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Sample records for hudson papenfuss recolectada

  1. TREATMENTS OF PLASMA CORONA RADIATION ON SEAWEED Gracilaria Verrucosa (HUDSON PAPENFUSS: Efforts to increase growth and biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filemon Jalu N Putra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Gracilaria verrucosa (Hudson Papenfuss has great potential to be farmed in the water resources in Indonesia. As natural resource, the weed has a major contribution in the field of industry both for human food and health. Efforts have been done intensively to increase the production capacity to meet the market demand especially gelatin, both national and international market. One of them is the application of plasma corona irradiation treatments on the weed to improve developmental pathways. The concept of plasma irradiation performed at atmospheric conditions may impact on nitrogen intrusion pathway that is important element in the growth of the weed. The aims of this study are to assess the potential impact of plasma irradiation in improving the growth of G. verrucosa and thus increase their biomass production. The treatments were done using five different duration of plasma irradiation, which were 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 minutes at a 0,5mA stable source of voltage and 8kV of electrical current. Observations of growth rate include thallus length and biomass of G. verrucosa , that was observed every week for 28 days. The result showed that the growth of weed exhibited better than those without radiation. The best growth was reached in the group of treatment of 8 minutes irradiation, exhibited 65,91g of biomass and 9.5515% growth rate and length of thallus reached 22,33 cm and daily growth rate of 2.9759%. The lowest growth of the weed occurred in the treatment of 10 minutes irradiation, which was 44,82 g biomass, 8.123% growth rate, 17,13 cm thallus length with a daily growth rate of 1.9942%

  2. Researcher Interview: Tom Hudson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom Hudson, M.D., President and Scientific Director of the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, describes the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC), which brings together cancer genomic data and research from across the world.

  3. Hudson 3 essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Meinholz, Lloyd

    2013-01-01

    A practical guide, packed with illustrations, that will help you become proficient with Hudson and able to utilize it how you want.If you are a Java developer or administrator who would to like automate some of the mundane work required to build and test software and improve software quality, this is the book for you. If you are a development manager or tester, you can also benefit from learning how Hudson works by gaining some insight into test results and historical trends.

  4. 2010 Hudson River Shallow Water Sediment Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Hudson River Shallow Water Mapping project characterizes the bottom of the Hudson River Estuary in shallow water (<3 m). The characterization includes...

  5. Variations in morphology and PSII photosynthetic capabilities during the early development of tetraspores of Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Ohmi) Papenfuss (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiujun; Wang, Guangce; Pan, Guanghua; Gao, Shan; Xu, Pu; Zhu, Jianyi

    2010-04-28

    Red algae are primitive photosynthetic eukaryotes, whose spores are ideal subjects for studies of photosynthesis and development. Although the development of red alga spores has received considerable research attention, few studies have focused on the detailed morphological and photosynthetic changes that occur during the early development of tetraspores of Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Ohmi) Papenfuss (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta). Herein, we documented these changes in this species of red algae. In the tetraspores, we observed two types of division, cruciate and zonate, and both could develop into multicellular bodies (disks). During the first 84 hours, tetraspores divided several times, but the diameter of the disks changed very little; thereafter, the diameter increased significantly. Scanning electron microscopy observations and analysis of histological sections revealed that the natural shape of the disk remains tapered over time, and the erect frond grows from the central protrusion of the disk. Cultivation of tissue from excised disks demonstrated that the central protrusion of the disk is essential for initiation of the erect frond. Photosynthetic (i.e., PSII) activities were measured using chlorophyll fluorescence analysis. The results indicated that freshly released tetraspores retained limited PSII photosynthetic capabilities; when the tetraspores attached to a substrate, those capabilities increased significantly. In the disk, the PSII activity of both marginal and central cells was similar, although some degree of morphological polarity was present; the PSII photosynthetic capabilities in young germling exhibited an apico-basal gradient. Attachment of tetraspores to a substrate significantly enhanced their PSII photosynthetic capabilities, and triggered further development. The central protrusion of the disk is the growth point, may have transfer of nutritive material with the marginal cells. Within the young germling, the hetero-distribution of PSII

  6. Variations in morphology and PSII photosynthetic capabilities during the early development of tetraspores of Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Ohmi Papenfuss (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Shan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Red algae are primitive photosynthetic eukaryotes, whose spores are ideal subjects for studies of photosynthesis and development. Although the development of red alga spores has received considerable research attention, few studies have focused on the detailed morphological and photosynthetic changes that occur during the early development of tetraspores of Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Ohmi Papenfuss (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta. Herein, we documented these changes in this species of red algae. Results In the tetraspores, we observed two types of division, cruciate and zonate, and both could develop into multicellular bodies (disks. During the first 84 hours, tetraspores divided several times, but the diameter of the disks changed very little; thereafter, the diameter increased significantly. Scanning electron microscopy observations and analysis of histological sections revealed that the natural shape of the disk remains tapered over time, and the erect frond grows from the central protrusion of the disk. Cultivation of tissue from excised disks demonstrated that the central protrusion of the disk is essential for initiation of the erect frond. Photosynthetic (i.e., PSII activities were measured using chlorophyll fluorescence analysis. The results indicated that freshly released tetraspores retained limited PSII photosynthetic capabilities; when the tetraspores attached to a substrate, those capabilities increased significantly. In the disk, the PSII activity of both marginal and central cells was similar, although some degree of morphological polarity was present; the PSII photosynthetic capabilities in young germling exhibited an apico-basal gradient. Conclusions Attachment of tetraspores to a substrate significantly enhanced their PSII photosynthetic capabilities, and triggered further development. The central protrusion of the disk is the growth point, may have transfer of nutritive material with the marginal cells. Within

  7. Towards a sustainable future in Hudson Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okrainetz, G.

    1991-01-01

    To date, ca $40-50 billion has been invested in or committed to hydroelectric development on the rivers feeding Hudson Bay. In addition, billions more have been invested in land uses such as forestry and mining within the Hudson Bay drainage basin. However, there has never been a study of the possible impacts on Hudson Bay resulting from this activity. Neither has there been any federal environmental assessment on any of the economic developments that affect Hudson Bay. To fill this gap in knowledge, the Hudson Bay Program was established. The program will not conduct scientific field research but will rather scan the published literature and consult with leading experts in an effort to identify biophysical factors that are likely to be significantly affected by the cumulative influence of hydroelectric and other developments within and outside the region. An annotated bibliography on Hudson Bay has been completed and used to prepare a science overview paper, which will be circulated for comment, revised, and used as the basis for a workshop on cumulative effects in Hudson Bay. Papers will then be commissioned for a second workshop to be held in fall 1993. A unique feature of the program is its integration of traditional ecological knowledge among the Inuit and Cree communities around Hudson Bay with the scientific approach to cumulative impact assessment. One goal of the program is to help these communities bring forward their knowledge in such a way that it can be integrated into the cumulative effects assessment

  8. 27 CFR 9.47 - Hudson River Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hudson River Region. 9.47... Hudson River Region. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Hudson River Region.” (b) Approved maps. The approved maps for determining the boundaries of Hudson River...

  9. Nelson River and Hudson Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Rivers that empty into large bodies of water can have a significant impact on the thawing of nearshore winter ice. This true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from May 18, 2001, shows the Nelson River emptying spring runoff from the Manitoba province to the south into the southwestern corner of Canada's Hudson Bay. The warmer waters from more southern latitudes hasten melting of ice near the shore, though some still remained, perhaps because in shallow coastal waters, the ice could have been anchored to the bottom. High volumes of sediment in the runoff turned the inflow brown, and the rim of the retreating ice has taken on a dirty appearance even far to the east of the river's entrance into the Bay. The sediment would have further hastened the melting of the ice because its darker color would have absorbed more solar radiation than cleaner, whiter ice. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  10. Babesiosis in Lower Hudson Valley, New York

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast discusses a study about an increase in babesiosis in the Lower Hudson Valley of New York state. Dr. Julie Joseph, Assistant Professor of Medicine at New York Medical College, shares details of this study.

  11. Hudson River Sub-Bottom Profile Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hudson River Estuary Shallow Water Surveys. Subbottom Profile Points. Subbottom data was collected November 5 to December 15, 2009, in the estuary north from...

  12. Quantum random walks and their convergence to Evans–Hudson ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quantum dynamical semigroup; Evans–Hudson flow; quantum random walk. 1. Introduction. The aim of this article is to investigate convergence of random walks on von Neumann algebra to Evans–Hudson flows. Here the random walks and Evans–Hudson flows are gene- ralizations of classical Markov chains and Markov ...

  13. 77 FR 22530 - Safety Zone; Fireworks, Hudson River, Rhinecliff, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-16

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Fireworks, Hudson River, Rhinecliff, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of... navigable waters of the Hudson River in the vicinity of Rhinecliff, NY for a fireworks display. This... fireworks displays. This rule is intended to restrict all vessels from a portion of the Hudson River before...

  14. Babesiosis in Lower Hudson Valley, New York

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-05-12

    This podcast discusses a study about an increase in babesiosis in the Lower Hudson Valley of New York state. Dr. Julie Joseph, Assistant Professor of Medicine at New York Medical College, shares details of this study.  Created: 5/12/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 5/23/2011.

  15. Stock characteristics of Hudson River striped bass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoff, T.B.; McLaren, J.B.; Cooper, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Striped bass, because of their tremendous popularity both commercially and recreationally, were a principal focus of the Hudson River power plant case. Between 1976 and 1979, over 23,000 age-II and older striped bass were studied as one facet of an extensive research program on the spring population in the Hudson River. Samples were collected from the overwintering as well as the spawning portion of the striped bass population, and included immature as well as mature fish. At least 12 age-groups contributed to spawning each year. Of these 12, age-groups III, IV, and V usually were most abundant, but the percentage of the population represented by any single age-group varied as the result of fluctuations in year-class strength. Males first became sexually mature at age II and females at age IV. Fast-growing individuals within a year class tended to mature earlier. Fecundity increased with the size of fish, reaching an observed maximum of about 3 million eggs per female. Although significant annual variations in maturity and growth were detected for Hudson River striped bass, there was no evidence of a consistent change in either variable that might be associated with increasing power plant operations and a reduction in striped bass abundance. Age at maturity and age structure are the two life history components that differ the most between the Hudson River population and other striped bass populations. 36 refs., 7 tabs

  16. Dating sediment cores from Hudson River marshes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robideau, R.; Bopp, R.F.

    1993-01-01

    There are several methods for determining sediment accumulation rates in the Hudson River estuary. One involves the analysis of the concentration of certain radionuclides in sediment core sections. Radionuclides occur in the Hudson River as a result of: natural sources, fallout from nuclear weapons testing and low level aqueous releases from the Indian Point Nuclear Power Facility. The following radionuclides have been studied in the authors work: Cesium-137, which is derived from global fallout that started in the 1950's and has peaked in 1963. Beryllium-7, a natural radionuclide with a 53 day half-life and found associated with very recently deposited sediments. Another useful natural radionuclide is Lead-210 derived from the decay of Radon-222 in the atmosphere. Lead-210 has a half-life of 22 years and can be used to date sediments up to about 100 years old. In the Hudson River, Cobalt-60 is a marker for Indian Point Nuclear Reactor discharges. The author's research involved taking sediment core samples from four sites in the Hudson River Estuarine Research Reserve areas. These core samples were sectioned, dried, ground and analyzed for the presence of radionuclides by the method of gamma-ray spectroscopy. The strength of each current pulse is proportional to the energy level of the gamma ray absorbed. Since different radionuclides produce gamma rays of different energies, several radionuclides can be analyzed simultaneously in each of the samples. The data obtained from this research will be compared to earlier work to obtain a complete chronology of sediment deposition in these Reserve areas of the river. Core samples may then by analyzed for the presence of PCB's, heavy metals and other pollutants such as pesticides to construct a pollution history of the river

  17. A River Summer on the Hudson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenna, T. C.; Pfirman, S.; Selleck, B.; Son, L.; Land, M.; Cronin, J.

    2006-12-01

    River Summer is a month-long faculty development program extending from the continental shelf off New York City to the headwaters of the Hudson in the Adirondack Mountains. During the program, faculty from the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges and Universities teach each other about the Hudson environment, using innovative methods of teaching and learning, with a focus on incorporation of hands-on approaches from the perspective of multiple disciplines. Over four weeks, faculty from research universities, community colleges, liberal arts institutions, and middle and high schools work and live together, on board a research vessel or in a remote tent campsite, for several days at a time. Using the geology, hydrology, and landscape of the River as a foundation, River Summer focuses on understanding development of the Hudson within the context of its natural resources and cultural history. Participants conduct field sampling and analyses and consider issues through approaches that are common to many disciplines: scaling for problem solving; sampling and assessing bias and representation; observing and documenting; representing and depicting; interpretation and assessing relationships and causality; and evaluation. They also get a chance to experience, first-hand, the complexity and often open-ended nature of doing science. By allowing individuals, many of whom come from non-science disciplines, to experience these methods and processes in a safe learning environment, science is made more meaningful and accessible. The program's pedagogy is based on the principles of cognitive psychology and immersive field-, place- and inquiry-based learning. Field programs have been found to provide memorable, transformative experiences for undergraduate students, and our experience with River Summer 2005 and 2006 suggests they are equally effective with faculty. Evaluation shows that River Summer has a significant impact on its participants. Participants develop new

  18. SOLAR PANELS ON HUDSON COUNTY FACILITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BARRY, KEVIN

    2014-06-06

    This project involved the installation of an 83 kW grid-connected photovoltaic system tied into the energy management system of Hudson County's new 60,000 square foot Emergency Operations and Command Center and staff offices. Other renewable energy features of the building include a 15 kW wind turbine, geothermal heating and cooling, natural daylighting, natural ventilation, gray water plumbing system and a green roof. The County intends to seek Silver LEED certification for the facility.

  19. Let's Bet on Sediments! Hudson Canyon Cruise--Grades 9-12. Focus: Sediments of Hudson Canyon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (DOC), Rockville, MD.

    These activities are designed to teach about the sediments of Hudson Canyon. Students investigate and analyze the patterns of sedimentation in the Hudson Canyon, observe how heavier particles sink faster than finer particles, and learn that submarine landslides are avalanches of sediment in deep ocean canyons. The activity provides learning…

  20. Radionuclides at the Hudson Canyon disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schell, W.R.; Nevissi, A.E.

    1983-01-01

    A sampling and analytical program was initiated in June 1978 to measure radionuclides in water, sediments, and biota collected at the deepwater (4000 m) radioactive waste disposal site at the mouth of the Hudson Canyon 350km off New York Harbor in the western Atlantic Ocean. Plutonium, americium, cesium, strontium, and uranium series isotopes were measured in selected samples; the /sup 210/Pb data were used to give sedimentation and mixing rates in the upper sediment layers. The results showed that /sup 137/Cs, /sup 239,240/Pu, and /sup 238/Pu were found at low concentrations in the skin, viscera, and stomach contents for some of the fish collected. Significant concentrations of /sup 241/Am were found in tissues of the common rattail Coryphaenoides (Macrouridae) collected at the disposal site, suggesting a local source for this radionuclide and biological accumulation. The edible muscle of this fish contained less than 2.6 x 10/sup -5/ Bq g/sup -1/ (dry wt) of /sup 239,240/Pu. Radionuclides measured in sediment-core profiles showed that mixing occurred to depths of 16 cm and that variable sedimentation or mixing rates, or both, exist at 4000 m deep. Radionuclide deposition near the canisters was not found to be significantly higher than the expected fallout levels at 4000 m deep. At the mouth of the Hudson Canyon variable sedimentation and mixing rates were found using the natural unsupported /sup 210/Pb tracer values; these variable rates were attributed to sediment transport by the currents and to bioturbation

  1. Habitat Mapping Cruise - Hudson Canyon (HB0904, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Objectives are to: 1) perform multibeam mapping of transitional and deepwater habitats in Hudson Canyon (off New Jersey) with the National Institute of Undersea...

  2. Inmunodiagnóstico de la infección en humanos por Trypanosoma cruzi mediante ELISA utilizando sangre recolectada en papel de filtro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis C. Orozco

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Los estudios seroepidemiológicos para la detección de anticuerpos contra Trypanosoma cruzi requieren de un gran número de muestras y la obtención de sangre por punción venosa y su transporte se hacen difíciles y costosos. La recolección de sangre en papel de filtro minimiza éstas dificultades y el estudio valoró tanto éste sistema como la validez y reproducibilidad del inmunoensayo ELlSA para el inmunodiagnóstico de la infección en humanos por T cruzi Se utilizó suero y eluídos de sangre recolectada en papel de filtro de personas de zona endémica de enfermedad de Chagas para la detección de anticuerpos contra T cruzi mediante las pruebas de inmunofluorescencia indirecta (IFI y ELISA. Lavalidez del ELlSA utilizando eluídos de sangre en papel de filtro presentó un área bajo la curva de receptor operador (ROC de 0.9944. El acuerdo del ELlSA entre los dos tipos de muestra presentó una distribución cercana a la normal con un promedio de -0.01 y una desviación estándar de 0.23. Se evidenció que la reproducibilidad del IFI es inferior a la del ELISA. Esta mayor concordancia y la mayor sensibilidad y especificidad encontrada previamente para el ELISA hacen pensar en la posibilidad de presentarla como alternativa de prueba de referencia para la detección de anticuerpos contra 7: cruziy su utilización en estudios epidemiológicos.

  3. Sustainable development in the Hudson Bay/James Bay bioregion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    An overview is presented of projects planned for the James Bay/Hudson Bay region, and the expected environmental impacts of these projects. The watershed of James Bay and Hudson Bay covers well over one third of Canada, from southern Alberta to central Ontario to Baffin Island, as well as parts of north Dakota and Minnesota in the U.S.A. Hydroelectric power developments that change the timing and rate of flow of fresh water may cause changes in the nature and duration of ice cover, habitats of marine mammals, fish and migratory birds, currents into and out of Hudson Bay/James Bay, seasonal and annual loads of sediments and nutrients to marine ecosystems, and anadromous fish populations. Hydroelectric projects are proposed for the region by Quebec, Ontario and Manitoba. In January 1992, the Canadian Arctic Resources Committee (CARC), the Environmental Committee of Sanikuluaq, and the Rawson Academy of Arctic Science will launch the Hudson Bay/James Bay Bioregion Program, an independent initiative to apply an ecosystem approach to the region. Two main objectives are to provide a comprehensive assessment of the cumulative impacts of human activities on the marine and freshwater ecosystems of the Hudson Bay/James Bay bioregion, and to foster sustainable development by examining and proposing cooperative processes for decision making among governments, developers, aboriginal peoples and other stakeholders. 1 fig

  4. 75 FR 76943 - Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River South of the Troy Locks, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-10

    ...-AA11 Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River South of the Troy Locks, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... Navigation Area (RNA) on the navigable waters of the Hudson River in New York, south of the Troy Locks. This... within the waters of the Hudson River south of the Troy Locks when ice is a threat to navigation. DATES...

  5. 75 FR 8486 - Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River south of the Troy Locks, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ...-AA11 Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River south of the Troy Locks, New York AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... area on the navigable waters of the Hudson River south of the Troy Locks. This regulated navigation... Hudson River south of the Troy locks when ice conditions are 8 inches or greater unless authorized by the...

  6. 76 FR 8654 - Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River South of the Troy Locks, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ...-AA11 Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River South of the Troy Locks, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... navigable waters of the Hudson River in New York, south of the Troy Locks. This action is necessary to... Hudson River south of the Troy Locks when ice is a threat to navigation. DATES: This rule is effective in...

  7. Zirconium/niobium-95 determined in Hudson River water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linsalata, P.; Cohen, N.

    1982-01-01

    Zirconium 95 and Niobium 95 are the fission products detected in greatest abundance in Hudson River water following the atmospheric testing of a nuclear device in N.W. China in 1980. Water samples, collected continuously and on a 'grab' basis, and processed monthly, have been studied to determine 95 Zr and 95 Nb concentrations, and plotted against collection time. Total precipitation values for each month, averaged over the whole Hudson River are also plotted. Airborne concentration data were obtained from sites in Lower Manhattan and Chester, N.J. A maximum value for 95 Zr in the Hudson River was found for February 1981. Half-time removal of 95 Zr from water was also calculated. (U.K.)

  8. Hudson River cooling tower proceeding: Interface between science and law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergen, G.S.P.

    1988-01-01

    As the Hudson River power plant case proceeded, the regulatory ground shifted under the utility companies. At first, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) contended that the utilities should build expensive closed-cycle cooling towers at three plants to minimize the plants' discharge of heated effluents to the river. When the formal hearing began, however, EPA claimed that cooling towers were needed to minimize the number of organisms impinged at and entrained through the plants. The Hudson River proceeding became a policy dispute over what the appropriate standard of environmental conduct should be, instead of a determination of whether a standard had been met or not. Such policy issues, which arise when legal precedent has yet to be developed for new laws like the Clean Water Act, are better addressed by a rule-making proceeding than by the adjudicatory hearing format used in the Hudson case. A rule-making proceeding would have markedly shortened the Hudson deliberations, probably without substantive change in the final settlement, and is recommended for future cases in which ambiguity in legislation or the lack of precedent has left policy matters unresolved. 2 refs

  9. Climate change and sea ice: Shipping accessibility on the marine transportation corridor through Hudson Bay and Hudson Strait (1980–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Andrews

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Shipping traffic has been increasing in Hudson Strait and Hudson Bay and the shipping route through these waters to the Port of Churchill may soon become a federally-designated transportation corridor. A dataset on passive microwave-based sea ice concentration was used to characterize the timing of the ice on the shipping corridor to the Port between 1980 and 2014. Efforts were made to produce results in a readily accessible format for stakeholders of the shipping industry; for example, open water was defined using a sea ice concentration threshold of ≤ 15% and results are presented in terms of real dates instead of anomalies. Between 1980 and 2014, the average breakup date on the corridor was July 4, the average freeze-up date was November 25, and the average length of the open water season was 145 days. However, each of these three variables exhibited significant long-term trends and spatial variability over the 34-year time period. Regression analysis revealed significant linear trends towards earlier breakup (–0.66 days year–1, later freeze-up (+0.52 days year–1, and a longer open water season (+1.14 days year–1 along the shipping corridor between 1980 and 2014. Moreover, the section of the corridor passing through Hudson Strait displayed significantly stronger trends than the two sections in Hudson Bay (i.e., “Hudson Islands” and “Hudson Bay”. As a result, sea ice timing in the Hudson Strait section of the corridor has diverged from the timing in the Hudson Bay sections. For example, the 2010–2014 median length of the open water season was 177 days in Hudson Strait and 153 days in the Hudson Bay sections. Finally, significant linear relationships were observed amongst breakup, freeze-up, and the length of the open water season for all sections of the corridor; correlation analysis suggests that these relationships have greatest impact in Hudson Strait.

  10. Impact of impingement on the Hudson River white perch population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnthouse, L.W.; Van Winkle, W.

    1980-01-01

    The impact of power plant impingement on the 1974 and 1975 year classes of the Hudson River white perch population is assessed using a simple model derived from Ricker's theory of fisheries dynamics. The impact of impingement is expressed in the model as the conditional mortality rate, rather than as the more commonly used exploitation rate. Since the calculated impact is sensitive to errors in the estimation of population size and total mortality, ranges of probable values of these quantities are used to compute upper and lower bounds on the fractional reduction in abundance of each year class. Best estimates of abundance and mortality are used to compute the conditional impingement mortality rate separately for each plant and month. The results are used to assess the relative impacts of white perch impingement at six Hudson River power plants and to identify the seasons during which the impact is highest

  11. Hudson River settlement agreement: Technical rationale and cost considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnthouse, L.W.; Boreman, J.; Englert, T.L.; Kirk, W.L.; Horn, E.G.

    1988-01-01

    In an effort to end litigation over open-cycle cooling at Hudson River power plants, out-of-court negotiations began in August 1979. On December 19, 1980, an agreement that was acceptable to all parties was reached. As an alternative to building cooling towers at the Indian Point, Bowline Point, and Roseton generating stations, the utilities agreed to a variety of technical and operational changes intended to reduce entrainment and impingement. In addition, they agreed to supplement the production of striped bass in the Hudson River estuary by means of a hatchery, to conduct a biological monitoring program, and to fund an independent research foundation for study of Hudson River environmental problems. Although the settlement costs were substantial, they were much smaller than the estimated costs of constructing and operating cooling towers. The settlement was expected to provide 15-43% of the impact reduction that might have been obtained with cooling at approximately 10% of the cost. 20 refs., 3 tabs

  12. 78 FR 20169 - Notice of Availability of an Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Hudson Yards Concrete...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-03

    ... Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Hudson Yards Concrete Casing Project in New York, New York AGENCY... of Availability of Environmental Assessment for the Hudson Yards Concrete Casing Construction... the construction of an underground concrete casing to preserve a right-of- way (ROW) (the proposed...

  13. 75 FR 38714 - Safety Zone; Macy's Fourth of July Fireworks Display, Hudson River, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-06

    ... is scheduled to occur on the waters of the Hudson River. This temporary safety zone is necessary to... public notification. Although the temporary safety zone will apply to the entire width of the river... establishment of a temporary safety zone on a portion of the Hudson River during the launching of fireworks. An...

  14. Comments on James D. Brown and Thom Hudson's "The Alternatives in Language Assessment."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruton, Anthony; Brown, James Dean; Hudson, Thom

    1999-01-01

    Anthony Bruton comments on Brown and Hudson's article "The Alternatives in Language Assessment," (v32 n4 Win 1998). Raises questions about some of their definitions and categories and suggests additional items that need to be considered by test takers. Brown and Hudson reply with clarifications of terms and definition of the scope of their paper.…

  15. 33 CFR 165.162 - Safety Zone: New York Super Boat Race, Hudson River, New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety Zone: New York Super Boat Race, Hudson River, New York. 165.162 Section 165.162 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.162 Safety Zone: New York Super Boat Race, Hudson River, New York. (a) Regulated area. The...

  16. 77 FR 41271 - Safety Zone; Newburgh to Beacon Swim, Newburgh, Hudson River, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-13

    ... 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Newburgh to Beacon Swim, Newburgh, Hudson River, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... navigable waters of the Hudson River, NY in the vicinity of Newburgh, NY for the annual Newburgh Beacon Swim... Beacon Swim is an annual recurring event that has a permanent safety zone found at 33 CFR 165.160. The...

  17. The Hudson River Plume: Exploring Human Impact on the Coastal Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Janice; Duncan, Ravit; Lichtenwalner, C. Sage; Dunbar, Laura

    2010-01-01

    The Hudson River Watershed contains a variety of geologic, topographic, climatic, and hydrologic features and a diversity of land-use patterns--making it an ideal model for studying human impact on the coastal environment. In this article, the authors present the Hudson River Plume (HRP), a problem-based online module that explores nonpoint-source…

  18. 33 CFR 207.50 - Hudson River Lock at Troy, N.Y.; navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hudson River Lock at Troy, N.Y..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.50 Hudson River Lock at Troy, N.Y.; navigation. (a...) [Reserved] (n) Trespass on U.S. property. Trespass on U.S. property, or willful injury to the banks, masonry...

  19. 78 FR 31454 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Hudson River, Troy and Green Island, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    ...-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Hudson River, Troy and Green Island, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... that governs the highway bridge (Troy Green Island) across the Hudson River, mile 152.7, between Troy... the regulations for the 112th Street Bridge, mile 155.4, between Troy and Cohoes which has been...

  20. 78 FR 56607 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Hudson River, Troy and Green Island, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-13

    ...-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Hudson River, Troy and Green Island, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... operation of the highway bridge across the Hudson River, mile 152.7, between Troy and Green Island, New York... Street Bridge, mile 155.4, between Troy and Cohoes which has been converted to a fixed bridge. It is...

  1. Transport of fallout and reactor radionuclides in the drainage basin of the Hudson River estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, H.J.; Linsalata, P.; Olsen, C.R.

    1982-01-01

    The transport and fate of Strontium 90, Cesium 137 and Plutonium 239, 240 in the Hudson River Estuary is discussed. Rates of radionuclide deposition and accumulation over time and space are calculated for the Hudson River watershed, estuary, and continental shelf offshore. 37 references, 7 figures, 15 tables

  2. Primula latifolia Lapeyr. and Primula vulgaris Hudson flavonoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Paola S; Flamini, Guido; Fico, Gelsomina

    2014-01-01

    Three flavonoids were isolated from the leaf MeOH extracts of Primula latifolia Lapeyr. and Primula vulgaris Hudson collected from Italian Alps: rutin (1) and kaempferol 3-neohesperidoside (2) from P. latifolia, and kaempferol 3-β-O-glucopyranosyl-(1 → 2) gentiobioside (3) from P. vulgaris. The structures were assigned on the basis of their (1)H and (13)C NMR data, including those derived from 2D NMR, as well as on HPLC-MS results. This article is the first to report on P. vulgaris tissue flavonoids after Harborne's study in 1968 and the first work ever on these compounds from P. latifolia.

  3. Benthic bacterial biomass and production in the Hudson River estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austin, H.K.; Findlay, S.E.G.

    1989-01-01

    Bacterial biomass, production, and turnover were determined for two freshwater march sites and a site in the main river channel along the tidally influenced Hudson River. The incorporation of [methyl- 3 H]thymidine into DNA was used to estimate the growth rate of surface and anaerobic bacteria. Bacterial production at marsh sites was similar to, and in some cases considerably higher than, production estimates reported for other aquatic wetland and marine sediment habitats. Production averaged 1.8-2.8 mg C·m -2 · hour -1 in marsh sediments. Anaerobic bacteria in marsh sediment incorporated significant amounts of [methyl- 3 H]thymidine into DNA. Despite differences in dominant vegatation and tidal regime, bacterial biomass was similar (1 x 10 3 ± 0.08 mg C·m -2 ) in Trapa, Typha, and Nuphar aquatic macrophyte communities. Bacterial abundance and productivity were lower in sandy sediments associated with Scirpus communities along the Hudson River (0.2 x 10 3 ± 0.05 mg C·m -2 and 0.3 ± 0.23 mg C · m -2 · hour -1 , respectively)

  4. On Measurements of the Tide at Churchill, Hudson Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    Since the late 1990s the semi-diurnal tide at Churchill, on the western shore of Hudson Bay, has been decreasing in amplitude, with M(sub 2) amplitudes falling from approximately 154 cm in 1998 to 146 cm in 2012 and 142 cm in 2014. There has been a corresponding small increase in phase lag. Mean low water, decreasing throughout most of the twentieth century, has levelled off. Although the tidal changes could reflect merely a malfunctioning tide gauge, the fact that there are no other measurements in the region and the possibility that the tide is revealing important environmental changes calls for serious investigation. Satellite altimeter measurements of the tide in Hudson Bay are complicated by the seasonal ice cover; at most locations less than 40% of satellite passes return valid ocean heights and even those can be impacted by errors from sea ice. Because the combined TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-1, and Jason-2 time series is more than 23 years long, it is now possible to obtain sufficient data at crossover locations near Churchill to search for tidal changes. The satellites sense no changes in M(sub 2) that are comparable to the changes seen at the Churchill gauge. The changes appear to be localized to the harbour, or to the Churchill River, or to the gauge itself.

  5. Natural radiation dose to Gammarus from Hudson river

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschoa, A.S.; Wrenn, M.E.; Eisenbud, M.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate the natural radiation dose rate to whole body and components of the Gammarus species, a zooplankton which occurs in the Hudson River among other places, and to compare the results with the upper limits of dose rates from man-made sources. The alpha dose rates to the exoskeleton and soft tissues are about 10 times the average alpha dose rate to the whole body, assuming uniform distribution of 226 Ra. The natural alpha radiation dose rate to Gammarus represents only about 5% of the total natural dose to the organism, i.e., 492 mrad/yr. The external dose rate due to 40 K, 238 U plus daughters and 232 Th plus daughters accumulated in the sediments comprise 91% of that total natural dose rate, the remaining percentage being due to natural internal beta emitters and cosmic radiation. Man-made sources can cause an external dose rate up to 224 mrad/yr, which comprises roughly 1/3 of the total dose rate (up to 716 mrad/yr; natural plus man-made) to the Gammarus of Hudson River in front of Indian Point Nuclear Power Station. However, in terms of dose-equivalent the natural sources of radiation would contribute more than 75% of the total dose to Gammarus

  6. Historical development of entrainment models for Hudson River striped bass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, S.W.; Englert, T.L.

    1988-01-01

    In the mid-1960s, concerns surfaced regarding entrainment and impingement of young-of-the-year (age-0) striped bass by electric power generating facilities on the Hudson River. These concerns stimulated the development of increasingly complex models to evaluate the impacts of these facilities. The earliest simplistic formulas, based on empirical data, proved inadequate because of conceptual shortcomings, incomplete development, and lack of data. By 1972, complex transport models based on biological and hydrodynamic principles had been developed and applied by scientists representing both the utilities and the government. Disagreements about the acceptability of these models spurred the development of even more complex models. The entrainment models stimulated the collection of substantial amounts of field data to define the spatial distributions and entrainment survival of early life stages. As the difficulties of accounting for the movement of early life stages from hydrodynamic principles became more evident and as more field data became available, simpler empirical modeling approaches became both practical and defensible. Both empirical and hydrodynamic modeling approaches were applied during the US Environmental Protection Agency's hearings on the Hudson River power case (1977-1980). The main lessons learned from the experience with entrainment-impingement modeling are that complex mechanistic models are not necessarily better than simpler empirical models for young fish, and that care must be taken to construct even the simple models correctly. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  7. Riverine organic matter composition and fluxes to Hudson Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzyk, Z. Z. A.; Macdonald, R. W.; Goni, M. A.; Godin, P.; Stern, G. A.

    2016-12-01

    With warming in northern regions, many changes including permafrost degradation, vegetation alteration, and wildfire incidence will impact the carbon cycle. Organic carbon (OC) carried by river runoff to northern oceans has the potential to provide integrated evidence of these impacts. Here, concentrations of dissolved (DOC) and particulate (POC) OC are used to estimate terrestrial OC transport in 17 major rivers draining varied vegetative and permafrost conditions into Hudson Bay and compositional data (lignin and 14C) to infer OC sources. Hudson Bay lies just south of the Arctic Circle in Canada and is surrounded by a large drainage basin (3.9 × 106 km2) dominated by permafrost. Analysis of POC and DOC in the 17 rivers indicates that DOC dominates the total OC load. The southern rivers dominate. The Nelson and Churchill Rivers to the southwest are particularly important suppliers of OC partly because of large drainage basins but also perhaps because of impacts by hydroelectric development, as suggested by a 14C age of DOC in the Churchill River of 2800 years. Higher DOC and POC concentrations in the southern rivers, which have substantive areas only partially covered by permafrost, compared to northern rivers draining areas with complete permafrost cover, implies that warming - and hence permafrost thawing - will lead to progressively higher DOC and POC loads for these rivers. Lignin composition in the organic matter (S/V and C/V ratios) reveals mixed sources of OC consistent with the dominant vegetation in the river basins. This vegetation is organized by latitude with southern regions below the tree line enriched by woody gymnosperm sources (boreal forest) and northern regions enriched with organic matter from non-woody angiosperms (flowering shrubs, tundra). Acid/Aldehyde composition together with Δ14C data for selected DOC samples suggest that most of the lignin has undergone oxidative degradation, particularly the DOC component. However, high Δ14C ages

  8. Hudson River Sub_Bottom Profile Data - Raw SEG-Y Files (*.sgy)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hudson River Estuary Shallow Water Surveys. Subbottom data was collected November 5 to December 15, 2009, in the estuary north from Saugerties to Troy. Data...

  9. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Hudson River, maps and geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0014791)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for the Hudson River from 1942 to 2005. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and...

  10. Cumulative impacts of hydroelectric development on the fresh water balance in Hudson Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anctil, F.; Couture, R.

    1994-01-01

    A study is presented of the impacts of hydroelectric development on the surface water layer of Hudson Bay, including James Bay and the Foxe Basin. These impacts are directly related to the modifications in the fresh water balance of Hudson Bay and originate from the management of hydroelectric complexes. The fresh water balance is determined by identifying, at different scales, the modifications caused by each complex. The main inputs are the freezing and thawing of the ice cover, runoff water, and mass exchange at the air-water interface. Three spatial scales were used to obtain the resolution required to document the cumulative effects of fresh water balance modifications on the water surface layer, one each for Hudson Bay, Hudson Strait, and the Labrador Sea. Finally, the addition of the proposed Great Whale hydroelectric complex is examined from the available information and forecasts. 18 refs,. 6 figs., 1 tab

  11. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, anadromous, and freshwater fish species in the Hudson River. Vector polygons in this...

  12. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: REPTILES (Reptile Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for estuarine reptiles (turtles, terrapins) and amphibians (salamanders, frogs) for the Hudson River....

  13. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: INVERT (Invertebrate Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine and estuarine invertebrate species for the Hudson River. Vector polygons in this data set...

  14. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: STAGING (Staging Site Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains human-use resource data for staging sites along the Hudson River. Vector points in this data set represent locations of possible staging areas...

  15. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: MGT (Management Area Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive human-use data for regional and state parks, historic sites, marine sanctuaries, and other managed areas for the Hudson River....

  16. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: RVRMILES (River Mile Marker Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains human-use resource data for river miles along the Hudson River. Vector lines in this data set represent river mile markers. This data set...

  17. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: SENSITIV (Sensitive Area Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains human-use resource data for sensitive areas along the Hudson River. Vector points in this data set represent sensitive areas. This data set...

  18. 2012 FEMA Topographic Lidar: Hudson-Hoosic and Deerfield Watersheds, Massachusetts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) dataset is a survey of the Hudson-Hoosic and Deerfield project area. The entire survey area for Massachusetts is...

  19. Salt Marsh Formation in the Lower Hudson River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merley, Michael; Peteet, Dorothy; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Salt marshes are constant depositional environments and as a result contain accurate indicators of past relative sea level rise and salinity. The Hudson River marshes are at least twice as deep when compared to coastal marshes on either side of the mouth of the Hudson. The reason for this difference in sedimentation is unclear. This study uses macrofossil data as well as sediment stratigraphy in order to understand the formation and evolution of these marshes. The composition of seeds, roots, shoots and foraminifera, are used to indicate past sea levels. The four sites involved in this study are, from south to north, the Arthur Kill Marsh in Staten Island (40 36 N, 74 77W), Piermont marsh (N 4100; 73 55W) Croton Point (41 14 N; 73 50W) and Iona Island (41 18N, 73 58W). These are all tidally influenced but with increasing distances from the New York Bight, which gives a good spectrum of tidal influence. AMS-C14 dates on basal macrofossils will document the time of each marsh formation. Basal material from Arthur Kill (8 m) includes freshwater seeds such as Viola, Potomageton and Alnus along with Salix buds. Basal material from Croton Point (10 m) includes fibrous woody material, foraminifera and Zanichellia seeds and other brackish vegetational components. The basal material from Piermont (13.77 m) is lacking any identifiable macrofossils between 150 and 500 microns. The basal material from Iona Island (10 m) has vegetation such as Scirpus and Cyperus seeds, probably implying a brackish environment. The freshwater origin of the Arthur Kill marsh in Staten Island is significant because it predates either sea level rise or the western channel incision. Additional implications for this study include evidence for changes in river channel geomorphology. Reasons for the relatively deeper river marshes include possible basal clay compaction, high production due to river and marine nutrients as well as tectonic activity. This study provides the groundwork for more high

  20. Mercury and cortisol in Western Hudson Bay polar bear hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechshoft, T; Derocher, A E; Richardson, E; Mislan, P; Lunn, N J; Sonne, C; Dietz, R; Janz, D M; St Louis, V L

    2015-08-01

    Non-invasive methods of assessing animal health and life history are becoming increasingly popular in wildlife research; hair samples from polar bears (Ursus maritimus), are being used to study an ever broader range of anthropogenic and endocrine compounds. A number of contaminants are known to disrupt endocrine function in polar bears. However, the relationship between mercury and cortisol remains unknown, although mercury is an endocrine disruptor in other species. Here, we examine the relationship between concentrations of cortisol and total mercury (THg) analyzed in guard hair from 378 polar bears (184 females, 194 males) sampled in Western Hudson Bay, 2004-2012. The difference in mean cortisol concentration between female (0.8 ± 0.6 pg/mg) and male (0.7 ± 0.5 pg/mg) polar bears bordered on significance (p = 0.054). However, mean mercury concentration was significantly greater (p = 0.009) in females (4.7 ± 1.4 μg/g) than males (4.3 ± 1.2 μg/g). Hair cortisol in males was significantly influenced by mercury, age, and fatness, as well as interactions between mercury and year, mercury and fatness, and year and fatness (all: p polar bears.

  1. Technical descriptions of Hudson River electricity generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchison, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    Six fossil-fueled and one nuclear electricity generating plants are sited along the Hudson River estuary between kilometers 8 and 228, measured from the river mouth. Their aggregate rated capacity is 5,798 MW of electricity; operating at that capacity they would withdraw cooling water from the river at the rate of 1.5 x 10 to the 9th power cu m/d and reject heat at the rate of 155 x 10 to the 9th power kcal/d. Three of these plants, the fossil-fueled Roseton and Bowline and the nuclear Indian Point facilities; account for 75% of total rated capacity, 62% of maximum water withdrawal, and 79% of potential heat rejection. These three plants and a proposed pumped-storage facility at Cornwall, all sited between km 60 and 106, were the focus of environmental litigation. The Indian Point plant normally operates at 100% generation capacity; the other plants may experience daily operating load changes that vary from approximately 50% to 100% of total generation capacity, depending on system electrical demand or economic considerations. All plants experience periodic unscheduled outages for repairs. 6 refs., 7 figs

  2. The Bible and mission in faith perspective: J.Hudson Taylor and the early China Inland Mission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wigram, C.E.M.

    2007-01-01

    The thesis 'The Bible and Mission in Faith Perspective: J.Hudson Taylor and the Early China Inland Mission' by Christopher E.M. Wigram analysis the hermeneutical assumptions that underlay Hudson Taylor's approach to biblical interpretation, and the significance of his approach for the mission which

  3. Analysis of impingement impacts on Hudson River fish populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnthouse, L.W.; van Winkle, W.

    1988-01-01

    Impacts of impingement, expressed as reductions in year-class abundance, were calculated for six Hudson River fish populations. Estimates were made for the 1974 and 1975 year classes of white perch, striped bass, Atlantic tomcod, and American shad, and the 1974 year classes of alewife and blueback herring. The maximum estimated reductions in year-class abundance were less than 5% for all year classes except the 1974 and 1975 white perch year classes and the 1974 striped bass year class. Only for white perch were the estimates greater than 10% per year. For striped bass, the 146,000 fish from the 1974 year class that were killed by impingement could have produced 12,000-16,000 5-year-old fish or 270-300 10-year-olds. Also estimated were the reductions in mortality that could have been achieved had closed-cycle cooling systems been installed at one or more of three power plants (Bowline point, Indian Point, and Roseton) and had the screen-wash systems at Bowline Point and Indian Point been modified to improve the survival of impinged fish. Closed-cycle cooling at all three plants would have reduced impingement impacts on white perch, striped bass, and Atlantic tomcod by 75% or more; installation of closed-cycle cooling at Indian Point alone would have reduced impingement impacts on white perch and Atlantic tomcod by 50%-80%. Modified traveling screens would have been less effective than closed-cycle cooling, but still would have reduced impingement impacts on white perch by roughly 20%. 23 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  4. Transport of fallout and reactor radionuclides in the drainage basin of the Hudson River estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, H.J.; Linsalata, P.; Olsen, C.R.; Cohen, N.; Trier, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    Fallout plutonium and radiocesium derived from both weapons testing and local reactor releases are found in the water column and sediments of the Hudson River in readily measurable amounts. The history of fallout delivery and dissolved phase runoff from the drainage basin of 80 Sr, 137 Cs, and /sup 239,240/Pu have been extensively documented since the mid-1950s. Sediment and water column concentrations of 134 Cs, 137 Cs, and /sup 239,240/Pu in the Hudson have also been documented since the mid-1960's and are summarized. Since the peak fallout years, substantial portions of the fallout radionuclides in the drainage basin have become unavailable to normal weathering processes as reflected by a measured decrease in the fallout nuclide transport to the waters of the tidal Hudson. Budget calculations indicate that plutonium may be transported into the estuary from the coastal ocean, and that desorption of radiocesium from particles has allowed a substantial fraction of radiocesium to be exported from the Hudson to marine waters. 29 references, 6 figures, 8 tables

  5. Radiogenic Lead Isotopes and Time Stratigraphy in the Hudson River, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chillrud, Steven N.; Bopp, Richard F.; Ross, James M.; Chaky, Damon A.; Hemming, Sidney; Shuster, Edward L.; Simpson, H. James; Estabrooks, Frank

    2004-01-01

    Radionuclide, radiogenic lead isotope and trace metal analyses on fine-grained sediment cores collected along 160 km of the upper and tidal Hudson River were used to examine temporal trends of contaminant loadings and to develop radiogenic lead isotopes both as a stratigraphic tool and as tracers for resolving decadal particle transport fluxes. Very large inputs of Cd, Sb, Pb, and Cr are evident in the sediment record, potentially from a single manufacturing facility. The total range in radiogenic lead isotope ratios observed in well-dated cores collected about 24 km downstream of the plant is large (e.g., maximum difference in 206 Pb/ 207 Pb is 10%), characterized by four major shifts occurring in the 1950s, 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. The upper Hudson signals in Cd and radiogenic lead isotopes were still evident in sediments collected 160 km downstream in the tidal Hudson. The large magnitude and abrupt shifts in radiogenic lead isotope ratios as a function of depth provide sensitive temporal constraints that complement information derived from radionuclide analyses to significantly improve the precision of dating assignments. Application of a simple dilution model to data from paired cores suggests much larger sediment inputs in one section of the river than previously reported, suggesting particle influxes to the Hudson have been underestimated

  6. Science, law, and Hudson River power plants: A case study in environmental impact assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnthouse, L.W.; Klauda, R.J.; Vaughan, D.S.; Kendall, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Between 1963 and 1980, the Hudson River estuary was the focus of one of the most ambitious environmental research and assessment programs ever performed. The studies supported a series of US federal proceedings involving licenses and discharge permits for two controversial electric power generating facilities: the Cornwall pumped storage facility, and units 2 and 3 of the Indian Point nuclear generating station. Both facilities were to draw large volumes of water from a region of the Hudson used as spawning and nursery habitat by several fish species, including the striped bass. Fishermen and conservationists feared that a major fraction of the striped bass eggs and larvae in the Hudson would be entrained with the pumped water and killed. Additional fish would be killed on trash screens at the intakes. Scientists were asked to aid the utility companies and regulatory agencies in determining the biological importance of entrainment and impingement. This monograph contains both technical papers that present research results and synthesis papers that summarize and interpret the results. The intent was to: (1) summarize the scientific issues and approaches; (2) present the significant results of the Hudson River biological studies; (3) describe the role of the studies in the decision-making process; (4) evaluate the successes and failures of the studies; and (5) present recommendations for future estuarine impact assessments. Separate abstracts are processed for 22 papers for inclusion in the appropriate data bases

  7. Demography and population status of polar bears in western Hudson Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, Nicholas J.; Regher, Eric V; Servanty, Sabrina; Converse, Sarah J.; Richardson, Evan S.; Stirling, Ian

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the demography and population status of the Western Hudson Bay (WH) polar bear subpopulation for the period 1984-2011, using live-recapture data from research studies and management actions, and dead-recovery data from polar bears harvested for subsistence purposes or removed during human-bear conflicts.

  8. 33 CFR 207.60 - Federal Dam, Hudson River, Troy, N.Y.; pool level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Federal Dam, Hudson River, Troy, N.Y.; pool level. 207.60 Section 207.60 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS..., N.Y.; pool level. (a) Whenever the elevation of the pool created by the Federal dam at Troy, N.Y...

  9. 75 FR 39839 - Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River and Port of NY/NJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-13

    ... navigation area (RNA) from Port Coeymans, New York on the Hudson River to Jersey City, New Jersey on Upper... replacement span. DATES: This rule is effective from July 13, 2010 through October 31, 2010. The RNA will be... time and place announced by a later notice in the Federal Register. [[Page 39840

  10. Using destination image to predict visitors' intention to revisit three Hudson River Valley, New York, communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudy M. Schuster; Laura Sullivan; Duarte Morais; Diane Kuehn

    2009-01-01

    This analysis explores the differences in Affective and Cognitive Destination Image among three Hudson River Valley (New York) tourism communities. Multiple regressions were used with six dimensions of visitors' images to predict future intention to revisit. Two of the three regression models were significant. The only significantly contributing independent...

  11. Low Latitude Pelagic Foraminifera Found in the Hudson River: Are They Hurricane Deposits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, K. M.; Abbott, D. H.; Hoenisch, B.; Breger, D.

    2011-12-01

    River sediment cores provide a record of past environmental changes through stacked layers of sediments. In core CD02-29A, recovered from the southern Hudson River, a significant number of tropical planktic foraminifer tests were found. Foraminifera were concentrated in sediment layers of low impedance, suggesting high carbonate content. Because modern planktic foraminifera are exclusively marine, their presence in Hudson sediments in the core was remarkable. We can think of only two mechanisms that could explain this observation: either living specimens are carried upriver with the daily tides, or storm surges carry large amounts of seawater and re-suspended marine sediment upriver. To test for the presence of living specimens in Hudson River water, plankton tow samples were collected during high tide at the Hudson Battery south of the sample site, and at Piermont Pier north of the sample site and no living foraminifera were found. In addition, oxygen isotope (δ18O) analyses reveal a marine composition but the large difference in δ18O between the two surface dwelling species Globigerinoides ruber (pink) and Globigerinoides sacculifer, picked from the same sediment layer, suggests re-suspension and mixing of marine sediment deposits. Because only planktic, tropical to subtropical foraminiferal assemblages were found, the Hudson River deposits differ from previously recorded storm deposits found on Long Island and in New Jersey. In particular, the foraminiferal assemblages contain up to 40% G. ruber (pink), suggesting a highly tropical signal from a location where abundances of G. ruber are very low. This data, in addition to the pulsed occurrence of tests in the sediment suggests that the introduction of planktic foraminifera into the Hudson River must be driven by rare events. We suggest that storm surges from rare high-intensity hurricanes most likely explain the presence of these tests in Hudson River sediments, possibly assisted by the Gulf Stream entraining

  12. Evidence of Spatially Extensive Resistance to PCBs in an Anadromous Fish of the Hudson River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhanpeng; Courtenay, Simon; Chambers, R. Christopher; Wirgin, Isaac

    2006-01-01

    Populations of organisms that are chronically exposed to high levels of chemical contaminants may not suffer the same sublethal or lethal effects as naive populations, a phenomenon called resistance. Atlantic tomcod (Microgadus tomcod) from the Hudson River, New York, are exposed to high concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and bioaccumulate polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs). They have developed resistance to PCBs and PCDDs but not to PAHs. Resistance is largely heritable and manifests at early-life-stage toxic end points and in inducibility of cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) mRNA expression. Because CYP1A induction is activated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) pathway, as are most toxic responses to these compounds, we sought to determine the geographic extent of resistance to CYP1A mRNA induction by PCBs in the Hudson River tomcod population. Samples of young-of-the-year tomcod were collected from seven locales in the Hudson River, extending from the Battery at river mile 1 (RM 1) to RM 90, and from the Miramichi River, New Brunswick, Canada. Laboratory-reared offspring of tomcod adults from Newark Bay, in the western portion of the Hudson River estuary, were also used in this study. Fish were partially depurated in clean water and intraperitoneally injected with 10 ppm coplanar PCB-77, 10 ppm benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), or corn oil vehicle, and levels of CYP1A mRNA were determined. CYP1A was significantly inducible by treatment with BaP in tomcod from the Miramichi River, from laboratory-spawned offspring of Newark Bay origin, and from all Hudson River sites spanning 90 miles of river. In contrast, only tomcod from the Miramichi River displayed significantly induced CYP1A mRNA expression when treated with PCB-77. Our results suggest that the population of tomcod from throughout the Hudson River estuary has developed resistance to CYP1A inducibility and probably

  13. Methods to assess impacts on Hudson River white perch: report for the period October 1, 1978 to September 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnthouse, L.W.; Kirk, B.L.; Kumar, K.D.; Van Winkle, W.; Vaughan, D.S.

    1980-06-01

    This report is a brief description of the work done on the NRC project entitled 'Methods to Assess Impacts on Hudson River White Perch' October 1, 1978 to September 30, 1979. Accounts of special studies of white perch entrainment at Hudson River power plants, of density-dependent growth in the Hudson River white perch population, and of data on the white perch populations of the Delaware and Chesapeake systems were performed. Complete accounts of these special studies are included in this report. During this period, a final draft topical report entitled 'Evaluation of Impingement Losses of White Perch at the Indian Point Nuclear Station and Other Hudson River Power Plants' (NUREG/CR-1100) was completed

  14. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: M_MAMMAL (Marine Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine mammals (seals) in the Hudson River. Vector polygons in this data set represent marine mammal...

  15. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: ESI (Environmental Sensitivity Index Shoreline Types - Lines and Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines and polygons representing the shoreline and coastal habitats for the Hudson River, classified according to the Environmental...

  16. National Status and Trends: Bioeffects Program - Magnitude and Extent of Sediment Toxicity in the Hudson-Raritan Estuary

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A survey of the toxicity of sediments was performed by NOAA's National Status and Trends (NSandT) Program throughout the Hudson-Raritan Estuary. The objectives of...

  17. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: T_MAMMAL (Terrestrial Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for small terrestrial mammals (woodrats, myotis, muskrat, mink) for the Hudson River. Vector polygons in...

  18. 239 240Pu and 238Pu in sediments of the Hudson River estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linsalata, P.; Wrenn, M.E.; Cohen, N.; Singh, N.P.

    1980-01-01

    Plutonium-239,240 and plutonium-238 were determined in 59 Hudson River sediment dredge samples collected during 1973-77 in the vicinity of the Indian Point Nuclear Power Station. Acid leaching followed by solvent extraction, electrodeposition, and alpha-spectrometry were used to extract, purify, and quantitate plutonium isotopes present in these samples. Annual median plutonium-238/plutonium-239,240 isotopic activity ratios in surficial sediments were 0.032 (1973-74), 0.035 (1975), 0.042 (1976), and 0.040 (1977). The source of these nuclides in the estuary was identified by analysis of the sample isotopic activity ratios. On the basis of the sampling regimen and the methods used, it is concluded that no input, other than that of fallout, has contributed significantly to the plutonium burden in Hudson sediments

  19. The partitioning of Triclosan between aqueous and particulate bound phases in the Hudson River Estuary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Brittan [University of Massachusetts, Department of Environment, Earth and Ocean Sciences, 100 Morrissey Blvd., Boston, MA 02125 (United States); Chen, Robert F. [University of Massachusetts, Department of Environment, Earth and Ocean Sciences, 100 Morrissey Blvd., Boston, MA 02125 (United States); Cantwell, Mark [NHEERL, Atlantic Ecology Division, US Environmental Protection Agency, 27 Tarzwell Drive, Narragansett, RI 02882 (United States); Gontz, Allen; Jun, Zhu; Olsen, Curtis R. [University of Massachusetts, Department of Environment, Earth and Ocean Sciences, 100 Morrissey Blvd., Boston, MA 02125 (United States)

    2009-07-01

    The distribution of Triclosan within the Hudson River Estuary can be explained by a balance among the overall effluent inputs from municipal sewage treatment facilities, dilution of Triclosan concentrations in the water column with freshwater and seawater inputs, removal of Triclosan from the water column by adsorption to particles, and loss to photodegradation. This study shows that an average water column concentration of 3 {+-} 2 ng/l (in the lower Hudson River Estuary) is consistent with an estimate for dilution of average wastewater concentrations with seawater and calculated rates of adsorption of Triclosan to particles. An average Triclosan sediment concentration of 26 {+-} 11 ng/g would be in equilibrium with the overlying water column if Triclosan has a particle-to-water partitioning coefficient of k{sub d} {approx} 10{sup 4}, consistent with laboratory estimates.

  20. The partitioning of Triclosan between aqueous and particulate bound phases in the Hudson River Estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Brittan; Chen, Robert F.; Cantwell, Mark; Gontz, Allen; Zhu Jun; Olsen, Curtis R.

    2009-01-01

    The distribution of Triclosan within the Hudson River Estuary can be explained by a balance among the overall effluent inputs from municipal sewage treatment facilities, dilution of Triclosan concentrations in the water column with freshwater and seawater inputs, removal of Triclosan from the water column by adsorption to particles, and loss to photodegradation. This study shows that an average water column concentration of 3 ± 2 ng/l (in the lower Hudson River Estuary) is consistent with an estimate for dilution of average wastewater concentrations with seawater and calculated rates of adsorption of Triclosan to particles. An average Triclosan sediment concentration of 26 ± 11 ng/g would be in equilibrium with the overlying water column if Triclosan has a particle-to-water partitioning coefficient of k d ∼ 10 4 , consistent with laboratory estimates.

  1. Influence of Aroclor 1242 Concentration on Polychlorinated Biphenyl Biotransformations in Hudson River Test Tube Microcosms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, K. M.

    1996-01-01

    When 93.3 to 933 (mu)mol of Aroclor 1242 per kg was added to Hudson River sediment test tube microcosms, the rates of polychlorinated biphenyl biotransformations increased with increasing Aroclor 1242 concentration after a 4- to 8-week acclimation period. In contrast, when 37.3 (mu)mol of Aroclor 1242 per kg was added, polychlorinated biphenyl biotransformations occurred at slow constant rates. PMID:16535387

  2. Ecological investigation of Hudson River macrozooplankton in the vicinity of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginn, T.C.

    1977-01-01

    Studies were conducted on selected Hudson River macrozooplankton species to determine temporal and spatial distributions and responses to power plant operation. Distinguishing morphological and habitat characteristics were determined for the three gammarid amphipods (Gammarus daiberi, G. tigrinus, and G. fasciatus) occurring in the Hudson River. The oedicerotid amphipod Monoculodes edwardsi and the mysid Neomysis americana, in addition to the gammarid amphipods, displayed characteristic diel and seasonal abundances which affect their potential availability for power plant entrainment. The selected macrozooplankton species were utilized in temperature and chlorine bioassays in order to predict responses to cooling water entrainment. Although amphipods (Gammarus spp. and M. edwardsi) survived typical Indian Point cooling water temperatures, N. americana had high mortalities during a 30-minute, 8.3 0 C ΔT at 25 0 C ambient temperature. The bioassay results were substantiated by generally high survivals of entrained amphipods at the Indian Point plant. Neomysis americana were more heat sensitive, as indicated in bioassays, with average entrainment mortalities ranging from 30 to 60 percent during the summer. All species examined had higher immediate and latent mortalities during plant condenser chlorination. The ability of Gammarus to survive condenser passage and exposure to the Indian Point thermal discharge plume indicates that power plant operation on the lower Hudson River Estuary has no adverse impact on local gammarid amphipod populations. Entrained N. americana experience considerable mortalities; however, the impact on Atlantic Coast populations is minimized by the limited exposure of the population fringe to the Indian Point power plant

  3. Seasonal air-water exchange fluxes of polychlorinated biphenyls in the Hudson River Estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Shu; Rodenburg, Lisa A.; Dachs, Jordi; Eisenreich, Steven J.

    2008-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were measured in the air and water over the Hudson River Estuary during six intensive field campaigns from December 1999 to April 2001. Over-water gas-phase ΣPCB concentrations averaged 1100 pg/m 3 and varied with temperature. Dissolved-phase ΣPCB concentrations averaged 1100 pg/L and displayed no seasonal trend. Uncertainty analysis of the results suggests that PCBs with 5 or fewer chlorines exhibited net volatilization. The direction of net air/water exchange could not be determined for PCBs with 6 or more chlorines. Instantaneous net fluxes of ΣPCBs ranged from +0.2 to +630 ng m -2 d -1 . Annual fluxes of ΣPCBs were predicted from modeled gas-phase concentrations, measured dissolved-phase concentrations, daily surface water temperatures and wind speeds. The net volatilization flux was +62 μg m -2 yr -1 , corresponding to an annual loss of +28 kg/yr of ΣPCBs from the Hudson River Estuary for the year of 2000. - Investigation of the air-water exchange of PCBs in the Hudson River Estuary suggests that PCBs with 5 or fewer chlorines undergo net volatilization

  4. Sources of heavy metals in sediments of the Hudson River Estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, S.C.; Simpson, H.J.; Olsen, C.R.; Bopp, R.F.

    1978-01-01

    Sediments in the Hudson Estuary contain zinc, copper and lead from metal pollutants discharged to the harbor in the New York City area, from dispersed sources of contamination introduced upstream, and from natural weathering processes. The magnitude of the contribution from each of these three sources to particular sites can be estimated on the basis of total metal abundances, relative proportions of several metals, and other sediment properties. The pattern of recent heavy-metal contamination in Hudson sediments closely follows the distribution in sediments of 137 Cs which was derived over the past two decades from global fallout and local releases from a commercial nuclear reactor. Several simple empirical corrections related to grain size and mineralogy variations are suggested for comparing heavy-metal contamination levels of sandy continental shelf sediments with fine-grained estuarine and coastal sediments. Iron has little variation in Hudson sediments while manganese is greater in surface sediment of some low-salinity and fresh-water areas than deeper in the sediments, and generally less in the high-salinity area of rapid sediment deposition in New York harbor. Much of the pollutant Cu added to the harbor appears to be rapidly deposited in the sediments. (Auth.)

  5. Megabenthic assemblages at the Hudson Canyon head (NW Atlantic margin): Habitat-faunal relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierdomenico, Martina; Gori, Andrea; Guida, Vincent G.; Gili, Josep-Maria

    2017-09-01

    The distribution of megabenthic communities at the head of Hudson Canyon and adjacent continental shelf was studied by means of underwater video transects and still photo imagery collected using a towed camera system. The goal was to explore the relationships between faunal distribution and physical seafloor conditions and to test the hypothesis that increased seafloor heterogeneity in the Hudson Canyon supports a larger diversity of benthic communities, compared with the adjacent continental shelf. Hierarchical cluster analysis was performed to identify benthic assemblages as defined in imagery. The BIO-ENV procedure and the Canonical Correspondence Analysis were carried out to elucidate species groupings in relation to terrain variables extracted from bathymetric data. Species accumulation curves were generated to evaluate species turn over in and out of Hudson Canyon. The results indicate that seafloor morphology is the main physical factor related to benthic community composition and distribution. Assemblages dominated by sponges, zoanthids and cup corals colonized the canyon margins and flanks, and were associated with coarse-grained sediments, while sea pen assemblages were observed along muddy seafloor within the thalweg. An assemblage dominated by sea stars occurred on the shelf, associated with a sandy seafloor. Some assemblages were exclusively observed in the canyon area, suggesting that the increased variability of seafloor composition, together with the oceanographic processes specific to the canyon area, enhance beta diversity. The colonization by benthic suspension feeders within the canyon, in contrast to shelf assemblages, mainly composed of carnivores and detritus feeders could be favored the intense hydrodynamics at the canyon head that increase the availability of suspended organic matter. From the perspective of management and conservation of marine resources, the results obtained support the relevance of Hudson Canyon as a biodiversity hotspot

  6. Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxins and tetrachlorodibenzofurans in Atlantic coast striped bass and in selected Hudson River fish, waterfowl and sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Keefe, P; Hilker, D; Meyer, C; Aldous, K; Shane, L; Donnelly, R; Smith, R; Sloan, R; Skinner, L; Horn, E

    1884-01-01

    In striped bass samples from the lower Hudson River and its estuary 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD) was found at concentrations from 16 to 120 pg/g (ppt). Striped bass from two other locations (Rhode Island coastal waters and Chesapeake Bay, Maryland) had <5 ppt, 2,3,7,8-TCDD. The contaminant, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran (2,3,7,8-TCDF), was found in striped bass from all three locations with concentrations varying from 6 ppt in Chesapeake Bay to 78 ppt in the Hudson River. Results from a limited number of non-migratory fish (carp and goldfish) and sediments suggest that the upper Hudson River is not a source for 2,3,7,8-TCDD/2,3,7,8-TCDF contamination of striped bass. 26 references, 3 tables.

  7. Measurement Error Affects Risk Estimates for Recruitment to the Hudson River Stock of Striped Bass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J. Dunning

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the consequences of ignoring the distinction between measurement error and natural variability in an assessment of risk to the Hudson River stock of striped bass posed by entrainment at the Bowline Point, Indian Point, and Roseton power plants. Risk was defined as the probability that recruitment of age-1+ striped bass would decline by 80% or more, relative to the equilibrium value, at least once during the time periods examined (1, 5, 10, and 15 years. Measurement error, estimated using two abundance indices from independent beach seine surveys conducted on the Hudson River, accounted for 50% of the variability in one index and 56% of the variability in the other. If a measurement error of 50% was ignored and all of the variability in abundance was attributed to natural causes, the risk that recruitment of age-1+ striped bass would decline by 80% or more after 15 years was 0.308 at the current level of entrainment mortality (11%. However, the risk decreased almost tenfold (0.032 if a measurement error of 50% was considered. The change in risk attributable to decreasing the entrainment mortality rate from 11 to 0% was very small (0.009 and similar in magnitude to the change in risk associated with an action proposed in Amendment #5 to the Interstate Fishery Management Plan for Atlantic striped bass (0.006— an increase in the instantaneous fishing mortality rate from 0.33 to 0.4. The proposed increase in fishing mortality was not considered an adverse environmental impact, which suggests that potentially costly efforts to reduce entrainment mortality on the Hudson River stock of striped bass are not warranted.

  8. Diatoms as Proxies for Abrupt Events in the Hudson River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorski, W.; Abbott, D. H.; Recasens, C.; Breger, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    The Hudson River estuary has been subject to many abrupt events throughout its history including hurricanes, droughts and pluvials. Hurricanes in particular are rare, discrete events that if fingerprinted can be used to develop better age models for Hudson River sediments. Proxies use observed physical characteristics or biological assemblages (e.g. diatom and foraminiferal assemblages) as tools to reconstruct past conditions prior to the modern instrumental record. Using a sediment core taken from the Hudson River (CDO2-29A), in New York City, drought and pluvial layers were selected based on Cs-137 dating while hurricane layers were determined from occurrences of tropical to subtropical foraminifera. Contrary to previous studies (Weaver, 1970, Weiss et al, 1978), more than sixty different diatom species have been identified using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Cosmopolitan, hurricane and drought assemblages have begun to be identified after observing multiple layers (Table 1). Tropical foraminifera dominated by Globigerinoides ruber pink were also found in a hurricane layer that we infer was deposited during Hurricane Belle in 1976. More diatom abundance analyses and cataloged SEM pictures will provide further insight into these proxies. Table 1 Diatom Genera and Species Environment Clarification Cyclotella caspia Planktonic, marine-brackish Cosmopolitan Karayevia clevei Freshwater Cosmopolitan Melosira sp Planktonic, marine Cosmopolitan Thalassiosira sp Marine, brackish Cosmopolitan Staurosirella leptostauron Benthic, freshwater Cosmopolitan Actinoptychus senarius Planktonic or benthic, freshwater to brackish Hurricane and pluvial layers Amphora aff. sp Benthic, marine or freshwater Hurricane layers only Nitzschia sp Benthic, marine or freshwater Hurricane layers only Gomphonema sp Freshwater Hurricane layers only Surirella sp Marine-brackish Drought layer only Triceratium sp Marine Drought layer only Other Genera and species Environment Clarification

  9. Spatial patterns of pharmaceuticals and wastewater tracers in the Hudson River Estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantwell, Mark G; Katz, David R; Sullivan, Julia C; Shapley, Daniel; Lipscomb, John; Epstein, Jennifer; Juhl, Andrew R; Knudson, Carol; O'Mullan, Gregory D

    2018-06-15

    The widespread use of pharmaceuticals by human populations results in their sustained discharge to surface waters via wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). In this study, 16 highly prescribed pharmaceuticals were quantified along a 250 km transect of the Hudson River Estuary and New York Harbor to describe their sources and spatial patterns. Sampling was conducted over two dry weather periods in May and July 2016, at 72 sites which included mid-channel and nearshore sites, as well as locations influenced by tributaries and WWTP outfalls. The detection frequency of the study pharmaceuticals was almost identical between the May and July sampling periods at 55% and 52%, respectively. Six pharmaceuticals were measurable at 92% or more of the sites during both sampling periods, illustrating their ubiquitous presence throughout the study area. Individual pharmaceutical concentrations were highly variable spatially, ranging from non-detect to 3810 ng/L during the study. Major factors controlling concentrations were proximity and magnitude of WWTP discharges, inputs from tributaries and tidal mixing. Two compounds, sucralose and caffeine, were evaluated as tracers to identify wastewater sources and assess pharmaceutical behavior. Sucralose was useful in identifying wastewater inputs to the river and concentrations showed excellent correlations with numerous pharmaceuticals in the study. Caffeine-sucralose ratios showed potential in identifying discharges of untreated wastewater occurring during a combined sewage overflow event. Many of the study pharmaceuticals were present throughout the Hudson River Estuary as a consequence of sustained wastewater discharge. Whereas some concentrations were above published effects levels, a more complete risk assessment is needed to understand the potential for ecological impacts due to pharmaceuticals in the Hudson River Estuary. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Desorption of Ba and 226Ra from river-borne sediments in the Hudson estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.-H.

    1979-01-01

    The pronounced desorption of Ba and 226 Ra from river-borne sediments in the Hudson estuary can be explained quantitatively by the drastic decrease in the distribution coefficients of both elements from a fresh to a salty water medium. The desorption in estuaries can augment, at least, the total global river fluxes of dissolved Ba and 226 Ra by one and nine times, respectively. The desorption flux of 226 Ra from estuaries accounts for 17-43% of the total 226 Ra flux from coastal sediments. Two mass balance models depicting mixing and adsorption-desorption processes in estuaries are discussed. (Auth.)

  11. Potential well yields from unconsolidated deposits in the lower Hudson and Delaware River basins, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolcott, Stephen W.

    1987-01-01

    A comprehensive groundwater protection plan, developed by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation in 1985, identified the need to delineate significant aquifers within the state. A map of the unconsolidated aquifers in the lower Hudson and Delaware River basins was compiled from available data on the surficial geology and well yields. It delineates the significant unconsolidated aquifers and indicates the potential yield of wells that tap these aquifers. The potential well yield is categorized into three ranges: 100 gal/min. No yield range is given for till, but some large diameter or dug wells in till may yield up 10 gal/min. (Lantz-PTT)

  12. Methods to assess impacts on Hudson River striped bass: report for the period October 1, 1977 to September 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnthouse, L.W.; Christensen, S.W.; Kirk, B.L.; Kumar, K.D.; Van Winkle, W.

    1980-06-01

    The overall objective of this project is to develop and apply quantitative methods for assessing the effects of power plant entrainment and impingement on the Hudson River striped bass population. During the two years covered in this reporting period, our work dealt with five interrelated aspects of this assessment problem: (1) young-of-the year models, (2) mortality of entrained eggs, larvae, and juveniles, (3) projection of long-term impacts using stock recruitment models, (4) relative contribution of the Hudson River stock to the Atlantic coastal striped bass population, and (5) distribution of entrainable striped bass life stages in the immediate vicinity of power plant intakes

  13. Wildlife habitat connectivity in the changing climate of New York's Hudson Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Timothy G; Schlesinger, Matthew D

    2013-09-01

    Maintaining and restoring connectivity are key adaptation strategies for biodiversity conservation under climate change. We present a novel combination of species distribution and connectivity modeling using current and future climate regimes to prioritize connections among populations of 26 rare species in New York's Hudson Valley. We modeled patches for each species for each time period and modeled potential connections among habitat patches by finding the least-cost path for every patch-to-patch connection. Finally, we aggregated these patches and paths to the tax parcel, commonly the primary unit of conservation action. Under future climate regimes, suitable habitat was predicted to contract or appear upslope and farther north. On average, predicted patches were nine times smaller and paths were twice as long under future climate. Parcels within the Hudson Highlands, Shawangunk Ridge, Catskill Mountains, and Harlem Valley had high species overlap, with areas upslope and northward increasing in importance over time. We envision that land managers and conservation planners can use these results to help prioritize parcel-level conservation and management and thus support biodiversity adaptation to climate change. © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  14. A History of Vegetation, Sediment and Nutrient Dynamics at Tivoli North Bay, Hudson Estuary, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sritrairat, Sanpisa; Peteet, Dorothy M.; Kenna, Timothy C.; Sambrotto, Ray; Kurdyla, Dorothy; Guilderson, Tom

    2012-01-01

    We conduct a stratigraphic paleoecological investigation at a Hudson River National Estuarine Research Reserve (HRNERR) site, Tivoli Bays, spanning the past 1100 years. Marsh sediment cores were analyzed for ecosystem changes using multiple proxies, including pollen, spores, macrofossils, charcoal, sediment bulk chemistry, and stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes. The results reveal climatic shifts such as the warm and dry Medieval Warm Period (MWP) followed by the cooler Little Ice Age (LIA), along with significant anthropogenic influence on the watershed ecosystem. A five-fold expansion of invasive species, including Typha angustifolia and Phragmites australis, is documented along with marked changes in sediment composition and nutrient input. During the last century, a ten-fold sedimentation rate increase due to land-use changes is observed. The large magnitude of shifts in vegetation, sedimentation, and nutrients during the last few centuries suggest that human activities have made the greatest impact to the marshes of the Hudson Estuary during the last millennium. Climate variability and ecosystem changes similar to those observed at other marshes in northeastern and mid-Atlantic estuaries, attest to the widespread regional signature recorded at Tivoli Bays.

  15. Sediment mixing and accumulation rate effects on radionuclide depth profiles in Hudson estuary sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, C.R.; Simpson, H.J.; Peng, T.; Bopp, R.F.; Trier, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    Measured anthropogenic radionuclide profiles in sediment cores from the Hudson River estuary were compared with profiles computed by using known input histories of radionuclides to the estuary and mixing coefficients which decreased exponentially with depth in the sediment. Observed 134 Cs sediment depth profiles were used in the mixing rate computation because reactor releases were the only significant source for this nuclide, whereas the inputs of 137 Cs and /sup 239.240/Pu to the estuary were complicated by runoff or erosion in upstream areas, in addition to direct fallout from precipitation. Our estimates for the rates of surface sediment mixing in the low salinity reach of the estuary range from 0.25 to 1 cm 2 /yr, or less. In some areas of the harbor adjacent to New York City, were fine-particle accumulation rates are generally >3 cm/yr, and often as high as 10 to 20 cm/yr, sediment mixing rates as high as 10 cm 2 /yr would have little effect on radionuclide peak distributions. Consequently, anthropogenic radionuclide maximum activities in subsurface sediments of the Hudson appear to be useful as time-stratigraphic reference levels, which can be correlated with periods of maximum radionuclide inputs for estimating rates and patterns of sediment accumulation

  16. Determining the flux of methane into Hudson Canyon at the edge of methane clathrate hydrate stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinsten, A.; Navarrete, L; Ruppel, Carolyn D.; Weber, T.C.; Leonte, M.; Kellermann, M.; Arrington, E.; Valentine, D.L.; Scranton, M.L; Kessler, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Methane seeps were investigated in Hudson Canyon, the largest shelf-break canyon on the northern US Atlantic Margin. The seeps investigated are located at or updip of the nominal limit of methane clathrate hydrate stability. The acoustic identification of bubble streams was used to guide water column sampling in a 32 km2 region within the canyon's thalweg. By incorporating measurements of dissolved methane concentration with methane oxidation rates and current velocity into a steady-state box model, the total emission of methane to the water column in this region was estimated to be 12 kmol methane per day (range: 6 – 24 kmol methane per day). These analyses suggest this methane is largely retained inside the canyon walls below 300 m water depth, and that it is aerobically oxidized to near completion within the larger extent of Hudson Canyon. Based on estimated methane emissions and measured oxidation rates, the oxidation of this methane to dissolved CO2 is expected to have minimal influences on seawater pH. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of impingement on the Hudson River white perch population. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnthouse, L.W.; Van Winkle, W.; Kirk, B.L.; Vaughan, D.S.

    1982-02-01

    This report summarizes a series of analyses of the magnitude and biological significance of the impingement of white perch at the Indian Point Nuclear Generating Station and other Hudson River power plants. Included in these analyses were evaluations of: (1) two independent lines of evidence relating to the magnitude of impingement impacts on the Hudson River white perch population; (2) the additional impact caused by entrainment of white perch; (3) data relating to density-dependent growth among young-of-the-year white perch; (4) the feasibility of performing population-level analyses of impingement impacts on the white perch populations of Chesapeake Bay and the Delaware River; and (5) the feasibility of using simple food chain and food web models to evaluate community-level effects of impingement and entrainment. Estimated reductions in the abundances of the 1974 and 1975 white perch year classes, caused by impingement and entrainment, were high enough that the possibility of adverse long-term effects cannot be excluded.

  18. Community-based observations on sustainable development in southern Hudson Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arragutainaq, L.; Fleming, B.

    1991-01-01

    Inuit residents of the Belcher Islands in Hudson Bay practice sustainable development over a wide region, and are heavily dependent on fish and wildlife for food. Large-scale hydroelectric developments on rivers emptying into Hudson Bay and James Bay threaten both the environment and the traditional economy and culture of those residents. The main focus of concern is the James Bay hydroelectric project, part 1 of which (La Grande) is now operational. In addition, hydroelectric projects in Manitoba and Ontario may also affect the region. The residents feel that the subdivision of each project into components, each subject to a separate environmental review and assessment, works in favor of the project proponents and does not address the issues of interest to those affected by the project. Neither does such a review process address questions related to the cumulative development of many projects over a long term. The Belcher Islands are remote from the territorial and national governments, neither of which seem to be giving the James Bay developments as much attention as seems necessary. The island community has identified its primary ecological concerns on part 2 of the James Bay project and presented them at a public hearing. These concerns include the long-term impacts of the project on the marine environment and the kinds of compensation, if any, for such impacts. 7 refs., 2 figs

  19. Groundwater quality in the Upper Hudson River Basin, New York, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Tia-Marie; Nystrom, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Water samples were collected from 20 production and domestic wells in the Upper Hudson River Basin (north of the Federal Dam at Troy, New York) in New York in August 2012 to characterize groundwater quality in the basin. The samples were collected and processed using standard U.S. Geological Survey procedures and were analyzed for 148 physiochemical properties and constituents, including dissolved gases, major ions, nutrients, trace elements, pesticides, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), radionuclides, and indicator bacteria. The Upper Hudson River Basin covers 4,600 square miles in upstate New York, Vermont, and Massachusetts; the study area encompasses the 4,000 square miles that lie within New York. The basin is underlain by crystalline and sedimentary bedrock, including gneiss, shale, and slate; some sandstone and carbonate rocks are present locally. The bedrock in some areas is overlain by surficial deposits of saturated sand and gravel. Eleven of the wells sampled in the Upper Hudson River Basin are completed in sand and gravel deposits, and nine are completed in bedrock. Groundwater in the Upper Hudson River Basin was typically neutral or slightly basic; the water typically was moderately hard. Bicarbonate, chloride, calcium, and sodium were the major ions with the greatest median concentrations; the dominant nutrient was nitrate. Methane was detected in 7 samples. Strontium, iron, barium, boron, and manganese were the trace elements with the highest median concentrations. Two pesticides, an herbicide degradate and an insecticide degredate, were detected in two samples at trace levels; seven VOCs, including chloroform, four solvents, and the gasoline additive methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) were detected in four samples. The greatest radon-222 activity, 2,900 picocuries per liter, was measured in a sample from a bedrock well; the median radon activity was higher in samples from bedrock wells than in samples from sand and gravel wells. Coliform bacteria were

  20. Declining metal levels at Foundry Cove (Hudson River, New York): Response to localized dredging of contaminated sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackie, Joshua A.; Natali, Susan M.; Levinton, Jeffrey S.; Sanudo-Wilhelmy, Sergio A.

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of remediating a well-recognized case of heavy metal pollution at Foundry Cove (FC), Hudson River, New York. This tidal freshwater marsh was polluted with battery-factory wastes (1953-1979) and dredged in 1994-1995. Eight years after remediation, dissolved and particulate metals (Cd, Co, Cu, Pb, Ni, and Ag) were found to be lower than levels in the lower Hudson near New York City. Levels of metals (Co, Ni, Cd) on suspended particles were comparatively high. Concentrations of surface sediment Cd throughout the marsh system remain high, but have decreased both in the dredged and undredged areas: Cd was 2.4-230 mg/kg dw of sediment in 2005 vs. 109-1500 mg/kg in the same area in 1983. The rate of tidal export of Cd from FC has decreased by >300-fold, suggesting that dredging successfully stemmed a major source of Cd to the Hudson River. - Dredging of a hotspot of metal-contaminated sediment is associated with a recognizable local and river-wide decline in cadmium in the Hudson River, New York

  1. De vluchtige olie van enkele chemotypen van mentha suaveolens EHRH. en van hybriden met mentha longifolia (L.) HUDSON

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Hindrik

    1974-01-01

    De opvatting dat Mentha x piperita L. een bastaard zou zijn van Mentha spicata L. en Mentha aquatica L. werd nader besproken. Hierbij werd Mentha spicata beschouwd als een bastaard van Mentha longifolia (L.) HUDSON en Mentha suaveolens EHRH. ... Zie: Samenvatting.

  2. 77 FR 63873 - Johnson Controls, Inc. Including On-Site Leased Workers of Valley Staffing and AZ Quality Hudson...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ... workers of Johnson Controls, Inc., including on-site leased workers from Valley Staffing, Hudson..., Wisconsin location of Johnson Controls, Inc. The Department has determined that these workers were sufficiently under the control of the subject firm to be considered leased workers. Based on these findings...

  3. The Natural Palette: Hudson River Artists and the Land. Teacher's Guide. Curriculum Resource: Grades 4 through 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Ted; Sorin, Gretchen Sullivan; Mack, Stevie; Fiore, Jennifer, Ed.

    This interdisciplinary curriculum guide resource kit focuses on 19th-century Euro-American painters of the Hudson River School. Lessons are designed to encourage student recognition of the significant impact of North American Indians, the natural environment, and the romantic period writers and philosophers artists and their work. The guide…

  4. Computer simulation model for the striped bass young-of-the-year population in the Hudson River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eraslan, A.H.; Van Winkle, W.; Sharp, R.D.; Christensen, S.W.; Goodyear, C.P.; Rush, R.M.; Fulkerson, W.

    1975-09-01

    This report presents a daily transient (tidal-averaged), longitudinally one-dimensional (cross-section-averaged) computer simulation model for the assessment of the entrainment and impingement impacts of power plant operations on young-of-the-year populations of the striped bass, Morone saxatilis, in the Hudson River

  5. Impact of entrainment and impingement on fish populations in the Hudson River estuary. Volume I. Entrainment-impact estimates for six fish populations inhabiting the Hudson River estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boreman, J.; Barnthouse, L.W.; Vaughn, D.S.; Goodyear, C.P.; Christensen, S.W.; Kumar, K.D.; Kirk, B.L.; Van Winkle, W.

    1982-01-01

    This volume is concerned with the estimation of the direct (or annual) entrainment impact of power plants on populations of striped bass, white perch, Alosa spp. (blueback herring and alewife), American shad, Atlantic tomcod, and bay anchovy in the Hudson River estuary. Entrainment impact results from the killing of fish eggs, larvae, and young juveniles that are contained in the cooling water cycled through a power plant. An Empirical Transport Model (ETM) is presented as the means of estimating a conditional entrainment mortality rate (defined as the fraction of a year class which would be killed due to entrainment in the absence of any other source of mortality). Most of this volume is concerned with the estimation of several parameters required by the ETM: physical input parameters (e.g., power-plant withdrawal flow rates); the longitudinal distribution of ichthyoplankton in time and space; the duration of susceptibility of the vulnerable organisms; the W-factors, which express the ratios of densities of organisms in power plant intakes to densities of organisms in the river; and the entrainment mortality factors (f-factors), which express the probability that an organism will be killed if it is entrained. Once these values are obtained, the ETM is used to estimate entrainment impact for both historical and projected conditions

  6. Plutonium, radiocesium and radiocobalt in sediments of the Hudson River estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, C.R.; Simpson, H.J.; Trier, R.M.; Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY

    1981-01-01

    Anthropogenic radionuclides have reached the Hudson estuary as global fallout from nuclear weapons testing and through local releases from commercial nuclear reactors. Significant activities of 238 Pu and 239 , 240 Pu (fallout-derived), 134 Cs and 60 Co (reactor-released), and 137 Cs (derived from both sources), have accumulated in the sediments throughout the estuary, with the primary zone of accumulation near the downstream end of the system in New York harbor. The estuary appears to have trapped nearly all of the 239 , 240 Pu delivered as fallout, and consequently, ocean dumping of dredged harbor sediment is currently the primary means for the net transport of these nuclides to coastal waters. In contrast, only 10-30% of the 137 Cs, 134 Cs and 60 Co delivered to the estuary have been retained on the fine particles which accumulate at a rapid rate in the harbor. (orig./HAE)

  7. Survival of fishes after impingement on traveling screens at Hudson River power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muessig, P.H.; Hutchison, J.B.; King, L.R.; Ligotino, R.J.; Daley, M.

    1988-01-01

    The survival of Hudson River fishes, juveniles and adults, after they had been impinged on continuously rotated traveling screens at the Bowline Point and Danskammer Point power plants was examined. Survival of principal species was similar at the two plants, and estimates of survival improved as monitoring stress was reduced. Adjusted for survival of control fish, survival over 84-108 h after fish were recovered from the screens was highest for Atlantic tomcod, striped bass, and white perch (50-90%) and lowest for bay anchovy, alewife, and blueback herring; other species showed intermediate survival. Survival of striped bass and white perch was positively correlated with water temperature in winter and with conductivity in spring and fall. Continual rotation of the screens, which shortens the average time that fish are impinged, increased survival over that associated with intermittent rotation. 24 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs

  8. Three-dimensional simulation of flow, salinity, sediment, and radionuclide movements in the Hudson River estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Y.; Trent, D.S.

    1985-04-01

    The three-dimensional, finite difference model, FLESCOT simulates time-varying movements of flow, turbulent kinetic energy, salinity, water temperature, sediment, and contaminants in estuarine, coastal, and ocean waters. The model was applied to a 106-km (66-mi) reach of the Hudson River estuary in New York between Chelsea and the mouth of the river. It predicted the time-varying, three-dimensional distributions of tidal flow, salinity, three separate groups of sediments (i.e., sand, silt, and clay), and a radionuclide ( 137 Cs) in both dissolved and particulate (those sorbed by sediments) forms for over 40 days. The model also calculated riverbed elevation changes caused by sediment deposition and bed erosion, bed sediment size distribution and armoring, and distributions of the particulate 137 Cs sorbed by sand, silt, and clay in the bed

  9. Potential yields of wells in unconsolidated aquifers in upstate New York--Hudson-Mohawk sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugliosi, Edward F.; Trudell, Ruth A.; Casey, George D.

    1988-01-01

    This map shows the location and potential well yields of unconsolidated aquifers in the Hudson-Mohawk region at a scale of 1:250,000. It also delineates segments of aquifers that are heavily used by community water systems and designated by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation as ' Primary Water Supply ' aquifers, and cites published reports that give detailed information on each area. Most aquifers were deposited in low-lying areas such as valleys or plains during deglaciations of the region. Thick, permeable, well-sorted sand and gravel deposits generally yield large quantities of water, greater than 100 gal/min. Thin sand, sand and gravel deposits, or thicker gravel units that have a large content of silt and fine sand, yield moderate amounts of water, 10 to 100 gal/min. Wells dug in till and those drilled in bedrock commonly yield less than 10 gal/min. (USGS)

  10. Potential yields of wells in unconsolidated aquifers in upstate New York--lower Hudson sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugliosi, Edward F.; Trudell, Ruth A.

    1988-01-01

    This map shows the location and potential well yields from unconsolidated aquifers in the lower-Hudson region at a 1:250 ,000 scale. It also delineates segments of aquifers that are heavily used by community water systems and designated by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation as ' Primary water supply ' aquifers and cites published reports that give detailed information on each area. Most aquifers were deposited in low-lying areas such as valleys or plains during deglaciation of the region. Thick, permeable, well-sorted sand and gravel deposits generally yield large quantities of water, more than 100 gal/min. Thin sand, sand and gravel deposits, or thicker gravel units that have a large content of silt and fine sand, yield moderate amounts of water, 10 to 100 gal/min. Wells dug in till and those drilled in bedrock commonly yield less than 10 gal/min. (USGS)

  11. The Hudson's Bay Company as a context for science in the Columbia Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schefke, Brian

    2008-01-01

    This article aims to elucidate and analyze the links between science, specifically natural history, and the imperialist project in what is now the northwestern United States and western Canada. Imperialism in this region found its expression through institutions such as the Hudson's Bay Company (HBC). I examine the activities of naturalists such as David Douglas and William Tolmie Fraser in the context of the fur trade in the Columbia Department. Here I show how natural history aided Britain in achieving its economic and political goals in the region. The key to this interpretation is to extend the role of the HBC as an imperial factor to encompass its role as a patron for natural history. This gives a better understanding of the ways in which imperialism--construed as mercantile, rather than military--delineated research priorities and activities of the naturalists who worked in the Columbia Department.

  12. Estimating the abundance of the Southern Hudson Bay polar bear subpopulation with aerial surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obbard, Martyn E.; Stapleton, Seth P.; Middel, Kevin R.; Thibault, Isabelle; Brodeur, Vincent; Jutras, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The Southern Hudson Bay (SH) polar bear subpopulation occurs at the southern extent of the species’ range. Although capture–recapture studies indicate abundance was likely unchanged between 1986 and 2005, declines in body condition and survival occurred during the period, possibly foreshadowing a future decrease in abundance. To obtain a current estimate of abundance, we conducted a comprehensive line transect aerial survey of SH during 2011–2012. We stratified the study site by anticipated densities and flew coastal contour transects and systematically spaced inland transects in Ontario and on Akimiski Island and large offshore islands in 2011. Data were collected with double-observer and distance sampling protocols. We surveyed small islands in James Bay and eastern Hudson Bay and flew a comprehensive transect along the Québec coastline in 2012. We observed 667 bears in Ontario and on Akimiski Island and nearby islands in 2011, and we sighted 80 bears on offshore islands during 2012. Mark–recapture distance sampling and sight–resight models yielded an estimate of 860 (SE = 174) for the 2011 study area. Our estimate of abundance for the entire SH subpopulation (943; SE = 174) suggests that abundance is unlikely to have changed significantly since 1986. However, this result should be interpreted cautiously because of the methodological differences between historical studies (physical capture–recapture) and this survey. A conservative management approach is warranted given previous increases in duration of the ice-free season, which are predicted to continue in the future, and previously documented declines in body condition and vital rates.

  13. Estimating abundance of the Southern Hudson Bay polar bear subpopulation using aerial surveys, 2011 and 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obbard, Martyn E.; Middel, Kevin R.; Stapleton, Seth P.; Thibault, Isabelle; Brodeur, Vincent; Jutras, Charles

    2013-01-01

    The Southern Hudson Bay (SH) polar bear subpopulation occurs at the southern extent of the species’ range. Although capture-recapture studies indicate that abundance remained stable between 1986 and 2005, declines in body condition and survival were documented during the period, possibly foreshadowing a future decrease in abundance. To obtain a current estimate of abundance, we conducted a comprehensive line transect aerial survey of SH during 2011–2012. We stratified the study site by anticipated densities and flew coastal contour transects and systematically spaced inland transects in Ontario and on Akimiski Island and large offshore islands in 2011. Data were collected with double observer and distance sampling protocols. We also surveyed small islands in Hudson Bay and James Bay and flew a comprehensive transect along the Québec coastline in 2012. We observed 667 bears in Ontario and on Akimiski Island and nearby islands in 2011, and we sighted 80 bears on offshore islands during 2012. Mark-recapture distance sampling and sightresight models yielded a model-averaged estimate of 868 (SE: 177) for the 2011 study area. Our estimate of abundance for the entire SH subpopulation (951; SE: 177) suggests that abundance has remained unchanged. However, this result should be interpreted cautiously because of the methodological differences between historical studies (physical capture) and this survey. A conservative management approach is warranted given the previous increases in the duration of the ice-free season, which are predicted to continue in the future, and previously documented declines in body condition and vital rates.

  14. The impact of water loading on postglacial decay times in Hudson Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Holly Kyeore; Gomez, Natalya

    2018-05-01

    Ongoing glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) due to surface loading (ice and water) variations during the last glacial cycle has been contributing to sea-level changes globally throughout the Holocene, especially in regions like Canada that were heavily glaciated during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The spatial and temporal distribution of GIA, as manifested in relative sea-level (RSL) change, are sensitive to the ice history and the rheological structure of the solid Earth, both of which are uncertain. It has been shown that RSL curves near the center of previously glaciated regions with no ongoing surface loading follow an exponential-like form, with the postglacial decay times associated with that form having a weak sensitivity to the details of the ice loading history. Postglacial decay time estimates thus provide a powerful datum for constraining the Earth's viscous structure and improving GIA predictions. We explore spatial patterns of postglacial decay time predictions in Hudson Bay by decomposing numerically modeled RSL changes into contributions from water and ice loading effects, and computing their relative impact on the decay times. We demonstrate that ice loading can contribute a strong geographic trend on the decay time estimates if the time window used to compute decay times includes periods that are temporally close to (i.e. contemporaneous with, or soon after) periods of active loading. This variability can be avoided by choosing a suitable starting point for the decay time window. However, more surprisingly, we show that across any adopted time window, water loading effects associated with inundation into, and postglacial flux out of, Hudson Bay and James Bay will impart significant geographic variability onto decay time estimates. We emphasize this issue by considering both maps of predicted decay times across the region and site-specific estimates, and we conclude that variability in observed decay times (whether based on existing or future data

  15. Understanding Spatial and Temporal Shifts in Blue Carbon, Piermont Marsh, Lower Hudson Estuary, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteet, D. M.; Nichols, J. E.; Kenna, T. C.; Corbett, E. J.; Allen, K. A.; Newton, R.; Vincent, S.; Haroon, A.; Shumer, M.

    2015-12-01

    Piermont Marsh is a National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR) protected brackish wetland in the lower Hudson Valley. It serves as a nursery for fish, a coastal buffer in storms, a repository of native wetland species unique to the Hudson, and a paleoenvironmental archive. At risk for disappearance due to rising sea level, we assess the present carbon stores and their spatial and temporal variability through time. Determining the depth of peat in transects throughout Piermont Marsh (41°N, 73°55'W), is one step in reconstructing the stores of carbon in the marsh and how they have shifted over millennia. Through the last decade, we have focused field efforts on probing the depths of the marsh through a series of transects and in acquiring sediment cores from which we establish sedimentation rates and carbon storage through time. AMS C-14 dating, XRF fluorescence, pollen analysis, and Cesium-137 provide chronological control for the sedimentation rates, pollution history, and an understanding of the regional and local shifts in vegetation. C-13 and pollen measurements in selected cores indicate major shifts in local vegetation with coastal eutrophication as the marsh has been invaded, first by Typha angustifolia in the nineteenth century and then by Phragmites australis in the twentieth century up to the present. N-15 measurements indicate a large shift in nitrogen as humans have impacted the marsh. We present a comprehensive, three-dimensional view of the effects of climate, vegetation, and human impact on the carbon storage of Piermont Marsh. This project provided a site for a place- and project-based learning through Lamont-Doherty's Secondary School Field Research Program. Many of the field samples were collected by young investigators from schools in New York City and towns near Piermont.

  16. Distributions of polyhalogenated compounds in Hudson River (New York, USA) fish in relation to human uses along the river

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, Lawrence C.

    2011-01-01

    PCBs (as Aroclor concentrations) have been extensively examined in fish along the Hudson River, but other xenobiotic chemicals in fish have had limited assessment. This study determined concentrations and congener distributions of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polybrominated and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PBDD/Fs and PCDD/Fs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in smallmouth bass and striped bass taken from a 385 km reach of the Hudson River. Concentrations of PBDEs and PCBs in smallmouth bass, and PCBs in striped bass, were positively related to human uses of the compounds in the basin. Generally low levels of PCDD/Fs were found. One striped bass, however, contained elevated 2,3,7,8-TCDD, indicating exposure to a known source in the adjacent Newark Bay-Passaic River basin. PBDDs were generally below detection. PBDFs were present in four of 18 smallmouth bass, but were not detected in striped bass. Dioxin-like PCBs contribute most to 2,3,7,8-TCDD toxic equivalents in 29 of 30 samples. - Highlights: → In the Hudson River, → PBDEs in smallmouth bass follow human population patterns, but do not for striped bass. → Proximity to known PCB sources govern PCB levels and patterns in fish. → PBDFs were in smallmouth bass but not striped bass. PBDDs were present in one fish. → PCDD/Fs were low in 29 of 30 fish. A 2,3,7,8-TCDD source affected one striped bass. → PCBs contribute most to 2,3,7,8-TCDD toxic equivalents in 29 of 30 samples. - Residues of polyhalogenated compounds in resident and migratory fish from the Hudson River are compared with human uses of the compounds in the river basin.

  17. Selective analysis of power plant operation on the Hudson River with emphasis on the Bowline Point Generating Station. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnthouse, L.W.; Cannon, J.B.; Christensen, S.G.

    1977-07-01

    A comprehensive study of the effects of power plant operation on the Hudson River was conducted. The study included thermal, biological, and air quality effects of existing and planned electrical generating stations. This section on thermal impacts presents a comprehensive mathematical modeling and computer simulation study of the effects of heat rejection from the plants. The overall study consisted of three major parts: near-field analysis; far-field analysis; and zone-matched near-field/far-field analysis. Near-field analyses were completed for Roseton, Danskammer, and Bowline Point Generating Stations, and near-field dilution ratios range from a low of about 2 for Bowline Point and 3 for Roseton to a maximum of 6 for both plants. The far-field analysis included a critical review of existing studies and a parametric review of operating plants. The maximum thermal load case, based on hypothetical 1974 river conditions, gives the daily maximum cross-section-averaged and 2-mile-segment-averaged water temperatures as 83.80 0 F in the vicinity of the Indian Point Station and 83.25 0 F in the vicinity of the Bowline Station. This maximum case will be significantly modified if cooling towers are used at certain units. A full analysis and discussion of these cases is presented. A study of the Hudson River striped bass population is divided into the following eight subsections: distribution of striped bass eggs, larvae, and juveniles in the Hudson River; entrainment mortality factor; intake factor; impingement; effects of discharges; compensation; model estimates of percent reduction; and Hudson River striped bass stock

  18. Distributions of polyhalogenated compounds in Hudson River (New York, USA) fish in relation to human uses along the river

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, Lawrence C., E-mail: lxskinne@gw.dec.state.ny.us [New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, 625 Broadway, Albany, NY 12233 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    PCBs (as Aroclor concentrations) have been extensively examined in fish along the Hudson River, but other xenobiotic chemicals in fish have had limited assessment. This study determined concentrations and congener distributions of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polybrominated and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PBDD/Fs and PCDD/Fs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in smallmouth bass and striped bass taken from a 385 km reach of the Hudson River. Concentrations of PBDEs and PCBs in smallmouth bass, and PCBs in striped bass, were positively related to human uses of the compounds in the basin. Generally low levels of PCDD/Fs were found. One striped bass, however, contained elevated 2,3,7,8-TCDD, indicating exposure to a known source in the adjacent Newark Bay-Passaic River basin. PBDDs were generally below detection. PBDFs were present in four of 18 smallmouth bass, but were not detected in striped bass. Dioxin-like PCBs contribute most to 2,3,7,8-TCDD toxic equivalents in 29 of 30 samples. - Highlights: > In the Hudson River, > PBDEs in smallmouth bass follow human population patterns, but do not for striped bass. > Proximity to known PCB sources govern PCB levels and patterns in fish. > PBDFs were in smallmouth bass but not striped bass. PBDDs were present in one fish. > PCDD/Fs were low in 29 of 30 fish. A 2,3,7,8-TCDD source affected one striped bass. > PCBs contribute most to 2,3,7,8-TCDD toxic equivalents in 29 of 30 samples. - Residues of polyhalogenated compounds in resident and migratory fish from the Hudson River are compared with human uses of the compounds in the river basin.

  19. Dietary composition and spatial patterns of polar bear foraging on land in western Hudson Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormezano, Linda J; Rockwell, Robert F

    2013-12-21

    Flexible foraging strategies, such as prey switching, omnivory and food mixing, are key to surviving in a labile and changing environment. Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) in western Hudson Bay are versatile predators that use all of these strategies as they seasonally exploit resources across trophic levels. Climate warming is reducing availability of their ice habitat, especially in spring when polar bears gain most of their annual fat reserves by consuming seal pups before coming ashore in summer. How polar bears combine these flexible foraging strategies to obtain and utilize terrestrial food will become increasingly important in compensating for energy deficits from lost seal hunting opportunities. We evaluated patterns in the composition of foods in scat to characterize the foraging behaviors that underpin the diet mixing and omnivory observed in polar bears on land in western Hudson Bay. Specifically, we measured diet richness, proportions of plant and animal foods, patterns in co-occurrence of foods, spatial composition and an index of temporal composition. Scats contained between 1 and 6 foods, with an average of 2.11 (SE = 0.04). Most scats (84.9%) contained at least one type of plant, but animals (35.4% of scats) and both plants and animals occurring together (34.4% of scats) were also common. Certain foods, such as Lyme grass seed heads (Leymus arenarius), berries and marine algae, were consumed in relatively higher proportions, sometimes to the exclusion of others, both where and when they occurred most abundantly. The predominance of localized vegetation in scats suggests little movement among habitat types between feeding sessions. Unlike the case for plants, no spatial patterns were found for animal remains, likely due the animals' more vagile and ubiquitous distribution. Our results suggest that polar bears are foraging opportunistically in a manner consistent with maximizing intake while minimizing energy expenditure associated with movement. The

  20. Hudson Canyon benthic habitats characterization and mapping by integrated analysis of multidisciplinary data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierdomenico, Martina; Guida, Vincent G.; Rona, Peter A.; Macelloni, Leonardo; Scranton, Mary I.; Asper, Vernon; Diercks, Arne

    2013-04-01

    Hudson Canyon, about 180 km SE of New York City, is the largest eastern U.S. submarine canyon and is under consideration for HAPC (Habitat Area of Particular Concern) status, representing a fisheries and biodiversity hot spot. Interest in the area, within the perspective of ecosystem based management, marine spatial planning, habitat and species conservation, led to a joint project between NOAA Northeast Fisheries, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Mississippi Mineral Research Institute (MMRI), National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), Stony Brook and Rutgers Universities for the study of benthic habitats, that includes the assembly of existing data with newly collected ones: acoustic mapping, visual ground-truthing, hydrographic, sedimentological, and trawl data collections. Acoustic mapping, performed using AUV-mounted multibeam sonar, provided ultra-high resolution bathymetric and backscatter imagery (3m and 1m respectively) at all water depths for identification of geomorphological features and for the characterization of surficial sediments along the two thirds of the shelf portion of the canyon. Identification of benthic and demersal communities was accomplished by visual ground thruthing with underwater vehicle video and still cameras, and from trawl catch data. A CTD-rosette sampler provided water column salinity-temperature profiles and water samples for dissolved methane analysis in the vicinity of suspected bottom sources. Analysis of data revealed a complex of topographic structures and hydrological patterns that provide a wide range of physical habitats in a relatively small area. A mosaic of sandy and muddy substrates, gravel beds, rock outcrops, and semilithified clay outcrops host rich and varied faunal assemblages, including deepwater corals and sponge communities. Pockmark fields, occurring below 300 m depth, suggest that methane-based chemosynthetic carbonate deposition contributes to creation of specific hard bottom habitats

  1. Replication of Annual Cycles in Mn in Hudson River Cores: Mn Peaks During High Water Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, D. H.; Hutson, D.; Marrero, A. M.; Block, K. A.; Chang, C.; Cai, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Using the results from an ITRAX, XRF scanner, we previously reported apparent annual cycles in Mn in a single, high sedimentation rate Hudson River core, LWB1-8, taken off Yonkers, NY (Carlson et al., 2016). We replicated these results in three more high sedimentation rate cores and found stratigraphic markers that verify our inferences about the annual nature of the Mn cycles. The three new cores are LWB4-5 taken off Peekskill, NY, and LWB3-44 and LWB3-25, both taken in Haverstraw Bay. The cores are from water depths of 7-9 meters and all have high magnetic susceptibilities (typically > 30 cgs units) in their upper 1 to 2 meters. The high susceptibilities are primarily produced by magnetite from modern industrial combustion. One core, LWB1-8, has reconnaissance Cs dates that verify the annual nature of the cycles. More Cs dates are expected before the meeting. We developed several new methods of verifying the annual nature of our layer counts. The first is looking at the grain size distribution and age of layers with unusually high Mn peaks. Peaks in Si, Ni and Ti and peaks in percentage of coarse material typically accompany the peaks in Mn. Some are visible as yellow sandy layers. The five highest peaks in Mn in LWB1-8 have layer counted ages that correspond (within 1 year in the top meter and within 2 years in the bottom meter) to 1996, 1948, 1913, 1857 and 1790. The latter three events are the three largest historical spring freshets on the Hudson. 1996 is a year of unusually high flow rate during the spring freshet. Based on our work and previous work on Mn cycling in rivers, we infer that the peaks in Mn are produced by extreme erosional events that erode sediment and release pore water Mn into the water column. The other methods of testing our chronology involve marine storms that increase Ca and Sr and a search for fragments of the Peekskill meteorite that fell in October 1992. More information on the latter will be available by the meeting.

  2. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station Port of Albany weather/hydro by Hudson River Environmental Conditions Observing System (HRECOS) and assembled by Mid-Atlantic Regional Association Coastal Ocean Observing System (MARACOOS) in the Hudson River from 2011-01-04 to 2017-07-31 (NCEI Accession 0163364)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0163364 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected at Port of Albany weather/hydro, a fixed station in the Hudson River. These...

  3. Oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected from station Schodack Island hydro/weather by Hudson River Environmental Conditions Observing System (HRECOS) and assembled by Mid-Atlantic Regional Association Coastal Ocean Observing System (MARACOOS) in the Hudson River from 2008-04-25 to 2017-05-31 (NCEI Accession 0163416)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0163416 contains oceanographic and surface meteorological data collected at Schodack Island hydro/weather, a fixed station in the Hudson River. These...

  4. Estimates of entrainment mortality for striped bass and other fish species inhabiting the Hudson River estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boreman, J.; Goodyear, C.P.

    1988-01-01

    An empirically derived age-, time-, and space-variant equation was used to estimate entrainment mortality at power plants for seven fish species inhabiting the Hudson River estuary. Entrainment mortality is expressed as a conditional rate, which is the fractional reduction in year-class strength due to entrainment if other sources of mortality are density-independent. Estimates of the conditional entrainment mortality, based on historical and projected once-through cooling operation of five power plants, were 11-22% for striped bass, 11-17% for white perch, 5-7% for Atlantic tomcod, 14-21% for American shad, 4-11% for river herring (alewife and blueback herring combined), and 35-79% for bay anchovy. Closed-cycle cooling (natural-draft cooling towers) at three of the power plants (Indian Point, Bowline Point, and Roseton) would reduce entrainment mortality of striped bass by 50-80%, of white perch by 75-80%, of Atlantic tocod by 65-70%, of American shad by 80%, of river herring by 30-90%, and of bay anchovy by 45-80%. The life stages most vulnerable to entrainment mortality were post-yolk-sac larva and entrainable size juvenile. 18 refs., 7 tabs

  5. Implications of power plant mortality for management of the Hudson River striped bass fishery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodyear, C.P.

    1988-01-01

    The Atlantic coastal stock of striped bass apparently declined from colonial times to the early 1930s and subsequently recovered. The reasons for the decline and recovery are not known, but fishing remains a possible explanation, which would suggest population sensitivity to increased mortality. Evidence suggests that fishing mortality has been increasing in recent years and will continue to increase in the absence of management intervention. The consequence of increased fishing mortality is an increase in the marginal effect of the power plant mortality which based on the utilities' models and parameter fits, could result in important reductions in the Hudson River striped bass population. Any management actions imposed to arrest population decline or to increase yield per effort in the fishery would be required to mitigate the impact of the power plants by reducing fishing mortality. It is estimated that a 20% conditional power plant mortality is equivalent to a 14% increase in the number of average fishermen using the stock. Consequently, should any management intervention be required on behalf of the population, managers would be required to reduce fishing mortality by about 14% just to account for the power plant mortality. 26 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  6. Hair Mercury Concentrations in Western Hudson Bay Polar Bear Family Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechshoft, Thea; Derocher, Andrew E; Richardson, Evan; Lunn, Nicholas J; St Louis, Vincent L

    2016-05-17

    Methylmercury is one of the more toxic forms of mercury (Hg), the biomagnification of which is prevalent in the Arctic where apex predators such as polar bears (Ursus maritimus) can carry high loads. The maternal transfer of contaminants to offspring is a concern, as offspring may be particularly sensitive to the effects of environmental pollutants during early development. However, few studies of polar bears report on Hg in dependent young. We examined hair total Hg (THg) concentrations in 24 polar bear family groups in western Hudson Bay: mother, cub-of-the-year (COY), yearling, and 2 year old. THg concentrations increased with bear age, with COYs having lower concentrations than other offspring groups (p ≤ 0.008). Using AICc-based regression models, we found maternal THg to be positively related to body condition and litter size, while overall offspring THg was positively related to maternal body condition in addition to being dependent on the sex and age of the offspring. COY THg concentrations were positively related to maternal THg while also depending on the sex of the offspring. Considering our results, future studies in polar bear ecotoxicology are encouraged to include offspring of different ages and sexes.

  7. Magnitude and seasonality of wetland methane emissions from the Hudson Bay Lowlands (Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Pickett-Heaps

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The Hudson Bay Lowlands (HBL is the second largest boreal wetland ecosystem in the world and an important natural source of global atmospheric methane. We quantify the HBL methane emissions by using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to simulate aircraft measurements over the HBL from the ARCTAS and pre-HIPPO campaigns in May–July 2008, together with continuous 2004–2008 surface observations at Fraserdale (southern edge of HBL and Alert (Arctic background. The difference in methane concentrations between Fraserdale and Alert is shown to be a good indicator of HBL emissions, and implies a sharp seasonal onset of emissions in late May (consistent with the aircraft data, a peak in July–August, and a seasonal shut-off in September. The model, in which seasonal variation of emission is mainly driven by surface temperature, reproduces well the observations in summer but its seasonal shoulders are too broad. We suggest that this reflects the suppression of emissions by snow cover and greatly improve the model simulation by accounting for this effect. Our resulting best estimate for HBL methane emissions is 2.3 Tg a−1, several-fold higher than previous estimates (Roulet et al., 1994; Worthy et al., 2000.

  8. Widespread Micropollutant Monitoring in the Hudson River Estuary Reveals Spatiotemporal Micropollutant Clusters and Their Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Corey M G; Helbling, Damian E

    2018-06-05

    The objective of this study was to identify sources of micropollutants in the Hudson River Estuary (HRE). We collected 127 grab samples at 17 sites along the HRE over 2 years and screened for up to 200 micropollutants. We quantified 168 of the micropollutants in at least one of the samples. Atrazine, gabapentin, metolachlor, and sucralose were measured in every sample. We used data-driven unsupervised methods to cluster the micropollutants on the basis of their spatiotemporal occurrence and normalized-concentration patterns. Three major clusters of micropollutants were identified: ubiquitous and mixed-use (core micropollutants), sourced from sewage treatment plant outfalls (STP micropollutants), and derived from diffuse upstream sources (diffuse micropollutants). Each of these clusters was further refined into subclusters that were linked to specific sources on the basis of relationships identified through geospatial analysis of watershed features. Evaluation of cumulative loadings of each subcluster revealed that the Mohawk River and Rondout Creek are major contributors of most core micropollutants and STP micropollutants and the upper HRE is a major contributor of diffuse micropollutants. These data provide the first comprehensive evaluation of micropollutants in the HRE and define distinct spatiotemporal micropollutant clusters that are linked to sources and conserved across surface water systems around the world.

  9. Peat Archives in the Hudson River Estuary… Marsh Formation, Carbon Storage and Release, and Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteet, D. M.; Corbett, E. J.; Nichols, J. E.; Kenna, T. C.; Chang, C.

    2017-12-01

    We target deep peat stores (at least 8 meters) of carbon in the lower Hudson Estuary, which formed as the glacial fjord became an estuary with mid-Holocene sea level rise. These deep marshes play an extremely important role in the estuary health and stability in a changing climate. Never before have we faced the threats to coastal marshes that we are facing today, and the resulting sedimentation rates, inorganic/organic component histories, pollen, macrofossil, isotopic, and XRF data reveal critical information about past vegetation and climate change. Long-term shifts in organic/inorganic storage appear to be linked to drought, as watershed erosion results in more sand, silt and clay in the marshes. Climatic shifts often result in regional watershed shifts in vegetation, both locally and regionally. Understanding how these marshes are linked to human impact (disturbance, invasive species, higher nitrogen, heavy metal pollution, dams) over the last four centuries is critical to providing management of these key ecosystems, and their preservation as sea level rises. Quantification of processes that cause carbon degradation and release from these wetlands to the estuary is also key to this investigation. Peat loss would contribute to heavy metal pollution in the estuary as well as carbon loss. Young investigators from secondary schools in New York City participated in much of the fieldwork as part of the NASA/GISS NYC Research Initiative and the LDEO Secondary School Field Research Carbon Team.

  10. Magnitude and Seasonality of Wetland Methane Emissions from the Hudson Bay Lowlands (Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett-Heaps, C. A.; Jacob, D. J.; Wecht, K. J.; Kort, E. A.; Wofsy, S. C.; Diskin, G. S.; Worthy, D. E. J.; Kaplan, J. O.; Bey, I.; Drevet, J.

    2011-01-01

    The Hudson Bay Lowlands (HBL) is the second largest boreal wetland ecosystem in the world and an important natural source of global atmospheric methane. We quantify the HBL methane emissions by using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to simulate aircraft measurements over the HBL from the ARCTAS and pre-HIPPO campaigns in May-July 2008, together with continuous 2004-2008 surface observations at Fraserdale (southern edge of HBL) and Alert (Arctic background). The difference in methane concentrations between Fraserdale and Alert is shown to be a good indicator of HBL emissions, and implies a sharp seasonal onset of emissions in late May (consistent with the aircraft data), a peak in July-August, and a seasonal shut-off in September. The model, in which seasonal variation of emission is mainly driven by surface temperature, reproduces well the observations in summer but its seasonal shoulders are too broad. We suggest that this reflects the suppression of emissions by snow cover and greatly improve the model simulation by accounting for this effect. Our resulting best estimate for HBL methane emissions is 2.3 Tg/a, several-fold higher than previous estimates (Roulet et al., 1994; Worthy et al., 2000).

  11. Permafrost and peatland evolution in the northern Hudson Bay lowland, Manitoba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyke, L.D.; Sladen, W.E. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Geological Survey of Canada

    2010-12-15

    This article reported on a study that investigated the sensitivity of peat plateau terrain to continued climate warming in the area of the northern Hudson Bay lowland. Snow and shallow standing water were assessed as the environmental factors most likely to create above-freezing ground temperatures in peat plateau terrain that is otherwise frozen. The relationships between air and ground temperatures in creating these surface environmental conditions were determined and used with air temperature records to predict whether peat plateaus will thaw as a result of foreseeable climate warming. Lake erosion was also assessed as a mechanism for the degradation of frozen peat plateau terrain. Environmental conditions that result in elevated ground temperatures at the margin of peat plateaus either eliminate permafrost or promote permafrost temperatures that are warmer than those beneath unforested peat plateaus. Under present climatic conditions, the process in which a frozen peat plateau degrades and transitions to fen is slow, but with continued warming the subsidence at plateau edges will become more pronounced, accelerating the subsidence process. The consequences of continued warming will be the expansion of thawed zones, subsidence at plateau margins, and potentially the collapse of plateau surfaces and conversion into fen. Peat plateau bog is also being lost to wave erosion of subsiding plateau borders at lake shorelines. 30 refs., 14 figs.

  12. Plutonium, cesium and uranium series radionuclides in the Hudson River estuary and other environments. Annual technical progress report, 1 December 1980-30 November 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, H.J.; Trier, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    Radionuclide activities were measured in sediment cores and suspended particle samples throughout the salinity range of the Hudson River estuary. Activities of 137 Cs, 134 Cs, 60 Co, 239 240 Pu, and 238 Pu indicate reasonably rapid accumulation rates in the sediments of marginal cove areas, and very rapid deposition in the harbor region adjacent to New York City, resulting in 239 240 Pu accumulations there more than an order of magnitude greater than the fallout delivery rate. Fallout 239 240 Pu reaching the Hudson is almost completely retained within the systems by particle deposition, while 80 to 90% of the 137 Cs derived from both reactor releases and fallout is exported to the coastal waters in solution. Depth profiles of radionuclides in Hudson sediments are not significantly altered by physical mixing processes in the sediments in areas accumulating particles at greater than 1 cm/yr. Measurements of fallout 239 2 xperimental quantities

  13. Small-scale variability in peatland pore-water biogeochemistry, Hudson Bay Lowland, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulanowski, T A; Branfireun, B A

    2013-06-01

    The Hudson Bay Lowland (HBL) of northern Ontario, Manitoba and Quebec, Canada is the second largest contiguous peatland complex in the world, currently containing more than half of Canada's soil carbon. Recent concerns about the ecohydrological impacts to these large northern peatlands resulting from climate change and resource extraction have catalyzed a resurgence in scientific research into this ecologically important region. However, the sheer size, heterogeneity and elaborate landscape arrangements of this ecosystem raise important questions concerning representative sampling of environmental media for chemical or physical characterization. To begin to quantify such variability, this study assessed the small-scale spatial (1m) and short temporal (21 day) variability of surface pore-water biogeochemistry (pH, dissolved organic carbon, and major ions) in a Sphagnum spp.-dominated, ombrotrophic raised bog, and a Carex spp.-dominated intermediate fen in the HBL. In general, pore-water pH and concentrations of dissolved solutes were similar to previously reported literature values from this region. However, systematic sampling revealed consistent statistically significant differences in pore-water chemistries between the bog and fen peatland types, and large within-site spatiotemporal variability. We found that microtopography in the bog was associated with consistent differences in most biogeochemical variables. Temporal changes in dissolved solute chemistry, particularly base cations (Na(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)), were statistically significant in the intermediate fen, likely a result of a dynamic connection between surficial waters and mineral-rich deep groundwater. In both the bog and fen, concentrations of SO4(2-) showed considerable spatial variability, and a significant decrease in concentrations over the study period. The observed variability in peatland pore-water biogeochemistry over such small spatial and temporal scales suggests that under-sampling in

  14. Heritability of body size in the polar bears of Western Hudson Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malenfant, René M; Davis, Corey S; Richardson, Evan S; Lunn, Nicholas J; Coltman, David W

    2018-04-18

    Among polar bears (Ursus maritimus), fitness is dependent on body size through males' abilities to win mates, females' abilities to provide for their young and all bears' abilities to survive increasingly longer fasting periods caused by climate change. In the Western Hudson Bay subpopulation (near Churchill, Manitoba, Canada), polar bears have declined in body size and condition, but nothing is known about the genetic underpinnings of body size variation, which may be subject to natural selection. Here, we combine a 4449-individual pedigree and an array of 5,433 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to provide the first quantitative genetic study of polar bears. We used animal models to estimate heritability (h 2 ) among polar bears handled between 1966 and 2011, obtaining h 2 estimates of 0.34-0.48 for strictly skeletal traits and 0.18 for axillary girth (which is also dependent on fatness). We genotyped 859 individuals with the SNP array to test for marker-trait association and combined p-values over genetic pathways using gene-set analysis. Variation in all traits appeared to be polygenic, but we detected one region of moderately large effect size in body length near a putative noncoding RNA in an unannotated region of the genome. Gene-set analysis suggested that variation in body length was associated with genes in the regulatory cascade of cyclin expression, which has previously been associated with body size in mice. A greater understanding of the genetic architecture of body size variation will be valuable in understanding the potential for adaptation in polar bear populations challenged by climate change. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Plutonium, cesium, uranium and thorium series radionuclides in the Hudson River estuary and other environments. Annual technical progress report, 1 December 1984-30 November 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, H.J.; Trier, R.M.; Anderson, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    We have measured radionuclide activities in a large number of sediment cores and suspended particle samples throughout the salinity range of the Hudson River estuary. Activities of 137 Cs, 134 Cs and 60 Co determined by gamma spectrometry and /sup 239,240/Pu and 238 Pu determined by alpha spectrometry indicate reasonably rapid accumulation rates in the sediments of marginal cove areas, and very rapid deposition in the harbor region adjacent to New York City, resulting in /sup 239,240/Pu accumulations there more than an order of magnitude greater than the fallout delivery rate. Fallout /sup 239,240/Pu moving downstream in the Hudson appears to be almost completely retained within the system by particle deposition, while more than 50% of the 137 Cs derived from both reactor releases and fallout has been exported from the tidal Hudson to coastal waters. Some significant movement of dissolved plutonium into the estuary from the adjacent coastal waters may well be occurring. Depth profiles of radionuclides in Hudson sediments do not appear to be significantly altered by physical mixing processes in the sediment in areas accumulating particles at greater than 1 cm/y. Transport of fallout radionuclides from the drainage basin to the tidal Hudson appears to have decreased much faster than would be calculated from continuous removal from a well-mixed soil reservoir, indicating that sequestering of a substantial portion of the soil fallout burden has occurred in the watershed soils over the past two decades. Activities of 60 Co in New York harbor sediments in 1984 averaged considerably higher than in 1979 and 1981, suggesting releases of this nuclide to the Hudson comparable to the first five years of reactor operations. 12 figs., 9 tabs

  16. Tsunami hazard assessment in the Hudson River Estuary based on dynamic tsunami-tide simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelby, Michael; Grilli, Stéphan T.; Grilli, Annette R.

    2016-12-01

    This work is part of a tsunami inundation mapping activity carried out along the US East Coast since 2010, under the auspice of the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation program (NTHMP). The US East Coast features two main estuaries with significant tidal forcing, which are bordered by numerous critical facilities (power plants, major harbors,...) as well as densely built low-level areas: Chesapeake Bay and the Hudson River Estuary (HRE). HRE is the object of this work, with specific focus on assessing tsunami hazard in Manhattan, the Hudson and East River areas. In the NTHMP work, inundation maps are computed as envelopes of maximum surface elevation along the coast and inland, by simulating the impact of selected probable maximum tsunamis (PMT) in the Atlantic ocean margin and basin. At present, such simulations assume a static reference level near shore equal to the local mean high water (MHW) level. Here, instead we simulate maximum inundation in the HRE resulting from dynamic interactions between the incident PMTs and a tide, which is calibrated to achieve MHW at its maximum level. To identify conditions leading to maximum tsunami inundation, each PMT is simulated for four different phases of the tide and results are compared to those obtained for a static reference level. We first separately simulate the tide and the three PMTs that were found to be most significant for the HRE. These are caused by: (1) a flank collapse of the Cumbre Vieja Volcano (CVV) in the Canary Islands (with a 80 km3 volume representing the most likely extreme scenario); (2) an M9 coseismic source in the Puerto Rico Trench (PRT); and (3) a large submarine mass failure (SMF) in the Hudson River canyon of parameters similar to the 165 km3 historical Currituck slide, which is used as a local proxy for the maximum possible SMF. Simulations are performed with the nonlinear and dispersive long wave model FUNWAVE-TVD, in a series of nested grids of increasing resolution towards the coast, by one

  17. Effects of earlier sea ice breakup on survival and population size of polar bears in western Hudson Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regehr, E.V.; Lunn, N.J.; Amstrup, Steven C.; Stirling, I.

    2007-01-01

    Some of the most pronounced ecological responses to climatic warming are expected to occur in polar marine regions, where temperature increases have been the greatest and sea ice provides a sensitive mechanism by which climatic conditions affect sympagic (i.e., with ice) species. Population-level effects of climatic change, however, remain difficult to quantify. We used a flexible extension of Cormack-Jolly-Seber capture-recapture models to estimate population size and survival for polar bears (Ursus maritimus), one of the most ice-dependent of Arctic marine mammals. We analyzed data for polar bears captured from 1984 to 2004 along the western coast of Hudson Bay and in the community of Churchill, Manitoba, Canada. The Western Hudson Bay polar bear population declined from 1,194 (95% CI = 1,020-1,368) in 1987 to 935 (95% CI = 794-1,076) in 2004. Total apparent survival of prime-adult polar bears (5-19 yr) was stable for females (0.93; 95% CI = 0.91-0.94) and males (0.90; 95% CI = 0.88-0.91). Survival of juvenile, subadult, and senescent-adult polar bears was correlated with spring sea ice breakup date, which was variable among years and occurred approximately 3 weeks earlier in 2004 than in 1984. We propose that this correlation provides evidence for a causal association between earlier sea ice breakup (due to climatic warming) and decreased polar bear survival. It may also explain why Churchill, like other communities along the western coast of Hudson Bay, has experienced an increase in human-polar bear interactions in recent years. Earlier sea ice breakup may have resulted in a larger number of nutritionally stressed polar bears, which are encroaching on human habitations in search of supplemental food. Because western Hudson Bay is near the southern limit of the species' range, our findings may foreshadow the demographic responses and management challenges that more northerly polar bear populations will experience if climatic warming in the Arctic continues as

  18. Adult tree swallow survival on the polychlorinated biphenyl-contaminated Hudson River, New York, USA, between 2006 and 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, Christine M.; Custer, Thomas W.; Hines, James E.

    2012-01-01

    The upper Hudson River basin in east central New York, USA, is highly contaminated, primarily with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Reduced adult survival has been documented in tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) at a similarly PCB-contaminated river system in western Massachusetts. The purpose of the present study was to assess whether adult survival of tree swallows was likewise affected in the Hudson River basin. Between 2006 and 2010, a total of 521 female tree swallows were banded, of which 148 were retrapped at least once. The authors used Program MARK and an information theoretic approach to test the hypothesis that PCB contamination reduced annual survival of female tree swallows. The model that best described the processes that generated the capture history data included covariate effects of year and female plumage coloration on survival but not PCB/river. Annual survival rates of brown-plumaged females (mostly one year old) were generally lower (mean phi = 0.39) than those of blue-plumaged females (mean phi = 0.50, one year or older). Poor early spring weather in 2007 was associated with reduced survival in both plumage-color groups compared to later years. Models with the effects of PCB exposure on survival (all ΔAICc values >5.0) received little support.

  19. Recent changes in mercury deposition and primary productivity inferred from sediments of lakes from the Hudson Bay Lowlands, Ontario, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazeau, Michelle L.; Poulain, Alexandre J.; Paterson, Andrew M.; Keller, Wendel; Sanei, Hamed; Blais, Jules M.

    2013-01-01

    Spatial and temporal changes in mercury (Hg) concentrations and organic carbon in lake sediments were examined from the Hudson Bay Lowlands to investigate whether Hg deposition to sediments is related to indicators of autochthonous production. Total organic carbon, “S2” carbon (mainly algal-derived OC), C:N and ∂ 13 C indicators suggest an increase in autochthonous productivity in recent decades. Up-core profiles of S2 concentrations and fluxes were significantly correlated with Hg suggesting that varying algal matter scavenging of Hg from the water column may play an important role in the temporal profiles of Hg throughout the sediment cores. Absence of significant relationship between total Hg and methyl Hg (MeHg) in surficial sediments suggested that inorganic Hg supply does not limit MeHg production. MeHg and OC were highly correlated across lakes in surface and deep sediment layers, indicating that sediment organic matter content explains part of the spatial variation in MeHg concentrations between lakes. - Highlights: ► Hg concentrations in sediment cores correlate with autochthonous organic production. ► Inorganic Hg supply in sediment does not limit MeHg production. ► Sediment methylmercury concentration is highly correlated with organic C content. - Increased mercury concentrations in lake sediment cores coincide with evidence of increased autochthonous production in lakes of the Hudson Bay Lowlands, Canada.

  20. What we didn't learn about the Hudson River, why, and what it means for environmental assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnthouse, L.W.; Klauda, R.J.; Vaughan, D.S.

    1988-01-01

    Many of the major objectives of utility-sponsored and agency-sponsored Hudson River research programs were not achieved. Among these were identification and quantification of regulatory mechanisms and discovery of factors controlling year-class strength in striped bass and other important fish populations. Questions about community-level and ecosystem-level effects were not seriously addressed. Because of these limitations, an unambiguous assessment of the effects of power plants on the long-term production and persistence of Hudson River fish populations was not possible. It is argued that the failure to reach a scientifically defensible bottom line was largely due to: (1) institutional constraints on the design and conduct of assessment studies; (2) the complexity and spatiotemporal variability of estuarine ecosystems; and (3) the inadequacy of existing population and ecosystem theory. It is concluded that, for the foreseeable future, estimates of short-term impacts on populations will continue to be the most useful indices of power plants effects. Long-term monitoring and basic research on ecological processes in estuaries, funded and managed independently of the regulatory process, are essential to improving future environmental impact assessments. 44 refs

  1. If it quacks like a duck: reviewing health care providers' speech restrictions under the first prong of Central Hudson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fultz, Shawn L

    2013-01-01

    The First Amendment protects the speech of health care providers. This protection can limit states' abilities to protect patients from harmful therapies involving speech, such as sexual orientation change efforts. Because providers' speech is more similar to commercial speech than traditional political discourse, it is possible to create a First Amendment review analysis that better balances states' police powers with providers' First Amendment rights. Under a "single-prong" approach, the first prong of Central Hudson can be used to identify quackery, which is analogous to false or misleading commercial speech and would therefore be outside the protection of the First Amendment. Because health care must be tailored to individual patients, restrictions on speech that survive the first prong of Central Hudson would be subject to strict scrutiny in order to leave the therapeutic decision to the provider and her patient, and maintain consistency with current jurisprudence. This Comment examines litigation from California's attempted ban on sexual orientation change therapy to illustrate the conflicts created by the current approach to First Amendment review of health care provider speech. This Comment then demonstrates the benefit of the proposed single-prong approach, including how it simultaneously protects patients from harm while protecting health care providers' speech.

  2. Plutonium and cesium radionuclides in the Hudson River estuary. Annual technical progress report, December 1, 1976--November 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, H.J.; Trier, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    We have obtained a large set of sediment cores from the Hudson estuary through much of the ambient salinity range. A number of core sections and samples of suspended particles have been analyzed for 137 Cs, 134 Cs and 60 Co by direct gamma counting, and 239 Pu, 240 Pu, and 238 Pu by alpha spectrometry. The distribution of both 137 Cs and 239 Pu, 240 Pu indicates rapid accumulation in marginal cover areas, and especially in the harbor region adjacent to New York City. The distributions of both 137 Cs and 239 Pu, 240 Pu are similar in surface sediments and with depth in cores, but there are deviations from the fallout ratio due to addition of reactor 137 Cs and loss of 137 Cs from the particle phases at higher salinities. Measureable amounts of reactor-derived 134 Cs and 60 Co are found in nearly all sediment samples containing appreciable 137 Cs, between 15 km upstream of Indian Point and the downstream extent of our sampling, 70 km south of the reactor. Accumulations of 239 Pu, 240 Pu in New York harbor sediments are more than an order of magnitude greater than the fallout delivery rate. The most likely explanation is accumulation of fine particles in the harbor which have been transported from upstream areas of the Hudson. Our evidence so far indicates that Indian Point is probably not a significant source of 239 Pu, 240 Pu or 238 Pu compared with the fallout burden of these nuclides already in the sediments

  3. What to eat now? Shifts in polar bear diet during the ice-free season in western Hudson Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormezano, Linda J; Rockwell, Robert F

    2013-01-01

    Under current climate trends, spring ice breakup in Hudson Bay is advancing rapidly, leaving polar bears (Ursus maritimus) less time to hunt seals during the spring when they accumulate the majority of their annual fat reserves. For this reason, foods that polar bears consume during the ice-free season may become increasingly important in alleviating nutritional stress from lost seal hunting opportunities. Defining how the terrestrial diet might have changed since the onset of rapid climate change is an important step in understanding how polar bears may be reacting to climate change. We characterized the current terrestrial diet of polar bears in western Hudson Bay by evaluating the contents of passively sampled scat and comparing it to a similar study conducted 40 years ago. While the two terrestrial diets broadly overlap, polar bears currently appear to be exploiting increasingly abundant resources such as caribou (Rangifer tarandus) and snow geese (Chen caerulescens caerulescens) and newly available resources such as eggs. This opportunistic shift is similar to the diet mixing strategy common among other Arctic predators and bear species. We discuss whether the observed diet shift is solely a response to a nutritional stress or is an expression of plastic foraging behavior. PMID:24223286

  4. Plutonium and cesium radionuclides in the Hudson River Estuary. Annual technical progress report, 1 December 1975--30 November 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, H.J.; Williams, S.C.

    1976-01-01

    We have obtained a large set of cores from the Hudson Estuary covering nearly all of the ambient salinity range. A number of core sections have been analyzed for 137 Cs, 134 Cs, 60 Co and 40 K by direct gamma counting and for 239 , 240 Pu and 238 Pu by alpha-spectrometry. Rapid accumulation, up to 20 cm/year, of sediments containing 239 , 240 Pu, 137 Cs, 134 Cs and 60 Co occurs in New York Harbor. Marginal coves upstream from the harbor also serve as depositional environments. The ratio of sediment /sup 239,240/Pu to 137 Cs is higher than the fallout ratio in the seaward end of New York Harbor, despite the presence of a significant component of reactor 137 Cs in the sediments, but lower than the range of ratios observed by others for nearshore environments with low sediment deposition rates. A substantial portion of gamma emitting fission product and activation nuclides released from the Indian Point nuclear facility have accumulated in New York Harbor, more than 60 km downstream from the release area. We have not yet established whether local transuranic releases to the Hudson have occurred

  5. Selective analysis of power plant operation on the Hudson River with emphasis on the Bowline Point Generating Station. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnthouse, L.W.; Cannon, J.B.; Christensen, S.G.

    1977-07-01

    Because of the location of the Bowline, Roseton, and Indian Point power generating facilities in the low-salinity zone of the Hudson estuary, operation of these plants with the present once-through cooling systems will adversely influence the fish populations that use the area for spawning and initial periods of growth and development. Recruitment rates and standing crops of several fish species may be lowered in response to the increased mortality caused by entrainment of nonscreenable eggs and larvae and by impingement of screenable young of the year. Entrainment and impingement data are particularly relevant for assessing which fish species have the greatest potential for being adversely affected by operation of Bowline, Roseton, and Indian Point with once-through cooling. These data from each of these three plants suggest that the six species that merit the greatest consideration are striped bass, white perch, tomcod, alewife, blueback herring, and bay anchovy. Two points of view are available for assessing the relative importance of the fish species in the Hudson River. From the fisheries point of view, the only two species of major importance are striped bass and shad. From the fish-community and ecosystem point of view, the dominant species, as determined by seasonal and regional standing crops (in numbers and biomass per hectare), are the six species most commonly entrained and impinged, namely, striped bass, white perch, tomcod, alewife, blueback herring, and anchovy

  6. 77 FR 40518 - Swim Events in the Captain of the Port New York Zone; Hudson River, East River, Upper New York...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-10

    ... 1625-AA00 Swim Events in the Captain of the Port New York Zone; Hudson River, East River, Upper New York Bay, Lower New York Bay; New York, NY ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing seven temporary safety zones for swim events within the Captain of the Port (COTP) New York Zone. These...

  7. Computer simulation model for the striped bass young-of-the-year population in the Hudson River. [Effects of entrainment and impingement at power plants on population dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eraslan, A.H.; Van Winkle, W.; Sharp, R.D.; Christensen, S.W.; Goodyear, C.P.; Rush, R.M.; Fulkerson, W.

    1975-09-01

    This report presents a daily transient (tidal-averaged), longitudinally one-dimensional (cross-section-averaged) computer simulation model for the assessment of the entrainment and impingement impacts of power plant operations on young-of-the-year populations of the striped bass, Morone saxatilis, in the Hudson River.

  8. Timing of sediment-hosted Cu-Ag mineralization in the Trans-Hudson orogen at Janice Lake, Wollaston Domain, Saskatchewan, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelló, José; Valencia, Víctor A.; Cornejo, Paula; Clifford, John; Wilson, Alan J.; Collins, Greg

    2018-04-01

    The Janice Lake Cu-Ag mineralization in the Wollaston Domain of northern Saskatchewan is hosted by a metasedimentary sequence in the upper part of the Wollaston Supergroup of the Trans-Hudson orogen. The Wollaston Supergroup was deposited between 2070 and 1865 Ma in a foreland basin setting constructed over Archean basement of the Hearne craton. The Trans-Hudson orogen underwent final collision and peak metamorphism at 1810 Ma, during consolidation of Laurentia and its amalgamation with the Columbia supercontinent. Titanite is a common constituent of the post-peak metamorphic assemblages of Trans-Hudson lithotectonic units and accompanied disseminated sediment-hosted Cu sulfide mineralization at Janice Lake. Titanite crystals, intergrown with chalcocite over a strike-length of 2 km of Cu-bearing stratigraphy, were dated by the ID-TIMS and LA-ICP-MS U-Pb methods, returning an age range from 1780 to 1760 Ma and a weighted average age of 1775 ± 10 Ma. The titanite ages effectively date the associated chalcocite-dominated sediment-hosted Cu-Ag mineralization and its formation during initial post-orogenic uplift and cooling, 30 myr after peak metamorphism. The age-range and tectonic setting of the Janice Lake mineralization confirms that sediment-hosted Cu mineralization was an integral part of the metallogenic endowment of Columbia and that its emplacement coincided with the continental-scale Trans-Hudson orogeny rather than with diagenesis and extensional basin development 100 myr earlier.

  9. Building sustainable communities using sense of place indicators in three Hudson River Valley, NY, tourism destinations: An application of the limits of acceptable change process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura E. Sullivan; Rudy M. Schuster; Diane M. Kuehn; Cheryl S. Doble; Duarte. Morais

    2010-01-01

    This study explores whether measures of residents' sense of place can act as indicators in the Limits of Acceptable Change (LAC) process to facilitate tourism planning and management. Data on community attributes valued by residents and the associated values and meanings were collected through focus groups with 27 residents in three Hudson River Valley, New York,...

  10. Improvements in Hudson River Water Quality Create the Need for a new Approach to Monitoring and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mullan, G. D.; Juhl, A.; Sambrotto, R.; Lipscomb, J.; Brown, T.

    2008-12-01

    The lower Hudson River is a well-flushed temperate estuary that continues to support diverse wildlife populations although its shores are home to the nation's most populated metropolitan area. Data sets from the last hundred years clearly demonstrate extreme nutrient concentrations, pathogen loading, and periods of persistent hypoxia. These data also show a clear trend of steadily improving water quality in the last thirty years. Recent increases in recreational activity, expanded shoreline parks, and waterfront redevelopment, indicate the return of the people of New York to the River, concomitant with improved water quality. While mean seasonal water quality indicators are now often acceptable for large portions of the River, there remains a lack of information about the finer scale spatial and temporal variability of water quality. A new water quality sampling program was initiated in the Fall of 2006 to address this challenge. Monthly sampling cruises collected continuous underway surface measurements of hydrographic variables in parallel with discrete sampling for nutrients and microbiology. In general, these data indicate that mid-channel locations are often within acceptable water quality standards during dry weather, but that wet weather events deliver large quantities of sewage to the River, leading to short-term deterioration in water quality. In 2006-2007, only 6 of 27 sample sites had geometric mean values for Enterococcus , a sewage-indicating microorganism, that suggest consistently poor water quality. In contrast, single-day exceedances of EPA recommended guidelines for Enterococcus were found at 21 of the 27 sites. Although the mid-channel of the River was relatively homogenous with respect to sewage indicators, large changes were observed at tributary mixing interfaces and along the shallow edges of the River where human contact is most likely. The changing use of the River, together with new information about the importance of episodic and

  11. Drought as a Disturbance: Implications for Peatland Carbon Budgets in the Hudson Bay Lowland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, R.; Abnizova, A.; Miller, E.

    2009-05-01

    Carbon feedbacks are of particular importance in high latitudes, both because of large circumpolar peatland carbon pools and because climate warming is occurring more rapidly at these latitudes. Longer-term net ecosystem exchange will be influenced by the capacity of plant communities to respond to changing conditions. The nature of community change and the factors inducing change are examined in this study of a disturbance generated by severe drought in 1994 causing widespread mortality in the dominant moss, Dicranum elongatum, occupying an upland tundra site within the Hudson Bay Lowland near Churchill, Manitoba. One quarter of this moss has recently died and become encrusted with the micro-lichen, Ochrolechia spp. Moss cushions affected in this manner exhibit strong allelopathic inhibition of seedling establishment progressing to complete moss decay. Chamber NEE growing-season flux measurements show an average net release of 642 mg C /m2/d from the dead moss compared to an average net uptake of 164 mg C /m2/d from completely healthy cushions. Between these two extremes, stressed living moss cushions support abundant seedling cover which increases in direct proportion with the fractional mortality. A proxy method for estimating the growth rates of cushions, based on the length of green living shoots, indicates that the moss community is uniform in age and established shortly after the most severe drought of historical record in 1966. Subsequent growth rates of cushions show a strong dependency on proximity to the water table (4.17-1.11 mm/y over 58 cm height interval). A growing-season moss water budget identifies the dominant water flow pathways and indicates capillary uptake (0.08 mm h-1) provides 64% of the storage gains, emphasizing the importance of groundwater for growth and survival. Maximum storage capacities are directly related to cushion biomass, leading to both enhanced moisture stress and increased susceptibility to mortality as cushion size

  12. Biological effects of simulated discharge plume entrainment at Indian Point Nuclear Power Station, Hudson River estuary, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanza, G.R.; Lauer, G.J.; Ginn, T.C.; Storm, P.C.; Zubarik, L.; New York Univ., N.Y.

    1975-01-01

    Laboratory and field simulations of the discharge plume entrainment of phytoplankton, zooplankton and fish were carried out at the Indian Point Nuclear Station, Hudson River estuary, USA. Phytoplankton assemblages studied on two dates produced different response patterns measured as photosynthetic activity. Chlorophyll-a levels did not change following simulated entrainment. Possible explanations for the differences are discussed. The two abundant copepods Acartia tonsa and Eurytemorta affinis appear to tolerate exposure to discharge plume ΔT without adverse effects. Copepods subjected to plume entrainment may suffer considerable mortality during periods of condenser chlorination. In general, the amphipod Gammarus spp. did not appear to suffer significant mortality during simulated entrainment. Juvenile striped bass, Morone saxatilis, were not affected by simulated plume transit before and during plant condenser chlorination; however, a simulated ''worst possible case'' plume ΔT produced statistically significant moralities. (author)

  13. Engineering Condition Survey and Evaluation of Troy Lock and Dam, Hudson River, New York Report 2. Evaluation and Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    boats in both the spring and fall make seasonal trips from the sunny south to the more mountainous , wooded north, as well as completing many short...back- ground of Troy Lock and Dam 8. The Hudson River originates in the Adirondack Mountains in northern New York State among the highest peaks of the...0.00 0.00 0.00 ___ ___ __ ___ ___ __ __is_ B C BC 25.24 34.14 0.00 0.00 C 25.24 36.00 0. 00 0.06 &M~E ALEA D 3.45 36.00 0.00 6.10 E 3.45 17.00 0.00

  14. Dreamers in dialogue: evolution, sex and gender in the utopian visions of William Morris and William Henry Hudson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Novák

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to explore the parallels between two late-nineteenth-century utopias,William Henry Hudsons A Crystal Age (1882 and William Morriss News from Nowhere (1891. Itaims to explore how these two works respond to the transition from a kinetic to a static conception ofutopia that under pressure from evolutionary and feminist discourses took place during the period.Particular focus lies on the way in which this is negotiated through the depiction of evolution, sexuality,and gender roles in the respective novels, and how the depiction of these disruptive elements may workas a means of ensuring the readers active engagement in political, intellectual and emotional terms.

  15. Sources, distribution, and mobility of plutonium and radiocesium in soils, sediments and water of the Hudson River Estuary and watershed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linsalata, P.

    1984-01-01

    Results of 239 240 Pu, 238 Pu and 137 Cs measurements are reported for soil cores sampled within the watershed, for many sediment cores and surface dredge samples taken along the length of the Hudson River Estuary and for water samples collected on a continuous basis in both fresh and estuarine reaches. Accumulations of 239 240 Pu and 137 Cs measured within sediment cores taken from discrete regions of the river-estuary were summed to arrive at total sediment inventories of 1.6 +/- 0.7 Ci and 53 +/- 20 Ci, respectively. The variability observed in the sediment accumulation of radionuclides is discussed in terms of the physical and chemical characteristics of the river-estuary. Plutonium-239,240 and 137 Cs were similary distributed in sediments and water sampled from fresh water reaches of the Hudson with activity ratios (i.e., 239 240 Pu/ 1 2number 7 Cs) ranging from 0.01 to 0.03. Distribution coefficients, which were determined both in vitro and in situ were similar for both nuclides (i.e., from 1 x 10 5 to 3 x 10 5 L.kg -1 ) in fresh water, but diverged significantly (as a result of increased 137 Cs solubility) in brackish waters that exhibited chlorinities in excess of 1-2 g Cl - .L -1 . The concentrations of 239 240 Pu and 137 Cs observed in fresh water samples were primarily functions of the suspended load. Approximately 60-70% of the annual downstream transport of 239 240 Pu and 137 Cs calculated during 1980 and 1981 (i.e., 4 +/- 0.5 mCi and 515 +/- 84 mCi, respectively) was associated with suspended particulates greater than or equal to 0.45 μm. An empirical model was developed to determine the rates of vertical migration of these nuclides in soils of the watershed

  16. Simulating the Effects of Sea Level Rise on the Resilience and Migration of Tidal Wetlands along the Hudson River.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nava M Tabak

    Full Text Available Sea Level Rise (SLR caused by climate change is impacting coastal wetlands around the globe. Due to their distinctive biophysical characteristics and unique plant communities, freshwater tidal wetlands are expected to exhibit a different response to SLR as compared with the better studied salt marshes. In this study we employed the Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM, which simulates regional- or local-scale changes in tidal wetland habitats in response to SLR, and adapted it for application in a freshwater-dominated tidal river system, the Hudson River Estuary. Using regionally-specific estimated ranges of SLR and accretion rates, we produced simulations for a spectrum of possible future wetland distributions and quantified the projected wetland resilience, migration or loss in the HRE through the end of the 21st century. Projections of total wetland extent and migration were more strongly determined by the rate of SLR than the rate of accretion. Surprisingly, an increase in net tidal wetland area was projected under all scenarios, with newly-formed tidal wetlands expected to comprise at least 33% of the HRE's wetland area by year 2100. Model simulations with high rates of SLR and/or low rates of accretion resulted in broad shifts in wetland composition with widespread conversion of high marsh habitat to low marsh, tidal flat or permanent inundation. Wetland expansion and resilience were not equally distributed through the estuary, with just three of 48 primary wetland areas encompassing >50% of projected new wetland by the year 2100. Our results open an avenue for improving predictive models of the response of freshwater tidal wetlands to sea level rise, and broadly inform the planning of conservation measures of this critical resource in the Hudson River Estuary.

  17. Immersion in a Hudson Valley Tidal Marsh and Climate Research Community - Lamont-Doherty's Secondary School Field Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteet, D. M.; Newton, R.; Vincent, S.; Sambrotto, R.; Bostick, B. C.; Schlosser, P.; Corbett, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    A primary advantage of place-based research is the multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary research that can be applied to a single locale, with a depth of continued study through time. Through the last decade, Lamont-Doherty's Secondary School Field Research Program (SSFRP) has promoted scientific inquiry, mostly among groups under-represented in STEM fields, in Piermont Marsh, a federally protected marsh in the Hudson estuary. At the same time, Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO) scientists have become more involved, through mentoring by researchers, postdocs and graduate students, often paired with high school teachers. The sustained engagement of high school students in a natural environment, experiencing the Hudson River and its tidal cycles, protection of coastline, water quality improvement, native and invasive plant communities, is fundamental to their understanding of the importance of wetlands with their many ecosystem services. In addition, the Program has come to see "place" as inclusive of the Observatory itself. The students' work at Lamont expands their understanding of educational opportunities and career possibilities. Immersing students in a research atmosphere brings a level of serious inquiry and study to their lives and provides them with concrete contributions that they make to team efforts. Students select existing projects ranging from water quality to Phragmites removal, read papers weekly, take field measurements, produce lab results, and present their research at the end of six weeks. Ongoing results build from year to year in studies of fish populations, nutrients, and carbon sequestration, and the students have presented at professional scientific meetings. Through the Program students gain a sense of ownership over both their natural and the academic environments. Challenges include sustained funding of the program; segmenting the research for reproducible, robust results; fitting the projects to PIs' research goals, time

  18. Microstructure, CTD and ADCP data collected from R/V ONRUST in Hudson River Estuary during 6 short cruises from 1994-05-19 to 2001-05-01 (NCEI Accession 0146260)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Observations of turbulent mixing, stratification and currents in the Hudson River Estuary made in 6 short cruises in 1994/1995 and 2001 were assembled. The lower...

  19. Natural activity in Hudson River estuary samples and their influence on the detection limits for gamma emitting radionuclides using NaI gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrenn, M.E.; Jinks, S.M.; Hairr, L.M.; Paschoa, A.S.; Lentsch, J.W.

    1972-01-01

    Sources of natural radioactivity in Hudson River Estuary are described. The technique of analysis for gamma spectrometry of environmental samples is presented and its pros and cons discussed. The distribution of natural radioactivity in water, biota and sediment was reported as well as the role played by the vertical distribution of cesium-137 in sediments as an indicator of the rate of sedimentation. The effect of the presence of natural radionuclides on the detection limits of man-made nuclides in the Hudson River environment is thoroughly examined. The results obtained with a 4-in. sodium iodide well crystal housed in a low background mercury shielding compare favorably with a more sophisticated Ge(Li) system which uses anticoincidence, as far as the analysis of environmental samples is concerned. (U.S.)

  20. Plutonium, cesium, uranium, and thorium series radionuclides in the Hudson River estuary and other environments. Annual technical progress report, December 1, 1982-November 30, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, H.J.; Trier, R.M.; Anderson, R.F.

    1983-01-01

    We have measured radionuclide activities in a large number of sediment cores and suspended particle samples throughout the salinity range of the Hudson River estuary. Activities of 137 Cs, 134 Cs and 60 Co determined by gamma spectrometry and 239 240 Pu and 238 Pu determined by alpha spectrometry indicate reasonably rapid accumulation rates in the sediments of marginal cove areas, and very rapid deposition in the harbor region adjacent to New York City, resulting in 239 240 Pu accumulations there more than an order of magnitude greater than the fallout delivery rate. Fallout 239 240 Pu moving downstream in the Hudson appears to be almost completely retained within the system by particle deposition, while more than 50% of the 137 Cs derived from both reactor releases and fallout has been exported from the tidal Hudson to coastal waters. Measurements of fallout 239 240 Pu in a saline lake with a high carbonate ion concentration yielded water column activities about two orders of magnitude greater than has been found for fallout plutonium in other continental waters, indicating extensive mobility in some natural water environments. Experiments using lake water suggest that carbonate ion is likely to be a critical factor in regulating plutonium solubility in some environments and that low molecular weight complexes are primarily responsible for enhanced plutonium solubility. 5 references

  1. Plutonium and cesium radionuclides in the Hudson River Estuary. Annual technical progress report, December 1, 1974--November 30, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, H.J.; Williams, S.C.

    1975-01-01

    We have obtained a large set of gravity cores from the Hudson Estuary through much of the ambient salinity range. A number of core sections have been analyzed for 137 Cs, 134 Cs, 60 Co, and 40 K by direct gamma counting, and for 239 , 240 Pu by alpha-spectrometry. The distribution of both 137 Cs and 239 , 240 Pu indicates rapid accumulation in marginal cove areas and in the harbor region adjacent to New York City. The distribution of both 137 Cs and 239 , 240 Pu in the sediments is quite similar in surface sediments, and the trends with depth in cores are also similar. The ratio of sediment 239 , 240 Pu to 137 Cs throughout the sampled salinity range (0-20 0 / 00 ) approximates that in fallout, except near the nuclear reactor at Indian Point where releases of 137 Cs result in a ratio lower (0.004 to 0.008) than typical of fallout (0.015). Measurement amounts of reactor-derived 134 Cs, 60 Co, and 54 Mn are found in nearly all of the samples containing appreciable 137 Cs. These samples were between 15 km upstream of Indian Point reactor site and the downstream extent of our sampling, 70 km south of the reactor

  2. Mixing and photoreactivity of dissolved organic matter in the Nelson/Hayes estuarine system (Hudson Bay, Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guéguen, C.; Mokhtar, M.; Perroud, A.; McCullough, G.; Papakyriakou, T.

    2016-09-01

    This work presents the results of a 4-year study (2009-2012) investigating the mixing and photoreactivity of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the Nelson/Hayes estuary (Hudson Bay). Dissolved organic carbon (DOC), colored DOM, and humic-like DOM decreased with increasing salinity (r2 = 0.70-0.84). Removal of DOM was noticeable at low to mid salinity range, likely due to degradation and/or adsorption to particles. DOM photobleaching rates (i.e., decrease in DOM signal resulting from exposure to solar radiation) ranged from 0.005 to 0.030 h- 1, corresponding to half-lives of 4.9-9.9 days. Dissolved organic matter from the Nelson and Hayes Rivers was more photoreactive than from the estuary where the photodegradation of terrestrial DOM decreased with increasing salinity. Coincident with the loss of CDOM absorption was an increase in spectral slope S, suggesting a decrease in DOM molecular weight. Marked differences in photoreactivity of protein- and humic-like DOM were observed with highly humidified material being the most photosensitive. Information generated by our study will provide a valuable data set for better understanding the impacts of future hydroelectric development and climate change on DOM biogeochemical dynamics in the Nelson/Hayes estuary and coastal domain. This study will constitute a reference on terrestrial DOM fate prior to building additional generating capacity on the Nelson River.

  3. Preliminary study of the antimicrobial activity of Mentha x villosa Hudson essential oil, rotundifolone and its analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thúlio. A. Arruda

    Full Text Available Essential oils present antimicrobial activity against a variety of bacteria and yeasts, including species resistant to antibiotics and antifungicals. In this context, this work aims at the evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of Mentha x villosa Hudson ("hortelã da folha miúda", its major component (rotundifolone and four similar analogues of rotundifolone (limonene oxide, pulegone oxide, carvone epoxide and (+-pulegone against strain standards of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, E. coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomona aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Candida albicans ATCC 76645 and one strain of meticilin - resistant Staphylococcus aureus - MRSA (171c from human clinic. The method of the diffusion in plates with solid medium was used. The results showed that the oil of Mentha x villosa, rotundifolone, limonene oxide and (+-pulegone, are similar regarding the antimicrobial activity against the tested strains of S. aureus and C. albicans. All of the products present antimocrobial potential with antibacterial activity for S. aureus ATCC 25923 and antifungal activity for C. albicans ATCC 76645. None of the products presented antimicrobial activity for the strains of E. coli ATCC 25922 and P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853, representatives of the Gram negative bacteria.

  4. Working with Decision Makers to Improve Energy-Water System Resiliency in the Lower Hudson River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellows, J. D.; Schoonen, M. A.; Pullen, J.; González, J. E.; Saleh, F.; Bhatt, V.

    2017-12-01

    Nearly half of the 180 million people living in the eastern U.S. reside in coastal watershed or shoreline counties. The population density of these areas continues to increase, driving an increase in energy-water (EW) system demand and expansion of critical infrastructure. Along with population, these areas are also being stressed by environmental and technology stresses, including climate change. We have been working with decision makers in the Lower Hudson River Basin (LHRB) to develop the tools and data needed to better understand and improve the resiliency of LHRB EW systems facing these kinds of stresses. The LHRB represents: 1) a coastal environment subject to sea level rise that is among the fastest in the East; 2) one of the steepest gradients in population density in the US, with Manhattan the most densely populated coastal county in the nation; 3) a EWN infrastructure serving the largest metropolitan area in the US and the financial center of the world; 4) a history of environmental impacts, ranging from heatwaves, hurricanes to localized storms, that can be used to hindcast; and 5) a wealth of historic and real-time data, extensive monitoring facilities and existing specific sector models that can be leveraged. This presentation will focus on the lessons learned working with the LHRB decision makers.

  5. Downward Migration of Coastal Conifers as a Response to Recent Land Emergence in Eastern Hudson Bay, Québec

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bégin, Yves; Bérubé, Dominique; Grégoire, Martin

    1993-07-01

    Postglacial uplift in the eastern Hudson Bay area is among the most rapid in the world (300 m during the last 8000 yr). Although emergence curves based on 14 C-dated raised shorelines give a consistent basis for modeling relative sea-level changes, such a low-resolution dating method is inappropriate for estimating trends over recent decades. A major downward displacement of white spruce ( Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) and tamarack ( Larix laricina (DuRoi) K. Koch) occurred on protected shores as a response to shoreline retreat during this century. Analysis of the age distribution of trees indicates a progradation of white spruce and tamarack on gently sloping terrain ranging from 1.3 and 2.6 cm/yr, respectively, toward the sea. Improvement of climatic conditions during the 20th century favored such expansion which was probably faster than the real land emergence rates, but recent episodes of high water levels caused regression of forest margins over the highly exposed shores. Nevertheless, the downward trend of the treeline over this century substantiates the projections of 14C-dated coastal emergence curves during the modern period (1.0 to 1.3 cm/yr) by providing an estimate of the maximum rates of shoreline retreat.

  6. Hudson River Unionids and Zebra Mussels: The Beginning of the End or the End of the Beginning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayer, D. L.; Malcom, H. M.

    2005-05-01

    The invasion of the Hudson River estuary by zebra mussels was followed by steep declines (77 to >99.7%) in populations of all species of native bivalves between 1992 and 1999. Body condition of all unionids, and growth and recruitment of young unionids also declined significantly. Declines in population size and body condition were correlated primarily with the filtration rate of the zebra mussel population, not with fouling of native bivalves by zebra mussels. Samples taken since 2000, however, have shown that populations of all 4 common native bivalves have stabilized or even recovered, although the zebra mussel population has not declined. The mechanisms underlying this apparent reversal of fortune are not clear: recruitment and growth of young mussels have showed limited recovery, but body condition of adults has not. We found no evidence that spatial refuges contributed to this reversal of population declines. Simple statistical models project now that native bivalves may persist at population densities about an order of magnitude below their pre-invasion densities.

  7. Ecological carryover effects associated with partial migration in white perch (Morone americana) within the Hudson River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Brian K.; Piccoli, Philip M.; Secor, David H.

    2018-01-01

    Partial migration in complex life cycles allows environmental conditions experienced during one life-stage to interact with genetic thresholds and produce divergent spatial behaviors in the next stage. We evaluated partial migration over the entire life cycle of white perch, (Morone americana) within the Hudson River Estuary, combining otolith microchemistry, population demographics and environmental data analysis. Ecological carryover effects were used as a framework to test how environmental variation during the larval period influenced migration behaviors and growth characteristics in subsequent life-stages. Two annual cohorts of juveniles were classified based on whether they persisted in natal habitats (freshwater resident contingent) or dispersed into non-natal habitats (brackish water migratory contingent) as juveniles. The migratory contingent tended to hatch earlier and experience cooler temperatures as larvae, while the availability of zooplankton prey during the larval period appeared to influence growth dynamics before and after metamorphosis. Juvenile migration behaviors were reversible but usually persisted into adulthood. As juveniles, the consequences of partial migration on growth appeared to be modified by river flow, as demonstrated by the influence of a large storm event on feeding conditions in one of the study years. Migratory adults grew faster and attained larger maximum sizes, but may also experience higher rates of mortality. The interplay uncovered between life-stage transitions, conditional migration behaviors and habitat productivity throughout the life cycle shapes white perch population dynamics and will likely play an important role in responses to long-term environmental change.

  8. Use of an ADCP to compute suspended-sediment discharge in the tidal Hudson River, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Gary R.; Nystrom, Elizabeth A.; Litten, Simon

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) can provide data needed for computation of suspended-sediment discharge in complex river systems, such as tidal rivers, in which conventional methods of collecting time-series data on suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) and water discharge are not feasible. Although ADCPs are not designed to measure SSC, ADCP data can be used as a surrogate under certain environmental conditions. However, the software for such computation is limited, and considerable post-processing is needed to correct and normalize ADCP data for this use. This report documents the sampling design and computational procedure used to calibrate ADCP measures of echo intensity to SSC and water velocity to discharge in the computation of suspended-sediment discharge at the study site on the Hudson River near Poughkeepsie, New York. The methods and procedures described may prove useful to others doing similar work in different locations; however, they are specific to this study site and may have limited applicability elsewhere.

  9. Plutonium, cesium and uranium series radionuclides in the Hudson River estuary and other environments. Annual technical progress report, December 1, 1979-November 30, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, H.J.; Trier, R.M.; Olsen, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    Radionuclide activities were measured in a large number of sediment cores and suspended particle samples throughout the salinity range of the Hudson River estuary. Activities of 137 Cs, 134 Cs and 60 Co determined by gamma spectrometry and 239 240 Pu and 238 Pu determined by alpha spectrometry indicate reasonably rapid accumulation rates in the sediments of marginal cove areas, and very rapid deposition in the harbor region adjacent to New York City, resulting in 239 240 Pu accumulations there more than an order of magnitude greater than the fallout delivery rate. Measurable amounts of reactor-derived 134 Cs and 60 Co are found in nearly al sediment samples containing appreciable 137 Cs between 15 km upstream of Indian Point and the downstream extent of our sampling about 70 km south of the reactor. Fallout 239 240 Pu reaching the Hudson appears to be almost completely retained within the systems by particle deposition, while 70 to 90% of the 137 Cs derived from both reactor releases and fallout has been exported to the coastal waters in solution. Activity levels of 239 240 Pu in New York harbor sediments indicate a significant source in addition to suspended particles carried down the Hudson. The most likely cause appears to be transport into the estuary of particles from offshore waters having higher specific activities of 239 240 Pu. Measurements of fallout 239 240 Pu in a saline lake with a high carbonate ion concentration yielded water column activities about two orders of magnitude greater than has been found for fallout plutonium in other continental waters, indicating extensive mobility in some natural water environments. Experiments using lake water suggest that carbonate ion may indeed be a critical factor in regulating plutonium solubility and that low molecular weight complexes are primarily responsible for enhanced plutonium solubility

  10. Coastal conduit in southwestern Hudson Bay (Canada) in summer: Rapid transit of freshwater and significant loss of colored dissolved organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granskog, Mats A.; MacDonald, Robie W.; Kuzyk, Zou Zou A.; Senneville, Simon; Mundy, Christopher-John; Barber, David G.; Stern, Gary A.; Saucier, Francois

    2009-08-01

    Distributions of freshwater (sea-ice melt and runoff) were investigated along inshore-offshore sections in southwestern Hudson Bay for fall conditions. Conductivity-temperature-density profiles and bottle samples collected for salinity, oxygen isotope (δ18O), and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) analyses were used to discriminate between contributions of river water (RW) and sea-ice melt (SIM). Stations had a fresh summer surface mixed layer 5-25 m thick overlying a cold subsurface layer indicative of the previous winter's polar mixed layer (PML). The fraction of RW decreased strongly with distance from shore, while the opposite was true for SIM. The majority of RW was constrained in a coastal domain within 100-150 km from shore, which, because of high alongshore velocities, accounts for the majority of freshwater and volume transports. On the basis of freshwater inventories and composition, brine and RW accumulate in the PML over winter because of ice formation and downward mixing. The summer surface circulation results in an annual net export of SIM from the region. Residence times for freshwater components in the southwestern sector of the bay, based on currents derived from a 3-D ocean model for Hudson Bay, are about 1-10 months, implying rapid transit of freshwater. Despite the short residence time for RW (1-3 months), CDOM is significantly photobleached and provides an unreliable tracer for RW. Photobleaching represents an important sink for dissolved organic carbon entering from rivers and could, in part, explain why Hudson Bay is only a minor sink for atmospheric CO2 in the open water season.

  11. Plutonium, cesium and uranium series radionuclides in the Hudson River estuary and other environments. Annual technical progress report, December 1, 1979-November 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, H. J.; Trier, R. M.; Olsen, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    Radionuclide activities were measured in a large number of sediment cores and suspended particle samples throughout the salinity range of the Hudson River estuary. Activities of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 134/Cs and /sup 60/Co determined by gamma spectrometry and /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu and /sup 238/Pu determined by alpha spectrometry indicate reasonably rapid accumulation rates in the sediments of marginal cove areas, and very rapid deposition in the harbor region adjacent to New York City, resulting in /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu accumulations there more than an order of magnitude greater than the fallout delivery rate. Measurable amounts of reactor-derived /sup 134/Cs and /sup 60/Co are found in nearly al sediment samples containing appreciable /sup 137/Cs between 15 km upstream of Indian Point and the downstream extent of our sampling about 70 km south of the reactor. Fallout /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu reaching the Hudson appears to be almost completely retained within the systems by particle deposition, while 70 to 90% of the /sup 137/Cs derived from both reactor releases and fallout has been exported to the coastal waters in solution. Activity levels of /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu in New York harbor sediments indicate a significant source in addition to suspended particles carried down the Hudson. The most likely cause appears to be transport into the estuary of particles from offshore waters having higher specific activities of /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu. Measurements of fallout /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu in a saline lake with a high carbonate ion concentration yielded water column activities about two orders of magnitude greater than has been found for fallout plutonium in other continental waters, indicating extensive mobility in some natural water environments. Experiments using lake water suggest that carbonate ion may indeed be a critical factor in regulating plutonium solubility and that low molecular weight complexes are primarily responsible for enhanced plutonium solubility.

  12. Evaluation of a barrier net used to mitigate fish impingement at a Hudson River power plant intake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchison, J.B.; Matousek, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    A multifilament nylon net of 0.95-cm bar mesh was deployed as a physical barrier to fish in front of the Bowline Point power plant cooling water intake on the Hudson River from 1976 to 1985. The barrier net was deployed during the historical peak impingement months of October-May. The primary species impinged on the intake screens during this period were young-of-year and yearling white perch, striped bass, rainbow smelt, alewife, blue-back herring, and American shad, generally ranging from 5 to 10 cm in total length. When the barrier net was deployed, median impingement of all fish was 91% lower than during comparable periods before the net was installed. A mark-recapture population estimate indicated that 230,000 yearling striped bass and white perch were in the embayment outside the net in April 1982; over a 9-d study period, only 1.6% of this estimated population was impinged. Concurrent survival probability studies of fish marked and released at locations inside and outside the barrier net showed that fish released inside had 72% lower survival (P

  13. Upscaling reflectance information of lichens and mosses using a singularity index: a case study of the Hudson Bay Lowlands, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Neta

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Assessing moisture contents of lichens and mosses using ground-based high spectral resolution spectrometers (400–2500 nm offers immense opportunities for a comprehensive monitoring of peatland moisture status by satellite/airborne imagery. This information may be valuable for present and future carbon balance modeling. Previous studies are based upon point measurements of vegetation moisture content and water table position, and therefore a detailed moisture status of entire northern peatlands is not available. Consequently, upscaling ground and remotely sensed data to the desired spatial resolutions is inevitable. This study continues our previous investigation of the impact of various moisture conditions of common sub-Arctic lichen and moss species (i.e., Cladina stellaris, Cladina rangiferina, Dicranum elongatum, and Tomenthypnum nitens upon the spectral signatures obtained in the Hudson Bay Lowlands, Canada. Upscaling reflectance measurements of the above species were conducted in the field, and reflectance analysis using a singularity index was made, since this study serves as a basis for future aircraft/satellite research. An attempt to upscale current and new spectral reflectance indices developed in our previous studies was made as well. Our findings indicate that the spectral index C. rangiferina is to a lesser amount influenced by scale since it has a small R2 values between the log of the index and the log of the resolution, reduced slopes between the log of the index and the log of the resolution, and similar slopes between log reflectance and log resolution (α of two wavelengths employed by the index. Future study should focus on concurrent monitoring of moisture variations in lichens and mosses both in situ and from satellite and airborne images, as well as analysis of fractal models in relations to the upscaling experiments.

  14. Distinguishing oil and water layers in a cracked porous medium using pulsed neutron logging data based on Hudson's crack theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueang; Yang, Zhichao; Tang, Bin; Wang, Renbo; Wei, Xiong

    2018-05-01

    During geophysical surveys, water layers may interfere with the detection of oil layers. In order to distinguish between oil and water layers in porous cracked media, research on the properties of the cracks, the oil and water layers, and their relation to pulsed neutron logging characteristics is essential. Using Hudson's crack theory, we simulated oil and water layers in a cracked porous medium with different crack parameters corresponding to the well log responses. We found that, in a cracked medium with medium-angle (40°-50°) cracks, the thermal neutron count peak value is higher and more sensitive than those in low-angle and high-angle crack environments; in addition, the thermal neutron density distribution shows more minimum values than in other cases. Further, the thermal neutron count and the rate of change for the oil layer are greater than those of the water layer, and the time spectrum count peak value for the water layer in middle-high-angle (40°-70°) cracked environments is higher than that of the oil layer. The thermal neutron density distribution sensitivity is higher in the water layer with a range of small crack angles (0°-30°) than in the oil layer with the same range of angles. In comparing the thermal neutron density distribution, thermal neutron count peak, thermal neutron density distribution sensitivity, and time spectrum maximum in the oil and water layers, we find that neutrons in medium-angle (40°-50°) cracked reservoirs are more sensitive to deceleration and absorption than those in water layers; neutrons in approximately horizontal (0°-30°) cracked water layers are more sensitive to deceleration than those in reservoirs. These results can guide future work in the cracked media neutron logging field.

  15. Organochlorine residues in harp seals, Phoca groenlandica, from the Gulf of St. Lawrence and Hudson Strait: An evaluation of contaminant concentrations and burdens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, G.G.; Smith, T.G. (Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans, Nanaimo, BC (Canada)); Addison, R.F. (Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans, Sidney, BC (Canada))

    1994-01-01

    Organochlorine contaminant concentrations and burdens were evaluated in blubber samples from 50 harp seals (Phoca groenlandica) obtained from the estuary and northern Gulf of St. Lawrence and Hudson Strait, Canada between December 1988 and December 1989. The concentration and burden of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) increased significantly during the winter months for males occupying the St. Lawrence estuary. The potential for rapid accumulation of contaminants in the estuary was also observed among females: nine postpartum females (1 month after weaning) had higher organochlorine levels than prepartum females from the same location. The lowest observed contaminant concentrations and burdens were in seals from Hudson Strait in autumn. In winter specimens, males had DDT and PCB concentrations about 4 and 2 times as great, respectively, as females of similar age distribution and collection date. Congeners with IUPAC Nos. 138 and 153 accounted for more than 50% of total identifiable PCBs, which is consistent with their prevalence in other marine biota. The concentration of PCBs has declined and the percent p,p'-DDE of total DDT has increased between 1982 and the present study. Unlike the beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas), harp seals occupy the more polluted waters of the estuary only seasonally, and this may account for their lower residue concentrations. 59 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  16. Polychlorinated biphenyls in adult black bass and yellow perch were not associated with their reproductive success in the upper Hudson River, New York, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maceina, Michael J; Sammons, Steven M

    2013-07-01

    Although production and use of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) ceased nearly 35 yr ago, questions still remain concerning the potential chronic effects these compounds may have on wild fish, including their reproductive success. In the upper Hudson River, New York, USA, fish were exposed to PCBs primarily from 2 manufacturing plants located approximately 320 km upstream of New York City, New York, from the 1940s to 1977. The authors collected yellow perch (Perca flavescens), smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu), and largemouth bass (M. salmoides) using electrofishing, measured PCBs in these adults, and estimated abundance and size of their offspring at age 1 yr (age-1 fish). Fish were collected annually from 2004 to 2009 from 1 control site upstream of the PCB discharge sites and from 2 sites downstream from where PCBs were released. These sites (pools) are separated by a series of dams, locks, and canals. Muscle tissue wet weight PCB and lipid-based PCB concentrations in adults in the 2 PCB exposure pools averaged approximately 1 to 3 µg/g and 100 to 500 µg/g, respectively. Age-1 abundances were not related to adult PCB concentrations but were inversely related to river flow. Size of age-1 fish was slightly greater at the PCB-exposure sites. Levels of PCBs in yellow perch, largemouth bass, and smallmouth bass in the upper Hudson River did not impair or reduce recruitment or reproductive success. Copyright © 2013 SETAC.

  17. Landscape controls on total and methyl mercury in the upper Hudson River basin of New York State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, D. A.; Murray, K. R.; Bradley, P. M.; Brigham, M. E.; Aiken, G.; Smith, M.

    2010-12-01

    High levels of mercury (Hg) in aquatic biota have been identified in surface waters of the Adirondack region of New York, and factors such as the prevalence of wetlands, extensive forest cover, and oligotrophic waters promote Hg bioaccumulation in this region. Past research in this region has focused on improved understanding of the Hg cycle in lake ecosystems. In the study described herein, the landscape controls on total Hg and methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in riverine ecosystems were explored through synoptic surveys of 27 sites in the upper Hudson River basin of the Adirondack region. Stream samples were collected and analyzed for total Hg, MeHg, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm (UV254) during spring and summer of 2006-08. Landscape indices including many common land cover, hydrographic, and topographic-based measures were explored as predictors of Hg through multivariate linear regression. Multivariate models that included a wetland or riparian area-based metric, an index for open water area, and in some cases a topographic metric such as the wetness index explained 55 to 65 percent of the variation in MeHg concentrations, and 55 to 80 percent of the variation in total Hg concentrations. An open water index (OWI) was developed that incorporated both the basin area drained by ponded water and the surface area of these ponds. This index was inversely related to concentrations of total Hg and MeHg. This OWI was also inversely related to specific ultra-violet absorbance, consistent with previous studies showing that open water increases the influence of algal-derived carbon on DOC, decreasing aromaticity, which should decrease the ability of the dissolved carbon pool to bind Hg. The OWI was not significant in models for total Hg that also included UV254 as a predictive variable, but the index did remain significant in similar models for MeHg suggesting that biogeochemical factors in addition to decreasing carbon

  18. Future sea ice conditions in Western Hudson Bay and consequences for polar bears in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro de la Guardia, Laura; Derocher, Andrew E; Myers, Paul G; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Arjen D; Lunn, Nick J

    2013-09-01

    The primary habitat of polar bears is sea ice, but in Western Hudson Bay (WH), the seasonal ice cycle forces polar bears ashore each summer. Survival of bears on land in WH is correlated with breakup and the ice-free season length, and studies suggest that exceeding thresholds in these variables will lead to large declines in the WH population. To estimate when anthropogenic warming may have progressed sufficiently to threaten the persistence of polar bears in WH, we predict changes in the ice cycle and the sea ice concentration (SIC) in spring (the primary feeding period of polar bears) with a high-resolution sea ice-ocean model and warming forced with 21st century IPCC greenhouse gas (GHG) emission scenarios: B1 (low), A1B (medium), and A2 (high). We define critical years for polar bears based on proposed thresholds in breakup and ice-free season and we assess when ice-cycle conditions cross these thresholds. In the three scenarios, critical years occur more commonly after 2050. From 2001 to 2050, 2 critical years occur under B1 and A2, and 4 under A1B; from 2051 to 2100, 8 critical years occur under B1, 35 under A1B and 41 under A2. Spring SIC in WH is high (>90%) in all three scenarios between 2001 and 2050, but declines rapidly after 2050 in A1B and A2. From 2090 to 2100, the mean spring SIC is 84 (±7)% in B1, 56 (±26)% in A1B and 20 (±13)% in A2. Our predictions suggest that the habitat of polar bears in WH will deteriorate in the 21st century. Ice predictions in A1B and A2 suggest that the polar bear population may struggle to persist after ca. 2050. Predictions under B1 suggest that reducing GHG emissions could allow polar bears to persist in WH throughout the 21st century. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Potential antiradical and alpha-glucosidase inhibitors from Ecklonia maxima (Osbeck) Papenfuss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengasamy, Kannan R R; Aderogba, Mutalib A; Amoo, Stephen O; Stirk, Wendy A; Van Staden, Johannes

    2013-11-15

    Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors play a potential role in the treatment of type 2 diabetes by delaying glucose absorption in the small intestine. Ecklonia maxima, a brown alga which grows abundantly on the west coast of South Africa, is used to produce alginate, animal feed, nutritional supplements and fertilizer. The crude aqueous methanol extract, four solvent fractions and three phlorotannins: 1,3,5-trihydroxybenezene (phloroglucinol) (1), dibenzo [1,4] dioxine-2,4,7,9-tetraol (2) and hexahydroxyphenoxydibenzo [1,4] dioxine (eckol) (3) isolated from E. maxima were evaluated for antiradical and alpha-glucosidase inhibitory activities. All the phlorotannins tested had strong antioxidant activities on DPPH free radicals with EC50 values ranging from 0.008 to 0.128μM. Compounds 2 and 3 demonstrated stronger antioxidant activity and an alpha-glucosidase inhibitory property than positive controls. These results suggest that E. maxima could be a natural source of potent antioxidants and alpha-glucosidase inhibitors. This study could facilitate effective utilization of E. maxima as an oral antidiabetic drug or functional food ingredient with a promising role in the formulation of medicines and nutrition supplements. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Plutonium and cesium radionuclides in the Hudson River Estuary and other environments. Annual technical progress report, 1 December 1977--30 November 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, H.J.; Trier, R.M.

    1978-01-01

    Radionuclide activities were measured in a large number of sediment cores and suspended particle samples throughout the salinity range of the Hudson River estuary. Activities of 137 Cs, 134 Cs, and 60 Co determined by gamma spectrometry and 239 , 240 Pu and 238 Pu determined by alpha spectrometry indicate reasonably rapid accumulation rates in the sediments of marginal cove areas, and very rapid deposition in the harbor region adjacent to New York City. General distributions of 137 Cs and 239 , 240 Pu are similar in surface sediments and with depth in cores, but there are deviations from the fallout ratio due to (1) addition of reactor 137 Cs and (2) loss of 137 Cs from the particle phases at higher salinities. Measurable amounts of reactor-derived 134 Cs and 60 Co are found in nearly all sediment samples containing appreciable 137 Cs between 15 Km upstream of Indian Point and 70 Km south of the reactor. Accumulations of 239 , 240 Pu in New York harbor sediments are more than an order of magnitude greater than the fallout delivery rate. Depth profiles of radionuclides and variations of activities with particle size at low salinities in the Hudson indicate the importance of organic phases, including large flocculent particles greater than 180μ, in binding plutonium, and no evidence of significant chemical migration within the sediments. Measurements of water column fallout 239 , 240 Pu in a saline lake with a high carbonate ion concentration yielded activities about two orders of magnitude greater than has been found for fallout plutonium in other continental waters, indicating extensive mobility in some natural water environments

  1. Plutonium, cesium, uranium, and thorium series radionuclides in the Hudson River estuary and other environments. Annual technical progress report, December 1, 1981-November 30, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, H.J.; Trier, R.M.; Anderson, R.F.

    1982-01-01

    Radionuclide activities were measured in a large number of sediment cores and suspended particle samples throughout the salinity range of the Hudson River estuary. Activities of 137 Cs, 134 Cs and 60 Co determined by gamma spectrometry and 239 240 Pu and 238 Pu determined by alpha spectrometry indicate reasonably rapid accumulation rates in the sediments of marginal cove areas, and very rapid deposition in the harbor region adjacent to New York City, resulting in 239 240 Pu accumulations there more than an order of magnitude greater than the fallout delivery rate. Fallout 239 240 Pu moving downstream in the Hudson appears to be almost completely retained within the system by particle deposition, while 80 to 90% of the 137 Cs derived from both reactor releases and fallout has been exported to the coastal waters in solution. Measurements of fallout 239 240 Pu in a saline lake with a high carbonate ion concentration yielded water column activities about two orders of magnitude greater than has been found for fallout plutonium in other continental waters, indicating extensive mobility in some natural water environments. Experiments using lake water suggest that carbonate ion is likely to be a critical factor in regulating plutonium solubility in some environments and that low molecular weight complexes are primarily responsible for enhanced plutonium solubility. Activities of several other nuclides of interest in radioactive waste management ( 238 U, 234 U, 232 Th, 230 Th, 228 Th, 231 Pa) were also found to be orders of magnitude greater in high carbonate waters than in other natural waters

  2. Plutonium and cesium radionuclides in the Hudson River estuary and other environments. Annual technical progress report, December 1, 1978-November 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, H.J.; Trier, R.M.

    1979-01-01

    Radionuclide activities were measured in a large number of sediment cores and suspended particle samples throughout the salinity range of the Hudson River estuary. Activities of 137 Cs, 134 Cs and 60 Co determined by gamma spectrometry and 239 240 Pu and 238 Pu determined by alpha spectrometry indicate reasonably rapid accumulation rates in the sediments of marginal cove areas, and very rapid deposition in the harbor region adjacent to New York City. General distributions of 137 Cs and 239 240 Pu are similar in surface sediments and with depth in cores, but there are deviations from the fallout ratio due to addition of reactor 137 Cs and loss of 137 Cs from the particle phases at higher salinities. Measurable amounts of reactor-derived 134 Cs and 60 Co are found in nearly all sediment samples containing appreciable 137 Cs between 15 km upstream of Indian Point and the downstream of our sampling about 70 km south of the reactor. Accumulations of 239 240 Pu in New York harbor sediments are more than an order of magnitude greater than the fallout delivery rate, probably primarily due to the accumulation of fine particles containing fallout plutonium in the harbor which have been transported from upstream areas of the Hudson. Measurements of fallout 239 240 Pu in a saline lake with a high carbonate ion concentration yielded water column activities about two orders of magnitude greater than has been found for fallout plutonium in other continental waters, indicating extensive mobility in some natural water environments. Experiments using lake water suggest that carbonate ion may indeed be a critical factor in regulatory plutonium solubility

  3. The Energetic Value of Land-Based Foods in Western Hudson Bay and Their Potential to Alleviate Energy Deficits of Starving Adult Male Polar Bears.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda J Gormezano

    Full Text Available Climate change is predicted to expand the ice-free season in western Hudson Bay and when it grows to 180 days, 28-48% of adult male polar bears are projected to starve unless nutritional deficits can be offset by foods consumed on land. We updated a dynamic energy budget model developed by Molnar et al. to allow influx of additional energy from novel terrestrial foods (lesser snow geese, eggs, caribou that polar bears currently consume as part of a mixed diet while on land. We calculated the units of each prey, alone and in combination, needed to alleviate these lethal energy deficits under conditions of resting or limited movement (2 km d-1 prior to starvation. We further considered the total energy available from each sex and age class of each animal prey over the period they would overlap land-bound polar bears and calculated the maximum number of starving adult males that could be sustained on each food during the ice-free season. Our results suggest that the net energy from land-based food, after subtracting costs of limited movement to obtain it, could eliminate all projected nutritional deficits of starving adult male polar bears and likely other demographic groups as well. The hunting tactics employed, success rates as well as behavior and abundance of each prey will determine the realized energetic values for individual polar bears. Although climate change may cause a phenological mismatch between polar bears and their historical ice-based prey, it may simultaneously yield a new match with certain land-based foods. If polar bears can transition their foraging behavior to effectively exploit these resources, predictions for starvation-related mortality may be overestimated for western Hudson Bay. We also discuss potential complications with stable-carbon isotope studies to evaluate utilization of land-based foods by polar bears including metabolic effects of capture-related stress and consuming a mixed diet.

  4. A retrospective streamflow ensemble forecast for an extreme hydrologic event: a case study of Hurricane Irene and on the Hudson River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Firas; Ramaswamy, Venkatsundar; Georgas, Nickitas; Blumberg, Alan F.; Pullen, Julie

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates the uncertainties in hourly streamflow ensemble forecasts for an extreme hydrological event using a hydrological model forced with short-range ensemble weather prediction models. A state-of-the art, automated, short-term hydrologic prediction framework was implemented using GIS and a regional scale hydrological model (HEC-HMS). The hydrologic framework was applied to the Hudson River basin ( ˜ 36 000 km2) in the United States using gridded precipitation data from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) and was validated against streamflow observations from the United States Geologic Survey (USGS). Finally, 21 precipitation ensemble members of the latest Global Ensemble Forecast System (GEFS/R) were forced into HEC-HMS to generate a retrospective streamflow ensemble forecast for an extreme hydrological event, Hurricane Irene. The work shows that ensemble stream discharge forecasts provide improved predictions and useful information about associated uncertainties, thus improving the assessment of risks when compared with deterministic forecasts. The uncertainties in weather inputs may result in false warnings and missed river flooding events, reducing the potential to effectively mitigate flood damage. The findings demonstrate how errors in the ensemble median streamflow forecast and time of peak, as well as the ensemble spread (uncertainty) are reduced 48 h pre-event by utilizing the ensemble framework. The methodology and implications of this work benefit efforts of short-term streamflow forecasts at regional scales, notably regarding the peak timing of an extreme hydrologic event when combined with a flood threshold exceedance diagram. Although the modeling framework was implemented on the Hudson River basin, it is flexible and applicable in other parts of the world where atmospheric reanalysis products and streamflow data are available.

  5. Geographic variability in amoeboid protists and other microbial groups in the water column of the lower Hudson River Estuary (New York, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhl, Andrew R.; Anderson, O. Roger

    2014-12-01

    In comparison to other groups of planktonic microorganisms, relatively little is known about the role of amoeboid protists (amebas) in planktonic ecosystems. This study describes the first geographic survey of the abundance and biomass of amebas in an estuarine water column. Samples collected in the lower Hudson River Estuary were used to investigate relationships between ameba abundance and biomass and hydrographic variables (temperature, salinity, and turbidity), water depth (surface and near bottom), distance from mid-channel to shore, phytoplankton biomass (chlorophyll fluorescence) and the occurrence of other heterotrophic microbial groups (heterotrophic bacteria, nanoflagellates, and ciliates) in the plankton. Although salinity increased significantly towards the mouth of the estuary, there were no significant differences in the abundance or biomass of any microbial group in surface samples collected at three stations separated by 44 km along the estuary's mid-channel. Peak biomass values for all microbial groups were found at the station closest to shore, however, cross-channel trends in microbial abundance and biomass were not statistically significant. Although ameba abundance and biomass in most samples were low compared to other microbial groups, clear patterns in ameba distribution were nevertheless found. Unlike other microbial groups examined, ameba numbers and biomass greatly increased in near bottom water compared to surface samples. Ameba abundance and biomass (in surface samples) were also strongly related to increasing turbidity. The different relationships of ameba abundance and biomass with turbidity suggest a rising contribution of large amebas in microbial communities of the Hudson estuary when turbidity increases. These results, emphasizing the importance of particle concentration as attachment and feeding surfaces for amebas, will help identify the environmental conditions when amebas are most likely to contribute significantly to estuarine

  6. The Energetic Value of Land-Based Foods in Western Hudson Bay and Their Potential to Alleviate Energy Deficits of Starving Adult Male Polar Bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormezano, Linda J; Rockwell, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is predicted to expand the ice-free season in western Hudson Bay and when it grows to 180 days, 28-48% of adult male polar bears are projected to starve unless nutritional deficits can be offset by foods consumed on land. We updated a dynamic energy budget model developed by Molnar et al. to allow influx of additional energy from novel terrestrial foods (lesser snow geese, eggs, caribou) that polar bears currently consume as part of a mixed diet while on land. We calculated the units of each prey, alone and in combination, needed to alleviate these lethal energy deficits under conditions of resting or limited movement (2 km d-1) prior to starvation. We further considered the total energy available from each sex and age class of each animal prey over the period they would overlap land-bound polar bears and calculated the maximum number of starving adult males that could be sustained on each food during the ice-free season. Our results suggest that the net energy from land-based food, after subtracting costs of limited movement to obtain it, could eliminate all projected nutritional deficits of starving adult male polar bears and likely other demographic groups as well. The hunting tactics employed, success rates as well as behavior and abundance of each prey will determine the realized energetic values for individual polar bears. Although climate change may cause a phenological mismatch between polar bears and their historical ice-based prey, it may simultaneously yield a new match with certain land-based foods. If polar bears can transition their foraging behavior to effectively exploit these resources, predictions for starvation-related mortality may be overestimated for western Hudson Bay. We also discuss potential complications with stable-carbon isotope studies to evaluate utilization of land-based foods by polar bears including metabolic effects of capture-related stress and consuming a mixed diet.

  7. Plutonium and cesium radionuclides in the Hudson River estuary and other environments. Annual technical progress report, December 1, 1978-November 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, H. J.; Trier, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    Radionuclide activities were measured in a large number of sediment cores and suspended particle samples throughout the salinity range of the Hudson River estuary. Activities of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 134/Cs and /sup 60/Co determined by gamma spectrometry and /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu and /sup 238/Pu determined by alpha spectrometry indicate reasonably rapid accumulation rates in the sediments of marginal cove areas, and very rapid deposition in the harbor region adjacent to New York City. General distributions of /sup 137/Cs and /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu are similar in surface sediments and with depth in cores, but there are deviations from the fallout ratio due to addition of reactor /sup 137/Cs and loss of /sup 137/Cs from the particle phases at higher salinities. Measurable amounts of reactor-derived /sup 134/Cs and /sup 60/Co are found in nearly all sediment samples containing appreciable /sup 137/Cs between 15 km upstream of Indian Point and the downstream of our sampling about 70 km south of the reactor. Accumulations of /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu in New York harbor sediments are more than an order of magnitude greater than the fallout delivery rate, probably primarily due to the accumulation of fine particles containing fallout plutonium in the harbor which have been transported from upstream areas of the Hudson. Measurements of fallout /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu in a saline lake with a high carbonate ion concentration yielded water column activities about two orders of magnitude greater than has been found for fallout plutonium in other continental waters, indicating extensive mobility in some natural water environments. Experiments using lake water suggest that carbonate ion may indeed be a critical factor in regulatory plutonium solubility.

  8. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from HUDSON in the North Atlantic Ocean, North Greenland Sea and Norwegian Sea from 1982-02-28 to 1982-04-04 (NODC Accession 0113889)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0113889 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the North Atlantic Ocean, North Greenland Sea and...

  9. Currents, backscatter, attenuation, conductivity, temperature, sigma theta, and pressure data collected in the Hudson Shelf Valley, North Atlantic Ocean from instruments deployed from the RV OCEANUS and RV CONNECTICUT on MOORINGS from December 4, 1999 to May 14, 2000 (NODC Accession 0066009)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Field experiments have been carried out to understand the transport of sediments and associated contaminants in the Hudson Shelf Valley, offshore of New York. The...

  10. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the HUDSON in the Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 1992-05-27 to 1992-06-15 (NODC Accession 0113550)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113550 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from...

  11. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 2015-05-04 to 2015-05-24 (NCEI Accession 0160487)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0160487 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean...

  12. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 2009-05-17 to 2009-06-01 (NODC Accession 0108073)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108073 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean...

  13. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 2003-07-13 to 2003-08-04 (NODC Accession 0108219)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108219 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean...

  14. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 2014-05-02 to 2014-05-24 (NCEI Accession 0157623)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157623 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean...

  15. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the HUDSON in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1993-04-05 to 1993-05-14 (NODC Accession 0113551)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113551 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1993-04-05 to 1993-05-14...

  16. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 2008-05-20 to 2008-06-04 (NODC Accession 0108224)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108224 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean...

  17. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Gulf of St. Lawrence and others from 1999-06-27 to 1999-07-13 (NODC Accession 0108215)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108215 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Gulf of St. Lawrence, Labrador Sea...

  18. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Gulf of St. Lawrence and others from 2006-05-24 to 2006-06-08 (NODC Accession 0108222)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108222 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Gulf of St. Lawrence, Labrador Sea...

  19. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Gulf of St. Lawrence and others from 2004-05-15 to 2004-05-30 (NODC Accession 0108220)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108220 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Gulf of St. Lawrence, Labrador Sea...

  20. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Gulf of St. Lawrence and others from 2001-05-30 to 2001-06-15 (NODC Accession 0108217)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108217 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Gulf of St. Lawrence, Labrador Sea...

  1. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Gulf of St. Lawrence and others from 2000-05-20 to 2000-06-08 (NODC Accession 0108216)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108216 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Gulf of St. Lawrence, Labrador Sea...

  2. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Gulf of St. Lawrence and others from 2013-05-07 to 2013-05-28 (NCEI Accession 0144303)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144303 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Gulf of St. Lawrence, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic...

  3. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 1997-05-09 to 1997-06-11 (NODC Accession 0113557)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113557 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean...

  4. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 1994-05-24 to 1994-06-12 (NODC Accession 0113554)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113554 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean...

  5. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Gulf of St. Lawrence and others from 1995-06-07 to 1995-07-05 (NODC Accession 0115006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115006 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Gulf of St. Lawrence, Labrador Sea...

  6. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the HUDSON in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 1998-06-22 to 1998-07-09 (NODC Accession 0113610)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113610 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Labrador Sea and North...

  7. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from the HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 2011-05-06 to 2011-05-28 (NODC Accession 0108124)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108124 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean...

  8. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from HUDSON, KNORR and others in the Alboran Sea, Arabian Sea and others from 1977-11-07 to 1990-04-16 (NODC Accession 9400165)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 9400165 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from HUDSON, KNORR, NOAA Ship MALCOLM BALDRIGE, MELVILLE,...

  9. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 2005-05-26 to 2005-06-17 (NODC Accession 0108221)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108221 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean...

  10. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 2010-05-13 to 2010-05-30 (NODC Accession 0108225)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108225 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean...

  11. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 2002-06-23 to 2002-07-19 (NODC Accession 0108218)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108218 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean...

  12. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 2007-05-10 to 2007-05-27 (NODC Accession 0108223)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108223 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean...

  13. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the HUDSON in the Davis Strait and Labrador Sea from 1993-06-17 to 1993-06-29 (NODC Accession 0113552)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113552 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the Davis Strait and Labrador Sea from 1993-06-17 to...

  14. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from HUDSON in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and North Atlantic Ocean from 1995-04-19 to 1995-05-16 (NODC Accession 0113556)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0113556 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from HUDSON in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and North Atlantic Ocean from 1995-04-19 to...

  15. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from HUDSON in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1994-10-12 to 1994-11-10 (NODC Accession 0113555)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0113555 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1994-10-12 to 1994-11-10....

  16. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the HUDSON in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1993-11-05 to 1993-12-16 (NODC Accession 0113553)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113553 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HUDSON in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1993-11-05 to 1993-12-16...

  17. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 1996-05-12 to 1996-06-01 (NODC Accession 0115010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0115010 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from HUDSON in the Davis Strait, Labrador Sea and North Atlantic Ocean from 1996-05-12 to...

  18. Currents, backscatter, attenuation, conductivity, temperature, sigma-theta, and pressure data from moorings deployed from the SAMANTHA MILLER and the RV CONNECTICUT on the Hudson Shelf Valley, North Atlantic Ocean from the from April 5, 2006 to June 21, 2006 (NODC Accession 0066107)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Field experiments have been carried out to understand the transport of sediments and associated contaminants in the Hudson Shelf Valley, offshore of New York. The...

  19. Origin of an unusual monazite-xenotime gneiss, Hudson Highlands, New York: SHRIMP U-Pb geochronology and trace element geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleinikoff, John N.; Grauch, Richard I.; Mazdab, Frank K.; Kwak, Loretta; Fanning, C. Mark; Kamo, Sandra L.

    2012-01-01

    A pod of monazite-xenotime gneiss (MXG) occurs within Mesoproterozoic paragneiss, Hudson Highlands, New York. This outcrop also contains granite of the Crystal Lake pluton, which migmatized the paragneiss. Previously, monazite, xenotime, and zircon from MXG, plus detrital zircon from the paragneiss, and igneous zircon from the granite, were dated using multi-grain thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). New SEM imagery of dated samples reveals that all minerals contain cores and rims. Thus TIMS analyses comprise mixtures of age components and are geologically meaningless. New spot analyses by sensitive high resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) of small homogeneous areas on individual grains allows deconvolution of ages within complexly zoned grains.Xenotime cores from MXG formed during two episodes (1034 ± 10 and 1014 ± 3 Ma), whereas three episodes of rim formation are recorded (999 ± 7, 961 ± 11, and 874 ± 11 Ma). Monazite cores from MXG mostly formed at 1004 ± 4 Ma; rims formed at 994 ± 4, 913 ± 7, and 890 ± 7 Ma. Zircon from MXG is composed of oscillatory-zoned detrital cores (2000-1170 Ma), plus metamorphic rims (1008 ± 7, 985 ± 5, and ∼950 Ma). In addition, MXG contains an unusual zircon population composed of irregularly-zoned elongate cores dated at 1036 ± 5 Ma, considered to be the time of formation of MXG. The time of granite emplacement is dated by oscillatory-zoned igneous cores at 1058 ± 4 Ma, which provides a minimum age constraint for the time of deposition of the paragneiss.Selected trace elements, including all REE plus U and Th, provide geochemical evidence for the origin of MXG. MREE-enriched xenotime from MXG are dissimilar from typical HREE-enriched patterns of igneous xenotime. The presence of large negative Eu anomalies and high U and Th in monazite and xenotime are uncharacteristic of typical ore-forming hydrothermal processes. We conclude that MXG is the result of unusual metasomatic processes during high grade

  20. Review Article: Souls, Hearts and Heritage: Passing from the Danube to the Hudson. Szegedy-Maszák, Marianne. 2013. I Kiss Your Hands Many Times – Hearts, Souls and Wars in Hungary. New York: Spiegel & Grau, Random House. 345 pp; and Griesz, Katherine. 2012. From the Danube to the Hudson. Seattle, WA: CreateSpace Independent Publishing. 482 pp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evi Blaikie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available How did the rich and the super-rich Hungarian Jews in Budapest fare during the 1930s, World War II and the Holocaust, and beyond? Two new books deal with their stories: Marianne Szegedy-Maszák's "I Kiss Your Hands Many Times" and Katherine Griesz's "From the Danube to the Hudson". Szegedy-Maszák was able to use her journalist's profession and skills to explore and vividly present her family's story in a work that can likewise satisfy the historians, the romantics and all those who like a “good read.” Griesz’s epic family memoir encompasses the same time period and topic as Szegedy-Maszák's book in its portrayal of a multi-generational Hungarian Jewish family's fate in the crisis -full mid-twentieth century, as seen and interpreted by its female descendant decades later.

  1. Proceedings of a workshop on the potential cumulative impacts of development in the region of Hudson and James Bays, 17-19 June 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunch, J.N.; Reeves, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    An interdepartmental scientific workshop was held to begin developing a response by the Canadian Department of Fisheries and Oceans to concerns about cumulative environmental effects of development in the region of Hudson Bay and James Bay. Discussions at the workshop centered on the major hydroelectric projects that are proposed or under way in that region. The main product of the workshop was a series of working hypotheses referring to potential cumulative effects under four headings: physics; inorganic nutrients, organic carbon, and suspended matter fluxes; mercury and other contaminants; and biological resources. Several of the hypotheses, such as those concerning the direction of physical changes due to modification of the timing and location of freshwater discharge, problems of mercury mobilization and contamination, and decreased productivity of anadromous fish populations, were considered well-supported by available data. Other hypotheses, such as those related to primary and secondary productivity in estuarine and marine environments, effects on isolated populations of harbor seals and Atlantic salmon, and the likely responses of fish and marine mammals to altered conditions in estuaries, were judged as needing more focused research. 27 refs., 2 figs

  2. A baseline and watershed assessment in the Lynx Creek, Brenot Creek, and Portage Creek watersheds near Hudson's Hope, BC : summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matscha, G.; Sutherland, D.

    2005-06-01

    This report summarized a baseline monitoring program for the Lynx Creek, Brenot Creek, and Portage Creek watersheds located near Hudson's Hope, British Columbia (BC). The monitoring program was designed to more accurately determine the effects of potential coalbed gas developments in the region, as well as to assess levels of agricultural and forest harvesting, and the impacts of current land use activities on water quantity and quality. Water quality was sampled at 18 sites during 5 different flow regimes, including summer and fall low flows; ice cover; spring run-off; and high flows after a heavy summer rain event. Sample sites were located up and downstream of both forest and agricultural activities. The water samples were analyzed for 70 contaminants including ions, nutrients, metals, hydrocarbons, and hydrocarbon fractions. Results showed that while many analyzed parameters met current BC water quality guidelines, total organic carbon, manganese, cadmium, E. coli, fecal coliforms, and fecal streptococci often exceeded recommended guidelines. Aluminum and cobalt values exceeded drinking water guidelines. The samples also had a slightly alkaline pH and showed high conductance. A multiple barrier approach was recommended to reduce potential risks of contamination from the watersheds. It was concluded that a more refined bacteria source tracking method is needed to determine whether fecal pollution has emanated from human, livestock or wildlife sources. 1 tab., 9 figs

  3. Critique and sensitivity analysis of the compensation function used in the LMS Hudson River striped bass models. Environmental Sciences Division publication No. 944

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Winkle, W.; Christensen, S.W.; Kauffman, G.

    1976-12-01

    The description and justification for the compensation function developed and used by Lawler, Matusky and Skelly Engineers (LMS) (under contract to Consolidated Edison Company of New York) in their Hudson River striped bass models are presented. A sensitivity analysis of this compensation function is reported, based on computer runs with a modified version of the LMS completely mixed (spatially homogeneous) model. Two types of sensitivity analysis were performed: a parametric study involving at least five levels for each of the three parameters in the compensation function, and a study of the form of the compensation function itself, involving comparison of the LMS function with functions having no compensation at standing crops either less than or greater than the equilibrium standing crops. For the range of parameter values used in this study, estimates of percent reduction are least sensitive to changes in YS, the equilibrium standing crop, and most sensitive to changes in KXO, the minimum mortality rate coefficient. Eliminating compensation at standing crops either less than or greater than the equilibrium standing crops results in higher estimates of percent reduction. For all values of KXO and for values of YS and KX at and above the baseline values, eliminating compensation at standing crops less than the equilibrium standing crops results in a greater increase in percent reduction than eliminating compensation at standing crops greater than the equilibrium standing crops

  4. Critique and sensitivity analysis of the compensation function used in the LMS Hudson River striped bass models. Environmental Sciences Division publication No. 944

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Winkle, W.; Christensen, S.W.; Kauffman, G.

    1976-12-01

    The description and justification for the compensation function developed and used by Lawler, Matusky and Skelly Engineers (LMS) (under contract to Consolidated Edison Company of New York) in their Hudson River striped bass models are presented. A sensitivity analysis of this compensation function is reported, based on computer runs with a modified version of the LMS completely mixed (spatially homogeneous) model. Two types of sensitivity analysis were performed: a parametric study involving at least five levels for each of the three parameters in the compensation function, and a study of the form of the compensation function itself, involving comparison of the LMS function with functions having no compensation at standing crops either less than or greater than the equilibrium standing crops. For the range of parameter values used in this study, estimates of percent reduction are least sensitive to changes in YS, the equilibrium standing crop, and most sensitive to changes in KXO, the minimum mortality rate coefficient. Eliminating compensation at standing crops either less than or greater than the equilibrium standing crops results in higher estimates of percent reduction. For all values of KXO and for values of YS and KX at and above the baseline values, eliminating compensation at standing crops less than the equilibrium standing crops results in a greater increase in percent reduction than eliminating compensation at standing crops greater than the equilibrium standing crops.

  5. Tests of bioaccumulation models for polychlorinated biphenyl compounds: a study of young-of-the-year bluefish in the Hudson River estuary, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Lawrence A; Buckel, Jeffrey A; Conover, David O; Brownawell, Bruce J

    2006-08-01

    A field-based study regarding uptake of polychlorinated biphenyl compounds (PCBs) by young-of-the-year (YOY) bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) was initiated to test a steady-state model of bioaccumulation and trophic transfer in a rapidly growing fish. Determination of prey composition as well as size-dependent growth and specific consumption rates for YOY bluefish from separate field and laboratory studies enabled the input of these species-specific parameters into the model. Furthermore, the time and duration of the exposure of YOY bluefish to dissolved PCBs from a well-characterized system (Hudson River, USA) was well known. Patterns of accumulation of individual PCB congeners differed relative to the accumulation of total PCBs, with the greatest net accumulation occurring for the higher-molecular-weight congeners. Comparison of lipid-normalized bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) with the octanol-water partition coefficients of individual PCB congeners revealed bluefish to be above the BAFs predicted by lipid-based equilibrium partitioning, suggesting that uptake from food is an important source of PCBs in YOY bluefish. Comparison of measured BAFs with values predicted by a steady-state, food-chain model showed good first-order agreement.

  6. Impact of entrainment and impingement on fish populations in the Hudson River Estuary. Volume II. Impingement impact analyses, evaluations of alternative screening devices, and critiques of utility testimony relating to density-dependent growth, the age-composition of the striped bass spawning stock, and the LMS real-time life cycle model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnthouse, L.W.; Van Winkle, W.; Golumbek, J.; Cada, G.F.; Goodyear, C.P.; Christensen, S.W.; Cannon, J.B.; Lee, D.W.

    1982-04-01

    This volume includes a series of four exhibits relating to impacts of impingement on fish populations, together with a collection of critical evaluations of testimony prepared for the utilities by their consultants. The first exhibit is a quantitative evaluation of four sources of bias (collection efficiency, reimpingement, impingement on inoperative screens, and impingement survival) affecting estimates of the number of fish killed at Hudson River power plants. The two following exhibits contain, respectively, a detailed assessment of the impact of impingement on the Hudson River white perch population and estimates of conditional impingement mortality rates for seven Hudson River fish populations. The fourth exhibit is an evaluation of the engineering feasibility and potential biological effectiveness of several types of modified intake structures proposed as alternatives to cooling towers for reducing impingement impacts. The remainder of Volume II consists of critical evaluations of the utilities' empirical evidence for the existence of density-dependent growth in young-of-the-year striped bass and white perch, of their estimate of the age-composition of the striped bass spawning stock in the Hudson River, and of their use of the Lawler, Matusky, and Skelly (LMS) Real-Time Life Cycle Model to estimate the impact of entrainment and impingement on the Hudson River striped bass population

  7. Plutonium, cesium, uranium and thorium series radionuclides in the Hudson River estuary and other environments. Annual technical progress report, December 1, 1983-November 30, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, H.J.; Trier, R.M.; Anderson, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    Radionuclide activities were measured in sediment cores and suspended particle samples from the Hudson River estuary. Activities of 137 Cs, 134 Cs, and 60 Co, 239 240 Pu and 238 Pu indicate rapid accumulation in marginal cove areas, and very rapid deposition in the harbor adjacent to New York City, resulting in 239 240 Pu accumulations of more than an order of magnitude greater than the fallout delivery rate. Fallout 239 240 Pu moving downstream appears to be retained within the system by particle deposition, while more than 50% of the 137 Cs derived from both reactor releases and fallout has been exported. Significant movement of dissolved plutonium into the estuary from adjacent coastal waters may be occurring. Depth profiles of radionuclides are not significantly altered by physical mixing processes in areas accumulating particles at greater than 1 cm/yr. Transport of fallout radionuclides appears to have decreased faster than would be calculated from continuous removal from a well-mixed soil reservoir, indicating that sequestering of a substantial portion of the soil fallout burden has occurred in the watershed soils over the past two decades. Measurements of fallout 239 240 Pu in a saline lake with a high carbonate ion concentration yielded water column activities two orders of magnitude greater than that found for fallout plutonium in other continental waters, indicating extensive mobility in some natural water environments. Experiments using lake water suggest that carbonate ions are likely to be important in regulating plutonium solubility in some environments and that low molecular weight complexes are primarily responsible for enhanced plutonium solubility. 45 references, 17 figures, 14 tables

  8. Limnological regime shifts caused by climate warming and Lesser Snow Goose population expansion in the western Hudson Bay Lowlands (Manitoba, Canada).

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Lauren A; Farquharson, Nicole; Merritt, Gillian; Fooks, Sam; Medeiros, Andrew S; Hall, Roland I; Wolfe, Brent B; Macrae, Merrin L; Sweetman, Jon N

    2015-02-01

    Shallow lakes are dominant features in subarctic and Arctic landscapes and are responsive to multiple stressors, which can lead to rapid changes in limnological regimes with consequences for aquatic resources. We address this theme in the coastal tundra region of Wapusk National Park, western Hudson Bay Lowlands (Canada), where climate has warmed during the past century and the Lesser Snow Goose (LSG; Chen caerulescens caerulescens) population has grown rapidly during the past ∽40 years. Integration of limnological and paleolimnological analyses documents profound responses of productivity, nutrient cycling, and aquatic habitat to warming at three ponds ("WAP 12", "WAP 20", and "WAP 21″), and to LSG disturbance at the two ponds located in an active nesting area (WAP 20, WAP 21). Based on multiparameter analysis of (210)Pb-dated sediment records from all three ponds, a regime shift occurred between 1875 and 1900 CE marked by a transition from low productivity, turbid, and nutrient-poor conditions of the Little Ice Age to conditions of higher productivity, lower nitrogen availability, and the development of benthic biofilm habitat as a result of climate warming. Beginning in the mid-1970s, sediment records from WAP 20 and WAP 21 reveal a second regime shift characterized by accelerated productivity and increased nitrogen availability. Coupled with 3 years of limnological data, results suggest that increased productivity at WAP 20 and WAP 21 led to atmospheric CO2 invasion to meet algal photosynthetic demand. This limnological regime shift is attributed to an increase in the supply of catchment-derived nutrients from the arrival of LSG and their subsequent disturbance to the landscape. Collectively, findings discriminate the consequences of warming and LSG disturbance on tundra ponds from which we identify a suite of sensitive limnological and paleolimnological measures that can be utilized to inform aquatic ecosystem monitoring.

  9. Antioxidant activity, the content of total phenols and flavonoids in the ethanol extracts of Mentha longifolia (L. Hudson dried by the use of different techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisavljević Dragana M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have examined the yield of extracted substances obtained by means of extraction using 70 % ethanol (v/v, the content of total phenols and flavonoids, as well as the antioxidant activity of the extracts obtained from the samples of the herbs dried by means of different techniques. Wild mint Mentha longifolia (L. Hudson was dried naturally in a laboratory oven at a temperature of 45 °C and in an absorptive low temperature condensation oven at 35°C. The highest yield of extracts was obtained from the naturally dried herbs and the lowest from the herbs dried in the low temperature condensation drying oven. The content of total phenols and flavonoids was determined by spectrophotometric methods with an FC reagent and by the complexation reaction with aluminium-chloride, respectively. The extract of the naturally dried herbs had the highest overall content of phenols (113.8±2.0 mg of gallic acid/g of the dry extract and flavonoids (106.7±0.3 mg of rutin/g of the dry extract. The highest antioxidant activity determined by the FRAP and DPPH assay was determined in the extracts obtained from naturally dried herbs (2.76±0.15 mmol Fe2+/mg of the dry extract and EC50=0.022±0.001 mg/ml, while the lowest was obtained from the extracts of herbs dried in the laboratory oven (1.13±0.11 mmol Fe2+/mg of the dry extract and EC50=0.033±0.001 mg/ml. The HPLC-DAD analysis result show that the greatest content of phenolic compounds show extract obtained from naturally dried plant material. The dominant phenolic component in the all extracts is Kaempferol 3-O-glucoside. The content of all phenolic compound strongly depend on the drying conditions.

  10. Selective analysis of power plant operation on the Hudson River with emphasis on the Bowline Point Generating Station. Volume 2. [Multiple impact of power plant once-through cooling systems on fish populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnthouse, L. W.; Cannon, J. B.; Christensen, S. G.

    1977-07-01

    Because of the location of the Bowline, Roseton, and Indian Point power generating facilities in the low-salinity zone of the Hudson estuary, operation of these plants with the present once-through cooling systems will adversely influence the fish populations that use the area for spawning and initial periods of growth and development. Recruitment rates and standing crops of several fish species may be lowered in response to the increased mortality caused by entrainment of nonscreenable eggs and larvae and by impingement of screenable young of the year. Entrainment and impingement data are particularly relevant for assessing which fish species have the greatest potential for being adversely affected by operation of Bowline, Roseton, and Indian Point with once-through cooling. These data from each of these three plants suggest that the six species that merit the greatest consideration are striped bass, white perch, tomcod, alewife, blueback herring, and bay anchovy. Two points of view are available for assessing the relative importance of the fish species in the Hudson River. From the fisheries point of view, the only two species of major importance are striped bass and shad. From the fish-community and ecosystem point of view, the dominant species, as determined by seasonal and regional standing crops (in numbers and biomass per hectare), are the six species most commonly entrained and impinged, namely, striped bass, white perch, tomcod, alewife, blueback herring, and anchovy.

  11. Geochemical and sedimentological properties of Heinrich layers H2 and H1 off the Hudson Strait ice-surging source areas: ice-rafting vs water-laid down depositional mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttin, L.; Hillaire-Marcel, C.

    2012-12-01

    The ~9 m-long core HU08-029-004PC was raised from the lower Labrador Sea slope (2674 m water-depth), approximately 180 km off Hudson Strait shelf edge. It yielded a high resolution record spanning the last 35 ka. The sequence includes layers with abundant detrital carbonates produced by glacial erosion of Paleozoic rocks and released into the Labrador Sea through ice streaming processes in Hudson Strait and Ungava Bay. These layers are assigned to 'Heinrich events' 3 (at core bottom), 2 and 1. Sedimentological properties and U and Th isotope measurements are used to document depositional mechanisms and durations of these layers. Data suggest: i) intense ice-rafting deposition (IRD) due to iceberg calving at the ice-stream edge, as illustrated by the coarse fraction content of the layers, and ii) sub-glacial meltwater flushing over the Hudson Strait sill, carrying fine silt-size, carbonate-rich glacial flour to the shelf-edge. Such suspended sediment pulses led to the spreading of turbidites mostly into the deep Labrador Sea, through the NAMOC system. Others late-glacial events, such as the ~ 8.2 ka final drainage of Lake Agassiz, are also recorded in the study core, whereas the H0 layer, exclusively observed in the western Labrador Sea is missing. CAT-scan images, mineralogical data, carbonate abundance, %>106 μm fraction (mostly IRD here), U-Th isotope data and 14C ages of planktic foraminifera assemblages (Neogloboquadrina pachyderma, l.) are used to further document H2 (760 to 700 cm) and H1 (588 to 488 cm). The H-layers contain up to 60% of fine detrital carbonates (about 2/3 calcite, 1/3 dolomite). Whereas the fine calcitic material points to sediment sources (basal till/water-laid glacial sediments) in the Hudson Strait and Ungava Bay, i.e., originating from the glacial erosion of Paleozoic carbonates from the area, the dolomitic component might have several origins (from Proterozoic and Paleozoic limestones in the Hudson Bay and Strait, to northwestern

  12. Demography of an apex predator at the edge of its range: impacts of changing sea ice on polar bears in Hudson Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, Nicholas J; Servanty, Sabrina; Regehr, Eric V; Converse, Sarah J; Richardson, Evan; Stirling, Ian

    2016-07-01

    Changes in the abundance and distribution of wildlife populations are common consequences of historic and contemporary climate change. Some Arctic marine mammals, such as the polar bear (Ursus maritimus), may be particularly vulnerable to such changes due to the loss of Arctic sea ice. We evaluated the impacts of environmental variation on demographic rates for the Western Hudson Bay (WH), polar bear subpopulation from 1984 to 2011 using live-recapture and dead-recovery data in a Bayesian implementation of multistate capture-recapture models. We found that survival of female polar bears was related to the annual timing of sea ice break-up and formation. Using estimated vital rates (e.g., survival and reproduction) in matrix projection models, we calculated the growth rate of the WH subpopulation and projected population responses under different environmental scenarios while accounting for parametric uncertainty, temporal variation, and demographic stochasticity. Our analysis suggested a long-term decline in the number of bears from 1185 (95% Bayesian credible interval [BCI] = 993-1411) in 1987 to 806 (95% BCI = 653-984) in 2011. In the last 10 yr of the study, the number of bears appeared stable due to temporary stability in sea ice conditions (mean population growth rate for the period 2001-2010 = 1.02, 95% BCI = 0.98-1.06). Looking forward, we estimated long-term growth rates for the WH subpopulation of ~1.02 (95% BCI = 1.00-1.05) and 0.97 (95% BCI = 0.92-1.01) under hypothetical high and low sea ice conditions, respectively. Our findings support previous evidence for a demographic linkage between sea ice conditions and polar bear population dynamics. Furthermore, we present a robust framework for sensitivity analysis with respect to continued climate change (e.g., to inform scenario planning) and for evaluating the combined effects of climate change and management actions on the status of wildlife populations. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of

  13. Demography of an apex predator at the edge of its range: impacts of changing sea ice on polar bears in Hudson Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, Nicholas J.; Servanty, Sabrina; Regehr, Eric V.; Converse, Sarah J.; Richardson, Evan S.; Stirling, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the abundance and distribution of wildlife populations are common consequences of historic and contemporary climate change. Some Arctic marine mammals, such as the polar bear (Ursus maritimus), may be particularly vulnerable to such changes due to the loss of Arctic sea ice. We evaluated the impacts of environmental variation on demographic rates for the Western Hudson Bay (WH), polar bear subpopulation from 1984 to 2011 using live-recapture and dead-recovery data in a Bayesian implementation of multistate capture–recapture models. We found that survival of female polar bears was related to the annual timing of sea ice break-up and formation. Using estimated vital rates (e.g., survival and reproduction) in matrix projection models, we calculated the growth rate of the WH subpopulation and projected population responses under different environmental scenarios while accounting for parametric uncertainty, temporal variation, and demographic stochasticity. Our analysis suggested a long-term decline in the number of bears from 1185 (95% Bayesian credible interval [BCI] = 993–1411) in 1987 to 806 (95% BCI = 653–984) in 2011. In the last 10 yr of the study, the number of bears appeared stable due to temporary stability in sea ice conditions (mean population growth rate for the period 2001–2010 = 1.02, 95% BCI = 0.98–1.06). Looking forward, we estimated long-term growth rates for the WH subpopulation of ~1.02 (95% BCI = 1.00–1.05) and 0.97 (95% BCI = 0.92–1.01) under hypothetical high and low sea ice conditions, respectively. Our findings support previous evidence for a demographic linkage between sea ice conditions and polar bear population dynamics. Furthermore, we present a robust framework for sensitivity analysis with respect to continued climate change (e.g., to inform scenario planning) and for evaluating the combined effects of climate change and management actions on the status of wildlife populations.

  14. The role of diet on long-term concentration and pattern trends of brominated and chlorinated contaminants in western Hudson Bay polar bears, 1991-2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, Melissa A.; Stirling, Ian; Lunn, Nick J.; Peacock, Elizabeth; Letcher, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Adipose tissue was sampled from the western Hudson Bay (WHB) subpopulation of polar bears at intervals from 1991 to 2007 to examine temporal trends of PCB and OCP levels both on an individual and sum-(Σ-)contaminant basis. We also determined levels and temporal trends of emerging polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and other current-use brominated flame retardants. Over the 17-year period, Σ DDT (and p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDD, p,p'-DDT) decreased (-8.4%/year); α-hexachlorocyclohexane (α-HCH) decreased (-11%/year); β-HCH increased (+ 8.3%/year); and Σ PCB and Σ chlordane (CHL), both contaminants at highest concentrations in all years (> 1 ppm), showed no distinct trends even when compared to previous data for this subpopulation dating back to 1968. Some of the less persistent PCB congeners decreased significantly (-1.6%/year to -6.3%/year), whereas CB153 levels tended to increase (+ 3.3%/year). Parent CHLs (c-nonachlor, t-nonachlor) declined, whereas non-monotonic trends were detected for metabolites (heptachlor epoxide, oxychlordane). Σ chlorobenzene, octachlorostyrene, Σ mirex, Σ MeSO 2 -PCB and dieldrin did not significantly change. Increasing Σ PBDE levels (+ 13%/year) matched increases in the four consistently detected congeners, BDE47, BDE99, BDE100 and BDE153. Although no trend was observed, total-(α)-HBCD was only detected post-2000. Levels of the highest concentration brominated contaminant, BB153, showed no temporal change. As long-term ecosystem changes affecting contaminant levels may also affect contaminant patterns, we examined the influence of year (i.e., aging or 'weathering' of the contaminant pattern), dietary tracers (carbon stable isotope ratios, fatty acid patterns) and biological (age/sex) group on congener/metabolite profiles. Patterns of PCBs, CHLs and PBDEs were correlated with dietary tracers and biological group, but only PCB and CHL patterns were correlated with year

  15. Estimation of low-flow statistics at ungaged sites on streams in the Lower Hudson River Basin, New York, from data in geographic information systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Allan D.; Freehafer, Douglas A.

    2017-08-02

    A variety of watershed properties available in 2015 from geographic information systems were tested in regression equations to estimate two commonly used statistical indices of the low flow of streams, namely the lowest flows averaged over 7 consecutive days that have a 1 in 10 and a 1 in 2 chance of not being exceeded in any given year (7-day, 10-year and 7-day, 2-year low flows). The equations were based on streamflow measurements in 51 watersheds in the Lower Hudson River Basin of New York during the years 1958–1978, when the number of streamflow measurement sites on unregulated streams was substantially greater than in subsequent years. These low-flow indices are chiefly a function of the area of surficial sand and gravel in the watershed; more precisely, 7-day, 10-year and 7-day, 2-year low flows both increase in proportion to the area of sand and gravel deposited by glacial meltwater, whereas 7-day, 2-year low flows also increase in proportion to the area of postglacial alluvium. Both low-flow statistics are also functions of mean annual runoff (a measure of net water input to the watershed from precipitation) and area of swamps and poorly drained soils in or adjacent to surficial sand and gravel (where groundwater recharge is unlikely and riparian water loss to evapotranspiration is substantial). Small but significant refinements in estimation accuracy resulted from the inclusion of two indices of stream geometry, channel slope and length, in the regression equations. Most of the regression analysis was undertaken with the ordinary least squares method, but four equations were replicated by using weighted least squares to provide a more realistic appraisal of the precision of low-flow estimates. The most accurate estimation equations tested in this study explain nearly 84 and 87 percent of the variation in 7-day, 10-year and 7-day, 2-year low flows, respectively, with standard errors of 0.032 and 0.050 cubic feet per second per square mile. The equations

  16. Hudson Nyabuga Nyambaka and Janice Ryley

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reversed phase column (Chromspher PAH for epoxides and Vydack TP-201 ... Samples for simulated solar-drying were spread in wire mesh trays in loads .... loss of double bonds so that when one bond is lost in 5,6-mono- and di-epoxides, a.

  17. 33 CFR 117.791 - Hudson River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... least 24 hours notice is given. (d) The draw of the state highway bridge, mile 150.2 between Troy and... between Troy and Green Island, operates as follows: (1) From April 1 through December 15, the draw shall... opened. (f) The draws of the 112th Street bridge, mile 155.4 between Troy and Cohoes operate as follows...

  18. Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Ohmi) Papenfuss, 1967 (Rhodophyta, Gracilariaceae) in northern Europe, with emphasis on Danish conditions, and what to expect in the future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Mads S.; Stæhr, Peter Anton; Nyberg, Cecilia D.

    2007-01-01

    Gracilaria vermiculophylla, a red macroalga from the West Pacific, was discovered in western Germany (the Wadden Sea) in 2002 and has since also been observed in Sweden (from about 70 km south to about 80 km north of Göteborg), Denmark (Wadden Sea, Horsens Fjord, Limfjorden, Vejle Fjord, Holckenh......Gracilaria vermiculophylla, a red macroalga from the West Pacific, was discovered in western Germany (the Wadden Sea) in 2002 and has since also been observed in Sweden (from about 70 km south to about 80 km north of Göteborg), Denmark (Wadden Sea, Horsens Fjord, Limfjorden, Vejle Fjord......-bottom estuaries and bays, typically in association with ubiquitous native invertebrates (lugworms, tube-building worms, mussels, cockles, snails). The invertebrates provide substratum for holdfast attachment and thalli incorporation, most likely increasing the stability of local G. vermiculophylla populations. We...

  19. Composición química del agua de lluvia y de niebla recolectada en la reserva biológica Monteverde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Vásquez Morera

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Se determinó la composición química del agua de lluvia y de niebla en tres sitios en la Reserva Biológica Monteverde, Puntarenas; entre octubre 2009 y enero 2010. Debido a su estado de conservación y a su ubicación geográfica sobre la deriva continental, la Reserva Biológica Monteverde ofrece un sitio de estudio ideal, para el estudio de la composición de las aguas atmosféricas (agua de lluvia y de niebla. Las muestras de agua de niebla se recolectaron al utilizar muestreadores de niebla con líneas de teflón, mientras que las de agua de lluvia se recogieron al emplear muestreadores de lluvia simples y uno de cascada. En ambos tipos de agua se analizaron las especies iónicas más relevantes: H3O+, NH4 +, Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, Na+, Cl-, NO3 - y SO4 2-, al utilizar cromatografía de iones y detección por conductividad eléctrica. Las concentraciones promedio de estas especies en el agua de lluvia estuvieron entre 0,54 ± 0,02 μeq L-1 y 101± 3 μeq L-1, mientras que en el agua de niebla variaron entre 1,00 ± 0,02 μeq L-1 y 93 ± 4 μeq L-1. Además, se presentan el balance iónico y los factores de enriquecimiento con respecto al mar y el suelo de ambos tipos de muestras.

  20. Bien recolectada pero mal tratada. El manejo municipal de la basura en Ciudad Obregón, Hermosillo y Nogales, Sonora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Pineda Pablos

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo hace un acercamiento a la manera cómo los gobiernos municipales manejan la basura desde el punte de vista del enfoque denominado "gestión integral de los residuos sólidos". Para ello, primeramente se revisan el concepto y los tipos de basura, así como las características del modelo de gestión integral de la basura y algunas ideas sobre el papel de los "pepenadores". Posteriormente, se exponen los procesos de recolección y tratamiento de la basura, así como las actividades de reciclaje y pepena que se llevan a cabo en Ciudad Obregón, Hermosillo y Nogales en el estado de Sonora (México. El estudio muestra que los servicios de estas ciudades están abocados principalmente a la etapa de la recolección y no contemplan ni la reducción ni el reciclaje. De las tres ciudades, sólo Hermosillo ha emprendido actividades parciales de reciclado y promoción de la reducción. En lo que se refiere al tratamiento, únicamente Hermosillo cuenta con un relleno sanitario que funciona adecuadamente, mientras que en Nogales el relleno sanitario con que se cuenta se maneja como tiradero y Ciudad Obregón carece enteramente de un sitio adecuado para el confinamiento de la basura. Por último, se revisa la situación del reciclado informal que hacen los pepenadores y se sugieren medidas a fin de formalizar su labor.

  1. Impact of entrainment and impingement on fish populations in the Hudson River estuary. Volume III. An analysis of the validity of the utilities' stock-recruitment curve-fitting exercise and prior estimation of beta technique. Environmental Sciences Division publication No. 1792

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, S.W.; Goodyear, C.P.; Kirk, B.L.

    1982-03-01

    This report addresses the validity of the utilities' use of the Ricker stock-recruitment model to extrapolate the combined entrainment-impingement losses of young fish to reductions in the equilibrium population size of adult fish. In our testimony, a methodology was developed and applied to address a single fundamental question: if the Ricker model really did apply to the Hudson River striped bass population, could the utilities' estimates, based on curve-fitting, of the parameter alpha (which controls the impact) be considered reliable. In addition, an analysis is included of the efficacy of an alternative means of estimating alpha, termed the technique of prior estimation of beta (used by the utilities in a report prepared for regulatory hearings on the Cornwall Pumped Storage Project). This validation methodology should also be useful in evaluating inferences drawn in the literature from fits of stock-recruitment models to data obtained from other fish stocks

  2. Phlorotannin Extracts from Fucales Characterized by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MSn: Approaches to Hyaluronidase Inhibitory Capacity and Antioxidant Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreres, Federico; Lopes, Graciliana; Gil-Izquierdo, Angel; Andrade, Paula B.; Sousa, Carla; Mouga, Teresa; Valentão, Patrícia

    2012-01-01

    Purified phlorotannin extracts from four brown seaweeds (Cystoseira nodicaulis (Withering) M. Roberts, Cystoseira tamariscifolia (Hudson) Papenfuss, Cystoseira usneoides (Linnaeus) M. Roberts and Fucus spiralis Linnaeus), were characterized by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MSn. Fucophloroethol, fucodiphloroethol, fucotriphloroethol, 7-phloroeckol, phlorofucofuroeckol and bieckol/dieckol were identified. The antioxidant activity and the hyaluronidase (HAase) inhibitory capacity exhibited by the extracts were also assessed. A correlation between the extracts activity and their chemical composition was established. F. spiralis, the species presenting higher molecular weight phlorotannins, generally displayed the strongest lipid peroxidation inhibitory activity (IC50 = 2.32 mg/mL dry weight) and the strongest HAase inhibitory capacity (IC50 = 0.73 mg/mL dry weight). As for superoxide radical scavenging, C. nodicaulis was the most efficient species (IC50 = 0.93 mg/mL dry weight), followed by F. spiralis (IC50 = 1.30 mg/mL dry weight). These results show that purified phlorotannin extracts have potent capabilities for preventing and slowing down the skin aging process, which is mainly associated with free radical damage and with the reduction of hyaluronic acid concentration, characteristic of the process. PMID:23222802

  3. Defining the Pen Islands Caribou Herd of southern Hudson Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth F. Abraham

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe the Pen Islands Herd of caribou, the largest aggregation of caribou in Ontario (it also occupies a portion of northeastern Manitoba. Photographic counts showed the herd had a minimum population of 2300 in 1979, 4660 in 1986, 7424 in 1987 and 10 798 in 1994. Throughout the 1980s, the Pen Islands caribou exhibited population behaviour similar to migratory barren-ground caribou herds, although morphology suggests they are woodland caribou or possibly a mixture of subspecies. The herd had well-defined traditional tundra calving grounds, formed nursery groups and large mobile post-calving aggregations, and migrated over 400 km between tundra summer habitats and boreal forest winter habitats. Its migration took it into three Canadian jurisdictions (Ontario, Manitoba, Northwest Territories and it was important to residents of both Manitoba and Ontario. It is clear that the herd should be managed as a migratory herd and the critical importance of both the coastal and variable large winter ranges should be noted in ensuring the herd's habitat needs are secure.

  4. Pachydictyols B and C: New Diterpenes from Dictyota dichotoma Hudson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartmut Laatsch

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Two new diterpenoids, pachydictyol B (1a/1b and C (2, were isolated from the dichloromethane extract of the marine brown alga, Dictyota dichotoma, collected from the Red Sea coast of Egypt, along with the known metabolites, pachydictyol A (3a, dictyol E (4, cis-africanan-1α-ol (5a, fucosterol (6, tetrahydrothiophen-1,1-dioxide and poly-β-hydroxybutyric acid. GC-MS analysis of the nonpolar fractions also indicated the presence of β-bourbonene and nonanal, along with three hydrocarbons and five fatty acids or their simple derivatives, respectively. GC-MS analysis of the unsaponifiable algal petroleum ether extract revealed the presence of a further eight compounds, among them 2,2,6,7-tetramethyl-10-oxatricyclo[4.3.0.1(1,7]decan-5-one (7, N-(4-bromo-n-butyl-pipe ridin-2-one (8 and tert-hexadecanethiol. Structures 1–6 were assigned by 1D and 2D NMR, mass spectra (EI, CI, HREI and HRESI and by comparison with data from related structures. The crude algal extract was potently active against the breast carcinoma tumor cell line, MCF7 (IC50 = 0.6 µg mL−1; pachydictyol B (1a and dictyol E (4 showed weak antimicrobial properties, and the other compounds were inactive. Pachydictyols B (1a and C (2 demonstrated a weak and unselective cytotoxicity against twelve human tumor cell lines with a mean IC50 of >30.0 µM.

  5. Editorial: Against the tide | Hudson | South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five years ago a Department of Health report highlighted the appalling truth about staffing in South African rural hospitals. At that time, over a quarter of medical posts and 33% of specialist positions were vacant. This meant that critical healthcare for the people of rural communities was being delivered by a handful of ...

  6. Editorial: Against the tide | Hudson | South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Family Practice. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 49, No 2 (2007) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load here if your ...

  7. The Chemical Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: Mrs. Hudson's Golden Brooch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Ken

    2009-01-01

    This story is a chemical mystery with an emphasis on qualitative analysis, metallurgy, and gravimetric analysis. It is, as well, yet another article in the continuing series, created by Thomas Waddell and Thomas R. Rybolt, that presents a scientific problem in mystery format in the context of the popular and beloved characters of Sherlock Holmes…

  8. Hudson River Sub-Bottom Profile Lines_r09272010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Subbottom Profiler Tracklines. Data was collected November 5 to December 15, 2009, in the estuary north from Saugerties to Troy. Fugro utilized the GeoAcoustics...

  9. Side-Scan-Sonar Points for Hudson River, NY

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Side Scan Point Files. These points correspond to individual pings which produced hte side-scan-sonar backscatter imagery. Sonar data were collected November 6 to...

  10. Side-Scan-Sonar Lines for Hudson River, NY

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Side Scan Sonar and Subbottom Profiler Tracklines. Data was collected November 5 to December 15, 2009, in the estuary north from Saugerties to Troy. Fugro utilized...

  11. Estudio comparativo de la composición química y actividad antibacteriana del aceite esencial de Ruta graveolens L. recolectada en los estados Mérida y Miranda, Venezuela.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janne Rojas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Essential oil from two R. graveolens samples collected from Mérida and Miranda states, Venezuela, were analyzed by GC/MS identifying as major components: 2-undecanone, 2-nonanonae and pregeijerene. On the other hand, the antibacterial activity assays showed the wide range of activity of the oils that inhibited the bacterial strains grow not only for the Gram positive (S. aureus and E. faecalis but the Gram negative (E. coli and K. pneumonie as well, displaying MIC values between 100 μg/mL and 200 μg/mL.

  12. Composición química de los aceites esenciales de las hojas de Helicteres guazumifolia (Sterculiaceae, Piper tuberculatum (Piperaceae, Scoparia dulcis (Arecaceae y Solanum subinerme (Solanaceae, recolectadas en Sucre, Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Ordaz

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Los aceites esenciales son biosintetizados por plantas aromáticas y pueden obtenerse de cualquier órgano de la misma, tienen gran aplicación en la industria farmacéutica, sanitaria, cosmética, agrícola y de alimentos. Los aceites esenciales de las hojas de las plantas Helicteres guazumifolia, Piper tuberculatum, Scoparia dulcis y Solanum subinerme fueron obtenidos mediante hidrodestilación con rendimientos de 0.004, 0.032, 0.016 y 0.005%, respectivamente. La CG/EM permitió identificar la mayoría de los constituyentes de estos aceites esenciales (88.00, 89.80, 87.50 y 89.47%, respectivamente, encontrándose en mayor proporción metabolitos no volátiles de estructura no terpenoidal en H. guazumifolia (30.28%, sesquiterpenoides oxigenados en P. tuberculatum (52.19%, sesquiterpenos en S. dulcis (26.09% y derivados oxigenados de diterpenos en S. subinerme (39.67%. Los constituyentes mayoritarios fueron el diisobutilftalato (13.11% en H. guazumifolia, (--espatulenol (11.37% en P. tuberculatum y el trans-fitol (8.29 y 36.00% para S. dulcis y S. subinerme, respectivamente. El diisooctilftalato fue el constituyente común en los aceites esenciales de todas las especies y los compuestos volátiles trans-pinano, L-linalool, β-ionona, isofitol, neofitadieno, trans-fitol, dibutilftalato y hexadecanoato de metilo, fueron detectados en tres de estas esencias. Esto sugiere que dichas plantas pueden requerir metabolitos secundarios similares para su interacción ecológica, posiblemente debido a factores ambientales comunes.

  13. Composición química de los aceites esenciales de las hojas de Helicteres guazumifolia (Sterculiaceae, Piper tuberculatum (Piperaceae, Scoparia dulcis (Arecaceae y Solanum subinerme (Solanaceae, recolectadas en Sucre, Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Ordaz

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Los aceites esenciales son biosintetizados por plantas aromáticas y pueden obtenerse de cualquier órgano de la misma, tienen gran aplicación en la industria farmacéutica, sanitaria, cosmética, agrícola y de alimentos. Los aceites esenciales de las hojas de las plantas Helicteres guazumifolia, Piper tuberculatum, Scoparia dulcis y Solanum subinerme fueron obtenidos mediante hidrodestilación con rendimientos de 0.004, 0.032, 0.016 y 0.005%, respectivamente. La CG/EM permitió identificar la mayoría de los constituyentes de estos aceites esenciales (88.00, 89.80, 87.50 y 89.47%, respectivamente, encontrándose en mayor proporción metabolitos no volátiles de estructura no terpenoidal en H. guazumifolia (30.28%, sesquiterpenoides oxigenados en P. tuberculatum (52.19%, sesquiterpenos en S. dulcis (26.09% y derivados oxigenados de diterpenos en S. subinerme (39.67%. Los constituyentes mayoritarios fueron el diisobutilftalato (13.11% en H. guazumifolia, (--espatulenol (11.37% en P. tuberculatum y el trans-fitol (8.29 y 36.00% para S. dulcis y S. subinerme, respectivamente. El diisooctilftalato fue el constituyente común en los aceites esenciales de todas las especies y los compuestos volátiles trans-pinano, L-linalool, β-ionona, isofitol, neofitadieno, trans-fitol, dibutilftalato y hexadecanoato de metilo, fueron detectados en tres de estas esencias. Esto sugiere que dichas plantas pueden requerir metabolitos secundarios similares para su interacción ecológica, posiblemente debido a factores ambientales comunes.Chemical composition of essential oils from leaves of Helicteres guazumifolia (Sterculiaceae, Piper tuberculatum (Piperaceae, Scoparia dulcis (Arecaceae and Solanum subinerme (Solanaceae from Sucre, Venezuela. Essential oils, biosynthesized and accumulated in aromatic plants, have a wide range of applications in the pharmaceutical health, cosmetics, food and agricultural industry. This study aimed to analyze the secondary metabolites in some plant species in order to contribute to their chemotaxonomy. Leaves from Helicteres guazumifolia, Piper tuberculatum, Scoparia dulcis and Solanum subinerme were collected and their essential oils were obtained by means of hydro-distillation. The oil fraction was analyzed and identified by GC/MS. The extraction yields were of 0.004, 0.032, 0.016 and 0.005%, and the oil constituents of 88.00, 89.80, 87.50 and 89.47%, respectively. The principal oils found were: non-terpenoids volatile secondary metabolites (30.28% in H. guazumifolia; sesquiterpenoids (20.82 and 26.09% and oxigen derivated (52.19 and 25.18% in P. tuberculatum and S. dulcis; and oxigen diterpenoids (39.67% in S. subinerme. The diisobuthylphtalate (13.11 % in H. guazumifolia, (--spathulenol (11.37% in P. tuberculatum and trans-phytol (8.29 and 36.00% in S. dulcis and S. subinerme, were the principal constituents in their respective essential oils. The diisooctylphtalate were the essential oil common to all species, but the volatile compounds such as trans-pinane, L-linalool, β-ionone, isophytol, neophytadiene, trans-phytol, dibutylphtalate and methyl hexadecanoate, were only detected in three of these essences. This suggests that these plants may require similar secondary metabolites for their ecological interactions, possibly due to common environmental factors. Rev. Biol. Trop. 59 (2: 585-595. Epub 2011 June 01.

  14. Union Security Provisions, Academic Freedom and Tenure: The Implications of Chicago Teachers Union v. Hudson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olswang, Steven G.

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between faculty union mandatory membership provisions in a collective bargaining agreement and the rights of faculty protected by tenure and academic freedom are examined, and college options and considerations in negotiating contracts under collective bargaining laws are discussed. (MSE)

  15. F00596: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Hudson River, New York, 2010-11-26

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  16. Sea Level, Land Motion, and the Anomalous Tide at Churchill, Hudson Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, R. D.

    2015-12-01

    The importance of the tide gauge at Churchill, Manitoba, cannot be overstated. It is the only permanently operating tide gauge in the central Canadian Arctic, and it sits on a prime spot for monitoring the mantle's rebound from the Laurentide ice loss. Yet interpretation of the sea-level time series at Churchill has long been problematic, going back even to early work by Gutenberg in the 1940s. The long-term relative sea-level rates are inconsistent: approximately -4, -19, -5 ± 1 mm/y for the periods 1940-1970, 1970-1990, 1990-2014 respectively. Annual mean high water (MHW) and mean low water (MLW) reflect these trends until around 1990, after which MLW leveled off and is now nearly unchanging. Slightly later, around 2000, the semidiurnal tides became very anomalous, with falling amplitudes and slightly increasing phase lags. The amplitude of M2 was approximately 154 cm before 2000; it dropped to about 146 cm by 2010 and reached an all-time low of 142 cm in 2014. Satellite altimeter estimates of the tide in this region, although challenging because of seasonal ice cover, show no comparable M2 changes, so the tidal changes must be localized to the near vicinity of the gauge (or to the gauge itself if caused by a malfunction). On the other hand, altimetry confirms the post-1992 Churchill measurements of mean sea level, thanks to the long time series of land motion measurements obtained at GPS station CHUR, which gives a vertical uplift of 10.1 mm/y. Combining satellite altimeter data with the Churchill tide-gauge data gives an implied vertical crustal rate of about 9.0 ± 0.8 mm/y, in reasonable agreement with the GPS. In summary, we have still anomalous MSL measurements at the Churchill gauge for the intermediate 1970-1990 era, and very anomalous tidal measurements since 2000, but we have apparently quite reliable MSL rates since 1990.

  17. Determined of Rainfall Erosivity Indices (EI30, Lal, Hudson and Onchev for Namak Lake Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z.T. Alipour

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research the indices EI30, AIm,‎ KE>1‎ as well as P/√t‎ were determined for 16 pluviograph as well as for 3 Namak Lake Basin nearby stations. Regression relationships were established between the dependent variables of EI30, AIm, KE>1‎ as well as P/√t‎ Indices and other easily accessible rainfall indices of: fournier, modified fournier, maximum monthly rainfall, maximum daily rainfall, standard deviation of monthly and annual rainfall as well as pluviometer site elevations. This made the establishment of appropriate relationships between rainfall intensity dependent indices and the dependent variable of rainfall intensity (at stations where intensity was non-existent possible. In the next step, the indices as well as easily accessible rainfall data from pluviograph stations were exploited to find out EI30 ,AIm ,‎ KE>1‎ as well as P/√t‎ indices, while using the previously obtained regression relationships.

  18. Determined of Rainfall Erosivity Indices (EI30, Lal, Hudson and Onchev) for Namak Lake Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Z.T. Alipour; M.H. Mahdian; S. Hakimkhani; M. Saeedi

    2011-01-01

    In this research the indices EI30, AIm,‎ KE>1‎ as well as P/√t‎ were determined for 16 pluviograph as well as for 3 Namak Lake Basin nearby stations. Regression relationships were established between the dependent variables of EI30, AIm, KE>1‎ as well as P/√t‎ Indices and other easily accessible rainfall indices of: fournier, modified fournier, maximum monthly rainfall, maximum daily rainfall, standard deviation of monthly and annual rainfall as well as pluviometer site elevations. This made ...

  19. Uue teabe omandamine projekteerimisprotsessis = Capturing unknown knowledge in design / Roly Hudson

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Hudson, Roly

    2011-01-01

    Artikkel uurib parameetriliste vahendite rolli tänapäeva disainipraktikas ja toob välja nende praktilised kasutegurid. Näitena kasutatakse autori enda kogemusi parameetriliste tehnikate rakendamisel sõltumatu konsultandina Aviva staadioni (avati mais 2010) kavandamisel Dublinis

  20. Science, law, and Hudson River power plants: a case study in environmental impact assessment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barnthouse, L. W; Barnthouse, Lawrence W

    1988-01-01

    Scientists spent more than 15 years studying the physical and chemical characteristics and biological productivity of the estuary and documenting the abundance, distribution, and life histories of the major fish species...

  1. 76 FR 63342 - Environmental Impact Statement, Tappan Zee Hudson River Crossing Project (Rockland and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-12

    ... connects the rapidly growing communities of Rockland and Orange Counties, New York with employment centers... correct substandard structural, operational, mobility, safety, and security features of the existing...

  2. Building America Case Study: Columbia County Habitat for Humanity Passive Townhomes, Hudson, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-04-01

    Columbia County (New York) Habitat for Humanity built a pair of townhomes to Passive House criteria with the purpose of exploring approaches for achieving Passive House performance and to eventually develop a prototype design for future projects. The project utilized a 2x6 frame wall with a structural insulated panel curtain wall and a ventilated attic over a sealed OSB ceiling air barrier. Mechanical systems include a single head, wall mounted ductless mini-split heat pump in each unit and a heat recovery ventilator. Costs were $26,000 per unit higher for Passive House construction compared with the same home built to ENERGY STAR version 3 specifications, representing about 18 percent of total construction cost. This report discusses the cost components, energy modeling results and lessons from construction. Two alternative ventilation systems are analyzed: a central system; and, a point-source system with small through-wall units distributed throughout the house. The report includes a design and cost analysis of these two approaches.

  3. Pre-approval of Prescription Drug Advertisements in the Shadow of Central Hudson

    OpenAIRE

    Ginn, Clifford M.

    2003-01-01

    The article examines the effects of prescription drug advertising on patients and physicians, and explains how a requirement of pre-approval by the FDA for prescription drug advertisements could eliminate many of the problems such advertisements create, without limiting the benefits of advertising or violating the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.

  4. NOAA Office for Coastal Management Coastal Inundation Digital Elevation Model: New York, Hudson River

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data were created as part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Office for Coastal Management's efforts to create an online mapping viewer...

  5. American Higher Education: Behind the Emerald City's Curtain. Hudson Briefing Paper, No. 188.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Chester E., Jr.; Manno, Bruno V.

    During the last 50 years, American higher education has steadily grown in scale, wealth, and, stature. Despite its current status as the world's education superpower, however, it has begun to encounter public disapproval and consumer resistance. Colleges and universities have been able to ignore productivity concerns because a college education…

  6. 76 FR 56469 - Notice of Inventory Completion: The University of Maine, Hudson Museum, Orono, ME

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-13

    ... present in their aboriginal claims area during the prehistory of what is now known as Arizona and Mexico... stories of this period in late prehistory, including not just the role of a great water serpent and a...

  7. 75 FR 10229 - Application for Presidential Permit; Champlain Hudson Power Express, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-05

    ... current (HVDC) electric transmission line that will originate at an HVDC converter station in Quebec... project (the ``Project'') would be a 2,000- megawatt (MW) HVDC Voltage Source Converter (VSC) controllable transmission system, comprising two 1,000-MW HVDC bipoles, each of which would include two submarine or...

  8. H09547: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Vicinity of Hudson Canyon, New Jersey, 1975-09-02

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  9. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: INDEX (Index Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector polygons representing the boundaries of all hardcopy cartographic products produced as part of the Environmental Sensitivity Index...

  10. H09546: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Vicinity of Hudson Canyon, New Jersey, 1975-07-17

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  11. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: HABITATS (Habitat Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV), floating aquatic vegetation (FAV), and rare/sensitive coastal...

  12. Respiratory fit testing for farmworkers in the Black Dirt region of Hudson Valley, New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earle-Richardson, Giulia; Fiske, Todd; Wyckoff, Sherry; Shuford, James; May, John

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory protection in agriculture has lagged behind other industries. Migrant farmworkers often work in dusty environments yet do not receive appropriate, fitted respiratory protection. During May and June of 2013, researchers pilot-tested a respiratory protection program adapted to fit the unique needs of migrant and seasonal farmworkers. It was implemented in Spanish, with literacy support, at convenient times and locations. Additionally, staff was known to workers, and a farmworker medical center provided medical follow-up. Fifty-six farmworkers participated (68%; 82 invited). Of the participants, 88% were male; 20% reported using respiratory protection. One worker had been fit tested previously; 57% reported being exposed to pesticides. All but six farmworkers passed the medical clearance (91%). The mask most commonly fit to the American-born population was a good fit for only 41% of Latino farmworkers. The fact that two thirds of invited farmworkers participated in the clearance and over half completed mask fitting indicates that the modified protocol meets farmworker needs. A wide range of mask types should be made available for Latino farmworkers.

  13. Nogmaals de Bijenorchis (Ophrys apifera Hudson) in het Delta-gebied

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sipkes, C.

    1988-01-01

    Some 200 specimens of Ophrys apifera were found in a moist, formerly saline but now desalinated terrain along one of the new dykes connecting the former islands in the province of Zeeland. The lasting occurrence of the orchid is threatened by mice and by Salix and Hippophaë scrub overgrowing the

  14. De toename van Anacamptis pyramidalis (L.) L.C. Rich. en Ophrys apifera Hudson in Nederland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreutz, C.A.J.

    1994-01-01

    Until some ten years ago Anacamptis pyramidalis and Ophrys apifera were very rare in the Netherlands. In the last decade, however, both species have been found at many new localities. In this paper these are discussed and new distribution maps are presented.

  15. Estimation of arboreal lichen biomass available to woodland caribou in Hudson Bay lowland black spruce sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K. Proceviat

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available An arboreal lichen index to be utilized in assessing woodland caribou habitat throughout northeastern Ontario was developed. The "index" was comprised of 5 classes, which differentiated arboreal lichen biomass on black spruce trees, ranging from maximal quantities of arboreal lichen (class 5 to minimal amounts of arboreal lichen (class 1. This arboreal lichen index was subsequently used to estimate the biomass of arboreal lichen available to woodland caribou on lowland black spruce sites ranging in age from 1 year to 150 years post-harvest. A total of 39 sites were assessed and significant differences in arboreal lichen biomass were found, with a positive linear relationship between arboreal lichen biomass and forest age. It is proposed that the index be utilized by government and industry as a means of assessing the suitability of lowland black spruce habitat for woodland caribou in this region.

  16. Side-Scan_Sonar backscatter tiles for Hudson River, NY (.xtf)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Raw XTF files. Sonar data were collected November 6 to December 15, 2009, in the estuary north from Saugerties to Troy. Data Collection and Processing: The...

  17. Antifungal, cytotoxic and chemical analyses of essential oils of Lippia origanoides H.B.K grown in Colombia Actividad antifúngica, citotó;xica y composición química de aceites esenciales de Lippia origanoides H.B.K recolectadas en Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Betancur-Galvis

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Aspergillus fumigatus is most commonly associated to invasive aspergillosis. Strong antifungal activity against A. fumigatus of L. origanoides essential oil gives a new added value to this natural product from Boyacá-Colombia. Aims: The increase in fungal infections, the development of resistance and toxicity of wide-spectrum antifungals have led to a constant search for therapeutic alternatives. The chemical composition, antifungal and cytotoxic activity of nine essential oils obtained from L. origanoides were evaluated and the relationship between the antifungal activities of the oil and of its major components were explored. Methods and Results: Antifungal activity was determined following the protocols AFST-EUCAST for Candida krusei and C. parapsilosis, and CLSI-M38A for Aspergillus fumigatus and A. flavus. The GC-MS analysis identified three chemotypes: thymol, carvacrol and p-cymene/trans-beta-caryophyllene. The essential oil of the thymol chemotype was the most active in antifungal assays with MIC values of 157.5, 198.4, 125 and 31 μg ml-1 against C. parapsilosis, C. krusei, A. flavus and A. fumigatus, respectively. The major components carvacrol and thymol were not active against A. fumigatus at concentrations below 157.5 μg ml-1. In general, the oils were not cytotoxic. Conclusions: The essential oil of the thymol chemotype of L. origanoides from the region of Boyacá- Colombia showed the highest antifungal activity against A. fumigatus among all the oils and major components tested. Salud UIS 2011; 43 (2: 141-148Introducción: La infección por el hongo Aspergillus fumigatus está más comúnmente asociada a la aspergilosis invasiva. La fuerte actividad antimicótica del aceite esencial de L. origanoides contra A. fumigatus ha dado un nuevo valor agregado a este producto natural de Boyacá-Colombia. Objetivo: El aumento de las infecciones por hongos, el desarrollo de la resistencia y la toxicidad de los antifúngicos de amplio espectro han llevado a una constante búsqueda de alternativas terapéuticas. En este estudio fueron evaluados la composición química, la actividad antifúngica y citotóxica de nueve aceites esenciales obtenidos de L. origanoides; y la relación entre la actividad antifúngica de los aceites con respecto a la presencia de sus principales componentes. Métodos y Resultados: La actividad antifúngica se determinó siguiendo los protocolos AFST-EUCAST para Candida krusei y C. parapsilosis; y CLSI M38A para Aspergillus fumigatus y A. flavus. El análisis por GC-MS identificó tres quimiotipos: carvacrol timol y p-cymene/trans-beta-caryophyllene. El aceite esencial del quimiotipo timol fue el más activo en los ensayos antifúngicos con valores de MIC de 157,5, 198,4, 125 y 31 mg ml-1 frente a C. parapsilosis, C. krusei, A. flavus y A. fumigatus, respectivamente. El carvacrol y el timol, los principales componentes, no fueron activos frente a A. fumigatus en concentraciones inferiores a 157,5 g / ml-1. En general, los aceites no fueron citotóxicos. Conclusiones: El aceite esencial de L origanoides, quimiotipo timol, de la región de Boyacá-Colombia presentó la mayor actividad antifúngica frente a A. fumigatus entre todos los aceites evaluados; igualmente, sus principales componentes fueron los más activos en comparación a los otros quimiotipos. Salud UIS 2011; 43 (2: 141-148

  18. 75 FR 29805 - CSX Transportation, Inc. and Delaware and Hudson Railway Company, Inc.-Joint Use Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-27

    ... attach a document and otherwise comply with the instructions found on the Board's website at `` www.stb... Syracuse and Huntingdon, Que. CSXT interchanges this cross-border rail traffic with Canadian National Railway Company (CN) at Huntingdon, with CN handling the traffic to and from the Montreal terminal area...

  19. Source and Fate of Inorganic Soil Contamination Around the Abandoned Phillips Sulfide Mine Hudson Highlands New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S Gilchrist; A Gates; E Elzinga; M Gorring; z Szabo

    2011-12-31

    The abandoned Phillips sulfide mine in the critical Highlands watershed in New York has been shown to produce strongly acidic mine drainage (AMD) with anomalous metal contaminants in first-order streams that exceeded local water standards by up to several orders of magnitude (Gilchrist et al., 2009). The metal-sulfide-rich tailings also produce contaminated soils with pH < 4, organic matter < 2.5% and trace metals sequestered in soil oxides. A geochemical transect to test worst-case soil contamination showed that Cr, Co and Ni correlated positively with Mn, (r = 0.72, r = 0.89, r = 0.80, respectively), suggesting Mn-oxide sequestration and that Cu and Pb correlated with Fe (r = 0.76, r = 0.83, respectively), suggesting sequestration in goethite. Ubiquitous, yellow coating on the mine wastes, including jarosite and goethite, is a carrier of the metals. Geochemical and {mu}-SXRF analyses determined Cu to be the major soil contaminant, {mu}-SXRF also demonstrated that the heterogeneous nature of the soil chemistry at the micro-meter scale is self-similar to those in the bulk soil samples. Generally metals decreased, with some fluctuations, rapidly downslope through suspension of fines and dissolution in AMD leaving the area of substantial contamination << 0.5 km from the source.

  20. 76 FR 31678 - Saratoga and North Creek Railway, LLC-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-Delaware and Hudson...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    ... was structured so that the Town would not incur a freight rail common carrier obligation when it....R., 8 I.C.C.2d 835 (1991). Saratoga is acquiring the easement and the associated freight rail common... Canadian Pacific (CP) a permanent and exclusive freight rail easement over, and to operate, approximately...

  1. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: SOCECON (Socioeconomic Resource Points and Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains human-use resource data for marinas, boat ramps, locks and dams, water intake sites, archaeological sites, U.S. Coast Guard stations,...

  2. In the Image of the Great Society: Reinventing K-12 Education in the Clinton Administration. Hudson Briefing Paper, No. 174.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manno, Bruno V.

    This policy paper, by a former U.S. Assistant Secretary of Education for Policy and Planning, argues that President Clinton and the previous "education Congress" designed a top-down strategy reminiscent of the Great Society programs in the 1960s to reform America's school systems. The resultant educational legislation has occurred at a…

  3. 78 FR 20559 - Safety Zones; Swim Events in the Captain of the Port New York Zone; Hudson River, East River...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... Liberty to Freedom Swim: Waters of the Upper New York Bay, from Liberty Island, NJ to North Cove, New York... security of people, places or vessels. 7. Unfunded Mandates Reform Act The Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of..., local, or tribal government, in the aggregate, or by the private sector of $100,000,000 (adjusted for...

  4. Dewatering treatments to increase dry matter content of the brown seaweed, kelp (Laminaria digitata ((Hudson) JV Lamouroux)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Joe A; Turner, Lesley B; Adams, Jessica M M; Dyer, Philip W; Theodorou, Michael K

    2017-01-01

    Macroalgal water content is an on-going problem for the use of readily accessible seaweeds in sustainable biorefining, including fuel production. Silage is a reduced-water, compactable, easily stored, transportable material. Ensiling could establish a non-seasonal supply of preserved algal biomass, but requires high initial dry matter content to mitigate environmental pollution risks from effluent. This study investigated potential dewatering methods for kelp harvested throughout the year. Treatments included air-drying, osmotic media and acids. Significant interactions between treatment and harvest-time were observed for traits of interest. Fresh weight loss during treatment was composed of changes in water and dry matter content. Air-drying gave reliable increase in final dry matter content; in summer and autumn 30% dry matter content was reached after 24h. Dilute hydrochloric acid reduced stickiness and rendered material suitable for dewatering by screw-pressing; it may be possible to use the consequent pH reduction to promote efficient preservation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. 78 FR 59231 - Regulated Navigation Area-Tappan Zee Bridge Construction Project, Hudson River; South Nyack and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-26

    ... Manager, Docket Operations, telephone (202) 366-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms COTP.... If you submit your comments by mail or hand delivery, submit them in an unbound format, no larger... section 4(a) of the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) (5 U.S.C. 553(b)). This provision authorizes an...

  6. Effect of different temperature regimes on the chlorophyll a concentration in four species of Antarctic macroalgae

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dhargalkar, V.K.

    th Symp. on Polar Biology, Nat. Inst. Pf Polar Research. Tokyo. Mem. natn. lnst. polar Res. Tokyo(Spec.Issue).32: l12-116. Papenfuss, G. F. 1964. Catalogue and bibliography of Antarctic and sub- antarctic benthic marine algae. Am. Geophys. Union...

  7. 77 FR 69647 - New Jersey; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-20

    ... designated as adversely affected by this major disaster: Atlantic, Cape May, Essex, Hudson, Middlesex, Monmouth, Ocean, and Union Counties for Individual Assistance. Atlantic, Cape May, Essex, Hudson, Middlesex...

  8. NOAA Digital Oblique Imagery Collection for the Coasts of Main/New Hampshire, Massachusetts/Rhode Island/Connecticut, and Hudson River/Long Island /NY/NJ

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Project: NOAA Digital Orthophotography and Ancillary Oblique Imagery Collection for the Coasts of Main/New Hampshire, Massachusetts/Rhode Island/Connecticut, and...

  9. National Dam Safety Program. Woodward Dam (Inventory Number NY 507), Lower Hudson River Basin, Orange County, New York. Phase I Inspection Report,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-30

    omomrnuurI CONTENTS Location Plan Watershed Map Plate la : Field Sketch of Woodward Dam Plate Ib: Field Sketch of Greenleaf Dam Plate 2: Plan of Dam...goOFftkoww P L "mm alom+0a,0164m asm a Gooch~~A’~e mftLrrL - ol-ob o prat -n 4A ~ /e4 SojA S~tT IIV&-~ ~ i pqPiE5M 1%b, k&vs APPENDIX F...in ry flScrvice orflSi).. L I) Ip. lv.ay ConcrCLC Sp’%way Las j’ r. Joints Surfncc of S p 5.3i). y ’Mclarical Ar .Dra .o ~~~ LI:C azard Class E

  10. National Dam Safety Program. Lake Wanda Dam (NJ00510), Hudson River Basin, Tributary to Wawayanda Creek, Sussex County, New Jersey. Phase 1 Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    8217 7rA’Al’A𔄀 /O’ 3 4 5 $-eS 7W# 55 Af1--7;72 6 10 12 - . . . . . ... . . . . . .’ . . .. 13 l 14 15 £ F6 3I f’f . 16 A6 18 19 200 _.._. . . . .. . . . 21’ 22...191, ~ C! . .. .. C.C C C L. C . C W .C . . . .C .C . . . .C .C . . . . .C . C . C C. . C . C 4 4 . . . a CC aa acca a aa aa C C

  11. National Dam Safety Program. Potake Lake Dam (Inventory Number N.Y. 970), Passaic River Basin, Lower Hudson River Area, Rockland County, New York. Phase I Inspection Report,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-14

    facilitate thedischarge of storm flows. 2. The animal burrows, depressions , and tire ruts onthe crest of the dam should be filled, compacted and seeded. 3...storm flows. 2. The animal burrows, depressions , and tire ruts on the crest of the dam should be filled, compacted, and seeded...defined by the Recommended Guidelines for Safety Inspection of Dams (Reference 13, Appendix D). d. Hazard Classifications - Cranberry Lake Dam is one mile

  12. The Mississippi River Campaign 1862-1863: The Impact of Climate and Pathogens on Operational Art at the Port Hudson Siege

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-13

    48 1 Introduction Sun Tzu , for one, advised commanders to, “camp on hard ground, the army...51 Bibliography ...Society Papers Volume XIII January to December 1885 (Richmond, VA: The Society, 1891), 329; Bell, 31. 248 Bell, 30. 52 Bibliography Army Doctrine

  13. National Dam Safety Program. Palmer Falls Dam, Upper Hudson River Basin, Saratoga and Warren Counties, New York. Phase I Inspection Report,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-23

    MA = -a a (A ILa 0. on 4 04 - 0 4.. 4i 44 4i . 4 4. PN w 4 - at AISA 4, 4. 4 ac I r V tvso l, -Vcp4pnfyw to &A0: 1. 0.V. 494 4...for Nuclear Power Plants, Regulating Guide 1.59, Revision 2, August1977 3. Linsley and Franzini: Water Resources Engineering, Second Edition , McGraw...Hill (1972) 4. W. Viessman, Jr., J. Knapp, G. Lewis, 1977, 2nd Edition , Introduction to Hydrology 5. Ven Te Chow: Handbook of Applied Hydrology, McGraw

  14. Novel antimicrobial activity of a dichloromethane extract obtained from red seaweed Ceramium rubrum (Hudson (Rhodophyta: Florideophyceae against Yersinia ruckeri and Saprolegnia parasitica, agents that cause diseases in salmonids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurima Cortés

    2014-05-01

    Conclusions: These results may constitute a basis for promising future applied research that could investigate the use of C. rubrum seaweed as a source of antimicrobial compounds against fish pathogens.

  15. Landscape Risk Factors for Lyme Disease in the Eastern Broadleaf Forest Province of the Hudson River Valley and the Effect of Explanatory Data Classification Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study assessed how landcover classification affects associations between landscape characteristics and Lyme disease rate. Landscape variables were derived from the National Land Cover Database (NLCD), including native classes (e.g., deciduous forest, developed low intensity)...

  16. 2011 - 2012 New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) Lidar: Coastal New York (Long Island and along the Hudson River)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data is remotely sensed high-resolution elevation data collected by an airborne collection platform. This LiDAR dataset is a...

  17. Changes in composition, structure and aboveground biomass over seventy-six years (1930-2006) in the Black Rock Forest, Hudson Highlands, southeastern New York State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, W S F; Griffin, K L; Roth, H; Turnbull, M H; Whitehead, D; Tissue, D T

    2008-04-01

    We sought to quantify changes in tree species composition, forest structure and aboveground forest biomass (AGB) over 76 years (1930-2006) in the deciduous Black Rock Forest in southeastern New York, USA. We used data from periodic forest inventories, published floras and a set of eight long-term plots, along with species-specific allometric equations to estimate AGB and carbon content. Between the early 1930s and 2000, three species were extirpated from the forest (American elm (Ulmus americana L.), paper birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh.) and black spruce (Picea mariana (nigra) (Mill.) BSP)) and seven species invaded the forest (non-natives tree-of-heaven (Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) Swingle) and white poplar (Populus alba L.) and native, generally southerly distributed, southern catalpa (Catalpa bignonioides Walt.), cockspur hawthorn (Crataegus crus-galli L.), red mulberry (Morus rubra L.), eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr.) and slippery elm (Ulmus rubra Muhl.)). Forest canopy was dominated by red oak and chestnut oak, but the understory tree community changed substantially from mixed oak-maple to red maple-black birch. Density decreased from an average of 1500 to 735 trees ha(-1), whereas basal area doubled from less than 15 m(2) ha(-1) to almost 30 m(2) ha(-1) by 2000. Forest-wide mean AGB from inventory data increased from about 71 Mg ha(-1) in 1930 to about 145 Mg ha(-1) in 1985, and mean AGB on the long-term plots increased from 75 Mg ha(-1) in 1936 to 218 Mg ha(-1) in 1998. Over 76 years, red oak (Quercus rubra L.) canopy trees stored carbon at about twice the rate of similar-sized canopy trees of other species. However, there has been a significant loss of live tree biomass as a result of canopy tree mortality since 1999. Important constraints on long-term biomass increment have included insect outbreaks and droughts.

  18. HUDSONAR (CW2014, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — HUDSONAR is a bioacoustic survey of the Hudson River Estuary being conducted aboard the Hudson River Sloop Clearwater by the Acoustic Laboratory for Ecology Studies...

  19. HUNDSONAR (CW2015, ES60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — HUDSONAR is a bioacoustic survey of the Hudson River Estuary being conducted aboard the Hudson River Sloop Clearwater by the Acoustic Laboratory for Ecology Studies...

  20. HUDSONAR (CW2013, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — HUDSONAR is a bioacoustic survey of the Hudson River Estuary being conducted aboard the Hudson River Sloop Clearwater by the Acoustic Laboratory for Ecology Studies...

  1. Experiment list: SRX100493 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available is=Carcinoma Hepatocellular 67635839,78.1,18.6,34708 GSM803448: HudsonAlpha ChipSeq HepG2 HEY1 v041610.1 sou...rce_name=HepG2 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=HudsonAlpha || lab description=Myers - Hudson Alpha Insti

  2. Experiment list: SRX100563 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s=Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous 39078535,86.0,20.8,1302 GSM803518: HudsonAlpha ChipSeq K562 BCL3 PCR1x source..._name=K562 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=HudsonAlpha || lab description=Myers - Hudson Alpha Institute

  3. Experiment list: SRX100430 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s=Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous 47818475,79.5,9.7,26072 GSM803385: HudsonAlpha ChipSeq K562 HEY1 PCR1x source..._name=K562 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=HudsonAlpha || lab description=Myers - Hudson Alpha Institute

  4. Morpho-anatomy of stypopodium zonale (phaeophycota) from the coast of karachi, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, A.; Shameel, M.

    2014-01-01

    A brown alga Stypopodium zonale (Lamouroux) Papenfuss (Dictyotales) was collected from Manora and Buleji, the coastal areas near Karachi (Pakistan) during March 2006-April 2009 and investigated for its morphology, anatomy and reproductive structures. This is the first detailed study on the Pakistani specimens of this species from these points of view, where presence or absence of intercellular spaces, cell-wall thickness of different cells and structure of surface cells were examined. In this connection the apical, middle and basal parts of the thallus were investigated anatomically. (author)

  5. North Atlantic Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Massachusetts (2001), Delaware Bay (1996), New Hampshire (2004), Hudson River (2006), and Rhode Island, Connecticut, NY/NJ Metro Area (2001) maps and geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0020555)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These ESI data were collected, mapped, and digitized to provide environmental data for oil spill planning and response. The Clean Water Act with amendments by the...

  6. Gilles Tondini, L’image obscène (The obscene image. Parisian hospital break room Graffitti, New York et Londres, Mark Batty publisher et Thames & Hudson, 2010, 159 p.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Hottin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Lors de la parution du livre de Gilles Tondini, le quotidien Libération consacra son « Grand angle » aux fresques des salles de garde des hôpitaux parisiens avec cette introduction : « Sur les murs des salles de garde, les réfectoires réservés aux Internes, s’étalent des peintures où le sexe est roi. Un livre de photos les révèle pour la première fois alors qu’elles sont menacées de disparition ». Comme souvent en feuilletant un journal, le lecteur un peu averti d’un sujet peut déceler d’embl...

  7. Comparative Didactics: A Reconstructive Move from Subject Didactics. Paper presented in the WERA Symposium "Transnational Research on Didactics - Learning and Teaching", coordinated by B. Hudson. European Congress on Educational Research, 8-11 sept 2015, Corvinus University, Hungary.

    OpenAIRE

    Ligozat, Florence

    2015-01-01

    In the history of the modern school systems in Europe, the development of the didactiques des disciplines (subject didactics) originates in 1) the building of “disciplines” (school subjects) as social organisations aimed at producing and diffusing knowledge and 2) the empowerment of the secondary school teachers through professional associations (Schneuwly, 2011). Subject didactics were thus born as practices of teaching a given discipline and attempts of theorising such practices. Against th...

  8. 75 FR 38144 - Investigations Regarding Certifications of Eligibility To Apply For Worker Adjustment Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .../09 (Company). 74233 DP-DHL US Express Plantation, FL........ 06/11/10 08/11/09 Headquarters (Company... Company, Hudson, NC 06/07/10 05/21/10 Plant 1 (Company). 74198 Kincaid Furniture Company, Hudson, NC 06/07/10 05/21/10 Shipping Dept. (Company). 74199 Kincaid Furniture Company, Hudson, NC 06/07/10 05/21/10...

  9. 76 FR 9041 - New Jersey; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ..., Middlesex, Monmouth, Morris, Ocean, Passaic, Somerset, and Union Counties for Public Assistance. Bergen, Burlington, Cape May, Essex, Hudson, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, Morris, Ocean, Passaic, Somerset, and Union...

  10. Effects of Child Characteristics on the Outcomes of a Parent Support Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Alan; Reece, John; Cameron, Christine; Matthews, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Background: Previous research has reported on the effectiveness of the Signposts program for supporting families of children with an intellectual disability and difficult behaviour (Hudson et al., 2003; Hudson, Cameron, & Matthews, 2008). This paper reports on an investigation of the extent to which child characteristics moderate the…

  11. 78 FR 15049 - Notice of Determinations Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... market disruption or threat thereof under section 421(b)(1); or (C) An affirmative final determination of... Newsprint Company. 82,247 Kincaid Furniture Co., Hudson, NC July 20, 2012. Inc., Plant 9 Lumber Yard, Foothills Temporary Employment. 82,247A Kincaid Furniture Co., Hudson, NC July 22, 2012. Inc., Plant 1...

  12. Apendicularias de la región oriental de Venezuela

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoppi de Roa, Evelyn

    1971-01-01

    El presente trabajo es una contribución al estudio de las Apendicularias de la región oriental de Venezuela. Presenta los resultados taxonómicos y de distribución de las especies recolectadas durante los años 1960 a 1962. Las muestras de plancton analizadas indicaron la presencia de 18 especies

  13. High mortality of Zostera marina under high temperature regimes but minor effects of the invasive macroalgae Gracilaria vermiculophylla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höffle, Hannes; Thomsen, M.S.; Holmer, M.

    2011-01-01

    The present study tested for density-dependent effects of the invasive drift macroalgae Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Ohmi) Papenfuss on growth and survival of the native eelgrass, Zostera marina L., under different temperature levels. Three weeks laboratory experiments were conducted in Odense......, Denmark, combining three algae densities (control, low 1.9 kg WW m2, high 4.5 kg WW m2) with typical Danish summer temperatures (18 C) and elevated temperatures (21 C and 27 C). There was a significant effect of temperature on shoot survival with on average 68% mortality in the high temperature treatment...... but almost no mortality at the two lower temperatures. The higher mortality was probably caused by high sulphide levels in the sediment pore water (0.6 mmol l1 at 18 C compared to 3.7 mmol l1 at 27 C). Above-ground growth of the surviving shoots was also significantly affected by temperature, with leaf...

  14. Regional Moment Tensor Source-Type Discrimination Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-16

    unique normalized eigenvalues (black ‘+’ signs) or unique source-types on (a) the fundamental Lune (Tape and Tape, 2012a,b), and (b) on the Hudson...Solutions color-coded by variance reduction (VR) pre- sented on the Tape and Tape (2012a) and Tape and Tape (2012b) Lune . The white circle...eigenvalues (black ‘+’ signs) or unique source-types on (a) the fundamental Lune (Tape and Tape, 2012a,b), and (b) on the Hudson source-type plot (Hudson

  15. Oscarite gala pole enam miljoni valge mehe marss / Triin Tael

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tael, Triin

    2007-01-01

    79. Oscarite gala oli Martin Scorsese maffiadraama "Kahe tule vahel" ja mustanahaliste näitlejate triumf. Parimaks meesnäitlejaks kuulutati Forest Whitaker ja parimaks naiskõrvalosatäitjaks Jennifer Hudson. Ka varasematest võitjatest

  16. Disease: H01262 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ORS ... Hilton JF, Christensen KE, Watkins D, Raby BA, Renaud Y, de la Luna S, Estivill X, MacKenzie RE, Hud...son TJ, Rosenblatt DS ... TITLE ... The molecular basis of glutamate formiminotransfe

  17. Benthic Habitat Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Beam trawl (2 m) and otter trawl (36' Yankee) demersal and epibenthic catches from targeted areas of interest including mid-Atlantic shelf and vicinity of Hudson...

  18. NOAA Digital Orthophotography for the Coasts of Connecticut and Long Island, NY

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Project: NOAA Digital Orthophotography for the Coasts of Main/New Hampshire, Massachusetts/Rhode Island/Connecticut, and Hudson River/Long Island /NY/NJ Contract No....

  19. NOAA Digital Orthophotography for the Coasts of New York and New Jersey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Project: NOAA Digital Orthophotography for the Coasts of Main/New Hampshire, Massachusetts/Rhode Island/Connecticut, and Hudson River/Long Island /NY/NJ Contract No....

  20. Fall Bottom Trawl Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The standardized NEFSC Fall Bottom Trawl Survey was initiated in 1963 and covered an area from Hudson Canyon, NY to Nova Scotia, Canada. Throughout the years,...

  1. S Greenfield*, K Karstens**, G Osborn*** and JP Rossouw

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aeg aeg

    This article is broadly concerned with the relationship between sport and personal injury and ..... See Hudson 1986 LQR 11 and also Goodhart 1962 LQR 490. ...... Krause LM et al "Understanding Mismatches in Body Size, Speed and Power.

  2. Route 139 rehabilitation: Pulaski Skyway contract 2 : technical brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    This study addressed the need for an aesthetically pleasing historic concrete balustrade design alternative for the Pulaski Skyway in Jersey City, Hudson County. In this study, a crashworthy design was developed according to AASHTO Section 13 specifi...

  3. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the LOUIS S. ST. LAURENT in the Baffin Bay, Davis Strait and others from 1997-08-03 to 1997-08-18 (NODC Accession 0114432)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0114432 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from LOUIS S. ST. LAURENT in the Baffin Bay, Davis Strait, Hudson...

  4. Mechanisms and Variability of Salt Transport in Partially-Stratified Estuaries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bowen, Melissa

    2000-01-01

    .... Analysis of salt transport from observations in the Hudson Estuary show that stratified periods with elevated estuarine salt transport occur in five-day intervals once a month during apogean neap tides...

  5. 76 FR 21408 - Notice of Determinations Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-15

    .... Solutions, Inc., A Xerox Company. 75,210 PricewaterhouseCoopers Tampa, FL February 8, 2010. LLP, Human Resources Shared Services Center, Talent Acquisition Associates, etc. 75,258 Kaz, Inc Hudson, NY September...

  6. Habitat Mapping Cruise (HB0805, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Objectives are to: 1) perform multibeam mapping of transitional and deepwater habitats in Hudson Canyon (off New Jersey) with the National Institute of Undersea...

  7. Chemical, temperature, and other data from bottle casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from 04 July 1966 to 17 June 1985 (NODC Accession 0000369)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, temperature, and other data were collected from HUDSON, SIGMA-T, and HOH from July 4, 1966 to June 17, 1985. These data were collected using bottle casts...

  8. Treating Cataracts | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Claudine Klose, 63, lives on a farm in New York's Hudson Valley. She had successful cataract surgery in 2013 and shared her experience recently with NIH MedlinePlus magazine. What did you notice about your vision that ...

  9. Kaks kirja vennale = Two Letters from Vincent van Gogh to his brother / Vincent van Gogh

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Gogh, Vincent van, 1853-1890

    2008-01-01

    Kunstnik Vincent van Goghi kaks kirja oma vennale Theole. Tõlge vene keelest ja kommentaar Mehis Heinsaarelt. Ingliskeelsed kirjad raamatust "The Complete Letters of Vincent van Gogh", Thames and Hudson, 1979

  10. Evaluation of PCB bioaccumulation by Lumbriculus variegatus in field-collected sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sediment bioaccumulation tests with Lumbriculus variegatus were performed on polychlorinated biphenyl (PCBs) contaminated sediment samples from the Hudson, Grasse, and Fox Rivers Superfund sites with concurrent measurement of PCB concentrations in sediment interstitial water. Th...

  11. Sediment toxicity data from stations in U.S. coastal waters from 19910318 to 19930303 (NCEI Accession 9400004)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The accession contains Sediment Toxicity data collected from Gulf of Mexico, Hudson Bay, New York Bight, North American Coastline-North, and Pamlico Sound as part of...

  12. Hazardous Waste Cleanup: Sabic Innovative Plastics US, LLC in Selkirk, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ownership of the facility was transferred from General Electric to Sabic Innovative Plastics in May 2007. The facility is located on Noryl Avenue in the town of Selkirk. The facility is approximately six miles from the Hudson River.

  13. New Approaches and Technologies to Sequence de novo Plant reference Genomes (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmutz, Jeremy

    2013-03-01

    Jeremy Schmutz of the HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology on New approaches and technologies to sequence de novo plant reference genomes at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, CA.

  14. The social and clinical characteristics of patients on antiretroviral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Professor Karl Peltzer a b kpeltzer@hsrc.ac.za, Shandir Ramlagan Master's Degree c , Dr Mohamed Salim Khan d & Dr Bernhard Gaede e f

    Causes of late access to the ART programme, such as delays in health care access (delayed health care seeking), health ..... severe (Holzemer, Hudson, Kirksey, Hamilton & Bakken, 2001). ..... Medical Care, 44(8 Suppl 2), S1-6. Cornell, M.

  15. ‘The real problem is that when most economists wring their hands about the financial system melting down, what they really mean is the top 1 percent losing the amazing amount of wealth they've doubled since 1979’

    OpenAIRE

    Achim Truger; Till van Treeck

    2014-01-01

    Michael Hudson is President of the Institute for the Study of Long-Term Economic Trends (ISLET), a Wall Street Financial Analyst, and Distinguished Research Professor of Economics at the University of Missouri, Kansas City. ISLET engages in research regarding domestic and international finance, national income and balance-sheet accounting with regard to real estate, and the economic history of the ancient Near East. Michael Hudson acts as an economic advisor to governments worldwide including...

  16. The Influence of Captain Alfred Thayer Mahan upon the United States Navy through the United States Naval Institute’s Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-13

    there was little tangible work to do on the Brazil Station “except to cruise between Rio de Janeiro and Montevideo, stopping occasionally at some...Mahan’s early childhood at West Point was marked by isolation, innocence and discovery. Steamboats from the Hudson River were the only...vessel, such as at rare intervals passed our home on the Hudson, fifty miles from the sea.”95 River access to West Point was problematic during the

  17. Siete especies nuevas de Allorhogas (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Doryctinae) de México

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez, Juan José; Zaldívar-Riverón, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Se describen, ilustran y caracterizan molecularmente 7 especies nuevas del género gallícola Allorhogas (Braconidae: Doryctinae): A. amuzgo sp. nov., A. coccolobae sp. nov., A. crassifemur sp. nov., A. jaliscoensis sp. nov., A. marshi sp. nov., A. parvus sp. nov. y A. scotti sp. nov. Estas especies fueron recolectadas en bosques tropicales caducifolios de la costa del Pacífico mexicano en Jalisco, Oaxaca y Guerrero. Allorhogas coccolobae fue criada de agallas foliares en Coccoloba barbadensis ...

  18. Utilizing Biomarker Signature Pairs To Develop Gene Therapeutic Viral Delivery Platforms For Treating Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Tamaro Hudson is currently an Assistant Professor at Howard University in the Department of Pharmacology and holds an appointment as a Health Research Specialist at the Washington VA Medical Center. Dr. Hudson received his Bachelor of Science from Iowa State University in Biology in 1994 and went on to receive a Master of Science in Preventive Medicine from Ohio State University in 2007. Afterwards, he received a Ph.D. from Ohio State University in 2002 where he focused on evaluating the functional differences among isothiocyanates in the rat esophageal tumor model. Following his Ph.D., Dr. Hudson was selected to complete a prestigious Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program at the National Institute of Health, National Cancer Institute, where he focused on utilizing in vitro and in vivo cancer models to assess the biological activity of bioactive compounds on prostate cancer molecular pathways. Concurrently, he completed a Master of Public Health degree from George Washington University in 2003 where he focused on assessing the degree of agreement between a food frequency questionnaire and a 4-day food record as it related to dietary fiber intake. Upon completion of his MPH and Fellowship, he was recruited by Howard University Cancer Center in 2007 as an Assistant Professor. Since joining the Howard faculty, Dr. Hudson has integrated his research focus by identifying novel signature biomarkers – that could have a significant impact on both the diagnosis and targeted treatment of prostate cancer – with the evaluation of new chemopreventive strategies, which have been evaluated in Phase I and Phase II clinical trials. Dr. Hudson received the first five-year VA-HBCU Research, Scientist, and Training grant that focuses on developing a biomarker-based risk prediction model for prostate cancer. Dr. Hudson serves on several Howard University committees and has many peer-reviewed publications. Dr. Hudson's research interests continue to expand as he tries to build

  19. Spreading and autoecology of the invasive species Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta) in the lagoons of the north-western Adriatic Sea (Mediterranean Sea, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfriso, A.; Wolf, M. A.; Maistro, S.; Sciuto, K.; Moro, I.

    2012-12-01

    Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Ohmi) Papenfuss, an invasive Rhodophyta recently recorded in the Po Delta lagoons (May 2008), was also found in the Venice lagoon in March 2009 and successively in Pialassa della Baiona (Emilia-Romagna Region) in May 2009. The species has colonized the eutrophic and confined areas of Venice by pleustophytic tangled populations (5-15 kg fwt m-2), replacing the allochthonous species whereas it is absent in the areas characterized by low nutrient availability and high water exchange. In contrast, in the Po Delta lagoons and in Pialassa della Baiona it is present everywhere, also with high water renewal, because of the eutrophication caused by the Po river and the industrial area of Ravenna. This study presents the autoecology and distribution of G. vermiculophylla in the above environments, according to their different eutrophication status, showing its relationship with physico-chemical parameters and nutrient concentrations in water column, pore-water, surface sediments and particulate matter collected by traps in a station of the Venice lagoon (Teneri) sampled monthly during one year. Furthermore, we give new information on its morphology and the high dimorphism between female and male gametophytes and tetrasporophytes.

  20. Geologic map of the Cochiti Dam quadrangle, Sandoval County, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dethier, David P.; Thompson, Ren A.; Hudson, Mark R.; Minor, Scott A.; Sawyer, David A.

    2011-01-01

    The Cochiti Dam quadrangle is located in the southern part of the Española Basin and contains sedimentary and volcanic deposits that record alluvial, colluvial, eolian, tectonic and volcanic processes over the past seventeen million years. The geology was mapped from 1997 to 1999 and modified in 2004 to 2008. The primary mapping responsibilities were as follows: Dethier mapped the surficial deposits, basin-fill sedimentary deposits, Miocene to Quaternary volcanic deposits of the Jemez volcanic field, and a preliminary version of fault distribution. Thompson and Hudson mapped the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic deposits of the Cerros del Rio volcanic field. Thompson, Minor, and Hudson mapped surface exposures of faults and Hudson conducted paleomagnetic studies for stratigraphic correlations. Thompson prepared the digital compilation of the geologic map.

  1. Seeing things the philosophy of reliable observation

    CERN Document Server

    Hudson, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In Seeing Things, Robert Hudson assesses a common way of arguing about observation reports called "robustness reasoning." Robustness reasoning claims that an observation report is more likely to be true if the report is produced by multiple, independent sources. Seeing Things argues that robustness reasoning lacks the special value it is often claimed to have. Hudson exposes key flaws in various popular philosophical defenses of robustness reasoning. This philosophical critique of robustness is extended by recounting five episodes in the history of science (from experimental microbiology, atomic theory, astrophysics and astronomy) where robustness reasoning is -- or could be claimed to have been -- used. Hudson goes on to show that none of these episodes do in fact exhibit robustness reasoning. In this way, the significance of robustness reasoning is rebutted on both philosophical and historical grounds. But the book does more than critique robustness reasoning. It also develops a better defense of the infor...

  2. Usage, structure, and substance in the English ditransitive construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shibuya, Yoshikata; Jensen, Kim Ebensgaard

    on observation of actual usage-patterns of the construction in naturally occurring discourse. Secondly, Hudson very much treats ditransitives as a functional monolith, assuming functional uniformity and ignoring possible functional variation. Thirdly, his analysis is primarily based on formal structure and pays......-substance-cum-semantic-structure, the scenarios encoded by monotransitives and ditransitives (Rasmussen & Jakobsen 1996: 103-105), the participants associated with T-OBJs and D-OBJs are non-uniform (Goldberg 1995, Croft et al. 2001: 583-586, Hopper and Thompson 1980). Unlike Hudson's (1992) syntactic account, a symbolic account would categorize...... at the level of conceptual content. Hudson (1992: 266-268) observes variation in the functionality of D-OBJs depending on the verb, such that, unlike those occurring with give and deny, D-OBJs occurring with peel take on a more adjunct-like function, but gives the construction the monolithic treatment. We...

  3. Anthropogenic inputs of dissolved organic matter in New York Harbor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, G. B.; Chen, R. F.; Olavasen, J.; Peri, F.

    2016-02-01

    The Hudson River flows into the Atlantic Ocean through a highly urbanized region which includes New York City to the east and Newark, New Jersey to the west. As a result, the export of Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) from the Hudson to the Atlantic Ocean includes a significant anthropogenic component. A series of high resolution studies of the DOC dynamics of this system were conducted between 2003 and 2010. These included both the Hudson and adjacent large waterways (East River, Newark Bay, Kill Van Kull and Arthur Kill) using coastal research vessels and smaller tributaries (Hackensack, Pasaic and Raritan rivers) using a 25' boat. In both cases measurements were made using towed instrument packages which could be cycled from near surface to near bottom depths with horizontal resolution of approximately 20 to 200 meters depending on depth and deployment strategy. Sensors on the instrument packages included a CTD to provide depth and salinity information and a chromophoric dissolved organic matter(CDOM) fluorometer to measure the fluorescent fraction of the DOC. Discrete samples allowed calibration of the fluorometer and the CDOM data to be related to DOC. The combined data set from these cruises identified multiple scales of source and transport processes for DOC within the Hudson River/New York Harbor region. The Hudson carries a substantial amount of natural DOC from its 230 km inland stretch. Additional sources exist in fringing salt marshes adjacent to the Hackensack and Raritan rivers. However the lower Hudson/New Harbor region receives a large input of DOC from multiple publically owned treatment works (POTW) discharges. The high resolution surveys allowed us to elucidate the distribution of these sources and the manner in which they are rapidly mixed to create the total export. We estimate that anthropogenic sources account for up to 2.5 times the DOC flux contributed by natural processes.

  4. Regional contamination versus regional dietary differences: Understanding geographic variation in brominated and chlorinated contaminant levels in polar bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, M.A.; Letcher, R.J.; Aars, Jon; Born, E.W.; Branigan, M.; Dietz, R.; Evans, T.J.; Gabrielsen, G.W.; Muir, D.C.G.; Peacock, E.; Sonne, C.

    2011-01-01

    The relative contribution of regional contamination versus dietary differences to geographic variation in polar bear (Ursus maritimus) contaminant levels is unknown. Dietary variation between Alaska Canada, East Greenland, and Svalbard subpopulations was assessed by muscle nitrogen and carbon stable isotope (?? 15N, ?? 13C) and adipose fatty acid (FA) signatures relative to their main prey (ringed seals). Western and southern Hudson Bay signatures were characterized by depleted ?? 15N and ??13C, lower proportions of C20 and C22 monounsaturated FAs and higher proportions of C18 and longer chain polyunsaturated FAs. East Greenland and Svalbard signatures were reversed relative to Hudson Bay. Alaskan ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  5. Indian Point Nuclear Generating Plant Unit No. 3 (Docket No. 50-286): Final environmental statement: Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-02-01

    This document contains nine appendices to Volume I, The Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Indian Point Nuclear Generating Plant Unit Number Three. Topics covered include thermal discharges to the Hudson River; supplemental information relating to biological models; radiation effects on aquatic biota; conditions, assumptions, and parameters used in calculating radioactive releases; meteorology for radiological dispersion calculations; life history information of important fish species in the Hudson River near Indian Point; additional information on cooling towers considered as alternatives; data and calculations for assessment of predicted electrical demand; and comments on draft environmental statement

  6. Notas sobre las especies de los pastizales entre Iquitos y Nauta, Loreto, Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Tovar-Serpa

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Durante el año 2006 fueron recolectadas especies que conforman los pastizales cercanos a la carretera entre Iquitos y Nauta. Se identificaron 69 especies. El tipo de vegetación que caracteriza esta región es el bosque tropical lluvioso, donde el estrato bajo es habitado por los pastos constituidos básicamente por las Gramineas (Poáceas y en pequeña proporción por especies de otras Familias como: Fabáceas, Malváceas, Acanthaceas, Amaranthaceas, etc. Se presentan claves para la identificación de Familias, Géneros y Especies.

  7. Epidemiological surveillance of cystic echinococcosis in dogs, sheep farms and humans in the Rio Negro Province

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez, Alicia; Costa, María T.; Gustavo, Cantoni; Mancini, Sergio; Mercapide, Carlos; Herrero, Eduardo; Volpe, Marcela; Araya, Daniel; Talmon, Gabriel; Chiosso, Carlos; Vázquez, Gabriela; Del Carpio, Mario; Santillán, Graciela; Larrieu, Edmundo

    2006-01-01

    La vigilancia de la equinococcosis quística para detectar infestación por Echinococcus granulosus en la Provincia de Río Negro en el período 1980-2002 fue efectuada en el hombre mediante encuestas serológicas y ultrasonográficas en población joven, y en el perro por el test de arecolina. Dadas las limitaciones de esta técnica, se planteó suplantarla por el complejo copro ELISA Western Blot en heces caninas recolectadas del suelo. El objetivo del presente trabajo fue comparar las ventajas y li...

  8. Ficoflora epilítica y variables ambientales del Arroyo Calimayo (Tucumán-Argentina)

    OpenAIRE

    Taboada, María De Los Ángeles; Gultemirian, María De Lourdes; Martínez De Marco, Silvia N; Tracanna, Beatriz C

    2015-01-01

    Tucumán se destaca por sus riquezas en recursos naturales e hídricos. Los estudios ficológicos se basaron principalmente en el fitoplancton, siendo escaso el análisis de la ficoflora epilítica. Los objetivos fueron analizar la taxocenosis epilítica y variables fisicoquímicas del arroyo durante un ciclo anual y contribuir al conocimiento de la ficoflora del NOA. Se estudiaron muestras fisicoquímicas y biológicas recolectadas durante 2012-2013. El agua tuvo un pH alcalino, se caracterizó como b...

  9. Capsaicinoides en chiles nativos de Puebla, México

    OpenAIRE

    Morán-Bañuelos, S. Hirán; Aguilar-Rincón, V. Heber; Corona-Torres, Tarsicio; Castillo-González, Fernando; Soto-Hernández, R. Marcos; San Miguel-Chávez, Rubén

    2008-01-01

    Los recursos genéticos del chile (Capsicum spp.) son importantes por ser la fuente natural de capsaicinoides que confieren el sabor picante a los frutos. Los reportes sobre la amplitud de esta característica en los chiles nativos cultivados por agricultores tradicionales en México son escasos. Por tanto, el objetivo del presente estudio fue identificar y cuantificar los capsaicinoides predominantes en 22 poblaciones recolectadas en nueve municipios de Puebla, México, mediante la extracción de...

  10. Identificación de biotipos de Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) en los departamentos de Córdoba, Meta, Tolima y Valle del Cauca mediante el gen mitocondrial Citocromo Oxidasa I (COI) y la región nuclear FR

    OpenAIRE

    Cano Calle, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Resumen: Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith, 1797) es un insecto plaga del maíz, arroz, algodón, sorgo y pastizales. Presenta dos formas biológicas (biotipos o razas) (maíz y arroz) que son idénticas morfológicamente, pero que difieren en varios aspectos tales como su composición genética, su aislamiento reproductivo y su tolerancia a insecticidas y controladores biológicos. En este trabajo se realizó la identificación molecular de estos biotipos a partir de larvas recolectadas en cultivos de...

  11. Reconfiguraciones de género y vulnerabilidad al VIH /Sida en mujeres transgénero en Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Estrada-Montoya, John Harold; Universidad Nacional de Colombia; García-Becerra, Andrea; Universidad Nacional de Colombia

    2010-01-01

    Esta investigación buscó identificar las formas más representativas para representar e imaginar la sexualidad dentro de la comunidad transgénero en Colombia. Desarrollamos un estudio descriptivo exploratorio utilizando encuestas, entrevistas a profundidad, grupos focales y estrategias etnográficas con 18 personas transgénero. La información recolectada fue analizada teniendo en cuenta las siguientes dimensiones de interpretación: 1. Amor, erotismo y relaciones sexuales. 2. Género e identidade...

  12. Productos de la colmena secretados por las abejas: Cera de abejas, jalea real y veneno de abejas

    OpenAIRE

    Vit, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    Las abejas producen secreciones para la construcción, nutrición y defensa de la colonia, las cuales también pueden ser recolectadas y utilizadas por los apicultores. En esta revisión se presentan las funciones de la cera de abejas, la jalea real y el veneno de abejas en la colonia de abejas, sus definiciones, composición, usos, forma de recolección por el apicultor, y los requisitos de calidad. Se considera la utilidad referencial de las normas brasileñas para cera, jalea real y veneno de abe...

  13. ESTUDIO CLIMATOLÓGICO CON REGISTROS DE ALTA RESOLUCIÓN TEMPORAL EN CAMPAMENTO POSESIÓN (ENAP): MAGALLANES, CHILE

    OpenAIRE

    Santana,Ariel; Olave,Carlos; Butorovic,Nicolás

    2010-01-01

    A fines de 2007 se instaló una estación automática de tiempo (AWS) en la planta Posesión (ENAP), al oriente de la región, en plena estepa magallánica. Se analiza la información recolectada durante el 2008 y se la compara con registros similares obtenidos en Punta Arenas. Se describen los montos y distribución de la radiación solar en diferentes rangos, al igual que el resto de variables atmosféricas. Se muestra que la temperatura del aire, la humedad relativa y el viento, dependen directament...

  14. DIAGNÓSTICO SEROLÓGICO (ROSA DE BENGALA) Y MOLECULAR (PCR) DE BRUCELOSIS EN HUMANO

    OpenAIRE

    Orly Fernando Cevallos Falquez; Aldelmo Rodríguez Grefa; Ariel Escobar Troya; Camilo Mestanza Uquillas; Diego Romero Garaicoa; Fabricio Canchignia Martínez; Jaime Fabian Vera Chang; Jonathan Mariscal Álvarez; Ketty Cobeña Rosado; Luís Ramos Gavilanes; Maria Lorena Cadme; Mercedes Susana Carranza Patiño; Silvia Gicela Saucedo Aguiar; Ximena Reyes Chancay

    2010-01-01

    El objetivo de esta investigación fue: Determinar y comparar la presencia de Brucelosis del personal que labora en los camales de los cantones, Buena Fé, Quevedo, El Empalme y Pichincha, utilizando la prueba serológica Rosa de Bengala (RB) y la técnica molecular (PCR). Se utilizó como fuente de ADN y anticuerpos sangre periférica. De un total de 115 muestras de sangre recolectadas al personal que labora en los camales como faenadores y operadores, 54 (47%) y 15 (13%) fueron positivas con RB y...

  15. Evaluación de la actividad antimicrobiana de plantas medicinales seleccionadas del Jardín Botánico del Orinoco, municipio Heres, Estado Bolívar

    OpenAIRE

    Rojas, Janne; Velasco Carrillo, Judith; Buitrago D., Alexis A.; Mender, Thamara; Rojas, John

    2017-01-01

    En la presente investigación se evaluaron los extractos metanólicos de treinta y dos (32) especies botánicas seleccionadas y recolectadas en el jardín botánico del Orinoco, municipio Heres, Estado Bolívar frente a diferentes microorganismos de referencia internacional, por el método de difusión en agar con discos. En el análisis se observó inhibición del crecimiento principalmente de Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29923 con valores de concentración inhibitoria minina (CIM) entre 20 y 550 mg/ m...

  16. New species of water mites of the genus Piona (Acari: Hydrachnidia: Pionidae), from Xochimilco's water channel, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Marín-Hernández, Carlos Humberto; Cramer-Hemkes, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    Se describe una especie nueva de hidracárido (Hydrachnidia: Pionidae) perteneciente al género Piona, recolectada en canales de la zona lacustre de Xochimilco, México, D. F. Éste es el primer registro de la familia y del género para la ciudad de México.A new water mite species is described, belonging to the genus Piona (Hydrachnidia: Pionidae), collected from a canal at Xochimilco, México City, Mexico.This represents the first family and genus record for México City.

  17. Involucramiento de producto y lealtad de marca para productos de consumo masivo en Bogotá D.C.

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Julián Ramírez Angulo; Edison Jair Duque Oliva

    2013-01-01

    Mediante este artículo, se busca validar algunas hipótesis referentes a la relación entre involucramiento de pro- ducto y lealtad de marca para productos de consumo masivo en Bogotá (Colombia). Para tal fin, se recolectó in- formación acerca de las percepciones de involucramiento de producto y lealtad de marca para 478 consumido- res bogotanos, que posteriormente fue analizada mediante modelos de ecuaciones estructurales. A través de la información recolectada, se determinó la existencia de r...

  18. CARACTERIZACIÓN ISOENZIMÁTICA DE NUEVE VARIEDADES BOTÁNICAS DE Tigridia pavonia (L. f.) DC

    OpenAIRE

    Amaury M. Arzate-Fernández

    2008-01-01

    Se estudiaron los patrones de bandeo isoenzimáticos (PBI) de nueve variedades botánicas de Tigridia pavonia (L. f.) DC., especie nativa de México con un alto potencial ornamental. Las variedades fueron recolectadas en tres municipios del Estado de México: Tenancingo (2100 m), Temascaltepec (2250 m) y Temoaya (2600 m). Como fuente de extracción de proteínas se usaron tejidos foliares de cada variedad. En los corrimientos se empleó la técnica de electroforesis horizontal en geles de almidón (SG...

  19. Coleópteros carábidos asociados a los campos de cultivo de la campiña cordobesa

    OpenAIRE

    Bach Piella, Carmen; Cárdenas Talaverón, Ana María

    1990-01-01

    Este trabajo constituye parte de un estudio realizado sobre la población de artrópodos asociada a los campos de cultivo de la campiña cordobesa. Las investigaciones se están efectuando en unos terrenos situados a 7 kilómetros de Córdoba, en dirección SW, dedicados al cultivo alternativo de trigo y de girasol. La fauna epigea fue recolectada mediante trampas de caída libre y Berlese. Un total de 23 especies de carábidos fueron capturadas de marzo a agosto, período de duración ...

  20. Implicaciones ambientales del uso de leña como combustible doméstico en la zona rural de Usme / Environmental implications of the use of wood as domestic fuel in the rural area of Usme

    OpenAIRE

    Mejía Barragán, Fabiola

    2011-01-01

    Este trabajo analiza las implicaciones ambientales del uso de la leña como combustible doméstico, tomando como caso de estudio la zona rural de Usme, Bogotá, Colombia, desde tres aspectos: el socio-cultural, el ecosistémico y el tecnológico. A través de trabajo de campo, de encuestas aplicadas y de la información recolectada por experimentación directa en algunas cocinas de la zona, se identificaron los impactos que el uso de la leña para cocción genera sobre la salud, la economía y aspectos...

  1. Evaluación de residuos sólidos generados en la industria del aserrío y su aprovechamiento con alternativas de tecnologías limpias, Iquitos - Loreto - Perú, 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Mogollón Maestre, Guillermo Enrique; Silva Doza, Luz Liliana

    2015-01-01

    El presente trabajo de investigación se realizó en el departamento de Loreto, provincia de Maynas, en los aserraderos que se encontraban en actividad, las mismas que recayeron en: Netrimac SAC, Raúl Oswaldo Oliveira García E.I.R.L, Zambito E.I.R.L.y Sico Maderas S.A.C. La información fue recolectada en los meses de Marzo - Abril del presente año. El estudio tuvo como finalidad cuantificar la generación residuos sólidos en los aserraderos de Iquitos y proponer alternativas de aprovechamiento c...

  2. Los comportamientos del liderazgo y su relación con el desarrollo de los modelos de gestión

    OpenAIRE

    Vega Roa, Mario Fernando

    2014-01-01

    El propósito de este trabajo de investigación teórica, es lograr basados en el estudio de variables del entorno empresarial, como lo son los modelos de negocio, comportamiento, cultura y complejidad organizacional, estructurar un artículo que invite a la reflexión sobre la incidencia del comportamiento de los líderes para con los modelos de gestión. Con base en la información recolectada, se observan patrones funcionales en el comportamiento de las organizaciones, derivados de los model...

  3. Efectos sobre la función hepática de la emulsión lipídica con Omega 3 en la nutrición parenteral en recién nacidos. Estudio Descriptivo. Bogotá 2014-2015

    OpenAIRE

    Coello Alvarado, Karicia María

    2017-01-01

    Se ha sugerido que las emulsiones de lípidos para nutrición parenteral que contienen omega 3 son superiores a otras ya que ocasionan menos complicaciones. Evaluar los cambios en la función hepática de los recien nacidos que recibieron nutrición parenteral prolongada con emulsión lipidica con omega-3. Se realizó un estudio observacional descriptivo longitudinal de naturaleza retrospectiva con información recolectada de las historias clínicas de los recién nacidos atendidos en la Funda...

  4. Cariotipo del tit? gris (Saguinus leucopus): similitudes con el cariotipo humano

    OpenAIRE

    Tabares, Juan Hember; Fierro, Carlos Humberto; Pulido, Paola Del Pilar; Ossa Reyes, Humberto

    2008-01-01

    El tit? gris (Saguinus leucopus) es un primate end?mico de Colombia cuyo cariotipo se describe en el presente estudio a partir de una pareja de individuos ubicados en el Centro de Rehabilitaci?n de Fauna Silvestre del Oriente de Caldas, Colombia. Las muestras de sangre fueron recolectadas de la vena femoral y anticoaguladas con heparina de sodio. Los cromosomas se obtuvieron por el m?todo cl?sico de cultivo de linfocitos y bandeamiento Q y G Los individuos presentan 46 cromosomas (2n = 46: 30...

  5. Assesment of chemical and morphological variation of Spanish Marjoram: Spanish Sage and Spike Lavender

    OpenAIRE

    Méndez Tovar, Inés Rosa

    2015-01-01

    El presente estudio se llevó a cabo para apoyar al sector agronómico y superar los problemas actuales del mercado de las plantas aromáticas y medicinales (PAM). El problema principal se debe a que las PAM se han recolectado tradicionalmente de forma silvestre. La recolección silvestre no permite la recogida de material vegetal de alta calidad y produce la deforestación, amenazando las especies recolectadas. Hay que añadir que exi...

  6. Comparación cuantitativa de ácido abscísico y citoquininas en la tuberización de Solanum tuberosum L. y Solanum phureja Juz. et Buk.

    OpenAIRE

    Ortiz Luz Yineth; Flórez Víctor Julio

    2008-01-01

    De las 30 variedades de papa cultivadas en Colombia tan solo 10 poseen importancia comercial. Entre otros factores, este número es limitado por la acción de hormonas endógenas que aceleran diferentes fases del proceso de tuberización, especialmente en las especies más precoces. En este trabajo fueron recolectadas muestras de tubérculos de diferentes especies de papa (Solanum tuberosum L. var. ICA-Única y Tuquerreña, y Solanum phureja

  7. Comparación cuantitativa de ácido abscísico y citoquininas en la tuberización de Solanum tuberosum L. y Solanum phureja Juz. et Buk.

    OpenAIRE

    Ortiz, Luz Yineth; Flórez, Víctor Julio

    2008-01-01

    De las 30 variedades de papa cultivadas en Colombia tan solo 10 poseen importancia comercial. Entre otros factores, este número es limitado por la acción de hormonas endógenas que aceleran diferentes fases del proceso de tuberización, especialmente en las especies más precoces. En este trabajo fueron recolectadas muestras de tubérculos de diferentes especies de papa (Solanum tuberosum L. var. ICA-Única y Tuquerreña, y Solanum phureja Juz. et Buk. var. Yema de Huevo), en los estadios fenológic...

  8. Comparación cuantitativa de ácido abscísico y citoquininas en la tuberización de solanum tuberosum l. y solanum phureja juz. et buk.

    OpenAIRE

    Ortiz, Luz Yineth; Flórez, Víctor Julio

    2010-01-01

    De las 30 variedades de papa cultivadas en Colombia tan solo 10 poseen importancia comercial. Entre otros factores, este número es limitado por la acción de hormonas endógenas que aceleran diferentes fases del proceso de tuberización, especialmente en las especies más precoces. En este trabajo fueron recolectadas muestras de tubérculos de diferentes especies de papa (Solanum tuberosum L. var. ICA-Única y Tuquerreña, y Solanum phureja Juz. et Buk. var. Yema de Huevo), en los estadios...

  9. Estudio de los polisacáridos del alga roja Polysiphonia nigrescens, cationización de agarosa, formación de complejos interpolielectrolito. Aplicaciones en floculación de coloides y liberación controlada de drogas

    OpenAIRE

    Prado, Héctor Juan

    2010-01-01

    En este Trabajo de Tesis se estudiaron los polisacáridos del alga roja Polysiphonia nigrescens, recolectada en las costas de Cabo Corrientes (Mar del Plata). Este alga biosintetiza agaranos sulfatados parcialmente ciclados y altamente sustituidos en C-6, principalmente con sulfato, aunque también se han encontrado éteres metílicos y ramificaciones simples de β-D-xilosa. Las dos díadas presentes en los galactanos de esta especie son: G6S→L6S (precursora) y G6S→LA. También se aisló una fracción...

  10. Epidemiología de la rabia canina en colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Cediel Becerra, Natalia Margarita; De la Hoz Restrepo, Fernando; Romero Prada, Jaime Ricardo; Villamil Jimenez, Luis Carlos; Diaz Gomez, Arturo

    2011-01-01

    Objetivo Se realizó un estudio epidemiológico ecológico para describir la tendencia de la rabia canina desde 1976-2006 y explorar posibles factores relacionados con su presentación en Colombia, Metodología Las variables fueron recolectadas mediante un cuestionario aplicado a los responsables del programa en cada departamento y  mediante fuentes de información oficiales nacionales. Se calculó la incidencia de la rabia canina entre 2001-2006. Se emplearon razones de tasas de incidencia y prueba...

  11. Epidemiología de la rabia canina en Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Cediel, Natalia; de la Hoz, Fernando; Villamil, Luis C; Romero, Jaime; Díaz, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    Objetivo Se realizó un estudio epidemiológico ecológico para describir la tendencia de la rabia canina desde 1976-2006 y explorar posibles factores relacionados con su presentación en Colombia. Metodología Las variables fueron recolectadas mediante un cuestionario aplicado a los responsables del programa en cada departamento y mediante fuentes de información oficiales nacionales. Se calculó la incidencia de la rabia canina entre 2001-2006. Se emplearon razones de tasas de incidencia y pruebas...

  12. Evaluación de extractos vegetales para el control de la broca del café (Hypothenemus hampei, ferrari)

    OpenAIRE

    Niño Osorio, Jaime; Correa N., Yaned Milena; Mosquera M., Oscar M.; Bustamante Peláez, Angélica María

    2007-01-01

    Este trabajo describe la evaluación por antibiosis de la actividad antibroca de 21 extractos metanólicos de las plantas recolectadas en la Reserva Natural Bremen-La Popa (Quindío). Los bioensayos se realizaron bajo condiciones controladas (23 ± 3 ºC; 75 ± 5 % H.R.), utilizando como unidad experimental (UE) un tubo eppendorf al interior del cual se transfirió un grano de café pergamino impregnado del respectivo extracto a 1000 mg/L y una hembra adulta de broca. Se hicieron 90 UE por cada extra...

  13. Nuevas citas de ácaros oribátidos (Acari: Oribatida para la Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana SALAZAR MARTÍNEZ

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available En la presente nota se citan, por primera vez para la Argentina, cuatro especies de ácaros oribátidos: Epilohmannia pallida americana Balogh & Mahunka, 1981, Protoribates (Triangius praeoccupatus (Pérez-Iñigo & Baggio, 1980, Scheloribates curvialatus Hammer, 1961 y Galumna innexa Pérez-Iñigo & Baggio, 1986. Los ejemplares fueron hallados en muestras de suelo recolectadas en La Plata, Provincia de Buenos Aires (34º 54’S, 57º 55 ́ W, en ambientes sometidos a intervención antrópica: bosques urbanos, huertas orgánicas y pastizales.

  14. ACHP | News | President Announces Appointments to Advisory Council on

    Science.gov (United States)

    ," said ACHP Chairman Milford Wayne Donaldson, FAIA. "Their respective expertise will be of Side Waterfront-Hudson River Park Plan in New York City, the Charles River Basin Plan for the we welcome our new members, we also thank the two appointees who will be leaving the ACHP after

  15. Cultural Resources Assessment of the Faulkner Lake Revetment, East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-06

    Palmer commande-- e vessels above the town (consisting of the U.S.S. Hartford, Albatross, Sachem, Estrella , and Arizona) . With tTeexception of the first...Hudson) 53 Tunica Indians 27 Tuscaloosa Trend 33, 44 80 000 U Union (see Federal) U.S.S. Albatross 47, 49 Arizona 49 Essex 47, 49 Estrella 49 Genessee

  16. 75 FR 23745 - Jo-Ann Stores, Inc., Provisional Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... Acceptance of a Settlement Agreement and Order AGENCY: Consumer Product Safety Commission. ACTION: Notice... under the laws of the State of Ohio, with its principal offices located in Hudson, Ohio. At all times relevant hereto, Jo-Ann imported, offered for sale and sold various children's products. Staff Allegations...

  17. Aeromagnetic anomalies over faulted strata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauch, V.J.S.; Hudson, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution aeromagnetic surveys are now an industry standard and they commonly detect anomalies that are attributed to faults within sedimentary basins. However, detailed studies identifying geologic sources of magnetic anomalies in sedimentary environments are rare in the literature. Opportunities to study these sources have come from well-exposed sedimentary basins of the Rio Grande rift in New Mexico and Colorado. High-resolution aeromagnetic data from these areas reveal numerous, curvilinear, low-amplitude (2–15 nT at 100-m terrain clearance) anomalies that consistently correspond to intrasedimentary normal faults (Figure 1). Detailed geophysical and rock-property studies provide evidence for the magnetic sources at several exposures of these faults in the central Rio Grande rift (summarized in Grauch and Hudson, 2007, and Hudson et al., 2008). A key result is that the aeromagnetic anomalies arise from the juxtaposition of magnetically differing strata at the faults as opposed to chemical processes acting at the fault zone. The studies also provide (1) guidelines for understanding and estimating the geophysical parameters controlling aeromagnetic anomalies at faulted strata (Grauch and Hudson), and (2) observations on key geologic factors that are favorable for developing similar sedimentary sources of aeromagnetic anomalies elsewhere (Hudson et al.).

  18. Värviküllane elujanu / Tiina Tammet

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tammet, Tiina, 1971-

    2004-01-01

    Suurbritannia Vähiuuringute keskusele loodud Elu Aed 2004. a. Chelsea aiandusnäitusel. Aia kujundasid Jane Hudson & Erik de Maeijer. Mosaiiktee autor Maggy Howarth. Soojades toonides külluslik lilleaed sisendab elujõudu, vabadust ja energiat. 4 ill

  19. Revisiting Hudson’s (1992) OO = O2 hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shibuya, Yoshikata; Jensen, Kim Ebensgaard

    2018-01-01

    In an important paper on the English “double-object”, or ditransitive, construction, Richard Hudson proposes a hypothesis that conflates the ditransitive direct object, or O2, and the monotransitive direct object, or OO, into the same syntactic functional category. While making important departures...

  20. The flux of 226Ra from estuarine and continental shelf sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.H.; Mathieu, G.; Biscaye, P.; Simpson, H.J.

    1977-01-01

    A pronounced desorption phenomenon of 226 Ra from sediment was observed in the Hudson River estuary. Mass balance calculations indicate that the desorption of 226 Ra from the river-borne sediment in estuarine environment is an important source of 226 Ra to the oceans. (Auth.)

  1. Experiment list: SRX100511 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ,37.1,107266 GSM803466: HudsonAlpha ChipSeq H1-hESC Rad21 v041610.2 source_name=H1-hESC || biomaterial_provi...SRX100511 hg19 TFs and others RAD21 Pluripotent stem cell hESC H1 NA 109287919,77.2

  2. Nuclear reactor in deep water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Events during October 1980, when the Indian Point 2 nuclear reactor was flooded by almost 500 000 litres of water from the Hudson river, are traced and the jumble of human errors and equipment failures chronicled. Possible damage which could result from the reactor getting wet and from thermal shock are considered. (U.K.)

  3. Good Teachers, Good Schools: How to Create a Successful School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, David

    2009-01-01

    "Good schools think 'with' people and not 'to' people" argues David Hudson in this thought provoking practical guide for those wanting to bridge the gap between middle and senior management roles, and make a difference in their schools. Accessibly and engagingly written and packed with real-life examples, this book will prove essential…

  4. 47 CFR 90.303 - Availability of frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... table lists frequency bands that are available for assignment in specific urban areas. The available... available for use by eligibles in the Public Safety Radio Pool in the following areas: New York City; Nassau...)” curve in Figure B in 47 CFR 90.309(b). (ii) For base stations located west of the Hudson River, Kill Van...

  5. An endoparasitic trichodinid (Ciliophora: Peritrichia) from the urinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1988-09-07

    Sep 7, 1988 ... During parasitological surveys in Gazankulu, an infection of a trichodinid peritrich was found in the urinary bladder and ureters of the three-spot barb, Barbus trimaculatus Peters, 1852, collected from Hudson-. Ntsanwisi Dam in the Olifants River system. A taxonomic description of this new species, ...

  6. Understanding Molecular-Ion Neutral Atom Collisions for the Production of Ultracold Molecular Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-03

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: This project was superseded and replaced by another ARO-funded project of the same name, which is still continuing. The goal...cooled atoms," IOTA -COST Workshop on molecular ions, Arosa, Switzerland. 5. E.R. Hudson, "Sympathetic cooling of molecules with laser cooled

  7. 75 FR 22323 - Anchorage Regulations; Port of New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-28

    ...-AA01 Anchorage Regulations; Port of New York AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Supplemental notice of..., Coast Guard Sector New York, Waterways Management Division; telephone 718-354-4195, e-mail Jeff.M.Yunker... Purpose The Hudson River Pilots Association, through the Port of New York/ New Jersey Harbor Safety...

  8. STECH VOL5 (1) FEBRUARY, 2016

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Copyright 1AARR 2012-2016: www.afrrevjo.net

    2016-02-11

    Feb 11, 2016 ... monthly Kinetic energy (E) using the Wischmeier and Smith (1978) equation ranged from 2.0 to 84.1MJha-1 ... Rainfall erosivity (R) is one of the six factors in the Universal Soil Loss. Equation (USLE) ... indices such as the kinetic energy of rainfall intensities greater than 25mmh-. 1(K.E>25)(Hudson, 1995), ...

  9. Résultats de recherche | Page 29 | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Transition et amélioration des indices mondiaux de philanthropie. Cette subvention aide à transférer les activités d'élaboration des indices mondiaux de dons privés du Center for Global Prosperity de l'Hudson Institute à la Lilly Family School of Philanthropy de l'Université de l'Indiana.

  10. Résultats de recherche | Page 41 | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Transition et amélioration des indices mondiaux de philanthropie. Cette subvention aide à transférer les activités d'élaboration des indices mondiaux de dons privés du Center for Global Prosperity de l'Hudson Institute à la Lilly Family School of Philanthropy de l'Université de l'Indiana. Projet.

  11. Résultats de recherche | Page 40 | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Transition et amélioration des indices mondiaux de philanthropie. Cette subvention aide à transférer les activités d'élaboration des indices mondiaux de dons privés du Center for Global Prosperity de l'Hudson Institute à la Lilly Family School of Philanthropy de l'Université de l'Indiana. Projet.

  12. Solid State Quantum Computer in Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-30

    Zac Evans Martin Fuechsle Virginia Gill Toby Hopf Lenneke Jong Gajendran Kandasamy Wee Han Lim Graeme Lowe Melissa Makin Mladen Mitic Dane McCamey...Hudson 0.50 Linda Macks 0.50 Andrea Morello 1.00 Thilo Reusch 1.00 Frank Ruess 0.00 Giordano Scappucci 0.00 Laurens Willems van Beveren 0.60

  13. Rocks, Paper, Scissors: Best Practices in Peer Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Shelly Hudson

    2014-01-01

    In this article, Shelly Hudson Bowden, a kindergarten teacher for 14 years, offers her observations of peer-to-peer mentoring relationships among her kindergarten students that they formed and maintained. These mentoring relationships supported students' learning as they mentored one another in both "social" and "academic"…

  14. 33 CFR 151.1504 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Ballast Water Management for Control of Nonindigenous Species in the Great Lakes and Hudson River § 151... organisms and ecosystems, and that emphasize integrated pest management techniques and non-chemical measures... water and suspended matter taken on board a vessel to control or maintain, trim, draught, stability, or...

  15. The Dependency Structure of Coordinate Phrases: A Corpus Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temperley, David

    2005-01-01

    Hudson (1990) proposes that each conjunct in a coordinate phrase forms dependency relations with heads or dependents outside the coordinate phrase (the "multi-head" view). This proposal is tested through corpus analysis of Wall Street Journal text. For right-branching constituents (such as direct-object NPs), a short-long preference for conjunct…

  16. Spacecraft Environmental Interactions Technology 1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    recently acquired a NASA field office within the Technology Lenter; that is staffed by Mr. Wa~ne Hudson. We take our guidance from Air Force...apogee of 4.6 % geocentric and a perigee of 650 )a altitude. The DR-1 Nigh Altitude Plama instrument (DAPI) consists of five electrostatic analyzers

  17. Iranian-Venezuelan Relations and Impacts on the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    COMITEE FARC REVOLUTIONARY ARMED FORCES OF COLOMBIA FTA FREE TRADE AGREEMENT FTAA FREE TRADE AGREEMENT AREA IAEA INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY...Latin America,” The Miami Herald, Mar . 14, 2012. 20 Jaime Daremblum, Iran and Latin America (Hudson Institute, 2011). 21 Countering Iran in the

  18. African Journal of Aquatic Science - Vol 36, No 3 (2011)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A vegetation-based hierarchical classification for seasonally pulsed floodplains in the Okavango Delta, Botswana · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. M Murray-Hudson, F Combs, P Wolski, MT Brown. http://dx.doi.org/10.2989/16085914.2011.636904 ...

  19. Siim Nestor kuulas, nautis ja õppis funk'i / Siim Nestor

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Nestor, Siim, 1974-

    2003-01-01

    Heliplaatidest: Roy Ayers Ubiquity "A Tear To A Smile", The Undisputed Truth "Face to Face With the Truth", Love Unlimited "In Heat", Gloria Scotti "What Am I Gonna Do", Bohannon "Summertime Groove", "Nice and Soulful", "One Way featuring Al Hudson", Cameo "Ugly Ego", The Gap Band "The Gap Band"

  20. Toward a theory of partnership as context for a theory of leisure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim Uhlik

    2008-01-01

    The field of leisure studies has been developing a body of theory since the late 1960s, but construction of an overarching, unified theory of leisure remains an elusive goal (Bedini and Wu, 1994; Brown, Dyer, & Whatey, 1973; Burdge, 1983; Edginton, Hudson, & Lankford, 2001; Henderson, 1994; Henderson, Presley & Bialeschki, 2004; Hendricks & Burdge, 1972...

  1. 40 CFR 81.331 - New Jersey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 130 and County Roads 675 & 607 2/5/96 Attainment Perth Amboy Area Middlesex County (part) City of... Attainment AQCR 043 NJ NY Connecticut Interstate (Remainder of) Unclassifiable/Attainment Middlesex County...-17. Hudson County Nonattainment Severe-17. Hunterdon County Nonattainment Severe-17. Middlesex County...

  2. Positron-Emitter Production in Solar Flares from 3He Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-04-01

    MeV nucleon1 from Brill (1965). At higher energies the cross section for 11C is from Crandall et al. (1956) and Aslanides et al. (1981). The labo...1989, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 53, 197 Aschwanden, M. J., Wills, M. J., Hudson, H. S., Kosugi, T., & Schwartz, R. A. 1996, ApJ, 468, 398 Aslanides

  3. Challenges in Coalition Unconventional Warfare: The Allied Campaign in Yugoslavia, 1941-1945

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    advertised abilities of the Chetniks because he lacked talented offi- cers such as Hudson and MacLean to give him solid assessments of their intentions...the Balkans but also in engen- dering goodwill toward the West that endured well into the Cold War era. Conclusion If the United States is sincere in

  4. Regularizing Unpredictable Variation: Evidence from a Natural Language Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Alison Eisel; Miller, Karen; Jackson, Carrie N.

    2018-01-01

    While previous sociolinguistic research has demonstrated that children faithfully acquire probabilistic input constrained by sociolinguistic and linguistic factors (e.g., gender and socioeconomic status), research suggests children regularize inconsistent input-probabilistic input that is not sociolinguistically constrained (e.g., Hudson Kam &…

  5. The Legend of Sleepy Hollow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Washington; Irving

    1987-01-01

    Part Ⅰ On the Eastern shore of the Hudson River there was a little valley, among high hills, which was one of the quietest places in the whole world. This little valley had long been known by the name of SIeepy Hollow. Many strange stories about ghosts were told and retold in the village situated there.

  6. Proceedings of Conference on Applications of Chemistry to Nuclear Weapons Effects (2nd). Held on 12-14 September 1972. Abstracts of Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-12-23

    atmosphere to study positive or negative sequences of ion-molecule reactions initiated by a radioactive source. In chemical applications for single...stratospheric polution problem. 6. F. Hudson (Sandia) listed over 30 neutral species produced in the 20 to 30 km region by solar UV. Besides the usual nitrogen

  7. What Can College Mean? Lessons from the Bard Prison Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagemann, Ellen Condliffe

    2011-01-01

    The Bard Prison Initiative (BPI), which is a part of the Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, is a prison program that operates a full liberal arts program leading to both AA and BA degrees. The students are convicted felons who are serving relatively long sentences for serious, often violent, crimes. They tend to be in their…

  8. Selection of scFvs specific for the HepG2 cell line using ribosome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhsudhan

    the important advantage of requiring no prior knowledge of ... were amplified separately by RT-PCR, and an anti-HepG2 VH/k chain ribosome display library was constructed ..... Engert A, Hudson P R and Power B E 2007 Selection of human.

  9. XPERT DESIGN AND DIAGNOSTICS' (XDD) IN-SITU CHEMICAL OXIDATION PROCESS USING POTASSIUM PERMANGANATE (KMNO4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xpert Design and Diagnostic's (XDD)potassium permanganate in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) process was evaluated under the EPA Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program at the former MEC Building site located in Hudson, New Hampshire. At this site, both soil and ...

  10. Science Achievement and Occupational Career/Technical Education Coursetaking in High School: The Class of 2005. Statistics in Brief. NCES 2010-021

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Karen; Wun, Jolene; Green, Caitlin

    2010-01-01

    The definition of CTE (career/technical education) used by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) includes, at the high school level, family and consumer sciences education, general labor market preparation, and occupational education (Bradby and Hoachlander 1999; Bradby and Hudson 2007). Most researchers focus on occupational…

  11. Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Extending the result for one dimensional noise, strong convergence of quantum random walks associated with bounded structure maps to Evans–Hudson flow is proved under suitable assumptions. Starting from the bounded generator of a given uniformly continuous quantum dynamical semigroup on a von Neumann ...

  12. The Reality of Virtual Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Sheldon

    1999-01-01

    Through a $7.5 million U.S. Department of Education grant, students at the Hudson (Massachusetts) Public Schools "attend" Virtual High School--a network of 30 schools in 10 states. Kids attend classes any time, work collaboratively, and choose among innovative, timely, technologically rich course offerings. Other sites are described.…

  13. 78 FR 54870 - Procurement List; Additions and Deletions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-06

    ...: Integrated Prime Vendor, Supply Chain Management Service(inventory control, obsolescence identification... Customs Enforcement,VA Hudson Valley HealthCare System Campus, Building 7 (Floors 1, 2, 3 & Basement.../Location: Mailing Service, VA Eastern Colorado Health Care System (ECHCS), 1055 Clermont Street, Denver, CO...

  14. John Rae (1813-93): explorer of the Canadian Arctic, the great pedestrian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loosmore, Brian

    2009-11-01

    Born and raised in the Orkney Islands, Dr John Rae joined the Hudson's Bay Company and rose to be Chief Factor. Unusually tough and intelligent, he explored much of northern Canada, mapping the north eastern shore and finding controversial evidence of the lost Franklin expedition of 1845. A talented botanist, geologist, anthropologist and cartographer, he was northern Canada's most distinguished explorer.

  15. The Impact of the 6:3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Ratio on Intermediate Markers of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Epidemiology of Breast Cancer” in The Breast: Comprehensive Management of Benign and Malignant Disorders, 4th edition , 2008 (in progress). Hudson A...antiinflammatory drugs. N Engl J Med 1999;340:1888–99. 41. Lanas A, Perez- Aisa MA, Feu F, et al. A nationwide study of mortality associated with hospital

  16. Evaluation of the Human/Extreme Environment Interaction: Implications for Enhancing Operational Performance and Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    RL. Serum antioxidant capacity is increased by consumption of strawberries , spinach, red wine or vitamin C in elderly women. J Nutr 128: 2383-2390...of strawberries , spinach, red wine or vitamin C in elderly women. J Nutr 128: 2383-2390, 1998. 6. Hudson, MB, Hosick, PA, McCaulley, GO, Schrieber

  17. Connecter l'Afrique, du Cap au Caire

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Cathy Egan

    CRDI : H. Hudson. LA RECHERCHE BIEN APPLIQUÉE. CENTRE DE RECHERCHES POUR LE DÉVELOPPEMENT INTERNATIONAL ... optique et de micro-ondes dotant les pays d'une capacité de transmission nationale et internatio- ... d'Afrique restent en effet paralysés par un éventail ahurissant de cadres de politiques.

  18. Characterizing Myeloid Cell Activation in NF1 Vasculopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    in Obesity Related Metabolic Disease, American Diabetes Association, Boston, MA 3. *Bessler,WK, Hudson FZ, Fulton DJ, Ingram DA, Stansfield BK...Weintraub NL. Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines Modulates Adipose Inflammation in Obesity Related Metabolic Disease, American Diabetes Association...Childhood Obesity : One Variable at a Time, American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference & Exhibition, San Francisco, CA 2016 Masoumy E

  19. 75 FR 13319 - NextEra Energy Seabrook, LLC, et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-19

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 50-443; NRC-2010-0108] NextEra Energy Seabrook, LLC, et al.,* Seabrook Station, Unit No. 1 Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact * NextEra Energy Seabrook, LLC is authorized to act as agent for the Hudson Light & Power Department...

  20. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure: does bubbling improve gas exchange?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, C J; Lau, R; De Paoli, A; Davis, P G

    2005-07-01

    In a randomised crossover trial, 26 babies, treated with Hudson prong continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) from a bubbling bottle, received vigorous, high amplitude, or slow bubbling for 30 minutes. Pulse oximetry, transcutaneous carbon dioxide, and respiratory rate were recorded. The bubbling rates had no effect on carbon dioxide, oxygenation, or respiratory rate.

  1. Proceedings of the Annual Sovereign Challenge Conference (5th): Regional Issues--Global Implications held 8-11 March 2010 in Key West, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Hudson River f. Plot out of the United Kingdom to attack the JFK Airport pipeline system using liquid explosives (Operation Overt) g. Plot to attack two...on the proposition that Al Qaeda and its franchises pose significant challenges to all nation states by seriously undermining their sovereignty. They

  2. Strategic Human Resources Management of Employer Cooperative Education Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Richard P.; Porter, Ralph C.

    1982-01-01

    This article discusses effective strategic planning and management of employer cooperative education programs. It examines types of planning, the need for such programs, and implementation strategies. Several case studies are considered: Dayton-Hudson, IBM, AT&T, Delta Airlines, and Rockwell International. (CT)

  3. 77 FR 26968 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-08

    ... upstream of Port-Hudson Pride Road. Sheet flow between McCarroll Drive and At North Jefferson Place 1 City.... Road. Approximately 0.9 mile +335 upstream of Wagener Trail Road. Dry Branch At the Hollow Creek West +217 Unincorporated Areas of confluence. Aiken County. Approximately 1,200 feet +318 upstream of Dry...

  4. Genetic diversity, kinship analysis, and broodstock management of captive Atlantic sturgeon for population restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, A.P.; Spidle, A.P.; King, T.L.

    2005-01-01

    Captive Atlantic sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus considered for use as broodstock in a restoration program were genotyped using nuclear DNA microsatellites and compared to wild collections from the Hudson River, New York (source of parents of the captive sturgeon) and from Albemarle Sound, North Carolina. Because the potential broodfish were the progeny of a small number of parents, maintaining genetic diversity and minimizing inbreeding is essential to a successful breeding and supplementation program. The microsatellite loci used in this analysis generated unique multilocus genotypes for each of 136 Atlantic sturgeon. Analyses indicated significant genetic separation between the New York and North Carolina collections and correctly identified the potential broodstock as a subset of the Hudson River population. Pairwise genetic distance (-In proportion of shared alleles) between half and full siblings in the potential broodfish was as great as 1.386, a value exceeded by only 36% of the sampled broodfish pairs available for mating. Because the current broodstock population does not seem to have deviated far from their ancestral population in the Hudson River, progeny from that broodstock, or the parents themselves, would seem to be genetically suitable for release back into the Hudson River.

  5. Smith Assists in Superstorm Sandy Relief Efforts | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Cathy McClintock, Guest Writer It should have been routine by now for a 30-year volunteer firefighter/ emergency medical technician from Thurmont, Md., but it wasn’t. That first night, as Ross Smith, IT security, looked across the Hudson River from Jersey City, N.J., he saw an unusually dark New York skyline.

  6. Comparative Economics of Soil and Associated Nutrient loss by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TEKWA IJASINI JOHN

    Gichuru, M. P., A. Bationo, M. A. Bakunda, H. C. Goma,. P. L., Mafongonya, D. N. Mugendi, H. M. Murwira, S. M.. Nandwa, P. Nyathi and M. J. Swift., 2003. Soil fertility. Management in Africa: A Regional Perspective. Academy Science Publishers. Nairobi, Kenya. Hudson, N. W., 1989. Soil Conservation. B. T. Batsford limited ...

  7. Unusual Metalloporphyrin Complexes of Rhenium and Technetium

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-06

    vitamin 8216,17). Changes or modification of general porphyrin metabolism are associated with cancer, drug metabolism, 18and specific disease syndromes ...D. Adler, F. R. Longo, J. D. Finarelli, J. Goldmacher, J. Assour, and L. Korsakoff , J. Org. Chem., 32; 476 (1967). 67. G. H. Barnett, M. F. Hudson

  8. Law and Power in the Middle Ages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    International konferenceantologi med bidrag fra Gerd Althoff, Dominique Bauer, Bruce C Brasington, Charlotte Christensen-Nugues, Michael H Gelting, John Gillingham, Eldbjørg Haug, John Hudson, Brigitte Meijns, Hans Jacob Orning, Anne Irene Riisøy, Matthew Strickland, Jo Rune Ugulen, og Sally N Va...

  9. Building a Collaborative Online Literary Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essid, Joe; Wilde, Fran

    2011-01-01

    Effective virtual simulations can embed participants in imaginary worlds. Researchers working in virtual worlds and gaming often refer to "immersion," a state in which a participant or player loses track of time and becomes one with the simulation. Immersive settings have been shown to deepen learning. Ken Hudson's work with students…

  10. Global Demographic Change and Its Implications for Military Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    developing countries. 13 See John Parker, “Burgeoning Bourgeoisie ,” The Economist, February 12, 2009. Numbers 21 year since then.14 If so, then...Annandale-on- Hudson, New York: The Levy Economics Institute of Bard College, Working Paper No. 500, May 2007. Parker, John, “Burgeoning Bourgeoisie

  11. Popmuusika / Margus Haav

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Haav, Margus, 1969-

    2006-01-01

    Uutest heliplaatidest Erasure "Union Street", The Hacker "A.n.d.N.O.W.", Nekta "Water The Flowers", Nickodemus & Mariano "Turntables On The Hudson Sir Remix", Jussi Syren & The Groundbreakers "Heartagrass", Dirty Pretty things "Waterloo To Anywhere", The Kooks "Inside In inside Out"

  12. Methods to Select Chemicals for In Situ Biodegradation of Fuel Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-07-01

    Aurelius , M.W. and Wallace, R.C. Degradation Of A Toxaphene-Contaminated Soil Matrix Under Anaerobic Conditions. Superfund 󈨜, Proceedings of the 9th...Biodegradation of Gasoline in a Sand Formation," Project No. 307-77, Suntech, Inc., Marcus Hook, PA, 1978. Raymond, R.L., Jamison, V.W., Hudson, J.O

  13. The Genus Antirrhinum (Snapdragon): A Flowering Plant Model for Evolution and Development

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Andrew Hudson, Joanna Critchley and Yvette Erasmus Corresponding author ([]()) ### INTRODUCTION The *Antirrhinum* species group comprises approximately 20 morphologically diverse members that are able to form fertile hybrids. It includes the cultivated snapdragon *Antirrhinum majus*, which has been used as a model for biochemical and developmental genetics for more than 75 yr. The research infrastructure for *A. majus*, together...

  14. RESULTADOS DE CITOLOGIA ONCÓTICA EM UMA REGIONAL DE SAÚDE NO PERÍODO DE 2007-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurícia Brochado Oliveira Soares

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available La colpocitología oncótica es un examen de rastreo capaz de detectar el cáncer de cuello uterino precoz. Este estudio retrospectivo planteó como objetivo describir la frecuencia de los resultados de las pruebas de colpocitología oncótica recolectadas en los años 2007 y 2008 en 16 municipios pertenecientes al Departamento Regional de Salud VIII / São Paulo, a través de datos del Sistema de Información de Cáncer de Cuello Uterino. Se realizó un análisis descriptivo de 28.066 y 27.044 pruebas recolectadas en los años 2007 y 2008, respectivamente, de éstas 62,3% en 2007 y 59,5% en 2008 estaban dentro de los límites de normalidad. Las alteraciones en células epiteliales escamosas representaron 0,2% y, 0,4% de los resultados en 2007 y 2008, y las alteraciones en células epiteliales glandulares 0,2% en 2007 y 2008. En este contexto, se percibe que los porcentajes de microbiología y de anormalidades de atipias celulares encontrados en esta investigación aparecen en inferior grado tocante a los resultados presentados por otras pesquisas en diferentes regiones del país.

  15. Bionomics of Neolasioptera aculeatae (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae, a promising biological control candidate against Parkinsonia aculeata (Fabaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Mc KAY

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inspecciones de campo realizadas sobre Parkinsonia aculeata L. en el Norte-centro de Argentina entre 2008 y 2011 revelaron la presencia del mosquito agallícola Neolasioptera aculeatae Gagné (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae. La presencia de las agallas de N. aculeatae está restringida a la distribución norte de P. aculeata. La disección de agallas recolectadas a lo largo del año, reveló la presencia de larvas y/o pupas en distintos estados fenológicos de P. aculeata. La emergencia de adultos de N. aculeatae tuvo lugar 13 a 34 días desde la recolección en el campo y se extendió por un período promedio de 22 días. Entre once especies de leguminosas inspeccionadas en el campo, adultos de N. aculeatae emergieron únicamente de agallas recolectadas sobre P. aculeata. Los atributos biológicos y el restringido conjunto de plantas hospederas utilizadas en el campo, hacen de N. aculeatae un agente promisorio para el control biológico de P. aculeata.

  16. Calidad del agua de la niebla captada artificialmente en la microcuenca del río Pixquiac, Veracruz, México: resultados preliminares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Jofre-Meléndez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Con el fin de determinar si el agua recolectada artificialmente de la niebla en la zona central montañosa del Estado de Veracruz es apta para el consumo humano, se realizó un muestreo preliminar de enero a marzo del año 2010, periodo de mayor frecuencia de nieblas, para analizar sus aspectos físicos, químicos y biológicos y evaluar su calidad. Se encontró que el agua contiene metales pesados como el mercurio, organismos coliformes y cantidades altas de nitrógeno amoniacal, pero esto se puede solucionar aplicando un tratamiento de saneamiento para uso humano con un costo de 0.00341 USD L -1 que no incluye mano de obra ni infraestructura. Se discuten las causas que pueden originar su contaminación y se concluye que el agua recolectada de la niebla no es adecuada para el consumo humano, pero sí para la agricultura.

  17. Algunos poliquetos holoplanctónicos (Annelida: Polychaeta del Parque Nacional Isla del Coco, Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soledad Jiménez-Cueto

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Los poliquetos holoplanctónicos no han sido estudiados en las aguas oceánicas adyacentes al Parque Isla del Coco. Se estudiaron estas formas pelágicas a partir del análisis de muestras de zooplancton recolectadas en esta área protegida. Las muestras fueron obtenidas mediante redes de plancton estándar (0.2-0.5mm de malla, 0.49m de diámetro de boca en arrastres horizontales y verticales en la isla oceánica Isla del Coco, Costa Rica, en el Pacífico Tropical Oriental. Los poliquetos pelágicos de esta zona fueron analizados taxonómicamente. El material obtenido incluye representantes de seis especies y cinco familias: Alciopidae, Lopadorhynchidae, Tomopteridae, Polynoidae y Typhloscolecidae. Se presentan diagnosis breves, sino- nimias, análisis morfológicos comparativos, ilustraciones taxonómicas y la distribución conocida de las especies recolectadas en el plancton de Isla del Coco. El registro de Drieschia pellucida Moore es el primero en el Pacífico Tropical Oriental; nuestro espécimen muestra algunas diferencias respecto a la descripción original. El resto de las especies han sido encontradas previamente en aguas del Pacífico Tropical Oriental y en el Domo de Costa Rica, pero son los primeros registros para esta área protegida.

  18. Growth-promoting effects of a seaweed concentrate at various pH and water hardness conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina D. Arthur

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Kelpak® – a liquid seaweed concentrate made from the kelp Ecklonia maxima (Osbeck Papenfuss – is used as a natural biostimulant to promote rooting and improve yield in crops. Plant–soil environmental conditions and the chemistry of water used for irrigation may affect the efficiency of Kelpak. The effect of pH (pH 4.5, 6.5 and 8.5 and water hardness (200 mg/L and 400 mg/L Ca2+ on the growth-promoting ability of Kelpak was assessed using the mungbean rooting bioassay and in a pot trial with Swiss chard. Kelpak promoted rooting in all the treatments in the mungbean bioassay with maximum rooting generally achieved with 20% Kelpak. With 20% Kelpak, the addition of 200 mg/L and 400 mg/L Ca2+ decreased rooting at pH 4.5, increased rooting at pH 6.5 and did not affect rooting at pH 8.5. A similar trend was observed in the pot trial with Swiss chard: leaf and root (fresh weight and pigment content (chl a, chl b and carotenoids improved with the addition of 200 mg/L Ca2+ + 5% Kelpak at pH 6.5 or pH 8.5, while Kelpak was able to partially mask the negative effect of 200 mg/L Ca2+ at pH 4.5. These results suggest that while Kelpak is most effective in neutral pHs, it can be used to promote plant growth in a wide range of pH and water hardness conditions.

  19. Canary: an atomic pipeline for clinical amplicon assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doig, Kenneth D; Ellul, Jason; Fellowes, Andrew; Thompson, Ella R; Ryland, Georgina; Blombery, Piers; Papenfuss, Anthony T; Fox, Stephen B

    2017-12-15

    or a Docker image at https://github.com/PapenfussLab/Canary under a GPL-3.0 License.

  20. High mortality of Zostera marina under high temperature regimes but minor effects of the invasive macroalgae Gracilaria vermiculophylla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höffle, H.; Thomsen, M. S.; Holmer, M.

    2011-03-01

    The present study tested for density-dependent effects of the invasive drift macroalgae Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Ohmi) Papenfuss on growth and survival of the native eelgrass, Zostera marina L., under different temperature levels. Three weeks laboratory experiments were conducted in Odense, Denmark, combining three algae densities (control, low 1.9 kg WW m -2, high 4.5 kg WW m -2) with typical Danish summer temperatures (18 °C) and elevated temperatures (21 °C and 27 °C). There was a significant effect of temperature on shoot survival with on average 68% mortality in the high temperature treatment but almost no mortality at the two lower temperatures. The higher mortality was probably caused by high sulphide levels in the sediment pore water (0.6 mmol l -1 at 18 °C compared to 3.7 mmol l -1 at 27 °C). Above-ground growth of the surviving shoots was also significantly affected by temperature, with leaf elongation rates being negatively affected, while the leaf plastochrone interval increased. Relative growth rate was significantly higher at 21 °C than at 18 °C or 27 °C, whereas rhizome elongation was significantly lowest at 27 °C. Elemental sulphur content in the plant tissues increased significantly with temperature and was up to 34 times higher (S 0 in rhizomes) at 27 °C compared to the lower temperatures. In contrast to the temperature effects, cover by G. vermiculophylla did not cause significant effects on any seagrass responses. However, there was a (non-significant) negative effect of algal cover at the highest temperature, where the seagrass is already stressed. The latter results suggest that more studies should test for interaction effects between temperature and other anthropogenic stressors given that temperature is predicted to increase in the near future.

  1. The Formation of Laurentia: Evidence from Shear Wave Splitting and Seismic Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddell, M. V.; Bastow, I. D.; Rawlinson, N.; Darbyshire, F. A.; Gilligan, A.

    2017-12-01

    The northern Hudson Bay region of Canada comprises several Archean cratonic nuclei, assembled by Paleoproterozoic orogenies including the 1.8 Ga Trans-Hudson Orogen (THO) and Rinkian-Nagssugtoqidian Orogen (NO). Questions remain about how similar in scale and nature these orogens were compared to modern orogens like the Himalayas. Also in question is whether the thick Laurentian cratonic root below Hudson Bay is stratified, with a seismically-fast Archean core underlain by a lower, younger, thermal layer. We investigate these problems via shear-wave splitting and teleseismic tomography using up to 25 years of data from 65 broadband seismic stations across northern Hudson Bay. The results of the complementary studies comprise the most comprehensive study to date of mantle seismic velocity and anisotropy in northern Laurentia. Splitting parameter patterns are used to interpret multiple layers, lithospheric boundaries, dipping anisotropy, and deformation zone limits for the THO and NO. Source-side waveguide effects from Japan and the Aleutian trench are observed despite the tomographic data being exclusively relative arrival time. Mitigating steps to ensure data quality are explained and enforced. In the Hudson Strait, anisotropic fast directions (φ) generally parallel the THO, which appears in tomographic images as a strong low velocity feature relative to the neighbouring Archean cratons. Several islands in northern Hudson Bay show short length-scale changes in φ coincident with strong velocity contrasts. These are interpreted as distinct lithospheric blocks with unique deformational histories, and point to a complex, rather than simple 2-plate, collisional history for the THO. Strong evidence is presented for multiple anisotropic layers beneath Archean zones, consistent with the episodic development model of cratonic keels (e.g., Yuan & Romanowicz 2010). We show via both tomographic inversion models and SKS splitting patterns that southern Baffin Island was

  2. Application of a Bayesian belief network for assessing the vulnerability of permafrost to thaw and implications for greenhouse gas production and climate feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webster, K.L.; McLaughlin, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Permafrost areas are subject to accelerated rates of climate change leading to thaw. • Thaw will increase decomposition rates, exacerbating climate feedback. • We present a Bayesian belief network as a tool to examine interacting factors. • Organic soil (Hudson Plain region) and mineral soil (Arctic region) are contrasted. • Hudson Plain has contributed more to climate feedback than Arctic, but gap closing. - Abstract: Permafrost affected soils are an important component of the Boreal, Subarctic, and Arctic ecosystems of Canada. These areas are undergoing accelerated rates of climate change and have been identified as being at high risk for thaw. Thaw will expose soil to warmer conditions that support increased decomposition rates, which in turn will affect short- and long-term carbon storage capacity and result in feedback to global climate. We present a tool in the form of a Bayesian belief network influence diagram that will allow policymakers and managers to understand how interacting factors contribute to permafrost thaw and resulting effects on greenhouse gas (GHG) production and climate feedback. A theoretical example of expected responses from an organic soil typical of the Hudson Plain region and a mineral soil typical in the Arctic region demonstrate variability in responses across different combinations of climate and soil conditions within Canada. Based on the network results, the Arctic has historically had higher probability of thaw, but the Hudson Plain has had higher probability of producing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and methane (CH 4 ). Under past and current climate conditions, the Hudson Plain has, on a per unit area basis, contributed more to climate feedback than the Arctic. However, the gap in contribution between the two regions is likely to decrease as thaw progresses more rapidly in the Arctic than Hudson Plain region, resulting in strong positive feedback to climate warming from both regions. The flexible framework

  3. TRACKING CHANGES IN CHLOROPHYLL AND CAROTENOIDS IN THE PRODUCTION PROCESS OF FROZEN SPINACH PURÉE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Mendelová

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Spinach is in the professional and general public considered highly nutritious vegetable with many beneficial effects on human health. It is a rich source of antioxidant active substances, especially chlorophyll, carotenoids, flavonoids and minerals especially zinc and copper. This work studies the changes of chlorophyll and carotenoids that occur after mass production technology of freezing at -37 °C. Before freezing was used blanching operation. In this work we used a variety Boeing, Boa, Beaver, Hudson and Chica. The highest content of all monitored parameters are found in fresh leaves of sampled Hudson. We found that within the processing decreases chlorophyll in 16.6%, 13.8% of chlorophyll b and carotenoids of 6.15%. This decrease was in all cases statistically significant.

  4. "mus co shee": Indigenous Plant Foods and Horticultural Imperialism in the Canadian Sub-Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloway, Beverly

    2015-01-01

    The 17th-century arrival of the Hudson's Bay Company in Rupert's Land disrupted Mushkegowuk (Cree) hunter-gatherer society by replacing the collection of indigenous plant foods with a British planted-food model. Within a hundred years of British contact, new foodways relied upon hunting and gardening, bringing a loss in heritage plant food knowledge. Mushkegowuk living in the sub-arctic today have minimal knowledge of edible indigenous plants. Dependence on limited local gardening or imported grocery store vegetables has affected diet, nutrition, and cultural systems. In addition to exploring plant food gathering and gardening history in the Hudson Bay Lowlands, this paper demonstrates how re-discovering lost foodway knowledge can contribute to the health and well-being of those living in the far north.

  5. Accidents involving off-road motor vehicles in a northern community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselback, P; Wilding, H R

    1987-01-01

    The increasing number of accidents associated with off-road motor vehicles used for recreational purposes prompted this prospective study. During 1985 the records of victims of all motor vehicle accidents who were seen at the Hudson Bay Union Hospital, Hudson Bay, Sask., were studied; patients involved in on-road vehicle accidents were included for comparison. Emphasis was placed on age, vehicle type, mechanism of accident, injury severity and the use of safety features. Almost half of the victims of off-road vehicle accidents were under 16 years of age. The poor adherence to government legislation and manufacturer recommendations was evident in the number of people who did not wear helmets or use headlights. PMID:3651929

  6. Revisión del género Neoquintius stat. nov., con descripción de cuatro especies nuevas y un análisis del complejo Quintius (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Coreidae: Nematopodini A revision of the genus Neoquintius nov. status, with the description of four new species and analysis of the Quintius complex (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Coreidae: Nematopodini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Brailovsky

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available El subgénero Neoquintius Brailovsky y Barrera (Coreidae: Nematopodini es elevado a categoría genérica describiéndose 4 especies nuevas recolectadas en Bolivia, Panamá y Perú. Se ilustran caracteres diagnósticos del pronoto y de la cápsula genital del macho (pigóforo. Se incluye una clave para la identificación de los géneros afines a Quintius Stål y otra para las especies conocidas de Neoquintius.The subgenus Neoquintius Brailovsky and Barrera (Coreidae: Nematopodini is elevated to generic level, and 4 new species from Bolivia, Panama, and Peru are described. Diagnostic taxonomic characters of pronotum and male genital capsule (pygophore are illustrated. An identification key to the genera closely related to Quintius Stål, as well as a key to the known species of Neoquintius are included.

  7. Estudio farmacognóstico de bromelia pinguin l. (Piña de Ratón.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Abreu Payrol

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Se describen los resultados del estudio de secado preliminar de las partes aéreas de Bromelia pinguin L., recolectadas en lugares cercanos a la ciudad de Cienfuegos, así como los valores de las cenizas y los resultados del tamizaje fitoquímico obtenidos en el estudio de estas partes de la planta y sus extractos.The results of the study of the preliminary drying of the aerial parts of Bromelia pinguin L., picked up in areas near the city of Cienfuegos, as well as the values of the ashes and the results of the phytochemical screening obtained through the study of these parts of the plant and its extracts, are described.

  8. New records of Mexican Tardigrada Nuevos registros de Tardigrada mexicanos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Kaczmarek

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In 9 moss samples collected from Mexico, 6 tardigrade species, including 4 new records for the country, were found. The new records raise the number of known Mexican water bear species to forty-one. We provide a full list of the known Mexican tardigrade species and discuss some biogeographical and taxonomic issues.En 9 muestras de musgo recolectadas en México, se encontraron 6 especies de tardígrados, incluyendo 4 nuevos registros para el país. Los nuevos registros incrementaron a 41 el número de especies de tardígrados mexicanos conocidos. Se proporciona una lista completa de tardígrados mexicanos conocidos y se discuten algunas cuestiones biogeográficas y taxonómicas.

  9. Estructura y la ultraestructura del ovario de Cichlasoma urophthalmus (Perciformes: Cichlidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Rubí Viedma; Jonathan Franco; Carlos Bedia; Guadalupe Guedea Fernández; Héctor Barrera Villa Zevallos; Héctor Barrera Escorcia

    2011-01-01

    Se realizó un estudio descriptivo de las gónadas femeninas de Cichlasoma urophthalmus. Las muestras fueron recolectadas en la Laguna de Alvarado Veracruz, México en el período 2007-2008 que incluyó las temporadas de Nortes, Secas y Lluvias. Se extrajeron las gónadas femeninas y una parte se fijó en formol al 4% para su tratamiento por técnica histológica de rutina hematoxilina y Eosina (H-E) y otra parte se procesó para microscopia electrónica de transmisión. Las gónadas se fijaron en glutara...

  10. Obtención de Antraquinona contenida en el exudado de Aloe Vera (L.) Burm. f. (Zábila)

    OpenAIRE

    Saavedra, Oswaldo; Rondón, Carlos; Gallignani, Máximo; Ayala, Carlos; Nicola, Margarelli

    2012-01-01

    La investigación tuvo como propósito obtener la antraquinona contenida en el exudado de Aloe vera (L.) Burm.f. (zábila) mediante el método de cristalización y su identificación mediante la técnica de espectrofotometría de radiación infrarroja. La muestra la conformaron 18 plantas de zábila, recolectadas al oeste de la ciudad Santa Ana de Coro, estado Falcón. Se utilizaron tres métodos para la obtención de antraquinona a partir del exudado de zábila. En el método A, la antraquinona se obtuvo p...

  11. A new species of Hyalella from the Andes in Perú (Crustacea: Amphipoda: Hyalellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Exequiel R González

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyalella pauperocavae n. sp. from Huancayo, Perú, is described. Five other epigean freshwater amphipods have been described from Peru (excluding Lake Titicaca, but the lack of type material and poor descriptions do not allow the assignment of the species described here to any of the names known for the areaSe describe la especie Hyalella pauperocavae n. sp. recolectada en la localidad de Huancayo, Perú. Otras cinco especies de anfípodos epígeos se conocen para el Perú (excluyendo aquellas presentes en el Lago Titicaca. La ausencia de material tipo y descripciones poco claras impidieron la asignación de la especie descrita aquí a alguno de los nombres conocidos para el área

  12. Involucramiento de producto y lealtad de marca para productos de consumo masivo en Bogotá D.C.☆

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Julián Ramírez Angulo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mediante este artículo, se busca validar algunas hipótesis referentes a la relación entre involucramiento de pro- ducto y lealtad de marca para productos de consumo masivo en Bogotá (Colombia. Para tal fin, se recolectó in- formación acerca de las percepciones de involucramiento de producto y lealtad de marca para 478 consumido- res bogotanos, que posteriormente fue analizada mediante modelos de ecuaciones estructurales. A través de la información recolectada, se determinó la existencia de relación directa entre involucramiento de producto y lealtad de marca, no solo como conceptos, sino para cada una de las dimensiones de cada concepto. También se encontraron diferencias en el comportamiento de estas variables para distintas tipologías de producto.

  13. Determinación de atrazina y algunos de sus productos de degradación en suelos y agua por medio de cromatografía líquida de alta resolución

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel Olarte

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available En este estudio se describe la validación de un método analítico para la determinación simultánea de atrazina (AT y sus metabolitos deetilatrazina (DEA y deisopropilatrazina (DÍA en agua de irrigación y suelo de uso agrícola. Las muestras de campo fueron tomadas de un ensayo realizado en el municipio de Saldaña, Tolima (Colombia, en una parcela de 330 m2 cultivada comercialmente con maíz, a la cual se le aplicó atrazina en una dosis de 2,9 kg. i.a/ha. Estas muestras fueron recolectadas durante un tiempo de 90 días después de la aplicación del herbicida.

  14. Enzimas de restricción de bacterias nativas de Nicaragua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    lan Roustan-Espinosa

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available Los avances de la ingeniería genética y la biología molecular han propiciado la utilización de bacterias en la industria biotecnológica. En este trabajo se presenta la identificación y caracterización de enzimas de restricción presentes en bacterias recolectadas en medios acuosos de Nicaragua. Se encontró actividad de restricción en el 25% del total de bacterias analizadas. Se abordan los procesos de purificación de extractos de proteínas de bacterias con actividades de Sau961 y Pvull. Este trabajo es un esfuerzo dirigido a la implementación de técnicas modernas de biotecnología en Nicaragua.

  15. NUEVAS ESPECIES COLOMBIANAS DE PHYLLOPHAGA HARRIS (COLEOPTERA: MELOLONTHIDAE: MELOLONTHINAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIGUEL ÁNGEL MORÓN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Se describen tres Phyllophaga (s. str.: Phyllophaga velezangeli, nueva especie del grupo “schizorhina” recolectada en una localidad montañosa del departamento de Boyacá, ubicada a 1 989 m de altitud; y P. citarae, nueva especie del grupo “rorulenta” que habita en el bosque tropical perennifolio establecido a 70 m snm en Tutunendo, departamento de Chocó y P. densata chocoana, nueva subespecie del grupo “rugipennis” localizada en bosques tropicales perennifolios de Chocó y Risaralda. Phyllophaga densata densata (Moser se registra por primera ocasión para Colombia. Se incluyen ilustraciones de los caracteres diagnósticos, habitus y comentarios sobre sus diferencias con otras especies de los grupos citados.

  16. Primer registro de Florometra magellanica (Bell, 1882 (Echinodermata: Crinoidea para el Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elba Prieto Rios

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Se registra por primera vez para el Perú al Crinoideo (Echinodermata Florometra magellanica (Bell, 1882. La especie fue recolectada en el talud continental (360 – 814 m frente al departamento de Piura al norte del Perú (3°38,67’S, 81° 2,73’W. El material de referencia se encuentra depositado en la Colección Científica del Instituto del mar del Perú (IMARPE, Lima, Perú y en la Colección Nacional de Equinodermos de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad de México.

  17. Gestión de la cadena de suministro de Bimbo

    OpenAIRE

    Riveros Benítez, Ángela; Rodríguez Melo, Ángela Marcela

    2016-01-01

    El presente trabajo es un informe final sobre los procesos de producción, logística y distribución de la empresa Bimbo. El informe está conformado por aspectos teóricos y prácticos, de esta manera, brinda información clara y concreta sobre los antecedentes más importantes de esta organización y su contribución a la productividad del país. La información presentada ha sido recolectada mediante una revisión teórica y una visita a sus instalaciones en Veracruz, México. De esta manera, se han est...

  18. Estimación indirecta de tasas de ingreso y de retiro de la actividad económica para México.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virgilio Partida Bush

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Con base en la información recolectada en la Encuesta Nacional de Ocupación y Empleo de México se han calculado las tasas de ingreso y retiro de la actividad para las 32 entidades federativas durante el periodo 2000-2007. Mediante regresiones lineales ordinarias de mínimos cuadrados se obtienen ecuaciones para predecir las tasas de ingreso y de retiro a partir de las tasas de participación en la actividad por edad, dado que es la información más fácil de conseguir en censos de población o encuestas de hogares por muestreo. Los resultados concuerdan satisfactoriamente con las cifras comparables disponibles. El algoritmo se ejemplifica con la ciudad de Zamora en 2000.

  19. Calidad de vida y ciudad: análisis del nivel de desarrollo en Bogotá a través del método de necesidades básicas insatisfechas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Torres

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo evalúa qué variables caracterizan el nivel de desarrollo y calidad de vida de las comunida- des que habitan las localidades de Bogotá. Para lograr este objetivo se recolectó información de 19 de ellas, dentro de las cuales se analizó el indicador compuesto de necesidades básicas insatisfechas (NBI y todos sus indicadores simples. Con la información recolectada se realizaron pruebas de correlación y análisis de componentes principales para evaluar el indicador Condiciones sanitarias deficientes y NBI. Se concluye que para realizar caracterizaciones gruesas en poblaciones como las de Bogotá, el indicador sim- ple Condiciones sanitarias deficientes es suficiente para clasificar la población. Sin embargo, si se quieren realizar caracterizaciones más finas es recomendable obtener también el NBI compuesto.

  20. Estudio de la comunidad de Cystoseira mediterránea en dos localidades de la península del cabo de Creus (Alt Empardà, Nordeste de España

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rull Lluch, Jordi

    1990-05-01

    Full Text Available A survey has been carried out of the Cystoseira mediterranea community from eight samples seasonally collected in two localities of the cape Creus peninsula (N. E. Spain .
    The results obtained are related to the environmental conditions and they are compared with those obtained by other authors.

    Se ha realizado un estudio de la comunidad de Cystoseira mediterranea a partir de ocho muestras recolectadas estacionalmente en dos localidades de la península del cabo de Creus (nordeste de España. Los resultados obtenidos se comentan en relación con las condiciones ambientales y se comparan con los obtenidos por otros autores.

  1. Primer registro de Heterocucumis godeffroyi(Semper, 1868 (Echinodermata: Holothuroidea en el mar peruano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Alonso Solís-Marín

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Se registra por primera vez para el Perú la especie de pepino de mar Heterocucumis godeffroyi(Semper, 1868 (Echinodermata: Holothuroidea. La especie fue recolectada a 19 m de profundidad en Pucusana, de-partamento de Lima. Este registro representa el límite más norteño de distribución de la especie reconocido hasta el momento. Material de referencia se encuentra depositado en la Colección de Zoología Acuática, del Laboratorio de Biología Marina, Departamento de Ciencias Biológicas y Fisiológicas, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Perú.

  2. Estudio sobre diferencias de género en el aula de matemáticas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Salazar

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Este proyecto indagó sobre las relaciones de género entre las y los profesores y las y los estudiantes en el aulade matemáticas, y cómo éstas influyen en el desempeño académico de ellos y ellas. Esta investigación se realizó en dos instituciones mixtas de la ciudad de San Juan de Pasto, y la información fue recolectada por medio de entrevistas y observaciones dentro del aula de clase, las cuales se analizaron desde un punto de vista cualitativo y cuantitativo.Finalmente, se espera que esta investigación contribuya a crear conciencia sobre esta problemática y a mejorar las relaciones en el salón de clase de matemáticas entre docentes y estudiantes, tomando en cuenta las diferencias de género.

  3. Prácticas Cotidianas y Conocimientos Matemáticos, Estudio de Caso con Modistas en Bogotá, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Camilo Fuentes Leal

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available En este documento se describen y analizan algunas habilidades, pensamientos y estrategias matemáticas referentes a la maximización de áreas utilizadas por un grupo de ocho (8 modistas que actualmente trabajan en una fábrica de confección de ropa en Bogotá Colombia. Inicialmente se hace una búsqueda de referentes de investigaciones de este tipo, posteriormente se hace una recolección de información por medio de entrevistas, observación no participante, diario de campo y la resolución a situaciones problemáticas del trabajo asociadas con la maximización de áreas, finalmente se hace un análisis y una reflexión de la información recolectada y el proceso llevado a cabo con la población.

  4. Involucramiento de producto y lealtad de marca para productos de consumo masivo en Bogotá D.C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Julián Ramírez Angulo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mediante este artículo, se busca validar algunas hipótesis referentes a la relación entre involucramiento de pro- ducto y lealtad de marca para productos de consumo masivo en Bogotá (Colombia. Para tal fin, se recolectó in- formación acerca de las percepciones de involucramiento de producto y lealtad de marca para 478 consumido- res bogotanos, que posteriormente fue analizada mediante modelos de ecuaciones estructurales. A través de la información recolectada, se determinó la existencia de relación directa entre involucramiento de producto y lealtad de marca, no solo como conceptos, sino para cada una de las dimensiones de cada concepto. También se encontraron diferencias en el comportamiento de estas variables para distintas tipologías de producto.

  5. Descripción de la dieta del zorro gris, Pseudalopex griseus (Canidae) (Gray, 1869), en el Parque Nacional Sierra de las quijadas, San Luis, Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Núñez, María Beatriz; Bozzolo, Liliana

    2006-01-01

    La dieta de Pseudalopex griseus (Gray, 1869) fue estudiada mediante el análisis de heces recolectadas en el Parque Nacional Sierra de las Quijadas. El parque representa un ambiente semiárido, con regímenes hídricos estacionalmente marcados. Los resultados obtenidos muestran que el ítem más abundante durante todo el año es el Orden Coleoptera (estación seca 26%; estación húmeda 31%). En la estación seca, el ítem más abundante fueron las cactáceas (12%) y en la húmeda las leguminosas (25%). Otr...

  6. The First Smallpox Epidemic on the Canadian Plains: In the Fur-traders' Words

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Stuart Houston

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available William Tomison, in charge of the Hudson's Bay Company's Cumberland House on the Saskatchewan River, described the devastating smallpox epidemic of 1781 and 1782. He understood contagion, practised isolation and disinfection, and provided mortality statistics during a 'virgin soil' epidemic. Above all, he showed remarkable compassion. He and his men took dying Indians into their already crowded quarters, and provided them with food, shelter and 24 h care. This article describes the epidemic and its aftermath.

  7. The Impact of Internal Unrest and Disputed Borders on Chinese Military Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    12 Andrea Den Boer and Valerie M. Hudson, "China’s Security, China’s Demographics: Aging, Masculinization , and Fertility Policy," Brown...concerned about growing Chinese hegemony in Southeast Asia. "CCP Leaders Said to Offer Exile to Peace Prize Winner and Charter 08 Organizer," East-Asia...Aging, Masculinization , and Fertility Policy." Brown Journal of World Affairs 14, no. 2 (Spring 2008): 185-200. Dhussa, Ramesh Chandra. "Tibet: A

  8. The social and psychological impact of endometriosis on women's lives: a critical narrative review

    OpenAIRE

    Culley, Lorraine; Law, Caroline; Hudson, Nicky; Denny, E.; Mitchell, H.; Baumgarten, M.; Raine-Fenning, N.

    2013-01-01

    The attached file is a pre – copy – editing, author produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Human Reproduction Update following peer review. The definitive publisher – authenticated version (Culley, L, Law, C, Hudson, N, Denny, E, Mitchell, H, Baumgarten, M, Raine – Fenning, N (2013) The social and psychological impact of endometriosis on women’s lives: a critical narrative review. Hum. Reprod. Update 19 (6): 625 – 639) is available online at: http://humupd.oxfordjournals.org/...

  9. Accessibility for Justice: Accessibility as a Tool for Promoting Justice in Librarianship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Rosen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In Brief Recent critiques of diversity in higher education and librarianship by Stewart (2017, Hudson (2017, and Hathcock (2015 have encouraged a critical shift away from diversity talk and initiatives, towards attention to equity, anti-racism, and whiteness. They point out that diversity initiatives often fail to address deeper power imbalances, and they offer new language for the effort to make our institutions more just.

  10. Transition et amélioration des indices mondiaux de philanthropie ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Cette subvention aide à transférer les activités d'élaboration des indices mondiaux de dons privés du Center for Global Prosperity de l'Hudson Institute à la Lilly Family School of Philanthropy de l'Université de l'Indiana. Ce projet vise principalement sur l'inclusion des pays à économie émergente. La Lilly Family School ...

  11. Résultats de recherche | Page 23 | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Transition et amélioration des indices mondiaux de philanthropie. Cette subvention aide à transférer les activités d'élaboration des indices mondiaux de dons privés du Center for Global Prosperity de l'Hudson Institute à la Lilly Family School of Philanthropy de l'Université de l'Indiana. Projet ...

  12. Résultats de recherche | Page 10 | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Cette subvention aide à transférer les activités d'élaboration des indices mondiaux de dons privés du Center for Global Prosperity de l'Hudson Institute à la Lilly Family School of Philanthropy de l'Université de l'Indiana. Projet. Réseau d'échanges et de recherche dans les deltas de l'océan Indien occidental. Le réseau ...

  13. An Application of Filtered Renewal Processes in Hydrology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Lefebvre

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Filtered renewal processes are used to forecast daily river flows. For these processes, contrary to filtered Poisson processes, the time between consecutive events is not necessarily exponentially distributed, which is more realistic. The model is applied to obtain one- and two-day-ahead forecasts of the flows of the Delaware and Hudson Rivers, both located in the United States. Better results are obtained than with filtered Poisson processes, which are often used to model river flows.

  14. An Overview of the Nigel Text Generation Grammar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-01

    34 76b, Hudson 76, Halliday 81, de Joia 80, Fawcett 80].3 1.2. Design Goals for the Grammar Three kinds of goals have guided the work of creating Nigel...Davey 79] Davey, A., Discourse Production, Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh, 1979. [ de Joia 80] de Joia , A., and A. Stenton, Terms in Systemic...1 1.1. The Text Generation Task as a Stimulus for Grammar Design .........................1I -1.2. Design Goals for the Grammar

  15. Nigel: A Systemic Grammar for Text Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-01

    presumed. Basic references on the systemic framework include [Berry 75, Berry 77, Halliday 76a, Halliday 76b, Hudson 76, Halliday 81, de Joia 80...Edinburgh, 1979. [do Joia 80] de Joia , A., and A. Stanton, Terms in Systemic Linguistics, Batsford Academic and Educational, Ltd., London, 1980. -’C...1 A Grammar for Text Generation- -The Challenge ................................. 1 *1.2 A Grammar for Text Generation--The Design

  16. AE8/AP8 Implementations in AE9/AP9, IRBEM, and SPENVIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-18

    period applies to orbit generation only; AE8/AP8 utilizes geomagnetic field models from other epochs as specified in the table below.) SHIELDOSE2 model...finite and semi- infinite slab data tables for Bremsstrahlung have been reversed [Heynderickx, private communication, May 2013]. This correction is...Cain, J. C., S. J. Hendricks, R. A. Langel, and W. V. Hudson (1967), A proposed model for the international geomagnetic reference field, 1965, J

  17. On Lipschitzian quantum stochastic differential inclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekhaguere, G.O.S.

    1990-12-01

    Quantum stochastic differential inclusions are introduced and studied within the framework of the Hudson-Parthasarathy formulation of quantum stochastic calculus. Results concerning the existence of solutions of a Lipschitzian quantum stochastic differential inclusion and the relationship between the solutions of such an inclusion and those of its convexification are presented. These generalize the Filippov existence theorem and the Filippov-Wazewski Relaxation Theorem for classical differential inclusions to the present noncommutative setting. (author). 9 refs

  18. International Conference on Langmuir-Blodgett Films (5th) Held in Paris, France on 26-30 August 1991, Abstracts Booklet

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    B.E. Hulshof Ebe2 2 Ebe P.Schudde and Ben L.Feringa 1) Department of Polymer Chemistry, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 16 9717 AG Groningen, The...S. C02 Hudson AJ. GP23 HPIO Gauvin S. 005 Hulshof J.B.E. CPI GeorgerJr J.H. E04 104 Hunklinger S. FPll Gevod V.S. BP28 Hutchings M.G. CP35 Gionis V

  19. A Regional Guidebook for Applying the Hydrogeomorphic Approach to Assessing Functions of Forested Wetlands in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    regions of applicability if they prefer, and they will yield essentially the same results as this guidebook. However, this version is designed to...in the 16th century, natural levees of the major rivers were extensively used for maize agriculture by Native Americans (Hudson 1997). By the time...Together these indicate whether the stand has a structure typical of a mature forest with “ gap ” regeneration processes in place. The second term of

  20. Comparison of the OxyMask and Venturi Mask in the Delivery of Supplemental Oxygen: Pilot Study in Oxygen-Dependent Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime M Beecroft

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The OxyMask (Southmedic Inc, Canada is a new face mask for oxygen delivery that uses a small ‘diffuser’ to concentrate and direct oxygen toward the mouth and nose. The authors hypothesized that this unique design would enable the OxyMask to deliver oxygen more efficiently than a Venturi mask (Hudson RCI, USA in patients with chronic hypoxemia.

  1. Comparison of three devices for oxygen administration in the late postoperative period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stausholm, K; Rosenberg-Adamsen, S; Skriver, M

    1995-01-01

    We have evaluated three different devices for oxygen administration in the surgical ward, the Hudson face mask (oxygen 3 litre min-1, air 12 litre min-1), the nasal prong (oxygen 3 litre min-1) and the binasal catheter (oxygen 3 litre min-1). We evaluated the three devices in random order......, but the highest degree of comfort was found with the binasal catheter. Use of the binasal catheter is recommended for oxygen administration in the late postoperative period....

  2. Evaluation of Three Commercial Backpack Sprayers with Aqualuer (registered trademark) 20-20 Against Caged Adult Aedes aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-11

    Sprayers with Aqualuer® 20–20 Against Caged Adult Aedes Aegypti Author(s): Derrick Conover, Ali Fulcher, Michael L. Smith, Muhammad Farooq, Marcia K... AEDES AEGYPTI DERRICK CONOVER,1 ALI FULCHER,1 MICHAEL L. SMITH,1 MUHAMMAD FAROOQ,2 MARCIA K. GAINES1 AND RUI-DE XUE1,3 ABSTRACT. Three commercially...adult Aedes aegypti in semifield trials in northeastern Florida. Two battery-powered sprayers, Birchmeier and Hudson, were compared with the standard

  3. Understanding Molecular Ion-Neutral Atom Collisions for the Production of Ultracold Molecular Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-06

    2012): 0. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.223002 Kuang Chen, Scott T. Sullivan, Wade G. Rellergert, Eric R. Hudson. Measurement of the Coulomb Logarithm...or fellowships for further studies in science, mathematics, engineering or technology fields: Student Metrics This section only applies to graduating...clouds of Ba+ ions and Ca atoms. Due to the strong Coulomb interaction, the Ba+ ions quickly cool the molecular ion translation motion, while the

  4. The Minnesota Innovation Research Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-01

    Jeanne Buckeye, Ron Dykstra, Roger Hudson, and Andrew Van de Ven 42 Financial Industry Innovation Study -- Ian Maitland , Robert Goodman, and Edward...PROJECT by Ian Maitland , Robert S. Goodman, and Ed Freeman We propose to examine the strategic innovations undertaken by a stratified sample of financial...with it. A sample of 6 innovati 1ve and 6 "noninrovative" school districts will be lonoitudinallv studied utsini interviews. direct observat ian , and

  5. Artists in and out of the Caribbean

    OpenAIRE

    Sally Price; Sally Price

    1999-01-01

    [First paragraph] Caribbean Art. VEERLE POUPEYE. London: Thames and Hudson, 1998. 224 pp. (Paper US$ 14.95) Transforming the Crown: African, Asian and Caribbean Artists in Britain, 1966-1996. MORA J. BEAUCHAMP-BYRD & M. FRANKLIN SIRMANS (eds.). New York: Caribbean Cultural Center, 1998. 177 pp. (Paper US$ 39.95, £31.95) "Caribbean" (like "Black British") culture is (as a Dutch colleague once said of postmodernism) a bit of a slippery fish. One of the books under ...

  6. Technology Solutions for New Homes Case Study: Columbia County Habitat for Humanity Passive Townhomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-04-01

    The Columbia County (New York) Habitat for Humanity (Columbia County Habitat) affiliate has been experimenting with high-performance building since 2012, starting with ENERGY STAR® Certified Homes. In 2013, they constructed their first homes aimed at the Passive House standards. Building off of this effort, in 2014 they began work on a second set of Passive Townhomes in Hudson, New York, in partnership with the Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions (ARIES) Building America team and BarlisWedlick Architects.

  7. Atlantic Coastal Experiment VI: R/V KNORR cruise, 23 August--11 September 1980, data report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, W.; von Bock, K. (eds)

    1983-01-01

    An investigation of the influence of estuaries on the ecosystem of the Mid-Atlantic Bight was undertaken. Data were collected from excursions into the Hudson, Delaware and Chesapeake estuaries, three across-shelf and one along-shelf transects, and two time series stations. In all, 139 stations were occupied and 164 XBT soundings were taken. In addition to standard hydrographic measurements, nutrient , chlorophyll, particulate carbon and nitrogen, 14C, 15N, DNA, particle size, FTD, phytoplankton and zooplankton analyses were made.

  8. Résultats de recherche | Page 41 | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Cette subvention aide à transférer les activités d'élaboration des indices mondiaux de dons privés du Center for Global Prosperity de l'Hudson Institute à la Lilly Family School of Philanthropy de l'Université de l'Indiana. Projet. Atténuer les risques de radicalisation violente chez les jeunes Maliens et Sénégalais. La région ...

  9. Arylimidamide-Azole Combinations against Leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Antileishmanial Activity of Compounds Derived from the Medicines for Malaria Venture Open Access Box Against Intracellular Leishmania major Amastigotes...Atovaquone and other antimalarial drugs against P. falciparum in vitro. Experimental Parasitology 80, 373-381, 1995. 4. Sharlow E, Leimgruber S...with in Vitro and in Vivo Anti-leishmanial Activity . ACS Chemical Biology, Dec 2013. 5. Caridha D, Parriot S, Hudson TH, Lang T, Ngundam F, Leed S

  10. Batrachospermum atrum (Rhodophyta – first record in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalski Wojciech A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives new data on the occurrence of Batrachospermum atrum (Hudson Harvey, a freshwater Rhodophyta species rare in Poland. It was found growing on stony bottom in a small stream in northwestern Poland; at this site it was associated mainly with Potamogeton nodosus Poir., green algae Cladophora glomerata (L. Kützing and Mougeotia sp. Its occurrence in Poland and some ecological data are discussed, and original photographs of the plant and its habitat are presented.

  11. Nuclear proliferation: dealing with problem countries. Hearing before the Subcommittees on International Security and Scientific Affairs and on International Economic Policy and Trade of the Committee on Foreign Affairs, House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, First Session, July 23, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    A panel of representatives of the Hudson Institute, the Georgetown Center for Strategic and International Studies, and the Ripon Society examined policy options at this hearing. At issue is how to deal with countries which are pursuing nuclear weapons and a nuclear-weapons capability. The panel also examined the role of international sanctions as a deterrent, consistent supplier export policies, and policies dealing with specific countries and regions. The hearing record includes their testimony and two appendices

  12. Falconry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    8217 --Independent--Back cover." - 150 - Filmed as Kes by Ken Loach in 1969, Barry Hines’ novel is a modern classic, and is a set GCSE text. Lawrence...signed by Richard Leach; and biographies of Richard Leach and Alfred V. Fedak. A compact disc accompanies the volume 52. Loach , Ken . KesNew...Passion of Falconry. London: Thames & Hudson, 2008. Call Number: SK 321 .A47 2008 23. Andersen, David Eric . "Military Training and the Ecology of Raptor

  13. The Role of Military Myth in Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    1963 film A Gathering of Eagles is broadly similar to Strategic Air Command in the elements of military myth it portrays. In the movie, Rock Hudson is...significant barriers and performed superbly in combat; the institutional racism that threatened several times to end the Tuskegee program and/or deny them...the face of adversity and contribute significantly to the war effort. The cause they served is portrayed as admirable and worthy, despite the racism

  14. Cultural Resources Survey of Greenwood Bend and Iowa Point Revetment, Mississippi River M-293.1 to 280-L

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    Clinton, in East Feliciana Parish. The Confederate Army recognized the importance of controlling this area, and constructed a bastion at Port Hudson in...past 20 years. This was especially true near where a small wooden bridge crossed the bayou. It would appear that Bayou Como served as a trash dump...Louisiana. Translated by Joseph G. Treagle. Louisiana American Revolution Bicentennial Commission, LSU Press, Baton Rouge, La. Originally published in 1774

  15. Population Viability Analysis of the Endangered Shortnose Sturgeon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    ll- 1 ) 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 Sturgeon ( left ) Prey ( right ) Figure 11. Model-simulated shortnose sturgeon population dynamics and prey dynamics over a...indicate low substrate diversity dominated by silt/sand substrate. ix ACRONYMS DO Dissolved oxygen DOC Dissolved organic carbon EFDC...fewer fish than the largest known population in the Hudson River ( Bain et al. 2007). Population estimates for this population have varied between 75

  16. A Community Terrain-Following Ocean Modeling System (ROMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    funded NOPP project titled: Toward the Development of a Coupled COAMPS-ROMS Ensemble Kalman filter and adjoint with a focus on the Indian Ocean and the...surface temperature and surface salinity daily averages for 31-Jan-2014. Similarly, Figure 3 shows the sea surface height averaged solution for 31-Jan... temperature (upper panel; Celsius) and surface salinity (lower panel) for 31-Jan-2014. The refined solution for the Hudson Canyon grid is overlaid on

  17. Modelos urbanos tridimensionales generados a partir de nubes de puntos de un escáner láser terrestre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernán Porras Díaz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se presenta una revisión del estado del arte de las diferentes metodologías que se han desarrollado para el tratamiento digital de nubes de puntos tridimensionales, recolectadas mediante un escáner láser terrestre. Este instrumento tiene la capacidad de capturar información topográfica y geométrica de cualquier estructura con precisiones hasta el orden de los milímetros, y en algunos casos también captura la información radiométrica de los objetos escaneados. Esta información recolectada se representa en forma de nubes de puntos que se utilizan en una amplia variedad de aplicaciones como la planeación del crecimiento urbano, el análisis estructural de construcciones, el modelado de fenómenos de erosión y deforestación, la documentación de patrimonio histórico y la navegación virtual a través de los sitios turísticos mediante modelos tridimensionales de edificaciones. Por lo tanto, el propósito de este trabajo es proveer una revisión en el estado del conocimiento acerca de las técnicas desarrolladas en las diferentes fases que se llevan a cabo con el tratamiento de estas nubes de puntos, como el registro y georreferenciación, la segmentación, clasificación y modelado tridimensional.

  18. Las especies de Trichogramma de Uruguay (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae Trichogramma species from Uruguay (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Basso

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Fueron recolectadas cinco especies de Trichogramma Westwood en Uruguay. La más ampliamente distribuida T. pretiosum Riley parasita Diatraea saccharalis (Fabricius, Heliothis zea (Boddie, Alabama argillacea (Hübner y Argyrotaenia sphaleropa (Meyrick. Trichogramma exiguum Pinto & Platner, a menudo confundida con T. fuentesi Torre, parasitan Bonagota cranaodes (Meyrick y A. sphaleropa. Otras dos especies T. galloi Zucchi y T. distinctum Zucchi parasita D. saccharalis. Ellas presentan una morfología relativamente similar y, de acuerdo a la información disponible, no es posible decidir si son especies próximas o sinónimas. Finalmente, T. bellaunionense Basso & Pintureau fue recolectada en Uruguay hasta el momento sólo sobre D. saccharalis. Se provee una clave ilustrada para determinar esas cinco especies. Por otra parte, se incluye una revisión del uso actual y proyectado de Trichogramma para controlar diferentes plagas en diversos cultivos en este país.Five Trichogramma Westwood species were collected in Uruguay. The widely distributed T. pretiosum Riley parasitizes Diatraea saccharalis (Fabricius, Heliothis zea (Boddie, Alabama argillacea (Hübner and Argyrotaenia sphaleropa (Meyrick. Trichogramma exiguum Pinto & Platner, often confused with T. fuentesi Torre, parasitizes Bonagota cranaodes (Meyrick and A. sphaleropa. The two species T. galloi Zucchi and T. distinctum Zucchi parasitize D. saccharalis. Their morphology is relatively close and, from the information available, it is not possible to decide if they are closely related species or synonymous species. Finally, up to now, T. bellaunionense Basso & Pintureau was only collected from Uruguay on D. saccharalis. An illustrated key is provided to identify these five species. Moreover, the present and expected use of Trichogramma to control different pests in different Uruguayan crops is reviewed.

  19. Study Impact of Gas Delivery Systems on Imaging Studies of Human Cerebral Blood Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, J.R.; Parkes, L.M.; Jackson, A.; Parkes, L.M.; Eadsforth, P.; Beards, S.C.

    2013-01-01

    To compare a semiopen breathing circuit with a non-rebreathing (Hudson mask) for MRI experiments involving gas delivery. Methods and Materials. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured by quantitative phase contrast angiography of the internal carotid and basilar arteries in 18 volunteers (20-31 years). In 8 subjects, gases were delivered via a standard non-re breathing (Hudson mask). In 10 subjects, gases were delivered using a modified “Mapleson A” semiopen anesthetic gas circuit and mouthpiece. All subjects were given 100% O 2 , medical air, and carbogen gas (95% O 2 and 5% CO 2 ) delivered at 15 L/min in a random order. Results. The Hudson mask group showed significant increases in CBF in response to increased FiCO 2 compared to air (+9.8%). A small nonsignificant reduction in CBF (-2.4%) was seen in response to increased inspired concentrations of oxygen (FiO 2 ). The Mapleson A group showed significantly larger changes in CBF in response to both increased inspired concentrations of carbon dioxide (FiCO 2 ) (+32.2%, Ρ<0.05) and FiO 2 (-14.6%, Ρ<0.01). Conclusions. The use of an anaesthetic gas delivery circuit avoids entrainment of room air and re breathing effects that may otherwise adversely affect the experimental results.

  20. Demographic, ecological, and physiological responses of ringed seals to an abrupt decline in sea ice availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Steven H; Young, Brent G; Yurkowski, David J; Anderson, Randi; Willing, Cornelia; Nielsen, Ole

    2017-01-01

    To assess whether demographic declines of Arctic species at the southern limit of their range will be gradual or punctuated, we compared large-scale environmental patterns including sea ice dynamics to ringed seal ( Pusa hispida ) reproduction, body condition, recruitment, and stress in Hudson Bay from 2003 to 2013. Aerial surveys suggested a gradual decline in seal density from 1995 to 2013, with the lowest density occurring in 2013. Body condition decreased and stress (cortisol) increased over time in relation to longer open water periods. The 2010 open water period in Hudson Bay coincided with extremes in large-scale atmospheric patterns (North Atlantic Oscillation, Arctic Oscillation, El Nino-Southern Oscillation) resulting in the earliest spring breakup and the latest ice formation on record. The warming event was coincident with high stress level, low ovulation rate, low pregnancy rate, few pups in the Inuit harvest, and observations of sick seals. Results provide evidence of changes in the condition of Arctic marine mammals in relation to climate mediated sea ice dynamics. We conclude that although negative demographic responses of Hudson Bay seals are occurring gradually with diminishing sea ice, a recent episodic environmental event played a significant role in a punctuated population decline.