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Sample records for hudson bay region

  1. Lithospheric Architecture Beneath Hudson Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porritt, R. W.; Miller, M. S.; Darbyshire, F. A.

    2015-12-01

    Hudson Bay overlies some of the thickest Precambrian lithosphere on Earth, whose internal structures contain important clues to the earliest workings of plate formation. The terminal collision, the Trans-Hudson Orogen, brought together the Western Churchill craton to the northwest and the Superior craton to the southeast. These two Archean cratons along with the Paleo-Proterozoic Trans-Hudson internides, form the core of the North American craton. We use S to P converted wave imaging and absolute shear velocity information from a joint inversion of P to S receiver functions, new ambient noise derived phase velocities, and teleseismic phase velocities to investigate this region and determine both the thickness of the lithosphere and the presence of internal discontinuities. The lithosphere under central Hudson Bay approaches 􏰂350 km thick but is thinner (􏰂200-250 km) around the periphery of the Bay. Furthermore, the amplitude of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) conversion from the S receiver functions is unusually large for a craton, suggesting a large thermal contrast across the LAB, which we interpret as direct evidence of the thermal insulation effect of continents on the asthenosphere. Within the lithosphere, midlithospheric discontinuities, significantly shallower than the base of the lithosphere, are often imaged, suggesting the mechanisms that form these layers are common. Lacking time-history information, we infer that these discontinuities reflect reactivation of formation structures during deformation of the craton.

  2. Nelson River and Hudson Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Rivers that empty into large bodies of water can have a significant impact on the thawing of nearshore winter ice. This true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from May 18, 2001, shows the Nelson River emptying spring runoff from the Manitoba province to the south into the southwestern corner of Canada's Hudson Bay. The warmer waters from more southern latitudes hasten melting of ice near the shore, though some still remained, perhaps because in shallow coastal waters, the ice could have been anchored to the bottom. High volumes of sediment in the runoff turned the inflow brown, and the rim of the retreating ice has taken on a dirty appearance even far to the east of the river's entrance into the Bay. The sediment would have further hastened the melting of the ice because its darker color would have absorbed more solar radiation than cleaner, whiter ice. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  3. Air mass distribution and the heterogeneity of the climate change signal in the Hudson Bay/Foxe Basin region, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Andrew; Gough, William

    2016-08-01

    The linkage between changes in air mass distribution and temperature trends from 1971 to 2010 is explored in the Hudson Bay/Foxe Basin region. Statistically significant temperature increases were found of varying spatial and temporal magnitude. Concurrent statistically significant changes in air mass frequency at the same locations were also detected, particularly in the declining frequency of dry polar (DP) air. These two sets of changes were found to be linked, and we thus conclude that the heterogeneity of the climatic warming signal in the region is at least partially the result of a fundamental shift in the concurrent air mass frequency in addition to global and regional changes in radiative forcing due to increases in long-lived greenhouse gases.

  4. Distribution and diversity of diatom assemblages in surficial sediments of shallow lakes in Wapusk National Park (Manitoba, Canada) region of the Hudson Bay Lowlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Olivier; Bouchard, Frédéric; MacDonald, Lauren A; Hall, Roland I; Wolfe, Brent B; Pienitz, Reinhard

    2016-07-01

    The hydrology of shallow lakes (and ponds) located in the western Hudson Bay Lowlands (HBL) is sensitive to climate warming and associated permafrost thaw. However, their biological characteristics are poorly known, which hampers effective aquatic ecosystem monitoring. Located in northern Manitoba along the southwestern coast of Hudson Bay, Wapusk National Park (WNP) encompasses numerous shallow lakes representative of the subarctic zone. We analyzed the distribution and diversity of diatom (microscopic algae; class Bacillariophyceae) assemblages in surficial sediments of 33 lakes located in three different ecozones spanning a vegetation gradient, from NE to SW: the Coastal Fen (CF), the Interior Peat Plateau (IPP), and the Boreal Spruce Forest (BSF). We found significant differences (P lakes, and CF and BSF lakes, but not between IPP and BSF lakes. These results are consistent with water chemistry measurements, which indicated distinct limnological conditions for CF lakes. Diatom communities in CF lakes were generally dominated by alkaliphilous taxa typical of waters with medium to high conductivity, such as Nitzschia denticula. In contrast, several IPP and BSF lakes were dominated by acidophilous and circumneutral diatom taxa with preference for low conductivity (e.g., Tabellaria flocculosa, Eunotia mucophila, E. necompacta var. vixcompacta). This exploratory survey provides a first detailed inventory of the diatom assemblages in the WNP region needed for monitoring programs to detect changes in shallow lake ecosystems and ecozonal shifts in response to climate variations.

  5. Integrating shear velocity observations of the Hudson Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porritt, R. W.; Miller, M. S.; Darbyshire, F. A.

    2013-12-01

    Hudson Bay is the core of the Laurentia craton of North America. This region contains some of the thickest lithosphere globally, reaching 250-300 km depth. Previous studies have shown that much of this region is composed of amalgamated proto-continents including the Western Churchill and Superior provinces and that much of the structure of these constituents has been retained since the Trans-Hudson Orogen at 1.8 Ga. Using the Hudson Bay Lithospheric Experiment (HuBLE) and other permanent and POLARIS broadband seismic data, we image the region with S to P receiver functions, joint inversion of P to S receiver functions with surface waves, and teleseismic S and P wave travel-times. The receiver function imaging reveals a persistent mid-lithospheric layer at ~80 km depth under all stations, but a variable lithospheric thickness. The teleseismic S delay times show a pattern of early arrivals around the center of the network, beneath Hudson Bay where the lithosphere is thickest, while the P delay times are early in the Superior province relative to the Western Churchill province. This suggests higher Vp/Vs ratios in the Superior province, which is evidence that stacked oceanic plates formed this province. The relatively flat Moho imaged by earlier receiver function studies and the lower mantle Vp/Vs of the Western Churchill province provides evidence of formation by plume head extraction. The joint inversion shows an LAB that is typically a broad discontinuity spanning ~20-30 km at ~220 km depth suggesting a primarily thermal boundary zone. The mid-lithospheric layer is composed of increasing velocity from the ~40 km depth Moho defined by H-k stacking of PRFs to a broad, constant velocity lithospheric lid spanning 80-200 km depth. We suggest this mid-lithospheric layer represents the mantle lithosphere of the proto-continents prior to collision and the lid formed due to post-collisional cooling. The integration of these seismic datasets furthers our understanding of

  6. Riverine organic matter composition and fluxes to Hudson Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzyk, Z. Z. A.; Macdonald, R. W.; Goni, M. A.; Godin, P.; Stern, G. A.

    2016-12-01

    With warming in northern regions, many changes including permafrost degradation, vegetation alteration, and wildfire incidence will impact the carbon cycle. Organic carbon (OC) carried by river runoff to northern oceans has the potential to provide integrated evidence of these impacts. Here, concentrations of dissolved (DOC) and particulate (POC) OC are used to estimate terrestrial OC transport in 17 major rivers draining varied vegetative and permafrost conditions into Hudson Bay and compositional data (lignin and 14C) to infer OC sources. Hudson Bay lies just south of the Arctic Circle in Canada and is surrounded by a large drainage basin (3.9 × 106 km2) dominated by permafrost. Analysis of POC and DOC in the 17 rivers indicates that DOC dominates the total OC load. The southern rivers dominate. The Nelson and Churchill Rivers to the southwest are particularly important suppliers of OC partly because of large drainage basins but also perhaps because of impacts by hydroelectric development, as suggested by a 14C age of DOC in the Churchill River of 2800 years. Higher DOC and POC concentrations in the southern rivers, which have substantive areas only partially covered by permafrost, compared to northern rivers draining areas with complete permafrost cover, implies that warming - and hence permafrost thawing - will lead to progressively higher DOC and POC loads for these rivers. Lignin composition in the organic matter (S/V and C/V ratios) reveals mixed sources of OC consistent with the dominant vegetation in the river basins. This vegetation is organized by latitude with southern regions below the tree line enriched by woody gymnosperm sources (boreal forest) and northern regions enriched with organic matter from non-woody angiosperms (flowering shrubs, tundra). Acid/Aldehyde composition together with Δ14C data for selected DOC samples suggest that most of the lignin has undergone oxidative degradation, particularly the DOC component. However, high Δ14C ages

  7. Paleoproterozoic Collisional Structures in the Hudson Bay Lithosphere Constrained by Multi-Observable Probabilistic Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbyshire, F. A.; Afonso, J. C.; Porritt, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    The Paleozoic Hudson Bay intracratonic basin conceals a Paleoproterozoic Himalayan-scale continental collision, the Trans-Hudson Orogen (THO), which marks an important milestone in the assembly of the Canadian Shield. The geometry of the THO is complex due to the double-indentor geometry of the collision between the Archean Superior and Western Churchill cratons. Seismic observations at regional scale show a thick, seismically fast lithospheric keel beneath the entire region; an intriguing feature of recent models is a 'curtain' of slightly lower wavespeeds trending NE-SW beneath the Bay, which may represent the remnants of more juvenile material trapped between the two Archean continental cores. The seismic models alone, however, cannot constrain the nature of this anomaly. We investigate the thermal and compositional structure of the Hudson Bay lithosphere using a multi-observable probabilistic inversion technique. This joint inversion uses Rayleigh wave phase velocity data from teleseismic earthquakes and ambient noise, geoid anomalies, surface elevation and heat flow to construct a pseudo-3D model of the crust and upper mantle. Initially a wide range of possible mantle compositions is permitted, and tests are carried out to ascertain whether the lithosphere is stratified with depth. Across the entire Hudson Bay region, low temperatures and a high degree of chemical depletion characterise the mantle lithosphere. Temperature anomalies within the lithosphere are modest, as may be expected from a tectonically-stable region. The base of the thermal lithosphere lies at depths of >250 km, reaching to ~300 km depth in the centre of the Bay. Lithospheric stratification, with a more-depleted upper layer, is best able to explain the geophysical data sets and surface observables. Some regions, where intermediate-period phase velocities are high, require stronger mid-lithospheric depletion. In addition, a narrow region of less-depleted material extends NE-SW across the Bay

  8. Inorganic carbon cycling and biogeochemical processes in an Arctic inland sea (Hudson Bay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, William J.; Thomas, Helmuth; Miller, Lisa A.; Granskog, Mats A.; Papakyriakou, Tim N.; Pengelly, Leah

    2016-08-01

    The distributions of carbonate system parameters in Hudson Bay, which not only receives nearly one-third of Canada's river discharge but is also subject to annual cycles of sea-ice formation and melt, indicate that the timing and magnitude of freshwater inputs play an important role in carbon biogeochemistry and acidification in this unique Arctic ecosystem. This study uses basin-wide measurements of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total alkalinity (TA), as well as stable isotope tracers (δ18O and δ13CDIC), to provide a detailed assessment of carbon cycling processes within the bay. Surface distributions of carbonate parameters reveal the particular importance of freshwater inputs in the southern portion of the bay. Based on TA, we surmise that the deep waters in the Hudson Bay are largely of Pacific origin. Riverine TA end-members vary significantly both regionally and with small changes in near-surface depths, highlighting the importance of careful surface water sampling in highly stratified waters. In an along-shore transect, large increases in subsurface DIC are accompanied by equivalent decreases in δ13CDIC with no discernable change in TA, indicating a respiratory DIC production on the order of 100 µmol kg-1 DIC during deep water circulation around the bay.

  9. Hydrological Research in Hudson Bay,Canada%加拿大Hudson海湾地区的水文研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William A.Gough

    2004-01-01

    Hudson Bay streamflow represents a major component of the streamflow in Canada, approximately 30% of all river discharge enters Hudson and James Bays. Three current hydrological research issues are examined for this region. First the relationship between streamflow and local climate change is reviewed. Second the impact of river discharge in James Bay is linked to sea level variations in Churchill, Manitoba and the implications of this on Hudson Bay recirculation are explored. Finally, the historical and projected sea level variations in the Bay are examined with particular emphasis on the Churchill, Manitoba record. The report is concluded by a discussion of future directions for hydrological research in the Hudson Bay region.%Hudson海湾的河川径流量在整个加拿大河川径流量中占有很大的比例,所有河流排泄量约30%流入了Hudson和James海湾.研究了该地区河川径流与当地气候变化之间的关系;把河川向James海湾的排泄与曼尼托巴省Churchill地区海水位的变化联系起来,讨论了其对Hudson海湾再循环的影响;根据曼尼托巴省Churchill地区海水位的观测资料重点讨论了该地区海水位在历史时期的变化及未来的预测变化等三个重要水文问题.最后指出了今后在Hudson海湾地区进行水文研究的方向.

  10. Climate change and sea ice: Shipping accessibility on the marine transportation corridor through Hudson Bay and Hudson Strait (1980–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Andrews

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Shipping traffic has been increasing in Hudson Strait and Hudson Bay and the shipping route through these waters to the Port of Churchill may soon become a federally-designated transportation corridor. A dataset on passive microwave-based sea ice concentration was used to characterize the timing of the ice on the shipping corridor to the Port between 1980 and 2014. Efforts were made to produce results in a readily accessible format for stakeholders of the shipping industry; for example, open water was defined using a sea ice concentration threshold of ≤ 15% and results are presented in terms of real dates instead of anomalies. Between 1980 and 2014, the average breakup date on the corridor was July 4, the average freeze-up date was November 25, and the average length of the open water season was 145 days. However, each of these three variables exhibited significant long-term trends and spatial variability over the 34-year time period. Regression analysis revealed significant linear trends towards earlier breakup (–0.66 days year–1, later freeze-up (+0.52 days year–1, and a longer open water season (+1.14 days year–1 along the shipping corridor between 1980 and 2014. Moreover, the section of the corridor passing through Hudson Strait displayed significantly stronger trends than the two sections in Hudson Bay (i.e., “Hudson Islands” and “Hudson Bay”. As a result, sea ice timing in the Hudson Strait section of the corridor has diverged from the timing in the Hudson Bay sections. For example, the 2010–2014 median length of the open water season was 177 days in Hudson Strait and 153 days in the Hudson Bay sections. Finally, significant linear relationships were observed amongst breakup, freeze-up, and the length of the open water season for all sections of the corridor; correlation analysis suggests that these relationships have greatest impact in Hudson Strait.

  11. Variability of an under-ice river plume in Hudson Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, R. Grant; Larouche, Pierre

    1987-08-01

    Observations of the Great Whale River plume in the coastal waters of Hudson Bay, Canada, during late winter and early spring during four different years showed its area to vary as a power of the discharge. The under-ice plume area was much larger than plume area in open water for comparable discharges. Differences in plume geometry were related to elapsed time since ice formation and low-frequency variability of the coastal circulation. The strength and orientation of the coastal motion was weakly correlated with the cross-Hudson Bay atmospheric pressure gradient. The passage of low-pressure systems over Hudson Bay is thought to generate a progressive edge wave in the absence of direct wind forcing. The amplitude of the low-frequency variations in coastal circulation decreased with the increasing spatial extent of the landfast ice in the study area.

  12. The changing freshwater regime of the Hudson Bay Drainage Basin: from present to 2070

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, M. K.; Stadnyk, T. A.; Déry, S.; Braun, M.; Koenig, K. A.

    2016-12-01

    The Hudson Bay Drainage Basin (HBDB) drains over a third of Canada's land mass and contains important hydroelectric infrastructure. Projecting future freshwater discharge in the HBDB is critical for forecasting generating potential, and for understanding potential changes to Hudson Bay sea ice coverage, contaminant, and nutrient cycling. Anticipated changes to the HBDB freshwater regime are characterized for the 2011-2040 and 2041-2070 climate normal periods relative to the baseline period (1981-2010). Existing flow regulation practices are held constant. A regional implementation of the Arctic-HYPE continental scale hydrological model is used. Historical calibration is performed over a split-sample period from 1971-2005 to span a range of climatic conditions. Gauges selected for calibration are non-biased with respect to drainage area covered by eight flow signatures. Lakes are plentiful across the HBDB, few of which are gauged directly at their outlet. A novel approach is used to parameterize lake storage-discharge relationships. K-means cluster analysis is used to group lakes based on similar physiographic characteristics, where they are given common discharge rating curve parameters. Nineteen members of the CMIP5 climate modeling experiment are used for meteorological forcing for discharge projections. Output from the climate models span the range of projected changes to precipitation and temperature over the region. Mean annual temperature is projected to increase by 1.2°C to 5.7°C from the baseline period to 2041-2070, and mean annual precipitation is projected to increase by 3% to 18%. The ensemble mean of discharge projections shows a general increase in mean annual and peak discharge across the HBDB during 2041-2070 compared to the baseline. Peak annual discharge shows the greatest increase over most northern regions of the basin, where there are the fewest hydrometric gauges. Low flows are projected to increase the least to the west of Hudson Bay, with

  13. Estimating the Economic Value of Narwhal and Beluga Hunts in Hudson Bay, Nunavut

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoover, C.; Bailey, M.L.; Higdon, J.; Ferguson, S.H.; Sumaila, R.

    2013-01-01

    Hunting of narwhal (Monodon monoceros) and beluga (Delphinapterus leucas) in Hudson Bay is an important activity, providing food and income in northern communities, yet few studies detail the economic aspects of these hunts. We outline the uses of narwhal and beluga and estimate the revenues, costs,

  14. Demography and population status of polar bears in western Hudson Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, Nicholas J.; Regher, Eric V; Servanty, Sabrina; Converse, Sarah J.; Richardson, Evan S.; Stirling, Ian

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the demography and population status of the Western Hudson Bay (WH) polar bear subpopulation for the period 1984-2011, using live-recapture data from research studies and management actions, and dead-recovery data from polar bears harvested for subsistence purposes or removed during human-bear conflicts.

  15. 40 CFR 81.129 - Hudson Valley Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.129 Hudson Valley Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Hudson Valley Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (New York) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hudson Valley Intrastate Air...

  16. Surface-Wave Tomographic Studies of the Hudson Bay Lithosphere: Implications for Paleoproterozoic Tectonic Processes and the Assembly of the Canadian Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbyshire, F. A.

    2015-12-01

    Hudson Bay is a shallow intracratonic basin that partially conceals the Trans-Hudson Orogen (THO) in northern Canada. The THO is thought to be a Himalayan-scale Paleoproterozoic orogenic event that was an important component of assembly of the Canadian Shield, marking the collision of the Archean Superior and Western Churchill plates. Until recently, only global and continental-scale seismic tomographic models had imaged the upper-mantle structure of the region, giving a broad but relatively low-resolution picture of the thick lithospheric keel. The Hudson Bay Lithospheric Experiment (HuBLE) investigated the present-day seismic structure beneath Hudson Bay and its surroundings, using a distributed broadband seismograph network installed around the periphery of the Bay and complemented by existing permanent and temporary seismographs further afield. This configuration, though not optimal for body-wave studies which use subvertical arrivals, is well-suited to surface wave tomographic techniques, with many paths crossing the Bay. As there is little seismicity in the region around the Canadian Shield, two-station measurements of teleseismic Rayleigh wave phase velocity formed the principal data set for lithospheric studies. The interstation measurements were combined in a linearized tomographic inversion for maps of phase velocity and azimuthal anisotropy at periods of 20-200 s; these maps were then used to calculate a pseudo-3D anisotropic upper-mantle shear-wavespeed model of the region. The model shows thick (~180-260 km), seismically fast lithosphere across the Hudson Bay region, with a near-vertical 'curtain' of lower wavespeeds trending NE-SW across the Bay, likely associated with more juvenile material trapped between the Archean Superior and Churchill continental cores during the THO. The lithosphere is layered, suggesting a 2-stage formation process. Seismic anisotropy patterns vary with depth; a circular pattern in the uppermost mantle wrapping around the

  17. Multiyear total and methyl mercury exports from two major sub-Arctic rivers draining into Hudson Bay, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Jane L; St Louis, Vincent L

    2009-04-01

    From 2003 to 2007, concentrations of total mercury and methylmercury (THg and MeHg) were continuously measured in two Canadian sub-Arctic rivers (the Nelson and the Churchill) that drain into western Hudson Bay. THg and MeHg concentrations were low in the Nelson River (mean i standard deviation, 0.88 +/- 0.33 and 0.05 +/- 0.03 ng L(-1), respectively). The Churchill River, however, had high concentrations of Hg, particularly MeHg (1.96 +/- 0.8 and 0.18 +/- 0.09 ng L(-1), respectively) and hence may be an important source of MeHg to organisms feeding in the Churchill River estuary. A large portion of THg in the Nelson River was particulate-bound (39 +/- 23%), while in the Churchill River, most was in the dissolved form (78 +/- 15%) and is likely dissolved organic carbon (DC)-bound Hg originating in the surrounding wetlands. In fact, both the Nelson and Churchill Rivers had high DOC concentrations and were therefore large exporters of DOC to Hudson Bay (1480 +/- 723 and 392 +/- 309 x 10(3) t year(-1), respectively) compared to rivers to the south and east Despite high Churchill River Hg concentrations, due to large Nelson River flows, average THg and MeHg exports to Hudson Bay from the Churchill River (37 +/- 28 and 4 +/- 4 kg year(-1), respectively) were about one-third and half the Nelson River exports (113 +/- 52 and 9 +/- 4 kg year(-1)). Interestingly, combined Hg exports to Hudson Bay from Nelson and Churchill River discharge are comparable to THg inputs from Hudson Bay springtime snowmelt (177 +/-140 kg year(-1)) but are approximately 13 times greater than MeHg snowmelt inputs (1 +/- 1 kg year(-1)). Although Hg inputs from rivers and snowmelt together may account for a large portion of the THg pool in Hudson Bay, these inputs account for a lesser portion of the MeHg pool, thus highlighting the importance of water column Hg(ll) methylation as a source of MeHg to Hudson Bay marine food webs.

  18. Multi Year Total and Methyl Mercury Exports from Two Major Sub Arctic Rivers Draining into Hudson Bay, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, J. L.; St. Louis, V. L.

    2009-05-01

    From 2003 to 2007, concentrations of total and methyl mercury (THg and MeHg), were continuously measured in two Canadian sub Arctic rivers (the Nelson and the Churchill) that drain into western Hudson Bay. THg and MeHg concentrations were low in the Nelson River (mean ± standard deviation; 0.88±0.33 and 0.05±0.03 ng/L, respectively). The Churchill River, however, had high concentrations of Hg, particularly MeHg (1.96±0.8 and 0.18±0.09 ng/L, respectively), and hence may be an important source of MeHg to organisms feeding in the Churchill River estuary. A large portion of THg in the Nelson River was particulate- bound (39±23%), while in the Churchill River, most was in the dissolved form (78±15%) and is likely DOC-bound Hg originating in surrounding wetlands. In fact, both the Nelson and Churchill Rivers had high DOC concentrations and were therefore large exporters of DOC to Hudson Bay (1480±723 and 392±309 x 103 tonnes/year, respectively) compared to rivers to the south and east. Despite high Churchill River Hg concentrations, due to large Nelson River flows, average THg and MeHg exports to Hudson Bay from the Churchill River (37±28 and 4±4 kg/year, respectively) were ˜ one third and half Nelson River exports (113±52 and 9±4 kg/year). Interestingly, combined Hg exports to Hudson Bay from Nelson and Churchill River discharge are comparable to THg inputs from Hudson Bay spring-time snowmelt (177±140 kg/year) but are approximately 13 times greater than MeHg snowmelt inputs (1±1 kg/year). Although Hg inputs from rivers and snowmelt together may account for a large portion of the THg pool in Hudson Bay, these inputs account for a lesser portion of the MeHg pool, thus highlighting the importance of water column Hg(II) methylation as a large source of MeHg to Hudson Bay marine foodwebs.

  19. Sea Level and Paleoenvironment Control on Late Ordovician Source Rocks, Hudson Bay Basin, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.; Hefter, J.

    2009-05-01

    Hudson Bay Basin is one of the largest Paleozoic sedimentary basins in North America, with Southampton Island on its north margin. The lower part of the basin succession comprises approximately 180 to 300 m of Upper Ordovician strata including Bad Cache Rapids and Churchill River groups and Red Head Rapids Formation. These units mainly comprise carbonate rocks consisting of alternating fossiliferous limestone, evaporitic and reefal dolostone, and minor shale. Shale units containing extremely high TOC, and interpreted to have potential as petroleum source rocks, were found at three levels in the lower Red Head Rapids Formation on Southampton Island, and were also recognized in exploration wells from the Hudson Bay offshore area. A study of conodonts from 390 conodont-bearing samples from continuous cores and well cuttings from six exploration wells in the Hudson Bay Lowlands and offshore area (Comeault Province No. 1, Kaskattama Province No. 1, Pen Island No. 1, Walrus A-71, Polar Bear C-11 and Narwhal South O-58), and about 250 conodont-bearing samples collected from outcrops on Southampton Island allows recognition of three conodont zones in the Upper Ordovician sequence, namely (in ascendant sequence) Belodina confluens, Amorphognathus ordovicicus, and Rhipidognathus symmetricus zones. The three conodont zones suggest a cycle of sea level changes of rising, reaching the highest level, and then falling during the Late Ordovician. Three intervals of petroleum potential source rock are within the Rhipidognathus symmetricus Zone in Red Head Rapids Formation, and formed in a restricted anoxic and hypersaline condition during a period of sea level falling. This is supported by the following data: 1) The conodont Rhipidognathus symmetricus represents the shallowest Late Ordovician conodont biofacies and very shallow subtidal to intertidal and hypersaline condition. This species has the greatest richness within the three oil shale intervals to compare other parts of Red

  20. Atmospheric forcing of sea ice in Hudson Bay during the fall period, 1980-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochheim, K. P.; Barber, D. G.

    2010-05-01

    The principal objective of this study is to describe the autumn sea ice regime of Hudson Bay in the context of atmospheric forcing from 1980 to 2005. Both gridded Canadian Ice Service (CIS) data and Passive Microwave (PMW) data are used to examine the freezeup period for weeks of year (WOY) 43-52. Sea ice concentration (SIC) anomalies reveal statistically significant trends, ranging from -23.3% to -26.9% per decade, during WOY 43-48 using the CIS data and trends ranging from -12.7% to -16.8% per decade during WOY 45-50 using the PMW data. Surface air temperature (SAT) anomalies are highly correlated with SIC anomalies (r2 = 0.52-0.72) and with sea ice extents (r2 = 0.53-0.72). CIS data show that mean sea ice extents based on SICs ≥80% (consolidated ice) have decreased by 1.05 × 105 to 1.17 × 105 km2 for every 1°C increase in temperature in late November; PMW data show similar results. Regression analysis between SAT and standardized climate indices over the 1951-2005 period show that the East Pacific/North Pacific index is highly predictive of interannual SATs followed by the North Atlantic Oscillation and Arctic Oscillation indices. The data show that the Hudson Bay area has recently undergone a climate regime shift, in the mid 1990s, which has resulted in a significant reduction in sea ice during the freezeup period and that these changes appear to be related to atmospheric indices.

  1. Three-Dimensional Scale-Model Tank Experiment of the Hudson Canyon Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Three-Dimensional Scale-Model Tank Experiment of the Hudson Canyon Region Jason D. Sagers Applied Research Laboratories at The University of...planning for future experiments in ocean environments with slopes and canyons . APPROACH The development of fully 3D numerical acoustic propagation models...Experiment of the Hudson Canyon Region 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER

  2. Divergent hydrological responses to 20th century climate change in shallow tundra ponds, western Hudson Bay Lowlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Brent B.; Light, Erin M.; Macrae, Merrin L.; Hall, Roland I.; Eichel, Kaleigh; Jasechko, Scott; White, Jerry; Fishback, LeeAnn; Edwards, Thomas W. D.

    2011-12-01

    The hydrological fate of shallow tundra lakes and ponds under conditions of continued warming remains uncertain, but has important implications for wildlife habitat and biogeochemical cycling. Observations of unprecedented pond desiccation, in particular, signify catastrophic loss of aquatic habitat in some Arctic locations. Shallow tundra ponds are a ubiquitous feature in the western Hudson Bay Lowlands (HBL), a region that has undergone intense warming over the past ˜50 years. But it remains unknown how hydrological processes in these ponds have responded. Here, we use cellulose-inferred pond water oxygen isotope records from sediment cores, informed by monitoring of modern pond water isotope compositions during the 2009 and 2010 ice-free seasons, to reconstruct hydrological conditions of four shallow tundra ponds in the western HBL over the past three centuries. Following an interval of relative hydrological stability during the early part of the records, results reveal widely differing hydrological responses to 20th century climate change among the study sites, which is largely dependent on hydrological connectivity of the basins within their respective surrounding peatlands. These findings suggest the 20th century has been characterized by an increasingly dynamic landscape that has variably influenced surface water balance - a factor that is likely to play a key role in determining the future water balance of ponds in this region.

  3. Magnitude and Seasonality of Wetland Methane Emissions from the Hudson Bay Lowlands (Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett-Heaps, C. A.; Jacob, D. J.; Wecht, K. J.; Kort, E. A.; Wofsy, S. C.; Diskin, G. S.; Worthy, D. E. J.; Kaplan, J. O.; Bey, I.; Drevet, J.

    2011-01-01

    The Hudson Bay Lowlands (HBL) is the second largest boreal wetland ecosystem in the world and an important natural source of global atmospheric methane. We quantify the HBL methane emissions by using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to simulate aircraft measurements over the HBL from the ARCTAS and pre-HIPPO campaigns in May-July 2008, together with continuous 2004-2008 surface observations at Fraserdale (southern edge of HBL) and Alert (Arctic background). The difference in methane concentrations between Fraserdale and Alert is shown to be a good indicator of HBL emissions, and implies a sharp seasonal onset of emissions in late May (consistent with the aircraft data), a peak in July-August, and a seasonal shut-off in September. The model, in which seasonal variation of emission is mainly driven by surface temperature, reproduces well the observations in summer but its seasonal shoulders are too broad. We suggest that this reflects the suppression of emissions by snow cover and greatly improve the model simulation by accounting for this effect. Our resulting best estimate for HBL methane emissions is 2.3 Tg/a, several-fold higher than previous estimates (Roulet et al., 1994; Worthy et al., 2000).

  4. Magnitude and seasonality of wetland methane emissions from the Hudson Bay Lowlands (Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Pickett-Heaps

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The Hudson Bay Lowlands (HBL is the second largest boreal wetland ecosystem in the world and an important natural source of global atmospheric methane. We quantify the HBL methane emissions by using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to simulate aircraft measurements over the HBL from the ARCTAS and pre-HIPPO campaigns in May–July 2008, together with continuous 2004–2008 surface observations at Fraserdale (southern edge of HBL and Alert (Arctic background. The difference in methane concentrations between Fraserdale and Alert is shown to be a good indicator of HBL emissions, and implies a sharp seasonal onset of emissions in late May (consistent with the aircraft data, a peak in July–August, and a seasonal shut-off in September. The model, in which seasonal variation of emission is mainly driven by surface temperature, reproduces well the observations in summer but its seasonal shoulders are too broad. We suggest that this reflects the suppression of emissions by snow cover and greatly improve the model simulation by accounting for this effect. Our resulting best estimate for HBL methane emissions is 2.3 Tg a−1, several-fold higher than previous estimates (Roulet et al., 1994; Worthy et al., 2000.

  5. Adenomatous hyperplasia of the thyroid gland in beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) from the St. Lawrence Estuary and Hudson Bay, Quebec, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikaelian, I; Labelle, P; Kopal, M; De Guise, S; Martineau, D

    2003-11-01

    We evaluated thyroid gland lesions in beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) from the St. Lawrence Estuary (n = 16) and Hudson Bay (n = 14). Follicular cysts and nodules of adenomatous hyperplasia of the thyroid gland were found in eight and nine adults from the St. Lawrence Estuary (n = 10), respectively, and in four and six adults from Hudson Bay (n = 14), respectively. The total volume of the lesions of thyroid adenomatous hyperplasia was positively correlated with age in both populations. Comparison between populations could not be performed because of differences in age structures of sample groups. Beluga whales from both populations have unique thyroid lesions among marine mammals.

  6. Groups of related belugas (Delphinapterus leucas) travel together during their seasonal migrations in and around Hudson Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbeck, Gabriel J; Duchesne, Pierre; Postma, Lianne D; Lesage, Véronique; Hammill, Mike O; Turgeon, Julie

    2013-02-07

    Social structure involving long-term associations with relatives should facilitate the learning of complex behaviours such as long-distance migration. In and around Hudson Bay (Canada), three stocks of beluga whales form a panmictic unit, but have different migratory behaviours associated with different summering areas. We analysed genetic variation at 13 microsatellite loci among 1524 belugas, to test hypotheses about social structure in belugas. We found significant proportions of mother-offspring pairs throughout the migratory cycle, but average relatedness extended beyond close kinship only during migration. Average relatedness was significantly above random expectations for pairs caught at the same site but on different days or months of a year, suggesting that belugas maintain associations with a network of relatives during migration. Pairs involving a female (female-female or male-female) were on average more related than pairs of males, and males seemed to disperse from their matrilineal group to associate with other mature males. Altogether, our results indicate that relatives other than strictly parents, and especially females, play a role in maintaining a social structure that could facilitate the learning of migration routes. Cultural conservatism may limit contributions from nearby summer stocks to endangered stocks such as the Eastern Hudson Bay beluga.

  7. The role of lichen on peatland development in the Hudson Bay Lowlands, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Lorna; Moore, Tim; Roulet, Nigel

    2015-04-01

    Lichen (Cladina stellaris) can be a dominant vegetation cover on bogs within the extensive peatland landscape of the Hudson Bay Lowlands (HBL), northern Ontario, Canada. The unique characteristics of lichens (growth structure and function as a symbiotic organism), their ability to form thick, dense mats across the HBL bogs, and their increased tolerance of extreme environmental conditions, points to their importance as a distinct plant functional type. However, the role of lichen within the peatland ecosystem is poorly understood, particularly ecosystem interactions (vegetation associations) and peatland development (including microtopography) and the resulting carbon sink. Many studies consider the role of different plant functional types on peatland CO2 and CH4 exchange (e.g. Bubier et al., 2003; Strack et al., 2006), and this understanding is included in peatland growth and climate change models. As far as we are aware lichens are currently omitted from these models. We suggest that lichens represent a distinct plant functional type with CO2 exchange characteristics (NEE and respiration) that are quite different to vascular plants and mosses. In this study we measured lichen CO2 exchange in both natural and modified moisture conditions at field sites in the HBL over two field seasons. Our results indicate that lichen productivity is strongly influenced by abiotic factors that affect lichen moisture content, with very dry lichen exhibiting little or no photosynthetic capacity. We suggest that the low productivity of lichen mats results in lower rates of peat accumulation compared to Sphagnum-dominated peatland areas, and that this has consequences for the development of peatland microtopography (hummocks and hollows) and feedback mechanisms. To better understand the role of lichen mats on peat accumulation and to test possible feedback mechanisms we developed a model, the parameters of which are supported by data from field sites in the HBL. This dependence of

  8. Drought as a Disturbance: Implications for Peatland Carbon Budgets in the Hudson Bay Lowland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, R.; Abnizova, A.; Miller, E.

    2009-05-01

    Carbon feedbacks are of particular importance in high latitudes, both because of large circumpolar peatland carbon pools and because climate warming is occurring more rapidly at these latitudes. Longer-term net ecosystem exchange will be influenced by the capacity of plant communities to respond to changing conditions. The nature of community change and the factors inducing change are examined in this study of a disturbance generated by severe drought in 1994 causing widespread mortality in the dominant moss, Dicranum elongatum, occupying an upland tundra site within the Hudson Bay Lowland near Churchill, Manitoba. One quarter of this moss has recently died and become encrusted with the micro-lichen, Ochrolechia spp. Moss cushions affected in this manner exhibit strong allelopathic inhibition of seedling establishment progressing to complete moss decay. Chamber NEE growing-season flux measurements show an average net release of 642 mg C /m2/d from the dead moss compared to an average net uptake of 164 mg C /m2/d from completely healthy cushions. Between these two extremes, stressed living moss cushions support abundant seedling cover which increases in direct proportion with the fractional mortality. A proxy method for estimating the growth rates of cushions, based on the length of green living shoots, indicates that the moss community is uniform in age and established shortly after the most severe drought of historical record in 1966. Subsequent growth rates of cushions show a strong dependency on proximity to the water table (4.17-1.11 mm/y over 58 cm height interval). A growing-season moss water budget identifies the dominant water flow pathways and indicates capillary uptake (0.08 mm h-1) provides 64% of the storage gains, emphasizing the importance of groundwater for growth and survival. Maximum storage capacities are directly related to cushion biomass, leading to both enhanced moisture stress and increased susceptibility to mortality as cushion size

  9. Constraining the Late Pleistocene history of the Laurentide Ice Sheet by dating the Missinaibi Formation, Hudson Bay Lowlands, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, April S.; Finkelstein, Sarah A.; Barnett, Peter J.; Forman, Steven L.

    2016-08-01

    Well-dated paleorecords from periods prior to the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) are important for validating models of ice sheet build-up and growth. However, owing to glacial erosion, most Late Pleistocene records lie outside of the previously glaciated region, which limits their ability to inform about the dynamics of paleo-ice sheets. Here, we evaluate new and previously published chronology data from the Missinaibi Formation, a Pleistocene-aged deposit in the Hudson Bay Lowlands (HBL), Canada, located near the geographic center of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS). Available radiocarbon (AMS = 44, conventional = 36), amino acid (n = 13), uranium-thorium (U-Th, n = 14), thermoluminescence (TL, n = 15) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL, n = 5) data suggest that an ice-free HBL may have been possible during parts of Marine Isotope Stage 7 (MIS 7; ca. 243,000 to ca. 190,000 yr BP), MIS 5 (ca. 130,000 to ca. 71,000 yr BP) and MIS 3 (ca. 29,000 to ca. 57,000). While MIS 7 and MIS 5 are well-documented interglacial periods, the development of peat, forest bed and fluvial deposits dating to MIS 3 (n = 20 radiocarbon dates; 4 TL dates, 3 OSL dates), suggests that the LIS retreated and remained beyond, or somewhere within, the boundaries of the HBL during this interstadial. Ice sheet models approximate the margin of the LIS to Southern Ontario during this time, which is 700 km south of the HBL. Therefore, if correct, our data help constrain a significantly different configuration and dynamicity for the LIS than previously modelled. We can find no chronological basis to discount the MIS 3 age assignments. However, since most data originate from radiocarbon dates lying close to the reliable limit of this geochronometer, future work on dating the Missinaibi Formation using other geochronological methods (e.g. U-Th, OSL) is necessary in order to confirm the age estimates and strengthen the boundaries of the LIS during this period.

  10. Legacy and new halogenated persistent organic pollutants in polar bears from a contamination hotspot in the Arctic, Hudson Bay Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letcher, R J; Morris, A D; Dyck, M; Sverko, E; Reiner, E J; Blair, D A D; Chu, S G; Shen, L

    2017-08-10

    A large and complex suite of 295 legacy and new halogenated persistent organic pollutants (POPs) were investigated in fat or liver tissue samples of polar bears collected in 2013-2014 from Southern (SHB) and Western (WHB) subpopulations of the Canadian Arctic contaminants hotspot of Hudson Bay. A total of 210 POPs were detected and/or quantifiable with some frequency in all fat or liver samples. POP profile and concentration differences were investigated both within (e.g. age and sex) and between the two subpopulations. Two time-point comparisons were made relative to POPs reported for Hudson Bay polar bears harvested in 2007-2008. ΣPolychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations at both time points were the most concentrated of the POP groups, and were spatially uniform with no detectable influence of sex or age, as were concentrations of the dominant congener CB153. ΣChlordanes (ΣCHLs, 74-79% oxychlordane) and the Σperfluoroalkyl substances (ΣPFASs, ≈60% perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS)) had the second greatest POP group concentrations in SHB and WHB respectively, with ΣPFASs and ΣCHLs being significantly influenced by age and/or sex. ΣCHLs were spatially uniform but ΣPFASs were greater in the SHB bears, as were e.g. some flame retardants, due to e.g. local contamination and/or changes in bear behavior and diet. Endosulfans and hexabromocyclododecane were detectable in samples from 2007-2008 but not from 2013-2014, which is consistent with their global POP regulations. ΣPolychlorinated naphthalenes (ΣPCNs) were consistently detected at relatively high concentrations compared to other arctic wildlife, however these concentrations were low relative to legacy POPs. ΣShort-chain chlorinated paraffins (ΣSCCPs) were major contributors to the overall POPs burden with concentrations comparable to other legacy POPs, though there was no significant difference between or within subpopulations for PCNs or SCCPs. Except for octachlorostyrene, POPs concentrations

  11. Dinoflagellate cyst production in Hudson Bay, the world's largest inland sea, based on monthly sediment trap data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, Maija; Pospelova, Vera; Forest, Alexandre; Stern, Gary

    2014-05-01

    Phytoplankters, microscopic primary producers of oceans are capable of responding rapidly to environmental fluctuations due to their high cell replication rates. Fast phytoplankton growth maybe balanced out by equally fast consumption by herbivorous grazers. In high-latitude marine systems, seasonal fluctuations in plankton biomass are essentially linked to light regime controlled by the waxing and waning sea-ice cover. In addition, nutrient limitation in surface waters, seasonal temperature fluctuations and changes in freshwater inputs may play important roles. In cold-water seas, many planktonic organisms cope with seasonal harshness by the production of benthic dormant stages. Dinoflagellates are a diverse group of single-celled plankton, constituting major marine primary producers, as well as herbivorous grazers of the microbial loop. Many dinoflagellate species produce highly resistant, organic-walled resting cysts that are archived in sediments and have been increasingly used to reconstruct past environmental conditions, e.g., sea-surface temperature and salinity, productivity, sea-ice cover and eutrophication. Marine sediment core sequences are characterized by slow accumulation rates and high mixing rates: the top centimeter of surface sediment from an arctic shelf may correspond to several years or decades of deposition. Consequently, sedimentary archives do not give direct information on long-term changes in seasonal bloom patterns or cues of annually recurring life-cycle events. We used two particle-intercepting sediment traps moored in eastern and western Hudson Bay, respectively, to study monthly fluctuations in dinoflagellate cyst production from October 2005 to September 2006. The traps were deployed close to the seafloor and recovered during the ArcticNet annual expeditions onboard the CCGS Amundsen in 2005 and the CCGS Pierre Radisson in 2006. We document the seasonal succession of dinoflagellate cyst taxa, together with cyst species composition

  12. The influence of a river plume on the sea-ice meiofauna in south-eastern Hudson Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grainger, E. H.

    1988-08-01

    Outflow from the Great Whale River produces a substantial freshwater layer (plume) beneath the winter ice cover and above water of higher salinity in south-eastern Hudson Bay. In 1983, samples of the lower-ice fauna and of zooplankton beneath the ice, were taken within, below and beyond the offshore reach of the plume. Nematodes accounted for the highest numbers (mean of 1956 1 1in the lower 3 cm of ice), and copepods, mainly Harpacticus and Halectinosoma with fewer Tisbe and Oithona, for the greatest biomass. All ice-inhabiting taxa were also found in the water below the ice, but many zooplankters occurring immediately beneath the ice did not form part of the ice fauna. No major qualitative differences were evident between the ice communities existing above the plume and offshore from it, but quantitative distinctions were readily apparent. Animals were consistently more concentrated (by 2-3 orders of magnitude) in the lower 3 cm of the ice than in the water immediately below, both over the plume and outside it. Except for the dominant rotifers in the plume, the concentration of zooplankton there was only 10% of that found in the surface water outside the plume. The river plume exerts a strong influence over the quantity of the fauna in the sea ice immediately above it. Changes in location and extent of the plume therefore may have an important effect on the food chain based in the sea ice.

  13. Mixing and photoreactivity of dissolved organic matter in the Nelson/Hayes estuarine system (Hudson Bay, Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guéguen, C.; Mokhtar, M.; Perroud, A.; McCullough, G.; Papakyriakou, T.

    2016-09-01

    This work presents the results of a 4-year study (2009-2012) investigating the mixing and photoreactivity of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the Nelson/Hayes estuary (Hudson Bay). Dissolved organic carbon (DOC), colored DOM, and humic-like DOM decreased with increasing salinity (r2 = 0.70-0.84). Removal of DOM was noticeable at low to mid salinity range, likely due to degradation and/or adsorption to particles. DOM photobleaching rates (i.e., decrease in DOM signal resulting from exposure to solar radiation) ranged from 0.005 to 0.030 h- 1, corresponding to half-lives of 4.9-9.9 days. Dissolved organic matter from the Nelson and Hayes Rivers was more photoreactive than from the estuary where the photodegradation of terrestrial DOM decreased with increasing salinity. Coincident with the loss of CDOM absorption was an increase in spectral slope S, suggesting a decrease in DOM molecular weight. Marked differences in photoreactivity of protein- and humic-like DOM were observed with highly humidified material being the most photosensitive. Information generated by our study will provide a valuable data set for better understanding the impacts of future hydroelectric development and climate change on DOM biogeochemical dynamics in the Nelson/Hayes estuary and coastal domain. This study will constitute a reference on terrestrial DOM fate prior to building additional generating capacity on the Nelson River.

  14. Variation of upper layer dynamics during breakup of the seasonal ice cover in Hudson Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepage, Serge; Ingram, R. Grant

    1991-07-01

    The present study describes circulation and stratification changes associated with the melt and breakup of the seasonal ice cover in the coastal waters of southeast Hudson Day. Field work was carried out at a station located 25 km north of the Great Whale River. Buoyancy fluxes and dissipation rates were calculated as well as changes in potential energy. Surface velocity data were partitioned into frequency bands and complex demodulated. Throughout the sampling period, most of the current energy was found to be in the semi-diurnal tidal band. After ice breakup, however, low frequency and inertial motions became relatively more important in response to direct wind forcing at the sea surface. Changes in amplitudes and phases of the major tidal constituents occurred and are related to the presence of the sea ice cover. Between early April and mid-June, semi-diurnal current amplitude doubled while its phase shifted by 45 to 60 degrees. In early June, the ice cover was sufficiently dispersed to allow the surface turbulence to overcome the buoyancy flux and mix the upper water column.

  15. Impact of freshwater on a subarctic coastal ecosystem under seasonal sea ice (southeastern Hudson Bay, Canada). I. Interannual variability and predicted global warming influence on river plume dynamics and sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, R. G.; Wang, J.; Lin, C.; Legendre, L.; Fortier, L.

    1996-02-01

    Analysis of sea ice cover, runoff and air temperature observations in Hudson Bay shows marked interannual variability. This variability is thought to play a major role in determining overall productivity of the coastal ecosystem by changes to river plume extent, under-ice light conditions and nutrient levels during spring. Extensive field work off the Great Whale River in southeastern Hudson Bay has shown the importance of freshwater discharge, sea ice cover and meteorological forcing on the production of under-ice microalgae and the success of first feeding in fish larvae. Recent global climate model (GCM) results for a doubling of present atmospheric carbon dioxide indicate increases of both air temperature and precipitation in the Hudson Bay area. Predictions based on GCM results are used to estimate future changes to the sea ice and runoff regime. Sea ice breakup in the offshore is predicted to occur about one month earlier than presently. Estimates of the spring freshet in the Great Whale River indicate it will also advance by approximately one month. Onset of the spring freshet will occur about one month before Hudson Bay ice breakup, similar to present. A predicted reduction of about 35% in maximum sea ice thickness will lead to an increase in the ice-ocean interface irradiance and a decrease in melt water input to the Hudson Bay surface waters. These results are used in a discussion of potential effects of global climate change on northern coastal marine environments.

  16. Upscaling reflectance information of lichens and mosses using a singularity index: a case study of the Hudson Bay Lowlands, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Neta

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Assessing moisture contents of lichens and mosses using ground-based high spectral resolution spectrometers (400–2500 nm offers immense opportunities for a comprehensive monitoring of peatland moisture status by satellite/airborne imagery. This information may be valuable for present and future carbon balance modeling. Previous studies are based upon point measurements of vegetation moisture content and water table position, and therefore a detailed moisture status of entire northern peatlands is not available. Consequently, upscaling ground and remotely sensed data to the desired spatial resolutions is inevitable. This study continues our previous investigation of the impact of various moisture conditions of common sub-Arctic lichen and moss species (i.e., Cladina stellaris, Cladina rangiferina, Dicranum elongatum, and Tomenthypnum nitens upon the spectral signatures obtained in the Hudson Bay Lowlands, Canada. Upscaling reflectance measurements of the above species were conducted in the field, and reflectance analysis using a singularity index was made, since this study serves as a basis for future aircraft/satellite research. An attempt to upscale current and new spectral reflectance indices developed in our previous studies was made as well. Our findings indicate that the spectral index C. rangiferina is to a lesser amount influenced by scale since it has a small R2 values between the log of the index and the log of the resolution, reduced slopes between the log of the index and the log of the resolution, and similar slopes between log reflectance and log resolution (α of two wavelengths employed by the index. Future study should focus on concurrent monitoring of moisture variations in lichens and mosses both in situ and from satellite and airborne images, as well as analysis of fractal models in relations to the upscaling experiments.

  17. Limnological regime shifts caused by climate warming and Lesser Snow Goose population expansion in the western Hudson Bay Lowlands (Manitoba, Canada).

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Lauren A; Farquharson, Nicole; Merritt, Gillian; Fooks, Sam; Medeiros, Andrew S; Hall, Roland I; Wolfe, Brent B; Macrae, Merrin L; Sweetman, Jon N

    2015-02-01

    Shallow lakes are dominant features in subarctic and Arctic landscapes and are responsive to multiple stressors, which can lead to rapid changes in limnological regimes with consequences for aquatic resources. We address this theme in the coastal tundra region of Wapusk National Park, western Hudson Bay Lowlands (Canada), where climate has warmed during the past century and the Lesser Snow Goose (LSG; Chen caerulescens caerulescens) population has grown rapidly during the past ∽40 years. Integration of limnological and paleolimnological analyses documents profound responses of productivity, nutrient cycling, and aquatic habitat to warming at three ponds ("WAP 12", "WAP 20", and "WAP 21″), and to LSG disturbance at the two ponds located in an active nesting area (WAP 20, WAP 21). Based on multiparameter analysis of (210)Pb-dated sediment records from all three ponds, a regime shift occurred between 1875 and 1900 CE marked by a transition from low productivity, turbid, and nutrient-poor conditions of the Little Ice Age to conditions of higher productivity, lower nitrogen availability, and the development of benthic biofilm habitat as a result of climate warming. Beginning in the mid-1970s, sediment records from WAP 20 and WAP 21 reveal a second regime shift characterized by accelerated productivity and increased nitrogen availability. Coupled with 3 years of limnological data, results suggest that increased productivity at WAP 20 and WAP 21 led to atmospheric CO2 invasion to meet algal photosynthetic demand. This limnological regime shift is attributed to an increase in the supply of catchment-derived nutrients from the arrival of LSG and their subsequent disturbance to the landscape. Collectively, findings discriminate the consequences of warming and LSG disturbance on tundra ponds from which we identify a suite of sensitive limnological and paleolimnological measures that can be utilized to inform aquatic ecosystem monitoring.

  18. Limnological regime shifts caused by climate warming and Lesser Snow Goose population expansion in the western Hudson Bay Lowlands (Manitoba, Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Lauren A; Farquharson, Nicole; Merritt, Gillian; Fooks, Sam; Medeiros, Andrew S; Hall, Roland I; Wolfe, Brent B; Macrae, Merrin L; Sweetman, Jon N

    2015-01-01

    Shallow lakes are dominant features in subarctic and Arctic landscapes and are responsive to multiple stressors, which can lead to rapid changes in limnological regimes with consequences for aquatic resources. We address this theme in the coastal tundra region of Wapusk National Park, western Hudson Bay Lowlands (Canada), where climate has warmed during the past century and the Lesser Snow Goose (LSG; Chen caerulescens caerulescens) population has grown rapidly during the past ∽40 years. Integration of limnological and paleolimnological analyses documents profound responses of productivity, nutrient cycling, and aquatic habitat to warming at three ponds (“WAP 12”, “WAP 20”, and “WAP 21″), and to LSG disturbance at the two ponds located in an active nesting area (WAP 20, WAP 21). Based on multiparameter analysis of 210Pb-dated sediment records from all three ponds, a regime shift occurred between 1875 and 1900 CE marked by a transition from low productivity, turbid, and nutrient-poor conditions of the Little Ice Age to conditions of higher productivity, lower nitrogen availability, and the development of benthic biofilm habitat as a result of climate warming. Beginning in the mid-1970s, sediment records from WAP 20 and WAP 21 reveal a second regime shift characterized by accelerated productivity and increased nitrogen availability. Coupled with 3 years of limnological data, results suggest that increased productivity at WAP 20 and WAP 21 led to atmospheric CO2 invasion to meet algal photosynthetic demand. This limnological regime shift is attributed to an increase in the supply of catchment-derived nutrients from the arrival of LSG and their subsequent disturbance to the landscape. Collectively, findings discriminate the consequences of warming and LSG disturbance on tundra ponds from which we identify a suite of sensitive limnological and paleolimnological measures that can be utilized to inform aquatic ecosystem monitoring. PMID:25750718

  19. Estimation of arboreal lichen biomass available to woodland caribou in Hudson Bay lowland black spruce sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K. Proceviat

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available An arboreal lichen index to be utilized in assessing woodland caribou habitat throughout northeastern Ontario was developed. The "index" was comprised of 5 classes, which differentiated arboreal lichen biomass on black spruce trees, ranging from maximal quantities of arboreal lichen (class 5 to minimal amounts of arboreal lichen (class 1. This arboreal lichen index was subsequently used to estimate the biomass of arboreal lichen available to woodland caribou on lowland black spruce sites ranging in age from 1 year to 150 years post-harvest. A total of 39 sites were assessed and significant differences in arboreal lichen biomass were found, with a positive linear relationship between arboreal lichen biomass and forest age. It is proposed that the index be utilized by government and industry as a means of assessing the suitability of lowland black spruce habitat for woodland caribou in this region.

  20. Hydrogeomorphic Regions in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Generalized lithology (rock type) and physiography based on geologic formations were used to characterize hydrgeomorphic regions (HGMR) within the Chesapeake Bay...

  1. Sea Level, Land Motion, and the Anomalous Tide at Churchill, Hudson Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, R. D.

    2015-12-01

    The importance of the tide gauge at Churchill, Manitoba, cannot be overstated. It is the only permanently operating tide gauge in the central Canadian Arctic, and it sits on a prime spot for monitoring the mantle's rebound from the Laurentide ice loss. Yet interpretation of the sea-level time series at Churchill has long been problematic, going back even to early work by Gutenberg in the 1940s. The long-term relative sea-level rates are inconsistent: approximately -4, -19, -5 ± 1 mm/y for the periods 1940-1970, 1970-1990, 1990-2014 respectively. Annual mean high water (MHW) and mean low water (MLW) reflect these trends until around 1990, after which MLW leveled off and is now nearly unchanging. Slightly later, around 2000, the semidiurnal tides became very anomalous, with falling amplitudes and slightly increasing phase lags. The amplitude of M2 was approximately 154 cm before 2000; it dropped to about 146 cm by 2010 and reached an all-time low of 142 cm in 2014. Satellite altimeter estimates of the tide in this region, although challenging because of seasonal ice cover, show no comparable M2 changes, so the tidal changes must be localized to the near vicinity of the gauge (or to the gauge itself if caused by a malfunction). On the other hand, altimetry confirms the post-1992 Churchill measurements of mean sea level, thanks to the long time series of land motion measurements obtained at GPS station CHUR, which gives a vertical uplift of 10.1 mm/y. Combining satellite altimeter data with the Churchill tide-gauge data gives an implied vertical crustal rate of about 9.0 ± 0.8 mm/y, in reasonable agreement with the GPS. In summary, we have still anomalous MSL measurements at the Churchill gauge for the intermediate 1970-1990 era, and very anomalous tidal measurements since 2000, but we have apparently quite reliable MSL rates since 1990.

  2. Organic matter compositions of rivers draining into Hudson Bay: Present-day trends and potential as recorders of future climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Pamela; Macdonald, Robie W.; Kuzyk, Zou Zou A.; Goñi, Miguel A.; Stern, Gary A.

    2017-07-01

    Concentrations and compositions of particulate and dissolved organic carbon (POC and DOC, respectively) and aromatic compounds including lignin were analyzed in water samples from 17 rivers flowing into Hudson Bay, northern Canada. These rivers incorporate basins to the south with no permafrost to basins in the north with continuous permafrost, and dominant vegetation systems that include Boreal Forest, the Hudson Plains, Taiga Shield, and Tundra. Major latitudinal trends in organic carbon and lignin concentrations and compositions were evident, with both DOC and dissolved lignin concentrations dominating over their particulate counterparts and exhibiting significant correlations with total dissolved and suspended solids, respectively. The composition of lignin reaction products in terms of the syringyl, cinnamyl, and vanillyl compositions indicate mixed sources of vascular land plant-derived organic carbon, with woody gymnosperms contributions dominating in the southern river basins whereas nonwoody angiosperm sources were more important in the most northerly rivers. The composition of nonlignin aromatic compounds, which provides a tracer for nonvascular plant contributions, suggests stronger contributions from Sphagnum mosses to dissolved organic matter in rivers below the tree line, including those with large peat bogs in their basins. Acid/aldehyde ratios of the lignin products together with Δ14C data for DOC in selected rivers indicate that DOC has generally undergone greater alteration than POC. Interestingly, several northern rivers exhibited relatively old DOC according to the Δ14C data suggesting that either old DOC is being released from permafrost or old DOC survives river transport in these rivers.

  3. The Competition of Tidal Mixing and Freshwater Forcing in Shaping the Outflow from Hudson Strait

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Strait outflow. Journal of Marine Systems , special issue on Hudson Bay, in press. St. Laurent, P., F. Straneo, J.F. Dumais, D.G. Barber, 2011 What...is the fate of the river waters of Hudson Bay? Journal of Marine Systems , special issue on Hudson Bay, in press. Straneo, F., D. Sutherland, D

  4. The Energetic Value of Land-Based Foods in Western Hudson Bay and Their Potential to Alleviate Energy Deficits of Starving Adult Male Polar Bears.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda J Gormezano

    Full Text Available Climate change is predicted to expand the ice-free season in western Hudson Bay and when it grows to 180 days, 28-48% of adult male polar bears are projected to starve unless nutritional deficits can be offset by foods consumed on land. We updated a dynamic energy budget model developed by Molnar et al. to allow influx of additional energy from novel terrestrial foods (lesser snow geese, eggs, caribou that polar bears currently consume as part of a mixed diet while on land. We calculated the units of each prey, alone and in combination, needed to alleviate these lethal energy deficits under conditions of resting or limited movement (2 km d-1 prior to starvation. We further considered the total energy available from each sex and age class of each animal prey over the period they would overlap land-bound polar bears and calculated the maximum number of starving adult males that could be sustained on each food during the ice-free season. Our results suggest that the net energy from land-based food, after subtracting costs of limited movement to obtain it, could eliminate all projected nutritional deficits of starving adult male polar bears and likely other demographic groups as well. The hunting tactics employed, success rates as well as behavior and abundance of each prey will determine the realized energetic values for individual polar bears. Although climate change may cause a phenological mismatch between polar bears and their historical ice-based prey, it may simultaneously yield a new match with certain land-based foods. If polar bears can transition their foraging behavior to effectively exploit these resources, predictions for starvation-related mortality may be overestimated for western Hudson Bay. We also discuss potential complications with stable-carbon isotope studies to evaluate utilization of land-based foods by polar bears including metabolic effects of capture-related stress and consuming a mixed diet.

  5. Impact of freshwater on a subarctic coastal ecosystem under seasonal sea ice (southeastern Hudson Bay, Canada). III. Feeding success of marine fish larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortier, L.; Gilbert, M.; Ponton, D.; Ingram, R. G.; Robineau, B.; Legendre, L.

    1996-02-01

    We monitored the feeding success (percent feeding incidence at length and mean feeding ratio at length) of Arctic cod ( Boreogadus saida) and sand lance ( Ammodytes sp.) larvae in relation to prey density, light, temperature and potential predator density under the ice cover of southeastern Hudson Bay in the spring of 1988, 1989 and 1990. Both prey density and light limited larval fish feeding. The relationship between feeding success and actual food availability (nauplii density X irradiance) was adequately described by an Ivlev function which explained 64 and 76% of the variance in Arctic cod and sand lance feeding success respectively. By affecting both prey density and irradiance, the thickness of the Great Whale River plume (as defined by the depth of the 25 isohaline) was the main determinant of prey availability. Arctic cod and sand lance larvae stopped feeding when the depth of the 25 isohaline exceeded 9 m. Limitation of feeding success attributable to freshwater inputs occurred exclusively in 1988, the only time when the depth of the 25 isohaline exceeded the 9 m threshold. The close dependence of larval fish feeding success on the timing of the freshet and plume dynamics suggests a direct link between climate and survival of Arctic cod and sand lance larvae. The actual impact of climate fluctuations and/or hydro-electric developments on recruitment will depend on the fraction of the larval dispersal area of the two species that is affected by river plumes.

  6. Geology of the Monterey Bay region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, H. Gary

    1977-01-01

    Geophysical data and sea floor samples collected from the continental shelf and slope between Ano Nuevo Point and Point Sur, California indicate that the Monterey Bay region has had a complex late Cenozoic tectonic history. Uplift and depression have produced a succession of regressive and transgressive sedimentary units, while contemporaneous right-slip along faults of the San Andreas system have offset major structural and lithologic elements. This deformation produced three regional and several local unconformities within upper Tertiary rocks and initiated development of a canyon system that today includes the Monterey, Ascension, Carmel, and other large submarine canyons. The Tertiary stratigraphy of the offshore Monterey Bay area is divided into two provinces by a major structural boundary, the north-trending Palo Colorado-San Gregorio fault zone. East of this zone in the offshore are four seismically distinct sequences that can be correlated with major sequences onshore. These sequences comprise (1) pre-Tertiary basement, and (2) middle Miocene, (3) upper Miocene to Pliocene, and (4) upper Pliocene to Holocene sedimentary intervals. Each of the latter three sequences is bounded by unconformities, as is its counterpart on land. Only Neogene sedimentary rocks are present offshore; Paleogene units, if originally present, have been removed completely by pre-middle Miocene erosion. An extensive erosional surface was cut during Zemorrian time into the late Mesozoic granitic basement rocks. Incised into this surface are the ancestral Monterey Canyon and an unnamed canyon. Marine sedimentary rocks of upper Miocene and Pliocene age overlie this unconformably and fill the unnamed canyon. Similar rocks also may have once filled Monterey Canyon. Near shore these strata are covered by terrestrial alluvial and eolian deposits, deltaic deposits, marine canyon fill, landslide and slump deposits, and unconsolidated sediments that range in age from upper Pliocene to Holocene

  7. Impact of freshwater on a subarctic coastal ecosystem under seasonal sea ice (southeastern Hudson Bay, Canada) II. Production and export of microalgae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legendre, L.; Robineau, B.; Gosselin, M.; Michel, C.; Ingram, R. G.; Fortier, L.; Therriault, J. C.; Demers, S.; Monti, D.

    1996-02-01

    In the under-ice plume of the Grande rivière de la Baleine (Great Whale River) and offshore waters of southeastern Hudson Bay (Canada), several environmental factors influence the distribution, growth, taxonomic composition and sedimentation of algae found in the sea ice, at the ice-water interface and in the underlying water column. During the spring and early summer, these factors include: salinity of bottom ice, water turbidity, nutrients and vertical stability of the water column. In the present study, relationships between three predictor variables (water salinity, river runoff and seasonal air temperature index) and biological variables are used to assess the impact of freshwater on production and export of microalgae. Relationships are derived from existing data, which were collected between 1978 and 1990. Correlations with water salinity are positive for some variables (salinity of bottom ice, phosphate, ammonium, Σ:Si, and algae in bottom ice and at the interface) and negative for others (coefficient of light attenuation, silicate, ΣN:P, ΣSi:P and water column phytoplankton). Using together salinity and the seasonal index leads to improved proportions of explained variance for nitrate, ammonium, ΣN:P and phytoplankton. The amount of sedimenting algae is positively correlated with runoff, and chemical composition (C/N) of the sedimenting material is negatively correlated with salinity. The empirical relationships are applied to the results of a model of river plume dynamics, for three runoff conditions. Seasonally averaged total Chl. a concentrations, derived from the model, are higher for maximum river runoff than for mean or minimum conditions. This is because, in the studied environment, areal concentrations of phytoplankton are higher than those of ice algae, especially under condition of maximum runoff.

  8. Demography of an apex predator at the edge of its range: impacts of changing sea ice on polar bears in Hudson Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, Nicholas J.; Servanty, Sabrina; Regehr, Eric V.; Converse, Sarah J.; Richardson, Evan S.; Stirling, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the abundance and distribution of wildlife populations are common consequences of historic and contemporary climate change. Some Arctic marine mammals, such as the polar bear (Ursus maritimus), may be particularly vulnerable to such changes due to the loss of Arctic sea ice. We evaluated the impacts of environmental variation on demographic rates for the Western Hudson Bay (WH), polar bear subpopulation from 1984 to 2011 using live-recapture and dead-recovery data in a Bayesian implementation of multistate capture–recapture models. We found that survival of female polar bears was related to the annual timing of sea ice break-up and formation. Using estimated vital rates (e.g., survival and reproduction) in matrix projection models, we calculated the growth rate of the WH subpopulation and projected population responses under different environmental scenarios while accounting for parametric uncertainty, temporal variation, and demographic stochasticity. Our analysis suggested a long-term decline in the number of bears from 1185 (95% Bayesian credible interval [BCI] = 993–1411) in 1987 to 806 (95% BCI = 653–984) in 2011. In the last 10 yr of the study, the number of bears appeared stable due to temporary stability in sea ice conditions (mean population growth rate for the period 2001–2010 = 1.02, 95% BCI = 0.98–1.06). Looking forward, we estimated long-term growth rates for the WH subpopulation of ~1.02 (95% BCI = 1.00–1.05) and 0.97 (95% BCI = 0.92–1.01) under hypothetical high and low sea ice conditions, respectively. Our findings support previous evidence for a demographic linkage between sea ice conditions and polar bear population dynamics. Furthermore, we present a robust framework for sensitivity analysis with respect to continued climate change (e.g., to inform scenario planning) and for evaluating the combined effects of climate change and management actions on the status of wildlife populations.

  9. Demography of an apex predator at the edge of its range: impacts of changing sea ice on polar bears in Hudson Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, Nicholas J; Servanty, Sabrina; Regehr, Eric V; Converse, Sarah J; Richardson, Evan; Stirling, Ian

    2016-07-01

    Changes in the abundance and distribution of wildlife populations are common consequences of historic and contemporary climate change. Some Arctic marine mammals, such as the polar bear (Ursus maritimus), may be particularly vulnerable to such changes due to the loss of Arctic sea ice. We evaluated the impacts of environmental variation on demographic rates for the Western Hudson Bay (WH), polar bear subpopulation from 1984 to 2011 using live-recapture and dead-recovery data in a Bayesian implementation of multistate capture-recapture models. We found that survival of female polar bears was related to the annual timing of sea ice break-up and formation. Using estimated vital rates (e.g., survival and reproduction) in matrix projection models, we calculated the growth rate of the WH subpopulation and projected population responses under different environmental scenarios while accounting for parametric uncertainty, temporal variation, and demographic stochasticity. Our analysis suggested a long-term decline in the number of bears from 1185 (95% Bayesian credible interval [BCI] = 993-1411) in 1987 to 806 (95% BCI = 653-984) in 2011. In the last 10 yr of the study, the number of bears appeared stable due to temporary stability in sea ice conditions (mean population growth rate for the period 2001-2010 = 1.02, 95% BCI = 0.98-1.06). Looking forward, we estimated long-term growth rates for the WH subpopulation of ~1.02 (95% BCI = 1.00-1.05) and 0.97 (95% BCI = 0.92-1.01) under hypothetical high and low sea ice conditions, respectively. Our findings support previous evidence for a demographic linkage between sea ice conditions and polar bear population dynamics. Furthermore, we present a robust framework for sensitivity analysis with respect to continued climate change (e.g., to inform scenario planning) and for evaluating the combined effects of climate change and management actions on the status of wildlife populations.

  10. The role of diet on long-term concentration and pattern trends of brominated and chlorinated contaminants in western Hudson Bay polar bears, 1991-2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinney, Melissa A., E-mail: melissaamckinney@gmail.com [Ecotoxicology and Wildlife Health Division, Science and Technology Branch, Environment Canada, Carleton University (Raven Road), Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H3 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada); Stirling, Ian; Lunn, Nick J. [Wildlife Research Division, Science and Technology Branch, Environment Canada, 5320 122 Street, Edmonton, Alberta T6H 3S5 (Canada); Peacock, Elizabeth [Department of Environment, Government of Nunavut, Igloolik, Nunavut X0A 0L0 (Canada); Letcher, Robert J., E-mail: robert.letcher@ec.gc.ca [Ecotoxicology and Wildlife Health Division, Science and Technology Branch, Environment Canada, Carleton University (Raven Road), Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H3 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)

    2010-11-15

    Adipose tissue was sampled from the western Hudson Bay (WHB) subpopulation of polar bears at intervals from 1991 to 2007 to examine temporal trends of PCB and OCP levels both on an individual and sum-({Sigma}-)contaminant basis. We also determined levels and temporal trends of emerging polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and other current-use brominated flame retardants. Over the 17-year period, {Sigma} DDT (and p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDD, p,p'-DDT) decreased (-8.4%/year); {alpha}-hexachlorocyclohexane ({alpha}-HCH) decreased (-11%/year); {beta}-HCH increased (+ 8.3%/year); and {Sigma} PCB and {Sigma} chlordane (CHL), both contaminants at highest concentrations in all years (> 1 ppm), showed no distinct trends even when compared to previous data for this subpopulation dating back to 1968. Some of the less persistent PCB congeners decreased significantly (-1.6%/year to -6.3%/year), whereas CB153 levels tended to increase (+ 3.3%/year). Parent CHLs (c-nonachlor, t-nonachlor) declined, whereas non-monotonic trends were detected for metabolites (heptachlor epoxide, oxychlordane). {Sigma} chlorobenzene, octachlorostyrene, {Sigma} mirex, {Sigma} MeSO{sub 2}-PCB and dieldrin did not significantly change. Increasing {Sigma} PBDE levels (+ 13%/year) matched increases in the four consistently detected congeners, BDE47, BDE99, BDE100 and BDE153. Although no trend was observed, total-({alpha})-HBCD was only detected post-2000. Levels of the highest concentration brominated contaminant, BB153, showed no temporal change. As long-term ecosystem changes affecting contaminant levels may also affect contaminant patterns, we examined the influence of year (i.e., aging or 'weathering' of the contaminant pattern), dietary tracers (carbon stable isotope ratios, fatty acid patterns) and biological (age/sex) group on congener/metabolite profiles. Patterns of PCBs, CHLs and PBDEs were correlated with

  11. The Hudson Bay Lithospheric Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastow, I. D.; Kendall, J.-M.; Helffrich, G. R.; Thompson, D. A.; Wookey, J.; Brisbourne, A. M.; Hawthorn, D.; Eaton, D.; Snyder, D. B.

    2011-12-01

    I D Bastow, J-M Kendall, A M Brisbourne, D B Snyder, D Thompson, D Hawthorn, G R Helffrich, J Wookey, A Horleston and D Eaton describe the motivation for - and successful operation of - a remote seismic survey in Arctic Canada.

  12. 1971 American Eagle Nest Survey of the Chesapeake Bay Region.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Data refers to the 1971 nesting season for the Bald Eagle in the Chesapeake area to include Virginia and Maryland. In general, the Chesapeake Bay region nesting...

  13. Migratory birds and marine mammals of the Bristol Bay region: Wildlife narratives for the Bristol Bay Cooperative Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a collection of reports on migratory birds and marine mammals of the Bristol Bay region for the purpose of facilitating the planning process in Bristol Bay....

  14. Annulation of tetrathiafulvalene to the bay region of perylenediimide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggi, Michael; Blum, Carmen; Marti, Basil S; Liu, Shi-Xia; Leutwyler, Samuel; Decurtins, Silvio

    2010-03-19

    A tetrathiafulvalene donor has been annulated to the bay region of perylenediimide affording a new pi-conjugated molecular dyad. Various electronic excited charge-transfer states are generated in different oxidation states, leading to almost full absorption in the visible to near-IR region with a high extinction coefficient.

  15. Marine littoral diatoms from the Gordon’s bay region of False Bay, Cape Province, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Giffen, MH

    1971-01-01

    Full Text Available and Comic/i for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria (Received: 5.2. 1970) The Gordon?s Bay region occupies the north western corner of False Bay, a large rectangular bay, bounded on the west by the Cape Peninsula ending at Cape Point...

  16. Researcher Interview: Tom Hudson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom Hudson, M.D., President and Scientific Director of the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, describes the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC), which brings together cancer genomic data and research from across the world.

  17. Rocks and geology in the San Francisco Bay region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffer, Philip W.

    2002-01-01

    The landscape of the San Francisco Bay region is host to a greater variety of rocks than most other regions in the United States. This introductory guide provides illustrated descriptions of 46 common and important varieties of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rock found in the region. Rock types are described in context of their identification qualities, how they form, and where they occur in the region. The guide also provides discussion about of regional geology, plate tectonics, the rock cycle, the significance of the selected rock types in relation to both earth history and the impact of mineral resources on the development in the region. Maps and text also provide information where rocks, fossils, and geologic features can be visited on public lands or in association with public displays in regional museums, park visitor centers, and other public facilities.

  18. Hudson 3 essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Meinholz, Lloyd

    2013-01-01

    A practical guide, packed with illustrations, that will help you become proficient with Hudson and able to utilize it how you want.If you are a Java developer or administrator who would to like automate some of the mundane work required to build and test software and improve software quality, this is the book for you. If you are a development manager or tester, you can also benefit from learning how Hudson works by gaining some insight into test results and historical trends.

  19. Regional contamination versus regional dietary differences: Understanding geographic variation in brominated and chlorinated contaminant levels in polar bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, M.A.; Letcher, R.J.; Aars, J.; Born, E.W.; Branigan, M.; Dietz, R.; Evans, T.J.; Gabrielsen, G.W.; Muir, D.C.G.; Peacock, E.; Sonne, C.

    2011-01-01

    The relative contribution of regional contamination versus dietary differences to geographic variation in polar bear (Ursus maritimus) contaminant levels is unknown. Dietary variation between Alaska Canada, East Greenland, and Svalbard subpopulations was assessed by muscle nitrogen and carbon stable isotope (?? 15N, ?? 13C) and adipose fatty acid (FA) signatures relative to their main prey (ringed seals). Western and southern Hudson Bay signatures were characterized by depleted ?? 15N and ??13C, lower proportions of C20 and C22 monounsaturated FAs and higher proportions of C18 and longer chain polyunsaturated FAs. East Greenland and Svalbard signatures were reversed relative to Hudson Bay. Alaskan ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  20. Past and Future Climatic Conditions in the Hudson Bay Lowland near Churchill, Manitoba and Implications for the Fate of Shallow Water Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrae, M. L.; Duguay, C. R.; Brown, L.; Svacina, N. A.; Parrott, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    Recent ground-based and remote sensing observations have shown a general decreasing trend in arctic lake/pond surface area over the past 50 years, suggesting that small water bodies at high latitudes are drying. This study aims to answer three key questions regarding the water balance of subarctic ponds to climate change from the second half of the 20th century to the end of the 21st century: 1) Have there been changes in precipitation quantity and distribution, annual and seasonal air temperature, and the duration of the ice-free season in the 1943-2008 observational period?; 2) Are these trends expected to continue until the end of the 21st century based on regional climate model (RCM) scenarios?; and 3) What are the implications of climate change for pond sustainability in the Churchill region? Climatic change and changes to pond hydrologic storage over the past 65 years were examined using a combination of field methods/instrumental records and modelling. Results show that annual precipitation has increased by 25% over the past 65 years. Annual rainfall during the period has increased by 50%, while annual snowfall has decreased by 17%, suggesting that snowfall is being replaced by rainfall in this region. Much of the increased annual rainfall has been observed in the months of August and September, where rainfall has increased by 60% and 88%, respectively. Mean annual air temperature has increased by approximately 1C between 1943-2008. Significant (p0.05). A comparison of modelled and observed precipitation and air temperature between 1961-2008 produced similar trends. The Canadian RCM projections indicate that both precipitation and air temperature will continue to increase for the remainder of the 21st century. Trends observed over the past 65 years and simulations of future scenarios show that rainfall is increasing at a faster rate than evaporation, causing a lessening of the summer moisture deficit that persists in this region. Consequently, conditions are

  1. Methylsulfone polychlorinated biphenyl and 2,2-bis(chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethylene metabolites in beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas) from the St. Lawrence River estuary and western Hudson Bay, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Letcher, R.J.; Norstrom, R.J.; Muir, D.C.G.; Sandau, C.D.; Koczanski, K.; Michaud, R.; De Guise, S.; Beland, P.

    2000-05-01

    Knowledge is limited regarding methylsulfone (MeSO{sub 2})-polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB), and especially MeSo{sub 2}-2,2-bis(chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethylene (DDE), metabolites in cetacean species. The authors hypothesized that the ability of beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas) to biotransform PCB and DDE compounds, and to form and degrade their MeSO{sub 2}-PCB and -DDE metabolites, is related to the capacity for xenobiotic metabolism. Adipose biopsies were collected from male and female beluga whale from distinct populations in the St. Lawrence River estuary (STL) and western Hudson Bay (WHB), Canada, which are contrasted by the exposure to different levels of cytochrome P450 enzyme-inducing, chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants. The PCBs, DDTs, DDEs, 28 MeSO{sub 2} metabolites of 14 meta-para chlorine-unsubstituted PCBs, and four MeSO{sub 2} metabolites of 4,4{prime}- and 2,4{prime}-DDE were determined. The mean concentrations of total ({Sigma}-) MeSO{sub 2}-PCB in male STL beluga (230 ng/g), and ratios of {Sigma}-MeSO{sub 2}-PCB to {Sigma}-PCB (0.05) and {Sigma}-precursor-PCB (0.17) were approximately twofold higher, whereas the {Sigma}-precursor-PCB to {Sigma}-PCB ratio was approximately twofold lower, than in male WHB beluga. Both populations had a low formation capacity for MeSO{sub 2}-PCBs with {le} six chlorines (<4% of {Sigma}-MeSO{sub 2}-PCBs). The congener patterns were dominated by trichloro- and tetrachloro-MeSO{sub 2}-PCBs, and tetrachloro- and pentachloro-MeSO{sub 2}-PCBs in WHB and STL animals, respectively. In addition to 2- and 3-MeSO{sub 2}-4,4{prime}-DDE, two unknown MeSO{sub 2}-2,4{prime}-DDEs were detected. The mean 3-MeSO{sub 2}-4,4{prime}-DDE concentration in STL beluga (1.2 ng/g) was much greater than in WHB animals. The concentrations of 4,4{prime}-DDE, and not 3-MeSO{sub 2}-4,4{prime}-DDE, increased with age in male STL animals. The authors demonstrated that sulfone formation and clearance is related to metabolic capacity, and thus

  2. A Contribution to Mitigating Seismic Risk in the Bay Area: The Bay Area Regional Deformation (BARD) GPS Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlie, N.; Romanowicz, B.; Hellweg, P.

    2007-05-01

    In the San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA), two million people live in a geologically complex, tectonically active region that has experienced several historic earthquakes, including the 1868 Hayward, the 1906 San Francisco, and 1989 Loma Prieta earthquakes. Geodetic measurements, which are especially useful for detecting deformation and strain on deep structures throughout the seismic cycle, show that Bay Area deformation is both spatially complex and varying with time. Increasingly, GPS data can also be used in real time to complement seismic data in providing robust real-time earthquake information, and, potentially, early warning. The Bay Area Regional Deformation (BARD) network of permanent, continuously operating Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers monitors crustal deformation in the Bay Area and northern California. BARD is a network collocated with several seismic networks (BDSN, NHFN, mini-PBO) operating in Northern California. As the local determination of magnitude is problematic for large earthquakes, the GPS will provide strong constraints on rupture geometry and amount of slip along the slipping fault. Thus, the collocation of all the networks will help mitigate earthquake- related risks associated with an earthquake in the SFBA or in northern California.

  3. Foraminiferal abundance in the modified marine environment of Cola Bay region of Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.; Narayanan, V.

    perforate foraminifera are found to be very abundant over all other types in the living populations. In the Cola Bay region of Goa, where the marine environment is affected by the industrial effluents, the foraminiferal distribution shows that @i...

  4. Beneficial Uses of Dredged Material Case Study: San Francisco Bay Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    A major interagency, regional planning effort led to the development of the Long-Term Management Strategy and other planning programs in the San Francisco Bay area. These programs incorporate beneficial uses of dredged material into local projects.

  5. Changes in Stream Water Temperatures in the Chesapeake Bay Region, 1960-2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This map shows the changes in stream water temperatures in the Chesapeake Bay region from 1960 to 2014. Blue circles represent cooling trends in stream water...

  6. Identifying Fossil Shell Resources via Geophysical Surveys: Chesapeake Bay Region, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    ER D C/ CH L TR -1 6- 4 Chesapeake Fossil Shell Survey Identifying Fossil Shell Resources via Geophysical Surveys: Chesapeake Bay Region...other technical reports published by ERDC, visit the ERDC online library at http://acwc.sdp.sirsi.net/client/default. Chesapeake Fossil Shell...Survey ERDC/CHL TR-16-4 May 2016 Identifying Fossil Shell Resources via Geophysical Surveys: Chesapeake Bay Region, Virginia Heidi M. Wadman and Jesse

  7. 2010 Hudson River Shallow Water Sediment Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Hudson River Shallow Water Mapping project characterizes the bottom of the Hudson River Estuary in shallow water (<3 m). The characterization includes...

  8. 2010 Hudson River Shallow Water Sediment Grabs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Hudson River Shallow Water Mapping project characterizes the bottom of the Hudson River Estuary in shallow water (<3 m). The characterization includes...

  9. Potential Inundation due to Rising Sea Levels in the San Francisco Bay Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Noah

    2009-01-01

    An increase in the rate of sea level rise is one of the primary impacts of projected global climate change. To assess potential inundation associated with a continued acceleration of sea level rise, the highest resolution elevation data available were assembled from various sources and mosaicked to cover the land surfaces of the San Francisco Bay region. Next, to quantify high water levels throughout the bay, a hydrodynamic model of the San Francisco Estuary was driven by a projection of hourly water levels at the Presidio. This projection was based on a combination of climate model outputs and empirical models and incorporates astronomical, storm surge, El Niño, and long-term sea level rise influences. Based on the resulting data, maps of areas vulnerable to inundation were produced, corresponding to specific amounts of sea level rise and recurrence intervals. These maps portray areas where inundation will likely be an increasing concern. In the North Bay, wetland survival and developed fill areas are at risk. In Central and South bays, a key feature is the bay-ward periphery of developed areas that would be newly vulnerable to inundation. Nearly all municipalities adjacent to South Bay face this risk to some degree. For the Bay as a whole, as early as 2050 under this scenario, the one-year peak event nearly equals the 100-year peak event in 2000. Maps of vulnerable areas are presented and some implications discussed.

  10. Assessing Sustainable Developments in a Coastal Region: the Garolim Bay in the West Coast of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, M. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Garolim Bay is a semi-enclosed bay located in the west coast of Korea and has a spring tidal range over 6 m. It is well known for vast tidal flats and healthy ecosystems that supports high productive and diverse marine lives. Due to its large tidal range it was considered favorable site for the construction of tidal power plant and went through controversies over decades. Local fishermen depending on their livelihood over generations strongly opposed the construction, so did the most environmental groups. They argued that construction of the tidal barrage at the entrance of the bay will reduce the tidal range resulting in increase of mud content of bottom sediments and disruption of marine lives. On the other hand, the power generation industry and some local residents supported the construction arguing that the tidal power is renewable energy and contributes to reduction of CO2 emission along with economic benefits from tourists' sightseeing of the tidal power plant. The application of the tidal power plant construction at the Garolim Bay was not approved by the Korean government due to the concerns of environmental impacts on the marine lives of the Garolim Bay region. This study briefly reviews developments associated with the tidal power plant construction in the Garolim Bay and considers how to approach the assessment of the sustainable development of the coastal region of the Garolim Bay in accordance with UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) 2030 with appropriate goals, targets and monitoring indicators. It will be of keen interests to policy makers of central and local governments as well as local residents to monitor and find out the benefits pursuing SDG in the Garolim Bay where conflicts of interests among stakeholders persisted, and may exemplify the case for other regions of similar situations.

  11. THE BAFFIN BAY REGION DURING THE LAST INTERGLACIATION: EVIDENCE FROM NORTHWEST GREENLAND

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Svend Visby

    1989-01-01

    Coastal sections in the Thule area, northwest Greenland, provide a recordof last interglacial glacial and oceanographic events on the northern perimeter of Baffin Bay. The record is dated by a combination of thermoluminescence and 14C dating; local and regional correlation is provided by amino ac...... that in this large region there was a causal relationship between oceanographic change and glaciation....

  12. Crustal structure of the coastal and marine San Francisco Bay region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Tom

    2002-01-01

    As of the time of this writing, the San Francisco Bay region is home to about 6.8 million people, ranking fifth among population centers in the United States. Most of these people live on the coastal lands along San Francisco Bay, the Sacramento River delta, and the Pacific coast. The region straddles the tectonic boundary between the Pacific and North American Plates and is crossed by several strands of the San Andreas Fault system. These faults, which are stressed by about 4 cm of relative plate motion each year, pose an obvious seismic hazard.

  13. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: MGT (Management Area Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive human-use data for regional and state parks, historic sites, marine sanctuaries, and other managed areas for the Hudson River....

  14. Empirical Baye's Method and Roper Resonance State in Very Light Quark Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董绍静; 张剑波; 应和平

    2003-01-01

    Based on the Bayesian theorem, an empirical Baye method is discussed. A programming chart for mass spectrum fitting is suggested. Using this method to extract the spectrum, we observe the puzzled Roper resonance state on a 163 × 28 lattice with overlap fermions at very light quark region.

  15. Empirical Bayes Credibility Models for Economic Catastrophic Losses by Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jindrová Pavla

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Catastrophic events affect various regions of the world with increasing frequency and intensity. The number of catastrophic events and the amount of economic losses is varying in different world regions. Part of these losses is covered by insurance. Catastrophe events in last years are associated with increases in premiums for some lines of business. The article focus on estimating the amount of net premiums that would be needed to cover the total or insured catastrophic losses in different world regions using Bühlmann and Bühlmann-Straub empirical credibility models based on data from Sigma Swiss Re 2010-2016. The empirical credibility models have been developed to estimate insurance premiums for short term insurance contracts using two ingredients: past data from the risk itself and collateral data from other sources considered to be relevant. In this article we deal with application of these models based on the real data about number of catastrophic events and about the total economic and insured catastrophe losses in seven regions of the world in time period 2009-2015. Estimated credible premiums by world regions provide information how much money in the monitored regions will be need to cover total and insured catastrophic losses in next year.

  16. 77 FR 41048 - Safety Zone; Hudson Valley Triathlon, Ulster Landing, Hudson River, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-12

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Hudson Valley Triathlon, Ulster Landing... Landing, NY for the 16th Annual Hudson Valley Triathlon swim event. This temporary safety zone is.... Regulatory History and Information The Hudson Valley Triathlon swim is an annual recurring event that has...

  17. Broadband Ground Motion Estimates for Scenario Earthquakes in the San Francisco Bay Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, R. W.

    2006-12-01

    Using broadband (0-10 Hz) simulation procedures, we are assessing the ground motions that could be generated by different earthquake scenarios occurring on major strike-slip faults of the San Francisco Bay region. These simulations explicitly account for several important ground motion features, including rupture directivity, 3D basin response, and the depletion of high frequency ground motions that occurs for surface rupturing events. This work compliments ongoing USGS efforts to quantify the ground shaking hazards throughout the San Francisco Bay region. These efforts involve development and testing of a 3D velocity model for northern California (USGS Bay Area Velocity Model, version 05.1.0) using observations from the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, characterization of 1906 rupture scenarios and ground motions, and the development and analysis of rupture scenarios on other Bay Area faults. The adequacy of the simulation model has been tested using ground motion data recorded during the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake and by comparison with the reported intensity data from the 1906 earthquake. Comparisons of the simulated broadband (0-10 Hz) ground motions with the recorded motions for the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake demonstrate that the modeling procedure matches the observations without significant bias over a broad range of frequencies, site types, and propagation distances. The Loma Prieta rupture model is based on a wavenumber-squared refinement of the Wald et al (1991) slip distribution, with the rupture velocity set at 75 percent of the local shear wave velocity and a Kostrov-type slip function having a rise time of about 1.4 sec. Simulations of 1906 scenario ruptures indicate very strong directivity effects to the north and south of the assumed epicenter, adjacent to San Francisco. We are currently analyzing additional earthquake scenarios on the Hayward-Rodgers Creek and San Andreas faults in order to provide a more comprehensive framework for assessing

  18. Delft Delta Design: The Houston Galveston Bay Region, Texas, USA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kothuis, B.L.M.; Brand, A.D.; Sebastian, A.G.; Nillesen, A.L.; Jonkman, S.N.

    2015-01-01

    In 2008, Hurricane Ike devastated Bolivar Peninsula, narrowly missing the more heavily industrialized and populated areas in the region. In the aftermath of the hurricane, the Severe Storm Prediction, Education and Evacuation from Disasters (SSPEED) Center at Rice University in Houston, and Texas A&

  19. 77 FR 40518 - Swim Events in the Captain of the Port New York Zone; Hudson River, East River, Upper New York...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-10

    ... Upper New York Bay, Hudson River 5.1 Brooklyn Bridge Swim Date: July 15, 2012. Rain Date: NA... Water Swim Clinics, Verrazano Bridge Swim, Rose Pitonof Swim, and Liberty to Freedom Swim. The sponsors... York Bay 2.1 Verrazano Bridge Swim Date: July 21, 2012. Rain Date: July 22, 2012. Enforcement Period...

  20. Review of wastewater problems and wastewater-management planning in the San Francisco Bay region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Walter G.

    1973-01-01

    The San Francisco Bay region has suffered adverse environmental effects related to the discharge of municipal-, industrial-, and agricultural- wastewater and storm-water runoff. Specific pollutional properties of theses discharges are not well understood in all cases although the toxic materials and aquatic-plant nutrients (biostimulants) found in municipal and industrial waterwater are considered to be a major cause of regional water-quality problems. Other water-quality problems in the region are commonly attributed to pesticides found in agricultural wastewater and potentially pathogenic bacteria in municipal-wastewater discharges and in storm-water runoff. The geographical distribution and magnitude of wastewater discharges in the bay region, particularly those from municipalities and industries, is largely a function of population, economic growth, and urban development. As might be expected, the total volume of wastewater has increased in a trend paralleling this growth and development. More significant, perhaps, is the fact that the total volume parameters such as BOD (biochemical oxygen demand), biostimulant concentrations, and toxicity, has increased despite large expenditures on new and improved municipal- and industrial-wastewater-treatment plants. Also, pollutant loadings from other major source, such as agriculture and storm-water runoff, have increased. At the time of writing (1972), many Federal, State, regional, and local agencies are engaged in a comprehensive wastewater-management-planning effort for the entire bay region. Initial objectives of this planning effort are: (1) the consolidation and coordination of loosely integrated wastewater-management facilities and (2) the elimination of wastewater discharges to ecologically sensitive areas, such as fresh-water streams and shallow extremities of San Francisco Bay. There has been some investigation of potential long-range wastewater-management alternatives based upon disposal in deep water in the

  1. Seismotectonic Implications Of Clustered Regional GPS Velocities In The San Francisco Bay Region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graymer, R. W.; Simpson, R.

    2012-12-01

    We have used a hierarchical agglomerative clustering algorithm with Euclidean distance and centroid linkage, applied to continuous GPS observations for the Bay region available from the U.S. Geological Survey website. This analysis reveals 4 robust, spatially coherent clusters that coincide with 4 first-order structural blocks separated by 3 major fault systems: San Andreas (SA), Southern/Central Calaveras-Hayward-Rodgers Creek-Maacama (HAY), and Northern Calaveras-Concord-Green Valley-Berryessa-Bartlett Springs (NCAL). Because observations seaward of the San Gregorio (SG) fault are few in number, the cluster to the west of SA may actually contain 2 major structural blocks not adequately resolved: the Pacific plate to the west of the northern SA and a Peninsula block between the Peninsula SA and the SG fault. The average inter-block velocities are 11, 10, and 9 mm/yr across SA, HAY, and NCAL respectively. There appears to be a significant component of fault-normal compression across NCAL, whereas SA and HAY faults appear to be, on regional average, purely strike-slip. The velocities for the Sierra Nevada - Great Valley (SNGV) block to the west of NCAL are impressive in their similarity. The cluster of these velocities in a velocity plot forms a tighter grouping compared with the groupings for the other cluster blocks, suggesting a more rigid behavior for this block than the others. We note that for 4 clusters, none of the 3 cluster boundaries illuminate geologic structures other than north-northwest trending dominantly strike-slip faults, so plate motion is not accommodated by large-scale fault-parallel compression or extension in the region or by significant plastic deformation , at least over the time span of the GPS observations. Complexities of interseismic deformation of the upper crust do not allow simple application of inter-block velocities as long-term slip rates on bounding faults. However, 2D dislocation models using inter-block velocities and typical

  2. Probabilistic estimation of numbers and costs of future landslides in the San Francisco Bay region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crovelli, R.A.; Coe, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    We used historical records of damaging landslides triggered by rainstorms and a newly developed Probabilistic Landslide Assessment Cost Estimation System (PLACES) to estimate the numbers and direct costs of future landslides in the 10-county San Francisco Bay region. Historical records of damaging landslides in the region are incomplete. Therefore, our estimates of numbers and costs of future landslides are minimal estimates. The estimated mean annual number of future damaging landslides for the entire 10-county region is about 65. Santa Cruz County has the highest estimated mean annual number of damaging future landslides (about 18), whereas Napa, San Francisco, and Solano Counties have the lowest estimated mean numbers of damaging landslides (about 1 each). The estimated mean annual cost of future landslides in the entire region is about US $14.80 million (year 2000 $). The estimated mean annual cost is highest for San Mateo County ($3.24 million) and lowest for Solano County ($0.18 million). The annual per capita cost for the entire region will be about $2.10. Santa Cruz County will have the highest annual per capita cost at $8.45, whereas San Francisco County will have the lowest per capita cost at $0.31. Normalising costs by dividing by the percentage of land area with slopes equal to or greater than 17% indicates that San Francisco County will have the highest cost per square km ($7,101), whereas Santa Clara County will have the lowest cost per square km ($229). These results indicate that the San Francisco Bay region has one of the highest levels of landslide risk in the United States. Compared with landslide cost estimates from the rest of the world, the risk level in the Bay region seems high, but not exceptionally high.

  3. Earthquake outlook for the San Francisco Bay region 2014–2043

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aagaard, Brad T.; Blair, James Luke; Boatwright, John; Garcia, Susan H.; Harris, Ruth A.; Michael, Andrew J.; Schwartz, David P.; DiLeo, Jeanne S.; Jacques, Kate; Donlin, Carolyn

    2016-06-13

    Using information from recent earthquakes, improved mapping of active faults, and a new model for estimating earthquake probabilities, the 2014 Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities updated the 30-year earthquake forecast for California. They concluded that there is a 72 percent probability (or likelihood) of at least one earthquake of magnitude 6.7 or greater striking somewhere in the San Francisco Bay region before 2043. Earthquakes this large are capable of causing widespread damage; therefore, communities in the region should take simple steps to help reduce injuries, damage, and disruption, as well as accelerate recovery from these earthquakes.

  4. San Francisco Bay Area Baseline Trash Loading Summary Results, San Francisco Bay Area CA, 2012, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The San Francisco Bay Area stormwater permit sets trash control guidelines for discharges through the storm drain system. The permit covers Alameda, Contra Costa,...

  5. The Lower Chesapeake Bay LTAR: A coastal urban-agricultural region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccarty, G.; Alfieri, J. G.; Cavigelli, M.; Cosh, M. H.; Hapeman, C. J.; Kustas, W. P.; Maul, J.; Mirsky, S.; Pooler, M.; Sadeghi, A. M.; Schomberg, H.; Timlin, D. J.; Rice, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    The Chesapeake Bay, located in the mid-Atlantic region of the U.S., is the largest estuary in North America. The watershed area includes six states from New York to Virginia and is nearly 167,000 km2 in size with more than 150 rivers and streams entering the 300-km Bay main stem. Forested and agricultural lands make up 58 and 22 percent of the land use, respectively. Nearly 9 percent is urban and suburban use, and the watershed is home to over 17 million people. However, the population is expected to reach 19 million by 2025, raising the potential for conflict between the agricultural and urban communities over land and water use and in protecting natural resources, especially in the lower portion of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. The Lower Chesapeake Bay study area, part of the USDA-ARS Long-Term Agroecosystem Research (LTAR) network, will provide much-needed data to support decisions at this critical agriculture-urban interface. Current long-term projects seek to assess the economic, production, and environmental performance of conventional and organic cropping systems and to evaluate the resilience of these systems to climate change. Large-scale studies are being conducted to examine the effects of land-use and landscape characteristics on ecosystem services and on energy, water, nutrient, carbon, and pest dynamics within watersheds. New in-situ measurement and remote sensor technologies are being considered with the expectancy that the data streams will be available on-line and for use in modeling. Results and outcomes of these research efforts will greatly benefit the national LTAR network and will be applicable to other US coastal urban-agricultural regions.

  6. Babesiosis in Lower Hudson Valley, New York, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sumith S.; Shams, Navid; Visintainer, Paul; Nadelman, Robert B.; Hosur, Srilatha; Nelson, John; Wormser, Gary P.

    2011-01-01

    Although Lyme disease has been endemic to parts of the Lower Hudson Valley of New York, United States, for >2 decades, babesiosis has emerged there only since 2001. The number of Lower Hudson Valley residents in whom babesiosis was diagnosed increased 20-fold, from 6 to 119 cases per year during 2001–2008, compared with an ≈1.6-fold increase for the rest of New York. During 2002–2009, a total of 19 patients with babesiosis were hospitalized on 22 occasions at the regional tertiary care center. Concurrent conditions included advanced age, malignancies, splenectomy, and AIDS. Two patients acquired the infection from blood transfusions and 1 from perinatal exposure, rather than from a tick bite. One patient died. Clinicians should consider babesiosis in persons with fever and hemolytic anemia who have had tick exposure or have received blood products. PMID:21529393

  7. Microbial Mercury Cycling in San Francisco Bay Sediments: From Regions to the Rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, V. A.; Mann, A.; Romeis, J.; Marvin-Dipasquale, M. C.; Agee, J. L.; Kieu, L. H.; Harms, H. A.

    2004-05-01

    The San Francisco Bay (SFB) estuary is hydrodynamically diverse ecosystem with extensive mercury contamination associated with historic gold and mercury mining wastes, and in a region with an unprecedented number of wetland restoration projects planned or ongoing. Wetlands are known to be active areas for the microbial transformation of Hg(II) to methylmercury (MeHg), which bioaccumulates in the food web. A better understanding of this microbial process, in these restored wetlands and other sub-habitats, is critical if Hg contamination is to be successfully managed in this system. An examination of MeHg production and degradation in sediments has been conducted at multiple spatial scales throughout the SFB estuary and its tributaries over the past four years. At the regional scale, we will present data from the brackish Bay, the delta, and rivers and reservoirs in tributary watersheds. Within the freshwater delta and river regions, a new project is focusing on emergent marsh, non-vegetated open water, and submerged-macrophyte zones. At the smallest scale, we consider microbial Hg cycling in the root zone (rhizosphere) of dominant wetland plants and propose a conceptual model of the key biogoechemical reactions that may make this transitional zone one of the most important with respect to Hg(II)-methylation.

  8. In-situ measurements of seismic velocities in the San Francisco Bay region...part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, James F.; Fumal, Thomas E.; Borcherdt, Roger D.

    1976-01-01

    Seismic wave velocities (compressional and shear) are important parameters for determining the seismic response characteristics of various geologic units when subjected to strong earthquake ground shaking. Seismic velocities of various units often show a strong correlation with the amounts of damage following large earthquakes and have been used as a basis for certain types of seismic zonation studies. Currently a program is in progress to measure seismic velocities in the San Francisco Bay region at an estimated 150 sites. At each site seismic travel times are measured in drill holes, normally at 2.5-m intervals to a depth of 30 m. Geologic logs are determined from drill hole cuttings, undisturbed samples, and penetrometer samples. The data provide a detailed comparison of geologic and seismic characteristics and provide parameters for estimating strong earthquake ground motions quantitatively at each of the site. A major emphasis of this program is to obtain a detailed comparison of geologic and seismic data on a regional scale for use in seismic zonation. The broad data base available in the San Francisco Bay region suggests using the area as a pilot area for the development of general techniques applicable to other areas.

  9. Hudson River Sub-Bottom Profile Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hudson River Estuary Shallow Water Surveys. Subbottom Profile Points. Subbottom data was collected November 5 to December 15, 2009, in the estuary north from...

  10. Maps of Quaternary Deposits and Liquefaction Susceptibility in the Central San Francisco Bay Region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witter, Robert C.; Knudsen, Keith L.; Sowers, Janet M.; Wentworth, Carl M.; Koehler, Richard D.; Randolph, Carolyn E.; Brooks, Suzanna K.; Gans, Kathleen D.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents a map and database of Quaternary deposits and liquefaction susceptibility for the urban core of the San Francisco Bay region. It supercedes the equivalent area of U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 00-444 (Knudsen and others, 2000), which covers the larger 9-county San Francisco Bay region. The report consists of (1) a spatial database, (2) two small-scale colored maps (Quaternary deposits and liquefaction susceptibility), (3) a text describing the Quaternary map and liquefaction interpretation (part 3), and (4) a text introducing the report and describing the database (part 1). All parts of the report are digital; part 1 describes the database and digital files and how to obtain them by downloading across the internet. The nine counties surrounding San Francisco Bay straddle the San Andreas fault system, which exposes the region to serious earthquake hazard (Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities, 1999). Much of the land adjacent to the Bay and the major rivers and streams is underlain by unconsolidated deposits that are particularly vulnerable to earthquake shaking and liquefaction of water-saturated granular sediment. This new map provides a consistent detailed treatment of the central part of the 9-county region in which much of the mapping of Open-File Report 00-444 was either at smaller (less detailed) scale or represented only preliminary revision of earlier work. Like Open-File Report 00-444, the current mapping uses geomorphic expression, pedogenic soils, inferred depositional environments, and geologic age to define and distinguish the map units. Further scrutiny of the factors controlling liquefaction susceptibility has led to some changes relative to Open-File Report 00-444: particularly the reclassification of San Francisco Bay mud (Qhbm) to have only MODERATE susceptibility and the rating of artificial fills according to the Quaternary map units inferred to underlie them (other than dams - adf). The two colored

  11. Bay sedimentation as controlled by regional crustal behaviour, local tectonics and eustatic sea-level changes: Coquimbo Formation (Miocene Pliocene), Bay of Tongoy, central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, J. P.; Olivares, Danisa M.; Nielsen, Sven N.; Smith, Norman D.; Middleton, Heather; Fenner, Juliane; Ishman, Scott E.

    2006-02-01

    The north-facing Bay of Tongoy in central Chile is flanked by topographic highs in the west and east. During the Miocene and Pliocene, the bay extended inland at least 30 km farther south than a present. It was filled with muds, sands, coquinas and gravel during a series of transgressions and regressions related to regional and local tectonic movements combined with global sea-level variations. 87Sr/ 86Sr and microfossil dating indicates transgressions between 11.9-11.2 Ma, 10.1-9.5 Ma, 9.0-7.3 Ma, 6.3-5.3 Ma, 4.3-2.2 Ma and 1.7-1.4 Ma. The regional tectonic behaviour of the crust shows general uplifting from 10.5 Ma to 6.9 Ma, associated with subduction of the Juan Fernández Ridge (JFR) beneath this part of the continent. Subsidence followed between 6.9 and 2.1 Ma, in the wake of the southeastward-migrating JFR. The subsequent subduction of an oceanic plateau similar to the JFR caused rapid uplift that led to the final emergence of the bay above sea level. The Puerto Aldea normal fault along the western limit of the study area was reactivated during the regional uplift and subsidence events, with reverse faulting occurring during the latter phase. Sporadic fault reactivation probably triggered the rapid changes in water depth reflected in the recorded vertical succession of facies.

  12. Estimation of regional hydrogeological properties for use in a hydrologic model of the Chesapeake Bay watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seck, A.; Welty, C.

    2012-12-01

    Characterization of subsurface hydrogeologic properties in three dimensions and at large scales for use in groundwater flow models can remain a challenge owing to the lack of regional data sets and scatter in coverage, type, and format of existing small-scale data sets. This is the case for the Chesapeake Bay watershed, where numerous studies have been carried out to quantify groundwater processes at small scales but limited information is available on subsurface characteristics and groundwater fluxes at regional scales. One goal of this work is to synthesize disparate information on subsurface properties for the Chesapeake Bay watershed for use in a 3D integrated ParFlow model over an area of 400,000 km2 with a horizontal resolution of 1 km and a vertical resolution of 5 m. We combined different types of data at various scales to characterize hydrostratigraphy and hydrogeological properties. The conceptual hydrogeologic model of the study area is composed of two major regions. One region extends from the Valley and Ridge physiographic province south of New York to the Piedmont physiographic province in Maryland and Virginia. This region is generally characterized by fractured rock overlain by a mantle of regolith. Soil thickness and hydraulic conductivity values were obtained from the U.S. General Soil Map (STATSGO2). Saprolite thickness was evaluated using casing depth information from well completion reports from four state agencies. Geostatistical methods were used to generalize point data to the model extent and resolution. A three-dimensional hydraulic conductivity field for fractured bedrock was estimated using a published national map of permeability and depth- varying functions from literature. The Coastal Plain of Maryland, Virginia, Delaware and New Jersey constitutes the second region and is characterized by layered sediments. In this region, the geometry of 20 aquifers and confining units was constructed using interpolation of published contour maps of

  13. Transport of Cerro Hudson SO2 clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Scott D.; Bluth, Gregg J. S.; Schnetzler, Charles C.; Krueger, Arlin J.; Walter, Louis S.

    The Cerro Hudson volcano in southern Chile (45.92°S, 73.0°W) emitted large ash and sulfur dioxide clouds on August 12-15, following several days of minor activity [Global Volcanism Network Bulletin, 1991]. The SO2 clouds were observed using (preliminary) near real-time data from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) as they encircled the south polar region. The injection of SO2 into the stratosphere has essentially created a gigantic chemical tracer that could provide new insights into the wind patterns and seasonal circulation around the Antarctic region.around the Antarctic region. The TOMS instrument, on board the National Aeronautic and Space Administration's Nimbus 7 satellite, measures the ratio of backscattered Earth radiance to incoming solar irradiance in the ultraviolet spectrum. Although originally designed to measure ozone, it was later discovered that the TOMS instrument could also detect and quantify SO2 [Krueger, 1985]. After this discovery, measurements from TOMS were examined for SO2 emissions for all recorded volcanic eruptions since Nimbus-7 was launched in October 1978, and current data are analyzed as new eruptions occur. The satellite is in a polar, Sun-synchronous orbit so that it crosses the equator at local noon and observes the whole sunlit Earth in approximately 14 orbits each day. Total column amounts of SO2 are determined that represent the amount of gas affecting the reflection of ultraviolet light through a column of the atmosphere from the satellite to the reflecting surface, Earth, given in terms of milli atmospheres centimeter (1000 milli atm cm = a gas layer 1-cm thick at STP). The mass of SO2 is calculated by integrating over the cloud area to obtain a volume, then converting to tons.

  14. Seismic velocity structure and seismotectonics of the eastern San Francisco Bay region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardebeck, J.L.; Michael, A.J.; Brocher, T.M.

    2007-01-01

    The Hayward Fault System is considered the most likely fault system in the San Francisco Bay Area, California, to produce a major earthquake in the next 30 years. To better understand this fault system, we use microseismicity to study its structure and kinematics. We present a new 3D seismic-velocity model for the eastern San Francisco Bay region, using microseismicity and controlled sources, which reveals a ???10% velocity contrast across the Hayward fault in the upper 10 km, with higher velocity in the Franciscan Complex to the west relative to the Great Valley Sequence to the east. This contrast is imaged more sharply in our localized model than in previous regional-scale models. Thick Cenozoic sedimentary basins, such as the Livermore basin, which may experience particularly strong shaking during an earthquake, are imaged in the model. The accurate earthquake locations and focal mechanisms obtained by using the 3D model allow us to study fault complexity and its implications for seismic hazard. The relocated hypocenters along the Hayward Fault in general are consistent with a near-vertical or steeply east-dipping fault zone. The southern Hayward fault merges smoothly with the Calaveras fault at depth, suggesting that large earthquakes may rupture across both faults. The use of the 3D velocity model reveals that most earthquakes along the Hayward fault have near-vertical strike-slip focal mechanisms, consistent with the large-scale orientation and sense of slip of the fault, with no evidence for zones of complex fracturing acting as barriers to earthquake rupture.

  15. AGE GROUPS OF ANTARCTIC KRILL,EUPHAUSIA SUPERBA DANA,IN THE PRYDZ BAY REGION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Age groups of Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba Dana) in the Prydz Bay region were studied by distribution mixture analysis based on length/frequency data collected by R/V Jidi during the 1989/1990 and 1990/1991 austral summer. Five age groups were determined, i.e. 1+, 2+, 3+, 4+, and 5+ , or six age groups in all, if the 0+ larvae were included. The mean body length of 1+ to 5+ age groups was 25.70 mm, 40.47 mm, 45.52 mm, 50.52 mm and 54.52 mm respectively. Supposing the difference in body length between successive age groups is a reflection of the yearly growth, the maximum growth rate occurred during the period from 1+ juveniles to 2+ subadults (14.77 mm/a). From 2+ subadults to 3+ adults the growth rate dropped steeply (5.05 mm/a) because at this stage, increase of body length was substituted, to a great extent, by the growth of sexual products. From 3+ onwards the growth rate was maintained at a relatively low level and decreased slowly with age. The relative abundance of age groups 1+ and 2+, in our sample must be much lower than that in the real population owing to both the large mesh size we used and the distribution difference between juveniles and adults. If we left aside 1+ and 2+ age groups and just looked at the relative abundance of adults, we found that age group 3+ dominated the adult population and that the relative abundance decreased sharply with increasing age. If this situation is normal, one can expect an extremely high mortality rate in adults, 82.6% from 3+ to 4+ and 94.0% from 4+ to 5+. This is reasonably expectable for the Prydz Bay region.

  16. CALCULATED MOLECULAR STRUCTURES AND POTENTIAL ENERGY FUNCTIONS OF PAHS WITH METHYL CROWDING IN THE BAY REGION AND THEIR METABOLITES: COMPARISON TO EXPERIMENTAL STRUCTURES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calculated molecular structures and potential energy functions ofP AHs with methyl crowding in the bay region and their metabolites: Comparison to experimental structures PAHs with methyl group substitution near a bay region represent a class of chemicals associated with ...

  17. Earthquake probabilities in the San Francisco Bay Region: 2000 to 2030 - a summary of findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1999-01-01

    The San Francisco Bay region sits astride a dangerous “earthquake machine,” the tectonic boundary between the Pacific and North American Plates. The region has experienced major and destructive earthquakes in 1838, 1868, 1906, and 1989, and future large earthquakes are a certainty. The ability to prepare for large earthquakes is critical to saving lives and reducing damage to property and infrastructure. An increased understanding of the timing, size, location, and effects of these likely earthquakes is a necessary component in any effective program of preparedness. This study reports on the probabilities of occurrence of major earthquakes in the San Francisco Bay region (SFBR) for the three decades 2000 to 2030. The SFBR extends from Healdsberg on the northwest to Salinas on the southeast and encloses the entire metropolitan area, including its most rapidly expanding urban and suburban areas. In this study a “major” earthquake is defined as one with M≥6.7 (where M is moment magnitude). As experience from the Northridge, California (M6.7, 1994) and Kobe, Japan (M6.9, 1995) earthquakes has shown us, earthquakes of this size can have a disastrous impact on the social and economic fabric of densely urbanized areas. To reevaluate the probability of large earthquakes striking the SFBR, the U.S. Geological Survey solicited data, interpretations, and analyses from dozens of scientists representing a wide crosssection of the Earth-science community (Appendix A). The primary approach of this new Working Group (WG99) was to develop a comprehensive, regional model for the long-term occurrence of earthquakes, founded on geologic and geophysical observations and constrained by plate tectonics. The model considers a broad range of observations and their possible interpretations. Using this model, we estimate the rates of occurrence of earthquakes and 30-year earthquake probabilities. Our study considers a range of magnitudes for earthquakes on the major faults in the

  18. Investigating the environmental and socioeconomic impacts of sea level rise in the Galveston Bay, Texas region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedee, M.; Dotson, M.; Gibeaut, J. C.

    2016-02-01

    Anthropogenic effects throughout the twenty-first century, particularly greenhouse gas emissions, have contributed to global climatic and environmental changes. Sea level rise (SLR) is one of these changes which is occurring along the Texas Coast and is amplified by land subsidence. SLR along the northern Texas coast is impacting sensitive coastal environments as well as human populations, and industries and infrastructure supporting those populations. Sea level data from the NOAA gauge at Galveston Pier 21 has shown an increase of 2.08 feet in relative sea level in 100 years. Given an expected increase in the rate of sea level rise in the next decades, the purpose of this study is to provide an in-depth assessment on the effects of relative sea level rise on the habitat distribution of highly valuable coastal wetlands in the Galveston Bay region. This study also focuses on projecting the potential socioeconomic losses due to coastal flooding that is amplified by SLR in the region. In this study, three SLR scenarios are modeled: a scenario based on a linear extrapolation of satellite altimetry data (0.21 m by 2100); the IPCC's RCP8.5 mean scenario (0.74 m by 2100); and a high-end scenario (1.8 m by 2100) as proposed by Jevrejeva et al. (2014). A land subsidence rate calculated by developing a subsidence grid using GPS-measured subsidence monitoring and releveling data is added to all these scenarios. The Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM) is used to predict wetland conversion due to long-term SLR incorporating the processes of inundation, erosion, accretion, overwash, and saturation. Similarly, HAZUS-MH is used to evaluate the property damage to building stocks and the direct business interruption losses due to flooding caused by 100-year flood event scenario with three SLR scenarios. This coordinated research effort to assess the physical, environmental and policy impacts due to SLR is intended to enable policy-makers, managers, and the general public to

  19. Defining the Pen Islands Caribou Herd of southern Hudson Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth F. Abraham

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe the Pen Islands Herd of caribou, the largest aggregation of caribou in Ontario (it also occupies a portion of northeastern Manitoba. Photographic counts showed the herd had a minimum population of 2300 in 1979, 4660 in 1986, 7424 in 1987 and 10 798 in 1994. Throughout the 1980s, the Pen Islands caribou exhibited population behaviour similar to migratory barren-ground caribou herds, although morphology suggests they are woodland caribou or possibly a mixture of subspecies. The herd had well-defined traditional tundra calving grounds, formed nursery groups and large mobile post-calving aggregations, and migrated over 400 km between tundra summer habitats and boreal forest winter habitats. Its migration took it into three Canadian jurisdictions (Ontario, Manitoba, Northwest Territories and it was important to residents of both Manitoba and Ontario. It is clear that the herd should be managed as a migratory herd and the critical importance of both the coastal and variable large winter ranges should be noted in ensuring the herd's habitat needs are secure.

  20. Babesiosis in Lower Hudson Valley, New York

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-05-12

    This podcast discusses a study about an increase in babesiosis in the Lower Hudson Valley of New York state. Dr. Julie Joseph, Assistant Professor of Medicine at New York Medical College, shares details of this study.  Created: 5/12/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 5/23/2011.

  1. Species Profiles: Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (Mid-Atlantic). Bay Anchovy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-01

    Laguna Madre of Pearcy, W., and S.W. Richards. 1962. Texas . Publ. Inst. Mar. Sc. Univ. Distribution and ecology of fishes Tex. 4(2):156-200. of the Mystic...ppt) in striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in the Upper Laguna Madre , Texas (Simmons Hudson River estuary were almost 1957). In the Mid-Atlantic Region...Seasonal abundance and distribution of marine fishes at a hot-water Fish . Serv. Fish . Bull. discharge in Galveston Bay, Texas . 76(2):438-487. Contrib. Mar

  2. Monitoring and modeling conditions for regional shallow landslide initiation in the San Francisco Bay area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, B. D.; Stock, J. D.; Godt, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    Bay Hills). In general, this coincides directly with relative precipitation totals in each region (i.e., Marin county typically receives more rainfall over a longer period of time than the East Bay). In those areas that are saturated for longer periods, the shallow landslide hazard is prolonged because these conditions are first needed for storm-related precipitation to subsequently generate positive pore pressure on the failure plane. Both piezometric field measurements and limit equilibrium slope stability analyses indicate that positive pore pressure is required for most shallow landslide failures to occur in the study regions. Based on measurements from two of the sites, our analyses further indicate that at least 2 kPa of pressure is required to trigger shallow landsliding. We measured this pressure at one of our sites in 2011, where more than 30 landslides, including several that mobilized into debris flows, occurred. Additional monitoring at these sites will be used to further constrain and refine antecedent moisture-based thresholds for shallow landslide initiation.

  3. Waveform tomography of crustal structure in the south San Francisco Bay region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollitz, F.F.; Fletcher, J.P.

    2005-01-01

    We utilize a scattering-based seismic tomography technique to constrain crustal tructure around the southern San Francisco Bay region (SFBR). This technique is based on coupled traveling wave scattering theory, which has usually been applied to the interpretation of surface waves in large regional-scale studies. Using fully three-dimensional kernels, this technique is here applied to observed P, S, and surface waves of intermediate period (3-4 s dominant period) observed following eight selected regional events. We use a total of 73 seismograms recorded by a U.S. Geological Survey short-period seismic array in the western Santa Clara Valley, the Berkeley Digital Seismic Network, and the Northern California Seismic Network. Modifications of observed waveforms due to scattering from crustal structure include (positive or negative) amplification, delay, and generation of coda waves. The derived crustal structure explains many of the observed signals which cannot be explained with a simple layered structure. There is sufficient sensitivity to both deep and shallow crustal structure that even with the few sources employed in the present study, we obtain shallow velocity structure which is reasonably consistent with previous P wave tomography results. We find a depth-dependent lateral velocity contrast across the San Andreas fault (SAF), with higher velocities southwest of the SAF in the shallow crust and higher velocities northeast of the SAF in the midcrust. The method does not have the resolution to identify very slow sediment velocities in the upper approximately 3 km since the tomographic models are smooth at a vertical scale of about 5 km. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. A Viscoelastic earthquake simulator with application to the San Francisco Bay region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollitz, F.F.

    2009-01-01

    Earthquake simulation on synthetic fault networks carries great potential for characterizing the statistical patterns of earthquake occurrence. I present an earthquake simulator based on elastic dislocation theory. It accounts for the effects of interseismic tectonic loading, static stress steps at the time of earthquakes, and postearthquake stress readjustment through viscoelastic relaxation of the lower crust and mantle. Earthquake rupture initiation and termination are determined with a Coulomb failure stress criterion and the static cascade model. The simulator is applied to interacting multifault systems: one, a synthetic two-fault network, and the other, a fault network representative of the San Francisco Bay region. The faults are discretized both along strike and along dip and can accommodate both strike slip and dip slip. Stress and seismicity functions are evaluated over 30,000 yr trial time periods, resulting in a detailed statistical characterization of the fault systems. Seismicity functions such as the coefficient of variation and a- and b-values exhibit systematic patterns with respect to simple model parameters. This suggests that reliable estimation of the controlling parameters of an earthquake simulator is a prerequisite to the interpretation of its output in terms of seismic hazard.

  5. Impact of horizontal resolution on prediction of tropical cyclones over Bay of Bengal using a regional weather prediction model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Mandal; U C Mohanty; K V J Potty; A Sarkar

    2003-03-01

    The present study is carried out to examine the performance of a regional atmospheric model in forecasting tropical cyclones over the Bay of Bengal and its sensitivity to horizontal resolution. Two cyclones, which formed over the Bay of Bengal during the years 1995 and 1997, are simulated using a regional weather prediction model with two horizontal resolutions of 165km and 55 km. The model is found to perform reasonably well towards simulation of the storms. The structure, intensity and track of the cyclones are found to be better simulated by finer resolution of the model as compared to the coarse resolution. Rainfall amount and its distribution are also found to be sensitive to the model horizontal resolution. Other important fields, viz., vertical velocity, horizontal divergence and horizontal moisture flux are also found to be sensitive to model horizontal resolution and are better simulated by the model with finer horizontal grids.

  6. Phosphorus cycling in the red tide incubator region of Monterey Bay in response to upwelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Rose Marie Mackey

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the cycling of phosphorus (P in the euphotic zone following upwelling in northeastern Monterey Bay (the Red Tide Incubator region of coastal California, with particular emphasis on how phytoplankton and bacteria mediate and respond to changes in P availability. In situ measurements of nutrient concentrations, phytoplankton community composition, and cell-specific alkaline phosphatase (AP activity (determined via enzyme labeled fluorescence assay were measured during 3 cruises. Upwelling led to a 10-fold increase in dissolved inorganic (DIP in surface waters, reaching ~0.5 mol L-1. This DIP was drawn down rapidly as upwelling relaxed over a period of 1 week. Relatively low ratios of nitrate to DIP uptake (~5:1 suggest that luxury P uptake was occurring as phytoplankton bloomed. Dissolved organic (DOP remained relatively constant (~0.3mol L-1 before and immediately following upwelling, but doubled as upwelling relaxed, likely due to phytoplankton excretion and release during grazing. This transition from a relatively high DIP:DOP ratio to lower DIP:DOP ratio was accompanied by a decline in the abundance of diatoms, which had low AP activity, toward localized, spatially-heterogeneous blooms of dinoflagellates in the genera Prorocentrum, Ceratium, Dinophysis, Alexandrium, and Scrippsiella that showed high AP activity regardless of ambient DIP levels. A nutrient addition incubation experiment showed that phytoplankton growth was primarily limited by nitrate, followed by DIP and then DOP, suggesting that P is a regulating, rather than limiting, nutrient in this region. AP activity was observed in bacteria associated with lysed cell debris and aggregates of particulate organic material, where it may serve to facilitate P regeneration, as well as affixed to the surfaces of intact phytoplankton cells, possibly indicative of close, beneficial phytoplankton-bacteria interactions.

  7. Contaminant exposure and reproductive success of ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) nesting in Chesapeake Bay regions of concern

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Chesapeake Bay osprey population has more than doubled in size since restrictions were placed on the production and use of and other in the 1970s. Ospreys are...

  8. Aircraft Regional-Scale Flux Measurements over Complex Landscapes of Mangroves, Desert, and Marine Ecosystems of Magdalena Bay, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Natural ecosystems are rarely structurally simple or functionally homogeneous. This is true for the complex coastal region of Magdalena Bay, Baja California Sur, Mexico, where the spatial variability in ecosystem fluxes from the Pacific coastal ocean, eutrophic lagoon, mangroves, and desert were studied. The Sky Arrow 650TCN environmental research aircraft proved to be an effective tool in characterizing land–atmosphere fluxes of energy, CO2, and water vapor across a heterogeneous landscape a...

  9. ASSESSMENT OF THE BLACK SEA ECOSYSTEM POLLUTION WITH COPPER AND CADMIUM IN SELECTED BAYS OF SEVASTOPOL REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Niemiec

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A high level of anthropopressure has been registered in Sevastopol region, connected with its strategic role as the main city in the region, but also due to Russian Black Sea Fleet stationing there for many years. A significant source of the Black Sea contamination in Sevastopol area is the industry located in this city, municipal waste and agriculture. Implementing measures aimed at protection of the Black Sea and the evolution of their results requires monitoring conducted in the regions with various levels of anthropopressure. The work was aimed at the assessment of copper and cadmium content in water and algae in selected bays of the Black Sea in the vicinity of Sevastopol. Samples of water and algae were collected in August 2012 from eight Sevastopol bays (Galubaja, Kozacha, Kamyshova, Kruhla, Strieletska, Pishchana, Pivdenna and Sevastopolska and from the open sea in the vicinity of Fiolent. Algae (Cystoseira barbata and Ulva rigida were collected from the same places. Collected water was preserved on the sampling place and brought to the laboratory where its copper and cadmium concentrations were assessed. Collected algae were rinsed in distilled water, dried, then homogenised and mineralised. Copper and cadmium content were determined in the mineralizates using ASA method with electrothermal atomisation. Cadmium concentration in water ranged from 0.13 to 1.74 µg Cd∙dm-3, and copper from 7.07 to 22.56 µg Cd∙dm-3. Considerable differences in the content of the analysed elements were registered in individual bays. The highest content was assessed in Galubaja and Sevastopolska bays, whereas the lowest one in the water collected in the open sea and in Pivdenna bay. Copper concentrations in the analysed algae fluctuated from 3.375 to 14.96 mg Cu∙kg-1 d.m. No differences were noted in this element content between the algae species. Cadmium content in the algae ranged from 0.133 to 1.133 mg Cd∙kg-1 d.m. Higher accumulation of cadmium

  10. Science, law, and Hudson River power plants: A case study in environmental impact assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnthouse, L.W.; Klauda, R.J.; Vaughan, D.S.; Kendall, R.L. (eds.)

    1988-01-01

    Between 1963 and 1980, the Hudson River estuary was the focus of one of the most ambitious environmental research and assessment programs ever performed. The studies supported a series of US federal proceedings involving licenses and discharge permits for two controversial electric power generating facilities: the Cornwall pumped storage facility, and units 2 and 3 of the Indian Point nuclear generating station. Both facilities were to draw large volumes of water from a region of the Hudson used as spawning and nursery habitat by several fish species, including the striped bass. Fishermen and conservationists feared that a major fraction of the striped bass eggs and larvae in the Hudson would be entrained with the pumped water and killed. Additional fish would be killed on trash screens at the intakes. Scientists were asked to aid the utility companies and regulatory agencies in determining the biological importance of entrainment and impingement. This monograph contains both technical papers that present research results and synthesis papers that summarize and interpret the results. The intent was to: (1) summarize the scientific issues and approaches; (2) present the significant results of the Hudson River biological studies; (3) describe the role of the studies in the decision-making process; (4) evaluate the successes and failures of the studies; and (5) present recommendations for future estuarine impact assessments. Separate abstracts are processed for 22 papers for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  11. A Proposed Physical Model of Strain Accumulation in the San Francisco Bay Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollitz, F. F.; Nyst, M. C.

    2002-12-01

    Strain accumulation in tectonically active regions is dependent on several factors, including background tectonic loading, steady-state dislocation processes such as creep, and transient deformation. In the San Francisco Bay (SFB) region, the most uncertain of these processes is transient deformation, which arises primarily in association with large historic earthquakes. As such it depends upon the history of faulting and the rheology of the crust and mantle, which together determine the pattern of longer-term (decade-scale) postseismic response to earthquakes. We utilize a set of 99 GPS velocity vectors in the SFB region in order to characterize the strain field and construct a physical model of its present deformation. We first perform an inversion for the continuous velocity gradient field from the discrete GPS velocity field, from which both tensor strain and rotation may be extracted. We then fit this strain field to a model of time-dependent deformation within a 135 km-wide, arcuate shear zone bounded by strong Pacific plate and Sierra Nevada block lithosphere to the SW and NE, respectively. Driving forces are purely lateral, consisting of shear zone deformation imposed by the relative motions between the thick Pacific plate and Sierra Nevada block lithospheres. Assuming depth-dependent viscoelastic structure within the shear zone, we account for the effects of steady creep on faults and viscoelastic relaxation following the 1906 San Francisco and 1989 Loma Prieta earthquakes, subject to constant velocity boundary conditions on the edges of the shear zone: 38 mm/yr fault-parallel motion and variable fault-perpendicular motion. Fault creep is realized by evaluating dislocations on the creeping portions of faults in the fluid limit of the viscoelastic model. The present strain pattern is well-described as a nearly uniform shear strain oriented approximately N35° W (140 nanostrain/yr) plus a more heterogeneous N55° E uniaxial compression averaging 20

  12. Simulation of Tropical Cyclones over Bay of Bengal with NCMRWF Regional Unified Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routray, A.; Singh, Vivek; George, John P.; Mohandas, Saji; Rajagopal, E. N.

    2016-12-01

    This study delineates the relative performance of the 12-km resolution NCMRWF regional Unified Model (NCUM-R) over the operational global NCUM (NCUM-G) model. Forecasts of four Bay of Bengal (BoB) landfalling tropical cyclones (TCs) using several different initial conditions (ICs) are used to compare the performance of two models. The position and intensity errors of the TCs are estimated with respect to the India Meteorological Department (IMD) and Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) best-track datasets and an inter-comparison study is also carried out between IMD and JTWC. The overall results suggest that the NCUM-R simulates the position and intensity of TCs more accurately compared to the NCUM-G. A majority of the TC tracks in the NCUM-G diverge more from the IMD track when compared to NCUM-R simulated tracks. It is also clearly noticed that both the models are more skillful in track prediction when initialized at intensity stages greater than "cyclone" category. However, the mean position errors at different forecast hours and landfall errors of TCs are reduced by approximately 31 and 47% in the NCUM-R simulations compared to NCUM-G simulations, respectively. The mean gain in skill of the NCUM-R in cross track (CT) and along track (AT) error is around 29 and 24% over NCUM-G, respectively. The intensity errors are less in the NCUM-R simulations. The mean rainfall skill scores are considerably improved in the NCUM-R simulations in day-1 and day-2 as compared to the NCUM-G simulations. It is noticed that the mean position errors of the TCs are approximately 8% lower when compared against the JTWC tracks than the IMD tracks. However, the intensity errors are higher against the JTWC than that of IMD most likely due to the averaging period of the wind speed.

  13. An Approach to Understanding Complex Socio-Economic Impacts and Responses to Climate Disruption in the Chesapeake Bay Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, R. K.; Nix, M.; Ihde, A. G.; Paxton, L. J.; Weiss, M.; Simpkins, S.; Fountain, G. H.; APl GAIA Team

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we describe the application of a proven methodology for modeling the complex social and economic interactions of a system under stress to the regional issues that are tied to global climate disruption. Under the auspices of the GAIA project (http://gaia.jhuapl.edu), we have investigated simulating the complex interplay between climate, politics, society, industry, and the environment in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed and associated geographic areas of Maryland, Virginia, and Pennsylvania. This Chesapeake Bay simulation draws on interrelated geophysical and climate models to support decision-making analysis about the Bay. In addition to physical models, however, human activity is also incorporated via input and output calculations. For example, policy implications are modeled in relation to business activities surrounding fishing, farming, industry and manufacturing, land development, and tourism. This approach fosters collaboration among subject matter experts to advance a more complete understanding of the regional impacts of climate change. Simulated interactive competition, in which teams of experts are assigned conflicting objectives in a controlled environment, allow for subject exploration which avoids trivial solutions that neglect the possible responses of affected parties. Results include improved planning, the anticipation of areas of conflict or high risk, and the increased likelihood of developing mutually acceptable solutions.

  14. Sea-level Rise Impacts on Hudson River Marshes and their Vegetation Zonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooks, A.; Nitsche, F. O.

    2016-12-01

    Rising sea levels may cause tidal marshes to be vulnerable to submergence and affect their ability to perform ecosystem services. However, tidal marshes are dynamic ecosystems that can adapt to sea-level rise through inland migration and vertical growth. This study examines how four tidal marshes on the Hudson River (Piermont Marsh, Iona Island Marsh, Tivoli Bays, and Stockport Flats) would be affected by 0.5m, 1m, and 1.5m of sea-level rise by 2100. Using high-resolution LiDAR elevation data and vegetation data, we mapped sea-level rise projections in GIS, accounting for current accretion rates unique to each marsh. We calculated the submerged area of each marsh and analyzed how vegetation zonation in each marsh is expected to change due to rising sea levels. We found that the steep topography of the Hudson River banks limits the marshes' ability to migrate inland, emphasizing the role of elevation-building processes in adaptation. The marshes studied would experience minimal to no inundation under lower rates of sea-level rise such as 0.5m by 2100. At higher projected rates of sea-level rise (1.5m by 2100), Piermont Marsh and Tivoli Bays would experience significant inundation while Iona Island marsh and Stockport Flats would be less affected. Overall, Stockport Flats is projected to be the marsh most resilient to sea-level rise due to its higher accretion rate and its topography. Rising sea levels are also expected to change the areas of vegetation zones, with upland, high marsh, and mid marsh zones generally declining in area and with subtidal and low marsh vegetation zones generally expanding under high rates of sea-level rise. Understanding the impacts of sea-level rise on Hudson River marshes enables long-term planning to adapt to potential changes in marsh ecosystem services and could motivate and inform conservation efforts.

  15. Selective analysis of power plant operation on the Hudson River with emphasis on the Bowline Point Generating Station. Volume 2. [Multiple impact of power plant once-through cooling systems on fish populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnthouse, L. W.; Cannon, J. B.; Christensen, S. G.

    1977-07-01

    Because of the location of the Bowline, Roseton, and Indian Point power generating facilities in the low-salinity zone of the Hudson estuary, operation of these plants with the present once-through cooling systems will adversely influence the fish populations that use the area for spawning and initial periods of growth and development. Recruitment rates and standing crops of several fish species may be lowered in response to the increased mortality caused by entrainment of nonscreenable eggs and larvae and by impingement of screenable young of the year. Entrainment and impingement data are particularly relevant for assessing which fish species have the greatest potential for being adversely affected by operation of Bowline, Roseton, and Indian Point with once-through cooling. These data from each of these three plants suggest that the six species that merit the greatest consideration are striped bass, white perch, tomcod, alewife, blueback herring, and bay anchovy. Two points of view are available for assessing the relative importance of the fish species in the Hudson River. From the fisheries point of view, the only two species of major importance are striped bass and shad. From the fish-community and ecosystem point of view, the dominant species, as determined by seasonal and regional standing crops (in numbers and biomass per hectare), are the six species most commonly entrained and impinged, namely, striped bass, white perch, tomcod, alewife, blueback herring, and anchovy.

  16. A physical model for strain accumulation in the San Francisco Bay Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollitz, F.F.; Nyst, M.

    2005-01-01

    Strain accumulation in tectonically active regions is generally a superposition of the effects of background tectonic loading, steady-state dislocation processes, such as creep, and transient deformation. In the San Francisco Bay region (SFBR), the most uncertain of these processes is transient deformation, which arises primarily in association with large earthquakes. As such, it depends upon the history of faulting and the rheology of the crust and mantle, which together determine the pattern of longer term (decade-scale) post-seismic response to earthquakes. We utilize a set of 102 GPS velocity vectors in the SFBR in order to characterize the strain rate field and construct a physical model of its present deformation. We first perform an inversion for the continuous velocity gradient field from the discrete GPS velocity field, from which both tensor strain rate and rotation rate may be extracted. The present strain rate pattern is well described as a nearly uniform shear strain rate oriented approximately N34??W (140 nanostrain yr-1) plus a N56??E uniaxial compression rate averaging 20 nanostrain yr-1 across the shear zone. We fit the velocity and strain rate fields to a model of time-dependent deformation within a 135-kin-wide, arcuate shear zone bounded by strong Pacific Plate and Sierra Nevada block lithosphere to the SW and NE, respectively. Driving forces are purely lateral, consisting of shear zone deformation imposed by the relative motions between the thick Pacific Plate and Sierra Nevada block lithospheres. Assuming a depth-dependent viscoelastic structure within the shear zone, we account for the effects of steady creep on faults and viscoelastic relaxation following the 1906 San Francisco and 1989 Loma Prieta earthquakes, subject to constant velocity boundary conditions on the edges of the shear zone. Fault creep is realized by evaluating dislocations on the creeping portions of faults in the fluid limit of the viscoelastic model. A priori plate

  17. A physical model for strain accumulation in the San Francisco Bay Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollitz, Fred F.; Nyst, Marleen

    2005-01-01

    Strain accumulation in tectonically active regions is generally a superposition of the effects of background tectonic loading, steady-state dislocation processes, such as creep, and transient deformation. In the San Francisco Bay region (SFBR), the most uncertain of these processes is transient deformation, which arises primarily in association with large earthquakes. As such, it depends upon the history of faulting and the rheology of the crust and mantle, which together determine the pattern of longer term (decade-scale) post-seismic response to earthquakes. We utilize a set of 102 GPS velocity vectors in the SFBR in order to characterize the strain rate field and construct a physical model of its present deformation. We first perform an inversion for the continuous velocity gradient field from the discrete GPS velocity field, from which both tensor strain rate and rotation rate may be extracted. The present strain rate pattern is well described as a nearly uniform shear strain rate oriented approximately N34°W (140 nanostrain yr-1) plus a N56°E uniaxial compression rate averaging 20 nanostrain yr-1 across the shear zone. We fit the velocity and strain rate fields to a model of time-dependent deformation within a 135-km-wide, arcuate shear zone bounded by strong Pacific Plate and Sierra Nevada block lithosphere to the SW and NE, respectively. Driving forces are purely lateral, consisting of shear zone deformation imposed by the relative motions between the thick Pacific Plate and Sierra Nevada block lithospheres. Assuming a depth-dependent viscoelastic structure within the shear zone, we account for the effects of steady creep on faults and viscoelastic relaxation following the 1906 San Francisco and 1989 Loma Prieta earthquakes, subject to constant velocity boundary conditions on the edges of the shear zone. Fault creep is realized by evaluating dislocations on the creeping portions of faults in the fluid limit of the viscoelastic model. A priori plate

  18. Water mass bio-optical properties in the Monterey Bay region: Fluorescence-based inference of shifts in phytoplankton photophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolliff, J. K.; Gould, R. W., Jr.; Penta, B.; Teague, W. J.; DeRada, S.; Chavez, F. P.; Arnone, R. A.

    2012-07-01

    A physical and bio-optical field survey of the Monterey Bay area was conducted during May-June 2008. The combined bio-optical and physical data may be summarized as a transition between two end-member states during the late spring to summer upwelling season: (1) the mesotrophic, nanoflagellate-dominated, low-salinity surface waters (chlorophyll-a ˜ 0.5-2 mg m-3; S 2 mg m-3; S > 33.8) of Monterey Bay and adjacent continental shelf areas. High-resolution and collocated spectrophotometric, fluorometric and CTD data obtained from a towed platform indicated low-salinity subarctic-origin surface waters intruded into Monterey Bay on 4 June. The dark in vivo fluorometry (IVF) phytoplankton response normalized to particle absorption at 676 nm (the apparent fluorescence efficiency, AFE) was nearly fourfold larger in this water mass type compared to higher salinity surface waters more typical of Monterey Bay. The collocated fluorescence and optical data were then used to estimate in situ irradiance values and determine apparent light saturation intensities (I'k) based on the remarkably consistent AFE water column inflection points. I'kvalues retrieved from the low-salinity surface waters were approximately half those obtained over the continental shelf. An analysis of concomitant HPLC data, in addition to historical data for the region, suggest these observed fluorescence trends may be indicative of taxon-specific variation in photophysiology. Specifically, the subarctic water mass-associated pelagic nanoflagellate group likely possesses a fundamentally different photosynthetic architecture than large diatoms prototypical of coastal upwelling regimes.

  19. SOLAR PANELS ON HUDSON COUNTY FACILITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BARRY, KEVIN

    2014-06-06

    This project involved the installation of an 83 kW grid-connected photovoltaic system tied into the energy management system of Hudson County's new 60,000 square foot Emergency Operations and Command Center and staff offices. Other renewable energy features of the building include a 15 kW wind turbine, geothermal heating and cooling, natural daylighting, natural ventilation, gray water plumbing system and a green roof. The County intends to seek Silver LEED certification for the facility.

  20. Physiography and superficial geology of the copper-nickel study region, northeastern Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olcott, P.G.; Siegel, D.I.

    1978-01-01

    The Copper-Nickel study region lies in the Superior Upland physiographic province and is located approximately 60 miles north of Duluth and 100 miles southeast of International Falls, Minnesota. It straddles the Laurentian Divide, which separates Hudson Bay and Lake Superior drainage. The topography exhibits a southwesterly trending lineation that parallels the strike of southeastward-dipping bedrock units and the southwestward direction of ice movement during Pleistocene glaciation. For this study, the region has been divided into seven physiographic areas based on geomorphic features related to the bedrock surface, glacial deposits, and hydrogeologic significance.

  1. Initial results from a test of the NASA EAARL lidar in the Tampa Bay region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, John C.; Wright, Wayne C.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Clayton, Tonya; Hansen, Mark; Longenecker, John; Gesch, Dean B.; Crane, Michael; Dutton, S.

    2002-01-01

    An initial test of the performance of the NASA Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) over coastal environments around the margins of an urbanized Gulf of Mexico estuary was performed over Tampa Bay in January 2002. The EAARL is a raster-scanning, water-penetrating, full-waveform adaptive lidar that is coupled to aircraft positioning systems and a downlooking color digital camera. The EAARL has unique capabilities for simultaneously mapping topography, shallow bathymetry, and vegetation. Initial analysis within 2 Tampa Bay subregions traversed by the survey flightlines has revealed that the EAARL can survey shallow bathymetry and variables associated with benthic cover in remarkable detail. The results of this ongoing study will aid in developing recommendations on the appropriate use of NASA EAARL surveys for mapping bathymetry and benthic habitats in estuaries around the Gulf of Mexico.

  2. Budování značky Hudson Global Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Šamšulová, Kristýna

    2014-01-01

    The main topic of this bachelor thesis is Hudson brand building of the recruitment company Hudson Global Resources s.r.o. in Czech market. The aim of the thesis is to define according my own research the Hudson brand perception by clients of the company and propose a Hudson brand strategy and also to evalute which brand management tool the company should use.

  3. Data from theodolite measurements of creep rates on San Francisco Bay region faults, California: 1979-2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galehouse, Jon S.

    2002-01-01

    My purpose is to make our creep data on San Francisco Bay region active faults available to the scientific research community. My student research assistants and I measured creep (aseismic slip) rates on these faults from 1979 until my retirement from the project in 2001. These data are further described in my final technical report as principal investigator, which summarizes results from 22 September 1979 through 28 February 2001 (Galehouse, 2001). We made over 2,600 creep measurements, about one-third in the ten years prior to the Loma Prieta earthquake (LPEQ) and two-thirds in the 11.4 years following it. The measurements are continuing to be made by members of the Geosciences Department at San Francisco State University (SFSU) under the direction of Karen Grove and John Caskey. A complete analysis of our results obtained on the Hayward fault is presented in Lienkaemper, Galehouse, and Simpson (2001). A formal report based on the entire San Francisco Bay region data set is in preparation. Data sheets for each site along the fault are available for downloading in Excel format to facilitate analysis of the data. They are also available as tab-delimited raw data. The data include all regular measurement sites, SF–1 through SF–34, and the 20 SFSU and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) afterslip sites on the Hayward fault.

  4. Using GRACE and altimetry to assess the regional sea level budget in the Indian Ocean and Bay of Bengal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietbroek, Roelof; Uebbing, Bernd; Kusche, Jürgen; Brunnabend, Sandra-Esther

    2016-04-01

    There are a variety of factors driving present-day sea level rise. On one hand, mass loss from Greenland, Antarctica, and the world's glaciers, cause regionally varying sea level increase. While on the other hand, volumetric expansion due to ocean heating, induce long term trends as well as short term fluctuations. In addition, internal ocean mass fluctuations, and vertical land motion play a considerable role on regional to local scales. On such scales, quantifying the regional sea level budget is more challenging compared to the global average, due to increased errors and complex coastal processes. A combination of GRACE gravimetry and radar altimetry allows the separation of the volumetric contribution from the mass contribution. Here, we also resolve for a finer separation into the various contributions (Greenland, Antarctica, etc.), which requires a more sophisticated approach. We use a simultaneous inversion of GRACE and satellite altimetry data over the years 2002-2014, to separate the sea level budget in the Indian Ocean. For this means, known spatial patterns for the different contributions are prescribed while their individual time variations are estimated from the data. Characteristics of sea level variations in the Indian Ocean (total trend of 3.8 mm/yr) are compared with the global mean sea level budget (2.7 mm/yr). The Bay of Bengal will then serve as an example for a further regionalization of the inversion approach. We find a total sea level in the Bay of Bengal region ranging from 3.8 mm/yr to 5.8 mm./yr, depending on the chosen averaging area and inversion set up. The contributions from the ice sheets and glaciers stand at 1.5 mm/yr, whereas terrestrial hydrology has a negative contribution of about -0.3 mm/yr. The most variable contribution is caused by steric effects whose trend ranges from 1.5 to 3 mm/yr.

  5. Cytochrome P450 and organochlorine contaminants in black-crowned night-herons from the Chesapeake Bay region, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattner, B.A.; Melancon, M.J.; Rice, C.P.; Riley, W.; Eisemann, J.; Hines, R.K.

    1997-01-01

    Black-crowned night-heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) offspring were collected from a relatively uncontaminated coastal reference site (next to Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge, VA, USA) and two sites in the Chesapeake Bay watershed (Baltimore Harbor, MD and Rock Creek Park, Washington, DC, USA). Hepatic microsomal activities of benzyloxyresorufin-O-dealkylase and ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase were significantly elevated (up to sixfold and ninefold induction, respectively) in pipping embryos from the Baltimore Harbor colony compared to the reference site, whereas values in embryos from the Rock Creek Park colony were intermediate. Concentrations of organochlorine pesticides and metabolites in pipping embryos from both sites in the Chesapeake watershed were greater than at the reference site but below the known threshold for reproductive impairment. However, concentrations of 10 arylhydrocarbon receptor-active polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners and estimated toxic equivalents were up to 37-fold greater in embryos collected from these two sites in the Chesapeake Bay region, with values for toxic congeners 77 and 126 exceeding those observed in pipping heron embryos from the Great Lakes. Monooxygenase activity of pipping embryos was associated with concentrations of several organochlorine pesticides, total PCBs, arylhydrocarbon receptor-active PCB congeners, and toxic equivalents (r = 0.30-0.59), providing further evidence of the value of cytochrome P450 as a biomarker of organic contaminant exposure. Organochlorine contaminant levels were greater in 10-d-old nestlings from Baltimore Harbor than the reference site but had no apparent effect on monooxygenase activity or growth. These findings demonstrate induction of cytochrome P450 in pipping black-crowned night-heron embryos in the Chesapeake Bay region, probably by exposure to PCB congeners of local origin, and the accumulation of organochlorine pesticides and metabolites in nestling herons from Baltimore

  6. Holocene paleoclimate records from a large California estuarine system and its watershed region: linking watershed climate and bay conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamud-Roam, Frances P.; Lynn Ingram, B.; Hughes, Malcolm; Florsheim, Joan L.

    2006-07-01

    The San Francisco Bay-Delta system includes a watershed that covers a large area of California and provides water to two-thirds of the State's population. Climate over the estuary and its watershed in the dry summer months is controlled by the subtropical high which dominates and deflects storms from California. The subtropical high weakens and migrates south as the Aleutian Low strengthens, bringing wet winter storms to the region. Paleoclimatic records from the Bay and its greater watershed, spanning the Holocene, are reviewed here in order to better understand natural variations of precipitation and runoff and the linkages between those variations and the salinity and ecosystems of the estuary. To better understand regional-scale climate patterns, paleoclimate records from coastal California and the Great Basin are also considered. Large fluctuations in climate have occurred during the period of interest, and there is generally good agreement between the paleoclimate records from different regions. Early Holocene climate throughout California was marked by rising temperatures and reduced moisture as seen in fire records from the watershed. This warmth and aridity peaked about 5000-7000 years ago and was followed by a cooling trend, with variable moisture conditions. The Estuary formed relatively rapidly in response to a high rate of sea level rise that dominated the Holocene until about 6000 years ago, and the subsequent reduced rate of inundation allowed vast tidal marshes to form along the edges of the estuary, which have since been recording changes in environmental conditions. The impacts of changing regional climate patterns are experienced in the San Francisco Bay-Delta system, as altered fresh water flows result in altered estuary salinity. For example, approximately 3800 cal yr B.P., records from throughout the state indicate a cool, moist period, and Bay salinity was reduced; this period was followed by a general drying trend throughout California over

  7. SEAWATER INTRUSION TYPES AND REGIONAL DIVISIONS IN THE SOUTHERN COAST OF LAIZHOU BAY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟广兰; 韩有松; 王少青; 王珍岩

    2002-01-01

    The southern coast of Laizhou Bay, Bohai Sea, is one of the areas in China most seriously impacted by seawater intrusion. Based on the sources of intruding wate rbodies, seawater intrusion can be divided into two types: intrusion of saline water derived from modern seawater, and intrusion of subsurface brine and saline water derived from paleo-seawater in shallow Quaternary sediments. There are so me distinct differences in their formation, mechanism and damage. The subsurface brine intrusion is a special typ e, which can cause very serious disaster.The coastal landform and the Quaternary hydrogeological environment are pr edominant factors in the classification of seawater intrusion types. Various coastal environments in diff erent coastal sections result in three types of intrusion: seawater intrusion, saline groundwater intrusion, and mixed seawater and saline water intrusion, in the southern coast of Laizhou Bay, which can be divided into four areas: the seawater intrusion area in the northern Laizhou City coast, the mixed seawater and saline groundwater in trusion area in the Baisha River-Jiaolai River mouth plain area, the mixed seawater and saline groundwater intrus ion area in the Weihe River mouth plain area northern Changyi county coast, and the saline groundwater intrusion area in the northern Shouguang plains.

  8. SEAWATER INTRUSION TYPES AND REGIONAL DIVISIONS IN THE SOUTHERN COAST OF LAIZHOU BAY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟广兰; 韩有松; 王少青; 王珍岩

    2002-01-01

    The southern coast of Laizhou Bay, Bohai Sea, is one of the areas in China most seriously impacted by seawater intrusion. Based on the sources of intruding waterbedies, seawater intrusion can be divided into two types: intrusion of saline water derived from modern seawater, and intrusion of subsurface brine and saline water derived from paleo-seawater in shallow Quaternary sediments. There are some distinct differences in their formation, mechanism and damage. The subsurface brine intrusion is a special type, which can cause very serious disaster. The coastal landform and the Quaternary hydrogeological environment are predominant factors in the classification of seawater intrusion types. Various coastal environments in different coastal sections result in three types of intrusion: seawater intrusion, saline groundwater intrusion, and mixed seawater and saline water intrusion, in the southern coast of Laizhou Bay, which can be divided into four areas: the sea-water intrusion area in the northern Laizhou City coast, the mixed seawater and saline groundwater intrusion area in the Baisha River-Jiaolai River mouth plain area, the mixed seawater and saline groundwater intrusion area in the Weihe River mouth plain area northern Changyi county coast, and the saline ground-water intrusion area in the northern Shouguang plains.

  9. Trends in the seasonal length and opening dates of a winter road in the western James Bay region, Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Yukari; Gough, William A.; Butler, Ken; Tsuji, Leonard J. S.

    2016-07-01

    In northern Canada, winter roads are essential for communities. The duration of the winter road season depends on particular meteorological conditions. In this study, we investigated whether there is a temporal relationship between seasonal weather trends and the historical opening dates of the James Bay Winter Road in Ontario's Far North. The statistical significance of the temporal trends and their magnitude are determined by the Mann-Kendall test and the Theil-Sen method. Results showed that decreasing trends in the freezing degree-days (FDDs) are statistically significant, along with the statistically significant increasing trends of monthly averages of both T min and T mean during the winter months in the western James Bay region for the 1961-2014 period. However, there were no statistically significant linkages between opening dates and FDDs detected, perhaps due to the paucity of opening dates data, although early opening dates in the last 10 years may be the result of larger FDDs. The FDDs during the months of October through December were more closely linked to opening dates than FDDs that were calculated up the opening date (including January dates), suggesting the key role of preconditioning during late fall and early winter. The lowest FDDs for the months of October to December that resulted in a viable winter road were 380 degree-days (°C). This threshold can be potentially used as a lower threshold for winter roads.

  10. Trends in the seasonal length and opening dates of a winter road in the western James Bay region, Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Yukari; Gough, William A.; Butler, Ken; Tsuji, Leonard J. S.

    2017-08-01

    In northern Canada, winter roads are essential for communities. The duration of the winter road season depends on particular meteorological conditions. In this study, we investigated whether there is a temporal relationship between seasonal weather trends and the historical opening dates of the James Bay Winter Road in Ontario's Far North. The statistical significance of the temporal trends and their magnitude are determined by the Mann-Kendall test and the Theil-Sen method. Results showed that decreasing trends in the freezing degree-days (FDDs) are statistically significant, along with the statistically significant increasing trends of monthly averages of both T min and T mean during the winter months in the western James Bay region for the 1961-2014 period. However, there were no statistically significant linkages between opening dates and FDDs detected, perhaps due to the paucity of opening dates data, although early opening dates in the last 10 years may be the result of larger FDDs. The FDDs during the months of October through December were more closely linked to opening dates than FDDs that were calculated up the opening date (including January dates), suggesting the key role of preconditioning during late fall and early winter. The lowest FDDs for the months of October to December that resulted in a viable winter road were 380 degree-days (°C). This threshold can be potentially used as a lower threshold for winter roads.

  11. Distribution and relative abundance of caribou in the Hudson Plains Ecozone of Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey J. Magoun

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available To determine past distribution and relative abundance of caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou in the Hudson Plains Ecozone (HPE of Ontario, we reviewed past HPE-wide winter systematic aerial surveys, partial winter systematic surveys, summer photographic surveys, incidental observations of caribou, and other sources of information from the period 1950—2003. We conducted new HPE-wide aerial surveys in February 2003 and 2004 to evaluate current distribution patterns. From this information, we defined 9 core wintering areas in the HPE and differentiated between 3 catego¬ries of relative abundance. Wintering areas for the January—March period have changed relatively little over the past 45 years. Summer distribution of caribou along the Hudson Bay coast apparently shifted or expanded from the area west of the Severn River to the central and eastern portions of the coast since the 1980s, and caribou observations have become much more common in the area east of the Winisk River since 1998. Because major resource development activities in the HPE are proposed and some are imminent, we recommend additional caribou surveys to document current caribou population identity, size, and distribution, and research projects to better define caribou wintering areas, calving areas, and movement patterns in the HPE.

  12. Impact of impingement on the Hudson River white perch population. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnthouse, L.W.; Van Winkle, W.; Kirk, B.L.; Vaughan, D.S.

    1982-02-01

    This report summarizes a series of analyses of the magnitude and biological significance of the impingement of white perch at the Indian Point Nuclear Generating Station and other Hudson River power plants. Included in these analyses were evaluations of: (1) two independent lines of evidence relating to the magnitude of impingement impacts on the Hudson River white perch population; (2) the additional impact caused by entrainment of white perch; (3) data relating to density-dependent growth among young-of-the-year white perch; (4) the feasibility of performing population-level analyses of impingement impacts on the white perch populations of Chesapeake Bay and the Delaware River; and (5) the feasibility of using simple food chain and food web models to evaluate community-level effects of impingement and entrainment. Estimated reductions in the abundances of the 1974 and 1975 white perch year classes, caused by impingement and entrainment, were high enough that the possibility of adverse long-term effects cannot be excluded.

  13. Late Pleistocene eolian features in southeastern Maryland and Chesapeake Bay region indicate strong WNW-NW winds accompanied growth of the Laurentide Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markewich, H.W.; Litwin, R.J.; Pavich, M.J.; Brook, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    Inactive parabolic dunes are present in southeastern Maryland, USA, along the east bank of the Potomac River. More elongate and finer-grained eolian deposits and paha-like ridges characterize the Potomac River-Patuxent River upland and the west side of Chesapeake Bay. These ridges are streamlined erosional features, veneered with eolian sediment and interspersed with dunes in the low-relief headwaters of Potomac- and Patuxent-river tributaries. Axis data for the dunes and ridges indicate formation by WNW-NW winds. Optically stimulated luminescence and radiocarbon age data suggest dune formation from ??? 33-15??ka, agreeing with the 30-13??ka ages Denny, C.S., Owens, J.P., Sirkin, L., Rubin, M., 1979. The Parsonburg Sand in the central Delmarva Peninsula, Maryland and Delaware. U.S. Geol. Surv. Prof. Pap. 1067-B, 16??pp. suggested for eolian deposits east of Chesapeake Bay. Age range and paleowind direction(s) for eolian features in the Bay region approximate those for late Wisconsin loess in the North American midcontinent. Formation of midcontinent loess and Bay-region eolian features was coeval with rapid growth of the Laurentide Ice Sheet and strong cooling episodes (??18O minima) evident in Greenland ice cores. Age and paleowind-direction coincidence, for eolian features in the midcontinent and Bay region, indicates strong mid-latitude WNW-NW winds for several hundred kilometers south of the Laurentide glacial terminus that were oblique to previously simulated anticyclonic winds for the last glacial maximum.

  14. Habitat Mapping Cruise - Hudson Canyon (HB0904, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Objectives are to: 1) perform multibeam mapping of transitional and deepwater habitats in Hudson Canyon (off New Jersey) with the National Institute of Undersea...

  15. Data from theodolite measurements of creep rates on San Francisco Bay region faults, California, 1979-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Forrest S.; Lienkaemper, James J.; Caskey, S. John

    2009-01-01

    Our purpose is to annually update our creep-data archive on San Francisco Bay region active faults for use by the scientific research community. Earlier data (1979-2001) were reported in Galehouse (2002) and were analyzed and described in detail in a summary report (Galehouse and Lienkaemper, 2003). A complete analysis of our earlier results obtained on the Hayward Fault was presented in Lienkaemper, Galehouse and Simpson (2001) and updated in Lienkaemper and others (2012). Lienkaemper and others (2014a) provide a new overview and analysis of fault creep along all sections of the northern San Andreas Fault system, from which they estimate by how much fault creep reduces the seismic hazard for each fault section.

  16. Distributions of polyhalogenated compounds in Hudson River (New York, USA) fish in relation to human uses along the river

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, Lawrence C., E-mail: lxskinne@gw.dec.state.ny.us [New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, 625 Broadway, Albany, NY 12233 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    PCBs (as Aroclor concentrations) have been extensively examined in fish along the Hudson River, but other xenobiotic chemicals in fish have had limited assessment. This study determined concentrations and congener distributions of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polybrominated and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PBDD/Fs and PCDD/Fs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in smallmouth bass and striped bass taken from a 385 km reach of the Hudson River. Concentrations of PBDEs and PCBs in smallmouth bass, and PCBs in striped bass, were positively related to human uses of the compounds in the basin. Generally low levels of PCDD/Fs were found. One striped bass, however, contained elevated 2,3,7,8-TCDD, indicating exposure to a known source in the adjacent Newark Bay-Passaic River basin. PBDDs were generally below detection. PBDFs were present in four of 18 smallmouth bass, but were not detected in striped bass. Dioxin-like PCBs contribute most to 2,3,7,8-TCDD toxic equivalents in 29 of 30 samples. - Highlights: > In the Hudson River, > PBDEs in smallmouth bass follow human population patterns, but do not for striped bass. > Proximity to known PCB sources govern PCB levels and patterns in fish. > PBDFs were in smallmouth bass but not striped bass. PBDDs were present in one fish. > PCDD/Fs were low in 29 of 30 fish. A 2,3,7,8-TCDD source affected one striped bass. > PCBs contribute most to 2,3,7,8-TCDD toxic equivalents in 29 of 30 samples. - Residues of polyhalogenated compounds in resident and migratory fish from the Hudson River are compared with human uses of the compounds in the river basin.

  17. NODC Standard Product: Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP) Chesapeake Bay Region Data from 1984 to 1989 on CD-ROM (NODC Accession 9200303)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data set on this CD-ROM shows changes in land cover for the Chesapeake Bay region over the 5-year interval from 1984 to 1988-89. The data set was produced...

  18. Microcystin in aquatic food webs of the Baltic and Chesapeake Bay regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukaveckas, Paul A.; Lesutienė, Jūratė; Gasiūnaitė, Zita R.; Ložys, Linas; Olenina, Irina; Pilkaitytė, Renata; Pūtys, Žilvinas; Tassone, Spencer; Wood, Joseph

    2017-05-01

    We undertook a comparative study of the James River Estuary, a sub-estuary of Chesapeake Bay, and the Curonian Lagoon, a sub-estuary of the Baltic Sea, to better understand the factors that determine the presence and persistence of algal toxins in food webs. Over a 2-year period, we measured microcystin concentrations in water, sediment and biota (fish and shellfish) at both sites. Across both food webs we found highest levels of microcystin among consumers of suspended particulate matter, including planktivorous fishes and filter-feeding shellfish, and lower levels of toxin among piscivores, scavengers and benthic omnivores. Despite similar levels of microcystin in the water column at the two sites, we observed higher toxin levels in fish and sediments of the Curonian Lagoon. We attribute this difference to the legacy of prior toxic cyanobacteria blooms in the Curonian Lagoon and hydrologic factors that result in a predominance of autochthonously-derived organic matter in the sediments at this site. Our results suggest that a consideration of species-specific differences in feeding habits, and organic matter sources supporting food webs are important to understanding the accumulation and persistence of algal toxins in food webs and should therefore be considered in assessment of risks to aquatic biota and human health.

  19. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the LOUIS S. ST. LAURENT in the Baffin Bay, Davis Strait and others from 1997-08-03 to 1997-08-18 (NODC Accession 0114432)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0114432 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from LOUIS S. ST. LAURENT in the Baffin Bay, Davis Strait, Hudson...

  20. Probabilistic Methodology for Estimation of Number and Economic Loss (Cost) of Future Landslides in the San Francisco Bay Region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crovelli, Robert A.; Coe, Jeffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    The Probabilistic Landslide Assessment Cost Estimation System (PLACES) presented in this report estimates the number and economic loss (cost) of landslides during a specified future time in individual areas, and then calculates the sum of those estimates. The analytic probabilistic methodology is based upon conditional probability theory and laws of expectation and variance. The probabilistic methodology is expressed in the form of a Microsoft Excel computer spreadsheet program. Using historical records, the PLACES spreadsheet is used to estimate the number of future damaging landslides and total damage, as economic loss, from future landslides caused by rainstorms in 10 counties of the San Francisco Bay region in California. Estimates are made for any future 5-year period of time. The estimated total number of future damaging landslides for the entire 10-county region during any future 5-year period of time is about 330. Santa Cruz County has the highest estimated number of damaging landslides (about 90), whereas Napa, San Francisco, and Solano Counties have the lowest estimated number of damaging landslides (5?6 each). Estimated direct costs from future damaging landslides for the entire 10-county region for any future 5-year period are about US $76 million (year 2000 dollars). San Mateo County has the highest estimated costs ($16.62 million), and Solano County has the lowest estimated costs (about $0.90 million). Estimated direct costs are also subdivided into public and private costs.

  1. Preliminary maps of Quaternary deposits and liquefaction susceptibility, nine-county San Francisco Bay region, California: a digital database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Keith L.; Sowers, Janet M.; Witter, Robert C.; Wentworth, Carl M.; Helley, Edward J.; Nicholson, Robert S.; Wright, Heather M.; Brown, Katherine H.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents a preliminary map and database of Quaternary deposits and liquefaction susceptibility for the nine-county San Francisco Bay region, together with a digital compendium of ground effects associated with past earthquakes in the region. The report consists of (1) a spatial database of fivedata layers (Quaternary deposits, quadrangle index, and three ground effects layers) and two text layers (a labels and leaders layer for Quaternary deposits and for ground effects), (2) two small-scale colored maps (Quaternary deposits and liquefaction susceptibility), (3) a text describing the Quaternary map, liquefaction interpretation, and the ground effects compendium, and (4) the databse description pamphlet. The nine counties surrounding San Francisco Bay straddle the San Andreas fault system, which exposes the region to serious earthquake hazard (Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities, 1999). Much of the land adjacent to the Bay and the major rivers and streams is underlain by unconsolidated deposits that are particularly vulnerable to earthquake shaking and liquefaction of water-saturated granular sediment. This new map provides a modern and regionally consistent treatment of Quaternary surficial deposits that builds on the pioneering mapping of Helley and Lajoie (Helley and others, 1979) and such intervening work as Atwater (1982), Helley and others (1994), and Helley and Graymer (1997a and b). Like these earlier studies, the current mapping uses geomorphic expression, pedogenic soils, and inferred depositional environments to define and distinguish the map units. In contrast to the twelve map units of Helley and Lajoie, however, this new map uses a complex stratigraphy of some forty units, which permits a more realistic portrayal of the Quaternary depositional system. The two colored maps provide a regional summary of the new mapping at a scale of 1:275,000, a scale that is sufficient to show the general distribution and relationships of

  2. Decadal re-evaluation of contaminant exposure and productivity of ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) nesting in Chesapeake Bay Regions of Concern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Rebecca; Rattner, Barnett A.; McGowan, Peter C.; Hale, Robert C.; Schultz, Sandra; Karouna, Natalie; Ottinger, Mary Ann

    2015-01-01

    The last large-scale ecotoxicological study of ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) in Chesapeake Bay was conducted in 2000-2001 and focused on U.S. EPA-designated Regions of Concern (ROCs; Baltimore Harbor/Patapsco, Anacostia/middle Potomac, and Elizabeth Rivers). In 2011-2012, ROCs were re-evaluated to determine spatial and temporal trends in productivity and contaminants. Concentrations of p,p'-DDE were low in eggs and below the threshold associated with eggshell thinning. Eggs from the Anacostia/middle Potomac Rivers had lower total PCB concentrations in 2011 than in 2000; however, concentrations remained unchanged in Baltimore Harbor. Polybrominated diphenyl ether flame retardants declined by 40%, and five alternative brominated flame retardants were detected at low levels. Osprey productivity was adequate to sustain local populations, and there was no relation between productivity and halogenated contaminants. Our findings document continued recovery of the osprey population, declining levels of many persistent halogenated compounds, and modest evidence of genetic damage in nestlings from industrialized regions.

  3. Supporting Coastal Management Decisions in the Face of Sea-Level Rise: Case Study for the Chesapeake Bay Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudt, A. C.; Glick, P.; Clough, J. S.; Nunley, B.

    2008-12-01

    Sea-level rise needs to be a major consideration in regional coastal management and ecological restoration plans. The National Wildlife Federation has initiated a multi-pronged strategy for assisting decision makers at government agencies that manage near-shore ecosystems in several vulnerable coastal regions. Results from our work in the Chesapeake Bay region will be presented. This strategy involves: (1) Detailed modeling of how coastal habitats will migrate in response to a range of sea-level rise scenarios. For this work, we used the Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM), which simulates the dominant processes involved in wetland conversions and shoreline modifications during long-term sea-level rise and takes into consideration localized changes in land elevation due to geological and ecological factors. These model results provide specific information about the locations that are likely to experience shifts in coastal marshes, swamps, beaches, and other habitats due to sea-level rise at a scale that is relevant to regional decision making. (2) Extensive literature review and analysis of habitat, fish, and wildlife impacts potentially resulting from expected sea-level rise and other local climate changes. Synthesizing the available research is an important service for natural resource agencies that are only beginning to consider climate impacts on ecosystems and natural resources. (3) Analysis of government programs and policies relevant to coastal management and identification of opportunities to revise these policies in light of projected climate changes. An important aspect of this analysis is meeting with key decision makers at relevant state fish and wildlife agencies to better understand the factors that affect their abilities to effect policy changes. (4) Proactive campaign to share our results with diverse audiences. We have developed different research products, ranging from a technical report of the modeling results to short report briefs, to

  4. Detecting and assessing Spartina invasion in coastal region of China:A case study in the Xiangshan Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Changming; ZHANG Xin; QI Jiaguo

    2016-01-01

    Spartina alterniflora is one of exotic plants along the coastal region in China. It was introduced as an important engineering approach to ecological restoration in the later 1970s. However, owing to its good adaptability and strong reproductive capacity, the introduced species is explosively spreading along the coastal region quickly and resulting in a significant impact on the health and safety of coastal wetland ecosystems. It is imperative to quantify the spatial extent and the rate ofS. alterniflora sprawl in order to assess its ecological damages and economic impacts. Remote sensing techniques have been used to address these challenges but large unsuccessful due to mixed spectral properties. In this study, a hybrid method was proposed forS. alterniflora detection using medium resolution remote sensing images by integrating both spatial and spectral features ofS. alterniflora. The hybrid method consists of two phases: (1) delineation of intertidal zone as the potential area ofS. alterniflora distribution and (2) extraction ofS. alterniflora fraction distribution with a mixture pixel analysis. The proposed method was tested at the Xiangshan Bay on the east coastal region of Zhejiang Province, China, and mapped the spatial extent ofS. alterniflora with Landsat datasets in the 2003, 2009 and 2014. The results showed that, theS. alterniflora has grown exponentially over past 10 years. In 2003, the total area ofS. alterniflora was about 590 hm2, but quickly reached to 1 745 hm2 in 2009, and 5 715 hm2 in 2014. With a rate of approximately 10-folds growth within a decade, the invasive species almost occupied all muddy beaches to become the most dominant coastal salt vegetation in this region. It is believed that the strong biological reproductive capacity was the primary reason for such quick spread and at the same time human reclamation activities were also believed to have facilitated the environmental conditions forS. alterniflora sprawl.

  5. A BAYES LIKELIHOOD INFORMATION THEORETIC APPROACH FOR THE EXOGENOUS AGGREGATION OF REGIONAL GROUND WATER QUALITY DATA

    Science.gov (United States)

    This work addresses a potentially serious problem in analysis or synthesis of spatially explicit data on ground water quality from wells, known to geographers as the modifiable areal unit problem (MAUP). It results from the fact that in regional aggregation of spatial data, inves...

  6. 78 FR 76140 - Extension of Public Comment Period for the Champlain Hudson Power Express Transmission Line...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-16

    ... Extension of Public Comment Period for the Champlain Hudson Power Express Transmission Line Project Draft... Hudson Power Express Transmission Line Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0447). The... permit to the Applicant, Champlain Hudson Power Express, Inc. (CHPEI), to construct, operate,...

  7. 77 FR 32984 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Maine, Hudson Museum, Orono, ME

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Maine, Hudson Museum, Orono, ME AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Maine, Hudson Museum has... contact the University of Maine, Hudson Museum. Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian...

  8. 76 FR 63342 - Environmental Impact Statement, Tappan Zee Hudson River Crossing Project (Rockland and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-12

    ... Impact Statement, Tappan Zee Hudson River Crossing Project (Rockland and Westchester Counties, NY) AGENCY... Tappan Zee Hudson River crossing in Rockland and Westchester Counties, New York. The purpose of this... infrastructure of the Tappan Zee Hudson River crossing. 1. Description of the Project Area The Tappan Zee...

  9. Regulation of eutrophication susceptibility in oligohaline regions of a northern Gulf of Mexico estuary, Mobile Bay, Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehrter, John C. [Dauphin Island Sea Lab, University of Alabama, 101 Bienville Boulevard, Dauphin Island, AL 36528 (United States)], E-mail: lehrter.john@epa.gov

    2008-08-15

    The factors regulating the eutrophication susceptibility of seven oligohaline regions in the sub-estuaries of Mobile Bay, Alabama were examined in a comparative analysis. The oligohaline regions differed primarily by the dominant land-use of their upstream watersheds, with two of the regions being primarily urban, two being primarily agricultural, and three being primarily forested. A stepwise model selection procedure was used to determine a suite of multiple regression models describing eutrophication response, in terms of a chlorophyll a (chla) on a sampling event basis, in relation to estuarine mixing time scales, nutrient concentrations, light availability, and watershed delivery of freshwater and nutrients. The models indicated a strong positive relationship between chla and mixing time scales (i.e., residence time or freshwater flushing time). Mixing time scales longer than five days allowed maximum chla (64 {mu}g l{sup -1}), while lowest chla (<1 {mu}g l{sup -1}) occurred when mixing time scales were less than two days. Of the watershed inputs, chla exhibited opposing relationships with the components of freshwater load, having a negative relationship with discharge and a positive relationship with incoming freshwater nitrogen concentrations. Estuarine phosphorus concentrations and photosynthetically active radiation were also found to be good descriptors of chla. The comparative approach employed here allowed for the development of empirical models that were used to determine the nutrient concentration reductions required to achieve a trophic state of <20 {mu}g l{sup -1} chla. The average reductions in nitrogen and phosphorus needed to achieve this trophic state ranged from 0 to 32%.

  10. Mechanisms Responsible for the Observed Thermodynamic Structure in a Convective Boundary Layer Over the Hudson Valley of New York State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Jeffrey M.; Fitzjarrald, David R.

    2017-02-01

    We examine cases of a regional elevated mixed layer (EML) observed during the Hudson Valley Ambient Meteorology Study (HVAMS) conducted in New York State, USA in 2003. Previously observed EMLs referred to topographic domains on scales of 105 -106 km2 . Here, we present observational evidence of the mechanisms responsible for the development and maintenance of regional EMLs overlying a valley-based convective boundary layer (CBL) on much smaller spatial scales (deployed during the HVAMS, we show that cross-valley horizontal advection, along-valley channelling, and fog-induced cold-air pooling are responsible for the formation and maintenance of the EML and valley-CBL coupling over New York State's Hudson Valley. The upper layer stability of the overlying EML constrains growth of the valley CBL, and this has important implications for air dispersion, aviation interests, and fog forecasting.

  11. Lateral extension of π conjugation along the bay regions of bisanthene through a diels-alder cycloaddition reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jinling

    2011-11-14

    Diels-Alder cycloaddition reactions at the bay regions of bisanthene (1) with dienophiles such as 1,4-naphthoquinone have been investigated. The products were submitted to nucleophilic addition followed by reductive aromatization reactions to afford the laterally extended bisanthene derivatives 2 and 3. Attempted synthesis of a larger expanded bisanthene 4 revealed an unexpected hydrogenation reaction at the last reductive aromatization step. Unusual Michael addition was observed on quinone 14, which was obtained by Diels-Alder reaction between 1 and 1,4-anthraquinone. Compounds 1-3 exhibited near-infrared (NIR) absorption and emission with high-to-moderate fluorescent quantum yields. Their structures and absorption spectra were studied by density function theory and non-planar twisted structures were calculated for 2 and 3. All compounds showed amphoteric redox behavior with multiple oxidation/reduction waves. Oxidative titration with SbCl 5 gave stable radical cations, and the process was followed by UV/Vis/NIR spectroscopic measurements. Their photostability was measured and correlated to their different geometries and electronic structures. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Geology, geochronology, and paleogeography of the southern Sonoma volcanic field and adjacent areas, northern San Francisco Bay region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, D.L.; Saucedo, G.J.; Clahan, K.B.; Fleck, R.J.; Langenheim, V.E.; McLaughlin, R.J.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Allen, J.R.; Deino, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    Recent geologic mapping in the northern San Francisco Bay region (California, USA) supported by radiometric dating and tephrochronologic correlations, provides insights into the framework geology, stratigraphy, tectonic evolution, and geologic history of this part of the San Andreas transform plate boundary. There are 25 new and existing radiometric dates that define three temporally distinct volcanic packages along the north margin of San Pablo Bay, i.e., the Burdell Mountain Volcanics (11.1 Ma), the Tolay Volcanics (ca. 10-8 Ma), and the Sonoma Volcanics (ca. 8-2.5 Ma). The Burdell Mountain and the Tolay Volcanics are allochthonous, having been displaced from the Quien Sabe Volcanics and the Berkeley Hills Volcanics, respectively. Two samples from a core of the Tolay Volcanics taken from the Murphy #1 well in the Petaluma oilfield yielded ages of 8.99 ?? 0.06 and 9.13 ?? 0.06 Ma, demonstrating that volcanic rocks exposed along Tolay Creek near Sears Point previously thought to be a separate unit, the Donnell Ranch volcanics, are part of the Tolay Volcanics. Other new dates reported herein show that volcanic rocks in the Meacham Hill area and extending southwest to the Burdell Mountain fault are also part of the Tolay Volcanics. In the Sonoma volcanic field, strongly bimodal volcanic sequences are intercalated with sediments. In the Mayacmas Mountains a belt of eruptive centers youngs to the north. The youngest of these volcanic centers at Sugarloaf Ridge, which lithologically, chemically, and temporally matches the Napa Valley eruptive center, was apparently displaced 30 km to the northwest by movement along the Carneros and West Napa faults. The older parts of the Sonoma Volcanics have been displaced at least 28 km along the RodgersCreek fault since ca. 7 Ma. The Petaluma Formation also youngs to the north along the Rodgers Creek-Hayward fault and the Bennett Valley fault. The Petaluma basin formed as part of the Contra Costa basin in the Late Miocene and was

  13. Analysis of mitochondrial control region nucleotide sequences from Baffin Bay beluga, (Delphinapterus leucas: detecting pods or sub-populations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Jakob Palsbøll

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the results of an analysis of the variation in the nucleotide sequence of the mitochondrial control region obtained in 218 samples collected from belugas, Delphinapterus leucas, around the Baffin Bay. We detected multiple instances of significant heterogeneity in the distribution of genetic variation among the analyzed mitochondrial control region sequences on a spatial as well as temporal scale indicating a high degree of maternal population structure. The detection of significant levels of heterogeneity between samples collected in different years but within the same area and season was unexpected. Re-examination of earlier results presented by Brown Gladden and coworkers also revealed temporal genetic heterogeneity within the one area where sufficient (n>15 samples were collected in multiple years. These findings suggest that non-random breeding and maternally directed site-fidelity are not the sole causes of genetic heterogeneity among belugas but that a matrilineal pod structure might cause significant levels of genetic heterogeneity as well, even within the same area. We propose that a maternal pod structure, which has been shown to be the cause of significant genetic heterogeneity in other odontocetes, may add to the overall level of heterogeneity in the maternally inherited DNA and hence that much of the spatial heterogeneity observed in this and previous studies might be attributed to pod rather than population structure. Our findings suggest that it is important to estimate the contribution of pod structure to overall heterogeneity before defining populations or management units in order to avoid interpreting heterogeneity due to sampling of different pods as different populations/management units.

  14. Bioavailability of heavy metals in water and sediments from a typical Mediterranean Bay (Málaga Bay, Region of Andalucía, Southern Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso Castillo, M L; Sánchez Trujillo, I; Vereda Alonso, E; García de Torres, A; Cano Pavón, J M

    2013-11-15

    Concentrations of heavy metals were measured in sediment and water from Málaga Bay (South Spain). In the later twentieth century, cities such as Málaga, have suffered the impact of mass summer tourism. The ancient industrial activities, and the actual urbanization and coastal development, recreation and tourism, wastewaters treatment facilities, have been sources of marine pollution. In sediments, Ni was the most disturbing metal because Ni concentrations exceeded the effects range low (ERL), concentration at which toxicity could start to be observed in 85% of the samples analyzed. The metal bioavailability decreased in the order: Cd>Ni>Pb>Cu>Cr. In the sea water samples, Cd and Pb were the most disturbing metals because they exceeded the continuous criteria concentration (CCC) of US EPA in a 22.5% and 10.0% of the samples, respectively. Statistical analyses (ANOVA, PCA, CA) were performed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Seismological structure of the 1.8 Ga Trans-Hudson Orogen of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilligan, Amy; Bastow, Ian D.; Darbyshire, Fiona A.

    2016-06-01

    Precambrian tectonic processes are debated: what was the nature and scale of orogenic events on the younger, hotter, and more ductile Earth? Northern Hudson Bay records the Paleoproterozoic collision between the Western Churchill and Superior plates—the ˜1.8 Ga Trans-Hudson Orogeny (THO)—and is an ideal locality to study Precambrian tectonic structure. Integrated field, geochronological, and thermobarometric studies suggest that the THO was comparable to the present-day Himalayan-Karakoram-Tibet Orogen (HKTO). However, detailed understanding of the deep crustal architecture of the THO, and how it compares to that of the evolving HKTO, is lacking. The joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave data provides new Moho depth estimates and shear velocity models for the crust and uppermost mantle of the THO. Most of the Archean crust is relatively thin (˜39 km) and structurally simple, with a sharp Moho; upper-crustal wave speed variations are attributed to postformation events. However, the Quebec-Baffin segment of the THO has a deeper Moho (˜45 km) and a more complex crustal structure. Observations show some similarity to recent models, computed using the same methods, of the HKTO crust. Based on Moho character, present-day crustal thickness, and metamorphic grade, we support the view that southern Baffin Island experienced thickening during the THO of a similar magnitude and width to present-day Tibet. Fast seismic velocities at >10 km below southern Baffin Island may be the result of partial eclogitization of the lower crust during the THO, as is currently thought to be happening in Tibet.

  16. Contrasting sedimentation patterns in two semi-enclosed mesotidal bays along the west and south coasts of Korea controlled by their orientation to the regional monsoon climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seok Hwi; Chun, Seung Soo; Chang, Tae Soo; Jang, Dae Geon

    2017-08-01

    Sedimentation patterns of tidal flats along the Korean west coast have long been known to be largely controlled by the monsoon climate. On the other hand, much less is known about the effect of the monsoon on sedimentation in coastal embayments with mouths of different geographic orientations. Good examples are Hampyeong and Yeoja bays along the west and south coasts, respectively. Both have narrow entrances, but their mouths open toward the northwest and the south, respectively. With mean tidal ranges of 3.46 and 3.2 m, respectively, the two bays experience similar tidal regimes and are hence excellent candidates to compare the effect of different exposure to the same regional monsoon climate on their respective sediment distribution patterns. The winter monsoon, in particular, is characterized by strong northwesterly winds that directly impact the west coast, but blow offshore along the south coast. For the purpose of this study, surficial sediment samples were collected from intertidal and subtidal flats of the two bays, both in summer and winter. Grain-size analyses were carried out by sieving (sand fraction) and Sedigraph (mud fraction). In the case of Yeoja Bay, the sediments consist mostly of mud (mean grain sizes of 5.4 to 8.8 phi). Seasonal changes are very subtle, the sediments being slightly coarser in summer when silt-dominated sediments are supplied by two streams to the northern parts of the bay in response to heavy rainfall. With the exception of the deeper tidal channels, Yeoja Bay is characterized by a thick mud blanket the year round, which is modulated by processes associated with the summer monsoon that predominantly blows from the east. Textural parameters suggest severely restricted sediment mixing on the subtidal and intertidal flats, the overall low energy situation preventing sands from reaching the tidal flats. The sediments of Hampyeong Bay, by contrast, are characterized by a distinct shoreward fining trend. Mean grain sizes average

  17. Contrasting sedimentation patterns in two semi-enclosed mesotidal bays along the west and south coasts of Korea controlled by their orientation to the regional monsoon climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seok Hwi; Chun, Seung Soo; Chang, Tae Soo; Jang, Dae Geon

    2016-11-01

    Sedimentation patterns of tidal flats along the Korean west coast have long been known to be largely controlled by the monsoon climate. On the other hand, much less is known about the effect of the monsoon on sedimentation in coastal embayments with mouths of different geographic orientations. Good examples are Hampyeong and Yeoja bays along the west and south coasts, respectively. Both have narrow entrances, but their mouths open toward the northwest and the south, respectively. With mean tidal ranges of 3.46 and 3.2 m, respectively, the two bays experience similar tidal regimes and are hence excellent candidates to compare the effect of different exposure to the same regional monsoon climate on their respective sediment distribution patterns. The winter monsoon, in particular, is characterized by strong northwesterly winds that directly impact the west coast, but blow offshore along the south coast. For the purpose of this study, surficial sediment samples were collected from intertidal and subtidal flats of the two bays, both in summer and winter. Grain-size analyses were carried out by sieving (sand fraction) and Sedigraph (mud fraction). In the case of Yeoja Bay, the sediments consist mostly of mud (mean grain sizes of 5.4 to 8.8 phi). Seasonal changes are very subtle, the sediments being slightly coarser in summer when silt-dominated sediments are supplied by two streams to the northern parts of the bay in response to heavy rainfall. With the exception of the deeper tidal channels, Yeoja Bay is characterized by a thick mud blanket the year round, which is modulated by processes associated with the summer monsoon that predominantly blows from the east. Textural parameters suggest severely restricted sediment mixing on the subtidal and intertidal flats, the overall low energy situation preventing sands from reaching the tidal flats. The sediments of Hampyeong Bay, by contrast, are characterized by a distinct shoreward fining trend. Mean grain sizes average

  18. Grazing of Salpa thompsoni on phytoplankton in summer in the Prydz Bay region, Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    During the CHINARE-Ⅺ cruise in austral summer of 1998/1999, the abundance and feeding activity of Salps thompsoni were investigated in the Prydz Bav region. Salps samples were collected by vertical tows from the depth of 200 m to the surface with a conical net of 330 μm mesh-size. At Ⅵ-3 station, the grazing rates were studied by the gut fluorescence method and culture experiments. S. Thompsoni was mainly distributed in the northern part of the survey area, and its maximum densities reached to 2795 ind. · 1000 m-3. A dramatic decrease in salp stock was observed at the Marginal Ice Zone. The results of the feeding experiments at the Ⅵ-3 show that the gut pigment contents of S. thompsoni ranged from (0. 14 - 1.27) μig ind. -1(average 0. 98 μg ind.-1). The individual ingestion rate is 7. 9 μg ind. -1 · day-1, and the filtration rate is 28 L ind. -1 · day-1 Through the daily grazing rate of S. thompsoni, which takes account of less than 1% of the phytoplankton standing stock, it shows arelatively higher grazing impress on the primary production (72. 2 % ).

  19. Three-Dimensional Geologic Map of the Hayward Fault Zone, San Francisco Bay Region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, G.A.; Graymer, R.W.; Jachens, R.C.; Ponce, D.A.; Simpson, R.W.; Wentworth, C.M.

    2008-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) geologic map of the Hayward Fault zone was created by integrating the results from geologic mapping, potential field geophysics, and seismology investigations. The map volume is 100 km long, 20 km wide, and extends to a depth of 12 km below sea level. The map volume is oriented northwest and is approximately bisected by the Hayward Fault. The complex geologic structure of the region makes it difficult to trace many geologic units into the subsurface. Therefore, the map units are generalized from 1:24,000-scale geologic maps. Descriptions of geologic units and structures are offered, along with a discussion of the methods used to map them and incorporate them into the 3D geologic map. The map spatial database and associated viewing software are provided. Elements of the map, such as individual fault surfaces, are also provided in a non-proprietary format so that the user can access the map via open-source software. The sheet accompanying this manuscript shows views taken from the 3D geologic map for the user to access. The 3D geologic map is designed as a multi-purpose resource for further geologic investigations and process modeling.

  20. Impact of entrainment and impingement on fish populations in the Hudson River estuary. Volume I. Entrainment-impact estimates for six fish populations inhabiting the Hudson River estuary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boreman, J.; Barnthouse, L.W.; Vaughn, D.S.; Goodyear, C.P.; Christensen, S.W.; Kumar, K.D.; Kirk, B.L.; Van Winkle, W.

    1982-01-01

    This volume is concerned with the estimation of the direct (or annual) entrainment impact of power plants on populations of striped bass, white perch, Alosa spp. (blueback herring and alewife), American shad, Atlantic tomcod, and bay anchovy in the Hudson River estuary. Entrainment impact results from the killing of fish eggs, larvae, and young juveniles that are contained in the cooling water cycled through a power plant. An Empirical Transport Model (ETM) is presented as the means of estimating a conditional entrainment mortality rate (defined as the fraction of a year class which would be killed due to entrainment in the absence of any other source of mortality). Most of this volume is concerned with the estimation of several parameters required by the ETM: physical input parameters (e.g., power-plant withdrawal flow rates); the longitudinal distribution of ichthyoplankton in time and space; the duration of susceptibility of the vulnerable organisms; the W-factors, which express the ratios of densities of organisms in power plant intakes to densities of organisms in the river; and the entrainment mortality factors (f-factors), which express the probability that an organism will be killed if it is entrained. Once these values are obtained, the ETM is used to estimate entrainment impact for both historical and projected conditions.

  1. The Bay of Bengal and the Statement of Understanding Concerning the Establishment of the Outer Edge of the Continental Margin: Regional Implications for Delimiting the Juridical Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mridha, M.; Varma, H.; Macnab, R.

    2005-12-01

    The Bay of Bengal is the site of massive depositions of sediment from the Ganga-Brahmaputra river systems, which discharge an estimated 2300 million tons of material into the Indian Ocean every year. The accumulated material comprises an enormous fan that extends some 4000 km from the Mouths of the Ganges, a delta system which encompasses the entire coast of Bangladesh and a segment of the coast of India. The major tectonic elements of the Bay of Bengal and surrounding areas are: the passive eastern continental margin of India; the 85E Ridge; the Ninetyeast Ridge; the intervening basin buried beneath deep sediment; and the Sunda Arc system with the associated back-arc Andaman Basin. Except for the Nikitin Seamounts which rise above the seabed just south of the Equator, the 85E Ridge is totally covered by thick sediment. The Ninetyeast Ridge, on the other hand, protrudes above the seabed as far north as 10N, where it plunges beneath the thickening sediment and separates the deposits into the Bengal Fan and the smaller Nicobar Fan. The 85E and Ninetyeast Ridges present the most significant relief in the crystalline basement underlying the Bay of Bengal, and should therefore figure substantially in any analysis of sediment thickness pursuant to the delimitation of the outer continental shelf. In this region, the sediment thickness provision of Article 76 has been modified by a Statement of Understanding in Annex II of the Final Act of the Third UN Conference on the Law of the Sea. To avoid a perceived inequity that might arise from the application of the standard one percent sediment thickness formula of Article 76, the Statement introduced a new formula: a qualified State in this region, even if it has a narrow physiographic continental shelf, may establish the outer edge of its continental margin by a line where the thickness of sedimentary rock is not less than one km. This presentation will describe the development of a joint formula line for the States that

  2. Real-time Monitoring Network to Characterize Anthropogenic and Natural Events Affecting the Hudson River, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M. S.; Bonner, J. S.; Fuller, C.; Kirkey, W.; Ojo, T.

    2011-12-01

    transition region between fresh and saline water, captured the occurrence of strong precipitation event on the Hudson river as indicated by reduced water column salinity levels in the water column. Despite the large influx of freshwater and suspended solids originating as precipitation runoff, tidal forces dominated the net water transport and coincident suspended particle load. Such information is crucial to track the particle-driven contaminant movement in the water column. Both the FRVP and MRUP have been deployed in an active Poly-Chlorinated Biphenyls Superfund site to characterize the fundamental sediment transport mechanisms affecting remedial dredging operations. A potential application of this monitoring system is in the development of an adaptive remedial operation, where activity would be adjusted to maintain conditions within threshold limits based on real time environmental observations. Further, observational REON data can be integrated with water quality and hydrodynamic models that can be used to evaluate episodic events and their subsequent impacts to the Hudson River.

  3. The new political scales of citizenship in a global era: The politics of hydroelectric development in the James Bay Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Jean

    2000-10-01

    In this dissertation, I examine the current reconfiguration of citizenship in Western societies in a period marked by the expansion of globalisation. Specifically, I focus on the spatial implications of globalisation via a comparative analysis of the politics of hydroelectric development, in the James Bay region of Quebec, Canada. I discuss the struggles surrounding its two main phases: the construction of the La Grande complex (1970--1975) and the aborted launching of the Great Whale project (1988--1994). I pay close attention to the mobilisation of the Cree people and ecology groups who launched successive campaigns to prevent the construction of both projects, reflecting what I depict as process of jumping scales. Whereas their campaigns were unsuccessful during the first phase, they became much more potent during the second phase. This transition reveals an important remapping of citizenship politics through which its national and territorial scales are being unbundled and no longer exclusively restricted to national state borders. As a result, citizenship politics becomes embedded in various locales---from the local to the emerging global. Each represents a political scene in which citizens can make claims and participate in debates around the recognition of their rights. This dissertation would contribute to the debates on citizenship and globalisation. It suggests that globalisation not only imposes new constraints on citizenship policies from above, but also creates now spaces in which citizenship is reframed or rather, rescaled. This dissertation also provides insights into the implications of globalisation. It illustrates how the globalisation of politics results from non-state actors, reflecting what is called "globalisation from below". This reveals contradictory forms of globalisation and implicitly, different political projects.

  4. Inferences drawn from two decades of alinement array measurements of creep on faults in the San Francisco Bay Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galehouse, J.S.; Lienkaemper, J.J.

    2003-01-01

    We summarize over 20 years of monitoring surface creep on faults of the San Andreas system in the San Francisco Bay region using alinement arrays. The San Andreas fault is fully locked at five sites northwest from San Juan Bautista, the southern end of the 1906 earthquake rupture, that is, no creep (San Gregorio, Rodgers Creek, and West Napa faults show no creep. The measured creep rate on the Calaveras-Paicines fault from Hollister southward is either 6 or ??? 10 mm/yr, depending on whether the arrays cross all of the creeping traces. Northward of Hollister, the central Calaveras creep rate reaches 14 ?? 2 mm/yr but drops to ??? 2 mm/yr near Calaveras Reservoir, where slip transfers to the southern Hayward fault at a maximum creep rate of 9 mm/yr at its south end. However, the Hayward fault averages only 4.6 mm/yr over most of its length. The Northern Calaveras fault, now creeping at 3-4 mm/yr, steps right to the Concord fault, which has a similar rate, 2.5-3.5 mm/yr, which is slightly slower than the 4.4 mm/yr rate on its northward continuation, the Green Valley fault. The Maacama fault creeps at 4.4 mm/yr near Ukiah and 6.5 mm/yr in Willits. The central and southern segments of the Calaveras fault are predominantly creeping, whereas the Hayward, Northern Calaveras, and Maacama faults are partly locked and, along with the Rodgers Creek and San Andreas, have high potential for major earthquakes.

  5. Data from Theodolite Measurements of Creep Rates on San Francisco Bay Region Faults, California: 1979-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Forrest S.; Lienkaemper, James J.; Caskey, S. John; Grove, Karen

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Our purpose is to update with six additional years of data, our creep data archive on San Francisco Bay region active faults for use by the scientific research community. Earlier data (1979-2001) were reported in Galehouse (2002) and were analyzed and described in detail in a summary report (Galehouse and Lienkaemper, 2003). A complete analysis of our earlier results obtained on the Hayward fault was presented in Lienkaemper, Galehouse and Simpson (2001). Jon Galehouse of San Francisco State University (SFSU) and many student research assistants measured creep (aseismic slip) rates on these faults from 1979 until his retirement from the project in 2001. The creep measurement project, which was initiated by Galehouse, has continued through the Geosciences Department at SFSU from 2001-2006 under the direction of Co-P.I.'s Karen Grove and John Caskey (Grove and Caskey, 2005), and by Caskey since 2006. Forrest McFarland has managed most of the technical and logistical project operations as well as data processing and compilation since 2001. We plan to publish detailed analyses of these updated creep data in future publications. We maintain a project web site (http://funnel.sfsu.edu/creep/) that includes the following information: project description, project personnel, creep characteristics and measurement, map of creep measurement sites, creep measurement site information, and data plots for each measurement site. Our most current, annually updated results are therefore accessible to the scientific community and to the general public. Information about the project can currently be requested by the public by an email link (fltcreep@sfsu.edu) found on our project website.

  6. The San Andreas fault in the San Francisco Bay region, California: Structure and kinematics of a Young plate boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jachens, R.C.; Zoback, M.L.

    1999-01-01

    Recently acquired high-resolution aeromagnetic data delineate offset and/or truncated magnetic rock bodies of the Franciscan Complex that define the location and structure of, and total offset across, the San Andreas fault in the San Francisco Bay region. Two distinctive magnetic anomalies caused by ultramafic rocks and metabasalts east of, and truncated at, the San Andreas fault have clear counterparts west of the fault that indicate a total right-lateral offset of only 22 km on the Peninsula segment, the active strand that ruptured in 1906. The location of the Peninsula segment is well defined magnetically on the northern peninsula where it goes offshore, and can be traced along strike an additional ~6 km to the northwest. Just offshore from Lake Merced, the inferred fault trace steps right (northeast) 3 km onto a nearly parallel strand that can be traced magnetically northwest more than 20 km as the linear northeast edge of a magnetic block bounded by the San Andreas fault, the Pilarcitos fault, and the San Gregorio-Hosgri fault zone. This right-stepping strand, the Golden Gate segment, joins the eastern mapped trace of the San Andreas fault at Bolinas Lagoon and projects back onshore to the southeast near Lake Merced. Inversion of detailed gravity data on the San Francisco Peninsula reveals a 3 km wide basin situated between the two strands of the San Andreas fault, floored by Franciscan basement and filled with Plio-Quaternary sedimentary deposits of the Merced and Colma formations. The basin, ~1 km deep at the coast, narrows and becomes thinner to the southeast along the fault over a distance of ~12 km. The length, width, and location of the basin between the two strands are consistent with a pull-apart basin formed behind the right step in the right-lateral strike-slip San Andreas fault system and currently moving southeast with the North American plate. Slight nonparallelism of the two strands bounding the basin (implying a small component of convergence

  7. Additions to the hydroids (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa) of the Bay of Fundy, northeastern North America, with a checklist of species reported from the region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, Dale R

    2017-04-24

    Two new species of hydroids, Eudendrium bleakneyi and Halecium praeparvum, are described from the Bay of Fundy. Fourteen others, Tubularia acadiae Petersen, 1990, Coryne pusilla Gaertner, 1774, Sarsia lovenii (M. Sars, 1846), Zanclea implexa (Alder, 1856), Corydendrium dispar Kramp, 1935, Rhizogeton fusiformis L. Agassiz, 1862, Bougainvillia muscus (Allman, 1863), Rhizorhagium roseum M. Sars, in G.O. Sars, 1874, Hydractinia symbiolongicarpus Buss & Yund, 1989, Eudendrium vaginatum Allman, 1863, Tiaropsis multicirrata (M. Sars, 1835), Obelia bidentata S.F. Clark, 1875, Halecium marsupiale Bergh, 1887, and Sertularella gigantea Hincks, 1874, are reported, with collection data, for the first time from the bay. All but Coryne pusilla, Rhizorhagium roseum, Eudendrium vaginatum, and Sertularella gigantea are also new to Atlantic Canada, while Zanclea implexa, Corydendrium dispar, and Halecium marsupiale are reported for the first time in the western North Atlantic. Two of those species, Hydractinia symbiolongicarpus and Obelia bidentata, are disjunct in distribution, with core populations occurring in warmer waters to the south of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Both were discovered in Minas Basin, a hydrographically distinct embayment where surface water temperatures are much warmer during summer than in the perpetually cold lower Bay of Fundy. Rhizorhagium roseum and the subfamily Rhizorhagiinae are transferred from family Bougainvilliidae Lütken, 1850 to Pandeidae Haeckel, 1879. An annotated checklist of hydroids from the Fundy region, based on previously published reports and on new records of species, is added as an appendix. Included in the checklist are 43 species of anthoathecates and 75 species of leptothecates, referable to 30 families and 56 genera. Families with the most species were Sertulariidae (23), Haleciidae (13), Eudendriidae (11), and Obeliidae (10). Biogeographically, the aggregate hydroid fauna of the bay conforms with that occurring in other parts of the

  8. 27 CFR 9.47 - Hudson River Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... to the New York-Pennsylvania state line in the Delaware River. (11) The boundary proceeds easterly along the Delaware River to the New York-New Jersey state line. (12) The boundary proceeds easterly... proceeds easterly along the northern side of Interstate Route 287 to the junction with N.Y. Route 15....

  9. Mineral deposit characteristics and distribution in the James Bay region of Quebec; Styles et repartition des gites metalliferes du territoire de la Baie-James (Quebec)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauthier, M. [Montreal Univ., Quebec, Dept. des Sciences de la Terre et de son Atmosphere, PQ (Canada)

    2000-06-01

    The James Bay region differs even more from the Abitibi Sub-province by the fact that Archean proto-continents proto-continents (older than 2.8 Ga) occur in this region, a situation similar to the Western Superior Province. Moreover, remnants of Meso-Archean arenitic platform sequences found on these proto-cratons contain uraniferous pyritic quartz-pebbles conglomerate that bear many similarities with the Witwater strand deposits of South Africa. As in the Western Superior Province, chromite deposits and PGE-nickel deposits are common in these cratonic terranes. The Kenoran Orogeny affected all the territory. Rare-element pegmatites and orogenic gold deposits are associated with the regional metamorphism and tectonic corridors. A uraniferous pegmatite field in northern James Bay strongly suggests the possibility of metamorphic remobilization of Meso-Archean uraniferous pyritic paleo-placers. Proterozoic continental and platform sequences also overlie the Archean rocks, preserved in a system of grabens that transect the James Bay region. Silver-rich five-element veins (Bi-Co-Ni-Ag-U) occur in horsts surrounding these Proterozoic grabens. Unconformity-related pitchblende vein fields also surround the grabens. Large, medium-grade, strata-bound uranium deposits are found in a basal euxinic lacustrine sequence that locally occurs at the base of Proterozoic red-bed formations. The regional distribution of the Meso-Archean uraniferous pyritic conglomerates, Neo-Archean uraniferous pegmatites and Proterozoic pitchblende veins in the Archean basement, and also of Proterozoic strata-bound U-Cu deposits, suggests a classical example of metallic heritage through time. (author)

  10. Hudson River Paleoclimate, Sea Level, and Human Impact: A Record From Piermont Marsh, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdyla; Peteet, Dorothy; Liberman, Louisa; Sugar; Wong; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A 13.77 meter sediment core from Piermont Marsh, NY (40 00 N, 73 55W) records the local and regional vegetational and foraminiferal history of the Hudson Estuary. The sediments were sampled every 4 cm, which represents a decadal to centuryscale resolution. Basal sediment dating is in progress, and the 11-m depth represents about 4000 years. Changes in plant macrofossils and charcoal appear to indicate differences in salinIty and drought, suggesting changes in climate. Scirpus, Salicornia, and high levels of charcoal seem to indicate drier/more saline conditions, while lack of these macrofossils and increases in Chara/Nitella, aquatic leaves, and very little charcoal suggests wetter conditions. Other macrofossils include Carex, Juncus, Polygonum, Zanichellia, Ruppia. High resolution AMS dating of plant macrofossils is in progress, and will be compared with changes in Hudson River sediment cores offshore. Foraminiferal assemblages from key intervals of the core will be presented. Human impact in the upper sediments is visible from the influx of grass seeds, primarily Phragmites, and the ragweed pollen rise.

  11. Humboldt Bay, California Benthic Habitats 2009 Substrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Humboldt Bay is the largest estuary in California north of San Francisco Bay and represents a significant resource for the north coast region. Beginning in 2007 the...

  12. Humboldt Bay, California Benthic Habitats 2009 Geoform

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Humboldt Bay is the largest estuary in California north of San Francisco Bay and represents a significant resource for the north coast region. Beginning in 2007 the...

  13. Humboldt Bay, California Benthic Habitats 2009 Geodatabase

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Humboldt Bay is the largest estuary in California north of San Francisco Bay and represents a significant resource for the north coast region. Beginning in 2007 the...

  14. Humboldt Bay, California Benthic Habitats 2009 Biotic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Humboldt Bay is the largest estuary in California north of San Francisco Bay and represents a significant resource for the north coast region. Beginning in 2007 the...

  15. Humboldt Bay Benthic Habitats 2009 Aquatic Setting

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Humboldt Bay is the largest estuary in California north of San Francisco Bay and represents a significant resource for the north coast region. Beginning in 2007 the...

  16. Mutagenicity and tumorigenicity of the four enantiopure bay-region 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide isomers of dibenz[a,h]anthracene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Richard L; Wood, Alexander W; Huang, Mou Tuan; Xie, Jian Guo; Cui, Xiao Xing; Reuhl, Kenneth R; Boyd, D R; Lin, Yong; Shih, Weichung Joe; Balani, Suresh K; Yagi, Haruhiko; Jerina, Donald M; Conney, Allan H

    2013-09-01

    Each enantiomer of the diastereomeric pair of bay-region dibenz[a,h]anthracene 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxides in which the benzylic 4-hydroxyl group and epoxide oxygen are either cis (isomer 1) or trans (isomer 2) were evaluated for mutagenic activity. In strains TA 98 and TA 100 of Salmonella typhimurium, the diol epoxide with (1S,2R,3S,4R) absolute configuration [(-)-diol epoxide-1] had the highest mutagenic activity. In Chinese hamster V-79 cells, the diol epoxide with (1R,2S,3S,4R) absolute configuration [(+)-diol epoxide-2] had the highest mutagenic activity. The (1R,2S,3R,4S) diol epoxide [(+)-diol epoxide-1] also had appreciable activity, whereas the other two bay-region diol epoxide enantiomers had very low activity. In tumor studies, the (1R,2S,3S,4R) enantiomer was the only diol epoxide isomer tested that had strong activity as a tumor initiator on mouse skin and in causing lung and liver tumors when injected into newborn mice. This stereoisomer was about one-third as active as the parent hydrocarbon, dibenz[a,h]anthracene as a tumor initiator on mouse skin; it was several-fold more active than dibenz[a,h]anthracene as a lung and liver carcinogen when injected into newborn mice. (-)-(3R,4R)-3β,4α-dihydroxy-3,4-dihydro-dibenz[a,h]anthracene [(-)-3,4-dihydrodiol] was slightly more active than dibenz[a,h]anthracene as a tumor initiator on mouse skin, whereas (+)-(3S,4S)-3α,4β-dihydroxy-3,4-dihydro-dibenz[a,h]anthracene [(+)-3,4-dihydrodiol] had only very weak activity. The present investigation and previous studies with the corresponding four possible enantiopure bay-region diol epoxide enantiomers/diastereomers of benzo[a]pyrene, benz[a]anthracene, chrysene, benzo[c]phenanthrene, dibenz[c,h]acridine, dibenz[a,h]acridine and dibenz[a,h]anthracene indicate that the bay-region diol epoxide enantiomer with [R,S,S,R] absolute stereochemistry has high tumorigenic activity on mouse skin and in newborn mice.

  17. Utility company installs first Hudson River drilled crossing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    Directionally drilling a natural gas pipe line under the Hudson River called for innovative installation techniques including an elevated pullback over a heavily traveled commuter railroad. The 3,700-ft crossing was installed for Central Hudson Gas and Electric Corp. as part of an 11-mi system to supply natural gas from the Iroquois Gas Transmission System to the utility company's Roseton Generating Station. It represents the first horizontal drilled pipe line installation of the Hudson River and the longest drilled crossing in the US Northeast. At the point of installation, the line was designed to contend with an existing glacial till geology, the river crossing, eight electric cables near the right-of-way and the high-speed Metro North Railroad on the east side of the river. Through the interconnection with Iroquois, the utility receives up to 100 MMcfd of natural gas at 750 psig. Total cost of the new system was about $13.1 million with nearly $3.2 million dedicated to the crossing. This paper describes the installation procedures used in this project.

  18. Genetic relationships of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in the Prudhoe Bay region of Alaska: inference from microsatellite DNA, mitochondrial DNA, and field observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, M; Shideler, R; Hechtel, J; Strobeck, C; Paetkau, D

    1999-01-01

    Grizzly bears are abundant in the region of the Prudhoe Bay oil fields in northern Alaska. We used field observations and molecular genetic data to identify parent-offspring and sibling relationships among bears in this region. We determined genotypes at 14 microsatellite DNA loci and the cytochrome b gene of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) for 36 bears. We identified 17 possible mother-offspring pairs and 8 possible father-offspring pairs. This includes verification of the relationships of 14 mother-offspring pairs identified from field observations. Three additional mother-offspring pairs and all eight father-offspring pairs were determined from genetic and age data. Relatedness coefficients based on numbers of shared alleles between individuals were as expected: approximately 0.50 for parent-offspring and sibling pairs and approximately 0.75 for a father-offspring pair resulting from a father-daughter mating. The level of genetic variation (mean number of alleles per locus = 6.6, mean heterozygosity = 70%) and allele frequencies in grizzly bears in the Prudhoe Bay region are similar to those in other parts of the species' range.

  19. Sources of suspended-sediment flux in streams of the chesapeake bay watershed: A regional application of the sparrow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakebill, J.W.; Ator, S.W.; Schwarz, G.E.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the sources and transport of fluvial suspended sediment in nontidal streams of the Chesapeake Bay watershed and vicinity. We applied SPAtially Referenced Regressions on Watershed attributes, which spatially correlates estimated mean annual flux of suspended sediment in nontidal streams with sources of suspended sediment and transport factors. According to our model, urban development generates on average the greatest amount of suspended sediment per unit area (3,928 Mg/km2/year), although agriculture is much more widespread and is the greatest overall source of suspended sediment (57 Mg/km2/year). Factors affecting sediment transport from uplands to streams include mean basin slope, reservoirs, physiography, and soil permeability. On average, 59% of upland suspended sediment generated is temporarily stored along large rivers draining the Coastal Plain or in reservoirs throughout the watershed. Applying erosion and sediment controls from agriculture and urban development in areas of the northern Piedmont close to the upper Bay, where the combined effects of watershed characteristics on sediment transport have the greatest influence may be most helpful in mitigating sedimentation in the bay and its tributaries. Stream restoration efforts addressing floodplain and bank stabilization and incision may be more effective in smaller, headwater streams outside of the Coastal Plain. ?? 2010 American Water Resources Association. No claim to original U.S. government works.

  20. Species-specific accumulation of polybrominated diphenyl ether flame retardants in birds of prey from the Chesapeake Bay region, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Da, E-mail: chen@vims.ed [Department of Environmental and Aquatic Animal Health, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, College of William and Mary, Gloucester Point, VA 23062 (United States); Hale, Robert C. [Department of Environmental and Aquatic Animal Health, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, College of William and Mary, Gloucester Point, VA 23062 (United States); Watts, Bryan D. [Center for Conservation Biology, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185 (United States); La Guardia, Mark J.; Harvey, Ellen [Department of Environmental and Aquatic Animal Health, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, College of William and Mary, Gloucester Point, VA 23062 (United States); Mojica, Elizabeth K. [Center for Conservation Biology, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Compared to organochlorines, little is known about polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) contamination of birds of prey breeding in the Chesapeake Bay, the largest estuary in the U.S. This study examined and compared PBDE contamination in eggs of osprey, double-crested cormorant, brown pelican and peregrine falcon from this area. Several legacy persistent organic pollutants such as PCBs and DDE were also investigated. The level of urbanization of the landscape appeared to influence the level of PBDE exposure. PBDE congener distribution patterns varied between piscivorous and terrestrial-feeding birds. This suggests individual congeners may be subject to differences in bioaccumulation, biomagnification or metabolism in the aquatic and terrestrial food webs. Biomagnification of PBDEs was studied in the Bay aquatic food chains for the first time. A biomagnification factor of 25.1 was estimated for SIGMAPBDEs for the fish - osprey egg food chain. Hazard quotients, applied as a preliminary evaluation, indicated that PBDEs may pose a moderate hazard to ospreys and peregrine falcons through impairment of reproductive performance. - Birds of prey breeding in the Chesapeake Bay (USA) exhibited species-specific PBDE accumulation patterns.

  1. Movement patterns of Antillean manatees in Chetumal Bay (Mexico) and coastal Belize: A challenge for regional conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelblanco-Martínez, Delma Nataly; Padilla-Saldivar, J.; Hernández-Arana, Héctor Abuid; Slone, D.H.; Reid, J.P.; Morales-Vela, B.

    2013-01-01

    Information from 15 satellite-tracked Antillean manatees (Trichechus manatus manatus) was analyzed in order to assess individual movements, home ranges, and high-use areas for conservation decisions. Manatees were captured in Chetumal Bay, Mexico, and tagged with Argos-monitored satellite transmitters. Location of the manatees and physical characteristics were assessed to describe habitat properties. Most manatees traveled to freshwater sources. The Maximum Area Size (MAS) for each manatee was determined using the observation-area method. Additional kernel densities of 95% home range and 50% Center of Activity (COA) were also calculated, with manatees having 1–3 COAs. Manatees exhibited two different movement patterns: remaining in Chetumal Bay, and long-distance (up to 240 km in 89 d). The residence time in Chetumal Bay was higher for females (89.6% of time) than for males (72.0%), but the daily travel rate (0.4–0.5 km/d) was similar for both sexes. Most of the COAs fell within Natural Protected Areas (NPA). However, manatees also travel for long distances into unprotected areas, where they face uncontrolled boat traffic, fishing activities, and habitat loss. Conservation of movement corridors may promote long-distance movements and facilitate genetic exchange.

  2. A synthesis of thermokarst lake water balance in high-latitude regions of North America from isotope tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Lauren A.; Wolfe, Brent B.; Turner, Kevin W.; Anderson, Lesleigh; Arp, Christopher D.; Birks, Jean; Bouchard, Frédéric; Edwards, Thomas W.D.; Farquharson, Nicole; Hall, Roland I.; McDonald, Ian; Narancic, Biljana; Ouimet, Chantal; Pienitz, Reinhard; Tondu, Jana; White, Hilary

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies utilizing remote sensing imagery and other methods have documented that thermokarst lakes are undergoing varied hydrological transitions in response to recent climate changes, from surface area expansion to drainage and evaporative desiccation. Here, we provide a synthesis of hydrological conditions for 376 lakes of mainly thermokarst origin across high-latitude North America. We assemble surface water isotope compositions measured during the past decade at five lake-rich landscapes including Arctic Coastal Plain (Alaska), Yukon Flats (Alaska), Old Crow Flats (Yukon), northwestern Hudson Bay Lowlands (Manitoba), and Nunavik (Quebec). These landscapes represent the broad range of thermokarst environments by spanning gradients in meteorological, permafrost, and vegetation conditions. An isotope framework was established based on flux-weighted long-term averages of meteorological conditions for each lake to quantify water balance metrics. The isotope composition of source water and evaporation-to-inflow ratio for each lake were determined, and the results demonstrated a substantial array of regional and subregional diversity of lake hydrological conditions. Controls on lake water balance and how these vary among the five landscapes and with differing environmental drivers are assessed. Findings reveal that lakes in the Hudson Bay Lowlands are most vulnerable to evaporative desiccation, whereas those in Nunavik are most resilient. However, we also identify the complexity in predicting hydrological responses of these thermokarst landscapes to future climate change.

  3. Winter-time circulation and sediment transport in the Hudson Shelf Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, C.K.; Butman, B.; Traykovski, P.

    2003-01-01

    The Hudson Shelf Valley is a bathymetric low that extends across the continental shelf offshore of New York and New Jersey. From December 1999 to April 2000 a field experiment was carried out to investigate the transport of sediment in the shelf and valley system. Near-bed tripods and water-column moorings were deployed at water depths from 38 to 75 m in the axis of the shelf valley and at about 26 m on the adjacent shelves offshore of New Jersey and Long Island, New York. These measured suspended sediment concentrations, current velocities, waves, and water column properties. This paper analyzes observations made during December 1999 and January 2000, and presents the first direct near-bed measurements of suspended sediment concentration and sediment flux from the region. Sediment transport within the Hudson Shelf Valley was coherent over tens of kilometers, and usually aligned with the axis of the shelf valley. Down-valley (off-shore) transport was associated with energetic waves, winds from the east, moderate current velocities (5-10 cm/s), and sea level setup at Sandy Hook, NJ. Up-valley (shoreward) transport occurred frequently, and was associated with winds from the west, low wave energy, high current velocities (20-40 cm/s), and sea level set-down at the coast. Within the shelf valley, net sediment flux (the product of near-bed concentration and velocity) was directed shoreward, up the axis of the valley. Current velocities and suspended sediment fluxes on the New York and New Jersey continental shelves were lower than within the shelf valley, and exhibited greater variability in alignment. Longer term meteorological data indicate that wind, setup, and wave conditions during the study period were more conducive to up-valley transport than seasonal data suggest as average. To relate the observed up-valley sediment flux to observed accumulation of contaminants within the Hudson Shelf Valley requires consideration of transport over longer timescales than those

  4. Shapes of fishing gears in relation to the tidal flat bio-organisms and habitat types in Daebu Island region, Gyeonggi Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Geel Je

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This is a base research to analyze the evolution of fishing gear shapes in response to the types of marine benthic organisms and ‘getbatang-harvesting tidal flat’ in Daebu Island in Gyeonggi Bay. Daebu Island has variety of relatively well preserved natural coast lines and fishing gears. Hand hoes were divided into two categories, one for manila clam collecting and the other for mud octopus collecting. The ones used to catch mud octopuses are much larger and heavier. Clear distinction of shapes and forms were found even among the hand hoes used for collecting the similar types of catch, depending on the getbatang that they were used on. Also, mud octopus hand hoes varied in shapes and forms depending on the region that they were found in and the sex of the user. Fishing gears of other islands in Gyeonggi Bay, Oi Island, Jangbong Island and Ganghwa–Donggum Island, showed differences as getbatang varies, and each region sometimes had different uses of the same tool from each other. It is necessary that we continue the investigation and analysis on the relationship between the shape of fishing gears, organisms, and getbatang sediment conditions before the traditional fishing gears disappear any further.

  5. Insights into the Lurking Structures and Related Intraplate Earthquakes in the Region of Bay of Bengal Using Gravity and Full Gravity Gradient Tensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, C. P.; Tiwari, V. M.; Rao, P. R.

    2017-09-01

    Comprehension of subsurface structures buried under thick sediments in the region of Bay of Bengal is vital as structural features are the key parameters that influence or are caused by the subsurface deformation and tectonic events like earthquakes. Here, we address this issue using the integrated analysis and interpretation of gravity and full gravity gradient tensor with few seismic profiles available in the poorly known region. A 2D model of the deep earth crust-mantle is constructed and interpreted with gravity gradients and seismic profiles, which made it possible to obtain a visual image of a deep seated fault below the basement associated with thick sediments strata. Gravity modelling along a NE-SW profile crossing the hypocentre of the earthquake of 21 May 2014 (M w 6.0) in the northern Bay of Bengal suggests that the location of intraplate normal dip fault earthquake in the upper mantle is at the boundary of density anomalies, which is probably connected to the crustal fault. We also report an enhanced structural trend of two major ridges, the 85°E and the 90°E ridges hidden under the sedimentary cover from the computed full gravity gradients tensor components.

  6. Determining Trends in Impervious Cover for the Mobile Bay, AL Region for 1974-2008, Based on a Landsat Time Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruce, Joseph P.; Smoot, James; Ellis, Jean; Swann, Roberta

    2011-01-01

    This presentation will discuss the development and use of Landsat-based impervious cover products in conjunction with land use land cover change products to assess multi-decadal urbanization across the Mobile Bay region at regional and watershed scales. This nationally important coastal region has undergone a variety of ephemeral and permanent land use land cover change since the mid-1970s, including gradual but consequential increases in urban surface cover. This urban sprawl corresponds with increased regional percent impervious cover. The region s coastal zone managers are concerned about the increasing percent impervious cover, since it can negatively influence water quality and is an important consideration for coastal conservation and restoration work. In response, we processed multi-temporal Landsat data to compute maps of percent impervious cover for multiple dates from 1974 through 2008, roughly at 5-year intervals. Each year of product was classified using one single date of leaf-on and leaf-off Landsat data in conjunction with Cubist software. We are assessing Landsat impervious cover product accuracy through comparisons to available reference data, including available NLCD impervious cover products from the USGS, raw Landsat data, plus higher spatial resolution aerial and satellite data. In particular, we are quantitatively comparing the 2008 Landsat impervious cover products to those from QuickBird 2.4-meter multispectral data. Initial visual comparisons with the QuickBird impervious cover product suggest that the 2008 Landsat product tends to underestimate impervious cover for high density urban areas and to overestimate impervious cover in established residential subdivisions mixed with forested cover. Landsat TM and ETM data appears to produce more accurate impervious cover products compared to those using lower resolution Landsat MSS data. Although imperfect, these Landsat impervious cover products have helped the Mobile Bay National Estuary

  7. Detrital carbonate peaks on the Labrador shelf, a 13-7 ka template for freshwater forcing from the Hudson Strait outlet of the Laurentide Ice Sheet into the subpolar gyre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Anne; Andrews, John; Pearce, Christof; Wilson, Lindsay; Ólfasdótttir, Sædís

    2015-01-01

    The Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) was a large, dynamic ice sheet in the early Holocene. The glacial events through Hudson Strait leading to its eventual demise are recorded in the well-dated Labrador shelf core, MD99-2236 from the Cartwright Saddle. We develop a detailed history of the timing of ice-sheet discharge events from the Hudson Strait outlet of the LIS during the Holocene using high-resolution detrital carbonate, ice rafted detritus (IRD), δ18O, and sediment color data. Eight detrital carbonate peaks (DCPs) associated with IRD peaks and light oxygen isotope events punctuate the MD99-2236 record between 11.5 and 8.0 ka. We use the stratigraphy of the DCPs developed from MD99-2236 to select the appropriate ΔR to calibrate the ages of recorded glacial events in Hudson Bay and Hudson Strait such that they match the DCPs in MD99-2236. We associate the eight DCPs with H0, Gold Cove advance, Noble Inlet advance, initial retreat of the Hudson Strait ice stream (HSIS) from Hudson Strait, opening of the Tyrrell Sea, and drainage of glacial lakes Agassiz and Ojibway. The opening of Foxe Channel and retreat of glacial ice from Foxe Basin are represented by a shoulder in the carbonate data. ΔR of 350 years applied to the radiocarbon ages constraining glacial events H0 through the opening of the Tyrell Sea provided the best match with the MD99-2236 DCPs; ΔR values and ages from the literature are used for the younger events. A very close age match was achieved between the 8.2 ka cold event in the Greenland ice cores, DCP7 (8.15 ka BP), and the drainage of glacial lakes Agassiz and Ojibway. Our stratigraphic comparison between the DCPs in MD99-2236 and the calibrated ages of Hudson Strait/Bay deglacial events shows that the retreat of the HSIS, the opening of the Tyrell Sea, and the catastrophic drainage of glacial lakes Agassiz and Ojibway at 8.2 ka are separate events that have been combined in previous estimates of the timing of the 8.2 ka event from marine records

  8. Tracklines of a multibeam survey of the Hudson Shelf Valley carried out in 1998 (polyline shapefile, geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Hudson Shelf Valley is the submerged seaward extension of the ancestral Hudson River drainage system and is the largest physiographic feature on the Middle...

  9. A finite element circulation model for embayments with drying intertidal areas and its application to the Quoddy region of the Bay of Fundy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, David A.; Shore, Jennifer A.; Page, Fred H.; Dowd, Michael

    A three-dimensional, triangular-mesh, finite element model has been adapted to allow for the flooding and drying of intertidal areas. The new algorithm sets velocities in dry areas to zero and removes elements from the computation when they are completely dry. Model tests simulating an idealized sloping beach that includes a tidal pool and a narrow deep channel laterally bounded by shallow drying sides, give qualitatively reasonable results. A simulation of the Quoddy region of the Bay of Fundy also gave good results when calibrated against available observations. This region includes extensive intertidal flats, tidal pools and channels that are blocked at low water by emerging shallows. The model is a clear improvement over a three-dimensional linear model and a fully nonlinear model without the drying routines using the same model grid. The drying model reproduces the tidal elevations with higher accuracy and has more realistic tidal currents.

  10. Subsurface structure and kinematics of the Calaveras-Hayward fault stepover from three-dimensional Vp and seismicity, San Francisco Bay region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaker, David M.; Michael, Andrew J.; Burgmann, Roland

    2005-01-01

    The Calaveras and Hayward faults are major components of the San Andreas fault system in the San Francisco Bay region. Dextral slip is presumed to transfer from the Calaveras fault to the Hayward fault in the Mission Hills region, an area of uplift in the contractional stepover between the two faults. Here the estimated deep slip rates drop from 15 to 6 mm/yr on the Calaveras fault, and slip begins on the Hayward fault at an estimated 9 mm/yr. A lineament of microseismicity near the Mission fault links the seismicity on the Calaveras and Hayward faults and is presumed to be related directly to this slip transfer. However, geologic and seismologic evidence suggest that the Mission fault may not be the source of the seismicity and that the Mission fault is not playing a major role in the slip transfer.

  11. The Riso-Hudson Enneagram Type Indicator: Estimates of Reliability and Validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newgent, Rebecca A.; Parr, Patricia E.; Newman, Isadore; Higgins, Kristin K.

    2004-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to estimate the reliability and validity of scores on the Riso-Hudson Enneagram Type Indicator (D. R. Riso & R. Hudson, 1999a). Results of 287 participants were analyzed. Alpha suggests an adequate degree of internal consistency. Evidence provides mixed support for construct validity using correlational and…

  12. 78 FR 20169 - Notice of Availability of an Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Hudson Yards Concrete...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-03

    ... Hudson Yards Concrete Casing Project in New York, New York AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA... Assessment for the Hudson Yards Concrete Casing Construction. SUMMARY: This notice advises the public that... coordination with Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) for the construction of an underground concrete casing...

  13. 75 FR 39839 - Regulated Navigation Area; Hudson River and Port of NY/NJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-13

    ... restrictions with the Kiewit and Weeks Marine contractors, and with Hudson River and Sandy Hook Pilots... transfer of the bridge span from shore to the barges has been scheduled on a weekday when it is expected to... Overtaking zones are established in areas identified by Weeks Marine, Hudson River and Sandy Hook Pilots as...

  14. Comments on James D. Brown and Thom Hudson's "The Alternatives in Language Assessment."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruton, Anthony; Brown, James Dean; Hudson, Thom

    1999-01-01

    Anthony Bruton comments on Brown and Hudson's article "The Alternatives in Language Assessment," (v32 n4 Win 1998). Raises questions about some of their definitions and categories and suggests additional items that need to be considered by test takers. Brown and Hudson reply with clarifications of terms and definition of the scope of their paper.…

  15. 33 CFR 165.170 - Safety Zone: Triathlon, Ulster Landing, Hudson River, NY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety Zone: Triathlon, Ulster Landing, Hudson River, NY. 165.170 Section 165.170 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... § 165.170 Safety Zone: Triathlon, Ulster Landing, Hudson River, NY. (a) Regulated area. The...

  16. 77 FR 65929 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Tappan Zee Hudson River Crossing Project in New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-31

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Tappan Zee Hudson River.... Sec. 139(l)(1). The actions relate to the Tappan Zee Hudson River Crossing Project located in Rockland... the following highway project in the State of New York: Tappan Zee Hudson River Crossing...

  17. 78 FR 27473 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Tappan Zee Hudson River Crossing Project in New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Tappan Zee Hudson River... within the meaning of 23 U.S.C. 139(l)(1). The actions relate to the Tappan Zee Hudson River Crossing... FHWA published a ``Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions'' on the Tappan Zee Hudson River...

  18. Burried MIS 5 abrasion platforms in the Bay of Koper (Gulf of Trieste, Northern Adriatic) confirm long-term subsidence of the Northern Adriatic region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trobec, Ana; Šmuc, Andrej; Poglajen, Sašo; Vrabec, Marko

    2016-04-01

    implies an average subsidence rate of the area between 0.28 and 0.38 mm/year, which agrees with previously published data for the Gulf of Trieste. This new dataset demonstrates that the Bay of Koper was connected to the Adriatic Sea approximately 125.000 ky ago during the MIS 5 sea-level highstand. Together with marine abrasion platforms and well data previously documented in the northeastern part of the Gulf of Trieste and well data from the northwestern part of the gulf our data corroborates the long-term subsidence of the Northern Adriatic region.

  19. Analyzing a Mid-Air Collision Over the Hudson River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sean; Holloway, C. Michael

    2012-01-01

    On August 8, 2009, a private airplane collided with a sightseeing helicopter over the Hudson River near Hoboken, New Jersey. All three people aboard the airplane, the pilot and two passengers, and all six people aboard the helicopter, the pilot and five passengers, were killed. The National Transportation Safety Board report on the accident identified inherent limitations of the see-and-avoid concept, inadequate regulations, and errors by the pilots and an air traffic controller as causing or contributing to the accident. This paper presents the results of analyzing the accident using the Systems-Theoretic Accident Model and Processes (STAMP) approach to determining accident causation.

  20. Younger Dryas and Holocene oceanography of the western Labrador Sea region based on foraminifera and sediment proxies from Placentia Bay, Newfoundland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Christina; Pearce, Christof; Seidenkrantz, Marit-Solveig; Kuijpers, Antoon; Reynisson, Njáll F.; Zilmer Christensen, Eva; Juncker Hansen, Mette

    2014-05-01

    Benthic foraminiferal assemblages and geochemical analyses from three marine sediment cores from Placentia Bay on the southwest coast of Newfoundland captured the evolving surface and subsurface environment of the eastern Labrador Sea during the late glacial and Holocene. The area, which is today located in the boundary zone between the Arctic Labrador current and the warm Gulf Stream in the eastern margin of the Labrador Sea was during the early part of the Younger Dryas (13.0-12.3 cal. kyr BP) dominated by cold, Arctic conditions and heavy sea-ice cover linked to a strong Polar Water component of the Inner Labrador Current. In the later part of the Younger Dryas (12.3-11.5 kyr BP) the influence of the Labrador Current (LC) became less pronounced resulting in more unstable conditions with varying sea-ice cover and increased influence of Gulf Stream water, presumably linked to an increased strength of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). The earliest Holocene (11.5-10.4 kyr BP) saw slightly warmer subsurface conditions in Placentia Bay and increased productivity, presumably caused by a decreased southward transport of Polar Water via the LC. The onset of a strong AMOC caused the northward movement of the frontal zone between the Subpolar Gyre and the North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre in the western North Atlantic region to closer proximity to the southern coast of Newfoundland compared to previously. From ca. 10.4-9.65 kyr BP increased bottom-current speeds and the presence of species often found in connection to oceanic fronts, suggest a further strengthening of the AMOC causing inflow of Atlantic-source water into Placentia Bay. This tendency was further strengthened at 9.65-7.3 kyr BP, which saw a relatively strong inflow of Atlantic-source Gulf Stream water into Placentia Bay, evidenced by high frequencies of Cassidulina neoteretis. This inflow of Atlantic was however temporarily halted around 8.2 kyr BP, when a short-lived, extreme peak in

  1. Landslides, Floods, and Marine Effects of the Storm of January 3-5, 1982, in the San Francisco Bay Region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellen, Stephen D.; Wieczorek, Gerald F.

    1988-01-01

    A catastrophic rainstorm in central California on January 3-5,1982, dropped as much as half the mean annual precipitation within a period of about 32 hours, triggering landslides and floods throughout 10 counties in the vicinity of the San Francisco Bay. More than 18,000 of the slides induced by the storm transformed into debris flows that swept down hillslopes or drainages with little warning. Debris flows damaged at least 100 homes, killed 14 residents, and carried a 15th victim into a creek. Shortly after rainfall ceased, more than 459,000 m3 of earth and rock slid from a mountainside above the community of Love Creek in Santa Cruz County, burying 10 people in their homes. Throughout the bay region, thousands of people vacated homes in hazardous areas, entire communities were isolated as roads were blocked, public water systems were destroyed, and power and telephone services were disrupted. Altogether, the storm damaged 6,300 homes, 1,500 businesses, and tens of kilometers of roads, bridges, and communication lines. Preliminary rough estimates of total storm damage, compiled for emergency purposes within 2 weeks of the storm, exceeded $280 million. Carefully documented direct costs from landslides exceeded $66 million; total costs from landslides certainly were greater and probably constituted a much larger proportion of the total storm damage than suggested by these disparate figures. Landslides accounted for 25 of the 33 deaths attributed to the storm.

  2. Transitions in the Colonial Hudson Valley: Capitalist, Bulk Goods, and Braudelian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Leitner

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A long debate about the American “transition to capitalism” was apparently settled via a rough consensus on the gradual prevalence of rural capitalism in the north; and that even small, subsistence-oriented farm households engaged in some market exchange, while market-oriented farm households engaged in some subsistence activities. Yet certain Marxist scholars argue that even prevalent market exchange did not necessarily signify a capitalist economy.  Similarly, certain world-systems scholars see the debates as somewhat pointless, inasmuch as capitalism is a systemic characteristic that exists regardless of any individual identification. These latter notions derive in part from Braudel’s tripartite structure of early modern economic life, which sees self-sufficiency and basic daily survival existing alongside market economies and everyday forms of exchange, with the capitalist world-economy in turn overarching, yet not necessarily affecting, the other two levels.  This paper posits that colonial America’s “transition” to capitalism was effectively the gradual, often contested, and geographically uneven addition of Braudel’s second layer of economic life – the market economy – onto the first layer of self-sufficiency and basic material life; with this process arguably driven by the third layer of the larger capitalist economy, as other recent studies of the colonial Hudson Valley have focused on, albeit while ignoring the region’s diverse and uneven economic geography  It explores the notion of geographically-uneven Braudelian economic structures and transitions within the late 17th and 18th century colonial Hudson Valley, a region of four rather distinct subregions demonstrating that even within relatively small geographical spaces, at least at certain times, one can find different means of Braudelian economic life, and by extension, varying articulations with the world-economy and possible paths to eventual core emergence.

  3. Vapor Intrusion Facilities - South Bay

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — POINT locations for the South Bay Vapor Instrusion Sites were derived from the NPL data for Region 9. One site, Philips Semiconductor, was extracted from the...

  4. Chesapeake Bay Program Water Quality Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Chesapeake Information Management System (CIMS), designed in 1996, is an integrated, accessible information management system for the Chesapeake Bay Region....

  5. Seasonal dynamics of methane emissions from a subarctic fen in the Hudson Bay Lowlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. L. Hanis

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ecosystem-scale methane (CH4 flux (FCH4 over a subarctic fen at Churchill, Manitoba, Canada was measured to understand the magnitude of emissions during spring and fall shoulder seasons, and the growing season in relation to physical and biological conditions. FCH4 was measured using eddy covariance with a closed-path analyzer in four years (2008–2011. Cumulative measured annual FCH4 (shoulder plus growing seasons ranged from 3.0 to 9.6 g CH4 m−2 yr−1 among the four study years, with a mean of 6.5 to 7.1 g CH4 m−2 yr−1 depending upon gap-filling method. Soil temperatures to depths of 50 cm and air temperature were highly correlated with FCH4, with near surface soil temperature at 5 cm most correlated across spring, fall, and the whole season. The response of FCH4 to soil temperature at the 5 cm depth and air temperature was more than double in spring to that of fall. Emission episodes were generally not observed during spring thaw. Growing season emissions also depended upon soil and air temperatures but water table also exerted influence with FCH4 highest when water was 2–13 cm below and least when it was at or above the mean peat surface.

  6. Seismological Structure of the 1.8Ga Trans-Hudson Orogen of North America and its affinity to present-day Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilligan, A.; Bastow, I. D.; Darbyshire, F. A.

    2015-12-01

    How tectonic processes operated and changed through the Precambrian is debated: what was the nature and scale of orogenic events and were they different on the younger, hotter, more ductile Earth? The geology of northern Hudson Bay records the Paleoproterozoic collision between the Western Churchill and Superior plates: the 1.8Ga Trans-Hudson Orogeny (THO) and is thus an ideal study locale to address this issue. It has been suggested, primarily on the strength of traditional field geology, that the THO was comparable in scale and style to the present-day Himalayan-Karakoram-Tibet Orogen (HKTO). However, understanding of the deep crustal architecture of the THO, and how it compares to the evolving HKTO is presently lacking. Through joint inversion of teleseismic receiver functions and surface wave data, we obtain new Moho depth estimates and shear velocity models for the crust and upper mantle. Archean crust in the Rae, Hearne and Churchill domains is thin and structurally simple, with a sharp Moho; upper crustal wavespeed variations are readily attributed to post-formation events. However, the Paleoproterozoic Quebec-Baffin segment of the THO has a deeper Moho and more complex crustal structure. Our observations are strikingly similar to recent models, computed using the same methods, of the HKTO lithosphere, where deformation also extends >400km beyond the collision front. On the strength of Moho character, present-day crustal thickness, and metamorphic grade, we thus propose that southern Baffin experienced uplift of a similar magnitude and spatial extent to the Himalayas during the Paleoproterozoic Trans-Hudson Orogeny.

  7. A simulation of the Cerro Hudson SO[sub 2] cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoeberl, M.R.; Lait, L.R.; Newman, P.A.; Krueger, A.J. (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)); Doiron, S.D. (Hughes STX Corp., Lanham, MD (United States))

    1993-02-20

    An isentropic trajectory model is used to simulate the evolution of the southern hemisphere SO[sub 2] cloud associated with the eruption of Cerro Hudson. By matching the parcel trajectories with total ozone mapping spectrometer SO[sub 2] retrievals, the principal stratospheric injection region is determined to be between 11 and 16 km in altitude. This region is characterized by weak wind shears and is located just poleward of the subtropical jet in the outer fringe of the stratospheric polar vortex. The lack of wind shear in the injection region explains the slow zonal dispersal of the SO[sub 2] cloud which was still clearly observed 19 days after the eruption. The trajectory model simulation of the SO[sub 2] cloud shows good agreement with observations for 7 days after the eruption. Using the potential vorticity and potential temperature estimates of the initial eruption cloud, the cloud position relative to the polar night jet is shown to be nearly fixed up to September 2, 1991, which was as long as the cloud was observed. This result suggests that the lower stratopsheric polar and mid-latitude regions are nearly isolated from each other during the late August period. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  8. How Sensitive is the Asian Monsoon System to Remote Forcing?: A Perspective from the late Quaternary Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, H. M.; Vance, D.; Arevalos, A.; Shimizu, N.; Burke, A.; Ziveri, P.

    2007-12-01

    Over the Quaternary has the Asian monsoon system responded predominantly to regional climate drivers such as orbital changes in summer insolation and the land-sea pressure gradient, or global climate boundary conditions such as the extent of northern hemisphere(NH) ice sheets and snow cover? Our paleorecords from the Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea reveal contrasting influence of the NH ice sheets. Seawater Nd isotopic ratios in the northern Bay of Bengal, reconstructed from planktic foraminifera, are sensitive to the degree of northward penetration of the Asian summer monsoon precipitation into the nonradiogenic terranes of the Himalayas. Shifts in river sources from the more northerly Ganges-Brahmaputra watershed to the more southerly Arakan coastal river systems respond dominantly to ITCZ movement driven by Northern Hemisphere cooling during 100 ky glacial-interglacial cycles. A nonlinear correlation of epsilon Nd with ice volume suggests that ITCZ movement responds to aerial coverage of ice sheets and snow rather than to ice thickness and volume as expected from albedo forcing. These data add support to recent general circulation models of which in this region show strong ITCZ response to Northern Hemisphere ice coverage. A small component of Nd isotopic variation on precessional timescales corresponds to ITCZ movement within the southern Irrawaddy and Arakan coastal systems. There is a strong connection between ITCZ movement and productivity even in a non-upwelling system such as the Bay of Bengal. In the northernmost Bay of Bengal, productivity indicators from Sr-Ca ratios in coccoliths and from Ba-Ti ratios of sediments exhibit principally glacial-interglacial variability consistent with the epsilon Nd record. Higher productivity during interglacials may reflect either higher riverine nutrient sources or stronger wind- driven eddy pumping. In the more southerly Andaman Sea, Sr-Ca ratios in coccoliths reveal productivity variations dominantly on precessional

  9. The influence of salinity and restoration on wetland soil microbial communities and carbon cycling in the San Francisco Bay-Delta Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theroux, S.; Hartman, W.; He, S.; Windham-Myers, L.; Tringe, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change is predicted to increase the average salinity of the San Francisco Bay-Delta watershed as sea levels rise and alpine snow volume decreases. Wetland soil microbial communities are responsible for cycling greenhouse gases and their response to climate change will heavily influence whether increasing salinity will have a negative or positive effect on the net greenhouse gas budgets of wetlands. To better understand the underlying factors determining the balance of greenhouse gas flux in wetland soils, we targeted the microbial communities along a salinity gradient ranging from freshwater to full seawater in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region. Using DNA and RNA sequencing, coupled with greenhouse gas monitoring, we sampled sixteen sites capturing a range of wetland plant types and restoration states. We determined a suite of soil biogeochemical parameters including moisture, carbon and nutrient contents, pH, sulfate, chloride, and trace metal concentrations. The results of our microbial diversity survey (16S rRNA gene Illumina tag sequencing) showed that salinity and sampling location were the primary drivers of belowground microbial community composition. Freshwater wetland soils, with lower sulfate concentrations, produced more methane than saline sites and we found a parallel increase in the relative abundance of methanogen populations in the high-methane samples. Surprisingly, wetland restoration status did not significantly alter microbial community composition, despite orders of magnitude greater methane flux in restored wetlands compared to reference sites. Deeper metagenomic and metatranscriptomic sequencing in a restored wetland allowed us to further evaluate the roles of methanogen abundance and activity in shaping soil methane production. Our study links belowground microbial communities with their greenhouse gas production, providing a mechanistic microbial framework for assessing climate change feedbacks in wetland soils resulting from sea

  10. Rock Engineering Design by Xiating Feng and John A Hudson

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E.T.Brown

    2012-01-01

    This highly original and innovative book is the outcome of the work of the Commission on Rock Engineering Design Methodology of the International Society for Rock Mechanics (ISRM) in the period 2007-2011.The work of the Commission was managed by the authors,Professor John A Hudson,ISRM President for 2007-2011,and Professor Xiating Feng,ISRM President for 2011-2015,in association with the Chinese Society for Rock Mechanics and Engineering.Recently,this reviewer (2011) has argued that the work of its Commissions has been among the major achievements of the ISRM in the 50 years since its foundation in 1962.This book adds to that impressive record of achievement.

  11. 2012 FEMA Topographic Lidar: Hudson-Hoosic and Deerfield Watersheds, Massachusetts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) dataset is a survey of the Hudson-Hoosic and Deerfield project area. The entire survey area for Massachusetts is...

  12. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: INVERT (Invertebrate Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine and estuarine invertebrate species for the Hudson River. Vector polygons in this data set...

  13. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Hudson River, maps and geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0014791)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for the Hudson River from 1942 to 2005. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and...

  14. Hudson River Sub_Bottom Profile Data - Raw SEG-Y Files (*.sgy)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hudson River Estuary Shallow Water Surveys. Subbottom data was collected November 5 to December 15, 2009, in the estuary north from Saugerties to Troy. Data...

  15. 2012 FEMA Topographic Lidar: Hudson-Hoosic and Deerfield Watersheds, Massachusetts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) dataset is a survey of the Hudson-Hoosic and Deerfield project area. The entire survey area for Massachusetts is...

  16. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: SENSITIV (Sensitive Area Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains human-use resource data for sensitive areas along the Hudson River. Vector points in this data set represent sensitive areas. This data set...

  17. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, anadromous, and freshwater fish species in the Hudson River. Vector polygons in this...

  18. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: HYDRO (Hydrography Lines and Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines and polygons representing coastal hydrography used in the creation of the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) for the Hudson...

  19. Energy-water nexus analysis of enhanced water supply scenarios: a regional comparison of Tampa Bay, Florida, and San Diego, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Weiwei; Wang, Ranran; Zimmerman, Julie B

    2014-05-20

    Increased water demand and scarce freshwater resources have forced communities to seek nontraditional water sources. These challenges are exacerbated in coastal communities, where population growth rates and densities in the United States are the highest. To understand the current management dilemma between constrained surface and groundwater sources and potential new water sources, Tampa Bay, Florida (TB), and San Diego, California (SD), were studied through 2030 accounting for changes in population, water demand, and electricity grid mix. These locations were chosen on the basis of their similar populations, land areas, economies, and water consumption characters as well as their coastal locations and rising contradictions between water demand and supply. Three scenarios were evaluated for each study area: (1) maximization of traditional supplies; (2) maximization of seawater desalination; and (3) maximization of nonpotable water reclamation. Three types of impacts were assessed: embodied energy, greenhouse gas (GHG) emission, and energy cost. SD was found to have higher embodied energy and energy cost but lower GHG emission than TB in most of its water infrastructure systems because of the differences between the electricity grid mixes and water resources of the two regions. Maximizing water reclamation was found to be better than increasing either traditional supplies or seawater desalination in both regions in terms of the three impact categories. The results further imply the importance of assessing the energy-water nexus when pursuing demand-side control targets or goals as well to ensure that the potentially most economical options are considered.

  20. Recent peat accumulation rates in minerotrophic peatlands of the Bay James region, Eastern Canada, inferred by 210Pb and 137Cs radiometric techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Adam A; Ghaleb, Bassam; Garneau, Michelle; Asnong, Hans; Loisel, Julie

    2008-10-01

    (210)Pb and (137)Cs dating techniques are used to characterise recent peat accumulation rates of two minerotrophic peatlands located in the La Grande Rivière hydrological watershed, in the James Bay region (Canada). Several cores were collected during the summer 2005 in different parts of the two selected peatlands. These minerotrophic patterned peatlands are presently affected by erosion processes, expressed by progressive mechanical destruction of their pools borders. This erosion process is related to a water table rise induced by a regional increase of humidity since the last century. The main objective of the present paper is to (1) evaluate if (210)Pb and (137)Cs dating techniques can be applied to build accurate chronologies in these environments and (2) detect changes in the peat accumulation rates in regard to this amplification of humidity. In both sites, unsupported (210)Pb shows an exponential decreasing according to the depth. Chronologies inferred from (210)Pb allow to reconstruct peat accumulation rates since ca. 1855 AD. The (137)Cs data displayed evident mobility and diffusion, preventing the establishment of any sustained chronology based on these measurements. In the two sites, peat accumulation rates inferred from (210)Pb chronologies fluctuate between 0.005 and 0.038 g cm(-2) yr(-1). As a result, the rise of the water table during the last decade has not yet affected peat accumulation rates.

  1. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Hudson River, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S.; Antrim, L.D.; Gruendell, B.D.; Word, J.Q.; Tokos, J.J.S. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The Hudson River (Federal Project No. 41) was one of seven waterways that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-New York District (USACE-NYD) requested the Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in March 1994. Sediment samples were collected from the Hudson River. Tests and analyses were conducted on Hudson River sediment core samples. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Hudson River included bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of site water and elutriate, water-column and benthic acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Individual sediment core samples collected from Hudson River were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). A composite sediment sample, representing the entire area proposed for dredging, was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Site water and elutriate water, prepared from the suspended-particulate phase (SPP) of Hudson River sediment, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS. Water-column or SPP toxicity tests were performed with three species. Benthic acute toxicity tests were performed. Bioaccumulation tests were also conducted.

  2. Bathymetric controls on sediment transport in the Hudson River estuary: Lateral asymmetry and frontal trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, David K.; Geyer, W. Rockwell; Warner, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Analyses of field observations and numerical model results have identified that sediment transport in the Hudson River estuary is laterally segregated between channel and shoals, features frontal trapping at multiple locations along the estuary, and varies significantly over the spring-neap tidal cycle. Lateral gradients in depth, and therefore baroclinic pressure gradient and stratification, control the lateral distribution of sediment transport. Within the saline estuary, sediment fluxes are strongly landward in the channel and seaward on the shoals. At multiple locations, bottom salinity fronts form at bathymetric transitions in width or depth. Sediment convergences near the fronts create local maxima in suspended-sediment concentration and deposition, providing a general mechanism for creation of secondary estuarine turbidity maxima at bathymetric transitions. The lateral bathymetry also affects the spring-neap cycle of sediment suspension and deposition. In regions with broad, shallow shoals, the shoals are erosional and the channel is depositional during neap tides, with the opposite pattern during spring tides. Narrower, deeper shoals are depositional during neaps and erosional during springs. In each case, the lateral transfer is from regions of higher to lower bed stress, and depends on the elevation of the pycnocline relative to the bed. Collectively, the results indicate that lateral and along-channel gradients in bathymetry and thus stratification, bed stress, and sediment flux lead to an unsteady, heterogeneous distribution of sediment transport and trapping along the estuary rather than trapping solely at a turbidity maximum at the limit of the salinity intrusion.

  3. 象山港海域生态分区研究%Studies on the eco-regionalization in Xiangshan Bay,Zhejiang,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏永杰; 何东海; 费岳军; 赵强; 曹维; 蔡燕红

    2015-01-01

    16 third hierarchy and 9 second hierarchy indicators are selected for the study from disciplines such as hydrology,water quality,sediment quality,bioecology and etc.A set of index system of eco-regionalization in Xiangshan Bay was established by the indexes.Based on GIS overlaid maps on the dimensional heterogeneity of Xiangshan Bay,the Bay can be regionalized into 5 areas.In area A and B,water exchange quickly and high salini-ty and offshore plankton species existed as a main feature.And the benthic community is presented by the clayey silty-polychaete-nassariidae-ophiurid.The environmental problems are heavy metal pollution in water and oil pollu-tion in the sediments.In area C,water exchange is weak and the water temperature is higher.In area D and E,the water exchange is poor with low salinity and relative high water temperature.In area C and D,temperate coastal species and warm sea species are dominant.The ecological problems are the water pollutions of heavy metals,oils, organic matters and eutrophication.The salinity in area E is low characterized by brackish plankton species.The main ecological problems of area E are organic pollution,eutrophication and heavy metal pollution.%从水文、水质、底质和生物生态等不同指标着手,筛选出9个二级指标和16个三级指标,建立了一套象山港海域生态分区指标体系.并利用 GIS 图层叠加技术对象山港海域进行空间异质性分析,将象山港从外湾至内湾划分为 A、B、C、D、E 5个区.其中,A 区和 B 区水交换能力较强,盐度较高,浮游生物以外洋种为主,底栖群落为粘土质粉砂-多毛类-织纹螺-蛇尾类群落,主要环境问题是水体重金属污染和沉积物石油类污染;C 区水交换能力较弱,水温较高,D 区和 E 区水交换能力差,盐度相对较低,水温相对较高.C 区和 D 区浮游生物以近岸温带种和暖海种为主,主要生态问题是水体重金属和石油类污染

  4. Association of mercury and selenium with altered glutathione metabolism and oxidative stress in diving ducks from the San Francisco Bay region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, D.J.; Ohlendorf, H.M.; Marn, C.M.; Pendleton, G.W.

    1998-01-01

    Adult male greater scaup (Aythya marila) (GS), surf scoters (Melanitta perspicillata)(SS), and ruddy ducks (Oxyura jamaicensis) (RD) were collected from Suisun Bay and coastal Tomales Bay in the greater San Francisco Bay area to assess exposure to inorganic contaminants. Hepatic selenium (Se) concentrations were highest in GS (geometric mean = 67 ppm, dw) and SS (119 ppm) in Suisun Bay, whereas hepatic mercury (Hg) was highest (19 ppm) in GS and SS from Tomales Bay. Hepatic Se and Hg were lower in RD and did not differ between locations. Hepatic supernatants were assayed for enzymes related to glutathione metabolism and antioxidant activity including: glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-peroxidase), glutathione reductase (GSSG-reductase), and glutathione-S-transferase (GSH-transferase). GSH-peroxidase activity was higher in SS and RD, and G-6-PDH higher in GS and SS from Suisun Bay than Tomales Bay. GSSG-reductase was higher in SS from Suisun Bay. The ratio of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) to reduced glutathione (GSH) was greater in all species from Tomales Bay. The following significant relationships were found in one or more species with increasing hepatic Hg concentration: lower body, liver and heart weights; decreased hepatic GSH concentration, G-6-PDH and GSH-peroxidase activities; increased ratio of GSSG to GSH, and increased GSSG-reductase activity. With increasing hepatic Se concentration, GSH-peroxidase increased but GSH decreased. It is concluded that measurement of associated enzymes in conjunction with thiol status may be a useful bioindicator to discriminate between Hg and Se effects. Concentrations of mercury and selenium and variable affected have been associated with adverse effects on reproduction and neurological function in experimental studies with mallards.

  5. USGS Tampa Bay Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, K.K.; Cronin, T. M.; Crane, M.; Hansen, M.; Nayeghandi, A.; Swarzenski, P.; Edgar, T.; Brooks, G.R.; Suthard, B.; Hine, A.; Locker, S.; Willard, D.A.; Hastings, D.; Flower, B.; Hollander, D.; Larson, R.A.; Smith, K.

    2007-01-01

    Many of the nation's estuaries have been environmentally stressed since the turn of the 20th century and will continue to be impacted in the future. Tampa Bay, one the Gulf of Mexico's largest estuaries, exemplifies the threats that our estuaries face (EPA Report 2001, Tampa Bay Estuary Program-Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan (TBEP-CCMP)). More than 2 million people live in the Tampa Bay watershed, and the population constitutes to grow. Demand for freshwater resources, conversion of undeveloped areas to resident and industrial uses, increases in storm-water runoff, and increased air pollution from urban and industrial sources are some of the known human activities that impact Tampa Bay. Beginning on 2001, additional anthropogenic modifications began in Tampa Bat including construction of an underwater gas pipeline and a desalinization plant, expansion of existing ports, and increased freshwater withdrawal from three major tributaries to the bay. In January of 2001, the Tampa Bay Estuary Program (TBEP) and its partners identifies a critical need for participation from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in providing multidisciplinary expertise and a regional-scale, integrated science approach to address complex scientific research issue and critical scientific information gaps that are necessary for continued restoration and preservation of Tampa Bay. Tampa Bay stakeholders identified several critical science gaps for which USGS expertise was needed (Yates et al. 2001). These critical science gaps fall under four topical categories (or system components): 1) water and sediment quality, 2) hydrodynamics, 3) geology and geomorphology, and 4) ecosystem structure and function. Scientists and resource managers participating in Tampa Bay studies recognize that it is no longer sufficient to simply examine each of these estuarine system components individually, Rather, the interrelation among system components must be understood to develop conceptual and

  6. Latest Holocene evolution and human disturbance of a channel segment in the Hudson River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingbeil, A.D.; Sommerfield, C.K.

    2005-01-01

    The latest Holocene sedimentary record of a cohesive channel and subtidal shoal in the lower Hudson River Estuary was examined to elucidate natural (sea-level rise, sediment transport) and anthropogenic (bulkheading, dredging) influences on the recent morphodynamic evolution of the system. To characterize the seafloor and shallow subbottom, ??? 100 km of high-resolution seismic reflection profiles (chirp) were collected within a 20-km reach of the estuary and correlated with sediment lithologies provided by eight vibracores recovered along seismic lines. Sediment geochronology with 137Cs and 14C was used to estimate intermediate and long-term sedimentation rates, respectively, and historical bathymetric data were analyzed to identify regional patterns of accretion and erosion, and to quantify changes in channel geometry and sediment volume. The shoal lithosome originated around 4 ka presumably with decelerating eustatic sea level rise during the latest Holocene. Long-term sedimentation rates on the shoal (2.3-2.6 mm/yr) are higher than in the channel (2 mm/yr) owing to hydrodynamic conditions that preferentially sequester suspended sediment on the western side of the estuary. As a result, the shoal accretes oblique to the principal axis of tidal transport, and more rapidly than the channel to produce an asymmetric cross-section. Shoal deposits consist of tidally bedded muds and are stratified by minor erosion surfaces that seismic profiles reveal to extend for 10s of meters to kilometers. The frequency and continuity of these surfaces suggest that the surficial shoal is catastrophically stripped on decadal-centennial time scales by elevated tidal flows; tidal erosion maintains the shoal at a uniform depth below sea level and prevents it from transitioning to an intertidal environment. Consequently, the long-term sedimentation rate approximates the rate of sea-level rise in the lower estuary (1-3 mm/yr). After the mid 1800s, the natural geometry of the lower Hudson

  7. Sea-Level Rise Impacts on Hudson River Marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooks, A.; Nitsche, F. O.

    2015-12-01

    The response of tidal marshes to increasing sea-level rise is uncertain. Tidal marshes can adapt to rising sea levels through vertical accretion and inland migration. Yet tidal marshes are vulnerable to submergence if the rate of sea-level rise exceeds the rate of accretion and if inland migration is limited by natural features or development. We studied how Piermont and Iona Island Marsh, two tidal marshes on the Hudson River, New York, would be affected by sea-level rise of 0.5m, 1m, and 1.5m by 2100. This study was based on the 2011-2012 Coastal New York LiDAR survey. Using GIS we mapped sea-level rise projections accounting for accretion rates and calculated the submerged area of the marsh. Based on the Hudson River National Estuarine Research Reserve Vegetation 2005 dataset, we studied how elevation zones based on vegetation distributions would change. To evaluate the potential for inland migration, we assessed land cover around each marsh using the National Land Cover Database 2011 Land Cover dataset and examined the slope beyond the marsh boundaries. With an accretion rate of 0.29cm/year and 0.5m of sea-level rise by 2100, Piermont Marsh would be mostly unchanged. With 1.5m of sea-level rise, 86% of Piermont Marsh would be flooded. For Iona Island Marsh with an accretion rate of 0.78cm/year, sea-level rise of 0.5m by 2100 would result in a 4% expansion while 1.5m sea-level rise would cause inundation of 17% of the marsh. The results indicate that Piermont and Iona Island Marsh may be able to survive rates of sea-level rise such as 0.5m by 2100 through vertical accretion. At rates of sea-level rise like 1.5m by 2100, vertical accretion cannot match sea-level rise, submerging parts of the marshes. High elevations and steep slopes limit Piermont and Iona Island Marsh's ability to migrate inland. Understanding the impacts of sea-level rise on Piermont and Iona Island Marsh allows for long-term planning and could motivate marsh conservation programs.

  8. Geoid and gravity anomaly data of conjugate regions of Bay of Bengal and Enderby Basin: New constraints on breakup and early spreading history between India and Antarctica

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishna, K.S.; Michael, L.; Bhattacharyya, R.; Majumdar, T.J.

    Enderby Basin as conjugate FZs that trace the early Cretaceous rifting of south ECMI from Enderby Land. Structural rises between the FZs of Bay of Bengal may either represent fossil ridge segments, possibly have extinct during the early evolution...

  9. NOSBATC - bathymetric contour data for the Monterey Bay region from Point Ano Nuevo to Point Sur, California based on NOAA/NOS data (UTM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset contains bathymetric data as contours for the the greater Monterey Bay area between Point Ano Nuevo to the north and Point Sur to the south. NOSBATC are...

  10. NOSBATC - bathymetric contour data for the Monterey Bay region from Point Ano Nuevo to Point Sur, California based on NOAA/NOS data (UTM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset contains bathymetric data as contours for the the greater Monterey Bay area between Point Ano Nuevo to the north and Point Sur to the south. NOSBATC are...

  11. Galveston Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Lawrence R.; Spear, Kathryn A.; Eleonor Taylor,; Thatcher, Cindy

    2011-01-01

    The Galveston Bay estuary is located on the upper Texas Gulf coast (Lester and Gonzalez, 2002). It is composed of four major sub-bays—Galveston, Trinity, East, and West Bays. It is Texas’ largest estuary on the Gulf Coast with a total area of 155,399 hectares (384,000 acres) and 1,885 km (1,171 miles) of shoreline (Burgan and Engle, 2006). The volume of the bay has increased over the past 50 years due to subsidence, dredging, and sea level rise. Outside of ship channels, the maximum depth is only 3.7 m (12 ft), with the average depth ranging from 1.2 m (4 ft) to 2.4 m (8 ft)— even shallower in areas with widespread oyster reefs (Lester and Gonzalez, 2002). The tidal range is less than 0.9 m (3 ft), but water levels and circulation are highly influenced by wind. The estuary was formed in a drowned river delta, and its bayous were once channels of the Brazos and Trinity Rivers. Today, the watersheds surrounding the Trinity and San Jacinto Rivers, along with many other smaller bayous, feed into the bay. The entire Galveston Bay watershed is 85,470 km2 (33,000 miles2 ) large (Figure 1). Galveston Island, a 5,000 year old sand bar that lies at the western edge of the bay’s opening into the Gulf of Mexico, impedes the freshwater flow of the Trinity and San Jacinto Rivers into the Gulf, the majority of which comes from the Trinity. The Bolivar Peninsula lies at the eastern edge of the bay’s opening into the Gulf. Water flows into the Gulf at Bolivar Roads, 1 U.S. Geological Survey National Wetlands Research Center, 700 Cajundome Blvd., Lafayette, LA 70506 2 Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies, Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi, 6300 Ocean Drive, Unit 5869, Corpus Christi, Texas 78412 2 Galveston Pass, between Galveston Island and Bolivar Peninsula, and at San Luis Pass, between the western side of Galveston Island and Follets Island.

  12. Hillslope gullying in the Solway Firth — Morecambe Bay region, Great Britain: Responses to human impact and/or climatic deterioration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiverrell, R. C.; Harvey, A. M.; Foster, G. C.

    2007-02-01

    In the Solway Firth — Morecambe Bay region of Great Britain there is evidence for heightened hillslope instability during the late Holocene (after 3000 cal. BP). Little or no hillslope geomorphic activity has been identified occurring during the early Holocene, but there is abundant evidence for late Holocene hillslope erosion (gullying) and associated alluvial fan and valley floor deposition. Interpretation of the regional radiocarbon chronology available from organic matter buried beneath alluvial fan units suggests much of this geomorphic activity can be attributed to four phases of more extensive gullying identified after 2500-2200, 1300-1000, 1000-800 and 500 cal. BP. Both climate and human impact models can be evoked to explain the crossing of geomorphic thresholds: and palaeoecological data on climatic change (bog surface wetness) and human impact (pollen), together with archaeological and documentary evidence of landscape history, provide a context for addressing the causes of late Holocene geomorphic instability. High magnitude storm events are the primary agent responsible for gully incision, but neither such events nor cooler/wetter climatic episodes appear to have produced gully systems in the region before 3000 cal. BP. Increased gullying after 2500-2200 cal. BP coincides with population expansion during Iron Age and Romano-British times. The widespread and extensive gullying after 1300-1000 cal. BP and after 1000-800 cal. BP coincides with periods of population expansion and a growing rural economy identified during Norse times, 9-10th centuries AD, and during the Medieval Period, 12-13th centuries AD. These periods were separated by a downturn associated with the 'harrying of the north' AD 1069 to 1070. The gullying episode after 500 cal. BP also coincides with increased anthropogenic pressure on the uplands, with population growth and agricultural expansion after AD 1500 following 150 years of malaise caused by livestock and human (the Black Death

  13. Bathymetry of the Hudson Shelf Valley (12-m resolution Esri binary grid and 32-bit GeoTIFF, Mercator, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Hudson Shelf Valley is the submerged seaward extension of the ancestral Hudson River drainage system and is the largest physiographic feature on the Middle...

  14. A century of landscape disturbance and urbanization of the San Francisco Bay region affects the present-day genetic diversity of the California Ridgway’s Rail (Rallus obsoletus obsoletus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Dustin A.; Bui, Thuy-Vy D.; Overton, Cory T.; Vandergast, Amy; Casazza, Michael L.; Hull, Joshua M.; Takekawa, John Y.

    2016-01-01

    Fragmentation and loss of natural habitat have important consequences for wild populations and can negatively affect long-term viability and resilience to environmental change. Salt marsh obligate species, such as those that occupy the San Francisco Bay Estuary in western North America, occupy already impaired habitats as result of human development and modifications and are highly susceptible to increased habitat loss and fragmentation due to global climate change. We examined the genetic variation of the California Ridgway’s rail ( Rallus obsoletus obsoletus), a state and federally endangered species that occurs within the fragmented salt marsh of the San Francisco Bay Estuary. We genotyped 107 rails across 11 microsatellite loci and a single mitochondrial gene to estimate genetic diversity and population structure among seven salt marsh fragments and assessed demographic connectivity by inferring patterns of gene flow and migration rates. We found pronounced genetic structuring among four geographically separate genetic clusters across the San Francisco Bay. Gene flow analyses supported a stepping stone model of gene flow from south-to-north. However, contemporary gene flow among the regional embayments was low. Genetic diversity among occupied salt marshes and genetic clusters were not significantly different. However, we detected low effective population sizes and significantly high relatedness among individuals within salt marshes. Preserving genetic diversity and connectivity throughout the San Francisco Bay may require attention to salt marsh restoration in the Central Bay where habitat is both most limited and most fragmented. Incorporating periodic genetic sampling in to the management regime may help evaluate population trends and guide long-term management priorities.These data support the following in-press publication: Wood, D.A., Bui, T.D., Overton, C.T., Vandergast, A.G., Casazza, M.L., Hull, J.M., and Takekawa, J.Y. Conservation Genetics (2016

  15. Tsunami hazard assessment in the Hudson River Estuary based on dynamic tsunami-tide simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelby, Michael; Grilli, Stéphan T.; Grilli, Annette R.

    2016-12-01

    This work is part of a tsunami inundation mapping activity carried out along the US East Coast since 2010, under the auspice of the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation program (NTHMP). The US East Coast features two main estuaries with significant tidal forcing, which are bordered by numerous critical facilities (power plants, major harbors,...) as well as densely built low-level areas: Chesapeake Bay and the Hudson River Estuary (HRE). HRE is the object of this work, with specific focus on assessing tsunami hazard in Manhattan, the Hudson and East River areas. In the NTHMP work, inundation maps are computed as envelopes of maximum surface elevation along the coast and inland, by simulating the impact of selected probable maximum tsunamis (PMT) in the Atlantic ocean margin and basin. At present, such simulations assume a static reference level near shore equal to the local mean high water (MHW) level. Here, instead we simulate maximum inundation in the HRE resulting from dynamic interactions between the incident PMTs and a tide, which is calibrated to achieve MHW at its maximum level. To identify conditions leading to maximum tsunami inundation, each PMT is simulated for four different phases of the tide and results are compared to those obtained for a static reference level. We first separately simulate the tide and the three PMTs that were found to be most significant for the HRE. These are caused by: (1) a flank collapse of the Cumbre Vieja Volcano (CVV) in the Canary Islands (with a 80 km3 volume representing the most likely extreme scenario); (2) an M9 coseismic source in the Puerto Rico Trench (PRT); and (3) a large submarine mass failure (SMF) in the Hudson River canyon of parameters similar to the 165 km3 historical Currituck slide, which is used as a local proxy for the maximum possible SMF. Simulations are performed with the nonlinear and dispersive long wave model FUNWAVE-TVD, in a series of nested grids of increasing resolution towards the coast, by one

  16. Nutrients, heavy metals and phthalate acid esters in solar greenhouse soils in Round-Bohai Bay-Region, China: impacts of cultivation year and biogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiqun; Tian, Tian; Gao, Lihong; Tian, Yongqiang

    2016-07-01

    Solar greenhouse is a common facility type used for horticultural crop production in China. However, most solar greenhouse fields have been degraded due to continuous cropping and excessive fertilizer use. Therefore, we investigated solar greenhouse soils covering a wide range of cultivation years and environmental conditions in Round-Bohai Bay-Region to test the effects of cultivation year and biogeography on nutrients, heavy metals, and phthalate acid esters (PAEs). In general, soil pH decreased while soil electrical conductivity (EC), organic matter (OM), total nitrogen (TN), NO3 (-)-N, NH4 (+)-N, mineral nitrogen (MN), Olsen-P, and NH4OAc-K contents increased as time of cultivation increased. However, this trend was influenced by sampling sites. Among sampling sites, Jiangsu showed a relatively low soil pH and high Olsen-P content, while Hebei showed a relatively high soil EC value, NO3 (-)-N, NH4 (+)-N, MN, and NH4OAc-K contents. Liaoning was characterized by relatively high soil OM and TN contents. The nutrient level indexes in evaluation of soil quality on Olsen-P and NH4OAc-K exceeded the standard seriously. The maximum values of the heavy metals Cd, Cu, and Zn were 4.87, 2.78, and 1.15 times higher than the threshold values, respectively. There was a rising trend on the heavy metal contents with the increasing cultivation years, and this trend was significantly influenced by sampling sites. Both Cu and Zn had relative high heavy metal indexes in evaluation of soil pollution. The PAEs were not detected in almost all sampling soils. Overall, the excessive fertilizer application was an important cause of nutrient accumulation and heavy metal pollution, resulting in soil degradation in solar greenhouses.

  17. Biodegraded Oil and Its High Molecular Weight (C35+) n-alkanes in the Qianmiqiao Region in the Bohai Bay Basin, Northern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Tieguan; ZHU Dan; LU Hong; ZHANG Zhihuan; YANG Chiyin

    2004-01-01

    With a production of 208.2 m3/d, heavy oil was produced by drill stem test (DST) from three shallow reservoirs in Sand Group Nos. Ⅰ and Ⅲ of the Neogene Guantao Formation (Ng1 and NgⅢ) and the Eogene Dongying Formation (Ed) in an exploratory well Ban-14-1 within the Qianmiqiao region, Bohai Bay Basin, northern China. Based on the GC and GC-MS data of theNgⅠand NgⅢheavy oil samples, all n-alkanes and most isoprenoid hydrocarbons are lost and the GC baseline appears as an evident "hump", implying a large quantity of unresolved complex mixture (UCM),which typically revealed a result of heavy biodegradation. However, there still is a complete series of C14-C73 n-alkanes in the high-temperature gas chromatograms (HTGC) of the heavy oil, among which, the abundance of C30- n-alkanes are drastically reduced. The C35-C55 high molecular weight (HMW) n-alkanes are at high abundance and show a normal distribution pattern with major peak at C43 and an obvious odd-carbon-number predominance with CPI37-55 and OEP45-49values of 1.17 and 1.16-1.20, respectively. According to GC-MS analysis, the heavy oil is characterized by dual source inputs of aquatic microbes and terrestrial higher plants. Various steranes and tricyclic terpanes indicate an algal origin, and hopane-type triterpanes, C24tetracyclic terpane and drimane series show the bacterial contribution. With the odd-carbonnumber preference, HMW n-alkanes provide significant information not only on higher plant source input and immaturity,but also on the strong resistibility to biodegradation.

  18. Organic composition of PM 2.5 and size-segregated aerosols and their sources during the 2002 Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE), Florida, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Raphaël T.; Riemer, Daniel D.; Zika, Rod G.

    PM 2.5 and size-segregated aerosols were collected in May 2002 as part of the Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE), Florida, USA. Aerosol organic composition was used to estimate sources of a series of alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) using chemical indices, hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and a chemical mass balance receptor model (CMB). Aerosols were collected on quartz fiber filters (QFF) using a PM 2.5 high volume sampler and on aluminum foil discs using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI, 50% aerodynamic cut diameters were 18, 10, 5.6, 3.2, 1.8, 1.0, 0.56, 0.315 and 0.171 μm). Target compounds included alkanes and PAHs and were solvent extracted using a mixture of dichloromethane, acetone and hexane, concentrated and then analyzed using a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS). The target compounds in PM 2.5 were dominated by six sources during the study period: mobile sources (39±5%), coal burning (33±5%), biogenic primary emission (20±2%), oil combustion (5±2%), biomass burning (1.0±0.3%) and an unidentified source (3±2%). Results obtained from the chemical indices, HCA and CMB were in very good agreement with each other. PAH size distributions are presented for days dominated by a same source. Seventy-five percent and 50% of the PAH were found below 1.8 and 0.56 μm, respectively (monthly PAH geometric diameters averaged 0.43 μm). Coarse size PAHs were observed on 1 day (15 May) and were correlated with nitrate and sodium size distribution. It is hypothesized that the PAHs, sodium and nitrate were internally mixed and that the PAHs deposited onto a pre-existing marine aerosol. This transfer process has significant implications for PAH deposition and lifetime and warrants further study.

  19. Ctenophores-invaders and their role in the trophic dynamics of the planktonic community in the coastal regions off the Crimean coasts of the Black Sea (Sevastopol Bay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finenko, G. A.; Romanova, Z. A.; Abolmasova, G. I.; Anninsky, B. E.; Pavlovskaya, T. V.; Bat, L.; Kideys, A.

    2006-07-01

    The abundances, biomasses, and population structures of two introduced ctenophore species— Mnemiopsis leidyi and Beroe ovata—were monitored along with mesoplankton in the near-shore waters of the northern Black Sea (Sevastopol Bay and adjacent regions) over a period of four years (2000-2003), after the B. ovata invasion. The annual dynamics of the M. leidyi population were similar in these years: very low abundances and biomass values were observed during the major part of the year (unlike previous years) with a shortterm peak in the summer-early autumn. B. ovata development during the growth in the M. leidyi biomass resulted in a sharp fall in the M. leidyi biomass down to extremely low values. The interannual differences in the populations of both ctenophore species were reflected by their quantitative parameters: the maximum biomass of M. leidyi varied from 790 g/m2 in 2001 to 211-266 g/m2 in other years. The maximum biomass values of B. ovata (38.9 and 32.5 g/m2) were observed in 2001 and 2003, respectively. In 2000-2003, from July to September, during the peak in mnemiopsis development, the population consumed from 1.9 ± 0.4 to 13.4 ± 5.7% of the mesoplankton biomass per day, while in the years of B. ovata absence, these values were as high as 30-40%. For the first time, the grazing rate of microzooplankton by M. leidi larvae was estimated. In August 2003, the maximum daily consumption rate was as great as 23-25% of the microzooplankton biomass. The daily rations of the mnemiopsis larvae on microzooplankton were close or even higher than those on mesoplankton.

  20. Simulating the Effects of Sea Level Rise on the Resilience and Migration of Tidal Wetlands along the Hudson River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabak, Nava M; Laba, Magdeline; Spector, Sacha

    2016-01-01

    Sea Level Rise (SLR) caused by climate change is impacting coastal wetlands around the globe. Due to their distinctive biophysical characteristics and unique plant communities, freshwater tidal wetlands are expected to exhibit a different response to SLR as compared with the better studied salt marshes. In this study we employed the Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM), which simulates regional- or local-scale changes in tidal wetland habitats in response to SLR, and adapted it for application in a freshwater-dominated tidal river system, the Hudson River Estuary. Using regionally-specific estimated ranges of SLR and accretion rates, we produced simulations for a spectrum of possible future wetland distributions and quantified the projected wetland resilience, migration or loss in the HRE through the end of the 21st century. Projections of total wetland extent and migration were more strongly determined by the rate of SLR than the rate of accretion. Surprisingly, an increase in net tidal wetland area was projected under all scenarios, with newly-formed tidal wetlands expected to comprise at least 33% of the HRE's wetland area by year 2100. Model simulations with high rates of SLR and/or low rates of accretion resulted in broad shifts in wetland composition with widespread conversion of high marsh habitat to low marsh, tidal flat or permanent inundation. Wetland expansion and resilience were not equally distributed through the estuary, with just three of 48 primary wetland areas encompassing >50% of projected new wetland by the year 2100. Our results open an avenue for improving predictive models of the response of freshwater tidal wetlands to sea level rise, and broadly inform the planning of conservation measures of this critical resource in the Hudson River Estuary.

  1. Simulating the Effects of Sea Level Rise on the Resilience and Migration of Tidal Wetlands along the Hudson River.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nava M Tabak

    Full Text Available Sea Level Rise (SLR caused by climate change is impacting coastal wetlands around the globe. Due to their distinctive biophysical characteristics and unique plant communities, freshwater tidal wetlands are expected to exhibit a different response to SLR as compared with the better studied salt marshes. In this study we employed the Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM, which simulates regional- or local-scale changes in tidal wetland habitats in response to SLR, and adapted it for application in a freshwater-dominated tidal river system, the Hudson River Estuary. Using regionally-specific estimated ranges of SLR and accretion rates, we produced simulations for a spectrum of possible future wetland distributions and quantified the projected wetland resilience, migration or loss in the HRE through the end of the 21st century. Projections of total wetland extent and migration were more strongly determined by the rate of SLR than the rate of accretion. Surprisingly, an increase in net tidal wetland area was projected under all scenarios, with newly-formed tidal wetlands expected to comprise at least 33% of the HRE's wetland area by year 2100. Model simulations with high rates of SLR and/or low rates of accretion resulted in broad shifts in wetland composition with widespread conversion of high marsh habitat to low marsh, tidal flat or permanent inundation. Wetland expansion and resilience were not equally distributed through the estuary, with just three of 48 primary wetland areas encompassing >50% of projected new wetland by the year 2100. Our results open an avenue for improving predictive models of the response of freshwater tidal wetlands to sea level rise, and broadly inform the planning of conservation measures of this critical resource in the Hudson River Estuary.

  2. Examination of aerosol distributions and radiative effects over the Bay of Bengal and the Arabian Sea region during ICARB using satellite data and a general circulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Cherian

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyse aerosol loading and its direct radiative effects over the Bay of Bengal (BoB and Arabian Sea (AS regions for the Integrated Campaign on Aerosols, gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB undertaken during 2006, using satellite data from the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS on board the Terra and Aqua satellites, the Aerosol Index from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI on board the Aura satellite, and the European-Community Hamburg (ECHAM5.5 general circulation model extended by Hamburg Aerosol Module (HAM. By statistically comparing with large-scale satellite data sets, we firstly show that the aerosol properties measured during the ship-based ICARB campaign and simulated by the model are representative for the BoB and AS regions and the pre-monsoon season. In a second step, the modelled aerosol distributions were evaluated by a comparison with the measurements from the ship-based sunphotometer, and the satellite retrievals during ICARB. It is found that the model broadly reproduces the observed spatial and temporal variability in aerosol optical depth (AOD over BoB and AS regions. However, AOD was systematically underestimated during high-pollution episodes, especially in the BoB leg. We show that this underprediction of AOD is mostly because of the deficiencies in the coarse mode, where the model shows that dust is the dominant component. The analysis of dust AOD along with the OMI Aerosol Index indicate that missing dust transport that results from too low dust emission fluxes over the Thar Desert region in the model caused this deficiency. Thirdly, we analysed the spatio-temporal variability of AOD comparing the ship-based observations to the large-scale satellite observations and simulations. It was found that most of the variability along the track was from geographical patterns, with a minor influence by single events. Aerosol fields were homogeneous enough to yield a good statistical agreement

  3. The Bible and mission in faith perspective: J.Hudson Taylor and the early China Inland Mission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wigram, C.E.M.

    2007-01-01

    The thesis 'The Bible and Mission in Faith Perspective: J.Hudson Taylor and the Early China Inland Mission' by Christopher E.M. Wigram analysis the hermeneutical assumptions that underlay Hudson Taylor's approach to biblical interpretation, and the significance of his approach for the mission which

  4. A statistical forecast model for Tropical Cyclone Rainfall and flood events for the Hudson River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioffi, Francesco; Conticello, Federico; Hall, Thimoty; Lall, Upmanu; Orton, Philip

    2014-05-01

    Tropical Cyclones (TCs) lead to potentially severe coastal flooding through wind surge and also through rainfall-runoff processes. There is growing interest in modeling these processes simultaneously. Here, a statistical approach that can facilitate this process is presented with an application to the Hudson River Basin that is associated with the New York City metropolitan area. Three submodels are used in sequence. The first submodel is a stochastic model of the complete life cycle of North Atlantic (NA) tropical cyclones developed by Hall and Yonekura (2011). It uses archived data of TCs throughout the North Atlantic to estimate landfall rates at high geographic resolution as a function of the ENSO state and of sea surface temperature (SST). The second submodel translates the attributes of a tropical cyclone simulated by the first model to rainfall intensity at selected stations within the watershed of Hudson River. Two different approaches are used and compared: artificial neural network (ANN) and k-nearest neighbor (KNN). Finally, the third submodel transforms, once again, by using an ANN approach and KNN, the rainfall intensities, calculated for the ensemble of the stations, to the streamflows at specific points of the tributaries of the Hudson River. These streamflows are to be used as inputs in a hydrodynamic model that includes storm surge surge dynamics for the simulation of coastal flooding along the Hudson River. Calibration and validation of the model is carried out by using, selected tropical cyclone data since 1950, and hourly station rainfall and streamflow recorded for such extreme events. Four stream gauges (Troy dam, Mohawk River at Cohoes, Mohawk River diversion at Crescent Dam, Hudson River above lock one nr Waterford), a gauge from a tributary in the lower Hudson River, and over 20 rain gauges are used. The performance of the proposed model as tool for storm events is then analyzed and discussed.

  5. Quantum Random Walks and their Convergence to Evans-Hudson Flows

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lingaraj Sahu

    2008-08-01

    Using coordinate-free basic operators on toy Fock spaces, quantum random walks are defined following the ideas of Attal and Pautrat. Extending the result for one dimensional noise, strong convergence of quantum random walks associated with bounded structure maps to Evans–Hudson flow is proved under suitable assumptions. Starting from the bounded generator of a given uniformly continuous quantum dynamical semigroup on a von Neumann algebra, we have constructed quantum random walks which converges strongly and the strong limit gives an Evans–Hudson dilation for the semigroup.

  6. The role of bay breezes and regional transport on a high surface ozone episode during the Houston, Texas DISCOVER-AQ field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughner, C.; Follette-Cook, M. B.; Pickering, K. E.; Estes, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The highest observed surface ozone concentrations in the Houston metropolitan area in 2013 occurred on September 25, which coincided with the Texas DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) field campaign. Surface ozone was elevated throughout the Houston metropolitan area. Maximum 8-hour average ozone peaked along the western shore of Galveston Bay, reaching 124 ppbv, almost 50 ppbv above the current EPA standard of 75 ppbv, at La Porte Sylvan Beach. Continental air pollution from the north and northeast was transported into the Houston metropolitan area where it mixed with locally generated emissions. A bay breeze circulation formed causing pollutants that were transported out over the water in the morning to recirculate back inland where they mixed with freshly emitted pollution near the bay breeze convergence zone. The highest surface ozone concentrations were reported near the bay breeze front at La Porte Sylvan Beach. This ozone episode will be presented using measurements made during the DISCOVER-AQ field campaign and WRF and CMAQ model simulations.

  7. U. S. groups fight James Bay II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    This article reviews the opposition program to the James Bay II hydroelectric project. The environmental costs of the first phase of James Bay, the La Grande project, have been huge, resulting in massive alterations of the environment and causing widespread mercury poisoning of fish, loss of wetlands and disruption of caribou calving grounds. Start-up of the Great Whale project is imminent, and will result in the flooding of ca 5,000 square kilometers of wilderness. The environmental costs of phases 2 and 3 will be even larger than for the first phase, with potential for significant disruption of fresh-water input into James and Hudson Bays. Drastic changes in the volume and salinity of the water will jeopardize the life patterns of many migratory birds, polar bears, beluga wales, seals and other wildlife. These, along with other social costs, are prohibitive for the Cree. The Cree have been actively opposing the project in the United States, and a groundswell of American opposition has been building. The Cree have been successful in persuading Bangor, Maine, to cancel a proposed contract with Hydro Quebec, on economic grounds. Opposition is building in Burlington, Vermont, to a contract with Hydro Quebec for the planned purchase of 15 MW of power from Hydro Quebec. Secret contracts between Hydro Quebec and thirteen multinational aluminum corporations, to supply power at below cost, have been publicized. The signing of an energy contract between New York and Quebec has been delayed for one year due to the inability of Hydro Quebec to make progress on the project in the face of opposition at home.

  8. Large-scale right-slip displacement on the East San Francisco Bay Region fault system, California: Implications for location of late Miocene to Pliocene Pacific plate boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, R.J.; Sliter, W.V.; Sorg, D.H.; Russell, P.C.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.

    1996-01-01

    A belt of northwardly younging Neogene and Quaternary volcanic rocks and hydrothermal vein systems, together with a distinctive Cretaceous terrane of the Franciscan Complex (the Permanente terrane), exhibits about 160 to 170 km of cumulative dextral offset across faults of the East San Francisco Bay Region (ESFBR) fault system. The offset hydrothermal veins and volcanic rocks range in age from .01 Ma at the northwest end to about 17.6 Ma at the southeast end. In the fault block between the San Andreas and ESFBR fault systems, where volcanic rocks are scarce, hydrothermal vein system ages clearly indicate that the northward younging thermal overprint affected these rocks beginning about 18 Ma. The age progression of these volcanic rocks and hydrothermal vein systems is consistent with previously proposed models that relate northward propagation of the San Andreas transform to the opening of an asthenospheric window beneath the North American plate margin in the wake of subducting lithosphere. The similarity in the amount of offset of the Permanente terrane across the ESFBR fault system to that derived by restoring continuity in the northward younging age progression of volcanic rocks and hydrothermal veins suggests a model in which 80-110 km of offset are taken up 8 to 6 Ma on a fault aligned with the Bloomfield-Tolay-Franklin-Concord-Sunol-Calaveras faults. An additional 50-70 km of cumulative slip are taken up ??? 6 Ma by the Rogers Creek-Hayward and Concord-Franklin-Sunol-Calaveras faults. An alternative model in which the Permanente terrane is offset about 80 km by pre-Miocene faults does not adequately restore the distribution of 8-12 Ma volcanic rocks and hydrothermal veins to a single northwardly younging age trend. If 80-110 km of slip was taken up by the ESFBR fault system between 8 and 6 Ma, dextral slip rates were 40-55 mm/yr. Such high rates might occur if the ESFBR fault system rather than the San Andreas fault acted as the transform margin at this time

  9. Abrupt Atmospheric Methane Increases Associated With Hudson Strait Heinrich Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, R.; Brook, E.; Chiang, J. C. H.; Blunier, T.; Maselli, O. J.; McConnell, J. R.; Romanini, D.; Severinghaus, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    The drivers of abrupt climate change during the Last Glacial Period are not well understood. While Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) cycles are thought to be linked to variations in the strength of the Atlantic Meridional Ocean Circulation (AMOC), it is not clear how or if Heinrich Events—extensive influxes of icebergs into the North Atlantic Ocean that impacted global climate and biogeochemistry—are related. An enduring problem is the difficultly in dating iceberg rafted debris deposits that typically lack foraminifera. Here we present an ultra-high resolution record of methane from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide ice core at unprecedented, continuous temporal resolution from 67.2-9.8 ka BP, which we propose constrains the timing of Heinrich events. Our methane record essentially mirrors Greenland ice core stable isotope variability across D-O events, except during Heinrich stadials 1, 2, 4 and 5. Partway through these stadials only, methane increases abruptly and rapidly, as at the onset of a D-O event but Greenland temperature exhibits no equivalent response. Speleothem records exhibit signatures of drought in the Northern extra-tropics and intensified monsoonal activity over South America at these times. We use a simple heuristic model to propose that cold air temperatures and extensive sea ice in the North, resulting from Heinrich events, caused extreme reorganization of tropical hydroclimate. This involved curtailment of the seasonal northerly migration of tropical rain belts, leading to intensification of rainfall over Southern Hemisphere tropical wetlands, thus allowing production of excess methane relative to a 'normal' Greenland stadial. We note that this mechanism can operate if AMOC is already in a slowed state when a Heinrich event occurs, as paleo-evidence suggests it was. Heinrich events and associated sea ice cover would therefore act to prolong the duration of this AMOC state. Our findings place the big four Heinrich events of Hudson Strait origin

  10. Sedimentary facies, geomorphic features and habitat distribution at the Hudson Canyon head from AUV multibeam data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierdomenico, Martina; Guida, Vincent G.; Macelloni, Leonardo; Chiocci, Francesco L.; Rona, Peter A.; Scranton, Mary I.; Asper, Vernon; Diercks, Arne

    2015-11-01

    Mapping of physical benthic habitats at the head of Hudson Canyon was performed by means of integrated analysis of acoustic data, video surveys and seafloor sampling. Acoustic mapping, performed using AUV-mounted multibeam sonar, provided ultra-high resolution bathymetric and backscatter imagery for the identification of geomorphological features and the characterization of surficial sediments. Habitat characterization in terms of seafloor texture and identification of benthic and demersal communities was accomplished by visual analysis of still photographs from underwater vehicles. Habitat classes were defined on the basis of the seafloor texture observed on photos and then compared with the geophysical data in order to associate habitats to acoustic classes and/or geomorphological features. This enabled us to infer habitat distribution on the basis of morpho-acoustic classes and extrapolate results over larger areas. Results from bottom trawling were used to determine the overall biodiversity within the identified habitats. Our analysis revealed a variety of topographic and sedimentological structures that provide a wide range of physical habitats. A variety of sandy and muddy substrates, gravel patches and mudstone outcrops host rich and varied faunal assemblages, including cold-water corals and sponge communities. Pockmark fields below 300 m depth suggest that methane-based chemosynthetic carbonate deposition may contributes to creation of specific benthic habitats. Hummocky terrain has been delineated along the canyon rims and associated with extensive, long-term burrowing activity by golden tilefish (Lopholatilus chamaeleonticeps). These results show the relationships of physical features to benthic habitat variation, support the notion of the area as a biodiversity hotspot and define essential habitats for planning of sustainable regional fisheries.

  11. Inherent and apparent optical measurements in the Hudson/Raritan estuary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagheri, S.; Rijkeboer, M.; Gons, H.J.

    2002-01-01

    During an August, 1999 field campaign, measurements were made to establish hydrologic optical properties of the Hudson/Raritan Estuary (New York-New Jersey): 1) concurrent above-and below-surface spectral irradiance; 2) sampling for laboratory determination of inherent optical properties; and 3) con

  12. Library Resources in the Mid-Hudson Valley: Columbia, Dutchess, Greene, Orange, Putnam, Rockland, Sullivan, Ulster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichmann, Felix; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to "survey the library resources in the eight Mid-Hudson Counties of Columbia, Dutchess, Greene, Orange, Putnam, Rockland, Sullivan, and Ulster in order to develop a plan of service in which assets would be shared, resources developed, and services extended." Survey data were collected by six questionnaires;…

  13. 77 FR 46613 - Safety Zone; 2012 Ironman US Championship Swim, Hudson River, Fort Lee, NJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-06

    ...) entitled 2012 Ironman US Championship Swim, Hudson River, Fort Lee, NJ in the Federal Register (77 FR 34285...) 366-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; 2012 Ironman US Championship Swim,...

  14. 77 FR 41271 - Safety Zone; Newburgh to Beacon Swim, Newburgh, Hudson River, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-13

    ... Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register CFR Code of Federal Regulations NPRM... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Newburgh to Beacon Swim, Newburgh, Hudson... Newburgh, NY for the annual Newburgh Beacon Swim event. This temporary safety zone is necessary to...

  15. 75 FR 10229 - Application for Presidential Permit; Champlain Hudson Power Express, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-05

    ... Connecticut. CHPEI proposes to construct and operate a primarily underground and submarine high-voltage direct... underground cables connected as a bipole pair. Each bipole will at all times utilize its partner in the bipole... railroad ROW for a distance of approximately 69.9 miles (107.7 km). The cables would re-enter the Hudson...

  16. Near-field receiving water monitoring of trace metals and a benthic community near the Palo Alto Regional Water Quality Control Plant in south San Francisco Bay, California: 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Daniel J.; Thompson, Janet K.; Crauder, Jeff; Parcheso, Francis; Stewart, Robin; Kleckner, Amy E.; Dyke, Jessica; Hornberger, Michelle I.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    2015-01-01

    Trace-metal concentrations in sediment and in the clam Macoma petalum (formerly reported as Macoma balthica), clam reproductive activity, and benthic macroinvertebrate community structure were investigated in a mudflat 1 kilometer (km) south of the discharge of the Palo Alto Regional Water Quality Control Plant (PARWQCP) in South San Francisco Bay, Calif. This report includes the data collected by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists for the period January 2014 to December 2014. These append to long-term datasets extending back to 1974, and serve as the basis for the City of Palo Alto’s Near-Field Receiving Water Monitoring Program, initiated in 1994. 

  17. Near-field receiving water monitoring of trace metals and a benthic community near the Palo Alto Regional Water Quality Control Plant in South San Francisco Bay, California-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyke, Jessica; Parcheso, Francis; Thompson, Janet K.; Cain, Daniel J.; Luoma, Samuel N.; Hornberger, Michelle I.

    2011-01-01

    Trace-metal concentrations in sediment and in the clam Macoma petalum (formerly reported as Macoma balthica), clam reproductive activity, and benthic macroinvertebrate community structure were investigated in a mudflat 1 kilometer south of the discharge of the Palo Alto Regional Water Quality Control Plant (PARWQCP) in South San Francisco Bay, Calif. This report includes the data collected for the period January 2010 to December 2010 and extends a critical long-term biogeochemical record that dates back to 1974. These data serve as the basis for the City of Palo Alto's Near-Field Receiving Water Monitoring Program initiated in 1994.

  18. Near-field receiving water monitoring of trace metals and a benthic community near the Palo Alto Regional Water Quality Control Plant in south San Francisco Bay, California; 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Daniel J.; Thompson, Janet K.; Crauder, Jeffrey; Parchaso, Francis; Stewart, Robin; Turner, Matthew A.; Hornberger, Michelle I.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    2016-07-22

    Trace-metal concentrations in sediment and in the clam Macoma petalum (formerly reported as Macoma balthica), clam reproductive activity, and benthic macroinvertebrate community structure were investigated in a mudflat 1 kilometer south of the discharge of the Palo Alto Regional Water Quality Control Plant (PARWQCP) in South San Francisco Bay, California. This report includes data collected by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists for the period from January 2015 to December 2015. These data are appended to long-term datasets extending back to 1974, and serve as the basis for the City of Palo Alto’s Near-Field Receiving Water Monitoring Program, initiated in 1994.

  19. Gradient Analysis and Classification of Carolina Bay Vegetation: A Framework for Bay Wetlands Conservation and Restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diane De Steven,Ph.D.; Maureen Tone,PhD.

    1997-10-01

    This report address four project objectives: (1) Gradient model of Carolina bay vegetation on the SRS--The authors use ordination analyses to identify environmental and landscape factors that are correlated with vegetation composition. Significant factors can provide a framework for site-based conservation of existing diversity, and they may also be useful site predictors for potential vegetation in bay restorations. (2) Regional analysis of Carolina bay vegetation diversity--They expand the ordination analyses to assess the degree to which SRS bays encompass the range of vegetation diversity found in the regional landscape of South Carolina's western Upper Coastal Plain. Such comparisons can indicate floristic status relative to regional potentials and identify missing species or community elements that might be re-introduced or restored. (3) Classification of vegetation communities in Upper Coastal Plain bays--They use cluster analysis to identify plant community-types at the regional scale, and explore how this classification may be functional with respect to significant environmental and landscape factors. An environmentally-based classification at the whole-bay level can provide a system of templates for managing bays as individual units and for restoring bays to desired plant communities. (4) Qualitative model for bay vegetation dynamics--They analyze present-day vegetation in relation to historic land uses and disturbances. The distinctive history of SRS bays provides the possibility of assessing pathways of post-disturbance succession. They attempt to develop a coarse-scale model of vegetation shifts in response to changing site factors; such qualitative models can provide a basis for suggesting management interventions that may be needed to maintain desired vegetation in protected or restored bays.

  20. Bayes and empirical Bayes: do they merge?

    CERN Document Server

    Petrone, Sonia; Scricciolo, Catia

    2012-01-01

    Bayesian inference is attractive for its coherence and good frequentist properties. However, it is a common experience that eliciting a honest prior may be difficult and, in practice, people often take an {\\em empirical Bayes} approach, plugging empirical estimates of the prior hyperparameters into the posterior distribution. Even if not rigorously justified, the underlying idea is that, when the sample size is large, empirical Bayes leads to "similar" inferential answers. Yet, precise mathematical results seem to be missing. In this work, we give a more rigorous justification in terms of merging of Bayes and empirical Bayes posterior distributions. We consider two notions of merging: Bayesian weak merging and frequentist merging in total variation. Since weak merging is related to consistency, we provide sufficient conditions for consistency of empirical Bayes posteriors. Also, we show that, under regularity conditions, the empirical Bayes procedure asymptotically selects the value of the hyperparameter for ...

  1. Blue Carbon Accumulation, Paleoecology, Human Impact, and Sea Level History of Yellow Bar and JoCo Marshes, Jamaica Bay, New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteet, D. M.; Nichols, J. E.; Kenna, T. C.; Lamb, A.; Taylor, M.; Reza, M.; O'Connor, J.; Kovari, S.; Chang, C.; Reguyal, S.; Stern-Protz, S.

    2016-12-01

    Yellow Bar and JoCo represent two significant marshes in Jamaica Bay National Wildlife Refuge in the lower Hudson Estuary. They are regional remnant marshes, and serve as nurseries for fish, coastal buffers in storms, and exceptional habitat for birds. In addition, they provide valuable paleoenvironmental archives. Through the last decade, we have focused field efforts on assessing the depths of the marshes through a series of probe transects and the acquisition of sediment cores upon which we utilize X-ray fluorescence (XRF) elemental analysis along with pollen, plant and foraminifera macrofossil analysis, and AMS C-14 dating of identified macrofossils. A major decline in inorganic supply to the marshes in recent centuries is evident in cores that span marsh initiation. Coupling carbon accumulation with regional and local shifts in vegetation and rates of sea level rise are presented along with the history of human impacts including heavy metals. Young investigators from secondary schools in New York City participated in much of the fieldwork as part of the NASA/GISS NYC Research Initiative.

  2. Water Quality Assessment of DoD Installations/Facilities in the Chesapeake Bay Region. Phase 3. Volume 2. Overall Approach, Findings and Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-01

    to quantify, where possible, the impacts of an installation on water quality in terms of: 1) conventional poilu - tants (nutrient, coliform and BOD...wildlife are the more visible manifestations of ecosystems in the estuary. Actually, there are many complex physico -chemical-biological interactions...that environmental stresses and rep’,- , in some areas of the Bay than in ot her.. 1l I, development of a segmentation scheme of the e ,ar. physico

  3. Concentrations and compositions of organochlorine contaminants in sediments, soils, crustaceans, fishes and birds collected from Lake Tai, Hangzhou Bay and Shanghai city region, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, Haruhiko [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)]. E-mail: nakata@sci.kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Hirakawa, Yuko [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Kawazoe, Masahiro [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555, (Japan); Nakabo, Tetsuji [Kyoto University Museum, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Arizono, Koji [Faculty of Environmental and Symbiotic Sciences, Kumamoto Prefectural University, 3-1-100 Tsukide, Kumamoto 862-8502 (Japan); Abe, Shin-Ichi [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Kitano, Takeshi [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Shimada, Hideaki [Faculty of Education, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Watanabe, Izumi [Faculty of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 3-5-8 Saiwai-cho, Fuchuu-city, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Li Weihua [Shanghai Institute of Planned Parenthood Research, 2140 Xie Tu road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Ding Xucheng [Shanghai Institute of Planned Parenthood Research, 2140 Xie Tu road, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2005-02-01

    Contamination by persistent organochlorines (OCs), such as DDTs, hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCHs), chlordane compounds (CHLs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were examined in sediments, soils, fishes, crustaceans, birds, and aquaculture feed from Lake Tai, Hangzhou Bay, and in the vicinity of Shanghai city in China during 2000 and 2001. OCs were detected in all samples analyzed, and DDT and its metabolites were the predominant contaminants in most sediments, soils and biota. Concentrations of p,p'-DDT and ratio of p,p'-DDT to {sigma}DDTs were significantly higher in marine fishes than those in freshwater fishes. While the use of DDTs has been officially banned in China since 1983, these results indicate a recent input of technical DDTs into the marine environment around Hangzhou Bay. Comparison of organochlorine concentrations in fishes collected from Lake Tai and Hangzhou Bay suggests the presence of local sources of HCHs, chlordanes and PCBs at Lake Tai. Higher proportions of penta- and hexa-PCB congeners in fishes at Lake Tai may suggest the use of highly chlorinated PCB product, such as PCB{sub 5}, around this lake. To our knowledge, this is a first comprehensive study to examine the present status of organochlorine contamination in various environmental media, such as sediments, soils and wildlife, in China. - Elevated concentrations of DDTs were detected in sediments, soils, and wildlife collected from China.

  4. Watershed nutrient inputs, phytoplankton accumulation, and C stocks in Chesapeake Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, T. R.; Boynton, W. R.; Hagy, J. D.

    2002-12-01

    Inputs of N and P to Chesapeake Bay have been enhanced by anthropogenic activities. Fertilizers, urbanization, N emissions, and industrial effluents contribute to point and diffuse sources currently 2-7X higher for P and 5-20X higher for N than those from undisturbed watersheds. Enhanced nutrient inputs cause phytoplankton blooms which obscure visibility, eliminate submerged grasses, and influence the distribution of C within the Bay. Accumulations of dissolved organic and particulate organic C lead to enhanced microbial respiration in isolated bottom waters, and dissolved oxygen is seasonally reduced to trace levels during summer. Cultural eutrophication is not unique to Chesapeake Bay. Although some estuaries such as the Delaware, Hudson, and San Francisco Bay also have high anthropogenic inputs, these estuaries have much shorter residence times, and much of the N and P may be exported to the coastal ocean. However, in Chesapeake Bay, with residence times >2 months, internal processing of watershed inputs results in local algal blooms within the estuary. Watershed restoration strategies for Chesapeake watersheds have had limited success to date. Groundwaters are enriched with nitrate, and the long residence times of groundwaters mean slow responses to watershed improvements. The few successes in the Chesapeake have been associated with point source reductions, although continued human population growth can easily override restoration efforts. Widespread improvement in water quality has yet to occur, but the limited successes show that the Bay responds to load changes.

  5. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: T_MAMMAL (Terrestrial Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for small terrestrial mammals (woodrats, myotis, muskrat, mink) for the Hudson River. Vector polygons in...

  6. 77 FR 22525 - Safety Zone; Swim Events in the Captain of the Port New York Zone; Hudson River, East River...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-16

    ...) Ederle Swim: Within the waters of the Hudson River between North Cove Marina, New York, NY and Sandy Hook... patrol vessel or may be on shore and will communicate with vessels via VHF-FM radio or loudhailer. In...

  7. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: WETLANDS (Environmental Sensitivity Index Wetland Types - Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector polygons representing coastal wetland habitats for the Hudson River classified according to the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI)...

  8. National Status and Trends: Bioeffects Program - Magnitude and Extent of Sediment Toxicity in the Hudson-Raritan Estuary

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A survey of the toxicity of sediments was performed by NOAA's National Status and Trends (NSandT) Program throughout the Hudson-Raritan Estuary. The objectives of...

  9. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: M_MAMMAL (Marine Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine mammals (seals) in the Hudson River. Vector polygons in this data set represent marine mammal...

  10. Three-dimensional crustal structure influences on wave propagation and generation of strong ground motion in the greater San Francisco Bay region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stidham, Christiane Wilson

    Recent development of three-dimensional finite-difference codes allows simulation of earthquakes using realistic three-dimensional earth models. These and other developments have shifted emphasis in seismology from earthquake prediction to estimation of location and magnitude of damage in future earthquakes. The accurate calculation of ground motions for future large earthquakes depends upon detailed knowledge of three-dimensional (3D) geologic structure and the earthquake source process, as well as sufficient computational resources. Knowledge of subsurface geologic structure in the San Francisco Bay Area is quite good relative to many areas, and this knowledge has been incorporated into a 3D velocity model of the Bay Area. With access to a 3D finite-difference code (E3D) developed by Shawn Larsen at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and use of super-computing resources at Livermore, we are able to complete calculations for simulations of a number of San Francisco Bay Area earthquakes. These include a small 1993 Rodgers Creek event recorded at Berkeley Seismological Laboratory, the 1989 Loma Prieta event recorded on the U.S. Geological Survey and Calif. Div. of Mines and Geology network of strong motion stations, and a number of small South Bay events (including the 8/12/98 San Juan Bautista EQ) recorded on a temporary USGS/UCB/PASSCAL Santa Clara array. In each of these cases, comparison of synthetic results (synthetic seismograms and plots of maximum horizontal ground velocity) from E3D to recorded data from the event gives an excellent opportunity to both judge the usefulness and the constraints necessary in using finite-difference modeling and the validity of the velocity model as it is now constructed. Results show that 3D finite-difference modeling produces waveforms that are often quite comparable to recorded data, and that fit the data considerably better than synthetics waveforms derived with a 1D velocity model. It is also possible to explore the

  11. 'Celebrities of the future’:fame and notability in Henry James’s Roderick Hudson and the American

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Focusing on two of Henry James’s earliest novels, Roderick Hudson (1875) and The American (1877), this essay explores the ways in which James’s initial formulation of his signature ‘international theme’ intersects with nineteenth-century discourses on fame. Roderick Hudson positions the eponymous American sculptor as a lion and notable in Europe, and then shows his fatal attempts to transcend the objectification and commodification that accompany fame. In The American the protagonist, Christo...

  12. Morphological features in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, K.V.L; Ramana, M.V; Subrahmanyam, V; Krishna, K.S.; Ramprasad, T.; Desa, M.

    -1 J. Ind. Geophys. Union (2000) Vol. 4, No.2, pp. 185-190 Morphological features in the Bay of Bengal K.V.L.N.S.Sarma, M.V.Ramana1 , V.Subrahmanyam1 K.S.Krishna1, T.Ramprasad1 and Maria Desa1 National Institute of Oceanography, Regional Centre 176... of magnetic anomalies, Ramana et al. (1994) inferred some fracture zones. Due to huge sediment overburden in the Bay of Bengal surface expression of these 185 K.V.L.N.S.Sarma et al. Figure la. Bathymetry map of the Bay of Bengal. Contour interval 500 m...

  13. Measurement Error Affects Risk Estimates for Recruitment to the Hudson River Stock of Striped Bass

    OpenAIRE

    Dennis J. Dunning; Ross, Quentin E.; Munch, Stephan B.; Ginzburg, Lev R.

    2002-01-01

    We examined the consequences of ignoring the distinction between measurement error and natural variability in an assessment of risk to the Hudson River stock of striped bass posed by entrainment at the Bowline Point, Indian Point, and Roseton power plants. Risk was defined as the probability that recruitment of age-1+ striped bass would decline by 80% or more, relative to the equilibrium value, at least once during the time periods examined (1, 5, 10, and 15 years). Measurement error, estimat...

  14. Public support for ecosystem restoration in the Hudson River Valley, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, Nancy A; Knuth, Barbara A; Kay, David L

    2002-04-01

    We applied the Theory of Planned Behavior to help understand the relationships between environmental beliefs, support for ecosystem restoration actions, and willingness to pay (WTP) for restoration and protection goals in the Hudson River estuary, New York State, USA. We conducted a mail survey with 3,000 randomly-chosen local residents of the Hudson River estuary in the fall of 1999. As hypothesized, the broad ecosystem restoration goals of the Hudson River Estuary Action Plan were more strongly supported than the corresponding specific implementation actions. We found that beliefs and past behavior were better explanatory variables than sociodemographic characteristics for explaining people's support for ecosystem restoration actions and WTP for restoration and protection goals. Because ecosystem restoration goals appear to be more generally acceptable than specific restoration actions, proponents of restoration programs should not become complacent about the need for active public outreach and involvement even if initial restoration program discussions have been low in controversy. Efforts to assess and foster support for ecosystem restoration should be targeted toward audiences identified on the basis of beliefs and past behaviors rather than on sociodemographic characteristics.

  15. Linking habitat use of Hudson River striped bass to accumulation of polychlorinated biphenyl congeners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashley, J.T.F.; Secor, D.H.; Zlokovitz, E.; Wales, S.Q.; Baker, J.E.

    2000-03-15

    Since 1976, the commercial striped bass fishery in the Hudson River (NY) has been closed due to total polychlorinated biphenyl (t-PCB) concentrations that exceed the US Food and Drug Administration's advisory level of 2 {micro}g/g-wet weight. Extensive monitoring of Hudson River striped bass demonstrated much more variability in t-PCB levels among individual striped bass than could be explained by their age, sex, or lipid contents. To investigate the possible role of differential habitat use among subpopulations of striped bass in controlling their PCB exposures, 70 fish collected throughout the Hudson River estuary and Long Island Sound in 1994--1995 were analyzed for PCB congeners, and their lifetime migration behaviors were estimated by otolith microchemistry. The mean salinity encountered during the fish's last growth season prior to capture was inversely correlated with the t-PCB body burden. Striped bass permanently residing in fresh and oligohaline portions of the estuary adjacent to known PCB sources had elevated t-PCB levels and congeneric patterns with higher proportions of di-, tri-, and tetrachlorobiphenyls. Conversely, fish spending the majority of their life in more saline waters of the estuary or migrating frequently throughout the salinity gradient contained lower PCB levels composed of more highly chlorinated congeners. The approach used in this study allows habitat use to be incorporated into exposure assessments for anadromous fish species such as striped bass.

  16. Circulation in the Hudson Shelf Valley: MESA Physical Oceanographic Studies in New York Bight, 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Dennis A.; Han, Gregory C.; Hansen, Donald V.

    1982-11-01

    Over 900 days of current velocity data were obtained at mainly two locations in the inner and outer Hudson Shelf Valley (HSV). The large cross-axis depth gradients in the HSV, together with the strong winter cyclones and the baroclinic density distribution over the shelf, are primarily responsible for the major circulation features observed in the valley. CSTD data from 12 cruises and meteorological data from JFK International Airport and an environmental buoy were collected concurrently with the current meter data. Although the mean cross-shelf pressure gradient is generally seaward in the Middle Atlantic Bight, it is shoreward in the HSV below the level of the adjacent continental shelf (shelf horizon), thus imposing a bias toward upvalley flow. The average velocity below the surrounding shelf horizon in the HSV is upvalley or shoreward (west-northwestward ≈ 290° T) in the range of 2-5 cm/s. The circulation in the HSV is seasonal and individual events can drastically alter the mean picture. The several day average upvalley flow can sometimes approach 20 cm/s when intense winter cyclones pass over the bight and can sometimes also be directed downvalley depending upon the path of the winter cyclone. A topographically controlled barotropic flow commonly opposes the dominant (southeast-ward) wind direction even near the surface in the winter. In the context of circulation on the open shelf, upvalley (downvalley) flow events generated by winter cyclones are associated with reduced (enhanced) southwestward flow or flow reversals that are northeastward in the lower half of the water column at LTM, a typical mid/shelf site (Mayer et al., 1979). Current meter data suggest that whether or not reversals occur on the open shelf depends upon the interannual variability of the winter wind regime. Upvalley flow events are not confined only to the winter (unstratified) season but are stronger in the winter and can last for several days and longer. During the summer

  17. Water Use Efficiency Improvement against a Backdrop of Expanding City Agglomeration in Developing Countries—A Case Study on Industrial and Agricultural Water Use in the Bohai Bay Region of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghao Bai

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Most city agglomerations of developing countries face water shortages and pollution due to population growth and industrial aggregation. To meet such water security challenges, policy makers need to evaluate water use efficiency at the regional or basin level because the prosperity of city agglomerations is indispensable to the sustainable development of the region or basin. To solve the issue, this paper adopts a non-directional distance function within the framework of environmental production technology to measure water use efficiency. Based on the distance between actual water use efficiency and the ideal efficiency, it calculates the potential reduction space of water input and pollutants by slack adjustment. Added to the Malmquist index, it forms a non-radial Malmquist water use performance index, which can be divided into technological change and technical efficiency change, to measure dynamic water use efficiency. Further, water use efficiency change is analyzed from the perspectives of technological improvement and institutional construction. Bohai Bay city agglomeration, a typical water-deficient city agglomeration in China, is taken as a case study, and data on water resource, environment, and economy from 2011 to 2014 have been used. In conclusion, there is much space for water use efficiency improvement on the whole. However, even having considered potential reduction space of water input and pollutant discharge under current environmental production technology, it is still not enough to support the city agglomeration’s sustainable development. To relieve current potential water safety hazards, not only technical improvement but also institution innovation for highly efficient water use should be kept accelerating in Bohai Bay region. In terms of urban water management in developing countries, the research conclusion is of theoretical and practical significance.

  18. Polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxins, furans, and organochlorine pesticides in spotted sandpiper eggs from the upper Hudson River basin, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, T.W.; Custer, Christine M.; Gray, B.R.

    2010-01-01

    In 2004, spotted sandpipers (Actitis macularia) were studied on the Hudson River near Fort Edward south to New Baltimore, NY and on two river drainages that flow into the Hudson River. Concentrations of 28 organochlorine pesticides, 160 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, and 17 dioxin and furan (PCDD-F) congeners were quantified in eggs collected on and off the Hudson River. The pattern of organochlorine pesticides and PCDD-F congeners did not differ significantly between eggs collected on and off the Hudson River. In contrast, the pattern of PCB congeners differed significantly between the Hudson River and other rivers. Total PCBs were significantly greater in eggs from the Hudson River (geometric mean = 9.1 ??g PCBs/g wet weight) than from the other two rivers (0.6 and 0.6 ??g PCBs/g wet weight). Seven of 35 (20%) eggs exceeded 20 ??g PCBs/g wet weight, the estimated threshold for reduced hatching in tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) and some raptor species; the maximum concentration was 72.3 ??g PCBs/g wet weight. Models that predicted nest survival and egg success (the proportion of eggs hatching in a clutch if at least one egg hatched) as functions of contaminant levels were poorly distinguished from models that presumed no such associations. While small sample size could have contributed to the inability to distinguish among contaminant and no toxicant models, we cannot rule out the possibility that contaminant concentrations on the Hudson River were not sufficiently high to demonstrate a relationship between contaminant concentrations and reproductive success. ?? 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  19. 75 FR 25794 - Regulated Navigation Area: Red Bull Air Race World Championship, Upper New York Bay, Lower Hudson...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-10

    ... Gates'' that will be strategically placed in the water to form the race course. The event organizer will... will issue maritime advisories widely available to users of the waterway. If you think that your... think it qualifies and how and to what degree this rule would economically affect it. Assistance...

  20. Short- and long-term monitoring of underwater sound levels in the Hudson River (New York, USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, S Bruce; Popper, Arthur N

    2016-04-01

    There is a growing body of research on natural and man-made sounds that create aquatic soundscapes. Less is known about the soundscapes of shallow waters, such as in harbors, rivers, and lakes. Knowledge of soundscapes is needed as a baseline against which to determine the changes in noise levels resulting from human activities. To provide baseline data for the Hudson River at the site of the Tappan Zee Bridge, 12 acoustic data loggers were deployed for a 24-h period at ranges of 0-3000 m from the bridge, and four of the data loggers were re-deployed for three months of continuous recording. Results demonstrate that this region of the river is relatively quiet compared to open ocean conditions and other large river systems. Moreover, the soundscape had temporal and spatial diversity. The temporal patterns of underwater noise from the bridge change with the cadence of human activity. Bridge noise (e.g., road traffic) was only detected within 300 m; farther from the bridge, boating activity increased sound levels during the day, and especially on the weekend. Results also suggest that recording near the river bottom produced lower pseudo-noise levels than previous studies that recorded in the river water column.

  1. Confidence Regions of Parameters in Terms of Curvatures in Nonlinear Models With Bayes Conditions%Bayes条件下非线性模型的参数置信域的曲率表示

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴一凡

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a differential geometric framework for nonlinear models with Bayes conditions. The framework may be regarded as an extension of that presented by Bates & Watts for nonlinear regression models. On this basis,we use this geometric framework to discuss about the confidence regions for parameter and parameter subset in terms of curvature.%给出了Bayes条件下非线性模型的参数估计,建立了该模型的几何结构,推广了Bates&Wates关于非线性回归模型的几何框架,在此基础上,用几何方法探讨了关于参数与子集参数置信域的曲率表示.

  2. Mercury distribution in the Jiaozhou Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Jiaozhou Bay is a semi-enclosed bay, Qingdao, China. More than 10 rivers enter the bay, of which most take wastes from industrial and household discharges. According to historical seasonal investigations in May, August, November 1979, the content,distribution, and development of heavy metal mercury are analyzed as a historical reference. Water samples were taken from the surface and bottom. The results revealed clear seasonal and regional changes in both horizontal and vertical directions, and close relation with major discharging rivers and plankton production. The seawater was polluted more seriously in spring than in any other seasons.However, it was the cleanest in winter during which least waste was input with low plankton production. According to historical data,the state of mercury pollution in seawater was worsening in the period, and has been improving in recent years. Terrestrial contamination was the main reason for mercury pollution in the bay.

  3. The Characteristic of Sea Ice Growth and Melt in the Prydz Bay Region, Antarctica%南极普里兹湾邻近海域海冰生消发展特征分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑少军; 史久新

    2011-01-01

    The spatial distribution character of sea ice in different seasons divided by 6 periods in the Pry-dz Bay were studied, by using high resolution ice concentration data from 2003 to 2008 year, which provided by the National Snow and Ice Data Center, at the same time its causation was analyzed according to the bathymetry and circulation of Prydz Bay region. The result indicated that the freezing and thawing stages went through 7 months and 5 months separately, the fastest months of sea ice thawing were Octo-ber and November, mainly from the decrease of sea ice concentration; the fastest months of sea ice freezing were April and June, mainly from the expending of sea ice edge. In the melting period, sea ice had the bidirectional melting character for the existent of Cape Darnley polynyas, Prydz Bay polynyas and Barrier Bay polynyas in the coast of the Prydz Bay, namely sea ice melt from north to south in abyssal ocean, and melt from north to south in the coast region of Prydz Bay. There were persistent ice tongues north of Cape Darnley and Four Ladies Bank, and the low sea ice concentration region between them was corresponding to the path of warm water intruding to the Prydz Bay. The Antarctic Circumpolar Current turned north when flowing by the Kerguelen Plateau, and made sea ice edge more north in winter time than that in the same longitude, which could reach 57°S. The divergent surface flow field of the Antarctic Divergence and upwelling warm current could restrict sea ice freezing and congregating, and formed low sea ice concentration region.%利用美国冰雪数据中心发布的2003-2008年高分辨率海冰密集度数据,分6个阶段对普里兹湾区域海冰季节性变化的空间分布特征进行了研究,并根据普里兹湾海区的地形和环流对这些特征的成因进行了分析.结果表明,普里兹湾海冰冻结过程和融化过程分别经历7个月和5个月,海冰融化速度最快月份是10月和11月,主要表现形式为海冰

  4. A retrospective streamflow ensemble forecast for an extreme hydrologic event: a case study of Hurricane Irene and on the Hudson River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Firas; Ramaswamy, Venkatsundar; Georgas, Nickitas; Blumberg, Alan F.; Pullen, Julie

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates the uncertainties in hourly streamflow ensemble forecasts for an extreme hydrological event using a hydrological model forced with short-range ensemble weather prediction models. A state-of-the art, automated, short-term hydrologic prediction framework was implemented using GIS and a regional scale hydrological model (HEC-HMS). The hydrologic framework was applied to the Hudson River basin ( ˜ 36 000 km2) in the United States using gridded precipitation data from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) and was validated against streamflow observations from the United States Geologic Survey (USGS). Finally, 21 precipitation ensemble members of the latest Global Ensemble Forecast System (GEFS/R) were forced into HEC-HMS to generate a retrospective streamflow ensemble forecast for an extreme hydrological event, Hurricane Irene. The work shows that ensemble stream discharge forecasts provide improved predictions and useful information about associated uncertainties, thus improving the assessment of risks when compared with deterministic forecasts. The uncertainties in weather inputs may result in false warnings and missed river flooding events, reducing the potential to effectively mitigate flood damage. The findings demonstrate how errors in the ensemble median streamflow forecast and time of peak, as well as the ensemble spread (uncertainty) are reduced 48 h pre-event by utilizing the ensemble framework. The methodology and implications of this work benefit efforts of short-term streamflow forecasts at regional scales, notably regarding the peak timing of an extreme hydrologic event when combined with a flood threshold exceedance diagram. Although the modeling framework was implemented on the Hudson River basin, it is flexible and applicable in other parts of the world where atmospheric reanalysis products and streamflow data are available.

  5. Land-Cover and Imperviousness Data for Regional Areas near Denver, Colorado; Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas; and Milwaukee-Green Bay, Wisconsin - 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, James A.; Pearson, Daniel K.

    2006-01-01

    This report describes the processing and results of land-cover and impervious surface derivation for parts of three metropolitan areas being studied as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program Effects of Urbanization on Stream Ecosystems (EUSE). The data were derived primarily from Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) satellite imagery from the period 1999-2002, and are provided as 30-meter resolution raster datasets. Data were produced to a standard consistent with data being produced as part of the USGS National Land Cover Database 2001 (NLCD01) Program, and were derived in cooperation with, and assistance from, NLCD01 personnel. The data were intended as surrogates for NLCD01 data because of the EUSE Program's time-critical need for updated land-cover for parts of the United States that would not be available in time from the NLCD01 Program. Six datasets are described in this report: separate land-cover (15-class categorical data) and imperviousness (0-100 percent continuous data) raster datasets for parts of the general Denver, Colorado area (South Platte River Basin), Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas area (Trinity River Basin), and Milwaukee-Green Bay, Wisconsin area (Western Lake Michigan Drainages).

  6. San Francisco Bay Long Term Management Strategy for Dredging

    Science.gov (United States)

    The San Francisco Bay Long Term Management Strategy (LTMS) is a cooperative effort to develop a new approach to dredging and dredged material disposal in the San Francisco Bay area. The LTMS serves as the Regional Dredging Team for the San Francisco area.

  7. CASCO BAY PLAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casco Bay lies at the heart of Maine's most populated area. The health of its waters, wetlands, and wildlife depend in large part on the activities of the quarter-million residents who live in its watershed. Less than 30 years ago, portions of Casco Bay were off-limits to recr...

  8. eBay.com

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engholm, Ida

    2014-01-01

    Celebrated as one of the leading and most valuable brands in the world, eBay has acquired iconic status on par with century-old brands such as Coca-Cola and Disney. The eBay logo is now synonymous with the world’s leading online auction website, and its design is associated with the company...

  9. Evaluation of the activity concentration of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 210}Pb in sediments from Antarctica in the Admiralty Bay region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora, Tamires de A.; Oliveira, Joselene de, E-mail: tamires.mora@usp.br, E-mail: jolivei@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Figueira, Rubens C.L.; Mahiques, Michel M.; Sousa, Silvia H.M., E-mail: rfigueira@usp.br, E-mail: mahiques@usp.br, E-mail: smsousa@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto Oceanografico

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we performed the radiochemical characterization of a sedimentary record (1B profile), collected in the vicinity of Admiralty Bay, King George Island in Antarctic Operation XXXI (January/2013). The activities of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 210}Pb were determined by the counting of gross alpha and gross beta activities in the precipitates of Ba(Ra)SO{sub 4} and PbCrO{sub 4}. Those measurements were carried out in a low background gas flow proportional detector. The {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra were measured after 21 days of the final precipitation. The {sup 210}Pb activity was determined after 10 days of the precipitation date by gross beta counting of its {sup 210}Bi decay product. The activity concentration of {sup 226}Ra ranged from 11±1 (mBq g-1) to 54±3 (mBq g{sup -1}), and the {sup 228}Ra ranged from 48±5 (mBq g{sup -1}) to 155±16 (mBq g{sup -1}). The activity concentration of {sup 210}Pb varied from 8±1 (mBq g{sup -1}) to 458±46 (mBq g{sup -1}), while unsupported {sup 210}Pb ranged from 6±1 (mBq g{sup -1}) to 434±65 (mBq g{sup -1}). The {sup 210}Pb concentrations in sediments have often been used to dating events like deposition and accumulation in various marine environments. Taking into account the results of {sup 210}Pb and {sup 226}Ra activities obtained in testimony-1B it was estimated the unsupported {sup 210}Pb activity which was applied to the CIC geochronological dating model (Constant Initial Concentration). Based in these data, the sedimentation rate obtained was 0.63±0.02 cm year{sup -1}. (author)

  10. Measurement error affects risk estimates for recruitment to the Hudson River stock of striped bass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, Dennis J; Ross, Quentin E; Munch, Stephan B; Ginzburg, Lev R

    2002-06-07

    We examined the consequences of ignoring the distinction between measurement error and natural variability in an assessment of risk to the Hudson River stock of striped bass posed by entrainment at the Bowline Point, Indian Point, and Roseton power plants. Risk was defined as the probability that recruitment of age-1+ striped bass would decline by 80% or more, relative to the equilibrium value, at least once during the time periods examined (1, 5, 10, and 15 years). Measurement error, estimated using two abundance indices from independent beach seine surveys conducted on the Hudson River, accounted for 50% of the variability in one index and 56% of the variability in the other. If a measurement error of 50% was ignored and all of the variability in abundance was attributed to natural causes, the risk that recruitment of age-1+ striped bass would decline by 80% or more after 15 years was 0.308 at the current level of entrainment mortality (11%). However, the risk decreased almost tenfold (0.032) if a measurement error of 50% was considered. The change in risk attributable to decreasing the entrainment mortality rate from 11 to 0% was very small (0.009) and similar in magnitude to the change in risk associated with an action proposed in Amendment #5 to the Interstate Fishery Management Plan for Atlantic striped bass (0.006)--an increase in the instantaneous fishing mortality rate from 0.33 to 0.4. The proposed increase in fishing mortality was not considered an adverse environmental impact, which suggests that potentially costly efforts to reduce entrainment mortality on the Hudson River stock of striped bass are not warranted.

  11. Measurement Error Affects Risk Estimates for Recruitment to the Hudson River Stock of Striped Bass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J. Dunning

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the consequences of ignoring the distinction between measurement error and natural variability in an assessment of risk to the Hudson River stock of striped bass posed by entrainment at the Bowline Point, Indian Point, and Roseton power plants. Risk was defined as the probability that recruitment of age-1+ striped bass would decline by 80% or more, relative to the equilibrium value, at least once during the time periods examined (1, 5, 10, and 15 years. Measurement error, estimated using two abundance indices from independent beach seine surveys conducted on the Hudson River, accounted for 50% of the variability in one index and 56% of the variability in the other. If a measurement error of 50% was ignored and all of the variability in abundance was attributed to natural causes, the risk that recruitment of age-1+ striped bass would decline by 80% or more after 15 years was 0.308 at the current level of entrainment mortality (11%. However, the risk decreased almost tenfold (0.032 if a measurement error of 50% was considered. The change in risk attributable to decreasing the entrainment mortality rate from 11 to 0% was very small (0.009 and similar in magnitude to the change in risk associated with an action proposed in Amendment #5 to the Interstate Fishery Management Plan for Atlantic striped bass (0.006— an increase in the instantaneous fishing mortality rate from 0.33 to 0.4. The proposed increase in fishing mortality was not considered an adverse environmental impact, which suggests that potentially costly efforts to reduce entrainment mortality on the Hudson River stock of striped bass are not warranted.

  12. Diatoms as Proxies for Abrupt Events in the Hudson River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorski, W.; Abbott, D. H.; Recasens, C.; Breger, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    The Hudson River estuary has been subject to many abrupt events throughout its history including hurricanes, droughts and pluvials. Hurricanes in particular are rare, discrete events that if fingerprinted can be used to develop better age models for Hudson River sediments. Proxies use observed physical characteristics or biological assemblages (e.g. diatom and foraminiferal assemblages) as tools to reconstruct past conditions prior to the modern instrumental record. Using a sediment core taken from the Hudson River (CDO2-29A), in New York City, drought and pluvial layers were selected based on Cs-137 dating while hurricane layers were determined from occurrences of tropical to subtropical foraminifera. Contrary to previous studies (Weaver, 1970, Weiss et al, 1978), more than sixty different diatom species have been identified using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Cosmopolitan, hurricane and drought assemblages have begun to be identified after observing multiple layers (Table 1). Tropical foraminifera dominated by Globigerinoides ruber pink were also found in a hurricane layer that we infer was deposited during Hurricane Belle in 1976. More diatom abundance analyses and cataloged SEM pictures will provide further insight into these proxies. Table 1 Diatom Genera and Species Environment Clarification Cyclotella caspia Planktonic, marine-brackish Cosmopolitan Karayevia clevei Freshwater Cosmopolitan Melosira sp Planktonic, marine Cosmopolitan Thalassiosira sp Marine, brackish Cosmopolitan Staurosirella leptostauron Benthic, freshwater Cosmopolitan Actinoptychus senarius Planktonic or benthic, freshwater to brackish Hurricane and pluvial layers Amphora aff. sp Benthic, marine or freshwater Hurricane layers only Nitzschia sp Benthic, marine or freshwater Hurricane layers only Gomphonema sp Freshwater Hurricane layers only Surirella sp Marine-brackish Drought layer only Triceratium sp Marine Drought layer only Other Genera and species Environment Clarification

  13. Suspended sediment transport in the freshwater reach of the Hudson river estuary in eastern New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, G.R.; Nystrom, E.A.; Litten, S.

    2008-01-01

    Deposition of Hudson River sediment into New York Harbor interferes with navigation lanes and requires continuous dredging. Sediment dynamics at the Hudson estuary turbidity maximum (ETM) have received considerable study, but delivery of sediment to the ETM through the freshwater reach of the estuary has received relatively little attention and few direct measurements. An acoustic Doppler current profiler was positioned at the approximate limit of continuous freshwater to develop a 4-year time series of water velocity, discharge, suspended sediment concentration, and suspended sediment discharge. This data set was compared with suspended sediment discharge data collected during the same period at two sites just above the Hudson head-of-tide (the Federal Dam at Troy) that together represent the single largest source of sediment entering the estuary. The mean annual suspended sediment-discharge from the freshwater reach of the estuary was 737,000 metric tons. Unexpectedly, the total suspended sediment discharge at the study site in November and December slightly exceeded that observed during March and April, the months during which rain and snowmelt typically result in the largest sediment discharge to the estuary. Suspended sediment discharge at the study site exceeded that from the Federal Dam, even though the intervening reach appears to store significant amounts of sediment, suggesting that 30-40% of sediment discharge observed at the study site is derived from tributaries to the estuary between the Federal Dam and study site. A simple model of sediment entering and passing through the freshwater reach on a timescale of weeks appears reasonable during normal hydrologic conditions in adjoining watersheds; however, this simple model may dramatically overestimate sediment delivery during extreme tributary high flows, especially those at the end of, or after, the "flushing season" (October through April). Previous estimates of annual or seasonal sediment delivery

  14. Impacts of Watershed Characteristics and Crop Rotations on Winter Cover Crop Nitrate-Nitrogen Uptake Capacity within Agricultural Watersheds in the Chesapeake Bay Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangchul; Yeo, In-Young; Sadeghi, Ali M; McCarty, Gregory W; Hively, W Dean; Lang, Megan W

    2016-01-01

    The adoption rate of winter cover crops (WCCs) as an effective conservation management practice to help reduce agricultural nutrient loads in the Chesapeake Bay (CB) is increasing. However, the WCC potential for water quality improvement has not been fully realized at the watershed scale. This study was conducted to evaluate the long-term impact of WCCs on hydrology and NO3-N loads in two adjacent watersheds and to identify key management factors that affect the effectiveness of WCCs using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and statistical methods. Simulation results indicated that WCCs are effective for reducing NO3-N loads and their performance varied based on planting date, species, soil characteristics, and crop rotations. Early-planted WCCs outperformed late-planted WCCs on the reduction of NO3-N loads and early-planted rye (RE) reduced NO3-N loads by ~49.3% compared to the baseline (no WCC). The WCCs were more effective in a watershed dominated by well-drained soils with increased reductions in NO3-N fluxes of ~2.5 kg N·ha-1 delivered to streams and ~10.1 kg N·ha-1 leached into groundwater compared to poorly-drained soils. Well-drained agricultural lands had higher transport of NO3-N in the soil profile and groundwater due to increased N leaching. Poorly-drained agricultural lands had lower NO3-N due to extensive drainage ditches and anaerobic soil conditions promoting denitrification. The performance of WCCs varied by crop rotations (i.e., continuous corn and corn-soybean), with increased N uptake following soybean crops due to the increased soil mineral N availability by mineralization of soybean residue compared to corn residue. The WCCs can reduce N leaching where baseline NO3-N loads are high in well-drained soils and/or when residual and mineralized N availability is high due to the cropping practices. The findings suggested that WCC implementation plans should be established in watersheds according to local edaphic and agronomic

  15. Impacts of Watershed Characteristics and Crop Rotations on Winter Cover Crop Nitrate-Nitrogen Uptake Capacity within Agricultural Watersheds in the Chesapeake Bay Region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangchul Lee

    Full Text Available The adoption rate of winter cover crops (WCCs as an effective conservation management practice to help reduce agricultural nutrient loads in the Chesapeake Bay (CB is increasing. However, the WCC potential for water quality improvement has not been fully realized at the watershed scale. This study was conducted to evaluate the long-term impact of WCCs on hydrology and NO3-N loads in two adjacent watersheds and to identify key management factors that affect the effectiveness of WCCs using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT and statistical methods. Simulation results indicated that WCCs are effective for reducing NO3-N loads and their performance varied based on planting date, species, soil characteristics, and crop rotations. Early-planted WCCs outperformed late-planted WCCs on the reduction of NO3-N loads and early-planted rye (RE reduced NO3-N loads by ~49.3% compared to the baseline (no WCC. The WCCs were more effective in a watershed dominated by well-drained soils with increased reductions in NO3-N fluxes of ~2.5 kg N·ha-1 delivered to streams and ~10.1 kg N·ha-1 leached into groundwater compared to poorly-drained soils. Well-drained agricultural lands had higher transport of NO3-N in the soil profile and groundwater due to increased N leaching. Poorly-drained agricultural lands had lower NO3-N due to extensive drainage ditches and anaerobic soil conditions promoting denitrification. The performance of WCCs varied by crop rotations (i.e., continuous corn and corn-soybean, with increased N uptake following soybean crops due to the increased soil mineral N availability by mineralization of soybean residue compared to corn residue. The WCCs can reduce N leaching where baseline NO3-N loads are high in well-drained soils and/or when residual and mineralized N availability is high due to the cropping practices. The findings suggested that WCC implementation plans should be established in watersheds according to local edaphic and agronomic

  16. Water resources of the Green Bay area, Wisconsin: G in Water resources of industrial regions: A summary of the source, occurrence, availability, and use of water in the area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Doyle Blewer; Dreher, F.C.; Whetstone, George Walter

    1964-01-01

    The Green Bay area comprises an area of about 525 square miles in eastern Wisconsin at the south end of Green Bay. It includes the western three-fourths of Brown County and the eastern one-ninth of Outagamie County. In 1960, the population of the area was estimated at 124,000.

  17. Carbonate Chemistry Dynamics in an Area of Active Gas Seepage: the Hudson Canyon, US Atlantic Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Tigreros Kodovska, F.; Kessler, J. D.; Leonte, M.; Chepigin, A.; Kellermann, M. Y.; Arrington, E. C.; Valentine, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    The fate of oceanic methane and its impact on the global climate has been of particular interest to the global community. The potential for vast amounts of methane to be emitted from the seafloor into the atmosphere due to gas hydrate decomposition has been under scientific evaluation. However, despite the great extent of these geological reservoirs, much of the methane released from the seafloor in deep ocean environments does not reach the atmosphere. Once dissolved in ocean water, the emitted methane can be microbially converted to either carbon dioxide or assimilated to biomass. Here, we will present results from a research cruise to the Hudson Canyon, northern US Atlantic Margin, where we investigated changes in ocean water carbonate chemistry induced by the oxidation of methane released from gas seeps. We will be presenting high precision pH data as well as methane and DIC concentrations, natural stable isotopes, and methane oxidation rates collected inside and adjacent to the Hudson Canyon in the summer of 2014.

  18. Low PCB concentrations observed in American eel (Anguilla rostrata) in six Hudson River tributaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limburg, K.E.; Machut, L.S.; Jeffers, P.; Schmidt, R.E.

    2008-01-01

    We analyzed 73 eels, collected in 2004 and 2005 above the head of tide in six Hudson River tributaries, for total PCBs, length, weight, age, and nitrogen stable isotope ratios (??15N). Mean total PCB concentration (wet weight basis) was 0.23 ppm ?? 0.08 (standard error), with a range of 0.008 to 5.4 ppm. A majority of eels (84) had concentrations below 0.25 ppm, and only seven eels (10%) had concentrations exceeding 0.5 ppm. Those eels with higher PCB concentrations were ???12 yr; there was a weak correlation of PCB concentration with ??15N and also with weight. Compared to recent (2003) data from the mainstem of the Hudson River estuary, these results indicate that tributaries are generally much less contaminated with PCBs. We hypothesize that those tributary eels with high PCB concentrations were relatively recent immigrants from the mainstem. Given concern over the possible adverse effects of PCBs on eel reproduction, these tributaries may serve as refugia. Therefore, providing improved access to upland tributaries may be critically important to this species. ?? 2008 Northeastern Naturalist.

  19. Groundwater quality in the Upper Hudson River Basin, New York, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Tia-Marie; Nystrom, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Water samples were collected from 20 production and domestic wells in the Upper Hudson River Basin (north of the Federal Dam at Troy, New York) in New York in August 2012 to characterize groundwater quality in the basin. The samples were collected and processed using standard U.S. Geological Survey procedures and were analyzed for 148 physiochemical properties and constituents, including dissolved gases, major ions, nutrients, trace elements, pesticides, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), radionuclides, and indicator bacteria. The Upper Hudson River Basin covers 4,600 square miles in upstate New York, Vermont, and Massachusetts; the study area encompasses the 4,000 square miles that lie within New York. The basin is underlain by crystalline and sedimentary bedrock, including gneiss, shale, and slate; some sandstone and carbonate rocks are present locally. The bedrock in some areas is overlain by surficial deposits of saturated sand and gravel. Eleven of the wells sampled in the Upper Hudson River Basin are completed in sand and gravel deposits, and nine are completed in bedrock. Groundwater in the Upper Hudson River Basin was typically neutral or slightly basic; the water typically was moderately hard. Bicarbonate, chloride, calcium, and sodium were the major ions with the greatest median concentrations; the dominant nutrient was nitrate. Methane was detected in 7 samples. Strontium, iron, barium, boron, and manganese were the trace elements with the highest median concentrations. Two pesticides, an herbicide degradate and an insecticide degredate, were detected in two samples at trace levels; seven VOCs, including chloroform, four solvents, and the gasoline additive methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) were detected in four samples. The greatest radon-222 activity, 2,900 picocuries per liter, was measured in a sample from a bedrock well; the median radon activity was higher in samples from bedrock wells than in samples from sand and gravel wells. Coliform bacteria were

  20. Assimilation of HF Radar Observations in the Chesapeake-Delaware Bay Region Using the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) and the Four-Dimensional Variational (4DVAR) Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Forget G, Kohl A, Terrill E. Assessing 40 -VAR for dynamical mapping of coastal high-frequency radar in San Diego . Dyn Allnos Oceans 2009;48:175-97...Mon Weather Rev 20 14;142(4): 1509- 24. 10. Roarty H, Glenn S, Kohut J, Gong D, Handel E, Rivera E, et at. Operation and applica- tion of a regional

  1. Transgressive Contours--Salt Point to Drakes Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the transgressive contours for the Salt Point to Drakes Bay, California, region. The vector file is included in...

  2. Isopachs--Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the isopachs for the Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California, region. The vector data file is included in...

  3. Transgressive Contours--Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the transgressive contours for the Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California, region. The vector file is included in...

  4. Sediment Thickness--Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the sediment-thickness map of the Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California, region. The raster data file is included in...

  5. Creating Safe Growth Strategies for the San Francisco Bay Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report from a technical assistance project with the Association of Bay Area Governments to develop strategies to ensure that growth in the region is resilient to hazards such as earthquakes and sea level rise, but also affordable and transit accessible.

  6. Isopachs--Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the isopachs for the Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California, region. The vector data file is included in...

  7. Transgressive Contours--Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the transgressive contours for the Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California, region. The vector file is included in...

  8. Sediment Thickness--Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the sediment-thickness map of the Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California, region. The raster data file is included in...

  9. Depth to Transition--Salt Point to Drakes Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the depth-to-transition map of the Salt Point to Drakes Bay, California, region. The raster data file is included in...

  10. Sediments of Cape Cod Bay, Massachusetts (HOUGH42 shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Cape Cod Bay, lying on the Massachusetts coast partly enclosed by Cape Cod, is in a glaciated region of low relief. Coarse sediments generally occur in areas exposed...

  11. Isopachs--Salt Point to Drakes Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the sediment-thickness map of the Salt Point to Drakes Bay, California, region. The raster data file is included in...

  12. Tampa Bay Topographic/Bathymetric Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In this joint demonstration project for the Tampa Bay region, NOAA's National Ocean Service (NOS) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have merged NOAA bathymetric...

  13. Species List for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a species list of fish, mammals, amphibians, and reptiles that are either common to the Back Bay area or have ranges that extend into this region. This list...

  14. Biscayne Bay Alongshore Epifauna

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Field studies to characterize the alongshore epifauna (shrimp, crabs, echinoderms, and small fishes) along the western shore of southern Biscayne Bay were started in...

  15. Bathymetry in Jobos Bay

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 4x4 meter resolution bathymetric surface for Jobos Bay, Puerto Rico (in NAD83 UTM 19 North). The depth values are in meters referenced to the...

  16. Hammond Bay Biological Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Hammond Bay Biological Station (HBBS), located near Millersburg, Michigan, is a field station of the USGS Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC). HBBS was established by...

  17. Chesapeake Bay Tributary Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesapeake Bay Tributary Strategies were developed by the seven watershed jurisdictions and outlined the river basin-specific implementation activities to reduce nutrient and sediment pollutant loads from point and nonpoint sources.

  18. Humboldt Bay Orthoimages

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set consists of 0.5-meter pixel resolution, four band orthoimages covering the Humboldt Bay area. An orthoimage is remotely sensed image data in which...

  19. De vluchtige olie van enkele chemotypen van mentha suaveolens EHRH. en van hybriden met mentha longifolia (L.) HUDSON

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Hindrik

    1974-01-01

    De opvatting dat Mentha x piperita L. een bastaard zou zijn van Mentha spicata L. en Mentha aquatica L. werd nader besproken. Hierbij werd Mentha spicata beschouwd als een bastaard van Mentha longifolia (L.) HUDSON en Mentha suaveolens EHRH. ... Zie: Samenvatting.

  20. De vluchtige olie van enkele chemotypen van mentha suaveolens EHRH. en van hybriden met mentha longifolia (L.) HUDSON

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Hindrik

    1974-01-01

    De opvatting dat Mentha x piperita L. een bastaard zou zijn van Mentha spicata L. en Mentha aquatica L. werd nader besproken. Hierbij werd Mentha spicata beschouwd als een bastaard van Mentha longifolia (L.) HUDSON en Mentha suaveolens EHRH. ... Zie: Samenvatting.

  1. Declining metal levels at Foundry Cove (Hudson River, New York): Response to localized dredging of contaminated sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackie, Joshua A. [Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, Invertebrate Zoology, 8272 Moss Landing Road, CA 95039-9647 (United States)], E-mail: jmackie@mlml.calstate.edu; Natali, Susan M.; Levinton, Jeffrey S. [Stony Brook University, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5245 (United States); Sanudo-Wilhelmy, Sergio A. [Stony Brook University, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5245 (United States); University of Southern California, Marine and Environmental Biology, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0371 (United States)

    2007-09-15

    This study examines the effectiveness of remediating a well-recognized case of heavy metal pollution at Foundry Cove (FC), Hudson River, New York. This tidal freshwater marsh was polluted with battery-factory wastes (1953-1979) and dredged in 1994-1995. Eight years after remediation, dissolved and particulate metals (Cd, Co, Cu, Pb, Ni, and Ag) were found to be lower than levels in the lower Hudson near New York City. Levels of metals (Co, Ni, Cd) on suspended particles were comparatively high. Concentrations of surface sediment Cd throughout the marsh system remain high, but have decreased both in the dredged and undredged areas: Cd was 2.4-230 mg/kg dw of sediment in 2005 vs. 109-1500 mg/kg in the same area in 1983. The rate of tidal export of Cd from FC has decreased by >300-fold, suggesting that dredging successfully stemmed a major source of Cd to the Hudson River. - Dredging of a hotspot of metal-contaminated sediment is associated with a recognizable local and river-wide decline in cadmium in the Hudson River, New York.

  2. 77 FR 34285 - Safety Zone; 2012 Ironman U.S. Championship Swim, Hudson River, Fort Lee, NJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-11

    ... the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not plan now to... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; 2012 Ironman U.S. Championship Swim, Hudson... vicinity of Englewood Cliffs and Fort Lee, NJ for the 2012 Ironman U.S. Championship swim event....

  3. 77 FR 66215 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Tappan Zee Hudson River Crossing Project in New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on the Tappan Zee Hudson River Crossing Project in New York Correction In notice document 2012-26799, appearing on page 65929 in the...

  4. 78 FR 59231 - Regulated Navigation Area-Tappan Zee Bridge Construction Project, Hudson River; South Nyack and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-26

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA11 Regulated Navigation Area--Tappan Zee Bridge... area (RNA) on the navigable waters of the Hudson River surrounding the Tappan Zee Bridge. This... situation created by the construction of the Tappan Zee Bridge. The Coast Guard has discussed this...

  5. eBay.com

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engholm, Ida

    2014-01-01

    Celebrated as one of the leading and most valuable brands in the world, eBay has acquired iconic status on par with century-old brands such as Coca-Cola and Disney. The eBay logo is now synonymous with the world’s leading online auction website, and its design is associated with the company......’s purpose: selling millions of goods, some of which are ‘designer’ items and some of which are considered design icons....

  6. Seabed morphology and gas venting features in the continental slope region of KrishnaeGodavari basin, Bay of Bengal: Implications in gas–hydrate exploration

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dewangan, P.; Ramprasad, T.; Ramana, M.V.; Mazumdar, A.; Desa, M.; Badesab, F.K.

    based on the analysis of HRS, SBP and bathymetry data. The HRS and bathymetry data resolved the finer details and regional extension of these features while MCS data helped in establishing the broader framework for the origin of mounds. We propose... based on the classification of echo character (Damuth, 1975; Pratson and Laine, 1989). Long sediment cores (~30 m) collected onboard Marion Dufresne (MD161: May, 2007) in KG offshore basin are used to study the occurrence of vent related authigenic...

  7. Landscape controls on total and methyl mercury in the upper Hudson River basin of New York State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, D. A.; Murray, K. R.; Bradley, P. M.; Brigham, M. E.; Aiken, G.; Smith, M.

    2010-12-01

    High levels of mercury (Hg) in aquatic biota have been identified in surface waters of the Adirondack region of New York, and factors such as the prevalence of wetlands, extensive forest cover, and oligotrophic waters promote Hg bioaccumulation in this region. Past research in this region has focused on improved understanding of the Hg cycle in lake ecosystems. In the study described herein, the landscape controls on total Hg and methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in riverine ecosystems were explored through synoptic surveys of 27 sites in the upper Hudson River basin of the Adirondack region. Stream samples were collected and analyzed for total Hg, MeHg, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm (UV254) during spring and summer of 2006-08. Landscape indices including many common land cover, hydrographic, and topographic-based measures were explored as predictors of Hg through multivariate linear regression. Multivariate models that included a wetland or riparian area-based metric, an index for open water area, and in some cases a topographic metric such as the wetness index explained 55 to 65 percent of the variation in MeHg concentrations, and 55 to 80 percent of the variation in total Hg concentrations. An open water index (OWI) was developed that incorporated both the basin area drained by ponded water and the surface area of these ponds. This index was inversely related to concentrations of total Hg and MeHg. This OWI was also inversely related to specific ultra-violet absorbance, consistent with previous studies showing that open water increases the influence of algal-derived carbon on DOC, decreasing aromaticity, which should decrease the ability of the dissolved carbon pool to bind Hg. The OWI was not significant in models for total Hg that also included UV254 as a predictive variable, but the index did remain significant in similar models for MeHg suggesting that biogeochemical factors in addition to decreasing carbon

  8. Scale and watershed features determine lake chemistry patterns across physiographic regions in the far north of Ontario, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef MacLeod

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the far north of Ontario (>50°N latitude, like climate warming and increased industrial development, will have direct effects on watershed characteristics and lakes. To better understand the nature of remote northern lakes that span the Canadian Shield and Hudson Bay Lowlands, and to address the pressing need for limnological data for this vast, little-studied area of Ontario, lake chemistry surveys were conducted during 2011-2012. Lakes at the transition between these physiographic regions displayed highly variable water chemistry, reflecting the peatland landscape with a mix of bog and fen watersheds, and variations in the extent of permafrost. In the transition area, Shield and Lowlands lakes could not be clearly differentiated based on water chemistry; peat cover decouples, to varying degrees, the lakes from the influences of bedrock and surficial deposits. Regional chemistry differences were apparent across a much broader area of northern Ontario, due to large-scale spatial changes in geology and in the extent of peatlands and permafrost.  Shield lakes in the far northwest of Ontario had Ca, Mg, and TP concentrations markedly higher than those of many Lowlands lakes and previously studied Shield lakes south of 50°N, related to an abundance of lacustrine and glacial end-moraine deposits in the north.

  9. Climatic characterization of the Banderas Bay Region using Köppen’s system modified by García and Geographic Information Systems techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Velázquez Ruiz

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The identification of different climatic zones can be an important factor for decision-makers in various fields such as urban planning and agricultural alternatives. In order to characterize the climates of the region of Bahía de Banderas (BB Mexico, we adopted a methodology that combines the use of the Köppen climate classification modified by Garc.a for Mexico and methods of Geographic Information Systems (GIS. We used simple regression between temperature (dependent variable and height as independent variable. Multiple regressions were applied for rainfall (dependent variable and geographical data as independent variables (thermal continentality, thermopluviometric index and slope. The temperature and precipitation data were obtained from the Comisión Nacional del Agua, and ERIC III, 2006 database. Information from geographical variables was obtained from a Digital Elevation Model and Gorzynski’s Index of Continentality. The coefficients of simple and multiple regressions were used to construct digital maps of annual temperature and precipitation via GIS. With these maps and using the CCK-EG tool, we generated the final map of climatic characterization. The result was highly representative. The determination coefficients were 0.82 and 0.39 for temperature and precipitation respectively. The resulting classification for each of the stations was located in their corresponding climate zone on the final map. Zones and climatic limits were identified for this study region.

  10. Module bay with directed flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torczynski, John R.

    2001-02-27

    A module bay requires less cleanroom airflow. A shaped gas inlet passage can allow cleanroom air into the module bay with flow velocity preferentially directed toward contaminant rich portions of a processing module in the module bay. Preferential gas flow direction can more efficiently purge contaminants from appropriate portions of the module bay, allowing a reduced cleanroom air flow rate for contaminant removal. A shelf extending from an air inlet slit in one wall of a module bay can direct air flowing therethrough toward contaminant-rich portions of the module bay, such as a junction between a lid and base of a processing module.

  11. 33 CFR 100.124 - Maggie Fischer Memorial Great South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay, New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay, New York. 100.124 Section 100.124 Navigation and Navigable... NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.124 Maggie Fischer Memorial Great South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay, New York... swimmer or safety craft on the swim event race course bounded by the following points: Starting Point...

  12. Near-field receiving water monitoring of trace metals and a benthic community near the Palo Alto Regional Water Quality Control Plant in south San Francisco Bay, California; 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyke, Jessica; Parchaso, Janet K.; Thompson, Janet K.; Cain, Daniel J.; Luoma, Samuel N.; Hornberger, Michelle I.

    2010-01-01

    Results reported herein include trace element concentrations in sediment and in the clam Macoma petalum (formerly reported as Macoma balthica (Cohen and Carlton, 1995)), clam reproductive activity, and benthic macroinvertebrate community structure for a mudflat one kilometer south of the discharge of the Palo Alto Regional Water Quality Control Plant (PARWQCP) in South San Francisco Bay. This report includes data collected for the period January 2009 to December 2009 and extends a critical long-term biogeochemical record dating back to 1974. These data serve as the basis for the City of Palo Alto's Near-Field Receiving Water Monitoring Program, initiated in 1994. In 2009, metal concentrations in both sediments and clam tissue were among the lowest concentrations on record and consistent with results observed since 1991. Following significant reductions in the late 1980s, silver (Ag) and copper (Cu) concentrations appeared to have stabilized. Annual mean concentrations have fluctuated modestly (2-4 fold) in a nondirectional manner. Data for other metals, including chromium, mercury, nickel, selenium, vanadium, and zinc, have been collected since 1994. Over this period, concentrations of these elements, which more likely reflect regional inputs and systemwide processes, have remained relatively constant, aside from typical seasonal variation that is common to all elements. Within years, the winter months (January-March) generally exhibit maximum concentrations, with a decline to annual minima in spring through fall. Mercury (Hg) in sediments and M. petalum were comparable to concentrations observed in 2008 and were generally consistent with data from previous years. Selenium (Se) concentrations in sediment varied among years and showed no sustained temporal trend. In 2009, sedimentary Se concentrations declined from the record high concentrations observed in 2008 to concentrations that were among the lowest on record. Selenium in M. petalum was unchanged from 2008

  13. Analysis of clay smoking pipes from archeological sites in the region of the Guanabara Bay (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) by FT-IR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Renato P.; Ribeiro, Iohanna M.; Calza, Cristiane; Oliveira, Ana L.; Silva, Mariane L.; Felix, Valter S.; Ferreira, Douglas S.; Coelho, Felipe A.; Gaspar, Maria D.; Pimenta, André R.; Medeiros, Elanio A.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, twenty samples of clay smoking pipes excavated in an 18 km2 area between the Macacu and Caceribu rivers, in the municipality of Itaboraí, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil were analyzed by FT-IR technique. The samples, excavated in different archeological sites of the region, are dated between the seventeenth and the nineteenth centuries and are part of the material culture left by Africans and African descendants that lived in the complex. FT-IR analyses and complementary SEM-EDS studies showed that the clay paste used in the manufacture of smoking pipes, mostly handcrafted, is composed of quartz, feldspar, phyllosilicates and iron oxides. Multivariate statistical tests (PCA) were applied to FT-IR data to assess the interactions between the archeological sites. The results indicated that one archeological site - Macacu IV - is greatly related to the other sites. The results obtained have helped archeologists and anthropologists in better understanding the manufacturing process employed in ancient ceramic artifacts produced during the period of colonial Brazil.

  14. La foresta tropicale come paradiso perduto: Green Mansions di W.H. Hudson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta Brazzelli

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In W.H. Hudson’s Green Mansions (1904 the mysterious and enchanting quality of the natural world is represented through the writer’s powerful imagination, and the exotic landscape of the South American rainforest is related to British territorial expansion: according to a long-standing literary tradition, the European colonial desire is projected onto remote, unknown places. On the one hand, the pristine forest appears a pure space, a site unspoiled by colonial expansion, the primitive and sacred world nourishing Western exotic dreams. On the other hand, by revisiting the myth of the lost paradise, Hudson conveys the late nineteenth-early twentieth century European perception of the tropical world, a patchwork of Charles Darwin’s theories, Biblical echoes and colonial ideology. Abel surrenders to the influence of the wild, ventures into the weird and entangled forest, seemingly refusing male invasion and domination. Rima’s subsequent death symbolizes the ecological catastrophe brought about by the Europeans in the primitive world of South America: the feathered bird-girl is assimilated to an Edenic being at the mercy of destructive forces. At the same time, Abel’s wish to possess the land reinforces the colonial viewpoint of the narration, while the movement from civilization to the wilderness implies the representation of a Darwinian struggle. Hudson frames the tropical space as substantially ambiguous, attractive and destructive for both colonizers and colonized, and through his narrative he introduces the fear of natural loss in the extreme form of the extinction of the green world.

  15. Environmental impact of aquaculture - sedimentation and nutrient loadings from shrimp culture of the southeast coastal region of the Bay of Bengal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Biplob Das; Yusuf Sharif Ahmed Khan; Pranab Das

    2004-01-01

    Nutrient loadings were measured for surface seawater and bottom sediments of semi-intensive and improved extensive shrimp culture pond, adjacent estuary, and fallow land in the south-east coastal region of Bangladesh during August, 2000 - January, 2001 to evaluate the impact of shrimp culture. The mean levels of nutrients found in the pond surface water were 108.780 mg/L for CaCO3, 0.526 mg/L for NH4+-N, 3.075 wt% for organic carbon, 7.00 mg/L for PO4-P, 5.57 mg/L for NO3-N, and 7.33 mg/L for chlorophyll-a. The maximum mean value of H2S(0.232 mg/L) was found in estuarine water. Nutrients loading were found to be decreased with distance from the shrimp farm discharge unit in estuarine water. The mean level of organic matter, total nitrogen, and organic carbon were found in higher concentrations in sediments of cultured pond compared to bottom soil of adjacent fallow land at the same elevation. Extractable Ca values were found in higher concentration(550.33 ppt) in adjacent fallow land, as; the shrimps for molting in shrimp ponds use extractable Ca. The relation between seawater H2S value and sediment pH (r = - 0.94); sediment organic carbon and sediment pH values (r = - 0.76), sediment total nitrogen and sediment pH (r = - 0.74) were found to be highly negatively correlated. Whereas the relation between seawater H2S value and sediment total nitrogen (r = 0.92), water NH4+-N and sediment pH (r = 0.66) were found to be positively correlated. The results revealed that load of nutrients at eutrophic level in estuarine water, and decrease of soil pH; leading to acid sulphate soil formation indicates a negative impact of shrimp culture.

  16. Integrating science and resource management in Tampa Bay, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Kimberly K.; Greening, Holly; Morrison, Gerold

    2011-01-01

    Tampa Bay is recognized internationally for its remarkable progress towards recovery since it was pronounced "dead" in the late 1970s. Due to significant efforts by local governments, industries and private citizens throughout the watershed, water clarity in Tampa Bay is now equal to what it was in 1950, when population in the watershed was less than one-quarter of what it is today. Seagrass extent has increased by more than 8,000 acres since the mid-1980s, and fish and wildlife populations are increasing. Central to this successful turn-around has been the Tampa Bay resource management community's long-term commitment to development and implementation of strong science-based management strategies. Research institutions and agencies, including Eckerd College, the Florida Wildlife Commission Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, Mote Marine Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Southwest Florida Water Management District, University of South Florida, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Geological Survey, local and State governments, and private companies contribute significantly to the scientific basis of our understanding of Tampa Bay's structure and ecological function. Resource management agencies, including the Tampa Bay Regional Planning Council's Agency on Bay Management, the Southwest Florida Water Management District's Surface Water Improvement and Management Program, and the Tampa Bay Estuary Program, depend upon this scientific basis to develop and implement regional adaptive management programs. The importance of integrating science with management has become fully recognized by scientists and managers throughout the region, State and Nation. Scientific studies conducted in Tampa Bay over the past 10–15 years are increasingly diverse and complex, and resource management programs reflect our increased knowledge of geology, hydrology and hydrodynamics, ecology and restoration techniques. However, a synthesis of this

  17. The Fermi's Bayes Theorem

    CERN Document Server

    D'Agostini, G

    2005-01-01

    It is curious to learn that Enrico Fermi knew how to base probabilistic inference on Bayes theorem, and that some influential notes on statistics for physicists stem from what the author calls elsewhere, but never in these notes, {\\it the Bayes Theorem of Fermi}. The fact is curious because the large majority of living physicists, educated in the second half of last century -- a kind of middle age in the statistical reasoning -- never heard of Bayes theorem during their studies, though they have been constantly using an intuitive reasoning quite Bayesian in spirit. This paper is based on recollections and notes by Jay Orear and on Gauss' ``Theoria motus corporum coelestium'', being the {\\it Princeps mathematicorum} remembered by Orear as source of Fermi's Bayesian reasoning.

  18. Lost lake - restoration of a Carolina bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanlin, H.G.; McLendon, J.P. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States). Dept. of Biology and Geology; Wike, L.D. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States). Dept. of Biology and Geology]|[Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Technology Center; Dietsch, B.M. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States). Dept. of Biology and Geology]|[Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Carolina bays are shallow wetland depressions found only on the Atlantic Coastal Plain. Although these isolated interstream wetlands support many types of communities, they share the common features of having a sandy margin, a fluctuating water level, an elliptical shape, and a northwest to southeast orientation. Lost Lake, an 11.3 hectare Carolina bay, was ditched and drained for agricultural production before establishment of the Savannah River Site in 1950. Later it received overflow from a seepage basin containing a variety of chemicals, primarily solvents and some heavy metals. In 1990 a plan was developed for the restoration of Lost Lake, and restoration activities were complete by mid-1991. Lost Lake is the first known project designed for the restoration and recovery of a Carolina bay. The bay was divided into eight soil treatment zones, allowing four treatments in duplicate. Each of the eight zones was planted with eight species of native wetland plants. Recolonization of the bay by amphibians and reptiles is being evaluated by using drift fences with pitfall traps and coverboard arrays in each of the treatment zones. Additional drift fences in five upland habitats were also established. Hoop turtle traps, funnel minnow traps, and dip nets were utilized for aquatic sampling. The presence of 43 species common to the region has been documented at Lost Lake. More than one-third of these species show evidence of breeding populations being established. Three species found prior to the restoration activity and a number of species common to undisturbed Carolina bays were not encountered. Colonization by additional species is anticipated as the wetland undergoes further succession.

  19. Mapping Oyster Reef Habitats in Mobile Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolte, Danielle

    2011-01-01

    habitats in the southeastern regions of the Bay.

  20. Near-field receiving water monitoring of trace metals and a benthic community near the Palo Alto Regional Water Quality Control Plant in South San Francisco Bay, California: 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyke, Jessica; Cain, Daniel J.; Thompson, Janet K.; Kleckner, Amy E.; Parcheso, Francis; Hornberger, Michelle I.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    2014-01-01

    Trace-metal concentrations in sediment and in the clam Macoma petalum (formerly reported as Macoma balthica), clam reproductive activity, and benthic macroinvertebrate community structure were investigated in a mudflat 1 kilometer south of the discharge of the Palo Alto Regional Water Quality Control Plant (PARWQCP) in South San Francisco Bay, Calif. This report includes the data collected by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists for the period January 2013 to December 2013. These data serve as the basis for the City of Palo Alto’s Near-Field Receiving Water Monitoring Program, initiated in 1994. Following significant reductions in the late 1980s, silver (Ag) and copper (Cu) concentrations in sediment and M. petalum appear to have stabilized. Data for other metals, including chromium (Cr), mercury (Hg), nickel (Ni), selenium (Se), and zinc (Zn), have been collected since 1994. Over this period, concentrations of these elements have remained relatively constant, aside from seasonal variation that is common to all elements. In 2013, concentrations of Ag and Cu in M. petalum varied seasonally in response to a combination of site-specific metal exposures and annual growth and reproduction, as reported previously. Seasonal patterns for other elements, including Cr, Ni, Zn, Hg, and Se, were generally similar in timing and magnitude as those for Ag and Cu. In M. petalum, all observed elements showed annual maxima in January–February and minima in April, except for Zn, which was lowest in December. In sediments, annual maxima also occurred in January–February, and minima were measured in June and September. In 2013, metal concentrations in both sediments and clam tissue were among the lowest concentrations on record. This record suggests that regional-scale factors now largely control sedimentary and bioavailable concentrations of Ag and Cu, as well as other elements of regulatory interest, at the Palo Alto site. Analyses of the benthic community structure of a

  1. Near-field receiving water monitoring of trace metals and a benthic community near the Palo Alto Regional Water Quality Control Plant in south San Francisco Bay, California, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyke, Jessica; Thompson, Janet K.; Cain, Daniel J.; Kleckner, Amy E.; Parcheso, Francis; Luoma, Samuel N.; Hornberger, Michelle I.

    2013-01-01

    Trace-metal concentrations in sediment and in the clam Macoma petalum (formerly reported as Macoma balthica), clam reproductive activity, and benthic macroinvertebrate community structure were investigated in a mudflat 1 kilometer south of the discharge of the Palo Alto Regional Water Quality Control Plant (PARWQCP) in South San Francisco Bay, Calif. This report includes the data collected by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists for the period January to December 2012. These data serve as the basis for the City of Palo Alto’s Near-Field Receiving Water Monitoring Program, initiated in 1994. Following significant reductions in the late 1980s, silver (Ag) and copper (Cu) concentrations in sediment and in M. petalum appear to have stabilized. Data for other metals, including chromium (Cr), mercury (Hg), nickel (Ni), selenium (Se), and zinc (Zn), have been collected since 1994. Over this period, concentrations of these elements have remained relatively constant, aside from seasonal variation that is common to all elements. In 2012, concentrations of Ag and Cu in M. petalum varied seasonally in response to a combination of site-specific metal exposures and annual growth and reproduction, as reported for previous time periods. Seasonal patterns for other elements, including Cr, Ni, Zn, Hg, and Se were generally similar in timing and magnitude as those for Ag and Cu. In 2012, metal concentrations in both sediments and clam tissue were among the lowest concentrations on record. This record suggests that regional-scale factors now largely control sedimentary and bioavailable concentrations of Ag and Cu, as well as other elements of regulatory interest, at the Palo Alto site. Analyses of the benthic community structure of a mudflat in South San Francisco Bay over a 39-year period show that changes in the community have occurred concurrent with reduced concentrations of metals in the sediment and in the tissues of the biosentinel clam, M. petalum, from the same area

  2. Confucianism in the Folk Culture of T iaolingtou in the Beibu Bay Region%北部湾地区“跳岭头”民俗文化的儒学显现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄宇鸿; 黄建霖

    2014-01-01

    广西北部湾地区的“跳岭头”民俗文化是脱胎于傩巫文化的产物,以萨满为表演主体,以“玛纳”为主要象征载体,在浓重的象征意味中体现着泛灵信仰和泛生信仰相结合的特点。在人类学视域下,北部湾地区的“跳岭头”民俗文化显现出儒学的礼、乐、仁等特征。无论从其体裁还是内容,“跳岭头”民俗文化显现了其儒学确证性,对研究人类学、民俗学、历史学、民族学、乡土乐舞、宗教学等多学科具有重要的参考价值。%Folk culture of T iaolingtou in the Beibu Bay region of Guangxi, born out of Nuo culture, with Shaman as performing subject and Manna as major symbolic carrier, embodies the combination of animism and animatism in strong symbolic implications.From the perspective of anthropology, T iaolingtou folk culture reveals Confucian philosophy—L i(ritual), Yue (music) and R en (humanity).It shows the verifia-bility of Confucianism both in its genre and content, which enables it to be of significant reference value in the study of many fields, such as anthropology, folklore, history, ethnology, religion and local music and dance.

  3. Impact of the Medieval Climate Anomaly, Little Ice Age, and Recent Warming on Hydrology and Carbon Accumulation in the James Bay Lowland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmquist, J. R.; Booth, R. K.; MacDonald, G. M.

    2013-12-01

    Reconstructing late-Holocene hydroclimatic variations can be useful to understand the sensitivity of peatland soil carbon (C) to climate change (Bunbury et al., 2012). We reconstructed water table depth (WTD), using testate amoebae, for a four-core north to south transect of the James Bay Lowland and Boreal Shield of Ontario, Canada, and compared WTD to long-term apparent rate of C accumulation (LARCA). The three southern sites indicate that WTD fluctuated relative to the mean, with a wetter Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) and drier Little Ice Age (LIA) (Fig. 1). However, the most northern site recorded a wet LIA and dry MCA (Fig. 1). All four cores recorded drying coincident with modern warming (Fig. 1). Increased Medieval moisture detected in the three southern sites is consistent with a geographic pattern of precipitation anomalies associated with La Niña-like conditions, which cause drought in the American southwest and central plains regions coupled with increased moisture in the Pacific Northwest and north of the Great Lakes (Feng et al., 2008; Seager et al., 2008). Despite the hydroclimatic sensitivity of the region, we observed no consistent relationship between variations in WTD and LARCA from the same cores. At these particular sites, at least, C accumulation has not been sensitive to the range of climatic variability associated with the MCA, LIA and recent warming. Bunbury, J., Finkelstein, S. A., & Bollmann, J. (2012). Holocene hydro-climatic change and effects on carbon accumulation inferred from a peat bog in the Attawapiskat River watershed, Hudson Bay Lowlands, Canada. Quaternary Research: 275-284. Feng, S., Oglesby, R. J., Rowe, C. M., Loope, D. B., & Hu, Q. (2008). Atlantic and Pacific SST influences on Medieval drought in North America simulated by the Community Atmospheric Model. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (1984-2012), 113(D11). Seager, R., Burgman, R., Kushnir, Y., Clement, A., Cook, E., Naik, N., & Miller, J. (2008). Tropical

  4. OTOLITH MICROCHEMISTRY INDICATES UNEXPECTED PATTERNS OF RESIDENCY AND ANADROMY IN BLUEBACK HERRING, ALOSA AESTIVALIS, IN THE HUDSON AND MOHAWK RIVERS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIMBURG K. E.

    2001-07-01

    PIXE, providing a detailed time series of data on the Sr:Ca, and thus habitat use history, of the fish. We also analyzed otoliths of Mohawk and Hudson River young-of-year (YOY. The Sr:Ca ratios of Mohawk YOY are slightly but significantly higher than those of Hudson YOY. Life history transects for 51 adults show complex patterns of Sr:Ca, indicating that many of the fish move into salt water at least for brief periods. However, many fish appear to spend extended parts of their post-YOY lives in fresh water, and at least two adults (caught in the Mohawk near Rome, NY appear never to have changed habitats at all. This is thus the first demonstration of residency in Mohawk River herring.

  5. Change detection in the Florida Bay using remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Joseph P.; Busch, Terrence V.

    1997-09-01

    The Florida Bay region is experiencing an economically and environmentally debilitating algal bloom. Remotely sensed data collected by the SPOT satellites provides fine spatial resolution data, necessary for this environment, currently available covering the spectral signature of chlorophyll. The study used SPOT multispectral data to test the utility of the green band (.5 - .6 microns) in algae detection while providing a change detection analysis of the Florida Bay for the years 1987, 1991, 1994 and 1996.

  6. Richards Bay effluent pipeline

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lord, DA

    1986-07-01

    Full Text Available This report discusses the adequate provision for waste disposal is an essential part of the infrastructure needed in the development of Richards Bay as a deepwater harbour and industrial/metropolitan area. Having considered various options for waste...

  7. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in adult and juvenile mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) from the Hudson River, New York, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Sean S; Skinner, Lawrence C

    2016-09-01

    The Hudson River, NY, USA is contaminated for over 300 km with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) released from two General Electric (GE) capacitor plants. We collected adult and juvenile mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) from four different areas of the river; an area upstream of the GE plants (n = 38), two areas directly downstream of the GE plants (n = 41, n = 38), and an area more than 100 km downstream in the freshwater tidal river (n = 20). Collections occurred during July and August (2008) when ducks were flightless to ensure ducks were "resident" and exposures were local. Fat and muscle tissue were analyzed for PCBs. PCBs were detected in all samples, and mallards below the GE plant sites on the Hudson River had orders of magnitude higher concentrations of PCBs than those above the plants. Juvenile mallards from areas directly downstream of the GE plant sites tended to have higher PCB concentrations in fat than adults. The patterns of PCB congeners and homolog groups varied across the study areas, with areas directly downstream of the GE plants dominated by tetra-chloro biphenyls whereas samples from upstream and the freshwater tidal river tended towards higher chlorinated congeners. Congener patterns between male and female and juvenile and adult mallards were generally similar within study areas, with the exception of one area downstream of the GE plants where adult birds exhibited different patterns than juveniles. Evidence of PCBs from the GE plant sites was detected in the tidal Hudson River, more than 100 km downstream of the plant sites. More than 90% of the ducks collected in areas downstream of the GE plants but above the tidally influenced river exceed the USFDA tolerance level for PCBs in poultry, which should be a concern for consumers of waterfowl taken in proximity to the upper Hudson River.

  8. Catastrophic meltwater discharge down the Hudson Valley: a potential trigger for the Intra-Allerød cold period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Jeffrey P.; Driscoll, Neal W.; Uchupi, Elazar; Keigwin, Loyd D.; Schwab, William C.; Thieler, E. Robert; Swift, Stephen A.

    2005-01-01

    Glacial freshwater discharge to the Atlantic Ocean during deglaciation may have inhibited oceanic thermohaline circulation, and is often postulated to have driven climatic fluctuations. Yet attributing meltwater-discharge events to particular climate oscillations is problematic, because the location, timing, and amount of meltwater discharge are often poorly constrained. We present evidence from the Hudson Valley and the northeastern U.S. continental margin that establishes the timing of the catastrophic draining of Glacial Lake Iroquois, which breached the moraine dam at the Narrows in New York City, eroded glacial lake sediments in the Hudson Valley, and deposited large sediment lobes on the New York and New Jersey continental shelf ca. 13,350 yr B.P. Excess 14C in Cariaco Basin sediments indicates a slowing in thermohaline circulation and heat transport to the North Atlantic at that time, and both marine and terrestrial paleoclimate proxy records around the North Atlantic show a short-lived (<400 yr) cold event (Intra-Aller??d cold period) that began ca. 13,350 yr B.P. The meltwater discharge out the Hudson Valley may have played an important role in triggering the Intra-Aller??d cold period by diminishing thermohaline circulation. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  9. The Liverpool Bay Coastal Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, John; Palmer, Matthew

    2011-11-01

    A pilot Coastal Observatory has been established in Liverpool Bay which integrates (near) real-time measurements with coupled models and whose results are displayed on the web. The aim is to understand the functioning of coastal seas, their response to natural forcing and the consequences of human activity. The eastern Irish Sea is an apt test site, since it encompasses a comprehensive range of processes found in tidally dominated coastal seas, including near-shore physical and biogeochemical processes influenced by estuarine inflows, where both vertical and horizontal gradients are important. Applications include hypernutrification, since the region receives significantly elevated levels of nutrient inputs, shoreline management (coastal flooding and beach erosion/accretion), and understanding present conditions to predict the impact of climate change (for instance if the number and severity of storms, or of high or low river flows, change). The integrated measurement suite which started in August 2002 covers a range of space and time scales. It includes in situ time series, four to six weekly regional water column surveys, an instrumented ferry, a shore-based HF radar system measuring surface currents and waves, coastal tide gauges and visible and infra-red satellite data. The time series enable definition of the seasonal cycle, its inter-annual variability and provide a baseline from which the relative importance of events can be quantified. A suite of nested 3D hydrodynamic, wave and ecosystem models is run daily, focusing on the observatory area by covering the ocean/shelf of northwest Europe (at 12-km resolution) and the Irish Sea (at 1.8 km), and Liverpool Bay at the highest resolution of 200 m. The measurements test the models against events as they happen in a truly 3D context. All measurements and model outputs are displayed freely on the Coastal Observatory website (http://cobs.pol.ac.uk) for an audience of researchers, education, coastal managers and the

  10. Preparing Informal Bay Area Educators for Climate Education Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, M.

    2016-12-01

    The Bay Area Climate Literacy Impact Collaborative (Bay-CLIC) joins informal science educators from over 30 environmental education organizations with the common goal of increasing climate literacy and action. Over this past year, the collaborative has been gathering existing tools and resources that will allow informal educators in the Bay Area to communicate on climate change with confidence. Bay-CLIC's work plans to bring climate science to life by equipping educators with climate data that resonates best with local audiences, which is data that is place-based and personal. Bay-CLIC is also researching effective sustainability campaigns focused on behavior change that can be crafted to fit our unique regional context and rolled out across multiple Bay-CLIC member organizations. This session will focus on sharing our findings from our six month information gathering phase. The overarching discussion will focus on the needs that Bay Area educators identified as necessary to address in order for them to provide the best quality climate education programming. We will also discuss the data we gathered on what local educators are already using in their work and share out on how this diverse array of informal educators will be implementing our research into their programs.

  11. Origin of an unusual monazite-xenotime gneiss, Hudson Highlands, New York: SHRIMP U-Pb geochronology and trace element geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleinikoff, John N.; Grauch, Richard I.; Mazdab, Frank K.; Kwak, Loretta; Fanning, C. Mark; Kamo, Sandra L.

    2012-01-01

    metamorphism that was initiated at about 1035 Ma. This rock was then subjected to repeated episodes of dissolution/reprecipitation for about 150 m.y. during regional cooling of the Hudson Highlands.

  12. Hudson Canyon benthic habitats characterization and mapping by integrated analysis of multidisciplinary data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierdomenico, Martina; Guida, Vincent G.; Rona, Peter A.; Macelloni, Leonardo; Scranton, Mary I.; Asper, Vernon; Diercks, Arne

    2013-04-01

    Hudson Canyon, about 180 km SE of New York City, is the largest eastern U.S. submarine canyon and is under consideration for HAPC (Habitat Area of Particular Concern) status, representing a fisheries and biodiversity hot spot. Interest in the area, within the perspective of ecosystem based management, marine spatial planning, habitat and species conservation, led to a joint project between NOAA Northeast Fisheries, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Mississippi Mineral Research Institute (MMRI), National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), Stony Brook and Rutgers Universities for the study of benthic habitats, that includes the assembly of existing data with newly collected ones: acoustic mapping, visual ground-truthing, hydrographic, sedimentological, and trawl data collections. Acoustic mapping, performed using AUV-mounted multibeam sonar, provided ultra-high resolution bathymetric and backscatter imagery (3m and 1m respectively) at all water depths for identification of geomorphological features and for the characterization of surficial sediments along the two thirds of the shelf portion of the canyon. Identification of benthic and demersal communities was accomplished by visual ground thruthing with underwater vehicle video and still cameras, and from trawl catch data. A CTD-rosette sampler provided water column salinity-temperature profiles and water samples for dissolved methane analysis in the vicinity of suspected bottom sources. Analysis of data revealed a complex of topographic structures and hydrological patterns that provide a wide range of physical habitats in a relatively small area. A mosaic of sandy and muddy substrates, gravel beds, rock outcrops, and semilithified clay outcrops host rich and varied faunal assemblages, including deepwater corals and sponge communities. Pockmark fields, occurring below 300 m depth, suggest that methane-based chemosynthetic carbonate deposition contributes to creation of specific hard bottom habitats

  13. Corpus Christi, Nueces, and Aransas Bays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Lawrence R.; Spear, Kathryn A.; Eleonor Taylor,; Thatcher, Cindy

    2015-01-01

    Corpus Christi Bay and Nueces Bay comprise the middle estuarine portion of Texas’ Coastal Bend region (Figure 1; Burgan and Engle, 2006). Aransas Bay is part of the upper estuarine portion of the region. These bays make up part of the Coastal Bend Bays and Estuaries Program, one of the many estuarine areas in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s National Estuary Program (Holt, 1998). The Coastal Bend region is sub-humid and sub-tropical. Summers are long, hot, and humid, and winters are short and mild. The landscape around the estuaries is dominated by row crops, pastures, and brushy rangeland (Handley and others, 2007). The Nueces River, along with other smaller rivers and creeks, provides freshwater inflow—along with essential nutrients and sediment— into Nueces Bay, which feeds into Corpus Christi Bay (Holt, 1998). Freshwater inflow into the Aransas Bay comes from Mission River, Aransas River, and Copano Creek. The region is relatively dry otherwise and prone to droughts. Corpus Christi receives an average of 76.2 cm (30 in) of rain annually; evaporation usually exceeds 177.8 cm (70 in) (Holt, 1998; Handley and others, 2007). The San Antonio-Nueces Coastal Basin drains into Aransas Bay. The Nueces River basin covers 43,253 km2 (16,700 miles2 ), from northwest of San Antonio, flowing southeast to where it drains into Nueces and Corpus Christi Bays (Holt, 1998). The Nueces-Rio Grande basin covers approximately 18,648 1 U.S. Geological Survey National Wetlands Research Center, 700 Cajundome Blvd., Lafayette, LA 70506 2 Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies, Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi, 6300 Ocean Drive, Unit 5869, Corpus Christi, Texas 78412 2 km2 (7,200 miles2 ) and flows partially into Corpus Christi Bay (as well as the upper Laguna Madre). The inflow from Nueces River has declined by approximately 20 percent over the past several decades, partly due to construction of lakes and reservoirs, particularly Lake Corpus Christi

  14. Surface layer temperature inversion in the Bay of Bengal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thadathil, Pankajakshan; Gopalakrishna, V. V.; Muraleedharan, P. M.; Reddy, G. V.; Araligidad, Nilesh; Shenoy, Shrikant

    2002-10-01

    Surface layer temperature inversion occurring in the Bay of Bengal has been addressed. Hydrographic data archived in the Indian Oceanographic Data Center are used to understand various aspects of the temperature inversion of surface layer in the Bay of Bengal, such as occurrence time, characteristics, stability, inter-annual variability and generating mechanisms. Spatially organized temperature inversion occurs in the coastal waters of the western and northeastern Bay during winter (November-February). Although the inversion in the northeastern Bay is sustained until February (with remnants seen even in March), in the western Bay it becomes less organized in January and almost disappears by February. Inversion is confined to the fresh water induced seasonal halocline of the surface layer. Inversions of large temperature difference (of the order of 1.6-2.4°C) and thin layer thickness (10-20 m) are located adjacent to major fresh water inputs from the Ganges, Brahmaputra, Irrawaddy, Krishna and Godavari rivers. The inversion is stable with a mean stability of 3600×10 -8 m -1. Inter-annual variability of the inversion is significantly high and it is caused by the inter-annual variability of fresh water flux and surface cooling in the northern Bay. Fresh water flux leads the occurrence process in association with surface heat flux and advection. The leading role of fresh water flux is understood from the observation that the two occurrence regions of inversion (the western and northeastern Bay) have proximity to the two low salinity (with values about 28-29‰) zones. In the western Bay, the East India Coastal Current brings less saline and cold water from the head of the Bay to the south-west Bay, where it advects over warm, saline water, promoting temperature inversion in this region in association with the surface heat loss. For inversion occurring in the northeastern Bay (where the surface water gains heat from atmosphere), surface advection of the less saline

  15. A baseline and watershed assessment in the Lynx Creek, Brenot Creek, and Portage Creek watersheds near Hudson's Hope, BC : summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matscha, G.; Sutherland, D. [British Columbia Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection, Prince George, BC (Canada)

    2005-06-15

    This report summarized a baseline monitoring program for the Lynx Creek, Brenot Creek, and Portage Creek watersheds located near Hudson's Hope, British Columbia (BC). The monitoring program was designed to more accurately determine the effects of potential coalbed gas developments in the region, as well as to assess levels of agricultural and forest harvesting, and the impacts of current land use activities on water quantity and quality. Water quality was sampled at 18 sites during 5 different flow regimes, including summer and fall low flows; ice cover; spring run-off; and high flows after a heavy summer rain event. Sample sites were located up and downstream of both forest and agricultural activities. The water samples were analyzed for 70 contaminants including ions, nutrients, metals, hydrocarbons, and hydrocarbon fractions. Results showed that while many analyzed parameters met current BC water quality guidelines, total organic carbon, manganese, cadmium, E. coli, fecal coliforms, and fecal streptococci often exceeded recommended guidelines. Aluminum and cobalt values exceeded drinking water guidelines. The samples also had a slightly alkaline pH and showed high conductance. A multiple barrier approach was recommended to reduce potential risks of contamination from the watersheds. It was concluded that a more refined bacteria source tracking method is needed to determine whether fecal pollution has emanated from human, livestock or wildlife sources. 1 tab., 9 figs.

  16. Accumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls in american shad during their migration in the Hudson River, spring 1977.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastel, M; Bush, B; Kim, J S

    1980-06-01

    Fifty-two female American shad (Alosa sapidissima) were collected during the spring of 1977 at two sites on the lower Hudson River, 27 miles and 75 miles from the river mouth. The fish were extracted with hexane, and the extracts were analyzed by electron-capture gas chromatography (EC-GC) and by GC/mass spectrometry (MS), PCBs were quantitated by EC-GC, and the concentrations were compared by fish length and by site. Fish collected from the downstream site contained a mean PCB concentration of 2.0 +/- 1.0 microgram/g, wet weight; fish from the upstream site contained a mean PCB concentration of 6.1 +/- 2.6 microgram/g, wet weight. Aliquots of the hexane extracts were fractionated before analysis by GC/MS. The presence of PCBs was confirmed, and DDE and the alkane series from C22 through C26 were detected. American shad are saltwater fish that only enter fresh water to spawn. Because they do not feed in fresh water before spawning, they may be used as an indicator of water contamination.

  17. Remarks on kernel Bayes' rule

    OpenAIRE

    Johno, Hisashi; Nakamoto, Kazunori; Saigo, Tatsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Kernel Bayes' rule has been proposed as a nonparametric kernel-based method to realize Bayesian inference in reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces. However, we demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that the prediction result by kernel Bayes' rule is in some cases unnatural. We consider that this phenomenon is in part due to the fact that the assumptions in kernel Bayes' rule do not hold in general.

  18. The effect of the bay-region 12-methyl group on the stereoselective metabolism at the K-region of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene by rat liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S K; Fu, P P

    1984-01-01

    The enantiomers of a trans-5,6-dihydrodiol formed in the metabolism of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene by rat liver microsomes (microsomal fractions) were resolved by chiral stationary-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The major 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene trans-5,6-dihydrodiol enantiomer and its hydrogenation product 5,6,8,9,10,11-hexahydro-trans-5,6-diol were found to have 5S,6S absolute configurations by the exciton chirality c.d. method. The R,R/S,S enantiomer ratios of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene trans-5,6-dihydrodiol formed in the metabolism of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene by liver microsomes from untreated, 3-methylcholanthrene-treated and phenobarbital-treated male Sprague-Dawley rats were found to be 11:89, 6:94, and 5:95 respectively. These findings and those reported previously on the metabolic formations of trans-5,6-dihydrodiols from 7-methylbenz[a]anthracene and 12-methylbenz[a]anthracene suggest that the 12-methyl group in 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene plays an important role in determining the stereoselective metabolism at the K-region 5,6-double bond. Furthermore, the finding that formation of 5S,6S-dihydrodiol as the predominant enantiomer was not significantly affected by the isoenzymic composition of cytochrome P-450 present in microsomes prepared from the livers of the rats pretreated with the different inducing agents indicates that the stereoselectivity depends on the substrate metabolized rather than on the precise nature of the metabolizing-enzyme system. PMID:6439187

  19. BCDC Bay Trail Alignment 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Bay Trail provides easily accessible recreational opportunities for outdoor enthusiasts, including hikers, joggers, bicyclists and skaters. It also offers a...

  20. BCDC Bay Trail Alignment 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Bay Trail provides easily accessible recreational opportunities for outdoor enthusiasts, including hikers, joggers, bicyclists and skaters. It also offers a...

  1. The Bay of Pigs: Revisiting Two Museums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Read

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The Museum of Playa Giron (the Bay of Pigs in the region of Cienega De Zapata, Cuba, celebrates the repulse of Brigade 2506 as the first reverse of US imperialism on the American continents. The equivalent Brigade 2506 Museum in Miami, dedicated to and maintained by the members of Brigade 2506, celebrates defeat at the Bay of Pigs as moral victory for the Cuban exiles. The forces were indeed implacable foes. Yet between the museums can be detected some curious similarities. Both present the common theme of the confrontation between forces of good and evil. Both celebrate the philosophy that dying for one’s country is the greatest good a citizen may achieve. Both museums fly the common Cuban flag. Both museums identify a common enemy: the United States of America. This article, by comparing the displays in the two museums, analyses some cultural elements of what, despite decades of separation, in some ways remains a common Cuban culture.

  2. Which Bay Leaf is in Your Spice Rack? - A Quality Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Vijayasankar; Bussmann, Rainer W; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2017-03-01

    The accurate identification of bay leaf in natural products commerce may often be confusing as the name is applied to several different species of aromatic plants. The true "bay leaf", also known as "bay laurel" or "sweet bay", is sourced from the tree Laurus nobilis, a native of the Mediterranean region. Nevertheless, the leaves of several other species including Cinnamomum tamala, Litsea glaucescens, Pimenta racemosa, Syzygium polyanthum, and Umbellularia californica are commonly substituted or mistaken for true bay leaves due to their similarity in the leaf morphology, aroma, and flavor. Substitute species are, however, often sold as "bay leaves". As such, the name "bay leaf" in literature and herbal commerce may refer to any of these botanicals. The odor and flavor of these leaves are, however, not the same as the true bay leaf, and for that reason they should not be used in cooking as a substitute for L. nobilis. Some of the bay leaf substitutes can also cause potential health problems. Therefore, the correct identification of the true bay leaf is important. The present work provides a detailed comparative study of the leaf morphological and anatomical features of L. nobilis and its common surrogates to allow for correct identification.

  3. Distribution of mercury in surficial sediments from Todos Santos Bay, Baja California, México.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Galindo, E A; Casas-Beltrán, D A; Muñoz-Barbosa, A; Daesslé, L W; Segovia-Zavala, J A; Macías-Zamora, J V; Orozco-Borbón, M V

    2008-02-01

    During 2004 the spatial distribution of total Hg in sediments from Todos Santos Bay, Baja California, México was studied to evaluate the degree of environmental impact in this bay. The results showed low concentrations and no Hg enrichment at any site. These findings suggest natural levels of Hg in the water of Todos Santos Bay. The regional distribution of Hg/Fe shows lower values in the East and higher in the West of the bay. No significant correlations (p<0.05) were found between Hg and organic matter or particle size, suggesting that the distribution of Hg is not controlled by these variables.

  4. Wind stress, curl and vertical velocity in the Bay of Bengal during southwest monsoon, 1984

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Babu, M.T.; Heblekar, A.K.; Murty, C.S.

    Wind distribution observed during southwest monsoon of 1984 has used to derive the mean wind stress for the season at every 1 degree square grid and curl over the Bay of Bengal. Two regions of maximum wind stress are present over the Bay of Bengal...

  5. Circulation and distribution of some hydrographical properties during the late winter in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, D.P.; Sastry, J.S.

    cooling near the head of the Bay, the influence of northeast monsoon winds, the influence of north equatorial current in the southern regions and the influence of fresh water discharges, especially in the northern Bay, Andaman Sea and along the east coast...

  6. Thatcher Bay, Washington, Nearshore Restoration Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breems, Joel; Wyllie-Echeverria, Sandy; Grossman, Eric E.; Elliott, Joel

    2009-01-01

    The San Juan Archipelago, located at the confluence of the Puget Sound, the Straits of Juan de Fuca in Washington State, and the Straits of Georgia, British Columbia, Canada, provides essential nearshore habitat for diverse salmonid, forage fish, and bird populations. With 408 miles of coastline, the San Juan Islands provide a significant portion of the available nearshore habitat for the greater Puget Sound and are an essential part of the regional efforts to restore Puget Sound (Puget Sound Shared Strategy 2005). The nearshore areas of the San Juan Islands provide a critical link between the terrestrial and marine environments. For this reason the focus on restoration and conservation of nearshore habitat in the San Juan Islands is of paramount importance. Wood-waste was a common by-product of historical lumber-milling operations. To date, relatively little attention has been given to the impact of historical lumber-milling operations in the San Juan Archipelago. Thatcher Bay, on Blakely Island, located near the east edge of the archipelago, is presented here as a case study on the restoration potential for a wood-waste contaminated nearshore area. Case study components include (1) a brief discussion of the history of milling operations. (2) an estimate of the location and amount of the current distribution of wood-waste at the site, (3) a preliminary examination of the impacts of wood-waste on benthic flora and fauna at the site, and (4) the presentation of several restoration alternatives for the site. The history of milling activity in Thatcher Bay began in 1879 with the construction of a mill in the southeastern part of the bay. Milling activity continued for more than 60 years, until the mill closed in 1942. Currently, the primary evidence of the historical milling operations is the presence of approximately 5,000 yd3 of wood-waste contaminated sediments. The distribution and thickness of residual wood-waste at the site was determined by using sediment

  7. Ground-Water Quality in the Upper Hudson River Basin, New York, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nystrom, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    Water samples were collected from 25 production and domestic wells in the Upper Hudson River Basin (north of the Federal Dam at Troy, N.Y.) from August through November 2007 to characterize the ground-water quality. The Upper Hudson River Basin covers 4,600 square miles in upstate New York, Vermont, and Massachusetts; the study area encompasses the 4,000 square miles that lie within New York. The basin is underlain by crystalline and sedimentary bedrock, including gneiss, shale, and slate; some sandstone and carbonate rocks are present locally. The bedrock in some areas is overlain by surficial deposits of saturated sand and gravel. Of the 25 wells sampled, 13 were finished in sand and gravel deposits, and 12 were finished in bedrock. The samples were collected and processed by standard U.S. Geological Survey procedures and were analyzed for 225 physical properties and constituents, including major ions, nutrients, trace elements, radon-222, pesticides, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and indicator bacteria. Water quality in the study area is generally good, but concentrations of some constituents exceeded current or proposed Federal or New York State drinking-water standards; these were: color (1 sample), pH (2 samples), sodium (5 samples), nitrate plus nitrite (2 samples), aluminum (3 samples), iron (1 sample), manganese (7 samples), radon-222 (11 samples), and bacteria (1 sample). Dissolved-oxygen concentrations in samples from wells finished in sand and gravel [median 5.4 milligrams per liter (mg/L)] were greater than those from wells finished in bedrock (median 0.4 mg/L). The pH of all samples was typically neutral or slightly basic (median 7.6); the median water temperature was 9.7 deg C. The ions with the highest concentrations were bicarbonate (median 123 mg/L) and calcium (median 33.9 mg/L). Ground water in the basin is generally soft to moderately hard (less than or equal to 120 mg/L as CaCO3) (median hardness 110 mg/L as CaCO3). Concentrations of

  8. The Bayes Inference Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, K.M.; Cunningham, G.S.

    1996-04-01

    The authors are developing a computer application, called the Bayes Inference Engine, to provide the means to make inferences about models of physical reality within a Bayesian framework. The construction of complex nonlinear models is achieved by a fully object-oriented design. The models are represented by a data-flow diagram that may be manipulated by the analyst through a graphical programming environment. Maximum a posteriori solutions are achieved using a general, gradient-based optimization algorithm. The application incorporates a new technique of estimating and visualizing the uncertainties in specific aspects of the model.

  9. The vertical structure of the circulation and dynamics in Hudson Shelf Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, Steven J.; Butman, Bradford; Harris, Courtney K.

    2014-01-01

    Hudson Shelf Valley is a 20–30 m deep, 5–10 km wide v-shaped submarine valley that extends across the Middle Atlantic Bight continental shelf. The valley provides a conduit for cross-shelf exchange via along-valley currents of 0.5 m s−1 or more. Current profile, pressure, and density observations collected during the winter of 1999–2000 are used to examine the vertical structure and dynamics of the flow. Near-bottom along-valley currents having times scales of a few days are driven by cross-shelf pressure gradients setup by wind stresses, with eastward (westward) winds driving onshore (offshore) flow within the valley. The along-valley momentum balance in the bottom boundary layer is predominantly between the pressure gradient and bottom stress because the valley bathymetry limits current veering. Above the bottom boundary layer, the flow veers toward an along-shelf (cross-valley) orientation and a geostrophic balance with some contribution from the wind stress (surface Ekman layer). The vertical structure and strength of the along-valley current depends on the magnitude and direction of the wind stress. During offshore flows driven by westward winds, the near-bottom stratification within the valley increases resulting in a thinner bottom boundary layer and weaker offshore currents. Conversely, during onshore flows driven by eastward winds the near-bottom stratification decreases resulting in a thicker bottom boundary layer and stronger onshore currents. Consequently, for wind stress magnitudes exceeding 0.1 N m−2, onshore along-valley transport associated with eastward wind stress exceeds the offshore transport associated with westward wind stress of the same magnitude.

  10. Dissolved platinum in rainwater, river water and seawater around Tokyo Bay and Otsuchi Bay in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashio, Asami Suzuki; Obata, Hajime; Tazoe, Hirofumi; Tsutsumi, Makoto; Ferrer i Santos, Antoni; Gamo, Toshitaka

    2016-10-01

    Platinum, among the rarest elements in the earth's crust, is now widely used in various products such as catalytic converters in automobiles and anticancer drugs. Consequently, the concentration of Pt in urban aquatic environments might be increasing. However, little is known about the distributions and geochemical cycles of Pt in aquatic environments because its overall concentration remains low. In this study, we examined dissolved Pt in river water and seawater around Tokyo Bay and Otsuchi Bay (Iwate Prefecture, Japan) and rainwater in the Tokyo area. To determine sub-picomolar levels of dissolved Pt, we used isotope-dilution Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) after column preconcentration with an anion exchange resin. We observed seasonal variation in the dissolved Pt concentrations in Tokyo rainwater in 2002; higher concentrations were found from January to March, which might be related to the pH of rainwaters. At the source of the Arakawa River in the greater Tokyo area, the dissolved Pt concentration was found to be similar to that in rainwater. Further downstream, the dissolved Pt concentration increased sharply, which seemingly reflects the anthropogenic input of Pt into the river. In a rural area in Japan (Otsuchi Bay), the dissolved Pt concentrations were lower than in Tokyo Bay. In this area, a sharp increase in dissolved Pt concentrations was observed in a high salinity region. Contrasting Pt distribution patterns between urban and rural areas indicate that strong anthropogenic Pt sources exist in urban estuaries and that geochemical processes within estuaries affect the Pt distribution.

  11. Environmental and Sanitary Conditions of Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fistarol, Giovana O.; Coutinho, Felipe H.; Moreira, Ana Paula B.; Venas, Tainá; Cánovas, Alba; de Paula, Sérgio E. M.; Coutinho, Ricardo; de Moura, Rodrigo L.; Valentin, Jean Louis; Tenenbaum, Denise R.; Paranhos, Rodolfo; do Valle, Rogério de A. B.; Vicente, Ana Carolina P.; Amado Filho, Gilberto M.; Pereira, Renato Crespo; Kruger, Ricardo; Rezende, Carlos E.; Thompson, Cristiane C.; Salomon, Paulo S.; Thompson, Fabiano L.

    2015-01-01

    Guanabara Bay is the second largest bay in the coast of Brazil, with an area of 384 km2. In its surroundings live circa 16 million inhabitants, out of which 6 million live in Rio de Janeiro city, one of the largest cities of the country, and the host of the 2016 Olympic Games. Anthropogenic interference in Guanabara Bay area started early in the XVI century, but environmental impacts escalated from 1930, when this region underwent an industrialization process. Herein we present an overview of the current environmental and sanitary conditions of Guanabara Bay, a consequence of all these decades of impacts. We will focus on microbial communities, how they may affect higher trophic levels of the aquatic community and also human health. The anthropogenic impacts in the bay are flagged by heavy eutrophication and by the emergence of pathogenic microorganisms that are either carried by domestic and/or hospital waste (e.g., virus, KPC-producing bacteria, and fecal coliforms), or that proliferate in such conditions (e.g., vibrios). Antibiotic resistance genes are commonly found in metagenomes of Guanabara Bay planktonic microorganisms. Furthermore, eutrophication results in recurrent algal blooms, with signs of a shift toward flagellated, mixotrophic groups, including several potentially harmful species. A recent large-scale fish kill episode, and a long trend decrease in fish stocks also reflects the bay’s degraded water quality. Although pollution of Guanabara Bay is not a recent problem, the hosting of the 2016 Olympic Games propelled the government to launch a series of plans to restore the bay’s water quality. If all plans are fully implemented, the restoration of Guanabara Bay and its shores may be one of the best legacies of the Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro. PMID:26635734

  12. Environmental and sanitary conditions of Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovana De Oliveira Fistarol

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Guanabara Bay is the second largest bay in the coast of Brazil, with an area of 384 km2. In its surroundings live circa 16 million inhabitants, out of which 6 million live in Rio de Janeiro city, one of the largest cities of the country, and the host of the 2016 Olympic Games. Anthropogenic interference in Guanabara Bay area started early in the XVI century, but environmental impacts escalated from 1930, when this region underwent an industrialization process. Herein we present an overview of the current environmental and sanitary conditions of Guanabara Bay, a consequence of all these decades of impacts. We will focus on microbial communities, how they may affect higher trophic levels of the aquatic community and also human health. The anthropogenic impacts in the bay are flagged by heavy eutrophication and by the emergence of pathogenic microorganisms that are either carried by domestic and/or hospital waste (e.g. virus, KPC-producing bacteria, and fecal coliforms, or that proliferate in such conditions (e.g. vibrios. Antibiotic resistance genes are commonly found in metagenomes of Guanabara Bay planktonic microorganisms. Furthermore, eutrophication results in recurrent algal blooms, with signs of a shift towards flagellated, mixotrophic groups, including several potentially harmful species. A recent large-scale fish kill episode, and a long trend decrease in fish stocks also reflects the bay’s degraded water quality. Although pollution of Guanabara Bay is not a recent problem, the hosting of the 2016 Olympic Games propelled the government to launch a series plans to restore the bay’s water quality. If all plans are fully implemented, the restoration of Guanabara Bay and its shores may be one of the best legacies of the Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro.

  13. Interpretación de algunas cárices (Carex L.) de la Flora Anglica de W. Hudson y tipificación de tres nombres relacionados

    OpenAIRE

    Molina González, Ana María; Acedo, Carmen; Llamas García, Félix

    2007-01-01

    Se discute la identidad de once especies y seis taxones infraespecíficos del género Carex tratados por Hudson en la Flora Anglica. Se estudia la obra de este autor, comparándola con los protólogos de Linneo y otros botánicos contemporáneos y se indica en cada caso el nombre en uso actual. Cinco especies, que Hudson llamó Carex acuta, C. brizoides, C. inflata en el sentido de la segunda edición , C. muricata y C. saxatilis, corresponden a taxones sin describir en aquel momento y actualmente s...

  14. Bayes Multiple Decision Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Wensong

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of simultaneously making many (M) binary decisions based on one realization of a random data matrix X. M is typically large and X will usually have M rows associated with each of the M decisions to make, but for each row the data may be low dimensional. A Bayesian decision-theoretic approach for this problem is implemented with the overall loss function being a cost-weighted linear combination of Type I and Type II loss functions. The class of loss functions considered allows for the use of the false discovery rate (FDR), false nondiscovery rate (FNR), and missed discovery rate (MDR) in assessing the decision. Through this Bayesian paradigm, the Bayes multiple decision function (BMDF) is derived and an efficient algorithm to obtain the optimal Bayes action is described. In contrast to many works in the literature where the rows of the matrix X are assumed to be stochastically independent, we allow in this paper a dependent data structure with the associations obtained through...

  15. 75 FR 29891 - Special Local Regulation; Maggie Fischer Memorial Great South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... Swim, Great South Bay, NY, in the Federal Register (74 FR 32428). We did not receive any comments or... published at 74 FR 32428 on July 8, 2009, is adopted as a final rule with the following changes: PART 100... South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY:...

  16. Near-Field Receiving Water Monitoring of Trace Metals and a Benthic Community Near the Palo Alto Regional Water Quality Control Plant in South San Francisco Bay, California: 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    private contractor familiar with the taxonomy of San Francisco Bay invertebrates (Susan McCormick, Colfax, CA) (Appendix H). S. McCormick also...0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Unid. Isopoda 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.6667 1.15 0 0 0 0 Unid. Nudibranchia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

  17. Chesapeake Bay: Introduction to an Ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    The Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in the contiguous United States. The Bay and its tidal tributaries make up the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. This document, which focuses of various aspects of this ecosystem, is divided into four major parts. The first part traces the geologic history of the Bay, describes the overall physical structure of…

  18. Subsurface structure of the East Bay Plain ground-water basin: San Francisco Bay to the Hayward fault, Alameda County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catchings, R.D.; Borchers, J.W.; Goldman, M.R.; Gandhok, G.; Ponce, D.A.; Steedman, C.E.

    2006-01-01

    The area of California between the San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, Santa Clara Valley, and the Diablo Ranges (East Bay Hills), commonly referred to as the 'East Bay', contains the East Bay Plain and Niles Cone ground-water basins. The area has a population of 1.46 million (2003 US Census), largely distributed among several cities, including Alameda, Berkeley, Fremont, Hayward, Newark, Oakland, San Leandro, San Lorenzo, and Union City. Major known tectonic structures in the East Bay area include the Hayward Fault and the Diablo Range to the east and a relatively deep sedimentary basin known as the San Leandro Basin beneath the eastern part of the bay. Known active faults, such as the Hayward, Calaveras, and San Andreas pose significant earthquake hazards to the region, and these and related faults also affect ground-water flow in the San Francisco Bay area. Because most of the valley comprising the San Francisco Bay area is covered by Holocene alluvium or water at the surface, our knowledge of the existence and locations of such faults, their potential hazards, and their effects on ground-water flow within the alluvial basins is incomplete. To better understand the subsurface stratigraphy and structures and their effects on ground-water and earthquake hazards, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the East Bay Municipal Utility District (EBMUD), acquired a series of high-resolution seismic reflection and refraction profiles across the East Bay Plain near San Leandro in June 2002. In this report, we present results of the seismic imaging investigations, with emphasis on ground water.

  19. Bayes multiple decision functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wensong; Peña, Edsel A

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of simultaneously making many (M) binary decisions based on one realization of a random data matrix X. M is typically large and X will usually have M rows associated with each of the M decisions to make, but for each row the data may be low dimensional. Such problems arise in many practical areas such as the biological and medical sciences, where the available dataset is from microarrays or other high-throughput technology and with the goal being to decide which among of many genes are relevant with respect to some phenotype of interest; in the engineering and reliability sciences; in astronomy; in education; and in business. A Bayesian decision-theoretic approach to this problem is implemented with the overall loss function being a cost-weighted linear combination of Type I and Type II loss functions. The class of loss functions considered allows for use of the false discovery rate (FDR), false nondiscovery rate (FNR), and missed discovery rate (MDR) in assessing the quality of decision. Through this Bayesian paradigm, the Bayes multiple decision function (BMDF) is derived and an efficient algorithm to obtain the optimal Bayes action is described. In contrast to many works in the literature where the rows of the matrix X are assumed to be stochastically independent, we allow a dependent data structure with the associations obtained through a class of frailty-induced Archimedean copulas. In particular, non-Gaussian dependent data structure, which is typical with failure-time data, can be entertained. The numerical implementation of the determination of the Bayes optimal action is facilitated through sequential Monte Carlo techniques. The theory developed could also be extended to the problem of multiple hypotheses testing, multiple classification and prediction, and high-dimensional variable selection. The proposed procedure is illustrated for the simple versus simple hypotheses setting and for the composite hypotheses setting

  20. Island Bay Wilderness study area : Island Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a brief report on a wilderness study area located in the Island Bay National Wildlife Refuge. It discusses the history of the study area, its...

  1. Spatial and temporal variations in silver contamination and toxicity in San Francisco Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegal, A R; Brown, C L; Squire, S; Ross, J R M; Scelfo, G M; Hibdon, S

    2007-09-01

    Although San Francisco Bay has a "Golden Gate", it may be argued that it is the "Silver Estuary". For at one time the Bay was reported to have the highest levels of silver in its sediments and biota, along with the only accurately measured values of silver in solution, of any estuarine system. Since then others have argued that silver contamination is higher elsewhere (e.g., New York Bight, Florida Bay, Galveston Bay) in a peculiar form of pollution machismo, while silver contamination has measurably declined in sediments, biota, and surface waters of the Bay over the past two to three decades. Documentation of those systemic temporal declines has been possible because of long-term, ongoing monitoring programs, using rigorous trace metal clean sampling and analytical techniques, of the United States Geological Survey and San Francisco Bay Regional Monitoring Program that are summarized in this report. However, recent toxicity studies with macro-invertebrates in the Bay have indicated that silver may still be adversely affecting the health of the estuarine system, and other studies have indicated that silver concentrations in the Bay may be increasing due to new industrial inputs and/or the diagenetic remobilization of silver from historically contaminated sediments being re-exposed to overlying surface waters and benthos. Consequently, the Bay may not be ready to relinquish its title as the "Silver Estuary".

  2. Spatial and temporal variations in silver contamination and toxicity in San Francisco Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegal, A.R.; Brown, C.L.; Squire, S.; Ross, J.R.M.; Scelfo, G.M.; Hibdon, S.

    2007-01-01

    Although San Francisco Bay has a "Golden Gate", it may be argued that it is the "Silver Estuary". For at one time the Bay was reported to have the highest levels of silver in its sediments and biota, along with the only accurately measured values of silver in solution, of any estuarine system. Since then others have argued that silver contamination is higher elsewhere (e.g., New York Bight, Florida Bay, Galveston Bay) in a peculiar form of pollution machismo, while silver contamination has measurably declined in sediments, biota, and surface waters of the Bay over the past two to three decades. Documentation of those systemic temporal declines has been possible because of long-term, ongoing monitoring programs, using rigorous trace metal clean sampling and analytical techniques, of the United States Geological Survey and San Francisco Bay Regional Monitoring Program that are summarized in this report. However, recent toxicity studies with macro-invertebrates in the Bay have indicated that silver may still be adversely affecting the health of the estuarine system, and other studies have indicated that silver concentrations in the Bay may be increasing due to new industrial inputs and/or the diagenetic remobilization of silver from historically contaminated sediments being re-exposed to overlying surface waters and benthos. Consequently, the Bay may not be ready to relinquish its title as the "Silver Estuary". ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Polychlorinated biphenyl source attribution in Green Bay, Wisconsin, USA, using multivariate similarity among congener profiles in sediment samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacela, Dave; Beltman, Douglas J; Lipton, Joshua

    2002-08-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congener concentrations measured in 1,189 sediment samples from Green Bay (MI/WI, USA), Lake Michigan (MI/WI, USA), and the Fox River (WI, USA) were analyzed statistically to evaluate whether PCB congener profiles in outer Green Bay are more similar to those observed in inner Green Bay or Lake Michigan. Similarities among PCB profiles were assessed with complementary multivariate analysis techniques: Principal component analysis (PCA), cluster analysis, and classification trees. The PCA indicated that profiles in outer Green Bay are distinct from those of inner Green Bay or Lake Michigan but are more similar to those of inner Green Bay. The outer bay profiles are dissimilar to profiles that would result from a simple process of mixing contaminated sediments from the inner bay with Lake Michigan sediments and, therefore, support the conclusion that contaminants in outer Green Bay come from discharges of the Fox River. Several classification trees based on small sets of congener proportions defined simple rules that consistently distinguished the regional profiles. Application of these rules to classify the outer bay samples suggests that the profiles of less than 7% of outer bay samples are similar to Lake Michigan profiles. These results are interpreted with respect to physical transport and chemical weathering processes that may account for the observed differences.

  4. The biology of the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gauns, M.

    This article focusses on the variability in physics and chemistry of the region and investigate its influence on the biology. This article is largely based on the recent observations made during the India JGOFS and BOBPS (Bay of Bengal Process Study...

  5. Sub-littoral meiobenthos of the northeastern Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rodrigues, C.L.; Harkantra, S.N.; Parulekar, A.H.

    super(3)m/2 (median = 31.45 x 10 super(3)) Distribution was contagious with varied fauna in the nearshore region On the basis of metabolic index, the food requirement of the benthic community (macro+meio) in the Bay of Bengal was found to be lower than...

  6. Trans-Hudson Orogen of North America and Himalaya-Karakoram-Tibetan Orogen of Asia: Structural and thermal characteristics of the lower and upper plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Onge, Marc R.; Searle, Michael P.; Wodicka, Natasha

    2006-08-01

    The Trans-Hudson Orogen (THO) of North America and the Himalaya-Karakoram-Tibetan Orogen (HKTO) of Asia preserve a Paleoproterozoic and Cenozoic record, respectively, of continent-continent collision that is notably similar in scale, duration and character. In THO, the tectonothermal evolution of the lower plate involves (1) early thin-skinned thrusting and Barrovian metamorphism, (2) out-of-sequence thrusting and high-T metamorphism, and (3) fluid-localized reequilibration, anatexis, and leucogranite formation. The crustal evolution of the Indian lower plate in HKTO involves (1) early subduction of continental crust to ultrahigh pressure (UHP) eclogite depths, (2) regional Barrovian metamorphism, and (3) widespread high-T metamorphism, anatexis, and leucogranite formation. The shallow depths of the high-T metamorphism in HKTO are consistent with early to mid-Miocene ductile flow of an Indian lower plate midcrustal channel, from beneath the southern Tibetan Plateau to the Greater Himalaya. Melt weakening of the lower plate in THO is not observed at a similar scale probably due to the paucity of pelitic lithologies. Tectonothermal events in the upper plate of both orogens include precollisional accretion of crustal blocks, emplacement of Andean-type plutonic suites, and high-T metamorphism. Syncollisional to postcollisional events include emplacement of garnet-biotite-muscovite leucogranites, anatectic granites, and sporadic metamorphism (up to 90 Myr following the onset of collision in THO). Comparing the type and duration of tectonothermal events for THO and HKTO supports the notion of tectonic uniformitarianism for at least the later half of dated Earth history and highlights the complementary nature of the rock record in an older "exhumed" orogen compared to one undergoing present-day orogenesis.

  7. Can we predict the frequency of cyclones over Bay of Bengal during October-December?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sadhuram, Y.

    Forecasting cyclone activity in Australian (Nicholls, 1984; 1992) and southern Pacific (Revell and Goulter, 1986) regions with SO (Southern Oscillation) and the influence of El-Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on Bay of Bengal cyclones (Felton et al...

  8. Multichannel Seismic Reflection Data - SCAR - Prydz Bay - 1984-1985, SDLS CD-ROM vol 21

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are stacked multichannel marine seismic reflection data recorded during 1984-85 in the Prydz Bay region, Antarctica, by the Japan National Oil...

  9. Final Environmental Statement : Acquisition of lands for the San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge California

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Federal Government proposes to acquire approximately 23,000 acres of land in the South San Francisco Bay region, Alameda, San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties, to...

  10. Multichannel Seismic Reflection - SCAR- Prydz Bay 1980 SDLS CD-ROM vol 8

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are stacked multichannel marine seismic reflection data recorded during 1980 in the Prydz Bay region, by Australian Geological Survey Organization. The...

  11. Building sustainable communities using sense of place indicators in three Hudson River Valley, NY, tourism destinations: An application of the limits of acceptable change process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura E. Sullivan; Rudy M. Schuster; Diane M. Kuehn; Cheryl S. Doble; Duarte. Morais

    2010-01-01

    This study explores whether measures of residents' sense of place can act as indicators in the Limits of Acceptable Change (LAC) process to facilitate tourism planning and management. Data on community attributes valued by residents and the associated values and meanings were collected through focus groups with 27 residents in three Hudson River Valley, New York,...

  12. Computer simulation model for the striped bass young-of-the-year population in the Hudson River. [Effects of entrainment and impingement at power plants on population dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eraslan, A.H.; Van Winkle, W.; Sharp, R.D.; Christensen, S.W.; Goodyear, C.P.; Rush, R.M.; Fulkerson, W.

    1975-09-01

    This report presents a daily transient (tidal-averaged), longitudinally one-dimensional (cross-section-averaged) computer simulation model for the assessment of the entrainment and impingement impacts of power plant operations on young-of-the-year populations of the striped bass, Morone saxatilis, in the Hudson River.

  13. Lavaca Bay 1985-1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Samples were collected from October 15, 1985 through June 12, 1987 in emergent marsh and non-vegetated habitats throughout the Lavaca Bay system to characterize...

  14. Annual report, Bristol Bay, 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Commercial fishery management activities for Bristol Bay for 1958, including lists of operators, extensive statistics, and descriptions of enforcement activities.

  15. FL BAY SPECTROUT-DIET

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Juvenile spotted seatrout and other sportfish are being monitored annually over a 6-mo period in Florida Bay to assess their abundance over time relative to...

  16. CHWAKA BAY MANGROVE SEDIMENTS, ZANZIBAR

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohammed-Studies on Benthic denitrification in the Chwaka bay mangrove. Extensive mangrove ... In this case, six sediment cores were taken randomly from the three study sites as above and a ..... Academic Press. Orlando. pp. 277-293.

  17. Annual report, Bristol Bay, 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Commercial fishery management activities for Bristol Bay for 1955, including lists of operators, extensive statistics, descriptions of enforcement activities, and...

  18. Back Bay Wilderness area description

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a description of the lands located within the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. Within these lands, it designates which area is suitable for...

  19. 区域物流企业数字化管理研究——以浙江省杭州湾经济区为例%Study on Digitalized Management of Regional Logistics Enterprises: Illustrated with the Case of Hangzhou Bay Economic Zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘虹

    2012-01-01

    网络技术、计算机技术的迅猛发展促使人类社会进入数字化时代,从而也对企业的管理模式产生了深刻的影响.数字化管理成为物流企业提升竞争力的必然抉择.浙江杭州湾经济区物流企业既具有良好的数字化基础和条件,但也面临条块化分割、发育迟缓等制约因素.实现区域物流企业的数字化战略以及管理模式升级,是当前杭州湾经济区物流企业亟待解决的问题.%Nowadays, digitalized management has become an inevitable choice in improving the competitiveness of logistics enterprises. Logistics enterprises from Hanghzou Bay economic zone generally have good foundation and necessary conditions for digitalization but are also constrained by factors such as segmentation and retarded development. Realizing the digital strategy of the regional logistics enterprises and upgrading their management mode are key matters awaiting solution for Hanghzou Bay economic zone.

  20. Spatiotemporal appraisal of TBT contamination and imposex along a tropical bay (Todos os Santos Bay, Brazil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artifon, Vanda; Castro, Ítalo Braga; Fillmann, Gilberto

    2016-08-01

    A spatiotemporal evaluation of butyltin contamination was performed between 2010 and 2012 along Todos os Santos Bay (Northeast Brazil) using surface sediments, bivalve tissues (Anomalocardia brasiliana and Mytella guyanensis), and imposex occurrence (Stramonita rustica). The spatial study detected high tributyltin (TBT) levels (maximum values of 262 ng Sn g (-1) - 21,833 ng Sn g(-1) of total organic carbon - for surface sediments and 421 ng Sn g(-1) for bivalve tissues) in the innermost part of the bay. The TBT levels detected in M. guyanensis tissues might cause human health risk since local population consumes these organisms. These high concentrations observed in the bivalves might result in ingestions higher than the safe limits established by European Food Safety Authority (250 ng TBT kg(-1) day(-1)). Considering the temporal evaluation, no difference (p > 0.05) was observed between TBT concentrations in sediments obtained during the two sampling campaigns (2010/2011 and 2012). However, the increasing predominance of TBT metabolites (butyltin degradation index (BDI) >1) in more recent sediments indicates further degradation of old TBT inputs. In spite of that, recent inputs are still evident at this region. Nevertheless, a reduction of imposex parameters in S. rustica over the last decade suggests an overall decline in the TBT contamination, at least in the outermost and possible less impacted region of the bay. The TBT contamination is probably reducing due to the national and international legislative restrictions on the use of TBT as antifouling biocide. The contamination levels, however, are still relevant especially in the inner part of Todos os Santos Bay since they are above those that are likely to cause toxicity to the biota.

  1. Genetic structure in populations of an ancient woodland sedge, carex sylvatica Hudson, at a regional and local scale.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arens, P.F.P.; Bijlsma, R.J.; Westende, van 't W.P.C.; Os, van B.; Smulders, M.J.M.; Vosman, B.J.

    2005-01-01

    Wood sedge (Carex sylvatica) is a well-known ancient woodland species with a long-term persistent seed bank and a caespitose growth habit. All thirteen isolated Carex sylvatica populations in the Dutch Rhine floodplain (including the river branches Waal and IJssel) were mapped in detail and analysed

  2. Genetic structure in populations of an ancient woodland sedge, Carex sylvatica Hudson, at a regional and local scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arens, P; Bijlsma, R-J; van't Westende, W; van Os, B; Smulders, M J M; Vosman, B

    2005-07-01

    Wood sedge (Carex sylvatica) is a well-known ancient woodland species with a long-term persistent seed bank and a caespitose growth habit. All thirteen isolated Carex sylvatica populations in the Dutch Rhine floodplain (including the river branches Waal and IJssel) were mapped in detail and analysed for genetic variation at a large number of AFLP loci and one microsatellite locus. Across all populations, only 40 % of the sampled individuals (n=216) represented a unique genotype. A high number of the studied patches (spatial clusters of tussocks, 2-10 m in diameter) within populations contained only one or a few genotypes. Identical plants (tussocks) were also found 20-500 m apart and in one case even 1000 m apart. Observed heterozygosity levels (H(O)=0.029) were low, indicating low levels of gene flow, which is in agreement with the selfing nature of other caespitose sedges. Although the number of genotypes in populations is low, these genotypes are genetically very distinct and variation within populations accounted for 55% of the total variation. The absence of a correlation between genetic and geographic distances among populations, and the scattered distribution of genotypes among patches within woodlands, support our hypothesis of rare establishments and subsequent local dispersal within woodlands in this forest floor species, which may benefit from and partly depend on human land use and forest management activities.

  3. A model for the geomorphology of the Carolina Bays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Geometrical analysis of the Carolina Bays using Google Earth in combination with LiDAR data makes it possible to postulate that the bays formed as the result of impacts, rather than from eolian and lacustrine processes. The Carolina Bays are elliptical conic sections with width-to-length ratios averaging 0.58 that are radially oriented toward the Great Lakes region. The radial distribution of ejecta is one characteristic of impacts, and the width-to-length ratios of the ellipses correspond to cones inclined at approximately 35°, which is consistent with ballistic trajectories from the point of convergence. These observations, and the fact that these geomorphological features occur only on unconsolidated soil close to the water table, make it plausible to propose that the Carolina Bays are the remodeled remains of oblique conical craters formed on ground liquefied by the seismic shock waves of secondary impacts of glacier ice boulders ejected by an extraterrestrial impact on the Laurentide Ice Sheet. Mathematical analysis using ballistic equations and scaling laws relating yield energy to crater size provide clues about the magnitude of the extraterrestrial event. An experimental model elucidates the remodeling mechanisms and provides an explanation for the morphology and the diverse dates of the bays.

  4. Dynamic modeling of Tampa Bay urban development using parallel computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, G.; Crane, M.; Steinwand, D.

    2005-01-01

    Urban land use and land cover has changed significantly in the environs of Tampa Bay, Florida, over the past 50 years. Extensive urbanization has created substantial change to the region's landscape and ecosystems. This paper uses a dynamic urban-growth model, SLEUTH, which applies six geospatial data themes (slope, land use, exclusion, urban extent, transportation, hillside), to study the process of urbanization and associated land use and land cover change in the Tampa Bay area. To reduce processing time and complete the modeling process within an acceptable period, the model is recoded and ported to a Beowulf cluster. The parallel-processing computer system accomplishes the massive amount of computation the modeling simulation requires. SLEUTH calibration process for the Tampa Bay urban growth simulation spends only 10 h CPU time. The model predicts future land use/cover change trends for Tampa Bay from 1992 to 2025. Urban extent is predicted to double in the Tampa Bay watershed between 1992 and 2025. Results show an upward trend of urbanization at the expense of a decline of 58% and 80% in agriculture and forested lands, respectively. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Groundwater quality in the Lower Hudson River Basin, New York, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nystrom, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    Water samples were collected from 32 production and domestic wells in the study area from August through November 2008 to characterize the groundwater quality. The study area, which covers 5,607 square miles, encompasses the part of the Lower Hudson River Basin that lies within New York plus the parts of the Housatonic, Hackensack, Bronx, and Saugatuck River Basins that are in New York. The study area is underlain by mainly clastic bedrock, predominantly shale, with carbonate and crystalline rock present locally. The bedrock is generally overlain by till, but surficial deposits of saturated sand and gravel are present in some areas. Of the 32 wells sampled, 16 were finished in sand and gravel deposits and 16 were finished in bedrock. The samples were collected and processed by standard U.S. Geological Survey procedures and were analyzed for 225 physiochemical properties and constituents, including major ions, nutrients, trace elements, radon-222, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs); indicator bacteria were collected and analyzed by New York State Department of Health procedures. Water quality in the study area is generally good, but concentrations of some constituents exceeded current or proposed Federal or New York State primary or secondary drinking-water standards; the standards exceeded were color (2 samples), pH (6 samples), sodium (8 samples), fluoride (1 sample), aluminum (3 samples), arsenic (1 sample), iron (7 samples), manganese (14 samples), radon-222 (17 samples), tetrachloroethene (1 sample), and bacteria (7 samples). The pH of all samples was typically neutral or slightly basic (median 7.2); the median water temperature was 11.8 degrees C. The ions with the highest concentrations were bicarbonate [median 167 milligrams per liter (mg/L)] and calcium (median 38.2 mg/L). Groundwater in the study area ranged from very soft to very hard, but more samples were classified as very hard (181 mg/L as CaCO3 or more) than soft (60 mg/L as CaCO3 or

  6. Dreamers in dialogue: evolution, sex and gender in the utopian visions of William Morris and William Henry Hudson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Novák

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to explore the parallels between two late-nineteenth-century utopias,William Henry Hudsons A Crystal Age (1882 and William Morriss News from Nowhere (1891. Itaims to explore how these two works respond to the transition from a kinetic to a static conception ofutopia that under pressure from evolutionary and feminist discourses took place during the period.Particular focus lies on the way in which this is negotiated through the depiction of evolution, sexuality,and gender roles in the respective novels, and how the depiction of these disruptive elements may workas a means of ensuring the readers active engagement in political, intellectual and emotional terms.

  7. Groundwater quality in the Chemung River, Eastern Lake Ontario, and Lower Hudson River Basins, New York, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Tia-Marie; Nystrom, Elizabeth A.; Reddy, James E.

    2015-11-10

    In a study conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, water samples were collected from 4 production wells and 4 domestic wells in the Chemung River Basin, 8 production wells and 7 domestic wells in the Eastern Lake Ontario Basin, and 12 production wells and 13 domestic wells in the Lower Hudson River Basin (south of the Federal Lock and Dam at Troy) in New York. All samples were collected in June, July, and August 2013 to characterize groundwater quality in these basins. The samples were collected and processed using standard USGS procedures and were analyzed for 148 physiochemical properties and constituents, including dissolved gases, major ions, nutrients, trace elements, pesticides, volatile organic compounds, radionuclides, and indicator bacteria.

  8. Immersion in a Hudson Valley Tidal Marsh and Climate Research Community - Lamont-Doherty's Secondary School Field Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peteet, D. M.; Newton, R.; Vincent, S.; Sambrotto, R.; Bostick, B. C.; Schlosser, P.; Corbett, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    A primary advantage of place-based research is the multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary research that can be applied to a single locale, with a depth of continued study through time. Through the last decade, Lamont-Doherty's Secondary School Field Research Program (SSFRP) has promoted scientific inquiry, mostly among groups under-represented in STEM fields, in Piermont Marsh, a federally protected marsh in the Hudson estuary. At the same time, Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO) scientists have become more involved, through mentoring by researchers, postdocs and graduate students, often paired with high school teachers. The sustained engagement of high school students in a natural environment, experiencing the Hudson River and its tidal cycles, protection of coastline, water quality improvement, native and invasive plant communities, is fundamental to their understanding of the importance of wetlands with their many ecosystem services. In addition, the Program has come to see "place" as inclusive of the Observatory itself. The students' work at Lamont expands their understanding of educational opportunities and career possibilities. Immersing students in a research atmosphere brings a level of serious inquiry and study to their lives and provides them with concrete contributions that they make to team efforts. Students select existing projects ranging from water quality to Phragmites removal, read papers weekly, take field measurements, produce lab results, and present their research at the end of six weeks. Ongoing results build from year to year in studies of fish populations, nutrients, and carbon sequestration, and the students have presented at professional scientific meetings. Through the Program students gain a sense of ownership over both their natural and the academic environments. Challenges include sustained funding of the program; segmenting the research for reproducible, robust results; fitting the projects to PIs' research goals, time

  9. Bayes and empirical Bayes estimators of abundance and density from spatial capture-recapture data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorazio, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    In capture-recapture and mark-resight surveys, movements of individuals both within and between sampling periods can alter the susceptibility of individuals to detection over the region of sampling. In these circumstances spatially explicit capture-recapture (SECR) models, which incorporate the observed locations of individuals, allow population density and abundance to be estimated while accounting for differences in detectability of individuals. In this paper I propose two Bayesian SECR models, one for the analysis of recaptures observed in trapping arrays and another for the analysis of recaptures observed in area searches. In formulating these models I used distinct submodels to specify the distribution of individual home-range centers and the observable recaptures associated with these individuals. This separation of ecological and observational processes allowed me to derive a formal connection between Bayes and empirical Bayes estimators of population abundance that has not been established previously. I showed that this connection applies to every Poisson point-process model of SECR data and provides theoretical support for a previously proposed estimator of abundance based on recaptures in trapping arrays. To illustrate results of both classical and Bayesian methods of analysis, I compared Bayes and empirical Bayes esimates of abundance and density using recaptures from simulated and real populations of animals. Real populations included two iconic datasets: recaptures of tigers detected in camera-trap surveys and recaptures of lizards detected in area-search surveys. In the datasets I analyzed, classical and Bayesian methods provided similar - and often identical - inferences, which is not surprising given the sample sizes and the noninformative priors used in the analyses.

  10. Oceanographic Data from Winter and Spring Circulation and Sediment Transport Studies in the Hudson Shelf Valley collected in December-April (1999/2000) and April-June 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted field experiments to understand the transport of sediments and associated contaminants in the Hudson Shelf Valley,...

  11. Temperature, salinity, and C14 profiles from bottle casts in the North Atlantic, Arctic, and other locations from the HUDSON, YMER (1980), and other platforms from 22 February 1973 to 19 September 1991 (NODC Accession 0000446)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bottle and other data were collected in the the North Atlantic, Arctic, and other locations from the HUDSON, YMER (1980), and other platforms from 22 February 1973...

  12. Microstructure, CTD and ADCP data collected from R/V ONRUST in Hudson River Estuary during 6 short cruises from 1994-05-19 to 2001-05-01 (NCEI Accession 0146260)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Observations of turbulent mixing, stratification and currents in the Hudson River Estuary made in 6 short cruises in 1994/1995 and 2001 were assembled. The lower...

  13. Oceanographic Data from Winter and Spring Circulation and Sediment Transport Studies in the Hudson Shelf Valley collected in December-April (1999/2000) and April-June 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted field experiments to understand the transport of sediments and associated contaminants in the Hudson Shelf Valley,...

  14. Oceanographic profile data collected from sound velocimeter casts aboard NAVIGATION RESPONSE TEAM 5 as part of project S-B916-NRT5-10 in the Hudson River on 2010-11-26 (NCEI Accession 0130785)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0130785 includes physical and profile data collected aboard the NAVIGATION RESPONSE TEAM 5 during project S-B916-NRT5-10 in the Hudson River near...

  15. 75 FR 36292 - Safety Zone; Bay Swim III, Presque Isle Bay, Erie, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-25

    ... of Presque Isle Bay, Lake Erie, near Erie, Pennsylvania between 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. on June 26, 2010.... The safety zone will encompass specified waters of Presque Isle Bay, Erie, Pennsylvania starting at... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Bay Swim III, Presque Isle Bay, Erie, PA...

  16. 77 FR 18739 - Safety Zone; Bay Swim V, Presque Isle Bay, Erie, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-28

    ... the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Bay Swim V, Presque Isle Bay, Erie, PA... is intended to restrict vessels from a portion of the Presque Island Bay during the Bay Swim...

  17. 77 FR 35860 - Safety Zone; Bay Swim V, Presque Isle Bay, Erie, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ..., Erie, PA in the Federal Register (77 FR 18739). We received no letters commenting on the proposed rule... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Bay Swim V, Presque Isle Bay, Erie, PA... restrict vessels from a portion of the Presque Island Bay during the Bay Swim V swimming event. The...

  18. 78 FR 34575 - Safety Zone; Bay Swim VI, Presque Isle Bay, Erie, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-10

    ... FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking TFR Temporary Final Rule A. Regulatory History... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Bay Swim VI, Presque Isle Bay, Erie, PA... portion of Presque Isle bay during the Bay Swim VI swimming event. This temporary safety zone is...

  19. SF Bay Water Quality Improvement Fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPAs grant program to protect and restore San Francisco Bay. The San Francisco Bay Water Quality Improvement Fund (SFBWQIF) has invested in 58 projects along with 70 partners contributing to restore wetlands, water quality, and reduce polluted runoff.,

  20. Bayes linear statistics, theory & methods

    CERN Document Server

    Goldstein, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Bayesian methods combine information available from data with any prior information available from expert knowledge. The Bayes linear approach follows this path, offering a quantitative structure for expressing beliefs, and systematic methods for adjusting these beliefs, given observational data. The methodology differs from the full Bayesian methodology in that it establishes simpler approaches to belief specification and analysis based around expectation judgements. Bayes Linear Statistics presents an authoritative account of this approach, explaining the foundations, theory, methodology, and practicalities of this important field. The text provides a thorough coverage of Bayes linear analysis, from the development of the basic language to the collection of algebraic results needed for efficient implementation, with detailed practical examples. The book covers:The importance of partial prior specifications for complex problems where it is difficult to supply a meaningful full prior probability specification...

  1. Deciphering the Paleoproterozoic cooling history of the northeastern Trans-Hudson Orogen, Baffin Island (Canada), using 40Ar/39Ar step-heating and UV laser thermochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipton, D. R.; Schneider, D. A.; Kellett, D. A.; Joyce, N. L.

    2017-07-01

    The previously unstudied cooling and exhumation history of mid-crustal rocks exposed on southeastern Baffin Island (Canada) provides new insights into the post-orogenic evolution of the Paleoproterozoic Trans-Hudson Orogen (THO). New 40Ar/39Ar step-heat analyses of biotite, muscovite and phlogopite and core-to-rim intra-grain 40Ar/39Ar analyses of muscovite have a range of apparent ages compatible with slow regional cooling following peak metamorphism. Twenty-nine amphibolite- to granulite-facies rocks were dated using the 40Ar/39Ar step-heating laser (CO2) method. 40Ar/39Ar spot analyses were performed across muscovite grains from three samples using an ultraviolet (UV) laser to investigate intra-grain 40Ar/39Ar age variations. Step-heating apparent ages range from ca. 1788-1622 Ma for biotite, 1720-1630 Ma for phlogopite and 1729-1657 Ma for muscovite. UV spot 40Ar/39Ar analyses in the three muscovite grains range from ca. 1661-1640 Ma, 1675-1645 Ma and 1680-1652 Ma, with core-to-rim apparent age gradients of 20-30 Myr. Previous studies resolved peak metamorphism in this region to between ca. 1860 and 1820 Ma and identified late- to post-THO zircon and monazite populations at ca. 1800-1750 Ma. Numerical diffusion models for Ar in muscovite were conducted to test different Proterozoic cooling and exhumation scenarios. Comparisons with our 40Ar/39Ar ages attest to cooling rates of 1-2 °C/Myr following peak metamorphism and 1.5-2.5 °C/Myr after ca. 1740 Ma. Anomalously old apparent 40Ar/39Ar ages, in cases equivalent to U-Pb zircon rim and monazite ages, likely result from incorporation of excess Ar. The results suggest that mid-crustal rocks on southeastern Baffin Island remained hotter than 420-450 °C for 150-200 Myr after peak metamorphism, with subsequent slow cooling and denudation rates that are typical of Proterozoic orogens. The apparent absence of orogenic collapse implies that, despite high temperatures and estimated maximum crustal thicknesses

  2. 33 CFR 165.1122 - San Diego Bay, Mission Bay and their Approaches-Regulated navigation area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Diego Bay, Mission Bay and... Coast Guard District § 165.1122 San Diego Bay, Mission Bay and their Approaches—Regulated navigation... waters of San Diego Bay, Mission Bay, and their approaches encompassed by a line commencing at Point La...

  3. Annual and interannual variations of sea-level anomaly in the Bay of Bengal and the Andaman Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Annual and interannual variations of sea-level anomaly (SLA) in the Bay of Bengal and the Andaman Sea are investigated using altimeter-derived SLA data from 1993 to 2003. It is found that the SLA annual variation in the study area can be divided into three phases with distinctive patterns. During the southwest monsoon (May-September), positive SLA presents in the equatorial region and extends northward along the eastern boundary of the bay, and the SLA distribution in the interior bay appears to be high in the east and low in the west with two cyclonic cells developing in the north and south of the western bay respectively, between which an anticyclonic cell exists. During the early northeast monsoon (October-December), the whole bay is dominated by a large cyclonic cell with the pattern of high SLA in the east and low in the west still retained, and the SLA distribution outside the bay is changed in response to the reversal of the Indian Monsoon Current (IMC) in November. During the late northeast monsoon (January-April), a large anticyclonic cell of SLA develops in the bay with negative SLA prevailing in the equatorial region and extending northward along the eastern boundary of bay. Therefore, the SLA distribution in the interior bay reverses to be high in the west and low in the east. It is suggested that the SLA annual variation in the bay is primarily driven by the local wind stress curl, involving Sverdrup balance while the abrupt SLA variation during the peak of northeast monsoon may be partly caused by the semiannual fluctuation of wind in the equatorial region. This fast adjustment in the interior bay is induced by the upwelling coastal Kelvin wave excited by the decay of Wyrtki jet during December through January. Besides the annual variation, in the bay, there are obvious SLA fluctuations with the periods of 2 and 3~7 a, which are driven by the interannual variability of large-scale wind field in the equatorial region. The coastal Kelvin wave also

  4. Estimation of Extreme Marine Hydrodynamic Variables in Western Laizhou Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Yanchen; QIAO Lulu; XU Jishang; ZHOU Chunyan; DING Dong; BI Wei

    2015-01-01

    Laizhou Bay and its adjacent waters are of great importance to China's marine oil and gas development. It is therefore crucial to estimate return-period values of marine environmental variables in this region to ensure the safety and success of maritime engineering and maritime exploration. In this study, we used numerical simulations to estimate extreme wave height, sea current velocity and sea-level height in western Laizhou Bay. The results show that the sea-level rise starts at the mouth of the bay, increases toward west/southwest, and reaches its maximum in the deepest basin of the bay. The 100-year return-period values of sea level rise can reach 3.4–4.0m in the western bay. The elevation of the western part of the Qingdong Oil Field would remain above the sea surface during extreme low sea level, while the rest of the oil field would be 1.6–2.4m below the sea surface. The return-period value of wave height is strongly affected by water depth; in fact, its spatial distribution is similar to the isobath's. The 100-year return-period values of effective wave height can be 6m or higher in the central bay and be more than 1 m in the shallow water near shore. The 100-year return-period values of current velocity is about 1.2–1.8ms-1 in the Qingdong Oil Field. These results provide scientific basis for ensuring construction safety and reducing construction cost.

  5. 33 CFR 117.622 - West Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false West Bay 117.622 Section 117.622 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.622 West Bay The draw of the West Bay Bridge, mile...

  6. Bayes' postulate for trinomial trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, M. A.; Polpo, A.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we discuss Bayes' postulate and its interpretation. We extend the binomial trial method proposed by de Finetti [1] to trinomial trials, for which we argue that the consideration of equiprobability a priori for the possible outcomes of the trinomial trials implies that the parameter vector has Dirichlet(1,1) as prior. Based on this result, we agree with Stigler [2] in that the notion in Bayes' postulate stating "absolutely know nothing" is related to the possible outcomes of an experiment and not to "non-information" about the parameter.

  7. Numerical Simulation of Pollutant Transport and Accumulation Areas in the Hangzhou Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ning; MAO Zhihua; ZHANG Qinghe

    2009-01-01

    Based on the COHERENS model (a coupled hydrodynamic ecological model for regional and shelf seas), a numerical hydrodynamic model of the Hangzhou Bay, influenced by tide, regional winds and freshwater from the Yangtze River and the Qiantangjiang River was established. The Lagrangian particle tracking was simulated to provide tracer trajectories. For convenience, the modeling area was divided into 8 subdomains and the modeling focused on March (dry season) and July (wet season). Numerical simulation and analysis indicate that the tracer trajectories originated in different subdomains are quite different. Most particles released in the mouth of the bay move outside the bay quickly and reach the farthest place at 122.5°E; while particles released in the inner part of the bay mostly remain in the same subdomain, with only minor migrations in two opposite directions along the shore. The tracer experiments also indicate that the northwest region of the bay is an area where pollutant can easily accumulate in both wet and dry seasons, and that the southeast region of the bay is another area for pollutant to accumulate in dry season because it is the main path for the contaminant.

  8. Benthic habitat classification in Lignumvitae Key Basin, Florida Bay, using the U.S. Geological Survey Along-Track Reef Imaging System (ATRIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, C.D.; Zawada, D.G.; Thompson, P.R.; Reynolds, C.E.; Spear, A.H.; Umberger, D.K.; Poore, R.Z.

    2011-01-01

    The Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) funded in partnership between the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, South Florida Water Management District, and other Federal, local and Tribal members has in its mandate a guideline to protect and restore freshwater flows to coastal environments to pre-1940s conditions (CERP, 1999). Historic salinity data are sparse for Florida Bay, so it is difficult for water managers to decide what the correct quantity, quality, timing, and distribution of freshwater are to maintain a healthy and productive estuarine ecosystem. Proxy records of seasurface temperature (SST) and salinity have proven useful in south Florida. Trace-element chemistry on foraminifera and molluscan shells preserved in shallow-water sediments has provided some information on historical salinity and temperature variability in coastal settings, but little information is available for areas within the main part of Florida Bay (Brewster-Wingard and others, 1996). Geochemistry of coral skeletons can be used to develop subannually resolved proxy records for SST and salinity. Previous studies suggest corals, specifically Solenastrea bournoni, present in the lower section of Florida Bay near Lignumvitae Key, may be suitable for developing records of SST and salinity for the past century, but the distribution and species composition of the bay coral community have not been well documented (Hudson and others, 1989; Swart and others, 1999). Oddly, S. bournoni thrives in the study area because it can grow on a sandy substratum and can tolerate highly turbid water. Solenastrea bournoni coral heads in this area should be ideally located to provide a record (~100-150 years) of past temperature and salinity variations in Florida Bay. The goal of this study was to utilize the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Along-Track Reef Imaging System (ATRIS) capability to further our understanding of the abundance, distribution, and size of corals in the Lignumvitae Key Basin. The

  9. Cetacean Community Ecology in the Waters of Sri Lanka and the Bay of Bengal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    water (e.g., Bay of Bengal), by evaporation and low river runoff (e.g., Arabian Sea), as well as coastal currents, eddy activity, and large-scale...Bay of Bengal. What little research has been done in the region has focused on the river dolphins and near- shore porpoises (e.g., Smith et al. 2008...area in the central Bay of Bengal and the waters of Sri Lanka, including ASIRI cruise transects and mooring lines. Light yellow lines indicate national EEZs. 5

  10. Comparison of the optical properties of dissolved organic matter in two river-influenced coastal regions of the Canadian Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retamal, Leira; Vincent, Warwick F.; Martineau, Christine; Osburn, Christopher L.

    2007-03-01

    The optical characteristics of coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM) were analyzed in the Great Whale River and adjacent Hudson Bay (55° N, 77° W) in the eastern Canadian Low Arctic, and in the Mackenzie River and adjacent Beaufort Sea in the western Canadian High Arctic (70° N, 133° W). Sampling was during ice-free open water conditions. Both rivers contained high concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (3 and 6 mg DOC l -1 in the Great Whale River and Mackenzie River, respectively) and CDOM ( a320 of 11 and 14 m -1), resulting in a substantial load of organic matter to their coastal seas. There were pronounced differences in the CDOM characteristics of the two rivers, notably in their synchronous fluorescence scans (SFS). The latter showed that the Mackenzie River was depleted in humic materials, implying a more mature catchment relative to the younger, more recently glaciated Great Whale River system. SFS spectra had a similar shape across the freshwater-saltwater transition zone of the Great Whale plume, and DOC was linearly related to salinity implying conservative mixing and no loss by flocculation or biological processes across the salt front. In contrast, there were major differences in SFS spectral shape from the Mackenzie River to the freshwater-influenced coastal ocean, with a marked decrease in the relative importance of fulvic and humic acid materials. The SFS spectra for the coastal Beaufort Sea in September-October strongly resembled those recorded for the Mackenzie River during the high discharge, CDOM-rich, snowmelt period in June, but with some loss of autochthonous materials. These results are consistent with differences in freshwater residence time between the Mackenzie River and Great Whale River coastal ocean systems. Models of arctic continental shelf responses to present and future climate regimes will need to consider these striking regional differences in the organic matter content, biogeochemistry and optics between waters from

  11. Coastal Acidification as Nutrients Over Enrichment Impact: A Case Study in Ambon Bay, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idha Yulia Ikhsani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Ambon Bay is a silled bay on Ambon Island consisting of two regions, Inner Ambon Bay (IAB and Outer Ambon Bay (OAB that are separated by shallow sill. Ambon bay and its surrounding have economically important ecosystem since the utilization for many activities. The bay is affected by anthropogenic impacts associated with urbanization, climate change, and nutrients over enrichment. The “deep water-rich nutrients” from Banda Sea that enter the bay during Southeast monsoon also contribute to this enrichment as well as the nutrients transport from the land. The high concentration of nutrients increases carbon dioxide level and promotes acidifications. There are literatures about nutrients over enrichment in Ambon Bay, however, little is known about coastal acidification as nutrients over enrichment impact. In order to study the effect of nutrients distribution on the acidity of Ambon Bay, the researchers measured pH and concentrations of nutrients {nitrate + nitrite (N+N and Soluble Reactive Phosphate (SRP} from water samples collected in 7 stations on both IAB and OAB during Southeast monsoon. The results showed that in surface water, nutrients concentrations is increased from May to June due to the “deep water flushing” occurrence on May and increased precipitations from May to June. From July to August, the nutrients concentrations on surface layer decreased, due to the decreased precipitations. In column and bottom water, the nutrients concentrations were increased from May to August. While the acidity have reverse pattern from the nutrients, when nutrient concentrations increased the acidity was decreased. From correlation test, pH was not significantly correlated with the concentrations of nutrients on surface water, but showed significantly correlated on column and bottom water. The results indicated that the distribution of nutrients on column and bottom water might be an important environmental factor affecting the acidification of

  12. Selective analysis of power plant operation on the Hudson River with emphasis on the Bowline Point Generating Station. Volume 1. [Effects on striped bass population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnthouse, L. W.; Cannon, J. B.; Christensen, S. G.

    1977-07-01

    A comprehensive study of the effects of power plant operation on the Hudson River was conducted. The study included thermal, biological, and air quality effects of existing and planned electrical generating stations. This section on thermal impacts presents a comprehensive mathematical modeling and computer simulation study of the effects of heat rejection from the plants. The overall study consisted of three major parts: near-field analysis; far-field analysis; and zone-matched near-field/far-field analysis. Near-field analyses were completed for Roseton, Danskammer, and Bowline Point Generating Stations, and near-field dilution ratios range from a low of about 2 for Bowline Point and 3 for Roseton to a maximum of 6 for both plants. The far-field analysis included a critical review of existing studies and a parametric review of operating plants. The maximum thermal load case, based on hypothetical 1974 river conditions, gives the daily maximum cross-section-averaged and 2-mile-segment-averaged water temperatures as 83.80/sup 0/F in the vicinity of the Indian Point Station and 83.25/sup 0/F in the vicinity of the Bowline Station. This maximum case will be significantly modified if cooling towers are used at certain units. A full analysis and discussion of these cases is presented. A study of the Hudson River striped bass population is divided into the following eight subsections: distribution of striped bass eggs, larvae, and juveniles in the Hudson River; entrainment mortality factor; intake factor; impingement; effects of discharges; compensation; model estimates of percent reduction; and Hudson River striped bass stock.

  13. Comprehensive computerized diabetes registry. Serving the Cree of Eeyou Istchee (eastern James Bay).

    OpenAIRE

    Dannenbaum, D.; Verronneau, M.; Torrie, J.; Smeja, H.; Robinson, E; Dumont, C.; Kovitch, I.; Webster, T.

    1999-01-01

    PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED: Diabetes is rapidly evolving as a major health concern in the Cree population of eastern James Bay (Eeyou Istchee). The Cree Board of Health and Social Services of James Bay (CBHSSJB) diabetes registry was the initial phase in the development of a comprehensive program for diabetes in this region. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM: The CBHSSJB diabetes registry was developed to provide a framework to track the prevalence of diabetes and the progression of diabetic complications. T...

  14. Free-living marine nematodes from San Antonio Bay (Río Negro, Argentina)

    OpenAIRE

    Villares, Gabriela; Lo Russo, Virginia; Pastor de Ward, Catalina; Milano, Viviana; Miyashiro, Lidia; Mazzanti, Renato

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The dataset of free-living marine nematodes of San Antonio Bay is based on sediment samples collected in February 2009 during doctoral theses funded by CONICET grants. A total of 36 samples has been taken at three locations in the San Antonio Bay, Santa Cruz Province, Argentina on the coastal littoral at three tidal levels. This presents a unique and important collection for benthic biodiversity assessment of Patagonian nematodes as this area remains one of the least known regions. I...

  15. Backscatter imagery in Jobos Bay

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 1x1 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of Jobos Bay, Puerto Rico (in NAD83 UTM 19 North). The backscatter values are in relative 8-bit (0 –...

  16. Ash storms: impacts of wind-remobilised volcanic ash on rural communities and agriculture following the 1991 Hudson eruption, southern Patagonia, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, T. M.; Cole, J. W.; Stewart, C.; Cronin, S. J.; Johnston, D. M.

    2011-04-01

    Tephra fall from the August 1991 eruption of Volcán Hudson affected some 100,000 km2 of Patagonia and was almost immediately reworked by strong winds, creating billowing clouds of remobilised ash, or `ash storms'. The immediate impacts on agriculture and rural communities were severe, but were then greatly exacerbated by continuing ash storms. This paper describes the findings of a 3-week study tour of the diverse environments of southern Patagonia affected by ash storms, with an emphasis on determining the impacts of repeated ash storms on agriculture and local practices that were developed in an attempt to mitigate these impacts. Ash storms produce similar effects to initial tephra eruptions, prolonged for considerable periods. These have included the burial of farmland under dune deposits, abrasion of vegetation and contamination of feed supplies with fine ash. These impacts can then cause problems for grazing animals such as starvation, severe tooth abrasion, gastrointestinal problems, corneal abrasion and blindness, and exhaustion if sheep fleeces become laden with ash. In addition, ash storms have led to exacerbated soil erosion, human health impacts, increased cleanup requirements, sedimentation in irrigation canals, and disruption of aviation and land transport. Ash deposits were naturally stabilised most rapidly in areas with high rainfall (>1,500 mm/year) through compaction and enhanced vegetation growth. Stabilisation was slowest in windy, semi-arid regions. Destruction of vegetation and suppression of regrowth by heavy tephra fall (>100 mm) hindered the stabilisation of deposits for years, and reduced the surface friction which increased wind erosivity. Stabilisation of tephra deposits was improved by intensive tillage, use of windbreaks and where there was dense and taller vegetative cover. Long-term drought and the impracticality of mixing ash deposits with soil by tillage on large farms was a barrier to stabilising deposits and, in turn

  17. Variabilidad espacial y temporal en la hidrografía invernal del sistema de bahías frente a la VIII región (Chile centro-sur Spatial and temporal variability of winter hydrography in the bay system off the VIII region (central-south Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PATRICIA FAÚNDEZ-BÁEZ

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available En la zona centro-sur de Chile (VIII región existe un sistema de bahías (~ 36°30'-37° S, que incluye las bahías de Concepción (BC, San Vicente (BSV y Coronel en el sector oriental del Golfo de Arauco (SOGA, conocido como un importante centro de desove y reclutamiento de especies de peces durante el período invernal. En el presente estudio se analizó la variabilidad hidrográfica (temperatura, salinidad y estratificación, en la dimensión espacial (dentro y entre bahías y temporal (entre años de muestreo, así como su relación con las condiciones meteorológicas (viento y precipitaciones y aporte fluvial (caudal de ríos, durante el período invernal (julio-agosto entre 1993 y 1996. A nivel superficial (1 m y estrato 1-10 m las tres bahías mostraron heterogeneidad espacial en las distribuciones de temperatura y salinidad, especialmente entre las zonas del saco y la boca. A este nivel, además, los menores valores de temperatura y salinidad ocurrieron generalmente en SOGA, la que además presentó una mayor estratificación por efecto de la presencia de aguas de mayor dilución (The central-south area of Chile (VIII region presents a system of bays (~36°30'-37º S, including the bays of Concepcion (BC, San Vicente (BSV and Coronel in the eastern boundary of the Gulf of Arauco (SOGA. This system has been recognized as an important center for the spawning and recruitment of fish species during the winter. In the present study the hydrographic variability (temperature, salinity and density, both in space (inside and between the bays and time (between sampling years, during the winter period (July-August between 1993 and 1996, was analyzed. As well, its relationship to the meteorological conditions (wind and rainfall and fluvial contribution (river discharge was explored. At the surface level (1 m and 1-10 m depth stratum, the three bays showed spatial heterogeneity in temperature and salinity distributions, especially between the inner

  18. Hydrodynamic Aspects at Vitória Bay Mouth, ES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FLÁVIA A.A. GARONCE

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Understading the hydrodynamic behavior and suspended particulated matter (SPM transport are of great importance in port regions such as Vitória Harbor, which is located at Vitória Bay, Vitória – ES, Brazil. Vitória Bay is an estuary that has not been systematically assessed through a temporal analysis in order to identify its hydrodynamics characteristics and SPM exchange. This study aims to investigate salt and suspended particulate matter flux at the estuarine mouth of Vitória Bay by understanding the temporal variation of salinity, temperature and tidal currents within the water column and at the channel crosssection. Results showed that the estuarine mouth tended to present partial stratification periods during neap tides and little stratification in spring tides. The circulation pattern was mainly influenced by the tide, with little influence from river discharge. With regard to the SPM, the mouth of the estuary tended to show low concentrations, with the highest values occurring during the dry season. A close relationship between momentary discharge, SPM and salt fluxes was observed. Despite all the data was collected at the mouth of the estuary, the system showed an importation trend of salt in all cycles and SPM importation for three of the four studied tidal cycles. Thus, Vitoria Bay is not exporting SPM to the adjacent inner shelf.

  19. Empirical Bayes Model Comparisons for Differential Methylation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxiang Teng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of empirical Bayes models (each with different statistical distribution assumptions have now been developed to analyze differential DNA methylation using high-density oligonucleotide tiling arrays. However, it remains unclear which model performs best. For example, for analysis of differentially methylated regions for conservative and functional sequence characteristics (e.g., enrichment of transcription factor-binding sites (TFBSs, the sensitivity of such analyses, using various empirical Bayes models, remains unclear. In this paper, five empirical Bayes models were constructed, based on either a gamma distribution or a log-normal distribution, for the identification of differential methylated loci and their cell division—(1, 3, and 5 and drug-treatment-(cisplatin dependent methylation patterns. While differential methylation patterns generated by log-normal models were enriched with numerous TFBSs, we observed almost no TFBS-enriched sequences using gamma assumption models. Statistical and biological results suggest log-normal, rather than gamma, empirical Bayes model distribution to be a highly accurate and precise method for differential methylation microarray analysis. In addition, we presented one of the log-normal models for differential methylation analysis and tested its reproducibility by simulation study. We believe this research to be the first extensive comparison of statistical modeling for the analysis of differential DNA methylation, an important biological phenomenon that precisely regulates gene transcription.

  20. Local Component Analysis for Nonparametric Bayes Classifier

    CERN Document Server

    Khademi, Mahmoud; safayani, Meharn

    2010-01-01

    The decision boundaries of Bayes classifier are optimal because they lead to maximum probability of correct decision. It means if we knew the prior probabilities and the class-conditional densities, we could design a classifier which gives the lowest probability of error. However, in classification based on nonparametric density estimation methods such as Parzen windows, the decision regions depend on the choice of parameters such as window width. Moreover, these methods suffer from curse of dimensionality of the feature space and small sample size problem which severely restricts their practical applications. In this paper, we address these problems by introducing a novel dimension reduction and classification method based on local component analysis. In this method, by adopting an iterative cross-validation algorithm, we simultaneously estimate the optimal transformation matrices (for dimension reduction) and classifier parameters based on local information. The proposed method can classify the data with co...

  1. bayesPop: Probabilistic Population Projections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Ševčíková

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe bayesPop, an R package for producing probabilistic population projections for all countries. This uses probabilistic projections of total fertility and life expectancy generated by Bayesian hierarchical models. It produces a sample from the joint posterior predictive distribution of future age- and sex-specific population counts, fertility rates and mortality rates, as well as future numbers of births and deaths. It provides graphical ways of summarizing this information, including trajectory plots and various kinds of probabilistic population pyramids. An expression language is introduced which allows the user to produce the predictive distribution of a wide variety of derived population quantities, such as the median age or the old age dependency ratio. The package produces aggregated projections for sets of countries, such as UN regions or trading blocs. The methodology has been used by the United Nations to produce their most recent official population projections for all countries, published in the World Population Prospects.

  2. Subsurface ammonium maxima in northern Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Satyanarayana, D.; Sahu, S.D.; Panigrahy, P.K.; Sarma, V.V.; Suguna, C.

    of Oceanography, Regional Centre, 52, Kirlampudi Layout, Visakhapatnam 530 023, India (Received 13 February 1990; revised version received 25 October 1990; accepted 23 November 1990) ABSTRACT Chemical oceanographic data collected on RV Gaveshani cruises 181...-borne 'Autosal' with a precision of +_0.003 x 10 -3 RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Chemical oceanographic data collected in the Bay of Bengal during March-April, 1987 showed an interesting pattern of ammonium distri- bution. The water column is divided into three...

  3. Impact of Bay-Breeze Circulations on Surface Air Quality and Boundary Layer Export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughner, Christopher P.; Tzortziou, Maria; Follette-Cook, Melanie; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Goldberg, Daniel; Satam, Chinmay; Weinheimer, Andrew; Crawford, James H.; Knapp, David J.; Montzka, Denise D.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Meteorological and air-quality model simulations are analyzed alongside observations to investigate the role of the Chesapeake Bay breeze on surface air quality, pollutant transport, and boundary layer venting. A case study was conducted to understand why a particular day was the only one during an 11-day ship-based field campaign on which surface ozone was not elevated in concentration over the Chesapeake Bay relative to the closest upwind site and why high ozone concentrations were observed aloft by in situ aircraft observations. Results show that southerly winds during the overnight and early-morning hours prevented the advection of air pollutants from the Washington, D.C., and Baltimore, Maryland, metropolitan areas over the surface waters of the bay. A strong and prolonged bay breeze developed during the late morning and early afternoon along the western coastline of the bay. The strength and duration of the bay breeze allowed pollutants to converge, resulting in high concentrations locally near the bay-breeze front within the Baltimore metropolitan area, where they were then lofted to the top of the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Near the top of the PBL, these pollutants were horizontally advected to a region with lower PBL heights, resulting in pollution transport out of the boundary layer and into the free troposphere. This elevated layer of air pollution aloft was transported downwind into New England by early the following morning where it likely mixed down to the surface, affecting air quality as the boundary layer grew.

  4. Loss of Arctic sea ice causing punctuated change in sightings of killer whales (Orcinus orca) over the past century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higdon, Jeff W; Ferguson, Steven H

    2009-07-01

    Killer whales (Orcinus orca) are major predators that may reshape marine ecosystems via top-down forcing. Climate change models predict major reductions in sea ice with the subsequent expectation for readjustments of species' distribution and abundance. Here, we measure changes in killer whale distribution in the Hudson Bay region with decreasing sea ice as an example of global readjustments occurring with climate change. We summarize records of killer whales in Hudson Bay, Hudson Strait, and Foxe Basin in the eastern Canadian Arctic and relate them to an historical sea ice data set while accounting for spatial and temporal autocorrelation in the data. We find evidence for "choke points," where sea ice inhibits killer whale movement, thereby creating restrictions to their Arctic distribution. We hypothesize that a threshold exists in seasonal sea ice concentration within these choke points that results in pulses in advancements in distribution of an ice-avoiding predator. Hudson Strait appears to have been a significant sea ice choke point that opened up .approximately 50 years ago allowing for an initial punctuated appearance of killer whales followed by a gradual advancing distribution within the entire Hudson Bay region. Killer whale sightings have increased exponentially and are now reported in the Hudson Bay region every summer. We predict that other choke points will soon open up with continued sea ice melt producing punctuated predator-prey trophic cascades across the Arctic.

  5. Seasonal variation of the upwelling trap in the Todos Santos Bay, Baja California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calva, M. A.; Perez-Brunius, P.; Lopez, M.; Candela, J.; García, E.

    2013-05-01

    Todos Santos Bay is located on the Pacific coast of Baja California, a region characterized by coastal upwelling throughout the year, being more intense in spring and summer. Aquaculture activities are expanding in the bay, so it is important to understand the processes that modulate the water temperature and stratification, given that these in turn affect biological productivity. This work presents an analysis of the seasonal variation of the temperature of the bay and adjacent regions, with satellite data and CTD casts made in quarterly cruises between 2008-2012. It has been observed that, on average, the surface temperature in the bay is warmer than outside, suggesting that upwelled waters that enter the bay are trapped a sufficiently long time to be heated by solar radiation, hence the name upwelling trap. During upwelling events that drive cold waters to the surface in the regions adjacent to the bay, satellite images show that the surface temperature inside the bay can be 4-5 °C higher than the surrounding area. This thermal front is strongest in summer when solar radiation is greater. We have studied the vertical structure of the lens of warm water with CTD data, which shows that its depth does not exceed 10 m and the temperature is 3 to 4 °C warmer than the water below. Preliminary results on the processes involved in the formation and evolution of the upwelling trap at synoptic to monthly scales will be presented, based on the analysis of sea surface temperature images, winds, and currents in the northwestern entrance of the bay.

  6. Microbial diversity in restored wetlands of San Francisco Bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theroux, Susanna [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Hartman, Wyatt [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; He, Shaomei [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Tringe, Susannah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.

    2013-12-09

    Wetland ecosystems may serve as either a source or a sink for atmospheric carbon and greenhouse gases. This delicate carbon balance is influenced by the activity of belowground microbial communities that return carbon dioxide and methane to the atmosphere. Wetland restoration efforts in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region may help to reverse land subsidence and possibly increase carbon storage in soils. However, the effects of wetland restoration on microbial communities, which mediate soil metabolic activity and carbon cycling, are poorly studied. In an effort to better understand the underlying factors which shape the balance of carbon flux in wetland soils, we targeted the microbial communities in a suite of restored and historic wetlands in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region. Using DNA and RNA sequencing, coupled with greenhouse gas monitoring, we profiled the diversity and metabolic potential of the wetland soil microbial communities along biogeochemical and wetland age gradients. Our results show relationships among geochemical gradients, availability of electron acceptors, and microbial community composition. Our study provides the first genomic glimpse into microbial populations in natural and restored wetlands of the San Francisco Bay-Delta region and provides a valuable benchmark for future studies.

  7. 75 FR 38714 - Safety Zone; Macy's Fourth of July Fireworks Display, Hudson River, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-06

    ... fireworks display. Based on accidents that have occurred in other Captain of the Port zones, and the... the Regional Small Business Regulatory Fairness Boards. The Ombudsman evaluates these actions annually...

  8. Evaluating Bay Area Methane Emission Inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Marc [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Jeong, Seongeun [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    As a regulatory agency, evaluating and improving estimates of methane (CH4) emissions from the San Francisco Bay Area is an area of interest to the Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD). Currently, regional, state, and federal agencies generally estimate methane emissions using bottom-up inventory methods that rely on a combination of activity data, emission factors, biogeochemical models and other information. Recent atmospheric top-down measurement estimates of methane emissions for the US as a whole (e.g., Miller et al., 2013) and in California (e.g., Jeong et al., 2013; Peischl et al., 2013) have shown inventories underestimate total methane emissions by ~ 50% in many areas of California, including the SF Bay Area (Fairley and Fischer, 2015). The goal of this research is to provide information to help improve methane emission estimates for the San Francisco Bay Area. The research effort builds upon our previous work that produced methane emission maps for each of the major source sectors as part of the California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Measurement (CALGEM) project (http://calgem.lbl.gov/prior_emission.html; Jeong et al., 2012; Jeong et al., 2013; Jeong et al., 2014). Working with BAAQMD, we evaluate the existing inventory in light of recently published literature and revise the CALGEM CH4 emission maps to provide better specificity for BAAQMD. We also suggest further research that will improve emission estimates. To accomplish the goals, we reviewed the current BAAQMD inventory, and compared its method with those from the state inventory from the California Air Resources Board (CARB), the CALGEM inventory, and recent published literature. We also updated activity data (e.g., livestock statistics) to reflect recent changes and to better represent spatial information. Then, we produced spatially explicit CH4 emission estimates on the 1-km modeling grid used by BAAQMD. We present the detailed activity data, methods and derived emission maps by sector

  9. Effects of recreational flow releases on natural resources of the Indian and Hudson Rivers in the Central Adirondack Mountains, New York, 2004-06

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldigo, Barry P.; Mulvihill, C.I.; Ernst, A.G.; Boisvert, B.A.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC), and Cornell University carried out a cooperative 2-year study from the fall of 2004 through the fall of 2006 to characterize the potential effects of recreational-flow releases from Lake Abanakee on natural resources in the Indian and Hudson Rivers. Researchers gathered baseline information on hydrology, temperature, habitat, nearshore wetlands, and macroinvertebrate and fish communities and assessed the behavior and thermoregulation of stocked brown trout in study reaches from both rivers and from a control river. The effects of recreational-flow releases (releases) were assessed by comparing data from affected reaches with data from the same reaches during nonrelease days, control reaches in a nearby run-of-the-river system (the Cedar River), and one reach in the Hudson River upstream from the confluence with the Indian River. A streamgage downstream from Lake Abanakee transmitted data by satellite from November 2004 to November 2006; these data were used as the basis for developing a rating curve that was used to estimate discharges for the study period. River habitat at most study reaches was delineated by using Global Positioning System and ArcMap software on a handheld computer, and wetlands were mapped by ground-based measurements of length, width, and areal density. River temperature in the Indian and Hudson Rivers was monitored continuously at eight sites during June through September of 2005 and 2006; temperature was mapped in 2005 by remote imaging made possible through collaboration with the Rochester Institute of Technology. Fish communities at all study reaches were surveyed and characterized through quantitative, nearshore electrofishing surveys. Macroinvertebrate communities in all study reaches were sampled using the traveling-kick method and characterized using standard indices. Radio telemetry was used to track the movement and persistence of

  10. Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Activity of the Essential Oils Obtained from Mentha longifolia L. Hudson, Dryed by Three Different Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Stanisavljević

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The way of drying the fresh herbal material influences the chemical content and the biological activities of their essential oils. The influence of the different drying methods of the herb Mentha longifolia (L. Hudson on the antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of the extracted essential oils has been analyzed in this study. Drying has been carried out in three ways: in the natural way, in the laboratory oven (45°C and in the absorptional low-temperature condensational drier (35°C. The antioxidant activity of the essential oil has been estimated by FRAP and DPPH assays, while the antimicrobial activity has been estimated by the diffusible and micro-delusional method, testing on the nine types of bacteria and two types of fungi. The essential oil obtained from the herb dried in the natural way has shown the highest antioxidant activity and the lowest from the herb dried in the laboratory oven. Bacillus subtilis , Micrococcus luteus and Enterococcus faecalis have shown the highest sensitivity on the three samples. The oil obtained from the herb dried in the absorptional low-temperature drier has shown the strongest antimicrobial effect.

  11. Isolation of a flavonoid, apigenin 7-O-glucoside, from Mentha longifolia (L.) Hudson subspecies longifolia and its genotoxic potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulluce, Medine; Orhan, Furkan; Yanmis, Derya; Arasoglu, Tulin; Guvenalp, Zuhal; Demirezer, Lutfiye Omur

    2015-09-01

    Mentha is a medicinal and aromatic plant belonging to the Lamiaceae family, which is widely used in food, flavor, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. Recently, it has been found that the use of Mentha as a pharmaceutical source is based on its phytochemical constituents that have far been identified as tannins, saponins, phenolic acids and flavonoids. This study was designed to evaluate the mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of apigenin 7-O-glucoside (A7G), a flavonoid isolated from Mentha longifolia (L.) Hudson subspecies longifolia (ML). The possible antimutagenic potential of A7G was examined against mutagens ethyl methanesulfonate and acridine in an eukaryotic cell system Saccharomyces cerevisiae and sodium azide in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535 and 9-aminoacridine in S. typhimurium TA1537. According to our findings, any concentrations of the A7G used did not show mutagenic activity but exerted strong antimutagenic activities at tested concentrations. The inhibition rates for the Ames test ranged from 27.2% (S. typhimurium TA1535: 0.4 μM/plate) to 91.1% (S. typhimurium TA1537: 0.2 μM/plate) and for the yeast deletion assay from 4% to 57.7%. This genotoxicological study suggests that a flavonoid from ML owing to antimutagenic properties is of great pharmacological importance and might be beneficial to industries producing food additives, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals products.

  12. Impact of the Clean Water Act on the levels of toxic metals in urban estuaries: The Hudson River estuary revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanudo-Wilhelmy, S.A.; Gill, G.A.

    1999-10-15

    To establish the impact of the Clean Water Act on the water quality of urban estuaries, dissolved trace metals and phosphate concentrations were determined in surface waters collected along the Hudson River estuary between 1995 and 1997 and compared with samples collected in the mid-1970s by Klinkhammer and Bender. The median concentrations along the estuary have apparently declined 36--56% for Cu, 55--89% for Cd, 53--85% for Ni, and 53--90% for Zn over a period of 23 years. These reductions appear to reflect improvements in controlling discharges from municipal and industrial wastewater treatment plants since the Clean Water Act was enacted in 1972. In contrast, levels of dissolved nutrients (PO{sub 4}) have remained relatively constant during the same period of time, suggesting that wastewater treatment plant improvements in the New York/New Jersey Metropolitan area have not been as effective at reducing nutrient levels within the estuary. While more advanced wastewater treatment could potentially reduce the levels of Ag and PO{sub 4} along the estuary, these improvements would have a more limited effect on the levels of other trace metals.

  13. Seasonal cycles of zooplankton from San Francisco Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambler, Julie W.; Cloern, James E.; Hutchinson, Anne

    1985-01-01

    The two estuarine systems composing San Francisco Bay have distinct zooplankton communities and seasonal population dynamics. In the South Bay, a shallow lagoon-type estuary, the copepods Acartia spp. and Oithona davisae dominate. As in estuaries along the northeast coast of the U.S., there is a seasonal succession involving the replacement of a cold-season Acartia species (A. clausi s.l.) by a warm-season species (A. californiensis), presumably resulting from the differential production and hatching of dormant eggs. Oithona davisae is most abundant during the fall. Copepods of northern San Francisco Bay, a partially-mixed estuary of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Rivers, organize into discrete populations according to salinity distribution: Sinocalanus doerrii (a recently introduced species) at the riverine boundary, Eurytemora affinis in the oligohaline mixing zone, Acartia spp. in polyhaline waters (18–30\\%), and neritic species (e.g., Paracalanus parvus) at the seaward boundary. Sinocalanus doerrii and E. affinis are present year-round. Acartia clausi s.l.is present almost year-round in the northern reach, and A. californiensis occurs only briefly there in summer-fall. The difference in succession of Acartia species between the two regions of San Francisco Bay may reflect differences in the seasonal temperature cycle (the South Bay warms earlier), and the perennial transport of A. clausi s.l. into the northern reach from the seaward boundary by nontidal advection.

  14. Bayes reconstruction of missing teeth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sporring, Jon; Jensen, Katrine Hommelhoff

    2008-01-01

     We propose a method for restoring the surface of tooth crowns in a 3D model of a human denture, so that the pose and anatomical features of the tooth will work well for chewing. This is achieved by including information about the position and anatomy of the other teeth in the mouth. Our system...... contains two major parts: A statistical model of a selection of tooth shapes and a reconstruction of missing data. We use a training set consisting of 3D scans of dental cast models obtained with a laser scanner, and we have build a model of the shape variability of the teeth, their neighbors...... regularization of the log-likelihood estimate based on differential geometrical properties of teeth surfaces, and we show general conditions under which this may be considered a Bayes prior.Finally we use Bayes method to propose the reconstruction of missing data, for e.g. finding the most probable shape...

  15. Probability Theory without Bayes' Rule

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriques, Samuel G.

    2014-01-01

    Within the Kolmogorov theory of probability, Bayes' rule allows one to perform statistical inference by relating conditional probabilities to unconditional probabilities. As we show here, however, there is a continuous set of alternative inference rules that yield the same results, and that may have computational or practical advantages for certain problems. We formulate generalized axioms for probability theory, according to which the reverse conditional probability distribution P(B|A) is no...

  16. Biodiversity inventories and conservation of the marine fishes of Bootless Bay, Papua New Guinea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew Joshua A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effective management and conservation of biodiversity is predicated on clearly defined conservation targets. Species number is frequently used as a metric for conservation prioritization and monitoring changes in ecosystem health. We conducted a series of synoptic surveys focusing on the fishes of the Bootless Bay region of Papua New Guinea to generate a checklist of fishes of the region. Bootless Bay lies directly south of Port Moresby, the capital of Papua New Guinea, and experiences the highest human population density of any marine area in the country. Our checklist will set a baseline against which future environmental changes can be tracked. Results We generated a checklist of 488 fish species in 72 families found in Bootless Bay during a two-week sampling effort. Using incident-based methods of species estimation, we extrapolate there to be approximately 940 fish species in Bootless Bay, one of the lowest reported numbers in Papua New Guinea. Conclusions Our data suggest that the Bootless Bay ecosystem of Papua New Guinea, while diverse in absolute terms, has lower fish biodiversity compared to other shallow marine areas within the country. These differences in faunal diversity are most likely a combination of unequal sampling effort as well as biophysical factors within Bootless Bay compounded by historical and/or contemporary anthropogenic disturbances.

  17. Interactions between finfish aquaculture and lobster catches in a sheltered bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucks, Ronald H; Smith, Ruth E; Fisher, E Brian

    2014-11-15

    Interactions between open-net pen finfish aquaculture and lobster catches in a sheltered bay in Nova Scotia, Canada, were investigated using fishermen's participatory research in annual lobster trap surveys over seven years. Fishermen recorded lobster catches during the last two weeks of May from 2007 to 2013. Catches for each trap haul were recorded separately for ovigerous and market-sized lobsters. Catch trends within the bay were compared to regional trends. Results of correlation analyses indicated that ovigerous catch trends were strongly affected by the fish farm's feeding/fallow periods. There was no significant correlation between trends for bay and LFA lobster landings. Patterns of lobster catch per unit effort extending over considerable distance in Port Mouton Bay appear to be influenced by proximity to the fish farm regardless of year-to-year variation in water temperatures and weather conditions. Odours and habitat changes surrounding open-net pen finfish operations are potential factors affecting lobster displacement.

  18. THREE-DIMENSIONAL NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF TIDES AND CURRENTS IN FUSHAN BAY, QINGDAO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ming-kui; HOU Yi-jun; WEI Ze-xun

    2004-01-01

    The three-dimensional Princeton Ocean Model(POM)was employed to simulate the tide and current simultanuously for the first time in the Fushan Bay,Qingdao,China.By adopting the elevation condition that was combined with the tides M2,S2,K1 and O1 at the open boundary and by choosing the proper value of bottom roughness,the horizontal and vertical distributions of the tidal current and water level variations in the bay were computed.The results agree well with the field observation data,indicating that this model can be used to predict accurately the variation of tides and currents in the Fushan Bay and other costal regions in the future.Our study also provides useful information and a data base for the Olympic Projects that will be conducted in the Fushan Bay in 2008.

  19. Zooplankton Biomass Data from Prince William Sound, Icy Bay and Yakutat Bay, Alaska 2010-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes zooplankton biomass from Prince William Sound, Icy Bay and Yakutat Bay, Alaska. Zooplankton were sampled with a ring net (0.6 m diameter with...

  20. Simulation of Pollutant Transport in Marmaris Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lale BALAS

    2001-01-01

    The circulation pattern and the pollutant transport in the Marmaris Bay are simulated by the developed three-dimensional baroclinic model. The Marmaris Bay is located at the Mediterranean Sea coast of Turkey. Since the sp ring tidal range is typically 20~30 cm, the dominant forcing for the circulation and water exchange is due to the wind action. In the Marmaris Bay, there is sea outfall discharging directly into the bay, and that threats the bay water quality significantly. The current patterns in the vicinity of the outfall have been observed by tracking drogues which are moved by currents at different water depths. In the simulations of pollutant transport, the coliforms-counts is used as the tracer.The model provides realistic predictions for the circulation and pollutant transport in the Marmaris Bay. The transport model component predictions well agree with the results of a laboratory model study.

  1. 33 CFR 80.1114 - San Pedro Bay-Anaheim Bay, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Pedro Bay-Anaheim Bay, CA. 80.1114 Section 80.1114 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1114 San Pedro Bay—Anaheim Bay,...

  2. 78 FR 45061 - Safety Zone; Sister Bay Marina Fest Fireworks and Ski Show, Sister Bay, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Sister Bay Marina Fest Fireworks and Ski... intended to restrict vessels from a portion of Sister Bay due to a fireworks display and ski show. This... with the fireworks display and ski show in Sister Bay on August 31, 2013. DATES: This rule is...

  3. 75 FR 73121 - Bandon Marsh, Nestucca Bay, and Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuges, Coos, Tillamook, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... of Neskowin, Oregon. Neskowin Marsh incorporates unique freshwater wetland and bog habitats and... Fish and Wildlife Service Bandon Marsh, Nestucca Bay, and Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuges, Coos... prepare a comprehensive conservation plan (CCP) for the Bandon Marsh, Nestucca Bay, and Siletz...

  4. 78 FR 39610 - Safety Zone; Big Bay Boom, San Diego Bay; San Diego, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Big Bay Boom, San Diego Bay; San Diego, CA... temporary safety zones upon the navigable waters of the San Diego Bay for the annual Port of San Diego... Sector San Diego, Coast Guard; telephone 619-278-7261, email d11marineeventssd@uscg.mil . If you have...

  5. 78 FR 29289 - Safety Zone; Big Bay Boom, San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-20

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Big Bay Boom, San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA... establish four temporary safety zones upon the navigable waters of San Diego ] Bay for the Port of San Diego... Management, U.S. Coast Guard Sector San Diego; telephone (619) 278-7261, email John.E.Bannon@uscg.mil . If...

  6. Chesapeake Bay subsidence monitored as wetlands loss continues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerem, R. S.; van Dam, T. M.; Schenewerk, M. S.

    Fragile wetland ecosystems, which support an abundance of wildlife, are being lost around the Chesapeake Bay at an alarming rate due to an increase in sea level. For example, one third of the total area of the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge (Figure 1) (approximately 20 km2) was lost between 1938 and 1979 [Leatherman, 1992]. Approximately 4,100 km2 of the perimeter of the Chesapeake Bay are covered by wetlands of which 58% forested wetlands and 28% are salt marshes. It is likely that many factors are responsible for the wetlands loss, some that have global implications, and some that reflect local phenomena.Understanding the mechanisms responsible for wetlands deterioration and loss, however, has been impeded by the lack of adequate data including quantitative monitoring of the types and distribution of flora, Tthe boundaries of specific habitat types, and data on the spatial variations in sea level and land subsidence. This article focuses on the latter problem, which is to determine the relative roles of sea level rise and land subsidence in the region. Over the past four years, a small network of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers have been installed near tide gauges in the Chesapeake Bay to help determine the cause of relative sea level rise in this region. These receivers are just beginning to yield results.

  7. Preliminary study of the antimicrobial activity of Mentha x villosa Hudson essential oil, rotundifolone and its analogues Estudo preliminar da atividade antimicrobiana do óleo essencial de Mentha x villosa Hudson, rotundifolona e seus análogos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thúlio. A. Arruda

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils present antimicrobial activity against a variety of bacteria and yeasts, including species resistant to antibiotics and antifungicals. In this context, this work aims at the evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of Mentha x villosa Hudson ("hortelã da folha miúda", its major component (rotundifolone and four similar analogues of rotundifolone (limonene oxide, pulegone oxide, carvone epoxide and (+-pulegone against strain standards of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, E. coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomona aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Candida albicans ATCC 76645 and one strain of meticilin - resistant Staphylococcus aureus - MRSA (171c from human clinic. The method of the diffusion in plates with solid medium was used. The results showed that the oil of Mentha x villosa, rotundifolone, limonene oxide and (+-pulegone, are similar regarding the antimicrobial activity against the tested strains of S. aureus and C. albicans. All of the products present antimocrobial potential with antibacterial activity for S. aureus ATCC 25923 and antifungal activity for C. albicans ATCC 76645. None of the products presented antimicrobial activity for the strains of E. coli ATCC 25922 and P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853, representatives of the Gram negative bacteria.Os óleos essenciais apresentam atividade antimicrobiana contra uma variedade de bactérias e fungos, incluindo espécies resistentes a antibióticos e antimicóticos. Neste contexto, este trabalho objetiva a avaliação da atividade de antimicrobiana do óleo essencial de Mentha x villosa Hudson (hortelã-da-folha-miúda - seu componente majoritário (rotundifolona e quatro análogos sintéticos da rotundifolona (epóxi-limoneno epóxi-pulegona, epóxi-carvona e (+-pulegona frente a cepas padrão de Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Candida albicans ATCC 76645 e uma cepa de Staphylococcus aureus meticilina - resistente

  8. Comparative study of the hydrochemical regime in the Gelendzhik and Golubaya Bays, northeastern Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyleva, A.; Chasovnikov, V.; Chjoo, V.; Menshikova, N.; Kuprikova, N.

    2009-04-01

    The goal of this work was to study the hydrochemical regime in the coastal waters of the northeastern Black Sea. The observations were performed in influenced by significant anthropogenic stress Gelendzhik Bay and at the open coast region (Golubaya Bay). A sampling program has been initiated by the Southern Branch of Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, RAS, (SB SIO RAS) on a weekly basis at the shore line area of «Chernomorets» beach (Gelendzhik Bay) and from the head of pier in the Golubaya Bay. Studies were carried out during a period from January 2001 to December 2008. List of measured parameters includes following: temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, biological oxygen demand (BOD), pH, alkalinity, phosphate, organic phosphorus, silicates, nitrates, nitrites, ammonia, urea, organic nitrogen, oil products. The Gelendzhik bay in its different parts is characterized with strong variability of concentrations of hydrochemical parameters. Above all, it relates to complex structure caused by wind impact. Parts of the bay filled with nearshore and sea waters are legibly differ from each other. The bay itself is rather isolated from the open sea, and its liability to man's impact leads to forming of next features of its seasonal variability of physical-chemical state: • On the base of Si/P and Si/N ratios analysis it was shown that the Gelendzhik Bay waters are significantly enriched with nitrogen and phosphorus compounds. • Unlike the Golubaya bay, phosphates are always present in the water of the Gelendzhik Bay and development of photosynthesis is not limited with nutrients. It may lead to processes of intensive eutrophication. • The oxygen saturation in the Gelendzhik Bay periodically descend lower than 80% during the summer period. That means, that even the Bay's surface layer formally corresponds to the hypoxic conditions that testify to the degradation of the ecosystem there. The conclusions obtained during our studies testify that the pollution from

  9. Multidisciplinary Investigations of Submarine Flow to Biscayne Bay, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halley, R. B.; Reich, C. D.; Swarzenski, P. W.; Langevin, C. D.

    2005-05-01

    Biscayne Bay and Biscayne National Park (BNP) are located next to the Miami-Dade urban complex and are adjacent to the Dade County South Dade Landfill Facility and the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer South District Plant. The base of the landfill is lined to separate it from the underlying Miami Limestone, the host rock for the surficial Biscayne Aquifer. The sewage-treatment facility injects treated sewage into the lower Florida Aquifer (750 m) that is overlain by an aquitard termed the Middle Confining Unit (450 m). The Biscayne Aquifer (up to 50 m thick) borders the western margin of BNP, and the Floridan Aquifer underlies the entire park. There is concern about leakage of contaminated aquifer water into BNP and its potential effects on water quality. Groundwater flux to Biscayne Bay is being studied using pressure measurements and geochemical analyses from submarine wells, electromagnetic seepage meters, streaming resistivity profiling, and local and regional model simulations. Both seepage meters and water analyses provide point information that can be placed into the regional context provided by flow models and geochemical and geophysical profiling, which, in turn, constrain the groundwater contribution. Water samples were collected approximately quarterly from August 2002 until March 2004 from submarine wells along a transect through Biscayne Bay and across the reef to the shelf edge. Samples were analyzed for conductivity (salinity), dissolved oxygen, temperature, redox potential, nutrients, metals, strontium isotopes, radon, sulfate, and wastewater compounds. Low-salinity water was identified from nearshore wells and indicates seepage from the Biscayne Aquifer and/or surface-water intrusion into the rocks along western Biscayne Bay. Analyses of water samples (n = 109) collected from wells across the Florida shelf show no consistent evidence of wastewater contaminants occurring in groundwater beneath BNP. No significant leakage from the Floridan Aquifer

  10. Tracing water and suspended matter in Raritan and Lower New York Bays using dissolved and particulate elemental concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    Geochemical tracers were used to examine the mixing of water and particles in Lower New York and Raritan Bays in August 1999 during low-flow conditions. Four brackish water masses (20 ≤ S ≤ 28) originating in the Raritan and Shrewsbury Rivers, Arthur Kill, and Upper New York Bay were characterized by their dissolved metals concentrations. The mixing lines of dissolved Cu, Ni, and Pb in Lower New York Bay were similar to those in Upper New York Bay, the source of most of the freshwater to the system. Dissolved Cd and Mn seemed to have been removed by particles in several regions of the study. Dissolved Cu, Ni and Pb in the Raritan River fell below the mixing lines of the Lower New York Bay. In contrast, the concentrations of dissolved Co and Mn in the Raritan River were distinctly higher than those in the Lower New York Bay, while dissolved Cu and Ni were elevated in the Arthur Kill. A plot of dissolved Co versus dissolved Ni clearly differentiated among three water masses: (1) Upper and Lower New York Bays and Sandy Hood Bay, (2) the Raritan River, and (3) Arthur Kill–Raritan Bay–Shrewsbury River.

  11. Evaluation of the activity concentration of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 210}Pb in sediments from Antarctica in the Admiralty bay region; Avaliacao da concentracao de atividade de Ra-226, Ra-228 e Pb-210 em sedimentos provenientes da Antartica na regiao da baia do Almirantado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora, Tamires de Araujo

    2015-07-01

    The natural radionuclides from radioactive series of {sup 238}U, {sup 235}U and {sup 232}Th have been applied as tracers in environmental studies for understanding the dynamics that occur in both marine and terrestrial environment, as for example, in research of oceanic processes and management of the coastal region. In the marine environment, these radionuclides can be used to estimate biogeochemical fluxes of marine particles and nutrients that occur in the water column as well as in the sediment. Several research works applied the distribution and the respective disequilibrium degree of natural radionuclides in the environment, including geochronological models for obtaining historical information on samples of certain sediment profile. In this study we performed a radiochemical characterization of the distribution of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 210}Pb from a sedimentary column called 1B (248 cm long) collected in the Admiralty Bay, Antarctic Peninsula region. The methodology used included the acid leaching of sediment samples followed by the radiochemical sequential separation of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra by co-precipitation with Ba(Ra)SO{sub 4} and {sup 210}Pb by co-precipitation with PbCrO{sub 4}. All measurements were carried out by counting of gross alpha and gross beta measures in a low background gas flow proportional detector. The activity concentrations of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 210}Pb were used to estimate the unsupported {sup 210}Pb activities present in sediment profile 1 B. Based on unsupported {sup 210}Pb data and the application of the CIC model (Constant Initial Concentration), it was possible to determine the sedimentation rate of 0.59 ± 0.05 cm /year. (author)

  12. Shifting shoals and shattered rocks : How man has transformed the floor of west-central San Francisco Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, John L.; Wong, Florence L.; Carlson, Paul R.

    2004-01-01

    San Francisco Bay, one of the world's finest natural harbors and a major center for maritime trade, is referred to as the 'Gateway to the Pacific Rim.' The bay is an urbanized estuary that is considered by many to be the major estuary in the United States most modified by man's activities. The population around the estuary has grown rapidly since the 1850's and now exceeds 7 million people. The San Francisco Bay area's economy ranks as one of the largest in the world, larger even than that of many countries. More than 10 million tourists are estimated to visit the bay region each year. The bay area's population and associated development have increasingly changed the estuary and its environment. San Francisco Bay and the contiguous Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta encompass roughly 1,600 square miles (4,100 km2) and are the outlet of a major watershed that drains more than 40 percent of the land area of the State of California. This watershed provides drinking water for 20 million people (two thirds of the State's population) and irrigates 4.5 million acres of farmland and ranchland. During the past several decades, much has been done to clean up the environment and waters of San Francisco Bay. Conservationist groups have even bought many areas on the margins of the bay with the intention of restoring them to a condition more like the natural marshes they once were. However, many of the major manmade changes to the bay's environment occurred so long ago that the nature of them has been forgotten. In addition, many changes continue to occur today, such as the introduction of exotic species and the loss of commercial and sport fisheries because of declining fish populations. The economy and population of the nine counties that surround the bay continue to grow and put increasing pressure on the bay, both direct and indirect. Therefore, there are mixed signals for the future health and welfare of San Francisco Bay. The San Francisco Bay estuary consists of three

  13. TREATMENTS OF PLASMA CORONA RADIATION ON SEAWEED Gracilaria Verrucosa (HUDSON PAPENFUSS: Efforts to increase growth and biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filemon Jalu N Putra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Gracilaria verrucosa (Hudson Papenfuss has great potential to be farmed in the water resources in Indonesia. As natural resource, the weed has a major contribution in the field of industry both for human food and health. Efforts have been done intensively to increase the production capacity to meet the market demand especially gelatin, both national and international market. One of them is the application of plasma corona irradiation treatments on the weed to improve developmental pathways. The concept of plasma irradiation performed at atmospheric conditions may impact on nitrogen intrusion pathway that is important element in the growth of the weed. The aims of this study are to assess the potential impact of plasma irradiation in improving the growth of G. verrucosa and thus increase their biomass production. The treatments were done using five different duration of plasma irradiation, which were 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 minutes at a 0,5mA stable source of voltage and 8kV of electrical current. Observations of growth rate include thallus length and biomass of G. verrucosa , that was observed every week for 28 days. The result showed that the growth of weed exhibited better than those without radiation. The best growth was reached in the group of treatment of 8 minutes irradiation, exhibited 65,91g of biomass and 9.5515% growth rate and length of thallus reached 22,33 cm and daily growth rate of 2.9759%. The lowest growth of the weed occurred in the treatment of 10 minutes irradiation, which was 44,82 g biomass, 8.123% growth rate, 17,13 cm thallus length with a daily growth rate of 1.9942%

  14. Numerical modelling of tides and storm surges in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sindhu, B.

    of the head bay and in the Gulf of Martaban region. The continental shelf in the head bay is wide enough to cause significant amplification of semi-diurnal tides which is in agreement with the Clarke and Battisti [1981] Summary 148 theory. In the north... wide and the amplitudes of semi-diurnal tides are doubled in this region while the diurnal tides amplify only marginally, which is in consistent with Clarke and Battisti [1981] theory. In the Malacca Strait, the amplitudes of both semi...

  15. Supramolecular assemblies of bay-substituted perylene diimides in solution and on a solid substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariola-Leikas, Essi; Niemi, Marja; Lemmetyinen, Helge; Efimov, Alexander

    2013-10-07

    Perylene diimides (PDIs) substituted with a terpyridine moiety at the bay-region have been synthesized. These building blocks were used to construct supramolecular complexes in chloroform. A dimer and a trimer were built via the bay-region complexation with zinc. The PDI compounds were further modified to have silane anchors and PDI self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were prepared on a quartz substrate. Complexation of metal ions was also done on the surface, and this was observed clearly in the absorption spectrum. These studies on the surface show possible progress in the study of supramolecular multilayer structures.

  16. Assessing the suitability of benthic foraminiferal morpho-groups to reconstruct paleomonsoon from Bay of Bengal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Manasa; Rajeev Saraswat; Rajiv Nigam

    2016-04-01

    Temporal changes in benthic foraminiferal morpho-groups were suggested as an effective proxy to reconstructpast monsoon intensity from the Arabian Sea. Here, in order to test the applicability of temporalvariation in morpho-groups to reconstruct past monsoon intensity from the Bay of Bengal, we havedocumented recent benthic foraminiferal distribution from the continental shelf region of the northwesternBay of Bengal. Based on the external morphology, benthic foraminifera were categorized intorounded symmetrical (RSBF) and angular asymmetrical benthic foraminifera (AABF). Additionally, afew other dominant groups were also identified based on test composition (agglutinated, calcareous) andabundance (Asterorotalids and Nonions). The relative abundance of each group was compared with theambient physico-chemical conditions, including dissolved oxygen, organic matter, salinity and temperature.We report that the RSBF are abundant in comparatively warm and well oxygenated waters of lowsalinity, suggesting a preference for high energy environment, whereas AABF dominate relatively cold,hypersaline deeper waters with low dissolved oxygen, indicating a low energy environment. The agglutinatedforaminifera, Asterorotalids and Nonions dominate shallow water, low salinity regions, whereasthe calcareous benthic foraminiferal abundance increases away from the riverine influx regions. Foodavailability, as estimated from organic carbon abundance in sediments, has comparatively less influenceon faunal distribution in the northwestern Bay of Bengal, as compared to dissolved oxygen, temperatureand salinity. We conclude that the factors associated with freshwater influx affect the distributionof benthic foraminiferal morpho-groups in the northwestern Bay of Bengal and thus it can be used toreconstruct past monsoon intensity from the Bay of Bengal.

  17. Dietary exposure of mink (Mustela vison) to fish from the upper Hudson River, New York, USA: effects on reproduction and offspring growth and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursian, Steven J; Kern, John; Remington, Richard E; Link, Jane E; Fitzgerald, Scott D

    2013-04-01

    The effects of feeding farm-raised mink (Mustela vison) diets containing polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated fish from the upper Hudson River (New York, USA) on adult reproductive performance and kit growth and mortality were evaluated. Diets contained 2.5 to 20% Hudson River fish, providing 0.72 to 6.1 µg ∑PCBs/g feed (4.8-38 pg toxic equivalents [TEQWHO 2005 ]/g feed). The percentage of stillborn kits per litter was significantly increased by dietary concentrations of 4.5 µg ∑PCBs/g feed (28 pg TEQWHO 2005 /g feed) and greater. All offspring exposed to dietary concentrations of 4.5 and 6.1 µg ∑PCBs/g feed (28 and 38 pg TEQWHO 2005 /g feed) died by 10 weeks of age, and all offspring exposed to 1.5 and 2.8 µg ∑PCBs/g feed (10 and 18 pg TEQWHO 2005 /g feed) died by 31 weeks of age, leaving juveniles in the control and 0.72 µg ∑PCBs/g feed (0.41- and 4.8 pg TEQWHO 2005 /g feed) groups only. The dietary concentration predicted to result in 20% kit mortality (LC20) at six weeks of age was 0.34 µg ∑PCBs/g feed (2.6 pg TEQWHO 2005 /g feed). The corresponding maternal hepatic concentration was 0.80 µg ∑PCBs/g liver, wet weight (13 pg TEQWHO 2005 /g liver, wet wt). Mink residing in the upper Hudson River would be expected to consume species of fish that contain an average of 4.0 µg ∑PCBs/g tissue. Thus, a daily diet composed of less than 10% Hudson River fish could provide a dietary concentration of ∑PCBs that resulted in 20% kit mortality in the present study.

  18. Integrated analysis of ecosystem interactions with land use Change: The Chesapeake Bay watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Scott J.; Jantz, Claire A.; Prince, Stephen D.; Smith, Andrew J.; Varlyguin, Dmitry; Wright, Robb K.

    The Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in the United States, encompassed by a watershed extending 168,000 km2 over portions of six states and Washington, D.C. Restoration of the Bay has been the focus of a two-decade regional partnership of local, state and federal agencies, including a network of scientists, politicians and activists interacting through various committees, working groups, and advisory panels. The effectiveness of the restoration effort has been mixed, with both notable successes and failures. The overall health of the Bay has not declined since the restoration was initiated in 1983, but many of the advances have been offset by the pressure of increasing population and exurban sprawl across the watershed. The needs of the Chesapeake Bay Program are many, but the greatest is accurate information on land cover and land use change, primarily to assess the implications for water quality, examine various restoration scenarios, and calibrate spatial models of the urbanization process. We report here on a number of new land cover and land use data products, and associated applications to assist vulnerability assessment, integrated ecosystem analysis, and ultimately Bay restoration. We provide brief overviews of applications to model new residential development, assess losses and vulnerability of resource lands, and identify the factors that disrupt the health of streams in small watersheds. These data products and approaches are being applied by a number of agencies involved with the restoration effort, including the Chesapeake Bay Program's activities focused on living resources, water quality, and sound land use.

  19. THE WIND-RESPONSE OF CHIKUGO RIVER ORIGINATED WATER IN ISAHAYA BAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongyuan; Matsunaga, Nobuhiro

    The wind response of salinity structures in Isahaya Bay was investigated by using the data of wind and salinity measured by the Kyushu Regional Agricultural Administration Office. In Isahaya Bay, the south-southwest wind and north-northeast wind were prevailing in summer season. It is known that the fresh water discharged from Chikugo River is transported along the west coast of the inner area of Ariake Sea and reaches to the mouth of Isahaya Bay. When a large amount of fresh water is discharged from Chikugo River and the northerly wind is blowing for a long period, the strong salinity stratification appears in Isahaya Bay. It is caused by that the northerly wind accelerates the transport of the Chikugo River originated fresh water into Isahaya Bay. After that, the salinity stratification is gone with the blow of southerly wind. The data-analysis reveals that the salinity structure in Isahaya Bay depends strongly on the fresh water from the Chikugo River and the wind blowing over Ariake Sea.

  20. 33 CFR 117.1101 - Sturgeon Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sturgeon Bay. 117.1101 Section 117.1101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Wisconsin § 117.1101 Sturgeon Bay. (a) The draw of the Michigan Street Bridge, mile 4.3 at Sturgeon...

  1. Evidence for mid-Holocene shift in depositional style in Mobile Bay, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twichell, David; Kelso, Kyle; Pendleton, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    The Holocene stratigraphy of Mobile Bay, Alabama, was mapped using a combination of high-resolution seismic data and sediment cores to refine changes in the bay's evolution during this time. The base of the Holocene-era stratigraphy is an erosional surface formed during the last glacial maximum. Overlying Holocene deposits are primarily estuarine mud that has a finely laminated weak acoustic signature. One exception is a thin unit, R1, with varying reflection amplitude that can be traced throughout the southern part of the bay. The continuity of the unit throughout the southern part of the bay suggests a baywide change in sedimentation that was perhaps driven by rapid retreat of the bay-head delta in response to a sudden rise in sea level or an abrupt change in accommodation space due to basin geometry. Along the southern edge of the bay, the R1 unit increases in thickness and reflector amplitude towards Morgan Peninsula. The peninsula itself underwent a period of erosion and narrowing between 4,300 to 3,000 years before present, and the variation in reflector amplitude and the geometry of this part of the R1 unit appear to reflect a period of increased overwashing of the peninsula during this period. Average estuarine sedimentation rates decreased after the formation of the R1 unit, and the decrease coincides with a decline in the rate of sea-level rise. A similar change in depositional style at approximately the same time in neighboring Apalachicola Bay suggests a change that affected the northeastern Gulf of Mexico region and not just Mobile Bay.

  2. Classification using Hierarchical Naive Bayes models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langseth, Helge; Dyhre Nielsen, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Classification problems have a long history in the machine learning literature. One of the simplest, and yet most consistently well-performing set of classifiers is the Naïve Bayes models. However, an inherent problem with these classifiers is the assumption that all attributes used to describe...... an instance are conditionally independent given the class of that instance. When this assumption is violated (which is often the case in practice) it can reduce classification accuracy due to “information double-counting” and interaction omission. In this paper we focus on a relatively new set of models......, termed Hierarchical Naïve Bayes models. Hierarchical Naïve Bayes models extend the modeling flexibility of Naïve Bayes models by introducing latent variables to relax some of the independence statements in these models. We propose a simple algorithm for learning Hierarchical Naïve Bayes models...

  3. Broad-spectrum monitoring strategies for predicting occult precipitation contribution to water balance in a coastal watershed in California: Ground-truthing, areal monitoring and isotopic analysis of fog in the San Francisco Bay region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koohafkan, M.; Thompson, S. E.; Leonardson, R.; Dufour, A.

    2013-12-01

    We showcase a fog monitoring study designed to quantitatively estimate the contribution of summer fog events to the water balance of a coastal watershed managed by the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission. Two decades of research now clearly show that fog and occult precipitation can be major contributors to the water balance of watersheds worldwide. Monitoring, understanding and predicting occult precipitation is therefore as hydrologically compelling as forecasting precipitation or evaporation, particularly in the face of climate variability. We combine ground-based monitoring and collection strategies with remote sensing technologies, time-lapse imagery, and isotope analysis to trace the ';signature' of fog in physical and ecological processes. Spatial coverage and duration of fog events in the watershed is monitored using time-lapse cameras and leaf wetness sensors strategically positioned to provide estimates of the fog bank extent and cloud base elevation, and this fine-scale data is used to estimate transpiration suppression by fog and is examined in the context of regional climate through the use of satellite imagery. Soil moisture sensors, throughfall collectors and advective fog collectors deployed throughout the watershed provide quantitative estimates of fog drip contribution to soil moisture and plants. Fog incidence records and streamflow monitoring provide daily estimates of fog contribution to streamflow. Isotope analysis of soil water, fog drip, stream water and vegetation samples are used to probe for evidence of direct root and leaf uptake of fog drip by plants. Using this diversity of fog monitoring methods, we develop an empirical framework for the inclusion of fog processes in water balance models.

  4. The unnatural history of Kāne‘ohe Bay: coral reef resilience in the face of centuries of anthropogenic impacts

    OpenAIRE

    Keisha D. Bahr; Paul L Jokiel; Toonen, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Kāneʻohe Bay, which is located on the on the NE coast of Oʻahu, Hawaiʻi, represents one of the most intensively studied estuarine coral reef ecosystems in the world. Despite a long history of anthropogenic disturbance, from early settlement to post European contact, the coral reef ecosystem of Kāneʻohe Bay appears to be in better condition in comparison to other reefs around the world. The island of Moku o Loʻe (Coconut Island) in the southern region of the bay became home to the Hawaiʻi Inst...

  5. River Flow Control on the Phytoplankton Dynamics of Chesapeake Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Qingyun; WANG You; TANG Xuexi; LI Ming

    2013-01-01

    Recent observations support an emerging paradigm that climate variability dominates nutrient enrichment in costal ecosystems,which can explain seasonal and inter-annual variability of phytoplankton community composition,biomass (Chl-a),and primary production (PP).In this paper,we combined observation and modeling to investigate the regulation of phytoplankton dynamics in Chesapeake Bay.The year we chose is 1996 that has high river runoff and is usually called a ‘wet year’.A 3-D physical-biogeochemical model based on ROMS was developed to simulate the seasonal cycle and the regional distributions of phytoplankton biomass and primary production in Chesapeake Bay.Based on the model results,NO3 presents a strong contrast to the river nitrate load during spring and the highest concentration in the bay reaches around 80mmol N m3.Compared with the normal year,phytoplankton bloom in spring of 1996 appears in lower latitudes with a higher concentration.Quantitative comparison between the modeled and observed seasonal averaged dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentrations shows that the model produces reliable results.The correlation coefficient r2 for all quantities exceeds 0.95,and the skill parameter for the four seasons is all above 0.95.

  6. Biomass and Carbon Stocks of Sofala Bay Mangrove Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida A. Sitoe

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Mangroves could be key ecosystems in strategies addressing the mitigation of climate changes through carbon storage. However, little is known regarding the carbon stocks of these ecosystems, particularly below-ground. This study was carried out in the mangrove forests of Sofala Bay, Central Mozambique, with the aim of quantifying carbon stocks of live and dead plant and soil components. The methods followed the procedures developed by the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR for mangrove forests. In this study, we developed a general allometric equation to estimate individual tree biomass and soil carbon content (up to 100 cm depth. We estimated the carbon in the whole mangrove ecosystem of Sofala Bay, including dead trees, wood debris, herbaceous, pneumatophores, litter and soil. The general allometric equation for live trees derived was [Above-ground tree dry weight (kg = 3.254 × exp(0.065 × DBH], root mean square error (RMSE = 4.244, and coefficient of determination (R2 = 0.89. The average total carbon storage of Sofala Bay mangrove was 218.5 Mg·ha−1, of which around 73% are stored in the soil. Mangrove conservation has the potential for REDD+ programs, especially in regions like Mozambique, which contains extensive mangrove areas with high deforestation and degradation rates.

  7. Holocene evolution of the Pomeranian Bay environment, southern Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Kostecki*, Beata Janczak-Kostecka

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the diatom assemblages and geochemical composition of sediment cores retrieved from the Pomeranian Bay. We also discuss similarities and differences in the diatom assemblages and the palaeogeographic development of nearby regions. Our main objective was to determine the characteristics and rate of the Littorina transgression in the Pomeranian Bay area. Sediments were divided into units based on differences in the distribution of diatom ecological groups and in geochemical ratios, such as Mg/Ca, Na/K and Fe/Mn. This study identified lacustrine sediments deposited during the time of the Ancylus Lake. This lacustrine-period sedimentation took place in a shallow lake under aerobic conditions. The record of the onset of marine environment dates to 8900-8300 cal BP and corresponds to the Littorina transgression. After about 8300 cal BP, sedimentation took place in a deeper marine environment with higher biogenic production and anaerobic conditions. The abrupt appearance of marine diatom species and increased geochemical salinity indicators reflect the large impact of the Littorina transgression on the Pomeranian Bay environment.

  8. Revisiting the 1899 Earthquakes of Yakutat Bay, Alaska Using New and Existing Geophysical Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, M. A. L.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Haeussler, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    North of Yakutat Bay in southeastern Alaska, the subducting Yakutat Block intersects with the Fairweather transform fault system. A series of large earthquakes occurred in the region in September of 1899, including a Mw 8.2 event on 10 September that resulted in >14 m of coseismic uplift and a 6 m tsunami in Yakutat Bay. Despite recurrence risk of the 1899 or similar events in the region, the fault(s) that ruptured in 1899 remain unidentified. Previous efforts to map active Yakutat Bay faults carried out by Plafker and Thatcher (2008) used post-1899 bedrock uplift measurements to infer the location of potentially important structures, including the Esker Creek and Bancas Point thrusts. As measurement error was not assessed in their study, we revisit the uplift measurements by quantifying uncertainty due to glacial isostatic adjustment, tidal range, and specific benchmark methods. We also combine new seismic reflection data with existing topography, bathymetry, GPS, and satellite photo data to update the original fault map. Our reevaluation of uplift measurements suggests that primary slip and uplift during the 10 September earthquake was limited to northwest of Yakutat Bay. Additionally, a high-resolution seismic reflection survey we conducted in Yakutat Bay during August 2012 constrains faulting to on- or near-shore based on the absence of bay-crossing faults. Collectively, our results imply that predominantly strike-slip and transpressive horsetail-type faults are southeast of Yakutat Bay, with compressional structures related to Yakutat Block subduction/collision to the northwest. We interpret the 10 September 1899 event to be the result of complex rupture somewhere within the Yakutat subduction/collision system. Based on our updated map of coseismic uplift and fault structure, we favor a rupture model where primary slip occurred along the Esker Creek system locally with possible induced coseismic slip along the neighboring Boundary transpressive fault system.

  9. Bioinvasion in a Brazilian bay: filling gaps in the knowledge of southwestern Atlantic biota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara L Ignacio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Biological invasions are a major cause of global species change. Nevertheless, knowledge about the distribution and ecology of introduced species is regionally biased, and many gaps in knowledge exist for most developing countries. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To study the zoobenthos on the hard substratum of the Ilha Grande Bay, a survey was conducted on both natural and artificial substrata at three depths and seven sites. The species recorded were classified as native, cryptogenic or introduced. Multivariate analyses were conducted to assess the prevalence of introduced species in these communities and to compare the distribution of species on natural and artificial substrata of this bay to identify possible discrepancies in habitat use. Of the 61 species, 25 were cryptogenic, 10 were introduced and 26 were native. Similar numbers of introduced species were found on both natural and artificial substrata, though the community composition was significantly different between them. We also compared the species composition of the Ilha Grande Bay survey to other inventories taken around the world. The highest similarities were found between the Ilha Grande Bay inventory and the Atlantic coastal region (Tampa Bay, USA and the Gulf of Mexico, American Samoa and Pearl Harbor (USA inventories. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study presents the first published comprehensive list of hard substratum sessile marine invertebrate species in a Brazilian bay. The high percentage of cryptogenic species reveals gaps in both zoological records and information on introduced species for the Brazilian coast. The introduced species successfully colonized different sites in the Ilha Grande Bay, including both natural and artificial substrata. In addition, we find that artificial structures may not be good surrogates for natural rocky shores and may represent an ecological threat. Comparisons with other inventories suggest a history of broad

  10. Field testing of behavioral barriers for fish exclusion at cooling-water intake systems, Central Hudson Gas and Electric Company Roseton Generating Station: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matousek, J.A.; Wells, A.W.; McGroddy, P.M.

    1988-09-01

    A seasonal field testing program was conducted during 1986 and 1987 to evaluate the effectiveness of behavioral barriers at Central Hudson Gas and Electric Corporations's Roseton Generating Station located in the euryhaline section of the Hudson River. This station was selected as representative of power plants with shoreline riverine/estuarine intake systems. Three commercially available devices (air bubble curtain, pneumatic gun, and underwater strobe light) were tested alone and in combination to determine their effectiveness in reducing impingement. The primary testing method incorporated three or four 6-h impingement collections during each test date, each consisting of two randomly assigned 3-h samples: one was an experimental test with a behavioral device in operation, the other a control test with no device operating. The effectiveness of the devices at excluding fish was determined by comparing impingement data from experimental and control periods. Results of the program do not establish that the deployment of underwater strobe lights, pneumatic guns, an air bubble curtain, or various combinations of the three devices will effectively lower fish impingement at power plants similar in design and location to the Roseton plant. Deterrent effectiveness was found to be species-specific and related to time of day. 51 refs., 67 figs., 72 tabs.

  11. Organochlorine residues in harp seals, Phoca groenlandica, from the Gulf of St. Lawrence and Hudson Strait: An evaluation of contaminant concentrations and burdens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, G.G.; Smith, T.G. (Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans, Nanaimo, BC (Canada)); Addison, R.F. (Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans, Sidney, BC (Canada))

    1994-01-01

    Organochlorine contaminant concentrations and burdens were evaluated in blubber samples from 50 harp seals (Phoca groenlandica) obtained from the estuary and northern Gulf of St. Lawrence and Hudson Strait, Canada between December 1988 and December 1989. The concentration and burden of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) increased significantly during the winter months for males occupying the St. Lawrence estuary. The potential for rapid accumulation of contaminants in the estuary was also observed among females: nine postpartum females (1 month after weaning) had higher organochlorine levels than prepartum females from the same location. The lowest observed contaminant concentrations and burdens were in seals from Hudson Strait in autumn. In winter specimens, males had DDT and PCB concentrations about 4 and 2 times as great, respectively, as females of similar age distribution and collection date. Congeners with IUPAC Nos. 138 and 153 accounted for more than 50% of total identifiable PCBs, which is consistent with their prevalence in other marine biota. The concentration of PCBs has declined and the percent p,p'-DDE of total DDT has increased between 1982 and the present study. Unlike the beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas), harp seals occupy the more polluted waters of the estuary only seasonally, and this may account for their lower residue concentrations. 59 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  12. Spectral aerosol optical depths over Bay of Bengal and Chennai: I—measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, S.; Jayaraman, A.

    A cruise experiment to study the aerosol optical characteristics was conducted in February-March 2001 over the Bay of Bengal, a data void region. An analysis of aerosol optical depths (AODs) measured onboard Sagar Kanya shows that the AODs are higher when compared to those measured over the west coast of India and the Arabian Sea. The mean AODs at 0.5 μm over the Bay of Bengal are in the range of 0.2-0.7, and are found to show a variation of about 40-50% in the wavelength region of 0.4- 0.85 μm. The mean wavelength exponent α over the Bay of Bengal is found to be 1.80, higher than the Arabian Sea value of 1.46, indicating a relatively higher concentration of submicron size particles. The mean Ångström coefficient β, which represents the columnar aerosol loading, over the Bay of Bengal is found to be 0.10. Measurements of AODs, made before and after the cruise in Chennai, an urban station located on the eastern coast of India, show higher values compared to the Bay of Bengal data. The mean α for Chennai is found to be 1.53, which is lower than the Bay of Bengal value while the mean β is higher at 0.18. While a higher α value indicates the dominance of smaller size particles over Bay of Bengal, a higher β and a higher AOD at all wavelengths indicate the dominance of both bigger and smaller particles over Chennai. A comparison of AODs obtained over a coastal station Trivandrum, located on the southwest coast of India, during March 2001 showed that in the smaller wavelength range the Chennai AODs are higher while above 0.6 μm the AODs are comparable. The day-to-day variations of AODs measured at Chennai are less significant when compared to Bay of Bengal and are below 10%. As Chennai is an urban, industrial and a well-populated city, and is a constant source of aerosol particles, there are lesser day-to-day variations in the AOD, while over the Bay of Bengal the air masses come from different source regions carrying aerosols of different chemical and

  13. Analysis and Applications API eBay

    OpenAIRE

    ŠIK, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The subject of this bachelor thesis "Analysis and Applications API eBay" is to create application based on the use of Application Programming Interface (API), released by eBay. The theoretical part is focused on explaining the fundamental issue of Internet auctions, e-commmerce, comparsion of auction portals and term "trust" as a key attribute of e-commerce. The practical part is based on analyse of principles and instruments of eBay API and create an application based on this interface. The ...

  14. Hampton roads regional Water-Quality Monitoring Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Aaron J.; Jastram, John D.

    2016-12-02

    IntroductionHow much nitrogen, phosphorus, and suspended solids are contributed by the highly urbanized areas of the Hampton Roads region in Virginia to Chesapeake Bay? The answer to this complex question has major implications for policy decisions, resource allocations, and efforts aimed at restoring clean waters to Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries. To quantify the amount of nitrogen, phosphorus, and suspended solids delivered to the bay from this region, the U.S. Geological Survey has partnered with the Hampton Roads Sanitation District (HRSD), in cooperation with the Hampton Roads Planning District Commission (HRPDC), to conduct a water-quality monitoring program throughout the Hampton Roads region.

  15. Latitudinal and longitudinal variation in aerosol characteristics from Sun photometer and MODIS over the Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea during ICARB

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sumita Kedia; S Ramachandran

    2008-07-01

    Spatial variations in aerosol optical properties as function of latitude and longitude are analysed over the Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea during ICARB cruise period of March–May 2006 from in situ sun photometer and MODIS (Terra, Aqua) satellite measurements. Monthly mean 550 nm aerosol optical depths (AODs) over the Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea show an increase from March to May both in spatial extent and magnitude. AODs are found to increase with latitude from 4°N to 20°N over the Bay of Bengal while over Arabian Sea, variations are not significant. Sun photometer and MODIS AODs agree well within ± 1 variation. Bay of Bengal AOD (0.28) is higher than the Arabian Sea (0.24) latitudinally. Aerosol fine mode fraction (FMF) is higher than 0.6 over Bay of Bengal, while FMF in the Arabian Sea is about 0.5. Bay of Bengal (∼1) is higher than the Arabian Sea value of 0.7, suggesting the dominance of fine mode aerosols over Bay of Bengal which is corroborated by higher FMF values over Bay of Bengal. Air back trajectory analyses suggest that aerosols from different source regions contribute differently to the optical characteristics over the Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea.

  16. Circulation and haline structure of a microtidal bay in the Sea of Japan influenced by the winter monsoon and the Tsushima Warm Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Sachihiko; Kasai, Akihide; Takeshige, Aigo; Zenimoto, Kei; Kimura, Shingo; Suzuki, Keita W.; Miyake, Yoichi; Funahashi, Tatsuhiro; Yamashita, Yoh; Watanabe, Yoshiro

    2016-08-01

    Mooring and hydrographic surveys were conducted in Tango Bay, a microtidal region of freshwater influence (ROFI) in the Sea of Japan, in order to clarify the circulation pattern in the bay and its driving forces. Monthly mean velocity records at four stations revealed an inflow and outflow at the eastern and northern openings of the bay, respectively, indicating an anticyclonic circulation across the bay mouth. The circulation was significantly intensified in winter, in accordance with the prevailing NW wind component of the winter monsoon. The anticyclonic circulation at the bay mouth was connected to an estuarine circulation that was evident near the mouth of the Yura River at the bay head. Surface salinity just offshore of the river mouth was closely related to the Yura River discharge, whereas in lower layers the offshore water had a stronger influence on salinity. Prior to a seasonal increase in the Yura River discharge, summer salinity decreased markedly through the water column in Tango Bay, possibly reflecting intrusion of the Changjiang Diluted Water transported by the Tsushima Warm Current. In contrast with the traditional assumption that estuarine circulation is controlled mainly by river discharge and tidal forcing, the circulation in Tango Bay is strongly influenced by seasonal wind and the Tsushima Warm Current. The narrow shelf may be responsible for the strong influence of the Tsushima Warm Current on circulation and water exchange processes in Tango Bay.

  17. THz identification and Bayes modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolnikov, Andre

    2017-05-01

    THz Identification is a developing technology. Sensing in the THz range potentially gives opportunity for short range radar sensing because THz waves can better penetrate through obscured atmosphere, such as fog, than visible light. The lower scattering of THz as opposed to the visible light results also in significantly better imaging than in IR spectrum. A much higher contrast can be achieved in medical trans-illumination applications than with X-rays or visible light. The same THz radiation qualities produce better tomographical images from hard surfaces, e.g. ceramics. This effect comes from the delay in time of reflected THz pulses detection. For special or commercial applications alike, the industrial quality control of defects is facilitated with a lower cost. The effectiveness of THz wave measurements is increased with computational methods. One of them is Bayes modeling. Examples of this kind of mathematical modeling are considered.

  18. Bayes linear covariance matrix adjustment

    CERN Document Server

    Wilkinson, Darren J

    1995-01-01

    In this thesis, a Bayes linear methodology for the adjustment of covariance matrices is presented and discussed. A geometric framework for quantifying uncertainties about covariance matrices is set up, and an inner-product for spaces of random matrices is motivated and constructed. The inner-product on this space captures aspects of our beliefs about the relationship between covariance matrices of interest to us, providing a structure rich enough for us to adjust beliefs about unknown matrices in the light of data such as sample covariance matrices, exploiting second-order exchangeability and related specifications to obtain representations allowing analysis. Adjustment is associated with orthogonal projection, and illustrated with examples of adjustments for some common problems. The problem of adjusting the covariance matrices underlying exchangeable random vectors is tackled and discussed. Learning about the covariance matrices associated with multivariate time series dynamic linear models is shown to be a...

  19. 76 FR 37641 - Safety Zone; Independence Day Fireworks Celebration for the City of Half Moon Bay, Half Moon Bay, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-28

    ... the City of Half Moon Bay, Half Moon Bay, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone in the navigable waters of Half Moon Bay, off of Pillar Point Harbor beach, Half Moon Bay, CA in support of the Independence Day...

  20. 78 FR 62293 - Safety Zone, Oyster Festival 30th Anniversary Fireworks Display, Oyster Bay; Oyster Bay, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-15

    ... CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone, Oyster Festival 30th Anniversary Fireworks Display, Oyster Bay; Oyster Bay, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone on the navigable waters of Oyster Bay near Oyster Bay, NY for the...