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Sample records for hpv viral load

  1. [Investigation on HPV viral load and high risk HPV types infection among patients with infertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-dong; Zhang, Hui-min; Pei, Jing; He, Gui-rong; Sun, Xiao-fang; Li, Bing

    2007-06-01

    High risk human papilomavirus (HPV) infection is often related to cervical cancer. This study investigated the infection of high risk HPV in cervical epithelia among infertile patients. Relative quantification and absolute quantification were applied for determination of "real" HPV viral load in the clinical setting. Adopting multi-channels real time PCR to genotype and quantify eight high risk HPV (HPV16, 18, 45, 31; intermediate risk types: HPV33, 52, 58, 67) DNA in cervical epithelia of the 130 infertile patients and the 150 controls. This study applied housekeeping gene (beta-globin) for the DNA quantification on secretions samples for clinical diagnosis. The infection rate of the infertility group was 25.38 percent (33/130) and that of the control group was 11.33 percent (17/150), the difference was statistically significant. Among the 33 positive cases in the infertility group, 24 cases showed a viral load no less than 106; in 9 of them, the viral load was less than 106. Among the 17 positive cases in the control group, 4 cases had a viral load no less than 106; in 13 of them, the viral load was less than 106. There is a statistically significant difference in viral load between the infertility group and the control group. The HPV infection rate of the infertility group was higher than that of the control group.

  2. High HPV 16 viral load is associated with increased cervical dysplasia in Honduran women.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabora, N.; Ferrera, A.; Bakkers, J.M.J.E.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Melchers, W.J.G.

    2008-01-01

    Cervical cancer is believed to have a co-factorial etiology in which high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are considered an essential factor and other elements play an ancillary role. Besides the importance of specific HPV genotypes, other viral cofactors as viral load may influence the

  3. Physical status and viral load in women with positive human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in uterine cervix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byoung Gie; Lee, Eui Don; Zin, Yong Jae [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the frequency of viral integration and viral load in women with positive HPV type 16 infection, and showing normal findings, CIN, and cervical cancer. Total 75 (normal, 15; CIN I, 20; CIN III, 20; cervical cancer, 20) cervical swab specimens were used. HPV detection, typing, and viral load was determined by PCR method. Seventy of 75 (93.3%) of cervical swab specimens showed same results with hybrid capture assay and PCR method for detecting HPV DNA. HPV type 16 DNA was identified more frequently with progression from normal to cervical cancer (normal, 13 %; CIN I, 15%; CIN III, 40 %; cervical cancer, 55 %). The frequency of HPV type 16 DNA integration also increased with grade of the lesion (normal, 0 %; CIN I, 33 %; CIN III, 87 %; cervical cancer, 91 %) suggesting most of HPV type 16 present as integration forms in the cells. In addition, high-level of HPV 16 viral load also was found more frequently in CIN III and cervical cancer (normal, 0 %; CIN I, 0 %; CIN III, 87 %; cervical cancer, 100 %). These results suggest that viral integration and high-level of viral load may play an important role in cervical carcinogenesis. (author). 13 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Comparison of HPV detection technologies: Hybrid capture 2, PreTect HPV-Proofer and analysis of HPV DNA viral load in HPV16, HPV18 and HPV33 E6/E7 mRNA positive specimens.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keegan, Helen

    2012-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing using molecular methods in liquid based cytology (LBC) specimens may be useful as an adjunct to cervical screening by cytology. We compared the positivity rate of the commercially available HPV DNA method hybrid capture 2 (hc2) and the commercially available E6\\/E7 mRNA method PreTect HPV-Proofer in cytological specimens (n=299). LBC specimens collected (n=299) represented the following cervical cytological disease categories: Normal (n=60), borderline nuclear abnormalities (BNA) (n=34), CIN1 (n=121), CIN2 (n=60), CIN3 (n=24). Overall, 69% (205\\/299) of the cases were positive by hc2 and 38% (112\\/299) of the cases were positive by PreTect HPV-Proofer. Concordance rates between the two tests were highest in the high-grade cytology cases (CIN2: 67% and CIN3: 83%) and the normal cytology cases (88%) and lowest in the BNA and CIN1 categories (56% and 52%). HPV DNA viral load analyses were carried out on HPV16 (n=55), HPV18 (n=9) and HPV33 (n=13) samples that were positive by PreTect HPV-Proofer. The sensitivity and specificity of PreTect HPV-Proofer and the hc2 DNA test for the detection of high-grade cytology (i.e. CIN2+) were 71.4% and 75.8% vs 100% and 43.7%, respectively. The relatively low detection rate observed by PreTect HPV-Proofer in the whole range of cytological positive cases, combined with a relatively higher specificity and PPV, suggests that PreTect HPV-Proofer may be more useful than hc2 for triage and in predicting high-grade disease.

  5. Anal HPV 16 and 18 viral load: A comparison between HIV-negative and -positive MSM and association with persistence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marra, Elske; King, Audrey; van Logchem, Elske; van der Weele, Pascal; Mooij, Sofie H.; Heijman, Titia; Meijer, Chris J. L. M.; Verhagen, Dominique W. M.; van der Sande, Marianne A. B.; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.

    2018-01-01

    Does anal HPV viral load explain the difference in anal HPV persistence between HIV-negative and -positive men who have sex with men (MSM)? MSM 18 years were recruited in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, in 2010-2011. Anal self-swabs were collected every 6 months and genotyped

  6. A new multiparameter assay to assess HPV 16/18, viral load and physical status together with gain of telomerase genes in HPV-related cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theelen, Wendy; Reijans, Martin; Simons, Guus; Ramaekers, Frans C S; Speel, Ernst-Jan M; Hopman, Anton H N

    2010-02-15

    Oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most important risk factor for cancer of the uterine cervix and a subgroup of head and neck cancers. Viral load has been associated with persistence of infection, whereas integration of HPV into the host cell genome is associated with transition to invasive disease. Viral integration is frequently correlated with loss of viral E2 and gain of the telomerase-related genes TERC and TERT. The objective of this study was to develop a rapid and sensitive multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assay for the simultaneous analysis of viral load, integration and copy number gain of TERC and TERT in HPV16/18-associated lesions. The performance of the assay was tested for HPV vs. human gene copy number ratios ranging from 0.1 to 100 and for percentages of integration ranging from 0 to 100%. The model systems used include plasmid mixtures and the HPV-positive cell lines SiHa, HeLa and CaSki described to contain a range of 2-600 viral copies per cell. In samples with low-viral load, viral integration can be reliably determined when more than 30% of the virus is integrated. Gain of the telomerase-related genes in the cell lines as determined by our MLPA assay was in accordance with data reported in the literature. Our study demonstrates that within a single MLPA-reaction viral type, load, integration and gain of TERC and TERT can be reliably determined, which will improve risk assessment for patients suspected for HPV infection.

  7. Association of HIV infection with distribution and viral load of HPV types in Kenya: a survey with 820 female sex workers

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    Delva Wim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomavirus (HPV and HIV are each responsible for a considerable burden of disease. Interactions between these infections pose substantial public health challenges, especially where HIV prevalence is high and HPV vaccine coverage low. Methods Between July 2005 and January 2006, a cross-sectional community-based survey in Mombasa, Kenya, enrolled female sex workers using snowball sampling. After interview and a gynaecological examination, blood and cervical cytology samples were taken. Quantitative real-time PCR detected HPV types and viral load measures. Prevalence of high-risk HPV was compared between HIV-infected and -uninfected women, and in women with abnormal cervical cytology, measured using conventional Pap smears. Results Median age of the 820 participants was 28 years (inter-quartile range [IQR] = 24-36 years. One third of women were HIV infected (283/803; 35.2% and these women were y more likely to have abnormal cervical cytology than HIV-negative women (27%, 73/269, versus 8%, 42/503; P P P = 0.98. High-risk HPV types other than 16 and 18 were common in LSIL (74.7%; 56/75 and HSIL (84.6%; 22/26; even higher among HIV-infected women. Conclusions HIV-infected sex workers had almost four-fold higher prevalence of high-risk HPV, raised viral load and more precancerous lesions. HPV 16 and HPV 18, preventable with current vaccines, were associated with cervical disease, though other high-risk types were commoner. HIV-infected sex workers likely contribute disproportionately to HPV transmission dynamics in the general population. Current efforts to prevent HIV and HPV are inadequate. New interventions are required and improved implementation of existing strategies.

  8. Some novel insights on HPV16 related cervical cancer pathogenesis based on analyses of LCR methylation, viral load, E7 and E2/E4 expressions.

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    Damayanti Das Ghosh

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to decipher the interdependent roles of (i methylation within E2 binding site I and II (E2BS-I/II and replication origin (nt 7862 in the long control region (LCR, (ii expression of viral oncogene E7, (iii expression of the transcript (E7-E1/E4 that encodes E2 repressor protein and (iv viral load, in human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16 related cervical cancer (CaCx pathogenesis. The results revealed over-representation (p<0.001 of methylation at nucleotide 58 of E2BS-I among E2-intact CaCx cases compared to E2-disrupted cases. Bisulphite sequencing of LCR revealed overrepresentation of methylation at nucleotide 58 or other CpGs in E2BS-I/II, among E2-intact cases than E2-disrupted cases and lack of methylation at replication origin in case of both. The viral transcript (E7-E1/E4 that produces the repressor E2 was analyzed by APOT (amplification of papillomavirus oncogenic transcript-coupled-quantitative-RT-PCR (of E7 and E4 genes to distinguish episomal (pure or concomitant with integrated from purely integrated viral genomes based on the ratio, E7 C(T/E4 C(T. Relative quantification based on comparative C(T (threshold cycle method revealed 75.087 folds higher E7 mRNA expression in episomal cases over purely integrated cases. Viral load and E2 gene copy numbers were negatively correlated with E7 C(T (p = 0.007 and E2 C(T (p<0.0001, respectively, each normalized with ACTB C(T, among episomal cases only. The k-means clustering analysis considering E7 C(T from APOT-coupled-quantitative-RT-PCR assay, in conjunction with viral load, revealed immense heterogeneity among the HPV16 positive CaCx cases portraying integrated viral genomes. The findings provide novel insights into HPV16 related CaCx pathogenesis and highlight that CaCx cases that harbour episomal HPV16 genomes with intact E2 are likely to be distinct biologically, from the purely integrated viral genomes in terms of host genes and/or pathways involved in cervical

  9. Concordance of HPV load and HPV mRNA for 16 carcinogenic/possibly carcinogenic HPV types in paired smear/tissue cervical cancer specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halec, Gordana; Dondog, Bolormaa; Pawlita, Michael; Schmitt, Markus

    2017-11-01

    HPV types with high viral load are associated with cervical abnormalities. However, viral load measurements and concordance of HPV loads and viral mRNA have not been demonstrated for all high-risk/possibly high-risk (HR-/pHR-)HPV types in cervical cancer (CxCa). Especially, the biological role of co-infecting HR-/pHR-HPV types with low viral load has not been thoroughly investigated. Using BSGP5+/6+-PCR/MPG genotyping, we analyzed viral loads for all currently defined 51 mucosal HPV types in 74 cervical smears from patients with CxCa and compared this data with HPV DNA and mRNA status in these patients' corresponding CxCa tissues. All cervical smear/tissue pairs were HPV DNA+. Overall HPV type agreement within pairs was 99% (complete agreement in 50%, partial agreement in 49%, and complete disagreement in 1% of cases). The proportion of multiple HPV types was significantly higher in smears compared to tissues (pHPV infections (>1 copy/cell) were found in 88% of HPV DNA+ smears, and were significantly associated with the presence of respective HPV DNA (kappa=0.685, CI: 0.567-0.803), and HPV mRNA (kappa=0.693, CI: 0.566-0.820) in CxCa tissues. In total, 93% (67/72) of high load HR-/pHR-HPV infections identified in smears were also present in corresponding CxCa tissues, and 93% (62/67) of these were HPV mRNA+. On the other hand, 78% (42/54) of low load HR-/pHR-HPV infections identified in smears were not detectable in tissues, including 11 out of 15 low load HPV16 infections. This data demonstrates that the presence of high HPV loads in CxCa smears predicts biologically active HR-/pHR-HPV types in tumor tissues.

  10. Prevalence and viral load of oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) in pterygia in multi‐ethnic patients in the Malay Peninsula

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chong, Pei Pei; Tung, Chee Hong; Rahman, Nurul Asyikin bt Abdul; Yajima, Misako; Chin, Fee Wai; Yeng, Crystale Lim Siew; Go, Eng Soon; Chan, Cordelia M. L; Yawata, Nobuyo; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in primary and recurrent pterygia samples collected from different ethnic groups in the equatorial Malay Peninsula...

  11. HIV Viral Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chains Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli Sickle Cell Tests Sirolimus Smooth Muscle ... used each time. Will exercise, nutrition, and other lifestyle modifications help decrease my HIV viral load? There ...

  12. Molecular detection of human papillomavirus and viral DNA load after radiotherapy for cervical carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahla, Saloua; Kochbati, Lotfi; Sarraj, Sana; Ben Daya, Imen; Maalej, Mongi; Oueslati, Ridha

    2016-10-13

    Infection with high-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV) is a necessary cause for cervical carcinoma. Radiation therapy together with surgery is the most effective treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the molecular basis of the response to radiotherapy in cervical cancer cells. Tumor cells were obtained from biopsies of 44 cervical cancers, collected before and after radiotherapy. The presence of HPV was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers specific for the L1 region. The prevalence of HPV was 70.4%, with HPV16 being the most common (54.5%) and HPV18 the second (15.9%). Our analyses show that ionizing radiation does not influence HPV detection, as the percentage of HPV-positive biopsies was similar in patients before and after radiotherapy (HPV16 60% vs. 51.7% and HPV18 20% vs. 13.7%, respectively). However, the detection of HPV did vary by tumor stage, with the highest proportion observed in late-stage tumors (HPV16 and HPV18 in 80% and 60% of stage III tumors, respectively). We also found that HPV viral load is influenced by radiotherapy and tumor stage, with the highest viral loads in late-stage tumors (stage III) after 1 day since radiotherapy (p<0.05). According to Kaplan-Meier curves, higher HPV viral load was associated with significantly shortened progression-free survival (p = 0.04). Our data provide prospective evidence that ionizing radiation can affect the HPV viral load and this might offer the best strategies for assessment of therapeutic efficacy.

  13. High-risk human papillomavirus viral load and persistence among heterosexual HIV-negative and HIV-positive men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Mary K; Gray, Ronald H; Serwadda, David; Kigozi, Godfrey; Gravitt, Patti E; Nalugoda, Fred; Reynolds, Steven J; Wawer, Maria J; Watya, Stephen; Quinn, Thomas C; Tobian, Aaron A R

    2014-06-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) viral load is associated with HR-HPV transmission and HR-HPV persistence in women. It is unknown whether HR-HPV viral load is associated with persistence in HIV-negative or HIV-positive men. HR-HPV viral load and persistence were evaluated among 703 HIV-negative and 233 HIV-positive heterosexual men who participated in a male circumcision trial in Rakai, Uganda. Penile swabs were tested at baseline and 6, 12 and 24 months for HR-HPV using the Roche HPV Linear Array, which provides a semiquantitative measure of HPV shedding by hybridisation band intensity (graded: 1-4). Prevalence risk ratios (PRR) were used to estimate the association between HR-HPV viral load and persistent detection of HR-HPV. HR-HPV genotypes with high viral load (grade:3-4) at baseline were more likely to persist than HR-HPV genotypes with low viral load (grade: 1-2) among HIV-negative men (month 6: adjPRR=1.83, 95% CI 1.32 to 2.52; month 12: adjPRR=2.01, 95% CI 1.42 to 3.11), and HIV-positive men (month 6: adjPRR=1.33, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.67; month 12: adjPRR=1.73, 95% CI 1.18 to 2.54). Long-term persistence of HR-HPV was more frequent among HIV-positive men compared with HIV-negative men (month 24: adjPRR=2.27, 95% CI 1.47 to 3.51). Persistence of newly detected HR-HPV at the 6-month and 12-month visits with high viral load were also more likely to persist to 24 months than HR-HPV with low viral load among HIV-negative men (adjPRR=1.67, 95% CI 0.88 to 3.16). HR-HPV genotypes with high viral load are more likely to persist among HIV-negative and HIV-positive men, though persistence was more common among HIV-positive men overall. The results may explain the association between high HR-HPV viral load and HR-HPV transmission. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Human Papillomavirus prevalence, viral load and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in HIV-infected women

    OpenAIRE

    Levi, José E.; Fink, Maria C.S.; Canto, Cynthia L.M.; Carretiero, Nadily; Matsubara, Regina; Linhares, Iara; Dores, Gérson B. das; Castelo, Adauto; Segurado, Aluísio; Uip, David E.; Eluf Neto, José

    2002-01-01

    HIV-infected women from São Paulo city were enrolled in a cross-sectional study on Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) prevalence and their association with laboratory markers of AIDS, namely HIV viral load and CD4+ cell counts. A cervical specimen was collected and submitted to Hybrid Capture, a test for HPV viral load determination. HPV-DNA was detected in 173 of 265 women (64.5%). Twenty (7.5%) women were infected by one or more low-risk viruses, 89 (33%...

  15. Human papillomavirus 16/18 E7 viral loads predict distant metastasis in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.

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    Huang, Chung-Guei; Lee, Li-Ang; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Liao, Chun-Ta; Yang, Lan-Yan; Kang, Chung-Jan; Chang, Kei-Ping; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Chen, I-How; Yang, Shu-Li; Lee, Li-Yu; Hsueh, Chuen; Chen, Tse-Ching; Lin, Chien-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Chang, Tung-Chieh; Wang, Hung-Ming; Ng, Shu-Hang; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2014-10-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) seem to be related to distant metastasis (DM) in advanced oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients. This study aimed to investigate whether high-risk HPV viral load may predict DM among OSCC patients and stratify patients for risk-adapted treatment. Viral loads of E7 oncogenes for HPV 16/18 were measured by quantitative PCR tests in paraffin-embedded lesional specimens from 312 OSCC of which the HPV genotypes had been determined previously. Multivariable Cox regression analysis was used to identify the independent prognostic factors for 5-year DM and C statistics were further computed. By multivariable analysis, high HPV 16 E7 viral load (≥15.0 copies/genome); high HPV 18 E7 viral load (≥15.0 copies/genome); pathological N2 status (pN2); tumor depth ≥11 mm; extracapsular spread (ECS); and level IV/V metastases were independent risk factors for DM. We further identified three prognostic groups. In the high-risk group (level IV/V metastases or high HPV 16/18 E7 viral load plus pN2, tumor depth ≥11 mm, or ECS), the 5-year distant metastasis rate was 74%. In the intermediate-risk group (high HPV 16/18 E7 viral load, pN2, tumor depth ≥11 mm, or ECS), the 5-year DM rate was 17%. Finally, the 5-year DM rate was 1% in the low-risk group (no risk factors). The value of the C statistics was 0.78. Among OSCC patients, high HPV 16/18 E7 viral load identifies a small subgroup of patients at high-risk of 5-year DM and suggest the need for more intensive treatments and follow-up strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Human papillomavirus prevalence, viral load and pre-cancerous lesions of the cervix in women initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy in South Africa: a cross-sectional study

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    Rybicki Ed

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervical cancer and infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV are both important public health problems in South Africa (SA. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions (SILs, high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV, HPV viral load and HPV genotypes in HIV positive women initiating anti-retroviral (ARV therapy. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted at an anti-retroviral (ARV treatment clinic in Cape Town, SA in 2007. Cervical specimens were taken for cytological analysis and HPV testing. The Digene Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2 test was used to detect HR-HPV. Relative light units (RLU were used as a measure of HPV viral load. HPV types were determined using the Roche Linear Array HPV Genotyping test. Crude associations with abnormal cytology were tested and multiple logistic regression was used to determine independent risk factors for abnormal cytology. Results The median age of the 109 participants was 31 years, the median CD4 count was 125/mm3, 66.3% had an abnormal Pap smear, the HR-HPV prevalence was 78.9% (Digene, the median HPV viral load was 181.1 RLU (HC2 positive samples only and 78.4% had multiple genotypes. Among women with abnormal smears the most prevalent HR-HPV types were HPV types 16, 58 and 51, all with a prevalence of 28.5%. On univariate analysis HR-HPV, multiple HPV types and HPV viral load were significantly associated with the presence of low and high-grade SILs (LSIL/HSIL. The multivariate logistic regression showed that HPV viral load was associated with an increased odds of LSIL/HSIL, odds ratio of 10.7 (95% CI 2.0 – 57.7 for those that were HC2 positive and had a viral load of ≤ 181.1 RLU (the median HPV viral load, and 33.8 (95% CI 6.4 – 178.9 for those that were HC2 positive with a HPV viral load > 181.1 RLU. Conclusion Women initiating ARVs have a high prevalence of abnormal Pap smears and HR-HPV. Our results underscore the need

  17. Correlation analysis of high-risk human papillomavirus viral load and cervical lesions

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    Xiao-xing MA

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To explore the association between high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV viral load and pathological grades of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN and cervical cancer. Methods  A total of 1248 patients from General Hospital of PLA, who underwent colposcopy and surgery due to cervical lesions between Jan. 2006 and Aug. 2011 were enrolled in this study, and they were divided five groups: cervicitis, CIN Ⅰ, CIN Ⅱ-Ⅲ, stage Ⅰ cervical cancer and stage Ⅱ cervical cancer. HR-HPV viral load (RLU/CO was determined by the Hybrid Capture Ⅱ (HCⅡ system, and they were categorized into five groups: 0-0.99, 1.00-9.99, 10.00-99.99, 100.00-999.99, ≥1000.00. The mean value and standard deviation of different HR-HPV viral load in the patients with cervicitis or with CIN Ⅰ, CINⅡ-Ⅲ, stage Ⅰ cervical cancer or stage Ⅱ cervical cancer were compared, and the correlation of HR-HPV viral load and pathogenesis of cervical lesions was analyzed. Results  HPV viral loads were significantly higher in CINⅠ(842.1±983.9, CINⅡ-Ⅲ (690.1±795.0, stage Ⅰ cervical cancer (893.1±974.2 and stage Ⅱ cervical cancer (699.5±908.3 patients than in cervicitis patients (274.2±613.6, P < 0.05, and the HPV viral loads in CINⅠ(842.1±983.9 and stage Ⅰ cervical cancer patients were higher than those in CINⅡ-Ⅲ patients (P < 0.05. When HR-HPV viral load was ≥100RLU/CO, the risk of CIN and cervical cancer increased with the increase in viral load, but there was no correlation between the viral load and pathological grades of cervical lesions. In the patients with stage ⅠB-Ⅱ cervical squamous cell carcinoma, when the HR-HPV viral load was ≥100RLU/CO, the risk of lymph node metastasis increased (P < 0.05, and the number of patients with maximum diameter of the cervical tumor ≥4cm also increased (P < 0.05. However, the HR-HPV viral load was not correlated with patient age, pathological type of the lesion, depth of cancer

  18. No association between HPV positive breast cancer and expression of human papilloma viral transcripts.

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    Gannon, Orla M; Antonsson, Annika; Milevskiy, Michael; Brown, Melissa A; Saunders, Nicholas A; Bennett, Ian C

    2015-12-14

    Infectious agents are thought to be responsible for approximately 16% of cancers worldwide, however there are mixed reports in the literature as to the prevalence and potential pathogenicity of viruses in breast cancer. Furthermore, most studies to date have focused primarily on viral DNA rather than the expression of viral transcripts. We screened a large cohort of fresh frozen breast cancer and normal breast tissue specimens collected from patients in Australia for the presence of human papilloma virus (HPV) DNA, with an overall prevalence of HPV of 16% and 10% in malignant and non-malignant tissue respectively. Samples that were positive for HPV DNA by nested PCR were screened by RNA-sequencing for the presence of transcripts of viral origin, using three different bioinformatic pipelines. We did not find any evidence for HPV or other viral transcripts in HPV DNA positive samples. In addition, we also screened publicly available breast RNA-seq data sets for the presence of viral transcripts and did not find any evidence for the expression of viral transcripts (HPV or otherwise) in other data sets. This data suggests that transcription of viral genomes is unlikely to be a significant factor in breast cancer pathogenesis.

  19. Partner Human Papillomavirus Viral Load and Incident Human Papillomavirus Detection in Heterosexual Couples.

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    Grabowski, Mary K; Kong, Xiangrong; Gray, Ronald H; Serwadda, David; Kigozi, Godfrey; Gravitt, Patti E; Nalugoda, Fred; Reynolds, Steven J; Wawer, Maria J; Redd, Andrew D; Watya, Stephen; Quinn, Thomas C; Tobian, Aaron A R

    2016-03-15

    The association between partner human papillomavirus (HPV) viral load and incident HPV detection in heterosexual couples is unknown. HPV genotypes were detected in 632 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative couples followed for 2 years in a male circumcision trial in Rakai, Uganda, using the Roche HPV Linear Array. This assay detects 37 genotypes and provides a semiquantitative measure of viral load based on the intensity (graded 1-4) of the genotype-specific band; a band intensity of 1 indicates a low genotype-specific HPV load, whereas an intensity of 4 indicates a high load. Using Poisson regression with generalized estimating equations, we measured the association between partner's genotype-specific viral load and detection of that genotype in the HPV-discordant partner 1 year later. Incident detection of HPV genotypes was 10.6% among men (54 of 508 genotype-specific visit intervals) and 9.0% among women (55 of 611 genotype-specific visit intervals). Use of male partners with a baseline genotype-specific band intensity of 1 as a reference yielded adjusted relative risks (aRRs) of 1.14 (95% confidence interval [CI], .58-2.27]) for incident detection of that genotype among women whose male partner had a baseline band intensity of 2, 1.75 (95% CI, .97-3.17) among those whose partner had an intensity of 3, and 2.52 (95% CI, 1.40-4.54) among those whose partner had an intensity of 4. Use of female partners with a baseline genotype-specific band intensity of 1 as a reference yielded an aRR of 2.83 (95% CI, 1.50-5.33) for incident detection of that genotype among men whose female partner had a baseline band intensity of 4. These associations were similar for high-risk and low-risk genotypes. Male circumcision also was associated with significant reductions in incident HPV detection in men (aRR, 0.53 [95% CI, .30-.95]) and women (aRR, 0.42 [95% CI, .23-.76]). In heterosexual couples, the genotype-specific HPV load in one partner is associated with the risk of new

  20. HPV genotyping and site of viral integration in cervical cancers in Indian women.

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    Das, Poulami; Thomas, Asha; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Shrivastava, Shyam K; Deodhar, Kedar; Mulherkar, Rita

    2012-01-01

    Persistent HPV infection plays a major role in cervical cancer. This study was undertaken to identify HPV types in a cohort of Indian women with locally advanced cervical cancer as well as to determine the physical state and/or site of viral integration in the host genome. Pretreatment biopsies (n = 270) from patients were screened for HPV infection by a high throughput HPV genotyping assay based on luminex xMAP technology as well as MY09/11 PCR and SPF1/2 PCR. Overall HPV positivity was observed to be 95%, with HPV16 being most common (63%) followed by infection with HPV18. Integration status of the virus was identified using Amplification of Papillomavirus Oncogene Transcripts (APOT) assay in a subset of samples positive for HPV16 and/or HPV18 (n = 86) and with an adequate follow-up. The data was correlated with clinical outcome of the patients. Integration of the viral genome was observed in 79% of the cases and a preference for integration into the chromosomal loci 1p, 3q, 6q, 11q, 13q and 20q was seen. Clinical data revealed that the physical state of the virus (integrated or episomal) could be an important prognostic marker for cervical cancer.

  1. HPV genotyping and site of viral integration in cervical cancers in Indian women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poulami Das

    Full Text Available Persistent HPV infection plays a major role in cervical cancer. This study was undertaken to identify HPV types in a cohort of Indian women with locally advanced cervical cancer as well as to determine the physical state and/or site of viral integration in the host genome. Pretreatment biopsies (n = 270 from patients were screened for HPV infection by a high throughput HPV genotyping assay based on luminex xMAP technology as well as MY09/11 PCR and SPF1/2 PCR. Overall HPV positivity was observed to be 95%, with HPV16 being most common (63% followed by infection with HPV18. Integration status of the virus was identified using Amplification of Papillomavirus Oncogene Transcripts (APOT assay in a subset of samples positive for HPV16 and/or HPV18 (n = 86 and with an adequate follow-up. The data was correlated with clinical outcome of the patients. Integration of the viral genome was observed in 79% of the cases and a preference for integration into the chromosomal loci 1p, 3q, 6q, 11q, 13q and 20q was seen. Clinical data revealed that the physical state of the virus (integrated or episomal could be an important prognostic marker for cervical cancer.

  2. Human papillomavirus viral load in predicting high-grade CIN in women with cervical smears showing only atypical squamous cells or low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion

    OpenAIRE

    Santos,André Luis Ferreira; Derchain,Sophie Françoise Mauricette; Martins,Marcos Roberto; Sarian,Luís Otávio Zanatta; Martinez,Edson Zangiacome; Syrjänen,Kari Juhani

    2003-01-01

    CONTEXT: Human papillomavirus (HPV) viral load may have an important role in predicting high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) in women with cervical smears showing atypical squamous cells or LSIL. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the assessment of the viral load of high-risk HPV DNA is useful in predicting the detection of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2 and 3) in women referred because of cervical smears showing only atypical squamous cells or LSIL. TYPE OF S...

  3. Viral DNA load of high-risk human papilloma virus is closely associated with the grade of cervical lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Guqun; Cheng, Jingxin; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Ping; Zhang, Guoqing

    2014-01-01

    This study is to explore the correlation between the viral load of high-risk human papilloma virus (HPV) and the degree of cervical lesions, as well as the follow-up monitoring role of high-risk HPV measurements in the treatment of patients with cervical lesions. Hybrid capture-2 method was used to measure the amount of high-risk HPV load of 361 patients who were enrolled from January 2009 to December 2010 at the Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University, including 76 cases of ...

  4. Hepatitis viral load correlates to glutathione levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Several recent scientific articles have found a direct correlation between Glutathione levels and viral activity for hepatitis B and C. When viral load increases, Glutathione decreases. Researchers from Germany report that adding NAC (N-acetyl cysteine) to HBV producing cells lines can reduce hepatitis viral load 50 fold. Glutathione is used by the liver to help break down toxins. Patients who have chronic infection for more than 90 days should ask their physicians to check their Glutathione levels. A test kit is available from ImmunoSciences Labs; contact information is included. An amino acid, L-Glutamine, can be used with Alpha Lipoic Acid and NAC to increase Glutathione levels. Chlorophyll also offers benefits to people with hepatitis and other infections. Instructions on how to use a special retention enema containing chlorophyll, water, and apple cider vinegar are provided.

  5. Viral DNA load of high-risk human papilloma virus is closely associated with the grade of cervical lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Guqun; Cheng, Jingxin; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Ping; Zhang, Guoqing

    2014-01-01

    This study is to explore the correlation between the viral load of high-risk human papilloma virus (HPV) and the degree of cervical lesions, as well as the follow-up monitoring role of high-risk HPV measurements in the treatment of patients with cervical lesions. Hybrid capture-2 method was used to measure the amount of high-risk HPV load of 361 patients who were enrolled from January 2009 to December 2010 at the Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University, including 76 cases of cervical squamous carcinoma, 119 cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and 166 cases of cervicitis. The correlation between the viral load of high-risk HPV and the degree of cervical lesions was analyzed using correlation analysis. Patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical squamous carcinoma were followed up until December 2013, with the follow-up time being 37-60 months. Statistically significant differences in the high-risk HPV load existed between cervicitis group, CIN group and cervical squamous carcinoma group (P = 0.000). In addition, the viral load was increased with the increase of the severity of cervical lesions, showing a positive correlation (r = 0.436, P = 0.000). During the follow-up, 6 cases of vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia, 3 cases of recurrence CIN and 1 case of vaginal squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva were found, which were shown to relate with the continuing high-risk HPV infection in vagina. Viral load of high-risk HPV were positively correlated with the severity of cervical lesions, playing an important role in the monitoring of patients with cervical lesions after treatment.

  6. Human papillomavirus (HPV types 16, 18, 31, 45 DNA loads and HPV-16 integration in persistent and transient infections in young women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferenczy Alex

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HPV burden is a predictor for high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cancer. The natural history of HPV load in young women being recently exposed to HPV is described in this paper. Methods A total of 636 female university students were followed for 2 years. Cervical specimens with HPV-16, -18, -31, or -45 DNA by consensus PCR were further evaluated with type-specific and β-globin real-time PCR assays. Proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR of infection clearance. Generalized estimating equations assessed whether HPV loads was predictive of HPV infection at the subsequent visit. Results HPV loads were consistently higher among women Conclusions The association between HPV load and persistence is not uniform across high-risk genital genotypes. HPV-16 integration was only rarely demonstrated in young women.

  7. Viral load and short-term natural history of type-specific oncogenic human papillomavirus infections in a high-risk cohort of midadult women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winer, Rachel L; Xi, Long Fu; Shen, Zhenping; Stern, Joshua E; Newman, Laura; Feng, Qinghua; Hughes, James P; Koutsky, Laura A

    2014-04-15

    Oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) viral load may inform the origin of newly detected infections and characterize oncogenic HPV natural history in midadult women. From 2007 to 2011, we enrolled 521 25-65-year-old-female online daters and followed them triannually with mailed health and sexual behavior questionnaires and kits for self-sampling for PCR-based HPV DNA testing. Samples from oncogenic HPV positive women were selected for type-specific DNA load testing by real-time PCR with adjustment for cellularity. Linear or logistic regression models were used to evaluate relationships between viral levels, health and sexual behavior, and longitudinal oncogenic HPV detection. Type-specific viral levels were borderline significantly higher in oncogenic HPV infections that were prevalent versus newly detected (p = 0.092), but levels in newly detected infections were higher than in infections redetected after intercurrent negativity (p detected intermittently, the likelihood of persistent (OR = 4.31, 95% CI: 2.20-8.45) or single-time (OR = 1.32, 95% CI: 1.03-1.71) detection increased per 1-unit increase in baseline log10 viral load. Viral load differences between redetected and newly detected infections suggest a portion of new detections were due to new acquisition, although report of recent new sex partners (a potential marker of new infection) was not predictive of viral load; oncogenic HPV infections in midadult women with new partners likely represent a mix of new acquisition and reactivation or intermittent detection of previous infection. Intermittent detection was characterized by low viral levels, suggesting that intermittent detection of persisting oncogenic HPV infection may be of limited clinical significance. © 2013 UICC.

  8. Development of a fluorescence-based multiplex genotyping method for simultaneous determination of human papillomavirus infections and viral loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhengrong; Zhang, Rong; Liu, Zhonghua; Liu, Chao; Li, Xiulin; Zhou, Weiqiang; Yang, Lianxia; Ruan, Qiang; Zhang, Xu

    2015-11-06

    Persistent high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is correlated with an increased risk of developing intraepithelial lesion or malignancy (NILM). The aims of the current study is to establish a method named BioPerfectus Multiplex Real Time (BMRT) HPV assay for simultaneous typing and quantifying HPVs, and to evaluate it by comparison with HPV GenoArray test and PCR-sequencing method, as well as histological status. A total of 817 cervical specimens were evaluated by BMRT method and HPV GenoArray test, using PCR-sequencing method as the reference standard; simultaneously, high-risk HPV-16 and -18 DNA loads were assessed in 443 specimens to investigate the correlation with infection outcomes. The overall detection coincidence rate between BMRT assay and HPV GenoArray test is 96.6 % and the Kappa value is 0.760. In addition, the sensitivity and positive predictive value of BMRT is 98.4 % and 95.7 % compared with the results detected by PCR-sequencing method, respectively. HPV-16 viral load has a correlation with CINs or worse lesions. By comparing with infected women presenting NILM /cervicitis, the cutoff value for HPV-16 from patients with CINs was 0.827. With this cutoff value, 74.6 % sensitivity and 72.5 % specificity for prediction of HPV-16 infected patients with CINI and higher CIN were achieved. High significance was obtained when comparing the infected women presenting NILM/cervicitis with women either with CIN and cervical carcinomas (p HPV testing, due to its high level of automation and ability to quantify HPV-16, HPV-18 and other HR-HPVs.

  9. Type-dependent association between risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and viral load of oncogenic human papillomavirus types other than types 16 and 18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu Xi, Long; Schiffman, Mark; Ke, Yang; Hughes, James P; Galloway, Denise A; He, Zhonghu; Hulbert, Ayaka; Winer, Rachel L; Koutsky, Laura A; Kiviat, Nancy B

    2017-04-15

    Studies of the clinical relevance of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA load have focused mainly on HPV16 and HPV18. Data on other oncogenic types are rare. Study subjects were women enrolled in the atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) triage study who had ≥1 of 11 non-HPV16/18 oncogenic types detected during a 2-year follow-up at 6-month intervals. Viral load measurements were performed on the first type-specific HPV-positive specimens. The association of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grades 2-3 (CIN2/3) with type-specific HPV DNA load was assessed with discrete-time Cox regression. Overall, the increase in the cumulative risk of CIN2/3 per 1 unit increase in log 10 -transformed viral load was statistically significant for four types within species 9 including HPV31 (adjusted hazard ratio [HR adjusted ] = 1.32: 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14-1.52), HPV35 (HR adjusted  = 1.47; 95% CI, 1.23-1.76), HPV52 (HR adjusted  = 1.14; 95% CI, 1.01-1.30) and HPV58 (HR adjusted  = 1.49; 95% CI, 1.23-1.82). The association was marginally significant for HPV33 (species 9) and HPV45 (species 7) and was not appreciable for other types. The per 1 log 10 -unit increase in viral load of a group of species 9 non-HPV16 oncogenic types was statistically significantly associated with risk of CIN2/3 for women with a cytologic diagnosis of within normal limits, ASC-US, or LSIL at the first HPV-positive visit but not for those with high-grade SIL. Findings suggest that the viral load-associated risk of CIN2/3 is type-dependent, and mainly restricted to the species of HPV types related to HPV16, which shares this association. © 2017 UICC.

  10. HPV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are a group of related viruses. They can cause warts on different parts of your body. There are ... cancer. There are two categories of sexually-transmitted HPV. Low-risk HPV can cause genital warts. High- ...

  11. Sperm viral infection and male infertility: focus on HBV, HCV, HIV, HPV, HSV, HCMV, and AAV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garolla, Andrea; Pizzol, Damiano; Bertoldo, Alessandro; Menegazzo, Massimo; Barzon, Luisa; Foresta, Carlo

    2013-11-01

    Chronic viral infections can infect sperm and are considered a risk factor in male infertility. Recent studies have shown that the presence of HIV, HBV or HCV in semen impairs sperm parameters, DNA integrity, and in particular reduces forward motility. In contrast, very little is known about semen infection with human papillomaviruses (HPV), herpesviruses (HSV), cytomegalovirus (HCMV), and adeno-associated virus (AAV). At present, EU directives for the viral screening of couples undergoing assisted reproduction techniques require only the evaluation of HIV, HBV, and HCV. However, growing evidence suggests that HPV, HSV, and HCMV might play a major role in male infertility and it has been demonstrated that HPV semen infection has a negative influence on sperm parameters, fertilization, and the abortion rate. Besides the risk of horizontal or vertical transmission, the negative impact of any viral sperm infection on male reproductive function seems to be dramatic. In addition, treatment with antiviral and antiretroviral therapies may further affect sperm parameters. In this review we attempted to focus on the interactions between defined sperm viral infections and their association with male fertility disorders. All viruses considered in this article have a potentially negative effect on male reproductive function and dangerous infections can be transmitted to partners and newborns. In light of this evidence, we suggest performing targeted sperm washing procedures for each sperm infection and to strongly consider screening male patients seeking fertility for HPV, HSV, and HCMV, both to avoid viral transmission and to improve assisted or even spontaneous fertility outcome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. HIV community viral load trends in South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Hrishikesh; Weissman, Sharon; Duffus, Wayne A; Hossain, Akhtar; Varma Samantapudi, Ashok; Iyer, Medha; Albrecht, Helmut

    2017-03-01

    Community viral load is an aggregate measure of HIV viral load in a particular geographic location, community, or subgroup. Community viral load provides a measure of disease burden in a community and community transmission risk. This study aims to examine community viral load trend in South Carolina and identify differences in community viral load trends between selected population subgroups using a state-wide surveillance dataset that maintains electronic records of all HIV viral load measurements reported to the state health department. Community viral load trends were examined using random mixed effects models, adjusting for age, race, gender, residence, CD4 counts, HIV risk group, and initial antiretroviral regimen during the study period, and time. The community viral load gradually decreased from 2004 to 2013 ( p HIV risk group, and single-tablet regimen versus multiple-tablet regimen subgroups. Slower declines in community viral load among females, those in rural areas, and heterosexuals suggest possible disparities in care that require further exploration. The association between using single-tablet regimen and faster community viral load decline is noteworthy.

  13. Synergistic effect of viral load and alcohol consumption on the risk of persistent high-risk human papillomavirus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hea Young Oh

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This prospective study aimed to examine the combined effect of viral load and alcohol consumption on the risk of persistent high-risk (HR human papillomavirus (HPV infection. METHODS: Among women undergoing health screening between 2002 and 2011 at the National Cancer Center, 284 and 122 women with HR-HPV infection and cytological findings of low-grade squamous intraepithelial or lower-grade lesions were followed up for 1 and 2 years, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed, and the relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI and synergy index (S were calculated. RESULTS: Among drinkers, the risks of 1-year (odds ratio [OR] 4.09, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.05-8.18 and 2-year persistence (OR 8.08, CI 2.36-27.6 were significantly higher for high HPV loads than for low HPV loads; this association was not seen for non-drinkers. The risks for 1-year (OR 4.14, CI 1.89-9.05 and 2-year persistence (OR 6.61, CI 2.09-20.9 were significantly higher in subjects with a high HPV load who were also drinkers than in those who were non-drinkers. A high HPV load together with a longer drinking duration or higher alcohol consumption was associated with increased risks of 1-year (OR 3.07, CI 1.40-6.75 or OR 2.05, CI 0.87-4.83 and 2-year persistence (OR 6.40, CI 1.72-23.8 or OR 4.14, CI 1.18-14.6. The synergistic effect of alcohol consumption and HR-HPV load was stronger on the risk of 2-year persistence (RERI = 3.26, S = 2.38 than on the risk of 1-year persistence (RERI = 1.21, S = 1.63. CONCLUSIONS: The synergistic effect of HR-HPV load and alcohol consumption was associated with the risk of HR-HPV persistence and was stronger for longer-term HR-HPV infection. Limiting alcohol consumption might be an important measure to prevent the development of cervical cancer in women with a high HR-HPV load.

  14. Expression of E6/E7 mRNA from 'high risk' human papillomavirus in relation to CIN grade, viral load and p16INK4a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Sonia; Hansson, Berit; Norman, Ingrid; Gaberi, Vera; Mints, Miriam; Hjerpe, Anders; Karlsen, Frank; Johansson, Bo

    2006-09-01

    Detection of E6/E7 mRNA expression with real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification assay (NASBA) method (PreTect HPV-Proofer) from high-risk types of human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) were compared with the presence of viral load, determined with quantitative real-time PCR in 80 cervical samples. Results regarding positivity and typing were in agreement using the two methods. However, there was no correlation between viral loads for HPV 16 or 18/45 and oncogene expression. Among 15 women with low grade atypia detected at a population-based cytology screening, and scored as 'within normal limits' according to histopathology, 14% were positive for oncogene expression, whereas 71% were HR-HPV positive. A correlation was observed between HR-HPV oncogene expression and high scores of p16(INK4a) positivity. Since HPV-Proofer detects full-length E6/E7 mRNA, a positive result should correlate with presence of integrated HPV, loss of HPV replication and stabilized E6/E7 full-length mRNA expression. Such expression from integrated HR-HPV generates a high and stable expression of full-length E6 proteins, which explains why a positive HPV-Proofer result was independent of viral load and correlate with high expression of p16(INK4a). Thus, E6/E7 oncogene expression analysis yielded information, which is consistent with and will complement the results from a real-time PCR method in a clinical prognostic procedure.

  15. Viral load: Roche applies for marketing approval for ultrasensitive test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-08-07

    Roche Molecular Systems has applied for FDA permission to market a more sensitive viral load test. The Amplicor HIV-1 Monitor UltraSensitive Method tests viral load as low as 50 copies; current tests are only accurate to 400 copies. There is a widespread consensus among physicians that testing below 400 copies would be a valuable treatment tool.

  16. PDZ Domains and Viral Infection: Versatile Potentials of HPV-PDZ Interactions in relation to Malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunori Nagasaka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is caused by high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs, and a unique characteristic of these is a PDZ (P̲SD-95/D̲lg/Z̲O-1-binding motif in their E6 proteins. Through this motif HPV E6 interacts with a variety of PDZ domain-containing proteins and targets them mainly for degradation. These E6-PDZ interactions exhibit extraordinarily different functions in relation to HPV-induced malignancy, depending upon various cellular contexts; for example, Dlg and Scrib show different distribution patterns from what is seen in normal epithelium, both in localization and in amount, and their loss may be a late-stage marker in malignant progression. Recent studies show that interactions with specific forms of the proteins may have oncogenic potential. In addition, it is interesting that PDZ proteins make a contribution to the stabilization of E6 and viral episomal maintenance during the course of HPV life cycle. Various posttranslational modifications also greatly affect their functions. Phosphorylation of hDlg and hScrib by certain kinases regulates several important signaling cascades, and E6-PDZ interactions themselves are regulated through PKA-dependent phosphorylation. Thus these interactions naturally have great potential for both predictive and therapeutic applications, and, with development of screening tools for identifying novel targets of their interactions, comprehensive spatiotemporal analysis is currently underway.

  17. Quantification of human papilloma virus (HPV) DNA using the Cobas 4800 system in women with and without pathological alterations attributable to the virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Argüelles, Marta Elena; de Oña-Navarro, María; Rojo-Alba, Susana; Torrens-Muns, Magdalena; Junquera-Llaneza, Maria Luisa; Antonio-Boga, Jose; Pérez-Castro, Sonia; Melón-García, Santiago

    2015-09-15

    Surrogate markers such as viral load are necessary to follow the evolution of disease resulting from infection with Human Papilloma virus (HPV), especially in this era of vaccination. As such, this paper uses the automated system Cobas-4800-HPV to define viral load as number of HPV copies/cell and apply the results to clinical samples. A curve to determine viral load per cell was constructed from HPV plasmid and cell concentrations using the Cobas-4800-HPV system. According to these curves, HPV viral load was determined in 309 positive endocervical swabs (58 from patients with previous HPV-infection, 118 with current lesions and 133 symptom-free patients presenting for screening) from women attending gynaecology consultations from January to June 2013. In curves with r(2)≥0.95 the Cobas-4800-HPV system has a detection limit of 150 (2.18 log) viral copies, and the limit for β-globin corresponds to that of a single cell. In women reporting for screening, viral load was under 10(4) (4 log) copies/10(3) cells. For women with lesions or previous HPV infection loads were significantly higher particularly in the 30-45 year group (p=0.038). Elevated viral loads were especially noticeable in non-HPV 16/HPV 18. Automated system Cobas-4800-HPV is suitable for define viral load of HPV. Correlation between viral load and number of cells established. Higher viral load in women with disease, and those between 30 and 45 years. Increased viral load of non-16/18 high-risk HPV genotypes detected in patients with lesions compared to screening patients. A difference not observed for HPV 16/18, or in coinfections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. 101 . experience with hepatitis b viral load testing in nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    ABSTRACT. Background: Quantification of the viral burden is an important laboratory tool in the management of hepatitis B virus. (HBV)-infected patients. However, widespread use of assays is still hampered by the high cost. Treatment reduces viral load to undetectable levels. HBV infected patients tend to have high HBV ...

  19. Experience with Hepatitis B viral load testing in Nigeria | Okwuraiwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Quantification of the viral burden is an important laboratory tool in the management of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected patients. However, widespread use of assays is still hampered by the high cost. Treatment reduces viral load to undetectable levels. HBV infected patients tend to have high HBV DNA levels, ...

  20. HPV positive neuroendocrine cervical cancer cells are dependent on Myc but not E6/E7 viral oncogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hang; Krawczyk, Ewa; Blancato, Jan; Albanese, Christopher; Zhou, Dan; Wang, Naidong; Paul, Siddartha; Alkhilaiwi, Faris; Palechor-Ceron, Nancy; Dakic, Aleksandra; Fang, Shuang; Choudhary, Sujata; Hou, Tung-Wei; Zheng, Yun-Ling; Haddad, Bassem R.; Usuda, Yukari; Hartmann, Dan; Symer, David; Gillison, Maura; Agarwal, Seema; Wangsa, Danny; Ried, Thomas; Liu, Xuefeng; Schlegel, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Using conditional cell reprogramming, we generated a stable cell culture of an extremely rare and aggressive neuroendocrine cervical cancer. The cultured cells contained HPV-16, formed colonies in soft agar and rapidly produced tumors in immunodeficient mice. The HPV-16 genome was integrated adjacent to the Myc gene, both of which were amplified 40-fold. Analysis of RNA transcripts detected fusion of the HPV/Myc genes, arising from apparent microhomologous recombination. Spectral karyotyping (SKY) and fluorescent-in-situ hybridization (FISH) demonstrated coordinate localization and translocation of the amplified Myc and HPV genes on chromosomes 8 and 21. Similar to the primary tumor, tumor cell cultures expressed very high levels of the Myc protein and, in contrast to all other HPV-positive cervical cancer cell lines, they harbored a gain-of-function mutation in p53 (R273C). Unexpectedly, viral oncogene knockdown had no effect on the growth of the cells, but it did inhibit the proliferation of a conventional HPV-16 positive cervical cancer cell line. Knockdown of Myc, but not the mutant p53, significantly inhibited tumor cell proliferation. On the basis of these data, we propose that the primary driver of transformation in this aggressive cervical cancer is not HPV oncogene expression but rather the overexpression of Myc. PMID:28378747

  1. Viral Load Pattern Among Hepatitis B Surface Antigen‑positive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Viral Load Pattern Among Hepatitis B Surface Antigen‑positive Patients: Laboratory Perspective and ... Journal Home > Vol 6, No 2 (2016) > ... The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web browser has a PDF reader plug-in installed ...

  2. Tissue viral load variability in chronic hepatitis C.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fanning, L

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: Liver biopsy is regarded as the gold standard for assessing disease activity in chronic hepatitis C, but sampling error is a potential limitation. Whether sampling variability applies equally to viral load assessment as it does to histology is uncertain. To examine this, we compared viral load between right- and left-lobe biopsy specimens from patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). METHODS: Bilobe biopsies were taken from 16 patients who were serum positive for HCV RNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Genotype was identified by reverse line probe hybridization. There was an absence of competing risk factors for infectious and other liver diseases in this patient group. Histology and hepatic viral load were assessed blindly. None of the patients had received antiviral therapy at the time of study. RESULTS: Detection of HCV in right and left lobes was concordant with serum positivity in all cases. The viral load between lobes was highly correlated (p = 0.0003, r = 0.79). In contrast, the histological activity indices of inflammation and fibrosis\\/cirrhosis were poorly correlated between lobes (p = 0.038, r = 0.60, and p = 0.098, r = 0.50, respectively). CONCLUSION: Hepatic viral load variability does not suffer from the same degree of heterogeneity of sampling variability as does histology.

  3. Ricerca di HPV-DNA e tipizzazione virale nella diagnostica di prevenzione del carcinoma della cervice uterina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Carcheri

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Papillomaviruses are relatively ubiquitous and have been described as causative agents for epithelial lesions in a wide variety of animals as well as in humans. Approximately 30 HPV types have been isolated from anogenital epithelium (cervix, vagina, vulva, rectum and penis. HPVs induce a variety of proliferative lesions, but only the “high-risk” types are associated with anogenital cancers. “Low-risk” viral types include HPV-6 and HPV-11; “high-risk” types include HPV-16, 18, 31 and 56. HPVs “high-risk” types are more strongly associated with high-grade lesions (HSIL than they are with low-grade lesions (LSIL. The traditional process for cervical cancer screening programs (PAP test is vulnerable to air drying artifacts and has limits to sensitivity, since as many as 90 percent of collectet cells can be discarted with collection device. The present study was undertaken to assess the screening performance of HPV-DNA typing in a sample of 142 women drawn from a routine screening for the prevention of cervical cancer. The results indicate that HPV-DNA screening and typing, used together with PAP test, can improve the detection of patients with cervical disease and can serve as a quality assurance indicator in cervical cancer screening programs.

  4. Depletion of HPV16 early genes induces autophagy and senescence in a cervical carcinogenesis model, regardless of viral physical state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanning, Jennifer E; Saini, Harpreet K; Murray, Matthew J; Caffarel, Maria M; van Dongen, Stijn; Ward, Dawn; Barker, Emily M; Scarpini, Cinzia G; Groves, Ian J; Stanley, Margaret A; Enright, Anton J; Pett, Mark R; Coleman, Nicholas

    2013-11-01

    In cervical carcinomas, high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) may be integrated into host chromosomes or remain extra-chromosomal (episomal). We used the W12 cervical keratinocyte model to investigate the effects of HPV16 early gene depletion on in vitro cervical carcinogenesis pathways, particularly effects shared by cells with episomal versus integrated HPV16 DNA. Importantly, we were able to study the specific cellular consequences of viral gene depletion by using short interfering RNAs known not to cause phenotypic or transcriptional off-target effects in keratinocytes. We found that while cervical neoplastic progression in vitro was characterized by dynamic changes in HPV16 transcript levels, viral early gene expression was required for cell survival at all stages of carcinogenesis, regardless of viral physical state, levels of early gene expression or histology in organotypic tissue culture. Moreover, HPV16 early gene depletion induced changes in host gene expression that were common to both episome-containing and integrant-containing cells. In particular, we observed up-regulation of autophagy genes, associated with enrichment of senescence and innate immune-response pathways, including the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). In keeping with these observations, HPV16 early gene depletion induced autophagy in both episome-containing and integrant-containing W12 cells, as evidenced by the appearance of autophagosomes, punctate expression of the autophagy marker LC3, conversion of LC3B-I to LC3B-II, and reduced levels of the autophagy substrate p62. Consistent with the reported association between autophagy and senescence pathways, HPV16 early gene depletion induced expression of the senescence marker beta-galactosidase and increased secretion of the SASP-related protein IGFBP3. Together, these data indicate that depleting HR-HPV early genes would be of potential therapeutic benefit in all cervical carcinogenesis pathways, regardless of viral

  5. Hepatitis C virus genotypes: A plausible association with viral loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma Ghulam Nabi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The basic aim of this study was to find out the association of genotypes with host age, gender and viral load. Material and Methods: The present study was conducted at Social Security Hospital, Pakistan. This study included 320 patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection who were referred to the hospital between November 2011 and July 2012. HCV viral detection and genotyping was performed and the association was seen between genotypes and host age, gender and viral load. Results : The analysis revealed the presence of genotypes 1 and 3 with further subtypes 1a, 1b, 3a, 3b and mixed genotypes 1b + 3a, 1b + 3b and 3a + 3b. Viral load quantification was carried out in all 151 HCV ribonucleic acid (RNA positive patients. The genotype 3a was observed in 124 (82.12% patients, 3b was found in 21 (13.91%, 1a was seen in 2 (1.32%, 1b in 1 (0.66%, mixed infection with 1b + 3a in 1 (0.66%, 1b + 3b in 1 (0.66% and 3a + 3b was also found in 1 (0.66% patient. Viral load quantification was carried out in all 151 HCV RNA positive patients and was compared between the various genotypes. The mean viral load in patients infected with genotype 1a was 2.75 × 10 6 , 1b 3.9 × 10 6 , 3a 2.65 × 10 6 , 3b 2.51 × 10 6 , 1b + 3a 3.4 × 106, 1b + 3b 2.7 × 106 and 3a + 3b 3.5 × 10 6 . An association between different types of genotypes and viral load was observed. Conclusion : Further studies should be carried out to determine the association of viral load with different genotypes so that sufficient data is available and can be used to determine the type and duration of therapy needed and predict disease outcome.

  6. Challenges with targeted viral load testing for medical inpatients at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Challenges with targeted viral load testing for medical inpatients at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital in Blantyre, Malawi. ... At 8 weeks post-discharge the laboratory database was checked for results and was triangulated with the HIV outpatient database to ascertain whether patients had attended clinic, received results, ...

  7. Long-term risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 or worse according to high-risk human papillomavirus genotype and semi-quantitative viral load among 33,288 women with normal cervical cytology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Louise T; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Munk, Christian

    2015-01-01

    In this prospective cohort study, we estimated the long-term risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 or cancer (CIN3+) by high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) genotype and semi-quantitative viral load at baseline among 33,288 women aged 14-90 years with normal baseline cytology. During...... 2002-2005, residual liquid-based cervical cytology samples were collected from women screened for cervical cancer in Copenhagen, Denmark. Samples were HPV-tested with Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) and genotyped with INNO-LiPA. Semi-quantitative viral load was measured by HC2 relative light units in women...

  8. Molecular characterization, tissue tropism, and genetic variability of the novel Mupapillomavirus type HPV204 and phylogenetically related types HPV1 and HPV63.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Šterbenc

    Full Text Available HPV204 is the only newly identified Mupapillomavirus (Mu-PV type in more than a decade. To comprehensively characterize HPV204, we performed a detailed molecular analysis of the viral genome and evaluated its clinical relevance in comparison to the other Mu-PVs, HPV1 and HPV63. The 7,227-bp long genome of HPV204 exhibits typical genomic organization of Mu-PVs with eight open reading frames (ORFs (E6, E7, E1, E2, E8, E4, L2, and L1. We developed three type-specific quantitative real-time PCRs and used them to test a representative collection (n = 1,006 of various HPV-associated benign and malignant neoplasms, as well as samples of clinically normal cutaneous, mucosal, and mucocutaneous origins. HPV204, HPV1, and HPV63 were detected in 1.1%, 2.7%, and 1.9% of samples tested, respectively, and were present in skin and mucosa, suggesting dual tissue tropism of all Mu-PVs. To evaluate the etiological role of Mu-PVs in the development of HPV-associated neoplasms, Mu-PV viral loads per single cell were estimated. HPV1 and HPV63 were present in high viral copy numbers in 3/43 and 1/43 cutaneous warts, respectively, and were identified as the most likely causative agents of these warts. HPV204 viral load was extremely low in a single HPV204-positive cutaneous wart (7.4 × 10-7 viral copies/cell. Hence, etiological association between HPV204 and the development of cutaneous warts could not be established. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate the genetic variability of Mu-PVs by sequencing complete LCR genomic regions of HPV204, HPV1, and HPV63. We detected several nucleotide substitutions and deletions within the LCR genomic regions of Mu-PVs and identified two genetic variants of HPV204 and HPV63 and five genetic variants of HPV1.

  9. Measles viral load may reflect SSPE disease progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin L

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE is a rare, slowly progressive neurological disorder caused by the persistent infection with measles virus (MV. Despite much research into SSPE, its pathology remains obscure. We examined autopsy tissues of eight SSPE patients by real time quantitative PCR, immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting to determine viral load. MV N, M and H gene RNA could be detected in the central nervous system (CNS of all patients and in two non-CNS tissues of one patient. The viral burden between patients differed up to four-fold by quantitative PCR and corresponded with detection of MV protein. The level of both viral RNA and antigen in the brain may correlate with disease progression.

  10. Pregnant and breastfeeding women: A priority population for HIV viral load monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, Landon; Essajee, Shaffiq; Broyles, Laura N; Watts, D Heather; Lesosky, Maia; El-Sadr, Wafaa M; Abrams, Elaine J

    2017-08-01

    Landon Myer and colleagues discuss viral load monitoring for pregnant HIV-positive women and those breastfeeding; ART treatments can suppress viral load and are key to preventing transmission to the child.

  11. HPV genotyping and site of viral integration in cervical cancers in Indian women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Das, Poulami; Thomas, Asha; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Shrivastava, Shyam K; Deodhar, Kedar; Mulherkar, Rita

    2012-01-01

    .... Pretreatment biopsies (n = 270) from patients were screened for HPV infection by a high throughput HPV genotyping assay based on luminex xMAP technology as well as MY09/11 PCR and SPF1/2 PCR...

  12. Specific interaction between hnRNP H and HPV16 L1 proteins: Implications for late gene auto-regulation enabling rapid viral capsid protein production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Zi-Zheng; Sun, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Min; Huang, Hui [National Institute of Diagnostics and Vaccine Development in Infectious Diseases, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Zhang, Jun; Xia, Ning-Shao [National Institute of Diagnostics and Vaccine Development in Infectious Diseases, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Public Health, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Miao, Ji, E-mail: jmiao@xmu.edu.cn [National Institute of Diagnostics and Vaccine Development in Infectious Diseases, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Zhao, Qinjian, E-mail: qinjian_zhao@xmu.edu.cn [National Institute of Diagnostics and Vaccine Development in Infectious Diseases, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Public Health, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► The RNA-binding hnRNP H regulates late viral gene expression. ► hnRNP H activity was inhibited by a late viral protein. ► Specific interaction between HPV L1 and hnRNP H was demonstrated. ► Co-localization of HPV L1 and hnRNP H inside cells was observed. ► Viral capsid protein production, enabling rapid capsid assembly, was implicated. -- Abstract: Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), including hnRNP H, are RNA-binding proteins that function as splicing factors and are involved in downstream gene regulation. hnRNP H, which binds to G triplet regions in RNA, has been shown to play an important role in regulating the staged expression of late proteins in viral systems. Here, we report that the specific association between hnRNP H and a late viral capsid protein, human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 protein, leads to the suppressed function of hnRNP H in the presence of the L1 protein. The direct interaction between the L1 protein and hnRNP H was demonstrated by complex formation in solution and intracellularly using a variety of biochemical and immunochemical methods, including peptide mapping, specific co-immunoprecipitation and confocal fluorescence microscopy. These results support a working hypothesis that a late viral protein HPV16 L1, which is down regulated by hnRNP H early in the viral life cycle may provide an auto-regulatory positive feedback loop that allows the rapid production of HPV capsid proteins through suppression of the function of hnRNP H at the late stage of the viral life cycle. In this positive feedback loop, the late viral gene products that were down regulated earlier themselves disable their suppressors, and this feedback mechanism could facilitate the rapid production of capsid proteins, allowing staged and efficient viral capsid assembly.

  13. Impact of Chloroquine on Viral Load in Breast Milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semrau, Katherine; Kuhn, Louise; Kasonde, Prisca; Sinkala, Moses; Kankasa, Chipepo; Shutes, Erin; Vwalika, Cheswa; Ghosh, Mrinal; Aldrovandi, Grace; Thea, Donald M.

    2006-01-01

    Summary The anti-malarial agent chloroquine has activity against HIV. We compared the effect of chloroquine (n = 18) to an anti-malarial agent without known anti-HIV-activity, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (n = 12), on breast milk HIV RNA levels among HIV-infected breastfeeding women in Zambia. After adjusting for CD4 count and plasma viral load, chloroquine was associated with a trend towards lower levels of HIV RNA in breast milk compared with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (P 0.05). Higher breastmilk viral load was also observed among women receiving presumptive treatment = for symptomatic malaria compared with asymptomatic controls and among controls reporting fever in the prior week. Further research is needed to determine the potential role of chloroquine in prevention of HIV transmission through breastfeeding. Impacte de la chloroquine sur la charge virale dans le lait maternelle La chloroquine, agent antimalarique, a une activité contre le VIH. Nous avons comparé l’effet de la chloroquine à celui d’un autre agent antimalarique, la sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, dont l’activité sur le VIH n’est pas connue, en mesurant les taux d’ARN de VIH dans le lait maternel de femmes allaitantes infectées par le VIH en Zambie. Après ajustement pour les taux de CD4 et la charge virale dans le plasma, la chloroquine comparée à la sulfadoxine pyrimethamine était associée à une tendance vers des teneurs plus bas en ARN de VIH dans le lait maternel (P = 0,05). Des charges virales plus élevées dans le lait maternel étaient aussi observées chez des femmes recevant un traitement présomptif pour des symptômes de malaria par rapport aux contrôles asymptomatiques et par rapport à des contrôles rapportant de la fièvre durant la première semaine. Des études supplémentaires sont nécessaires pour déterminer le rôle potentiel de la chloroquine dans la prévention de la transmission du VIH par l’allaitement maternel. mots clésVIH, malaria, allaitement maternel

  14. Analysis of host genetic diversity and viral entry as sources of between-host variation in viral load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargo, Andrew R.; Kell, Alison M.; Scott, Robert J.; Thorgaard, Gary H.; Kurath, Gael

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the factors that drive the high levels of between-host variation in pathogen burden that are frequently observed in viral infections. Here, two factors thought to impact viral load variability, host genetic diversity and stochastic processes linked with viral entry into the host, were examined. This work was conducted with the aquatic vertebrate virus, Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), in its natural host, rainbow trout. It was found that in controlled in vivo infections of IHNV, a suggestive trend of reduced between-fish viral load variation was observed in a clonal population of isogenic trout compared to a genetically diverse population of out-bred trout. However, this trend was not statistically significant for any of the four viral genotypes examined, and high levels of fish-to-fish variation persisted even in the isogenic trout population. A decrease in fish-to-fish viral load variation was also observed in virus injection challenges that bypassed the host entry step, compared to fish exposed to the virus through the natural water-borne immersion route of infection. This trend was significant for three of the four virus genotypes examined and suggests host entry may play a role in viral load variability. However, high levels of viral load variation also remained in the injection challenges. Together, these results indicate that although host genetic diversity and viral entry may play some role in between-fish viral load variation, they are not major factors. Other biological and non-biological parameters that may influence viral load variation are discussed.

  15. Diagnosing norovirus-associated infectious intestinal disease using viral load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tam Clarence C

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR is the main method for laboratory diagnosis of norovirus-associated infectious intestinal disease (IID. However, up to 16% of healthy individuals in the community, with no recent history of IID, may be RT-PCR positive; so it is unclear whether norovirus is actually the cause of illness in an IID case when they are RT-PCR positive. It is important to identify the pathogen causing illness in sporadic IID cases, for clinical management and for community based incidence studies. The aim of this study was to investigate how faecal viral load can be used to determine when norovirus is the most likely cause of illness in an IID case. Methods Real-time RT-PCR was used to determine the viral load in faecal specimens collected from 589 IID cases and 159 healthy controls, who were infected with genogroup II noroviruses. Cycle threshold (Ct values from the real-time RT-PCR were used as a proxy measure of viral load. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC analysis was used to identify a cut-off in viral load for attributing illness to norovirus in IID cases. Results One hundred and sixty-nine IID cases and 159 controls met the inclusion criteria for the ROC analysis. The optimal Ct value cut-off for attributing IID to norovirus was 31. The same cut-off was selected when using healthy controls, or IID cases who were positive by culture for bacterial pathogens, as the reference negative group. This alternative reference negative group can be identified amongst specimens routinely received in clinical virology laboratories. Conclusion We demonstrated that ROC analysis can be used to select a cut-off for a norovirus real time RT-PCR assay, to aid clinical interpretation and diagnose when norovirus is the cause of IID. Specimens routinely received for diagnosis in clinical virology laboratories can be used to select an appropriate cut-off. Individual laboratories can use this method to

  16. High Heritability Is Compatible with the Broad Distribution of Set Point Viral Load in HIV Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonhoeffer, Sebastian; Fraser, Christophe; Leventhal, Gabriel E.

    2015-01-01

    Set point viral load in HIV patients ranges over several orders of magnitude and is a key determinant of disease progression in HIV. A number of recent studies have reported high heritability of set point viral load implying that viral genetic factors contribute substantially to the overall variation in viral load. The high heritability is surprising given the diversity of host factors associated with controlling viral infection. Here we develop an analytical model that describes the temporal changes of the distribution of set point viral load as a function of heritability. This model shows that high heritability is the most parsimonious explanation for the observed variance of set point viral load. Our results thus not only reinforce the credibility of previous estimates of heritability but also shed new light onto mechanisms of viral pathogenesis. PMID:25658741

  17. High heritability is compatible with the broad distribution of set point viral load in HIV carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Bonhoeffer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Set point viral load in HIV patients ranges over several orders of magnitude and is a key determinant of disease progression in HIV. A number of recent studies have reported high heritability of set point viral load implying that viral genetic factors contribute substantially to the overall variation in viral load. The high heritability is surprising given the diversity of host factors associated with controlling viral infection. Here we develop an analytical model that describes the temporal changes of the distribution of set point viral load as a function of heritability. This model shows that high heritability is the most parsimonious explanation for the observed variance of set point viral load. Our results thus not only reinforce the credibility of previous estimates of heritability but also shed new light onto mechanisms of viral pathogenesis.

  18. An HIV epidemic model based on viral load dynamics: value in assessing empirical trends in HIV virulence and community viral load.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua T Herbeck

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Trends in HIV virulence have been monitored since the start of the AIDS pandemic, as studying HIV virulence informs our understanding of HIV epidemiology and pathogenesis. Here, we model changes in HIV virulence as a strictly evolutionary process, using set point viral load (SPVL as a proxy, to make inferences about empirical SPVL trends from longitudinal HIV cohorts. We develop an agent-based epidemic model based on HIV viral load dynamics. The model contains functions for viral load and transmission, SPVL and disease progression, viral load trajectories in multiple stages of infection, and the heritability of SPVL across transmissions. We find that HIV virulence evolves to an intermediate level that balances infectiousness with longer infected lifespans, resulting in an optimal SPVL∼4.75 log10 viral RNA copies/mL. Adaptive viral evolution may explain observed HIV virulence trends: our model produces SPVL trends with magnitudes that are broadly similar to empirical trends. With regard to variation among studies in empirical SPVL trends, results from our model suggest that variation may be explained by the specific epidemic context, e.g. the mean SPVL of the founding lineage or the age of the epidemic; or improvements in HIV screening and diagnosis that results in sampling biases. We also use our model to examine trends in community viral load, a population-level measure of HIV viral load that is thought to reflect a population's overall transmission potential. We find that community viral load evolves in association with SPVL, in the absence of prevention programs such as antiretroviral therapy, and that the mean community viral load is not necessarily a strong predictor of HIV incidence.

  19. Anti-HPV16 E2 protein T-cell responses and viral control in women with usual vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia and their healthy partners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Jacobelli

    Full Text Available T-cell responses (proliferation, intracellular cytokine synthesis and IFNγ ELISPOT against human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16 E2 peptides were tested during 18 months in a longitudinal study in eight women presenting with HPV16-related usual vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN and their healthy male partners. In six women, anti-E2 proliferative responses and cytokine production (single IFNγ and/or dual IFNγ/IL2 and/or single IL2 by CD4+ T lymphocytes became detectable after treating and healing of the usual VIN. In the women presenting with persistent lesions despite therapy, no proliferation was observed. Anti-E2 proliferative responses were also observed with dual IFNγ/IL2 production by CD4+ T-cells in six male partners who did not exhibit any genital HPV-related diseases. Ex vivo IFNγ ELISPOT showed numerous effector T-cells producing IFNγ after stimulation by a dominant E2 peptide in all men and women. Since the E2 protein is absent from the viral particles but is required for viral DNA replication, these results suggest a recent infection with replicative HPV16 in male partners. The presence of polyfunctional anti-E2 T-cell responses in the blood of asymptomatic men unambiguously establishes HPV infection even without detectable lesions. These results, despite the small size of the studied group, provide an argument in favor of prophylactic HPV vaccination of young men in order to prevent HPV16 infection and viral transmission from men to women.

  20. Anti-HPV16 E2 protein T-cell responses and viral control in women with usual vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia and their healthy partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobelli, Simon; Sanaa, Fedoua; Moyal-Barracco, Micheline; Pelisse, Monique; Berville, Sophie; Villefroy, Pascale; North, Marie Odile; Figueiredo, Suzanne; Charmeteau, Bénédicte; Clerici, Thierry; Plantier, Françoise; Arnold, Françoise; Touzé, Antoine; Dupin, Nicolas; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Guillet, Jean-Gérard; Cheynier, Rémi; Bourgault-Villada, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    T-cell responses (proliferation, intracellular cytokine synthesis and IFNγ ELISPOT) against human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) E2 peptides were tested during 18 months in a longitudinal study in eight women presenting with HPV16-related usual vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) and their healthy male partners. In six women, anti-E2 proliferative responses and cytokine production (single IFNγ and/or dual IFNγ/IL2 and/or single IL2) by CD4+ T lymphocytes became detectable after treating and healing of the usual VIN. In the women presenting with persistent lesions despite therapy, no proliferation was observed. Anti-E2 proliferative responses were also observed with dual IFNγ/IL2 production by CD4+ T-cells in six male partners who did not exhibit any genital HPV-related diseases. Ex vivo IFNγ ELISPOT showed numerous effector T-cells producing IFNγ after stimulation by a dominant E2 peptide in all men and women. Since the E2 protein is absent from the viral particles but is required for viral DNA replication, these results suggest a recent infection with replicative HPV16 in male partners. The presence of polyfunctional anti-E2 T-cell responses in the blood of asymptomatic men unambiguously establishes HPV infection even without detectable lesions. These results, despite the small size of the studied group, provide an argument in favor of prophylactic HPV vaccination of young men in order to prevent HPV16 infection and viral transmission from men to women.

  1. HPV16 E6 polymorphism and physical state of viral genome in relation to the risk of cervical cancer in women from the south of Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szostek, Slawa; Zawilinska, Barbara; Klimek, Malgorzata; Kosz-Vnenchak, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the correlation between HPV16 E6 variants and the physical status of viral genome (integrated, mixed, episomal) among patients with cervical cancer (n=40) and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions - LSIL (n=40). The study was performed on 80 HPV16 positive samples. HPV16 E6 variants were identified using PCR and DNA sequencing. Nucleotide sequences of E6 were compared with the prototype sequence (EUR-350T). The physical state of HPV DNA was determined as the ratio of E2/E6 copy number per cell. Twelve different intratypic variants were identified as belonging to European (in 77 samples) and North-American 1 (in 3 samples) sublineages. The most prevalent non-synonymous variant was EUR-350G, which occurred with similar frequency in cervical cancer and LSIL. The frequencies of additional mutations in variants with EUR-350T or EUR-350G sequences differed significantly. For the first time, missense mutations G122A, C153T and G188A were discovered in EUR-350G variant. The integrated viral genome was predominant in women with cervical cancer. The EUR-350T prototype and EUR-350G without additional mutations variants were prevalent in cervical cancer samples with the HPV16 characterized by integrated DNA. In summary, European variants of HPV16 E6 dominated in both cancer and LSIL group. The presence of EUR-350G favoured the occurrence of additional nucleotide changes. We showed that nucleotide changes occur significantly more often in the mixed form of viral DNA and in LSIL group and that the variants without additional mutations may promote integration of HPV16 genome.

  2. Influenza and rhinovirus viral load and disease severity in upper respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados, Andrea; Peci, Adriana; McGeer, Allison; Gubbay, Jonathan B

    2017-01-01

    The role of viral load in respiratory viral infection is unclear. It is proposed that the viral load of some, but not all respiratory viruses correlate with disease severity. We aimed to determine if an association exists between viral loads among patients in ambulatory settings, compared to those requiring hospitalization/intensive care unit (ICU) admission with influenza A/H3N2, influenza B, or human rhinovirus (HRV); we also explored the impact of age, gender and co-detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae on patient setting. We hypothesized that hospitalized/ICU patients have higher respiratory virus viral loads compared to ambulatory (e.g. walk-in clinics, family practices)/ER patients. We quantified viral load by in-house real-time RT-PCR in 774 nasopharyngeal swabs with influenza A/H3N2, or B or HRV viruses from various patient settings in Ontario, Canada. Mean viral load (log10 copies/ml) of influenza A/H3N2 (6.94) was higher than influenza B (4.96) and HRV (5.58) (p<0.0001). Influenza A/H3N2 viral loads were highest in infants and the elderly; however, increased A/H3N2 viral loads were not associated with hospitalization/ICU admission compared to swabs collected in ambulatory/ER settings. Influenza B viral loads were higher in patients in hospital/ICU settings compared to those in ambulatory settings (OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.11-1.47). HRV viral loads did not differ by age (p=0.67) or setting (p=0.54); there was no association between S. pneumoniae colonization and setting for any virus. When compared to ambulatory/ER patients, viral load was higher in hospitalized/ICU patients with influenza B, but not influenza A or HRV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. BRD4 Phosphorylation Regulates HPV E2-Mediated Viral Transcription, Origin Replication, and Cellular MMP-9 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shwu-Yuan Wu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Post-translational modification can modulate protein conformation and alter binding partner recruitment within gene regulatory regions. Here, we report that bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4, a transcription co-factor and chromatin regulator, uses a phosphorylation-induced switch mechanism to recruit E2 protein encoded by cancer-associated human papillomavirus (HPV to viral early gene and cellular matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 promoters. Enhanced MMP-9 expression, induced upon keratinocyte differentiation, occurs via BRD4-dependent recruitment of active AP-1 and NF-κB to their target sequences. This is triggered by replacement of AP-1 family members JunB and JunD by c-Jun and by re-localization of NF-κB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. In addition, BRD4 phosphorylation is critical for E2- and origin-dependent HPV DNA replication. A class of phospho-BRD4-targeting compounds, distinct from the BET bromodomain inhibitors, effectively blocks BRD4 phosphorylation-specific functions in transcription and factor recruitment.

  4. Association between high nasopharyngeal viral load and disease severity in children with human metapneumovirus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosis, Samantha; Esposito, Susanna; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Tremolati, Elena; Begliatti, Enrica; Tagliabue, Claudia; Corti, Fabiola; Principi, Nicola; Niesters, Hubert G. M.

    Background: Previous studies have shown that viral genotype and viral load may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of viral infections. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate these aspects of hMPV infections in children and their household contacts. Study design: Between I

  5. HPV vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccine - HPV; Immunization - HPV; Gardasil; HPV2; HPV4; Vaccine to prevent cervical cancer; Genital warts - HPV vaccine; Cervical dysplasia - HPV vaccine; Cervical cancer - HPV vaccine; Cancer of the cervix - HPV vaccine; Abnormal ...

  6. Comparison of the performance in detection of HPV infections between the high-risk HPV genotyping real time PCR and the PCR-reverse dot blot assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lahong; Dai, Yibei; Chen, Jiahuan; Hong, Liquan; Liu, Yuhua; Ke, Qiang; Chen, Yiwen; Cai, Chengsong; Liu, Xia; Chen, Zhaojun

    2018-01-01

    A new multiplex real-time PCR assay, the high-risk HPV genotyping real time PCR assay (HR HPV RT-PCR), has been developed to detect 15 high-risk HPV types with respective viral loads. In this report, a total of 684 cervical specimens from women diagnosed with vaginitis were assessed by the HR HPV RT-PCR and the PCR reaction and reverse dot blot (PCR-RDB) assays, using a PCR-sequencing method as a reference standard. A total coincidence of 97.7% between the HR HPV RT PCR and the PCR-RDB assays was determined with a Kappa value of 0.953. The HR HPV RT PCR assay had sensitivity, specificity, and concordance rates (accuracy) of 99.7%, 99.7%, and 99.7%, respectively, as confirmed by PCR-sequencing, while the PCR-RDB assay had respective rates of 98.8%, 97.1%, and 98.0%. The overall rate of HPV infection, determined by PCR-sequencing, in women diagnosed with vaginitis was 49.85%, including 36.26% of single infection and 13.6% of multiple infections. The most common infections among the 15 high-risk HPV types in women diagnosed with vaginitis were HPV-52, HPV-16, and HPV-58, with a total detection rate of 10.23%, 7.75%, and 5.85%, respectively. We conclude that the HR HPV RT PCR assay exhibits better clinical performance than the PCR-RDB assay, and is an ideal alternative method for HPV genotyping. In addition, the HR HPV RT PCR assay provides HPV DNA viral loads, and could serve as a quantitative marker in the diagnosis and treatment of single and multiple HPV infections. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Community-driven demand creation for the use of routine viral load testing: a model to scale up routine viral load testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killingo, Bactrin M; Taro, Trisa B; Mosime, Wame N

    2017-11-01

    HIV treatment outcomes are dependent on the use of viral load measurement. Despite global and national guidelines recommending the use of routine viral load testing, these policies alone have not translated into widespread implementation or sufficiently increased access for people living with HIV (PLHIV). Civil society and communities of PLHIV recognize the need to close this gap and to enable the scale up of routine viral load testing. The International Treatment Preparedness Coalition (ITPC) developed an approach to community-led demand creation for the use of routine viral load testing. Using this Community Demand Creation Model, implementers follow a step-wise process to capacitate and empower communities to address their most pressing needs. This includes utlizing a specific toolkit that includes conducting a baseline assessment, developing a treatment education toolkit, organizing mobilization workshops for knowledge building, provision of small grants to support advocacy work and conducting benchmark evaluations. The Community Demand Creation Model to increase demand for routine viral load testing services by PLHIV has been delivered in diverse contexts including in the sub-Saharan African, Asian, Latin American and the Caribbean regions. Between December 2015 and December 2016, ITPC trained more than 240 PLHIV activists, and disbursed US$90,000 to network partners in support of their national advocacy work. The latter efforts informed a regional, community-driven campaign calling for domestic investment in the expeditious implementation of national viral load testing guidelines. HIV treatment education and community mobilization are critical components of demand creation for access to optimal HIV treatment, especially for the use of routine viral load testing. ITPC's Community Demand Creation Model offers a novel approach to achieving this goal. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of the International AIDS Society published by John Wiley & sons Ltd on behalf of

  8. Carga viral vaginal de HIV em mulheres brasileiras infectadas pelo HIV HIV vaginal viral load in Brazilian HIV-infected women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Campos

    2008-02-01

    undergone histerectomy, had used vaginal medication within the last 48 hours, had had unprotected sex less than 72 hours before, were pregnant, or had genital bleeding. After signing an informed consent, blood samples were obtained for T CD4 lymphocytes count and plasmatic viral load, in addition to cervico-vaginal lavage using 10mL of sterile normal saline, later centrifuged, aliquoted and stored at - 70°C to quantify free HIV-RNA. Plasmatic and vaginal viral load were measured using the kit HIV Monitor v1.5 Cobas Amplicor, Roche. Hybrid Capture test Digene was utilized for HPV (high and low risk, clamydia trachomatis and N. gonorrhoae detection from an endocervical sample. Vaginal swab for bacterioscopy by the Gram method, evaluated according to Nugent criteria was obtained. RESULTS: Among 200 women evaluated, 73.5% were using HAART. The RNA-HIV was detectable in the vaginal lavage of 18 (9%, but in only one of those who had undetectable plasma viral load (0.5%. The vaginal prevalence of HIV was 24 times higher among those with detectable plasmatic HIV. Plasma viral load > 1500 copies/mL, no HAART use, reduced CD4 and bacterial vaginosis had increased prevalence of vaginal HIV-RNA, but in the adjusted statistical analysis, only the former remained significant CONCLUSION: Prevalence of vaginal HIV-RNA was low (9%. Plasmatic viral load > 1500 copies/mL, was the only risk factor for free vaginal HIV-RNA.

  9. Tandemly Integrated HPV16 Can Form a Brd4-Dependent Super-Enhancer-Like Element That Drives Transcription of Viral Oncogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine E. Dooley

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In cancer cells associated with human papillomavirus (HPV infections, the viral genome is very often found integrated into the cellular genome. The viral oncogenes E6 and E7 are transcribed from the viral promoter, and integration events that alter transcriptional regulation of this promoter contribute to carcinogenic progression. In this study, we detected highly enriched binding of the super-enhancer markers Brd4, MED1, and H3K27ac, visible as a prominent nuclear focus by immunofluorescence, at the tandemly integrated copies of HPV16 in cells of the cervical neoplasia cell line W12 subclone 20861. Tumor cells are often addicted to super-enhancer-driven oncogenes and are particularly sensitive to disruption of transcription factor binding to the enhancers. Treatment of 20861 cells with bromodomain inhibitors displaced Brd4 from the HPV integration site, greatly decreased E6/E7 transcription, and inhibited cellular proliferation. Thus, Brd4 activates viral transcription at this integration site, and strong selection for E6/E7 expression can drive the formation of a super-enhancer-like element to promote oncogenesis.

  10. Assessment of the Cavidi ExaVir Load Assay for Monitoring Plasma Viral Load in HIV-2-Infected Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrego, Pedro; Gonçalves, Maria Fátima; Gomes, Perpétua; Araújo, Lavínia; Moranguinho, Inês; Figueiredo, Inês Brito; Barahona, Isabel; Rocha, José; Mendonça, Claudino; Cruz, Maria Cesarina; Barreto, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV plasma viral load is an established marker of disease progression and of response to antiretroviral therapy, but currently there is no commercial assay validated for the quantification of viral load in HIV-2-infected individuals. We sought to make the first clinical evaluation of Cavidi ExaVir Load (version 3) in HIV-2-infected patients. Samples were collected from a total of 102 individuals living in Cape Verde, and the HIV-2 viral load was quantified by both ExaVir Load and a reference in-house real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) used in Portugal in 91 samples. The associations between viral load and clinical prognostic variables (CD4+ T cell counts and antiretroviral therapy status) were similar for measurements obtained using ExaVir Load and qPCR. There was no difference between the two methods in the capacity to discriminate between nonquantifiable and quantifiable HIV-2 in the plasma. In samples with an HIV-2 viral load quantifiable by both methods (n = 27), the measurements were highly correlated (Pearson r = 0.908), but the ExaVir Load values were systematically higher relative to those determined by qPCR (median difference, 0.942 log10 copies/ml). A regression model was derived that enables the conversion of ExaVir Load results to those that would have been obtained by the reference qPCR. In conclusion, ExaVir Load version 3 is a reliable commercial assay to measure viral load in HIV-2-infected patients and therefore a valuable alternative to the in-house assays in current use. PMID:28515216

  11. Human papillomavirus viral load expressed as relative light units (RLU) correlates with the presence and grade of preneoplastic lesions of the uterine cervix in atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Origoni, M; Carminati, G; Rolla, S; Clementi, M; Sideri, M; Sandri, M T; Candiani, M

    2012-09-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing is more sensitive and has higher negative predictive value (NPV) than the Pap test for the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) in patients with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) cytology, but has low specificity, leading to high referral rates to second-level triage. Our goal was to identify the prognostic significance of HPV viral load figures. We evaluated whether a correlation between viral load, expressed as relative light units/cutoff (RLU/CO), and the severity of cervical lesions existed in 614 ASCUS cases. Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2®) RLU/CO values, categorised into five classes, were correlated to clinical outcomes and statistically analysed. A significant correlation (p 1,000 (p ASCUS cases significantly correlates with the severity of cervical cancer precursors. These data may have prognostic value, as they significantly correlate with the probability of a CIN2+ .

  12. Human metapneumovirus viral load is an important risk factor for disease severity in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussy, Jean-François; Carbonneau, Julie; Ouakki, Manale; Papenburg, Jesse; Hamelin, Marie-Ève; De Serres, Gaston; Boivin, Guy

    2014-06-01

    The role of viral load in human metapneumovirus (HMPV) disease severity has not yet been clearly determined. We evaluated the importance of viral load along with other factors in HMPV disease severity among children aged <3 years old. HMPV-positive cases were selected from a cohort of outpatients and hospitalized children with lower respiratory tract infections. HMPV groups (A or B) and viral loads were determined in their nasopharyngeal aspirates. Disease severity was defined by assessing risk for hospitalization and by using two validated clinical severity scores. Of the 118 HMPV cases detected over 4 years for which viral load could be determined, 60 belonged to genotype A and 58 to genotype B. Baseline characteristics were similar in HMPV-A and HMPV-B mono-infected patients. In multivariate analysis, HMPV hospitalization was associated with viral load ≥1000 copies/10(4)cells (OR, 3.2; 95%CI, 1.4-7.4), age <6 months (OR, 3.1; 95%CI, 1.2-8.6) and presence of ≥3 children in the household (OR, 2.7; 95%CI, 1.04-6.9). A high HMPV viral load was also associated with pulmonary rales (p=.03), use of bronchodilators (p=.02) and inhaled corticosteroids (p=.01). HMPV viral load is associated with disease severity in young children along with young age and household crowding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Is Higher Viral Load in the Upper Respiratory Tract Associated With Severe Pneumonia? Findings From the PERCH Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feikin, Daniel R; Fu, Wei; Park, Daniel E; Shi, Qiyuan; Higdon, Melissa M; Baggett, Henry C; Brooks, W Abdullah; Deloria Knoll, Maria; Hammitt, Laura L; Howie, Stephen R C; Kotloff, Karen L; Levine, Orin S; Madhi, Shabir A; Scott, J Anthony G; Thea, Donald M; Adrian, Peter V; Antonio, Martin; Awori, Juliet O; Baillie, Vicky L; DeLuca, Andrea N; Driscoll, Amanda J; Ebruke, Bernard E; Goswami, Doli; Karron, Ruth A; Li, Mengying; Morpeth, Susan C; Mwaba, John; Mwansa, James; Prosperi, Christine; Sawatwong, Pongpun; Sow, Samba O; Tapia, Milagritos D; Whistler, Toni; Zaman, Khalequ; Zeger, Scott L; O' Brien, Katherine L; Murdoch, David R

    2017-06-15

    The etiologic inference of identifying a pathogen in the upper respiratory tract (URT) of children with pneumonia is unclear. To determine if viral load could provide evidence of causality of pneumonia, we compared viral load in the URT of children with World Health Organization-defined severe and very severe pneumonia and age-matched community controls. In the 9 developing country sites, nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs from children with and without pneumonia were tested using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction for 17 viruses. The association of viral load with case status was evaluated using logistic regression. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed to determine optimal discriminatory viral load cutoffs. Viral load density distributions were plotted. The mean viral load was higher in cases than controls for 7 viruses. However, there was substantial overlap in viral load distribution of cases and controls for all viruses. ROC curves to determine the optimal viral load cutoff produced an area under the curve of <0.80 for all viruses, suggesting poor to fair discrimination between cases and controls. Fatal and very severe pneumonia cases did not have higher viral load than less severe cases for most viruses. Although we found higher viral loads among pneumonia cases than controls for some viruses, the utility in using viral load of URT specimens to define viral pneumonia was equivocal. Our analysis was limited by lack of a gold standard for viral pneumonia.

  14. ENHANCING VACCINAL PREVENTION OF THE HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRAL (HPV INFECTION: PROTECTING PEOPLE OF DIFFERENT AGE AND SEX FROM A RANGE OF HPV-ASSOCIATED DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Galitskaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available HPV is the most widespread sexually transmitted infection. HPV affects men and women regardless of age and leads to the development of various anogenital area diseases. International studies proved a wide clinical range of the tetravalent HPV vaccine protection and allowed recommending it for the prevention of not only cervical cancer, but also of vulvar, vaginal and anal cancer and anogenital condylomae in patients of both sexes. 42 countries have already introduced national HPV-vaccination programs in compliance with WHO recommendations. Anogenital area cancer morbidity reduction in these countries is expected in 10-15 years. However, a reduction or even complete disappearance of anogenital condylomae among the population has already been noted in a range of countries because the incubation period of this disease is short; this is the first marker of vaccination efficacy in a population.

  15. [Viral load test conducive to excluding negative subjects from suspects in HIV antibody detections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei, Fa-Xin; Zhang, Qi-Yun; Sun, Wei-Dong; Zhang, Qin; Ye, Jing-Rong; Liu, Hai-Lin; Lu, Hong-Yan

    2008-01-01

    To study whether plasma viral load testing is helpful to exclude ones free from Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections from suspects in HIV antibody detections. 19 Specimens, which showed disconcordant results of the two HIV EIA testing (S/CO test, were selected. Viral load of the specimens were detected. A six-month follow up survey in detecting HIV antibody was conducted in these subjects. None of these 19 cases was observed to be positive HIV viral loads and there was no any progress in WB bands development during the follow-up period. The possibility of HIV infection could be excluded. When the specimens react with very low intensity in both EIA and WB, negative viral load result is conducive to exclude negative subjects from suspects in HIV antibody detections.

  16. Sustainable HIV treatment in Africa through viral-load-informed differentiated care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, Andrew; Shroufi, Amir; Vojnov, Lara

    2015-01-01

    every 6 months, but patients are rarely switched to second-line therapies. To ensure sustainability of treatment programmes, a transition to more cost-effective delivery of antiretroviral therapy is needed. In contrast to the CD4 count, measurement of the level of HIV RNA in plasma (the viral load...... to a second-line regimen. The most feasible approach to measuring viral load in many countries is to collect dried blood spot samples for testing in regional laboratories; however, there have been concerns over the sensitivity and specificity of this approach to define treatment failure and the delay...... in returning results to the clinic. We use modelling to synthesize evidence and evaluate the cost-effectiveness of viral-load-informed differentiated care, accounting for limitations of dried blood sample testing. We find that viral-load-informed differentiated care using dried blood sample testing is cost...

  17. Virological and immunological profiles among patients with undetectable viral load followed prospectively for 24 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katzenstein, T L; Ullum, H; Røge, Birgit T

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To quantify HIV-RNA in plasma, in lymphoid tissue and proviral DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and to relate these to immunological markers among patients with plasma viral load counts of

  18. Mapping HIV community viral load: space, power and the government of bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Marilou; Guta, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    HIV plasma viral load testing has become more than just a clinical tool to monitor treatment response at the individual level. Increasingly, individual HIV plasma viral load testing is being reported to public health agencies and is used to inform epidemiological surveillance and monitor the presence of the virus collectively using techniques to measure ‘community viral load’. This article seeks to formulate a critique and propose a novel way of theorizing community viral load. Based on the salient work of Michel Foucault, especially the governmentality literature, this article critically examines the use of community viral load as a new strategy of government. Drawing also on the work of Miller and Rose, this article explores the deployment of ‘community’ through the re-configuration of space, the problematization of viral concentrations in specific microlocales, and the government (in the Foucauldian sense) of specific bodies which are seen as ‘risky’, dangerous and therefore, in need of attention. It also examines community viral load as a necessary precondition — forming the ‘conditions of possibility’ — for the recent shift to high impact prevention tactics that are being scaled up across North America. PMID:23060688

  19. Residual viraemia in HIV-1-infected patients with plasma viral load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, S.R.; Katzenstein, T.L.; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2008-01-01

    Despite undetectable viral load in conventional assays, probably all human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infected patients have residual viraemia (RV) detectable by ultra-sensitive assays. To study this issue, this study investigated virologic and immunologic consequences of RV in highly active...... was associated with higher pre-HAART plasma viral load suggests that RV is linked to pre-HAART disease progression Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12...

  20. Evolution and taxonomic classification of human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16-related variant genomes: HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV52, HPV58 and HPV67.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zigui Chen

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16 species group (alpha-9 of the Alphapapillomavirus genus contains HPV16, HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV52, HPV58 and HPV67. These HPVs account for 75% of invasive cervical cancers worldwide. Viral variants of these HPVs differ in evolutionary history and pathogenicity. Moreover, a comprehensive nomenclature system for HPV variants is lacking, limiting comparisons between studies.DNA from cervical samples previously characterized for HPV type were obtained from multiple geographic regions to screen for novel variants. The complete 8 kb genomes of 120 variants representing the major and minor lineages of the HPV16-related alpha-9 HPV types were sequenced to capture maximum viral heterogeneity. Viral evolution was characterized by constructing phylogenic trees based on complete genomes using multiple algorithms. Maximal and viral region specific divergence was calculated by global and pairwise alignments. Variant lineages were classified and named using an alphanumeric system; the prototype genome was assigned to the A lineage for all types.The range of genome-genome sequence heterogeneity varied from 0.6% for HPV35 to 2.2% for HPV52 and included 1.4% for HPV31, 1.1% for HPV33, 1.7% for HPV58 and 1.1% for HPV67. Nucleotide differences of approximately 1.0% - 10.0% and 0.5%-1.0% of the complete genomes were used to define variant lineages and sublineages, respectively. Each gene/region differs in sequence diversity, from most variable to least variable: noncoding region 1 (NCR1 /noncoding region 2 (NCR2 >upstream regulatory region (URR> E6/E7 > E2/L2 > E1/L1.These data define maximum viral genomic heterogeneity of HPV16-related alpha-9 HPV variants. The proposed nomenclature system facilitates the comparison of variants across epidemiological studies. Sequence diversity and phylogenies of this clinically important group of HPVs provides the basis for further studies of discrete viral evolution, epidemiology, pathogenesis and

  1. Epstein-Barr viral load before a liver transplant in children with chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakibazad, Nader; Honar, Naser; Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Alborzi, Abdolvahab

    2014-12-01

    Many children with chronic liver disease require a liver transplant. These patients are prone to various infections, including Epstein-Barr virus infection. This study sought to measure the Epstein-Barr viral load by polymerase chain reaction before a liver transplant. This cross-sectional study was done at the Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran, in 2011. All patients were aged younger than 18 years with chronic liver disease and were candidates for a liver transplant at the Shiraz Nemazee Hospital Organ Transplant Center. They had been investigated regarding their demographic characteristics, underlying disease, laboratory findings, and Epstein-Barr viral load by real-time TaqMan polymerase chain reaction. Ninety-eight patients were studied and the mean age was 6.5 ± 5.9 years. Cryptogenic cirrhosis was the most-prevalent reason for liver transplant, and the death rate before a transplant was 15%. Among the study subjects, 6 had measurable Epstein-Barr viral load by polymerase chain reaction before the transplant, and 4 of them had considerably higher Epstein-Barr viral loads (more than 1000 copies/mL). With respect to the close prevalence of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (6%) and the high Epstein-Barr viral load in the patients before a transplant (4%), high pretransplant Epstein-Barr viral load can be considered a risk factor for posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

  2. Cytomegalovirus Viral Load in Bronchoalveolar Lavage to Diagnose Lung Transplant Associated CMV Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodding, Isabelle Paula; Schultz, Hans Henrik; Jensen, Jens-Ulrik; Kirkby, Nikolai; Perch, Michael; Andersen, Claus; Lundgren, Jens D; Iversen, Martin

    2018-02-01

    The diagnostic yield for cytomegalovirus (CMV) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) viral load in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) or in plasma to diagnose CMV pneumonia in lung transplant recipients remains uncertain and was investigated in a large cohort of consecutive lung transplant recipients. Bronchoscopies within the first year of lung transplantation with CMV detectable in BAL by PCR (ie, viral load, ≥273 IU/mL) were included (66 recipients; 145 bronchoscopies); at each bronchoscopy episode, 2 independent experts reviewed clinical and laboratory information to determine whether the patient at that time fulfilled the criteria for CMV pneumonia per current international recommendations. Corresponding plasma CMV PCR viral load determined at time of the bronchoscopy (n = 126) was also studied. Optimal CMV PCR viral load cutoff for CMV pneumonia diagnosis was determined using receiver operating characteristics. CMV was detected in BAL with CMV PCR in 145 episodes, and 34 (23%) of these episodes fulfilled the criteria for CMV pneumonia. The area under the curve-receiver operating characteristics for CMV in BAL was 90% at the optimum cutoff (4545 IU/mL) with a corresponding sensitivity of 91% and specificity of 77% (in plasma the corresponding values were 274 IU/mL, 63% and 76%, respectively). CMV PCR viral load in BAL had a high performance to diagnose CMV pneumonia in lung transplant recipients; plasma CMV viral load did not reliably aid as a diagnostic tool.

  3. Sustainable HIV Treatment in Africa through Viral Load-Informed Differentiated Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Andrew; Shroufi, Amir; Vojnov, Lara; Cohn, Jennifer; Roberts, Teri; Ellman, Tom; Bonner, Kimberly; Rousseau, Christine; Garnett, Geoff; Cambiano, Valentina; Nakagawa, Fumiyo; Ford, Deborah; Bansi-Matharu, Loveleen; Miners, Alec; Lundgren, Jens; Eaton, Jeff; Parkes-Ratanshi, Rosalind; Katz, Zachary; Maman, David; Ford, Nathan; Vitoria, Marco; Doherty, Meg; Dowdy, David; Nichols, Brooke; Murtagh, Maurine; Wareham, Meghan; Palamountain, Kara; Musanhu, Christine Chiedza; Stevens, Wendy; Katzenstein, David; Ciaranello, Andrea; Barnabas, Ruanne; Braithwaite, Scott; Bendavid, Eran; Nathoo, Kusum J; van de Vijver, David; Wilson, David; Holmes, Charles; Bershteyn, Anna; Walker, Simon; Raizes, Elliot; Jani, Ilesh; Nelson, Lisa; Peeling, Rosanna; Terris-Prestholt, Fern; Murungu, Joseph; Mutasa-Apollo, Tsitsi; Hallett, Timothy; Revill, Paul

    2016-01-01

    There are inefficiencies in current approaches to monitoring patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa. Patients typically attend clinics every 1–3 months for clinical assessment, with clinic costs being comparable with costs of drugs themselves, CD4 counts are measured every 6 months, yet patients are rarely switched to second-line therapies. To ensure sustainability of treatment programmes a transition to more cost-effective ART deliver is needed. In contrast to the CD4 count, measurement of the level of HIV RNA in plasma (“viral load”) provides a direct measure of current treatment effect. Viral load informed differentiated care is a means of tailoring care whereby those with suppressed viral load have less frequent clinical visits and attention is paid to those with unsuppressed viral load to promote adherence and timely switching to a second-line regimen. The most feasible approach in many countries to measure viral load is by collecting dried blood spot (DBS) samples for testing in regional laboratories, although there have been concerns over the sensitivity/specificity of DBS to define treatment failure and the delay in receiving results. We use modelling to synthesize available evidence and evaluate the cost-effectiveness of viral load-informed differentiated care, account for limitations of DBS. We find that viral load-informed differentiated care using DBS is expected to be cost-effective and is recommended as the strategy for patient monitoring, although further empirical evidence as the approach is rolled out would be of value. We also explore the potential benefits of future availability of point-of-care (POC) viral load tests. PMID:26633768

  4. Changes in plasma viral load and penile viral shedding after circumcision among HIV-positive men in Kisumu, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odoyo-June, Elijah; Rogers, John H; Jaoko, Walter; Bailey, Robert C

    2013-12-15

    We conducted a prospective cohort study of HIV-positive men aged 18-35 years in Kisumu, Kenya to determine if medical circumcision of ART-naive HIV-positive men leads to increased viral load and penile viral shedding. From 108 HIV-positive men circumcised by forceps-guided method and followed up weekly for 6 weeks, 29 men were evaluated for penile viral shedding. HIV-1 RNA was measured in plasma from 19 men and in penile lavage samples from 29 men. Samples were collected before circumcision and at weekly intervals for 6 weeks or until the circumcision wound was healed. CD4 T-cell counts from 102 HIV-positive men were determined at baseline and at 2 weeks thereafter. Wounds with healthy scar, no scab or opening, and no suture tracks were deemed healed. Among 65 ART-naive men, mean CD4 T-cell count increased from 417 cells per cubic millimeter at baseline to 456 cells per cubic millimeter after 2 weeks (P = 0.04), but did not change in the 37 men on ART (P = 0.81). There was no change in HIV plasma viral load (P = 0.36), but penile viral shedding rose significantly within 1 week after circumcision then declined to undetectable levels by 6 weeks (multivariate analysis of variance; P healing. Medical circumcision among ART-naive HIV-infected men results in a transitory rise in penile viral shedding before complete wound healing, which should pose no additional risk of HIV transmission if men adhere to 6 weeks postcircumcision sexual abstinence and use condoms consistently.

  5. Correlation between viral load of cytomegalovirus and tacrolimus and sirolimus levels in transplanted pediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herlinda Reyes-Pérez

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: These data support that the doses of immunosuppressive drugs do not correlate with the levels of the same in whole blood. Therefore, systemic levels of immunosuppressant should be constantly monitored together with CMV load. Meanwhile, a high correlation between viral load measured in whole blood and plasma was found.

  6. Antiretroviral treatment, viral load of mothers & perinatal HIV transmission in Mumbai, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati P Ahir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Mother-to-child transmission (MTCT is the most significant route of HIV transmission in children below the age of 15 yr. In India, perinatal HIV transmission, even after treatment, accounts for 5.4 per cent of HIV cases. The present study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of anti-retro viral therapy (ART or prophylactic treatment (PT to control maternal viral load in HIV positive women, and its effect on vertical HIV transmission to their infants. Methods: A total of 58 HIV positive women were enrolled at the time of delivery and their plasma samples were obtained within 24 h of delivery for estimation of viral load. Viral load analysis was completed in 38 women. Infants received single dose nevirapine within 2 h of birth and zidovudine for 6 wk. At the end of 18 month follow up, HIV positive or negative status was available in 28 infants. Results: Results revealed undetectable levels of viral load in 58.3 per cent of women with ART compared to 30.7 per cent of women with PT. No women on ART had viral load more than 10,000 copies/ml, whereas seven (26.9%, P=0.07 women receiving PT had this viral load. Median CD4 count of women on PT (483 cells/μl was high compared to the women on ART (289 cells/ μl. At the end of 18 months follow up, only two children were HIV positive, whose mothers were on PT. One had in utero transmission; infection detected within 48 h of delivery, while the other child was infected post partum as HIV was detected at six months follow up. Interpretation & conclusions: Women who received a single dose of nevirapine during delivery had higher levels of viral load than women on ART. Combination drug therapy for pregnant women is now a standard of care in most of the western countries; use of nevirapine monotherapy at the time of delivery in our settings is not effective in controlling viral load. This highlights initiation of ART in pregnant women to control their viral load and thus to inhibit

  7. Multicenter Evaluation of the Cepheid Xpert Hepatitis C Virus Viral Load Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, M P; Wu, A H B; Chevaliez, S; Pawlotsky, J M; Hallin, M; Templeton, K E

    2017-05-01

    Viral load monitoring for hepatitis C virus (HCV) is necessary to diagnose infection and monitor response to therapy, but the tests involved are currently confined to specialist institutions. There is a need for a fast, accurate assay with limited operator input to enhance the access to viral load monitoring. We evaluated the quantification of HCV RNA in serum and plasma by the Cepheid Xpert HCV Viral Load assay in comparison to the Abbott RealTi m e HCV assay. Serum and plasma samples were gathered from HCV-infected individuals at four international sites. These were tested with the Xpert HCV Viral Load assay, and results were compared to quantification by the Abbott RealTi m e HCV assay. An external quality assessment panel of eight samples was also tested. In total, 614 samples were analyzed in the study, and the qualitative results agreed on the two platforms for 588 (95.8%) samples. Further analysis of 396 samples quantified by both tests showed strong correlation (correlation coefficient r = 0.99) across the quantifiable range, with Bland-Altman plot data showing a mean difference (±1.96 standard deviation) of 0.03 ± 0.44 log 10 IU/ml. In the external quality assessment panel, the Xpert HCV Viral Load assay results (quantified in log 10 IU per milliliter) were within 1 standard deviation of the target value for all but one sample, which was also similarly misquantified by the Abbott RealTime HCV assay. The Xpert HCV Viral Load assay performs well compared to a market-leading HCV viral load test and should be considered for instances where rapid near-to-patient testing is required. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. Variables that influence HIV-1 cerebrospinal fluid viral load in cryptococcal meningitis: a linear regression analysis

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    Cecchini Diego M

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The central nervous system is considered a sanctuary site for HIV-1 replication. Variables associated with HIV cerebrospinal fluid (CSF viral load in the context of opportunistic CNS infections are poorly understood. Our objective was to evaluate the relation between: (1 CSF HIV-1 viral load and CSF cytological and biochemical characteristics (leukocyte count, protein concentration, cryptococcal antigen titer; (2 CSF HIV-1 viral load and HIV-1 plasma viral load; and (3 CSF leukocyte count and the peripheral blood CD4+ T lymphocyte count. Methods Our approach was to use a prospective collection and analysis of pre-treatment, paired CSF and plasma samples from antiretroviral-naive HIV-positive patients with cryptococcal meningitis and assisted at the Francisco J Muñiz Hospital, Buenos Aires, Argentina (period: 2004 to 2006. We measured HIV CSF and plasma levels by polymerase chain reaction using the Cobas Amplicor HIV-1 Monitor Test version 1.5 (Roche. Data were processed with Statistix 7.0 software (linear regression analysis. Results Samples from 34 patients were analyzed. CSF leukocyte count showed statistically significant correlation with CSF HIV-1 viral load (r = 0.4, 95% CI = 0.13-0.63, p = 0.01. No correlation was found with the plasma viral load, CSF protein concentration and cryptococcal antigen titer. A positive correlation was found between peripheral blood CD4+ T lymphocyte count and the CSF leukocyte count (r = 0.44, 95% CI = 0.125-0.674, p = 0.0123. Conclusion Our study suggests that CSF leukocyte count influences CSF HIV-1 viral load in patients with meningitis caused by Cryptococcus neoformans.

  9. Effects of Interferon-α/β on HBV Replication Determined by Viral Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yongjun; Chen, Wen-ling; Ou, Jing-hsiung James

    2011-01-01

    Interferons α and β (IFN-α/β) are type I interferons produced by the host to control microbial infections. However, the use of IFN-α to treat hepatitis B virus (HBV) patients generated sustained response to only a minority of patients. By using HBV transgenic mice as a model and by using hydrodynamic injection to introduce HBV DNA into the mouse liver, we studied the effect of IFN-α/β on HBV in vivo. Interestingly, our results indicated that IFN-α/β could have opposite effects on HBV: they suppressed HBV replication when viral load was high and enhanced HBV replication when viral load was low. IFN-α/β apparently suppressed HBV replication via transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulations. In contrast, IFN-α/β enhanced viral replication by inducing the transcription factor HNF3γ and activating STAT3, which together stimulated HBV gene expression and replication. Further studies revealed an important role of IFN-α/β in stimulating viral growth and prolonging viremia when viral load is low. This use of an innate immune response to enhance its replication and persistence may represent a novel strategy that HBV uses to enhance its growth and spread in the early stage of viral infection when the viral level is low. PMID:21829354

  10. Piecewise mixed-effects models with skew distributions for evaluating viral load changes: A Bayesian approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yangxin; Dagne, Getachew A; Zhou, Shumin; Wang, Zhongjun

    2015-12-01

    Studies of human immunodeficiency virus dynamics in acquired immuno deficiency syndrome (AIDS) research are very important in evaluating the effectiveness of antiretroviral (ARV) therapies. The potency of ARV agents in AIDS clinical trials can be assessed on the basis of a viral response such as viral decay rate or viral load change in plasma. Following ARV treatment, the profile of each subject's viral load tends to follow a 'broken stick'-like dynamic trajectory, indicating multiple phases of decline and increase in viral loads. Such multiple-phases (change-points) can be described by a random change-point model with random subject-specific parameters. One usually assumes a normal distribution for model error. However, this assumption may be unrealistic, obscuring important features of within- and among-subject variations. In this article, we propose piecewise linear mixed-effects models with skew-elliptical distributions to describe the time trend of a response variable under a Bayesian framework. This methodology can be widely applied to real problems for longitudinal studies. A real data analysis, using viral load data from an AIDS study, is carried out to illustrate the proposed method by comparing various candidate models. Biologically important findings are reported, and these findings also suggest that it is very important to assume a model with skew distribution in order to achieve reliable results, in particular, when the data exhibit skewness. © The Author(s) 2011.

  11. Impact of collection method on assessment of semen HIV RNA viral load.

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    Brendan J W Osborne

    Full Text Available The blood HIV RNA viral load is the best-defined predictor of HIV transmission, in part due to ease of measurement and the correlation of blood and genital tract (semen or cervico-vaginal viral load, although recent studies found semen HIV RNA concentration to be a stronger predictor of HIV transmission. There is currently no standardized method for semen collection when measuring HIV RNA concentration. Therefore, we compared two collection techniques in order to study of the impact of antiretroviral therapy on the semen viral load.Semen was collected by masturbation from HIV-infected, therapy-naïve men who have sex with men (MSM either undiluted (Visit 1 or directly into transport medium (Visit 2. Seminal plasma was then isolated, and the HIV RNA concentration obtained with each collection technique was measured and corrected for dilution if necessary. Collection of semen directly into transport medium resulted in a median HIV RNA viral load that was 0.4 log10 higher than undiluted samples.The method of semen collection is an important consideration when quantifying the HIV RNA viral load in this compartment.

  12. HIV viral load scale-up: multiple interventions to meet the HIV treatment cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Sergio; Peter, Trevor; Berrie, Leigh

    2017-03-01

    In 2015, the WHO urged countries to provide ART to all people living with HIV, irrespective of their CD4 cell count, this new recommendation supports the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS elimination targets. However, to meet these aims, urgent scale-up of viral load testing is critical. The multiple interventions in the healthcare system required to support scale-up of viral load testing are reviewed here. It is estimated that 18.2 million individuals are accessing antiretroviral therapy, consequently this will cause significant demand for viral load monitoring; however, at the current rate of implementation, demand will not meet the required target by 2020. To change this trajectory, multiple stakeholders must be involved, communities and key populations need increased treatment literacy to create demand and greater numbers of healthcare workers will require training. In addition, laboratories and point-of-care testing sites will need to be expanded, and adequate monitoring and evaluation tools will need to be put in place to identify gaps in the system, to institute prompt corrective actions and to direct resources where needed. Sufficient scale-up of viral load may well be possible if innovations in mHealth are used to support healthcare workers and patients with regard to the scale-up and effective use of viral load monitoring; new laboratory technologies are implemented, both at a centralized level and point-of-care, to manage higher volumes and improve coverage; and there is careful coordination between implementing partners and funders.

  13. Examining HIV Viral Load in a Matched Cohort of HIV Positive Individuals With and Without Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jashin J; Gilbert, Kathleen E; Batech, Michael; Manalo, Iviensan F; Towner, William J; Raposo, Rui André Saraiva; Nixon, Douglas F; Liao, Wilson

    2017-04-01

    BACKGROUND: HIV-associated psoriasis is well-documented. Genetic, cellular, and cytokine profiles have been used as evidence to suggest psoriasis activates antiviral pathways. There has been a lack of epidemiologic evidence investigating whether psoriasis patients have lower HIV viral counts compared to non-psoriasis patients. OBJECTIVE: Compare the viral load set point of HIV positive patients with and without psoriasis. METHODS: A retrospective matched cohort study of HIV positive patients with and without psoriasis using the Kaiser Permanente Southern California Health Plan database. RESULTS: We identified 101 HIV-positive psoriasis cases; 19 met inclusion criteria and were matched with 3-5 control patients; 94 total patients were analyzed. The mean age was 41.4 (12.07) years and 83% were male. Overall, the median log of the viral load of cases was slightly higher than controls (4.3 vs 4.2; P less than 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: The serum viral load set point of patients with HIV and psoriasis was slightly higher than the viral load set point of HIV patients without psoriasis. J Drugs Dermatol. 2017;16(4):372-377..

  14. The case for viral load testing in adolescents in resource-limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Rebecca; Ferrand, Rashida A; Kranzer, Katharina; Bekker, Linda-Gail

    2017-11-01

    The success of HIV treatment programmes globally has resulted in children with perinatally acquired HIV reaching adolescence in large numbers. The number of adolescents living with HIV is growing further due to persisting high HIV incidence rates among adolescents in low- and middle-income settings, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Although expanding access to HIV viral load monitoring is necessary to achieve the 90-90-90 targets across the HIV care continuum, implementation is incomplete. We discuss the rationale for prioritizing viral load monitoring among adolescents and the associated challenges. Adolescents with HIV are a complex group to treat successfully due to extensive exposure to antiretroviral therapy for those with perinatally acquired HIV and the challenges in sustained medication adherence in this age group. Given the high risk of treatment failure among adolescents and the limited drug regimens available in limited resource settings, HIV viral load monitoring in adolescents could prevent unnecessary and costly switches to second-line therapy in virologically suppressed adolescents. Because adolescents living with HIV may be heavily treatment experienced, have suboptimal treatment adherence, or may be on second or even third-line therapy, viral load testing would allow clinicians to make informed decisions about increased counselling and support for adolescents together with the need to maintain or switch therapeutic regimens. Given scarce resources, prioritization of viral load testing among groups with a high risk of virological failure may be required. Adolescents have disproportionately high rates of virological failure, and targeting this age group for viral load monitoring may provide valuable lessons to inform broader scale-up. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of the International AIDS Society published by John Wiley & sons Ltd on behalf of the International AIDS Society.

  15. Hierarchical clustering of HPV genotype patterns in the ASCUS-LSIL triage study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wilson, Lauren E.; Wheeler, Cosette M.; Carreon, Joseph D.; Gravitt, Patti E.; Schiffman, Mark; Castle, Philip E.

    2010-01-01

    Anogenital cancers are associated with about 13 carcinogenic HPV types in a broader group that cause cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). Multiple concurrent cervical HPV infections are common which complicate the attribution of HPV types to different grades of CIN. Here we report the analysis of HPV genotype patterns in the ASCUS-LSIL triage study using unsupervised hierarchical clustering. Women who underwent colposcopy at baseline (n = 2780) were grouped into 20 disease categories based on histology and cytology. Disease groups and HPV genotypes were clustered using complete linkage. Risk of 2-year cumulative CIN3+, viral load, colposcopic impression, and age were compared between disease groups and major clusters. Hierarchical clustering yielded four major disease clusters: Cluster 1 included all CIN3 histology with abnormal cytology; Cluster 2 included CIN3 histology with normal cytology and combinations with either CIN2 or high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) cytology; Cluster 3 included older women with normal or low grade histology/cytology and low viral load; Cluster 4 included younger women with low grade histology/cytology, multiple infections, and the highest viral load. Three major groups of HPV genotypes were identified: Group 1 included only HPV16; Group 2 included nine carcinogenic types plus non-carcinogenic HPV53 and HPV66; and Group 3 included non-carcinogenic types plus carcinogenic HPV33 and HPV45. Clustering results suggested that colposcopy missed a prevalent precancer in many women with no biopsy/normal histology and HSIL. This result was confirmed by an elevated 2-year risk of CIN3+ in these groups. Our novel approach to study multiple genotype infections in cervical disease using unsupervised hierarchical clustering can address complex genotype distributions on a population level. PMID:20959485

  16. Viral characteristics of human papillomavirus infection and antioxidant levels as risk factors for cervical dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, G Y; Palan, P R; Basu, J; Romney, S L; Kadish, A S; Mikhail, M; Wassertheil-Smoller, S; Runowicz, C; Burk, R D

    1998-11-23

    Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the major causal factor of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). The potential role of nutrition as an additional, independent risk factor for CIN has not been appropriately addressed in the context of HPV. This case-control study evaluated the etiologic role of HPV in terms of viral type and load and examined the association between CIN and plasma levels of micronutrients adjusting for HPV. Cases (n = 378) with histo-pathologically confirmed CIN and controls (n = 366) with no history of abnormal Pap smears were recruited from colposcopy and gynecology clinics, respectively. Risk of CIN was significantly increased among women who were infected with multiple HPV types (odds ratio [OR] = 21.06), a high viral load (OR = 13.08) and HPV 16 (OR = 62.49). After adjusting for HPV positivity and demographic factors, there was an inverse correlation between plasma alpha-tocopherol and risk of CIN (OR = 0.15). Plasma ascorbic acid was protective at a high level of > or = 0.803 mg/dl (OR = 0.46). CIN was not associated with plasma retinol and beta-carotene levels. The effect of genital HPV infection on CIN development is highly influenced by oncogenic viral type and high viral load. Vitamins C and E may play an independent protective role in development of CIN that needs to be confirmed in prospective studies.

  17. Clinical Utility of Viral Load in Management of Cytomegalovirus Infection after Solid Organ Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The negative impact of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection on transplant outcomes warrants efforts toward improving its prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. During the last 2 decades, significant breakthroughs in diagnostic virology have facilitated remarkable improvements in CMV disease management. During this period, CMV nucleic acid amplification testing (NAT) evolved to become one of the most commonly performed tests in clinical virology laboratories. NAT provides a means for rapid and sensitive diagnosis of CMV infection in transplant recipients. Viral quantification also introduced several principles of CMV disease management. Specifically, viral load has been utilized (i) for prognostication of CMV disease, (ii) to guide preemptive therapy, (iii) to assess the efficacy of antiviral treatment, (iv) to guide the duration of treatment, and (v) to indicate the risk of clinical relapse or antiviral drug resistance. However, there remain important limitations that require further optimization, including the interassay variability in viral load reporting, which has limited the generation of standardized viral load thresholds for various clinical indications. The recent introduction of an international reference standard should advance the major goal of uniform viral load reporting and interpretation. However, it has also become apparent that other aspects of NAT should be standardized, including sample selection, nucleic acid extraction, amplification, detection, and calibration, among others. This review article synthesizes the vast amount of information on CMV NAT and provides a timely review of the clinical utility of viral load testing in the management of CMV in solid organ transplant recipients. Current limitations are highlighted, and avenues for further research are suggested to optimize the clinical application of NAT in the management of CMV after transplantation. PMID:24092851

  18. Molecular Analysis of Ganciclovir-Resistant Cytomegalovirus in Renal Transplant Recipients with High Viral Load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, Majid; Behzadian, Farida; Hosseini, Seied Mohammad Javad; Lashini, Hadi

    2016-10-01

    Gancyclovir-resistant (GanR) cytomegalovirus (CMV) remains an issue, especially in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. Some mutations in UL54 and UL97 confer this resistance. Long-lasting high-dose drug exposure, high viral load, together with lack of sufficient compliance with treatment may account for these mutations. The aim of this study was to detect UL97 and UL54 putative mutations conferring ganciclovir-resistance in renal organ transplant recipients with high CMV load. In this cross-sectional study, 58 serum samples were collected from renal transplant recipients who had referred to three hospitals in Tehran from January 2014 to June 2015. Specific criteria such as CMV syndrome, presence of CMV in blood and organ dysfunction were considered. Then, they were tested for viral load in their early fourth month of intravenous ganciclovir treatment. Fifty cases revealing more than 200 copies/mL were analyzed for mutations. Two fragments of UL54 and Ul97 genes were amplified and sequenced bidirectionally. Sequence alignment and statistical analysis were performed by Mutation Surveyor software and t-test respectively. A significant difference was observed in viral load between seronegative and seropositive recipients (P = 0.036). The most frequent mutation was related to D605E in UL97 gene with the rate of 25%. Regardless of viral load, neither putative mutation nor simultaneous mutation was detected in either UL97 and UL54 regions. In spite of high viral load and persistence of symptoms, our population study did not reveal putative mutations. Hence, the direct relationship between the presence of high quantity of CMV and the occurrence of putative mutation cannot be considered. Non-putative gancyclovir resistant mutations and prolonged drug exposure may have a role in these manifestations.

  19. Use of an improved quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay to determine differences in human rhinovirus viral loads in different populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados, Andrea; Luinstra, Kathy; Chong, Sylvia; Goodall, Emma; Banh, Lisa; Mubareka, Samira; Smieja, Marek; Mahony, James

    2012-12-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRV) frequently cause acute respiratory infections and chronic respiratory disease exacerbations. However, testing is not generally offered. We developed a modified HRV quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay to assess viral loads in the community and hospital patients. The assay had a lower limit of detection of 2 log(10) viral copies/mL and displayed linearity over 5 log(10) viral copies, with a lower limit of quantitation of 4 log(10) viral copies/mL. Mean viral loads (95% confidence interval) for hospitalized children, university students, and institutionalized elderly, were 7.08 log(10) viral copies/mL (6.7-7.5), 6.87 log(10) viral copies/mL (6.5-7.2), and 7.09 log(10) viral copies/mL (6.9-7.3), respectively (P = 0.67). Serial specimens of 14 university students showed a decrease of mean viral loads from 6.36 log(10) viral copies/mL on day 1 to 2.32 log(10) viral copies/mL 7 days past symptom onset (P < 0.001). Using an HRV qPCR, we showed that viral loads did not differ between the community and hospitalized populations and significantly decreased following symptoms onset in healthy individuals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Profile of HIV-1 RNA viral load among HIV-TB co-infected patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The overlapping epidemiology of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and tuberculosis (TB) is expected in Nigeria that is ranked 10th amongst the 22 countries that bears the burden of TB worldwide. This study aims to estimate the HIV-1 RNA viral load and impact of anti TB therapy (ATT) in a CD4 cell count ...

  1. Comparison of HIV-1 viral loads, CD4-Th2-lymphocytes and effects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparison of HIV-1 viral loads, CD4-Th2-lymphocytes and effects of praziquantel treatment among adults infected or uninfected with Schistosoma mansoni in fishing villages of ... Single stool samples were examined for S. mansoni eggs using Kato Katz technique at 6-month follow-up and 12 weeks after treatment.

  2. Quantitative molecular viral loads in 7 horses with naturally occurring equine herpesvirus-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estell, K E; Dawson, D R; Magdesian, K G; Swain, E; Laing, S T; Siso, S; Mapes, S; Pusterla, N

    2015-11-01

    Data associating quantitative viral load with severity, clinical signs and survival in equine herpesvirus-1 myeloencephalopathy (EHM) have not been reported. To report the clinical signs, treatment, and temporal progression of viral loads in 7 horses with naturally occurring EHM and to examine the association of these factors with survival. Retrospective case series. The population included 7 horses with EHM presented to the University of California, Davis William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital from May to September 2011. Horses were graded using a neurological grading scale. Daily quantitative PCR was performed on nasal secretions and whole blood. Treatment, survival, outcome and histopathology were reported. At presentation, one horse was neurological grade 5/5, 3 were grade 4/5 and 3 were grade 3/5. All were treated with anti-inflammatory drugs, valacyclovir and management in a sling if necessary. All were infected with equine herpesvirus-1 of DNA polymerase D752 genotype. Peak viral load in nasal secretions and blood of 5 survivors ranged from 6.9 × 10(3) to 2.81 × 10(5) (median 5.11 × 10(4) ) and from 143 to 4340 gB gene copies/million eukaryotic cells (median 3146), respectively. The 2 nonsurvivors presented with grade 3/5 neurological signs and progressed to encephalopathy. Peak viral load was higher in nonsurvivors, with levels in nasal secretions of 1.9 × 10(9) and 2.2 × 10(9) and in blood of 2.05 × 10(4) and 1.02 × 10(5) gB gene copies/million eukaryotic cells. Case fatality was 2/7. Nonsurvivors had viral loads 1000-fold higher in nasal secretions and 10-fold higher in blood than survivors. There was no relationship between severity of clinical signs at presentation and survival. Thus, encephalopathy and high viral load were negatively associated with survival in this population. Further research should be performed to determine whether high viral loads are associated with encephalopathy and poor prognosis. The Summary is

  3. Therapeutic HPV DNA vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ken; Roosinovich, Elena; Ma, Barbara; Hung, Chien-Fu

    2010-01-01

    It is now well established that most cervical cancers are causally associated with HPV infection. This realization has led to efforts to control HPV-associated malignancy through prevention or treatment of HPV infection. Currently, commercially available HPV vaccines are not designed to control established HPV infection and associated premalignant and malignant lesions. To treat and eradicate pre-existing HPV infections and associated lesions which remain prevalent in the U.S. and worldwide, effective therapeutic HPV vaccines are needed. DNA vaccination has emerged as a particularly promising form of therapeutic HPV vaccines due to its safety, stability and ability to induce antigen-specific immunity. This review focuses on improving the potency of therapeutic HPV vaccines through modification of dendritic cells (DCs) by [1] increasing the number of antigen-expressing/antigen-loaded DCs, [2] improving HPV antigen expression, processing and presentation in DCs, and [3] enhancing DC and T cell interaction. Continued improvement in therapeutic HPV DNA vaccines may ultimately lead to an effective DNA vaccine for the treatment of HPV-associated malignancies. PMID:20066511

  4. Digital droplet PCR (ddPCR) for the detection and quantification of HPV 16, 18, 33 and 45 - a short report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillsunde Larsson, Gabriella; Helenius, Gisela

    2017-07-26

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection is associated with several anogenital malignancies. Here, we set out to evaluate digital droplet PCR (ddPCR) as a tool for HPV 16, 18, 33 and 45 viral load quantification and, in addition, to compare the efficacy of the ddPCR assay for HPV 16 detection with that of quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Clinical samples, positive for HPV genotypes 16, 18, 33 and 45 were analyzed for viral load using ddPCR. Sample DNA was cleaved before droplet generation and PCR. Droplets positive for VIC and FAM fluorescence were read in a QX200 Droplet reader™ (BIO-RAD) after which the viral load was calculated using Quantasoft software. We found that DNAs extracted from formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue samples yielded lower amplification signals compared to those obtained from liquid based cytology (LBC) samples, but they were clearly distinguishable from negative background signals. The viral limit of detection was 1.6 copies of HPV 16, 2.8 copies of HPV 18, 4.6 copies of HPV 33 and 1.6 copies of HPV 45. The mean inter-assay coefficients of variability (CV) for the assays ranged from 3.4 to 7.0%, and the mean intra-assay CV from 2.6 to 8.2%. The viral load in the different cohorts of tumor samples ranged from 154 to 340,200 copies for HPV 16, 244 to 31,300 copies for HPV 18 and 738 to 69,100 copies for HPV 33. One sample positive for HPV 45 contained 1331 viral copies. When comparing qPCR data with ddPCR copy number data, the qPCR values were found to be 1 to 31 times higher. Separation of fragments in nanodroplets may facilitate the amplification of fragmented human and viral DNA. The method of digital droplet PCR may, thus, provide a new and promising tool for evaluating the HPV viral load in clinical samples.

  5. Large Variations in HIV-1 Viral Load Explained by Shifting-Mosaic Metapopulation Dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina A Lythgoe

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The viral population of HIV-1, like many pathogens that cause systemic infection, is structured and differentiated within the body. The dynamics of cellular immune trafficking through the blood and within compartments of the body has also received wide attention. Despite these advances, mathematical models, which are widely used to interpret and predict viral and immune dynamics in infection, typically treat the infected host as a well-mixed homogeneous environment. Here, we present mathematical, analytical, and computational results that demonstrate that consideration of the spatial structure of the viral population within the host radically alters predictions of previous models. We study the dynamics of virus replication and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs within a metapopulation of spatially segregated patches, representing T cell areas connected by circulating blood and lymph. The dynamics of the system depend critically on the interaction between CTLs and infected cells at the within-patch level. We show that for a wide range of parameters, the system admits an unexpected outcome called the shifting-mosaic steady state. In this state, the whole body's viral population is stable over time, but the equilibrium results from an underlying, highly dynamic process of local infection and clearance within T-cell centers. Notably, and in contrast to previous models, this new model can explain the large differences in set-point viral load (SPVL observed between patients and their distribution, as well as the relatively low proportion of cells infected at any one time, and alters the predicted determinants of viral load variation.

  6. Brachial amyotrophic diplegia in the setting of complete HIV viral load suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachia, David; Izzy, Saef; Ionete, Carolina; Salameh, Johnny

    2012-12-06

    Brachial amyotrophic diplegia (BAD) is a rare segmental form of motor neuron disease which presents with asymmetric lower motor neuron weakness largely confined to the upper extremities (UE). In the case being reported, a 62-year-old gentleman on antiretroviral treatment since 1993, presented with left-arm weakness in 2007 that quickly progressed to involve the right arm. Complete HIV-viral load suppression had been achieved since 2003. Examination revealed lower motor neuron weakness in both UEs, worse proximally than distally and normal strength in the lower extremities (LEs). Nerve conduction studies showed reduced amplitudes of bilateral median and ulnar nerves' motor responses. Needle electromyography of bilateral UE showed active and chronic denervation/reinnervation changes with normal findings in both LEs. MRI of the cervical spine showed cord atrophy. This is the first case report describing a patient who presented with BAD in the setting of complete HIV-viral load suppression for many years.

  7. Single detection of human bocavirus 1 with a high viral load in severe respiratory tract infections in previously healthy children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lili; Zheng, Shouyan; Xiao, Qiuyan; Ren, Luo; Xie, Xiaohong; Luo, Jian; Wang, Lijia; Huang, Ailong; Liu, Wei; Liu, Enmei

    2014-07-30

    Human bocavirus is a newly discovered parvovirus. Multiple studies have confirmed the presence of human bocavirus1 (HBoV1) in respiratory tract samples of children. The viral load, presentation of single detection and its role as a causative agent of severe respiratory tract infections have not been thoroughly elucidated. We investigated the presence of HBoV1 by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of nasopharyngeal aspirate specimens from 1229 children hospitalized for respiratory tract infections. The samples were analyzed for 15 respiratory viruses by PCR and 7 respiratory viruses by viral culture. At least one virus was detected in 652 (53.1%) of 1229 children, and two or more viruses were detected in 266 (21.6%) children. HBoV1 was detected in 127 children (10.3%), in which 66/127 (52%) of the cases were the only HBoV1 virus detected. Seasonal variation was observed with a high HBoV1 infection rate in summer. A cutoff value of 107 copies/mL was used to distinguish high and low HBoV1 viral loads in the nasopharyngeal aspirates. High viral loads of HBoV1 were noted predominantly in the absence of other viral agents (28/39, 71.8%) whereas there was primarily co-detection in cases of low HBoV1 viral loads (50/88, 56.8%). There were no differences in the clinical symptoms and severity between HBoV1 single detection and co-detection. In cases of HBoV1 single detection, the high viral load group was more prevalent among children with dyspnea and wheezing than was the low viral load group (42.9% vs. 23.7%, P = 0.036; 60.7% vs. 31.6%, P = 0.018). In clinical severity, a significant difference was recorded (25.0% vs. 5.3%, P = 0.003) between high viral load and low viral load groups. Of the HBoV1 positive patients associated with severe respiratory tract infections, 10/18 (55.6%) patients belonged to the HBoV1 high viral load group, and 7/10 (70%) patients had cases of HBoV1 single detection. HBoV1 at a high viral load is not frequently found in co

  8. Comparison of asymptomatic and symptomatic rhinovirus infections in university students: incidence, species diversity, and viral load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados, Andrea; Goodall, Emma C; Luinstra, Kathy; Smieja, Marek; Mahony, James

    2015-08-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) infections are common but poorly characterized in university students. Thus, we characterized asymptomatic and symptomatic HRV infections by incidence, species diversity, and viral load of 502 university students during September and October of 2010 and 2011 from nasal swabs and electronically submitted symptom questionnaires. We tested all symptomatic students and randomly sampled participants who remained asymptomatic (n=25/week, over 8 weeks each study year) on a weekly basis by real-time PCR and sequenced HRV positives. HRV was identified in 33/400 (8.3%) and 85/92 (92.4%) of the asymptomatic and symptomatic students, respectively. We identified a higher than previously reported rate of HRV-B in both groups, although the distribution of HRV species was similar (P=0.37). Asymptomatic viral load averaged 1.2 log10 copies/mL lower than symptomatic HRV (P<0.001). In conclusion, asymptomatic HRV activity preceded peak symptomatic activity in September and October and was associated with lower viral load. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. New onset seizures in HIV--seizure semiology, CD4 counts, and viral loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Mala; Mochan, Andre; Modi, Girish

    2009-05-01

    Thirty-seven HIV-positive patients with new-onset seizures (NOS) were prospectively identified during a 1-year study period. The patients were categorized according to the different mechanisms causing NOS in HIV, namely focal brain lesion (FBL) in 21 patients (57%), meningitis in 6 patients (16%), metabolic derangement (no patient), and no identified cause (NIC) other than HIV itself (10 patients, 27%). Seizure semiology, CD4 counts, and blood and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) viral loads were studied to identify any special characteristics of the different categories. With respect to seizure semiology, all NIC patients had generalized seizures. Two-thirds of the meningitis patients had generalized seizures with one-third having focal seizures. Half of the patients with FBL had generalized seizures and one-third had focal seizures. Status epilepticus was strongly associated with FBL. No significant difference could be detected between the subgroups with respect to CD4 counts and serum and CSF viral loads. The median CD4 count in all patients was 108 cells/ml, indicating advanced immunosuppression. In the FBL group this was 104 cells/ml. In the meningitis group the median CD4 count was 298 cells/ml, and in the NIC group this was 213 cells/ml. Similarly, no differences were noted in the NOS categories with respect to serum and CSF viral loads. Seizures in HIV are a nonspecific manifestation of the seizure mechanism.

  10. Behavioral and Other Characteristics Associated with HIV Viral Load in an Outpatient Clinic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul L Sacamano

    Full Text Available Persons living with HIV (PLWH who are engaged in care, yet not virally suppressed, represent a risk for transmission and opportunity for risk reduction interventions. This study describes characteristics of an outpatient clinic cohort of PLWH by laboratory confirmed viral suppression status and examines associations with demographics and sexual and drug use behaviors gathered through questionnaire. From a sample of 500 clinic patients, 438 were prescribed antiretroviral treatment (ART and 62 were not. Among the 438 on ART, 72 (16.4% were not virally suppressed at the most recent lab draw. Compared to individuals with a suppressed viral load, those that were unsuppressed were more likely to: be black (79.2% vs. 64.2%; p = 0.014; earn below $25,000/year (88.9% vs. 65.0%; p < 0.001; be of a younger age (47.8 vs. 50.0 mean years; p = 0.009; be on opiate substitution (14.1% vs. 6.3%; p = 0.023; and acknowledge poly-substance (38.9% vs. 24.4%; p = 0.012 and excessive alcohol use (13.9% vs. 6.0%; p = 0.019. Conversely, a smaller proportion of those with an unsuppressed viral load had multiple sex partners in the previous 30 days (39.8% vs. 58.5%; p = 0.003. In multivariable regression of those on ART, the prevalence of an unsuppressed viral load was 3% lower with each increasing year of age (aPR: 0.97; 95% CI: 0.95, 0.99 and 47% lower with income over $25,000/year (aPR: 0.33; 95% CI: 0.16, 0.70. In a separate analysis of all 500 subjects, ART was less frequently prescribed to blacks compared to whites, heterosexuals, those with lower education and income, and persons with active substance use. Findings confirm that a large proportion of PLWH and engaged in care were not virally suppressed and continued behaviors that risk transmission, indicating the need for screening, prevention counseling and access to ancillary services to lower the incidence of HIV infections.

  11. Monitoring HIV viral load in resource limited settings: still a matter of debate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireia Arnedo

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Consequences of lack of viral monitoring in predicting the effects of development of HIV drug resistance mutations during HAART in resource-limited settings (RLS is still a matter of debate. DESIGN: To assess, among HIV+ patients receiving their first-line HAART, prevalence of virological failure and genotypic resistance mutations pattern in a Médécins Sans Frontières/Ministry of Health programme in Busia District (Kenya. METHODS: Patients with HAART treatment for ≥12 months were eligible for the study and those with HIV-RNA ≥5000 copies/ml underwent genotypic study. Total HIV-1 RNA from Dried Blood Spots was extracted using Nuclisens method. RESULTS: 926 patients were included. Among 274 (29.6% patients with detectable viral load, 55 (5.9% experienced treatment failure (viral load >5.000 copies/ml; 61.8% were female and 10 (18.2% had clinical failure. Median CD4 cell count was 116 cell/mm3 (IQR: 54-189. Median HIV-RNA was 32,000 copies/ml (IQR: 11000-68000. Eighteen out of 55 (33% samples could be sequenced on PR and RT genes, with resistance associated mutations (RAMs in 15 out of 18 samples (83%. Among patients carrying RAMs, 12/15 (81% harboured RAMs associated to thymidine analogues (TAMs. All of them (100% showed M184V resistance associated mutation to lamivudine as well as NNRTI's RAMS. CONCLUSIONS: Virological failure rate in resource-limited settings are similar to those observed in developed countries. Resistance mutation patterns were concordant with HAART received by failing patients. Long term detectable viral load confers greater probability of developing resistance and as a consequence, making difficult to find out a cost-effective subsequent treatment regimen.

  12. Prognostic impact of human papilloma virus (HPV) genotyping and HPV-16 subtyping in vaginal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Gabriella Lillsunde; Helenius, Gisela; Andersson, Sören; Sorbe, Bengt; Karlsson, Mats G

    2013-05-01

    The objectives of this study are to investigate the human papilloma virus (HPV) distribution in vaginal cancer and to evaluate HPV-genotype as well as HPV16-variant impact on prognosis. Sixty-nine patients diagnosed with primary vaginal carcinoma (1975-2002) were included in the study. Detection of twelve high-risk HPV (hr HPV) and two low-risk HPV (lr HPV) was performed with realtime-PCR. Samples positive for HPV-16 were analyzed for variants in the E6-gene with PCR and pyrosequencing. 53.6% (37/69) of the tumors were found to be HPV-positive, mostly for HPV-16 (N=26). Other HPV-types were HPV-18 (N=2), HPV-31 (N=2), HPV-33 (N=2), HPV-45 (N=1), HPV-52 (N=2), HPV-56 (N=1) and HPV-58 (N=1). Only European subtypes of HPV-16 were represented and the two most common HPV-16-variants were E-p (N=13) and E-G350 (N=11). Patients with HPV-positive tumors (N=37) had a significantly (log-rank test=3.341; p=0.0008) superior 5-year overall survival rate as well as cancer-specific survival rate and progression-free survival rate (p=0.0002; p=0.0004), compared with patients with HPV-negative tumors (N=32). Interestingly, patients with HPV-16-positive tumors had a superior overall survival compared with patients with tumors containing other HPV-genotypes. In a Cox proportional multivariate analysis age, tumor size, and HPV-status were independent and significant prognostic factors with regard to overall survival rate. HPV-status is of prognostic importance in vaginal carcinoma and varies with viral genotype. In this era of HPV-vaccination, genotypes other than those included in the vaccination program could still lead to vaginal carcinoma with unfavorable prognosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Efavirenz Plasma Concentrations and HIV Viral Load in HIV/AIDS-tuberculosis Infection Patients Treated with Rifampicin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mariana, Nina; Purwantyastuti; Instiaty; Rusli, Adria

    2016-01-01

    to determine the effect of a rifampicin-containing tuberculosis regimen on efavirenz plasma concentrations and viral load in HIV/AIDS-Tuberculosis infection patients who received efavirenz-based antiretroviral therapy...

  14. Detection of high biliary and fecal viral loads in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monrroy, Hugo; Angulo, Jenniffer; Pino, Karla; Labbé, Pilar; Miquel, Juan Francisco; López-Lastra, Marcelo; Soza, Alejandro

    2017-05-01

    The life cycle of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is closely associated with lipid metabolism. Recently, NPC1L1 (a cholesterol transporter) has been reported to function as an HCV receptor. This receptor is expressed in the hepatocyte canalicular membrane and in the intestine; serving as a key transporter for the cholesterol enterohepatic cycle. We hypothesized that HCV might have a similar cycle, so we aimed to study the presence of HCV in bile and stools of infected patients. Blood, feces, and duodenal bile samples were collected from patients infected with HCV. The biliary viral load was normalized to the bile salt concentration of each sample and the presence of HCV core protein was also evaluated. A total of 12 patients were recruited. HCV RNA was detected in the bile from ten patients. The mean viral load was 2.5log10IU/60mg bile salt. In the stool samples, HCV RNA was detected in ten patients (mean concentration 2.7log10IU/g of feces). HCV RNA is readily detectable and is present at relatively high concentrations in the bile and stool samples of infected patients. This may be relevant as a source of infection in men who have sex with men. Biliary HCV secretion may perhaps play a role in the persistence of viral infection via an enterohepatic cycle of the virus or intrahepatic spread. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U., AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  15. HBeAg and not genotypes predicts viral load in patients with hepatitis B in Denmark: a nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Henrik Bygum; Andersen, Stig; Madsen, Poul Henning

    2011-01-01

    To explore the influence of HBV genotype on viral load in patients with HBV infection, and to investigate the relation to gender, age and country of origin or antibodies against hepatitis Be antigen (anti-HBe).......To explore the influence of HBV genotype on viral load in patients with HBV infection, and to investigate the relation to gender, age and country of origin or antibodies against hepatitis Be antigen (anti-HBe)....

  16. HBeAg and not genotypes predicts viral load in patients with hepatitis B in Denmark: A nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Henrik; Andersen, Stig; Madsen, Poul Henning

    2011-01-01

    To explore the influence of HBV genotype on viral load in patients with HBV infection, and to investigate the relation to gender, age and country of origin or antibodies against hepatitis Be antigen (anti-HBe).......To explore the influence of HBV genotype on viral load in patients with HBV infection, and to investigate the relation to gender, age and country of origin or antibodies against hepatitis Be antigen (anti-HBe)....

  17. The Effects of Viral Load Burden on Pregnancy Loss among HIV-Infected Women in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Jordan E; Westreich, Daniel; Edmonds, Andrew; Wright, Rodney L; Minkoff, Howard; Colie, Christine; Greenblatt, Ruth M; Cejtin, Helen E; Karim, Roksana; Haddad, Lisa B; Kempf, Mirjam-Colette; Golub, Elizabeth T; Adimora, Adaora A

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of HIV viral load, measured cross-sectionally and cumulatively, on the risk of miscarriage or stillbirth (pregnancy loss) among HIV-infected women enrolled in the Women's Interagency HIV Study between 1994 and 2013. We assessed three exposures: most recent viral load measure before the pregnancy ended, log10 copy-years viremia from initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) to conception, and log10 copy-years viremia in the two years before conception. The risk of pregnancy loss for those with log10 viral load >4.00 before pregnancy ended was 1.59 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.99, 2.56) times as high as the risk for women whose log10 viral load was ≤1.60. There was not a meaningful impact of log10 copy-years viremia since ART or log10 copy-years viremia in the two years before conception on pregnancy loss (adjusted risk ratios (aRRs): 0.80 (95% CI: 0.69, 0.92) and 1.00 (95% CI: 0.90, 1.11), resp.). Cumulative viral load burden does not appear to be an informative measure for pregnancy loss risk, but the extent of HIV replication during pregnancy, as represented by plasma HIV RNA viral load, predicted loss versus live birth in this ethnically diverse cohort of HIV-infected US women.

  18. Someone to count on: social support as an effect modifier of viral load suppression in a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, M Reuel; Coulter, Robert W S; Silvestre, Anthony J; Stall, Ron; Teplin, Linda; Shoptaw, Steve; Surkan, Pamela J; Plankey, Michael W

    2017-04-01

    Though functional social support has been shown to serve as a protective factor for HIV viral load suppression in other populations, scant research has examined this relationship among men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United States. We assessed characteristics of social support, effects of social support on HIV viral load, and moderation by social support of the relationship between psychosocial indicators of a synergistic epidemic (syndemic) and HIV viral load. We analyzed longitudinal data from HIV-positive MSM using antiretroviral therapy who were enrolled in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study between 2002 and 2009 (n = 712). First, we conducted reliability assessments of a one-item social support measure. Then, we conducted a series of generalized longitudinal mixed models to assess our research questions. Moderation was assessed using an interaction term. A three-level (low/medium/high) social support variable demonstrated high reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients  = 0.72; 95% CI: 0.70, 0.75). Black and Hispanic MSM reported lower social support than their White counterparts (p social support (p social support (p social support levels were associated with greater viral load suppression and lower viral load means (p Social support moderated the relationships between syndemic and HIV viral load (p social support. Creating strengths-based interventions may also have particularly high impact among HIV-positive MSM with the highest psychosocial burdens.

  19. Variations in cerebrospinal fluid viral loads among enterovirus genotypes in patients hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed meningitis due to enterovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volle, Romain; Bailly, Jean-Luc; Mirand, Audrey; Pereira, Bruno; Marque-Juillet, Stéphanie; Chambon, Martine; Regagnon, Christel; Brebion, Amélie; Henquell, Cécile; Peigue-Lafeuille, Hélène; Archimbaud, Christine

    2014-08-15

    Acute enterovirus (EV) meningitis is a major cause of hospitalization among adults and children. It is caused by multiple EV genotypes assigned to 4 species (EV-A, EV-B, EV-C, and EV-D). We determined viral loads in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 156 patients of all ages with EV meningitis during a 5-year observational prospective study. The virus strains were genotyped, and their time origin was determined with Bayesian phylogenetic methods. The CSF viral loads ranged between 3.4 and 7.5 log10 copies/mL (median, 4.9 log10 copies/mL). They were higher in neonates than in infants and children (P = .02) but were comparable in adults. Viral loads were associated with EV genotypes (P viral loads (P viral loads were in meningitis cases caused by coxsackievirus A9, B4, and B5 genotypes. Most patients infected by a same genotype were infected by a major virus variant of recent emergence. The variations in CSF viral loads in patients at the onset of EV meningitis are related to genotypic differences in the virus strains involved. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1–associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis: Viral load and muscle tone are correlated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunt, JR; Montano, SM; Beck, I; Alarcón, JOV; Frenkel, LM; Bautista, CT; Price, R; Longstreth, WT

    2009-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infections are associated with varying degrees of HTLV-1 viral load and spasticity. Increased viral load is associated with higher risk of developing HTLV-1–associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). The authors performed a cross-sectional study of 24 people with HAM/TSP in Lima, Perú, to determine if higher HTLV-1 viral load was correlated with increased muscle tone, measured with a device providing quantitative spasticity assessment (QSA). Median HTLV-1 viral load was 17.0 copies/100 peripheral blood mononuclear cells and QSA value was 39.9 Newton-meters/radian. HTLV-1 viral load was significantly correlated with QSA value (Spearman rho = .48, P = .02), suggesting viral load may play a role in expression of symptomatic neurologic disease. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine if treatments that reduce viral load will reduce muscle tone. PMID:17162662

  1. Lack of association between viral load and severity of acute bronchiolitis in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Duarte de Souza

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To investigate the correlation between respiratory syncytial viral load and length of hospitalization in infants with acute wheezing episodes. Methods: This was a two-year, cross-sectional study of infants ≤ 12 months of age with bronchiolitis at the time of admission to a tertiary hospital. For the identification of respiratory viruses, nasopharyngeal secretions were collected. Samples were analyzed (throughout the study period by direct immunofluorescence and (in the second year of the study by quantitative real-time PCR. We screened for three human viruses: rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and metapneumovirus. Results: Of 110 samples evaluated by direct immunofluorescence, 56 (50.9% were positive for a single virus, and 16 (14.5% were positive for two or more viruses. Among those 72 samples, the most prevalent virus was respiratory syncytial virus, followed by influenza. Of 56 samples evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR, 24 (42.8% were positive for a single virus, and 1 (1.7% was positive for two viruses. Among those 25 samples, the most prevalent virus was again respiratory syncytial virus, followed by human rhinovirus. Coinfection did not influence the length of the hospital stay or other outcome s. In addition, there was no association between respiratory syncytial virus load and the length of hospitalization. Conclusions: Neither coinfection nor respiratory syncytial viral load appears to influence the outcomes of acute bronchiolitis in infants.

  2. PD-1 blockade in chronically HIV-1-infected humanized mice suppresses viral loads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Seung

    Full Text Available An estimated 34 million people are living with HIV worldwide (UNAIDS, 2012, with the number of infected persons rising every year. Increases in HIV prevalence have resulted not only from new infections, but also from increases in the survival of HIV-infected persons produced by effective anti-retroviral therapies. Augmentation of anti-viral immune responses may be able to further increase the survival of HIV-infected persons. One strategy to augment these responses is to reinvigorate exhausted anti-HIV immune cells present in chronically infected persons. The PD-1-PD-L1 pathway has been implicated in the exhaustion of virus-specific T cells during chronic HIV infection. Inhibition of PD-1 signaling using blocking anti-PD-1 antibodies has been shown to reduce simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV loads in monkeys. We now show that PD-1 blockade can improve control of HIV replication in vivo in an animal model. BLT (Bone marrow-Liver-Thymus humanized mice chronically infected with HIV-1 were treated with an anti-PD-1 antibody over a 10-day period. The PD-1 blockade resulted in a very significant 45-fold reduction in HIV viral loads in humanized mice with high CD8(+ T cell expression of PD-1, compared to controls at 4 weeks post-treatment. The anti-PD-1 antibody treatment also resulted in a significant increase in CD8(+ T cells. PD-1 blockade did not affect T cell expression of other inhibitory receptors co-expressed with PD-1, including CD244, CD160 and LAG-3, and did not appear to affect virus-specific humoral immune responses. These data demonstrate that inhibiting PD-1 signaling can reduce HIV viral loads in vivo in the humanized BLT mouse model, suggesting that blockade of the PD-1-PD-L1 pathway may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of patients already infected with the AIDS virus.

  3. Interferon-β induced microRNA-129-5p down-regulates HPV-18 E6 and E7 viral gene expression by targeting SP1 in cervical cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiarong Zhang

    Full Text Available Infection by human papillomavirus (HPV can cause cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN and cancer. Down-regulation of E6 and E7 expression may be responsible for the positive clinical outcomes observed with IFN treatment, but the molecular basis has not been well determined. As miRNAs play an important role in HPV induced cervical carcinogenesis, we hypothesize that IFN-β can regulate the expressions of specific miRNAs in cervical cancer cells, and that these miRNAs can mediate E6 and E7 expression, thus modulate their oncogenic potential. In this study, we found that miR-129-5p to be a candidate IFN-β inducible miRNA. MiR-129-5p levels gradually decrease with the development of cervical intraepithelial lesions. Manipulation of miR-129-5p expression in Hela cells modulates HPV-18 E6 and E7 viral gene expression. Exogenous miR-129-5p inhibits cell proliferation in Hela cells, promotes apoptosis and blocks cell cycle progression in Hela cells. SP1 is a direct target of miR-129-5p in Hela cells. This study is the first report of a cellular miRNA with anti-HPV activity and provides new insights into regulatory mechanisms between the HPV and the IFN system in host cells at the miRNA level.

  4. Viral load affects the immune response to HBV in mice with humanized immune system and liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusséaux, Mathilde; Masse-Ranson, Guillemette; Darche, Sylvie; Ahodantin, James; Li, Yan; Fiquet, Oriane; Beaumont, Elodie; Moreau, Pierrick; Rivière, Lise; Neuveut, Christine; Soussan, Patrick; Roingeard, Philippe; Kremsdorf, Dina; Di Santo, James P; Strick-Marchand, Helene

    2017-08-26

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infects hepatocytes, but the mechanisms of the immune response against the virus, and how it affects disease progression, are unclear. We performed studies with BALB/c Rag2(-/-)Il2rg(-/-)Sirpa(NOD)Alb-uPA(tg/tg) mice, stably engrafted with human hepatocytes (HUHEP) with or without a human immune system (HIS). HUHEP and HIS-HUHEP mice were given an intraperitoneal injection of HBV. Mononuclear cells were isolated from spleen and liver for analysis by flow cytometry. Liver was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and mRNA levels were measured by quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Plasma levels of HBV DNA was quantified by quantitative PCR, and antigen-specific antibodies were detected by immunocytochemistry of HBV transfected BHK-21 cells. Following HBV infection, a complete viral life cycle, with production of HBV DNA, hepatitis B e, core (HBc) and surface (HBs) antigens, and covalently closed circular DNA, was observed in HUHEP and HIS-HUHEP mice. HBV replicated unrestricted in HUHEP mice resulting in high viral titers without pathologic effects. In contrast, HBV-infected HIS-HUHEP mice developed chronic hepatitis with 10-fold lower titers and antigen-specific IgGs, (anti-HBs, anti-HBc), consistent with partial immune control. HBV-infected HIS-HUHEP livers contained infiltrating Kupffer cells, mature activated natural killer cells (CD69+), and PD-1+ effector memory T cells (CD45RO+). Reducing the viral inoculum resulted in more efficient immune control. Plasma from HBV-infected HIS-HUHEP mice had increased levels of inflammatory and immune-suppressive cytokines (C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 10 and interleukin 10), which correlated with populations of intrahepatic CD4+ T cells (CD45RO+PD-1+). Mice with high levels of viremia had HBV-infected liver progenitor cells. Giving the mice the nucleoside analogue entecavir reduced viral loads and decreased liver inflammation. In HIS-HUHEP mice, HBV infection completes a full life cycle and

  5. HPV Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... detects the presence of HPV, the virus that causes cervical cancer, in your system. Certain types of HPV — including ... have any of the types of HPV that cause cervical cancer. Depending on your test results, your doctor may ...

  6. Detection of HPV16 in Esophageal Cancer in a High-Incidence Region of Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Lidwina Geßner

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to explore the role of human papillomavirus (HPV in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC. Fifty-five patients receiving diagnostic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy at Zomba Central Hospital or Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Blantyre (Malawi in 2010, were included in our study. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded biopsies were collected for histopathological diagnosis. HPV DNA was detected using multiplex Quantitative PCR (qPCR and in situ hybridization (ISH. p16INK4a staining served as a surrogate marker for HPV oncogene activity. Cell proliferation was determined by Ki-67 staining. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV status was evaluated by serology. Data on the consumption of alcohol and tobacco, and history of tuberculosis (TBC, oral thrush, and Herpes zoster, were obtained by questionnaire. Forty patients displayed ESCC, three displayed dysplastic epithelium, and 12 displayed normal epithelium. HPV16 was detected in six ESCC specimens and in one dysplastic lesion. Among HPV-positive patients, viral load varied from 0.001 to 2.5 copies per tumor cell. HPV DNA presence could not be confirmed by ISH. p16INK4a positivity correlated with the presence of HPV DNA (p = 0.03. Of particular note is that the Ki-67 proliferation index, in areas with diffuse nuclear or cytoplasmatic p16INK4a staining ≥50%, was significantly higher in HPV-positive tumors compared to the corresponding p16INK4a stained areas of HPV-negative tumors (p = 0.004. HPV infection in ESCC was not associated with the consumption of tobacco or alcohol, but there were significantly more patients drinking locally brewed alcohol among HPV-positive tumor patients compared to non-tumor patients (p = 0.02 and compared to HPV-negative tumor patients (p = 0.047. There was no association between HIV infection, history of TBC, Herpes zoster, oral thrush, or HPV infection, in ESCC patients. Our indirect evidence for viral oncogene activity is restricted to single tumor

  7. Impact of genetic heterogeneity in polymerase of hepatitis B virus on dynamics of viral load and hepatitis B progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Jung Huang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The hepatitis B virus (HBV-polymerase region overlaps pre-S/S genes with high epitope density and plays an essential role in viral replication. We investigated whether genetic variation in the polymerase region determined long-term dynamics of viral load and the risk of hepatitis B progression in a population-based cohort study. METHODS: We sequenced the HBV-polymerase region using baseline plasma from treatment-naïve individuals with HBV-DNA levels≥1000 copies/mL in a longitudinal viral-load study of participants with chronic HBV infection followed-up for 17 years, and obtained sequences from 575 participants (80% with HBV genotype Ba and 17% with Ce. RESULTS: Patterns of viral sequence diversity across phases (i.e., immune-tolerant, immune-clearance, non/low replicative, and hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg-negative hepatitis phases of HBV-infection, which were associated with viral and clinical features at baseline and during follow-up, were similar between HBV genotypes, despite greater diversity for genotype Ce vs. Ba. Irrespective of genotypes, however, HBeAg-negative participants had 1.5-to-2-fold higher levels of sequence diversity than HBeAg-positive participants (P<0.0001. Furthermore, levels of viral genetic divergence from the population consensus sequence, estimated by numbers of nucleotide substitutions, were inversely associated with long-term viral load even in HBeAg-negative participants. A mixed model developed through analysis of the entire HBV-polymerase region identified 153 viral load-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms in overall and 136 in HBeAg-negative participants, with distinct profiles between HBV genotypes. These polymorphisms were most evident at sites within or flanking T-cell epitopes. Seven polymorphisms revealed associations with both enhanced viral load and a more than 4-fold increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma and/or liver cirrhosis. CONCLUSIONS: The data highlight a role of viral

  8. Influence of maintained hemodialysis on viral load in patients with end-stage renal disease with HBV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Huifang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD with hepatitis B virus (HBV infection who underwent hemodialysis, the viral load of HBV DNA is relatively low and stable. For this phenomenon, some studies suggest that hemodialysis can reduce the HBV DNA load. The mechanism, which remains unclear, may be as follows: when HBV DNA enters the dialysate through the dialysis membrane, it was adsorbed onto the dialysis membrane; some virus particles were destroyed, and antiviral substances were produced in the course of hemodialysis. At present, there is no consensus on the mechanism responsible for the influence of maintained hemodialysis on the viral load of HBV DNA. This article reviews the factors involved in the influence of maintained hemodialysis on the viral load in ESRD patients with HBV infection and the recent progress.

  9. Association of genotypes with viral load and biochemical markers in HCV-infected Sindhi patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Riaz

    Full Text Available Abstract The presented study had two objectives. The first was to examine distributions of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV genotypes in Sindh, Pakistan, where HCV is prevalent. The other was to explore clinically relevant relationships between the genotypes, viral load (measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction assays and biochemical markers. For this, 1471 HCV-infected patients in six cities in Sindh were recruited and sampled. HCV genotype distributions varied among the cities, but genotype 3a was most prevalent, followed by 3b, 1a and 1b (detected in 51.5, 22.7. 9.25 and 3.2% of the cases, respectively. No type-specific sequences were detected in serum samples from 189 (12.8% of the 1471 patients. Frequencies of low (600,000 IU/mL serum viral loads were respectively 45.4, 16.5 and 38.1% for patients infected with genotype 3, and 16.9, 36.9 and 46.2%, respectively, for patients with other genotypes. Infection with genotype 1a was associated with significantly higher (p < 0.005 alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase titers than infection with genotype 3a. The results will help in the formulation of treatment strategies.

  10. HPV-associated flat penile lesions in men of a non-STD hospital population: less frequent and smaller in size than in male sexual partners of women with CIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleeker, Maaike C G; Hogewoning, Cornelis J A; Voorhorst, Feja J; van den Brule, Adriaan J C; Berkhof, Johannes; Hesselink, Albertus T; Lettink, Marjolein; Starink, Theo M; Stoof, Tom J; Snijders, Peter J F; Meijer, Chris J L M

    2005-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections and HPV-associated penile lesions are frequently found in male sexual partners of women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). To determine the significance of these findings, we studied the prevalence of HPV and HPV associated penile lesions in a male hospital population with non-STD complaints. Penoscopy was performed after application of acetic acid to identify flat lesions, papular lesions, condylomata acuminata and pearly penile papules (PPPs). Presence of HPV DNA in penile scrapes was tested by GP5+6+ PCR. In case of HPV 16 positivity, viral loads were quantified using a LightCycler based real-time PCR method. Comparing the non-STD male hospital population (n = 118) with the male sexual partners of women with CIN (n = 238), flat penile lesions were found in 14% vs. 60% and penile HPV in 25% vs. 59% of the men, respectively. We found that the presence of penile HPV and, in case of HPV 16 positivity, higher viral loads were associated with the presence of flat penile lesions. Amongst the HPV-positive men, flat penile lesions were more common and larger in size in male sexual partners of women with CIN than in the non-STD hospital population. HPV infections and HPV-associated flat penile lesions are commonly found in the non-STD male population. However, these lesions are less frequently present and smaller in size than in male sexual partners of women with CIN. Higher viral loads in penile scrapes of male sexual partners of women with CIN are reflected by a higher prevalence of flat penile lesions and a larger size of these lesions.

  11. Frequent detection of high human papillomavirus DNA loads in oral potentially malignant disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierangeli, A; Cannella, F; Scagnolari, C; Gentile, M; Sciandra, I; Antonelli, G; Ciolfi, C; Russo, C; Palaia, G; Romeo, U; Polimeni, A

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is estimated to be the cause of 40--80% of the squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx but only of a small fraction of the oral cavity cancers. The prevalence of oral HPV infection has significantly increased in the last decade, raising concerns about the role of HPV in progression of oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD) toward squamous cell carcinomas. We sought to study HPV infection in patients with oral lesions, and in control individuals, using non-invasive and site-specific oral brushing and sensitive molecular methods. HPV DNA positivity and viral loads were evaluated in relation to patient data and clinical diagnosis. We enrolled 116 individuals attending Dental Clinics: 62 patients with benign oral lesions (e.g. fibromas, papillomatosis, ulcers) or OPMD (e.g. lichen, leukoplakia) and 54 controls. Oral cells were collected with Cytobrush and HPV-DNA was detected with quantitative real-time PCR for the more common high-risk (HR) and low-risk (LR) genotypes. HPV detection rate, percentage of HR HPVs and HPV-DNA loads (namely HPV16 and in particular, HPV18) were significantly higher in patients than in controls. Lichen planus cases had the highest HPV-positive rate (75.0%), hairy leukoplakia the lowest (33.3%). This study detected unexpectedly high rates of HPV infection in cells of the oral mucosa. The elevated HR HPV loads found in OPMD suggest the effectiveness of quantitative PCR in testing oral lesions. Prospective studies are needed to establish whether elevated viral loads represent a clinically useful marker of the risk of malignant progression. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Meticulous plasma isolation is essential to avoid false low-level viraemia in Roche Cobas HIV-1 viral load assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortier, Virginie; Vancoillie, Leen; Dauwe, Kenny; Staelens, Delfien; Demecheleer, Els; Schauvliege, Marlies; Dinakis, Sylvie; Van Maerken, Tom; Dessilly, Géraldine; Ruelle, Jean; Verhofstede, Chris

    2017-10-24

    Pre-analytical sample processing is often overlooked as a potential cause of inaccurate assay results. Here we demonstrate how plasma, extracted from standard EDTA- containing blood collection tubes, may contain traces of blood cells consequently resulting in a false low-level HIV-1 viral load when using Roche Cobas HIV-1 assays. The presence of human DNA in Roche Cobas 4800 RNA extracts and in RNA extracts from the Abbott HIV-1 RealTime assay was assessed by quantifying the human albumin gene by means of qPCR. RNA was extracted from plasma samples before and after an additional centrifugation and tested for viral load and DNA contamination. The relation between total DNA content and viral load was defined. Elevated concentrations of genomic DNA were detected in 28 out of 100 Cobas 4800 extracts and were significantly more frequent in samples processed outside of the Aids Reference Laboratory. An association between genomic DNA presence and spurious low-level viremia results was demonstrated. Supplementary centrifugation of plasma before RNA extraction eliminated the contamination and the false viremia. Plasma isolated from standard EDTA-containing blood collection tubes may contain traces of HIV DNA leading to false viral load results above the clinical cut-off. Supplementary centrifugation of plasma before viral load analysis may eliminate the occurrence of this spurious low-level viremia.

  13. The semen microbiome and its relationship with local immunology and viral load in HIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy M Liu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Semen is a major vector for HIV transmission, but the semen HIV RNA viral load (VL only correlates moderately with the blood VL. Viral shedding can be enhanced by genital infections and associated inflammation, but it can also occur in the absence of classical pathogens. Thus, we hypothesized that a dysregulated semen microbiome correlates with local HIV shedding. We analyzed semen samples from 49 men who have sex with men (MSM, including 22 HIV-uninfected and 27 HIV-infected men, at baseline and after starting antiretroviral therapy (ART using 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR. We studied the relationship of semen bacteria with HIV infection, semen cytokine levels, and semen VL by linear regression, non-metric multidimensional scaling, and goodness-of-fit test. Streptococcus, Corynebacterium, and Staphylococcus were common semen bacteria, irrespective of HIV status. While Ureaplasma was the more abundant Mollicutes in HIV-uninfected men, Mycoplasma dominated after HIV infection. HIV infection was associated with decreased semen microbiome diversity and richness, which were restored after six months of ART. In HIV-infected men, semen bacterial load correlated with seven pro-inflammatory semen cytokines, including IL-6 (p = 0.024, TNF-α (p = 0.009, and IL-1b (p = 0.002. IL-1b in particular was associated with semen VL (r(2  = 0.18, p = 0.02. Semen bacterial load was also directly linked to the semen HIV VL (r(2 = 0.15, p = 0.02. HIV infection reshapes the relationship between semen bacteria and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and both are linked to semen VL, which supports a role of the semen microbiome in HIV sexual transmission.

  14. CD4 cell count and the risk of AIDS or death in HIV-Infected adults on combination antiretroviral therapy with a suppressed viral load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Most adults infected with HIV achieve viral suppression within a year of starting combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). It is important to understand the risk of AIDS events or death for patients with a suppressed viral load.......Most adults infected with HIV achieve viral suppression within a year of starting combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). It is important to understand the risk of AIDS events or death for patients with a suppressed viral load....

  15. Comparative analysis of HPV16 gene expression profiles in cervical and in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerasuolo, Andrea; Annunziata, Clorinda; Tortora, Marianna; Starita, Noemy; Stellato, Giovanni; Greggi, Stefano; Maglione, Maria Grazia; Ionna, Franco; Losito, Simona; Botti, Gerardo; Buonaguro, Luigi; Buonaguro, Franco M.; Tornesello, Maria Lina

    2017-01-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) is the major cause of cervical cancer and of a fraction of oropharyngeal carcinoma. Few studies compared the viral expression profiles in the two types of tumor. We analyzed HPV genotypes and viral load as well as early (E2/E4, E5, E6, E6*I, E6*II, E7) and late (L1 and L2) gene expression of HPV16 in cervical and oropharyngeal cancer biopsies. The study included 28 cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and ten oropharyngeal SCC, along with pair-matched non-tumor tissues, as well as four oropharynx dysplastic tissues and 112 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia biopsies. Viral load was found higher in cervical SCC (<1 to 694 copies/cell) and CIN (<1 to 43 copies/cell) compared to oropharyngeal SCC (<1 to 4 copies/cell). HPV16 E2/E4 and E5 as well as L1 and L2 mRNA levels were low in cervical SCC and CIN and undetectable in oropharynx cases. The HPV16 E6 and E7 mRNAs were consistently high in cervical SCC and low in oropharyngeal SCC. The analysis of HPV16 E6 mRNA expression pattern showed statistically significant higher levels of E6*I versus E6*II isoform in cervical SCC (p = 0.002) and a slightly higher expression of E6*I versus E6*II in oropharyngeal cases. In conclusion, the HPV16 E5, E6, E6*I, E6*II and E7 mRNA levels were more abundant in cervical SCC compared to oropharyngeal SCC suggesting different carcinogenic mechanisms in the two types of HPV-related cancers. PMID:28423662

  16. Comparative analysis of HPV16 gene expression profiles in cervical and in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerasuolo, Andrea; Annunziata, Clorinda; Tortora, Marianna; Starita, Noemy; Stellato, Giovanni; Greggi, Stefano; Maglione, Maria Grazia; Ionna, Franco; Losito, Simona; Botti, Gerardo; Buonaguro, Luigi; Buonaguro, Franco M; Tornesello, Maria Lina

    2017-05-23

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) is the major cause of cervical cancer and of a fraction of oropharyngeal carcinoma. Few studies compared the viral expression profiles in the two types of tumor. We analyzed HPV genotypes and viral load as well as early (E2/E4, E5, E6, E6*I, E6*II, E7) and late (L1 and L2) gene expression of HPV16 in cervical and oropharyngeal cancer biopsies. The study included 28 cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and ten oropharyngeal SCC, along with pair-matched non-tumor tissues, as well as four oropharynx dysplastic tissues and 112 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia biopsies. Viral load was found higher in cervical SCC (<1 to 694 copies/cell) and CIN (<1 to 43 copies/cell) compared to oropharyngeal SCC (<1 to 4 copies/cell). HPV16 E2/E4 and E5 as well as L1 and L2 mRNA levels were low in cervical SCC and CIN and undetectable in oropharynx cases. The HPV16 E6 and E7 mRNAs were consistently high in cervical SCC and low in oropharyngeal SCC. The analysis of HPV16 E6 mRNA expression pattern showed statistically significant higher levels of E6*I versus E6*II isoform in cervical SCC (p = 0.002) and a slightly higher expression of E6*I versus E6*II in oropharyngeal cases. In conclusion, the HPV16 E5, E6, E6*I, E6*II and E7 mRNA levels were more abundant in cervical SCC compared to oropharyngeal SCC suggesting different carcinogenic mechanisms in the two types of HPV-related cancers.

  17. CD4 count-based failure criteria combined with viral load monitoring may trigger worse switch decisions than viral load monitoring alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Christopher J; Maritz, Jean; van Zyl, Gert U

    2016-02-01

    CD4 count decline often triggers antiretroviral regimen switches in resource-limited settings, even when viral load testing is available. We therefore compared CD4 failure and CD4 trends in patients with viraemia with or without antiretroviral resistance. Retrospective cohort study investigating the association of HIV drug resistance with CD4 failure or CD4 trends in patients on first-line antiretroviral regimens during viraemia. Patients with viraemia (HIV RNA >1000 copies/ml) from two HIV treatment programmes in South Africa (n = 350) were included. We investigated the association of M184V and NNRTI resistance with WHO immunological failure criteria and CD4 count trends, using chi-square tests and linear mixed models. Fewer patients with the M184V mutation reached immunologic failure criteria than those without: 51 of 151(34%) vs. 90 of 199 (45%) (P = 0.03). Similarly, 79 of 220 (36%) patients, who had major NNRTI resistance, had immunological failure, whereas 62 of 130 (48%) without (chi-square P = 0.03) did. The CD4 count decline among patients with the M184V mutation was 2.5 cells/mm(3) /year, whereas in those without M184V it was 14 cells/mm(3) /year (P = 0.1), but the difference in CD4 count decline with and without NNRTI resistance was marginal. Our data suggest that CD4 count monitoring may lead to inappropriate delayed therapy switches for patients with HIV drug resistance. Conversely, patients with viraemia but no drug resistance are more likely to have a CD4 count decline and thus may be more likely to be switched to a second-line regimen. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Plasma Epstein Barr viral load in adult-onset Hodgkin lymphoma in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Mahua; Rao, Clementina Rama; Shafiulla, Mohammed; Shankaranand, Bharatnur; Viveka, Belathur K; Lakshmaiah, Kuntegowdanahalli C; Jacob, Linu Abraham; Babu, Govind K; Jayshree, Rudrapatna S

    2016-03-01

    Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) DNA load is increasingly being used as a noninvasive biomarker for detecting EBV association in lymphomas. Since there is a need of data from India, we undertook to prospectively evaluate plasma EBV DNA load as a marker of EBV association in newly diagnosed adult-onset Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). EBV DNA was quantified using real-time polymerase chain reaction. In a subset of patients, an assay was validated qualitatively with EBV latent membrane protein-1 (LMP1) immunohistochemistry (IHC). Wherever possible, follow-up plasma samples post three cycles of chemotherapy were obtained. Over a period of 10 months, 33 newly diagnosed adult-onset HL were enrolled in the study. Pretherapy plasma EBV DNA was detectable in ∼49% (16/33) patients (viral loads range, 1.0-51.2×10(3)copies/mL) and undetectable in 30 voluntary blood donors. LMP1 IHC was positive in 56% of cases tested (14/25). Sensitivity and specificity of plasma EBV DNA with respect to LMP1 IHC were 86% and 100%, respectively. Of the eight patients in whom follow-up plasma was available, in five EBV baseline-positive patients EBV load reverted to negative postchemotherapy and corroborated with clinical remission. Plasma EBV DNA load estimation may be useful in detecting EBV-association and possibly monitoring the response to therapy in EBV-related HL especially in our country where EBV association of HL is higher than in developed nations. Copyright © 2015 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Chicken parvovirus viral loads in cloacal swabs from malabsorption syndrome-affected and healthy broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkler, Fabrine; de Lima, Diane Alves; Cerva, Cristine; Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Teixeira, Thais Fumaco; Dos Santos, Helton Fernandes; de Almeida, Laura Lopes; Roehe, Paulo Michel; Franco, Ana Cláudia

    2016-12-01

    Chicken parvovirus (ChPV) has been associated with malabsorption syndrome (MAS) in broilers. However, the participation of this virus in such syndrome is unclear, since it may be detected in diseased and healthy chickens. In the course of these studies, it was argued whether ChPV genome loads might be correlated to the occurrence of MAS. To check such a hypothesis, a SYBR green-based quantitative polymerase chain reaction was developed to detect and quantify ChPV genomes. Cloacal swabs from 68 broilers with MAS and 59 from healthy animals were collected from different poultry farms. Genomes of ChPV were detected in all samples, regardless of their health status. However, viral genome loads in MAS-affected broilers were significantly higher (1 × 10 5 genome copies per 100 ng DNA) than in healthy animals (1.3 × 10 3 GC/100 ng DNA). These findings indicate that there is an association between high ChPV genome loads and the occurrence of MAS in broilers.

  20. HPV Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Yourself Against HPV en español Vacuna contra el virus del papiloma humano (VPH) What Is HPV and Why Is It a Problem? Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) . HPV is the virus that causes genital warts . Besides genital warts, an ...

  1. Factors associated with poor CD4 and viral load outcomes in patients with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Imran Ahmed; Sulaiman, Syed Azhar Syed; Hassali, Mohammad Azmi; Syed, Shahzad Hasan; Shan, Lau Hui; Lee, Christopher K C

    2016-05-01

    Suboptimal viral suppression and CD4 response to antiretroviral treatment (HAART) is known to cause poor outcomes with the increase cost of treatment. We aimed to assess factors associated with such control among HIV/AIDS patients in Malaysia. Four hundred and six HIV/AIDS patients, using Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) for at least the past three months, treated as outpatients at medication therapy adherence clinics (MTAC) were recruited. CD4 cell counts, viral load readings along with co-variants such as socio-demographic factors, adverse drug reactions, comorbidities, and medication record were obtained. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS(®)) version 18 and STATA IC(®) version 12 were used for data analysis. CD4 counts were found highest among those within the age category 41-50 years (390.43 ± 272.28), female (402.64 ± 276.14), other ethnicities (400.20 ± 278.04), and participants with no formal education (414.87 ± 290.90). Patients experiencing adverse effects had a 2.28 (95%CI:1.25-4.18) fold greater risk of poor CD4 control, while patients with comorbidities had 2.46 (95%CI:1.02-5.91) fold greater risk of mild viral suppression. Adverse drug reactions, co-morbidities were found to be significantly associated with poor immunological and virological outcomes in HIV/AIDS patients. However, a comprehensive evaluation is needed to better understand other confounders. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Genomic Loads and Genotypes of Respiratory Syncytial Virus: Viral Factors during Lower Respiratory Tract Infection in Chilean Hospitalized Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Yazmín; San Martín, Camila; Torres, Alejandro A; Farfán, Mauricio J; Torres, Juan P; Avadhanula, Vasanthi; Piedra, Pedro A; Tapia, Lorena I

    2017-03-21

    The clinical impact of viral factors (types and viral loads) during respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is still controversial, especially regarding newly described genotypes. In this study, infants with RSV bronchiolitis were recruited to describe the association of these viral factors with severity of infection. RSV antigenic types, genotypes, and viral loads were determined from hospitalized patients at Hospital Roberto del Río, Santiago, Chile. Cases were characterized by demographic and clinical information, including days of lower respiratory symptoms and severity. A total of 86 patients were included: 49 moderate and 37 severe cases. During 2013, RSV-A was dominant (86%). RSV-B predominated in 2014 (92%). Phylogenetic analyses revealed circulation of GA2, Buenos Aires (BA), and Ontario (ON) genotypes. No association was observed between severity of infection and RSV group (p = 0.69) or genotype (p = 0.87). After a clinical categorization of duration of illness, higher RSV genomic loads were detected in infants evaluated earlier in their disease (p < 0.001) and also in infants evaluated later, but coursing a more severe infection (p = 0.04). Although types and genotypes did not associate with severity in our children, higher RSV genomic loads and delayed viral clearance in severe patients define a group that might benefit from new antiviral therapies.

  3. [Relationship between viral load of human bocavirus and clinical characteristics in children with acute lower respiratory tract infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Bing; Zhong, Li-Li; Xie, Le-Yun; Xiao, Ni-Guang

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the prevalence of human bocavirus (HBoV) in children with acute lower respiratory tract infection and to explore the relationship between the viral load of HBoV and the clinical characteristics of acute lower respiratory tract infection in children. A total of 1 554 nasopharyngeal aspirates from children who were hospitalized due to acute lower respiratory tract infection between March 2011 and March 2014 were collected. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to detect 12 RNA and 2 DNA viruses, adenovirus (ADV) and HBoV, and to measure the viral load of HBoV in HBoV-positive children. A comprehensive analysis was performed with reference to clinical symptoms and indicators. In the 1 554 specimens, 1 212 (77.99%) were positive for viruses, and 275 (17.70%) were HBoV-positive. In HBoV-positive cases, 94.9% were aged infection, and 230 (83.64%) had mixed infection. There was no significant difference in viral load between children with single infection and mixed infection (P>0.05). The patients with fever had a significantly higher viral load than those without fever (Pacute lower respiratory tract infection (P>0.05). HBoV is one of the important pathogens of acute lower respiratory tract infection in children. Children with a higher viral load of HBoV are more likely to experience symptoms such as fever and wheezing. However, the severity of disease and mixed infection are not significantly related to viral load.

  4. Impact of two different commercial DNA extraction methods on BK virus viral load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Bergallo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: BK virus, a member of human polyomavirus family, is a worldwide distributed virus characterized by a seroprevalence rate of 70-90% in adult population. Monitoring of viral replication is made by evaluation of BK DNA by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Many different methods can be applied for extraction of nucleic acid from several specimens. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of two different DNA extraction procedure on BK viral load. Materials and methods: DNA extraction procedure including the Nuclisens easyMAG platform (bioMerieux, Marcy l’Etoile, France and manual QIAGEN extraction (QIAGEN Hilden, Germany. BK DNA quantification was performed by Real Time TaqMan PCR using a commercial kit. Result and discussion: The samples capacity, cost and time spent were compared for both systems. In conclusion our results demonstrate that automated nucleic acid extraction method using Nuclisense easyMAG was superior to manual protocol (QIAGEN Blood Mini kit, for the extraction of BK virus from serum and urine specimens.

  5. Which adherence measure - self-report, clinician recorded or pharmacy refill - is best able to predict detectable viral load in a public ART programme without routine plasma viral load monitoring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekuria, Legese A; Prins, Jan M; Yalew, Alemayehu W; Sprangers, Mirjam A G; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T

    2016-07-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) suppresses viral replication to an undetectable level if a sufficiently high level of adherence is achieved. We investigated which adherence measurement best distinguishes between patients with and without detectable viral load in a public ART programme without routine plasma viral load monitoring. We randomly selected 870 patients who started cART between May 2009 and April 2012 in 10 healthcare facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Six hundred and sixty-four (76.3%) patients who were retained in HIV care and were receiving cART for at least 6 months were included and 642 had their plasma HIV-1 RNA concentration measured. Patients' adherence to cART was assessed according to self-report, clinician recorded and pharmacy refill measures. Multivariate logistic regression model was fitted to identify the predictors of detectable viremia. Model accuracy was evaluated by computing the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. A total of 9.2% and 5.5% of the 642 patients had a detectable viral load of ≥40 and ≥400 RNA copies/ml, respectively. In the multivariate analyses, younger age, lower CD4 cell count at cART initiation, being illiterate and widowed, and each of the adherence measures were significantly and independently predictive of having ≥400 RNA copies/ml. The ROC curve showed that these variables altogether had a likelihood of more than 80% to distinguish patients with a plasma viral load of ≥400 RNA copies/ml from those without. Adherence to cART was remarkably high. Self-report, clinician recorded and pharmacy refill non-adherence were all significantly predictive of detectable viremia. The choice for one of these methods to detect non-adherence and predict a detectable viral load can therefore be based on what is most practical in a particular setting. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Psychiatric correlates of HAART utilization and viral load among HIV-positive impoverished persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrico, Adam W; Bangsberg, David R; Weiser, Sheri D; Chartier, Maggie; Dilworth, Samantha E; Riley, Elise D

    2011-05-15

    Research on the role psychiatric factors in HIV disease management has yielded discrepant findings, possibly because prior studies did not include comprehensive psychiatric screeners. This study administered a validated screener to examine psychiatric correlates of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) utilization and viral load. Community-recruited, HIV-positive impoverished persons provided sociodemographic information, completed a Diagnostic Interview Schedule that screened for psychiatric disorders, and provided a blood sample to measure HIV disease markers. In this cross-sectional investigation with 227 participants, a multiple logistic regression model examined correlates of HAART utilization compared to a reference group that was eligible for (i.e. CD4(+) cell count impoverished persons and boost the effectiveness of 'test and treat' approaches to HIV prevention.

  7. Expansion of Viral Load Testing and the Potential Impact on HIV Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raizes, Elliot; Hader, Shannon; Birx, Deborah

    2017-12-01

    The US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) supports aggressive scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in high-burden countries and across all genders and populations at risk toward global human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic control. PEPFAR recognizes the risk of HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) as a consequence of aggressive ART scale-up and is actively promoting 3 key steps to mitigate the impact of HIVDR: (1) routine access to routine viral load monitoring in all settings; (2) optimization of ART regimens; and (3) routine collection and analysis of HIVDR data to monitor the success of mitigation strategies. The transition to dolutegravir-based regimens in PEPFAR-supported countries and the continuous evolution of HIVDR surveillance strategies are essential elements of PEPFAR implementation. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  8. Disseminated HIV-Associated Kaposi’s Sarcoma With High CD4 Cell Count And Low Viral Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Pereira Anjos

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi’s sarcoma is considered an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-defining illness and is caused by human herpesvirus 8. It has been associated with patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV who have CD4 T lymphocytes <200 cells/uL and high viral loads. We report a case of a 23-year old woman infected with HIV-1 and receiving antiretroviral treatment since diagnosis, with high CD4 cell count and low viral load that presented with disseminated Kaposi’s sarcoma. Clinicians should be aware of the occurrence of Kaposi’s sarcoma despite robust CD4 cell counts.

  9. Factors associated with short-term changes in HIV viral load and CD4(+) cell count in antiretroviral-naive individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Obel, Niels; Kirk, Ole

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Among antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive individuals, viral load levels tend to increase and CD4(+) cell counts decline over time. We sought to explore the rate of change and influence of other factors associated with these markers of HIV progression. DESIGN: An observational cohort...... of CD4(+) cell count depletion than baseline viral load. Neither sex, race nor transmission by injecting drug use was associated with change in either the viral load or CD4(+) cell count. DISCUSSION: We found that in ART-naive individuals, viral load continues to increase over time and more sharply...

  10. Evidence for vertical transmission of HPV from mothers to infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elaine M; Parker, Michael A; Rubenstein, Linda M; Haugen, Thomas H; Hamsikova, Eva; Turek, Lubomir P

    2010-01-01

    Few large studies have evaluated concordance based on a broad spectrum of human papillomavirus (HPV) types in oral and genital specimens of mothers and their recently born infants. This information is important in determining whether HPV vaccines administered prior to pregnancy may be useful for preventing vertical transmission. HPV DNA was positive in 30% of mothers and 1.5% of newborns. Maternal/newborn concordance (HPV+/+ or HPV-/-) was 71%. Among HPV DNA+ mothers, only 3% of their infants were DNA+ and only 1 pair had the same HPV type. Among HPV- women, 0.8% of infants were HPV+. HPV DNA detected in hospitalized newborns reflects current infection transmitted to infants during pregnancy or delivery. None of the mother/baby HPV DNA+ concordance pairs detected viral types found in HPV vaccines suggesting that vaccination prior to pregnancy is unlikely to be efficacious in preventing vertical transmission.

  11. Enterovirus D68 in Hospitalized Children: Sequence Variation, Viral Loads and Clinical Outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Moyer

    Full Text Available An outbreak of enterovirus D68 (EV-D68 caused severe respiratory illness in 2014. The disease spectrum of EV-D68 infections in children with underlying medical conditions other than asthma, the role of EV-D68 loads on clinical illness, and the variation of EV-D68 strains within the same institution over time have not been described. We sought to define the association between EV-D68 loads and sequence variation, and the clinical characteristic in hospitalized children at our institution from 2011 to 2014.May through November 2014, and August to September 2011 to 2013, a convenience sample of nasopharyngeal specimens from children with rhinovirus (RV/EV respiratory infections were tested for EV-D68 by RT-PCR. Clinical data were compared between children with RV/EV-non-EV-D68 and EV-D68 infections, and among children with EV-D68 infections categorized as healthy, asthmatics, and chronic medical conditions. EV-D68 loads were analyzed in relation to disease severity parameters and sequence variability characterized over time.In 2014, 44% (192/438 of samples tested positive for EV-D68 vs. 10% (13/130 in 2011-13 (p<0.0001. PICU admissions (p<0.0001 and non-invasive ventilation (p<0.0001 were more common in children with EV-D68 vs. RV/EV-non-EV-D68 infections. Asthmatic EV-D68+ children, required supplemental oxygen administration (p = 0.03 and PICU admissions (p <0.001 more frequently than healthy children or those with chronic medical conditions; however oxygen duration (p<0.0001, and both PICU and total hospital stay (p<0.01 were greater in children with underlying medical conditions, irrespective of viral burden. By phylogenetic analysis, the 2014 EV-D68 strains clustered into a new sublineage within clade B.This is one of the largest pediatric cohorts described from the EV-D68 outbreak. Irrespective of viral loads, EV-D68 was associated with high morbidity in children with asthma and co-morbidities. While EV-D68 circulated before 2014, the

  12. CCR5 limits cortical viral loads during West Nile virus infection of the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrant, Douglas M; Daniels, Brian P; Pasieka, TracyJo; Dorsey, Denise; Klein, Robyn S

    2015-12-15

    Cell-mediated immunity is critical for clearance of central nervous system (CNS) infection with the encephalitic flavivirus, West Nile virus (WNV). Prior studies from our laboratory have shown that WNV-infected neurons express chemoattractants that mediate recruitment of antiviral leukocytes into the CNS. Although the chemokine receptor, CCR5, has been shown to play an important role in CNS host defense during WNV infection, regional effects of its activity within the infected brain have not been defined. We used CCR5-deficient mice and an established murine model of WNV encephalitis to determine whether CCR5 activity impacts on WNV levels within the CNS in a region-specific fashion. Statistical comparisons between groups were made with one- or two-way analysis of variance; Bonferroni's post hoc test was subsequently used to compare individual means. Survival was analyzed by the log-rank test. Analyses were conducted using Prism software (GraphPad Prism). All data were expressed as means ± SEM. Differences were considered significant if P ≤ 0.05. As previously shown, lack of CCR5 activity led to increased symptomatic disease and mortality in mice after subcutaneous infection with WNV. Evaluation of viral burden in the footpad, draining lymph nodes, spleen, olfactory bulb, and cerebellum derived from WNV-infected wild-type, and CCR5(-/-) mice showed no differences between the genotypes. In contrast, WNV-infected, CCR5(-/-) mice exhibited significantly increased viral burden in cortical tissues, including the hippocampus, at day 8 post-infection. CNS regional studies of chemokine expression via luminex analysis revealed significantly increased expression of CCR5 ligands, CCL4 and CCL5, within the cortices of WNV-infected, CCR5(-/-) mice compared with those of similarly infected WT animals. Cortical elevations in viral loads and CCR5 ligands in WNV-infected, CCR5(-/-) mice, however, were associated with decreased numbers of infiltrating mononuclear cells

  13. Effect of artemether-lumefantrine (Coartem) on cytomegalovirus urine viral load during and following treatment for malaria in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger-Kamate, Breanna; Forman, Michael; Sangare, Cheik Oumar; Haidara, Aboubecrin Sedhigh A; Maiga, Hamma; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Djimde, Abdoulaye; Arav-Boger, Ravit

    2016-04-01

    Artemisinins, commonly used to treat malaria, have shown activity against cytomegalovirus (CMV) in vitro, in an animal model, and in case reports; however, the in vivo anti-CMV activity has not been well investigated. To evaluate whether artemisinins affect CMV shedding among subjects co-infected with CMV and malaria. A prospective observational study of children in Mali (6 month-10 year) presenting with fever. Urine samples were collected at day 0, 3, and 14 from children treated with artemether-lumefantrine (Coartem(®)) for malaria and those who had other illnesses not treated with Coartem. CMV DNA was quantified using a real-time PCR. Resulting urine viral loads were compared between the groups at three time points. 164 malaria cases and 143 non-malaria comparisons were enrolled. Eighty-one (49%) cases and 88 (62%) comparisons shed CMV at day 0. Day 0 and day 3 viral loads were similar, but at day 14 the median viral load of cases was lower than that of comparisons (360 vs 720 copies/mL or 2.56 vs 2.86 log10), p=0.059. A stratified analysis of day 0 high viral shedders (defined as >1000 copies/mL) showed significantly lower median viral load at day 14 among cases (490 copies/mL, 2.69 log10) vs comparisons (1200 copies/mL, 3.08 log10), p=0.045. A high rate of urinary CMV shedding was found in a malaria-endemic area. Among high virus shedders artemether-lumefantrine decreased urine viral load, but the effect was not observed when analysis of both high and low shedders was performed. These results support additional studies of artemisinin dosing and duration in CMV infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical value of determination HIV viral load in the cerebrospinal fluid of HIV-infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Musatov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To analyze the concentration of HIV RNA in the cerebrospinal fluid and to evaluate its significance in the pathology of the central nervous system among HIV infected persons.Materials: We examined 36 patients with HIV infection with signs of pathology of the central nervous system. All patients was done completed a standard investigation of cerebrospinal fluid, cytological examination and detection viral load of HIV in the cerebrospinal fluid and serum.Results. A different of opportunistic and HIV-related disease was diagnosed in 29 patients. The most frequent pathology of the nervous system (12 cases is a diffuse HIV-associated brain damage occurring in 7 patients in the form of aseptic non purulent meningitis and in 5 patients in the form of encephalitis. The average value of the absolute and relative count of CD4-lymphocytes in patients amounted 147,0 cells/μl (40,0; 408,75 and 10.0% (4,00; 18,50. Pathological changes in cellular composition and protein concentration of cerebrospinal fluid detected in 19 cases. Replication of HIV in the cerebrospinal fluid are detected in 31 of 32 patients not receiving antiretroviral therapy, including 17 patients with normal values of cerebrospinal fluid. The average HIV viral load in the cerebrospinal fluid was 15 133,0 copies/ml (2501,0; 30624,0 or 4,18 (3,35; 4,48 lg HIV RNA, average HIV viral load in serum – 62 784,0 copies/ml (6027,5; 173869,0 or 4,80 4,80 (3,7; 5,2 lg HIV RNA. The concentration of HIV in the cerebrospinal fluid was significantly lower than in serum (4,18 and 4,80 lg HIV RNA, p=0.027. 4 patients with severe, multietiology damage of the central nervous system viral, microbial and fungal etiology, there was an inverse relationship between the concentration of HIV in the cerebrospinal fluid and in serum, the concentrations of HIV was higher in the cerebrospinal fluid.Conclusion: Among the majority of HIV-infected patients with signs of the central

  15. Association between feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) plasma viral RNA load, concentration of acute phase proteins and disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kann, Rebecca K C; Seddon, Jennifer M; Kyaw-Tanner, Myat T; Henning, Joerg; Meers, Joanne

    2014-08-01

    Veterinarians have few tools to predict the rate of disease progression in FIV-infected cats. In contrast, in HIV infection, plasma viral RNA load and acute phase protein concentrations are commonly used as predictors of disease progression. This study evaluated these predictors in cats naturally infected with FIV. In older cats (>5 years), log10 FIV RNA load was higher in the terminal stages of disease compared to the asymptomatic stage. There was a significant association between log10 FIV RNA load and both log10 serum amyloid A concentration and age in unwell FIV-infected cats. This study suggests that viral RNA load and serum amyloid A warrant further investigation as predictors of disease status and prognosis in FIV-infected cats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Differences in viral load among human respiratory syncytial virus genotypes in hospitalized children with severe acute respiratory infections in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadji, Francois Marie Ngako; Okamoto, Michiko; Furuse, Yuki; Tamaki, Raita; Suzuki, Akira; Lirio, Irene; Dapat, Clyde; Malasao, Rungnapa; Saito, Mariko; Pedrera-Rico, Gay Anne Granada; Tallo, Veronica; Lupisan, Socorro; Saito, Mayuko; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2016-06-27

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a leading viral etiologic agent of pediatric lower respiratory infections, including bronchiolitis and pneumonia. Two antigenic subgroups, HRSV-A and B, each contain several genotypes. While viral load may vary among HRSV genotypes and affect the clinical course of disease, data are scarce regarding the actual differences among genotypes. Therefore, this study estimated and compared viral load among NA1 and ON1 genotypes of HRSV-A and BA9 of HRSV-B. ON1 is a newly emerged genotype with a 72-nucleotide duplication in the G gene as observed previously with BA genotypes in HRSV-B. Children <5 years of age with an initial diagnosis of severe or very severe pneumonia at a hospital in the Philippines from September 2012 to December 2013 were enrolled. HRSV genotypes were determined and the viral load measured from nasopharyngeal swabs (NPS). The viral load of HRSV genotype NA1 were significantly higher than those of ON1 and BA9. Regression analysis showed that both genotype NA1 and younger age were significantly associated with high HRSV viral load. The viral load of NA1 was higher than that of ON1 and BA9 in NPS samples. HRSV genotypes may be associated with HRSV viral load. The reasons and clinical impacts of these differences in viral load among HRSV genotypes require further evaluation.

  17. HIV-1 viral DNA load in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from seroconverters and long-term infected individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurriaans, S.; Dekker, J. T.; de Ronde, A.

    1992-01-01

    To determine viral DNA load in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from HIV-1-infected individuals. HIV-1 copy numbers were determined using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the PCR-aided template titration assay (PATTY). PATTY utilizes an internal plasmid control DNA, which is

  18. Design and implementation of an external quality assessment program for HIV viral load measurements using dried blood spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prach, Lisa M; Puren, Adrian; Lippman, Sheri A; Carmona, Sergio; Stephenson, Sophie; Cutler, Ewalde; Barnhart, Scott; Liegler, Teri

    2015-03-01

    An external quality assurance program was developed for HIV-1 RNA viral load measurements taken from dried blood spots using a reference panel and field-collected specimens. The program demonstrated that accurate and reproducible quantitation can be obtained from field-collected specimens. Residual proviral DNA may confound interpretation in virologically suppressed subjects. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Thrombocytopenia in hydropic fetuses with parvovirus B19 infection: incidence, treatment and correlation with fetal B19 viral load

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, T. R.; van den Akker, E. S. A.; Porcelijn, L.; Oepkes, D.; Kroes, A. C. M.; Walther, F. J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To examine (1) the incidence of fetal thrombocytopenia in hydropic fetuses with congenital B19 virus infection, (2) the effect of intrauterine platelet transfusions and (3) the correlation between fetal B19 viral load and severity of thrombocytopenia. Design Retrospective analysis of data

  20. The role of targeted viral load testing in diagnosing virological failure in children on antiretroviral therapy with immunological failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Mary-Ann; Boulle, Andrew; Technau, Karl; Eley, Brian; Moultrie, Harry; Rabie, Helena; Garone, Daniela; Giddy, Janet; Wood, Robin; Egger, Matthias; Keiser, Olivia

    2012-11-01

    To determine the improvement in positive predictive value of immunological failure criteria for identifying virological failure in HIV-infected children on antiretroviral therapy (ART) when a single targeted viral load measurement is performed in children identified as having immunological failure. Analysis of data from children (5000 copies/ml on two consecutive occasions treatment in virologically suppressed children. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Undetectable plasma viral load predicts normal survival in HIV-2-infected people in a West African village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricard Dominique

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There have been no previous studies of the long-term survival and temporal changes in plasma viral load among HIV-2 infected subjects. Methods 133 HIV-2 infected and 158 HIV-uninfected subjects from a rural area in North-west Guinea-Bissau, West Africa were enrolled into a prospective cohort study in 1991 and followed-up to mid-2009. Data were collected on four occasions during that period on HIV antibodies, CD4% and HIV-2 plasma viral load. Results Median age (interquartile range [IQR] of HIV-2 infected subjects at time of enrollment was 47 (36, 60 years, similar to that of HIV-uninfected control subjects, 49 (38, 62 (p = 0.4. Median (IQR plasma viral load and CD4 percentage were 347 (50, 4,300 copies/ml and 29 (22, 35 respectively. Overall loss to follow-up to assess vital status was small, at 6.7% and 6.3% for HIV-2 infected and uninfected subjects respectively. An additional 17 (12.8% and 16 (10.1% of HIV-2 infected and uninfected subjects respectively were censored during follow-up due to infection with HIV-1. The mortality rate per 100 person-years (95% CI was 4.5 (3.6, 5.8 among HIV-2 infected subjects compared to 2.1 (1.6, 2.9 among HIV-uninfected (age-sex adjusted rate ratio 1.9 (1.3, 2.8, p Viral load measurements were available for 98%, 78%, 77% and 61% HIV-2 infected subjects who were alive and had not become super-infected with HIV-1, in 1991, 1996, 2003 and 2006 respectively. Median plasma viral load (RNA copies per ml (IQR did not change significantly over time, being 150 (50, 1,554; n = 77 in 1996, 203 (50, 2,837; n = 47 in 2003 and 171 (50, 497; n = 31 in 2006. Thirty seven percent of HIV-2 subjects had undetectable viraemia ( Conclusions A substantial proportion of HIV-2 infected subjects in this cohort have stable plasma viral load, and those with an undetectable viral load (37% at study entry had a normal survival rate. However, the sequential laboratory findings need to be interpreted with caution given

  2. Phylogenetic approach reveals that virus genotype largely determines HIV set-point viral load.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Alizon

    Full Text Available HIV virulence, i.e. the time of progression to AIDS, varies greatly among patients. As for other rapidly evolving pathogens of humans, it is difficult to know if this variance is controlled by the genotype of the host or that of the virus because the transmission chain is usually unknown. We apply the phylogenetic comparative approach (PCA to estimate the heritability of a trait from one infection to the next, which indicates the control of the virus genotype over this trait. The idea is to use viral RNA sequences obtained from patients infected by HIV-1 subtype B to build a phylogeny, which approximately reflects the transmission chain. Heritability is measured statistically as the propensity for patients close in the phylogeny to exhibit similar infection trait values. The approach reveals that up to half of the variance in set-point viral load, a trait associated with virulence, can be heritable. Our estimate is significant and robust to noise in the phylogeny. We also check for the consistency of our approach by showing that a trait related to drug resistance is almost entirely heritable. Finally, we show the importance of taking into account the transmission chain when estimating correlations between infection traits. The fact that HIV virulence is, at least partially, heritable from one infection to the next has clinical and epidemiological implications. The difference between earlier studies and ours comes from the quality of our dataset and from the power of the PCA, which can be applied to large datasets and accounts for within-host evolution. The PCA opens new perspectives for approaches linking clinical data and evolutionary biology because it can be extended to study other traits or other infectious diseases.

  3. Correlation between viral load, plasma levels of CD4 - CD8 T lymphocytes and AIDS-related oral diseases: a multicentre study on 30 HIV+ children in the HAART era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesti, M; Carli, E; Giaquinto, C; Rampon, O; Nastasio, S; Giuca, M R

    2012-01-01

    This experimental retrospective multicenter study carried out on 30 seropositive children treated with Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART), between the ages of 18 months and 14 years, in the clinical categories Centers for Disease Control (CDC) classification 1993 A (mildly symptomatic), B (moderately symptomatic) and C (severely symptomatic) aims to: 1) clinically and immunologically demonstrate the therapeutic benefits of HAART; 2) monitor the frequency of AIDS-related oral diseases in seropositive children with HAART therapy; 3) monitor the plasma levels of total CD4, CD4 percent, CD8 percent, CD4-CD8 lymphocytes and viral load from 1997 to 30 April, 2011. The statistic methods used are the analysis of covariance and the Bonferroni Test. More than 100 AIDS-related oral diseases were found in the study samples, the most frequent being: oral candidiasis, oropharyngeal candidiasis, HSV-1 herpetic esophagyitis, herpetic gingivolstomatitis (RHOG), recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS), parotid swelling, oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL), Herpes simplex 1 (HSV-1), linear gingival erythema (LGE), necrotizing gingivitis (NUG), facial lipodistrophy, facial-cervical lymphadenopathy (FCL), xerostomia, dysgeusia, hyposmia, oral mucosa hyperpigmentation (OMP). The Bonferroni test showed a significant difference between the mean plasma values (mpVTL) of total CD4, CD4 percentage, CD4-CD8 T lymphocytes and Viral Load (VL) of the various oral diseases found in the study samples. The therapeutic benefits of HAART are: immune reconstitution; reduction of the HIV/AIDS-related stomatology diseases; prevention and cure of the AIDS correlated neoplasias; reduction in maternal-fetal transmission of the HIV virus. The negative effects of HAART in relation to odontostomatolgy are: increase in oral lesions from HPV; xerostomia; dysgeusia/ageusia, hyposmia, perioral paresthesia; hyperpigmentation of oral mucosa; facial lipodystrophy, recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS). No case of

  4. Genital Warts (HPV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Growth Problems Cervical Cap HPV Vaccine Genital Warts (HPV) KidsHealth > For Teens > Genital Warts (HPV) Print A ... HPV infection. How Do People Know They Have HPV? Most HPV infections have no signs or symptoms. ...

  5. Beak and feather disease virus: correlation between viral load and clinical signs in wild Cape parrots (Poicepahlus robustus) in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnard, Guy L; Boyes, Rutledge S; Martin, Rowan O; Hitzeroth, Inga I; Rybicki, Edward P

    2015-01-01

    Psittacine beak and feather disease (PBFD), the most prevalent viral disease affecting psittacines, is caused by beak and feather disease virus (BFDV). This study assessed viral load using qPCR in a wild Cape parrot population affected by PBFD and compared it to overall physical condition based on clinical signs attributable to PBFD. A significant inverse correlation between viral load and overall physical condition was found, which confirmed that clinical signs may confidently be used to diagnose the relative severity of BFDV infections in wild populations. This is the first assessment of BFDV viral load in a wild psittacine population.

  6. The Effect of GBV-C Infection on CD4 Count and Viral Loads in Patients Infected With HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyvani, Hossein; Mohammadi, Avid; Sabouri Ghannad, Masoud; Hajabdolbaghi, Mahboobeh

    2012-01-01

    The picture that has emerged from studies investigating HIV infected people with GBV-C viremia is that they have lower plasma HIV viral loads in comparison with HIV-positive people who did not have the GBV-C viremia. Since GBV-C HIV coinfection has not been studied in Iran, we have designed a survey to study the outcomes of GBV-C infection on HIV infected individuals. We analyzed 78 serum samples from HIV-positive patients in Tehran. The HIV positive statue was confirmed by Western blot in our laboratory. Next we detected GBV-C RNA by RT nested-PCR and divided our patient into GBV-C positive and GBV-C negative groups. The final step was measuring the CD4 count and HIV viral load and comparing the means of the CD4 count and HIV viral load in HIV-infected individuals in the GBV-C positive and GBV-C negative groups. We detected GBV-C RNA in 15 patients out of 78. The mean CD4 count was 607.13 compared to 415.87 in the GBV-C negative group and the difference was significant (P = 0.005). In contrast to the CD4 count there was no significant difference in HIV viral loads between HIV infected individuals in the GBV-C positive and GBV-C negative groups. Although there was no significant difference in the mean of the HIV viral load between the GBV-C positive and GBV-C negative groups, the significantly higher CD4 mean in the GBV-C positive group compared with the GBV-C negative group suggests a beneficial effect of this coinfection.

  7. Fluorescence in situ hybridization is superior for monitoring Epstein Barr viral load in infectious mononucleosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Pengfei; Zhang, Meili; Wang, Wei; Dai, Yafei; Sai, Buqing; Sun, Jun; Wang, Lujuan; Wang, Fan; Li, Guiyuan; Xiang, Juanjuan

    2017-05-03

    DNA detected using real-time PCR was observed in 89.5% of these IM patients. The EBV genome was detected by the FISH assay in 97.4% of the IM patients. The EB viral loads detected by FISH and real-time PCR increased with the severity of IM. The EBV genome was detected in almost all the PBMC of IM with haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and chronic active EBV infection patients. Molecular tests, including FISH and EBV real-time PCR, are more sensitive than serological assays for the detection of EBV infection. The FISH assay detecting EBV copies in unfractionated whole blood is preferable and superior to plasma real-time PCR in its reflection of the absolute viral burden circulating in the patients.

  8. Factors associated with 10 years of continuous viral load suppression on HAART.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Kathryn J; Mesner, Octavio; O'Bryan, Thomas A; Won, Seung Hyun; Lalani, Tahaniyat; Ganesan, Anuradha; Agan, Brian K; Okulicz, Jason F

    2016-07-22

    The principal goal of HAART is sustained viral load (VL) suppression resulting in immune reconstitution and improved HIV outcomes. We studied the factors associated with 10 years of continuous VL suppression on HAART in the US Military HIV Natural History Study. Participants with continuous VL suppression (CS, n = 149) were compared to those who did not have continuous viral load suppression (NCS, n = 127) for ≥10 years on HAART. Factors associated with >10 years of VL suppression were evaluated by multivariate logistic regression. Additionally, association between CS and CD4 reconstitution was analyzed with a mixed effects model. Compared to NCS participants, a lower proportion of CS participants started HAART in the early HAART era (66 vs 90 %, for years 1996-1999; p < 0.001) and had less antiretroviral use prior to HAART (37 vs 83 %; p < 0.001). At initial HAART, the median CD4 cell count was higher and VL was lower for CS compared to NCS participants (375 cells/uL [256, 499] vs 261 cells/uL [146, 400]; p < 0.001 and 4.4 log10 copies/mL [3.5, 4.9] vs 4.5 log10 copies/mL [3.8, 5.0]; p = 0.048, respectively). New AIDS events were lower during HAART (5 vs 13 %; p = 0.032) and post-HAART CD4 trajectories were greater for the CS compared to NCS group. Factors negatively associated with ≥10 years of VL suppression included log10 VL at first HAART (OR 0.61, 95 % CI 0.4, 0.92; p = 0.020) and antiretroviral use prior to HAART (OR 0.16, 95 % CI 0.06, 0.38; p < .001). Sustained VL suppression is a key to long-term health in HIV-infected patients, as demonstrated by the lower proportion of AIDS events observed 10 years after HAART initiation. The current use of more potent and well-tolerated regimens may mitigate the negative factors of pre-HAART VL and prior ARV use encountered by treatment initiated in the early HAART era.

  9. Dependence of intracellular and exosomal microRNAs on viral E6/E7 oncogene expression in HPV-positive tumor cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Honegger, Anja; Schilling, Daniela; Bastian, Sandra; Sponagel, Jasmin; Kuryshev, Vladimir; Sültmann, Holger; Scheffner, Martin; Hoppe-Seyler, Karin; Hoppe-Seyler, Felix

    2015-01-01

    ...) expression patterns. By genome-wide analyses, we investigate whether the intracellular and exosomal miRNA compositions of HPV-positive cancer cells are dependent on endogenous E6/E7 oncogene expression...

  10. Factors associated with short-term changes in HIV viral load and CD4+ cell count in antiretroviral-naive individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Among antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive individuals, viral load levels tend to increase and CD4(+) cell counts decline over time. We sought to explore the rate of change and influence of other factors associated with these markers of HIV progression. DESIGN: An observational cohort...... collaboration study. METHODS: A total of 158 385 pairs of consecutive viral load and CD4(+) cell count simultaneously measured from 34 384 ART-naive individuals in the COHERE database were analysed. Annual changes and factors associated with these changes were estimated using generalized estimating equations...... of CD4(+) cell count depletion than baseline viral load. Neither sex, race nor transmission by injecting drug use was associated with change in either the viral load or CD4(+) cell count. DISCUSSION: We found that in ART-naive individuals, viral load continues to increase over time and more sharply...

  11. Clinical Factors and Viral Load Influencing Severity of Acute Hepatitis A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Woong Lee

    Full Text Available Clinical manifestations of hepatitis A virus (HAV infection vary from mild to fulminant hepatic failure (FHF in adults. We investigated the relationship between laboratory findings, including viral load, and clinical outcomes in patients with acute hepatitis A (AHA and evaluated predictive factors for severe acute hepatitis (s-AH.We analyzed the clinical manifestations of AHA in 770 patients. Patients with a prothrombin time (PT of less than 40% of normal were classified as s-AH and included 4 patients with FHF, 11 patients with acute renal failure, and 3 patients with prolonged jaundice (n = 128. Other patients were defined as mild acute hepatitis (m-AH (n = 642. Serum samples were obtained from 48 patients with acute hepatitis A. Among them, 20 with s-AH, and 28 with m-AH, were tested for HAV RNA titer.In a multivariate analysis, age (HR = 1.042, P = 0.041, peak creatinine (HR = 4.014, P = 0.001, bilirubin (HR = 1.153, P = 0.003, alanine aminotransferase (ALT (HR = 1.001, P < 0.001, initial lactate dehydrogenase (LDH (HR = 1.000, P = 0.045 and total cholesterol (HR = 0.978, P < 0.001 were independent factors for s-AH. Serum HAV RNA was detected in 20/20 (100% patients with s-AH and 22/28 (78.6% patients with m-AH. In a multivariate analysis of the 48 patients who were tested for HAV RNA, peak ALT (HR = 1.001, P = 0.004 and HAV RNA titer (HR = 2.076, P = 0.012 were independent factors for s-AH.Clinical factors including age, peak creatinine, bilirubin, ALT, initial LDH and total cholesterol were independent factors for s-AH in a multivariate analysis. In particular, HAV load strongly correlated with the severity of hepatitis A.

  12. Critical evaluation of HPV16 gene copy number quantification by SYBR green PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pett Mark R

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papilloma virus (HPV load and physical status are considered useful parameters for clinical evaluation of cervical squamous cell neoplasia. However, the errors implicit in HPV gene quantification by PCR are not well documented. We have undertaken the first rigorous evaluation of the errors that can be expected when using SYBR green qPCR for quantification of HPV type 16 gene copy numbers. We assessed a modified method, in which external calibration curves were generated from a single construct containing HPV16 E2, HPV16 E6 and the host gene hydroxymethylbilane synthase in a 1:1:1 ratio. Results When testing dilutions of mixed HPV/host DNA in replicate runs, we observed errors in quantifying E2 and E6 amplicons of 5–40%, with greatest error at the lowest DNA template concentration (3 ng/μl. Errors in determining viral copy numbers per diploid genome were 13–53%. Nevertheless, in cervical keratinocyte cell lines we observed reasonable agreement between viral loads determined by qPCR and Southern blotting. The mean E2/E6 ratio in episome-only cells was 1.04, but with a range of 0.76–1.32. In three integrant-only lines the mean E2/E6 ratios were 0.20, 0.72 and 2.61 (values confirmed by gene-specific Southern blotting. When E2/E6 ratios in fourteen HPV16-positive cervical carcinomas were analysed, conclusions regarding viral physical state could only be made in three cases, where the E2/E6 ratio was ≤ 0.06. Conclusion Run-to-run variation in SYBR green qPCR produces unavoidable inaccuracies that should be allowed for when quantifying HPV gene copy number. While E6 copy numbers can be considered to provide a useable indication of viral loads, the E2/E6 ratio is of limited value. Previous studies may have overestimated the frequency of mixed episomal/integrant HPV infections.

  13. Clinical Factors and Viral Load Influencing Severity of Acute Hepatitis A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Woong; Chang, Dong-Yeop; Moon, Hong Ju; Chang, Hye Young; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Lee, June Sung; Kim, Kyung-Ah; Kim, Hyung Joon

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Clinical manifestations of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection vary from mild to fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) in adults. We investigated the relationship between laboratory findings, including viral load, and clinical outcomes in patients with acute hepatitis A (AHA) and evaluated predictive factors for severe acute hepatitis (s-AH). Methods We analyzed the clinical manifestations of AHA in 770 patients. Patients with a prothrombin time (PT) of less than 40% of normal were classified as s-AH and included 4 patients with FHF, 11 patients with acute renal failure, and 3 patients with prolonged jaundice (n = 128). Other patients were defined as mild acute hepatitis (m-AH) (n = 642). Serum samples were obtained from 48 patients with acute hepatitis A. Among them, 20 with s-AH, and 28 with m-AH, were tested for HAV RNA titer. Results In a multivariate analysis, age (HR = 1.042, P = 0.041), peak creatinine (HR = 4.014, P = 0.001), bilirubin (HR = 1.153, P = 0.003), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (HR = 1.001, Phepatitis A. PMID:26090677

  14. Using Exclusion-Based Sample Preparation (ESP to Reduce Viral Load Assay Cost.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M Berry

    Full Text Available Viral load (VL measurements are critical to the proper management of HIV in developing countries. However, access to VL assays is limited by the high cost and complexity of existing assays. While there is a need for low cost VL assays, performance must not be compromised. Thus, new assays must be validated on metrics of limit of detection (LOD, accuracy, and dynamic range. Patient plasma samples from the Joint Clinical Research Centre in Uganda were de-identified and measured using both an existing VL assay (Abbott RealTime HIV-1 and our assay, which combines low cost reagents with a simplified method of RNA isolation termed Exclusion-Based Sample Preparation (ESP.71 patient samples with VLs ranging from 3,000,000 copies/mL were used to compare the two methods. We demonstrated equivalent LOD (~50 copies/mL and high accuracy (average difference between methods of 0.08 log, R2 = 0.97. Using expenditures from this trial, we estimate that the cost of the reagents and consumables for this assay to be approximately $5 USD. As cost is a significant barrier to implementation of VL testing, we anticipate that our assay will enhance access to this critical monitoring test in developing countries.

  15. Using Exclusion-Based Sample Preparation (ESP) to Reduce Viral Load Assay Cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Scott M; Pezzi, Hannah M; Williams, Eram D; Loeb, Jennifer M; Guckenberger, David J; Lavanway, Alex J; Puchalski, Alice A; Kityo, Cissy M; Mugyenyi, Peter N; Graziano, Franklin M; Beebe, David J

    2015-01-01

    Viral load (VL) measurements are critical to the proper management of HIV in developing countries. However, access to VL assays is limited by the high cost and complexity of existing assays. While there is a need for low cost VL assays, performance must not be compromised. Thus, new assays must be validated on metrics of limit of detection (LOD), accuracy, and dynamic range. Patient plasma samples from the Joint Clinical Research Centre in Uganda were de-identified and measured using both an existing VL assay (Abbott RealTime HIV-1) and our assay, which combines low cost reagents with a simplified method of RNA isolation termed Exclusion-Based Sample Preparation (ESP).71 patient samples with VLs ranging from 3,000,000 copies/mL were used to compare the two methods. We demonstrated equivalent LOD (~50 copies/mL) and high accuracy (average difference between methods of 0.08 log, R2 = 0.97). Using expenditures from this trial, we estimate that the cost of the reagents and consumables for this assay to be approximately $5 USD. As cost is a significant barrier to implementation of VL testing, we anticipate that our assay will enhance access to this critical monitoring test in developing countries.

  16. [Utility of the viral load measurement after one month of antiretroviral treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kra, O; Ouattara, B; Aba, Yt; Roger, Pm; Dellamonica, P

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the therapeutic utility of the viral load (VL) measurement after one month (M1) of antiretroviral (ARV) treatment. A retrospective study of HIV patients included in the NADIS database from 1998 to 2006 and followed at Nice University Hospital. We included ARV-naive patients who received ARV (3-drug combination) for at least 3 months and ARV-experienced patients beginning a new ARV after virologic failure. The NADIS database included 1065 patients from 1998 to 2006. We included 262. In all, 234 of them had VL measured at M1 and are considered in this analysis. Their mean age was 44 years, and 174 were men, for a sex ratio of 9.1. ARV-naïve patients accounted for 35% of the sample (n = 81) and previously treated patients 65% (n = 153). All the naive patients had a VL decrease at M1 > 1 log, as did all but 14 of the previously treated patients (9%). This virological result was followed by a medical action 21 times for the naive patients and 97 times for the previously treated patients (p < 0.004). The VL measurement at M1 indicates a virological objective that was reached for all the naive patients and 91% of the previously treated patients. Moreover, the medical actions taken at M1 for a new ARV treatment appear to be associated with the patient's treatment history and not the virological results.

  17. Late Persistent Positive EBV Viral Load and Risk of Solid Cancer in Kidney Transplant Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamoulid, Jamal; Courivaud, Cécile; Coaquette, Alain; Crépin, Thomas; Carron, Clémence; Gaiffe, Emilie; Roubiou, Caroline; Rebibou, Jean-Michel; Ducloux, Didier

    2017-06-01

    Recent studies reported that posttransplant Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) replication is frequent and indicates overimmunosuppression. We hypothesized that long-term EBV replication may identify overimmunosuppressed patients at higher risk of cancer. We analyzed a prospective cohort of renal transplant recipients having routine EBV PCR surveillance. All cancers (except EBV-related neoplasia) were recorded. Mean follow up was 94 + 23 months. Samples (8412) were available in 669 patients. Three hundred eighty-eight of the 669 patients (58%) had at least 1 positive viremia during follow-up.Epstein-Barr virus D+/R- patients (P = 0.046) as well as those having received antithymocyte globulin (P EBV viremia. Eighty-six patients (12.9%) developed a cancer during follow-up. The cumulated incidence of cancer was higher in patients with persistent high EBV replication (22.4% vs 10.2%, P = 0.005). The effect of persistent EBV infection remained significant even after adjustment for all confounding factors (hazard ratio, 1.69; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-2.61; P = 0.018). Age, history of antithymocyte globulin use, smoking, and history of cancer were also associated with cancer occurrence. Persistent high EBV viral load is associated with the occurrence of solid cancer. In this setting, more intensive screening and/or minimization of immunosuppressive treatment are probably required.

  18. Anthropogenic Viral Load on the Sources of Water in Kryvyi Rig

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    N.S. Prus

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the hepatropic viruses load on the natural sources of wastewater use of the industrial region. Methods. We investigated open water samples from places of water intake, which is later purified and used in consumer’s drinking purposes; river water samples in resting places and samples of sewage from discharge to the environment places. We used EUSA method using sets of reagents for the detection of antigen of hepatitis A virus (HAV HAV-antigen ELISA-Best (Russia, devices for the automatic washing of microplates and automatic record of the results using the immunoassay analyzer StatFax303 (Awareness Technology Inc., USA. Results. During 2000–2015 three peaks of the indication of HAV antigens’ rise in river water and sewage samples were noted. In 2002–2003 in average 34.4 and 32.3 % of the sewage and river water samples were positive, in 2008 26.7 and 27.1 %, respectively. The third peak of HAV antigen detection in open water was observed in 2012, only 17.8 %. Wastewater has been losing viral antigens since 2008, in fact to 0 % in 2013–2014. Conclusions. Aquatic ecosystem pollution by biological components occurs despite of primary treatment of wastewater. Drinking water contamination, which is used in everyday life, probably can be linked to an unsatisfactory condition of pipelines and laying of sewage supply.

  19. Clinical Performance of APTIMA Human Papillomavirus (HPV) 16 18/45 mRNA Genotyping Testing for the Detection of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia 3 (CIN3) or Cancer in a Select Group of Chinese Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan-Li; You, Ke; Geng, Li; Qiao, Jie

    2016-07-01

    HPV type was evaluated in a select group of Chinese women that were positive with hybrid capture, and correlations were performed between the pathology found, the type of virus and a semiquantitation from the hybrid capture results. Totally 394 referred high-risk-HPV-positive women evaluated by Hybrid Capture 2 (HC-2) assay were enrolled. Before colposcopy, cervical specimens were collected from all participants and suspended into PreservCytcollection medium (Hologic Inc., Marlborough, MA), and tested with the APTIMA HPV16 18/45 mRNA assay. Colposcopy and diagnostic biopsies were done on all participants. Viral load was assessed by HC2 assay. Totally 55 women were diagnosed as CIN 3 plus cancer (≥CIN3), and the prevalence of HPV16/18/45 was 65.5 % (95 % confidence interval [CI], 52.9-78.0 %) among these ≥CIN3 women. Compared with the group with positive HC2 but negative HPV16/18/45, the odds ratio (OR) to identify ≥CIN3 was 6.3 (95 % CI, 3.2-12.3) for HPV16 and 3.2 (95 % CI, 1.4-7.2) for HPV18/45. When using ≥CIN3 as an endpoint, the sensitivity and specificity was 65.5 % (95 % CI, 52.9-78.0 %) and 72.0 % (95 % CI, 67.2-76.8 %). In the case of HPV16/18/45 negative, no high HPV load had a statistically significant increased risk for the prevalence of ≥CIN3. HPV16, 18 and 45 infection is a major cause for ≥CIN3 in Chinese women. Women with positive HPV16/18/45 should be referred to colposcopy immediately. HPV load was not suitable for the further triaged of the HPV16/18/45 negative cases.

  20. Evolution and taxonomic classification of alphapapillomavirus 7 complete genomes: HPV18, HPV39, HPV45, HPV59, HPV68 and HPV70.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zigui Chen

    Full Text Available The species Alphapapillomavirus 7 (alpha-7 contains human papillomavirus genotypes that account for 15% of invasive cervical cancers and are disproportionately associated with adenocarcinoma of the cervix. Complete genome analyses enable identification and nomenclature of variant lineages and sublineages.The URR/E6 region was sequenced to screen for novel variants of HPV18, 39, 45, 59, 68, 70, 85 and 97 from 1147 cervical samples obtained from multiple geographic regions that had previously been shown to contain an alpha-7 HPV isolate. To study viral heterogeneity, the complete 8 kb genome of 128 isolates, including 109 sequenced for this analysis, were annotated and analyzed. Viral evolution was characterized by constructing phylogenic trees using maximum-likelihood and Bayesian algorithms. Global and pairwise alignments were used to calculate total and ORF/region nucleotide differences; lineages and sublineages were assigned using an alphanumeric system. The prototype genome was assigned to the A lineage or A1 sublineage.The genomic diversity of alpha-7 HPV types ranged from 1.1% to 6.7% nucleotide sequence differences; the extent of genome-genome pairwise intratype heterogeneity was 1.1% for HPV39, 1.3% for HPV59, 1.5% for HPV45, 1.6% for HPV70, 2.1% for HPV18, and 6.7% for HPV68. ME180 (previously a subtype of HPV68 was designated as the representative genome for HPV68 sublineage C1. Each ORF/region differed in sequence diversity, from most variable to least variable: noncoding region 1 (NCR1 / noncoding region 2 (NCR2 > upstream regulatory region (URR > E6 / E7 > E2 / L2 > E1 / L1.These data provide estimates of the maximum viral genomic heterogeneity of alpha-7 HPV type variants. The proposed taxonomic system facilitates the comparison of variants across epidemiological and molecular studies. Sequence diversity, geographic distribution and phylogenetic topology of this clinically important group of HPVs suggest an independent evolutionary

  1. Efavirenz Plasma Concentrations and HIV Viral Load in HIV/AIDS-tuberculosis Infection Patients Treated with Rifampicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Mariana

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim:to determine the effect of a rifampicin-containing tuberculosis regimen on efavirenz plasma concentrations and viral load in HIV/AIDS-Tuberculosis infection patients who received efavirenz-based antiretroviral therapy. Methods:plasma efavirenz concentrations and HIV viral load were measured in HIV/AIDS patients treated with 600 mg efavirenz-based antiretroviral for 3 to 6 months and in HIV/AIDS-Tuberculosis infection patients treated with similar antiretroviral regimen plus rifampicin-containing antituberculosis in Sulianti Saroso Infectious disease Hospital, Jakarta. Plasma efavirenz concentration in both groups were compared using Mann-Whitney test, while proportion of patients with viral load >40 copy/mL were analyzed with chi-square test. Results:forty five patients (27 with HIV/AIDS and 18 with HIV/AIDS-Tuberculosis infections were recruited during the period of February to May 2015. The median efavirenz plasma concentration obtained from HIV/AIDS group was 0,680 mg/L(range 0,24 to 5,67 mg/L and that obtained from HIV/AIDS-Tuberculosis group was 0.685 mg/L (0.12 -2.23 mg/L which was not significantly different statistically. The proportion of patients with viral load ≥40 copies/mL after 3-6 months of ARV treatment in the HIV/AIDS group was 51.9%, and in the HIV/AIDS-Tuberculosis group was 72.2%, which was not significantly different statistically (Chi Square test, p=0.291. Conclusion:plasma efavirenz concentration in HIV/AIDS-tuberculosis patients receiving antiretroviral and rifampicin is not significantly different from that on HIV/AIDS patients without tuberculosis. Proportion of patients with viral load of >40 copy/mL is higher in HIV/AIDS-tuberculosis patients receiving rifampicin compared to HIV/AIDS patients that not receive rifampicin. However, this difference did not reach statistical significance. Confirmatory studies with bigger sample size are needed to clarify the influence of rifampicin on plasma level ofefavirenzand and

  2. Validation and clinical use of a sensitive HIV-2 viral load assay that uses a whole virus internal control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styer, Linda M; Miller, Thomas T; Parker, Monica M

    2013-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) is distantly related to the more widespread HIV-1. Although HIV-2 infection is rare in the U.S., cases are concentrated in the Northeast. No FDA-approved HIV-2 viral load assays exist. A clinically validated laboratory-developed assay is currently available in the U.S., however it is not currently approved for use on New York State patients. To develop a sensitive viral load assay to quantify HIV-2 RNA in plasma and to validate it for clinical use. The real-time RT-PCR assay simultaneously amplifies HIV-2 and a whole virus internal control, added during the lysis step. Two extraction volumes can be used. Results are reported in HIV-2 RNA International Units (IU). The assay has a limit of detection of 7 IU/mL and a lower limit of quantification of 29 IU/mL. The assay detects multiple strains of HIV-2 group A and B and generates reproducible results. Samples exchanged with a comparator laboratory produced similar viral load results, with 74% of positives differing by loads (range: 1.63-5.14 log10 IU/mL), 10 (19%) were positive but not quantifiable, and 14 were negative. HIV-2 RNA was detected in at least one specimen from 19 of 25 (76%) individuals tested. We developed a sensitive and accurate HIV-2 viral load assay. Validation data indicate the assay is suitable for clinical use and its availability in New York State will improve clinical monitoring of HIV-2 infected patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The nuclear retention signal of HPV16 L2 protein is essential for incoming viral genome to transverse the trans-Golgi network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiGiuseppe, Stephen; Bienkowska-Haba, Malgorzata; Hilbig, Lydia; Sapp, Martin, E-mail: msapp1@lsuhsc.edu

    2014-06-15

    The Human papillomavirus (HPV) capsid is composed of the major and minor capsid proteins, L1 and L2, respectively. Infectious entry requires a complex series of conformational changes in both proteins that lead to uptake and allow uncoating to occur. During entry, the capsid is disassembled and host cyclophilins dissociate L1 protein from the L2/DNA complex. Herein, we describe a mutant HPV16 L2 protein (HPV16 L2-R302/5A) that traffics pseudogenome to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) but fails to egress. Our data provide further evidence that HPV16 traffics through the TGN and demonstrates that L2 is essential for TGN egress. Furthermore, we show that cyclophilin activity is required for the L2/DNA complex to be transported to the TGN which is accompanied by a reduced L1 protein levels. - Highlights: • mNLS mutant HPV16 L2 protein traffics pseudogenome to the TGN but fails to egress. • Cyclophilin activity is required for trafficking of the L2/DNA complex to the TGN. • Majority of L1 protein is shed from the L2/DNA complex prior to reaching the TGN.

  4. Cytomegalovirus viral load in cord blood and impact of congenital infection on markers of hematopoietic progenitor cell potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albano, M Susana; Ciubotariu, Rodica; Dobrila, Ludy; Tarnawski, Michal; DeLeon, Margely; Watanabe, Chiseko; Krishnan, Siddarth; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Rubinstein, Pablo

    2017-11-01

    The low incidence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in neonates decreases the risk of viral transmission with cord blood transplantation. Cord blood donors are screened by testing the maternal sample for total antibodies to CMV. Some cord blood banks also screen cord blood for CMV-DNA. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assay to measure CMV viral load in cord blood from asymptomatic infants with congenital CMV infection and to assess the impact of CMV infection on cord blood hematopoietic progenitor cell concentrations and colony-forming unit functionality. CMV infection was evaluated in two groups of cord blood donors: 1) 30,308 neonates prospectively screened by saliva culture, including 41 positive cases (0.14%), all from mothers with total antibodies to CMV; and 2) 4712 newborns from mothers with total antibodies to CMV who were screened retrospectively by polymerase chain reaction, including 18 positive cases (0.38%). All 59 infants with CMV were asymptomatic at birth. Among the 59 positive cases, the average CMV viral load in cord blood was 20.6 × 104 viral copies (vc)/mL; seven of 59 mothers (12%) had CMV-DNA detected, however, with no association to their newborns' CMV viral load. Levels of colony-forming units, CD34+ /CD45+ cells, and total nucleated cells measured in a cohort of CMV-positive cord blood samples were higher than those in the matched control group. We developed and validated a multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assay to detect CMV-DNA in cord blood. In our study, maternal total antibodies to CMV or CMV-DNA at birth were poor predictors of infection in cord blood donors. Furthermore, our results suggest that CMV congenital infection impacts CD34+ /CD45+ cells and some hematopoietic progenitor cells toward higher proliferation. © 2017 AABB.

  5. Prevalence of Oral Manifestations and Their Association with CD4/CD8 Ratio and HIV Viral Load in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Gaurav

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present research was to determine the prevalence of oral manifestations in an HIV infected population from south India and evaluate their association with HIV viral load and CD4/CD8 ratio. Intraoral examination of 103 patients, whose CD4/CD8 ratio was available, were conducted. HIV viral loads were available for thirty patients only. The prevalence of oral manifestations was 80.6% (83/103. The most common oromucosal lesion was erythematous candidiasis (EC (38.8% followed by melanotic hyperpigmentation (35.9%. Patients having any oral manifestation had a mean CD4/CD8 ratio of 0.24. EC had positive predictive value of 85.0% for CD4/CD8 ratio 20,000 copies/mL (20,000 copies/mL.

  6. Epstein-Barr virus: general factors, virus-related diseases and measurement of viral load after transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Cristina Fagundes Gequelin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Epstein-Barr virus is responsible for infectious mononucleosis syndrome and is also closely associated to several types of cancer. The main complication involving Epstein-Barr virus infection, both in recipients of hematopoietic stem cells and solid organs, is post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease. The importance of this disease has increased interest in the development of laboratory tools to improve post-transplant monitoring and to detect the disease before clinical evolution. Viral load analysis for Epstein-Barr virus through real-time polymerase chain reaction is, at present, the best tool to measure viral load. However, there is not a consensus on which sample type is the best for the test and what is its predictive value for therapeutic interventions.

  7. Systematic Review of the Performance of HIV Viral Load Technologies on Plasma Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollis, Kimberly A.; Smit, Pieter W.; Fiscus, Susan; Ford, Nathan; Vitoria, Marco; Essajee, Shaffiq; Barnett, David; Cheng, Ben; Crowe, Suzanne M.; Denny, Thomas; Landay, Alan; Stevens, Wendy; Habiyambere, Vincent; Perrins, Jos; Peeling, Rosanna W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Viral load (VL) monitoring is the standard of care in developing country settings for detecting HIV treatment failure. Since 2010 the World Health Organization has recommended a phase-in approach to VL monitoring in resource-limited settings. We conducted a systematic review of the accuracy and precision of HIV VL technologies for treatment monitoring. Methods and Findings A search of Medline and Embase was conducted for studies evaluating the accuracy or reproducibility of commercially available HIV VL assays. 37 studies were included for review including evaluations of the Amplicor Monitor HIV-1 v1.5 (n = 25), Cobas TaqMan v2.0 (n = 11), Abbott RealTime HIV-1 (n = 23), Versant HIV-1 RNA bDNA 3.0 (n = 15), Versant HIV-1 RNA kPCR 1.0 (n = 2), ExaVir Load v3 (n = 2), and NucliSens EasyQ v2.0 (n = 1). All currently available HIV VL assays are of sufficient sensitivity to detect plasma virus levels at a lower detection limit of 1,000 copies/mL. Bias data comparing the Abbott RealTime HIV-1, TaqMan v2.0 to the Amplicor Monitor v1.5 showed a tendency of the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 to under-estimate results while the TaqMan v2.0 overestimated VL counts. Compared to the Amplicor Monitor v1.5, 2–26% and 9–70% of results from the Versant bDNA 3.0 and Abbott RealTime HIV-1 differed by greater than 0.5log10. The average intra and inter-assay variation of the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 were 2.95% (range 2.0–5.1%) and 5.44% (range 1.17–30.00%) across the range of VL counts (2log10–7log10). Conclusions This review found that all currently available HIV VL assays are of sufficient sensitivity to detect plasma VL of 1,000 copies/mL as a threshold to initiate investigations of treatment adherence or possible treatment failure. Sources of variability between VL assays include differences in technology platform, plasma input volume, and ability to detect HIV-1 subtypes. Monitoring of individual patients should be performed on the same

  8. Membrane Bioreactor-Based Wastewater Treatment Plant in Saudi Arabia: Reduction of Viral Diversity, Load, and Infectious Capacity

    KAUST Repository

    Jumat, Muhammad

    2017-07-18

    A membrane bioreactor (MBR)-based wastewater treatment plant in Saudi Arabia was assessed over a nine-month period for virus removal efficiency. Viral diversity was detected using omics-based approaches. Log reduction values (LRV) of Adenoviruses (AdV) and Enteroviruses (EV) were enumerated using digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) and assessed for infectivity using fluorescence-based infection assays. MBR treatment was successful in reducing viral diversity. Plant viruses remained abundant in the treated effluent. Human enteric viruses were present in lower abundance than plant viruses, and were reduced by MBR at varying LRV. AdV copy numbers were reduced by 3.7-log. Infectious AdV was not detected in the effluent. EV copy numbers were reduced by 1.7-log post MBR and infectious EV decreased by an average of 2.0-log. Infectious EV was detected in the chlorinated effluent, occasionally in concentrations that approximate to its 50% infectious dose. Overall, results indicated that a MBR-based wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effectively reduces viral diversity, viral load, and infectious capacity by up to 4-logs. These findings suggest potential concerns associated with plant and human enteric viruses for reuse events in this country. Local guidelines for assessment of treated water quality should take into consideration both infectious viral concentration and LRV.

  9. Prevalence of oral lesions in HIV patients related to CD4 cell count and viral load in a Venezuelan population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Inés María; Correnti, María; Escalona, Laura; Perrone, Marianella; Brito, Aubert; Tovar, Vilma; Rivera, Helen

    2006-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of oral lesions in a HIV+ group of patients, related to CD4 cell count and viral load in a Venezuelan population. In the present study, we evaluated 75 HIV+ adult patients, attended at the Center of Infectious Diseases, at the Faculty of Dentistry, Central University of Venezuela. Each patient was clinically examined for detection of oral mucosal lesions. In addition, CD4 cell count was determined by flow cytometry, as well as viral load by RT-PCR (Amplicor HIV-RNA, TM test 1.5, Roche). 85% (64/75) of HIV/AIDS patients showed associated HIV lesions. Oral Candidiasis constituted the most common lesion representing a 61% (39/64), followed by Oral Hairy Leukoplakia 53% (34/64); Oral Leukoplakia 34% (22/64), Melanic Hyperpigmentation 38% (18/64); Papilloma 13 (6/64), Lineal Gingival Erythema 8% (5/64); Aphtous Recurrent Stomatitis 5% (4/64) and Kaposi's Sarcoma 5% (3/64). Only one case of the following lesions were represented by Non Hodgkin Lymphoma, Multifocal Epithelial Hyperplasia, Recurrent Herpes, Histoplasmosis and Molluscum Contagiosum. The patients with a viral load of 30.000 copies/mm3 exhibited oral lesions related with HIV, independent of CD4 cell count, although patients with CD4+ levels of 200 cel/mm3 were more susceptible to develop these lesions. The most common oral lesion was Oral Candidiasis followed by Oral Hairy Leukoplakia, Oral Leukoplakia and Melanic Hyperpigmentation. A high viral load was strongly associated to the oral lesions occurrence independently of CD4+ cell count.

  10. Kinetics of viral loads and genotypic analysis of elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus-1 infection in captive Asian elephants (Elephas maximus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Jeffrey J; Zong, Jian-Chao; Eng, Crystal; Howard, Lauren; Flanagan, Joe; Stevens, Martina; Schmitt, Dennis; Wiedner, Ellen; Graham, Danielle; Junge, Randall E; Weber, Martha A; Fischer, Martha; Mejia, Alicia; Tan, Jie; Latimer, Erin; Herron, Alan; Hayward, Gary S; Ling, Paul D

    2013-03-01

    Elephant endotheliotropic herpesviruses (EEHVs) can cause fatal hemorrhagic disease in juvenile Asian elephants (Elphas maximus); however, sporadic shedding of virus in trunk washes collected from healthy elephants also has been detected. Data regarding the relationship of viral loads in blood compared with trunk washes are lacking, and questions about whether elephants can undergo multiple infections with EEHVs have not been addressed previously. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the kinetics of EEHV1 loads, and genotypic analysis was performed on EEHV1 DNA detected in various fluid samples obtained from five Asian elephants that survived detectable EEHV1 DNAemia on at least two separate occasions. In three elephants displaying clinical signs of illness, preclinical EEHV1 DNAemia was detectable, and peak whole-blood viral loads occurred 3-8 days after the onset of clinical signs. In two elephants with EEHV1 DNAemia that persisted for 7-21 days, no clinical signs of illness were observed. Detection of EEHV1 DNA in trunk washes peaked approximately 21 days after DNAemia, and viral genotypes detected during DNAemia matched those detected in subsequent trunk washes from the same elephant. In each of the five elephants, two distinct EEHV1 genotypes were identified in whole blood and trunk washes at different time points. In each case, these genotypes represented both an EEHV1A and an EEHV1B subtype. These data suggest that knowledge of viral loads could be useful for the management of elephants before or during clinical illness. Furthermore, sequential infection with both EEHV1 subtypes occurs in Asian elephants, suggesting that they do not elicit cross-protective sterilizing immunity. These data will be useful to individuals involved in the husbandry and clinical care of Asian elephants.

  11. Scavenger receptor class B member 1 (SCARB1) variants modulate hepatitis C virus replication cycle and viral load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westhaus, Sandra; Deest, Maximilian; Nguyen, Anna T X; Stanke, Frauke; Heckl, Dirk; Costa, Rui; Schambach, Axel; Manns, Michael P; Berg, Thomas; Vondran, Florian W R; Sarrazin, Christoph; Ciesek, Sandra; von Hahn, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    There are numerous coding and non-coding variants in the SCARB1 gene that encodes scavenger receptor class B member 1 (SR-BI), a key receptor for both high density lipoproteins and hepatitis C virus (HCV). Many have been linked to clinical phenotypes, yet their impact on the HCV replication cycle is incompletely understood. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of these variants on the molecular biology and clinical course of HCV. We analyzed key coding non-synonymous as well as non-coding SCARB1 variants using virological in vitro and human genetics approaches. Non-synonymous variants: S112F and T175A have greatly reduced HCV receptor function. When present on the cell surface, these variants are impaired in their ability to interact with HCV E2. Non-coding variants: The G allele in rs3782287 is associated with decreased viral load. Haplotype analysis confirmed these findings and identified haplotype rs3782287 A/rs5888 C as a risk allele associated with increased viral load. We also detected a trend towards lower hepatic SR-BI expression in individuals with the rs3782287 GG genotype associated with low viral load suggesting a potential underlying mechanism. Coding and non-coding genetic SCARB1 variants modulate the HCV replication cycle and possibly clinical features of hepatitis C. These findings underscore the relevance of SR-BI as an HCV receptor and contribute to our understanding of inter-individual variation in HCV infection. The cell surface receptor SR-BI (scavenger receptor class B member 1), is essential for hepatitis C virus (HCV) entry into hepatocytes. Variations in the gene coding this receptor influence infectivity and viral load. We analyzed these variations to gain a better understanding of inter-individual differences over the course of HCV infection. Copyright © 2017 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of HIV-Infection and Cumulative Viral Load on Age-Related Decline in Grip Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    SCHRACK, Jennifer A; JACOBSON, Lisa P.; ALTHOFF, Keri N.; ERLANDSON, Kristine M.; JAMIESON, Beth D.; KOLETAR, Susan L.; PHAIR, John; BROWN, Todd T.; MARGOLICK, Joseph B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Grip strength predicts functional decline and death, and is regarded as a biomarker of biological aging. The primary objective of this manuscript was to assess differences in the rate of decline in grip strength in persons aging with and without HIV. Design Grip strength was assessed in 1,552 (716 HIV+ and 836 HIV−) men ≥ 50 years participating in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study between 2007 and 2014. Methods Grip strength decline was modeled longitudinally, adjusting for serostatus, demographics, comorbidities, and conditions. In HIV-specific models, coefficients were included for cumulative viral load and history of AIDS. Results Grip strength at age 50 averaged 37.9 kg and 38.2 kg for HIV+ and HIV− men, respectively (p = 0.70). In fully adjusted models, grip strength declined 0.33 kg/yr in HIV− men (p <0.001) and 0.42 kg/yr in HIV+ men (p = 0.01). In HIV-stratified models, higher cumulative viral load indicated greater strength decline (−0.884 kg for 3.1 – 4.0 log10 copies-years/mL and −1.077 kg for ≥ 4.1 log10 copies-years/mL) relative to men with consistently low viral load (≤ 3.0 log10 copies-years/mL). Adjusted Cox proportional hazard models revealed a 70% greater risk of clinically weak grip strength in HIV+ men (aHR 1.70; 95% CI, 1.22 – 2.40). Conclusions Grip strength decline is accelerated in HIV-infected men, which may contribute to decreased life expectancy and lower quality of life with aging. Greater cumulative viral load exposure appears to be an important driver of this decline and underscores the importance of early initiation of therapy. PMID:27603294

  13. HIV Viral Load Trends in Six Eastern Caribbean Countries Utilizing a Regional Laboratory Referral Service: Implications for Treatment as Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    R Clive Landis; Kelly Carmichael-Simmons; Hambleton, Ian R; Anton Best

    2015-01-01

    Objective Since 2009, seven countries in the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS), Antigua & Barbuda, Dominica, Grenada, Montserrat, St. Kitts & Nevis, Saint Lucia, and St. Vincent & the Grenadines, have been utilizing a laboratory referral service for HIV-1 viral load (VL) offered by The Ladymeade Reference Unit (LRU) Laboratory, Barbados. The objective of this study was to evaluate 5 year VL trends in the six larger OECS countries participating in this regional referral service. ...

  14. Predictors of undetectable plasma viral load in HIV-positive adults receiving antiretroviral therapy in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marysabel Pinto Telis Silveira

    Full Text Available Factors associated with undetectable viral load ( or = 95% of adherence (CI 95% 1,80-13,28; CI 95% 1,73-9,53, compared with less than 60% adherence; it was greater for less than 6 months in treatment (OR = 3.37; CI 95% 1.09-10.46; and smaller for viral load previous to adherence measurement > or = 5.2 log10 (OR = 0.19; CI95% 0.06-0.58, adjusted for these variables and sex, age, clinical status, current immune status, group of drugs and interval between the two measurements of viral load. The crude odds were lower for age 16-24 years and use of Nucleoside Analog Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors only, but these effects were not significant in the multivariate model. There was no evidence of effect of sex, clinical status, current immune status, and changes in treatment regimen. Treatment adherence gave the largest effect. Motivational interventions directed at adherence may improve treatment effectiveness.

  15. Conversion of HPV 18 positive non-tumorigenic HeLa-fibroblast hybrids to invasive growth involves loss of TNF-alpha mediated repression of viral transcription and modification of the AP-1 transcription complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, U; Das, B C; Lengert, M; Finzer, P; zur Hausen, H; Rösl, F

    1999-05-27

    AP-1 represents a transcription factor, which plays a pivotal role in initiating and maintaining the expression of human papillomavirus (HPV) oncoproteins E6 and E7 during HPV-linked carcinogenesis of the uterine cervix. AP-1 stands as a synonym for different proteins such as c-Jun, JunB, JunD, c-Fos, FosB as well as the Fos-related antigens Fra-1 and Fra-2, which can either homo- or heterodimerize to build up a functional transcription complex. AP-1 is mainly considered as a positive regulator, which binds to cognate DNA sequences within the viral upstream regulatory region. By using non-tumorigenic HeLa-fibroblast hybrids ('444'), their tumorigenic segregants ('CGL3') as well as HPV 18 positive HeLa cells as a experimental model system, evidence is provided that AP-1 composition differs considerably between these cell lines. In nuclear extracts obtained from non-tumorigenic cells, Jun-family members (in the order c-Jun>JunD>JunB) were mainly heterodimerized with Fra-1, a protein, known to be involved in the abrogation of AP-1 activity under certain experimental conditions. In contrast, Fra-1 concentration is low in extracts from tumorigenic cells. Conversely, c-Fos, the canonical dimerization partner of Jun proteins is expressed in substantial quantity in HeLa- and 'CGL3' cells, but it is completely absent in AP-1 complexes from non-tumorigenic '444' cells. Ectopical expression of c-fos under a heterologous promoter in '444'-cells induces tumorigenicity and a change of the Jun/Fra-1 ratio towards a constellation initially detected in 'CGL3'-and HeLa cells. Furthermore, conversion to tumorigenicity is accompanied with a resistance against TNF-alpha, a cytokine, capable to selectively suppress HPV 18 transcription in formerly non-malignant cells. These data propose a novel role for AP-1 as an essential component of an inter- and intracellular surveillance mechanism negatively controlling HPV transcription in non-tumorigenic cells.

  16. Mining for viral fragments in methylation enriched sequencing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaas eMensaert

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Most next generation sequencing experiments generate more data than is required for the experimental set up. For example, methyl-CpG binding domain (MBD affinity purification based sequencing is often used for DNA-methylation profiling, but up to 30% of the sequenced fragments cannot be mapped uniquely to the reference genome. Here we present and evaluate a methodology for the identification of viruses in these otherwise unused paired-end MBD-seq data. Viral detection is accomplished by mapping non-reference alignable reads to a comprehensive set of viral genomes. As viruses play an important role in epigenetics and cancer development, 92 (premalignant and benign samples, originating from two different collections of cervical samples and related cell lines, were used in this study. These samples include primary carcinomas (n=22, low- & high-grade cervical intrapeithelial neoplasia (CIN1 & CIN2/3 - n=2/n=30 and normal tissue (n=20, as well as control samples (n=17. Viruses that were detected include phages, adenoviruses, herpesviridae and HPV. HPV, which causes virtually all cervical cancers, was identified in 95% of the carcinomas, 100% of the CIN2/3 samples, both CIN1 samples and in 55% of the normal samples. Comparing the amount of mapped fragments on HPV for each HPV-infected sample yielded a significant difference between normal samples and carcinomas or CIN2/3 samples (adjusted p-values resp. < 10^-5, < 10^-5, reflecting different viral loads and/or methylation degrees in non-normal samples. Fragments originating from different HPV types could be distinguished and were independently validated by PCR-based assays with a specificity of 98% and a sensitivitity of 66%. In conclusion, although limited by the a priori knowledge of viral reference genome sequences, the proposed methodology can provide a first but substantial insight into the presence, concentration and types of methylated viral sequences in MBD-seq data without additional costs.

  17. Service impact of a change in HIV-1 viral load quantification assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Tipple

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Due to discontinuation of the Siemens Versant HIV-1 RNA (bDNA assay in the UK, our laboratory switched to the Roche Cobas Ampliprep/Taqman HIV-1 viral load (VL assay (Roche in April 2013. This assay has a lower cut-off of 20 RNA copies/mL (compared with <50 for the Siemens assay. Our laboratory demonstrated previously that a significant proportion (18% of patients undetectable using bDNA HIV-1 RNA quantification exhibited low level viraemia (LLV using the new assay. Local guidelines recommend that patients stable on therapy receive twice-yearly VLs. We evaluated the impact of the introduction of the new assay on our clinical service. Methods: A retrospective cohort analysis of treated patients with stable undetectable VL by bDNA (<50 copies/mL followed by ≥ one low-level (<400 copies/mL VL with the Roche assay. Demographic data were collected in addition to frequency of VL testing and genotypic resistance assays. Referrals to virtual clinic (VC were recorded. Patients were identified using laboratory data and information collected from electronic patient records. Results were analyzed with SPSS v18. Results: One hundred and ninety patients were included. Demographics: 79.5% male; 60.6% homosexual; mean age of 46 years. Duration on stable treatment was 46.35 (std. dev. 38.15 months. Current treatment regimens were 43.3% PI-based; 43.3% NNRTI-based and 13.7% other. Patients were stratified into VL 20–49 copies/mL (n=109; VL 50–199 copies/mL (n=71 and VL 200–399 copies/mL (n=10. In total, there were 471 VLs measured of which 274 were additional as a result of the assay switch. This resulted in six HIV-1 genotype requests and 16 VC discussions (Table 1. Longer duration on HAART was associated with reduced frequency of VL testing. The relative risk of ongoing detectability according to drug class are: PI 1.62 (95% CI 1.18–2.21; NNRTI 0.507 (95% CI 0.30–0.85 and other 1.09 (95% CI 0.48–2.43. Conclusions: Changes in assay

  18. Concordance of HPV-DNA in cervical dysplasia or genital warts in women and their monogamous long-term male partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rob, Filip; Tachezy, Ruth; Pichlík, Tomáš; Škapa, Petr; Rob, Lukáš; Hamšíková, Eva; Šmahelová, Jana; Hercogová, Jana

    2017-09-01

    Transmission of human papillomavirus (HPV) is a premise for development of cervical dysplasia and genital warts (GWs). This cross-sectional study assesses concordance of HPV types present in GWs or cervical dysplasia in women and genital infection of their monogamous male partners in conjunction with seroprevalence of HPV-6, -11, -16, and -18 antibodies. Blood was taken from both women and men, as well a smear of the urogenital area of men. HPV DNA detection in women was done in fixed paraffin embedded tissues under histological control. Of 143 couples who agreed to participate in the study, 68 met inclusion criteria. Type-specific concordance was observed in 32.5% (13/40) of couples in which women had genital warts and in 32.1% (9/28) of couples in which women had cervical dysplasia. In multivariate analysis only smoking in women was associated with concordance (P HPV-specific antibodies was high in male partners, but was not associated with presence of the same HPV type on their genitals. The same type-specific HPV antibodies were detected in 81.8% of men in couples with HPV-6 concordant genital warts, but only in 14.3% of men in couples with HPV-16 concordant cervical dysplasia (P HPV concordance in genital warts and cervical dysplasia lesions of women and genital infection of their male partners is common and similar. Higher seroconversion in couples with HPV-6 concordant genital warts compared with couples with HPV-16 concordant cervical dysplasia may be explained by viral load exposure. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Factors associated with time to achieve an undetectable HIV RNA viral load after start of antiretroviral treatment in HIV-1-infected pregnant women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snippenburg, W.; Nellen, F. J. B.; Smit, C.; Wensing, A. M. J.; Godfried, M. H.; Mudrikova, T.

    2017-01-01

    To identify factors associated with the time to viral suppression in women starting antiretroviral treatment (ART) during pregnancy. Knowledge on duration of viral load (VL) decline could help deciding the timing of treatment initiation. Highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART)-naive pregnant

  20. Reducing uncertainty in within-host parameter estimates of influenza infection by measuring both infectious and total viral load.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M Petrie

    Full Text Available For in vivo studies of influenza dynamics where within-host measurements are fit with a mathematical model, infectivity assays (e.g. 50% tissue culture infectious dose; TCID50 are often used to estimate the infectious virion concentration over time. Less frequently, measurements of the total (infectious and non-infectious viral particle concentration (obtained using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction; rRT-PCR have been used as an alternative to infectivity assays. We investigated the degree to which measuring both infectious (via TCID50 and total (via rRT-PCR viral load allows within-host model parameters to be estimated with greater consistency and reduced uncertainty, compared with fitting to TCID50 data alone. We applied our models to viral load data from an experimental ferret infection study. Best-fit parameter estimates for the "dual-measurement" model are similar to those from the TCID50-only model, with greater consistency in best-fit estimates across different experiments, as well as reduced uncertainty in some parameter estimates. Our results also highlight how variation in TCID50 assay sensitivity and calibration may hinder model interpretation, as some parameter estimates systematically vary with known uncontrolled variations in the assay. Our techniques may aid in drawing stronger quantitative inferences from in vivo studies of influenza virus dynamics.

  1. Fatal and nonfatal AIDS and non-AIDS events in HIV-1-positive individuals with high CD4 cell counts according to viral load strata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reekie, Joanne; Gatell, Jose M; Yust, Israel

    2011-01-01

    This study compared the incidence of fatal and nonfatal AIDS and non-AIDS events in HIV-positive individuals with a CD4 cell count more than 350¿ cells/µl among viral load strata: low (......This study compared the incidence of fatal and nonfatal AIDS and non-AIDS events in HIV-positive individuals with a CD4 cell count more than 350¿ cells/µl among viral load strata: low (...

  2. CD4 cell count and viral load-specific rates of AIDS, non-AIDS and deaths according to current antiretroviral use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocroft, Amanda; Phillips, Andrew N; Gatell, Jose

    2013-01-01

    CD4 cell count and viral loads are used in clinical trials as surrogate endpoints for assessing efficacy of newly available antiretrovirals. If antiretrovirals act through other pathways or increase the risk of disease this would not be identified prior to licensing. The aim of this study was to ...... was to investigate the CD4 cell count and viral load-specific rates of fatal and nonfatal AIDS and non-AIDS events according to current antiretrovirals....

  3. The effect of antioxidant supplementation on hepatitis C viral load, transaminases and oxidative status: a randomized trial among chronic hepatitis C virus-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groenbaek, K.; Friis, H.; Hansen, Max

    2006-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of antioxidant supplementation on hepatitis C viral load, transaminases and oxidative status. Methods We performed a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial to assess the effect of antioxidant supplementation on serum alanine aminotransferase, plasma hepa...... and catalase) or plasma levels of oxidative markers (malondialdehyde and 2-amino-adipic semialdehyde) were found. Conclusion Supplementation with vitamin C, E and selenium increased the antioxidant status, but had no effects on alanine aminotransferase, viral load or oxidative markers....

  4. Hepatitis C seroprevalence and correlation between viral load and viral genotype among primary care clients in Mexico Seroprevalencia de hepatitis C y correlación entre la carga viral y el genotipo viral en asistentes al nivel primario de atención enMéxico

    OpenAIRE

    Ana I Burguete-Garcia; Carlos J Conde-Gonzalez; Ricardo Jimenez-Mendez; Yanet Juarez-Diaz; Elizabeth Meda-Monzon; Kirvis Torres-Poveda; Vicente Madrid-Marina

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To measure hepatitis C virus (HCV) sero-prevalence, prevalence, hepatitis risk characteristics frequency, and genotype correlation with viral load among clients attending health care clinics. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Venous blood samples from l12 226 consecutive consenting adults were collected from January 2006 through December 2009. HCV antibodies were detected by immunoassay. HCV RNA was detected by qRT-PCR and viral genotype was performed by PCR and LIPA test. RESULTS: The HCV ser...

  5. Automated extraction and quantitation of oncogenic HPV genotypes from cervical samples by a real-time PCR-based system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broccolo, Francesco; Cocuzza, Clementina E

    2008-03-01

    Accurate laboratory assays for the diagnosis of persistent oncogenic HPV infection are being recognized increasingly as essential for clinical management of women with cervical precancerous lesions. HPV viral load has been suggested to be a surrogate marker of persistent infection. Four independent real-time quantitative TaqMan PCR assays were developed for: HPV-16, -31, -18 and/or -45 and -33 and/or -52, -58, -67. The assays had a wide dynamic range of detection and a high degree of accuracy, repeatability and reproducibility. In order to minimize material and hands-on time, automated nucleic acid extraction was performed using a 96-well plate format integrated into a robotic liquid handler workstation. The performance of the TaqMan assays for HPV identification was assessed by comparing results with those obtained by means of PCR using consensus primers (GP5+/GP6+) and sequencing (296 samples) and INNO-LiPA analysis (31 samples). Good agreement was found generally between results obtained by real-time PCR assays and GP(+)-PCR system (kappa statistic=0.91). In conclusion, this study describes four newly developed real-time PCR assays that provide a reliable and high-throughput method for detection of not only HPV DNA but also HPV activity of the most common oncogenic HPV types in cervical specimens.

  6. Blood, and not urine, BK viral load predicts renal outcome in children with hemorrhagic cystitis following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Hilary L; Laskin, Benjamin L; Goebel, Jens; Davies, Stella M; Yin, Hong J; Lawrence, Julia; Mehta, Parinda A; Bleesing, Jack J; Filipovich, Alexandra H; Marsh, Rebecca A; Jodele, Sonata

    2011-10-01

    BK virus is a significant cause of hemorrhagic cystitis after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). However, its role in nephropathy post-HSCT is less studied. We retrospectively evaluated clinical outcomes in pediatric HSCT patients with hemorrhagic cystitis. Although most of these patients had very high urine BK viral loads (viruria), patients with higher BK plasma loads (viremia) had significant renal dysfunction, a worse clinical course, and decreased survival. Patients with a peak plasma BK viral load of >10,000 copies/mL (high viremia) were more likely to need dialysis and aggressive treatment for hemorrhagic cystitis compared to patients with ≤ 10,000 copies/mL (low viremia). Conversely, most patients with low viremia had only transient elevations in creatinine, and less severe hemorrhagic cystitis that resolved with supportive therapy. Overall survival (OS) at 1 year post-HSCT was 89% in the low viremia group and 48% in the high viremia group. We conclude that the degree of BK viremia, and not viruria, may predict renal, urologic, and overall outcome in the post-HSCT population. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. High viral load in lymph nodes and latent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in peripheral blood cells of HIV-1-infected chimpanzees.

    OpenAIRE

    Saksela, K; Muchmore, E; Girard, M; Fultz, P; Baltimore, D

    1993-01-01

    We have examined human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in chimpanzees by analyzing HIV-1 DNA and RNA in lymph nodes and peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Like certain asymptomatic HIV-infected persons, these chimpanzees had no detectable viral replication in their PBMCs. However, viral replication and a high viral load were observed in the lymphatic tissue. Despite the absence of viral replication in PBMCs, 1/1,000 to 1/10,000 of the PBMCs contained HIV-1 proviral DNA, and...

  8. KIR content genotypes associate with carriage of hepatitis B surface antigen, e antigen and HBV viral load in Gambians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-Marie Yindom

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC causes over 800,000 deaths worldwide annually, mainly in low income countries, and incidence is rising rapidly in the developed world with the spread of hepatitis B (HBV and C (HCV viruses. Natural Killer (NK cells protect against viral infections and tumours by killing abnormal cells recognised by Killer-cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIR. Thus genes and haplotypes encoding these receptors may be important in determining both outcome of initial hepatitis infection and subsequent chronic liver disease and tumour formation. HBV is highly prevalent in The Gambia and the commonest cause of liver disease. The Gambia Liver Cancer Study was a matched case-control study conducted between September 1997 and January 2001 where cases with liver disease were identified in three tertiary referral hospitals and matched with out-patient controls with no clinical evidence of liver disease.We typed 15 KIR genes using the polymerase chain reaction with sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP in 279 adult Gambians, 136 with liver disease (HCC or Cirrhosis and 143 matched controls. We investigated effects of KIR genotypes and haplotypes on HBV infection and associations with cirrhosis and HCC.Homozygosity for KIR group A gene-content haplotype was associated with HBsAg carriage (OR 3.7, 95% CI 1.4-10.0 whilst telomeric A genotype (t-AA was associated with reduced risk of e antigenaemia (OR 0.2, 95% CI 0.0-0.6 and lower viral loads (mean log viral load 5.2 vs. 6.9, pc = 0.022. One novel telomeric B genotype (t-ABx2 containing KIR3DS1 (which is rare in West Africa was also linked to e antigenaemia (OR 8.8, 95% CI 1.3-60.5. There were no associations with cirrhosis or HCC.Certain KIR profiles may promote clearance of hepatitis B surface antigen whilst others predispose to e antigen carriage and high viral load. Larger studies are necessary to quantify the effects of individual KIR genes, haplotypes and KIR/HLA combinations on long

  9. Chronic hepatitis B in pregnant women: is hepatitis B surface antigen quantification useful for viral load prediction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiko, Masita; Chalid, Maisuri T; Turyadi; Ie, Susan I; Maghfira; Syafri; Wahyuni, Ridha; Roni, Martono; Patellongi, Ilhamjaya; Massi, M Nasrum; Muljono, David H

    2015-12-01

    New cases of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection continue to occur worldwide. Most of these are due to mother-to-child transmission (MTCT), with maternal viraemia as the most important contributing factor. The hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) level, which correlates positively with viral load, has been used for treatment monitoring in chronic hepatitis B. This study evaluated the usefulness of quantitative HBsAg for viral load prediction in HBsAg-positive pregnant women. A total of 943 pregnant women in Makassar, Indonesia, were screened for HBsAg. Sixty-four women were HBsAg-positive and investigated. HBsAg level and hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)/hepatitis B e antibody (anti-HBe) status were determined serologically. Viral load was measured by real-time PCR. HBV DNA was sequenced and analysed for identification of genotype and basal core promoter (BCP)/precore (PC) mutations. Of 64 subjects, 12 (18.8%) were HBeAg-positive and 52 (81.3%) were HBeAg-negative. HBsAg and HBV DNA levels were significantly higher in the HBeAg-positive group (ppregnant women. The HBeAg-negative group had a frequent occurrence of BCP/PC variants, which may have contributed to the lack of correlation observed. Samples with a low HBsAg level, which is associated with a low risk of MTCT, do not require HBV DNA measurement. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Systematic Review of the Use of Dried Blood Spots for Monitoring HIV Viral Load and for Early Infant Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Pieter W.; Sollis, Kimberly A.; Fiscus, Susan; Ford, Nathan; Vitoria, Marco; Essajee, Shaffiq; Barnett, David; Cheng, Ben; Crowe, Suzanne M.; Denny, Thomas; Landay, Alan; Stevens, Wendy; Habiyambere, Vincent; Perriens, Joseph H.; Peeling, Rosanna W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Dried blood spots (DBS) have been used as alternative specimens to plasma to increase access to HIV viral load (VL) monitoring and early infant diagnosis (EID) in remote settings. We systematically reviewed evidence on the performance of DBS compared to plasma for VL monitoring and EID. Methods and Findings Thirteen peer reviewed HIV VL publications and five HIV EID papers were included. Depending on the technology and the viral load distribution in the study population, the percentage of DBS samples that are within 0.5 log of VL in plasma ranged from 52–100%. Because the input sample volume is much smaller in a blood spot, there is a risk of false negatives with DBS. Sensitivity of DBS VL was found to be 78–100% compared to plasma at VL below 1000 copies/ml, but this increased to 100% at a threshold of 5000 copies/ml. Unlike a plasma VL test which measures only cell free HIV RNA, a DBS VL also measures proviral DNA as well as cell-associated RNA, potentially leading to false positive results when using DBS. The systematic review showed that specificity was close to 100% at DBS VL above 5000 copies/ml, and this threshold would be the most reliable for predicting true virologic failure using DBS. For early infant diagnosis, DBS has a sensitivity of 100% compared to fresh whole blood or plasma in all studies. Conclusions Although limited data are available for EID, DBS offer a highly sensitive and specific sampling strategy to make viral load monitoring and early infant diagnosis more accessible in remote settings. A standardized approach for sampling, storing, and processing DBS samples would be essential to allow successful implementation. Trial Registration PROSPERO Registration #: CRD42013003621. PMID:24603442

  11. Systematic review of the use of dried blood spots for monitoring HIV viral load and for early infant diagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter W Smit

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dried blood spots (DBS have been used as alternative specimens to plasma to increase access to HIV viral load (VL monitoring and early infant diagnosis (EID in remote settings. We systematically reviewed evidence on the performance of DBS compared to plasma for VL monitoring and EID. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Thirteen peer reviewed HIV VL publications and five HIV EID papers were included. Depending on the technology and the viral load distribution in the study population, the percentage of DBS samples that are within 0.5 log of VL in plasma ranged from 52-100%. Because the input sample volume is much smaller in a blood spot, there is a risk of false negatives with DBS. Sensitivity of DBS VL was found to be 78-100% compared to plasma at VL below 1000 copies/ml, but this increased to 100% at a threshold of 5000 copies/ml. Unlike a plasma VL test which measures only cell free HIV RNA, a DBS VL also measures proviral DNA as well as cell-associated RNA, potentially leading to false positive results when using DBS. The systematic review showed that specificity was close to 100% at DBS VL above 5000 copies/ml, and this threshold would be the most reliable for predicting true virologic failure using DBS. For early infant diagnosis, DBS has a sensitivity of 100% compared to fresh whole blood or plasma in all studies. CONCLUSIONS: Although limited data are available for EID, DBS offer a highly sensitive and specific sampling strategy to make viral load monitoring and early infant diagnosis more accessible in remote settings. A standardized approach for sampling, storing, and processing DBS samples would be essential to allow successful implementation. TRIAL REGISTRATION: PROSPERO Registration #: CRD42013003621.

  12. Large fragment pre-S deletion and high viral load independently predict hepatitis B relapse after liver transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Jung Wu

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV associated end-stage liver diseases are the leading causes of liver transplantation (LT in Taiwan. Relapse of hepatitis B occurs after LT, raising the risk of graft failure and reducing patient survival. Although several oral antiviral agents have been approved for anti-HBV treatment, lamivudine (LAM remained to be the most widely used preventive regimen in Taiwan. While several clinical predictors have been identified for hepatitis B relapse, the predictive roles of the histopathological characteristics in liver explants as well as the genotypic features of the viruses in pre-LT serum samples have not been assessed. Between September 2002 and August 2009, 150 consecutive hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg positive patients undergoing LT were included for outcome analysis following assessment of the clinicopathological and virological factors prior to LT. Kaplan-Meier analyses discovered that pre-operative LAM treatment ≤3 months; membranous distribution and higher expression of tissue HBsAg in liver explants; preoperative viral load ≥10(6 copies/ml; and presence of large fragment (>100 base pairs pre-S deletion (LFpreSDel correlated significantly with hepatitis B relapse. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that the presence of LFpreSDel (P = 0.001 and viral load ≥10(6 copies/mL (P = 0.023 were independent predictors for hepatitis B relapse. In conclusion, besides high viral load, LFpreSDel mutation is an important independent predictor for hepatitis B relapse after LT. More aggressive preventive strategies should be applied for patients carrying these risk factors.

  13. [Effect of laboratory referencing on data analysis of community viral load in HIV positive MSM from 15 cities, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Z; Jiang, Z; Pan, P L; Song, W L; Xu, J; Wu, Z Y

    2017-12-10

    Objective: To compare the community viral load (CVL) among MSM in 15 cities in China using standardized national reference sources. Methods: The study analyzed the existing database of National Major Science and Technology Project of China. The database was established with serial random survey of MSM HIV CVL among MSM in 15 cities from 2013 to 2015. VL tests were conducted in 15 laboratories with different equipment and methods, including RT-PCR, nucleic acid sequence based amplification (NASBA), branched DNA testing (bDNA) and Abbott M2000 RealTime system (M2000). Based on proficiency test for 15 laboratories conducted by National HIV Reference Laboratory, VL test values detected with EasyQ, bDNA and M2000 were converted and standardized into resultant values of TaqMan 2.0. Software SPSS 17.0 was used to produce descriptive statistics for the dataset. Results: From 2014 to 2015, the 15 testing sites were found to use a number of different viral load detection techniques. In 2014, the community viral load values were (2.38±1.47) and (2.99±1.31) in 15 testing sites, while in 2015 these values were found to be (2.07±1.34) and (2.72±1.19). The measurement of community VL was done using standard benchmarks of ≤200 copies/ml, ≤400 copies/ml and ≤1 000 copies/ml, that were used for reference for now. Conclusion: It is necessary to use standard detection method to improve the comparability of annual results. Using a standardized rate of ≤400 copies/ml or ≤1 000 copies/ml for successful control of VL was found with high stability for the result comparison among different areas.

  14. Punch biopsy guided by both colposcopy and HR-HPV status is more efficient for identification of immediate high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion or worse among HPV-infected women with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Z; Li, Y; Chen, A; Song, M; Zhang, Y

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the accuracy of colposcopy for diagnosing high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) or worse (HSIL+) in human papillomavirus (HPV)-infected patients with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) cytology, and determine whether genotyping and viral load quantitation can be useful for detecting immediate HSIL+ risk in these patients. This study included 620 cases with ASCUS and positive for high-risk (HR)-HPV within 1 month before or after cervical cytology at Qilu Hospital between February 2013 and February 2014. Based on the colposcopic impression, lesion-targeted punch biopsy, endocervical curettage biopsy or random cervical punch biopsy in four quadrants was performed on these patients within 1 month. The accuracy of colposcopy for diagnosing HSIL+ was evaluated through comparison with the biopsy results. HR-HPV status determined by Hybrid Capture 2 or HPV genotyping was analysed retrospectively as a possible predictor of HSIL+. Agreement between colposcopic impression and cervical pathology was matched perfectly in 89.2% of cases (553/620), and the strength of agreement with the κ statistic was 0.698 (ptypes of HPV (17.9%, pbiopsies considering HPV-16 infection or virus load ≥50 RLU/CO may be helpful for increasing the HSIL+ detection rate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Anal Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Prevalences and Factors Associated with Abnormal Anal Cytology in HIV-Infected Women in an Urban Cohort from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Paula M.; Lake, Jordan E.; Levi, José Eduardo; Coutinho, José Ricardo; de Andrade, Angela; Heinke, Thais; Derrico, Mônica; Veloso, Valdilea G.; Friedman, Ruth K.; Grinsztejn, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Identifying factors, including human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes, associated with abnormal anal cytology in HIV-infected women have implications for anal squamous cell cancer (SCC) prevention in HIV-infected women. Anal and cervical samples were collected for cytology, and tested for high-(HR-HPV) and low-risk HPV (LR-HPV) genotypes in a cross-sectional analysis of the IPEC Women's HIV Cohort (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). Multivariate log-binomial regression models estimated prevalence ratios for factors associated with abnormal anal cytology [≥atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, (ASC-US)]. Characteristics of the 863 participants included: median age 42 years, 57% non-white, 79% current CD4+ T-cell count >350 cells/mm3, 53% HIV-1 viral load anal specimens contained ≥1 HR-HPV genotype; 31% had abnormal anal cytology [14% ASC-US, 11% low-grade squamous intra-epithelial lesion, (LSIL); 2% atypical squamous cells-cannot exclude high-grade SIL (ASC-H); 4% high-grade SIL/cancer (HSIL+)]. In multivariate analysis, cervical LSIL+, nadir CD4+ T-cell count ≤50 cells/mm3, HIV-1 viral load ≥50 copies/mL, and anal HPV 6, 11, 16, 18, 33, 45, 52, 56, and 58 were associated with ≥anal ASC-US (panal cytology and HR-HPV prevalences were high. HIV-infected women with cervical LSIL+, low nadir CD4+ counts, or detectable HIV-1 viral loads should be a particular focus for enhanced anal SCC screening efforts. PMID:25361401

  16. The Effect of GBV-C Infection on CD4 Count and Viral Loads in Patients Infected With HIV

    OpenAIRE

    Hossein Keyvani; Avid Mohammadi; Masoud Sabouri Ghannad; Mahboobeh Hajabdolbaghi

    2012-01-01

    Background: The picture that has emerged from studies investigating HIV infected people with GBV-C viremia is that they have lower plasma HIV viral loads in comparison with HIV-positive people who did not have the GBV-C viremia.Objectives: Since GBV-C HIV coinfection has not been studied in Iran, we have designed a survey to study the outcomes of GBV-C infection on HIV infected individuals.Patients and Methods: We analyzed 78 serum samples from HIV-positive patients in Tehran. The HIV positiv...

  17. Low Viral Load Does Not Exclude Significant Liver Damage in Patients with Chronic HBV Infection in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamun Al-Mahtab

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In general, it is assumed that patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection with high viral load exhibit increased liver damages. Accordingly, the treatment guidelines emphasize on reducing viral load in chronic HBV carriers. The ethical and scientific basis of these observations was mainly accumulated from investigations from developed countries of the world. More than 80% chronic HBV carriers live in the developing nations of the world, but little is known about relationship between HBV viral load and extent of liver damages in these countries. In this study, we addressed this issue to provide insights about this. Methods: In this retrospective study we reviewed the records of 210 chronic hepatitis B (CHB patients from our pool of 561 Bangladeshi CHB patients. All of these 210 patients had low HBV DNA (<105 copies/ml by PCR. Of them 16 were HBeAg +ve and rest 194 HBeAg -ve. They have also been tested for other serologic markers of HBV (i.e. HBsAg, anti-HBe, HCV (i.e. anti-HCV and serum alaninetransaminase (ALT level. All patients also underwent per-cutaneous liver biopsy. Results: 37.5% (6/16 HBeAg +ve patients with low HBV DNA had significant hepatic necro-inflammation (HAI-NI ≥7, whereas this figure was 31.44% (61/194 in case of HBeAg -ve patients. On the other hand significant hepatic fibrosis (HAI-F ≥3 was observed in 31.25% (5/16 and 14.4% (28/194 in HBeAg +ve and -ve patients respectively. Conclusion: This study shows that a correlation could not be established between viral load and liver damage in patients with CHB in Bangladesh. A significant percentage of patients with low HBV DNA may have marked hepatic necro-inflammation and fibrosis, more so in case of HBeAg +ve CHB. Further study may be needed to find out the influence of other factors on liver damages in CHB patients in developing nations like Bangladesh, where about 8 million chronic HBV carriers are living. Most of these patients have not been

  18. Impact of polymorphisms in the HCP5 and HLA-C, and ZNRD1 genes on HIV viral load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thørner, Lise Wegner; Erikstrup, Christian; Harritshøj, Lene Holm

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human leucocyte antigen (HLA) complex P5 (HCP5), HLA-C, and near the zinc ribbon domain containing 1 (ZNRD1) have been shown to influence viral load (VL) set point in HIV-infected individuals with a known seroconversion onset. We aimed...... to determine the influence of HCP5 rs2395029, HLA-C rs9264942, and ZNRD1 rs3869068 on VL in antiretroviral-naïve individuals and on time to the first VL

  19. Kinetics of viral load and erythrocytic inclusion body formation in pacific herring artificially infected with erythrocytic necrosis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Jolene A.; Emmenegger, Eveline J.; Grady, Courtney A.; Roon, Sean R.; Gregg, Jacob L.; Conway, Carla M.; Winton, James R.; Hershberger, Paul K.

    2012-01-01

    Viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) is a condition that affects marine and anadromous fish species, including herrings and salmonids, in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Infection is frequently associated with severe anemia and causes episodic mortality among wild and hatchery fish when accompanied by additional stressors; VEN can be presumptively diagnosed by (1) light microscopic identification of a single characteristic—a round, magenta-colored, 0.8-μm-diameter inclusion body (IB) within the cytoplasm of erythrocytes and their precursors on Giemsa-stained blood films; or (2) observation (via transmission electron microscopy [TEM]) of the causative iridovirus, erythrocytic necrosis virus (ENV), within erythrocytes or their precursors. To better understand the kinetics of VEN, specific-pathogen-free Pacific herring Clupea pallasii were infected with ENV by intraperitoneal injection. At 1, 4, 7, 10, 14, 21, and 28 d postexposure, samples of blood, spleen, and kidney were collected and assessed (1) via light microscopy for the number of intracytoplasmic IBs in blood smears and (2) via TEM for the number of virions within erythrocytes. The mean prevalence of intracytoplasmic IBs in the blood cells increased from 0% at 0–4 d postexposure to 94% at 28 d postexposure. Viral load within circulating red blood cells peaked at 7 d postexposure, fell slightly, and then reached a plateau. However, blood cells observed within the kidney and spleen tissues demonstrated high levels of ENV between 14 and 28 d postexposure. The results indicate that the viral load within erythrocytes does not correlate well with IB prevalence and that the virus can persist in infected fish for more than 28 d.

  20. Treatment as prevention in resource-limited settings: is it feasible to maintain HIV viral load suppression over time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socías, María Eugenia; Rotryng, Flavio; Lapadula, Pablo; Medrano, Maira; Paz, Daniela; Stern, Liliana; Lambierto, Alberto; Pryluka, Daniel

    2013-08-15

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in the role of "treatment as prevention" (TasP). Some of the questions regarding TasP strategies arise from the perceived difficulties in achieving and maintaining viral load (VL) suppression over time and the risk of emergence of viral resistance that could compromise future treatment options. This study was conducted to assess these questions in a resource-limited setting. We performed a retrospective observational study of HIV-infected patients diagnosed in the pre-HAART era on follow-up at a private center from Buenos Aires, Argentina. Socio-demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were extracted from clinical charts. Analyses were performed to test for potential associations of selected variables with current virologic failure or use of third-line drugs. Of 619 patients on follow-up, 82 (13.2%) were diagnosed in the pre-HAART era. At the time of our study, 79 (96.3%) patients were on HAART, with a median duration of 14 years (IQR 12-15) of therapy, and exposure to mono or dual nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors regimens in 47.8% of cases. Sixty-nine patients (87.3%) had undetectable VL, 37 (46.8%) never presented virologic failure, and 19 (24.1%) experienced only one failure. Thirteen patients (16.5%) were receiving third-line ART regimens, with an average of 2.7-fold more virologic failures than those on first- or second-line regimens (p = 0.007). Maintaining viral load suppression over time in resource-limited-settings is feasible.

  1. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Why get vaccinated?HPV vaccine prevents infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) types that are associated with cause ... at http://www.cdc.gov/hpv. HPV Vaccine (Human Papillomavirus) Information Statement. U.S. Department of Health and ...

  2. HPV Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... May 4). Revised Cervical Cancer Screening Guidelines Require Reeducation of Women and Physicians. ACOG [On-line news ... PressAnnouncements/ucm187003.htm. Issued October 16, 2009. Accessd March 23, 2009. National Cancer Institute. Fact Sheet. HPV ...

  3. Clinical characteristics and viral load of respiratory syncytial virus and human metapneumovirus in children hospitaled for acute lower respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiao-Li; Li, Yu-Ning; Tang, Yi-Jie; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Gao, Han-Chun; Yang, Xue-Mei; Li, Yu-Mei; Liu, Li-Jun; Duan, Zhao-Jun

    2017-04-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human metapneumovirus (HMPV) are two common viral pathogens in acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRTI). However, the association of viral load with clinical characteristics is not well-defined in ALRTI. To explore the correlation between viral load and clinical characteristics of RSV and HMPV in children hospitalized for ALRTI in Lanzhou, China. Three hundred and eighty-seven children hospitalized for ALRTI were enrolled. Nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs) were sampled from each children. Real-time PCR was used to screen RSV, HMPV, and twelve additional respiratory viruses. Bronchiolitis was the leading diagnoses both in RSV and HMPV positive patients. A significantly greater frequency of wheezing (52% vs. 33.52%, P = 0.000) was noted in RSV positive and negative patients. The RSV viral load was significant higher in children aged infections (P = 0.000). No difference was found in the clinical features of HMPV positive and negative patients. The HMPV viral load had no correlation with any clinical characteristics. The incidences of severe disease were similar between single infection and coinfection for the two viruses (RSV, P = 0.221; HMPV, P = 0.764) and there has no statistical significance between severity and viral load (P = 0.166 and P = 0.721). Bronchiolitis is the most common disease caused by RSV and HMPV. High viral load or co-infection may be associated with some symptoms but neither has a significant impact on disease severity for the two viruses. J. Med. Virol. 89:589-597, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The Breadth of Expandable Memory CD8+ T Cells Inversely Correlates with Residual Viral Loads in HIV Elite Controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndhlovu, Zaza M.; Stampouloglou, Eleni; Cesa, Kevin; Mavrothalassitis, Orestes; Alvino, Donna Marie; Li, Jonathan Z.; Wilton, Shannon; Karel, Daniel; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Chen, Huabiao; Pereyra, Florencia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previous studies have shown that elite controllers with minimal effector T cell responses harbor a low-frequency, readily expandable, highly functional, and broadly directed memory population. Here, we interrogated the in vivo relevance of this cell population by investigating whether the breadth of expandable memory responses is associated with the magnitude of residual viremia in individuals achieving durable suppression of HIV infection. HIV-specific memory CD8+ T cells were expanded by using autologous epitopic and variant peptides. Viral load was measured by an ultrasensitive single-copy PCR assay. Following expansion, controllers showed a greater increase in the overall breadth of Gag responses than did untreated progressors (P = 0.01) as well as treated progressors (P = 0.0003). Nef- and Env-specific memory cells expanded poorly for all groups, and their expanded breadths were indistinguishable among groups (P = 0.9 for Nef as determined by a Kruskal-Wallis test; P = 0.6 for Env as determined by a Kruskal-Wallis test). More importantly, we show that the breadth of expandable, previously undetectable Gag-specific responses was inversely correlated with residual viral load (r = −0.6; P = 0.009). Together, these data reveal a direct link between the abundance of Gag-specific expandable memory responses and prolonged maintenance of low-level viremia. Our studies highlight a CD8+ T cell feature that would be desirable in a vaccine-induced T cell response. IMPORTANCE Many studies have shown that the rare ability of some individuals to control HIV infection in the absence of antiretroviral therapy appears to be heavily dependent upon special HIV-specific killer T lymphocytes that are able to inhibit viral replication. The identification of key features of these immune cells has the potential to inform rational HIV vaccine design. This study shows that a special subset of killer lymphocytes, known as central memory CD8+ T lymphocytes, is at least

  5. Cost-effectiveness of testing hepatitis B-positive pregnant women for hepatitis B e antigen or viral load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lin; Owusu-Edusei, Kwame; Schillie, Sarah F; Murphy, Trudy V

    2014-05-01

    To estimate the cost-effectiveness of testing pregnant women with hepatitis B (hepatitis B surface antigen [HBsAg]-positive) for hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) or hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA, and administering maternal antiviral prophylaxis if indicated, to decrease breakthrough perinatal HBV transmission from the U.S. health care perspective. A Markov decision model was constructed for a 2010 birth cohort of 4 million neonates to estimate the cost-effectiveness of two strategies: testing HBsAg-positive pregnant women for 1) HBeAg or 2) HBV load. Maternal antiviral prophylaxis is given from 28 weeks of gestation through 4 weeks postpartum when HBeAg is positive or HBV load is high (10 copies/mL or greater). These strategies were compared with the current recommendation. All neonates born to HBsAg-positive women received recommended active-passive immunoprophylaxis. Effects were measured in quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and all costs were in 2010 U.S. dollars. The HBeAg testing strategy saved $3.3 million and 3,080 QALYs and prevented 486 chronic HBV infections compared with the current recommendation. The HBV load testing strategy cost $3 million more than current recommendation, saved 2,080 QALYs, and prevented 324 chronic infections with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $1,583 per QALY saved compared with the current recommendations. The results remained robust over a wide range of assumptions. Testing HBsAg-positive pregnant women for HBeAg or HBV load followed by maternal antiviral prophylaxis if HBeAg-positive or high viral load to reduce perinatal hepatitis B transmission in the United States is cost-effective.

  6. Brief Report: Appraising Viral Load Thresholds and Adherence Support Recommendations in the World Health Organization Guidelines for Detection and Management of Virologic Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluskey, Suzanne M; Boum, Yap; Musinguzi, Nicholas; Haberer, Jessica E; Martin, Jeffrey N; Hunt, Peter W; Marconi, Vincent C; Bangsberg, David R; Siedner, Mark J

    2017-10-01

    The World Health Organization defines HIV virologic failure as 2 consecutive viral loads >1000 copies/mL, measured 3-6 months apart, with interval adherence support. We sought to empirically evaluate these guidelines using data from an observational cohort. The Uganda AIDS Rural Treatment Outcomes study observed adults with HIV in southwestern Uganda from the time of antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation and monitored adherence with electronic pill bottles. We included participants on ART with a detectable HIV RNA viral load and who remained on the same regimen until the subsequent measurement. We fit logistic regression models with viral resuppression as the outcome of interest and both initial viral load level and average adherence as predictors of interest. We analyzed 139 events. Median ART duration was 0.92 years, and 100% were on a nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor-based regimen. Viral resuppression occurred in 88% of those with initial HIV RNA 1000 copies/mL (P 1000 copies/mL (P = 0.894; interaction term P = 0.077). Among patients on ART with detectable HIV RNA >1000 copies/mL who remain on the same regimen, only 42% resuppressed at next measurement, and there was no association between interval adherence and viral resuppression. These data support consideration of resistance testing to help guide management of virologic failure in resource-limited settings.

  7. Plasma Viral Loads During Early HIV-1 Infection Are Similar in Subtype C– and Non-Subtype C–Infected African Seroconverters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Mary S.; Kahle, Erin M.; Celum, Connie; Lingappa, Jairam R.; Kapiga, Saidi; Mujugira, Andrew; Mugo, Nelly R.; Fife, Kenneth H.; Mullins, James I.; Baeten, Jared M.; Celum, Connie; Wald, Anna; Lingappa, Jairam; Baeten, Jared M.; Campbell, Mary S.; Corey, Lawrence; Coombs, Robert W.; Hughes, James P.; Magaret, Amalia; McElrath, M. Juliana; Morrow, Rhoda; Mullins, James I.; Coetzee, David; Fife, Kenneth; Were, Edwin; Essex, Max; Makhema, Joseph; Katabira, Elly; Ronald, Allan; Allen, Susan; Kayitenkore, Kayitesi; Karita, Etienne; Bukusi, Elizabeth; Cohen, Craig; Allen, Susan; Kanweka, William; Allen, Susan; Vwalika, Bellington; Kapiga, Saidi; Manongi, Rachel; Farquhar, Carey; John-Stewart, Grace; Kiarie, James; Allen, Susan; Inambao, Mubiana; Farm, Orange; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead; Rees, Helen; de Bruyn, Guy; Gray, Glenda; McIntyre, James; Mugo, Nelly Rwamba

    2013-01-01

    Recent data suggest that infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtype C results in prolonged high-level viremia (>5 log10 copies/mL) during early infection. We examined the relationship between HIV-1 subtype and plasma viremia among 153 African seroconverters. Mean setpoint viral loads were similar for C and non-C subtypes: 4.36 vs 4.42 log10 copies/mL (P = .61). The proportion of subtype C–infected participants with viral loads >5 log10 copies/mL was not greater than the proportion for those with non-C infection. Our data do not support the hypothesis that higher early viral load accounts for the rapid spread of HIV-1 subtype C in southern Africa. PMID:23315322

  8. Melittin-loaded immunoliposomes against viral surface proteins, a new approach to antiviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falco Gracia, J.A.; Barrajon-Catalan, E.; Menendez-Gutierrez, M.P.; Coll, J.; Micol, V.; Estepa, A.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, melittin, a well-characterized pore-forming lytic amphiphilic peptide susceptible to be vehiculized in lipid membranes, has been utilized to study their antiviral properties. For this purpose, an assay based on melittin loaded-immunoliposomes previously described by our group was

  9. Defining the stoichiometry and cargo load of viral and bacterial nanoparticles by Orbitrap mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, Joost|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/338018328; van de Waterbeemd, Michiel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412537761; Damoc, Eugen; Denisov, Eduard; Grinfeld, Dmitry; Bennett, Antonette; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Makarov, Alexander; Heck, Albert J R|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/105189332

    2014-01-01

    Accurate mass analysis can provide useful information on the stoichiometry and composition of protein-based particles, such as virus-like assemblies. For applications in nanotechnology and medicine, such nanoparticles are loaded with foreign cargos, making accurate mass information essential to

  10. Viral load, CD4+ T-lymphocyte counts and antibody titres in HIV-1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There are limited reports on HIV-1 RNA load, CD4+ T-lymphocytes and antibody responses in relation to disease progression in HIV-1 infected untreated children in Africa. Methods: To describe the relationships between these parameters, we conducted a longitudinal cohort study involving 51 perinatally HIV-1 ...

  11. HIV-1 variability and viral load technique could lead to false positive HIV-1 detection and to erroneous viral quantification in infected specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Patricia; Martín, Leticia; Prieto, Luis; Obiang, Jacinta; Vargas, Antonio; Avedillo, Pedro; Rojo, Pablo; Fernández McPhee, Carolina; Benito, Agustín; Ramos, José Tomás; Holguín, África

    2015-09-01

    Viral load (VL) testing is used for early HIV diagnosis in infants (EID) and for detecting early therapeutic failure events, but can be affected by HIV genetic variability. Dried blood samples (DBS) increase VL access and EID in remote settings and when low blood volume is available. This study compares VL values using Siemens VERSANT HIV-1 RNA 1.0 kPCR assay (kPCR) and Roche CAP/CTM Quantitative test v2.0 (CAP/CTM v2.0) in 176 DBS carrying different HIV-1 variants collected from 69 Equatoguinean mothers and their infants with known HIV-1 status (71 infected, 105 uninfected). CAP/CTM v2.0 provided false positive VLs in 11 (10.5%) cases. VL differences above 0.5 log10 were observed in 42/49 (87.5%) DBS, and were above 1 log10 in 18 cases. CAP/CTM v2.0 quantified all the 41 specimens with previously inferred HIV-1 variant by phylogenetic analysis (68.3% recombinants) whereas kPCR only identified 90.2% of them, and was unable to detect 14.3% of 21 CRF02_AG viruses. CAP/CTM v2.0 showed higher sensitivity than kPCR (95.8% vs. 70.1%), quantifying a higher rate of viruses in infected DBS from subjects under antiretroviral exposure at sampling time compared to kPCR (94.7% vs. 96.2%, p-valueHIV-1 quantifications, which could be interpreted as virological failure events, or false negative diagnostic results due to genetic variability. We recommend using the same VL technique for each patient during antiretroviral therapy monitoring. Copyright © 2015 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Analysis of E2 gene integrity in HPV16 and HPV58 viruses isolated from women with cervical pathology

    OpenAIRE

    González-Losa,María del R; Puerto-Solis,Marylin; Tenorio Ruiz,Juan; Rosado-López,Ariel I; Hau-Aviles,Oscar; Ayora-Talavera,Guadalupe; Cisneros-Cutz,Isidro; Conde-Ferráez,Laura

    2016-01-01

    Integration of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA into human cells accompanied by the disruption of the viral genome has been described as a prerequisite for cancer development. This study aimed to investigate E2 gene integrity of HPV16 and HPV58 viruses isolated from infected women with cervical lesions. Forty-two HPV16- and 31 HPV58-positive samples were analysed. E2 integrity was assumed when all fragments covering the E2 gene were amplified with specific polymerase chain reaction primers. Ove...

  13. Dynamics of CD4 Lymphocytes and Viral Load at the Natural History of Perinatal HIV-infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Daminov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the analysis of indicators of CD4 lymphocyte count and viral load in the natural history (in the absence of ART in perinatally HIV-infected children. It was revealed that perinatal way of transmission is characterized by a higher rate of immunodeficiency progression. It may be associated with intrauterine infection, as well as an early defeat HIV immature immune system of the child. The concentration of virus in perinatally infected children since the beginning of the observation and in 30 months after infection is more than in parenterally infected children in 5 and 2 times, respectively, which determines a infavourable version of the disease in perinatally infected children.

  14. The Recombinant Maize Ribosome-Inactivating Protein Transiently Reduces Viral Load in SHIV89.6 Infected Chinese Rhesus Macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Rui Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs inhibit protein synthesis by depurinating the large ribosomal RNA and some are found to possess anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV activity. Maize ribosome inactivating protein (RIP has an internal inactivation loop which is proteolytically removed for full catalytic activity. Here, we showed that the recombinant active maize RIP protected chimeric simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV 89.6-infected macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells from lysis ex vivo and transiently reduced plasma viral load in SHIV89.6-infected rhesus macaque model. No evidence of immune dysregulation and other obvious side-effects was found in the treated macaques. Our work demonstrates the potential development of maize RIP as an anti-HIV agent without impeding systemic immune functions.

  15. Marek's Disease in Backyard Chickens, A Study of Pathologic Findings and Viral Loads in Tumorous and Nontumorous Birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mete, Aslı; Gharpure, Radhika; Pitesky, Maurice E; Famini, Dan; Sverlow, Karen; Dunn, John

    2016-12-01

    Marek's disease (MD) is a major cause of mortality in backyard chickens. The diagnosis of MD is complex, however, and knowledge of Marek's disease virus (MDV) in spontaneous field cases such as in backyard chickens is largely unknown. In this study, 40 backyard chickens with a presumptive MD diagnosis based on histologic lymphoid infiltrations in peripheral nerves with and without lymphomas were investigated. Twenty-eight of the birds were submitted to the diagnostic laboratory for disease explorations, and 12 chickens were from a flock in which some members demonstrated anisocoria and pupil irregularities compatible with ocular MD. Histologic scores were established for brain, peripheral nerves, heart, lung, liver, kidney, and gonad sections, ranging from mild (+) to severe (+++) lymphoid infiltrations. Twelve chickens had gross lymphomas, and all but two chickens had mild to severe peripheral nerve lymphoid infiltrates. There were no age or breed predispositions in the study group. Quantification of serotypes MDV-1, -2, and -3 performed with real-time PCR demonstrated high correlation (R2 = 0.94) between fresh and fixed spleen specimens, as well as between histopathology scores and MDV-1 viral loads. MDV-2 DNA was detected in a portion of the chickens, likely consistent with naturally occurring virus, whereas the vaccine strain MDV-3 was rarely detected. Significant differences in MDV-1 viral loads between tumorous and nontumorous chickens were observed, in which a ratio of MDV-1 glycoprotein B/glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase ≥ 0.5 was suggestive of gross tumors in this study. We propose that real-time PCR may be a good tool for MD diagnosis in backyard chickens.

  16. High specific immune response to a bivalent anti-HPV vaccine in HIV-1-infected men in São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriele Fontes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Infection with Human papillomavirus (HPV has been reported as one of the most prevalent agent sexually transmitted diseases, but its true prevalence in men is not precisely known, mainly due to the near absence of symptoms. Moreover, few studies evaluating the post-vaccination immune response have been performed to date in men, hence the hypotheses tested in this study can be important to enable a better understanding of both the immunopathogenesis and the response to vaccination in HIV-infected patients, and to help in the elaboration of strategies of vaccination against HPV in the HIV-infected population. Objectives: To analyze the specific response to antigens of HPV vaccine in HIV-infected men. Methods: A total of 25 HIV-infected male patients who met the inclusion criteria during the data collection period were vaccinated; however, six (30% had anti-HPV at baseline, and were not considered further in the analysis. Therefore, 19 HIV-infected individuals were included in the study, along with five healthy, HPV-seronegative controls. Results: Patients infected with HIV-1 were subdivided into two groups, A and B, according to their T CD4 cells count at the time of vaccination, namely: Group A: CD4>500; Group B: CD4<500. The proportion of seroconversion after immunization with three doses of a bivalent anti-HPV vaccine was 92%. Conclusion: HIV-infected patients as well as HIV negative controls responded to anti-HPV vaccination, regardless of their T CD4 cells count and HIV plasma viral load. These results demonstrate that anti-HPV immunization in HIV-infected males is effective and should be encouraged, thus helping to decrease the risk of infection, mortality and morbidity of diseases associated with HPV in men. Keywords: HIV-1, HPV, Vaccine, Immune response

  17. Influenza A viral loads in respiratory samples collected from patients infected with pandemic H1N1, seasonal H1N1 and H3N2 viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuchottaworn Charoen

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA, nasal swab (NS, and throat swab (TS are common specimens used for diagnosis of respiratory virus infections based on the detection of viral genomes, viral antigens and viral isolation. However, there is no documented data regarding the type of specimen that yields the best result of viral detection. In this study, quantitative real time RT-PCR specific for M gene was used to determine influenza A viral loads present in NS, NPA and TS samples collected from patients infected with the 2009 pandemic H1N1, seasonal H1N1 and H3N2 viruses. Various copy numbers of RNA transcripts derived from recombinant plasmids containing complete M gene insert of each virus strain were assayed by RT-PCR. A standard curve for viral RNA quantification was constructed by plotting each Ct value against the log quantity of each standard RNA copy number. Results Copy numbers of M gene were obtained through the extrapolation of Ct values of the test samples against the corresponding standard curve. Among a total of 29 patients with severe influenza enrolled in this study (12 cases of the 2009 pandemic influenza, 5 cases of seasonal H1N1 and 12 cases of seasonal H3N2 virus, NPA was found to contain significantly highest amount of viral loads and followed in order by NS and TS specimen. Viral loads among patients infected with those viruses were comparable regarding type of specimen analyzed. Conclusion Based on M gene copy numbers, we conclude that NPA is the best specimen for detection of influenza A viruses, and followed in order by NS and TS.

  18. Sequence imputation of HPV16 genomes for genetic association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Smith

    Full Text Available Human Papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16 causes over half of all cervical cancer and some HPV16 variants are more oncogenic than others. The genetic basis for the extraordinary oncogenic properties of HPV16 compared to other HPVs is unknown. In addition, we neither know which nucleotides vary across and within HPV types and lineages, nor which of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs determine oncogenicity.A reference set of 62 HPV16 complete genome sequences was established and used to examine patterns of evolutionary relatedness amongst variants using a pairwise identity heatmap and HPV16 phylogeny. A BLAST-based algorithm was developed to impute complete genome data from partial sequence information using the reference database. To interrogate the oncogenic risk of determined and imputed HPV16 SNPs, odds-ratios for each SNP were calculated in a case-control viral genome-wide association study (VWAS using biopsy confirmed high-grade cervix neoplasia and self-limited HPV16 infections from Guanacaste, Costa Rica.HPV16 variants display evolutionarily stable lineages that contain conserved diagnostic SNPs. The imputation algorithm indicated that an average of 97.5±1.03% of SNPs could be accurately imputed. The VWAS revealed specific HPV16 viral SNPs associated with variant lineages and elevated odds ratios; however, individual causal SNPs could not be distinguished with certainty due to the nature of HPV evolution.Conserved and lineage-specific SNPs can be imputed with a high degree of accuracy from limited viral polymorphic data due to the lack of recombination and the stochastic mechanism of variation accumulation in the HPV genome. However, to determine the role of novel variants or non-lineage-specific SNPs by VWAS will require direct sequence analysis. The investigation of patterns of genetic variation and the identification of diagnostic SNPs for lineages of HPV16 variants provides a valuable resource for future studies of HPV16

  19. El virus del papiloma humano (HPV, agente viral importante precusor de la mayoría de las displasias o cáncer cervical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Patricia Consuegra Mayor

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Una de las patologías más frecuentes con la que el hombre ha tenido que luchar en las últimas décadas es el cáncer. Los países industrializados y aun aquellos en vía de desarrollo se han dado a la tarea de combatir el cáncer, han hecho grandes esfuerzos e invertido cantidades de dinero con el propósito de conocer el origen y seguimiento de esta enfermedad y buscar alternativas que ayuden a erradicarla o a limitarla. Son impresionantes los datos recientes respecto al origen del cáncer a nivel molecular y se conocen con más precisión los procesos de progresión, invasión y metástasis tumoral (1. Todos estos experimentos han podido dilucidar algunos factores potenciadores o estimuladores para la aparición de esta enfermedad. El cáncer de cuello uterino es el segundo cáncer más común en la mujer después del cáncer de mama, y existe un desproporcionado aumento del cáncer cervical en mujeres jóvenes (2. Como el cáncer de cuello uterino se desarrolla en mujeres más jóvenes que el de mama, es una de las neoplasias malignas más devastadoras y es el principal cáncer genital femenino en los países en desarrollo (3,4. En Colombia es la segunda causa de mortalidad femenina (5. Desde hace más de 100 años se ha considerado que el cáncer cervical tiene una causa infecciosa (1. Posteriormente se demostró que los virus del papiloma humano (HPV, por su sigla en inglés human papillomavirus contribuyen directamente en la carcinogénesis. Es de anotar que el HPV es causa necesaria para el desarrollo del cáncer de cérvix, pero no es suficiente, ya que otros factores están involucrados en la progresión de infección a cáncer (6

  20. A humanized mouse-based HIV-1 viral outgrowth assay with higher sensitivity than in vitro qVOA in detecting latently infected cells from individuals on ART with undetectable viral loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlins, Paige; Schmitt, Kimberly; Remling-Mulder, Leila; Hogan, Louise E; Hanhauser, Emily; Hobbs, Kristen S; Hecht, Frederick; Deeks, Steven G; Henrich, Timothy J; Akkina, Ramesh

    2017-07-01

    Assays that can verify full viral eradication are essential in the context of achieving a cure for HIV/AIDS. In vitro quantitative viral out growth assays (qVOA) are currently the gold standard for measuring latent HIV-1 but these assays often fail to detect very low levels of replication-competent virus. Here we investigated an alternative in vivo approach for sensitive viral detection using humanized mice (hmVOA). Peripheral blood CD4+ T cell samples from HIV subjects on stable ART with undetectable viral loads by RT-PCR were first assayed by in vitro qVOA. Corresponding patient samples in which no virus was detected by qVOA were injected into humanized mice to allow viral outgrowth. Of the five qVOA virus negative samples, four gave positive viral outgrowth in the hmVOA assay suggesting that it is more sensitive in detecting latent HIV-1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Asynchronous progression through the lytic cascade and variations in intracellular viral loads revealed by high-throughput single-cell analysis of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adang, Laura A; Parsons, Christopher H; Kedes, Dean H

    2006-10-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV or human herpesvirus-8) is frequently tumorigenic in immunocompromised patients. The average intracellular viral copy number within infected cells, however, varies markedly by tumor type. Since the KSHV-encoded latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) tethers viral episomes to host heterochromatin and displays a punctate pattern by fluorescence microscopy, we investigated whether accurate quantification of individual LANA dots is predictive of intracellular viral genome load. Using a novel technology that integrates single-cell imaging with flow cytometry, we found that both the number and the summed immunofluorescence of individual LANA dots are directly proportional to the amount of intracellular viral DNA. Moreover, combining viral (immediate early lytic replication and transcription activator [RTA] and late lytic K8.1) and cellular (syndecan-1) staining with image-based flow cytometry, we were also able to rapidly and simultaneously distinguish among cells supporting latent, immediate early lytic, early lytic, late lytic, and a potential fourth "delayed late" category of lytic replication. Applying image-based flow cytometry to KSHV culture models, we found that de novo infection results in highly varied levels of intracellular viral load and that lytic induction of latently infected cells likewise leads to a heterogeneous population at various stages of reactivation. These findings additionally underscore the potential advantages of studying KSHV biology with high-throughput analysis of individual cells.

  2. Nonendemic HPV-Positive Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: Association With Poor Prognosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenmark, Matthew H., E-mail: stenmark@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); McHugh, Jonathan B. [Department of Pathology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Schipper, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Walline, Heather M.; Komarck, Christine [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Feng, Felix Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Worden, Francis P. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Wolf, Gregory T.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Prince, Mark E.; Bradford, Carol R. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Mukherji, Suresh K. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Eisbruch, Avraham [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Carey, Thomas E. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in nonendemic nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and assess the prognostic implications of viral status. Methods and Materials: Paraffin-embedded tumor specimens from 62 patients with primary NPC diagnosed between 1985 and 2011 were analyzed for EBV and high-risk HPV. EBV status was determined by the use of in situ hybridization for EBV encoded RNA. HPV status was assessed with p16 immunohistochemistry and multiplex polymerase chain reaction MassArray for determination of HPV type. Proportional hazards models were used to compare the risk of death among patients as stratified by viral status. Results: Of 61 evaluable tumors, 26 (43%) were EBV-positive/HPV-negative, 18 (30%) were HPV-positive/EBV-negative, and 17 (28%) were EBV/HPV-negative. EBV and HPV infection was mutually exclusive. HPV positivity was significantly correlated with World Health Organization grade 2 tumors, older age, and smoking (all P<.001). The racial distribution of the study population was 74% white, 15% African American, and 11% Asian/Middle Eastern. Among HPV-positive patients, 94% were white. At a median follow-up time of 7 years, HPV-positive and EBV/HPV-negative tumors exhibited worse outcomes than did EBV-positive tumors, including decreased overall survival (hazard ratio [HR] 2.98, P=.01; and HR 3.89, P=.002), progression-free survival (HR 2.55, P=.02; and HR 4.04, P<.001), and locoregional control (HR 4.01, P=.03; and HR 6.87, P=.001). Conclusion: In our Midwestern population, high-risk HPV infection may play an etiologic role in the development of nonendemic, EBV-negative NPC. Compared with EBV-positive NPC, HPV-positive and EBV/HPV-negative NPC are associated with worse outcomes. A larger confirmatory study is needed to validate these findings.

  3. Adenoviral and AAV-mediated gene transfer to the inner ear: role of serotype, promoter, and viral load on in vivo and in vitro infection efficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebke, Anne E; Rova, Cherokee; Von Doersten, Peter G; Poulsen, David J

    2009-01-01

    The lack of effective treatments for many forms of hearing and vestibular disorders has produced interest in virally mediated gene therapies. However, to develop a gene therapy strategy that would successfully treat inner ear disorders, appropriate viral vectors capable of transfecting cochlear and support cells must be identified. While virally mediated gene transfer into the inner ear has been accomplished using herpes simplex type I virus, vaccinia virus, retroviruses, adenovirus, and adeno-associated virus (AAV), we will restrict our discussion to AAV and adenoviral vectors. Issues such as vector toxicity and load, viral serotype and backbone, and promoter specificity are discussed and contrasted for both in vivo vs. in vitro inner ear gene transfer. Copyright (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Factors associated with short-term changes in HIV viral load and CD4 R cell count in antiretroviral-naive individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakagawa, Fumiyo; Lodwick, Rebecca; Smith, Colette; Costagliola, Dominique; van Sighem, Ard; Ledergerber, Bruno; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Dorrucci, Maria; Torti, Carlo; Suarez-Lozano, Ignacio; Obel, Niels; Brockmeyer, Norbert; Thiebaut, Rodolphe; Lundgren, Jens; Castagna, Antonella; Alejos, Belén; de Wit, Stéphane; Zangerle, Robert; Pantazis, Nikos; Ehren, Kathrin; Casabona, Jordi; Grarup, Jesper; Chêne, Geneviève; Phillips, Andrew; Touloumi, Giota; Warszawski, Josiane; Meyer, Laurence; Dabis, François; Krause, Murielle Mary; Ghosn, Jade; Leport, Catherine; Reiss, Peter; Wit, Ferdinand; Prins, Maria; Bucher, Heiner C.; Sabin, Caroline; Gibb, Diana; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; del Amo, Julia; Thorne, Claire; Mocroft, Amanda; Kirk, Ole; Stephan, Christoph; Pérez-Hoyos, Santiago; Hamouda, Osamah; Gussenheimer-Bartmeyer, Barbara; Noguera-Julian, Antoni; Antinori, Andrea; Ramos, José; Battegay, Manuel; Rauch, Andri; Mussini, Cristina; Tookey, Pat; Miró, Jose M.; de Wit, Stephane; Goetghebuer, Tessa; Teira, Ramon; Garrido, Myriam; Judd, Ali; Haerry, David; Weller, Ian; D'Arminio-Monforte, Antonella; Colin, Céline; Schwimmer, Christine; Termote, Monique; Barger, Diana; Kjaer, Jesper; Campbell, Maria; Raben, Dorthe; Bohlius, Julia; Bouteloup, Vincent; Bucher, Heiner; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Egger, Matthias; Engsig, Frederik; Furrer, Hansjakob; Lambotte, Olivier; Lewden, Charlotte; Lodi, Sara; Matheron, Sophie; Miro, Jose; Monge, Susana; Paredes, Roger; Puoti, Massimo; Reekie, Joanne; Scherrer, Alexandra; Smit, Colette; Sterne, Jonathan; Wittkop, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Objectives:Among antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive individuals, viral load levels tend to increase and CD4(+) cell counts decline over time. We sought to explore the rate of change and influence of other factors associated with these markers of HIV progression.Design:An observational cohort

  5. Outcomes from monitoring of patients on antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings with viral load, CD4 cell count, or clinical observation alone: a computer simulation model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, Andrew N; Pillay, Deenan; Miners, Alec H

    2008-01-01

    : For patients on the first-line regimen of stavudine, lamivudine, and nevirapine the benefits of viral load or CD4 cell count monitoring over clinical monitoring alone are modest. Development of cheap and robust versions of these assays is important, but widening access to antiretrovirals-with or without...

  6. Integrase inhibitors in late pregnancy and rapid HIV viral load reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahangdale, Lisa; Cates, Jordan; Potter, JoNell; Badell, Martina L; Seidman, Dominika; Miller, Emilly S; Coleman, Jenell S; Lazenby, Gweneth B; Levison, Judy; Short, William R; Yawetz, Sigal; Ciaranello, Andrea; Livingston, Elizabeth; Duthely, Lunthita; Rimawi, Bassam H; Anderson, Jean R; Stringer, Elizabeth M

    2016-03-01

    Minimizing time to HIV viral suppression is critical in pregnancy. Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs), like raltegravir, are known to rapidly suppress plasma HIV RNA in nonpregnant adults. There are limited data in pregnant women. We describe time to clinically relevant reduction in HIV RNA in pregnant women using INSTI-containing and non-INSTI-containing antiretroviral therapy (ART) options. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of pregnant HIV-infected women in the United States from 2009 through 2015. We included women who initiated ART, intensified their regimen, or switched to a new regimen due to detectable viremia (HIV RNA >40 copies/mL) at ≥20 weeks gestation. Among women with a baseline HIV RNA permitting 1-log reduction, we estimated time to 1-log RNA reduction using the Kaplan-Meier estimator comparing women starting/adding an INSTI in their regimen vs other ART. To compare groups with similar follow-up time, we also conducted a subgroup analysis limited to women with ≤14 days between baseline and follow-up RNA data. This study describes 101 HIV-infected pregnant women from 11 US clinics. In all, 75% (76/101) of women were not taking ART at baseline; 24 were taking non-INSTI containing ART, and 1 received zidovudine monotherapy. In all, 39% (39/101) of women started an INSTI-containing regimen or added an INSTI to their ART regimen. Among 90 women with a baseline HIV RNA permitting 1-log reduction, the median time to 1-log RNA reduction was 8 days (interquartile range [IQR], 7-14) in the INSTI group vs 35 days (IQR, 20-53) in the non-INSTI ART group (P pregnancy. Inclusion of an INSTI may play a role in optimal reduction of HIV RNA for HIV-infected pregnant women presenting late to care or failing initial therapy. Larger studies are urgently needed to assess the safety and effectiveness of this approach. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. hpvPDB: An Online Proteome Reserve for Human Papillomavirus

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Satish; Jena, Lingaraja; Daf, Sangeeta; Mohod, Kanchan; Goyal, Peyush; Varma, Ashok K.

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the leading cause of cancer mortality among women worldwide. The molecular understanding of HPV proteins has significant connotation for understanding their intrusion in the host and designing novel protein vaccines and anti-viral agents, etc. Genomic, proteomic, structural, and disease-related information on HPV is available on the web; yet, with trivial annotations and more so, it is not well customized for data analysis, host-pathogen interaction, st...

  8. Evaluation of the Xpert HCV Viral Load point-of-care assay from venepuncture-collected and finger-stick capillary whole-blood samples: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebely, Jason; Lamoury, Francois M J; Hajarizadeh, Behzad; Mowat, Yasmin; Marshall, Alison D; Bajis, Sahar; Marks, Philippa; Amin, Janaki; Smith, Julie; Edwards, Michael; Gorton, Carla; Ezard, Nadine; Persing, David; Kleman, Marika; Cunningham, Philip; Catlett, Beth; Dore, Gregory J; Applegate, Tanya L

    2017-07-01

    Point-of-care hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA testing offers an advantage over antibody testing (which only indicates previous exposure), enabling diagnosis of active infection in a single visit. In this study, we evaluated the performance of the Xpert HCV Viral Load assay with venepuncture and finger-stick capillary whole-blood samples. Plasma and finger-stick capillary whole-blood samples were collected from participants in an observational cohort enrolled at five sites in Australia (three drug and alcohol clinics, one homelessness service, and one needle and syringe programme). We compared the sensitivity and specificity of the Xpert HCV Viral Load test for HCV RNA detection by venepuncture and finger-stick collection with the Abbott RealTime HCV Viral Load assay (gold standard). Of 210 participants enrolled between Feb 8, 2016, and July 27, 2016, 150 participants had viral load testing results for the three assays tested. HCV RNA was detected in 45 (30% [95% CI 23-38]) of 150 participants based on Abbott RealTime. Sensitivity of the Xpert HCV Viral Load assay for HCV RNA detection in plasma collected by venepuncture was 100·0% (95% CI 92·0-100·0) and specificity was 99·1% (95% CI 94·9-100·0). Sensitivity of the Xpert HCV Viral Load assay for HCV RNA detection in samples collected by finger-stick was 95·5% (95% CI 84·5-99·4) and specificity was 98·1% (95% CI 93·4-99·8). No adverse events caused by the index test or the reference standard were observed. The Xpert HCV Viral Load test can detect active infection from a finger-stick sample, which represents an advance over antibody-based tests that only indicate past or previous exposure. National Health and Medical Research Council (Australia), Cepheid, South Eastern Sydney Local Health District (Australia), and Merck Sharp & Dohme (Australia). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. An accurate definition of the status of inactive hepatitis B virus carrier by a combination of biomarkers (FibroTest-ActiTest and viral load.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen Ngo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The combination of transaminases (ALT, biopsy, HBeAg and viral load have classically defined the inactive status of carriers of chronic hepatitis B. The use of FibroTest (FT and ActiTest (AT, biomarkers of fibrosis and necroinflammatory activity, has been previously validated as alternatives to biopsy. We compared the 4-year prognostic value of combining FT-AT and viral load for a better definition of the inactive carrier status. METHODS AND FINDINGS: 1,300 consecutive CHB patients who had been prospectively followed since 2001 were pre-included. The main endpoint was the absence of liver-related complications, transplantation or death. We used the manufacturers' definitions of normal FT (< = 0.27, normal AT (< = 0.29 and 3 standard classes for viral load. The adjustment factors were age, sex, HBeAg, ethnic origin, alcohol consumption, HIV-Delta-HCV co-infections and treatment. RESULTS: 1,074 patients with baseline FT-AT and viral load were included: 41 years old, 47% African, 27% Asian, 26% Caucasian. At 4 years follow-up, 50 complications occurred (survival without complications 93.4%, 36 deaths occurred (survival 95.0%, including 27 related to HBV (survival 96.1%. The prognostic value of FT was higher than those of viral load or ALT when compared using area under the ROC curves [0.89 (95%CI 0.84-0.93 vs 0.64 (0.55-0.71 vs 0.53 (0.46-0.60 all P<0.001], survival curves and multivariate Cox model [regression coefficient 5.2 (3.5-6.9; P<0.001 vs 0.53 (0.15-0.92; P = 0.007 vs -0.001 (-0.003-0.000;P = 0.052] respectively. A new definition of inactive carriers was proposed with an algorithm combining "zero" scores for FT-AT (F0 and A0 and viral load classes. This new algorithm provides a 100% negative predictive value for the prediction of liver related complications or death. Among the 275 patients with the classic definition of inactive carrier, 62 (23% had fibrosis presumed with FT, and 3 died or had complications at 4 year

  10. Antiretroviral-treated HIV-1 patients can harbour resistant viruses in CSF despite an undetectable viral load in plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulie, Cathia; Grudé, Maxime; Descamps, Diane; Amiel, Corinne; Morand-Joubert, Laurence; Raymond, Stéphanie; Pallier, Coralie; Bellecave, Pantxika; Reigadas, Sandrine; Trabaud, Mary-Anne; Delaugerre, Constance; Montes, Brigitte; Barin, Francis; Ferré, Virginie; Jeulin, Hélène; Alloui, Chakib; Yerly, Sabine; Signori-Schmuck, Anne; Guigon, Aurélie; Fafi-Kremer, Samira; Haïm-Boukobza, Stéphanie; Mirand, Audrey; Maillard, Anne; Vallet, Sophie; Roussel, Catherine; Assoumou, Lambert; Calvez, Vincent; Flandre, Philippe; Marcelin, Anne-Geneviève

    2017-08-01

    HIV therapy reduces the CSF HIV RNA viral load (VL) and prevents disorders related to HIV encephalitis. However, these brain disorders may persist in some cases. A large population of antiretroviral-treated patients who had a VL > 1.7 log 10 copies/mL in CSF with detectable or undetectable VL in plasma associated with cognitive impairment was studied, in order to characterize discriminatory factors of these two patient populations. Blood and CSF samples were collected at the time of neurological disorders for 227 patients in 22 centres in France and 1 centre in Switzerland. Genotypic HIV resistance tests were performed on CSF. The genotypic susceptibility score was calculated according to the last Agence Nationale de Recherche sur le Sida et les hépatites virales Action Coordonnée 11 (ANRS AC11) genotype interpretation algorithm. Among the 227 studied patients with VL > 1.7 log 10 copies/mL in CSF, 195 had VL detectable in plasma [median (IQR) HIV RNA was 3.7 (2.7-4.7) log 10 copies/mL] and 32 had discordant VL in plasma (VL plasma compared with patients with plasma VL > 1.7 log 10 copies/mL. Resistance to antiretrovirals was observed in CSF for the two groups of patients. Fourteen percent of this population of patients with cognitive impairment and detectable VL in CSF had well controlled VL in plasma. Thus, it is important to explore CSF HIV (VL and genotype) even if the HIV VL is controlled in plasma because HIV resistance may be observed.

  11. HPV disease transmission protection and control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil D. Christensen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomaviruses (HPVs represent a large collection of viral types associated with significant clinical disease of cutaneous and mucosal epithelium. HPV-associated cancers are found in anogenital and oral mucosa, and at various cutaneous sites. Papillomaviruses are highly species and tissue restricted, and these viruses display both mucosotropic, cutaneotropic or dual tropism for epithelial tissues. A subset of HPV types, predominantly mucosal, are also oncogenic and cancers with these HPV types account for more than 200,000 deaths world-wide. Host control of HPV infections requires both innate and adaptive immunity, but the viruses have developed strategies to escape immune detection. Viral proteins can disrupt both innate pathogen-sensing pathways and T-cell based recognition and subsequent destruction of infected tissues. Current treatments to manage HPV infections include mostly ablative strategies in which recurrences are common and only active disease is treated. Although much is known about the papillomavirus life cycle, viral protein functions, and immune responsiveness, we still lack knowledge in a number of key areas of PV biology including tissue tropism, site-specific cancer progression, codon usage profiles, and what are the best strategies to mount an effective immune response to the carcinogenic stages of PV disease. In this review, disease transmission, protection and control are discussed together with questions related to areas in PV biology that will continue to provide productive opportunities of discovery and to further our understanding of this diverse set of human viral pathogens.

  12. HIV-1 viral load measurement in venous blood and fingerprick blood using Abbott RealTime HIV-1 DBS assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ning; Pahalawatta, Vihanga; Frank, Andrea; Bagley, Zowie; Viana, Raquel; Lampinen, John; Leckie, Gregor; Huang, Shihai; Abravaya, Klara; Wallis, Carole L

    2017-07-01

    HIV RNA suppression is a key indicator for monitoring success of antiretroviral therapy. From a logistical perspective, viral load (VL) testing using Dried Blood Spots (DBS) is a promising alternative to plasma based VL testing in resource-limited settings. To evaluate the analytical and clinical performance of the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay using a fully automated one-spot DBS sample protocol. Limit of detection (LOD), linearity, lower limit of quantitation (LLQ), upper limit of quantitation (ULQ), and precision were determined using serial dilutions of HIV-1 Virology Quality Assurance stock (VQA Rush University), or HIV-1-containing armored RNA, made in venous blood. To evaluate correlation, bias, and agreement, 497 HIV-1 positive adult clinical samples were collected from Ivory Coast, Uganda and South Africa. For each HIV-1 participant, DBS-fingerprick, DBS-venous and plasma sample results were compared. Correlation and bias values were obtained. The sensitivity and specificity were analyzed at a threshold of 1000 HIV-1 copies/mL generated using the standard plasma protocol. The Abbott HIV-1 DBS protocol had an LOD of 839 copies/mL, a linear range from 500 to 1×107 copies/mL, an LLQ of 839 copies/mL, a ULQ of 1×107 copies/mL, and an inter-assay SD of ≤0.30 log copies/mL for all tested levels within this range. With clinical samples, the correlation coefficient (r value) was 0.896 between DBS-fingerprick and plasma and 0.901 between DBS-venous and plasma, and the bias was -0.07 log copies/mL between DBS-fingerprick and plasma and -0.02 log copies/mL between DBS-venous and plasma. The sensitivity of DBS-fingerprick and DBS-venous was 93%, while the specificity of both DBS methods was 95%. The results demonstrated that the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay with DBS sample protocol is highly sensitive, specific and precise across a wide dynamic range and correlates well with plasma values. The Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay with DBS sample protocol provides an

  13. Cigarette smoking is associated with high HIV viral load among adults presenting for antiretroviral therapy in Vietnam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd M Pollack

    Full Text Available High HIV viral load (VL >100,000 cp/ml is associated with increased HIV transmission risk, faster progression to AIDS, and reduced response to some antiretroviral regimens. To better understand factors associated with high VL, we examined characteristics of patients presenting for treatment in Hanoi, Vietnam. We examined baseline data from the Viral Load Monitoring in Vietnam Study, a randomized controlled trial of routine VL monitoring in a population starting antiretroviral therapy (ART at a clinic in Hanoi. Patients with prior treatment failure or ART resistance were excluded. Characteristics examined included demographics, clinical and laboratory data, and substance use. Logistic regression was used to calculate crude and adjusted odds ratios (aOR and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI. Out of 636 patients, 62.7% were male, 72.9% were ≥30 years old, and 28.3% had a history of drug injection. Median CD4 was 132 cells/mm3, and 34.9% were clinical stage IV. Active cigarette smoking was reported by 36.3% with 14.0% smoking >10 cigarettes per day. Alcohol consumption was reported by 20.1% with 6.1% having ≥5 drinks per event. Overall 53.0% had a VL >100,000 cp/ml. Male gender, low body weight, low CD4 count, prior TB, and cigarette smoking were associated with high VL. Those who smoked 1-10 cigarettes per day were more likely to have high VL (aOR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1.15-3.45, while the smaller number of patients who smoked >10 cigarettes per day had a non-significant trend toward higher VL (aOR = 1.41, 95% CI = 0.75-2.66. Alcohol consumption was not significantly associated with high VL. Tobacco use is increasingly recognized as a contributor to premature morbidity and mortality among HIV-infected patients. In our study, cigarette smoking in the last 30 days was associated with a 1.5 to 2-fold higher odds of having an HIV VL >100,000 cp/ml among patients presenting for ART. These findings provide further evidence of the negative effects of

  14. Cigarette smoking is associated with high HIV viral load among adults presenting for antiretroviral therapy in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Todd M; Duong, Hao T; Pham, Thuy T; Do, Cuong D; Colby, Donn

    2017-01-01

    High HIV viral load (VL >100,000 cp/ml) is associated with increased HIV transmission risk, faster progression to AIDS, and reduced response to some antiretroviral regimens. To better understand factors associated with high VL, we examined characteristics of patients presenting for treatment in Hanoi, Vietnam. We examined baseline data from the Viral Load Monitoring in Vietnam Study, a randomized controlled trial of routine VL monitoring in a population starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) at a clinic in Hanoi. Patients with prior treatment failure or ART resistance were excluded. Characteristics examined included demographics, clinical and laboratory data, and substance use. Logistic regression was used to calculate crude and adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Out of 636 patients, 62.7% were male, 72.9% were ≥30 years old, and 28.3% had a history of drug injection. Median CD4 was 132 cells/mm3, and 34.9% were clinical stage IV. Active cigarette smoking was reported by 36.3% with 14.0% smoking >10 cigarettes per day. Alcohol consumption was reported by 20.1% with 6.1% having ≥5 drinks per event. Overall 53.0% had a VL >100,000 cp/ml. Male gender, low body weight, low CD4 count, prior TB, and cigarette smoking were associated with high VL. Those who smoked 1-10 cigarettes per day were more likely to have high VL (aOR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1.15-3.45), while the smaller number of patients who smoked >10 cigarettes per day had a non-significant trend toward higher VL (aOR = 1.41, 95% CI = 0.75-2.66). Alcohol consumption was not significantly associated with high VL. Tobacco use is increasingly recognized as a contributor to premature morbidity and mortality among HIV-infected patients. In our study, cigarette smoking in the last 30 days was associated with a 1.5 to 2-fold higher odds of having an HIV VL >100,000 cp/ml among patients presenting for ART. These findings provide further evidence of the negative effects of tobacco use among

  15. Human Papillomavirus (HPV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Vaccine: What You Need to Know (VIS) ... Why get vaccinated? HPV vaccine prevents infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) types that are associated with many ...

  16. TNFalpha polymorphism frequencies in HPV-associated cervical dysplasia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirkpatrick, A.; Bidwell, J; Brule, van den AJ; Meijer, C.J.L.M.; Pawade, J; Glew, S

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Persistent high-risk HPV infection of the uterine cervix is associated with CIN and cervical carcinoma. Women with a reduced pro-inflammatory response to HPV are likely to be susceptible to viral persistence, and therefore, potentially more vulnerable to cervical neoplasia. In this

  17. Broad HPV distribution in the genital region of men from the HPV infection in men (HIM) study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sichero, Laura; Pierce Campbell, Christine M.; Ferreira, Silvaneide; Sobrinho, João S.; Baggio, Maria Luiza; Galan, Lenice; Silva, Roberto C.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R.; Villa, Luisa L.

    2013-01-01

    The HPV infection in men (HIM) study examines the natural history of genital HPV infection in men. Genotyping methods used in this study identify 37 α-HPV types; however, the viral type could not be identified in approximately 22% of male genital specimens that were HPV PCR positive. Our aim was to genotype HPV-unclassified specimens by sequencing PGMY09/11, GP5+/6+ or FAP59/64 PCR products. Using this approach we were able to detect 86 unique HPV types among 508 of 931 specimens analyzed. We report for the first time the presence of a broad range of α-, β- and γ-HPV at the male genitals. PMID:23722104

  18. Frequent Hypermethylation of RASSF1A, TSLC1, High Viral Load of Epstein-Barr Virus DNA in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma, Matched Tumor-Adjacent Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zhou

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available We examined the promoter hypermethylation of tumorsuppressor genes RASSF1A, TSLC1, quantitated EBV DNA load in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC tissues (T tissues, matched tumor-adjacent tissues outside 0.5 cm (P tissues, outside 1.0 cm (Z tissues to evaluate the role of promoter hypermethylation of RASSF1A, TSLC1 as well as viral load in the pathogenesis of NPC. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR for RASSF1A, TSLC1, quantitative real-time PCR analysis of EBV DNA were performed on matched T, P, Z tissues (n = 28 as well as chronic nasopharyngitis tissues (n = 8. Hypermethylated RASSF1A was frequently detected in the T (82%, P tissues (75%, but less frequently in Z tissues (46%. The average quantities of EBV DNA (copies/μg DNA in matched T, P, Z tissues were 673,000, 90,000, 7000. The differences of promoter hypermethylation of RASSF1A, EBV viral load among T, P, Z tissues were statistically significant, with more frequent methylation, higher viral load detected when tissues examined were nearer to the NPC tissues. Our results suggest that aberrant hypermethylation of RASSF1A, high EBV load might be important events in NPC pathogenesis, they may be useful molecular diagnostic markers for this cancer.

  19. Diagnostic values for the viral load in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with chronic active Epstein-Barr virus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Michio; Kawada, Jun-ichi; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus disease (CAEBV) is a distinct EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease with a poor prognosis. Although the viral load in blood samples has been widely used for diagnosing CAEBV, well-defined viral load thresholds to guide clinicians are currently lacking. The aim of the present study was to determine standardized diagnostic values for EBV load in blood samples of CAEBV patients using the World Health Organization international standard for reporting. Levels of EBV DNA in 103 peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and 95 plasma/serum samples from 107 cases with CAEBV were quantified and expressed in international units. Receiver operating characteristic curves were analyzed to assess the most appropriate cut-off values for levels of EBV DNA to distinguish CAEBV from EBV-associated infectious mononucleosis (IM) and controls with past EBV infection. Levels of EBV DNA in PBMCs were significantly higher in the CAEBV group (median, 10(4.2) IU/μgDNA) compared to the IM (median, 10(2.1) IU/μgDNA) and control groups. An inconsistent qualitative result was seen in 13 of 86 CAEBV patients; in these, EBV-DNA was positive in PBMCs, but negative in plasma. Diagnostic cut-off values for viral load in PBMCs from CAEBV patients, as compared to those of healthy controls and IM patients, were 10(2.0) IU/μgDNA and 10(3.2) IU/μgDNA, respectively. For diagnostic purposes, the viral load of PBMCs was better than of plasma/serum. A diagnostic cut-off EBV load for CAEBV may be useful for the management of CAEBV patients. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Liver stiffness measurement and biochemical markers in Senegalese chronic hepatitis B patients with normal ALT and high viral load.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papa Saliou Mbaye

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Despite the high prevalence of chronic hepatitis B (CHB in Africa, few studies have been performed among African patients. We sought to evaluate liver stiffness measurement by FibroScan® (LSM and two biochemical scores (FibroTest®, Fibrometer® to diagnose liver fibrosis in Senegalese CHB patients with HBV plasma DNA load ≥3.2 log(10 IU/mL and normal alanine aminotransferase (ALT values. METHODS: LSM and liver fibrosis biochemical markers were performed on 225 consecutive HBV infected Senegalese patients with high viral load. Patients with an LSM range between 7 and 13 kPa underwent liver biopsy (LB. Two experienced liver pathologists performed histological grading using Metavir and Ishak scoring. RESULTS: 225 patients were evaluated (84% male and LB was performed in 69 patients, showing F2 and F3 fibrosis in 17% and 10% respectively. In these patients with a 7-13 kPa range of LSM, accuracy for diagnosis of significant fibrosis according to LB was unsatisfactory for all non-invasive markers with AUROCs below 0.70. For patients with LSM values below 7 kPa, FibroTest® (FT, and Fibrometer® (FM using the cut-offs recommended by the test promoters suggested a fibrosis in 18% of cases for FT (8% severe fibrosis and 8% for FM. For patients with LSM values greater than 13 kPa, FT, FM suggested a possible fibrosis in 73% and 70%, respectively. CONCLUSION: In highly replicative HBV-infected African patients with normal ALT and LSM value below 13 kPa, FibroScan®, FibroTest® or Fibrometer® were unsuitable to predict the histological liver status of fibrosis.

  1. Relationship between viral load and self-report measures of medication adherence among youth with perinatal HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usitalo, Ann; Leister, Erin; Tassiopoulos, Katherine; Allison, Susannah; Malee, Kathleen; Paul, Mary E; Smith, Renee; Van Dyke, Russell B; Seage, George R; Mellins, Claude A

    2014-01-01

    Poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) contributes to disease progression and emergence of drug-resistant HIV in youth with perinatally acquired HIV infection (PHIV +), necessitating reliable measures of adherence. Although electronic monitoring devices have often been considered the gold-standard assessment in HIV research, they are costly, can overestimate nonadherence and are not practical for routine care. Thus, the development of valid, easily administered self-report adherence measures is crucial for adherence monitoring. PHIV+youth aged 7-16 (n = 289) and their caregivers, enrolled in a multisite cohort study, were interviewed to assess several reported indicators of adherence. HIV-1 RNA viral load (VL) was dichotomized into >/≤ 400 copies/mL. Lower adherence was significantly associated with VL >400 copies/mL across most indicators, including ≥ 1 missed dose in past seven days [youth report: OR = 2.78 (95% CI, 1.46-5.27)]. Caregiver and combined youth/caregiver reports yielded similar results. Within-rater agreement between various adherence indicators was high for both youth and caregivers. Inter-rater agreement on adherence was moderate across most indicators. Age ≥ 13 years and living with biological mother or relative were associated with VL >400 copies/mL. Findings support the validity of caregiver and youth adherence reports and identify youth at risk of poor adherence.

  2. Performance of the Xpert® HIV-1 Viral Load assay: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Madlen; Huddart, Sophie; Badar, Sayema; Baliga, Shrikala; Saravu, Kavitha; Pai, Madhukar

    2018-01-31

    Viral load (VL) is the preferred treatment monitoring approach for HIV-positive patients. However, more rapid, near-patient, and low-complexity assays are needed to scale-up VL testing. The Xpert HIV-1 VL assay (Cepheid, Sunnyvale) is a new, automated molecular test, and can leverage the GeneXpert systems that are being used widely for tuberculosis diagnosis. We systematically reviewed the evidence on the performance of this new tool in comparison to established reference standards. A total of twelve articles (thirteen studies) in which HIV patient VLs were compared between Xpert HIV VL assay and a reference standard VL assay were identified. Study quality was generally high but substantial variability was observed in the number and type of agreement measures reported. Correlation coefficients between Xpert and reference assays were high with a pooled Pearson correlation (n=8) of 0.94 [lsqb]0.89,0.97[rsqb] and Spearman correlation (n=3) of 0.96 [lsqb]0.86, 0.99[rsqb]. Bland-Altman metrics (n=11) were all within 0.35 log copies/mL of perfect agreement. Overall, Xpert HIV -1 VL performed well in comparison with current reference tests. The minimal training and infrastructure requirements for the Xpert HIV-1 VL assay make it attractive for use in resource constrained settings, where point-of-care VL testing is most needed. Copyright © 2018 Nash et al.

  3. Use of Dried Plasma Spots for HIV-1 Viral Load Determination and Drug Resistance Genotyping in Mexican Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Rodriguez-Auad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring antiretroviral therapy using measurements of viral load (VL and the genotyping of resistance mutations is not routinely performed in low- to middle-income countries because of the high costs of the commercial assays that are used. The analysis of dried plasma spot (DPS samples on filter paper may represent an alternative for resource-limited settings. Therefore, we evaluated the usefulness of analyzing DPS samples to determine VL and identify drug resistance mutations (DRM in a group of HIV-1 patients. The VL was measured from 22 paired plasma and DPS samples. In these samples, the average VL was 4.7 log10 copies/mL in liquid plasma and 4.1 log10 copies/mL in DPS, with a correlation coefficient of R = 0.83. A 1.1 kb fragment of HIV pol could be amplified in 14/22 (63.6% of the DPS samples and the same value was amplified in plasma samples. A collection of ten paired DPS and liquid plasma samples was evaluated for the presence of DRM; an excellent correlation was found in the identification of DRM between the paired samples. All HIV-1 pol sequences that were obtained corresponded to HIV subtype B. The analysis of DPS samples offers an attractive alternative for monitoring ARV therapy in resource-limited settings.

  4. Dynamics of Epstein-Barr viral load after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and effect of preemptive rituximab therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raberahona, Mihaja; Wackenheim, Chloe; Germi, Raphaele; Carré, Martin; Bulabois, Claude-Eric; Thiébaut, Anne; Lupo, Julien; Semenova, Touyana; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Morand, Patrice; Epaulard, Olivier

    2016-12-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) displays oncogenic properties, particularly in the immunocompromised host. Notably, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients with a detectable blood EBV viral load (BEBVL) are considered at higher risk of post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (PTLD). Therefore, BEBVL is monitored after HSCT, and preemptive rituximab may be used in patients with high values. However, little is known about post-HSCT BEBVL dynamics, and the threshold that should lead to anti-CD20 therapy is poorly defined. We retrospectively analyzed the post-HSCT BEBVL of 332 adult HSCT recipients in our center from 2005 to 2013, including the effect of rituximab. Detection of BEBVL >100, 1000, 5000, 10 000, and 50 000 copies/mL occurred in, respectively, 77.7%, 69.6%, 37.0%, 27.1%, and 7.5% of the patients after a respective median time of 9, 14, 15, 16, and 14 weeks. No BEBVL threshold was associated with an overall survival difference. Seventy-eight patients received rituximab, with a BEBVL decrease in most. Among patients with detectable BEBVL, long-term survival did not differ in rituximab treated and non-treated, except for patients with BEBVL ≥50 000. Only one case of PTLD was observed. BEBVL is frequently detectable after HSCT, but suggests no strong association with survival. Preemptive rituximab therapy threshold remains to be defined. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. BK DNA viral load in plasma: evidence for an association with hemorrhagic cystitis in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erard, Veronique; Kim, Hyung Woo; Corey, Lawrence; Limaye, Ajit; Huang, Meei-Li; Myerson, David; Davis, Chris; Boeckh, Michael

    2005-01-01

    We performed a case-control study to determine the association of BK plasma viremia with hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients. Thirty cases of HC (14 of which occurred after platelet engraftment with documented BK viruria [BK-HC]) were compared with matched controls. Weekly plasma samples were tested for BK virus DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). BK viremia detected before or during the disease was independently associated with HC (adjusted odds ratio = 30, P < .001); BK viremia was even important before clinical symptoms of HC occurred (odds ratio = 11, P < .001). Cases of HC and BK-HC had a significantly higher peak of BK plasma viral load than controls. BK virus was detected by in situ hybridization in bladder biopsies of 2 cases with severe HC and long-lasting BK viremia. BK virus seems to play a role in the development of HC and quantitative detection of BK DNA in plasma appears to be a marker of BK virus disease in HCT recipients. PMID:15845896

  6. Viral hijacking of a replicative helicase loader and its implications for helicase loading control and phage replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hood, Iris V.; Berger, James M.

    2016-05-31

    Replisome assembly requires the loading of replicative hexameric helicases onto origins by AAA+ ATPases. How loader activity is appropriately controlled remains unclear. Here, we use structural and biochemical analyses to establish how an antimicrobial phage protein interferes with the function of theStaphylococcus aureusreplicative helicase loader, DnaI. The viral protein binds to the loader’s AAA+ ATPase domain, allowing binding of the host replicative helicase but impeding loader self-assembly and ATPase activity. Close inspection of the complex highlights an unexpected locus for the binding of an interdomain linker element in DnaI/DnaC-family proteins. We find that the inhibitor protein is genetically coupled to a phage-encoded homolog of the bacterial helicase loader, which we show binds to the host helicase but not to the inhibitor itself. These findings establish a new approach by which viruses can hijack host replication processes and explain how loader activity is internally regulated to prevent aberrant auto-association.

  7. Four-drugs regimen containing raltegravir is highly effective in HIV patients starting therapy with >500,000 copies/mL viral load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterrantino, Gaetana; Zaccarelli, Mauro; Prati, Francesca; Boschi, Andrea; Sighinolfi, Laura; Borghi, Vanni

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Assessing virological response of four-drugs antiretroviral regimen that include raltegravir (RAL) in naïve patients with high viral load (>500,000 copies/mL) selected from a multicentre Italian database. Methods Naïve patients with HIV RNA>500,000 copies/mL, who began standard antiretroviral regimens either based on non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) or boosted-PI (PI/r), or a standard regimen plus RAL between 2008 and 2013 were analyzed. Observation was censored at 12 months and the percentage of patients who achieved a viral load below the limit of detection (BLD) was calculated. Virological failure was defined as two consecutive viral loads>40 copies/mL. Results Overall, 179 patients were included (13% with primary HIV infection (PHI), and 42.5% with AIDS diagnosis). Of them, 156 started standard three-drugs antiretroviral regimen (75.6% PI/r-based, 24.4% NNRTI-based. Among patients with PHI, 23 patients (12.8%), 6 (25%) started a four-drugs antiretroviral regimen containing both RAL and PI/r. Patients’ characteristics were as follows: males 74%, median age 42 years (IQR 35–51), sexually transmission 75.1%, median CD4 count 156 cells/µL (IQR 47–368) and median HIV-RNA 6.1 log10 copies/mL (IQR 5.8–6.4). 91 of 179 patients (50.8%) reached BLD viral load during the twelve months of observation. Three patients (1.7%) who began regimens PI/r-based with three-drugs had virological rebound after reaching BLD viral load. By use of survival analysis, we show that those patients who added RAL to the standard regimen have reached the primary end point faster (mean 8.4 months (95% CI 7.2–9.6) vs 11.4 (95% CI 11.0–11.8) in PI group and 10.3 (95% CI 9.4–11.1) in NNRTI group; p500,000 copies/mL HIV-RNA had virological success at 12 months. The success was reached faster using the RAL-containing four-drugs regimen, suggesting that strengthening the initial regimen could be an option in patients with very high viral load to

  8. PLGA-PEG Nanoparticles Coated with Anti-CD45RO and Loaded with HDAC Plus Protease Inhibitors Activate Latent HIV and Inhibit Viral Spread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaolong; Liang, Yong; Liu, Xinkuang; Zhou, Shuping; Liu, Liang; Zhang, Fujina; Xie, Chunmei; Cai, Shuyu; Wei, Jia; Zhu, Yongqiang; Hou, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Activating HIV-1 proviruses in latent reservoirs combined with inhibiting viral spread might be an effective anti-HIV therapeutic strategy. Active specific delivery of therapeutic drugs into cells harboring latent HIV, without the use of viral vectors, is a critical challenge to this objective. In this study, nanoparticles of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-polyethylene glycol diblock copolymers conjugated with anti-CD45RO antibody and loaded with the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and/or protease inhibitor nelfinavir (Nel) were tested for activity against latent virus in vitro. Nanoparticles loaded with SAHA, Nel, and SAHA + Nel were characterized in terms of size, surface morphology, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency, drug release, and toxicity to ACH-2 cells. We show that SAHA- and SAHA + Nel-loaded nanoparticles can target latently infected CD4+ T-cells and stimulate virus production. Moreover, nanoparticles loaded with SAHA + NEL were capable of both activating latent virus and inhibiting viral spread. Taken together, these data demonstrate the potential of this novel reagent for targeting and eliminating latent HIV reservoirs.

  9. Generation of dried tube specimen for HIV-1 viral load proficiency test panels: a cost-effective alternative for external quality assessment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Artur; Nguyen, Shon; Garcia, Albert; Subbarao, Shambavi; Nkengasong, John N; Ellenberger, Dennis

    2013-03-01

    Participation in external quality assessment programs is critical to ensure quality clinical laboratory testing. Commercially available proficiency test panels for HIV-1 virus load testing that are used commonly in external quality assessment programs remain a financial obstacle to resource-limited countries. Maintaining cold-chain transportation largely contributes to the cost of traditional liquid proficiency test panels. Therefore, we developed and evaluated a proficiency test panel using dried tube specimens that can be shipped and stored at ambient temperature. This dried tube specimens panel consisted of 20 μl aliquots of a HIV-1 stock that were added to 2 ml tubes and left uncapped for drying, as a preservation method. The stability of dried tube specimens at concentrations ranging from 10² to 10⁶·⁵ RNA copies/ml was tested at different temperatures over time, showing no viral load reduction at 37 °C and a decrease in viral load smaller than 0.5 Log₁₀ at 45 °C for up to eight weeks when compared to initial results. Eight cycles of freezing-thawing had no effect on the stability of the dried tube specimens. Comparable viral load results were observed when dried tube specimen panels were tested on Roche CAPTAQ, Abbott m2000, and Biomerieux easyMAG viral load systems. Preliminary test results of dried proficiency test panels shipped to four African countries at ambient temperature demonstrated a low inter assay variation (SD range: 0.29-0.41 Log₁₀ RNA copies/ml). These results indicated that HIV-1 proficiency test panels generated by this methodology might be an acceptable alternative for laboratories in resource-limited countries to participate in external quality assessment programs. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Immunization with single-cycle SIV significantly reduces viral loads after an intravenous challenge with SIV(mac239.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Jia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Strains of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV that are limited to a single cycle of infection were evaluated for the ability to elicit protective immunity against wild-type SIV(mac239 infection of rhesus macaques by two different vaccine regimens. Six animals were inoculated at 8-week intervals with 6 identical doses consisting of a mixture of three different envelope variants of single-cycle SIV (scSIV. Six additional animals were primed with a mixture of cytoplasmic domain-truncated envelope variants of scSIV and boosted with two doses of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV G trans-complemented scSIV. While both regimens elicited detectable virus-specific T cell responses, SIV-specific T cell frequencies were more than 10-fold higher after boosting with VSV G trans-complemented scSIV (VSV G scSIV. Broad T cell recognition of multiple viral antigens and Gag-specific CD4(+ T cell responses were also observed after boosting with VSV G scSIV. With the exception of a single animal in the repeated immunization group, all of the animals became infected following an intravenous challenge with SIV(mac239. However, significantly lower viral loads and higher memory CD4(+ T cell counts were observed in both immunized groups relative to an unvaccinated control group. Indeed, both scSIV immunization regimens resulted in containment of SIV(mac239 replication after challenge that was as good as, if not better than, what has been achieved by other non-persisting vaccine vectors that have been evaluated in this challenge model. Nevertheless, the extent of protection afforded by scSIV was not as good as typically conferred by persistent infection with live, attenuated SIV. These observations have potentially important implications to the design of an effective AIDS vaccine, since they suggest that ongoing stimulation of virus-specific immune responses may be essential to achieving the degree of protection afforded by live, attenuated SIV.

  11. Analysis of E2 gene integrity in HPV16 and HPV58 viruses isolated from women with cervical pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del R González-Losa

    Full Text Available Integration of human papillomavirus (HPV DNA into human cells accompanied by the disruption of the viral genome has been described as a prerequisite for cancer development. This study aimed to investigate E2 gene integrity of HPV16 and HPV58 viruses isolated from infected women with cervical lesions. Forty-two HPV16- and 31 HPV58-positive samples were analysed. E2 integrity was assumed when all fragments covering the E2 gene were amplified with specific polymerase chain reaction primers. Overall, in 59% of the samples, at least one fragment was not amplified in HPV16- (57% and HPV58-positive samples (61%. Samples from high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions had the highest frequency of E2 gene disruptions (73%, followed by samples from low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (63% and, finally, samples from invasive cervical cancer (35%. Association between the integrity status of the E2 gene, and lesion grade was assessed by the chi-squared test applied to the combined set of viruses (p = 0.6555 or to populations of the same virus type (HPV58, p = 0.3101; HPV16, p = 0.3024. In conclusion, in this study, no association was found between the presence of E2 gene disruptions and the grade of cervical lesions caused by HPV16 and HPV58.

  12. Analysis of E2 gene integrity in HPV16 and HPV58 viruses isolated from women with cervical pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Losa, María Del R; Puerto-Solis, Marylin; Tenorio Ruiz, Juan; Rosado-López, Ariel I; Hau-Aviles, Oscar; Ayora-Talavera, Guadalupe; Cisneros-Cutz, Isidro; Conde-Ferráez, Laura

    2016-12-01

    Integration of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA into human cells accompanied by the disruption of the viral genome has been described as a prerequisite for cancer development. This study aimed to investigate E2 gene integrity of HPV16 and HPV58 viruses isolated from infected women with cervical lesions. Forty-two HPV16- and 31 HPV58-positive samples were analysed. E2 integrity was assumed when all fragments covering the E2 gene were amplified with specific polymerase chain reaction primers. Overall, in 59% of the samples, at least one fragment was not amplified in HPV16- (57%) and HPV58-positive samples (61%). Samples from high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions had the highest frequency of E2 gene disruptions (73%), followed by samples from low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (63%) and, finally, samples from invasive cervical cancer (35%). Association between the integrity status of the E2 gene, and lesion grade was assessed by the chi-squared test applied to the combined set of viruses (p = 0.6555) or to populations of the same virus type (HPV58, p = 0.3101; HPV16, p = 0.3024). In conclusion, in this study, no association was found between the presence of E2 gene disruptions and the grade of cervical lesions caused by HPV16 and HPV58.

  13. Association of Human Papillomavirus 31 DNA Load with Risk of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grades 2 and 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xia; Schiffman, Mark; Hulbert, Ayaka; He, Zhonghu; Shen, Zhenping; Koutsky, Laura A; Xi, Long Fu

    2015-11-01

    The association between human papillomavirus 31 (HPV31) DNA loads and the risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grades 2 and 3 (CIN2-3) was evaluated among women enrolled in the atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) triage study (ALTS), who were monitored semiannually over 2 years and who had HPV31 infections detected at ≥1 visit. HPV31 DNA loads in the first HPV31-positive samples and in a random set of the last positive samples from women with ≥2 HPV31-positive visits were measured by a real-time PCR assay. CIN2-3 was histologically confirmed at the same time as the first detection of HPV31 for 88 (16.6%) of 530 women. After adjustment for HPV31 lineages, coinfection with other oncogenic types, and the timing of the first positive detection, the odds ratio (OR) per 1-log-unit increase in viral loads for the risk of a concurrent diagnosis of CIN2-3 was 1.5 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2 to 1.9). Of 373 women without CIN2-3 at the first positive visit who had ≥1 later visit, 44 had subsequent diagnoses of CIN2-3. The initial viral loads were associated with CIN2-3 diagnosed within 6 months after the first positive visit (adjusted OR, 1.5 [95% CI, 1.0 to 2.4]) but were unrelated to CIN2-3 diagnosed later. For a random set of 49 women who were tested for viral loads at the first and last positive visits, changes in viral loads were upward and downward among women with and without follow-up CIN2-3 diagnoses, respectively, although the difference was not statistically significant. Results suggest that HPV31 DNA load levels at the first positive visit signal a short-term but not long-term risk of CIN2-3. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. HPV and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a group of more than 200 related viruses that can cause several cancers including cervical cancer, anal cancer, and oropharyngeal cancer. Learn more about how HPV is transmitted, the different types of HPV, HPV vaccines, and HPV treatment.

  15. Mucosal immunization with recombinant adenoviral vectors expressing murine gammaherpesvirus-68 genes M2 and M3 can reduce latent viral load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoegh-Petersen, Mette; Thomsen, Allan R; Christensen, Jan P

    2009-01-01

    -based vaccines are substantially more immunogenic than DNA vaccines and can be applied to induce mucosal immunity. Here we show that a significant reduction of the late viral load in the spleens, at 60 days post-infection, was achieved when immunizing mice both intranasally and subcutaneously with adenoviral......-68 (MHV-68) is a member of the Gammaherpesvirinae subfamily and represents a useful murine model for this category of infections, in which new vaccination strategies may initially be evaluated. Two attenuated variants of MHV-68 have successfully been used as vaccines, but the oncogenic potential...... vectors encoding both M2 and M3. Additionally we show that M3 immunization prevented the usual development of virus-induced splenomegaly at 2-3 weeks post-infection. This is the first time that immunization with a non-replicating vaccine has lead to a significantly reduced viral load at time points beyond...

  16. Short Communication: False Recent Ratio of the Limiting-Antigen Avidity Assay and Viral Load Testing Algorithm Among Cameroonians with Long-Term HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Briana A; Patel, Eshan U; Courtney, Colleen R; Nanfack, Aubin J; Bimela, Jude; Wang, Xiaohong; Eid, Issa; Quinn, Thomas C; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Nyambi, Phillipe N; Duerr, Ralf; Redd, Andrew D

    2017-11-01

    Current serological assays that are used for cross-sectional HIV incidence estimation have been shown to misclassify individuals with chronic infection. Limited information exists on the performance of cross-sectional incidence assays in Central Africa. HIV-positive individuals from Cameroon who were infected for at least 1 or 2 years were evaluated to determine the false recent ratio (FRR) of a two-assay algorithm, which includes the Limiting Antigen Avidity (LAg-Avidity) assay (normalized optical density units, ODn HIV viral load (>1000 copies/ml). The subject-level FRR was 5.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.1-10.5) for individuals infected for ≥1 year and 3.9% (95% CI, 0.8-11.0) for individuals infected for ≥2 years. These data suggest that the LAg-Avidity plus viral load incidence algorithm may overestimate HIV incidence rates in Central Africa.

  17. MicroRNA, HPV AND CERVICAL CARCINOGENESIS: MOLECULAR ASPECTS AND PROSPECTS OF CLINICAL APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Arkhangelskaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers of the female reproductive system and a leading cause of mortality in women worldwide. Epidemiologic and experimental data have clearly demonstrated a causal role of Human Papillomavirus in cervical carcinogenesis. Determination of HPV DNA of high carcinogenic risk is relevant screening tool to identify patients with an increased risk of cervical neoplasia. However, the positive predictive value of such an analysis is not high enough. Analysis of additional indicators of infection (viral load, the ratio of episomal and integrated forms of the virus, the duration of its persistence can be used to improve the diagnostic and prognostic value of HPV testing. In the last decade, studies have shown that HPV induces specific changes in miRNA profile of the infected cell, which reflect the phasing of the disease and may have diagnostic / prognostic value. This review summarizes the current understanding of cellular changes in the profile of microRNAs, caused by infection with HPV, given the known examples of microRNA involvement in cervical carcinogenesis and the perspectives of the possible use of microRNAs as biomarkers in the diagnosis of cervical cancer.

  18. HIV Viral Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... online at http://www.aidsinfonet.org/fact_sheets/view/125. Accessed February 2009. (Updated 2011 January 10). Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in HIV-1-Infected Adults and Adolescents, Plasma HIV RNA Testing. AIDSinfo On-line information]. ...

  19. Comparison of EBV DNA viral load in whole blood, plasma, B-cells and B-cell culture supernatant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouedraogo, David Eric; Bollore, Karine; Viljoen, Johannes; Foulongne, Vincent; Reynes, Jacques; Cartron, Guillaume; Vendrell, Jean-Pierre; Van de Perre, Philippe; Tuaillon, Edouard

    2014-05-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome quantitation in whole blood is used widely for therapeutic monitoring of EBV-associated disorders in immunosuppressed individuals and in patients with EBV-associated lymphoma. However, the most appropriate biological material to be used for EBV DNA quantitation remains a subject of debate. This study compare the detection rate and levels of EBV DNA from whole blood, plasma, enriched B-cells, and B-cell short-term culture supernatant using quantitative real-time PCR. Samples were collected from 33 subjects with either HIV infection or B-cell lymphoma. Overall, EBV DNA was detected in 100% of enriched B-cell samples, in 82% of B-cell culture supernatants, in 57% of plasma, and 42% of whole blood samples. A significant correlation for EBV viral load was found between enriched B-cell and B-cell culture supernatant material (ρ = 0.92; P cells (ρ = -0.02; P = 0.89), whole blood and plasma (ρ = 0.24; P = 0.24), or enriched B-cells and plasma (ρ = 0.08; P = 0.77). Testing of enriched B-cells appeared to be the most sensitive method for detection of EBV DNA as well as for exploration of the cellular reservoir. Quantitation of EBV DNA in plasma and B-cell culture supernatant may be of interest to assess EBV reactivation dynamics and response to treatment as well as to decipher EBV host-pathogen interactions in various clinical scenarios. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. HIV Viral Load Trends in Six Eastern Caribbean Countries Utilizing a Regional Laboratory Referral Service: Implications for Treatment as Prevention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Clive Landis

    Full Text Available Since 2009, seven countries in the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS, Antigua & Barbuda, Dominica, Grenada, Montserrat, St. Kitts & Nevis, Saint Lucia, and St. Vincent & the Grenadines, have been utilizing a laboratory referral service for HIV-1 viral load (VL offered by The Ladymeade Reference Unit (LRU Laboratory, Barbados. The objective of this study was to evaluate 5 year VL trends in the six larger OECS countries participating in this regional referral service.Blood samples were collected in source countries and transported to Barbados as frozen plasma according to a standardized protocol. Plasma specimens were amplified by RT PCR on a Roche TaqMan 48 analyser (Roche Diagnostics, Panama City, Panama. VL was considered optimally suppressed below a threshold level of < 200 HIV-1 copies/mL of blood. The same threshold was used as a binary indicator in an analysis of the secular change in VL suppression. Montserrat was excluded due to insufficient number of samples.A steady rise in VL referrals from OECS countries was recorded, rising from 312 samples in 2009 to 1,060 samples in 2013. A total of 3,543 samples were tested, with a sample rejection rate (9.2% mostly due to breaks in the cold chain. Aggregate VL data showed the odds of VL suppression in the Eastern Caribbean improved by 66% for each additional year after 2009 (Odds Ratio 1.66 [95% CI 1.46 to 1.88]; p<0.001.We demonstrate the feasibility of establishing a regional laboratory referral service for HIV VL monitoring in the Eastern Caribbean. Aggregate VL trends showed a significant year-on-year improvement in VL suppression, implying public health benefits through treatment as prevention in the OECS. VL provides a powerful monitoring & evaluation tool for strengthening HIV programs at country level among the small island states participating in this regional referral network.

  1. HIV Viral Load Trends in Six Eastern Caribbean Countries Utilizing a Regional Laboratory Referral Service: Implications for Treatment as Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, R Clive; Carmichael-Simmons, Kelly; Hambleton, Ian R; Best, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Since 2009, seven countries in the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS), Antigua & Barbuda, Dominica, Grenada, Montserrat, St. Kitts & Nevis, Saint Lucia, and St. Vincent & the Grenadines, have been utilizing a laboratory referral service for HIV-1 viral load (VL) offered by The Ladymeade Reference Unit (LRU) Laboratory, Barbados. The objective of this study was to evaluate 5 year VL trends in the six larger OECS countries participating in this regional referral service. Blood samples were collected in source countries and transported to Barbados as frozen plasma according to a standardized protocol. Plasma specimens were amplified by RT PCR on a Roche TaqMan 48 analyser (Roche Diagnostics, Panama City, Panama). VL was considered optimally suppressed below a threshold level of < 200 HIV-1 copies/mL of blood. The same threshold was used as a binary indicator in an analysis of the secular change in VL suppression. Montserrat was excluded due to insufficient number of samples. A steady rise in VL referrals from OECS countries was recorded, rising from 312 samples in 2009 to 1,060 samples in 2013. A total of 3,543 samples were tested, with a sample rejection rate (9.2%) mostly due to breaks in the cold chain. Aggregate VL data showed the odds of VL suppression in the Eastern Caribbean improved by 66% for each additional year after 2009 (Odds Ratio 1.66 [95% CI 1.46 to 1.88]; p<0.001). We demonstrate the feasibility of establishing a regional laboratory referral service for HIV VL monitoring in the Eastern Caribbean. Aggregate VL trends showed a significant year-on-year improvement in VL suppression, implying public health benefits through treatment as prevention in the OECS. VL provides a powerful monitoring & evaluation tool for strengthening HIV programs at country level among the small island states participating in this regional referral network.

  2. Quality Control Assessment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 (HIV-2) Viral Load Quantification Assays: Results from an International Collaboration on HIV-2 Infection in 2006▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damond, Florence; Benard, Antoine; Ruelle, Jean; Alabi, Abraham; Kupfer, Bernd; Gomes, Perpetua; Rodes, Berta; Albert, Jan; Böni, Jürg; Garson, Jeremy; Ferns, Bridget; Matheron, Sophie; Chene, Geneviève; Brun-Vezinet, Françoise

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) RNA quantification assays used in nine laboratories of the ACHIEV2E (A Collaboration on HIV-2 Infection) study group were evaluated. In a blinded experimental design, laboratories quantified three series of aliquots of an HIV-2 subtype A strain, each at a different theoretical viral load. Quantification varied between laboratories, and international standardization of quantification assays is strongly needed. PMID:18434556

  3. GeneXpert HIV-1 quant assay, a new tool for scale up of viral load monitoring in the success of ART programme in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Smita; Jadhav, Sushama; Khopkar, Priyanka; Sane, Suvarna; Londhe, Rajkumar; Chimanpure, Vaishali; Dhilpe, Veronica; Ghate, Manisha; Yelagate, Rajendra; Panchal, Narayan; Rahane, Girish; Kadam, Dilip; Gaikwad, Nitin; Rewari, Bharat; Gangakhedkar, Raman

    2017-07-21

    Recent WHO guidelines identify virologic monitoring for diagnosing and confirming ART failure. In view of this, validation and scale up of point of care viral load technologies is essential in resource limited settings. A systematic validation of the GeneXpert® HIV-1 Quant assay (a point-of-care technology) in view of scaling up HIV-1 viral load in India to monitor the success of national ART programme was carried out. Two hundred nineteen plasma specimens falling in nine viral load ranges (5 L copies/ml) were tested by the Abbott m2000rt Real Time and GeneXpert HIV-1 Quant assays. Additionally, 20 seronegative; 16 stored specimens and 10 spiked controls were also tested. Statistical analysis was done using Stata/IC and sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and %misclassification rates were calculated as per DHSs/AISs, WHO, NACO cut-offs for virological failure. The GeneXpert assay compared well with the Abbott assay with a higher sensitivity (97%), specificity (97-100%) and concordance (91.32%). The correlation between two assays (r = 0.886) was statistically significant (p HIV-1 Quant assay compared well with Abbott HIV-1 m2000 Real Time PCR; suggesting its use as a Point of care assay for viral load estimation in resource limited settings. Its ease of performance and rapidity will aid in timely diagnosis of ART failures, integrated HIV-TB management and will facilitate the UNAIDS 90-90-90 target.

  4. Viral Load in Infants Hospitalized for Respiratory Syncytial Virus Bronchiolitis Correlates with Recurrent Wheezing at Thirty-Six-Month Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenna, Raffaella; Ferrara, Marianna; Nicolai, Ambra; Pierangeli, Alessandra; Scagnolari, Carolina; Papoff, Paola; Antonelli, Guido; Moretti, Corrado; Midulla, Fabio

    2015-10-01

    The relationship between viral infection, host immune response in infants with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis and subsequent wheezing is discussed. We measured RSV-RNA load and interferon-λ1-3 expression in the nasopharyngeal washings from 68 infants hospitalized for RSV bronchiolitis, and wheezing was assessed 36 months after the first episode of bronchiolitis. Higher RSV-RNA load and higher interferon-λ2/3 levels were found in children with recurrent wheezing at 36-month follow-up.

  5. GBV-C/HIV-1 coinfection is associated with low HIV-1 viral load and high CD4(+) T lymphocyte count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Miranda, Bárbara Katharine Barbosa; de Sá, Keyla Santos Guedes; da Silva, Andrea Nazaré Rangel; Feitosa, Rosimar Neris Martins; Cayres-Vallinoto, Izaura Maria Vieira; Ishak, Ricardo; Vallinoto, Antonio Carlos Rosário

    2017-11-01

    GB virus C (GBV-C) is a lymphotropic virus with a low level or non-existent replication in the liver. The interaction between HIV-1 and GBV-C apparently reduces the progression of HIV-1 infection to AIDS and improves the quality of life of HIV-1 infected individuals. A cross-sectional study was established to determine the possible effect of HIV-1/GBV-C coinfection on HIV-1 viral load and CD4(+) T lymphocyte counts. Samples from 313 HIV-1 infected persons from the Virus Laboratory of the Federal University of Pará as well as demographic and clinical information were obtained from medical records. This study used a nested PCR method to determine GBV-C viremia. The prevalence of HIV-1/GBV-C coinfection was 17%. There were no significant differences in the distribution according to age, sex or ethnicity between the groups. The differences in HIV-1 viral load and CD4(+) T lymphocyte count between the HIV-1 and HIV-1/GBV-C groups were highly significant, indicating that coinfection results in lower viral loads and higher CD4(+) T lymphocyte counts compared to HIV-1 mono-infection. The results indicate a protective effect among coinfected individuals.

  6. EPIDEMIOLOGIA DEL VIRUS PAPILOMA HUMANO (HPV)

    OpenAIRE

    Rivera Z.,René; Aguilera T.,Jorge; Larraín H,Angélica

    2002-01-01

    Se presenta una revisión de la epidemiología del Virus Papiloma Humano (HPV). Patogenia, prevalencia mundial, magnitud de la infección, factores de riesgo, algunas lesiones producidas según tipo específico y se describe el concepto de clearance y persistencia viral.

  7. Overview of Current Humman Papilloma Virus (HPV Vaccination

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    Cumhur Artuk

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Persistent viral infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV genotypes causes virtually all cancer of the cervix. The same HPV genotypes (“types” also cause cases of anal cancer. Cervical cancer is the third most frequent cancer in women worldwide after breast and colorectal cancers. It ranks fourth of women’s cancers according to the mortality ratio. Two vaccines have been developed against HPV infection; one is a quadrivalent vaccine (Gardasil™ and the other is a bivalent vaccine (Cervarix™. This topic will cover issues related to HPV infections, routine HPV immunization recommendations, vaccination in special patient populations, the cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccination, and vaccine safety. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2013; 12(3.000: 327-334

  8. Relationships of PBMC microRNA expression, plasma viral load, and CD4+ T-cell count in HIV-1-infected elite suppressors and viremic patients

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    Witwer Kenneth W

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1-infected elite controllers or suppressors (ES maintain undetectable viral loads ( Results miRNA profiles, obtained using multiple acquisition, data processing, and analysis methods, distinguished ES and uninfected controls from viremic HIV-1-infected patients. For several miRNAs, however, ES and viremic patients shared similar expression patterns. Differentially expressed miRNAs included those with reported roles in HIV-1 latency (miR-29 family members, miRs -125b and -150. Others, such as miR-31 and miR-31*, had no previously reported connection with HIV-1 infection but were found here to differ significantly with uncontrolled HIV-1 replication. Correlations of miRNA expression with CD4+ T-cell count and viral load were found, and we observed that ES with low CD4+ T-cell counts had miRNA profiles more closely related to viremic patients than controls. However, expression patterns indicate that miRNA variability cannot be explained solely by CD4+ T-cell variation. Conclusions The intimate involvement of miRNAs in disease processes is underscored by connections of miRNA expression with the HIV disease clinical parameters of CD4 count and plasma viral load. However, miRNA profile changes are not explained completely by these variables. Significant declines of miRs-125b and -150, among others, in both ES and viremic patients indicate the persistence of host miRNA responses or ongoing effects of infection despite viral suppression by ES. We found no negative correlations with viral load in viremic patients, not even those that have been reported to silence HIV-1 in vitro, suggesting that the effects of these miRNAs are exerted in a focused, cell-type-specific manner. Finally, the observation that some ES with low CD4 counts were consistently related to viremic patients suggests that miRNAs may serve as biomarkers for risk of disease progression even in the presence of viral suppression.

  9. Treatment-associated polymorphisms in protease are significantly associated with higher viral load and lower CD4 count in newly diagnosed drug-naive HIV-1 infected patients

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    Theys Kristof

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effect of drug resistance transmission on disease progression in the newly infected patient is not well understood. Major drug resistance mutations severely impair viral fitness in a drug free environment, and therefore are expected to revert quickly. Compensatory mutations, often already polymorphic in wild-type viruses, do not tend to revert after transmission. While compensatory mutations increase fitness during treatment, their presence may also modulate viral fitness and virulence in absence of therapy and major resistance mutations. We previously designed a modeling technique that quantifies genotypic footprints of in vivo treatment selective pressure, including both drug resistance mutations and polymorphic compensatory mutations, through the quantitative description of a fitness landscape from virus genetic sequences. Results Genotypic correlates of viral load and CD4 cell count were evaluated in subtype B sequences from recently diagnosed treatment-naive patients enrolled in the SPREAD programme. The association of surveillance drug resistance mutations, reported compensatory mutations and fitness estimated from drug selective pressure fitness landscapes with baseline viral load and CD4 cell count was evaluated using regression techniques. Protease genotypic variability estimated to increase fitness during treatment was associated with higher viral load and lower CD4 cell counts also in treatment-naive patients, which could primarily be attributed to well-known compensatory mutations at highly polymorphic positions. By contrast, treatment-related mutations in reverse transcriptase could not explain viral load or CD4 cell count variability. Conclusions These results suggest that polymorphic compensatory mutations in protease, reported to be selected during treatment, may improve the replicative capacity of HIV-1 even in absence of drug selective pressure or major resistance mutations. The presence of this

  10. Hepatitis C seroprevalence and correlation between viral load and viral genotype among primary care clients in Mexico Seroprevalencia de hepatitis C y correlación entre la carga viral y el genotipo viral en asistentes al nivel primario de atención enMéxico

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    Ana I Burguete-Garcia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To measure hepatitis C virus (HCV sero-prevalence, prevalence, hepatitis risk characteristics frequency, and genotype correlation with viral load among clients attending health care clinics. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Venous blood samples from l12 226 consecutive consenting adults were collected from January 2006 through December 2009. HCV antibodies were detected by immunoassay. HCV RNA was detected by qRT-PCR and viral genotype was performed by PCR and LIPA test. RESULTS: The HCV seroprevalence observed was l.5 % (C.I. 95% l.3-l.7, from seropositive individuals 60.9 % reported previous blood transfusion, 28.3% declared to have relatives with cirrhosis, 25.2% had tattoos or piercings, and 6.9% referred to have used drugs. Male gender and transfusion (pOBJETIVO: Medir la seroprevalencia y prevalencia del virus de hepatitis C (VHC, la frecuencia de caracteristicas de riesgo y la correlacion genotipica con la carga viral en sujetos asistentes a clinicas de medicina familiar. MATERIAL Y METODOS: muestras de sangre venosa se colectaron de l12 226 adultos, previo consentimiento informado, de enero 2006 hasta diciembre 2009, para la deteccion de anticuerpos contra VHC por ELISA. La deteccion de RNA-VHC y el genotipo viral se realizo mediante qRT-PCR. RESULTADOS: La seroprevalencia de VHC fue l.5 % (C.I. 95% l.3-l.7, 60.9% reportaron transfusion sanguinea previa, 28.3% dijo tener familiares cercanos con cirrosis, 25.2% tenian tatuajes o piercing y 6.9% refirio ser usuario de drogas intravenosas. El ser hombre, el antecedente de transfusiones y el uso de drogas (p<0.00l, fueron los factores con mayor frecuencia en el grupo VHC seropositivo. La prevalencia del RNA-VHC en seropositivos fue de 48.3%. El genotipo mas frecuente en todas las areas geograficas de Mexico fue el l (subtipo lA, 33%; subtipo lB, 21.4% seguido por el genotipo 2 (subtipo 2A, 8.50%. Se observó una correlación positiva de 51% con la carga viral más alta y el genotipo viral 1A

  11. Short-term garlic supplementation and highly active antiretroviral treatment adherence, CD4+ cell counts, and human immunodeficiency virus viral load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chenglong; Wang, Cuiwei; Robison, Esther; Levine, Alexandra M; Gandhi, Monica; Schwartz, Rebecca; Weber, Kathleen M; Merenstein, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals frequently have consumed garlic, a popular complementary supplement. Researchers rarely have studied garlic's association with antiretroviral therapies, however, even though that association is very relevant clinically. To examine associations of supplemental use of garlic with highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) adherence level and HAART effectiveness (HIV viral load and CD4+ cell counts) in HIV-infected women. The research team carried out a self-controlled, longitudinal study nested within the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). The team used a paired study design that allowed participants to serve as their own controls. The team first identified all of the studies visits in which the participant self-reported the use of a garlic supplement since her last visit (index visit). Then for each index visit, the team identified a matching visit (a control visit) using the following criteria: (a) the visit must be one for the same participant in which that participant reported no garlic supplementation; (b) the visit must immediately precede the index visit (less than 1 year apart); and (c) at the time of the control visit, the participant must have been using antiretroviral therapy identical to that used at the time of the index visit. Participants were persons using garlic supplementation who already were participants in the WIHS. The research team used a logistic regression model to examine the association between garlic supplementation and HAART adherence level. The team used a mixed linear model to examine the association of garlic supplementation with HIV viral load and CD4+ cell counts. From October 1994 to April 2009, 390 HIV-infected women in the WIHS made 1112 visits at which they reported using garlic supplements. Seventy-seven HIV-infected women using HAART met the research teams selection criteria and contributed 99 pairs of visits for the study. Among the women who used garlic

  12. EFFECT OF LAMIVUDINE TREATMENT IN THE THIRD TRIMESTER IN HEPATITIS B POSITIVE PREGNANT WOMEN IN DECREASING THE VIRAL LOAD AND SUBSEQUENT FOETAL TRANSMISSION

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    Beena Guhan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Hepatitis B infection is most commonly acquired through perinatal or horizontal transmission. The combined immunity of hepatitis B vaccine and high-titre hepatitis B immunoglobulin HBIG has excellent efficacies in blocking the maternal-foetal transmission of hepatitis B virus. This study was aimed to stop such transmission from mothers with high hepatitis B virus DNA viral loads by giving them lamivudine antenatally. The aim of the study is to study the effect of lamivudine treatment to decrease hepatitis B virus DNA viral load in the third trimester in hepatitis B surface antigen pregnant positive women and its effect on vertical transmission of hepatitis B. MATERIALS AND METHODS The hepatitis B surface antigen positive pregnant women attending the department who satisfied the inclusion criteria were selected for this prospective case-control study of 30 in each group. Hepatitis B viral DNA load was seen at 28 weeks in both groups and lamivudine started at 32 weeks in the case group. Both groups were followed up antenatally, intrapartum and postpartum till 1 month and babies till 6 months. DNA viral load 1 month postpartum for the mother and hepatitis B surface antigen positivity observed in the babies till the age of 6months. RESULTS The prevalence of hepatitis B infection was more in the age group of 25-30 years. A high transmission rate of 36.1% was observed in hepatitis B envelope antigen positive mothers. There was a significant fall in the DNA viral load in the range of 10 log 4 to 10 log 6 in the case group, p value 0.000. 48.3% hepatitis B envelope antigen positive mothers in the case group became hepatitis B envelope antigen negative at the end of the study. 46.7% babies in the control group versus only 16.7% in the case group were hepatitis B surface antigen positive at the end. CONCLUSION Lamivudine treatment of highly viraemic hepatitis B surface antigen positive women during the final months of pregnancy has reduced the

  13. Short-term Garlic Supplementation and Highly Active Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence, CD4+ Cell Counts, and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Viral Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chenglong; Wang, Cuiwei; Robison, Esther; Levine, Alexandra M.; Gandhi, Monica; Schwartz, Rebecca; Weber, Kathleen M.; Merenstein, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Context Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected individuals frequently have consumed garlic, a popular complementary supplement. Researchers rarely have studied garlic’s association with antiretroviral therapies, however, even though that association is very relevant clinically. Objective To examine associations of supplemental use of garlic with highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) adherence level and HAART effectiveness (HIV viral load and CD4+ cell counts) in HIV-infected women. Design The research team carried out a self-controlled, longitudinal study nested within the Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). The team used a paired study design that allowed participants to serve as their own controls. The team first identified all of the study’s visits in which the participant self-reported the use of a garlic supplement since her last visit (index visit). Then for each index visit, the team identified a matching visit (a control visit) using the following criteria: (a) the visit must be one for the same participant in which that participant reported no garlic supplementation; (b) the visit must immediately precede the index visit (less than 1 year apart); and (c) at the time of the control visit, the participant must have been using antiretroviral therapy identical to that used at the time of the index visit. Participants Participants were persons using garlic supplementation who already were participants in the WIHS. Outcome Measures The research team used a logistic regression model to examine the association between garlic supplementation and HAART adherence level. The team used a mixed linear model to examine the association of garlic supplementation with HIV viral load and CD4+ cell counts. Results From October 1994 to April 2009, 390 HIV-infected women in the WIHS made 1112 visits at which they reported using garlic supplements. Seventy-seven HIV-infected women using HAART met the research team’s selection criteria and contributed 99

  14. Filariae-Retrovirus Co-infection in Mice is Associated with Suppressed Virus-Specific IgG Immune Response and Higher Viral Loads.

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    Dietze, Kirsten Katrin; Dittmer, Ulf; Koudaimi, Daniel Karim; Schimmer, Simone; Reitz, Martina; Breloer, Minka; Hartmann, Wiebke

    2016-12-01

    Worldwide more than 2 billion people are infected with helminths, predominantly in developing countries. Co-infections with viruses such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are common due to the geographical overlap of these pathogens. Helminth and viral infections induce antagonistic cytokine responses in their hosts. Helminths shift the immune system to a type 2-dominated immune response, while viral infections skew the cytokine response towards a type 1 immune response. Moreover, chronic helminth infections are often associated with a generalized suppression of the immune system leading to prolonged parasite survival, and also to a reduced defence against unrelated pathogens. To test whether helminths affect the outcome of a viral infection we set up a filarial/retrovirus co-infection model in C57BL/6 mice. Although Friend virus (FV) infection altered the L. sigmodontis-specific immunoglobulin response towards a type I associated IgG2 isotype in co-infected mice, control of L. sigmodontis infection was not affected by a FV-superinfection. However, reciprocal control of FV infection was clearly impaired by concurrent L. sigmodontis infection. Spleen weight as an indicator of pathology and viral loads in spleen, lymph nodes (LN) and bone marrow (BM) were increased in L. sigmodontis/FV-co-infected mice compared to only FV-infected mice. Numbers of FV-specific CD8+ T cells as well as cytokine production by CD4+ and CD8+ cells were alike in co-infected and FV-infected mice. Increased viral loads in co-infected mice were associated with reduced titres of neutralising FV-specific IgG2b and IgG2c antibodies. In summary our findings suggest that helminth infection interfered with the control of retroviral infection by dampening the virus-specific neutralising antibody response.

  15. PD-1 expression on peripheral CD8+ TEM/TEMRA subsets closely correlated with HCV viral load in chronic hepatitis C patients

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    Zhang Weidong

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tight correlation between host circulating CD8+ T cell-mediated immune response and control of viral replication is classical characteristic of long-term HCV infection. CD8+ T cell maturation/activation markers are expected to be associated with viral replication and disease progression in chronic HCV infection. The aim of the present study was to explore novel markers on CD8+ T cells with ability to evaluate HCV viral replication and disease progression. Methods PBMCs were isolated from 37 chronic HCV-infected patients and 17 healthy controls. Distributed pattern of CD8+ T cells subsets and expression of PD-1, CD38, HLA-DR and CD127 were analyzed by flow cytometry. The correlation between expression of surface markers and HCV viral load or ALT was studied. Results Declined naïve and increased TEMRA CD8+ T subsets were found in HCV-infected individuals compared with healthy controls. Percentage and MFI of PD-1, CD38 and HLA-DR on all CD8+ T cell subsets were higher in HCV-infected patients than healthy controls. In contrast, CD127 expression on CD8+ TCM showed an opposite trend as PD-1, CD38 and HLA-DR did. In chronic HCV infection, MFI of PD-1 on CD8+ TEM (p Conclusion PD-1 level on peripheral CD8+ TEM/TEMRA was highly correlated with HCV viral load in chronic HCV-infected patients, which made PD-1 a novel indicator to evaluate HCV replication and disease progression in chronic hepatitis C patients.

  16. Subtypes of HPV-positive head and neck cancers are associated with HPV characteristics, copy number alterations, PIK3CA mutation, and pathway signatures

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    Zhang, Yanxiao; Koneva, Lada A.; Virani, Shama; Arthur, Anna E.; Virani, Alisha; Hall, Pelle B.; Warden, Charles D.; Carey, Thomas E.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Prince, Mark E.; McHugh, Jonathan B.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Rozek, Laura S.; Sartor, Maureen A.

    2016-01-01

    Structured Abstract Purpose There is substantial heterogeneity within human papillomavirus (HPV) associated head and neck cancer (HNC) tumors that predispose them to different outcomes, however the molecular heterogeneity in this subgroup is poorly characterized due to various historical reasons. Experimental Design We performed unsupervised gene expression clustering on deeply-annotated (transcriptome and genome) HPV(+) HNC samples from two cohorts (84 total primary tumors), including 18 HPV(−) HNC samples, to discover subtypes and characterize the differences between subgroups in terms of their HPV characteristics, pathway activity, whole-genome somatic copy number alterations and mutation frequencies. Results We identified two distinct HPV(+) subtypes (namely HPV-KRT and HPV-IMU). HPV-KRT is characterized by elevated expression of genes in keratinocyte differentiation and oxidation-reduction process, whereas HPV-IMU has strong immune response and mesenchymal differentiation. The differences in expression are likely connected to the differences in HPV characteristics and genomic changes. HPV-KRT has more genic viral integration, lower E2/E4/E5 expression levels and higher ratio of spliced to full length HPV oncogene E6 than HPV-IMU; the subgroups also show differences in copy number alterations and mutations, in particular the loss of chr16q in HPV-IMU and gain of chr3q and PIK3CA mutation in HPV-KRT. Conclusion Our characterization of two subtypes of HPV(+) HNC tumors provides valuable molecular level information that point to two main carcinogenic paths. Together, these results shed light on stratifications of the HPV(+) HNCs and will help to guide personalized care for HPV(+) HNC patients. PMID:27091409

  17. Role of host immune response and viral load in the differential outcome of pandemic H1N1 (2009 influenza virus infection in Indian patients.

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    Vidya A Arankalle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An unusually high number of severe pneumonia cases with considerable mortality is being observed with the pandemic H1N1 2009 virus infections globally. In India, all mild as well as critically ill cases were admitted and treated in the government hospitals during the initial phase of the pandemic. The present study was undertaken during this early phase of the pandemic. METHODOLOGY: The role of viral load and host factors in the pathogenesis were assessed by examining 26 mild (MP, 15 critically ill patients (CIP and 20 healthy controls from Pune, India. Sequential blood and lung aspirate samples were collected from CIP. Viral load and cytokines/chemokine levels were determined from the plasma and lung aspirates of the patients. TLR levels were determined by staining and FACS analysis. Gene profiling was done for both cells in the lung aspirates and PBMCs using TaqMan Low Density arrays. Antibody titres and isotyping was done using HA protein based ELISAs. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 13/15 critically ill patients expired. All plasma samples were negative for the virus irrespective of the patient's category. Sequential lung samples from CIP showed lower viral loads questioning association of viral replication with the severity. Anti-rpH1N1-09-HA-IgG titres were significantly higher in critically ill patients and both categories circulated exclusively IgG1 isotype. Critically ill patients exhibited increase in TLR-3, 4, 7 and decrease in TLR-2 expressions. The disease severity correlated with increased plasma levels of IL1RA, IL2, IL6, CCL3, CCL4 and IL10. Majority of the immune-function genes were down-regulated in the PBMCs and up-regulated in the cells from lung aspirates of critically ill patients. No distinct pattern differentiating fatal and surviving patients was observed when sequential samples were examined for various parameters. CONCLUSIONS: Disease severity was associated with pronounced impairment of host immune response.

  18. Performance of the SAMBA I and II HIV-1 Semi-Q Tests for viral load monitoring at the point-of-care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Neha; Ritchie, Allyson V; Mtapuri-Zinyowera, Sekesai; Zeh, Clement; Stepchenkova, Tetiana; Lehga, Jesse; De Ruiter, Annemiek; Farleigh, Laura E; Edemaga, Daniel; So, Rosario; Sembongi, Hiroshi; Wisniewski, Craig; Nadala, Lourdes; Schito, Marco; Lee, Helen

    2017-06-01

    Although access to antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection is increasing in resource-poor countries, viral load testing for monitoring of treatment efficacy remains limited, expensive, and confined to centralized laboratories. The SAMBA HIV-1 Semi-Q Test is a nucleic acid-based amplification assay developed for viral load monitoring performed on either the semi-automated SAMBA I system for laboratory use or the fully automated SAMBA II system for point-of care use. We have assessed the performance characteristics of the SAMBA HIV-1 Semi-Q Test on SAMBA I and SAMBA II systems according to the Common Technical Specifications of the European Community's 98/79 In Vitro Diagnostic Medical Devices Directive. The sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility, and viral subtype coverage of the test were similar on the SAMBA I and SAMBA II platforms. The clinical performance on the SAMBA I system was compared with the Roche CAP/CTM assay and evaluated in-house with 130 patient specimens from London as well as in the field with 390 specimens in Kenya and Zimbabwe. The overall concordance between the SAMBA and CAP/CTM assays was 98.1%. The clinical performance of the test on the SAMBA II platform in comparison with the Abbott HIV-1 RealTime Assay was evaluated in-house with 150 specimens from Ukraine, yielding a concordance of 98.0%. The results thus show that the SAMBA HIV-1 Semi-Q Test performs equivalently on SAMBA I and SAMBA II, and they suggest that the test is suitable for implementation at the point-of-care in resource-poor regions where viral load testing is desperately needed but often unavailable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Use of maraviroc in patients with undetectable viral load: efficacy, tolerance and predictors of viral response in MARAVIROC-cohort study

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    María Jesús Pérez Elías

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: No controlled clinical trials had studied the role of maraviroc (MRV in fully suppressed patients (1. Materials and Methods: MRV-cohort is an observational, retrospective, multicentric (27 sites large cohort study of patients starting MRV in clinical practice under different circumstances, with at least 48 weeks of follow-up. For the present analysis we selected all those patients starting with an HIV-RNA<50 copies/mL. Demographics, baseline CD4 cell count, past history of antiretroviral treatment (ART, tropism, reasons for MRV use, MRV based therapy and change/end of MRV use were assessed. Paired analysis of lipid, hepatic and kidney profile changes and univariate and multivariate analyses of HIV-RNA<50 copies/mL at 48 weeks were explored. Results: We included 247 out of 667 subjects from the entire cohort. At study entry, their median age was 47 years, 23% were women, 31% MSM, 49% had CDC category C, median CD4+ counts were 468 cells/mm3, 46% were HCV+ and 4.5% AgHBs+. Tropism information was available in 197 (94% R5. Median length of prior ARTV was 10.7 years, with exposure to a median of three drug families. Main reasons for prescribing MRV were: toxicity 38%, inmunodiscordance 23%, simplification 19% and admission in a clinical trial 10.4%. MRV based therapies used were MRV+2NRTIs 9%, MRV+PI 46%, MRV+PI+other 40% and MRV+other 5%. At 48 weeks, 23% of patients had changed or finished MRV therapy due to toxicity 2.4%, virological failure 2%, immunological failure 1.2%, simplification 3,2%, trial requirement 9.7%, medical decision 2.8%, treatment suspension 1.2% and unknown 0.4%. At 48 weeks, no significant changes were observed in lipid, hepatic or kidney profiles, and 85% of patients remained with HIV-RNA<50 copies/mL. Focusing on viral response univariate and multivariate models did not show any significant baseline variable explaining viral failure. Conclusions: In clinical practice MRV was used, mostly in R5 positive

  20. HPV-FASTER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosch, F Xavier; Robles, Claudia; Díaz, Mireia

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-related screening technologies and HPV vaccination offer enormous potential for cancer prevention, notably prevention of cervical cancer. The effectiveness of these approaches is, however, suboptimal owing to limited implementation of screening programmes and restricted...... indications for HPV vaccination. Trials of HPV vaccination in women aged up to 55 years have shown almost 90% protection from cervical precancer caused by HPV16/18 among HPV16/18-DNA-negative women. We propose extending routine vaccination programmes to women of up to 30 years of age (and to the 45-50-year...... age groups in some settings), paired with at least one HPV-screening test at age 30 years or older. Expanding the indications for HPV vaccination and much greater use of HPV testing in screening programmes has the potential to accelerate the decline in cervical cancer incidence. Such a combined...

  1. Impact of polymorphisms in the HCP5 and HLA-C, and ZNRD1 genes on HIV viral load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thørner, Lise Wegner; Erikstrup, Christian; Harritshøj, Lene Holm; Larsen, Margit Hørup; Kronborg, Gitte; Pedersen, Court; Larsen, Carsten Schade; Pedersen, Gitte; Gerstoft, Jan; Obel, Niels; Ullum, Henrik

    2016-07-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human leucocyte antigen (HLA) complex P5 (HCP5), HLA-C, and near the zinc ribbon domain containing 1 (ZNRD1) have been shown to influence viral load (VL) set point in HIV-infected individuals with a known seroconversion onset. We aimed to determine the influence of HCP5 rs2395029, HLA-C rs9264942, and ZNRD1 rs3869068 on VL in antiretroviral-naïve individuals and on time to the first VLC), rs9264942 (T>C), and rs3869068 (C>T) SNPs in 1897 Caucasians from The Danish HIV Cohort Study - a prospective, nationwide, population-based study of HIV-infected individuals in Denmark. General linear models evaluated the effect of SNPs on VL in antiretroviral-naïve individuals 0-18months after diagnosis and on CD4(+) T-cell recovery during cART. Cox proportional hazard regression analysis assessed the association with time to first VL<51 copies/ml. All models were assuming additive genetic effects. The rs2395029, rs9264942, and rs3869068 minor alleles were associated with lower VL in antiretroviral-naïve individuals (rs2395029: [mean VL (copies/ml)], A/A: 70,795 [61,660-79,433], A/C: 33,884 [19,498-58,884], P=0.002; rs9264942: TT: 81,283 [67,608-97,724], T/C: 63,096 [54,954-75,858], CC: 38,905 [25,119-58,884], P<0.0001; rs3869068, CC: 72,444 [63,096-83,176], C/T: 45,709 [33,113-64,565], TT: 58,884 [20,417-169,824], P=0.01). Moreover, the C-alleles of rs2395029 and rs9264942 were associated with shorter time to VL<51 copies/ml: (HR [95% confidence interval], 1.67 [1.09-1.72], P=0.008; 1.16 [1.06-1.28], P=0.002; 1.30 [1.08-1.53], P=0.005, respectively, adjusted for last VL before cART). None of the SNPs predicted CD4(+) T-cell recovery during cART. The minor alleles of rs2395029, rs9264942, and rs3689068 associate with lower VL among antiretroviral-naïve individuals and with shorter time to first VL<51copies/ml during cART even after adjustment for VL before cART. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Albuminuria Is Associated with Traditional Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Viral Load in HIV-Infected Patients in Rural South Africa.

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    G Emerens Wensink

    Full Text Available As life expectancy improves among Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV patients, renal and cardiovascular diseases are increasingly prevalent in this population. Renal and cardiovascular disease are mutual risk factors and are characterized by albuminuria. Understanding the interactions between HIV, cardiovascular risk factors and renal disease is the first step in tackling this new therapeutic frontier in HIV.In a rural primary health care centre, 903 HIV-infected adult patients were randomly selected and data on HIV-infection and cardiovascular risk factors were collected. Glomerular filtration rate (eGFR was estimated. Albuminuria was defined as an Albumin-Creatinine-Ratio above 30 mg/g. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to analyse albuminuria and demographic, clinical and HIV-associated variables.The study population consisted of 903 HIV-infected patients, with a median age of 40 years (Inter-Quartile Range (IQR 34-48 years, and included 625 (69% women. The median duration since HIV diagnosis was 26 months (IQR 12-58 months and 787 (87% received antiretroviral therapy. Thirty-six (4% of the subjects were shown to have diabetes and 205 (23% hypertension. In the cohort, 21% had albuminuria and 2% an eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73m2. Albuminuria was associated with hypertension (adjusted odds ratio (aOR 1.59; 95% confidence interval (CI 1.05-2.41; p<0.05, total cholesterol (aOR 1.31; 95% CI 1.11-1.54; p<0.05, eGFR (aOR 0.98; 95% CI 0.97-0.99; p<0.001 and detectable viral load (aOR 2.74; 95% CI 1.56-4.79; p<0.001. Hypertension was undertreated: 78% were not receiving treatment, while another 11% were inadequately treated. No patients were receiving lipid-lowering medication.Glomerular filtration rate was well conserved, while albuminuria was common amongst HIV-infected patients in rural South Africa. Both cardiovascular and HIV-specific variables were associated with albuminuria. Improved cardiovascular risk prevention as well as adequate

  3. Prevalence and genotyping of HPV, by cervical brushing, in Irpinia area of Campania region

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    Pia Carmen Melillo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is due to persistent genital infection with Human Papillomavirus (HPV.The purpose of this study was to evaluate prevalence of HPV in Irpinia (Campania region, Italy, distribution of different viral genotypes, correlating cytological results and virological investigations. In the period 2006-2011, were made 1080 cervical samples of women aged 18-65 years for HPV identification and genotyping. Detection of the virus was performed by Multiplex-PCR System (Seegene,Arrow and typing with INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping Extra test (Innogenetics. Out of the 1080 tested samples, 330 (30.6% samples were positive for HPV DNA. The most frequently occurring High Risk (HR-HPV genotype in single infections was HPV16 (16.6%, followed by HPV51 (10.7%, in multiple infections HPV16 (15.7% and 31 (14.6%. The prevalence of infection, correlated with age of patients studied, is greater in the group aged 26-30 years (42.5%. HR-HPV were detected in different percent in patients with Pap test scores: 22.5% in normal Pap smear (20% HPV16, 14.5% ASCUS (47.6% HPV16, 24% LSIL (20% HPV16, 79.3% HSIL (72.7% HPV16; 9.1% HPV18 detected only in this type of cellular alteration. The high prevalence of HR-HPV in patients with ASCUS or normal Pap test, suggesting the real advantage of HPV screening test, more sensitive in selecting the actual population at risk. Based on the findings of our epidemiological study, HR-HPV screening and HPV genotyping test should be strongly advised also to the vaccinated population for the high incidence of genotypes which are not included in vaccines (67%.

  4. Control of HPV infection and related cancer through vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Nam Phuong; Hung, Chien-Fu; Roden, Richard; Wu, T-C

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV), the most common sexually transmitted virus, and its associated diseases continue to cause significant morbidity and mortality in over 600 million infected individuals. Major progress has been made with preventative vaccines, and clinical data have emerged regarding the efficacy and cross-reactivity of the two FDA approved L1 virus like particle (VLP)-based vaccines. However, the cost of the approved vaccines currently limits their widespread use in developing countries which carry the greatest burden of HPV-associated diseases. Furthermore, the licensed preventive HPV vaccines only contain two high-risk types of HPV (HPV-16 and HPV-18) which can protect only up to 75 % of all cervical cancers. Thus, second generation preventative vaccine candidates hope to address the issues of cost and broaden protection through the use of more multivalent L1-VLPs, vaccine formulations, or alternative antigens such as L1 capsomers, L2 capsid proteins, and chimeric VLPs. Preventative vaccines are crucial to controlling the transmission of HPV, but there are already hundreds of millions of infected individuals who have HPV-associated lesions that are silently progressing toward malignancy. This raises the need for therapeutic HPV vaccines that can trigger T cell killing of established HPV lesions, including HPV-transformed tumor cells. In order to stimulate such antitumor immune responses, therapeutic vaccine candidates deliver HPV antigens in vivo by employing various bacterial, viral, protein, peptide, dendritic cell, and DNA-based vectors. This book chapter will review the commercially available preventive vaccines, present second generation candidates, and discuss the progress of developing therapeutic HPV vaccines.

  5. The contribution of Ebola viral load at admission and other patient characteristics to mortality in a Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) Ebola Case Management Centre (CMC), Kailahun, Sierra Leone, June -October, 2014.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzpatrick, Gabriel

    2015-05-22

    This paper describes patient characteristics, including Ebola viral load, associated with mortality in an MSF Ebola case management centre. Out of 780 admissions between June and October 2014, 525 (67%) were positive for Ebola with a known outcome. The crude mortality rate was 51% (270\\/525). Ebola viral load (whole blood sample) data was available on 76% (397\\/525) of patients. Univariate analysis indicated viral load at admission, age, symptom duration prior to admission and distance travelled to the CMC were associated with mortality (p value<0.05). The multivariable model predicted mortality in those with a viral load at admission greater than 10 million copies per millilitre (p value<0.05, Odds Ratio>10), aged 50 years or more (p value=0.08, Odds Ratio=2) and symptom duration prior to admission less than 5 days (p value=0.14). The presence of confusion, diarrhoea and conjunctivitis were significantly higher (p value<0.05) in Ebola patients who died. These findings highlight the importance viral load at admission has on mortality outcomes and could be used to cohort cases with viral loads greater than 10 million copies into dedicated wards with more intensive medical support to further reduce mortality.

  6. The Nuclear DNA Sensor IFI16 Acts as a Restriction Factor for Human Papillomavirus Replication through Epigenetic Modifications of the Viral Promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Cigno, Irene; De Andrea, Marco; Borgogna, Cinzia; Albertini, Silvia; Landini, Manuela M; Peretti, Alberto; Johnson, Karen E; Chandran, Bala; Landolfo, Santo; Gariglio, Marisa

    2015-08-01

    The human interferon-inducible IFI16 protein, an innate immune sensor of intracellular DNA, was recently demonstrated to act as a restriction factor for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection by inhibiting both viral-DNA replication and transcription. Through the use of two distinct cellular models, this study provides strong evidence in support of the notion that IFI16 can also restrict human papillomavirus 18 (HPV18) replication. In the first model, an immortalized keratinocyte cell line (NIKS) was used, in which the IFI16 protein was knocked down through the use of small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology and overexpressed following transduction with the adenovirus IFI16 (AdVIFI16) vector. The second model consisted of U2OS cells transfected by electroporation with HPV18 minicircles. In differentiated IFI16-silenced NIKS-HPV18 cells, viral-load values were significantly increased compared with differentiated control cells. Consistent with this, IFI16 overexpression severely impaired HPV18 replication in both NIKS and U2OS cells, thus confirming its antiviral restriction activity. In addition to the inhibition of viral replication, IFI16 was also able to reduce viral transcription, as demonstrated by viral-gene expression analysis in U2OS cells carrying episomal HPV18 minicircles and HeLa cells. We also provide evidence that IFI16 promotes the addition of heterochromatin marks and the reduction of euchromatin marks on viral chromatin at both early and late promoters, thus reducing both viral replication and transcription. Altogether, these results argue that IFI16 restricts chromatinized HPV DNA through epigenetic modifications and plays a broad surveillance role against viral DNA in the nucleus that is not restricted to herpesviruses. Intrinsic immunity is mediated by cellular restriction factors that are constitutively expressed and active even before a pathogen enters the cell. The host nuclear factor IFI16 acts as a sensor

  7. HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women HPV (human papillomavirus) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Español In Chamorro In Urdu In Vietnamese HPV (human papillomavirus) is a sexually transmitted virus. It is ...

  8. Correlation between ebv co-infection and HPV16 genome integrity in Tunisian cervical cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kahla, Saloua; Oueslati, Sarra; Achour, Mongia; Kochbati, Lotfi; Chanoufi, Mohamed Badis; Maalej, Mongi; Oueslati, Ridha

    2012-01-01

    Infection with high risk Human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) is necessary but not sufficient to cause cervical carcinoma. This study explored whether multiple HR-HPV or coinfection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) influence the integration status of HPV16 genome. The presence and typing of HPV in a series of 125 cervical specimens were assessed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using the specific primers for the HPV L1 region. As for EBV infection, the viral EBNA1 gene was used for its detection thro...

  9. Impact on life expectancy of HIV-1 positive individuals of CD4+ cell count and viral load response to antiretroviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Margaret T.; Gompels, Mark; Delpech, Valerie; Porter, Kholoud; Orkin, Chloe; Kegg, Stephen; Hay, Phillip; Johnson, Margaret; Palfreeman, Adrian; Gilson, Richard; Chadwick, David; Martin, Fabiola; Hill, Teresa; Walsh, John; Post, Frank; Fisher, Martin; Ainsworth, Jonathan; Jose, Sophie; Leen, Clifford; Nelson, Mark; Anderson, Jane; Sabin, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to estimate life expectancies of HIV-positive patients conditional on response to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods: Patients aged more than 20 years who started ART during 2000–2010 (excluding IDU) in HIV clinics contributing to the UK CHIC Study were followed for mortality until 2012. We determined the latest CD4+ cell count and viral load before ART and in each of years 1–5 of ART. For each duration of ART, life tables based on estimated mortality rates by sex, age, latest CD4+ cell count and viral suppression (HIV-1 RNA <400 copies/ml), were used to estimate expected age at death for ages 20–85 years. Results: Of 21 388 patients who started ART, 961 (4.5%) died during 110 697 person-years. At start of ART, expected age at death [95% confidence interval (CI)] of 35-year-old men with CD4+ cell count less than 200, 200–349, at least 350 cells/μl was 71 (68–73), 78 (74–82) and 77 (72–81) years, respectively, compared with 78 years for men in the general UK population. Thirty-five-year-old men who increased their CD4+ cell count in the first year of ART from less than 200 to 200–349 or at least 350 cells/μl and achieved viral suppression gained 7 and 10 years, respectively. After 5 years on ART, expected age at death of 35-year-old men varied from 54 (48–61) (CD4+ cell count <200 cells/μl and no viral suppression) to 80 (76–83) years (CD4+ cell count ≥350 cells/μl and viral suppression). Conclusion: Successfully treated HIV-positive individuals have a normal life expectancy. Patients who started ART with a low CD4+ cell count significantly improve their life expectancy if they have a good CD4+ cell count response and undetectable viral load. PMID:24556869

  10. Accumulation of Pol Mutations Selected by HLA-B*52:01-C*12:02 Protective Haplotype-Restricted Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes Causes Low Plasma Viral Load Due to Low Viral Fitness of Mutant Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakoshi, Hayato; Koyanagi, Madoka; Chikata, Takayuki; Rahman, Mohammad Arif; Kuse, Nozomi; Sakai, Keiko; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Oka, Shinichi; Takiguchi, Masafumi

    2017-02-15

    HLA-B*52:01-C*12:02, which is the most abundant haplotype in Japan, has a protective effect on disease progression in HIV-1-infected Japanese individuals, whereas HLA-B*57 and -B*27 protective alleles are very rare in Japan. A previous study on HLA-associated polymorphisms demonstrated that the number of HLA-B*52:01-associated mutations at four Pol positions was inversely correlated with plasma viral load (pVL) in HLA-B*52:01-negative individuals, suggesting that the transmission of HIV-1 with these mutations could modulate the pVL in the population. However, it remains unknown whether these mutations were selected by HLA-B*52:01-restricted CTLs and also reduced viral fitness. In this study, we identified two HLA-B*52:01-restricted and one HLA-C*12:02-restricted novel cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes in Pol. Analysis using CTLs specific for these three epitopes demonstrated that these CTLs failed to recognize mutant epitopes or more weakly recognized cells infected with mutant viruses than wild-type virus, supporting the idea that these mutations were selected by the HLA-B*52:01- or HLA-C*12:02-restricted T cells. We further showed that these mutations reduced viral fitness, although the effect of each mutation was weak. The present study demonstrated that the accumulation of these Pol mutations selected by HLA-B*52:01- or HLA-C*12:02-restricted CTLs impaired viral replication capacity and thus reduced the pVL. The fitness cost imposed by the mutations partially accounted for the effect of the HLA-B*52:01-C*12:02 haplotype on clinical outcome, together with the effect of HLA-B*52:01-restricted CTLs on viral replication, which had been previously demonstrated. Numerous population-based studies identified HLA-associated HIV-1 mutations to predict HIV-1 escape mutations from cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). However, the majority of these HLA-associated mutations have not been identified as CTL escape mutations. Our previous population-based study showed that five

  11. Effect of mild-to-moderate smoking on viral load, cytokines, oxidative stress, and cytochrome P450 enzymes in HIV-infected individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusha Ande

    Full Text Available Mild-to-moderate tobacco smoking is highly prevalent in HIV-infected individuals, and is known to exacerbate HIV pathogenesis. The objective of this study was to determine the specific effects of mild-to-moderate smoking on viral load, cytokine production, and oxidative stress and cytochrome P450 (CYP pathways in HIV-infected individuals who have not yet received antiretroviral therapy (ART. Thirty-two human subjects were recruited and assigned to four different cohorts as follows: a HIV negative non-smokers, b HIV positive non-smokers, c HIV negative mild-to-moderate smokers, and d HIV positive mild-to-moderate smokers. Patients were recruited in Cameroon, Africa using strict selection criteria to exclude patients not yet eligible for ART and not receiving conventional or traditional medications. Those with active tuberculosis, hepatitis B or with a history of substance abuse were also excluded. Our results showed an increase in the viral load in the plasma of HIV positive patients who were mild-to-moderate smokers compared to individuals who did not smoke. Furthermore, although we did not observe significant changes in the levels of most pro-inflammatory cytokines, the cytokine IL-8 and MCP-1 showed a significant decrease in the plasma of HIV-infected patients and smokers compared with HIV negative non-smokers. Importantly, HIV-infected individuals and smokers showed a significant increase in oxidative stress compared with HIV negative non-smoker subjects in both plasma and monocytes. To examine the possible pathways involved in increased oxidative stress and viral load, we determined the mRNA levels of several antioxidant and cytochrome P450 enzymes in monocytes. The results showed that the levels of most antioxidants are unaltered, suggesting their inability to counter oxidative stress. While CYP2A6 was induced in smokers, CYP3A4 was induced in HIV and HIV positive smokers compared with HIV negative non-smokers. Overall, the findings suggest

  12. Deep sequencing of HPV16 genomes: A new high-throughput tool for exploring the carcinogenicity and natural history of HPV16 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Cullen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available For unknown reasons, there is huge variability in risk conferred by different HPV types and, remarkably, strong differences even between closely related variant lineages within each type. HPV16 is a uniquely powerful carcinogenic type, causing approximately half of cervical cancer and most other HPV-related cancers. To permit the large-scale study of HPV genome variability and precancer/cancer, starting with HPV16 and cervical cancer, we developed a high-throughput next-generation sequencing (NGS whole-genome method. We designed a custom HPV16 AmpliSeq™ panel that generated 47 overlapping amplicons covering 99% of the genome sequenced on the Ion Torrent Proton platform. After validating with Sanger, the current “gold standard” of sequencing, in 89 specimens with concordance of 99.9%, we used our NGS method and custom annotation pipeline to sequence 796 HPV16-positive exfoliated cervical cell specimens. The median completion rate per sample was 98.0%.Our method enabled us to discover novel SNPs, large contiguous deletions suggestive of viral integration (OR of 27.3, 95% CI 3.3–222, P=0.002, and the sensitive detection of variant lineage coinfections. This method represents an innovative high-throughput, ultra-deep coverage technique for HPV genomic sequencing, which, in turn, enables the investigation of the role of genetic variation in HPV epidemiology and carcinogenesis. Keywords: HPV16, HPV epidemiology, HPV genomics

  13. Disease severity and viral load are correlated in infants with primary respiratory syncytial virus infection in the community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houben, M. L.; Coenjaerts, F. E. J.; Rossen, J. W. A.; Belderbos, M. E.; Hofland, R. W.; Kimpen, J. L. L.; Bont, L.

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of respiratory tract infections in infants, with remarkable variability in disease severity. Factors determining severity of disease in previously healthy infants are still unclear. It was hypothesized that disease severity is correlated with viral

  14. Longitudinal comparison between plasma and seminal HIV-1 viral loads during antiretroviral treatment Comparação longitudinal entre cargas virais seminais e plasmáticas do HIV-1 durante terapia anti-retroviral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauro Ferreira da Silva Pinto Neto

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate the impact of anti-retroviral therapy on both plasma and seminal HIV-1 viral loads and the correlation between viral loads in these compartments after treatment. Viral load, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell counts were evaluated in paired plasma and semen samples from 36 antiretroviral therapy-naïve patients at baseline and on days 45, 90, and 180 of treatment. Slopes for blood and seminal viral loads in all treated patients were similar (p = 0.21. Median HIV-1 RNA titers in plasma and semen at baseline were 4.95 log10 and 4.48 log10 copies/ml, respectively. After 180 days of therapy, the median viral load declined to 3.15 log10 copies/ml (plasma and 3.2 log10 copies/ml (semen. At this timepoint 22 patients presented HIV-1 viral load below 400 copies/ml in either plasma or semen, but only 9 had viral loads below 400 copies/ml in both compartments.Este estudo foi desenhado para investigar o impacto do tratamento com anti-retrovirais na evolução das cargas virais plasmáticas e seminais do HIV-1. A carga viral do HIV-1 e a contagem de linfócitos T CD4+ e CD8+ foi determinada em amostras pareadas de sangue e sêmen de 36 pacientes virgem de tratamento nos dias 0, 45, 90 e 180 após o início da terapia. As curvas de declínio das cargas virais plasmática e seminal foram semelhantes (p= 0.21. As medianas da carga viral plasmática e seminal no pré-tratamento (dia 0 foram 4.95 e 4.48 log10 cópias/ml, respectivamente. Seis meses após o início da terapia, a mediana da carga viral plasmática era 3.15 log10 cópias/ml e a seminal 3.2 log10 cópias/ml. Neste mesmo periodo, 22 pacientes apresentavam carga viral abaixo de 400 cópias/ml no plasma e/ou sêmen, enquanto apenas 9 pacientes apresentavam carga viral abaixo do limite de detecção nos dois compartimentos.

  15. Recidiva de lesões associadas ao HPV em pacientes HIV positivos após tratamento cirúrgico Recurrence of HPV lesions after surgical treatment in HIV-positive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luigi Pincinato

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available O HPV é a doença anal sexualmente transmissível mais diagnosticada em pacientes HIV positivos. Neste estudo investigamos a taxa de recidiva após tratamento cirúrgico do HPV em pacientes HIV positivos. Foi realizado um estudo retrospectivo em 74 pacientes que foram submetidos a tratamento cirúrgico de lesões remanescentes após tratamento clínico do HPV, no Hospital Heliópolis, São Paulo, Brasil, de julho de 2004 até junho de 2007. A maioria dos pacientes eram homens (91,9%, idade variando de 22 a 57 anos (média de 36 anos. Carga viral variou de indetectável até 488.000 cópias/mm³, células T CD4 de 19 a 900 céls/mm³. Observamos neoplasia intraepitelial de alto grau em 12,2% e recorrência das lesões em 58,1% dos pacientes. A recorrência foi significantemente menor em pacientes com células T CD4 =200 cells/mm³ e carga viral indetectável.HPV is the commonest anal disease in HIV-infected patients. In the present study we investigated the recurrence rates after surgical treatment of HPV in HIV-positive patients. A retrospective review was performed on 74 patients who underwent surgical intervention for medically intractable anal condyloma at Hospital Heliópolis, São Paulo, Brazil, from July 2004 to June 2007. The majority of the patients were male (91,9%, ranged in age from 22 to 57 years (mean 36 years. Viral load ranged from undetectable to 488.000 copies/mm³, T CD4 cells counts from 19 to 900 cells/mm³. We observed high grade anal squamous intraepithelial lesions in 12,2% and anal condyloma recurred in 58,1%. A significantly lower recurrence was observed in patients with T CD4 cells counts =200 cells/mm³ and viral load undetectable.

  16. Two novel genital human papillomavirus (HPV) types, HPV68 and HPV70, related to the potentially oncogenic HPV39.

    OpenAIRE

    Longuet, M; Beaudenon, S; Orth, G

    1996-01-01

    The genomes of two novel human papillomavirus (HPV) types, HPV68 and HPV70, were cloned from a low-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and a vulvar papilloma, respectively, and partially sequenced. Both types are related to HPV39, a potentially oncogenic virus. HPV68 and HPV70 were also detected in genital intraepithelial neoplasia from three patients and one patient, respectively. Comparison with sequence data in the literature indicates that the subgenomic ME180-HPV DNA fragment, clone...

  17. Soluble rhesus lymphocryptovirus gp350 protects against infection and reduces viral loads in animals that become infected with virus after challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sashihara, Junji; Hoshino, Yo; Bowman, J Jason; Krogmann, Tammy; Burbelo, Peter D; Coffield, V McNeil; Kamrud, Kurt; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2011-10-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human lymphocryptovirus that is associated with several malignancies. Elevated EBV DNA in the blood is observed in transplant recipients prior to, and at the time of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease; thus, a vaccine that either prevents EBV infection or lowers the viral load might reduce certain EBV malignancies. Two major approaches have been suggested for an EBV vaccine- immunization with either EBV glycoprotein 350 (gp350) or EBV latency proteins (e.g. EBV nuclear antigens [EBNAs]). No comparative trials, however, have been performed. Rhesus lymphocryptovirus (LCV) encodes a homolog for each gene in EBV and infection of monkeys reproduces the clinical, immunologic, and virologic features of both acute and latent EBV infection. We vaccinated rhesus monkeys at 0, 4 and 12 weeks with (a) soluble rhesus LCV gp350, (b) virus-like replicon particles (VRPs) expressing rhesus LCV gp350, (c) VRPs expressing rhesus LCV gp350, EBNA-3A, and EBNA-3B, or (d) PBS. Animals vaccinated with soluble gp350 produced higher levels of antibody to the glycoprotein than those vaccinated with VRPs expressing gp350. Animals vaccinated with VRPs expressing EBNA-3A and EBNA-3B developed LCV-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell immunity to these proteins, while VRPs expressing gp350 did not induce detectable T cell immunity to gp350. After challenge with rhesus LCV, animals vaccinated with soluble rhesus LCV gp350 had the best level of protection against infection based on seroconversion, viral DNA, and viral RNA in the blood after challenge. Surprisingly, animals vaccinated with gp350 that became infected had the lowest LCV DNA loads in the blood at 23 months after challenge. These studies indicate that gp350 is critical for both protection against infection with rhesus LCV and for reducing the viral load in animals that become infected after challenge. Our results suggest that additional trials with soluble EBV gp350 alone, or in combination with other EBV

  18. Soluble rhesus lymphocryptovirus gp350 protects against infection and reduces viral loads in animals that become infected with virus after challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Sashihara

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is a human lymphocryptovirus that is associated with several malignancies. Elevated EBV DNA in the blood is observed in transplant recipients prior to, and at the time of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease; thus, a vaccine that either prevents EBV infection or lowers the viral load might reduce certain EBV malignancies. Two major approaches have been suggested for an EBV vaccine- immunization with either EBV glycoprotein 350 (gp350 or EBV latency proteins (e.g. EBV nuclear antigens [EBNAs]. No comparative trials, however, have been performed. Rhesus lymphocryptovirus (LCV encodes a homolog for each gene in EBV and infection of monkeys reproduces the clinical, immunologic, and virologic features of both acute and latent EBV infection. We vaccinated rhesus monkeys at 0, 4 and 12 weeks with (a soluble rhesus LCV gp350, (b virus-like replicon particles (VRPs expressing rhesus LCV gp350, (c VRPs expressing rhesus LCV gp350, EBNA-3A, and EBNA-3B, or (d PBS. Animals vaccinated with soluble gp350 produced higher levels of antibody to the glycoprotein than those vaccinated with VRPs expressing gp350. Animals vaccinated with VRPs expressing EBNA-3A and EBNA-3B developed LCV-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell immunity to these proteins, while VRPs expressing gp350 did not induce detectable T cell immunity to gp350. After challenge with rhesus LCV, animals vaccinated with soluble rhesus LCV gp350 had the best level of protection against infection based on seroconversion, viral DNA, and viral RNA in the blood after challenge. Surprisingly, animals vaccinated with gp350 that became infected had the lowest LCV DNA loads in the blood at 23 months after challenge. These studies indicate that gp350 is critical for both protection against infection with rhesus LCV and for reducing the viral load in animals that become infected after challenge. Our results suggest that additional trials with soluble EBV gp350 alone, or in combination with

  19. Protective efficacy of VP1-specific neutralizing antibody associated with a reduction of viral load and pro-inflammatory cytokines in human SCARB2-transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsuen-Wen; Lin, Yi-Wen; Ho, Hui-Min; Lin, Min-Han; Liu, Chia-Chyi; Shao, Hsiao-Yun; Chong, Pele; Sia, Charles; Chow, Yen-Hung

    2013-01-01

    Hand-foot-mouth diseases (HFMD) caused by enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus 16 (CVA16) in children have now become a severe public health issue in the Asian-Pacific region. Recently we have successfully developed transgenic mice expressing human scavenger receptor class B member 2 (hSCARB2, a receptor of EV71 and CVA16) as an animal model for evaluating the pathogenesis of enterovirus infections. In this study, hSCARB2-transgenic mice were used to investigate the efficacy conferred by a previously described EV71 neutralizing antibody, N3. A single injection of N3 effectively inhibited the HFMD-like skin scurfs in mice pre-infected with clinical isolate of EV71 E59 (B4 genotype) or prevented severe limb paralysis and death in mice pre-inoculated with 5746 (C2 genotype). This protection was correlated with remarkable reduction of viral loads in the brain, spinal cord and limb muscles. Accumulated viral loads and the associated pro-inflammatory cytokines were all reduced. The protective efficacy of N3 was not observed in animals challenged with CVA16. This could be due to dissimilarity sequences of the neutralizing epitope found in CVA16. These results indicate N3 could be useful in treating severe EV71 infections and the hSCARB2-transgenic mouse could be used to evaluate the protective efficacy of potential anti-enterovirus agent candidates.

  20. Protective efficacy of VP1-specific neutralizing antibody associated with a reduction of viral load and pro-inflammatory cytokines in human SCARB2-transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsuen-Wen Chang

    Full Text Available Hand-foot-mouth diseases (HFMD caused by enterovirus 71 (EV71 and coxsackievirus 16 (CVA16 in children have now become a severe public health issue in the Asian-Pacific region. Recently we have successfully developed transgenic mice expressing human scavenger receptor class B member 2 (hSCARB2, a receptor of EV71 and CVA16 as an animal model for evaluating the pathogenesis of enterovirus infections. In this study, hSCARB2-transgenic mice were used to investigate the efficacy conferred by a previously described EV71 neutralizing antibody, N3. A single injection of N3 effectively inhibited the HFMD-like skin scurfs in mice pre-infected with clinical isolate of EV71 E59 (B4 genotype or prevented severe limb paralysis and death in mice pre-inoculated with 5746 (C2 genotype. This protection was correlated with remarkable reduction of viral loads in the brain, spinal cord and limb muscles. Accumulated viral loads and the associated pro-inflammatory cytokines were all reduced. The protective efficacy of N3 was not observed in animals challenged with CVA16. This could be due to dissimilarity sequences of the neutralizing epitope found in CVA16. These results indicate N3 could be useful in treating severe EV71 infections and the hSCARB2-transgenic mouse could be used to evaluate the protective efficacy of potential anti-enterovirus agent candidates.

  1. Generation of HIV-1 and Internal Control Transcripts as Standards for an In-House Quantitative Competitive RT-PCR Assay to Determine HIV-1 Viral Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anny Armas Cayarga

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 viral load is useful for monitoring disease progression in HIV-infected individuals. We generated RNA standards of HIV-1 and internal control (IC by in vitro transcription and evaluated its performance in a quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR assay. HIV-1 and IC standards were obtained at high RNA concentrations, without DNA contamination. When these transcripts were included as standards in a qRT-PCR assay, it was obtained a good accuracy (±0.5 log10 unit of the expected results in the quantification of the HIV-1 RNA international standard and controls. The lower limit detection achieved using these standards was 511.0 IU/mL. A high correlation (=0.925 was obtained between the in-house qRT-PCR assay and the NucliSens easyQ HIV-1 test (bioMerieux for HIV-1 RNA quantitation with clinical samples (=14. HIV-1 and IC RNA transcripts, generated in this study, proved to be useful as standards in an in-house qRT-PCR assay for determination of HIV-1 viral load.

  2. Increase in transaminase levels following the use of raltegravir in a woman with a high HIV viral load at 35 weeks of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renet, Sophie; Closon, Aurélie; Brochet, Marie-Sophie; Bussières, Jean-François; Boucher, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Despite the efficacy of raltegravir in reducing viral load in HIV-infected patients, evidence for its safety in late pregnancy is lacking. A high rate of placental transfer was recently demonstrated. A treatment-naïve 34-year-old HIV-1-positive woman of African origin began treatment with zidovudine/lamivudine, lopinavir/ritonavir, and raltegravir at 35 weeks of pregnancy. After 11 days of treatment with raltegravir, a substantial reduction in viral load was achieved. Concurrently, she had a 23-fold increase in serum alanine aminotransferase and a 10-fold increase in serum aspartate aminotransferase, both of which returned to normal when raltegravir treatment was discontinued. A healthy boy was delivered at term. The infant's tests for HIV were negative at five months, and he had no health problems at eight months. This is the first case report, to our knowledge, of increased maternal serum transaminase levels following the use of raltegravir in a woman at a late stage of pregnancy.

  3. PNPLA 3 I148M genetic variant associates with insulin resistance and baseline viral load in HCV genotype 2 but not in genotype 3 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rembeck Karolina

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatic steatosis in HCV patients has been postulated as a risk factor associated with a higher frequency of fibrosis and cirrhosis. A single genetic variant, PNPLA3 I148M, has been widely associated with increased hepatic steatosis. Previous studies of the PNPLA3 I148M sequence variant in HCV infected individuals have reported an association between this variant and prevalence of steatosis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. To evaluate the impact of PNPLA3 I148M variant on metabolic traits and treatment response in HCV genotype 2 and 3 infected patients. Methods Three hundred and eighty-two treatment naïve HCV genotype 2 or 3 infected patients were included in a phase III, open label, randomized, multicenter, investigator-initiated trial (the NORDynamIC study, in which pretreatment liver biopsies were mandatory. PNPLA3I148M genotyping was performed in a total of 359 Caucasian patients. Results In HCV genotype 2 infected patients carrying the PNPLA3 148M allele, there was significantly increased insulin resistance (P = 0.023 and lower viral load (P = 0.005 at baseline as well as the first seven days of antiviral treatment. These results were not observed in HCV genotype 3 infected patients. Conclusions Our results suggest a possible association between the PNPLA3 148M allele and insulin resistance as well as baseline viral load in HCV genotype 2, but not in genotype 3.

  4. Correlation between baseline CD4 + T-Lymphocyte count and plasma viral load in AIDS patients and their early clinical and immunological response to HAART: A preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautam H

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the clinical, immunological and virological status of newly diagnosed AIDS cases and to monitor their clinical and immunological response to HAART after a minimum period of three months. Forty three drug naive AIDS patients were enrolled. The most common presenting complaints were weight loss (74.4%, cough (72.1% and diarrhoea (67.4%. Mean baseline CD4 cell count was 112 ± 60 cells/μL and mean baseline plasma viral load of 31 patients studied was 192,686 copies/mL. Baseline plasma viral load was higher among patients with lower baseline CD4 cell count. During follow-up, 80.8% patients showed clinical improvement, while a CD4 cell count increased by ≥50 cells/μL in 84.6% cases. Mean CD4 cell count increased from 126 ± 16.6 cells/μL at baseline to 278 ± 196.7 cells/μL.

  5. Prevalence of Howell-Jolly body-like inclusions in HIV patients and their correlation with CD4 counts and HIV RNA viral load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Brian; Huang, Richard Sheng Poe; Dasgupta, Amitava; Nguyen, Nghia; Wahed, Amer

    2015-01-01

    Previous reports have described the rare occurrence of detached nuclear fragments resembling Howell-Jolly bodies within neutrophils from HIV patients, organ-transplant recipients, and patients on immunosuppressive drugs. To date, their potential clinical significance is unknown, and pathologists tend to disregard their presence. Our study sought to find a correlation between these inclusions and the overall disease state, specifically within the HIV patient population. Eighty-three peripheral smears, all from different patients, were examined for the presence of inclusions and compared with recent CD4 counts and HIV RNA viral loads. Six cases contained inclusions, yielding a prevalence of 7.2%. These six patients had a mean CD4 count of 546±305 cells/μL compared to 247±242 cells/μL in those lacking inclusions (pHowell-Jolly body-like inclusions may be viewed as a potential biomarker indicative of a low risk for disease progression and/or good response to therapy based upon higher CD4 counts and relatively favorable viral loads. © 2015 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  6. Optimal timing of viral load monitoring during pregnancy to predict viraemia at delivery in HIV-infected women initiating ART in South Africa: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesosky, Maia; Glass, Tracy; Mukonda, Elton; Hsiao, Nei-Yuan; Abrams, Elaine J; Myer, Landon

    2017-11-01

    HIV viral load (VL) monitoring is a central tool to evaluate ART effectiveness and transmission risk. There is a global movement to expand VL monitoring following recent recommendations from the World Health Organization (WHO), but there has been little research into VL monitoring in pregnant women. We investigated one important question in this area: when and how frequently VL should be monitored in women initiating ART during pregnancy to predict VL at the time of delivery in a simulated South African population. We developed a mathematical model simulating VL from conception through delivery using VL data from the Maternal and Child Health - Antiretroviral Therapy (MCH-ART) cohort. VL was modelled based on three major compartments: pre-ART VL, viral decay immediately after ART initiation and viral maintenance (including viral suppression and viraemic episodes). Using this simulation, we examined the performance of various VL monitoring schema in predicting elevated VL at delivery. If WHO guidelines for non-pregnant adults were used, the majority of HIV-infected pregnant women (69%) would not receive a VL test during pregnancy. Most models that based VL monitoring in pregnancy on the time elapsed since ART initiation (regardless of gestation) performed poorly (sensitivity ART) appeared to perform better overall (sensitivity >60%). Across all permutations, inclusion of pre-ART VL values had a negligible impact on predictive performance (improving test sensitivity and specificity ART, in women initiating ART during pregnancy, supporting better integration of maternal and HIV health services. Testing turnaround times require careful consideration, and point-of-care VL testing may be the best approach for measuring VL at delivery. Broadening the scope of this simulation model in the light of current scale up of VL monitoring in high burden countries is important. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of the International AIDS Society published by John Wiley & sons Ltd on

  7. Progress realized: trends in HIV-1 viral load and CD4 cell count in a tertiary-care center from 1999 through 2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard B Gale

    Full Text Available HIV-1 RNA and CD4 cell counts are important parameters for HIV care. The objective of this study was to assess the overall trends in HIV-1 viral load and CD4 cell counts within our clinic.Patients with at least one of each test performed by the Infectious Diseases Laboratory from 1999 through 2011 were included in this analysis. By adapting a novel statistical model, log(10 HIV-1 RNA means were estimated by month, and log(10-transformed HIV-1 RNA means were estimated by calendar year. Geometric means were calculated for CD4 cell counts by month and calendar year. Log(10 HIV-1 RNA and CD4 cell count monthly means were also examined with polynomial regression.There were 1,814 individuals with approximately 25,000 paired tests over the 13-year observation period. Based on each patient's final value of the year, the percentage of patients with viral loads below the lower limit of quantitation rose from 29% in 1999 to 72% in 2011, while the percentage with CD4 counts <200 cells/µL fell from 31% to 11%. On average annually, the mean HIV-1 RNA decreased by 86 copies/mL and the mean CD4 counts increased by 16 cells/µL. For the monthly means, the correlations (R(2 from second-order polynomial regressions were 0.944 for log(10 HIV-1 RNA and 0.840 for CD4 cell counts.Marked improvements in HIV-1 RNA suppression and CD4 cell counts were achieved in a large inner-city population from 1999 through 2011. This success demonstrates that sustained viral control with improved immunologic status can be a realistic goal for most individuals in clinical care.

  8. Prevalence and genotyping of HPV, by cervical brushing, in Irpinia area of Campania region

    OpenAIRE

    Pia Carmen Melillo; Maria Landi; Raffaele Ariola; Franca Romeo; Generoso Violano; Elio De Nisco; Anna Todisco

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer is due to persistent genital infection with Human Papillomavirus (HPV).The purpose of this study was to evaluate prevalence of HPV in Irpinia (Campania region, Italy), distribution of different viral genotypes, correlating cytological results and virological investigations. In the period 2006-2011, were made 1080 cervical samples of women aged 18-65 years for HPV identification and genotyping. Detection of the virus was performed by Multiplex-PCR System (Seegene,Arrow) and typ...

  9. Genome wide expression analysis in HPV16 Cervical Cancer: identification of altered metabolic pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos; Vázquez-Ortiz, Guelaguetza; López-Romero, Ricardo; Piña-Sanchez, Patricia; Moreno, José; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Cervical carcinoma (CC) is a leading cause of death among women worldwide. Human papilloma virus (HPV) is a major etiological factor in CC and HPV 16 is the more frequent viral type present. Our aim was to characterize metabolic pathways altered in HPV 16 tumor samples by means of transcriptome wide analysis and bioinformatics tools for visualizing expression data in the context of KEGG biological pathways. Results We found 2,067 genes significantly up or down-modulated (a...

  10. HPV Infection in Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel M. Palefsky

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available While much is known about the natural history of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV infection and its consequences, including cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical cancer, relatively little is known about the natural history of anogenital HPV infection and diseases in men. In part this reflects difficulties in penile sampling and visual assessment of penile lesions. Anal HPV infection and disease also remain poorly understood. Although HPV is transmitted sexually and infects the genitals of both sexes, the cervix remains biologically more vulnerable to malignant transformation than does the penis or anus in men. An understanding of male HPV infection is therefore important in terms of reducing transmission of HPV to women and improving women's health. However, it is also important due to the burden of disease in men, who may develop both penile and anal cancer, particularly among HIV-positive men who have sex with men. Improved sampling techniques of the male genitalia and cohort studies in progress should provide important information on the natural history of anogenital HPV infection and disease in men, including risk factors for HPV acquisition and transmission. The impact of HPV vaccination in women on male anogenital HPV infection will also need to be assessed.

  11. [Analysis of the results of the HIV-1, HCV and HBV viral load of SEIMC External Quality Control Program. Year 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guna Serrano, María del Remedio; Orta Mira, Nieves; Latorre Martínez, José-Carlos; Ovies, María Rosario; Poveda, Marta; Ruiz de Gopegui, Enrique; Gimeno Cardona, Concepción

    2014-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis B (HBV) and C virus (HCV) viral load determinations are among the most relevant markers for the follow up of patients infected with these viruses. External quality control tools are crucial to ensure the accuracy of results obtained by microbiology laboratories. This article summarized the results obtained from the 2012 SEIMC External Quality Control Programme for HIV-1, HCV, and HBV viral loads. In the HIV-1 program, a total of five standards were sent. One standard consisted in seronegative human plasma, while the remaining four contained plasma from three different viremic patients, in the range of 2-5 log10 copies/mL; two of these standards were identical aiming to determine repeatability. A significant proportion of the laboratories (22.3% on average) obtained values out of the accepted range (mean±0.25 log10 copies/mL), depending on the standard and on the method used for quantification. Repeatability was excellent, with up to 98.9% of laboratories reporting results within the limits (Δ load contents. Most of the participants, 84% in the case of HCV and 88% in the HBV, obtained all the results within the accepted range (mean±1.96 SD log10 UI/mL). Data from this analysis reinforce the utility of proficiency programmes to ensure the quality of the results obtained by a particular laboratory, as well as the importance of the post-analytical phase on the overall quality. Due to the remarkable interlaboratory variability, it is advisable to use the same method and the same laboratory for patient follow up. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. [Analysis of the results of the HIV-1, HCV and HBV viral load of SEIMC External Quality Control Program. Year 2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orta Mira, Nieves; Del Remedio Guna Serrano, María; Latorre Martínez, José-Carlos; Medina González, Rafael; Rosario Ovies, María; Poveda, Marta; Ruiz de Gopegui, Enrique; Gimeno Cardona, Concepción

    2015-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis B (HBV) and C virus (HCV) viral load determinations are among the most relevant markers for the follow up of patients infected with these viruses. External quality control tools are crucial to ensure the accuracy of results obtained by microbiology laboratories. This article summarized the results obtained from the 2013 SEIMC External Quality Control Programme for HIV-1, HCV, and HBV viral loads. In the HIV-1 program, a total of five standards were sent. One standard consisted in seronegative human plasma, while the remaining four contained plasma from three different viremic patients, in the range of 2-5 log10 copies/mL; two of these standards were identical aiming to determine repeatability. A significant proportion of the laboratories (25% on average) obtained values out of the accepted range (mean ± 0.25 log10 copies/mL), depending on the standard and on the method used for quantification. Repeatability was excellent, with up to 98.9% of laboratories reporting results within the limits (D load contents. Most of the participants, 82% in the case of HCV and 78% in the HBV, obtained all the results within the accepted range (mean ± 1.96 SD log10 UI/mL). Data from this analysis reinforce the utility of proficiency programmes to ensure the quality of the results obtained by a particular laboratory, as well as the importance of the post-analytical phase on the overall quality. Due to the remarkable interlaboratory variability, it is advisable to use the same method and the same laboratory for patient follow up. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. [Analysis of the results of the HIV-1 and HCV viral load of the SEIMC External Quality Control Program. Year 2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orta Mira, Nieves; del Remedio Guna Serrano, María; Martínez, José-Carlos Latorre; Ovies, María Rosario; Poveda, Marta; de Gopegui, Enrique Ruiz; Pérez, José L; Cardona, Concepción Gimeno

    2011-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) viral load determinations are among the most important markers in the follow-up of patients infected with these viruses. External quality control tools are crucial to ensure the accuracy of the results obtained by microbiology laboratories. This article summarizes the results obtained from the SEIMC's External Quality Control Program for HIV-1 and HCV viral loads in 2009. In the HIV-1 program, a total of five standards were sent. One standard consisted of seronegative human plasma, while the remaining four contained plasma from three different viremic patients, in the range of 2-5 log(10) copies/mL; two of these standards were identical, aiming to determine repeatability. A significant proportion of the laboratories (21.5% on average) obtained values outside the accepted range (mean ± 0.2 log(10) copies/mL), depending on the standard and on the method used for quantification. Repeatability was very good, with up to 95 % of laboratories reporting results within the accepted limits (Δload contents. Most of the participants (79.7%) obtained results within the accepted range (mean ± 1.96 SD log(10) UI/mL). Data from this analysis reinforce the utility of proficiency programs to ensure the quality of the results obtained by a particular laboratory, as well as the importance of the post-analytical phase in overall quality. Due to marked interlaboratory variability, use of the same method and the same laboratory for patient follow-up is advisable. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. [Analysis of the results of the HIV-1, HCV and HBV viral load of SEIMC External Quality Control Program. Year 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina González, Rafael; Orta Mira, Nieves; Guna Serrano, María Del Remedio; Latorre Martínez, José-Carlos; Gopegui, Enrique Ruiz de; Rosario Ovies, María; Poveda, Marta; Gimeno Cardona, Concepción

    2016-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) viral load determinations are among the most relevant markers for the follow up of patients infected with these viruses. External quality control tools are crucial to ensure the accuracy of results obtained by microbiology laboratories. This article summarizes the results obtained from the 2014 SEIMC (Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology) External Quality Control Programme for HIV-1, HCV, and HBV viral loads. In the HIV-1 program, a total of 5 standards were sent. One standard consisted in seronegative human plasma, while the remaining 4 contained plasma from 3 different viremic patients, in the range of 2-5 log10 copies/mL; 2 of these standards were identical aiming to determine repeatability. A significant proportion of the laboratories (30.8% on average) obtained values out of the accepted range (mean ± 0.25 log10 copies/mL), depending on the standard and on the method used for quantification. Repeatability was excellent, with up to 95.8% of laboratories reporting results within the limits (Δ load contents. Most of the participants, 83.7% in the case of HCV and 87.9% in the HBV, obtained all the results within the accepted range (mean ± 1.96 standard deviations log10 IU/mL). Data from this analysis reinforce the utility of proficiency programmes to ensure the quality of the results obtained by a particular laboratory, as well as the importance of the post-analytical phase on the overall quality. Due to the remarkable interlaboratory variability, it is advisable to use the same method and the same laboratory for patient follow up. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. [Analysis of the results of the HIV-1, HCV and HBV viral load of the SEIMC External Quality Control Program. Year 2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orta Mira, Nieves; Guna Serrano, María del Remedio; Latorre Martínez, José-Carlos; Ovies, María Rosario; Poveda, Marta; Ruiz de Gopegui, Enrique; Gimeno Cardona, Concepción

    2013-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis B (HBV) and C virus (HCV) viral load determinations are among the most important markers in the follow-up of patients infected with these viruses. External quality control tools are crucial to ensure the accuracy of the results obtained by microbiology laboratories. This article summarizes the results of the 2011 SEIMC External Quality Control Program for HIV-1, HCV, and HBV viral loads. In the HIV-1 program, a total of five standards were sent. One standard consisted of seronegative human plasma, while the remaining four contained plasma from three different viremic patients in the range of 2-5 log10 copies/mL; to determine repeatability, two of these standards were identical. A significant proportion of the laboratories (52.1% on average) obtained values outside the accepted range (mean ± 0,25 log10 copies/mL), depending on the standard and on the method used for quantification. Repeatability was very good, with up to 94.9% of laboratories reporting results within the accepted range (Δload contents. In most of the participating laboratories (90% in the case of HCV and 86% in that of HBV), all the results were within the accepted range (mean ± 1.96 SD log10UI/mL). Data from this analysis reinforce the utility of proficiency programs to ensure the quality of the results obtained by a particular laboratory, as well as the importance of the post-analytical phase in overall quality. Due to the marked interlaboratory variability found, use of the same method and the same laboratory for patient follow-up is advisable. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  16. Neisseria gonorrhoeae co-infection exacerbates vaginal HIV shedding without affecting systemic viral loads in human CD34+ engrafted mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Stacey X; Leontyev, Danila; Kaul, Rupert; Gray-Owen, Scott D

    2018-01-01

    HIV synergy with sexually transmitted co-infections is well-documented in the clinic. Co-infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae in particular, increases genital HIV shedding and mucosal transmission. However, no animal model of co-infection currently exists to directly explore this relationship or to bridge the gap in understanding between clinical and in vitro studies of this interaction. This study aims to test the feasibility of using a humanized mouse model to overcome this barrier. Combining recent in vivo modelling advancements in both HIV and gonococcal research, we developed a co-infection model by engrafting immunodeficient NSG mice with human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells to generate humanized mice that permit both systemic HIV infection and genital N. gonorrhoeae infection. Systemic plasma and vaginal lavage titres of HIV were measured in order to assess the impact of gonococcal challenge on viral plasma titres and genital shedding. Engrafted mice showed human CD45+ leukocyte repopulation in blood and mucosal tissues. Systemic HIV challenge resulted in 104-105 copies/mL of viral RNA in blood by week 4 post-infection, as well as vaginal shedding of virus. Subsequent gonococcal challenge resulted in unchanged plasma HIV levels but higher viral shedding in the genital tract, which reflects published clinical observations. Thus, human CD34+ stem cell-transplanted NSG mice represent an experimentally tractable animal model in which to study HIV shedding during gonococcal co-infection, allowing dissection of molecular and immunological interactions between these pathogens, and providing a platform to assess future therapeutics aimed at reducing HIV transmission.

  17. Identification of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA integration and the ensuing patterns of methylation in HPV-associated head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatano, Takashi; Sano, Daisuke; Takahashi, Hideaki; Hyakusoku, Hiroshi; Isono, Yasuhiro; Shimada, Shoko; Sawakuma, Kae; Takada, Kentaro; Oikawa, Ritsuko; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Fumio; Myers, Jeffrey N; Oridate, Nobuhiko

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies showed that human papillomavirus (HPV) integration contributes to the genomic instability seen in HPV-associated head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HPV-HNSCC). However, the epigenetic alterations induced after HPV integration remains unclear. To identify the molecular details of HPV16 DNA integration and the ensuing patterns of methylation in HNSCC, we performed next-generation sequencing using a target-enrichment method for the effective identification of HPV16 integration breakpoints as well as the characterization of genomic sequences adjacent to HPV16 integration breakpoints with three HPV16-related HNSCC cell lines. The DNA methylation levels of the integrated HPV16 genome and that of the adjacent human genome were also analyzed by bisulfite pyrosequencing. We found various integration loci, including novel integration sites. Integration loci were located predominantly in the intergenic region, with a significant enrichment of the microhomologous sequences between the human and HPV16 genomes at the integration breakpoints. Furthermore, various levels of methylation within both the human genome and the integrated HPV genome at the integration breakpoints in each integrant were observed. Allele-specific methylation analysis suggested that the HPV16 integrants remained hypomethylated when the flanking host genome was hypomethylated. After integration into highly methylated human genome regions, however, the HPV16 DNA became methylated. In conclusion, we found novel integration sites and methylation patterns in HPV-HNSCC using our unique method. These findings may provide insights into understanding of viral integration mechanism and virus-associated carcinogenesis of HPV-HNSCC. © 2016 UICC.

  18. Interleukin-28B polymorphisms are associated with hepatitis C virus clearance and viral load in a HIV-1-infected cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, L N; Weis, N; Astvad, K

    2011-01-01

    higher median HCV RNA levels than individuals with unfavourable haplotype blocks (P = 0.05). Our findings suggest that IL28B may account for some differences in HCV outcome but that other factors including the viral genotype, host genetics and the host-virus interaction are likely to influence......Summary. Twenty-five per cent of individuals infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) are able to clear HCV spontaneously. Differences in host genetics are believed to affect the outcome of HCV infection. We analysed an exonic, a promoter and an intronic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP...

  19. HPV as a model for the development of prophylactic and therapeutic cancer vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samara, Raed N; Khleif, Samir N

    2009-08-01

    HPV has been linked to many human malignancies and, as such, represents a major public health crisis. The understanding of HPV biology, however, has helped tremendously in developing prophylactic vaccines, which should help in decreasing mortality due to HPV infections. Understanding HPV biology has allowed researchers to use the virus as a model for the development of not only prophylactic vaccines, but also therapeutic ones. The advantages of HPV as a model stem from the limited number of proteins encoded by the HPV genome that can be targeted by vaccines, and also from the restricted expression of certain viral proteins during different stages of infection. In this review, we discuss how HPV can be used as a model for the development of both prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines.

  20. Presence of p24-Antigen Associated to Erythrocyte in HIV-Positive Individuals Even in Patients with Undetectable Plasma Viral Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Maria Noé; dos Ramos Farias, Maria Sol; Ávila, Maria Mercedes; Rabinovich, Roberto Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Background HIV adherence to erythrocytes has been demonstrated in vitro, and it has been suggested that erythrocytes may be carriers of the virus. However, the association between HIV particles or viral proteins and erythrocytes in HIV-infected individuals is still to be elucidated. Methodology/Principal Findings HIV-positive participants (n = 112) were classified into two groups according to values of three plasma viral loads (pVL) determined during the 12-month period prior to the study. The first group included 71 individuals with detectable pVL, whereas the second group included 41 individuals with undetectable pVL. Plasma viral load, erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen and p24-antigen in plasma were determined at the moment of the study. A total of 51 out of the 71 patients with detectable pVL showed erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen whereas 13 showed p24-antigen in plasma. Twenty-two out of the 51 patients with erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen showed pVLerythrocyte-associated p24-antigen was not related to p24-antigen in plasma or pVL levels in this group. Among the 41 patients with prior undetectable pVL, eight presented detectable pVL and erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen at the moment of the study. The other 33 showed undetectable pVL and five of these presented erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen. A positive relationship was found between the presence of erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen and the detectable pVL at the moment of the study (perythrocytes was determined and it was always accompanied by erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen detection. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrates the presence of erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen in HIV-infected individuals. Since erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen is not always related to pVL or p24-antigen in plasma, erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen showed viral expression not represented in plasma. Therefore, the determination of erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen may contribute to better

  1. Sp100 colocalizes with HPV replication foci and restricts the productive stage of the infectious cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley H Stepp

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We have shown previously that Sp100 (a component of the ND10 nuclear body represses transcription, replication and establishment of incoming human papillomavirus (HPV DNA in the early stages of infection. In this follow up study, we show that Sp100 does not substantially regulate viral infection in the maintenance phase, however at late stages of infection Sp100 interacts with amplifying viral genomes to repress viral processes. We find that Sp100 localizes to HPV16 replication foci generated in primary keratinocytes, to HPV31 replication foci that form in differentiated cells, and to HPV16 replication foci in CIN 1 cervical biopsies. To analyze this further, Sp100 was down regulated by siRNA treatment of differentiating HPV31 containing cells and levels of viral transcription and replication were assessed. This revealed that Sp100 represses viral transcription and replication in differentiated cells. Analysis of Sp100 binding to viral chromatin showed that Sp100 bound across the viral genome, and that binding increased at late stages of infection. Therefore, Sp100 represses the HPV life cycle at both early and late stages of infection.

  2. HPV-Associated Cancers Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Linked with HPV Each Year? Rates by Race and Ethnicity HPV-Associated Anal Cancer HPV-Associated ... file ePub file RIS file Page last reviewed: March 6, 2017 Page last updated: March 6, 2017 ...

  3. The HPV Vaccine: Framing the Arguments "for" and "against" Mandatory Vaccination of All Middle School Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamos, Cheryl A.; McDermott, Robert J.; Daley, Ellen M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV), the virus responsible for cervical cancer, is the most common viral sexually transmitted infection in the United States. A vaccine was approved in 2006 that is effective in preventing the types of HPV responsible for 70% of cervical cancers and 90% of genital warts. Proposals for routine and mandatory HPV…

  4. High viral load and elevated angiogenic markers associated with increased risk of preeclampsia among women initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy in pregnancy in the Mma Bana study, Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powis, Kathleen M; McElrath, Thomas F; Hughes, Michael D; Ogwu, Anthony; Souda, Sajini; Datwyler, Saul A; von Widenfelt, Erik; Moyo, Sikhulile; Nádas, Marisa; Makhema, Joseph; Machakaire, Esther; Lockman, Shahin; Essex, Max; Shapiro, Roger L

    2013-04-15

    Risk factors associated with preeclampsia in HIV-infected women remain largely unknown. Systemic angiogenic imbalance contributes to preeclampsia in HIV-uninfected women, but changes in angiogenic markers after highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) initiation have not been studied. The Mma Bana study randomized 560 HIV-infected, HAART-naive pregnant women with CD4 counts ≥ 200 cells per cubic millimeter between 26 and 34 weeks gestation to lopinavir/ritonavir/zidovudine/lamivudine or abacavir/zidovudine/lamivudine. Another 170 participants with CD4 counts less than 200 cells per cubic millimeter initiated nevirapine/zidovudine/lamivudine between 18 and 34 weeks gestation. Characteristics of 11 women who developed preeclampsia were compared with the remaining 722 Mma Bana participants who delivered using logistic regression. Plasma samples drawn at HAART initiation and 1 month later from 60 women without preeclampsia and at HAART initiation for all 11 preeclamptic women were assayed for placental growth factor (PlGF) and soluble FMS toll-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1). Pre-HAART viral load greater than 100,000 copies per milliliter was associated with preeclampsia (odds ratio: 5.8, 95% confidence interval: 1.8 to 19.4, P = 0.004). Median pre-HAART PlGF level was lower and sFlt-1 was higher in women who developed preeclampsia vs those who did not (130 vs 992 pg/mL, P = 0.001; 17.5 vs 9.4 pg/mL, P = 0.03, respectively). In multivariate analysis, PlGF and viral load remained significantly associated with preeclampsia. No significant changes in angiogenic factors were noted after 1 month of HAART treatment among non-preeclamptic women. Pre-HAART viral load greater than 100,000 copies per milliliter and PlGF predicted preeclampsia among women starting HAART in pregnancy. Among non-preeclamptic women, HAART treatment did not significantly alter levels of PlGF or sFlt-1 after 1 month of treatment.

  5. [Developments in HPV vaccination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melker, Hester; Kenter, Gemma; van Rossum, Tekla; Conyn-van Spaendonck, Marina

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination against the human papilloma virus (HPV) has been included in the national Vaccination Programme of the Netherlands for 12-year-old girls since 2010. Vaccination coverage for the birth cohort of 1997 was 56.; there is a gradual increase in uptake. Continuous safety monitoring brought no new unknown serious side effects to light; many girls suffered from transient symptoms such as painful arm, fatigue and headache. After the current vaccines that protect against HPV types 2 and 4 types, respectively and induce some cross protection, vaccines are being developed that can induce broader protection. HPV vaccination of 12-year-old girls is cost-effective, even for relatively low vaccination coverage. The potential protection of HPV vaccination extends beyond prevention of cervical cancer by preventing other oncological manifestations of HPV infection in women as well as men and genital warts. The preventive HPV vaccines do not appear to be effective in treating existing abnormalities.

  6. Genetic Diversity in the Major Capsid L1 Protein of HPV-16 and HPV-18 in the Netherlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey J King

    Full Text Available Intratypic molecular variants of human papillomavirus (HPV type-16 and -18 exist. In the Netherlands, a bivalent vaccine, composed of recombinant L1 proteins from HPV-16 and -18, is used to prevent cervical cancer since 2009. Long-term vaccination could lead to changes in HPV-16 and -18 virus population, thereby hampering vaccination strategies. We determined the genetic diversity of the L1 gene in HPV-16 and -18 viral strains circulating in the Netherlands at the start of vaccination in order to understand the baseline genetic diversity in the Dutch population.DNA sequences of the L1 gene were determined in HPV-16 (n = 241 and HPV-18 (n = 108 positive anogenital samples collected in 2009 and 2011 among Dutch 16- to 24-year old female and male attendees of the sexually transmitted infection (STI clinics. Phylogenetic analysis was performed and sequences were compared to reference sequences HPV-16 (AF536179 and HPV-18 (X05015 using BioNumerics 7.1.For HPV-16, ninety-five single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs were identified, twenty-seven (28% were non-synonymous variations. For HPV-18, seventy-one SNPs were identified, twenty-nine (41% were non-synonymous. The majority of the non-silent variations were located in sequences encoding alpha helix, beta sheet or surface loops, in particular in the immunodominant FG loop, and may influence the protein secondary structure and immune recognition.This study provides unique pre-vaccination/baseline data on the genetic L1 diversity of HPV-16 and -18 viruses circulating in the Netherlands among adolescents and young adults.

  7. Detection of E6/E7 HPV oncogene transcripts as biomarker of cervical intaepithelial displasia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mauro Carcheri; Caterina Oliveri; Anna Fusco; Ilaria Chiossone; Paola Milano; Annamaria Ferretti; Anna Alabiso; Licia Muselli; Rossana Cirillo; Roberto Capuzzo

    2009-01-01

    ...) is a significant risk factor for the development of an invasive squamous cervical cancer. The overexpression of viral oncogenes E6/E7 of HPV is considered a necessary process for incurring in a malignant...

  8. Asociación de LT-CD4 y carga viral con candidiasis bucal en pacientes VIH/SIDA en Talca, Chile Association between LT-CD4 and the viral load with oral candidiasis in HIV/AIDS patients in Talca, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Brevis Azocar

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available La candidiasis bucal aparece con frecuencia en las personas infectadas por el virus de la inmunodeficiencia humana (VIH y puede causar diversas manifestaciones clínicas y complicaciones. En los pacientes VIH la carga viral es considerada uno de los principales predictores en la progresión de la enfermedad. Se realizó un estudio en 29 pacientes adultos VIH-positivos para evaluar los niveles de linfocitos T-CD4 y carga viral; se estableció una relación con las manifestaciones de la candidiasis bucal. El análisis estadístico mostró que hubo relación entre la manifestación de la candidiasis bucal y la carga viral, pues en pacientes con cargas virales superiores a 10 000 copias/mL, las lesiones fueron más frecuentes.Oral candidiasis is frequently appearing in persons infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and may to cause many clinical and complications manifestations. In HIV patients the viral load is considered one of the main predictors in disease progression. A study was conducted in 29 HIV-positive adult patients to assess the T-CD4 lymphocyte levels and the viral load establishing a relationship with oral candidiasis manifestations. The statistical analysis showed that there was a relationship between the oral candidiasis manifestation and the viral load since in patients with viral load higher than 10 000 copies/mL, lesions were more frequent.

  9. Characterization of HIV-1 Near Full-Length Proviral Genome Quasispecies from Patients with Undetectable Viral Load Undergoing First-Line HAART Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunna M. Alves

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART by human immunodeficiency virus postive (HIV+ individuals has become a reality worldwide. In Brazil, HAART currently reaches over half of HIV-infected subjects. In the context of a remarkable HIV-1 genetic variability, highly related variants, called quasispecies, are generated. HIV quasispecies generated during infection can influence virus persistence and pathogenicity, representing a challenge to treatment. However, the clinical relevance of minority quasispecies is still uncertain. In this study, we have determined the archived proviral sequences, viral subtype and drug resistance mutations from a cohort of HIV+ patients with undetectable viral load undergoing HAART as first-line therapy using next-generation sequencing for near full-length virus genome (NFLG assembly. HIV-1 consensus sequences representing NFLG were obtained for eleven patients, while for another twelve varying genome coverage rates were obtained. Phylogenetic analysis showed the predominance of subtype B (83%; 19/23. Considering the minority variants, 18 patients carried archived virus harboring at least one mutation conferring antiretroviral resistance; for six patients, the mutations correlated with the current ARVs used. These data highlight the importance of monitoring HIV minority drug resistant variants and their clinical impact, to guide future regimen switches and improve HIV treatment success.

  10. Identification of several high-risk HPV inhibitors and drug targets with a novel high-throughput screening assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toots, Mart; Ustav, Mart; Männik, Andres; Mumm, Karl; Tämm, Kaido; Tamm, Tarmo; Ustav, Mart

    2017-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are oncogenic viruses that cause numerous different cancers as well as benign lesions in the epithelia. To date, there is no effective cure for an ongoing HPV infection. Here, we describe the generation process of a platform for the development of anti-HPV drugs. This system consists of engineered full-length HPV genomes that express reporter genes for evaluation of the viral copy number in all three HPV replication stages. We demonstrate the usefulness of this system by conducting high-throughput screens to identify novel high-risk HPV-specific inhibitors. At least five of the inhibitors block the function of Tdp1 and PARP1, which have been identified as essential cellular proteins for HPV replication and promising candidates for the development of antivirals against HPV and possibly against HPV-related cancers. PMID:28182794

  11. Analysis of virological efficacy in trials of antiretroviral regimens: drawbacks of not including viral load measurements after premature discontinuation of therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Ole; Pedersen, Court; Law, Matthew

    2002-01-01

    to ITT/s=f, 22-70% of the patients starting a HAART regimen in a RCT experienced a virological response at week 48. Only two RCTs had complete follow-up data (n=424): between 29 and 62% achieved a virological response at week 48 in the six treatment arms evaluated in the studies according to ITT...... confirmed virological failure: 63 vs 33%), varied largely across regimens and were not associated with the discontinuation rate. CONCLUSIONS: Discontinuation of follow-up at switch from the therapy to be evaluated remains common in antiretroviral treatment trials, but leads to an imprecise and incomplete......SIDA) starting their first HAART regimen. METHODS: Two classifications of defining virological response 48 weeks after starting the therapy to be evaluated were compared: 1) only patients remaining on the therapy and having a plasma viral load (pVL) below a given cut-off level at week 48 were classified...

  12. CD4+ and viral load outcomes of antiretroviral therapy switch strategies after virologic failure of combination antiretroviral therapy in perinatally HIV-infected youth in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairlie, Lee; Karalius, Brad; Patel, Kunjal; van Dyke, Russell B; Hazra, Rohan; Hernán, Miguel A; Siberry, George K; Seage, George R; Agwu, Allison; Wiznia, Andrew

    2015-10-23

    This study compared 12-month CD4 and viral load outcomes in HIV-infected children and adolescents with virological failure, managed with four treatment switch strategies. This observational study included perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV) children in the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study (PHACS) and Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials (PACTG) Protocol 219C. Treatment strategies among children with virologic failure were compared: continue failing combination antiretroviral therapy (cART); switch to new cART; switch to drug-sparing regimen; and discontinue all ART. Mean changes in CD4% and viral load from baseline (time of virologic failure) to 12 months follow-up in each group were evaluated using weighted linear regression models. Virologic failure occurred in 939 out of 2373 (40%) children. At 12 months, children switching to new cART (16%) had a nonsignificant increase in CD4% from baseline, 0.59 percentage points [95% confidence interval (95% CI) -1.01 to 2.19], not different than those who continued failing cART (71%) (-0.64 percentage points, P = 0.15) or switched to a drug-sparing regimen (5%) (1.40 percentage points, P = 0.64). Children discontinuing all ART (7%) experienced significant CD4% decline -3.18 percentage points (95% CI -5.25 to -1.11) compared with those initiating new cART (P = 0.04). All treatment strategies except discontinuing ART yielded significant mean decreases in log10VL by 12 months, the new cART group having the largest drop (-1.15 log10VL). In PHIV children with virologic failure, switching to new cART was associated with the best virological response, while stopping all ART resulted in the worst immunologic and virologic outcomes and should be avoided. Drug-sparing regimens and continuing failing regimens may be considered with careful monitoring.

  13. Staphylococcus spp., Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonadaceae oral isolates from Brazilian HIV-positive patients. Correlation with CD4 cell counts and viral load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back-Brito, Graziella Nuernberg; El Ackhar, Vivian Narana Ribeiro; Querido, Silvia Maria Rodrigues; dos Santos, Silvana Soléo Ferreira; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Reis, Alexandre de Souza de Macedo; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Yumi

    2011-10-01

    The aim was to evaluate the presence of Staphylococcus spp., Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonadaceae in the oral cavities of HIV-positive patients. Forty-five individuals diagnosed as HIV-positive by ELISA and Western-blot, and under anti-retroviral therapy for at least 1 year, were included in the study. The control group constituted 45 systemically healthy individuals matched to the HIV patients to gender, age and oral conditions. Oral rinses were collected and isolates were identified by API system. Counts of microorganisms from HIV and control groups were compared statistically by a Mann-Whitney test (α=5%). The percentages of individuals positive for staphylococci were similar between the groups (p=0.764), whereas for Gram-negative rods, a higher percentage was observed amongst HIV-positive (p=0.001). There was no difference in Staphylococcus counts between HIV and control groups (p=0.1008). Counts were lower in the oral cavities of patients with low viral load (p=0.021), and no difference was observed in relation to CD4 counts (p=0.929). Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequently isolated species in HIV group, and Staphylococcus epidermidis was the prevalent species in the control group. Significantly higher numbers of enteric bacteria and pseudomonas were detected in the oral cavities of the HIV group than in the control (p=0.0001). Enterobacter cloacae was the most frequently isolated species in both groups. Counts of enteric bacteria and pseudomonas were significantly lower in patients with low CD4 counts (p=0.011); however, there was no difference relating to viral load. It may be concluded that HIV group showed greater species diversity and a higher prevalence of Enterobacteriaceae/Pseudomonadaceae. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Induction pegylated interferon alfa-2a and high dose ribavirin do not increase SVR in heavy patients with HCV genotype 1 and high viral loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K Rajender; Shiffman, Mitchell L; Rodriguez-Torres, Maribel; Cheinquer, Hugo; Abdurakhmanov, Djamal; Bakulin, Igor; Morozov, Viacheslav; Silva, Giovanni Faria; Geyvandova, Natalia; Stanciu, Carol; Rabbia, Michael; McKenna, Michael; Thommes, James A; Harrison, Stephen A

    2010-12-01

    Patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1, body weight ≥85 kg, and high baseline viral load respond poorly to standard doses of pegylated interferon (peginterferon) and ribavirin. We evaluated intensified therapy with peginterferon alfa-2a plus ribavirin. This double-blind randomized trial included HCV genotype 1-infected outpatients from hepatology clinics with body weight ≥85 kg and HCV RNA titer ≥400,000 IU/mL. Patients were randomized to 180 μg/wk peginterferon alfa-2a for 48 weeks plus 1200 mg/day ribavirin (standard of care) (group A, n = 191) or 1400/1600 mg/day ribavirin (group B, n = 189). Additional groups included 360 μg/wk peginterferon alfa-2a for 12 weeks then 180 μg/wk peginterferon alfa-2a for 36 weeks plus 1200 mg/day ribavirin (group C, n = 382) or 1400/1600 mg/day ribavirin (group D, n = 383). Follow-up lasted 24 weeks after treatment. Sustained virologic response rates (HCV RNA level alfa-2a regimens (A + B vs C + D: odds ratio [OR], 1.08; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83-1.39; P = .584) or pooled ribavirin regimens (A + C vs B + D: OR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.79-1.28; P = .974). In patients infected with HCV genotype 1 who are difficult to treat (high viral load, body weight ≥85 kg), a 12-week induction regimen of peginterferon alfa-2a and/or higher-dose ribavirin is not more effective than the standard regimen. Copyright © 2010 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. ARCHITECT® HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay: correlation of HIV-1 p24 antigen sensitivity and RNA viral load using genetically diverse virus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Catherine A; Yamaguchi, Julie; Vallari, Ana; Swanson, Priscilla; Hackett, John R

    2013-06-01

    HIV antigen/antibody (Ag/Ab) combination assays represent a significant advancement in assays used for diagnosing HIV infection based on their ability to detect acute and chronic infections. During acute HIV infection (AHI), detection depends on assay sensitivity for p24 Ag. To directly compare the Ag sensitivity of the ARCHITECT(®) HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay to RNA viral load using cell culture supernatants of virus isolates. HIV-1 isolates allow correlation in the total absence of an antibody response to infection and across genetically diverse HIV-1 group M strains. Thirty-five HIV-1 isolates comprising subtypes A-D, F and G, CRF01_AE, CRF02_AG, and unique recombinant forms were evaluated. Cell-free culture supernatant for each isolate was diluted to four levels and tested in the HIV Combo assay to determine a signal to cutoff ratio and the RealTime(®) HIV-1 assay to quantify RNA. The RNA copies/mL at the HIV Combo assay cutoff was determined. The median RNA copies/mL at the HIV Combo assay cutoff was 57,900 for individual virus isolates (range 26,440-102,400). A single plot of all the data gave a value of 58,500RNA copies/mL. An analysis of data published for acute HIV infection in human subjects gave a similar result; HIV Combo detected 97% of AHIs with RNA copies/mL > 30,700. Based on analysis of virus isolates, the ARCHITECT HIV Combo assay can detect p24 Ag when RNA is above approximately 58,000copies/mL. The correlation of viral load and Ag sensitivity was consistent across genetically diverse HIV-1 group M strains. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Novel use of surveillance data to detect HIV-infected persons with sustained high viral load and durable virologic suppression in New York City.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpi S Terzian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Monitoring of the uptake and efficacy of ART in a population often relies on cross-sectional data, providing limited information that could be used to design specific targeted intervention programs. Using repeated measures of viral load (VL surveillance data, we aimed to estimate and characterize the proportion of persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA in New York City (NYC with sustained high VL (SHVL and durably suppressed VL (DSVL. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Retrospective cohort study of all persons reported to the NYC HIV Surveillance Registry who were alive and ≥12 years old by the end of 2005 and who had ≥2 VL tests in 2006 and 2007. SHVL and DSVL were defined as PLWHA with 2 consecutive VLs ≥100,000 copies/mL and PLWHA with all VLs ≤400 copies/mL, respectively. Logistic regression models using generalized estimating equations were used to model the association between SHVL and covariates. There were 56,836 PLWHA, of whom 7% had SHVL and 38% had DSVL. Compared to those without SHVL, persons with SHVL were more likely to be younger, black and have injection drug use (IDU risk. PLWHA with SHVL were more likely to die by 2007 and be younger by nearly ten years, on average. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Nearly 60% of PLWHA in 2005 had multiple VLs, of whom almost 40% had DSVL, suggesting successful ART uptake. A small proportion had SHVL, representing groups known to have suboptimal engagement in care. This group should be targeted for additional outreach to reduce morbidity and secondary transmission. Measures based on longitudinal analyses of surveillance data in conjunction with cross-sectional measures such as community viral load represent more precise and powerful tools for monitoring ART effectiveness and potential impact on disease transmission than cross-sectional measures alone.

  17. Prevalence and risk factors associated to chronic kidney disease in HIV-infected patients on HAART and undetectable viral load in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia M Menezes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To determine the prevalence and associated factors with chronic kidney disease (CKD in a cohort of HIV-positive individuals with undetectable viral load on HAART. METHODS: From March, 2009 to September 2009, 213 individuals between 18-70 years, period on HAART ≥12 months, viral load < 50 copies/mm(3, and CD4 ≥ 200 cells/mm(3, were consecutively enrolled at the outpatient clinic of Hospital de Clínicas, Porto Alegre, Brazil. Exclusion criteria were obesity, malnourishment, amputee, paraplegic, previous history of renal disease, pregnancy and hepatic insufficiency. Renal function was determined by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR assessed by the modification of diet in renal disease. CKD was defined as an eGFR less or equal than 60 ml/min/1.73 m(2, for a period of at least 3 months. Poisson regression was used to determine factors associated with CKD. RESULTS: CKD was diagnosed in 8.4% of the population, and after adjustment, the risk factors were hypertension (RR = 3.88, 95%CI, 1.84-8.16, time on HAART (RR = 1.15, 95%CI,1.03-1.27 and tenofovir exposure (RR = 2.25, 95%CI, 1.04-4.95. Higher weight (RR = 0.88 95%CI, 0.82-0.96 was associated to normal function. CONCLUSIONS: CKD was a common finding in this cohort of patients and was related to hypertension, time on HAART and tenofovir exposure. We suggest a more frequent monitoring of renal function, especially for those with risk factors to early identify renal impairment.

  18. Evaluation of Two Techniques for Viral Load Monitoring Using Dried Blood Spot in Routine Practice in Vietnam (French National Agency for AIDS and Hepatitis Research 12338).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taieb, Fabien; Tram, Tran Hong; Ho, Hien Thi; Pham, Van Anh; Nguyen, Lan; Pham, Ban Hien; Tong, Linh An; Tuaillon, Edouard; Delaporte, Eric; Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Bui, Duc Duong; Do, NhanThi; Madec, Yoann

    2016-09-01

    Background.  Although it is the best method to detect early therapeutic failure, viral load (VL) monitoring is still not widely available in many resource-limited settings because of difficulties in specimen transfer, personnel shortage, and insufficient laboratory infrastructures. Dried blood spot (DBS) use, which was introduced in the latest World Health Organization recommendations, can overcome these difficulties. This evaluation aimed at validating VL measurement in DBS, in a laboratory without previous DBS experience and in routine testing conditions. Methods.  Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults were observed in a HIV care site in Hanoi, and each patient provided 2 DBS cards with whole blood spots and 2 plasma samples. Viral load was measured in DBS and in plasma using the COBAS Ampliprep/TaqMan and the Abbott RealTime assays. To correctly identify those with VL ≥ 1000 copies/mL, sensitivity and specificity were estimated. Results.  A total of 198 patients were enrolled. With the Roche technique, 51 plasma VL were ≥1000 copies/mL; among these, 28 presented a VL in DBS that was also ≥1000 copies/mL (sensitivity, 54.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 40.3-68.9). On the other hand, all plasma VL < 1000 copies/mL were also <1000 copies/mL in DBS (specificity, 100; 95% CI, 97.5-100). With the Abbott technique, 45 plasma VL were ≥1000 copies/mL; among these, 42 VL in DBS were also ≥1000 copies/mL (sensitivity, 93.3%; 95% CI, 81.7-98.6); specificity was 94.8 (95% CI, 90.0-97.7). Conclusions.  The Abbott RealTime polymerase chain reaction assay provided adequate VL results in DBS, thus allowing DBS use for VL monitoring.

  19. Effect of aging, glucose level, and HIV viral load on response to treatment with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin in HIV/HCV co-infected women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasta, Paola; Maida, Ivana; Cattelan, Anna Maria; Pontali, Emanuele; Angeli, Elena; Giralda, Mariarosaria; Verucchi, Gabriella; Caputo, Antonietta; Iannacone, Claudio; Puoti, Massimo; Carosi, Giampiero

    2015-02-01

    This was a post-hoc analysis of the Optimized Pegylated interferons Efficacy and anti-Retroviral Approach (OPERA) study, originally designed to document routine clinical and treatment data in HIV/HCV coinfected patients treated with pegylated interferon/ribavirin (PEG-IFN/RBV). The aim of this study was to define the impact of several variables, such as age, glucose metabolism, and HIV viral load, on PEG-IFN/RBV treatment outcomes, in HIV/HCV coinfected women. Female subjects from the OPERA database were retrospectively evaluated and factors associated with sustained virological response (SVR) were assessed and compared to the male population by logistic regression analysis. At baseline, clinical and demographic data were collected. Patients were then administered with PEG-IFN/RBV therapy for 48 weeks. After a 24-week follow-up period, SVR was evaluated. A total of 1523 patients were enrolled in 98 centers across Italy, 1284 of whom were IFN therapy naïve and were included in the post-hoc analysis. In the female group, factors associated with SVR were the presence of HCV genotype 2,3 (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=6.87, pHIV-RNA (AOR=1.47, p=0.033) but not glucose level (AOR=1.0, p=0.95) predicted SVR. Findings from the present study demonstrate that several factors may be predictive of SVR when pegylated interferon plus ribavirin is used (i.e., age, gender, HIV viral load and HCV genotype) that need to be carefully considered prior to therapeutic intervention, since they may hinder successful therapy. Use of PEG-IFN/RBV with novel direct antiviral agents will likely be still maintained until less expensive and effective interferon-free strategies become available.

  20. Effects of Relative Humidity and Spraying Medium on Ultraviolet (UV) Decontamination of Filters Loaded with Viral Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    severe acute respiratory syndrome ) have raised the level of public interest in biological aerosols and protection meth- ods that prevent their...water, electrolytes, mucus, and enzyme. AS (0.3% mucin from porcine stomach [M1778; Sigma-Aldrich] as a mucus simulant plus around 0.3% salts as...of MS2 and UV exposure susceptibility of MS2, augmented by stress imposed on MS2 by aerosolization under different loading RHs. The second

  1. Pioglitazone decreases hepatitis C viral load in overweight, treatment naïve, genotype 4 infected-patients: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Chojkier

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance (IR is induced by chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV genotypes 1 and 4 infections. It is not known whether drugs that affect IR such as Pioglitazone and Prednisone also affect serum HCV RNA titers independently of PEG-Interferon-α2/ribavirin treatment. The primary aim was to assess whether Pioglitazone by improving IR and/or inflammation decreases HCV viral load independently of standard of care HCV treatment. A secondary aim was to assess whether Prednisone, a drug that induces insulin resistance and stimulates HCV viral entry and replication in replicon culture systems, increases HCV viral load in this population.We designed a two-arm, parallel Pilot Study of overweight, treatment naïve genotype 4 HCV-infected patients at a public referral Liver Clinic in Giza, Egypt. The subjects received Pioglitazone (30 mg/day for 14 days or Prednisone (40 mg/day for 4 days in a randomized fashion, but the two arms can be considered independent pilot studies. Only changes from baseline within each arm were assessed and no contrasts of the interventions were made, as this was not an aim of the study. Among 105 consecutive HCV genotype 4 patients, 39 were enrolled based on the optimal sample size and power analysis according to the CONSORT statement; 20 to the Pioglitazone group and 19 to the Prednisone group. Pioglitazone was effective in decreasing serum HCV RNA at day-14 (n = 10; difference of means = 205,618 IU/ml; 95% CI 26,600 to 384,600; P<0.001. Although Prednisone did increase serum HCV RNA at day-4 (n = 10; change from baseline = -42,786 IU/ml; 95% CI -85,500 to -15,700; P = 0.049, the log(10 HCV RNA titers were statistically not different from baseline day-0.This is the first documentation that Pioglitazone decreases the serum HCV RNA titers independently of PEG-Interferon-α2/ribavirin treatment. The novel findings of our Study provide the foundation for basic and clinical investigations on the molecular

  2. HPV 16 and cigarette smoking as risk factors for high-grade cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, G Y; Kadish, A S; Burk, R D; Basu, J; Palan, P R; Mikhail, M; Romney, S L

    1998-10-29

    Although genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is well established as the etiologic agent for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), little is known about the cofactors involved in the development of high-grade lesions or the progression of low-grade to high-grade lesions. In our study of HPV-infected women with CIN (163 CIN I, 51 CIN II and 44 CIN III), women with CIN II or III were compared with those with CIN I for risk factors associated with high-grade lesions. After controlling for age, education, ethnicity and frequency of Pap smear screening, infection with HPV 16, but not high viral load or infection with multiple types, was associated with high-grade lesions (OR for CIN II = 11.96, OR for CIN III = 23.74). Risk of CIN III, but not CIN II, increased with number of cigarettes smoked per day (ORs = 1.49 and 3.35 for 10 cigarettes per day, respectively) and decreased with frequency of condom use during sex (ORs = 0.60 and 0.32 for women who used condoms occasionally/sometimes and most/all of the time, respectively). There were no associations between high-grade lesions and plasma levels of micronutrients (retinol, beta-carotene, alpha-tocopherol and reduced ascorbic acid). Our results indicate that infection with HPV 16 is associated with high-grade lesions. Additional cofactors, such as cigarette smoking, may be required as a carcinogen to advance HPV-infected cells toward neoplastic progression.

  3. Human Papilloma Viral DNA Replicates as a Stable Episome in Cultured Epidermal Keratinocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laporta, Robert F.; Taichman, Lorne B.

    1982-06-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) is poorly understood because systems for its growth in tissue culture have not been developed. We report here that cultured human epidermal keratinocytes could be infected with HPV from plantar warts and that the viral DNA persisted and replicated as a stable episome. There were 50-200 copies of viral DNA per cell and there was no evidence to indicate integration of viral DNA into the cellular genome. There was also no evidence to suggest that viral DNA underwent productive replication. We conclude that cultured human epidermal keratinocytes may be a model for the study of certain aspects of HPV biology.

  4. Frequency of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) 16 and 18 Detection in Paraffin- Embedded Laryngeal Carcinoma Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed Zinab; Makvandi, Manoochehr; Samarbafzade, Alireza; Timori, Ali; Ranjbar, Nastaran; Saki, Nader; Nisi, Nilofar; Shahani, Toran; Varnaseri, Mehran; Ahmadi, Kambiz Angali

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objective: Human papilloma virus (HPV) 16 and HPV18 have been detected in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) and there is evidence that detection of HPVs would have better prognostic value than patients with HNSCC negative for HPVs. Thus, this study was conducted to evaluate frequency of HPV 16 and HPV 18 genotypes in patients with laryngeal carcinoma. Materials and methods: Fifty formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue blocks of laryngeal cancers were collected. Sections were prepared at 5 µm and DNA was extracted from each sample and subjected to the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect HPV-16/18 DNA s. Results: All samples were squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Overall 14/50 (28%) were positive for HPVs, 8 (18%) with HPV-16 and 6 (12%) with HPV-18. Additionally, 2 (4%) mixed infections of HPV 16 and 18 genotypes were observed among these cases. Conclusions: Overall, 28% of HNSCC samples proved positive for HPV16 and HPV18 genotypes, two high-risk HPV types. It is important to further assess whether such viral infection, could be a risk factor in HNSCC progression. PMID:28545184

  5. HPV vaccine cross-protection: Highlights on additional clinical benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vincenzo, Rosa; Ricci, Caterina; Conte, Carmine; Scambia, Giovanni

    2013-09-01

    Prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are administered in vaccination programs, targeted at young adolescent girls before sexual exposure, and in catch-up programs for young women in some countries. All the data indicate that HPV-virus-like particles (VLPs) effectively prevent papillomavirus infections with a high level of antibodies and safety. Since non-vaccine HPV types are responsible for about 30% of cervical cancers, cross-protection would potentially enhance primary cervical cancer prevention efforts. High levels of specific neutralizing antibodies can be generated after immunization with HPV VLPs. Immunity to HPV is type-specific. However, if we consider the phylogenetic tree including the different HPV types, we realize that a certain degree of cross-protection is possible, due to the high homology of some viral types with vaccine ones. The assessment of cross-protective properties of HPV vaccines is an extremely important matter, which has also increased public health implications and could add further value to their preventive potential. The impact of cross-protection is mostly represented by a reduction of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia CIN2-3 more than what expected. In this article we review the mechanisms and the effectiveness of Bivalent (HPV-16/-18) and Quadrivalent (HPV-6/-11/-16/-18) HPV vaccine cross-protection, focusing on the critical aspects and the potential biases in clinical trials, in order to understand how cross-protection could impact on clinical outcomes and on the new perspectives in post-vaccine era. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Testicular cancer and HPV semen infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eGarolla

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Testicular cancer represents the more frequent solid tumour affecting males aged 15-35 years.In the last decades, its incidence showed a progressive increased probably due to genetic and environmental factors. Despite exposure to some viruses such as HIV, HCV, EBV and HPV is frequently related to cancer development, there are no studies aimed to evaluate the possible implication of viral infections in the pathogenesis of testicular cancer. In this study we analyzed sperm parameters and prevalence of HPV on sperm in 155 testicular cancer patients at diagnosis (T-1, after orchiectomy (T0 and after 12 months from surgery or from the end of adjuvant treatments (T12. All patients showed a significantly higher prevalence of semen infection than controls (9.5% and 2.4% respectively and altered sperm parameters both at T-1 and T0. Considering sperm parameters, at T-1 we observed a reduction of progressive motility, and after orchiectomy patients showed a reduction of sperm concentration and count and a further worsening of motility. Thereafter, patients were assigned to three groups on the basis of medical option after surgery: S = surveillance, R = radiotherapy and C = chemotherapy +/- radiotherapy. At T12, untreated patients had an improvement of sperm parameters while R group and even more C group had a strong decrease of sperm number (p<0.01 both vs T0 and S group. Moreover, patients who received radio and/or chemotherapy had a very high prevalence of HPV semen infection (S: 7.7%, R: 30.8% and C: 61.5%. In conclusion, patients with testicular cancer had frequently altered sperm parameters and higher prevalence of HPV semen infection that were worsened after radio and chemotherapy. Because HPV infection is a risk factor for cancer development and it may further reduce fertility, we suggest screening for HPV in testicular cancer patients at diagnosis and particularly after adjuvant treatments.

  7. Testicular cancer and HPV semen infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garolla, Andrea; Pizzol, Damiano; Bertoldo, Alessandro; Ghezzi, Marco; Carraro, Umberto; Ferlin, Alberto; Foresta, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Testicular cancer represents the more frequent solid tumor affecting males aged 15-35 years. In the last decades, its incidence showed a progressive increased probably due to genetic and environmental factors. Despite exposure to some viruses such as HIV, HCV, EBV, and HPV is frequently related to cancer development, there are no studies aimed to evaluate the possible implication of viral infections in the pathogenesis of testicular cancer. In this study, we analyzed sperm parameters and prevalence of HPV on sperm in 155 testicular cancer patients at diagnosis (T-1), after orchiectomy (T0) and after 12 months from surgery or from the end of adjuvant treatments (T12). All patients showed a significantly higher prevalence of semen infection than controls (9.5% and 2.4% respectively,) and altered sperm parameters both at T-1 and T0. Considering sperm parameters, at T-1 we observed a reduction of progressive motility, and after orchiectomy patients showed a reduction of sperm concentration and count and a further worsening of motility. Thereafter, patients were assigned to three groups on the basis of medical option after surgery: S = surveillance, R = radiotherapy, and C = chemotherapy +/- radiotherapy. At T12, untreated patients had an improvement of sperm parameters while R group and even more C group had a strong decrease of sperm number (p HPV semen infection (S = 7.7%, R = 30.8%, and C = 61.5%). In conclusion, patients with testicular cancer had frequently altered sperm parameters and higher prevalence of HPV semen infection that were worsened after radio and chemotherapy. Because HPV infection is a risk factor for cancer development and it may further reduce fertility, we suggest screening for HPV in testicular cancer patients at diagnosis and particularly after adjuvant treatments.

  8. Correlation between ebv co-infection and HPV16 genome integrity in Tunisian cervical cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saloua Kahla

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Infection with high risk Human papillomavirus (HR-HPV is necessary but not sufficient to cause cervical carcinoma. This study explored whether multiple HR-HPV or coinfection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV influence the integration status of HPV16 genome. The presence and typing of HPV in a series of 125 cervical specimens were assessed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR using the specific primers for the HPV L1 region. As for EBV infection, the viral EBNA1 gene was used for its detection through PCR amplification. Disruption of the HPV E2 gene was assessed by amplification of the entire E2 gene with single set of primers, while E2 transcripts were evaluated by a reverse transcription PCR method (RT-PCR. The overall prevalence of HPVDNA was of 81.8% in cervical cancers versus 26.9% in benign lesions. In HPV positive cases, HPV16 and HPV18 were the most prevalent types, followed by HPV types 33, 31. EBV EBNA1 prevalence was statistically more frequent in cervical carcinomas than in benign lesions (29.5%, vs 9.6%; P=0.01. No viral infection was detected in healthy control women. The uninterrupted E2 gene was correlated with the presence of E2 transcripts originating from the HPV episomal forms. It was observed that integration was more common in HPV18 and EBV coinfection. The presence of EBV caused a five-fold [OR= 5; CI= 1.15-21.8; P = 0.04] increase in the risk of HPV16 genome integration in the host genome. This study indicates that EBV infection is acting as a cofactor for induction of cervical cancer by favoring HPVDNA integration.

  9. Correlation between ebv co-infection and HPV16 genome integrity in Tunisian cervical cancer patients.

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    Kahla, Saloua; Oueslati, Sarra; Achour, Mongia; Kochbati, Lotfi; Chanoufi, Mohamed Badis; Maalej, Mongi; Oueslati, Ridha

    2012-04-01

    Infection with high risk Human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) is necessary but not sufficient to cause cervical carcinoma. This study explored whether multiple HR-HPV or coinfection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) influence the integration status of HPV16 genome. The presence and typing of HPV in a series of 125 cervical specimens were assessed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using the specific primers for the HPV L1 region. As for EBV infection, the viral EBNA1 gene was used for its detection through PCR amplification. Disruption of the HPV E2 gene was assessed by amplification of the entire E2 gene with single set of primers, while E2 transcripts were evaluated by a reverse transcription PCR method (RT-PCR). The overall prevalence of HPVDNA was of 81.8% in cervical cancers versus 26.9% in benign lesions. In HPV positive cases, HPV16 and HPV18 were the most prevalent types, followed by HPV types 33, 31. EBV EBNA1 prevalence was statistically more frequent in cervical carcinomas than in benign lesions (29.5%, vs 9.6%; P=0.01). No viral infection was detected in healthy control women. The uninterrupted E2 gene was correlated with the presence of E2 transcripts originating from the HPV episomal forms. It was observed that integration was more common in HPV18 and EBV coinfection. The presence of EBV caused a five-fold [OR= 5; CI= 1.15-21.8; P = 0.04] increase in the risk of HPV16 genome integration in the host genome. This study indicates that EBV infection is acting as a cofactor for induction of cervical cancer by favoring HPVDNA integration.

  10. [Human PAPILLOMA Virus (HPV) vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safra, Tamar

    2007-10-01

    A solid tumor related to viral infection is a rare and challenging condition to the medical community raising the possibility to fight and prevent this cancer by vaccine. Cervical cancer, caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), is a major health problem worldwide. The two HPV vaccines approved lately could lead to more than a 70% reduction in cases of cervical cancer and a similar reduction in deaths from the cancer. Pap smear screening significantly (80%) reduced disease incidence and is still useful and needed. In addition to early detection, vaccination will prevent the development of precancerous and cancerous lesion and reduce morbidity, mortality and psychological and social stress as well as stressful and expensive follow-ups in women with suspicious lesions. The vaccinations described will bring to a significant reduction in genital warts incidence, a serious social and psychological burden to the infected population. Practical social and psychological issues are still to be addressed, some of them are: time and frequency of administration, use of vaccination in men, public acceptance and behavior, appropriate populations to be vaccinated, etc. Most unresolved questions will be answered over time. The new vaccines embody a big promise to humanity, although we still have to overcome the financial burden and possible late side effects of the vaccine.

  11. Virological profile of pregnant HIV positive women with high levels of CD4 count in low income settings: Can viral load help as eligibility criteria for maternal triple ARV prophylaxis (WHO 2010 option B?

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    Anne Esther Njom Nlend

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The objective of the study was to determine HIV-1 RNA load profile during pregnancy and assess the eligibility for the maternal triple antiretroviral prophylaxis. It was an observational cohort of pregnant HIV positive women ignorant of antiretroviral therapy with CD4 cell count of > 350/mm3. METHODS:Routine CD4 cell count assessment in HIV positive pregnant women completed by non exclusive measurement of the viral load by PCR /ARN in those with CD4 cell count > 350/mm3. Exclusion criteria: highly active antiretroviral therapy prior to pregnancy. RESULTS:Between January and December 2010, CD4 cell count was systematically performed in all pregnant women diagnosed as HIV-infected (n=266 in a referral center of 25 antenatal clinics. 63% (N=170 had CD4 cell count > 350/mm3, median: 528 (IQR: 421-625. 145 underwent measurement of viral load by PCR/RNA at a median gestational of 23 weeks of pregnancy (IQR: 19-28. Median viral load 4.4log10/ml, IQR (3.5-4.9.19/145(13% had an undetectable viral load of=1.8log10/ml. 89/145(61% had a viral load of = 4 log10/ml and were eligible for maternal triple ARV prophylaxis. CONCLUSION: More than 6 in 10 pregnant HIV positive women with CD4 cell count of > 350/mm3 may require triple antiretroviral for prophylaxis of MTCT. Regardless of cost, such results are conclusive and may be considered in HIV high burden countries for universal access to triple antiretroviral prophylaxis in order to move towards virtual elimination of HIV MTCT.

  12. Interferon Alpha Induces Sustained Changes in NK Cell Responsiveness to Hepatitis B Viral Load Suppression In Vivo.

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    Upkar S Gill

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available NK cells are important antiviral effectors, highly enriched in the liver, with the potential to regulate immunopathogenesis in persistent viral infections. Here we examined whether changes in the NK pool are induced when patients with eAg-positive CHB are 'primed' with PegIFNα and importantly, whether these changes are sustained or further modulated long-term after switching to nucleos(tides (sequential NUC therapy, an approach currently tested in the clinic. Longitudinal sampling of a prospectively recruited cohort of patients with eAg+CHB showed that the cumulative expansion of CD56bright NK cells driven by 48-weeks of PegIFNα was maintained at higher than baseline levels throughout the subsequent 9 months of sequential NUCs. Unexpectedly, PegIFNα-expanded NK cells showed further augmentation in their expression of the activating NK cell receptors NKp30 and NKp46 during sequential NUCs. The expansion in proliferating, functional NK cells was more pronounced following sequential NUCs than in comparison cohorts of patients treated with de novo NUCs or PegIFNα only. Reduction in circulating HBsAg concentrations, a key goal in the path towards functional cure of CHB, was only achieved in those patients with enhancement of NK cell IFNγ and cytotoxicity but decrease in their expression of the death ligand TRAIL. In summary, we conclude that PegIFNα priming can expand a population of functional NK cells with an altered responsiveness to subsequent antiviral suppression by NUCs. Patients on sequential NUCs with a distinct NK cell profile show a decline in HBsAg, providing mechanistic insights for the further optimisation of treatment strategies to achieve sustained responses in CHB.

  13. Increased methylation of Human Papillomavirus type 16 DNA correlates with viral integration in Vulval Intraepithelial Neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Dean; Onions, Tiffany; Raybould, Rachel; Jones, Sadie; Tristram, Amanda; Hibbitts, Samantha; Fiander, Alison; Powell, Ned

    2014-11-01

    Methylation of HPV16 DNA is a promising biomarker for triage of HPV positive cervical screening samples but the biological basis for the association between HPV-associated neoplasia and increased methylation is unclear. To determine whether HPV16 DNA methylation was associated with viral integration, and investigate the relationships between viral DNA methylation, integration and gene expression. HPV16 DNA methylation, integration and gene expression were assessed using pyrosequencing, ligation-mediated PCR and QPCR, in biopsies from 25 patients attending a specialist vulval neoplasia clinic and in short-term clonal cell lines derived from vulval and vaginal neoplasia. Increased methylation of the HPV16 L1/L2 and E2 regions was associated with integration of viral DNA into the host genome. This relationship was observed both in vivo and in vitro. Increased methylation of E2 binding sites did not appear to be associated with greater expression of viral early genes. Expression of HPV E6 and E7 did not correlate with either integration state or increased L1/L2 methylation. The data suggest that increased HPV DNA methylation may be partly attributable to viral integration, and provide a biological rationale for quantification of L1/L2 methylation in triage of HPV positive cervical screening samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Down-regulation of Toll-like Receptor TLR4 Is Associated with HPV DNA Integration in Penile Carcinoma.

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    Damasdi, Miklos; Kovacs, Krisztina; Farkas, Nelli; Jakab, Ferenc; Kovacs, Gyula

    2017-10-01

    Development of penile cancers is attributed to HPV-related carcinogenesis. Our aim was to analyze HPV positivity and TLR4, p16(ink4a) and p53 expression. HPV presence was assessed with virus-specific TaqMan PCR and HPV Genotyping Test in 31 penile cancers. Immunohistochemistry was carried out on tissue microarray. TLR4 expression was detected in 4 of the 16 HPV positive and 13 of the 15 HPV negative tumors. We found a significant inverse correlation between HPV positivity and TLR4 expression (p=0.0006). Ten of the 16 HPV-positive but none of the 15 HPV-negative tumors expressed p16INK4a. A significant correlation was seen between p53 expression and lack of HPV DNA (p=0.0191) as well as between TLR4 and p53 expression (p=0.0198) in penile cancers. Our findings suggest a protective role of TLR4 expression against HPV DNA integration and the viral and non-viral carcinogenesis of penile cancer. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  15. In vivo evolution of the gp90 gene and consistently low plasma viral load during transient immune suppression demonstrate the safety of an attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian; Jiang, Chenggang; Lin, Yuezhi; Wang, Xuefeng; Zhao, Liping; Xiang, Wenhua; Shao, Yiming; Shen, Rongxian; Kong, Xiangang; Zhou, Jianhua

    2009-01-01

    To study the in vivo evolution of the attenuated Chinese equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine, viral gp90 gene variation and virus replication in immunosuppressed hosts were investigated. The results showed that after vaccination, the gp90 gene followed an evolutionary trend of declining diversity. The trend coincided with the maturation of immunity to EIAV, and eventually, the gp90 gene became highly homologous. The sequences of these predominant quasispecies were consistently detected up to 18 months after vaccination. Furthermore, after transient immune suppression with dexamethasone, the plasma viral RNA copy number of the vaccine strain in three vaccinated ponies remained consistently below the "pathogenic threshold" level, while the viral load increased by 25,000-fold in the positive control of an inapparent carrier of the parental virulent strain. This study is the first to provide evidence for the safety of an attenuated lentiviral vaccine with decreased genomic diversity and consistently low viral replication under suppressed immunity.

  16. Molecular events leading to HPV-induced high grade neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia M. Wilting

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is initiated by high-risk types of the human papillomavirus (hrHPV and develops via precursor stages, called cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN. High-grade CIN lesions are considered true precancerous lesions when the viral oncogenes E6 and E7 are aberrantly expressed in the dividing cells. This results in abolishment of normal cell cycle control via p53 and pRb degradation. However, it has become clear that these viral oncogenes possess additional oncogenic properties, including interference with the DNA methylation machinery and mitotic checkpoints. Identification of the resulting molecular events leading to high-grade neoplasia will 1 increase our understanding of cervical carcinogenesis, 2 yield biomarkers for early diagnosis, and 3 identify therapeutic targets for HPV-induced (pre cancerous lesions.This review will briefly summarise current advances in our understanding of the molecular alterations in the host cell genome that occur during HPV-induced carcinogenesis.

  17. Detection of E6/E7 HPV oncogene transcripts as biomarker of cervical intaepithelial displasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Carcheri

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that only persistent infection with high risk types of Human Papillomavirus (HPV HR is a significant risk factor for the development of an invasive squamous cervical cancer. The overexpression of viral oncogenes E6/E7 of HPV is considered a necessary process for incurring in a malignant phenotype.A HPV infection can be identified by detection of HPV DNA in biological samples, but the DNAbased tests cannot delineate between transient or persistent and potentially transforming infection. Instead there is many evidence to suggest that detection of HPV gene expression may constitute a more specific approach to highlight a clinically significant infection. Especially seems that the detection of E6/E7 transcripts can be usefully used for identify the women with a persistent HPV infection that will can induce a future cervical cancer. The aim of our study is to investigate if the detection of oncogenic viral gene activity by detecting transcripts of the E6 and E7 genes can be most usefull of HPV-DNA test in the triage of ASCUS or low grade cervical lesions. Our results confirm that HPV E6/E7 mRNA test can be considered a promising method to stratify HPV positive women for risk of future high-grade cervical lesions or cervical intaepithelial neoplasia.

  18. Characterization of HPV and host genome interactions in primary head and neck cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfenov, Michael; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Gehlenborg, Nils; Freeman, Samuel S.; Danilova, Ludmila; Bristow, Christopher A.; Lee, Semin; Hadjipanayis, Angela G.; Ivanova, Elena V.; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Protopopov, Alexei; Yang, Lixing; Seth, Sahil; Song, Xingzhi; Tang, Jiabin; Ren, Xiaojia; Zhang, Jianhua; Pantazi, Angeliki; Santoso, Netty; Xu, Andrew W.; Mahadeshwar, Harshad; Wheeler, David A.; Haddad, Robert I.; Jung, Joonil; Ojesina, Akinyemi I.; Issaeva, Natalia; Yarbrough, Wendell G.; Hayes, D. Neil; Grandis, Jennifer R.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Meyerson, Matthew; Park, Peter J.; Chin, Lynda; Seidman, J. G.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Kucherlapati, Raju; Ally, Adrian; Balasundaram, Miruna; Birol, Inanc; Bowlby, Reanne; Butterfield, Yaron S.N.; Carlsen, Rebecca; Cheng, Dean; Chu, Andy; Dhalla, Noreen; Guin, Ranabir; Holt, Robert A.; Jones, Steven J.M.; Lee, Darlene; Li, Haiyan I.; Marra, Marco A.; Mayo, Michael; Moore, Richard A.; Mungall, Andrew J.; Robertson, A. Gordon; Schein, Jacqueline E.; Sipahimalani, Payal; Tam, Angela; Thiessen, Nina; Wong, Tina; Protopopov, Alexei; Santoso, Netty; Lee, Semin; Parfenov, Michael; Zhang, Jianhua; Mahadeshwar, Harshad S.; Tang, Jiabin; Ren, Xiaojia; Seth, Sahil; Haseley, Psalm; Zeng, Dong; Yang, Lixing; Xu, Andrew W.; Song, Xingzhi; Pantazi, Angeliki; Bristow, Christopher; Hadjipanayis, Angela; Seidman, Jonathan; Chin, Lynda; Park, Peter J.; Kucherlapati, Raju; Akbani, Rehan; Casasent, Tod; Liu, Wenbin; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon; Motter, Thomas; Weinstein, John; Diao, Lixia; Wang, Jing; Fan, You Hong; Liu, Jinze; Wang, Kai; Auman, J. Todd; Balu, Saianand; Bodenheimer, Tom; Buda, Elizabeth; Hayes, D. Neil; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Hoyle, Alan P.; Jefferys, Stuart R.; Jones, Corbin D.; Kimes, Patrick K.; Marron, J.S.; Meng, Shaowu; Mieczkowski, Piotr A.; Mose, Lisle E.; Parker, Joel S.; Perou, Charles M.; Prins, Jan F.; Roach, Jeffrey; Shi, Yan; Simons, Janae V.; Singh, Darshan; Soloway, Mathew G.; Tan, Donghui; Veluvolu, Umadevi; Walter, Vonn; Waring, Scot; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Wu, Junyuan; Zhao, Ni; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Tward, Aaron D.; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Saksena, Gordon; Jung, Joonil; Ojesina, Akinyemi I.; Carter, Scott L.; Zack, Travis I.; Schumacher, Steven E.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Freeman, Samuel S.; Meyerson, Matthew; Cho, Juok; Chin, Lynda; Getz, Gad; Noble, Michael S.; DiCara, Daniel; Zhang, Hailei; Heiman, David I.; Gehlenborg, Nils; Voet, Doug; Lin, Pei; Frazer, Scott; Stojanov, Petar; Liu, Yingchun; Zou, Lihua; Kim, Jaegil; Lawrence, Michael S.; Sougnez, Carrie; Lichtenstein, Lee; Cibulskis, Kristian; Lander, Eric; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Muzny, Donna; Doddapaneni, HarshaVardhan; Kovar, Christie; Reid, Jeff; Morton, Donna; Han, Yi; Hale, Walker; Chao, Hsu; Chang, Kyle; Drummond, Jennifer A.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Kakkar, Nipun; Wheeler, David; Xi, Liu; Ciriello, Giovanni; Ladanyi, Marc; Lee, William; Ramirez, Ricardo; Sander, Chris; Shen, Ronglai; Sinha, Rileen; Weinhold, Nils; Taylor, Barry S.; Aksoy, B. Arman; Dresdner, Gideon; Gao, Jianjiong; Gross, Benjamin; Jacobsen, Anders; Reva, Boris; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sumer, S. Onur; Sun, Yichao; Chan, Timothy; Morris, Luc; Stuart, Joshua; Benz, Stephen; Ng, Sam; Benz, Christopher; Yau, Christina; Baylin, Stephen B.; Cope, Leslie; Danilova, Ludmila; Herman, James G.; Bootwalla, Moiz; Maglinte, Dennis T.; Laird, Peter W.; Triche, Timothy; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Van Den Berg, David J.; Agrawal, Nishant; Bishop, Justin; Boutros, Paul C.; Bruce, Jeff P; Byers, Lauren Averett; Califano, Joseph; Carey, Thomas E.; Chen, Zhong; Cheng, Hui; Chiosea, Simion I.; Cohen, Ezra; Diergaarde, Brenda; Egloff, Ann Marie; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Ferris, Robert L.; Frederick, Mitchell J.; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Guo, Yan; Haddad, Robert I.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Harris, Thomas; Hayes, D. Neil; Hui, Angela BY; Lee, J. Jack; Lippman, Scott M.; Liu, Fei-Fei; McHugh, Jonathan B.; Myers, Jeff; Ng, Patrick Kwok Shing; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Pickering, Curtis R.; Prystowsky, Michael; Romkes, Marjorie; Saleh, Anthony D.; Sartor, Maureen A.; Seethala, Raja; Seiwert, Tanguy Y.; Si, Han; Tward, Aaron D.; Van Waes, Carter; Waggott, Daryl M.; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Yarbrough, Wendell; Zhang, Jiexin; Zuo, Zhixiang; Burnett, Ken; Crain, Daniel; Gardner, Johanna; Lau, Kevin; Mallery, David; Morris, Scott; Paulauskis, Joseph; Penny, Robert; Shelton, Candance; Shelton, Troy; Sherman, Mark; Yena, Peggy; Black, Aaron D.; Bowen, Jay; Frick, Jessica; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Harper, Hollie A.; Lichtenberg, Tara M.; Ramirez, Nilsa C.; Wise, Lisa; Zmuda, Erik; Baboud, Julien; Jensen, Mark A.; Kahn, Ari B.; Pihl, Todd D.; Pot, David A.; Srinivasan, Deepak; Walton, Jessica S.; Wan, Yunhu; Burton, Robert; Davidsen, Tanja; Demchok, John A.; Eley, Greg; Ferguson, Martin L.; Shaw, Kenna R. Mills; Ozenberger, Bradley A.; Sheth, Margi; Sofia, Heidi J.; Tarnuzzer, Roy; Wang, Zhining; Yang, Liming; Zenklusen, Jean Claude; Saller, Charles; Tarvin, Katherine; Chen, Chu; Bollag, Roni; Weinberger, Paul; Golusiński, Wojciech; Golusiński, Paweł; Ibbs, Matthiew; Korski, Konstanty; Mackiewicz, Andrzej; Suchorska, Wiktoria; Szybiak, Bartosz; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Burnett, Ken; Curley, Erin; Gardner, Johanna; Mallery, David; Penny, Robert; Shelton, Troy; Yena, Peggy; Beard, Christina; Mitchell, Colleen; Sandusky, George; Agrawal, Nishant; Ahn, Julie; Bishop, Justin; Califano, Joseph; Khan, Zubair; Bruce, Jeff P; Hui, Angela BY; Irish, Jonathan; Liu, Fei-Fei; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Waldron, John; Boutros, Paul C.; Waggott, Daryl M.; Myers, Jeff; Lippman, Scott M.; Egea, Sophie; Gomez-Fernandez, Carmen; Herbert, Lynn; Bradford, Carol R.; Carey, Thomas E.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Haddad, Andrea S.; Jones, Tamara R.; Komarck, Christine M.; Malakh, Mayya; McHugh, Jonathan B.; Moyer, Jeffrey S.; Nguyen, Ariane; Peterson, Lisa A.; Prince, Mark E.; Rozek, Laura S.; Sartor, Maureen A.; Taylor, Evan G.; Walline, Heather M.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Boice, Lori; Chera, Bhishamjit S.; Funkhouser, William K.; Gulley, Margaret L.; Hackman, Trevor G.; Hayes, D. Neil; Hayward, Michele C.; Huang, Mei; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Salazar, Ashley H.; Shockley, William W.; Shores, Carol G.; Thorne, Leigh; Weissler, Mark C.; Wrenn, Sylvia; Zanation, Adam M.; Chiosea, Simion I.; Diergaarde, Brenda; Egloff, Ann Marie; Ferris, Robert L.; Romkes, Marjorie; Seethala, Raja; Brown, Brandee T.; Guo, Yan; Pham, Michelle; Yarbrough, Wendell G.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have established that a subset of head and neck tumors contains human papillomavirus (HPV) sequences and that HPV-driven head and neck cancers display distinct biological and clinical features. HPV is known to drive cancer by the actions of the E6 and E7 oncoproteins, but the molecular architecture of HPV infection and its interaction with the host genome in head and neck cancers have not been comprehensively described. We profiled a cohort of 279 head and neck cancers with next generation RNA and DNA sequencing and show that 35 (12.5%) tumors displayed evidence of high-risk HPV types 16, 33, or 35. Twenty-five cases had integration of the viral genome into one or more locations in the human genome with statistical enrichment for genic regions. Integrations had a marked impact on the human genome and were associated with alterations in DNA copy number, mRNA transcript abundance and splicing, and both inter- and intrachromosomal rearrangements. Many of these events involved genes with documented roles in cancer. Cancers with integrated vs. nonintegrated HPV displayed different patterns of DNA methylation and both human and viral gene expressions. Together, these data provide insight into the mechanisms by which HPV interacts with the human genome beyond expression of viral oncoproteins and suggest that specific integration events are an integral component of viral oncogenesis. PMID:25313082

  19. Somatic Host Cell Alterations in HPV Carcinogenesis

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    Tamara R. Litwin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available High-risk human papilloma virus (HPV infections cause cancers in different organ sites, most commonly cervical and head and neck cancers. While carcinogenesis is initiated by two viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, increasing evidence shows the importance of specific somatic events in host cells for malignant transformation. HPV-driven cancers share characteristic somatic changes, including apolipoprotein B mRNA editing catalytic polypeptide-like (APOBEC-driven mutations and genomic instability leading to copy number variations and large chromosomal rearrangements. HPV-associated cancers have recurrent somatic mutations in phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN, human leukocyte antigen A and B (HLA-A and HLA-B-A/B, and the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ pathway, and rarely have mutations in the tumor protein p53 (TP53 and RB transcriptional corepressor 1 (RB1 tumor suppressor genes. There are some variations by tumor site, such as NOTCH1 mutations which are primarily found in head and neck cancers. Understanding the somatic events following HPV infection and persistence can aid the development of early detection biomarkers, particularly when mutations in precancers are characterized. Somatic mutations may also influence prognosis and treatment decisions.

  20. Somatic Host Cell Alterations in HPV Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin, Tamara R; Clarke, Megan A; Dean, Michael; Wentzensen, Nicolas

    2017-08-03

    High-risk human papilloma virus (HPV) infections cause cancers in different organ sites, most commonly cervical and head and neck cancers. While carcinogenesis is initiated by two viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, increasing evidence shows the importance of specific somatic events in host cells for malignant transformation. HPV-driven cancers share characteristic somatic changes, including apolipoprotein B mRNA editing catalytic polypeptide-like (APOBEC)-driven mutations and genomic instability leading to copy number variations and large chromosomal rearrangements. HPV-associated cancers have recurrent somatic mutations in phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha ( PIK3CA ) and phosphatase and tensin homolog ( PTEN ), human leukocyte antigen A and B ( HLA-A and HLA-B ) -A/B , and the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) pathway, and rarely have mutations in the tumor protein p53 ( TP53 ) and RB transcriptional corepressor 1 ( RB1 ) tumor suppressor genes. There are some variations by tumor site, such as NOTCH1 mutations which are primarily found in head and neck cancers. Understanding the somatic events following HPV infection and persistence can aid the development of early detection biomarkers, particularly when mutations in precancers are characterized. Somatic mutations may also influence prognosis and treatment decisions.

  1. Viral Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home A-Z Health Topics Viral hepatitis Viral hepatitis > A-Z Health Topics Viral hepatitis (PDF, 90 ... liver. Source: National Cancer Institute Learn more about hepatitis Watch a video. Learn who is at risk ...

  2. IL-10 gene polymorphism c.-592C>A increases HPV infection susceptibility and influences IL-10 levels in HPV infected women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, Fernanda Costa Brandão; Pereira, Ana Paula Lombardi; Trugilo, Kleber Paiva; Cebinelli, Guilherme Cesar Martelossi; Silva, Lorena Flor da Rosa Santos; Lozovoy, Marcell Alysson Batisti; Simão, Andréa Name Colado; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara; de Oliveira, Karen Brajão

    2017-09-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) influences HPV infection and viral persistence, favoring cervical immunosuppression and cervical carcinogenesis. IL-10 levels may be influenced by HPV itself and by IL-10 polymorphisms, including rs1800872 (c.-592C>A). Therefore, we evaluated the influence of IL-10 c.-592C>A polymorphism in HPV infection and in IL-10 plasmatic/cervical levels in HPV infected and non-infected women. The study included 174 infected and 186 non-infected patients. Cervical epithelial scrapings were obtained to determine HPV DNA presence PCR. Peripheral blood samples were obtained to determine IL-10 polymorphism by PCR-RFLP, while IL-10 levels were assessed by ELISA. HPV was more prevalent among allele A carriers (pA polymorphism being associated with HPV infection. As demonstrated by binary logistic regression analysis, heterozygotes [ORadj=2.081 95% CI (1.222-3.544), p=0.007] and homozygotes [ORadj=3.745 95% CI (1.695-8.271), p=0.001] showed approximately 2 and 4 time's greater odds, respectively, of presenting HPV when compared to CC patients. Moreover, HPV infected patients carrying polymorphic allele A showed higher IL-10 cervical levels (p=0.039). Binary logistic regression analysis demonstrated that IL-10 cervical levels were not independently associated to CA+AA genotypes (p=0.162), neither to HPV's presence (p=0.061), thus IL-10 cervical levels are possibly increased because of both HPV and allele A presence. Taken together, these findings suggest that IL-10 c.-592C>A polymorphism is independently associated with HPV infection susceptibility exerting influence on IL-10 cervical levels in HPV infected women, thus contributing to cervical carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Therapeutic Vaccination for HPV Induced Cervical Cancers

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    Joeli A. Brinkman

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical Cancer is the second leading cause of cancer–related deaths in women worldwide and is associated with Human Papillomavirus (HPV infection, creating a unique opportunity to treat cervical cancer through anti-viral vaccination. Although a prophylactic vaccine may be available within a year, millions of women, already infected, will continue to suffer from HPV-related disease, emphasizing the need to develop therapeutic vaccination strategies. A majority of clinical trials examining therapeutic vaccination have shown limited efficacy due to examining patients with more advanced-stage cancer who tend to have decreased immune function. Current trends in clinical trials with therapeutic agents examine patients with pre-invasive lesions in order to prevent invasive cervical cancer. However, longer follow-up is necessary to correlate immune responses to lesion regression. Meanwhile, preclinical studies in this field include further exploration of peptide or protein vaccination, and the delivery of HPV antigens in DNA-based vaccines or in viral vectors. As long as pre-clinical studies continue to advance, the prospect of therapeutic vaccination to treat existing lesions seem good in the near future. Positive consequences of therapeutic vaccination would include less disfiguring treatment options and fewer instances of recurrent or progressive lesions leading to a reduction in cervical cancer incidence.

  4. TTV and HPV co-infection in cervical smears of patients with cervical lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tachezy Ruth

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The female lower genital tract is a gateway for pathogens entering the host through the mucous membrane. One of the prevalent human viruses is Torque teno virus (TTV. The major reported routes of TTV transmission are fecal-oral and parenteral. Furthermore, other modes of transmission, e.g. sexual contact, are suggested. To investigate the sexual route of TTV transmission, cervical smears of healthy women and those with cervical lesions were screened for the presence of TTV DNA. Methods TTV DNA was studied in cervical smears of 95 patients with cervical lesions and 55 healthy women. Paired serum samples were available from 55 and 42 women, respectively. All healthy women had normal cytology while 44 patients had histologically confirmed low-grade lesion (LGL and 51 high-grade lesion (HGL. TTV DNA was detected with primers specific for the non-coding region. In 40 paired cervical smears and serum samples, the phylogenetic group of TTV isolates was determined. The presence of HPV DNA in cervical smears was detected by means of PCR with MY09/11 primers. Results The prevalence of TTV DNA in cervical smears of healthy women was 52.7% and was comparable with that in paired serum samples (50%. Symptomatic women had significantly higher prevalence of TTV DNA in cervical smears (74.7% than healthy controls. The TTV DNA prevalence in patient serum samples was 51%. The phylogenetic groups of TTV serum isolates were concordant with those of TTV from cervical smears of the same subjects. In cervical smears, a wider variety of TTV isolates was found. The viral loads in cervical smears were 10 to 1000 times as high as in sera. The HPV-positive study subjects had significantly higher TTV DNA prevalence than HPV negatives. The prevalence of TTV was not associated with disease severity. Conclusion High prevalence of TTV in cervical smears suggests that sexual transmission is another mode of expansion of TTV infection among the population. The

  5. Viral load of equine herpesviruses 2 and 5 in nasal swabs of actively racing Standardbred trotters: Temporal relationship of shedding to clinical findings and poor performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, Helena; Ullman, Karin; Treiberg Berndtsson, Louise; Riihimäki, Miia; Penell, Johanna; Ståhl, Karl; Valarcher, Jean-François; Pringle, John

    2015-09-30

    The equine gamma herpesviruses 2 and 5 (EHV-2 and -5) have frequently been observed in the equine population and until recently presumed low to nonpathogenic. However, recent reports linking presence of equine gamma herpesviruses with clinical signs of mild to severe lung disease, suggest that the role of these viruses in respiratory disease and poor performance syndrome is still unclear. Moreover, baseline data regarding the temporal pattern of shedding of EHV-2 and EHV-5 within stables and within individual actively racing horses have been lacking. In a prospective longitudinal study, we followed elite racing Standardbred trotters at monthly intervals for 13 months, to investigate whether the amount of EHV-2 and EHV-5 shedded in nasal secretions varied over time within and between individual horses. Sixty-six elite horses were investigated by analyzing nasal swabs and serum samples, a health check and evaluation of athletic performance monthly during the study period. Nasal swabs were analyzed with two newly developed qPCR assays for EHV-2 and EHV-5, respectively. Of 663 samples, 197 (30%) were positive for EHV-2 and 492 (74%) positive for EHV-5. Furthermore, 176 (27%) of the samples were positive for both EHV-2 and EHV-5 simultaneously. There was considerable variation in the amount and frequency of shedding of EHV-2 and EHV-5 within and between individual horses. Viral load varied seasonally, but neither EHV-2 nor EHV-5 viral peaks were associated with clinical respiratory disease and/or poor performance in racing Standardbred trotters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Detection of hepatitis C virus in patients with terminal renal disease undergoing dialysis in southern Brazil: prevalence, risk factors, genotypes, and viral load dynamics in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidales-Braz, Beatris Maria; da Silva, Naylê Maria Oliveira; Lobato, Rubens; Germano, Fabiana Nunes; da Mota, Luiza Dias; Barros, Elvino J G; de Martinez, Ana Maria Barral

    2015-02-03

    Hepatitis C (HCV) is a serious public health issue, and it is estimated that 3% of the world's population is infected. Patients in hemodialysis units have an increased risk for contracting HCV, and high prevalence rates have been found in hemodialysis units around the world. This study is aimed at determining the prevalence of HCV in patients with terminal chronic renal disease (tCRD) who have been submitted to hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis in southern Brazil to characterize the most prevalent genotypes, the viral load, and possible risk factors and to assess the validity between the ELISA and RT-PCR detection methods. Of 320 patients from three dialysis units, 318 participated in this study. According to the medical records, 55 patients were reactive to HCV, as determined via ELISA. All 318 samples were submitted to RT-PCR and genotyped using an Abbott Realtime m2000 system. Data obtained through a questionnaire and chemical variables were associated with the HCV. The prevalence of HCV was 18.24% (58), and the concordance between the HCV serology and the RT-PCR was 94%. Three patients were diagnosed to be negative for HCV using the ELISA assay but positive when using RT-PCR. Genotype 1 was the most prevalent (46.7%) genotype, within which subtype 1a was the most frequent (74.1%). One of the risk factors associated with HCV infection was the length of time that the patient had been undergoing hemodialysis treatments (p hemodialysis (p hemodialysis indicates a possible destruction or gripping of viral particles to the dialyzer membrane.

  7. Persistent genital tract HIV-1 RNA shedding after change in treatment regimens in antiretroviral-experienced women with detectable plasma viral load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Kartik K; DeLong, Allison K; Kantor, Rami; Chapman, Stacey; Ingersoll, Jessica; Kurpewski, Jaclynn; De Pasquale, Maria Pia; D'Aquila, Richard; Caliendo, Angela M; Cu-Uvin, Susan

    2013-04-01

    To longitudinally assess the association between plasma viral load (PVL) and genital tract human immunodeficiency virus (GT HIV) RNA among HIV-1 infected women changing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) because of detectable PVL on current treatment. Women were eligible for the study if they had detectable PVL (defined as two consecutive samples with PVL>1000 copies/mL) and intended to change their current HAART regimen at the time of enrollment. Paired plasma and GT HIV-1 RNA were measured prospectively over 3 years. Longitudinal analyses examined rates of GT HIV-1 RNA shedding and the association with PVL. Sixteen women were followed for a median of 11 visits contributing a total of 205 study visits. At study enrollment, all had detectable PVL and 69% had detectable GT HIV-1 RNA. Half of the women changed to a new HAART regimen with ≥3 active antiretroviral drugs. The probability of having detectable PVL ≥30 days after changing HAART was 0.56 (95% CI: 0.37 to 0.74). Fourteen women (88%) had detectable PVL on a follow-up visit ≥30 or 60 days after changing HAART; and 12 women (75%) had detectable GT HIV-1 RNA on a follow-up visit ≥30 or 60 days after changing HAART. When PVL was undetectable, GT shedding occurred at 11% of visits, and when PVL was detectable, GT shedding occurred at 47% of visits. Some treatment-experienced HIV-infected women continue to have detectable virus in both the plasma and GT following a change in HAART, highlighting the difficulty of viral suppression in this patient population.

  8. Pattern of HPV infection in basal cell carcinoma and in perilesional skin biopsies from immunocompetent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewska, Krystyna; Regalbuto, Elisa; Pierucci, Federica; Arvia, Rosaria; Mazzoli, Sandra; Gori, Alessia; de Giorgi, Vincenzo

    2012-12-17

    The association between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) such as squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is not yet fully understood. We analysed the prevalence and spectrum of cutaneous beta-HPV types and mucosal/genital HPV types in paired biopsies (tumour and corresponding perilesional skin) obtained from 50 BCC immunocompetent patients. A small group of SCC patients (n=9) was also included. We also evaluated some previously postulated risk factors for HPV infection in NMSC patients. All biopsies were negative for mucosal/genital HPV types. Overall, beta-HPV DNA was detected more often in SCC compared to BCC patients (78% vs 55% of total samples). The frequency of infection increased with the patient's age [OR=4.88 (95% CI 1.29-18.39)]. There was no significant correlation between beta-HPV positivity and sex, skin type and UV exposure. The prevalence of beta-HPV species 1 types was significantly higher than those belonging to other beta-HPV species in biopsies from BCC (p=0.022) but not from SCC subjects (p=0.091). There was no significant difference in the overall prevalence of beta-HPV infection and the number of viral types between tumour lesions and perilesional skin. BCC samples were significantly more likely to be infected with beta-HPV species 1 types compared to perilesional skin (p=0.036) and showed a higher frequency of mixed infections (p=0.028). These findings demonstrate that beta-HPV types belonging to species 1 are the most common HPV types detected in the skin of BCC patients. Moreover beta-1-HPV types and mixed infections are significantly more frequent in tumour samples than in healthy perilesional skin. Our results suggest that beta-1-HPVs as well as co-infection with more than one viral type could be important in NMSC and in particular in BCC.Further studies aimed to compare the biological activity of viral types in tumours and in healthy skin (viral replication and expression

  9. Pattern of HPV infection in basal cell carcinoma and in perilesional skin biopsies from immunocompetent patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakrzewska Krystyna

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The association between human papillomavirus (HPV infection and non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs such as squamous cell carcinoma (SCC and basal cell carcinoma (BCC is not yet fully understood. We analysed the prevalence and spectrum of cutaneous beta-HPV types and mucosal/genital HPV types in paired biopsies (tumour and corresponding perilesional skin obtained from 50 BCC immunocompetent patients. A small group of SCC patients (n=9 was also included. We also evaluated some previously postulated risk factors for HPV infection in NMSC patients. Results All biopsies were negative for mucosal/genital HPV types. Overall, beta-HPV DNA was detected more often in SCC compared to BCC patients (78% vs 55% of total samples. The frequency of infection increased with the patient’s age [OR=4.88 (95% CI 1.29-18.39]. There was no significant correlation between beta-HPV positivity and sex, skin type and UV exposure. The prevalence of beta-HPV species 1 types was significantly higher than those belonging to other beta-HPV species in biopsies from BCC (p=0.022 but not from SCC subjects (p=0.091. There was no significant difference in the overall prevalence of beta-HPV infection and the number of viral types between tumour lesions and perilesional skin. BCC samples were significantly more likely to be infected with beta-HPV species 1 types compared to perilesional skin (p=0.036 and showed a higher frequency of mixed infections (p=0.028. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that beta-HPV types belonging to species 1 are the most common HPV types detected in the skin of BCC patients. Moreover beta-1-HPV types and mixed infections are significantly more frequent in tumour samples than in healthy perilesional skin. Our results suggest that beta-1-HPVs as well as co-infection with more than one viral type could be important in NMSC and in particular in BCC. Further studies aimed to compare the biological activity of viral types in tumours and in

  10. Comparison of the health-related quality of life, CD4 count and viral load of AIDS patients and people with HIV who have been on treatment for 12 months in rural South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igumbor, Jude; Stewart, Aimee; Holzemer, William

    2013-03-01

    This study compared the level of CD4 count, viral load and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) between treatment-naïve AIDS patients and a cohort of people living with HIV who have been on treatment for 12 months. This study is based on a secondary data analysis of the records of 642 people with HIV consisting of 311 treatment-naïve AIDS patients and 331 people with HIV who have been on treatment for 12 months. The study findings are mostly presented in tables and analysed using the t-test to compare HRQOL scores, CD4 count and viral load in the two groups. The study generally noted poor financial capacity and low activity tolerance among the participants. Significant changes were noted in all the domains of HRQOL compared between the treatment-naïve patients and the 12 months treatment cohort. In the same manner, the median CD4 cell count and viral load differed significantly between both groups. The treatment-naïve and the 12 months treatment cohorts consistently reported much lower quality of life scores in the level of dependence domain which includes the measures of mobility, activity of daily living, dependence on medication and work capacity. There were little or no associations between the biomedical markers (CD4 count and viral load) and HRQOL indicators. However, the quality of life tended to increase with increase in the CD4 cell count. The poor to no association between the biomedical markers and HRQOL indicators show that these cannot be direct proxies of each other and that the CD4 cell count and viral load alone may be inadequate eligibility criteria for social support.

  11. HPV infection in women: psychosexual impact of genital warts and intraepithelial lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziottin, Alessandra; Serafini, Audrey

    2009-03-01

    Genital Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most commonly occurring sexually transmitted viral infection in humans. HPV is a wide family of DNA viruses, which may cause benign skin and mucosal tumors (genital, anal, or oral warts), intraepithelial neoplasias, and/or malignant cancers in different organs. Women are more susceptible to the oncogenic effect of HPVs, mostly at the genital site on the uterine cervix. This review analyzes the impact of: (i) genital warts (GWs) and their treatment; (ii) HPV-related genital, oral, and anal precancerous lesions on women's sexual function. A Medline search was carried out. Search terms were HPV, GWs, intraepithelial neoplasia, cervical cancer, anal cancer, oral cancer, epidemiology, HPV risk factors, sexual dysfunctions, desire disorders, arousal disorders, dyspareunia, vulvar vestibulitis, vulvodynia, orgasmic difficulties, sexual repertoire, couple sexual problems, depression, anxiety, pap smear, screening program, therapy, and vaccines. Sexual consequences of HPV infection in women, specifically GWs and intraepithelial HPV-related neoplasia. Psychosexual vulnerability increases with number of recurrences of HPV infections. Depression, anxiety, and anger are the emotions most frequently reported. However, to date, there is no conclusive evidence of a specific correlation between HPV infection and a specific female sexual disorder. The relationship between HPV and vulvar vestibulitis/vulvodynia-related dyspareunia seems not to be direct. Counseling problems, the role of anti-HPV vaccine, and the concept of the high-risk partner are discussed. The reader is offered a practical approach with clinically relevant recommendations that may prove useful in his/her daily practice when dealing with HPV-infected women and couples. The evidence of psychosexual consequences of HPV-related GWs and intraepithelial lesions is limited. Specific research on the sexual impact of GWs and intraepithelial HPV-related lesion in women is

  12. Gene expression profiles in HPV-infected head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlecht, N F; Burk, R D; Adrien, L; Dunne, A; Kawachi, N; Sarta, C; Chen, Q; Brandwein-Gensler, M; Prystowsky, M B; Childs, G; Smith, R V; Belbin, T J

    2007-11-01

    Epidemiological and laboratory evidence indicate that, in addition to tobacco and alcohol, human papillomaviruses (HPV) play an important aetiological role in a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). To evaluate the molecular pathogenesis of HPV-infected HNSCC, we compared gene expression patterns between HPV-positive and -negative HNSCC tumours using cDNA microarrays. Tumour tissue was collected from 42 histologically confirmed HNSCC patients from an inner-city area of New York. Total DNA and RNA were extracted and purified from frozen tumour samples and gene expression levels were compared to a universal human reference RNA standard using a 27 323 cDNA microarray chip. HPV detection and genotyping were performed using an MY09/11-PCR system and RT-PCR. HPV was detected in 29% of HNSCC tumours. Most harboured only HPV16 and expressed the HPV16-E6 oncogene. HPV prevalence was highest in pharyngeal tumours (45%). Gene expression patterns that differentiated HPV-positive from negative tumours were compared by supervised classification analysis, and a multiple-gene signature was found to predict HPV16 prevalence in primary HNSCC with a false discovery rate HPV16-positive HNSCC. Overexpressed genes in HPV-positive HNSCC tumours included the retinoblastoma-binding protein (p18), replication factor-C gene, and an E2F-dimerization partner transcription factor (TFDP2) that have also been found to be overexpressed in cervical cancer. An additional subset of genes involved in viral defence and immune response, including interleukins and interferon-induced proteins, was found to be down-regulated in HPV-positive tumours, supporting a characteristic and unique transcriptional profile in HPV-induced HNSCC. Copyright 2007 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Focal epithelial hyperplasia by human papillomavirus (HPV)-32 misdiagnosed as HPV-16 and treated with combination of retinoids, imiquimod and quadrivalent HPV vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemigniani, Franco; Hernández-Losa, Javier; Ferrer, Berta; García-Patos, Vicente

    2015-12-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) or Heck's disease is a rare, benign and asymptomatic mucosal proliferation associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, mainly with genotypes 13 and 32. We report a florid case of FEH in an 11-year-old Haitian girl with systemic lupus erythematosus receiving immunosuppressive therapy. Cryotherapy was previously performed on numerous occasions with no results. We decided to prescribe a non-invasive and more comfortable treatment. A combination of topical retinoid and imiquimod cream was well tolerated and led to an important improvement. The evidence of infection by HPV-16 detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique, prompted us to prescribe the quadrivalent HPV vaccine (types 6, 11,16 and 18). Subsequent PCR sequencing with generic primers GP5-GP6 and further BLAST comparative analysis confirmed that genomic viral sequence in our case truly corresponded with HPV-32. This molecular misdiagnosis can be explained by the similarity between genomic sequences of both HPV-16 and -32 genotypes. At the 1-year follow up, we observed total clinical improvement and no recurrences of the disease. Complete healing in this case may correspond to a potential action of topical retinoid, imiquimod and the cross-protection mechanism of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  14. Chronic hepatitis C infection: influence of the viral load, genotypes, and GBV-C/HGV coinfection on the severity of the disease in a Brazilian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Leila M M B; Spinelli, Victorino; Ximenes, Ricardo A; Cavalcanti, Maria S; Melo, Raul; Jucá, Norma; Mizokami, Masashi; McFarlane, Ian G

    2002-05-01

    The distributions of the different genotypes of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) and GBV-C virus (GBV-C/HGV) vary geographically and information worldwide is still incomplete. In particular, there are few data on the distribution of genotypes (and their relationship to the severity of liver disease) in South America. Findings are described in 114 consecutive patients from Northeast Brazil (median age 52 years, range 18-72 years) who had abnormal levels of serum aminotransferases and seropositivity for HCV RNA. The patients were recruited from an outpatient clinic between November 1997 and April 1998. Quantitative HCV RNA and GBV-C/HGV RNA estimations were carried out by double-nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers from the 5'-untranslated regions (UTRs) of the genomes. HCV genotypes were determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis with 5'-UTR primers and by PCR with type-specific 5'-UTR primers. GBV-C/HGV-RNA genotypes were determined by RFLP with specific 5'-UTR primers and phylogenetic trees were constructed using the Neighbour-Joining and Drawtree programs. Histological features were graded and staged according to international criteria. Of the 114 patients, 35 (30.7%) patients had cirrhosis and 22 (27.8%) had mild, 51 (64.6%) had moderate, and 6 (7.6%) had severe chronic hepatitis. Median HCV viral load was 10(6) genome equivalents per millilitre (range 10(4)-10(9)/ml). Frequencies of genotypes were 5.3% type 1a, 44.7% type 1b, 3.5% type 2, 41.2% type 3, and 5.3% mixed types. GBV-C/HGV-RNA was detected in the sera of 12 (10.5%) patients and was distributed among three phylogenetic groups. There were no significant differences between patients with the predominant HCV genotypes (1b and 3) with respect to gender, age group, viral load, severity of liver disease, or coinfection with GBV-C/HGV. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Switching HIV treatment in adults based on CD4 count versus viral load monitoring: a randomized, non-inferiority trial in Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzague Jourdain

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Viral load (VL is recommended for monitoring the response to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART but is not routinely available in most low- and middle-income countries. The purpose of the study was to determine whether a CD4-based monitoring and switching strategy would provide a similar clinical outcome compared to the standard VL-based strategy in Thailand.The Programs for HIV Prevention and Treatment (PHPT-3 non-inferiority randomized clinical trial compared a treatment switching strategy based on CD4-only (CD4 monitoring versus viral-load (VL. Consenting participants were antiretroviral-naïve HIV-infected adults (CD4 count 50-250/mm(3 initiating non-nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI-based therapy. Randomization, stratified by site (21 public hospitals, was performed centrally after enrollment. Clinicians were unaware of the VL values of patients randomized to the CD4 arm. Participants switched to second-line combination with confirmed CD4 decline >30% from peak (within 200 cells from baseline in the CD4 arm, or confirmed VL >400 copies/ml in the VL arm. Primary endpoint was clinical failure at 3 years, defined as death, new AIDS-defining event, or CD4 400 copies/ml at switch was 7.2 months (5.8-8.0 in VL versus 15.8 months (8.5-20.4 in CD4 (p=0.002. FDO scores were not significantly different at time of switch. No adverse events related to the monitoring strategy were reported.The 3-year rates of clinical failure and loss of treatment options did not differ between strategies although the longer-term consequences of CD4 monitoring would need to be investigated. These results provide reassurance to treatment programs currently based on CD4 monitoring as VL measurement becomes more affordable and feasible in resource-limited settings.ClinicalTrials.govNCT00162682 Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  16. Real-Time PCR in HIV/Trypanosoma cruzi Coinfection with and without Chagas Disease Reactivation: Association with HIV Viral Load and CD4+ Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Vera Lúcia Teixeira; da Silva, Sheila Cristina Vicente; Sartori, Ana Marli; Bezerra, Rita Cristina; Westphalen, Elizabeth Visone Nunes; Molina, Tatiane Decaris; Teixeira, Antonio R. L.; Ibrahim, Karim Yaqub; Shikanai-Yasuda, Maria Aparecida

    2011-01-01

    Background Reactivation of chronic Chagas disease, which occurs in approximately 20% of patients coinfected with HIV/Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi), is commonly characterized by severe meningoencephalitis and myocarditis. The use of quantitative molecular tests to monitor Chagas disease reactivation was analyzed. Methodology Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of kDNA sequences, competitive (C-) PCR and real-time quantitative (q) PCR were compared with blood cultures and xenodiagnosis in samples from 91 patients (57 patients with chronic Chagas disease and 34 with HIV/T. cruzi coinfection), of whom 5 had reactivation of Chagas disease and 29 did not. Principal Findings qRT-PCR showed significant differences between groups; the highest parasitemia was observed in patients infected with HIV/T. cruzi with Chagas disease reactivation (median 1428.90 T. cruzi/mL), followed by patients with HIV/T. cruzi infection without reactivation (median 1.57 T. cruzi/mL) and patients with Chagas disease without HIV (median 0.00 T. cruzi/mL). Spearman's correlation coefficient showed that xenodiagnosis was correlated with blood culture, C-PCR and qRT-PCR. A stronger Spearman correlation index was found between C-PCR and qRT-PCR, the number of parasites and the HIV viral load, expressed as the number of CD4+ cells or the CD4+/CD8+ ratio. Conclusions qRT-PCR distinguished the groups of HIV/T. cruzi coinfected patients with and without reactivation. Therefore, this new method of qRT-PCR is proposed as a tool for prospective studies to analyze the importance of parasitemia (persistent and/or increased) as a criterion for recommending pre-emptive therapy in patients with chronic Chagas disease with HIV infection or immunosuppression. As seen in this study, an increase in HIV viral load and decreases in the number of CD4+ cells/mm3 and the CD4+/CD8+ ratio were identified as cofactors for increased parasitemia that can be used to target the introduction of early, pre-emptive therapy. PMID

  17. Multicenter Evaluation of Whole-Blood Epstein-Barr Viral Load Standardization Using the WHO International Standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenova, Touyana; Lupo, Julien; Alain, Sophie; Perrin-Confort, Gwladys; Grossi, Laurence; Dimier, Julie; Epaulard, Olivier; Morand, Patrice; Germi, Raphaële

    2016-07-01

    The first WHO international standard for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) (WHO EBV standard) for nucleic acid amplification technology (NAT)-based assays was commercialized in January 2012 by the National Institute for Biological Standards and Control. In the study reported here, we compared whole-blood EBV DNA load (EDL) results from 12 French laboratories for seven samples (Quality Controls for Molecular Diagnostics 2013 proficiency panel) in order to determine whether expression in international units reduces interlaboratory variability in whole-blood EDLs. Each testing laboratory used a conversion factor to convert EDL results from copies per milliliter to international units per milliliter. This conversion factor was calculated from the WHO EBV standard according to the protocol described in this study (nine laboratories) or the recommendations of the PCR kit suppliers (three laboratories). The interlaboratory variability in whole-blood EDL results was reduced after standardization of the results using the WHO EBV standard. For the seven samples tested, standard deviations (SD) ranged from 0.41 to 0.55 when the results were expressed in log copies per milliliter, whereas the SD ranged from 0.17 to 0.32 when results were given in log international units per milliliter. Comparing the variance data (F test), we showed that the dispersion of whole-blood EDL results was significantly lower when they were expressed in log international units per milliliter (P blood EDL results between laboratories as well as the monitoring of patients at high risk of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders or other EBV-associated diseases. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. HPV in genital cancers (at the exception of cervical cancer) and anal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sanjosé, Silvia; Bruni, Laia; Alemany, Laia

    2014-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been firmly established as a central and necessary cause of invasive cervical cancer and it has been etiologically linked to other anogenital (vulva, vagina, anus and penis) and head and neck cancers, particularly oropharyngeal. Although being rare, the incidence of some of these cancers in some countries has increased in the last decades. HPV-related anogenital tumors share many risk factors with cervical cancer. The HPV aetiological contribution differs in each anatomical location reflecting differences in the natural history and viral tissue tropism. The highest prevalence of HPV DNA in cancers other than cervix has been described for anal, followed by vagina, penile and vulvar cancers. HPV16 has been described as the most common type detected in all cancer sites with different contributions being the highest in anal carcinoma (around 80% of HPV DNA positive anal cancers) and the lowest in vaginal cancers with a contribution similar to that found in cervical cancers (around 60%). Current HPV vaccines have already demonstrated their efficacy in preventing anogenital pre-neoplastic lesions caused by vaccine HPV types. HPV-based prevention tools like HPV vaccination and to a lesser extend screening (e.g. for anal cancer) can be useful measures for reducing the burden of these anogenital cancers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... caused by persistent infection and genital warts ( 22 ). Analyses of data from women participating in a clinical ... is to contact the insurance plan or the clinic. Most private insurance plans cover HPV vaccination. The ...

  20. HPV DNA test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... test; Cancer of cervix - HPV DNA test References Hacker NF. Cervical dysplasia and cancer. In: Hacker NF, Gambone JC, Hobel CJ, eds. Hacker and Moore's Essentials of Obstetrics and Gynecology . 6th ...

  1. The HPV Vaccination Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Following the release of a consensus statement from the NCI-Designated Cancer Centers urging HPV vaccination in the United States, Dr. Noel Brewer discusses the country’s low vaccination rates and how clinicians can help to improve them.

  2. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... 6348 Email CDC-INFO U.S. Department of Health & Human Services HHS/Open USA.gov TOP

  3. HIV infection, viral load, low birth weight, and nevirapine are independent influences on growth velocity in HIV-exposed South African infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramokolo, Vundli; Lombard, Carl; Fadnes, Lars T; Doherty, Tanya; Jackson, Debra J; Goga, Ameena E; Chhagan, Meera; Van den Broeck, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Data from a prospective multisite cohort study were used to examine the effect of HIV exposure, untreated HIV infection, and single-dose nevirapine on infant growth velocity. The 2009 WHO growth velocity standards constitute a new tool for this type of investigation and are in need of functional validation. In period 1 (3-24 wk), 65 HIV-infected, 502 HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU), and 216 HIV-unexposed infants were included. In period 2 (25-36 wk), 31 infants moved from the HEU group to the HIV-infected group. We compared weight velocity Z-scores (WVZ) and length velocity Z-scores (LVZ) by HIV group and assessed their independent influences. In period 1, mean WVZ (95% CI) was significantly (P infected [-0.87 (-1.77, 0.04)] than HEU [0.81 (0.67, 0.94)] and unexposed [0.55 (0.33, 0.78)] infants. LVZ showed similar associations. In both periods, sick infants and those exposed to higher maternal viral loads had lower WVZ. Higher mean LVZ was associated with low birth weight. Infants that had received nevirapine had higher LVZ. In conclusion, HIV infection and not exposure was associated with low WVZ and LVZ in period 1. Eliminating infant HIV infection is a critical component in averting HIV-related poor growth patterns in infants in the first 6 mo of life.

  4. Changes in leukocyte subsets of pregnant gilts experimentally infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and relationships with viral load and fetal outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladinig, Andrea; Gerner, Wilhelm; Saalmüller, Armin; Lunney, Joan K; Ashley, Carolyn; Harding, John C S

    2014-12-14

    In spite of more than two decades of extensive research, the understanding of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSv) immunity is still incomplete. A PRRSv infection of the late term pregnant female can result in abortions, early farrowings, fetal death, and the birth of weak, congenitally infected piglets. The objectives of the present study were to investigate changes in peripheral blood mononuclear cell populations in third trimester pregnant females infected with type 2 PRRSv (NVSL 97-7895) and to analyze potential relationships with viral load and fetal mortality rate. PRRSv infection caused a massive, acute drop in total leukocyte counts affecting all PBMC populations by two days post infection. Except for B cells, cell counts started to rebound by day six post infection. Our data also show a greater decrease of naïve B cells, T-helper cells and cytolytic T cells than their respective effector or memory counterparts. Absolute numbers of T cells and γδ T cells were negatively associated with PRRSv RNA concentration in gilt serum over time. Additionally, absolute numbers of T helper cells may be predictive of fetal mortality rate. The preceding three leukocyte populations may therefore be predictive of PRRSv-related pathological outcomes in pregnant gilts. Although many questions regarding the immune responses remain unanswered, these findings provide insight and clues that may help reduce the impact of PRRSv in pregnant gilts.

  5. Breast Milk Human Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Viral Load and the Establishment of Breast Milk CMV-pp65-Specific CD8 T Cells in Human CMV Infected Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moylan, David C; Pati, Sunil K; Ross, Shannon A; Fowler, Karen B; Boppana, Suresh B; Sabbaj, Steffanie

    2017-11-27

    The role of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-specific T-cell responses in breast milk of HCMV-seropositive mothers is not well defined. In these studies, we demonstrate that the frequency of cytomegalovirus (CMV)-pp65-specific T-cell responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and breast milk cells (BMCs) is increased for CD8+ T cells in both sample sources when compared with CD4+ T cells. The frequency of pp55-specific CD8 T cells producing interferon γ (IFN-γ) alone or dual IFN-γ/granzyme rB producers is increased in breast milk compared with PBMCs. Lastly, we observed a positive correlation between breast milk viral load and the CD8 pp65-specific response, suggesting that local virus replication drives antigen-specific CD8 T cells into the breast. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Syphilis and HIV-1 co-infection: influence on CD4 T cell count, HIV-1 viral load and treatment response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Kristian; Gerstoft, Jan; Mathiesen, Lars Reinhardt

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the effect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 and syphilis coinfection on HIV-ribonucleic acid (RNA) viral load, CD4 cell count, and the response in rapid plasmin reagin (RPR) to treatment of the syphilis infection. STUDY DESIGN: Cases of syphilis diagnosed during 1 year...... in HIV-infected patients in Copenhagen were included. HIV-RNA, CD4 cell counts, and RPR-serology were measured before, during, and after syphilis. RESULTS: Forty-one patients were included. CD4 cell count decreased significantly during infection in patients with primary and secondary stages of syphilis...... (mean 106 cells/mm, P = 0.03). Treatment of syphilis was associated with an increase in the CD4 cell count and a decrease in HIV-RNA in the overall group (mean 66 cells/mm and -0.261 RNA log10 copies/ml, P = 0.02 and 0.04). The serological response rates for 15 patients treated with penicillin and 25...

  7. Analysis of virological efficacy in trials of antiretroviral regimens: drawbacks of not including viral load measurements after premature discontinuation of therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Ole; Pedersen, Court; Law, Matthew

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare two analytic approaches to assess the virological effect of HAART according to the intention-to-treat (ITT) principle. MATERIAL: Data from 2318 patients enrolled in 10 randomised clinical trials (RCTs) and from 3091 patients followed in an observation cohort (EuroSIDA) star......OBJECTIVES: To compare two analytic approaches to assess the virological effect of HAART according to the intention-to-treat (ITT) principle. MATERIAL: Data from 2318 patients enrolled in 10 randomised clinical trials (RCTs) and from 3091 patients followed in an observation cohort (Euro......SIDA) starting their first HAART regimen. METHODS: Two classifications of defining virological response 48 weeks after starting the therapy to be evaluated were compared: 1) only patients remaining on the therapy and having a plasma viral load (pVL) below a given cut-off level at week 48 were classified...... to ITT/s=f, 22-70% of the patients starting a HAART regimen in a RCT experienced a virological response at week 48. Only two RCTs had complete follow-up data (n=424): between 29 and 62% achieved a virological response at week 48 in the six treatment arms evaluated in the studies according to ITT...

  8. Association of Adolescent- and Caregiver-Reported Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence with HIV Viral Load Among Perinatally-infected South African Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittain, Kirsty; Asafu-Agyei, Nana Akua; Hoare, Jacqueline; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Rabie, Helena; Nuttall, James; Roux, Paul; Stein, Dan J; Zar, Heather J; Myer, Landon

    2017-12-09

    Accurate measurement of antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence remains challenging and there are few data assessing the validity of self-reported adherence among perinatally HIV-infected adolescents. We examined adolescent and caregiver reports of adolescent adherence among perinatally-infected adolescents aged 9-14 years in Cape Town, South Africa, and explored factors that may modify associations between reported adherence and elevated viral load (VL). Among 474 adolescents (median age 12.0 years; median duration of ART use 7.5 years), elevated VL and caregiver- and adolescent-report of missed ART doses were common. Elevated VL was particularly prevalent among older, male adolescents. Low-moderate concordance was observed between caregiver and adolescent report. Among adolescents aged ≥ 12 years, caregiver- and adolescent-reported adherence was associated with elevated VL across most items assessed, but few significant associations were observed among adolescents adolescents who require adherence interventions are needed in this context.

  9. Evaluation of viral load thresholds for predicting new WHO Stage 3 and 4 events in HIV-infected children receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siberry, George K; Harris, D. Robert; Oliveira, Ricardo Hugo; Krauss, Margot R.; Hofer, Cristina B.; Tiraboschi, Adriana Aparecida; Marques, Heloisa; Succi, Regina C.; Abreu, Thalita; Negra, Marinella Della; Mofenson, Lynne M.; Hazra, Rohan

    2012-01-01

    Background This study evaluated a wide range of viral load (VL) thresholds to identify a cut-point that best predicts new clinical events in children on stable highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Methods Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to assess the adjusted risk of World Health Organization stage 3 or 4 clinical events (WHO events) as a function of time-varying CD4, VL, and hemoglobin values in a cohort study of Latin American children on HAART ≥ 6 months. Models were fit using different VL cut-points between 400 and 50,000 copies/mL, with model fit evaluated on the basis of the minimum Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) value, a standard model fit statistic. Results Models were based on 67 subjects with WHO events out of 550 subjects on study. The VL cutpoints of > 2600 copies/mL and > 32,000 copies/mL corresponded to the lowest AIC values and were associated with the highest hazard ratios [2.0 (p = 0.015) and 2.1 (p = 0.0058), respectively] for WHO events. Conclusions In HIV-infected Latin American children on stable HAART, two distinct VL thresholds (> 2,600 copies/mL and > 32,000 copies/mL) were identified for predicting children at significantly increased risk of HIV-related clinical illness, after accounting for CD4 level, hemoglobin level, and other significant factors. PMID:22343177

  10. Análise comparativa da proliferação celular entre carcinomas de células escamosas orais HPV-positivos e HPV-negativos Comparative analysis of the cellular proliferation between HPV-positive and HPV-negative oral squamous cell carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Albuquerque Pires Rocha

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: O carcinoma de células escamosas oral (OSCC representa a neoplasia maligna mais freqüente em boca, e, entre os agentes etiológicos implicados, o papilomavírus humano (HPV tem sido extensivamente estudado nos últimos anos. OBJETIVO: Analisar comparativamente os índices de proliferação celular em OSCCs HPV-negativos e HPV-positivos. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: A amostra consistiu em 11 casos de OSCCs HPV-positivos (10 infectados por HPV-18 e um por HPV-16 e 18 e 13 HPV-negativos, previamente analisados quanto à presença ou ausência, bem quanto à tipagem viral por proteína C reativa (PCR (primers GP5+/GP6+ e hibridização dot blot, respectivamente. No método imunoistoquímico utilizou-se a técnica da estreptoavidina-biotina, com anticorpo para a proteína nuclear Ki-67. RESULTADOS: O teste estatístico não-paramétrico de Mann-Whitney revelou que não houve diferença estatisticamente significativa entre os grupos HPV-positivo e HPV-negativo (p = 0,72. Discussão: Os estudos semelhantes a estes são poucos e não são concordantes em demonstrar maior atividade proliferativa tumoral nos casos HPV-positivos em relação aos HPV-negativos, seja através da análise da expressão de proteínas relacionadas ao ciclo celular, seja na análise direta da fração proliferativa tumoral. CONCLUSÃO: Não houve diferença no índice de proliferação celular entre os grupos de OSCCs HPV-positivo e HPV-negativos.BACKGROUND: Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC is the most common malignant tumor in the mouth, and the human papillomavirus (HPV has been hardly studied as a possible etiologic agent. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to compare the rates of cell proliferation in HPV-positive and HPV-negative OSCC, using the immunohistochemical antibody Ki-67. MATERIAL AND METHOD: The sample consisted of 11 cases HPV-positive OSCC (10 cases infected with HPV-18 and 1 case infected with HPV-16 and 18 and 13 cases HPV-negative OSCCs

  11. Viral coinfection in the oral cavity of HIV-infected children: relation among HIV viral load, CD4+T lymphocyte count and detection of EBV, CMV and HSV Co-infecção viral na cavidade bucal de crianças infectadas pelo HIV: relação entre carga viral, contagem de linfócitos T-CD4+ e detecção de EBV, CMV e HSV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliane Janete Grando

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Viral coinfection in the oral cavity associated to HIV infection was evaluated in 180 children from birth to 13 years of age of both sexes. The oral examinations were performed at the Pediatric AIDS Outpatient Clinic, São Lucas Hospital and Clinic Hospital, both in Porto Alegre, Brazil and at the School of Dental Medicine, University Hospital Center, State University of New York at Stony Brook, USA. The aim of this study was to identify the presence of viral infections in the oral cavity. PCR technique was used to determine opportunistic viral infections caused by CMV, EBV, and HSV in mucosal swabs. A high frequency of viral infection was detected in the oral cavity of HIV-infected children determined by the PCR technique. HIV-infected children with viruses had a favorable CD4+T lymphocyte count and unfavorable viral load.A relação entre a infecção pelo HIV e a presença de diferentes tipos de vírus na cavidade bucal foi estudada em 180 crianças HIV-positivo, com idades entre zero e 13 anos de idade, de ambos os sexos. Os exames foram realizados nos Ambulatórios de Aids Pediátrica dos Hospitais São Lucas e de Clínicas, ambos em Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil e no Centro Hospitalar Universitário da Universidade Estadual de Nova Iorque, em Stony Brook (EUA. O objetivo desta pesquisa foi usar a técnica da PCR para detectar a presença dos vírus CMV, EBV e HSV na cavidade bucal desses pacientes, independentemente da presença ou não de manifestações estomatológicas relacionadas aos mesmos. Pode-se concluir que foi alta a freqüência de vírus detectados na cavidade bucal das crianças da amostra através da técnica da PCR e que a contagem média de linfócitos T-CD4+ das crianças com a presença dos vírus encontrava-se próxima da normalidade, enquanto a Carga Viral do HIV encontrava-se elevada.

  12. Avaliação de ensaio molecular para determinação de carga viral em indivíduos sorologicamente negativos para o HIV-1 Evaluation of a molecular assay for determining viral load on HIV-1 antibody negative patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Moreira Pereira

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available O teste de carga viral foi concebido para acompanhar a evolução e o tratamento do paciente com diagnóstico confirmado de HIV-1. Contudo, sua especificidade diagnóstica não foi ainda avaliada em pessoas que apresentam um teste sorológico negativo. Mesmo assim, ele tem sido erroneamente utilizado para o diagnóstico da infecção primária pelo HIV-1. Este trabalho relata quatro pacientes em que a carga viral plasmática NucliSens (Organon Teknika foi repetidamente positiva na ausência de anticorpos para HIV e chama atenção para o fato de que a carga viral abaixo de 10 mil cópias/ml é de difícil interpretação, como tem sido assinalado em numerosos artigos, em que foram utilizadas outras metodologias.The plasma viral load test for HIV-1,a exquisitely high sensitive assay, were neither developed nor evaluated for the diagnosis of primary HIV infection; therefore, their diagnostic specificity is not well delineated when applied to persons who are negative for HIV antibody. This article reported four cases of false positive results obtained by using NucliSens viral load assay (Organon Teknika and emphasize the importance that low positive plasma viral load (< 10 000 copies/ml may be difficult to interpret how has been assinalated in numerous articles in the medical literature, using other methodologies.

  13. HIV Type 1 Disease Progression to AIDS and Death in a Rural Ugandan Cohort Is Primarily Dependent on Viral Load Despite Variable Subtype and T-Cell Immune Activation Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, Michael A; Opollo, Marc S; Liu, Michelle; Redd, Andrew D; Eller, Leigh Anne; Kityo, Cissy; Kayiwa, Joshua; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Wawer, Maria J; Milazzo, Mark; Kiwanuka, Noah; Gray, Ronald H; Serwadda, David; Sewankambo, Nelson K; Quinn, Thomas C; Michael, Nelson L; Wabwire-Mangen, Fred; Sandberg, Johan K; Robb, Merlin L

    2015-05-15

    Untreated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) infection is associated with persistent immune activation, which is an independent driver of disease progression in European and United States cohorts. In Uganda, HIV-1 subtypes A and D and recombinant AD viruses predominate and exhibit differential rates of disease progression. HIV-1 seroconverters (n = 156) from rural Uganda were evaluated to assess the effects of T-cell activation, viral load, and viral subtype on disease progression during clinical follow-up. The frequency of activated T cells was increased in HIV-1-infected Ugandans, compared with community matched uninfected individuals, but did not differ significantly between viral subtypes. Higher HIV-1 load, subtype D, older age, and high T-cell activation levels were associated with faster disease progression to AIDS or death. In a multivariate Cox regression analysis, HIV-1 load was the strongest predictor of progression, with subtype also contributing. T-cell activation did not emerge an independent predictor of disease progression from this particular cohort. These findings suggest that the independent contribution of T-cell activation on morbidity and mortality observed in European and North American cohorts may not be directly translated to the HIV epidemic in East Africa. In this setting, HIV-1 load appears to be the primary determinant of disease progression. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Congenital papillomas and papillomatoses associated with the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV: report on 5 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Pedra Dias

    Full Text Available The authors present a study of five cases of vulvar congenital papillomas and papillomatoses in stillborns and neonates dead upon birth. The studied material was collected from five necropsies. The histopathological evaluation showed hyperkeratosis, acanthosis, papillomatosis, perinuclear haloes, and nuclear abnormalities. In three of the cases, the electron microscopy identified nuclear and cytoplasmatic viral particles ranging from 40 to 60 nm in size, compatible with HPV. The immunohistochemical study of those lesions showed nuclear and cytoplasmatic positivity. The authors concluded that the presence of viral particles suggestive of HPV added to the immunopositivity indicated the possibility of viral infection.

  15. AKT1 loss correlates with episomal HPV16 in vulval intraepithelial neoplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arucha L Ekeowa-Anderson

    Full Text Available Anogenital malignancy has a significant association with high-risk mucosal alpha-human papillomaviruses (alpha-PV, particularly HPV 16 and 18 whereas extragenital SCC has been linked to the presence of cutaneous beta and gamma-HPV types. Vulval skin may be colonised by both mucosal and cutaneous (beta-, mu-, nu- and gamma- PV types, but there are few systematic studies investigating their presence and their relative contributions to vulval malignancy. Dysregulation of AKT, a serine/threonine kinase, plays a significant role in several cancers. Mucosal HPV types can increase AKT phosphorylation and activity whereas cutaneous HPV types down-regulate AKT1 expression, probably to weaken the cornified envelope to promote viral release. We assessed the presence of mucosal and cutaneous HPV in vulval malignancy and its relationship to AKT1 expression in order to establish the corresponding HPV and AKT1 profile of normal vulval skin, vulval intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN and vulval squamous cell carcinoma (vSCC. We show that HPV16 is the principle HPV type present in VIN, there were few detectable beta types present and AKT1 loss was not associated with the presence of these cutaneous HPV. We show that HPV16 early gene expression reduced AKT1 expression in transgenic mouse epidermis. AKT1 loss in our VIN cohort correlated with presence of high copy number, episomal HPV16. Maintained AKT1 expression correlated with low copy number, an increased frequency of integration and increased HPV16E7 expression, a finding we replicated in another untyped cohort of vSCC. Since expression of E7 reflects tumour progression, these findings suggest that AKT1 loss associated with episomal HPV16 may have positive prognostic implications in vulval malignancy.

  16. HPV vaccination acceptability in young boys

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    Giancarlo Tisi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the comprehension and acceptance of HPV vaccination in parents of adolescent boys aged 11 to 15 years. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted by means of questionnaires sent directly to the homes of all families with young males aged between 11 and 15, residents of three municipalities of the Province of Brescia, Italy. The documentation also contained an informative leaflet summarizing the HPV-related disease characteristics, the burden of disease and the available strategies for prevention and treatment, illustrating the rationale of vaccination and describing the project and its phases. The questionnaire included questions on demographic data, acceptance and motivations for HPV vaccination. The collected data was analyzed using descriptive statistics. At the end of the study, parents who received the questionnaires were also offered the possibility of vaccinating their male sons for free. RESULTS: From a total of 1072 questionnaires sent, 161 where returned from the three selected municipalities (average response rate 15%; 97% of adolescent males involved in the study were Italian and 91% Catholic; 97% of parents declared themselves to be willing to vaccinate their sons: the principal motivation given (92% was prevention of the disease, cancerous or not, related to viral infection. Among the respondents not willing to vaccinate their sons, the motivation was lack of information about the vaccine and the disease. At the end of the study, around 71 boys were vaccinated. DISCUSSION: To our knowledge, this is the first survey in Italy exclusively conducted on parents of adolescent males about the acceptability and feasibility of vaccination against HPV: a very high percentage of respondents was favorable to accept the vaccination for their sons, the main motivation being the fact that parents considered protecting their sons from HPV-related diseases highly important. Of the 161 boys

  17. From Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Detection to Cervical Cancer Prevention in Clinical Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sin Hang, E-mail: shlee01@snet.net; Vigliotti, Jessica S.; Vigliotti, Veronica S.; Jones, William [Department of Pathology, Milford Hospital, 300 Seaside Ave., Milford, CT 06460 (United States)

    2014-10-02

    The newly gained knowledge of the viral etiology in cervical carcinogenesis has prompted industrial interests in developing virology-based tools for cervical cancer prevention. Due to the long incubation period from viral infection to developing an invasive cancer, a process whose outcome is influenced by numerous life-style and genetic factors, the true efficacy of the genotype-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines in cervical cancer prevention cannot be determined for another 30 years. Most HPV DNA test kits designed to replace the traditional Papanicolaou (Pap) smears for precancer detection lack the analytical sensitivity and specificity to comprehensively detect all potentially carcinogenic HPVs and to perform reliable genotyping. The authors implemented the classic nested PCR and Sanger DNA-sequencing technology for routine HPV testing. The results showed a true negative HPV PCR invariably indicates the absence of precancerous cells in the cytology samples. However, 80.5% of single positive HPV-16 tests and 97.3% of single positive HPV-18 tests were associated with a negative or a largely self-reversible Pap cytology. Routine sensitive and reliable HPV type-specific or perhaps even variant-specific methods are needed to address the issues of persistence of HPV infection if a virology-based primary cervical screen is used to replace the Pap cytology screening paradigm.

  18. hpvPDB: An Online Proteome Reserve for Human Papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Satish; Jena, Lingaraja; Daf, Sangeeta; Mohod, Kanchan; Goyal, Peyush; Varma, Ashok K

    2013-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the leading cause of cancer mortality among women worldwide. The molecular understanding of HPV proteins has significant connotation for understanding their intrusion in the host and designing novel protein vaccines and anti-viral agents, etc. Genomic, proteomic, structural, and disease-related information on HPV is available on the web; yet, with trivial annotations and more so, it is not well customized for data analysis, host-pathogen interaction, strain-disease association, drug designing, and sequence analysis, etc. We attempted to design an online reserve with comprehensive information on HPV for the end users desiring the same. The Human Papillomavirus Proteome Database (hpvPDB) domiciles proteomic and genomic information on 150 HPV strains sequenced to date. Simultaneous easy expandability and retrieval of the strain-specific data, with a provision for sequence analysis and exploration potential of predicted structures, and easy access for curation and annotation through a range of search options at one platform are a few of its important features. Affluent information in this reserve could be of help for researchers involved in structural virology, cancer research, drug discovery, and vaccine design.

  19. hpvPDB: An Online Proteome Reserve for Human Papillomavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV infection is the leading cause of cancer mortality among women worldwide. The molecular understanding of HPV proteins has significant connotation for understanding their intrusion in the host and designing novel protein vaccines and anti-viral agents, etc. Genomic, proteomic, structural, and disease-related information on HPV is available on the web; yet, with trivial annotations and more so, it is not well customized for data analysis, host-pathogen interaction, strain-disease association, drug designing, and sequence analysis, etc. We attempted to design an online reserve with comprehensive information on HPV for the end users desiring the same. The Human Papillomavirus Proteome Database (hpvPDB domiciles proteomic and genomic information on 150 HPV strains sequenced to date. Simultaneous easy expandability and retrieval of the strain-specific data, with a provision for sequence analysis and exploration potential of predicted structures, and easy access for curation and annotation through a range of search options at one platform are a few of its important features. Affluent information in this reserve could be of help for researchers involved in structural virology, cancer research, drug discovery, and vaccine design.

  20. DETEKSI INFEKSI Human palillomavirus (HPV 16/18 PADA KARSINOMA SEL SKUAMOSA RONGGA MULUT DENGAN NESTED PCR

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    Siti Hamidatul Aliyah

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTHead and neck cancer ranks fourth nationally cancer incidence in Indonesia. Oral SCC is one of Head and neck cancer incidence. Oral SCC related to several factors, including  smoking, alcohol, viral infection human papillomavirus (HPV 16/18 and genetic On the other hand, HPV E6 oncoprotein binds and inactivates TP53, and result in loss of control of the cell cycle. This study aimed to detect HPV 16/18 infection in oral SCC. Detection of HPV serotypes 16 and 18 performed on FFPE DNA isolates oral SCC with the method of nested Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR. Nested PCR was performed in two stages, namely amplification with L1 primer, followed by specific PCR E6 HPV-16 and HPV-18. A total of 33% (11/33 FFPE samples showed positive for HPV 18 infection (single-sized DNA bands 415bp and not detected the presence of infection with HPV 16. It can be concluded that the type of FFPE biosampel can be used for studies related to HPV infection. Furthermore, it should be tested on different types biosampel by a larger amount so as to represent the prevalence of oncogenic HPV infection in Indonesia.Keyword: Oral SCC, HPV 16/18, PCR, FFPE ABSTRAKKanker kepala dan leher menempati urutan kejadian kanker keempat di Indonesia. KSS rongga mulut merupakan salah satu kejadian kepala dan kanker leher. KSS rongga mulut terkait dengan beberapa faktor, termasuk merokok, alkohol, infeksi virus human papillomavirus (HPV 16/18 dan genetik Di sisi lain, HPV E6 mengikat onkoprotein dan menginaktivasi TP53, dan mengakibatkan hilangnya kontrol dari siklus sel. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mendeteksi HPV 16/18 infeksi pada KSS rongga mulut Deteksi HPV serotipe 16 dan 18 dilakukan pada FFPE DNA isolat SCC lisan dengan metode bersarang Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR. Nested PCR dilakukan dalam dua tahap, yaitu amplifikasi dengan L1 primer, diikuti dengan PCR spesifik E6 HPV-16 dan HPV-18. Sebanyak 33% (11/33 sampel FFPE menunjukkan hasil positif untuk HPV 18 infeksi

  1. Oral inverted ductal papilloma: not related to HPV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do Canto, Alan Motta; Mistro, Florence Zumbaio; Kignel, Sergio; Martins, Fabiana; Palmieri, Michelle; Braz-Silva, Paulo Henrique

    2017-03-15

    Oral inverted ductal papilloma (OIDP) is a rare, nonrecurrent,benign lesion of salivary glands. The etiologyis still poorly understood; the correlation with humanpapilloma virus (HPV) is controversial. Herein wepresent a 74-year-old man with a tumor in lower lip.Incisional biopsy was performed and the histologicaldiagnosis was OIDP. Inno-LiPA assay, based onpolymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridizationwas used to assess for HPV with no detection of viralDNA. Surgical excision was performed without anyrecurrences after two years of follow-up.

  2. Viral encephalitis

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    Marcus Tulius T Silva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available While systemic viral infections are exceptionally common, symptomatic viral infections of the brain parenchyma itself are very rare, but a serious neurologic condition. It is estimated that viral encephalitis occurs at a rate of 1.4 cases per 100.000 inhabitants. Geography is a major determinant of encephalitis caused by vector-borne pathogens. A diagnosis of viral encephalitis could be a challenge to the clinician, since almost 70% of viral encephalitis cases are left without an etiologic agent identified. In this review, the most common viral encephalitis will be discussed, with focus on ecology, diagnosis, and clinical management.

  3. HPV Vaccine - Questions and Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Media Resources News Newsletters Events Redirect for HPV Vaccine FAQ Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... to the address below. http://www.cdc.gov/hpv/parents/questions-answers.html File Formats Help: How ...

  4. Reported Church Attendance at the Time of Entry into HIV Care is Associated with Viral Load Suppression at 12 Months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wagoner, Nicholas; Elopre, Latesha; Westfall, Andrew O; Mugavero, Michael J; Turan, Janet; Hook, Edward W

    2016-08-01

    The Southeast has high rates of church attendance and HIV infection rates. We evaluated the relationship between church attendance and HIV viremia in a Southeastern US, HIV-infected cohort. Viremia (viral load ≥200 copies/ml) was analyzed 12 months after initiation of care. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression models were fit for variables potentially related to viremia. Of 382 patients, 74 % were virally suppressed at 12 months. Protective variables included church attendance (AOR 0.5; 95 % CI 0.2, 0.9), being on antiretroviral therapy (AOR 0.01; 95 % CI 0.004, 0.04), CD4(+) T lymphocyte count 200-350 cells/mm(3) at care entry (AOR 0.3; 95 % 0.1, 0.9), and education (AOR 0.5; 95 % CI 0.2, 0.9). Variables predicting viremia included black race (AOR 3.2; 95 % CI 1.4, 7.4) and selective disclosure of HIV status (AOR 2.7; 95 % CI 1.2, 5.6). Church attendance may provide needed support for patients entering HIV care for the first time. El Sur Este de los Estados Unidos tiene tasas altas de visitas a iglesias y de infección por VIH. Evaluamos la relación entre visitas a iglesias y viremia por VIH en una cohorte de pacientes infectados con VIH en el Sur Este de los EEUU. La viremia (carga viral ≥ 200 copias/ml) fue analizada a los 12 meses de iniciar el cuidado médico. Los modelos de regresión logística univariado y multivariado fueron ajustados para variables potencialmente relacionadas a viremia. De 382 pacientes, 75 % tuvieron supresión virológica a los 12 meses. Variables que ofrecieron protección fueron visitas a iglesias (AOR 0.5; IC95 % 0.2-0.9), recibir terapia antiretroviral (AOR 0.01; IC95 % 0.004,0.04), recuento de linfocitos T CD4 + 200-350 al iniciar cuidado médico (AOR 0.3; IC95 % 0.1,09), y educación (AOR 0.5; IC95 % 0.2,0.9). Las variables que predijeron viremia incluyeron raza negra (AOR 3.2; IC95 % 1.4,7.4) y la comunicación selectiva del diagnóstico de VIH a otras personas (AOR 2.7; 95 % IC 1

  5. The specifities of the HPV-genital infections in males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihael Skerlev

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Anogenital infections caused by Human papillomavirus (HPV are the most frequently diagnosed sexually transmitted infections of viral origin and up to 150 HPV DNA types have been recognized so far. Anogenital warts (condylomata acuminata are the most common lesions presented in men, however, during the last decade the other HPV-associated exaggerated lesions such as condylomata plana, penile,scrotal, and anal intraepithelial neoplasias, as well as the penile, urine bladder and prostate cancer have been studied somewhat more extensively. The clinical variations might range from clinically invisible, asymptomatic lesions to the bizarre forms of giant condyloma of Buschke-Löwenstein type, including Bowenoid papulosis,Mb. Bowen, different kinds of eryhtroplasia both in men and women and a large spectrum of HPV-induced dermatovenereological entities in genital region including high-grade intraepithelial genital neoplasias, such as penile, anal, scrotal, vulvar, vaginal etc. (thus not only cervical, and, last but not least - the anogenital warts. A prophylactic vaccine that targets these types should thus substantially reduce the burden of HPV-associated clinical diseases. Ultimately, within the spectrum of therapeutic options for condylomata, no method is really superior to others; recurrences occurred in 30-70% of cases. We definitely need the HPV vaccination programme to eliminate one of the oldest and up to now unsolved problems of the mankind. Since HPV is transmitted by sexual intercourse, treatment of both partners is necessary in order to eliminate the virus from the population. Approaches to this include prophylactic vaccines such as quadrivalent HPV vaccine for both men and women

  6. HPV vaccines: a controversial issue?

    OpenAIRE

    Nicol, A.F.; Andrade, C.V.; Russomano, F.B.; Rodrigues, L.L.S.; Oliveira, N.S.; D.W. Provance Jr

    2016-01-01

    Controversy still exists over whether the benefits of the available HPV vaccines outweigh the risks and this has suppressed uptake of the HPV vaccines in comparison to other vaccines. Concerns about HPV vaccine safety have led some physicians, healthcare officials and parents to withhold the recommended vaccination from the target population. The most common reason for not administering the prophylactic HPV vaccines are concerns over adverse effects. The aim of this review is the assessment o...

  7. Identification of HPV variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, John; Bible, Jon; Mant, Christine

    2005-01-01

    The vast majority of anogenital carcinomas are caused by high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs), and among Western nations HPV-16 is usually the most predominant cancer-associated type. As a DNA virus, HPV type 16 has a relatively stable genome that is believed to have co-evolved with its host over the millennia. Nevertheless, among the "wild" populations of HPV-16 that are circulating, a large number of variants have been identified, and these may have considerably different pathogenic potentials. In this chapter, methods for screening and characterizing HPV-16 sequence variants are described. In particular, we describe methods for the identification of variation within the HPV-16 E5 open reading frame and for the detection of the nt 131 A-->G mutation of the E6 ORF, using restriction fragment length polymorphism assays. In addition, we describe approaches for DNA sequencing and analysis. Such methods are likely to be of particular interest to those involved in epidemiological investigations of virus transmission and pathogenicity studies.

  8. Select neurocognitive impairment in HIV-infected women: associations with HIV viral load, hepatitis C virus, and depression, but not leukocyte telomere length.

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    Chantelle J Giesbrecht

    Full Text Available Through implementation of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART remarkable gains have been achieved in the management of HIV infection; nonetheless, the neurocognitive consequences of infection remain a pivotal concern in the cART era. Research has often employed norm-referenced neuropsychological scores, derived from healthy populations (excluding many seronegative individuals at high risk for HIV infection, to characterize impairments in predominately male HIV-infected populations.Using matched-group methodology, we assessed 81 HIV-seropositive (HIV+ women with established neuropsychological measures validated for detection of HIV-related impairments, as well as additional detailed tests of executive function and decision-making from the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB.On validated tests, the HIV+ women exhibited impairments that were limited to significantly slower information processing speed when compared with 45 HIV-seronegative (HIV- women with very similar demographic backgrounds and illness comorbidities. Additionally, select executive impairments in shifting attention (i.e., reversal learning and in decision-making quality were revealed in HIV+ participants. Modifiers of neurocognition in HIV-infected women included detectable HIV plasma viral load, active hepatitis C virus co-infection, and self-reported depression symptoms. In contrast, leukocyte telomere length (LTL, a marker of cellular aging, did not significantly differ between HIV+ and HIV- women, nor was LTL associated with overall neurocognition in the HIV+ group.The findings suggest that well-managed HIV infection may entail a more circumscribed neurocognitive deficit pattern than that reported in many norm-referenced studies, and that common comorbidities make a secondary contribution to HIV-related neurocognitive impairments.

  9. Cumulative viral load and virologic decay patterns after antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected subjects influence CD4 recovery and AIDS.

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    Vincent C Marconi

    Full Text Available The impact of viral load (VL decay and cumulative VL on CD4 recovery and AIDS after highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART is unknown.Three virologic kinetic parameters (first year and overall exponential VL decay constants, and first year VL slope and cumulative VL during HAART were estimated for 2,278 patients who initiated HAART in the U.S. Military HIV Natural History Study. CD4 and VL trajectories were computed using linear and nonlinear Generalized Estimating Equations models. Multivariate Poisson and linear regression models were used to determine associations of VL parameters with CD4 recovery, adjusted for factors known to correlate with immune recovery. Cumulative VL higher than the sample median was independently associated with an increased risk of AIDS (relative risk 2.38, 95% confidence interval 1.56-3.62, p<0.001. Among patients with VL suppression, first year VL decay and slope were independent predictors of early CD4 recovery (p = 0.001 and overall gain (p<0.05. Despite VL suppression, those with slow decay during the first year of HAART as well as during the entire therapy period (overall, in general, gained less CD4 cells compared to the other subjects (133 vs. 195.4 cells/µL; p = 0.001 even after adjusting for potential confounders.In a cohort with free access to healthcare, independent of established predictors of AIDS and CD4 recovery during HAART, cumulative VL and virologic decay patterns were associated with AIDS and distinct aspects of CD4 reconstitution.

  10. Implementation and Operational Research: Risk Charts to Guide Targeted HIV-1 Viral Load Monitoring of ART: Development and Validation in Patients From Resource-Limited Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, Manuel; Fatti, Geoffrey; Chi, Benjamin H; Keiser, Olivia; Hoffmann, Christopher J; Wood, Robin; Prozesky, Hans; Stinson, Kathryn; Giddy, Janet; Mutevedzi, Portia; Fox, Matthew P; Law, Matthew; Boulle, Andrew; Egger, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    HIV-1 RNA viral load (VL) testing is recommended to monitor antiretroviral therapy (ART) but not available in many resource-limited settings. We developed and validated CD4-based risk charts to guide targeted VL testing. We modeled the probability of virologic failure up to 5 years of ART based on current and baseline CD4 counts, developed decision rules for targeted VL testing of 10%, 20%, or 40% of patients in 7 cohorts of patients starting ART in South Africa, and plotted cutoffs for VL testing on colour-coded risk charts. We assessed the accuracy of risk chart-guided VL testing to detect virologic failure in validation cohorts from South Africa, Zambia, and the Asia-Pacific. In total, 31,450 adult patients were included in the derivation and 25,294 patients in the validation cohorts. Positive predictive values increased with the percentage of patients tested: from 79% (10% tested) to 98% (40% tested) in the South African cohort, from 64% to 93% in the Zambian cohort, and from 73% to 96% in the Asia-Pacific cohort. Corresponding increases in sensitivity were from 35% to 68% in South Africa, from 55% to 82% in Zambia, and from 37% to 71% in Asia-Pacific. The area under the receiver operating curve increased from 0.75 to 0.91 in South Africa, from 0.76 to 0.91 in Zambia, and from 0.77 to 0.92 in Asia-Pacific. CD4-based risk charts with optimal cutoffs for targeted VL testing maybe useful to monitor ART in settings where VL capacity is limited.

  11. Prevalence of HIV-1 drug resistance in treated patients with viral load >50 copies/mL: a 2014 French nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assoumou, L; Charpentier, C; Recordon-Pinson, P; Grudé, M; Pallier, C; Morand-Joubert, L; Fafi-Kremer, S; Krivine, A; Montes, B; Ferré, V; Bouvier-Alias, M; Plantier, J-C; Izopet, J; Trabaud, M-A; Yerly, S; Dufayard, J; Alloui, C; Courdavault, L; Le Guillou-Guillemette, H; Maillard, A; Amiel, C; Vabret, A; Roussel, C; Vallet, S; Guinard, J; Mirand, A; Beby-Defaux, A; Barin, F; Allardet-Servent, A; Ait-Namane, R; Wirden, M; Delaugerre, C; Calvez, V; Chaix, M-L; Descamps, D; Reigadas, S

    2017-06-01

    Surveillance of HIV-1 resistance in treated patients with a detectable viral load (VL) is important to monitor, in order to assess the risk of spread of resistant viruses and to determine the proportion of patients who need new antiretroviral drugs with minimal cross-resistance. The HIV-1 protease and reverse transcriptase (RT) and integrase genes were sequenced in plasma samples from 782 consecutive patients on failing antiretroviral regimens, seen in 37 specialized centres in 2014. The genotyping results were interpreted using the ANRS v24 algorithm. Prevalence rates were compared with those obtained during a similar survey conducted in 2009. The protease and RT sequences were obtained in 566 patients, and the integrase sequence in 382 patients. Sequencing was successful in 60%, 78%, 78% and 87% of patients with VLs of 51-200, 201-500, 501-1000 and >1000 copies/mL, respectively. Resistance to at least one antiretroviral drug was detected in 56.3% of samples. Respectively, 3.9%, 8.7%, 1.5% and 3.4% of patients harboured viruses that were resistant to any NRTI, NNRTI, PI and integrase inhibitor (INI). Resistance rates were lower in 2014 than in 2009. Resistance was detected in 48.5% of samples from patients with a VL between 51 and 200 copies/mL. In France in 2014, 90.0% of patients in AIDS care centres were receiving antiretroviral drugs and 12.0% of them had VLs >50 copies/mL. Therefore, this study suggests that 6.7% of treated patients in France might transmit resistant strains. Resistance testing may be warranted in all treated patients with VL > 50 copies/mL.

  12. Non-random integration of the HPV genome in cervical cancer.

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    Martina Schmitz

    Full Text Available HPV DNA integration into the host genome is a characteristic but not an exclusive step during cervical carcinogenesis. It is still a matter of debate whether viral integration contributes to the transformation process beyond ensuring the constitutive expression of the viral oncogenes. There is mounting evidence for a non-random distribution of integration loci and the direct involvement of cellular cancer-related genes. In this study we addressed this topic by extending the existing data set by an additional 47 HPV16 and HPV18 positive cervical carcinoma. We provide supportive evidence for previously defined integration hotspots and have revealed another cluster of integration sites within the cytogenetic band 3q28. Moreover, in the vicinity of these hotspots numerous microRNAs (miRNAs are located and may be influenced by the integrated HPV DNA. By compiling our data and published reports 9 genes could be identified which were affected by HPV integration at least twice in independent tumors. In some tumors the viral-cellular fusion transcripts were even identical with respect to the viral donor and cellular acceptor sites used. However, the exact integration sites are likely to differ since none of the integration sites analysed thus far have shown more than a few nucleotides of homology between viral and host sequences. Therefore, DNA recombination involving large stretches of homology at the integration site can be ruled out. It is however intriguing that by sequence alignment several regions of the HPV16 genome were found to have highly homologous stretches of up to 50 nucleotides to the aforementioned genes and the integration hotspots. One common region of homologies with cellular sequences is between the viral gene E5 and L2 (nucleotides positions 4100 to 4240. We speculate that this and other regions of homology are involved in the integration process. Our observations suggest that targeted disruption, possibly also of critical cellular

  13. Current trends in the etiology and diagnosis of HPV-related head and neck cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Ryan C; Lambie, Duncan; Verma, Mukesh; Punyadeera, Chamindie

    2015-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection is a major risk factor for a distinct subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The current review summarizes the epidemiology of HNSCC and the disease burden, the infectious cycle of HPV, the roles of viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, and the downstream cellular events that lead to malignant transformation. Current techniques for the clinical diagnosis of HPV-associated HNSCC will also be discussed, that is, the detection of HPV DNA, RNA, and the HPV surrogate marker, p16 in tumor tissues, as well as HPV-specific antibodies in serum. Such methods do not allow for the early detection of HPV-associated HNSCC and most cases are at an advanced stage upon diagnosis. Novel noninvasive approaches using oral fluid, a clinically relevant biological fluid, allow for the detection of HPV and cellular alterations in infected cells, which may aid in the early detection and HPV-typing of HNSCC tumors. Noninvasive diagnostic methods will enable early detection and intervention, leading to a significant reduction in mortality and morbidity associated with HNSCC. PMID:25644715

  14. Risk factors for cervical cancer among HPV positive women in Mexico Factores de riesgo de cáncer cervical en mujeres VPH positivas en México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne N Flores

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify factors that are associated with an increased risk of developing high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN or cancer among human papillomavirus (HPV-positive women in Mexico. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A case-control study design was used. A total of 94 cases and 501 controls who met the study inclusion criteria were selected from the 7 732 women who participated in the Morelos HPV Study from May 1999 to June 2000. Risk factor information was obtained from interviews and from HPV viral load results. Odds ratios and 95 percent confidence intervals were estimated using unconditional multivariate regression. RESULTS: Increasing age, high viral load, a young age at first sexual intercourse, and a low socio-economic status are associated with an increased risk of disease among HPV-positive women. CONCLUSIONS: These results could have important implications for future screening activities in Mexico and other low resource countries.OBJETIVO: Identificar factores asociados con un mayor riesgo de desarrollar neoplasia intraepitelial cervical (NIC de alto grado o cáncer en mujeres con virus de papiloma humano (VPH, en México. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se utilizó un diseño de casos y controles. Un total de 94 casos y 501 controles fueron seleccionados de las 7 732 mujeres que participaron en el Estudio de VPH en Morelos, de mayo de 1999 a junio de 2000. La información sobre factores de riesgo se obtuvo de entrevistas y de los resultados de carga virales de VPH. Se estimaron razones de momios e intervalos de confianza de 95% con modelos multivariados de regresión no condicionada. RESULTADOS: El incremento de edad, la carga viral elevada, la edad temprana al inicio de la vida sexual y el nivel socioeconómico bajo se asocian con un mayor riesgo de enfermedad en mujeres VPH positivas. CONCLUSIONES: Estos resultados podrían tener implicaciones importantes a futuro para las actividades de tamizaje en México y en otros países de

  15. Viral marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Bláhová, Adéla

    2012-01-01

    The aim of my thesis is to provide a comprehensive overview of the viral marketing and to analyze selected viral campaigns. There is a description of advantages and disadvantages of this marketing tool. In the end I suggest for which companies viral marketing is an appropriate form of the promotion.

  16. Viral phylodynamics.

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    Erik M Volz

    Full Text Available Viral phylodynamics is defined as the study of how epidemiological, immunological, and evolutionary processes act and potentially interact to shape viralphylogenies. Since the coining of the term in 2004, research on viral phylodynamics has focused on transmission dynamics in an effort to shed light on how these dynamics impact viral genetic variation. Transmission dynamics can be considered at the level of cells within an infected host, individual hosts within a population, or entire populations of hosts. Many viruses, especially RNA viruses, rapidly accumulate genetic variation because of short generation times and high mutation rates. Patterns of viral genetic variation are therefore heavily influenced by how quickly transmission occurs and by which entities transmit to one another. Patterns of viral genetic variation will also be affected by selection acting on viral phenotypes. Although viruses can differ with respect to many phenotypes, phylodynamic studies have to date tended to focus on a limited number of viral phenotypes. These include virulence phenotypes, phenotypes associated with viral transmissibility, cell or tissue tropism phenotypes, and antigenic phenotypes that can facilitate escape from host immunity. Due to the impact that transmission dynamics and selection can have on viral genetic variation, viral phylogenies can therefore be used to investigate important epidemiological, immunological, and evolutionary processes, such as epidemic spread[2], spatio-temporal dynamics including metapopulation dynamics[3], zoonotic transmission, tissue tropism[4], and antigenic drift[5]. The quantitative investigation of these processes through the consideration of viral phylogenies is the central aim of viral phylodynamics.

  17. Autophagy regulates UBC9 levels during viral-mediated tumorigenesis.

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    Domenico Mattoscio

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available UBC9, the sole E2-conjugating enzyme required for SUMOylation, is a key regulator of essential cellular functions and, as such, is frequently altered in cancers. Along these lines, we recently reported that its expression gradually increases during early stages of human papillomavirus (HPV-mediated cervical lesions transformation. However, a better understanding of how UBC9 is exploited by