC 6475, and the Hyades. For these, we homogenize the conversion of instrumental count rates to L$_X$ by applying the same one-temperature emission model as for M37, and obtain masses using the same empirical...

  8. Huge Gastric Teratoma in an 8-Year Old Boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisodiya, Rajpal S; Ratan, Simmi K; Man, Parveen K

    2016-01-01

    Gastric teratoma is very rare tumor and usually presents in early infancy. An 8-year-old boy presented with a huge mass in abdomen extending from epigastrium to the pelvis. Ultrasound and CT scan of abdomen revealed a huge mass with solid and cystic components and internal calcifications. The preoperative diagnosis was a teratoma but not specifically gastric one. At operation, it was found to be gastric teratoma. The mass was excised completely with part of the stomach wall. The histopathology confirmed it to be mature gastric teratoma. The rarity of the teratoma with delayed presentation prompted us to report the case.

  9. Initiation and early evolution of a Coronal Mass Ejection on May 13, 2009 from EUV and white-light observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, Anton; Kuzin, Sergey; Bogachev, Sergey; Ulyanov, Artyom

    In this talk we present results of the observations of a CME, which occurred on May 13, 2009. The most important feature of these observations is that the CME was observed from the very beginning stage (the solar surface) up to the distance of 15 solar radii (R_⊙). Below 2 R_⊙ we used the data from the TESIS EUV telescopes obtained in the Fe 171 Å and He 304 Å lines, and above 2 R_⊙ we used the observations of the LASCO C2 and C3 coronagraphs. Using data of these three instruments, we have studied the evolution of the CME in details. The CME had a curved trajectory -- its helio-latitude decreased with time. The mass ejection originated at a latitudes of about 50(°) and reached the ecliptic plane at a distance of 2.5 R_⊙ from the Sun’s center. The CME velocity and acceleration increased as the CME went away from the Sun. At the distance of 15 R_⊙ from the Sun’s center the CME had a velocity of 250 km/s and an acceleration of 5 m/s(2) . The CME was not associated with a flare, and didn’t have an impulsive acceleration phase. The mass ejection had U-shaped structure which was observed both in the 171 Å images and in white-light. The CME was formed at a distance of about 0.2 -- 0.5 R_⊙ from the Sun’s surface. Observations in the line 304 Å showed that the CME was associated with the erupting prominence, which was located in the lowest part of the U-shaped structure close to the X-point of the magnetic reconnection. The prominence disappeared at the height of 0.4 R_⊙ above the solar limb. Some aspects of these observations can’t be explained in the standard CME model, which predicts that the prominence should be located inside the U-shaped structure, and the CME should be associated with a flare and have an impulsive acceleration phase.

  10. A STUDY OF THE HELIOCENTRIC DEPENDENCE OF SHOCK STANDOFF DISTANCE AND GEOMETRY USING 2.5D MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF CORONAL MASS EJECTION DRIVEN SHOCKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savani, N. P. [University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Shiota, D. [Computational Astrophysics Laboratory, Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kusano, K. [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Vourlidas, A. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Lugaz, N., E-mail: neel.savani02@imperial.ac.uk [Experimental Space Plasma Group, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)

    2012-11-10

    We perform four numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulations in 2.5 dimensions (2.5D) of fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and their associated shock fronts between 10 Rs and 300 Rs. We investigate the relative change in the shock standoff distance, {Delta}, as a fraction of the CME radial half-width, D {sub OB} (i.e., {Delta}/D {sub OB}). Previous hydrodynamic studies have related the shock standoff distance for Earth's magnetosphere to the density compression ratio (DR; {rho} {sub u}/{rho} {sub d}) measured across the bow shock. The DR coefficient, k {sub dr}, which is the proportionality constant between the relative standoff distance ({Delta}/D {sub OB}) and the compression ratio, was semi-empirically estimated as 1.1. For CMEs, we show that this value varies linearly as a function of heliocentric distance and changes significantly for different radii of curvature of the CME's leading edge. We find that a value of 0.8 {+-} 0.1 is more appropriate for small heliocentric distances (<30 Rs) which corresponds to the spherical geometry of a magnetosphere presented by Seiff. As the CME propagates its cross section becomes more oblate and the k {sub dr} value increases linearly with heliocentric distance, such that k {sub dr} = 1.1 is most appropriate at a heliocentric distance of about 80 Rs. For terrestrial distances (215 Rs) we estimate k {sub dr} = 1.8 {+-} 0.3, which also indicates that the CME cross-sectional structure is generally more oblate than that of Earth's magnetosphere. These alterations to the proportionality coefficients may serve to improve investigations into the estimates of the magnetic field in the corona upstream of a CME as well as the aspect ratio of CMEs as measured in situ.

  11. Data-driven Simulations of Magnetic Connectivity in Behind-the-Limb Gamma-ray Flares and Associated Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Meng; Petrosian, Vahe; Liu, Wei; Omodei, Nicola

    2017-08-01

    Recent Fermi detection of high-energy gamma-ray emission from the behind-the-limb (BTL) solar flares pose a puzzle on the particle acceleration and transport mechanisms in such events. Due to the large separation between the flare site and the location of gamma-ray emission, it is believed that the associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) play an important role in accelerating and subsequently transporting particles back to the Sun to produce obseved gamma-rays. We explore this scenario by simulating the CME associated with a well-observed flare on 2014 September 1 about 40 degrees behind the east solar limb and by comparing the simulation and observational results. We utilize a data-driven global magnetohydrodynamics model (AWSoM: Alfven-wave Solar Model) to track the dynamical evolution of the global magnetic field during the event and investigate the magnetic connectivity between the CME/CME-driven shock and the Fermi emission region. Moreover, we derive the time-varying shock parameters (e.g., compression ratio, Alfven Mach number, and ThetaBN) over the area that is magnetically connected to the visible solar disk where Fermi gamma-ray emission originates. Our simulation shows that the visible solar disk develops connections both to the flare region and to the CME-driven shock during the eruption, which indicate that the CME’s interaction with the global solar corona is critical for understanding such Fermi BTL events and gamma-ray flares in general. We discuss the causes and implications of Fermi BTL events, in the framework of a potential shift of paradigm on particle acceleration in solar flares/CMEs.

  12. Role of solar wind speed and interplanetary magnetic field during two-step Forbush decreases caused by Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar, Ankush; Vichare, Geeta; Arunbabu, K. P.; Raghav, Anil

    2016-07-01

    The relationship of Forbush decreases (FDs) observed in Moscow neutron monitor with the interplanetary magnetic field (B) and solar wind speed (Vsw) is investigated in detail for the FDs associated with Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) during 2001-2004. The classical two-step FD events are selected, and characteristics of the first step (mainly associated with shock), as well as of complete decrease (main phase) and recovery phase, are studied here. It is observed that the onset of FD occurs generally after zero to a few hours of shock arrival, indicating in the post-shock region that mainly sheath and ICME act as important drivers of FD. A good correlation is observed between the amplitude of B and associated FD magnitude observed in the neutron count rate of the main phase. The duration of the main phase observed in the neutron count rate also shows good correlation with B. This might indicate that stronger interplanetary disturbances have a large dimension of magnetic field structure which causes longer fall time of FD main phase when they transit across the Earth. It is observed that Vsw and neutron count rate time profiles show considerable similarity with each other during complete FD, especially during the recovery phase of FD. Linear relationship is observed between time duration/e-folding time of FD recovery phase and Vsw. These observations indicate that the FDs are influenced by the inhibited diffusion of cosmic rays due to the enhanced convection associated with the interplanetary disturbances. We infer that the inhibited cross-field diffusion of the cosmic rays due to enhanced B is mainly responsible for the main phase of FD whereas the expansion of ICME contributes in the early recovery phase and the gradual variation of Vsw beyond ICME boundaries contributes to the long duration of FD recovery through reduced convection-diffusion.

  13. Deriving the radial distances of wide coronal mass ejections from elongation measurements in the heliosphere – application to CME-CME interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Roussev

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We present general considerations regarding the derivation of the radial distances of coronal mass ejections (CMEs from elongation angle measurements such as those provided by SECCHI and SMEI, focusing on measurements in the Heliospheric Imager 2 (HI-2 field of view (i.e. past 0.3 AU. This study is based on a three-dimensional (3-D magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD simulation of two CMEs observed by SECCHI on 24–27 January 2007. Having a 3-D simulation with synthetic HI images, we are able to compare the two basic methods used to derive CME positions from elongation angles, the so-called "Point-P" and "Fixed-φ" approximations. We confirm, following similar works, that both methods, while valid in the most inner heliosphere, yield increasingly large errors in HI-2 field of view for fast and wide CMEs. Using a simple model of a CME as an expanding self-similar sphere, we derive an analytical relationship between elongation angles and radial distances for wide CMEs. This relationship is simply the harmonic mean of the "Point-P" and "Fixed-φ" approximations and it is aimed at complementing 3-D fitting of CMEs by cone models or flux rope shapes. It proves better at getting the kinematics of the simulated CME right when we compare the results of our line-of-sights to the MHD simulation. Based on this approximation, we re-analyze the J-maps (time-elongation maps in 26–27 January 2007 and present the first observational evidence that the merging of CMEs is associated with a momentum exchange from the faster ejection to the slower one due to the propagation of the shock wave associated with the fast eruption through the slow eruption.

  14. On the statistical characteristics of radio-loud and radio-quiet halo coronal mass ejections and their associated flares during solar cycles 23 and 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Nishant; Sharma, Joginder; Verma, Virendar Kumar; Garg, Vijay

    2016-08-01

    We have studied the characteristics of radio-loud (RL) and radio-quiet (RQ) front side halo coronal mass ejections (HCMEs) (angular width 360°) observed between the time period years 1996-2014. RL-HCMEs are associated with type II radio bursts, while RQ-HCMEs are not associated with type II radio bursts. CMEs near the Sun in the interplanetary medium associated with radio bursts also affect the magnetosphere. The type II radio burst data was observed by WIND/WAVES instrument and HCMEs were observed by LASCO/ SOHO instruments. In our study, we have examined the properties of RL-HCMEs and RQ-HCMEs and found that RL-HCMEs follow the solar cycle variation. Our study also shows that the 26% of slow speed HCMEs and 82% of fast speed HCMEs are RL. The average speed of RL-HCMEs and RQ-HCMEs are 1370 km/s and 727 km/s, respectively. Most of the RQ-HCMEs occur around the solar disc center while most of RL-HCMEs are uniformly distributed across the solar disc. The mean value of acceleration of RL-HCMEs is more than twice that of RQ-HCMEs and mean value of deceleration of RL- HCMEs is very small compare to RQ-HCMEs events. It is also found that RQ-HCMEs events are associated with C- and M-class of SXR flares, while RL-HCMEs events are associated with M and X-class of SXR flares, which indicates that the RQ-HCMEs are less energetic than the RL-HCMEs. We have also discussed the various results obtained in present investigation in view of recent scenario of solar physics.

  15. Analysis of a coronal mass ejection and corotating interaction region as they travel from the Sun passing Venus, Earth, Mars, and Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prise, A. J.; Harra, L. K.; Matthews, S. A.; Arridge, C. S.; Achilleos, N.

    2015-03-01

    During June 2010 a good alignment in the solar system between Venus, STEREO-B, Mars, and Saturn provided an excellent opportunity to study the propagation of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and closely occurring corotating interaction region (CIR) from the Sun to Saturn. The CME erupted from the Sun at 01:30 UT on 20 June 2010,with v≈ 600 km s-1, as observed by STEREO-B, Solar Dynamics Observatory, and SOHO/Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph. It arrived at Venus over 2 days later, some 3.5 days after a CIR is also detected here. The CIR was also observed at STEREO-B and Mars, prior to the arrival of the CME. The CME is not directed earthward, but the CIR is detected here less than 2 days after its arrival at Mars. Around a month later, a strong compression of the Saturn magnetosphere is observed by Cassini, consistent with the scenario that the CME and CIR have merged into a single solar transient. The arrival times of both the CME and the CIR at different locations were predicted using the ENLIL solar wind model. The arrival time of the CME at Venus, STEREO-B, and Mars is predicted to within 20 h of its actual detection, but the predictions for the CIR showed greater differences from observations, all over 1.5 days early. More accurate predictions for the CIR were found by extrapolating the travel time between different locations using the arrival times and speeds detected by STEREO-B and ACE. We discuss the implications of these results for understanding the propagation of solar transients.

  16. Laparoscopic Management of Huge Cervical Myoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peker, Nuri; Gündoğan, Savaş; Şendağ, Fatih

    To demonstrate the feasibility of laparoscopic management of a huge cervical myoma. Step-by-step video demonstration of the surgical procedure (Canadian Task Force classification III-C). Uterine myoma is the most common benign neoplasm of the female reproductive tract, with an estimated incidence of 25% to 30% at reproductive age [1,2]. Patients generally have no symptoms; however, those with such symptoms as severe pelvic pain, heavy uterine bleeding, or infertility may be candidates for surgery. The traditional management is surgery; however, uterine artery embolization or hormonal therapy using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist or a selective estrogen receptor modulator should be preferred as the medical approach. Surgical management should be performed via laparoscopy or laparotomy; however, the use of laparoscopic myomectomy is being debated for patients with huge myomas. Difficulties in the excision, removal, and repair of myometrial defects, increased operative time, and blood loss are factors keeping physicians away from laparoscopic myomectomy [1,2]. A 40-year-old gravida 0, para 0 woman was admitted to our clinic with complaints of chronic pelvic pain, dyspareunia, and infertility. Her health history was unremarkable. Ultrasonographic examination revealed a 14 × 10-cm myoma in the cervical region. On bimanual examination, an immobile solid mass originating from the uterine cervix and filling the pouch of Douglas was palpated. The patient was informed of the findings, and laparoscopic myomectomy was recommended because of her desire to preserve her fertility. Abdominopelvic examination revealed a huge myoma filling and enlarging the cervix. Myomectomy was performed using standard technique as described elsewhere. A transverse incision was made using a harmonic scalpel. The myoma was fixed with a corkscrew manipulator and enucleated. Once bleeding was controlled, the myoma bed was filled with Spongostan to prevent possible bleeding from leakage

  17. Huge Tongue Lipoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Damghani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lipomas are among the most common tumors of the human body. However, they are uncommon in the oral cavity and are observed as slow growing, painless, and asymptomatic yellowish submucosal masses. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice and recurrence is not expected.    Case Report: The case of a 30-year-old woman with a huge lipoma on the tip of her tongue since 3 years, is presented. She had difficulty with speech and mastication because the tongue tumor was filling the oral cavity. Clinical examination revealed a yellowish lesion, measuring 8 cm in maximum diameter, protruding from the lingual surface. The tumor was surgically excised with restoration of normal tongue function and histopathological examination of the tumor confirmed that it was a lipoma.   Conclusion:  Tongue lipoma is rarely seen and can be a cause of macroglossia. Surgical excision for lipoma is indicated for symptomatic relief and exclusion of associated malignancy.

  18. Coronal influence on dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Warnecke, Jörn

    2013-01-01

    We report on turbulent dynamo simulations in a spherical wedge with an outer coronal layer. We apply a two-layer model where the lower layer represents the convection zone and the upper layer the solar corona. This setup is used to study the coronal influence on the dynamo action beneath the surface. Increasing the radial coronal extent gradually to three times the solar radius and changing the magnetic Reynolds number, we find that dynamo action benefits from the additional coronal extent in terms of higher magnetic energy in the saturated stage. The flux of magnetic helicity can play an important role in this context.

  19. Case of huge neurofibroma expanding extra- and intracranially through the enlarged jugular foramen. CT scan findings and surgical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanakita, Junya; Imataka, Kiyoharu; Handa, Hajime (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1984-01-01

    The surgical approach to the jugular foramen has been considered to be very difficult and troublesome, because of the location in which important structures, such as the internal jugular vein, internal carotid artery and lower cranial nerves, converge in the narrow deep space. A case of huge neurofibroma, which extended from the tentorium cerebelli through the dilated jugular foramen to the level of the vertebral body of C/sub 3/ was presented. A 12-year-old girl was admitted with complaints of visual disturbance and palsy of the V-XII cranial nerves of the left side. Plain skull film showed prominent widening of the cranial sutures and enlargement of the sella turcica. Horizontal CT scan with contrast showed symmetrical ventricular dilatation and a heterogeneously enhanced mass, which was situated mainly in the left CP angle. Coronal CT scan with contrast revealed a huge mass and enlarged jugular foramen, through which the tumor extended to the level of the vertebral body of C/sub 3/. Occlusion of the sigmoid sinus and the internal jugular vein of the left side was noticed in the vertebral angiography. Two-stage approach, the first one for removal of the intracranial tumor and the second one for extracranial tumor, was performed for its huge tumor. Several authors have reported excellent surgical approaches for the tumors situated in the jugular foramen. By our approach, modifying Gardner's original one, a wide operative field was obtained to remove the tumor around the jugular foramen with success. Our approach for the jugular foramen was described with illustrations.

  20. Hot prominence detected in the core of a coronal mass ejection: Analysis of SOHO/UVCS Lα and SOHO/LASCO visible-light observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzel, P.; Susino, R.; Jejčič, S.; Bemporad, A.; Anzer, U.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The paper deals with the physics of erupting prominences in the core of coronal mass ejections (CME). Aims: We determine the physical parameters of an erupting prominence embedded in the core of a CME using SOHO/UVCS hydrogen Lα and Lβ lines and SOHO/LASCO visible light observations. In particular we analyze the CME event observed on August 2, 2000. We develop the non-LTE (NLTE; i.e. considering departures from the local thermodynamic equilibrium - LTE) spectral diagnostics based on Lα and visible light observations. Methods: Our method is based on 1D NLTE modeling of eruptive prominences and takes into account the effect of large flow velocities, which reach up to 300 km s-1 for the studied event (the so-called Doppler dimming). The NLTE radiative-transfer method can be used for both optically thin and thick prominence structures. We combine spectroscopic UVCS observations of an erupting prominence in the core of a CME with visible light images from LASCO-C2 in order to derive the geometrical parameters like projected thickness and velocity, together with the effective temperature and column density of electrons. These are then used to constrain our NLTE radiative transfer modeling which provides the kinetic temperature, microturbulent velocity, gas pressure, ionization degree, the line opacities, and the prominence effective thickness (geometrical filling factor). Results: Analysis was made for 69 observational points (spatial pixels) inside the whole erupting prominence. Roughly one-half of them show a non-negligible Lα optical thickness for flow velocity 300 km s-1 and about one-third for flow velocity 150 km s-1. All pixels with Lατ0 ≤ 0.3 have been considered for further analysis, which is presented in the form of statistical distributions (histograms) of various physical quantities such as the kinetic temperature, gas pressure, and electron density for two representative flow velocities (150 and 300 km s-1) and non-zero microturbulence. For

  1. M-I coupling across the auroral oval at dusk and midnight: repetitive substorm activity driven by interplanetary coronal mass ejections (CMEs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandholt, P. E.; Farrugia, C. J.; Denig, W. F.

    2014-04-01

    We study substorms from two perspectives, i.e., magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling across the auroral oval at dusk and at midnight magnetic local times. By this approach we monitor the activations/expansions of basic elements of the substorm current system (Bostrøm type I centered at midnight and Bostrøm type II maximizing at dawn and dusk) during the evolution of the substorm activity. Emphasis is placed on the R1 and R2 types of field-aligned current (FAC) coupling across the Harang reversal at dusk. We distinguish between two distinct activity levels in the substorm expansion phase, i.e., an initial transient phase and a persistent phase. These activities/phases are discussed in relation to polar cap convection which is continuously monitored by the polar cap north (PCN) index. The substorm activity we selected occurred during a long interval of continuously strong solar wind forcing at the interplanetary coronal mass ejection passage on 18 August 2003. The advantage of our scientific approach lies in the combination of (i) continuous ground observations of the ionospheric signatures within wide latitude ranges across the auroral oval at dusk and midnight by meridian chain magnetometer data, (ii) "snapshot" satellite (DMSP F13) observations of FAC/precipitation/ion drift profiles, and (iii) observations of current disruption/near-Earth magnetic field dipolarizations at geostationary altitude. Under the prevailing fortunate circumstances we are able to discriminate between the roles of the dayside and nightside sources of polar cap convection. For the nightside source we distinguish between the roles of inductive and potential electric fields in the two substages of the substorm expansion phase. According to our estimates the observed dipolarization rate (δ Bz/δt) and the inferred large spatial scales (in radial and azimuthal dimensions) of the dipolarization process in these strong substorm expansions may lead to 50-100 kV enhancements of the cross

  2. M-I coupling across the auroral oval at dusk and midnight. Repetitive substorm activity driven by interplanetary coronal mass ejections (CMEs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandholt, P.E. [Oslo Univ. (Norway). Dept. of Physics; Farrugia, C.J. [New Hampshire Univ., Durham (United Kingdom). Space Science Center; Denig, W.F. [NOAA, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2014-07-01

    We study substorms from two perspectives, i.e., magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling across the auroral oval at dusk and at midnight magnetic local times. By this approach we monitor the activations/expansions of basic elements of the substorm current system (Bostroem type I centered at midnight and Bostroem type II maximizing at dawn and dusk) during the evolution of the substorm activity. Emphasis is placed on the R1 and R2 types of field-aligned current (FAC) coupling across the Harang reversal at dusk. We distinguish between two distinct activity levels in the substorm expansion phase, i.e., an initial transient phase and a persistent phase. These activities/phases are discussed in relation to polar cap convection which is continuously monitored by the polar cap north (PCN) index. The substorm activity we selected occurred during a long interval of continuously strong solar wind forcing at the interplanetary coronal mass ejection passage on 18 August 2003. The advantage of our scientific approach lies in the combination of (i) continuous ground observations of the ionospheric signatures within wide latitude ranges across the auroral oval at dusk and midnight by meridian chain magnetometer data, (ii) 'snapshot' satellite (DMSP F13) observations of FAC/precipitation/ion drift profiles, and (iii) observations of current disruption/near-Earth magnetic field dipolarizations at geostationary altitude. Under the prevailing fortunate circumstances we are able to discriminate between the roles of the dayside and nightside sources of polar cap convection. For the nightside source we distinguish between the roles of inductive and potential electric fields in the two substages of the substorm expansion phase. According to our estimates the observed dipolarization rate (δB{sub z}/δt) and the inferred large spatial scales (in radial and azimuthal dimensions) of the dipolarization process in these strong substorm expansions may lead to 50-100 kV enhancements of the

  3. Imaging of huge lingual thyroid gland with goitre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C.C.; Chen, C.Y.; Chen, F.H.; Lee, G.W.; Hsiao, H.S. [Nat. Defense Medical Centre, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiol.; Zimmermann, R.A. [Department of Radiology, The Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th St. and Civic Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19014 (United States)

    1998-05-01

    We present the CT and MRI findings in a 75-year-old woman with a huge pathologically proven lingual thyroid which underwent goitrous degeneration. CT and MRI showed a midline, tongue-based, exophytic mass with areas of necrosis and heterogeneous contrast enhancement, as seen in large goitres in the normal thyroid gland. (orig.) With 1 fig., 7 refs.

  4. A Huge Ovarian Dermoid Cyst: Successful Laparoscopic Total Excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyanikoglu, Hacer; Dusak, Abdurrahim

    2017-08-01

    Giant ovarian cysts, ≥15 cm in diameter, are quite rare in women of reproductive age. Here, we present a case of ovarian cyst with unusual presentation treated by laparoscopic surgery. On histology, mass was found to be mature cystic teratoma. The diagnostic and management challenges posed by this huge ovarian cyst were discussed in the light of the literature.

  5. Halo-coronal mass ejections near the 23rd solar minimum: lift-off, inner heliosphere, and in situ (1 AU signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Berdichevsky

    Full Text Available The extreme ultraviolet (EUV signatures of a solar lift-off, decametric and kilometric radio burst emissions and energetic particle (EP inner heliospheric signatures of an interplanetary shock, and in situ identification of its driver through solar wind observations are discussed for 12 isolated halo coronal mass ejections (H-CMEs occurring between December 1996 and 1997. For the aforementioned twelve and the one event added in the discussion, it is found that ten passed several necessary conditions for being a "Sun-Earth connection". It is found that low corona EUV and Ha chromospheric signatures indicate filament eruption as the cause of H-CME. These signatures indicate that the 12 events can be divided into two major subsets, 7 related to active regions (ARs and 5 unrelated or related to decayed AR. In the case of events related to AR, there is indication of a faster lift-off, while a more gradual lift-off appears to characterize the second set. Inner heliospheric signatures – the presence of long lasting enhanced energetic particle flux and/or kilometric type II radio bursts – of a driven shock were identified in half of the 12 events. The in situ (1 AU analyses using five different solar wind ejecta signatures and comparisons with the bidirectional flow of suprathermal particles and Forbush decreases result in indications of a strong solar wind ejecta signatures for 11 out of 12 cases. From the discussion of these results, combined with work by other authors for overlapping events, we conclude that good Sun-Earth connection candidates originate most likely from solar filament eruptions with at least one of its extremities located closer to the central meridian than ~ 30° E or ~ 35° W with a larger extension in latitudinal location possible. In seven of the twelve cases it appears that the encountered ejecta was driving a shock at 1 AU. Support for this interpretation is found on the approximately equal

  6. Intelligent Classification in Huge Heterogeneous Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    INTELLIGENT CLASSIFICATION IN HUGE HETEROGENEOUS DATA SETS JUNE 2015 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED...To) JUL 2013 – APR 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE INTELLIGENT CLASSIFICATION IN HUGE HETEROGENEOUS DATA SETS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER IN-HOUSE 5b. GRANT...signals and through data dimension reduction, and to develop and tailor algorithms for the extraction of intelligence from several huge heterogeneous

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of Coronal Evolution and Disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linker, Jon

    2002-01-01

    Flux cancellation, defined observationally as the mutual disappearance of magnetic fields of opposite polarity at the neutral line separating them, has been found to occur frequently at the site of filaments (called prominences when observed on the limb of the Sun). During the second year of this project, we have studied theoretically the role that flux cancellation may play in prominence formation, prominence eruption, and the initiation of coronal mass ejections. This work has been in published in two papers: "Magnetic Field Topology in Prominences" by Lionello, Mikic, Linker, and Amari and "Flux Cancellation and Coronal Mass Ejections" by Linker, Mikic, Riley, Lionello, Amari, and Odstrcil.

  8. Coronal rain in magnetic bipolar weak fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, C.; Keppens, R.; Fang, X.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: We intend to investigate the underlying physics for the coronal rain phenomenon in a representative bipolar magnetic field, including the formation and the dynamics of coronal rain blobs. Methods: With the MPI-AMRVAC code, we performed three dimensional radiative magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation with strong heating localized on footpoints of magnetic loops after a relaxation to quiet solar atmosphere. Results: Progressive cooling and in-situ condensation starts at the loop top due to radiative thermal instability. The first large-scale condensation on the loop top suffers Rayleigh-Taylor instability and becomes fragmented into smaller blobs. The blobs fall vertically dragging magnetic loops until they reach low-β regions and start to fall along the loops from loop top to loop footpoints. A statistic study of the coronal rain blobs finds that small blobs with masses of less than 1010 g dominate the population. When blobs fall to lower regions along the magnetic loops, they are stretched and develop a non-uniform velocity pattern with an anti-parallel shearing pattern seen to develop along the central axis of the blobs. Synthetic images of simulated coronal rain with Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly well resemble real observations presenting dark falling clumps in hot channels and bright rain blobs in a cool channel. We also find density inhomogeneities during a coronal rain "shower", which reflects the observed multi-stranded nature of coronal rain. Movies associated to Figs. 3 and 7 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  9. A case of a huge gastroepiploic arterial aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Hirokuni; Takeo, Masahiko; Mikami, Ryuuichi; Yamamoto, Mistuo

    2015-08-05

    An 85-year-old man complaining of vague abdominal discomfort was admitted to our hospital. A pulsatile 8 × 7-cm mass in the right upper abdomen was noticed on clinical examination. Computed tomography of the abdomen showed a huge arterial aneurysm in the right gastroepiploic artery, and the left gastroepiploic artery was meandering and expanding. An image diagnosis of gastroepiploic arterial aneurysm (GEAA) was made. Because of the huge size of the aneurysm and the predicted high risk of perforation, surgical intervention was planned. The aneurysm was identified in the greater curve and was found to adhere firmly to the transverse colon. Partial resection of the stomach, aneurysmectomy and partial resection of the transverse colon were performed. Clinically, splanchnic arterial aneurysms are rare. Among them, GEAA is especially rare. We report a rare case of a huge GEAA that was treated successfully by surgery. Published by Oxford University Press and JSCR Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015.

  10. A new view of solar coronal mass ejections with the Heliophysics System Observatory (Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Young Scientists Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moestl, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) play a pivotal role in solar, heliospheric and planetary physics because they lead to connections of plasma phenomena from the Sun to the planets throughout the solar system. CMEs drive the strongest geomagnetic storms, fill the heliosphere with energetic particles, illuminate planetary skies with aurorae, modulate cosmic rays on planetary surfaces, and lead to erosion of planetary atmospheres over long time scales. Thus, even for studying the detection of life on exoplanets, the role of possible stellar CMEs should not be neglected. However, besides the simple fascination of studying the biggest explosions in the solar system, they are of increasingly high practical significance concerning risk mitigation of natural desasters and the protection of our common wealth. As the impact of a "super-CME", a rare but possible event, may affect the entire planet Earth, coordinated international efforts for their fundamental understanding, as well as building dedicated space weather missions for daily forecasts is necessary. There is a chance of a CME on the order of a Carrington event, with a minimum Dst of about -1000 nT, impacting Earth once every 100 years - or a 10% chance in a given solar cycle. An impact of such a super-CME is expected to cause e.g. wide-spread electricity blackouts and satellite failures. In the last 10 years, the field has made major advantages in understanding how CMEs evolve from the Sun to the planets. Because of the extension of CMEs on the order of 60-100 degree heliospheric longitude and radial sizes around 0.1-0.2 AU, multipoint imaging and in situ observations are inevitably necessary to understand basic CME physics. To this end, I will show data, as provided by the Heliophysics System Observatory (HSO), and their interpretation with various modeling effors. The HSO can be understood as a web of sensors placed throughout the heliosphere, consisting of spacecraft such as STEREO, Wind, ACE, Venus Express and

  11. Solar Coronal Plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannina Poletto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Polar plumes are thin long ray-like structures that project beyond the limb of the Sun polar regions, maintaining their identity over distances of several solar radii. Plumes have been first observed in white-light (WL images of the Sun, but, with the advent of the space era, they have been identified also in X-ray and UV wavelengths (XUV and, possibly, even in in situ data. This review traces the history of plumes, from the time they have been first imaged, to the complex means by which nowadays we attempt to reconstruct their 3-D structure. Spectroscopic techniques allowed us also to infer the physical parameters of plumes and estimate their electron and kinetic temperatures and their densities. However, perhaps the most interesting problem we need to solve is the role they cover in the solar wind origin and acceleration: Does the solar wind emanate from plumes or from the ambient coronal hole wherein they are embedded? Do plumes have a role in solar wind acceleration and mass loading? Answers to these questions are still somewhat ambiguous and theoretical modeling does not provide definite answers either. Recent data, with an unprecedented high spatial and temporal resolution, provide new information on the fine structure of plumes, their temporal evolution and relationship with other transient phenomena that may shed further light on these elusive features.

  12. A huge renal capsular leiomyoma mimicking retroperitoneal sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lal Anupam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A huge left renal capsular leiomyoma mimicking retroperitoneal sarcoma presented in a patient as an abdominal mass. Computed tomography displayed a large heterogeneous retro-peritoneal mass in the left side of the abdomen with inferior and medial displacement as well as loss of fat plane with the left kidney. Surgical exploration revealed a capsulated mass that was tightly adherent to the left kidney; therefore, total tumor resection with radical left nephrectomy was performed. Histopathology ultimately confirmed the benign nature of the mass. This is the largest leiomyoma reported in literature to the best of our knowledge.

  13. Huge Intravascular Tumor Extending to the Heart: Leiomyomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suat Doganci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intravenous leiomyomatosis (IVL is a rare neoplasm characterized by histologically benign-looking smooth muscle cell tumor mass, which is growing within the intrauterine and extrauterine venous system. In this report we aimed to present an unusual case of IVL, which is originating from iliac vein and extended throughout to right cardiac chambers. A 49-year-old female patient, who was treated with warfarin sodium due to right iliac vein thrombosis, was admitted to our department with intermittent dyspnea, palpitation, and dizziness. Physical examination was almost normal except bilateral pretibial edema. On magnetic resonance venography, there was an intravenous mass, which is originated from right internal iliac vein and extended into the inferior vena cava. Transthoracic echocardiography and transesophageal echocardiography revealed a huge mass extending from the inferior vena cava through the right atrium, with obvious venous occlusion. Thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic MR showed an intravascular mass, which is concordant with leiomyomatosis. Surgery was performed through median sternotomy. A huge mass with 25-cm length and 186-gr weight was excised through right atrial oblique incision, on beating heart with cardiopulmonary bypass. Histopathologic assessment was compatible with IVL. Exact strategy for the surgical treatment of IVL is still controversial. We used one-stage approach, with complete resection of a huge IVL extending from right atrium to right iliac vein. In such cases, high recurrence rate is a significant problem; therefore it should be kept in mind.

  14. Huge Intravascular Tumor Extending to the Heart: Leiomyomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doganci, Suat; Kaya, Erkan; Kadan, Murat; Karabacak, Kubilay; Erol, Gökhan; Demirkilic, Ufuk

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous leiomyomatosis (IVL) is a rare neoplasm characterized by histologically benign-looking smooth muscle cell tumor mass, which is growing within the intrauterine and extrauterine venous system. In this report we aimed to present an unusual case of IVL, which is originating from iliac vein and extended throughout to right cardiac chambers. A 49-year-old female patient, who was treated with warfarin sodium due to right iliac vein thrombosis, was admitted to our department with intermittent dyspnea, palpitation, and dizziness. Physical examination was almost normal except bilateral pretibial edema. On magnetic resonance venography, there was an intravenous mass, which is originated from right internal iliac vein and extended into the inferior vena cava. Transthoracic echocardiography and transesophageal echocardiography revealed a huge mass extending from the inferior vena cava through the right atrium, with obvious venous occlusion. Thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic MR showed an intravascular mass, which is concordant with leiomyomatosis. Surgery was performed through median sternotomy. A huge mass with 25-cm length and 186-gr weight was excised through right atrial oblique incision, on beating heart with cardiopulmonary bypass. Histopathologic assessment was compatible with IVL. Exact strategy for the surgical treatment of IVL is still controversial. We used one-stage approach, with complete resection of a huge IVL extending from right atrium to right iliac vein. In such cases, high recurrence rate is a significant problem; therefore it should be kept in mind.

  15. Coronal Waves and Oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakariakov Valery M.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Wave and oscillatory activity of the solar corona is confidently observed with modern imaging and spectral instruments in the visible light, EUV, X-ray and radio bands, and interpreted in terms of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD wave theory. The review reflects the current trends in the observational study of coronal waves and oscillations (standing kink, sausage and longitudinal modes, propagating slow waves and fast wave trains, the search for torsional waves, theoretical modelling of interaction of MHD waves with plasma structures, and implementation of the theoretical results for the mode identification. Also the use of MHD waves for remote diagnostics of coronal plasma - MHD coronal seismology - is discussed and the applicability of this method for the estimation of coronal magnetic field, transport coefficients, fine structuring and heating function is demonstrated.

  16. Mechanisms of Coronal Heating

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. R. Verma

    2006-06-01

    The Sun is a mysterious star. The high temperature of the chromosphere and corona present one of the most puzzling problems of solar physics. Observations show that the solar coronal heating problem is highly complex with many different facts. It is likely that different heating mechanisms are at work in solar corona. Recent observations show that Magnetic Carpet is a potential candidate for solar coronal heating.

  17. Severe microphthalmos with cyst and unusually huge dermolipoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weidong; Zhang, Ping; Chen, Qiwen; Ye, Xuelian; Li, Jianqun; Yan, Jianhua

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to report an unusual case of severe microphthalmos, together with an orbital cyst and huge ocular surface dermolipoma. This is a clinical report relating clinical features as well as imaging and histopathologic findings, along with surgical management of the patient. A 5-month-old Chinese male infant was referred, with 2 large masses in the left eye that were present since birth. Ocular examination results revealed a complete absence of any eye structures in the left orbit. In its place were 2 large masses between the left upper and lower palpebral fissure. One was a 3 × 3 × 2.5-cm spherical red tumor with a smooth surface. The other was a large solid spherical tumor, 4 × 4 × 5 cm, covered with normal skin located in the temporal region and attached to the red mass by a pedicle. Orbital magnetic resonance imaging examination findings confirmed that no eye structures were present in the left orbit. However, a cystic lesion was found in the left orbit, with a low signal on T1-weighted imaging and high signal on T2-weighted imaging, and another huge spherical heterogeneous mass was located "outside" the left orbit. Anterior orbitotomy by conjunctival incision was performed under general anesthesia. A spherical cystic mass of 1.5 × 1.5 × 1.6 cm, a small eye of 0.7 × 0.7 × 0.6 cm, and a huge dermolipoma were removed completely. Pathologic examination results confirmed the diagnosis of severe microphthalmos, together with orbital dermoid cyst and dermolipoma. This rare case demonstrates that severe microphthalmos with a cyst may be completely covered by conjunctiva and associated with an unusually huge dermolipoma.

  18. Fibrous dysplasia of the rib presenting as a huge chest wall tumor: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, B S; Lee, S C; Harn, H J

    1994-07-01

    Fibrous dysplasia of the rib is not uncommon, but is rarely demonstrated as a huge chest wall mass with severe clinical symptoms. A 59-year-old patient, presenting with a huge, rapidly expanding chest wall tumor compressing the lung, liver and heart accompanied by chest pain and dyspnea, is reported. The tumor was success-fully excised by local radical resection.

  19. Huge plastic bezoar: a rare cause of gastrointestinal obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaka, Mbarek; Ehirchiou, Abdelkader; Alkandry, Tariq Tajdin Sifeddine; Sair, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Bezoars are rare causes of gastrointestinal obstruction. Basically, they are of four types: trichobezoars, phytobezoars, pharmacobezoars, and lactobezoars. Some rare types of bezoars are also known. In this article a unique case of plastic bezoars is presented. We describe a girl aged 14 years who ingested large amounts of plastic material used for knitting chairs and charpoys. The conglomerate of plastic threads, entrapped food material and other debris, formed a huge mass occupying the whole stomach and extended into small bowel.

  20. A Huge Cystic Retroperitoneal Lymphangioma Presenting with Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubachev, Kubach; Abdullaev, Elbrus; Babyshin, Valentin; Neronov, Dmitriy; Abdullaev, Abakar

    2016-01-01

    Retroperitoneal lymphangioma is a rare location and type of benign abdominal tumors. The clinical presentation of this rare disease is nonspecific, ranging from abdominal distention to sepsis. Here we present a 73-year-old female patient with 3-month history of back pain. USG and CT revealed a huge cystic mass which was surgically excised and appeared to be lymphangioma on histopathology. PMID:27843456

  1. Outcome of Hepatectomy for Huge Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Sungho

    2011-05-01

    In spite of the recent improved results of hepatectomy for huge hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC), the prognosis of patients with huge HCCs is still poor compared to that of patients with small HCCs. This study was performed to compare the results of hepatectomy between patients with huge HCCs and those with small HCCs, to identify the prognostic factors in patients with huge HCCs, and to determine the preoperative selection criteria. We retrospectively analyzed 51 patients who underwent hepatectomy, between July 1994 and February 2009 at Dankook University Hospital. Patients with HCC≥10 cm were classified in large (L) group and others were classified in small (S) group. The clinicopathological features, operative procedures, and postoperative outcome were compared between both groups and various prognostic factors were investigated in group L. Eleven patients were classified in group L. Tumor size, vascular invasion, and tumor stage were higher in group L. Postoperative morbidity was higher in group L, but mortality was not different between the groups. Disease-free survivals were significantly lower in group L than in group S (36.4%, and 24.2% vs. 72.0%, and 44.0% for 1- and 3-year), but overall survival rates were similar in both groups (45.5%, and 15.2% in group L vs. 60.3%, and 41.3% in group S for 3- and 5-year). Presence of satellite nodules was the only prognostic factor in multivariate analysis after surgery for huge HCC. Regardless of tumor size, huge HCCs deserve consideration for surgery in patients with preserved liver function. Furthermore, the effect of surgery could be maximized with appropriate selection criteria, such as huge HCC without satellite nodules.

  2. Observing Episodic Coronal Heating Events Rooted in Chromospheric Activity

    CERN Document Server

    McIntosh, Scott W

    2009-01-01

    We present results of a multi-wavelength study of episodic plasma injection into the corona of AR 10942. We exploit long-exposure images of the Hinode and Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) spacecraft to study the properties of faint, episodic, "blobs" of plasma that are propelled upward along coronal loops that are rooted in the AR plage. We find that the source location and characteristic velocities of these episodic upflow events match those expected from recent spectroscopic observations of faint coronal upflows that are associated with upper chromospheric activity, in the form of highly dynamic spicules. The analysis presented ties together observations from coronal and chromospheric spectrographs and imagers, providing more evidence of the connection of discrete coronal mass heating and injection events with their source, dynamic spicules, in the chromosphere.

  3. Connecting slow earthquakes to huge earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Kazushige; Kato, Aitaro

    2016-07-15

    Slow earthquakes are characterized by a wide spectrum of fault slip behaviors and seismic radiation patterns that differ from those of traditional earthquakes. However, slow earthquakes and huge megathrust earthquakes can have common slip mechanisms and are located in neighboring regions of the seismogenic zone. The frequent occurrence of slow earthquakes may help to reveal the physics underlying megathrust events as useful analogs. Slow earthquakes may function as stress meters because of their high sensitivity to stress changes in the seismogenic zone. Episodic stress transfer to megathrust source faults leads to an increased probability of triggering huge earthquakes if the adjacent locked region is critically loaded. Careful and precise monitoring of slow earthquakes may provide new information on the likelihood of impending huge earthquakes.

  4. Connecting slow earthquakes to huge earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Kazushige; Kato, Aitaro

    2016-07-01

    Slow earthquakes are characterized by a wide spectrum of fault slip behaviors and seismic radiation patterns that differ from those of traditional earthquakes. However, slow earthquakes and huge megathrust earthquakes can have common slip mechanisms and are located in neighboring regions of the seismogenic zone. The frequent occurrence of slow earthquakes may help to reveal the physics underlying megathrust events as useful analogs. Slow earthquakes may function as stress meters because of their high sensitivity to stress changes in the seismogenic zone. Episodic stress transfer to megathrust source faults leads to an increased probability of triggering huge earthquakes if the adjacent locked region is critically loaded. Careful and precise monitoring of slow earthquakes may provide new information on the likelihood of impending huge earthquakes.

  5. Treatment strategies for huge central neurocytomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhong-wei; Zhang, Jian-jian; Zhang, Ting-bao; Sun, Shou-jia; Wu, Xiao-lin; Wang, Hao; You, Chao; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Hua-qiu; Chen, Jin-cao

    2015-02-01

    Central neurocytomas (CNs), initially asymptomatic, sometimes become huge before detection. We described and analyzed the clinical, radiological, operational and outcome data of 13 cases of huge intraventricular CNs, and discussed the treatment strategies in this study. All huge CNs (n=13) in our study were located in bilateral lateral ventricle with diameter ≥5.0 cm and had a broad-based attachment to at least one side of the ventricle wall. All patients received craniotomy to remove the tumor through transcallosal or transcortical approach and CNs were of typical histologic and immunohistochemical features. Adjuvant therapies including conventional radiation therapy (RT) or gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) were also performed postoperatively. Transcallosal and transcortical approaches were used in 8 and 5 patients, respectively. Two patients died within one month after operation and 3 patients with gross total resection (GTR) were additionally given a decompressive craniectomy (DC) and/or ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS) as the salvage therapy. Six patients received GTR(+RT) and 7 patients received subtotal resection (STR)(+GKRS). Eight patients suffered serious complications such as hydrocephalus, paralysis and seizure after operation, and patients who underwent GTR showed worse functional outcome [less Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) scores] than those having STR(+GKRS) during the follow-up period. The clinical outcome of huge CNs seemed not to be favorable as that described in previous reports. Surgical resection for huge CNs should be meticulously considered to guarantee the maximum safety. Better results were achieved in STR(+GKRS) compared with GTR(+RT) for huge CNs, suggesting that STR(+GKRS) may be a better treatment choice. The recurrent or residual tumor can be treated with GKRS effectively.

  6. A Huge Ancient Schwannoma of the Epiglottis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Kim, Jo Heon; Yoon, Tae Mi; Lee, Joon Kyoo; Lim, Sang Chul

    2016-03-01

    Ancient schwannoma of the epiglottis is extremely rare. The authors report the first case of a patient with a huge ancient schwannoma of the epiglottis. Clinicians should consider the possibility that ancient schwannoma may originate in the epiglottis mimicking the other more frequently observed lesions.

  7. A Two-Fluid, MHD Coronal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, S. T.; Wang, A.-H.; Wu, S. T.; Poletto, G.; McComas, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    We describe first results from a numerical two-fluid MHD model of the global structure of the solar Corona. The model is two-fluid in the sense that it accounts for the collisional energy exchange between protons and electrons. As in our single-fluid model, volumetric heat and Momentum sources are required to produce high speed wind from Corona] holes, low speed wind above streamers, and mass fluxes similar to the empirical solar wind. By specifying different proton and electron heating functions we obtain a high proton temperature in the coronal hole and a relatively low proton temperature above the streamer (in comparison with the electron temperature). This is consistent with inferences from SOHO/UltraViolet Coronagraph Spectrometer instrument (UVCS), and with the Ulysses/Solar Wind Observations Over the Poles of the Sun instrument (SWOOPS) proton and electron temperature measurements which we show from the fast latitude scan. The density in the coronal hole between 2 and 5 solar radii (2 and 5 R(sub S)) is similar to the density reported from SPARTAN 201.-01 measurements by Fisher and Guhathakurta [19941. The proton mass flux scaled to 1 AU is 2.4 x 10(exp 8)/sq cm s, which is consistent with Ulysses observations. Inside the closed field region, the density is sufficiently high so that the simulation gives equal proton and electron temperatures due to the high collision rate. In open field regions (in the coronal hole and above the streamer) the proton and electron temperatures differ by varying amounts. In the streamer the temperature and density are similar to those reported empirically by Li et al. [1998], and the plasma beta is larger than unity everywhere above approx. 1.5 R(sub S), as it is in all other MHD coronal streamer models [e.g., Steinolfson et al., 1982; also G. A. Gary and D. Alexander, Constructing the coronal magnetic field, submitted to Solar Physics, 1998].

  8. Large-scale Globally Propagating Coronal Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Warmuth

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale, globally propagating wave-like disturbances have been observed in the solar chromosphere and by inference in the corona since the 1960s. However, detailed analysis of these phenomena has only been conducted since the late 1990s. This was prompted by the availability of high-cadence coronal imaging data from numerous spaced-based instruments, which routinely show spectacular globally propagating bright fronts. Coronal waves, as these perturbations are usually referred to, have now been observed in a wide range of spectral channels, yielding a wealth of information. Many findings have supported the “classical” interpretation of the disturbances: fast-mode MHD waves or shocks that are propagating in the solar corona. However, observations that seemed inconsistent with this picture have stimulated the development of alternative models in which “pseudo waves” are generated by magnetic reconfiguration in the framework of an expanding coronal mass ejection. This has resulted in a vigorous debate on the physical nature of these disturbances. This review focuses on demonstrating how the numerous observational findings of the last one and a half decades can be used to constrain our models of large-scale coronal waves, and how a coherent physical understanding of these disturbances is finally emerging.

  9. Coronal bright points associated with minifilament eruptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Junchao; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Li, Haidong [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Yang, Bo; Yang, Dan, E-mail: hjcsolar@ynao.ac.cn [Also at Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. (China)

    2014-12-01

    Coronal bright points (CBPs) are small-scale, long-lived coronal brightenings that always correspond to photospheric network magnetic features of opposite polarity. In this paper, we subjectively adopt 30 CBPs in a coronal hole to study their eruptive behavior using data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. About one-quarter to one-third of the CBPs in the coronal hole go through one or more minifilament eruption(s) (MFE(s)) throughout their lifetimes. The MFEs occur in temporal association with the brightness maxima of CBPs and possibly result from the convergence and cancellation of underlying magnetic dipoles. Two examples of CBPs with MFEs are analyzed in detail, where minifilaments appear as dark features of a cool channel that divide the CBPs along the neutral lines of the dipoles beneath. The MFEs show the typical rising movements of filaments and mass ejections with brightenings at CBPs, similar to large-scale filament eruptions. Via differential emission measure analysis, it is found that CBPs are heated dramatically by their MFEs and the ejected plasmas in the MFEs have average temperatures close to the pre-eruption BP plasmas and electron densities typically near 10{sup 9} cm{sup –3}. These new observational results indicate that CBPs are more complex in dynamical evolution and magnetic structure than previously thought.

  10. Solar Coronal Jets: Observations, Theory, and Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Raouafi, N E; Pariat, E; Young, P R; Sterling, A C; Savcheva, A; Shimojo, M; Moreno-Insertis, F; DeVore, C R; Archontis, V; Török, T; Mason, H; Curdt, W; Meyer, K; Dalmasse, K; Matsui, Y

    2016-01-01

    Coronal jets represent important manifestations of ubiquitous solar transients, which may be the source of significant mass and energy input to the upper solar atmosphere and the solar wind. While the energy involved in a jet-like event is smaller than that of "nominal" solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), jets share many common properties with these phenomena, in particular, the explosive magnetically driven dynamics. Studies of jets could, therefore, provide critical insight for understanding the larger, more complex drivers of the solar activity. On the other side of the size-spectrum, the study of jets could also supply important clues on the physics of transients close or at the limit of the current spatial resolution such as spicules. Furthermore, jet phenomena may hint to basic process for heating the corona and accelerating the solar wind; consequently their study gives us the opportunity to attack a broad range of solar-heliospheric problems.

  11. A young woman with a huge paratubal cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceren Golbasi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Paratubal cysts are asymptomatic embryological remnants. These cysts are usually diagnosed during adolescence and reproductive age. In general, their sizes are small but can be complicated by rupture, torsion, or hemorrhage. Paratubal cysts are often discovered fortuitously on routine ultrasound examination. We report a 19-year-old female patient who presented with irregular menses and abdominal pain. Ultrasound examination revealed a huge cystic mass at the right adnexial area. The diagnosis was confirmed as paratubal cyst during laporotomy and, hence, cystectomy and right salpingectomy were performed. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(3.000: 573-576

  12. From tiny microalgae to huge biorefineries

    OpenAIRE

    Gouveia, L.

    2014-01-01

    Microalgae are an emerging research field due to their high potential as a source of several biofuels in addition to the fact that they have a high-nutritional value and contain compounds that have health benefits. They are also highly used for water stream bioremediation and carbon dioxide mitigation. Therefore, the tiny microalgae could lead to a huge source of compounds and products, giving a good example of a real biorefinery approach. This work shows and presents examples of experimental...

  13. Properties and Radial Trends of Coronal Mass Ejecta and Their Associated Shocks Observed by Ulysses in the Ecliptic Plane. Appendix 2; Repr. from Journal of Geophysical Research, v. 105, 2000 p 12,617-12,626

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Pete; Gosling, J. T.; McComas, D. J.; Forsyth, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, magnetic and plasma measurements are used to analyze 17 interplanetary coronal mass ejections (CMEs) identified by Ulysses during its in-ecliptic passage to Jupiter. We focus on the expansion characteristics of these CMEs (as inferred from the time rate of change of the velocity profiles through the CMEs) and the properties of 14 forward shocks unambiguously associated with these CMEs. We highlight radial trends from 1 to 5.4 AU. Our results indicate that the CMEs are generally expanding at all heliocentric distances. With regard to the shocks preceding these ejecta, we note the following: (1) There is a clear tendency for the shock speed (in the upstream frame of reference) to decrease with increasing heliocentric distance as the CMEs transfer momentum to the ambient solar wind and slow down; (2) 86% of the shock fronts are oriented in the ecliptic plane such that their normals point westward (i.e., in the direction of planetary motion about the Sun), (3) 86% of the shocks are propagating toward the heliographic equator; and (4) no clear trend was found in the strength of the shocks versus heliocentric distance. These results are interpreted using simple dynamical arguments and are supported by fluid and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations.

  14. Coronal radiation belts

    CERN Document Server

    Hudson, H S; Frewen, S F N; DeRosa, M L

    2009-01-01

    The magnetic field of the solar corona has a large-scale dipole character, which maps into the bipolar field in the solar wind. Using standard representations of the coronal field, we show that high-energy ions can be trapped stably in these large-scale closed fields. The drift shells that describe the conservation of the third adiabatic invariant may have complicated geometries. Particles trapped in these zones would resemble the Van Allen Belts and could have detectable consequences. We discuss potential sources of trapped particles.

  15. Jet phenomena above null points of the coronal magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, B.; Koutchmy, S.; Golub, L.

    2009-12-01

    Short-lived plasma jets of various scales, from giant X-ray jets more than 300 Mm in extent to numerous small jets with sizes typical of macrospicules, are the phenomena observed in the solar corona in extreme ultraviolet and X-ray emission. Small jets are particularly prominent in polar coronal holes. They are close neighbors of tiny bright loops and coincide in time with their sudden brightening and increase in size. The geometric shape of the jets and their location suggest that they arise near singular null points of the coronal magnetic field. These points appear in coronal holes due to the emergence of small bipolar or unipolar magnetic structures within large-scale unipolar cells. Polar jets show a distinct vertical plasma motion in a coronal hole that introduces significant momentum and mass into the solar wind flow. Investigating the dynamics of polar jets can elucidate certain details in the problem of fast solar wind acceleration.

  16. The Contribution of Coronal Jets To The Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Lionello, R; Titov, V S; Leake, J E; MikiĆ, Z; Linker, J A; Linton, M G

    2016-01-01

    Transient collimated plasma eruptions in the solar corona, commonly known as coronal (or X-ray) jets, are among the most interesting manifestations of solar activity. It has been suggested that these events contribute to the mass and energy content of the corona and solar wind, but the extent of these contributions remains uncertain. We have recently modeled the formation and evolution of coronal jets using a three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code with thermodynamics in a large spherical domain that includes the solar wind. Our model is coupled to 3D MHD flux-emergence simulations, i.e, we use boundary conditions provided by such simulations to drive a time-dependent coronal evolution. The model includes parametric coronal heating, radiative losses, and thermal conduction, which enables us to simulate the dynamics and plasma properties of coronal jets in a more realistic manner than done so far. Here we employ these simulations to calculate the amount of mass and energy transported by coronal j...

  17. Huge Bilateral Paramesonephric Cysts in a 25 year old Nulliparous woman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagili, Haritha; Krishnan, Manikandan; Dasari, Papa

    2013-01-01

    Paraovarian cysts are uncommon adnexal masses which are usually asymptomatic. We describe a case of bilateral huge paramesonephric cysts in a nulliparous woman. A 25-year-old lady presented with abdominal distension for one year duration. Examination and imaging revealed large abdominopelvic cystic masses with no solid areas or septations. Intraoperatively there were huge bilateral paraovarian cysts which were excised. Histopathology revealed low cuboidal to ciliated columnar epithelium with no evidence of ovarian parenchyma suggestive of paramesonephric cyst. Paraovarian cyst should be included in the differential diagnosis of a cystic mass visualised on ultrasound. PMID:24392412

  18. Huge music archives on mobile devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blume, H.; Bischl, B.; Botteck, M.

    2011-01-01

    The availability of huge nonvolatile storage capacities such as flash memory allows large music archives to be maintained even in mobile devices. With the increase in size, manual organization of these archives and manual search for specific music becomes very inconvenient. Automated dynamic...... and difficult to tackle on mobile platforms. Against this background, we provided an overview of algorithms for music classification as well as their computation times and other hardware-related aspects, such as power consumption on various hardware architectures. For mobile platforms such as smartphones...

  19. First use of synoptic vector magnetograms for global nonlinear force free coronal magnetic field models

    OpenAIRE

    Tadesse, Tilaye; Wiegelmann, T.; Gosain, S.; Macneice, P.; Pevtsov, Alexei A.

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic field permeating the solar atmosphere is generally thought to provide the energy for much of the activity seen in the solar corona, such as flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), etc. To overcome the unavailability of coronal magnetic field measurements, photospheric magnetic field vector data can be used to reconstruct the coronal field. Currently there are several modelling techniques being used to calculate three-dimension of the field lines into the solar atmosphere. For the ...

  20. Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegelmann, Thomas; Petrie, Gordon J. D.; Riley, Pete

    2017-09-01

    Coronal magnetic field models use photospheric field measurements as boundary condition to model the solar corona. We review in this paper the most common model assumptions, starting from MHD-models, magnetohydrostatics, force-free and finally potential field models. Each model in this list is somewhat less complex than the previous one and makes more restrictive assumptions by neglecting physical effects. The magnetohydrostatic approach neglects time-dependent phenomena and plasma flows, the force-free approach neglects additionally the gradient of the plasma pressure and the gravity force. This leads to the assumption of a vanishing Lorentz force and electric currents are parallel (or anti-parallel) to the magnetic field lines. Finally, the potential field approach neglects also these currents. We outline the main assumptions, benefits and limitations of these models both from a theoretical (how realistic are the models?) and a practical viewpoint (which computer resources to we need?). Finally we address the important problem of noisy and inconsistent photospheric boundary conditions and the possibility of using chromospheric and coronal observations to improve the models.

  1. A Huge Ovarian Cyst in a Middle-Aged Iranian Female

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kazem Moslemi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A 38-year-old Iranian woman was found to have a huge ovarian cystic mass. Her presenting symptom was vague abdominal pain and severe abdominal distention. She underwent laparotomy and after surgical removal, the mass was found to be mucinous cystadenoma on histology.

  2. Laparoscopic Management of Huge Myoma Nascendi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peker, Nuri; Gündoğan, Savas; Şendağ, Fatih

    To demonstrate the feasibility of laparoscopic management of a huge myoma nascendi. Step-by-step video demonstration of the surgical procedure (Canadian Task Force classification III-C). Uterine myoma is the most common benign neoplasm of the female reproductive tract, with an estimated incidence of 25% to 30% at reproductive age [1,2]. Patients generally have no symptoms; however, those with such symptoms as severe pelvic pain, heavy uterine bleeding, or infertility may be candidates for surgery. The traditional management is surgery; however, uterine artery embolization or hormonal therapy using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist or a selective estrogen receptor modulator should be preferred as the medical approach. Surgical management should be performed via laparoscopy or laparotomy; however, the use of laparoscopic myomectomy is being debated for patients with huge myomas. Difficulties in the excision, removal, and repair of myometrial defects, increased operative time, and blood loss are factors keeping physicians away from laparoscopic myomectomy [1,2]. A 35-year-old woman was admitted to our clinic with complaints of chronic pelvic pain and heavy menstrual bleeding. Her medical history included multiple hospitalizations for blood transfusions, along with a recently measured hemoglobin level of 9.5 g/dL and a hematocrit value of 29%. She had never been married and had no children. Pelvic ultrasonography revealed a 12 × 10-cm uterine myoma located on the posterior side of the corpus uteri and protruding through to the cervical channel. This was a huge intramural submucous myoma in close proximity to the endometrial cavity and spreading through the myometrium. On vaginal examination, the myoma was found to extend into the vagina through the cervical channel. Laparoscopic myomectomy was planned because of the patient's desire for fertility preservation. Abdominopelvic exploration revealed a huge myoma filling the posterior side of the corpus uteri and

  3. The coronal fricative problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinnsen, Daniel A.; Dow, Michael C.; Gierut, Judith A.; Morrisette, Michele L.; Green, Christopher R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines a range of predicted versus attested error patterns involving coronal fricatives (e.g. [s, z, θ, ð]) as targets and repairs in the early sound systems of monolingual English-acquiring children. Typological results are reported from a cross-sectional study of 234 children with phonological delays (ages 3 years; 0 months to 7;9). Our analyses revealed different instantiations of a putative developmental conspiracy within and across children. Supplemental longitudinal evidence is also presented that replicates the cross-sectional results, offering further insight into the life-cycle of the conspiracy. Several of the observed typological anomalies are argued to follow from a modified version of Optimality Theory with Candidate Chains (McCarthy, 2007). PMID:24790247

  4. Galaxies Collide to Create Hot, Huge Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    This image of a pair of colliding galaxies called NGC 6240 shows them in a rare, short-lived phase of their evolution just before they merge into a single, larger galaxy. The prolonged, violent collision has drastically altered the appearance of both galaxies and created huge amounts of heat turning NGC 6240 into an 'infrared luminous' active galaxy. A rich variety of active galaxies, with different shapes, luminosities and radiation profiles exist. These galaxies may be related astronomers have suspected that they may represent an evolutionary sequence. By catching different galaxies in different stages of merging, a story emerges as one type of active galaxy changes into another. NGC 6240 provides an important 'missing link' in this process. This image was created from combined data from the infrared array camera of NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope at 3.6 and 8.0 microns (red) and visible light from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (green and blue).

  5. Characteristics of polar coronal hole jets

    CERN Document Server

    Chandrashekhar, K; Banerjee, D; Gupta, G R; Teriaca, L

    2013-01-01

    High spatial- and temporal-resolution images of coronal hole regions show a dynamical environment where mass flows and jets are frequently observed. These jets are believed to be important for the coronal heating and the acceleration of the fast solar wind. We studied the dynamics of two jets seen in a polar coronal hole with a combination of imaging from EIS and XRT onboard Hinode. We observed drift motions related to the evolution and formation of these small-scale jets, which we tried to model as well. We found observational evidence that supports the idea that polar jets are very likely produced by multiple small-scale reconnections occurring at different times in different locations. These eject plasma blobs that flow up and down with a motion very similar to a simple ballistic motion. The associated drift speed of the first jet is estimated to be $\\approx$ 27 km s$^{-1}$. The average outward speed of the first jet is $\\approx 171$ km s$^{-1}$, well below the escape speed, hence if simple ballistic motio...

  6. Optimizing Global Coronal Magnetic Field Models Using Image-Based Constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Shaela I; Uritsky, Vadim M

    2015-01-01

    The coronal magnetic field directly or indirectly affects a majority of the phenomena studied in space physics. It provides energy for coronal heating, controls the release of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and drives heliospheric and magnetospheric activity, yet the coronal magnetic field itself has proven difficult to measure. This difficulty has prompted a decades-long effort to develop accurate, timely, models of the field - an effort that continues today. We have developed a method for improving global coronal magnetic field models by incorporating the type of morphological constraints which could be derived from coronal images. Here we report promising initial tests of this approach on two theoretical problems, and discuss opportunities for application.

  7. HUBBLE SPIES HUGE CLUSTERS OF STARS FORMED

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    BY ANCIENT ENCOUNTER This stunningly beautiful image [right] taken with the NASA Hubble Space Telescope shows the heart of the prototypical starburst galaxy M82. The ongoing violent star formation due to an ancient encounter with its large galactic neighbor, M81, gives this galaxy its disturbed appearance. The smaller picture at upper left shows the entire galaxy. The image was taken in December 1994 by the Kitt Peak National Observatory's 0.9-meter telescope. Hubble's view is represented by the white outline in the center. In the Hubble image, taken by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, the huge lanes of dust that crisscross M82's disk are another telltale sign of the flurry of star formation. Below the center and to the right, a strong galactic wind is spewing knotty filaments of hydrogen and nitrogen gas. More than 100 super star clusters -- very bright, compact groupings of about 100,000 stars -- are seen in this detailed Hubble picture as white dots sprinkled throughout M82's central region. The dark region just above the center of the picture is a huge dust cloud. A collaboration of European and American scientists used these clusters to date the ancient interaction between M82 and M81. About 600 million years ago, a region called 'M82 B' (the bright area just below and to the left of the central dust cloud) exploded with new stars. Scientists have discovered that this ancient starburst was triggered by the violent encounter with M81. M82 is a bright (eighth magnitude), nearby (12 million light-years from Earth) galaxy in the constellation Ursa Major (the Great Bear). The Hubble picture was taken Sept. 15, 1997. The natural-color composite was constructed from three Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 exposures, which were combined in chromatic order: 4,250 seconds through a blue filter (428 nm); 2,800 seconds through a green filter (520 nm); and 2,200 seconds through a red (820 nm) filter. Credits for Hubble image: NASA, ESA, R. de Grijs (Institute of

  8. The Fate of Cool Material in the Hot Corona: Solar Prominences and Coronal Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Antolin, Patrick; Sun, Xudong; Vial, Jean-Claude; Berger, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    As an important chain of the chromosphere-corona mass cycle, some of the million-degree hot coronal mass undergoes a radiative cooling instability and condenses into material at chromospheric or transition-region temperatures in two distinct forms - prominences and coronal rain (some of which eventually falls back to the chromosphere). A quiescent prominence usually consists of numerous long-lasting, filamentary downflow threads, while coronal rain consists of transient mass blobs falling at comparably higher speeds along well-defined paths. It remains puzzling why such material of similar temperatures exhibit contrasting morphologies and behaviors. We report recent SDO/AIA and IRIS observations that suggest different magnetic environments being responsible for such distinctions. Specifically, in a hybrid prominence-coronal rain complex structure, we found that the prominence material is formed and resides near magnetic null points that favor the radiative cooling process and provide possibly a high plasma-beta environment suitable for the existence of meandering prominence threads. As the cool material descends, it turns into coronal rain tied onto low-lying coronal loops in a likely low-beta environment. Such structures resemble to certain extent the so-called coronal spiders or cloud prominences, but the observations reported here provide critical new insights. We will discuss the broad physical implications of these observations for fundamental questions, such as coronal heating and beyond (e.g., in astrophysical and/or laboratory plasma environments).

  9. An estimate of solar wind velocity profiles in an coronal hole and a coronal streamer area (6-40 solar radius)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paetzold, M.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Bird, M. K.

    1995-01-01

    Using the total electron content data obtained by the Ulysses Solar Corona Experiment during the superior solar conjunction in summer 1991, we selected two data sets, one associated with a coronal hole and the other one with coronal streamer crossings. By doing this data splitting, we find two entirely different density profiles varying as r(exp -2.7) and r(exp -2.3) for the coronal hole and coronal streamers, respectively. Assuming mass flux conservation from the inner corona to one AU, an estimate for the velocity profiles or acceleration in these two different regions can be determined. The more negative exponent of the coronal hole density profile indicates a more extended heating and acceleration region or more flaring, or both. Various possible explanations will be discussed.

  10. Solar coronal jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrzyck, D.

    The solar jets were first observed by SOHO instruments (EIT, LASCO, UVCS) during the previous solar minimum. They were small, fast ejections originating from flaring UV bright points within large polar coronal holes. The obtained data provided us with estimates of the jet plasma conditions, dynamics, evolution of the electron temperature and heating rate required to reproduce the observed ionization state. To follow the polar jets through the solar cycle a special SOHO Joint Observing Program (JOP 155) was designed. It involves a number of SOHO instruments (EIT, CDS, UVCS, LASCO) as well as TRACE. The coordinated observations have been carried out since April 2002. The data enabled to identify counterparts of the 1996-1998 solar minimum jets. Their frequency of several events per day appear comparable to the frequency from the previous solar minimum. The jets are believed to be triggered by field line reconnection between emerging magnetic dipole and pre-existing unipolar field. Existing models predict that the hot jet is formed together with another jet of a cool material. The particular goal of the coordinated SOHO and TRACE observations was to look for possible association of the hot and cool plasma ejections. Currently there is observational evidence that supports these models.

  11. Space Weather Effects of Coronal Mass Ejection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K. N. Iyer; R. M. Jadav; A. K. Jadeja; P. K. Manoharan; Som Sharma; Hari Om Vats

    2006-06-01

    This paper describes the space weather effects of a major CME which was accompanied by extremely violent events on the Sun. The signatures of the event in the interplanetary medium (IPM) sensed by Ooty Radio Telescope, the solar observations by LASCO coronagraph onboard SOHO, GOES X-ray measurements, satellite measurements of the interplanetary parameters, GPS based ionospheric measurements, the geomagnetic storm parameter Dst and ground based ionosonde data are used in the study to understand the space weather effects in the different regions of the solar-terrestrial environment. The effects of this event are compared and possible explanations attempted.

  12. Initiation and Propagation of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P. F. Chen

    2008-03-01

    This paper reviews recent progress in the research on the initiation and propagation of CMEs. In the initiation part, several trigger mechanisms are discussed; in the propagation part, the observations and modelings of EIT waves/dimmings, as the EUV counterparts of CMEs, are described.

  13. Reconnection in a slow Coronal Mass Ejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Poletto

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at studying reconnection occurring in the aftermath of the 28 May 2004, CME, first imaged by the LASCO (Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph C2 at 11:06 UT. The CME was observed in White Light and UV radiation: images acquired by the LASCO C2 and C3 coronagraphs and spectra acquired by UVCS (Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer allowed us to identify the level at which field lines, stretched outwards by the CME ejection, reconnect below the CME bubble. As the CME propagates outwards, reconnection occurs at increasingly higher levels. The process goes on at a low pace for several hours: here we give the profile of the reconnection rate vs. heliocentric distance over a time interval of ≈14 h after the CME onset, extending estimates of the reconnection rate to larger distances than previously inferred by other authors. The reconnection rate appears to decrease with time/altitude. We also calculate upper and lower limits to the density in the diffusion region between 4 and 7 R and conclude by comparing estimates of the classical and anomalous resistivity in the diffusion region with the value inferred from the data. The latter turns out to be ≥5 order of magnitudes larger than predicted by classical or anomalous theories, pointing to the need of identifying the process responsible for the observed value.

  14. Umbilicoplasty in children with huge umbilical hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akakpo-Numado Gamedzi Komlatsè

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Huge umbilical hernias (HUH are voluminous umbilical hernia (UH that are frequent in black African children. Several surgical techniques are used in their treatment for umbilical reconstruction, but techniques using skin flaps provide better aesthetic results. In this study, we presented our technique of umbilicoplasty in HUH, and its results. Patients and Methods: It is a retrospective study on children treated for HUH, from January 2012 to December 2013. The UH was called HUH when its basis diameter (BD exceeds 3 cm. Every HUH was characterised by its height, BD and morphology. Our technique was a two lateral flaps technique; the flaps are symmetrical and drawn so as to reconstitute the different parts of the umbilicus. The results were appreciated with criteria, including the peripheral ring and the central depression of the neo-umbilicus. Results : Twelve children were concerned (7 boys and 5 girls. Their mean age was 5 years and 6 months. The mean BD was 5.6 cm (extremes 3 and 8 cm, and the mean height of the HUH was 7.45 cm (extremes 3 and 9 cm. All underwent umbilicoplasty. In early post-operative period, two children presented a transitory subcutaneous hematoma. Late complications were granulation tissue with two children, and cheloid scar with one. With a mean follow-up of 10 months, we had 10 excellent results and two fair results according to our criteria. Conclusion: Our two lateral flaps umbilicoplasty is well-adapted to HUH in children. It is simple and assures a satisfactory anatomical and cosmetic result.

  15. Hepatectomy for huge hepatocellular carcinoma: single institute's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lianyue; Xu, Jiangfeng; Ou, Dipeng; Wu, Wei; Zeng, Zhijun

    2013-09-01

    The surgical resection of huge hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is still controversial. This study was designed to introduce our experience of liver resection for huge HCC and evaluate the safety and outcomes of hepatectomy for huge HCC. A total of 258 hepatic resections for the patients with huge HCC were analysed retrospectively from December 2002 to December 2011. The operative outcomes were compared with 293 patients with HCC >5.0 cm but huge HCC group and HCC >5.0 cm but huge HCC group has significantly a more longer overall and disease-free survival time than nodular huge HCC (P = 0.026, P = 0.022). Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that the types of tumour, vascular invasion, and UICC stage were independent prognostic factors for overall survival (P = 0.047, P = 0.037, P = 0.033). Hepatic resection can be performed safely for huge HCC with a low mortality and favorable survival outcomes. Solitary huge HCC has the better surgical outcomes than nodular huge HCC.

  16. Coronal Seismology -- Achievements and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruderman, Michael

    Coronal seismology is a new and fast developing branch of the solar physics. The main idea of coronal seismology is the same as of any branches of seismology: to determine basic properties of a medium using properties of waves propagating in this medium. The waves and oscillations in the solar corona are routinely observed in the late space missions. In our brief review we concentrate only on one of the most spectacular type of oscillations observed in the solar corona - the transverse oscillations of coronal magnetic loops. These oscillations were first observed by TRACE on 14 July 1998. At present there are a few dozens of similar observations. Shortly after the first observation of the coronal loop transverse oscillations they were interpreted as kink oscillations of magnetic tubes with the ends frozen in the dense photospheric plasma. The frequency of the kink oscillation is proportional to the magnetic field magnitude and inversely proportional to the tube length times the square root of the plasma density. This fact was used to estimate the magnetic field magnitude in the coronal loops. In 2004 the first simultaneous observation of the fundamental mode and first overtone of the coronal loop transverse oscillation was reported. If we model a coronal loop as a homogeneous magnetic tube, then the ratio of the frequencies of the first overtone and the fundamental mode should be equal to 2. However, the ratio of the observed frequencies was smaller than 2. This is related to the density variation along the loop. If we assume that the corona is isothermal and prescribe the loop shape (usually it is assumed that it has the shape of half-circle), then, using the ratio of the two frequencies, we can determine the temperature of the coronal plasma. The first observation of transverse oscillations of the coronal loops showed that they were strongly damped. This phenomenon was confirmed by the subsequent observations. At present, the most reliable candidate for the

  17. Coronal Dynamic Activities in the Declining Phase of a Solar Cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Jang, Minhwan; Hong, Sunhak; Choe, G S

    2016-01-01

    It has been known that some solar activity indicators show a double-peak feature in their evolution through a solar cycle, which is not conspicuous in sunspot number. In this letter, we investigate the high solar dynamic activity in the declining phase of the sunspot cycle by examining the evolution of polar and low latitude coronal hole areas and the statistics of splitting and merging events of coronal holes and coronal mass ejections detected by SOHO/LASCO C3 in solar cycle 23. Although the total coronal hole area is at its maximum near the sunspot minimum, in which polar coronal holes prevail, it shows a comparable second maximum in the declining phase of the cycle, in which low latitude coronal holes are dominant. The events of coronal hole splitting or merging, which are attributed to surface motions of magnetic fluxes, are also mostly populated in the declining phase of the cycle. The far-reaching C3 coronal mass ejections are also over-populated in the declining phase of the cycle. From these results ...

  18. Characterizing the Properties of Coronal Magnetic Null Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Graham; DeRosa, Marc; Wagner, Eric

    2015-08-01

    The topology of the coronal magnetic field plays a role in a wide range of phenomena, from Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) through heating of the corona. One fundamental topological feature is the null point, where the magnetic field vanishes. These points are natural sites of magnetic reconnection, and hence the release of energy stored in the magnetic field. We present preliminary results of a study using data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager aboard NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory to characterize the properties and evolution of null points in a Potential Field Source Surface model of the coronal field. The main properties considered are the lifetime of the null points, their distribution with height, and how they form and subsequently vanish.This work is supported by NASA/LWS Grant NNX14AD45G, and by NSF/SHINE grant 1357018.

  19. Influence of coronal holes on CMEs in causing SEP events

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Long Shen; Jia Yao; Yu-Ming Wang; Pin-Zhong Ye; Xue-Pu Zhao; Shui Wang

    2010-01-01

    The issue of the influence of coronal holes(CHs)on coronal mass ejections(CMEs)in causing solar energetic particle(SEP)events is revisited.It is a continuation and extension of our previous work,in which no evident effects of CHs on CMEs in generating SEPs were found by statistically investigating 56 CME events.This result is consistent with the conclusion obtained by Kahler in 2004.We extrapolate the coronal magnetic field,define CHs as the regions consisting of only open magnetic field lines and perform a similar analysis on this issue for 76 events in total by extending the study interval to the end of 2008.Three key parameters,CH proximity,CH area and CH relative position,are involved in the analysis.The new result confirms the previous conclusion that CHs did not show any evident effect on CMEs in causing SEP events.

  20. The Nature of CME-Flare Associated Coronal Dimming

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, J X

    2016-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are often accompanied by coronal dimming evident in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray observations. The locations of dimming are sometimes considered to map footpoints of the erupting flux rope. As the emitting material expands in the corona, the decreased plasma density leads to reduced emission observed in spectral and irradiance measurements. Therefore, signatures of dimming may reflect properties of CMEs in the early phase of its eruption. In this study, we analyze the event of flare, CME, and coronal dimming on December 26, 2011. We use the data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on Solar Dynamics Observatories (SDO) for disk observations of the dimming, and analyze images taken by EUVI, COR1, and COR2 onboard the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatories to obtain the height and velocity of the associated CMEs observed at the limb. We also measure magnetic reconnection rate from flare observations. Dimming occurs in a few locations next to the flare ribbons,...

  1. Ponderomotive Acceleration in Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Laming, J. M.; Taylor, B. D.; Obenschain, K.

    2016-11-01

    Ponderomotive acceleration has been asserted to be a cause of the first ionization potential (FIP) effect, the well-known enhancement in abundance by a factor of 3-4 over photospheric values of elements in the solar corona with FIP less than about 10 eV. It is shown here by means of numerical simulations that ponderomotive acceleration occurs in solar coronal loops, with the appropriate magnitude and direction, as a “by-product” of coronal heating. The numerical simulations are performed with the HYPERION code, which solves the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations including nonlinear thermal conduction and optically thin radiation. Numerical simulations of coronal loops with an axial magnetic field from 0.005 to 0.02 T and lengths from 25,000 to 75,000 km are presented. In the simulations the footpoints of the axial loop magnetic field are convected by random, large-scale motions. There is a continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets, which act to heat the loop. As a consequence of coronal magnetic reconnection, small-scale, high-speed jets form. The familiar vortex quadrupoles form at reconnection sites. Between the magnetic footpoints and the corona the reconnection flow merges with the boundary flow. It is in this region that the ponderomotive acceleration occurs. Mirroring the character of the coronal reconnection, the ponderomotive acceleration is also found to be intermittent.

  2. A huge posteromedial mediastinal cyst complicated with vertebral dislodgment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoussaridis Jordan T

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mediastinal cysts compromise almost 20% of all mediastinal masses with bronchogenic subtype accounting for 60% of all cystic lesions. Although compression of adjoining soft tissues is usual, spinal complications and neurological symptoms are outmost rare and tend to characterize almost exclusively the neuroenteric cysts. Case presentation A young patient with intermittent, dull pain in his back and free medical history presented in the orthopaedic department of our hospital. There, the initial clinical and radiologic evaluation revealed a mediastinal mass and the patient was referred to the thoracic surgery department for further exploration. The following computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI shown a huge mediastinal cyst compressing the T4-T6 vertebral bodies. The neurological symptoms of the patient were attributed to this specific pathology due to the complete agreement between the location of the cyst and the nervous rule area of the compressed thoracic vertebrae. Despite our strongly suggestions for surgery the patient denied any treatment. Conclusion In controversy with the common faith that the spine plays the role of the natural barrier to the further expansion of cystic lesions, our case clearly indicates that, exceptionally, mediastinal cysts may cause severe vertebral complications. Therefore, early excision should be considered especially in young patients or where close follow up is uncertain.

  3. Motion magnification in coronal seismology

    CERN Document Server

    Anfinogentov, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new method for the investigation of low-amplitude transverse oscillations of solar plasma non-uniformities, such as coronal loops, individual strands in coronal arcades, jets, prominence fibrils, polar plumes, and other contrast features, observed with imaging instruments. The method is based on the two-dimensional dual tree complex wavelet transform (DT$\\mathbb{C}$WT). It allows us to magnify transverse, in the plane-of-the-sky, quasi-periodic motions of contrast features in image sequences. The tests performed on the artificial data cubes imitating exponentially decaying, multi-periodic and frequency-modulated kink oscillations of coronal loops showed the effectiveness, reliability and robustness of this technique. The algorithm was found to give linear scaling of the magnified amplitudes with the original amplitudes provided they are sufficiently small. Also, the magnification is independent of the oscillation period in a broad range of the periods. The application of this technique to SDO/A...

  4. Observational Analysis of Coronal Fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talpeanu, D.-C.; Rachmeler, L; Mierla, Marilena

    2017-01-01

    Coronal fans (see Figure 1) are bright observational structures that extend to large distances above the solar surface and can easily be seen in EUV (174 angstrom) above the limb. They have a very long lifetime and can live up to several Carrington rotations (CR), remaining relatively stationary for many months. Note that they are not off-limb manifestation of similarly-named active region fans. The solar conditions required to create coronal fans are not well understood. The goal of this research was to find as many associations as possible of coronal fans with other solar features and to gain a better understanding of these structures. Therefore, we analyzed many fans and created an overview of their properties. We present the results of this statistical analysis and also a case study on the longest living fan.

  5. Giant pulmonary teratoma with huge splenic lymphangiomatosis: a very rare case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsubaie, Hemail M; Alsubaie, Khaled M; Mahfouz, Mohammed Eid

    2017-09-01

    Teratomas are tumors composed of tissues derived from more than one germ cell line. They manifested with a great variety of clinical and radiological features. We report a case of a giant left hemithorax teratoma in a female with huge spleen tumor and review the relevant literature. A 38-year-old female with progressively aggravating dyspnea at rest from a mild trauma. Absent breath sounds on the left side. There was splenomegaly. Computed tomography scan revealed a huge mass (20 × 15 × 18 cm), containing elements of heterogeneous density in the left hemithorax. The spleen tumor was occupying most of the spleen without any other abdominal manifestations. The patient underwent left thoracotomy and laparoscopic splenectomy. Histopathological examination revealed a benign mature teratoma and cystic lymphangiomatosis of the spleen. To the best of our knowledge and after reviewing the available literature this is the first case of huge mature pulmonary teratoma with large cystic spleen lymphangiomatosis.

  6. Huge splenic epidermoid cyst with elevation of serum CA19-9 level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Sayo; Mori, Toshifumi; Miyoshi, Jinsei; Imoto, Yoshitaka; Shinomiya, Hirohiko; Wada, Satoshi; Nakao, Toshihiro; Shinohara, Hisamitsu; Yoshida, Sadahiro; Izumi, Keisuke; Okazaki, Jun; Muguruma, Naoki; Takayama, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    A 30-year-old female was referred to our hospital for further examination of liver dysfunction. A huge, soft mass was noted in her left upper quadrant on physical examination. Abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed a huge cystic tumor of 20 cm in the hilus of the spleen. Serum CA19-9 was 491 U/ml, and splenectomy was performed under suspicion of a malignant cystic tumor. The inner surface of the cyst was lined by squamous epithelial cells that were immunohistochemically positive for CA19-9. Serum CA19-9 level was normalized after the surgery. Our case of a very rare, huge epidermoid cyst of the spleen suggests that measurement of the serum CA19-9 level is useful for evaluating therapeutic efficacy of a splenic epidermoid cyst.

  7. Collaborative treatment of huge intrathoracic meningoceles associated with neurofibromatosis type 1: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Deog Gon; Chang, Yong Jin; Cho, Kyu Do; Hong, Jae Taek

    2015-11-10

    An intrathoracic meningocele is a relatively rare disease, and it commonly accompanies neurofibromatosis type 1. Patients tend to have no symptom but if its size is too large and compresses a lung and neighboring organs, it needs shunt drainage or surgical resection. Herein, we present the case of a 52 year-old female patient with huge intrathoracic meningoceles associated with neurofibromatosis type 1, who has complained about chest discomfort and dyspnea at rest. As for a preliminary treatment, a neurosurgeon had performed a cystoperitoneal shunt, but the symptoms continued and the size of mass and the amount of pleural effusion did not change significantly. Therefore, the huge thoracic meningoceles were successfully treated through the thoracotomic approach in combination with lumbar puncture and cerebrospinal fluid drainage. It is reported that double huge intrathoracic meningoceles associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 was successfully treated by a shunting procedure followed by thoracotomic resection with collaboration of a neurosurgeon.

  8. A Case of Huge Retroperitoneal Ganglioneuroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbarzadeh Pasha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available "nIntroduction: Ganglioneuroma is a rare, benign, fully differentiated tumor that contains mature schwann cells, ganglion cells, fibrous tissue and nerve fibers. This tumor has no immature elements, atypia, mitotic figures, intermediate cells or necrosis. This lesion can occur almost anywhere along the paravertebral sympathetic ganglia and sometimes in the adrenal medulla. This tumor can arise de novo and result from the maturation of a ganglioneuroblastoma or neuroblastoma; it may also develop within a neuroblastoma treated by chemotherapy. Metastasis is exceedingly rare. "nCase Presentation: The patient is a 7 year-old-girl living in Bam, Iran, presented with an abdominal mass 6 months ago. Physical examination revealed a very large, firm and painless abdominal mass in the right side of the abdomen with extension to the left side. She was otherwise well. In sonography, a very large heterogeneous retroperitoneal mass was seen arising on the right side crossing the midline. Dimensions were at least 170×160 mm. The right kidney and liver were displaced downward and upward, respectively. No liver metastasis or ascites was seen. In the colour Doppler ultrasonography, the lesion was hypervascular with a low resistance flow. The aorta was completely encased and displaced anteriorly but not invaded. Urinary VMA, bone marrow aspiration and biopsy were normal. A poor quality noncontrast CT scan revealed no more information than sonography (a hypodense noncalcified mass. The patient had tolerated two periods of chemotherapy with the impression of neuroblastoma without tissue diagnosis. Spiral CT scan performed at Pasteur hospital in Bam revealed a very large hypervascular hypodense retroperitoneal mass with complete encasement of the aorta and a large vessel originating from the aorta. The right kidney and liver were displaced downward and upward, respectively and the bowel loops were displaced to the left side. Sonography-guided needle biopsy was

  9. Coronal Fourier power spectra: implications for coronal seismology and coronal heating

    CERN Document Server

    Ireland, Jack; Inglis, Andrew R

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of regions of the solar corona are investigated using Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 171\\AA\\ and 193\\AA\\ data. The coronal emission from the quiet Sun, coronal loop footprints, coronal moss, and from above a sunspot is studied. It is shown that the mean Fourier power spectra in these regions can be described by a power law at lower frequencies that tails to flat spectrum at higher frequencies, plus a Gaussian-shaped contribution that varies depending on the region studied. This Fourier spectral shape is in contrast to the commonly-held assumption that coronal time-series are well described by the sum of a long time-scale background trend plus Gaussian-distributed noise, with some specific locations also showing an oscillatory signal. The implications of this discovery to the field of coronal seismology and the automated detections of oscillations are discussed. The power law contribution to the shape of the Fourier power spectrum is interpreted as being due to the summation of a distribution ...

  10. MRI Verification of a Case of Huge Infantile Rhabdomyoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadani, Naser; Kreshnike, Kreshnike Dedushi; Muçaj, Sefedin; Kabashi, Serbeze; Hoxhaj, Astrit; Jerliu, Naim; Bejiçi, Ramush

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiac rhabdomyoma is type of benign myocardial tumor that is the most common fetal cardiac tumor. Cardiac rhabdomyomas are usually detected before birth or during the first year of life. They account for over 60% of all primary cardiac tumors. Case report: A 6 month old child with coughing and obstruction in breathing, was hospitalized in the Pediatric Clinic in UCCK, Pristine. The difficulty of breathing was heard and the pathological noise of the heart was noticed from the pediatrician. In the echo of the heart at the posterior and apico-lateral part of the left ventricle a tumoral mass was presented with the dimensions of 56 × 54 mm that forwarded the contractions of the left ventricle, the mass involved also the left ventricle wall and was not vascularized. The right ventricle was deformed and with the shifting of the SIV on the right the contractility was preserved. Aorta, the left arch and AP were normal with laminar circulation. The pericard was presented free. Radiography of thoracic organs was made; it resulted on cardiomegaly and significant bronchovascular drawing. It was completed with an MRI and it resulted on: Cardiomegaly due to large tumoral mass lesion (60×34 mm) involving lateral wall of left ventricle. It was isointense to the muscle on T1W images, markedly hyperintense on T2W images. There were a few septa or bant like hypointensities within lesion. On postcontrast study it showed avid enhancement. The left ventricle volume was decreased. Mild pericardial effusion was also noted. Surgical intervention was performed and it resulted on the histopathological aspect as a huge infantile rhadbomyoma. Conclusion: In most cases no treatment is required and these lesions regress spontaneously. Patients with left ventricular outflow tract obstruction or refractory arrhythmias respond well to surgical excision. Rhabdomyomas are frequently diagnosed by means of fetal echocardiography during the prenatal period. PMID:27147810

  11. New techniques for the characterisation of dynamical phenomena in solar coronal images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbrecht, E.

    2007-02-01

    ) was an important step on the way to subarcsecond telescopes. It allows a spatial resolution of 1" in the EUV and UV bands and, simultaneously, a temporal resolution of the order of a few seconds. Coronal physics studies are dominated by two major and interlinked problems: coronal heating and solar wind acceleration. Above the chromosphere there is a thin transition layer in which the temperature suddenly increases and density drops. How can the temperature of the solar corona be three orders of magnitude higher than the temperature of the photosphere? In order for this huge temperature gradient to be stationary, non-thermal energy must be transported from below the photosphere towards the chromosphere and corona and converted into heat to balance the radiative and conductive losses. This puzzle of origin, transport and conversion of energy is referred to as the "coronal heating problem". Due to its fundamental role in the structuring of the corona, the magnetic field is supposed to play an important role in the heating. In this dissertation we describe two aspects of solar coronal dynamics: waves in coronal loops (Part I) and coronal mass ejections (Part II). We investigate the influence of (semi-) automated techniques on solar coronal research. This is a timely discussion since the observation of solar phenomena is transitioning from manual detection to "Solar Image Processing". Our results are mainly based on images from the Extreme UV Imaging Telescope (EIT) and the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO), two instruments onboard the satellite SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) of which we recently celebrated its 11th anniversary. The high quality of the images together with the long timespan created a valuable database for solar physics research. Part I reports on the first detection of slow magnetoacoustic waves in transequatorial coronal loops observed in high cadence image sequences simultaneously produced by EIT and TRACE (Transition Region

  12. A Moreton Wave and its Coronal Counterparts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francile, Carlos N.; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Long, David; Cremades, Hebe; Lopez, Fernando M.; Luoni, Maria Luisa

    2016-07-01

    On 29 March 2014, a Moreton wave was detected in AR 12017 with the Halpha Solar Telescope for Argentina (HASTA) in association with an X1 flare. Several phenomena took place in various regimes in connection with this event, such as low coronal waves and a coronal mass ejection (CME). We investigate their role and relationship with the Moreton wave to shed light on issues so far under debate. We analyze its connection with waves observed in the low corona with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO/AIA), as well as with the ensuing CME, via kinematics analyses. We build stack plots from sequences of images obtained at different wavelengths to track wave fronts along several directions and find links between the features observed in the chromosphere and low corona, as well as in the associated CME. We also derive the shock front properties. We propose a geometrical model of the wave to explain the observed wave fronts as the photospheric and chromospheric traces of an expanding and outward-traveling bubble intersecting the Sun.

  13. Optimization of Dynamically Generated SQL Queries for Tiny-Huge, Huge-Tiny Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjun K Sirohi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In most new commercial business software applications like Customer Relationship Management, the datais stored in the database layer which is usually a Relational Database Management System (RDBMS likeOracle, DB2 UDB or SQL Server. To access data from these databases, Structured Query Language (SQLqueries are used that are generated dynamically at run time based on defined business models and businessrules. One such business rule is visibility- the capability of the application to restrict data access based onthe role and responsibility of the user logged in to the application. This is generally achieved by appendingsecurity predicates in the form of sub-queries to the main query based on the roles and responsibility of theuser. In some cases, the outer query may be more restrictive while in other cases, the security predicatesmay be more restrictive. This often results in a dilemma for the cost-based optimizer (CBO of the backenddatabase whether to drive from the outer query or drive from the security predicate sub-queries. Thisdilemma is sometimes called the “Tiny-Huge, Huge-Tiny” problem and results in serious performancedegradation by way of increased response times on the application User Interface (UI. This paperprovides a case study of a new approach to vastly reduce this CBO dilemma by a combination of denormalizedcolumns and re-writing of the security predicates’ sub-queries at run-time, thereby levelling theouter and security sub-queries. This approach results in more stable execution plans in the database andmuch better performance of such SQLs, effectively leading to higher performance and scalability of theapplication.

  14. Kinematics and amplitude evolution of global coronal extreme ultraviolet waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting Li; Jun Zhang; Shu-Hong Yang; Wei Liu

    2012-01-01

    With the observations of the Solar-Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) and the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO),we analyze in detail the kinematics of global coronal waves together with their intensity amplitudes (so-called "perturbation profiles").We use a semi-automatic method to investigate the perturbation profiles of coronal waves.The location and amplitude of the coronal waves are calculated over a 30° sector on the sphere,where the wave signal is strongest.The position with the strongest perturbation at each time is considered as the location of the wave front.In all four events,the wave velocities vary with time for most of their lifetime,up to 15 min,while in the event observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly there is an additional early phase with a much higher velocity.The velocity varies greatly between different waves from 216 to 440 km s-1.The velocity of the two waves initially increases,subsequently decreases,and then increases again.Two other waves show a deceleration followed by an acceleration.Three categories of amplitude evolution of global coronal waves are found for the four events.The first is that the amplitude only shows a decrease.The second is that the amplitude initially increases and then decreases,and the third is that the amplitude shows an orderly increase,a decrease,an increase again and then a decrease.All the extreme ultraviolet waves show a decrease in amplitude while propagating farther away,probably because the driver of the global coronal wave (coronal mass ejection) is moving farther away from the solar surface.

  15. Late Intervention-Related Complication - A Huge Subepicardial Hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Po-Yen; Chang, Chih-Ping; Yang, Chen-Chia; Lin, Jen-Jyh

    2013-05-01

    A 75-year-old man had a history of triple vessel coronary artery disease. In August 2009, he had undergone successful percutaneous coronary intervention to the left circumflex coronary artery (LCX) for management of an in-stent restenosis (ISR) lesion. However, in September 2010, he began experiencing recurrent episodes of exertional chest pain. Chest radiography showed the left cardiac border bulging upwards. Transthoracic echocardiography and chest computed tomography revealed a huge oval mass of about 10.4 cm × 7.9 cm × 8.6 cm, which showed calcification and was obliterating the LCX. Subsequent coronary angiography revealed significant instent restenosis, with extravasation of a small amount of contrast material at the stent location, suggesting that the coronary artery had ruptured. We implanted a polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stent to seal the coronary perforation and to release the occlusion. The patient was symptom-free and had an uneventful outcome until the 1-year follow up. Coronary artery perforation; Covered stent; Hematoma.

  16. Observations and Numerical Models of Solar Coronal Heating Associated with Spicules

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pontieu, B.; De Moortel, I.; Martinez-Sykora, J.; McIntosh, S. W.

    2017-08-01

    Spicules have been proposed as significant contributors to the mass and energy balance of the corona. While previous observations have provided a glimpse of short-lived transient brightenings in the corona that are associated with spicules, these observations have been contested and are the subject of a vigorous debate both on the modeling and the observational side. Therefore, it remains unclear whether plasma is heated to coronal temperatures in association with spicules. We use high-resolution observations of the chromosphere and transition region (TR) with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph and of the corona with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory to show evidence of the formation of coronal structures associated with spicular mass ejections and heating of plasma to TR and coronal temperatures. Our observations suggest that a significant fraction of the highly dynamic loop fan environment associated with plage regions may be the result of the formation of such new coronal strands, a process that previously had been interpreted as the propagation of transient propagating coronal disturbances. Our observations are supported by 2.5D radiative MHD simulations that show heating to coronal temperatures in association with spicules. Our results suggest that heating and strong flows play an important role in maintaining the substructure of loop fans, in addition to the waves that permeate this low coronal environment.

  17. A huge chondromyxoid fibroma of the nasal cavity in a newborn baby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Young Tae; Park, Joo Hyun; Sunwoo, Woong Sang; Rhee, Chae-Seo

    2012-08-01

    Chondromyxoid fibroma is a rare benign tumor that usually occurs in the long bones. A 2-month newborn presented with huge masses in the both nasal cavities, which turned out to be chondromyxoid fibroma. The masses originated from both inferior turbinates. Total turbinectomy on the left side and submucosal mass excision on the right side were performed. No recurrence or new lesion was observed during the 2 years of follow up. We report here on a rare case of nasal cavity chondromyxoid fibroma in a neonate and we review the relevant literature.

  18. Coronal Neutrino Emission in Hypercritical Accretion Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Kawabata, R; Kawanaka, N

    2007-01-01

    Hypercritical accretion flows onto stellar mass black holes (BHs) are commonly considered as a promising model of central engines of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In this model a certain fraction of gravitational binding energy of accreting matter is deposited to the energy of relativistic jets via neutrino annihilation and/or magnetic fields. However, some recent studies have indicated that the energy deposition rate by neutrino annihilation is somewhat smaller than that needed to power a GRB. To overcome this difficulty, Ramirez-Ruiz & Socrates (2005) proposed that high energy neutrinos from hot corona above the accretion disk might enhance the efficiency of energy deposition. We elucidate the disk corona model in the context of hypercritical accretion flows. From the energy balance in the disk and the corona, we can calculate the disk and coronal temperature, Td and Tc, and neutrino spectra, taking into account the neutrino cooling processes by neutrino-electron scatterings and neutrino pair productions. Th...

  19. A magnetohydrodynamic theory of coronal loop transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, T.

    1982-01-01

    The physical and geometrical characteristics of solar coronal loop transients are described in an MHD model based on Archimedes' MHD buoyancy force. The theory was developed from interpretation of coronagraphic data, particularly from Skylab. The brightness of a loop is taken to indicate the electron density, and successive pictures reveal the electron enhancement in different columns. The forces which lift the loop off the sun surface are analyzed as an MHD buoyancy force affecting every mass element by imparting an inertial force necessary for heliocentrifugal motion. Thermal forces are responsible for transferring the ambient stress to the interior of the loop to begin the process. The kinematic and hydrostatic buoyancy overcome the gravitational force, and a flux rope can then curve upward, spiralling like a corkscrew with varying cross section around the unwinding solar magnetic field lines.

  20. Huge echinococcal cyst of the liver managed by hepatectomy: Report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlidis, Efstathios T; Symeonidis, Nikolaos; Psarras, Kyriakos; Pavlidis, Theodoros E

    2017-01-01

    Echinococcocal cysts are predominantly located in the right liver. They are usually solitary and asymptomatic, but large cysts can cause compression symptoms. We report two cases of huge (25cm and 20cm in diameter, respectively) echinococcal cysts located in the left liver, which presented as a large palpable mass causing compression symptoms. Diagnosis was established with CT scan showing a cystic mass with the characteristic daughter cysts and reactive layer (pericystic wall) consisting of fibrous connective tissue and calcifications. Both patients were treated radically with left hepatectomy and had uneventful postoperative course and no recurrence upon follow-up. The treatment of liver echinococcal cysts represent a unique surgical challenge. Even though conservative approaches are less technically demanding, the radical approach with resection has better outcome with less recurrences, when performed by experienced surgeons. Resection rather than drainage is the management of choice for such huge liver echinococcal cysts. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Intrinsic Instability of Coronal Streamers

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Y; Song, H Q; Shi, Q Q; Feng, S W; Xia, L D; 10.1088/0004-637X/691/2/1936

    2009-01-01

    Plasma blobs are observed to be weak density enhancements as radially stretched structures emerging from the cusps of quiescent coronal streamers. In this paper, it is suggested that the formation of blobs is a consequence of an intrinsic instability of coronal streamers occurring at a very localized region around the cusp. The evolutionary process of the instability, as revealed in our calculations, can be described as follows: (1) through the localized cusp region where the field is too weak to sustain the confinement, plasmas expand and stretch the closed field lines radially outward as a result of the freezing-in effect of plasma-magnetic field coupling; the expansion brings a strong velocity gradient into the slow wind regime providing the free energy necessary for the onset of a subsequent magnetohydrodynamic instability; (2) the instability manifests itself mainly as mixed streaming sausage-kink modes, the former results in pinches of elongated magnetic loops to provoke reconnections at one or many loc...

  2. Measurements of outflow from the base of solar coronal holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottman, G. J.; Orrall, F. Q.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    New evidence is presented that EUV emission lines formed at the levels of the base of the corona and the transition region are systematically shifted to shorter wavelengths within coronal holes relative to the rest of the solar disk, and that moreover this shift increases with height in the atmosphere. Measurements were made with a rocket-borne EUV spectrometer having high spectroscopic resolution and stability flown on July 15, 1980. Repeated measurements were made along a chord of the solar disk that crossed a compact coronal hole near sun center identified on gamma 10830 He I spectroheliograms. The maximum measured shift corresponded to a velocity of 12 km/sec in gamma 625 Mg X and 7 km/sec in gamma 629 O V. If these velocities correspond to a true mass flux, they provide important data on the acceleration of coronal plasma in open magnetic field regions. These observed Doppler displacements are a strong and significant signature of coronal holes, now measured on three rocket flights.

  3. Isotope abundances of solar coronal material derived from solar energetic particle measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.

    1989-01-01

    Coronal isotopic abundances for the elements He, C, N, O, Ne, and Mg are derived from previously published measurements of the isotopic composition of solar energetic particles by first measuring, and then correcting for, the charge-to-mass-dependent fractionation due to solar flare acceleration and propagation processes. The resulting coronal composition generally agrees with that of other samples of solar system material, but the previously noted difference between the solar flare and solar wind Ne-22/Ne-20 ratios remains unresolved.

  4. Scarless surgery for a huge liver cyst: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwagi, Hiroyuki; Kawachi, Jun; Isogai, Naoko; Ishii, Masanori; Miyake, Katsunori; Shimoyama, Rai; Fukai, Ryota; Ogino, Hidemitsu

    2017-09-01

    Symptomatic or complicated liver cysts sometimes require surgical intervention and laparoscopic fenestration is the definitive treatment for these cysts. We performed minimally invasive surgery, hybrid natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) without scarring, for a huge liver cyst. An 82-year-old female presented with a month-long history of right upper abdominal pain. We diagnosed her condition as a huge liver cyst by morphological studies. She denied any history of abdominal trauma. Her serum CEA and CA19-9 were normal and a serum echinococcus serologic test was negative. Laparoscopic fenestration, using a hybrid NOTES procedure via a transvaginal approach, was performed for a huge liver cyst because we anticipated difficulty with an umbilical approach, such as single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS). Her post-operative course was uneventful and she was discharged from our hospital three days after surgery. Pain killers were not required during and after hospitalization. No recurrence of the liver cyst or bulging was detected by clinical examination two years later. A recent trend of laparoscopic procedure has been towards minimizing the number of incisions to achieve less invasiveness. This hybrid NOTES, with a small incision for abdominal access, along with vaginal access, enabled painless operation for a huge liver cyst. We report a huge liver cyst treated by hybrid NOTES. This approach is safe, less invasive, and may be the first choice for a huge liver cyst. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Motion Magnification in Coronal Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anfinogentov, Sergey; Nakariakov, Valery M.

    2016-11-01

    We introduce a new method for the investigation of low-amplitude transverse oscillations of solar plasma non-uniformities, such as coronal loops, individual strands in coronal arcades, jets, prominence fibrils, polar plumes, and other contrast features that have been observed with imaging instruments. The method is based on the two-dimensional dual-tree complex wavelet transform (DTℂWT). It allows us to magnify transverse, in the plane-of-the-sky, quasi-periodic motions of contrast features in image sequences. The tests performed on the artificial data cubes that imitated exponentially decaying, multi-periodic and frequency-modulated kink oscillations of coronal loops showed the effectiveness, reliability, and robustness of this technique. The algorithm was found to give linear scaling of the magnified amplitudes with the original amplitudes, provided these are sufficiently small. In addition, the magnification is independent of the oscillation period in a broad range of the periods. The application of this technique to SDO/AIA EUV data cubes of a non-flaring active region allowed for the improved detection of low-amplitude decay-less oscillations in the majority of loops.

  6. Ponderomotive Acceleration in Coronal Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Dahlburg, R B; Taylor, B D; Obenschain, K

    2016-01-01

    Ponderomotive acceleration has been asserted to be a cause of the First Ionization Potential (FIP) effect, the by now well known enhancement in abundance by a factor of 3-4 over photospheric values of elements in the solar corona with FIP less than about 10 eV. It is shown here by means of numerical simulations that ponderomotive acceleration occurs in solar coronal loops, with the appropriate magnitude and direction, as a "byproduct" of coronal heating. The numerical simulations are performed with the HYPERION code, which solves the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations including nonlinear thermal conduction and optically thin radiation. Numerical simulations of a coronal loops with an axial magnetic field from 0.005 Teslas to 0.02 Teslas and lengths from 25000 km to 75000 km are presented. In the simulations the footpoints of the axial loop magnetic field are convected by random, large-scale motions. There is a continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets...

  7. A Huge Subcutaneous Hematoma in an Adult with Kasabach-Merritt Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kuan-Lin; Liao, Chiung-Ying; Chang, Chen-Kuang; Ho, Shang-Yun; Tyan, Yeu-Sheng; Huang, Yuan-Chun

    2017-06-19

    BACKGROUND Kasabach-Merritt syndrome is a potentially fatal disease that consists of hemangioma(s) with thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and coagulopathy. Extensive hemangiomatosis is rare. We present the radiological features and treatment strategy of a young adult suffering from Kasabach-Merritt syndrome with widespread hemangiomas and an infected huge hematoma in the right thigh. CASE REPORT A 33-year-old Taiwanese male presented with a painful 20-cm mass over his right thigh and gross hematuria for 2 days. Hemangiomatosis was bioptically proven in infancy and the patient was under regular follow-up. Physical examination revealed normal heart rate, respiratory rate, and body temperature. Multiple palpable lumps with brown and purple areas of skin over the neck, trunk, and right thigh were noted. Laboratory examinations revealed thrombocytopenia anemia and elevated fibrin degradation products. There were no signs of sepsis. Blood transfusion and steroid therapy were executed. Computed tomography showed a huge complicated subcutaneous hematoma in the right thigh. Drainage of the huge hematoma was performed and antibiotics were prescribed. After the local infection in the right thigh and the bleeding tendency were controlled, the patient was discharged in a stable condition two weeks later. CONCLUSIONS A huge infected hematoma and widespread hemangiomas are extremely rare complications of Kasabach-Merritt syndrome. There are no known treatment guidelines currently available. Our patient was successfully treated with steroids, drainage, and antibiotics.

  8. Commentary on the Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun II. Insight Relative to Coronal Rain and Splashdown Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Coronal rain represents blobs of solar material with a width of ∼ 300 km and a length of ∼ 700 km which are falling from the active region of the corona towards the solar surface along loop-like paths. Conversely, coronal showers are com prised of much larger bulks of matter, or clumps of solar rain. Beyond coronal rain and showers, the expulsion of solar matter from the surface, whether through flares, pro minences, or coronal mass ejections, can result in massive disruptions which have bee n observed to rise far into the corona, return towards the Sun, and splashdown onto the phot osphere. The existence of coronal rain and the splashdown of mass ejections onto the so lar surface constitute the twenty-third and twenty-fourth lines of evidence that the S un is condensed matter.

  9. Numerical Simulation of DC Coronal Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlburg, Russell B.; Einaudi, G.; Taylor, Brian D.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Warren, Harry; Rappazzo, A. F.; Velli, Marco

    2016-05-01

    Recent research on observational signatures of turbulent heating of a coronal loop will be discussed. The evolution of the loop is is studied by means of numerical simulations of the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations using the HYPERION code. HYPERION calculates the full energy cycle involving footpoint convection, magnetic reconnection, nonlinear thermal conduction and optically thin radiation. The footpoints of the loop magnetic field are convected by random photospheric motions. As a consequence the magnetic field in the loop is energized and develops turbulent nonlinear dynamics characterized by the continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets: energy is deposited at small scales where heating occurs. Dissipation is non-uniformly distributed so that only a fraction of thecoronal mass and volume gets heated at any time. Temperature and density are highly structured at scales which, in the solar corona, remain observationally unresolved: the plasma of the simulated loop is multi thermal, where highly dynamical hotter and cooler plasma strands are scattered throughout the loop at sub-observational scales. Typical simulated coronal loops are 50000 km length and have axial magnetic field intensities ranging from 0.01 to 0.04 Tesla. To connect these simulations to observations the computed number densities and temperatures are used to synthesize the intensities expected in emission lines typically observed with the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode. These intensities are then employed to compute differential emission measure distributions, which are found to be very similar to those derived from observations of solar active regions.

  10. PROMINENCE ACTIVATION BY CORONAL FAST MODE SHOCK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Takuya [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Asai, Ayumi [Unit of Synergetic Studies for Space, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan); Shibata, Kazunari, E-mail: takahashi@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan)

    2015-03-01

    An X5.4 class flare occurred in active region NOAA11429 on 2012 March 7. The flare was associated with a very fast coronal mass ejection (CME) with a velocity of over 2500 km s{sup −1}. In the images taken with the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory-B/COR1, a dome-like disturbance was seen to detach from an expanding CME bubble and propagated further. A Type-II radio burst was also observed at the same time. On the other hand, in extreme ultraviolet images obtained by the Solar Dynamic Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), the expanding dome-like structure and its footprint propagating to the north were observed. The footprint propagated with an average speed of about 670 km s{sup −1} and hit a prominence located at the north pole and activated it. During the activation, the prominence was strongly brightened. On the basis of some observational evidence, we concluded that the footprint in AIA images and the ones in COR1 images are the same, that is, the MHD fast mode shock front. With the help of a linear theory, the fast mode Mach number of the coronal shock is estimated to be between 1.11 and 1.29 using the initial velocity of the activated prominence. Also, the plasma compression ratio of the shock is enhanced to be between 1.18 and 2.11 in the prominence material, which we consider to be the reason for the strong brightening of the activated prominence. The applicability of linear theory to the shock problem is tested with a nonlinear MHD simulation.

  11. Biliary obstruction due to a huge simple hepatic cyst treated with laparoscopic resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneya, Yohei; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Matsutani, Takeshi; Hirakata, Atsushi; Matsushita, Akira; Suzuki, Seiji; Yokoyama, Tadashi; Maruyama, Hiroshi; Sasajima, Koji; Uchida, Eiji

    2011-01-01

    Most hepatic cysts are asymptomatic, but complications occasionally occur. We describe a patient with biliary obstruction due to a huge simple hepatic cyst treated with laparoscopic resection. A 60-year-old Japanese woman was admitted to our hospital because of a nontender mass in the right upper quadrant of the abdomen. Laboratory tests revealed the following: serum total bilirubin, 0.6 mg/dL; serum aspartate aminotransferase, 100 IU/L; serum alanine aminotransferase, 78 IU/L; serum alkaline phosphatase, 521 IU/L; and serum gamma glutamic transpeptidase, 298 IU/L. Abdominal computed tomography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography revealed a huge hepatic cyst, 13 cm in diameter, at the hepatic hilum, accompanied by dilatation of the intrahepatic bile duct and obstruction of the common bile duct. We diagnosed biliary obstruction due to a huge hepatic cyst at the hepatic hilum, and laparoscopic surgery was performed. A huge hepatic cyst was seen at the hepatic hilum. After needle puncture of the huge cyst, the anterior wall of the cyst was unroofed, and cholecystectomy was done. Intraoperative cholangiography through a cystic duct revealed stenosis of the duct. Subsequent decapsulation of the cyst was performed in front of the common bile duct. After this procedure, cholangiography revealed that the stenosis of the common bile duct had resolved. Histopathological examination of the surgical specimen confirmed the hepatic cyst was benign. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the results of liver function tests normalized. The patient was discharged 7 days after operation. Computed tomography 3 months after operation revealed disappearance of the hepatic cyst and no dilatation of the intrahepatic bile duct.

  12. From Forbidden Coronal Lines to Meaningful Coronal Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Judge, Philip G; Landi, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    We review methods to measure magnetic fields within the corona using the polarized light in magnetic-dipole (M1) lines. We are particularly interested in both the global magnetic-field evolution over a solar cycle, and the local storage of magnetic free energy within coronal plasmas. We address commonly held skepticisms concerning angular ambiguities and line-of-sight confusion. We argue that ambiguities are in principle no worse than more familiar remotely sensed photospheric vector-fields, and that the diagnosis of M1 line data would benefit from simultaneous observations of EUV lines. Based on calculations and data from eclipses, we discuss the most promising lines and different approaches that might be used. We point to the S-like [Fe {\\sc XI}] line (J=2 to J=1) at 789.2nm as a prime target line (for ATST for example) to augment the hotter 1074.7 and 1079.8 nm Si-like lines of [Fe {\\sc XIII}] currently observed by the Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter (CoMP). Significant breakthroughs will be made possibl...

  13. First use of synoptic vector magnetograms for global nonlinear force free coronal magnetic field models

    CERN Document Server

    Tadesse, Tilaye; Gosain, S; MacNeice, P; Pevtsov, Alexei A

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic field permeating the solar atmosphere is generally thought to provide the energy for much of the activity seen in the solar corona, such as flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), etc. To overcome the unavailability of coronal magnetic field measurements, photospheric magnetic field vector data can be used to reconstruct the coronal field. Currently there are several modelling techniques being used to calculate three-dimension of the field lines into the solar atmosphere. For the first time, synoptic maps of photospheric vector magnetic field synthesized from Vector Spectromagnetograph (VSM) on Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) are used to model the coronal magnetic field and estimate free magnetic energy in the global scale. The free energy (i.e., the energy in excess of the potential field energy) is one of the main indicators used in space weather forecasts to predict the eruptivity of active regions. We solve the nonlinear force-free field equations using optimizatio...

  14. Solar Coronal Loops Associated with Small-scale Mixed Polarity Surface Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitta, L. P.; Peter, H.; Solanki, S. K.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A.; Gizon, L.; Hirzberger, J.; Riethmüller, T. L.; van Noort, M.; Blanco Rodríguez, J.; Del Toro Iniesta, J. C.; Orozco Suárez, D.; Schmidt, W.; Martínez Pillet, V.; Knölker, M.

    2017-03-01

    How and where are coronal loops rooted in the solar lower atmosphere? The details of the magnetic environment and its evolution at the footpoints of coronal loops are crucial to understanding the processes of mass and energy supply to the solar corona. To address the above question, we use high-resolution line-of-sight magnetic field data from the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment instrument on the Sunrise balloon-borne observatory and coronal observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory of an emerging active region. We find that the coronal loops are often rooted at the locations with minor small-scale but persistent opposite-polarity magnetic elements very close to the larger dominant polarity. These opposite-polarity small-scale elements continually interact with the dominant polarity underlying the coronal loop through flux cancellation. At these locations we detect small inverse Y-shaped jets in chromospheric Ca ii H images obtained from the Sunrise Filter Imager during the flux cancellation. Our results indicate that magnetic flux cancellation and reconnection at the base of coronal loops due to mixed polarity fields might be a crucial feature for the supply of mass and energy into the corona.

  15. A huge 6.2 kilogram uterine myoma coinciding with omental leiomyosarcoma: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, C W; Lee, C L; Yen, C F; Wang, C J; Soong, Y K

    1999-12-01

    Surgery for massive abdominal tumors is both interesting and challenging. We present a case involving a multiple uterine myoma weighing 6.2 Kg which coincided with omental leiomyosarcoma. To our knowledge, this is the first report of this type of condition in the English literature. A 44-year-old nulliparous woman had suffered from abdominal pain for a long time. A huge abdominal mass was palpated on physical examination. Computed tomography scanning revealed a huge pelvic-abdominal mass with the possibility of small bowel loops invaded by the mass. A 6-cm omental mass was incidentally found during the subsequent hysterectomy procedure. Perforation of the urinary bladder occurred during the dissection of adhesion. Resection of the omental mass, wide wedge resection of the invaded small bowel, primary repair of the bladder, and hysterectomy were performed. The final pathologic diagnosis was uterine leiomyomata with omental leiomyosarcoma. The patient returned home on postoperative day 14 and was well at the 18-month follow-up examination. The challenge of these tumors lies in their proper diagnosis and surgical management. More case reports and follow-up studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of their management.

  16. Successful Vaginal Delivery despite a Huge Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenoma Complicating Pregnancy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipak Mandi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A 22-year-old patient with 9 months of amenorrhea and a huge abdominal swelling was admitted to our institution with an ultrasonography report of a multiloculated cystic space-occupying lesion, almost taking up the whole abdomen (probably of ovarian origin, along with a single live intrauterine fetus. She delivered vaginally a boy baby within 4 hours of admission without any maternal complication, but the baby had features of intrauterine growth restriction along with low birth weight. On the 8th postpartum day, the multiloculated cystic mass, which arose from the right ovary and weighed about 11 kg, was removed via laparotomy. A mucinous cystadenoma with no malignant cells in peritoneal washing was detected in histopathology examination. This report describes a rare case of a successful vaginal delivery despite a huge cystadenoma of the right ovary complicating the pregnancy.

  17. Mitral valve regurgitation due to annular dilatation caused by a huge and floating left atrial myxoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Mehmet; Ersoy, Burak; Yeniterzi, Mehmet

    2015-09-01

    We describe a case of mitral valve annular dilatation caused by a huge left atrial myxoma obstructing the mitral valve orifice. A 50-year-old man presenting with palpitation was found to have a huge left atrial myxoma protruding into the left ventricle during diastole, causing severe mitral regurgitation. The diagnosis was made with echocardiogram. Transoesophageal echocardiography revealed a solid mass of 75 × 55 mm. During operation, the myxoma was completely removed from its attachment in the atrium. We preferred to place a mechanical heart valve after an annuloplasty ring because of severely dilated mitral annulus and chordae elongation. The patient had an uneventful recovery. Our case suggests that immediate surgery, careful evaluation of mitral valve annulus preoperatively is recommended.

  18. Anaesthetic management in a case of huge plunging ranula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheet, Jagabandhu; Mandal, Anamitra; Sengupta, Swapnadeep; Jana, Debaleena; Mukherji, Sudakshina; Swaika, Sarbari

    2014-01-01

    Plunging ranula is a rare form of mucous retention cyst arising from submandibular and sublingual salivary glands, which may occasionally become huge occupying the whole of the floor of the mouth and extending into the neck, thus, restricting the neck movement as well as disfiguring the normal airway anatomy. Without fiberoptic assistance, blind or retrograde nasal intubation remains valuable choices in this type of situation. Here, we present a case of successful management of airway by blind nasal intubation in a patient posted for excision of a huge plunging ranula.

  19. Anaesthetic challenges in a patient presenting with huge neck teratoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Jain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Paediatric airway management is a great challenge even for an experienced anaesthesiologist. Difficult airway in huge cervical teratoma further exaggerates the complexity. This case report is intended at describing the intubation difficulties that were confronted during the airway management of a three year old girl presenting with huge neck teratoma and respiratory distress. This patient was successfully intubated with uncuffed endotracheal tubes in second attempt under inhalational anaesthesia with halothane and spontaneous ventilation. This case exemplifies the importance of careful preoperative workup of an anticipated difficult airway in paediatric patients with neck swelling to minimize any perioperative complications.

  20. Anaesthetic management in a case of huge plunging ranula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheet, Jagabandhu; Mandal, Anamitra; Sengupta, Swapnadeep; Jana, Debaleena; Mukherji, Sudakshina; Swaika, Sarbari

    2014-01-01

    Plunging ranula is a rare form of mucous retention cyst arising from submandibular and sublingual salivary glands, which may occasionally become huge occupying the whole of the floor of the mouth and extending into the neck, thus, restricting the neck movement as well as disfiguring the normal airway anatomy. Without fiberoptic assistance, blind or retrograde nasal intubation remains valuable choices in this type of situation. Here, we present a case of successful management of airway by blind nasal intubation in a patient posted for excision of a huge plunging ranula. PMID:25886120

  1. Estimate of Coronal Magnetic Field Strength Using Plasmoid Acceleration Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, G.; Lee, K.; Jang, M.

    2010-12-01

    A method of estimating the lower bound of coronal magnetic field strength in the neighborhood of an ejecting plasmoid is presented. Based on the assumption that the plasma ejecta is within a magnetic island, an analytical expression for the force acting on the ejecta is derived. A rather simple calculation shows that the vertical force acting on a cylinder-like volume, whose lateral surface is a flux surface and whose magnetic axis is parallel to the horizontal, is just the difference in total pressure (magnetic pressure plus plasma pressure) below and above the volume. The method is applied to a limb coronal mass ejection event, and a lower bound of the magnetic field strength just below the CME core is estimated. The method is expected to provide useful information on the strength of reconnecting magnetic field if applied to X-ray plasma ejecta.

  2. Magnetic shuffling of coronal downdrafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petralia, A.; Reale, F.; Orlando, S.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Channelled fragmented downflows are ubiquitous in magnetized atmospheres, and have recently been addressed based on an observation after a solar eruption. Aims: We study the possible back-effect of the magnetic field on the propagation of confined flows. Methods: We compared two 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of dense supersonic plasma blobs that fall down along a coronal magnetic flux tube. In one, the blobs move strictly along the field lines; in the other, the initial velocity of the blobs is not perfectly aligned with the magnetic field and the field is weaker. Results: The aligned blobs remain compact while flowing along the tube, with the generated shocks. The misaligned blobs are disrupted and merge through the chaotic shuffling of the field lines. They are structured into thinner filaments. Alfvén wave fronts are generated together with shocks ahead of the dense moving front. Conclusions: Downflowing plasma fragments can be chaotically and efficiently mixed if their motion is misaligned with field lines, with broad implications for disk accretion in protostars, coronal eruptions, and rain, for example. Movies associated to Figs. 2 and 3 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  3. Pre-flare coronal dimmings

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Q M; Ji, H S

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the pre-flare coronal dimmings. We report our multiwavelength observations of the GOES X1.6 solar flare and the accompanying halo CME produced by the eruption of a sigmoidal magnetic flux rope (MFR) in NOAA active region (AR) 12158 on 2014 September 10. The eruption was observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) aboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). The photospheric line-of-sight magnetograms were observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) aboard SDO. The soft X-ray (SXR) fluxes were recorded by the GOES spacecraft. The halo CME was observed by the white light coronagraphs of the Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) aboard SOHO.} {About 96 minutes before the onset of flare/CME, narrow pre-flare coronal dimmings appeared at the two ends of the twisted MFR. They extended very slowly with their intensities decreasing with time, while their apparent widths (8$-$9 Mm) nearly kept constant. During the impulsive and decay phases of flare, typical fanlike ...

  4. Professionalism in practice: the Coroner's Court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Richard

    2017-01-02

    A coroner recently declared a district nursing service as unfit for purpose following the death of a patient and held the care given by district nurses was unprofessional and contributed to the patient's decline and death. In this article Richard Griffith considers the coroners concerns in relation to the professional standards imposed on district nurses.

  5. Deep coronal hole associated with quiescent filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesumaningrum, Rasdewita; Herdiwidjaya, Dhani

    2014-03-01

    We present a study of the morphology of quiescent filament observed by H-alpha Solar Telescope at Bosscha Observatory in association with coronal hole observed by Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument in 193 Å from Solar Dynamics Observatory. H-alpha images were processed by imaging softwares, namely Iris 5.59 and ImageJ, to enhance the signal to noise ratio and to identify the filament features associated with coronal hole. For images observed on October 12, 2011, November 14, 2011 and January 2, 2012, we identified distinct features of coronal holes above the quiescent filaments. This associated coronal holes have filament-like morphology with a thick long thread as it's `spine', defined as Deep Coronal Hole. Because of strong magnetic field of sunspot, these filaments and coronal holes emerged far from active region and lasted for several days. It is interesting as for segmented filament, deep coronal holes above the filaments lasted for a quite long period of time and merged. This association between filament and deep coronal hole can be explained by filament magnetic loop.

  6. Swift X-ray monitoring of stellar coronal variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Brendan P.; Gallo, Elena; Wright, Jason; Hagen, Cedric

    2017-08-01

    We used California Planet Search Ca II H and K core emission measurements to identify and characterize chromospheric activity cycles in a sample of main-sequence FGK stars. About a dozen of these with existing ROSAT archival data were targeted with Swift to obtain a current epoch X-ray flux. We find that coronal variability by a factor of several is common on decade-long timescales (we attempt to link to the chromospheric cycle phase) but can also occur on short timescales between Swift visits to a given target, presumably related to stellar rotation and coronal inhomogeneity or to small flares.Additionally, we present new Swift monitoring observations of two M dwarfs with known exoplanets: GJ 15A and GJ 674. GJ 15A b is around 5.3 Earth masses with an 11.4 day orbital period, while GJ 674 is around 11.1 Earth masses with a 4.7 day orbital period. GJ 15A was observed several times in late 2014 and then monitored at approximately weekly intervals for several months in early 2016, for a total exposure of 18 ks. GJ 674 was monitored at approximately weekly intervals for most of 2016, for a total exposure of 40 ks. We provide light curves and hardness ratios for both sources, and also compare to earlier archival X-ray data. Both sources show significant X-ray variability, including between consecutive observations. We quantify the energy distribution for coronal flaring, and compare to optical results for M dwarfs from Kepler. Finally, we discuss the implications of M dwarf coronal activity for exoplanets orbiting within the nominal habitable zone.

  7. Bootstrapping the Coronal Magnetic Field with STEREO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2010-05-01

    The 3D coronal magnetic field obtained from stereoscopically triangulated loops has been compared with standard photospheric magnetogram extrapolations. We found a large misalignment of 20-40 deg, depending on the complexity of an AR (Sandman et al. 2009; DeRosa et al. 2009). These studies prove that the magnetic field in the photosphere is not force-free and fundamentally cannot reproduce the coronal magnetic field. Bootstrapping with coronal loop 3D geometries are required to improve modeling of the coronal field. Such coronal field bootstrapping methods are currently developed using stereoscopically triangulated loops from STEREO/EUVI and preliminary results show already a significantly reduced misalignment of 10-20 deg.

  8. The Inconvenient Truth About Coronal Dimmings

    CERN Document Server

    McIntosh, Scott W

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the occurrence of a coronal dimming using a combination of high resolution spectro-polarimetric, spectral and broadband images which span from the deep photosphere into the corona. These observations reinforce the belief that coronal dimmings, or transient coronal holes as they are also known, are indeed the locations of open magnetic flux in the corona resulting from the launch of a CME. We will see that, as open magnetic regions, they must act just as coronal holes and be sources of the fast solar wind, but only temporarily. An inescapable question therefore arises - what impact does this source of fast wind have on the propagation and in-flight characteristics of the CME that initiates the coronal dimming in the first place?

  9. EIT waves and coronal magnetic field diagnostics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN PengFei

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic field in the solar lower atmosphere can be measured by the use of the Zeeman and Hanle effects. By contrast, the coronal magnetic field well above the solar surface, which directly controls various eruptive phenomena, can not be precisely measured with the traditional techniques. Several attempts are being made to probe the coronal magnetic field, such as force-free extrapolation based on the photospheric magnetograms, gyroresonance radio emissions, and coronal seismology based on MHD waves in the corona. Compared to the waves trapped in the localized coronal loops, EIT waves are the only global-scale wave phenomenon, and thus are the ideal tool for the coronal global seismology. In this paper, we review the observations and modelings of EIT waves, and illustrate how they can be applied to probe the global magnetic field in the corona.

  10. Smart Cities as Support and Legacy of Huge Sport Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAURION, C.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss the concept of a smart city and the importance of huge Sport events as an incentive to the creation of the infrastructure necessary for the development of cities that provide quality of life for all its citizens using information technology.

  11. The big, large and huge case of state-building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harste, Gorm

      Using communication theory as point of departure, it is not evident how to study macro phenomena. Michel Foucault limited his studies to a non-Grand Theory when studying discursive events. At the same time, Charles Tilly wrote about Big Structures, Large Processes, Huge Comparisons when trying...

  12. [Experience of surgical treatment of huge mediastinal tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanbo; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Qingsheng; Su, Lei; Zhi, Xiuyi; Wang, Ruotian; Qian, Kun; Hu, Mu; Liu, Lei

    2014-09-23

    The diagnosis and surgical treatment of 36 huge mediastinal tumors were summarized in order to evaluate the effect and safety of the operation. Thirty-six huge mediastinal tumor patients treated in our department from June 2006 to June 2013 were retrospective analyzed, of whom clinical manifestations, diagnosis, surgical treatment and prognosis were carefully collected. Twenty-three cases were men and 13 were women. The average age was 39.2 years old. The pathology turned out to be benign in 23 cases and malignant in 13 cases. Complete resection was achieved in 34 cases while palliative resection in 2 cases with no perioperative death. Six cases had developed postoperative complications but all recovered after active treatment. Patients who had been diagnosed with benign tumors were all alive after follow-up periods of 6 months to 7 years. Nine malignat tumor patients developed recurrence or metastasis, including seven deaths. Surgery played a vital role in the diagnosis and treatment of huge mediastinal tumors. Preoperative diagnosis, accurate surgical approach and careful operation were the key to successful treatment. Benign huge mediastinal tumors had excellent prognosis with surgery.

  13. Huge mediastinal liposarcoma resected by clamshell thoracotomy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Michihito; Izumi, Nobuhiro; Tsukioka, Takuma; Komatsu, Hiroaki; Okada, Satoshi; Hara, Kantaro; Ito, Ryuichi; Shibata, Toshihiko; Nishiyama, Noritoshi

    2017-12-01

    Liposarcoma is the single most common soft tissue sarcoma. Because mediastinal liposarcomas often grow rapidly and frequently recur locally despite adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy, they require complete excision. Therefore, the feasibility of achieving complete surgical excision must be carefully considered. We here report a case of a huge mediastinal liposarcoma resected via clamshell thoracotomy. A 64-year-old man presented with dyspnea on effort. Cardiomegaly had been diagnosed 6 years previously, but had been left untreated. A computed tomography scan showed a huge (36 cm diameter) anterior mediastinal tumor expanding into the pleural cavities bilaterally. The tumor comprised mostly fatty tissue but contained two solid areas. Echo-guided needle biopsies were performed and a diagnosis of an atypical lipomatous tumor was established by pathological examination of the biopsy samples. Surgical resection was performed via a clamshell incision, enabling en bloc resection of this huge tumor. Although there was no invasion of surrounding organs, the left brachiocephalic vein was resected because it was circumferentially surrounded by tumor and could not be preserved. The tumor weighed 3500 g. Pathologic examination of the resected tumor resulted in a diagnosis of a biphasic tumor comprising dedifferentiated liposarcoma and non-adipocytic sarcoma with necrotic areas. The patient remains free of recurrent tumor 20 months postoperatively. Clamshell incision provides an excellent surgical field and can be performed safely in patients with huge mediastinal liposarcomas.

  14. The study of Equatorial coronal hole during maximum phase of Solar Cycle 21, 22, 23 and 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karna, Mahendra; Karna, Nishu

    2017-08-01

    The 11-year Solar Cycle (SC) is characterized by the periodic change in the solar activity like sunspot numbers, coronal holes, active regions, eruptions such as flares and coronal mass ejections. We study the relationship between equatorial coronal holes (ECH) and the active regions (AR) as coronal whole positions and sizes change with the solar cycle. We made a detailed study of equatorial coronal hole for four solar maximum: Solar Cycle 21 (1979,1980,1981 and 1982), Solar Cycle 22 (1989, 1990, 1991 and 1992), Solar Cycle 23 (1999, 2000, 2001 and 2002) and Solar Cycle 24 (2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015). We used publically available NOAA solar coronal hole data for cycle 21 and 22. We measured the ECH region using the EIT and AIA synoptic map for cycle 23 and 24. We noted that in two complete 22-year cycle of solar activity, the equatorial coronal hole numbers in SC 22 is greater than SC 21 and similarly, SC 24 equatorial coronal hole numbers are greater than SC 23. Moreover, we also compared the position of AR and ECH during SC 23 and 24. We used daily Solar Region Summary (SRS) data from SWPC/NOAA website. Our goal is to examine the correlation between equatorial holes, active regions, and flares.

  15. Characteristics of EUV Coronal Jets Observed with STEREO/SECCHI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisticò, G.; Bothmer, V.; Patsourakos, S.; Zimbardo, G.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we present the first comprehensive statistical study of EUV coronal jets observed with the SECCHI (Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation) imaging suites of the two STEREO spacecraft. A catalogue of 79 polar jets is presented, identified from simultaneous EUV and white-light coronagraph observations, taken during the time period March 2007 to April 2008, when solar activity was at a minimum. The twin spacecraft angular separation increased during this time interval from 2 to 48 degrees. The appearances of the coronal jets were always correlated with underlying small-scale chromospheric bright points. A basic characterization of the morphology and identification of the presence of helical structure were established with respect to recently proposed models for their origin and temporal evolution. Though each jet appeared morphologically similar in the coronagraph field of view, in the sense of a narrow collimated outward flow of matter, at the source region in the low corona the jet showed different characteristics, which may correspond to different magnetic structures. A classification of the events with respect to previous jet studies shows that amongst the 79 events there were 37 Eiffel tower-type jet events, commonly interpreted as a small-scale (˜35 arc sec) magnetic bipole reconnecting with the ambient unipolar open coronal magnetic fields at its loop tops, and 12 lambda-type jet events commonly interpreted as reconnection with the ambient field happening at the bipole footpoints. Five events were termed micro-CME-type jet events because they resembled the classical coronal mass ejections (CMEs) but on much smaller scales. The remaining 25 cases could not be uniquely classified. Thirty-one of the total number of events exhibited a helical magnetic field structure, indicative for a torsional motion of the jet around its axis of propagation. A few jets are also found in equatorial coronal holes. In this study we present sample

  16. Network Coronal Bright Points: Coronal Heating Concentrations Found in the Solar Magnetic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Porter, J. G.; Hathaway, D. H.

    1998-01-01

    We examine the magnetic origins of coronal heating in quiet regions by combining SOHO/EIT Fe xii coronal images and Kitt Peak magnetograms. Spatial filtering of the coronal images shows a network of enhanced structures on the scale of the magnetic network in quiet regions. Superposition of the filtered coronal images on maps of the magnetic network extracted from the magnetograms shows that the coronal network does indeed trace and stem from the magnetic network. Network coronal bright points, the brightest features in the network lanes, are found to have a highly significant coincidence with polarity dividing lines (neutral lines) in the network and are often at the feet of enhanced coronal structures that stem from the network and reach out over the cell interiors. These results indicate that, similar to the close linkage of neutral-line core fields with coronal heating in active regions (shown in previous work), low-lying core fields encasing neutral lines in the magnetic network often drive noticeable coronal heating both within themselves (the network coronal bright points) and on more extended field lines rooted around them. This behavior favors the possibility that active core fields in the network are the main drivers of the heating of the bulk of the quiet corona, on scales much larger than the network lanes and cells.

  17. Recent advances in coronal heating

    CERN Document Server

    De Moortel, Ineke

    2015-01-01

    The solar corona, the tenuous outer atmosphere of the Sun, is orders of magnitude hotter than the solar surface. This 'coronal heating problem' requires the identification of a heat source to balance losses due to thermal conduction, radiation and (in some locations) convection. The review papers in this Theo Murphy meeting issue present an overview of recent observational findings, large- and small-scale numerical modelling of physical processes occurring in the solar atmosphere and other aspects which may affect our understanding of the proposed heating mechanisms. At the same time, they also set out the directions and challenges which must be tackled by future research. In this brief introduction, we summarize some of the issues and themes which reoccur throughout this issue.

  18. Projection effects in coronal dimmings and associated EUV wave event

    CERN Document Server

    Dissauer, Karin; Veronig, Astrid M; Vanninathan, Kamalam; Magdalenić, Jasmina

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the high-speed ($v >$ 1000 km s$^{-1}$) extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave associated with an X1.2 flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) from NOAA active region 11283 on 2011 September 6 (SOL2011-09-06T22:12). This EUV wave features peculiar on-disk signatures, in particular we observe an intermittent "disappearance" of the front for 120 s in SDO/AIA 171, 193, 211 {\\AA} data, whereas the 335 {\\AA} filter, sensitive to hotter plasmas (T$\\sim$2.5 MK), shows a continuous evolution of the wave front. The eruption was also accompanied by localized coronal dimming regions. We exploit the multi-point quadrature position of SDO and STEREO-A, to make a thorough analysis of the EUV wave evolution, with respect to its kinematics and amplitude evolution and reconstruct the SDO line-of-sight (LOS) direction of the identified coronal dimming regions in STEREO-A. We show that the observed intensities of the dimming regions in SDO/AIA depend on the structures that are lying along their LOS and are the combination ...

  19. FORWARD: A toolset for multiwavelength coronal magnetometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah eGibson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Determining the 3D coronal magnetic field is a critical, but extremely difficult problem to solve. Since different types of multiwavelength coronal data probe different aspects of the coronal magnetic field, ideally these data should be used together to validate and constrain specifications of that field. Such a task requires the ability to create observable quantities at a range of wavelengths from a distribution of magnetic field and associated plasma -- i.e., to perform forward calculations. In this paper we describe the capabilities of the FORWARD SolarSoft IDL package, a uniquely comprehensive toolset for coronal magnetometry. FORWARD is a community resource that may be used both to synthesize a broad range of coronal observables, and to access and compare synthetic observables to existing data. It enables forward fitting of specific observations, and helps to build intuition into how the physical properties of coronal magnetic structures translate to observable properties. FORWARD can also be used to generate synthetic test beds from MHD simulations in order to facilitate the development of coronal magnetometric inversion methods, and to prepare for the analysis of future large solar telescope data.

  20. FORWARD: A toolset for multiwavelength coronal magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Sarah; Kucera, Therese; White, Stephen; Dove, James; Fan, Yuhong; Forland, Blake; Rachmeler, Laurel; Downs, Cooper; Reeves, Katharine

    2016-03-01

    Determining the 3D coronal magnetic field is a critical, but extremely difficult problem to solve. Since different types of multiwavelength coronal data probe different aspects of the coronal magnetic field, ideally these data should be used together to validate and constrain specifications of that field. Such a task requires the ability to create observable quantities at a range of wavelengths from a distribution of magnetic field and associated plasma -- i.e., to perform forward calculations. In this paper we describe the capabilities of the FORWARD SolarSoft IDL package, a uniquely comprehensive toolset for coronal magnetometry. FORWARD is a community resource that may be used both to synthesize a broad range of coronal observables, and to access and compare synthetic observables to existing data. It enables forward fitting of specific observations, and helps to build intuition into how the physical properties of coronal magnetic structures translate to observable properties. FORWARD can also be used to generate synthetic test beds from MHD simulations in order to facilitate the development of coronal magnetometric inversion methods, and to prepare for the analysis of future large solar telescope data.

  1. Observational features of equatorial coronal hole jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zimbardo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Collimated ejections of plasma called "coronal hole jets" are commonly observed in polar coronal holes. However, such coronal jets are not only a specific features of polar coronal holes but they can also be found in coronal holes appearing at lower heliographic latitudes. In this paper we present some observations of "equatorial coronal hole jets" made up with data provided by the STEREO/SECCHI instruments during a period comprising March 2007 and December 2007. The jet events are selected by requiring at least some visibility in both COR1 and EUVI instruments. We report 15 jet events, and we discuss their main features. For one event, the uplift velocity has been determined as about 200 km s−1, while the deceleration rate appears to be about 0.11 km s−2, less than solar gravity. The average jet visibility time is about 30 min, consistent with jet observed in polar regions. On the basis of the present dataset, we provisionally conclude that there are not substantial physical differences between polar and equatorial coronal hole jets.

  2. Projection Effects in Coronal Dimmings and Associated EUV Wave Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissauer, K.; Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.; Vanninathan, K.; Magdalenić, J.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the high-speed (v > 1000 km s‑1) extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave associated with an X1.2 flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) from NOAA active region 11283 on 2011 September 6 (SOL2011-09-06T22:12). This EUV wave features peculiar on-disk signatures in particular, we observe an intermittent “disappearance” of the front for 120 s in Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/AIA 171, 193, 211 Å data, whereas the 335 Å filter, sensitive to hotter plasmas (T ∼ 2.5 MK), shows a continuous evolution of the wave front. The eruption was also accompanied by localized coronal dimming regions. We exploit the multi-point quadrature position of SDO and STEREO-A, to make a thorough analysis of the EUV wave evolution, with respect to its kinematics and amplitude evolution and reconstruct the SDO line-of-sight (LOS) direction of the identified coronal dimming regions in STEREO-A. We show that the observed intensities of the dimming regions in SDO/AIA depend on the structures that are lying along their LOS and are the combination of their individual intensities, e.g., the expanding CME body, the enhanced EUV wave, and the CME front. In this context, we conclude that the intermittent disappearance of the EUV wave in the AIA 171, 193, and 211 Å filters, which are channels sensitive to plasma with temperatures below ∼2 MK is also caused by such LOS integration effects. These observations clearly demonstrate that single-view image data provide us with limited insight to correctly interpret coronal features.

  3. Huge aneurysm and coronary-cameral fistula from right coronary branch: First case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Tanveer; Pasarad, Ashwini Kumar; Kishore, Kolkebaile Sadanand; Maheshwarappa, Nandakumar Neralakere

    2016-02-01

    Coronary-cameral fistulas are rare cardiovascular anomalies. A giant coronary artery aneurysm associated with a coronary-cameral fistula is a very rare condition, with an estimated prevalence of 0.02%. We report the case of middle-aged woman who presented with a huge extracardiac aneurysmal mass and a coronary-cameral fistula from a right coronary artery branch. It was successfully repaired by ligation and excision plus marsupialization of the aneurysm. We believe this is the first such a case reported in literature.

  4. Multiscale Modeling of Solar Coronal Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.; Karpen, Judith T.; DeVore, C. Richard

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is widely believed to be the primary process by which the magnetic field releases energy to plasma in the Sun's corona. For example, in the breakout model for the initiation of coronal mass ejections/eruptive flares, reconnection is responsible for the catastrophic destabilizing of magnetic force balance in the corona, leading to explosive energy release. A critical requirement for the reconnection is that it have a "switch-on' nature in that the reconnection stays off until a large store of magnetic free energy has built up, and then it turn on abruptly and stay on until most of this free energy has been released. We discuss the implications of this requirement for reconnection in the context of the breakout model for CMEs/flares. We argue that it imposes stringent constraints on the properties of the flux breaking mechanism, which is expected to operate in the corona on kinetic scales. We present numerical simulations demonstrating how the reconnection and the eruption depend on the effective resistivity, i.e., the effective Lundquist number, and propose a model for incorporating kinetic flux-breaking mechanisms into MHO calculation of CMEs/flares.

  5. [One case of huge cyst at the back end of nasal septum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Jian; Liu, Qian; Jiang, Xuejun

    2014-04-01

    A male of 17 years old complained of bilateral nasal congestion with mouth breathing for half a year. The physical examination showed patency of bilateral nasal cavity. Nasopharyngeal fiberscope revealed a huge spherical smooth reddish mass at the nasopharyngeal posterior wall and the back-end of nasal cavity blocking the entire postnaris and contacting with bilateral tubal tori, the size of which is about 3.5 cm x 2.5 cm. The nasopharyngeal 3D-CT showed a low density cystic mass area in the nasopharynx with smooth edges, and the CT value is approximately 32.4 HU. No exact enhancement was observed. The cystic mass originated from and compressed the back end of nasal septum. A semicircular defect in the leading edge of clivus was observed, and the inferior wall of sphenoid sinus is compressed uplifted upwards. The nasopharyngeal MR showed that the nasopharyngeal lesion presented short T1 and long T2 signals with multiple small wall nodules around. Neither the lesion nor the peripheral nodules can be significantly enhanced by enhancement scan. After a nasal endoscopic surgery, the case was definitely diagnosed as nasal septum back-end huge cyst.

  6. Slipping magnetic reconnection in coronal loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulanier, Guillaume; Golub, Leon; Deluca, Edward E; Cirtain, Jonathan W; Kano, Ryouhei; Lundquist, Loraine L; Narukage, Noriyuki; Sakao, Taro; Weber, Mark A

    2007-12-07

    Magnetic reconnection of solar coronal loops is the main process that causes solar flares and possibly coronal heating. In the standard model, magnetic field lines break and reconnect instantaneously at places where the field mapping is discontinuous. However, another mode may operate where the magnetic field mapping is continuous but shows steep gradients: The field lines may slip across each other. Soft x-ray observations of fast bidirectional motions of coronal loops, observed by the Hinode spacecraft, support the existence of this slipping magnetic reconnection regime in the Sun's corona. This basic process should be considered when interpreting reconnection, both on the Sun and in laboratory-based plasma experiments.

  7. Huge uterine-cervical diverticulum mimicking as a cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Chufal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we report an incidental huge uterine-cervical diverticulum from a total abdominal hysterectomy specimen in a perimenopausal woman who presented with acute abdominal pain. The diverticulum was mimicking with various cysts present in the lateral side of the female genital tract. Histopathological examination confirmed this to be a cervical diverticulum with communication to uterine cavity through two different openings. They can attain huge size if left ignored for long duration and present a diagnostic challenge to clinicians, radiologists, as well as pathologists because of its extreme rarity. Therefore, diverticula should also be included as a differential diagnosis. Its histopathological confirmation also highlights that diverticula can present as an acute abdomen, requiring early diagnosis with appropriate timely intervention. Immunohistochemistry CD 10 has also been used to differentiate it from a mesonephric cyst.

  8. Huge uterine-cervical diverticulum mimicking as a cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chufal, S; Thapliyal, Naveen; Gupta, Manoj; Pangtey, Nirmal

    2012-01-01

    Here we report an incidental huge uterine-cervical diverticulum from a total abdominal hysterectomy specimen in a perimenopausal woman who presented with acute abdominal pain. The diverticulum was mimicking with various cysts present in the lateral side of the female genital tract. Histopathological examination confirmed this to be a cervical diverticulum with communication to uterine cavity through two different openings. They can attain huge size if left ignored for long duration and present a diagnostic challenge to clinicians, radiologists, as well as pathologists because of its extreme rarity. Therefore, diverticula should also be included as a differential diagnosis. Its histopathological confirmation also highlights that diverticula can present as an acute abdomen, requiring early diagnosis with appropriate timely intervention. Immunohistochemistry CD 10 has also been used to differentiate it from a mesonephric cyst.

  9. A case of huge primary liposarcoma in the liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang-Mou Kuo; Hong-Shiue Chou; Kun-Ming Chan; Ming-Chin Yu; Wei-Chen Lee

    2006-01-01

    Primary liver liposarcoma is a rare disease. Because of its rarity, the knowledge of the clinical course, management, and prognosis of primary liver liposarcoma are all limited for clinicians. A 61-year-old female patient who suffered from a huge primary liposarcoma in the central portion of the liver had the clinical presentations of fever, nausea, vomiting, jaundice, and body weight loss.The huge tumor was resected successfully. However,the tumor recurred repeatedly and she had repeated hepatectomies to remove the tumor. Thetumor became aggravating after repeated surgeries. Eventually, the patient had cervical spinal metastasis of liposarcoma and she survived for 26 months after liver liposarcoma was diagnosed. Although the tumor may become aggravating after repeated surgeries, repeated hepatectomies are still the best policy to achieve a long-term survival for the patients.

  10. Black Hole Firewalls Require Huge Energy of Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Hotta, Masahiro; Funo, Ken

    2013-01-01

    The unitary moving mirror model is one of the best quantum systems for checking the reasoning of the firewall paradox in quantum black holes. The reasoning of Almheiri et al. inevitably raises a firewall paradox in the model. We resolve this paradox from the viewpoint of the energy cost of quantum measurements. No firewall with a deadly, huge energy flux appears, as long as the energy for the measurement is much smaller than the ultraviolet cutoff scale.

  11. Huge Left Atrium Accompanied by Normally Functioning Prosthetic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabzi, Feridoun

    2015-01-01

    Giant left atria are defined as those measuring larger than 8 cm and are typically found in patients who have rheumatic mitral valve disease with severe regurgitation. Enlargement of the left atrium may create compression of the surrounding structures such as the esophagus, pulmonary veins, respiratory tract, lung, inferior vena cava, recurrent laryngeal nerve, and thoracic vertebrae and lead to dysphagia, respiratory dysfunction, peripheral edema, hoarse voice, or back pain. However, a huge left atrium is usually associated with rheumatic mitral valve disease but is very rare in a normally functioning prosthetic mitral valve, as was the case in our patient. A 46-year-old woman with a past medical history of mitral valve replacement and chronic atrial fibrillation was admitted to our hospital with a chief complaint of cough and shortness of breath, worsened in the last month. Physical examination showed elevated jugular venous pressure, respiratory distress, cardiac cachexia, heart failure, hepatomegaly, and severe edema in the legs. Chest radiography revealed an inconceivably huge cardiac sell-out. Transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated a huge left atrium, associated with thrombosis, and normal function of the prosthetic mitral valve. Cardiac surgery with left atrial exploration for the extraction of the huge thrombosis and De Vega annuloplasty for tricuspid regurgitation were carried out. The postoperative course was eventful due to right ventricular failure and low cardiac output syndrome; and after two days, the patient expired with multiple organ failure. Thorough literature review showed that our case was the largest left atrium (20 × 22 cm) reported thus far in adults with a normal prosthetic mitral valve function.

  12. Huge Left Atrium Accompanied by Normally Function- ing Prosthetic Valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feridoun Sabzi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Giant left atria are defined as those measuring larger than 8 cm and are typically found in patients who have rheumatic mitral valve disease with severe regurgitation. Enlargement of the left atrium may create compression of the surrounding structures such as the esophagus, pulmonary veins, respiratory tract, lung, inferior vena cava, recurrent laryngeal nerve, and thoracic vertebrae and lead to dysphagia, respiratory dysfunction, peripheral edema, hoarse voice, or back pain. However, a huge left atrium is usually associated with rheumatic mitral valve disease but is very rare in a normally functioning prosthetic mitral valve, as was the case in our patient. A 46-year-old woman with a past medical history of mitral valve replacement and chronic atrial fibrillation was admitted to our hospital with a chief complaint of cough and shortness of breath, worsened in the last month. Physical examination showed elevated jugular venous pressure, respiratory distress, cardiac cachexia, heart failure, hepatomegaly, and severe edema in the legs. Chest radiography revealed an inconceivably huge cardiac sell-out. Transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated a huge left atrium, associated with thrombosis, and normal function of the prosthetic mitral valve. Cardiac surgery with left atrial exploration for the extraction of the huge thrombosis and De Vega annuloplasty for tricuspid regurgitation were carried out. The postoperative course was eventful due to right ventricular failure and low cardiac output syndrome; and after two days, the patient expired with multiple organ failure. Thorough literature review showed that our case was the largest left atrium (20 × 22 cm reported thus far in adults with a normal prosthetic mitral valve function.

  13. Huge Nevus Lipomatosus Cutaneous Superficialis on Back: An Unusual Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Dipti; Das, Anupam; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Kumar, Dhiraj

    2015-01-01

    Nevus lipomatosus cutaneous superficialis (NLCS) is a benign dermatosis, histologically characterized by the presence of mature ectopic adipocytes in the dermis. We hereby report a case of a 10-year-old boy who presented with multiple huge swellings on the scapular regions and lower back. The lesions were surmounted by small papules, along with peau-d orange appearance at places. Histology showed features consistent with NLCS. The case is being reported for the unusual clinical presentation.

  14. Huge nevus lipomatosus cutaneous superficialis on back: An unusual presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipti Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nevus lipomatosus cutaneous superficialis (NLCS is a benign dermatosis, histologically characterized by the presence of mature ectopic adipocytes in the dermis. We hereby report a case of a 10-year-old boy who presented with multiple huge swellings on the scapular regions and lower back. The lesions were surmounted by small papules, along with peau-d orange appearance at places. Histology showed features consistent with NLCS. The case is being reported for the unusual clinical presentation.

  15. Imaging solar coronal magnetic structures in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartledge, N. P.

    The study of solar coronal structures and, in particular prominences, is a key part of understanding the highly complex physical mechanisms occurring in the Sun's atmosphere. Solar prominences are important in their own right and some of the most puzzling questions in solar theory have arisen through their study. For example, how do they form and how is their mass continuously replenished? How can the magnetic field provide their continuous support against gravity over time periods of several months? How can such cool, dense material exist in thermal equilibrium in the surrounding coronal environment? Why do they erupt? A study of their structure and that of the surrounding medium is important in determining the nature of the coronal plasma and magnetic field. Also, prominences are closely associated with other key phenomena such as coronal mass ejections and eruptive solar flares which occur as a prominence loses equilibrium and rises from the solar surface. Our current understanding of these fascinating structures is extremely limited and we know very little about their basic global structure. In fact, recent prominence observations have caused our basic paradigms to be challenged (Priest, 1996) and so we must set up new models in order to gain even a fundamental understanding. Prominences are highly nonlinear, three-dimensional structures. Large feet (or barbs) reach out from the main body of a prominence and reach down to the photosphere where the dense material continuously drains away. These provide a real clue to the three-dimensional nature of the coronal field and its relation to the photospheric field. It is important, therefore, to make stereographic observations of prominences in order to gain a basic understanding of their essentially three-dimensional nature and attempt to formulate new paradigms for their structure and evolution. There is no doubt that the study of prominences in three dimensions is a crucial exercise if we are to develop a better

  16. Coronal Dynamics at Recent Total Solar Eclipses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, J. M.; Lu, M.; Davis, A. B.; Demianski, M.; Rusin, V.; Saniga, M.; Seaton, D. B.; Lucas, R.; Babcock, B. A.; Dantowitz, R.; Gaintatzis, P.; Seeger, C. H.; Malamut, C.; Steele, A.

    2014-12-01

    Our composite images of the solar corona based on extensive imaging at the total solar eclipses of 2010 (Easter Island), 2012 (Australia), and 2013 (Gabon) reveal several coronal mass ejections and other changes in coronal streamers and in polar plumes. Our resultant spatial resolution is finer than that available in imaging from spacecraft, including that from SOHO/LASCO or STEREO. We trace the eruptions back to their footpoints on the sun using imaging from SDO and SWAP, and follow them upwards through the corona, measuring velocities. The high-resolution computer compositing by Miloslav Druckmüller and Hana Druckmüllerová (2010 and 2013) and Pavlos Gaintatzis (2012) allows comparison of our images with those taken at intervals of minutes or hours along the totality path. Williams College's 2013 eclipse expedition was supported in part by grant 9327-13 from National Geographic Society/Committee for Research and Exploration. Our work on the 2012 eclipse is supported in part by grant AGS-1047726 from Solar Terrestrial Research/NSF AGS. V.R. and M.S. were partially supported by the VEGA grant agency project 2/0098/10 and 2/0003/13 (Slovak Academy of Sciences) and Grant 0139-12 from NG/CRE, and Hana Druckmüllerová by grant 205/09/1469 of the Czech Science Foundation. M.L. was supported by Sigma Xi. C.M. was a Keck Northeast Astronomy Consortium Summer Fellow, supported at Williams College by REU/NSF grant AST-1005024. Partial support was provided by U.S. Department of Defense's ASSURE program. J.M.P. thanks Caltech's Planetary Sciences Department for hospitality. Support for D.B.S. and SWAP came from PRODEX grant C90345 managed by ESA in collaboration with the Belgian Federal Science Policy Office (BELSPO) in support of the PROBA2/SWAP mission, and from the EC's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant 218816 (SOTERIA project, www.soteria-space.eu). SWAP is a project of the Centre Spatial de Liège and the Royal Observatory of Belgium funded by

  17. Multimodality treatment with radiotherapy for huge hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hee Ji; Kim, Mi Sun; Cha, Jihye; Choi, Jin Sub; Han, Kwang Hyub; Seong, Jinsil

    2014-01-01

    For huge hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), therapeutic decisions have varied from local therapy to systemic therapy, with radiotherapy (RT) playing only a palliative role. In this study, we investigated whether multimodality treatment involving RT could be effective in huge HCC. This study was performed in 116 patients with HCC >10 cm. The number of patients in stage II, III and IV was 12, 54 and 50, respectively. RT was given as a combined modality in most patients. The median dose was 45 Gy, with 1.8 Gy per fraction. The median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 14.8 and 6.5 months, respectively. The median infield PFS was not reached. Infield failure, outfield intrahepatic and extrahepatic failure were observed in 8.6, 18.1, and 12.1% of patients, respectively. For OS and PFS, number of tumors, initial alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) level, treatment response, percent AFP decrement, and hepatic resection were significant prognostic factors. Tumor characteristics and treatment response were significantly different between long-term survivors and the other patients. Although huge HCC presents an aggressive clinical course, multimodality approaches involving RT can offer an opportunity for prolonged survival. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Relating magnetic reconnection to coronal heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longcope, D W; Tarr, L A

    2015-05-28

    It is clear that the solar corona is being heated and that coronal magnetic fields undergo reconnection all the time. Here we attempt to show that these two facts are related--i.e. coronal reconnection generates heat. This attempt must address the fact that topological change of field lines does not automatically generate heat. We present one case of flux emergence where we have measured the rate of coronal magnetic reconnection and the rate of energy dissipation in the corona. The ratio of these two, [Formula: see text], is a current comparable to the amount of current expected to flow along the boundary separating the emerged flux from the pre-existing flux overlying it. We can generalize this relation to the overall corona in quiet Sun or in active regions. Doing so yields estimates for the contribution to coronal heating from magnetic reconnection. These estimated rates are comparable to the amount required to maintain the corona at its observed temperature.

  19. Microwave Enhancement in Coronal Holes: Statistical Properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ν. Gopalswamy; Κ. Shibasaki; Μ. Salem

    2000-09-01

    We report on the statistical properties of the microwave enhancement (brightness temperature, area, fine structure, life time and magnetic field strength) in coronal holes observed over a period of several solar rotations.

  20. Observational Consequences of Coronal Heating Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winebarger, Amy R.; Cirtain, Jonathan C.; Golub, Leon; Kobayashi, Ken

    2014-01-01

    The coronal heating problem remains unsolved today, 80 years after its discovery, despite 50 years of suborbital and orbital coronal observatories. Tens of theoretical coronal heating mechanisms have been suggested, but only a few have been able to be ruled out. In this talk, we will explore the reasons for the slow progress and discuss the measurements that will be needed for potential breakthrough, including imaging the solar corona at small spatial scales, measuring the chromospheric magnetic fields, and detecting the presence of high temperature, low emission measure plasma. We will discuss three sounding rocket instruments developed to make these measurements: the High resolution Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C), the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectropolarimeter (CLASP), and the Marshall Grazing Incidence X-ray Spectrometer (MaGIXS).