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Sample records for hprt gene loci

  1. TRAIL causes deletions at the HPRT and TK1 loci of clonogenically competent cells

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    Miles, Mark A.; Shekhar, Tanmay M. [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria (Australia); La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria (Australia); Hall, Nathan E. [La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria (Australia); Life Sciences Computation Centre, Victorian Life Sciences Computation Initiative, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Hawkins, Christine J., E-mail: c.hawkins@latrobe.edu.au [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria (Australia); La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria (Australia)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Treatment with TRAIL or EMS provokes mutations in clonogenically viable TK6 cells. • TRAIL is 2–5-fold less mutagenic than an equivalently lethal concentration of EMS. • EMS mainly causes transition mutations at the HPRT and TK1 loci of TK6 cells. • Most loss-of-function HPRT or TK1 mutations caused by TRAIL treatment are deletions. - Abstract: When chemotherapy and radiotherapy are effective, they function by inducing DNA damage in cancerous cells, which respond by undergoing apoptosis. Some adverse effects can result from collateral destruction of non-cancerous cells, via the same mechanism. Therapy-related cancers, a particularly serious adverse effect of anti-cancer treatments, develop due to oncogenic mutations created in non-cancerous cells by the DNA damaging therapies used to eliminate the original cancer. Physiologically achievable concentrations of direct apoptosis inducing anti-cancer drugs that target Bcl-2 and IAP proteins possess negligible mutagenic activity, however death receptor agonists like TRAIL/Apo2L can provoke mutations in surviving cells, probably via caspase-mediated activation of the nuclease CAD. In this study we compared the types of mutations sustained in the HPRT and TK1 loci of clonogenically competent cells following treatment with TRAIL or the alkylating agent ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS). As expected, the loss-of-function mutations in the HPRT or TK1 loci triggered by exposure to EMS were almost all transitions. In contrast, only a minority of the mutations identified in TRAIL-treated clones lacking HPRT or TK1 activity were substitutions. Almost three quarters of the TRAIL-induced mutations were partial or complete deletions of the HPRT or TK1 genes, consistent with sub-lethal TRAIL treatment provoking double strand breaks, which may be mis-repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Mis-repair of double-strand breaks following exposure to chemotherapy drugs has been implicated in the pathogenesis of

  2. Somatic cell mutation frequency at the HPRT, T-cell antigen receptor and glycophorin A loci in Cockayne syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y W; Kubota, M; Hirota, H; Furusho, K; Tomiwa, K; Ochi, J; Kasahara, Y; Sasaki, H; Ohta, S

    1995-07-01

    Skin fibroblasts of patients with Cockayne syndrome (CS) are hypersensitive to the lethal or mutagenic effect of ultraviolet light, which may cause genetic instability. Up to now, however, no systematic study of in vivo somatic cell mutation in CS cells has been reported. This article describes our investigation of the mutation frequencies (Mfs) at three different loci, i.e. hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT), T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) and glycophorin A (GPA), in six patients with CS. Mfs at the HPRT and TCR loci were found to be within the normal range as determined in age-matched controls. In the GPA locus of two patients, there was a slight increase, but it was much smaller than that reported in other DNA repair deficient syndromes. The frequency of spontaneous HPRT mutation in Epstein-Barr virus transformed B-lymphoblastoid cells derived from CS patients was similar to that in cells from normal children. The molecular characterization of the representative HPRT mutant T cell clones from CS patients did not show any structural alterations. These results may explain, at least in part, why CS is not associated with predisposition to cancer.

  3. The housekeeping gene hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT regulates multiple developmental and metabolic pathways of murine embryonic stem cell neuronal differentiation.

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    Tae Hyuk Kang

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which mutations of the purinergic housekeeping gene hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT cause the severe neurodevelopmental Lesch Nyhan Disease (LND are poorly understood. The best recognized neural consequences of HPRT deficiency are defective basal ganglia expression of the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA and aberrant DA neuronal function. We have reported that HPRT deficiency leads to dysregulated expression of multiple DA-related developmental functions and cellular signaling defects in a variety of HPRT-deficient cells, including human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells. We now describe results of gene expression studies during neuronal differentiation of HPRT-deficient murine ESD3 embryonic stem cells and report that HPRT knockdown causes a marked switch from neuronal to glial gene expression and dysregulates expression of Sox2 and its regulator, genes vital for stem cell pluripotency and for the neuronal/glial cell fate decision. In addition, HPRT deficiency dysregulates many cellular functions controlling cell cycle and proliferation mechanisms, RNA metabolism, DNA replication and repair, replication stress, lysosome function, membrane trafficking, signaling pathway for platelet activation (SPPA multiple neurotransmission systems and sphingolipid, sulfur and glycan metabolism. We propose that the neural aberrations of HPRT deficiency result from combinatorial effects of these multi-system metabolic errors. Since some of these aberrations are also found in forms of Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease, we predict that some of these systems defects play similar neuropathogenic roles in diverse neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases in common and may therefore provide new experimental opportunities for clarifying pathogenesis and for devising new potential therapeutic targets in developmental and genetic disease.

  4. Targeting the Hprt locus in mice reveals differential regulation of Tie2 gene expression in the endothelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, V.; Hatzopoulos, A.; Aird, W. C.; Rayburn, H. B.; Rosenberg, R. D.; Kuivenhoven, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    To study the in vivo expression of the murine Tie2 gene, we have targeted the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (Hprt) gene locus to generate two single-copy transgenic mice: T1, containing the 2,100-bp Tie2 promoter upstream from the beta-galactosidase (LacZ) gene, and T5, which also included

  5. Recombination in immunoglobulin gene loci

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    Komisarenko S. V.

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Gene network of the lymphoid cell differentiation coordinates precisely the recombination process in immunoglobulin gene loci. In our opinion, cellular microRNAs can contribute to the allelic exclusion through microRNA-directed DNA methylation and participate in retargeting recombinases activity from the gene loci of heavy immunoglobulin chains to the gene loci of light chains

  6. Increase in radiation-induced HPRT gene mutation frequency after nonthermal exposure to nonionizing 60 Hz electromagnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walleczek, J; Shiu, E C; Hahn, G M

    1999-04-01

    It is widely accepted that moderate levels of nonionizing electric or magnetic fields, for example 50/60 Hz magnetic fields of about 1 mT, are not mutagenic. However, it is not known whether such fields can enhance the action of known mutagens. To explore this question, a stringent experimental protocol, which included blinding and systematic negative controls, was implemented, minimizing the possibility of observer bias or experimental artifacts. As a model system, we chose to measure mutation frequencies induced by 2 Gy gamma rays in the redox-sensitive hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) gene in Chinese hamster ovary cells. We tested whether a 12-h exposure to a 60 Hz sinusoidally oscillating magnetic-flux density (Brms = 0.7 mT) could affect the mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation on the HPRT gene locus. We determined that the magnetic-field exposure induced an approximate 1.8-fold increase in HPRT mutation frequency. Additional experiments at Brms = 0.23 and 0.47 mT revealed that the effect was reduced at lower flux densities. The field exposure did not enhance radiation-induced cytotoxicity or mutation frequencies in cells not exposed to ionizing radiation. These results suggest that moderate-strength, oscillating magnetic fields may act as an enhancer of mutagenesis in mammalian cells.

  7. Creation of Mice Bearing a Partial Duplication of HPRT Gene Marked with a GFP Gene and Detection of Revertant Cells In Situ as GFP-Positive Somatic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Asao; Suemori, Hirofumi; Hirai, Yuko; Hamasaki, Kanya; Kodama, Yoshiaki; Mitani, Hiroshi; Landes, Reid D; Nakamura, Nori

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming clear that apparently normal somatic cells accumulate mutations. Such accumulations or propagations of mutant cells are thought to be related to certain diseases such as cancer. To better understand the nature of somatic mutations, we developed a mouse model that enables in vivo detection of rare genetically altered cells via GFP positive cells. The mouse model carries a partial duplication of 3' portion of X-chromosomal HPRT gene and a GFP gene at the end of the last exon. In addition, although HPRT gene expression was thought ubiquitous, the expression level was found insufficient in vivo to make the revertant cells detectable by GFP positivity. To overcome the problem, we replaced the natural HPRT-gene promoter with a CAG promoter. In such animals, termed HPRT-dup-GFP mouse, losing one duplicated segment by crossover between the two sister chromatids or within a single molecule of DNA reactivates gene function, producing hybrid HPRT-GFP proteins which, in turn, cause the revertant cells to be detected as GFP-positive cells in various tissues. Frequencies of green mutant cells were measured using fixed and frozen sections (liver and pancreas), fixed whole mount (small intestine), or by means of flow cytometry (unfixed splenocytes). The results showed that the frequencies varied extensively among individuals as well as among tissues. X-ray exposure (3 Gy) increased the frequency moderately (~2 times) in the liver and small intestine. Further, in two animals out of 278 examined, some solid tissues showed too many GFP-positive cells to score (termed extreme jackpot mutation). Present results illustrated a complex nature of somatic mutations occurring in vivo. While the HPRT-dup-GFP mouse may have a potential for detecting tissue-specific environmental mutagens, large inter-individual variations of mutant cell frequency cause the results unstable and hence have to be reduced. This future challenge will likely involve lowering the background mutation

  8. Creation of Mice Bearing a Partial Duplication of HPRT Gene Marked with a GFP Gene and Detection of Revertant Cells In Situ as GFP-Positive Somatic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asao Noda

    Full Text Available It is becoming clear that apparently normal somatic cells accumulate mutations. Such accumulations or propagations of mutant cells are thought to be related to certain diseases such as cancer. To better understand the nature of somatic mutations, we developed a mouse model that enables in vivo detection of rare genetically altered cells via GFP positive cells. The mouse model carries a partial duplication of 3' portion of X-chromosomal HPRT gene and a GFP gene at the end of the last exon. In addition, although HPRT gene expression was thought ubiquitous, the expression level was found insufficient in vivo to make the revertant cells detectable by GFP positivity. To overcome the problem, we replaced the natural HPRT-gene promoter with a CAG promoter. In such animals, termed HPRT-dup-GFP mouse, losing one duplicated segment by crossover between the two sister chromatids or within a single molecule of DNA reactivates gene function, producing hybrid HPRT-GFP proteins which, in turn, cause the revertant cells to be detected as GFP-positive cells in various tissues. Frequencies of green mutant cells were measured using fixed and frozen sections (liver and pancreas, fixed whole mount (small intestine, or by means of flow cytometry (unfixed splenocytes. The results showed that the frequencies varied extensively among individuals as well as among tissues. X-ray exposure (3 Gy increased the frequency moderately (~2 times in the liver and small intestine. Further, in two animals out of 278 examined, some solid tissues showed too many GFP-positive cells to score (termed extreme jackpot mutation. Present results illustrated a complex nature of somatic mutations occurring in vivo. While the HPRT-dup-GFP mouse may have a potential for detecting tissue-specific environmental mutagens, large inter-individual variations of mutant cell frequency cause the results unstable and hence have to be reduced. This future challenge will likely involve lowering the

  9. Increased frequency of mutations in the hprt gene of T cells isolated from patients with anti-U1-70kD-autoantibody-positive connective tissue disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holyst, M M; Hill, D L; Sharp, G C; Hoffman, R W

    1994-11-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is characterized by the presence of high titers of anti-U1-70kD autoantibodies which are the result of substantial B cell activation. The hprt gene encodes the constitutively expressed enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase which is active in the purine salvage pathway. Rapidly dividing cells randomly accumulate gene mutations, including mutations in the hprt gene. These mutations may be used to identify activated cells. If activated T cells play a role in the pathogenesis of MCTD, an increased frequency of mutations in the hprt gene might be expected among T cells isolated from such patients. To examine this hypothesis, we isolated and cloned T cells from 10 anti-U1-70kD-autoantibody-positive MCTD patients and determined the precursor frequencies of cells possessing mutations in hprt by comparing the frequency of cells grown in the presence and absence of the purine analogue 6-thioguanine. We found that the frequency of 6-thioguanine-resistant hprt-negative T cells was significantly increased among MCTD patients (mean 566/10(6); range 122-2,845/10(6)) versus age- and sex-matched controls (mean 42/10(6); range 21-78/10(6); p < 0.003). These results demonstrate that there is an increase in the measured mutant frequency of T cells from MCTD patients. Such T cells may play a role in the pathogenesis of this disease.

  10. Arsenic[III] and heavy metal ions induce intrachromosomal homologous recombination in the hprt gene of V79 Chinese hamster cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helleday, T; Nilsson, R; Jenssen, D

    2000-01-01

    In the present study the carcinogenic metal ions Cd[II], Co[II], Cr[VI], Ni[II], and Pb[II], as well as As[III], were examined for their ability to induce intrachromosomal homologous and nonhomologous recombination in the hprt gene of two V79 Chinese hamster cell lines, SPD8 and Sp5, respectively. With the exception of Pb[II], all of these ions enhanced homologous recombination, the order of potency being Cr>Cd>As>Co>Ni. In contrast, Cr[VI] was the only ion to enhance recombination of the nonhomologous type. In order to obtain additional information on the mechanism of recombination in the SPD8 cell line, individual clones exhibiting metal-induced recombination were isolated, and the sequence of their hprt gene determined. These findings confirmed that all recombinogenic events in this cell line were of the homologous type, involving predominantly a chromatid exchange mechanism. The mechanisms underlying the recombination induced by these ions are discussed in relationship to their genotoxicity, as well as to DNA repair and replication. Induced recombination may constitute a novel mechanism for induction of neoplastic disease. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Bilirubin UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) Gene Promoter Polymorphisms and HPRT, Glycophorin A, and Micronuclei Mutant Frequencies in Human Blood

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    Grant, D; Hall, I J; Eastmond, D; Jones, I M; Bell, D A

    2004-10-06

    A dinucleotide repeat polymorphism (5-, 6-, 7-, or 8-TA units) has been identified within the promoter region of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 gene (UGT1A1). The 7-TA repeat allele has been associated with elevated serum bilirubin levels that cause a mild hyperbilirubinemia (Gilbert's syndrome). Studies suggest that promoter transcriptional activity of UGT1A1 is inversely related to the number of TA repeats and that unconjugated bilirubin concentration increases directly with the number of TA repeat elements. Because bilirubin is a known antioxidant, we hypothesized that UGT1A1 repeats associated with higher bilirubin may be protective against oxidative damage. We examined the effect of UGT1A1 genotype on somatic mutant frequency in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase (HPRT) gene in human lymphocytes and the glycophorin A (GPA) gene of red blood cells (both N0, NN mutants), and the frequency of lymphocyte micronuclei (both kinetochore (K) positive or micronuclei K negative) in 101 healthy smoking and nonsmoking individuals. As hypothesized, genotypes containing 7-TA and 8-TA displayed marginally lower GPA{_}NN mutant frequency relative to 5/5, 5/6, 6/6 genotypes (p<0.05). In contrast, our analysis showed that lower expressing UGT1A1 alleles (7-TA and 8-TA) were associated with modestly increased HPRT mutation frequency (p<0.05) while the same low expression genotypes were not significantly associated with micronuclei frequencies (K-positive or K-negative) when compared to high expression genotypes (5-TA and 6-TA). We found weak evidence that UGT1A1 genotypes containing 7-TA and 8-TA were associated with increased GPA{_}N0 mutant frequency relative to 5/5, 5/6, 6/6 genotypes (p<0.05). These data suggest that UGT1A1 genotype may modulate somatic mutation of some types, in some cell lineages, by a mechanism not involving bilirubin antioxidant activity. More detailed studies examining UGT1A1 promoter variation, oxidant/antioxidant balance and

  12. Spare PRELI gene loci: failsafe chromosome insurance?

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    Wenbin Ma

    Full Text Available LEA (late embryogenesis abundant proteins encode conserved N-terminal mitochondrial signal domains and C-terminal (A/TAEKAK motif repeats, long-presumed to confer cell resistance to stress and death cues. This prompted the hypothesis that LEA proteins are central to mitochondria mechanisms that connect bioenergetics with cell responses to stress and death signaling. In support of this hypothesis, recent studies have demonstrated that mammalian LEA protein PRELI can act as a biochemical hub, which upholds mitochondria energy metabolism, while concomitantly promoting B cell resistance to stress and induced death. Hence, it is important to define in vivo the physiological relevance of PRELI expression.Given the ubiquitous PRELI expression during mouse development, embryo lethality could be anticipated. Thus, conditional gene targeting was engineered by insertion of flanking loxP (flox/Cre recognition sites on PRELI chromosome 13 (Chr 13 locus to abort its expression in a tissue-specific manner. After obtaining mouse lines with homozygous PRELI floxed alleles (PRELI(f/f, the animals were crossed with CD19-driven Cre-recombinase transgenic mice to investigate whether PRELI inactivation could affect B-lymphocyte physiology and survival. Mice with homozygous B cell-specific PRELI deletion (CD19-Cre/Chr13 PRELI(-/- bred normally and did not show any signs of morbidity. Histopathology and flow cytometry analyses revealed that cell lineage identity, morphology, and viability were indistinguishable between wild type CD19-Cre/Chr13 PRELI(+/+ and CD19-Cre/Chr13 PRELI(-/- deficient mice. Furthermore, B cell PRELI gene expression seemed unaffected by Chr13 PRELI gene targeting. However, identification of additional PRELI loci in mouse Chr1 and Chr5 provided an explanation for the paradox between LEA-dependent cytoprotection and the seemingly futile consequences of Chr 13 PRELI gene inactivation. Importantly, PRELI expression from spare gene loci appeared ample

  13. Evolution of V genes from the TRV loci of mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, David N; Gambón-Cerdá, Santiago; Gambón-Deza, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Information concerning the evolution of T lymphocyte receptors (TCR) can be deciphered from that part of the molecule that recognizes antigen presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC), namely the variable (V) regions. The genes that code for these variable regions are found within the TCR loci. Here, we describe a study of the evolutionary origin of V genes that code for the α and β chains of the TCR loci of mammals. In particular, we demonstrate that most of the 35 TRAV and 25 TRBV conserved genes found in Primates are also found in other Eutheria, while in Marsupials, Monotremes, and Reptiles, these genes diversified in a different manner. We also show that in mammals, all TRAV genes are derived from five ancestral genes, while all TRBV genes originate from four such genes. In Reptiles, the five TRAV and three out of the four TRBV ancestral genes exist, as well as other V genes not found in mammals. We also studied the TRGV and TRDV loci from all mammals, and we show a relationship of the TRDV to the TRAV locus throughout evolutionary time.

  14. Allozyme frequency distribution patterns at two gene loci of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Allozyme diversity at the gene loci of the Phosphoglucomutase and Fumarate hydratase enzymes were studied in cowpea landraces,with accession numbers 87/139, 87/142, 87/157, 87/30, 87/37, 87/55, 87/77, 87/81, and 87/83. Leaf protein of the accessions were extracted and subjected to starch gel electrophoresis.

  15. Gene network analysis of candidate loci for human anorectal malformations.

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    Emily H M Wong

    Full Text Available Anorectal malformations (ARMs are birth defects that require surgery and carry significant chronic morbidity. Our earlier genome-wide copy number variation (CNV study had provided a wealth of candidate loci. To find out whether these candidate loci are related to important developmental pathways, we have performed an extensive literature search coupled with the currently available bioinformatics tools. This has allowed us to assign both genic and non-genic CNVs to interrelated pathways known to govern the development of the anorectal region. We have linked 11 candidate genes to the WNT signalling pathway and 17 genes to the cytoskeletal network. Interestingly, candidate genes with similar functions are disrupted by the same type of CNV. The gene network we discovered provides evidence that rare mutations in different interrelated genes may lead to similar phenotypes, accounting for genetic heterogeneity in ARMs. Classification of patients according to the affected pathway and lesion type should eventually improve the diagnosis and the identification of common genes/molecules as therapeutic targets.

  16. Simultaneous mapping of multiple gene loci with pooled segregants.

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    Jürgen Claesen

    Full Text Available The analysis of polygenic, phenotypic characteristics such as quantitative traits or inheritable diseases remains an important challenge. It requires reliable scoring of many genetic markers covering the entire genome. The advent of high-throughput sequencing technologies provides a new way to evaluate large numbers of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs as genetic markers. Combining the technologies with pooling of segregants, as performed in bulked segregant analysis (BSA, should, in principle, allow the simultaneous mapping of multiple genetic loci present throughout the genome. The gene mapping process, applied here, consists of three steps: First, a controlled crossing of parents with and without a trait. Second, selection based on phenotypic screening of the offspring, followed by the mapping of short offspring sequences against the parental reference. The final step aims at detecting genetic markers such as SNPs, insertions and deletions with next generation sequencing (NGS. Markers in close proximity of genomic loci that are associated to the trait have a higher probability to be inherited together. Hence, these markers are very useful for discovering the loci and the genetic mechanism underlying the characteristic of interest. Within this context, NGS produces binomial counts along the genome, i.e., the number of sequenced reads that matches with the SNP of the parental reference strain, which is a proxy for the number of individuals in the offspring that share the SNP with the parent. Genomic loci associated with the trait can thus be discovered by analyzing trends in the counts along the genome. We exploit the link between smoothing splines and generalized mixed models for estimating the underlying structure present in the SNP scatterplots.

  17. Unexpected heterogeneity derived from Cas9 ribonucleoprotein-introduced clonal cells at the HPRT1 locus.

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    Sakuma, Tetsushi; Mochida, Keiji; Nakade, Shota; Ezure, Toru; Minagawa, Sachi; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2018-02-09

    Single-cell cloning is an essential technique for establishing genome-edited cell clones mediated by programmable nucleases such as CRISPR-Cas9. However, residual genome-editing activity after single-cell cloning may cause heterogeneity in the clonal cells. Previous studies showed efficient mutagenesis and rapid degradation of CRISPR-Cas9 components in cultured cells by introducing Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs). In this study, we investigated how the timing for single-cell cloning of Cas9 RNP-transfected cells affected the heterogeneity of the resultant clones. We carried out transfection of Cas9 RNPs targeting several loci in the HPRT1 gene in HCT116 cells, followed by single-cell cloning at 24, 48, 72 hr and 1 week post-transfection. After approximately 3 weeks of incubation, the clonal cells were collected and genotyped by high-resolution microchip electrophoresis and Sanger sequencing. Unexpectedly, long-term incubation before single-cell cloning resulted in highly heterogeneous clones. We used a lipofection method for transfection, and the media containing transfectable RNPs were not removed before single-cell cloning. Therefore, the active Cas9 RNPs were considered to be continuously incorporated into cells during the precloning incubation. Our findings provide a warning that lipofection of Cas9 RNPs may cause continuous introduction of gene mutations depending on the experimental procedures. © 2018 Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. CRISPR loci reveal networks of gene exchange in archaea.

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    Brodt, Avital; Lurie-Weinberger, Mor N; Gophna, Uri

    2011-12-21

    CRISPR (Clustered, Regularly, Interspaced, Short, Palindromic Repeats) loci provide prokaryotes with an adaptive immunity against viruses and other mobile genetic elements. CRISPR arrays can be transcribed and processed into small crRNA molecules, which are then used by the cell to target the foreign nucleic acid. Since spacers are accumulated by active CRISPR/Cas systems, the sequences of these spacers provide a record of the past "infection history" of the organism. Here we analyzed all currently known spacers present in archaeal genomes and identified their source by DNA similarity. While nearly 50% of archaeal spacers matched mobile genetic elements, such as plasmids or viruses, several others matched chromosomal genes of other organisms, primarily other archaea. Thus, networks of gene exchange between archaeal species were revealed by the spacer analysis, including many cases of inter-genus and inter-species gene transfer events. Spacers that recognize viral sequences tend to be located further away from the leader sequence, implying that there exists a selective pressure for their retention. CRISPR spacers provide direct evidence for extensive gene exchange in archaea, especially within genera, and support the current dogma where the primary role of the CRISPR/Cas system is anti-viral and anti-plasmid defense. This article was reviewed by: Profs. W. Ford Doolittle, John van der Oost, Christa Schleper (nominated by board member Prof. J Peter Gogarten).

  19. CRISPR loci reveal networks of gene exchange in archaea

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    Brodt Avital

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CRISPR (Clustered, Regularly, Interspaced, Short, Palindromic Repeats loci provide prokaryotes with an adaptive immunity against viruses and other mobile genetic elements. CRISPR arrays can be transcribed and processed into small crRNA molecules, which are then used by the cell to target the foreign nucleic acid. Since spacers are accumulated by active CRISPR/Cas systems, the sequences of these spacers provide a record of the past "infection history" of the organism. Results Here we analyzed all currently known spacers present in archaeal genomes and identified their source by DNA similarity. While nearly 50% of archaeal spacers matched mobile genetic elements, such as plasmids or viruses, several others matched chromosomal genes of other organisms, primarily other archaea. Thus, networks of gene exchange between archaeal species were revealed by the spacer analysis, including many cases of inter-genus and inter-species gene transfer events. Spacers that recognize viral sequences tend to be located further away from the leader sequence, implying that there exists a selective pressure for their retention. Conclusions CRISPR spacers provide direct evidence for extensive gene exchange in archaea, especially within genera, and support the current dogma where the primary role of the CRISPR/Cas system is anti-viral and anti-plasmid defense. Open peer review This article was reviewed by: Profs. W. Ford Doolittle, John van der Oost, Christa Schleper (nominated by board member Prof. J Peter Gogarten

  20. Description of electrophoretic loci and tissue specific gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1994-02-09

    Feb 9, 1994 ... The expression of one locus (L-Idh-I) was restricted to endodermal tissue, specifically to liver, and no locus was expressed exclusively in tissues of ectodermal ori- gin. Of the remaining 39 loci, 23 were expressed in one or more tissues derived from each germ layer. The products of. 13 loci were found in ...

  1. Mild Lesch-Nyhan Disease in a Boy with a Null Mutation inHPRT1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayat, Allan; Christensen, Mette; Wibrand, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) deficiency results in a continuous spectrum of clinical phenotypes though all include overproduction of uric acid with hyperuricaemia, urate nephrolithiasis and gout. HPRT1 mutations that result in very low or no HPRT enzyme activities...

  2. Enrichment of putative PAX8 target genes at serous epithelial ovarian cancer susceptibility loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kar, Siddhartha P; Adler, Emily; Tyrer, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 18 loci associated with serous ovarian cancer (SOC) susceptibility but the biological mechanisms driving these findings remain poorly characterised. Germline cancer risk loci may be enriched for target genes of transcription facto...

  3. Blood Pressure Loci Identified with a Gene-Centric Array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Toby; Gaunt, Tom R.; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Kumari, Meena; Morris, Richard W.; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; O'Brien, Eoin T.; Poulter, Neil R.; Sever, Peter; Shields, Denis C.; Thom, Simon; Wannamethee, Sasiwarang G.; Whincup, Peter H.; Brown, Morris J.; Connell, John M.; Dobson, Richard J.; Howard, Philip J.; Mein, Charles A.; Onipinla, Abiodun; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Zhang, Yun; Smith, George Davey; Day, Ian N. M.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Goodall, Alison H.; Fowkes, F. Gerald; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Elliott, Paul; Gateva, Vesela; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Tobin, Martin D.; van der Harst, Pim; Glorioso, Nicola; Neuvrith, Hani; Salvi, Erika; Staessen, Jan A.; Stucchi, Andrea; Devos, Nabila; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Plouin, Pierre-Francois; Tichet, Jean; Juhanson, Peeter; Org, Elin; Putku, Margus; Sober, Siim; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Levinsson, Anna; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S.; Hastie, Claire E.; Hedner, Thomas; Lee, Wai K.; Melander, Olle; Wahlstrand, Bjoern; Hardy, Rebecca; Wong, Andrew; Cooper, Jackie A.; Palmen, Jutta; Chen, Li; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Wells, George A.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wolfs, Marcel G. M.; Clarke, Robert; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Lathrop, Mark; Peden, John F.; Seedorf, Udo; Watkins, Hugh; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Sambrook, Jennifer; Stephens, Jonathan; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Drenos, Fotios; Holmes, Michael V.; Kivimaki, Mika; Shah, Sonia; Shah, Tina; Talmud, Philippa J.; Whittaker, John; Wallace, Chris; Delles, Christian; Laan, Mans; Kuh, Diana; Humphries, Steve E.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Cusi, Daniele; Roberts, Robert; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Franke, Lude; Stanton, Alice V.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Farrall, Martin; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Munroe, Patricia B.

    2011-01-01

    Raised blood pressure (BP) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Previous studies have identified 47 distinct genetic variants robustly associated with BP, but collectively these explain only a few percent of the heritability for BP phenotypes. To find additional BP loci, we used a

  4. Hypomutability in Fanconi anemia cells is associated with increased deletion frequency at the HPRT locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadopoulo, D.; Guillouf, C.; Moustacchi, E. (Unite Recherche Associee due Centre National del La Recherche Scientifique, Paris (France)); Mohrenweiser, H. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1990-11-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited human disorder associated with a predisposition to cancer and characterized by anomalies in the processing of DNA cross-links and certain monoadducts. The authors reported previously that the frequency of psoralen-photoinduced mutations at the HPRT locus is lower in FA cells than in normal cells. This hypomutability is shown here to be associated with an increased frequency of deletions in the HPRT gene when either a mixture of cross-links and monoadducts or monoadducts alone are induced. Molecular analysis of mutants in the HPRT gene was carried out. In normal cells the majority of spontaneous and induced mutants are point mutations whereas in FA deletion mutations predominate. In that case a majority of mutants were found to lack individual exons or small clusters of exons whereas in normal cells large (complete or major gene loss) and small deletions are almost equally represented. Thus they propose that the FA defect lies in a mutagenic pathway that, in normal cells, involves by passing lesions and subsequent gap filling by a recombinational process during replication.

  5. Dynamic changes in the interchromosomal interaction of early histone gene loci during development of sea urchin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Masaya; Ochiai, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ken-Ichi T; Hayashi, Sayaka; Yamamoto, Takashi; Awazu, Akinori; Sakamoto, Naoaki

    2017-12-15

    The nuclear positioning and chromatin dynamics of eukaryotic genes are closely related to the regulation of gene expression, but they have not been well examined during early development, which is accompanied by rapid cell cycle progression and dynamic changes in nuclear organization, such as nuclear size and chromatin constitution. In this study, we focused on the early development of the sea urchin Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus and performed three-dimensional fluorescence in situ hybridization of gene loci encoding early histones (one of the types of histone in sea urchin). There are two non-allelic early histone gene loci per sea urchin genome. We found that during the morula stage, when the early histone gene expression levels are at their maximum, interchromosomal interactions were often formed between the early histone gene loci on separate chromosomes and that the gene loci were directed to locate to more interior positions. Furthermore, these interactions were associated with the active transcription of the early histone genes. Thus, such dynamic interchromosomal interactions may contribute to the efficient synthesis of early histone mRNA during the morula stage of sea urchin development. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Systematic analysis of chromatin interactions at disease associated loci links novel candidate genes to inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meddens, Claartje A; Harakalova, Magdalena; van den Dungen, Noortje A M; Foroughi Asl, Hassan; Hijma, Hemme J; Cuppen, Edwin P J G; Björkegren, Johan L M; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; Mokry, Michal

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed many susceptibility loci for complex genetic diseases. For most loci, the causal genes have not been identified. Currently, the identification of candidate genes is predominantly based on genes that localize close to or within

  7. Expression QTL-based analyses reveal candidate causal genes and loci across five tumor types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiyuan; Stram, Alexander; Chen, Constance; Kar, Siddhartha; Gayther, Simon; Pharoah, Paul; Haiman, Christopher; Stranger, Barbara; Kraft, Peter; Freedman, Matthew L.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of trait-associated loci discovered through genome-wide association studies are located outside of known protein coding regions. Consequently, it is difficult to ascertain the mechanism underlying these variants and to pinpoint the causal alleles. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) provide an organizing principle to address both of these issues. eQTLs are genetic loci that correlate with RNA transcript levels. Large-scale data sets such as the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) provide an ideal opportunity to systematically evaluate eQTLs as they have generated multiple data types on hundreds of samples. We evaluated the determinants of gene expression (germline variants and somatic copy number and methylation) and performed cis-eQTL analyses for mRNA expression and miRNA expression in five tumor types (breast, colon, kidney, lung and prostate). We next tested 149 known cancer risk loci for eQTL effects, and observed that 42 (28.2%) were significantly associated with at least one transcript. Lastly, we described a fine-mapping strategy for these 42 eQTL target–gene associations based on an integrated strategy that combines the eQTL level of significance and the regulatory potential as measured by DNaseI hypersensitivity. For each of the risk loci, our analyses suggested 1 to 81 candidate causal variants that may be prioritized for downstream functional analysis. In summary, our study provided a comprehensive landscape of the genetic determinants of gene expression in different tumor types and ranked the genes and loci for further functional assessment of known cancer risk loci. PMID:24907074

  8. Replication and Narrowing of Gene Expression Quantitative Trait Loci using Inbred Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Gatti, Daniel M.; Harrill, Alison H.; Wright, Fred A.; Threadgill, David W.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Gene expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) mapping has become a powerful tool in systems biology. While many authors have made important discoveries using this approach, one persistent challenge in eQTL studies is the selection of loci and genes that should receive further biological investigation. In this study, we compared eQTL generated from gene expression profiling in the livers of two panels of mouse strains, 41 BXD recombinant inbred and 36 mouse diversity panel (MDP) strains. Cis...

  9. Alzheimer's Disease Risk Polymorphisms Regulate Gene Expression in the ZCWPW1 and the CELF1 Loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celeste M Karch

    Full Text Available Late onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD is a genetically complex and clinically heterogeneous disease. Recent large-scale genome wide association studies (GWAS have identified more than twenty loci that modify risk for AD. Despite the identification of these loci, little progress has been made in identifying the functional variants that explain the association with AD risk. Thus, we sought to determine whether the novel LOAD GWAS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs alter expression of LOAD GWAS genes and whether expression of these genes is altered in AD brains. The majority of LOAD GWAS SNPs occur in gene dense regions under large linkage disequilibrium (LD blocks, making it unclear which gene(s are modified by the SNP. Thus, we tested for brain expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs between LOAD GWAS SNPs and SNPs in high LD with the LOAD GWAS SNPs in all of the genes within the GWAS loci. We found a significant eQTL between rs1476679 and PILRB and GATS, which occurs within the ZCWPW1 locus. PILRB and GATS expression levels, within the ZCWPW1 locus, were also associated with AD status. Rs7120548 was associated with MTCH2 expression, which occurs within the CELF1 locus. Additionally, expression of several genes within the CELF1 locus, including MTCH2, were highly correlated with one another and were associated with AD status. We further demonstrate that PILRB, as well as other genes within the GWAS loci, are most highly expressed in microglia. These findings together with the function of PILRB as a DAP12 receptor supports the critical role of microglia and neuroinflammation in AD risk.

  10. Knockdown of HPRT for Selection of Genetically Modified Human Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Rashmi; Baturin, Dmitry; Fosmire, Susan; Freed, Brian; Porter, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    The inability to obtain sufficient numbers of transduced cells remains a limitation in gene therapy. One strategy to address this limitation is in vivo pharmacologic selection of transduced cells. We have previously shown that knockdown of HPRT using lentiviral delivered shRNA facilitates efficient selection of transduced murine hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) using 6-thioguanine (6TG). Herein, we now extend these studies to human HPC. We tested multiple shRNA constructs in human derived cell lines and identified the optimal shRNA sequence for knockdown of HPRT and 6TG resistance. We then tested this vector in human umbilical cord blood derived HPC in vitro and in NOD/SCID recipients. Knockdown of HPRT effectively provided resistance to 6TG in vitro. 6TG treatment of mice resulted in increased percentages of transduced human CD45+ cells in the peripheral blood and in the spleen in particular, in both myeloid and lymphoid compartments. 6TG treatment of secondary recipients resulted in higher percentages of transduced human cells in the bone marrow, confirming selection from the progeny of long-term repopulating HPCs. However, the extent of selection of cells in the bone marrow at the doses of 6TG tested and the toxicity of higher doses, suggest that this strategy may be limited to selection of more committed progenitor cells. Together, these data suggest that human HPC can be programmed to be resistant to purine analogs, but that HPRT knockdown/6TG-based selection may not be robust enough for in vivo selection. PMID:23555045

  11. Knockdown of HPRT for selection of genetically modified human hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Choudhary

    Full Text Available The inability to obtain sufficient numbers of transduced cells remains a limitation in gene therapy. One strategy to address this limitation is in vivo pharmacologic selection of transduced cells. We have previously shown that knockdown of HPRT using lentiviral delivered shRNA facilitates efficient selection of transduced murine hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC using 6-thioguanine (6TG. Herein, we now extend these studies to human HPC. We tested multiple shRNA constructs in human derived cell lines and identified the optimal shRNA sequence for knockdown of HPRT and 6TG resistance. We then tested this vector in human umbilical cord blood derived HPC in vitro and in NOD/SCID recipients. Knockdown of HPRT effectively provided resistance to 6TG in vitro. 6TG treatment of mice resulted in increased percentages of transduced human CD45(+ cells in the peripheral blood and in the spleen in particular, in both myeloid and lymphoid compartments. 6TG treatment of secondary recipients resulted in higher percentages of transduced human cells in the bone marrow, confirming selection from the progeny of long-term repopulating HPCs. However, the extent of selection of cells in the bone marrow at the doses of 6TG tested and the toxicity of higher doses, suggest that this strategy may be limited to selection of more committed progenitor cells. Together, these data suggest that human HPC can be programmed to be resistant to purine analogs, but that HPRT knockdown/6TG-based selection may not be robust enough for in vivo selection.

  12. Genetic Susceptibility to Vitiligo: GWAS Approaches for Identifying Vitiligo Susceptibility Genes and Loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Changbing; Gao, Jing; Sheng, Yujun; Dou, Jinfa; Zhou, Fusheng; Zheng, Xiaodong; Ko, Randy; Tang, Xianfa; Zhu, Caihong; Yin, Xianyong; Sun, Liangdan; Cui, Yong; Zhang, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease with a strong genetic component, characterized by areas of depigmented skin resulting from loss of epidermal melanocytes. Genetic factors are known to play key roles in vitiligo through discoveries in association studies and family studies. Previously, vitiligo susceptibility genes were mainly revealed through linkage analysis and candidate gene studies. Recently, our understanding of the genetic basis of vitiligo has been rapidly advancing through genome-wide association study (GWAS). More than 40 robust susceptible loci have been identified and confirmed to be associated with vitiligo by using GWAS. Most of these associated genes participate in important pathways involved in the pathogenesis of vitiligo. Many susceptible loci with unknown functions in the pathogenesis of vitiligo have also been identified, indicating that additional molecular mechanisms may contribute to the risk of developing vitiligo. In this review, we summarize the key loci that are of genome-wide significance, which have been shown to influence vitiligo risk. These genetic loci may help build the foundation for genetic diagnosis and personalize treatment for patients with vitiligo in the future. However, substantial additional studies, including gene-targeted and functional studies, are required to confirm the causality of the genetic variants and their biological relevance in the development of vitiligo. PMID:26870082

  13. Tissue Restricted Splice Junctions Originate Not Only from Tissue-Specific Gene Loci, but Gene Loci with a Broad Pattern of Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Hestand

    Full Text Available Cellular mechanisms that achieve protein diversity in eukaryotes are multifaceted, including transcriptional components such as RNA splicing. Through alternative splicing, a single protein-coding gene can generate multiple mRNA transcripts and protein isoforms, some of which are tissue-specific. We have conducted qualitative and quantitative analyses of the Bodymap 2.0 messenger RNA-sequencing data from 16 human tissue samples and identified 209,363 splice junctions. Of these, 22,231 (10.6% were not previously annotated and 21,650 (10.3% were expressed in a tissue-restricted pattern. Tissue-restricted alternative splicing was found to be widespread, with approximately 65% of expressed multi-exon genes containing at least one tissue-specific splice junction. Interestingly, we observed many tissue-specific splice junctions not only in genes expressed in one or a few tissues, but also from gene loci with a broad pattern of expression.

  14. Mapping quantitative trait loci and identification of genes that control fatness in poultry

    OpenAIRE

    Burt, David W.; Hocking, Paul M.

    2002-01-01

    Chicken genomics has benefited from the rapid technological advances in the genomics of model organisms and man. A number of resources and approaches are now well established, in the chicken, including genetic markers and maps (both genetic and physical), quantitative trait loci mapping, comparative mapping, expressed sequence tag and bacterial artificial chromosome resources, and physical mapping. In addition, the next phase of gene discovery, functional genomics, is underway. Progress in ma...

  15. Quantitative trait loci define genes and pathways underlying genetic variation in longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmookler Reis, Robert J; Kang, Ping; Ayyadevara, Srinivas

    2006-10-01

    Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping provides a means to discover and roughly position regions of the genome that harbor genes responsible for natural variation in a complex trait. QTL mapping has been utilized extensively in the pursuit of genes contributing to longevity, chiefly in two animal models, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the dipteran insect Drosophila melanogaster. Research on both species has demonstrated that a relatively small set of loci accounts for most of their genetic variance in lifespan. QTL mapping complements the discovery of longevity genes by mutagenesis screens, because the two procedures are predicted to unveil overlapping but distinct types of genes. We argue that information gained from animal models, even invertebrates, can greatly facilitate the process of gene identification and testing of homologous genes in humans.

  16. Systematic analysis of chromatin interactions at disease associated loci links novel candidate genes to inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meddens, Claartje A; Harakalova, Magdalena; van den Dungen, Noortje A M; Foroughi Asl, Hassan; Hijma, Hemme J; Cuppen, Edwin P J G; Björkegren, Johan L M; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; Mokry, Michal

    2016-11-30

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed many susceptibility loci for complex genetic diseases. For most loci, the causal genes have not been identified. Currently, the identification of candidate genes is predominantly based on genes that localize close to or within identified loci. We have recently shown that 92 of the 163 inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-loci co-localize with non-coding DNA regulatory elements (DREs). Mutations in DREs can contribute to IBD pathogenesis through dysregulation of gene expression. Consequently, genes that are regulated by these 92 DREs are to be considered as candidate genes. This study uses circular chromosome conformation capture-sequencing (4C-seq) to systematically analyze chromatin-interactions at IBD susceptibility loci that localize to regulatory DNA. Using 4C-seq, we identify genomic regions that physically interact with the 92 DRE that were found at IBD susceptibility loci. Since the activity of regulatory elements is cell-type specific, 4C-seq was performed in monocytes, lymphocytes, and intestinal epithelial cells. Altogether, we identified 902 novel IBD candidate genes. These include genes specific for IBD-subtypes and many noteworthy genes including ATG9A and IL10RA. We show that expression of many novel candidate genes is genotype-dependent and that these genes are upregulated during intestinal inflammation in IBD. Furthermore, we identify HNF4α as a potential key upstream regulator of IBD candidate genes. We reveal many novel and relevant IBD candidate genes, pathways, and regulators. Our approach complements classical candidate gene identification, links novel genes to IBD and can be applied to any existing GWAS data.

  17. Gene interaction at seed-awning loci in the genetic background of wild rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikemoto, Mai; Otsuka, Mitsuharu; Thanh, Pham Thien; Phan, Phuong Dang Thai; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ishii, Takashige

    2017-09-12

    Seed awning is one of the important traits for successful propagation in wild rice. During the domestication of rice by ancient humans, plants with awnless seeds may have been selected because long awns hindered collection and handling activities. To investigate domestication of awnless rice, QTL analysis for seed awning was first carried out using backcross recombinant inbred lines between Oryza sativa Nipponbare (recurrent parent) and O. rufipogon W630 (donor parent). Two strong QTLs were detected in the same regions as known major seed-awning loci, An-1 and RAE2. Subsequent causal mutation surveying and fine mapping confirmed that O. rufipogon W630 has functional alleles at both loci. The gene effects and interactions at these loci were examined using two backcross populations with reciprocal genetic backgrounds of O. sativa Nipponbare and O. rufipogon W630. As awn length in wild rice varied among seeds even in the same plant, awn length was measured based on spikelet position. In the genetic background of cultivated rice, the wild alleles at An-1 and RAE2 had awning effects, and plants having both wild homozygous alleles produced awns whose length was about 70% of those of the wild parent. On the other hand, in the genetic background of wild rice, the substitution of cultivated alleles at An-1 and RAE2 contributed little to awn length reduction. These results indicate that the domestication process of awnless seeds was complicated because many genes are involved in awn formation in wild rice.

  18. Allelic loss of the ING gene family loci is a frequent event in ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkosky, Silvia S; Gunduz, Mehmet; Beder, Levent; Tsujigiwa, Hidetsugu; Tamamura, Ryo; Gunduz, Esra; Katase, Naoki; Rodriguez, Andrea P; Sasaki, Akira; Nagai, Noriyuki; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is the most frequently encountered odontogenic tumor, characterized by a locally invasive behavior, frequent recurrences, and, although rare, metastatic capacity. Loss or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) allows cells to acquire neoplastic growth. The ING family proteins are tumor suppressors that physically and functionally interact with p53 to perform important roles in apoptosis, DNA repair, cell cycle regulation, and senescence. TP53 genetic alterations were reported to infrequently occur in ameloblastoma. Considering that other TSGs related to TP53 could be altered in this tumor, we focused our study on the ING family genes. We analyzed the loss of heterozygosity (LOH) status of the ING family (ING1-ING5) chromosomal loci in a group of ameloblastomas by microsatellite analysis, and correlated the ING LOH status with clinicopathological characteristics. By using specific microsatellite markers, high frequency of LOH was found at the loci of each ING gene family member (33.3-72.2%). A significant relationship was shown between LOH of D2S 140 (ING5 locus) and solid tumor type (p = 0.02). LOH of ING3MS (ING3 locus) was also high in solid type tumors, showing a near significant association. In addition, a notable tendency toward higher LOH for half of the markers was observed in recurrent cases. LOH of ING family genes appears as a common genetic alteration in solid ameloblastoma. The current study provides interesting novel information regarding the potential prognostic significance of the allelic loss of the ING gene family loci in ameloblastoma tumorigenesis.

  19. Nonrandom Distribution of miRNAs Genes and Single Nucleotide Variants in Keratoconus Loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Dorota M; Gajecka, Marzena

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous studies, the causes of both development and progression of keratoconus remain elusive. Previous studies of this disorder focused mainly on one or two genetic factors only. However, in the analysis of such complex diseases all potential factors should be taken into consideration. The purpose of this study was a comprehensive analysis of known keratoconus loci to uncover genetic factors involved in this disease causation in the general population, which could be omitted in the original studies. In this investigation genomic data available in various databases and experimental own data were assessed. The lists of single nucleotide variants and miRNA genes localized in reported keratoconus loci were obtained from Ensembl and miRBase, respectively. The potential impact of nonsynonymous amino acid substitutions on protein structure and function was assessed with PolyPhen-2 and SIFT. For selected protein genes the ranking was made to choose those most promising for keratoconus development. Ranking results were based on topological features in the protein-protein interaction network. High specificity for the populations in which the causative sequence variants have been identified was found. In addition, the possibility of links between previously analyzed keratoconus loci was confirmed including miRNA-gene interactions. Identified number of genes associated with oxidative stress and inflammatory agents corroborated the hypothesis of their effect on the disease etiology. Distribution of the numerous sequences variants within both exons and mature miRNA which forces you to search for a broader look at the determinants of keratoconus. Our findings highlight the complexity of the keratoconus genetics.

  20. Nonrandom Distribution of miRNAs Genes and Single Nucleotide Variants in Keratoconus Loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota M Nowak

    Full Text Available Despite numerous studies, the causes of both development and progression of keratoconus remain elusive. Previous studies of this disorder focused mainly on one or two genetic factors only. However, in the analysis of such complex diseases all potential factors should be taken into consideration. The purpose of this study was a comprehensive analysis of known keratoconus loci to uncover genetic factors involved in this disease causation in the general population, which could be omitted in the original studies. In this investigation genomic data available in various databases and experimental own data were assessed. The lists of single nucleotide variants and miRNA genes localized in reported keratoconus loci were obtained from Ensembl and miRBase, respectively. The potential impact of nonsynonymous amino acid substitutions on protein structure and function was assessed with PolyPhen-2 and SIFT. For selected protein genes the ranking was made to choose those most promising for keratoconus development. Ranking results were based on topological features in the protein-protein interaction network. High specificity for the populations in which the causative sequence variants have been identified was found. In addition, the possibility of links between previously analyzed keratoconus loci was confirmed including miRNA-gene interactions. Identified number of genes associated with oxidative stress and inflammatory agents corroborated the hypothesis of their effect on the disease etiology. Distribution of the numerous sequences variants within both exons and mature miRNA which forces you to search for a broader look at the determinants of keratoconus. Our findings highlight the complexity of the keratoconus genetics.

  1. Genes and quality trait loci (QTLs) associated with firmness in Malus x domestica

    KAUST Repository

    Marondedze, Claudius

    2013-03-31

    Fruit firmness, a quality quantitative trait, has long been established as a key textural property and one of the essential parameters for estimating ripening and shelf life of apples. Loss of firmness, also referred to as fruit softening, is undesirable in apples and represents a serious problem for growers in many countries. This results in the reduction of apple shelf life and in turn influences its commercialization. Low firmness impacts negatively on the sensory values of juiciness, crunchiness and crispness. Fruit firmness is affected by the inheritance of alleles at multiple loci and their possible interactions with the environment. Identification of these loci is key for the determination of genetic candidate markers that can be implemented in marker assisted selection and breeding for trees and/or cultivars that can yield firmer fruits with economic value. In turn, this technique can help reduce the time needed to evaluate plants and new cultivars could become available faster. This review provides an overview of quantitative trait loci (QTL), including additional putative QTLs that we have identified, and genes associated with firmness and their importance to biotechnology, the breeding industry and eventually the consumers.

  2. Coexpression and expression quantitative trait loci analyses of the angiogenesis gene-gene interaction network in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui-Yi; Cheng, Chia-Ho; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Chen, Y Ann; Park, Jong Y

    2016-10-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) shows a substantial clinical heterogeneity. The existing risk classification for PCa prognosis based on clinical factors is not sufficient. Although some biomarkers for PCa aggressiveness have been identified, their underlying functional mechanisms are still unclear. We previously reported a gene-gene interaction network associated with PCa aggressiveness based on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-SNP interactions in the angiogenesis pathway. The goal of this study is to investigate potential functional evidence of the involvement of the genes in this gene-gene interaction network. A total of 11 angiogenesis genes were evaluated. The crosstalks among genes were examined through coexpression and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analyses. The study population is 352 Caucasian PCa patients in the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) study. The pairwise coexpressions among the genes of interest were evaluated using the Spearman coefficient. The eQTL analyses were tested using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Among all within gene and 55 possible pairwise gene evaluations, 12 gene pairs and one gene (MMP16) showed strong coexpression or significant eQTL evidence. There are nine gene pairs with a strong correlation (Spearman correlation ≥0.6, PROBO1 (r=0.62), CSF1-HSPG2 (r=0.61), CSF1-FBLN5 (r=0.6), and CSF1-ROBO1 (r=0.60). One cis-eQTL in MMP16 and five trans-eQTLs (MMP16-ESR1, ESR1-ROBO1, CSF1-ROBO1, HSPG2-ROBO1, and FBLN5-CSF1) are significant with a false discovery rate q value less than 0.2. These findings provide potential biological evidence for the gene-gene interactions in this angiogenesis network. These identified interactions between the angiogenesis genes not only provide information for PCa etiology mechanism but also may serve as integrated biomarkers for building a risk prediction model for PCa aggressiveness.

  3. Replication and narrowing of gene expression quantitative trait loci using inbred mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Daniel M; Harrill, Alison H; Wright, Fred A; Threadgill, David W; Rusyn, Ivan

    2009-07-01

    Gene expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) mapping has become a powerful tool in systems biology. While many authors have made important discoveries using this approach, one persistent challenge in eQTL studies is the selection of loci and genes that should receive further biological investigation. In this study we compared eQTL generated from gene expression profiling in the livers of two panels of mouse strains: 41 BXD recombinant inbred and 36 Mouse Diversity Panel (MDP) strains. Cis-eQTL, loci in which the transcript and its maximum QTL are colocated, have been shown to be more reproducible than trans-eQTL, which are not colocated with the transcript. We observed that between 9.9 and 12.1% of cis-eQTL and between 2.0 and 12.6% of trans-eQTL replicated between the two panels depending on the degree of statistical stringency. Notably, a significant eQTL hotspot on distal chromosome 12 observed in the BXD panel was reproduced in the MDP. Furthermore, the shorter linkage disequilibrium in the MDP strains allowed us to considerably narrow the locus and limit the number of candidate genes to a cluster of Serpin genes, which code for extracellular proteases. We conclude that this strategy has some utility in increasing confidence and resolution in eQTL mapping studies; however, due to the high false-positive rate in the MDP, eQTL mapping in inbred strains is best carried out in combination with an eQTL linkage study.

  4. Mutation survey of known LCA genes and loci in the Saudi Arabian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yumei; Wang, Hui; Peng, Jianlan; Gibbs, Richard A; Lewis, Richard Alan; Lupski, James R; Mardon, Graeme; Chen, Rui

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a comprehensive survey of all known Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) genes and loci in a collection of 37 consanguineous LCA families from Saudi Arabia. Direct PCR and sequencing were used to screen 13 known LCA genes (GUCY2D, CRX, RPE65, TULP1, AIPL1, CRB1, RPGRIP1, LRAT, RDH12, IMPDH1, CEP290, RD3, LCA5). In addition, families without mutations identified were further screened with STR markers around these 13 known LCA genes and two loci. Disease-causing mutations were identified in nine of the 37 families: five in TULP1, two in CRB1, one in RPE65, and one in GUCY2D. Mutations in known genes only accounted for 24% of the Saudi families--much less than what has been observed in the European population (65%). Phenotype-genotype analysis was carried out to investigate the LCA disease penetrance for all families whose mutations identified. All identified mutations were found to segregate perfectly with the disease phenotype. On the other hand, severity of the disease varies for different patients carrying the same mutation and even within the same family. Furthermore, based on homozygosity mapping with both STR and SNP markers, one family is likely to map to the LCA3 locus. These results underscore the importance of studying LCA disease families from different ethnic backgrounds to identify additional novel LCA disease genes. Furthermore, perfect segregation between mutation and disease indicates that LCA is fully penetrant. However, phenotypic variations among patients carrying the same mutation suggest that at least some of the variations in the clinical phenotype is due to modification from the genetic background, environment, or other factors.

  5. Novel Loci for metabolic networks and multi-tissue expression studies reveal genes for atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, Michael; Ripatti, Samuli; Kettunen, Johannes; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Oksala, Niku; Laurila, Pirkka-Pekka; Kangas, Antti J; Soininen, Pasi; Savolainen, Markku J; Viikari, Jorma; Kähönen, Mika; Perola, Markus; Salomaa, Veikko; Raitakari, Olli; Lehtimäki, Terho; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Palotie, Aarno; de Bakker, Paul I W

    2012-01-01

    Association testing of multiple correlated phenotypes offers better power than univariate analysis of single traits. We analyzed 6,600 individuals from two population-based cohorts with both genome-wide SNP data and serum metabolomic profiles. From the observed correlation structure of 130 metabolites measured by nuclear magnetic resonance, we identified 11 metabolic networks and performed a multivariate genome-wide association analysis. We identified 34 genomic loci at genome-wide significance, of which 7 are novel. In comparison to univariate tests, multivariate association analysis identified nearly twice as many significant associations in total. Multi-tissue gene expression studies identified variants in our top loci, SERPINA1 and AQP9, as eQTLs and showed that SERPINA1 and AQP9 expression in human blood was associated with metabolites from their corresponding metabolic networks. Finally, liver expression of AQP9 was associated with atherosclerotic lesion area in mice, and in human arterial tissue both SERPINA1 and AQP9 were shown to be upregulated (6.3-fold and 4.6-fold, respectively) in atherosclerotic plaques. Our study illustrates the power of multi-phenotype GWAS and highlights candidate genes for atherosclerosis.

  6. Novel Loci for metabolic networks and multi-tissue expression studies reveal genes for atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Inouye

    Full Text Available Association testing of multiple correlated phenotypes offers better power than univariate analysis of single traits. We analyzed 6,600 individuals from two population-based cohorts with both genome-wide SNP data and serum metabolomic profiles. From the observed correlation structure of 130 metabolites measured by nuclear magnetic resonance, we identified 11 metabolic networks and performed a multivariate genome-wide association analysis. We identified 34 genomic loci at genome-wide significance, of which 7 are novel. In comparison to univariate tests, multivariate association analysis identified nearly twice as many significant associations in total. Multi-tissue gene expression studies identified variants in our top loci, SERPINA1 and AQP9, as eQTLs and showed that SERPINA1 and AQP9 expression in human blood was associated with metabolites from their corresponding metabolic networks. Finally, liver expression of AQP9 was associated with atherosclerotic lesion area in mice, and in human arterial tissue both SERPINA1 and AQP9 were shown to be upregulated (6.3-fold and 4.6-fold, respectively in atherosclerotic plaques. Our study illustrates the power of multi-phenotype GWAS and highlights candidate genes for atherosclerosis.

  7. Identification of quantitative trait loci and candidate genes for cadmium tolerance in Populus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Induri, Brahma R [West Virginia University; Ellis, Danielle R [West Virginia University; Slavov, Goncho T. [West Virginia University; Yin, Tongming [ORNL; Zhang, Xinye [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; DiFazio, Steven P [West Virginia University

    2012-01-01

    Understanding genetic variation for the response of Populus to heavy metals like cadmium (Cd) is an important step in elucidating the underlying mechanisms of tolerance. In this study, a pseudo-backcross pedigree of Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray and Populus deltoides Bart. was characterized for growth and performance traits after Cd exposure. A total of 16 quantitative trait loci (QTL) at logarithm of odds (LOD) ratio 2.5 were detected for total dry weight, its components and root volume. Major QTL for Cd responses were mapped to two different linkage groups and the relative allelic effects were in opposing directions on the two chromosomes, suggesting differential mechanisms at these two loci. The phenotypic variance explained by Cd QTL ranged from 5.9 to 11.6% and averaged 8.2% across all QTL. A whole-genome microarray study led to the identification of nine Cd-responsive genes from these QTL. Promising candidates for Cd tolerance include an NHL repeat membrane-spanning protein, a metal transporter and a putative transcription factor. Additional candidates in the QTL intervals include a putative homolog of a glutamate cysteine ligase, and a glutathione-S-transferase. Functional characterization of these candidate genes should enhance our understanding of Cd metabolism and transport and phytoremediation capabilities of Populus.

  8. Spectra of spontaneous and X-ray-induced mutations at the hprt locus in related human lymphoblast cell lines that express wild-type or mutant p53

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, E.N.; Xia, F.; Kelsey, K.T.; Liber, H.L. [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Previous work showed that WTK1 human lymphoblastoid cells are radioresistant but more sensitive to X-ray-induced mutation than the closely related line TK6. In addition, WTK1 cells contain a mutant p53 while in TK6 cells p53 is wild-type. In this work, we examined the spectra of 68 X-ray-induced and 56 spontaneous mutants at the hemizygous hprt locus in WTK1 cells. The induced spectra were classified by Southern blot and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR); there were 19 point mutations (28%) with an unaltered Southern blot or PCR pattern, 26 (38%) partial deletions or rearrangements and 23 (34%) complete gene deletions. The spontaneous spectrum included 25 (45%) point mutations, 22 (39%) partial deletions and 9 (16%) complete gene deletions. These spectra of mutations were compared to those of TK6 cells. Although distinct differences in the spectra of mutations at the tk locus were reported previously, overall there is no significant difference in the spectra of X-ray-induced or spontaneous mutations at the hprt locus in these two cell lines. While there was an increase in the proportion of large-scale changes that occurred at tk after X irradiation, the spectrum of mutations at the hprt locus shows all classes of mutations increasing proportionately in WTK1 cells. However, the proportion of internal partial deletion mutations at the hprt locus was about 2 times more frequent in WTK1 than in TK6 cells. 39 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Targeted transgenesis at the HPRT locus: an efficient strategy to achieve tightly controlled in vivo conditional expression with the tet system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palais, G; Nguyen Dinh Cat, A; Friedman, H; Panek-Huet, N; Millet, A; Tronche, F; Gellen, B; Mercadier, J-J; Peterson, A; Jaisser, F

    2009-04-10

    The tet-inducible system has been widely used to achieve conditional gene expression in genetically modified mice. To alleviate the frequent difficulties associated with recovery of relevant transgenic founders, we tested whether a controlled strategy of transgenesis would support reliable cell-specific, doxycycline (Dox)-controlled transgene expression in vivo. Taking advantage of the potent hypoxanthine-aminopterin-thymidine selection strategy and an embryonic stem (ES) cell line supporting efficient germ-line transmission, we used hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) targeting to insert a single copy tet-inducible construct designed to allow both glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and beta-galactosidase (beta-Gal) expression. Conditional, Dox-dependent GR and beta-Gal expression was evidenced in targeted ES cells. Breeding ES-derived single copy transgenic mice with mice bearing appropriate tet transactivators resulted in beta-Gal expression both qualitatively and quantitatively similar to that observed in mice with random integration of the same construct. Interestingly, GR expression in mice was dependent on transgene orientation in the HPRT locus while embryonic stem cell expression was not. Thus, a conditional construct inserted in single copy and in predetermined orientation at the HPRT locus demonstrated a Dox-dependent gene expression phenotype in adult mice suggesting that controlled insertion of tet-inducible constructs at the HPRT locus can provide an efficient alternative strategy to reproducibly generate animal models with tetracycline-induced transgene expression.

  10. SATB1 tethers multiple gene loci to reprogram expression profiledriving breast cancer metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Hye-Jung; Kohwi, Yoshinori; Kohwi-Shigematsu, Terumi

    2006-07-13

    Global changes in gene expression occur during tumor progression, as indicated by expression profiling of metastatic tumors. How this occurs is poorly understood. SATB1 functions as a genome organizer by folding chromatin via tethering multiple genomic loci and recruiting chromatin remodeling enzymes to regulate chromatin structure and expression of a large number of genes. Here we show that SATB1 is expressed at high levels in aggressive breast cancer cells, and is undetectable in non-malignant breast epithelial cells. Importantly, RNAi-mediated removal of SATB1 from highly-aggressive MDA-MB-231 cells altered the expression levels of over 1200 genes, restored breast-like acinar polarity in three-dimensional cultures, and prevented the metastastic phenotype in vivo. Conversely, overexpression of SATB1 in the less-aggressive breast cancer cell line Hs578T altered the gene expression profile and increased metastasis dramatically in vivo. Thus, SATB1 is a global regulator of gene expression in breast cancer cells, directly regulating crucial metastasis-associated genes, including ERRB2 (HER2/NEU), TGF-{beta}1, matrix metalloproteinase 3, and metastasin. The identification of SATB1 as a protein that re-programs chromatin organization and transcription profiles to promote breast cancer metastasis suggests a new model for metastasis and may provide means of therapeutic intervention.

  11. Comprehensive analysis of schizophrenia-associated loci highlights ion channel pathways and biologically plausible candidate causal genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pers, Tune H; Timshel, Pascal; Ripke, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Over 100 associated genetic loci have been robustly associated with schizophrenia. Gene prioritization and pathway analysis have focused on a priori hypotheses and thus may have been unduly influenced by prior assumptions and missed important causal genes and pathways. Using a data-driven approac...

  12. Epigenetic modifications unlock the milk protein gene loci during mouse mammary gland development and differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Rijnkels

    Full Text Available Unlike other tissues, development and differentiation of the mammary gland occur mostly after birth. The roles of systemic hormones and local growth factors important for this development and functional differentiation are well-studied. In other tissues, it has been shown that chromatin organization plays a key role in transcriptional regulation and underlies epigenetic regulation during development and differentiation. However, the role of chromatin organization in mammary gland development and differentiation is less well-defined. Here, we have studied the changes in chromatin organization at the milk protein gene loci (casein, whey acidic protein, and others in the mouse mammary gland before and after functional differentiation.Distal regulatory elements within the casein gene cluster and whey acidic protein gene region have an open chromatin organization after pubertal development, while proximal promoters only gain open-chromatin marks during pregnancy in conjunction with the major induction of their expression. In contrast, other milk protein genes, such as alpha-lactalbumin, already have an open chromatin organization in the mature virgin gland. Changes in chromatin organization in the casein gene cluster region that are present after puberty persisted after lactation has ceased, while the changes which occurred during pregnancy at the gene promoters were not maintained. In general, mammary gland expressed genes and their regulatory elements exhibit developmental stage- and tissue-specific chromatin organization.A progressive gain of epigenetic marks indicative of open/active chromatin on genes marking functional differentiation accompanies the development of the mammary gland. These results support a model in which a chromatin organization is established during pubertal development that is then poised to respond to the systemic hormonal signals of pregnancy and lactation to achieve the full functional capacity of the mammary gland.

  13. Large-Scale Gene-Centric Meta-analysis across 32 Studies Identifies Multiple Lipid Loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Guo, Yiran; van Iperen, Erik P.A.; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Tragante, Vinicius; Lanktree, Matthew B.; Lange, Leslie A.; Almoguera, Berta; Appelman, Yolande E.; Barnard, John; Baumert, Jens; Beitelshees, Amber L.; Bhangale, Tushar R.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Gaunt, Tom R.; Gong, Yan; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Johnson, Toby; Kleber, Marcus E.; Langaee, Taimour Y.; Li, Mingyao; Li, Yun R.; Liu, Kiang; McDonough, Caitrin W.; Meijs, Matthijs F.L.; Middelberg, Rita P.S.; Musunuru, Kiran; Nelson, Christopher P.; O’Connell, Jeffery R.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pankow, James S.; Pankratz, Nathan; Rafelt, Suzanne; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Romaine, Simon P.R.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Shaffer, Jonathan; Shen, Haiqing; Smith, Erin N.; Tischfield, Sam E.; van der Most, Peter J.; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Verweij, Niek; Volcik, Kelly A.; Zhang, Li; Bailey, Kent R.; Bailey, Kristian M.; Bauer, Florianne; Boer, Jolanda M.A.; Braund, Peter S.; Burt, Amber; Burton, Paul R.; Buxbaum, Sarah G.; Chen, Wei; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; deJong, Jonas S.; Delles, Christian; Duggan, David; Fornage, Myriam; Furlong, Clement E.; Glazer, Nicole; Gums, John G.; Hastie, Claire; Holmes, Michael V.; Illig, Thomas; Kirkland, Susan A.; Kivimaki, Mika; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E.; Kooperberg, Charles; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Kumari, Meena; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Mallela, Laya; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Ordovas, Jose; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Post, Wendy S.; Saxena, Richa; Scharnagl, Hubert; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Shah, Tina; Shields, Denis C.; Shimbo, Daichi; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Taylor, Herman A.; Topol, Eric J.; Toskala, Elina; van Pelt, Joost L.; van Setten, Jessica; Yusuf, Salim; Whittaker, John C.; Zwinderman, A.H.; Anand, Sonia S.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Berenson, Gerald S.; Bezzina, Connie R.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Casas, Juan P.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Clarke, Robert; Connell, John M.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Davidson, Karina W.; Day, Ian N.M.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Hall, Alistair S.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hillege, Hans L.; Hofker, Marten H.; Humphries, Steve E.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Johnson, Julie A.; Kaess, Bernhard M.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Koenig, Wolfgang; Lawlor, Debbie A.; März, Winfried; Melander, Olle; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Murray, Sarah S.; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Poulter, Neil; Psaty, Bruce; Redline, Susan; Rich, Stephen S.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Schunkert, Heribert; Sever, Peter; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Stanton, Alice; Thorand, Barbara; Trip, Mieke D.; Tsai, Michael Y.; van der Harst, Pim; van der Schoot, Ellen; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Verschuren, W.M. Monique; Watkins, Hugh; Wilde, Arthur A.M.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Whitfield, John B.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Reilly, Muredach P.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wilson, James G.; Rader, Daniel J.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Reiner, Alex P.; Hegele, Robert A.; Kastelein, John J.P.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Talmud, Philippa J.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Elbers, Clara C.; Keating, Brendan J.; Drenos, Fotios

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified many SNPs underlying variations in plasma-lipid levels. We explore whether additional loci associated with plasma-lipid phenotypes, such as high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholesterol (TC), and triglycerides (TGs), can be identified by a dense gene-centric approach. Our meta-analysis of 32 studies in 66,240 individuals of European ancestry was based on the custom ∼50,000 SNP genotyping array (the ITMAT-Broad-CARe array) covering ∼2,000 candidate genes. SNP-lipid associations were replicated either in a cohort comprising an additional 24,736 samples or within the Global Lipid Genetic Consortium. We identified four, six, ten, and four unreported SNPs in established lipid genes for HDL-C, LDL-C, TC, and TGs, respectively. We also identified several lipid-related SNPs in previously unreported genes: DGAT2, HCAR2, GPIHBP1, PPARG, and FTO for HDL-C; SOCS3, APOH, SPTY2D1, BRCA2, and VLDLR for LDL-C; SOCS3, UGT1A1, BRCA2, UBE3B, FCGR2A, CHUK, and INSIG2 for TC; and SERPINF2, C4B, GCK, GATA4, INSR, and LPAL2 for TGs. The proportion of explained phenotypic variance in the subset of studies providing individual-level data was 9.9% for HDL-C, 9.5% for LDL-C, 10.3% for TC, and 8.0% for TGs. This large meta-analysis of lipid phenotypes with the use of a dense gene-centric approach identified multiple SNPs not previously described in established lipid genes and several previously unknown loci. The explained phenotypic variance from this approach was comparable to that from a meta-analysis of GWAS data, suggesting that a focused genotyping approach can further increase the understanding of heritability of plasma lipids. PMID:23063622

  14. Ancestral genes can control the ability of horizontally acquired loci to confer new traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Deborah Chen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Horizontally acquired genes typically function as autonomous units conferring new abilities when introduced into different species. However, we reasoned that proteins preexisting in an organism might constrain the functionality of a horizontally acquired gene product if it operates on an ancestral pathway. Here, we determine how the horizontally acquired pmrD gene product activates the ancestral PmrA/PmrB two-component system in Salmonella enterica but not in the closely related bacterium Escherichia coli. The Salmonella PmrD protein binds to the phosphorylated PmrA protein (PmrA-P, protecting it from dephosphorylation by the PmrB protein. This results in transcription of PmrA-dependent genes, including those conferring polymyxin B resistance. We now report that the E. coli PmrD protein can activate the PmrA/PmrB system in Salmonella even though it cannot do it in E. coli, suggesting that these two species differ in an additional component controlling PmrA-P levels. We establish that the E. coli PmrB displays higher phosphatase activity towards PmrA-P than the Salmonella PmrB, and we identified a PmrB subdomain responsible for this property. Replacement of the E. coli pmrB gene with the Salmonella homolog was sufficient to render E. coli resistant to polymyxin B under PmrD-inducing conditions. Our findings provide a singular example whereby quantitative differences in the biochemical activities of orthologous ancestral proteins dictate the ability of a horizontally acquired gene product to confer species-specific traits. And they suggest that horizontally acquired genes can potentiate selection at ancestral loci.

  15. Adaptation in toxic environments: comparative genomics of loci carrying antibiotic resistance genes derived from acid mine drainage waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsène-Ploetze, Florence; Chiboub, Olfa; Lièvremont, Didier; Farasin, Julien; Freel, Kelle C; Fouteau, Stephanie; Barbe, Valérie

    2017-10-31

    Several studies have suggested the existence of a close relationship between antibiotic-resistant phenotypes and resistance to other toxic compounds such as heavy metals, which involve co-resistance or cross-resistance mechanisms. A metagenomic library was previously constructed in Escherichia coli with DNA extracted from the bacterial community inhabiting an acid mine drainage (AMD) site highly contaminated with heavy metals. Here, we conducted a search for genes involved in antibiotic resistance using this previously constructed library. In particular, resistance to antibiotics was observed among five clones carrying four different loci originating from CARN5 and CARN2, two genomes reconstructed from the metagenomic data. Among the three CARN2 loci, two carry genes homologous to those previously proposed to be involved in antibiotic resistance. The third CARN2 locus carries a gene encoding a membrane transporter with an unknown function and was found to confer bacterial resistance to rifampicin, gentamycin, and kanamycin. The genome of Thiomonas delicata DSM 16361 and Thiomonas sp. X19 were sequenced in this study. Homologs of genes carried on these three CARN2 loci were found in these genomes, two of these loci were found in genomic islands. Together, these findings confirm that AMD environments contaminated with several toxic metals also constitute habitats for bacteria that function as reservoirs for antibiotic resistance genes.

  16. Genomic and population analyses of the mating type loci in Coccidioides species reveal evidence for sexual reproduction and gene acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, M Alejandra; Barker, Bridget M; Kroken, Scott; Rounsley, Steven D; Orbach, Marc J

    2007-07-01

    Coccidioides species, the fungi responsible for the valley fever disease, are known to reproduce asexually through the production of arthroconidia that are the infectious propagules. The possible role of sexual reproduction in the survival and dispersal of these pathogens is unexplored. To determine the potential for mating of Coccidioides, we analyzed genome sequences and identified mating type loci characteristic of heterothallic ascomycetes. Coccidioides strains contain either a MAT1-1 or a MAT1-2 idiomorph, which is 8.1 or 9 kb in length, respectively, the longest reported for any ascomycete species. These idiomorphs contain four or five genes, respectively, more than are present in the MAT loci of most ascomycetes. Along with their cDNA structures, we determined that all genes in the MAT loci are transcribed. Two genes frequently found in common sequences flanking MAT idiomorphs, APN2 and COX13, are within the MAT loci in Coccidioides, but the MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 copies have diverged dramatically from each other. Data indicate that the acquisition of these genes in the MAT loci occurred prior to the separation of Coccidioides from Uncinocarpus reesii. An analysis of 436 Coccidioides isolates from patients and the environment indicates that in both Coccidioides immitis and C. posadasii, there is a 1:1 distribution of MAT loci, as would be expected for sexually reproducing species. In addition, an analysis of isolates obtained from 11 soil samples demonstrated that at three sampling sites, strains of both mating types were present, indicating that compatible strains were in close proximity in the environment.

  17. FancyGene: dynamic visualization of gene structures and protein domain architectures on genomic loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambaldi, Davide; Ciccarelli, Francesca D

    2009-09-01

    FancyGene is a fast and user-friendly web-based tool for producing images of one or more genes directly on the corresponding genomic locus. Starting from a variety of input formats, FancyGene rebuilds the basic components of a gene (UTRs, intron, exons). Once the initial representation is obtained, the user can superimpose additional features-such as protein domains and/or a variety of biological markers-in specific positions. FancyGene is extremely flexible allowing the user to change the resulting image dynamically, modifying colors and shapes and adding and/or removing objects. The output images are generated either in portable network graphics (PNG) or portable document format (PDF) formats and can be used for scientific presentations as well as for publications. The PDF format preserves editing capabilities, allowing picture modification using any vector graphics editor.

  18. Phylogeny and historical biogeography of the cocosoid palms (Arecaceae, Arecoideae, Cocoseae) inferred from sequences of six WRKY gene family loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arecaceae tribe Cocoseae is the most economically important tribe of palms, including both coconut and African oil palm. It is mostly represented in the Neotropics, with one and two genera endemic to South Africa and Madagascar, respectively. Using primers for six single copy WRKY gene family loci...

  19. Linkage study of 14 candidate genes and loci in four large Dutch families with vesico-ureteral reflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerde, A.M. van; Koeleman, B.P.C.; Kamp, J.M. van de; Jong, T.P.V.M. de; Wijmenga, C.; Giltay, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Vesico-ureteral reflux (VUR) is a major contributing factor to end-stage renal disease in paediatric patients. Primary VUR is a familial disorder, but little is known about its genetic causes. To investigate the involvement of 12 functional candidate genes and two reported loci in VUR, we

  20. Linkage study of 14 candidate genes and loci in four large Dutch families with vesico-ureteral reflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerde, Albertien M.; Koeleman, Bobby P. C.; van de Kamp, Jiddeke M.; de Jong, Tom P. V. M.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Giltay, Jacques C.

    2007-01-01

    Vesico-ureteral reflux (VUR) is a major contributing factor to end-stage renal disease in paediatric patients. Primary VUR is a familial disorder, but little is known about its genetic causes. To investigate the involvement of 12 functional candidate genes and two reported loci in VUR, we performed

  1. Systems genomics study reveals expression quantitative trait loci, regulator genes and pathways associated with boar taint in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drag, Markus; Hansen, Mathias Brygger; Kadarmideen, Haja

    2018-01-01

    to identify expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) with potential effects on boar taint compounds to improve breeding possibilities for reduced boar taint. Danish Landrace male boars with low, medium and high genetic merit for skatole and human nose score (HNS) were slaughtered at ~100 kg. Gene expression...

  2. Association study of genetic variants in eight genes/loci with type 2 diabetes in a Han Chinese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Shi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At least twenty genes/loci were shown to be associated with type 2diabetes in European original populations. Five of these genes were shown to be associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D in Chinese populations. The purpose of this study was to replicate the association of genetic vairants in the eight diabetes-related genes/loci with type 2 diabetes in a Han Chinese cohort from western part of China. Nineteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs from the eight genes/loci including TCF7L2, HHEX, CDKAL1, SLC30A8, PPARG, IGF2BP2, KCNJ11, and CDKN2A/CDKN2B were genotyped in 1,529 cases and 1,439 controls in a Han Chinese population using the ABI SNaPshot method. The meta-analysis of the association between rs7903146 in TCF7L2 gene and T2D in the Han Chinese was performed. Results Among the eight genes/loci examined, we found that four were significantly associated with T2D. Although previous studies showed that the association between the SNP rs7903146 in the TCF7L2 gene and T2D was controversial within the Han Chinese population, we have confirmed the significant association between the SNP rs7903146 in the TCF7L2 gene and T2D in both this study and the meta-analysis in the population. In addition, we also confirmed that three SNPs (rs1111875, rs7923837 and rs5015480 in HHEX , one SNP (rs10946398 in CDKAL1, and three SNPs (rs13266634, rs3802177 and rs11558471 in SLC30A8 were significantly associated with T2D in the population being studied. Conclusions We demonstrated that the variants in TCF7L2, CDKAL1, HHEX, and SLC30A8 genes are associated with T2D in a Han Chinese population.

  3. A novel CpG island set identifies tissue-specific methylation at developmental gene loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Illingworth

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available CpG islands (CGIs are dense clusters of CpG sequences that punctuate the CpG-deficient human genome and associate with many gene promoters. As CGIs also differ from bulk chromosomal DNA by their frequent lack of cytosine methylation, we devised a CGI enrichment method based on nonmethylated CpG affinity chromatography. The resulting library was sequenced to define a novel human blood CGI set that includes many that are not detected by current algorithms. Approximately half of CGIs were associated with annotated gene transcription start sites, the remainder being intra- or intergenic. Using an array representing over 17,000 CGIs, we established that 6%-8% of CGIs are methylated in genomic DNA of human blood, brain, muscle, and spleen. Inter- and intragenic CGIs are preferentially susceptible to methylation. CGIs showing tissue-specific methylation were overrepresented at numerous genetic loci that are essential for development, including HOX and PAX family members. The findings enable a comprehensive analysis of the roles played by CGI methylation in normal and diseased human tissues.

  4. Detection of Histone Modifications at Specific Gene Loci in Single Cells in Histological Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Delphine; Shankman, Laura L; Nguyen, Anh T; Owens, Gary K

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays have contributed greatly to our understanding of the role of histone modifications in gene regulation. However, a major limitation is that they do not permit analysis with single cell resolution thus confounding analyses of heterogeneous cell populations. Herein we present a new method which permits visualization of histone modifications of single genomic loci with single-cell resolution in formaldehyde-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections based on combined use of In Situ Hybridization (ISH) and Proximity Ligation Assays (PLA). Using this method we show that H3K4dime of the MYH11 locus is restricted to the smooth muscle cell (SMC) lineage in human and mouse tissue sections, and that the mark persists even in phenotypically modulated SMC within atherosclerotic lesions that show no detectable expression of SMC marker genes. This new methodology has promise for broad applications in the study of epigenetic mechanisms in complex multicellular tissues in development and disease. PMID:23314172

  5. Quantitative trait loci and candidate genes associated with starch pasting viscosity characteristics in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanyasiriwat, T; Sraphet, S; Whankaew, S; Boonseng, O; Bao, J; Lightfoot, D A; Tangphatsornruang, S; Triwitayakorn, K

    2014-01-01

    Starch pasting viscosity is an important quality trait in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) cultivars. The aim here was to identify loci and candidate genes associated with the starch pasting viscosity. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping for seven pasting viscosity parameters was carried out using 100 lines of an F1 mapping population from a cross between two cassava cultivars Huay Bong 60 and Hanatee. Starch samples were obtained from roots of cassava grown in 2008 and 2009 at Rayong, and in 2009 at Lop Buri province, Thailand. The traits showed continuous distribution among the F1 progeny with transgressive variation. Fifteen QTL were identified from mean trait data, with Logarithm of Odds (LOD) values from 2.77-13.01 and phenotype variations explained (PVE) from10.0-48.4%. In addition, 48 QTL were identified in separate environments. The LOD values ranged from 2.55-8.68 and explained 6.6-43.7% of phenotype variation. The loci were located on 19 linkage groups. The most important QTL for pasting temperature (PT) (qPT.1LG1) from mean trait values showed largest effect with highest LOD value (13.01) and PVE (48.4%). The QTL co-localised with PT and pasting time (PTi) loci that were identified in separate environments. Candidate genes were identified within the QTL peak regions. However, the major genes of interest, encoding the family of glycosyl or glucosyl transferases and hydrolases, were located at the periphery of QTL peaks. The loci identified could be effectively applied in breeding programmes to improve cassava starch quality. Alleles of candidate genes should be further studied in order to better understand their effects on starch quality traits. © 2013 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  6. Expression QTL analysis of top loci from GWAS meta-analysis highlights additional schizophrenia candidate genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Jong, Simone; van Eijk, Kristel R; Zeegers, Dave W L H

    2012-01-01

    of the Psychiatric GWAS consortium (PGC) yielded five novel loci for schizophrenia. In this study, we aim to highlight additional schizophrenia susceptibility loci from the PGC study by combining the top association findings from the discovery stage (9394 schizophrenia cases and 12 462 controls) with expression QTLs...

  7. Different loci and mRNA copy number of the increased serum survival gene of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wang-Ye; Li, Yi-Jing; Fan, Chen

    2018-02-01

    The increased serum survival gene (iss) has been identified as a virulence trait associated with the virulence of Escherichia coli, causing colibacillosis in poultry. However, it remains unclear as to whether iss mRNA copy number and sequence affect virulence. To examine these influences, we assessed the presence of iss, sequence analysis, iss mRNA copy number, and serum resistance. The iss gene was detected in 88 (all) E. coli isolates from different sources, and sequencing identified 16 alleles (32 different loci) and 10 amino acid sequences (10 different loci). Nested polymerase chain reaction improved iss detection. The isolates from sick chickens had >68% livability in serum resistance tests and higher iss mRNA copy number. The iss mRNA copy number highly correlated with mortality and E. coli livability. Student's t tests confirmed the relationship between the different loci to iss transcription, serum resistance, and virulence. These data suggest that iss mRNA copy number and different loci affect the virulence and serum resistance. These findings could be useful in further studies on the prevalence of iss among E. coli isolates and other virulence factors.

  8. Allele Distributions at Hybrid Incompatibility Loci Facilitate the Potential for Gene Flow between Cultivated and Weedy Rice in the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Stephanie M.; Reagon, Michael; Resnick, Lauren E.; Caicedo, Ana L.

    2014-01-01

    The accumulation of independent mutations over time in two populations often leads to reproductive isolation. Reproductive isolation between diverging populations may be reinforced by barriers that occur either pre- or postzygotically. Hybrid sterility is the most common form of postzygotic isolation in plants. Four postzygotic sterility loci, comprising three hybrid sterility systems (Sa, s5, DPL), have been recently identified in Oryza sativa. These loci explain, in part, the limited hybridization that occurs between the domesticated cultivated rice varieties, O. sativa spp. japonica and O. sativa spp. indica. In the United States, cultivated fields of japonica rice are often invaded by conspecific weeds that have been shown to be of indica origin. Crop-weed hybrids have been identified in crop fields, but at low frequencies. Here we examined the possible role of these hybrid incompatibility loci in the interaction between cultivated and weedy rice. We identified a novel allele at Sa that seemingly prevents loss of fertility in hybrids. Additionally, we found wide-compatibility type alleles at strikingly high frequencies at the Sa and s5 loci in weed groups, and a general lack of incompatible alleles between crops and weeds at the DPL loci. Our results suggest that weedy individuals, particularly those of the SH and BRH groups, should be able to freely hybridize with the local japonica crop, and that prezygotic factors, such as differences in flowering time, have been more important in limiting weed-crop gene flow in the past. As the selective landscape for weedy rice changes due to increased use of herbicide resistant strains of cultivated rice, the genetic barriers that hinder indica-japonica hybridization cannot be counted on to limit the flow of favorable crop genes into weeds. PMID:24489758

  9. Allele distributions at hybrid incompatibility loci facilitate the potential for gene flow between cultivated and weedy rice in the US.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M Craig

    Full Text Available The accumulation of independent mutations over time in two populations often leads to reproductive isolation. Reproductive isolation between diverging populations may be reinforced by barriers that occur either pre- or postzygotically. Hybrid sterility is the most common form of postzygotic isolation in plants. Four postzygotic sterility loci, comprising three hybrid sterility systems (Sa, s5, DPL, have been recently identified in Oryza sativa. These loci explain, in part, the limited hybridization that occurs between the domesticated cultivated rice varieties, O. sativa spp. japonica and O. sativa spp. indica. In the United States, cultivated fields of japonica rice are often invaded by conspecific weeds that have been shown to be of indica origin. Crop-weed hybrids have been identified in crop fields, but at low frequencies. Here we examined the possible role of these hybrid incompatibility loci in the interaction between cultivated and weedy rice. We identified a novel allele at Sa that seemingly prevents loss of fertility in hybrids. Additionally, we found wide-compatibility type alleles at strikingly high frequencies at the Sa and s5 loci in weed groups, and a general lack of incompatible alleles between crops and weeds at the DPL loci. Our results suggest that weedy individuals, particularly those of the SH and BRH groups, should be able to freely hybridize with the local japonica crop, and that prezygotic factors, such as differences in flowering time, have been more important in limiting weed-crop gene flow in the past. As the selective landscape for weedy rice changes due to increased use of herbicide resistant strains of cultivated rice, the genetic barriers that hinder indica-japonica hybridization cannot be counted on to limit the flow of favorable crop genes into weeds.

  10. Mapping of rRNA gene loci in the mice, Mus musculus molossinus (Japan) and Mus musculus musculus (Russia) by double color FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tsuyoshi; Tsuchiya, Kimiyuki; Osawa, Susumu; Shibata, Hideshi; Kanda, Naotoshi

    2008-09-01

    Ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) loci of Russian Mus musculus musculus and of Japanese Mus musuculus molossinus were mapped by double color FISH. The total number of rDNA loci was varied from 5 to 12, although the loci on chromosomes 12, 15, 16, 18, and 19 were common to all mice examined. Instead, polymorphisms of the rDNA loci were found on chromosomes 1, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13 and 17. The novel rDNA loci of M. m. musculus were found in Nov/TUA strain on chromosomes 8 and 17. These observations, together with those of previous reports, suggest that the rDNA loci of Mus musculus species are in the evolutionary process of further translocation to other chromosomes.

  11. Integrative analysis of a cross-loci regulation network identifies App as a gene regulating insulin secretion from pancreatic islets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhidong Tu

    Full Text Available Complex diseases result from molecular changes induced by multiple genetic factors and the environment. To derive a systems view of how genetic loci interact in the context of tissue-specific molecular networks, we constructed an F2 intercross comprised of >500 mice from diabetes-resistant (B6 and diabetes-susceptible (BTBR mouse strains made genetically obese by the Leptin(ob/ob mutation (Lep(ob. High-density genotypes, diabetes-related clinical traits, and whole-transcriptome expression profiling in five tissues (white adipose, liver, pancreatic islets, hypothalamus, and gastrocnemius muscle were determined for all mice. We performed an integrative analysis to investigate the inter-relationship among genetic factors, expression traits, and plasma insulin, a hallmark diabetes trait. Among five tissues under study, there are extensive protein-protein interactions between genes responding to different loci in adipose and pancreatic islets that potentially jointly participated in the regulation of plasma insulin. We developed a novel ranking scheme based on cross-loci protein-protein network topology and gene expression to assess each gene's potential to regulate plasma insulin. Unique candidate genes were identified in adipose tissue and islets. In islets, the Alzheimer's gene App was identified as a top candidate regulator. Islets from 17-week-old, but not 10-week-old, App knockout mice showed increased insulin secretion in response to glucose or a membrane-permeant cAMP analog, in agreement with the predictions of the network model. Our result provides a novel hypothesis on the mechanism for the connection between two aging-related diseases: Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes.

  12. Contrasting evolutionary histories of MHC class I and class II loci in grouse—Effects of selection and gene conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minias, Piotr; Bateson, Zachary W; Whittingham, Linda A; Johnson, Jeff A.; Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Dunn, Peter O

    2016-01-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) encode receptor molecules that are responsible for recognition of intracellular and extracellular pathogens (class I and class II genes, respectively) in vertebrates. Given the different roles of class I and II MHC genes, one might expect the strength of selection to differ between these two classes. Different selective pressures may also promote different rates of gene conversion at each class. Despite these predictions, surprisingly few studies have looked at differences between class I and II genes in terms of both selection and gene conversion. Here, we investigated the molecular evolution of MHC class I and II genes in five closely related species of prairie grouse (Centrocercus and Tympanuchus) that possess one class I and two class II loci. We found striking differences in the strength of balancing selection acting on MHC class I versus class II genes. More than half of the putative antigen-binding sites (ABS) of class II were under positive or episodic diversifying selection, compared with only 10% at class I. We also found that gene conversion had a stronger role in shaping the evolution of MHC class II than class I. Overall, the combination of strong positive (balancing) selection and frequent gene conversion has maintained higher diversity of MHC class II than class I in prairie grouse. This is one of the first studies clearly demonstrating that macroevolutionary mechanisms can act differently on genes involved in the immune response against intracellular and extracellular pathogens.

  13. An unusual DNA sequence observed in the. gamma. globin gene loci of two members of a Chinese family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, Q.C.

    1989-01-01

    There are two nonallelic human {gamma} globin genes located on the short arm of chromosome No. 11 in the order 5{prime}-{sup G}{sub {gamma}}-{sup A}{sub {gamma}}-3{prime}. Various modifications of the two {gamma} genes have been reported and include: deletions, triplications, quadruplications and recently a quintuplication. These are generally created by one or more unequal crossovers in the {gamma} globin gene regions on adjacent chromosomes. During the course of looking for a {gamma}{sup {degree}} thalassemia, which might be due to a crossover of looking for a {gamma} genes, two cases were found in the family W. Bgl II mapping studies showed a 5 kb deletion at the {gamma} gene loci in these individuals. The Bgl II fragment from the {gamma} gene loci of R.W. was cloned into the phage vector QR1. Phage mapping showed that two out of the three Pst I sites within the Bgl II fragment were missing which suggested that the crossover might have occurred within the {gamma} gene, possibly within the {gamma}IVS II region. Sequence analysis of the cloned fragment revealed an unusual sequence which had no sequence homology with the {gamma} gene region except for a small 264 bp region near the 3{prime} end. The orientation of the 264 bp fragment is inverted relative to homologous sequences in the {sup G}{sub {gamma}} and {sup A}{sub {gamma}} IVS II. The unusual sequence was computer analyzed for homology with every DNA sequence file in the EMBL database and GenBank and did not show any significant homologies to all the available DNA sequences except for the 264 bp {gamma}IVS II homology.

  14. Large-Scale Gene-Centric Meta-analysis across 32 Studies Identifies Multiple Lipid Loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Guo, Yiran; van Iperen, Erik P. A.; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Tragante, Vinicius; Lanktree, Matthew B.; Lange, Leslie A.; Almoguera, Berta; Appelman, Yolande E.; Barnard, John; Baumert, Jens; Beitelshees, Amber L.; Bhangale, Tushar R.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Gaunt, Tom R.; Gong, Yan; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Johnson, Toby; Kleber, Marcus E.; Langaee, Taimour Y.; Li, Mingyao; Li, Yun R.; Liu, Kiang; McDonough, Caitrin W.; Meijs, Matthijs El.; Middelberg, Rita P. S.; Musunuru, Kiran; Nelson, Christopher P.; O'Connell, Jeffery R.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pankow, James S.; Pankratz, Nathan; Rafelt, Suzanne; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Romaine, Simon P. R.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Shaffer, Jonathan; Shen, Haiqing; Smith, Erin N.; Tischfield, Sam E.; van der Most, Peter J.; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Verweij, Niek; Volcik, Kelly A.; Zhang, Li; Bailey, Kent R.; Bailey, Kristian M.; Bauer, Florianne; Boer, Jolanda M. A.; Braund, Peter S.; Burt, Amber; Burton, Paul R.; Buxbaum, Sarah G.; Chen, Wei; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; deJong, Jonas S.; Delles, Christian; Duggan, David; Fornage, Myriam; Furlong, Clement E.; Glazer, Nicole; Gums, John G.; Hastie, Claire; Holmes, Michael V.; Illig, Thomas; Kirkland, Susan A.; Kivimaki, Mika; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E.; Kooperberg, Charles; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Kumari, Meena; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Mallela, Laya; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Ordovas, Jose; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Post, Wendy S.; Saxena, Richa; Scharnagl, Hubert; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Shah, Tina; Shields, Denis C.; Shimbo, Daichi; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Taylor, Herman A.; Topo, Eric J.; Toskala, Elina; van Pelt, Joost L.; van Setten, Jessica; Yusuf, Salim; Whittaker, John C.; Zwinderman, A. H.; Anand, Sonia S.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Berenson, Gerald S.; Bezzina, Connie R.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Casas, Juan P.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Clarke, Robert; Connell, John M.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Davidson, Karina W.; Day, Ian N. M.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Dominiczak, Anna E.; Hall, Alistair S.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hillege, Hans L.; Hofker, Marten H.; Humphries, Steve E.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Johnson, Julie A.; Kaess, Bernhard M.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Koenig, Wolfgang; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Maerz, Winfried; Melander, Olle; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Murray, Sarah S.; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Poulter, Neil; Psaty, Bruce; Redline, Susan; Rich, Stephen S.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Schunkert, Heribert; Sever, Peter; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Stanton, Alice; Thorand, Barbara; Trip, Mieke D.; Tsai, Michael Y.; van der Harst, Pim; van der Schoot, Ellen; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Verschuren, W. M. Monique; Watkins, Hugh; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Whitfield, John B.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Reilly, Muredach P.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wilson, James G.; Rader, Daniel J.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Reiner, Alex P.; Hegele, Robert A.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Talmud, Philippa J.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Elbers, Clara C.; Keating, Brendan J.; Drenos, Fotios

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified many SNPs underlying variations in plasma-lipid levels. We explore whether additional loci associated with plasma-lipid phenotypes, such as high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total

  15. GWAS of clinically defined gout and subtypes identifies multiple susceptibility loci that include urate transporter genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakayama, A.; Nakaoka, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Sakiyama, M.; Shaukat, A.; Toyoda, Y.; Okada, Y.; Kamatani, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Takada, T.; Inoue, K.; Yasujima, T.; Yuasa, H.; Shirahama, Y.; Nakashima, H.; Shimizu, S.; Higashino, T.; Kawamura, Y.; Ogata, H.; Kawaguchi, M.; Ohkawa, Y.; Danjoh, I.; Tokumasu, A.; Ooyama, K.; Ito, T.; Kondo, T.; Wakai, K.; Stiburkova, B.; Pavelka, K.; Stamp, L.K.; Dalbeth, N.; Sakurai, Y.; Suzuki, H; Hosoyamada, M.; Fujimori, S.; Yokoo, T.; Hosoya, T.; Inoue, I.; Takahashi, A.; Kubo, M.; Ooyama, H.; Shimizu, T.; Ichida, K.; Shinomiya, N.; Merriman, T.R.; Matsuo, H.; Andres, M; Joosten, L.A.; Janssen, M.C.H.; Jansen, T.L.; Liote, F.; Radstake, T.R.; Riches, P.L.; So, A.; Tauches, A.K.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of gout and its subtypes was performed to identify novel gout loci, including those that are subtype-specific. METHODS: Putative causal association signals from a GWAS of 945 clinically defined gout cases and 1213 controls from Japanese males were

  16. Genes and quality trait loci (QTLs) associated with firmness in Malus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This results in the reduction of apple shelf life and in turn influences its commercialization. Low firmness impacts negatively on the sensory values of juiciness, crunchiness and crispness. Fruit firmness is affected by the inheritance of alleles at multiple loci and their possible interactions with the environment. Identification of ...

  17. Gene conversion events and variable degree of homogenization of rDNA loci in cultivars of Brassica napus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochorová, Jana; Coriton, Olivier; Kuderová, Alena; Lunerová, Jana; Chèvre, Anne-Marie; Kovařík, Aleš

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims Brassica napus (AACC, 2n = 38, oilseed rape) is a relatively recent allotetraploid species derived from the putative progenitor diploid species Brassica rapa (AA, 2n = 20) and Brassica oleracea (CC, 2n = 18). To determine the influence of intensive breeding conditions on the evolution of its genome, we analysed structure and copy number of rDNA in 21 cultivars of B. napus, representative of genetic diversity. Methods We used next-generation sequencing genomic approaches, Southern blot hybridization, expression analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Subgenome-specific sequences derived from rDNA intergenic spacers (IGS) were used as probes for identification of loci composition on chromosomes. Key Results Most B. napus cultivars (18/21, 86 %) had more A-genome than C-genome rDNA copies. Three cultivars analysed by FISH (‘Darmor’, ‘Yudal’ and ‘Asparagus kale’) harboured the same number (12 per diploid set) of loci. In B. napus ‘Darmor’, the A-genome-specific rDNA probe hybridized to all 12 rDNA loci (eight on the A-genome and four on the C-genome) while the C-genome-specific probe showed weak signals on the C-genome loci only. Deep sequencing revealed high homogeneity of arrays suggesting that the C-genome genes were largely overwritten by the A-genome variants in B. napus ‘Darmor’. In contrast, B. napus ‘Yudal’ showed a lack of gene conversion evidenced by additive inheritance of progenitor rDNA variants and highly localized hybridization signals of subgenome-specific probes on chromosomes. Brassica napus ‘Asparagus kale’ showed an intermediate pattern to ‘Darmor’ and ‘Yudal’. At the expression level, most cultivars (95 %) exhibited stable A-genome nucleolar dominance while one cultivar (‘Norin 9’) showed co-dominance. Conclusions The B. napus cultivars differ in the degree and direction of rDNA homogenization. The prevalent direction of gene conversion (towards the A-genome) correlates

  18. Gene conversion events and variable degree of homogenization of rDNA loci in cultivars of Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochorová, Jana; Coriton, Olivier; Kuderová, Alena; Lunerová, Jana; Chèvre, Anne-Marie; Kovařík, Aleš

    2017-01-01

    Brassica napus (AACC, 2n = 38, oilseed rape) is a relatively recent allotetraploid species derived from the putative progenitor diploid species Brassica rapa (AA, 2n = 20) and Brassica oleracea (CC, 2n = 18). To determine the influence of intensive breeding conditions on the evolution of its genome, we analysed structure and copy number of rDNA in 21 cultivars of B. napus, representative of genetic diversity. We used next-generation sequencing genomic approaches, Southern blot hybridization, expression analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Subgenome-specific sequences derived from rDNA intergenic spacers (IGS) were used as probes for identification of loci composition on chromosomes. Most B. napus cultivars (18/21, 86 %) had more A-genome than C-genome rDNA copies. Three cultivars analysed by FISH ('Darmor', 'Yudal' and 'Asparagus kale') harboured the same number (12 per diploid set) of loci. In B. napus 'Darmor', the A-genome-specific rDNA probe hybridized to all 12 rDNA loci (eight on the A-genome and four on the C-genome) while the C-genome-specific probe showed weak signals on the C-genome loci only. Deep sequencing revealed high homogeneity of arrays suggesting that the C-genome genes were largely overwritten by the A-genome variants in B. napus 'Darmor'. In contrast, B. napus 'Yudal' showed a lack of gene conversion evidenced by additive inheritance of progenitor rDNA variants and highly localized hybridization signals of subgenome-specific probes on chromosomes. Brassica napus 'Asparagus kale' showed an intermediate pattern to 'Darmor' and 'Yudal'. At the expression level, most cultivars (95 %) exhibited stable A-genome nucleolar dominance while one cultivar ('Norin 9') showed co-dominance. The B. napus cultivars differ in the degree and direction of rDNA homogenization. The prevalent direction of gene conversion (towards the A-genome) correlates with the direction of expression dominance indicating that gene activity may be needed for

  19. GWAS of clinically defined gout and subtypes identifies multiple susceptibility loci that include urate transporter genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Ken; Sakiyama, Masayuki; Shaukat, Amara; Toyoda, Yu; Okada, Yukinori; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Nakamura, Takahiro; Takada, Tappei; Inoue, Katsuhisa; Yasujima, Tomoya; Yuasa, Hiroaki; Shirahama, Yuko; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Seiko; Higashino, Toshihide; Kawamura, Yusuke; Ogata, Hiraku; Kawaguchi, Makoto; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Danjoh, Inaho; Tokumasu, Atsumi; Ooyama, Keiko; Ito, Toshimitsu; Kondo, Takaaki; Wakai, Kenji; Stiburkova, Blanka; Pavelka, Karel; Stamp, Lisa K; Dalbeth, Nicola; Sakurai, Yutaka; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Hosoyamada, Makoto; Fujimori, Shin; Yokoo, Takashi; Hosoya, Tatsuo; Inoue, Ituro; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kubo, Michiaki; Ooyama, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Toru; Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi; Merriman, Tony R; Matsuo, Hirotaka

    2017-05-01

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of gout and its subtypes was performed to identify novel gout loci, including those that are subtype-specific. Putative causal association signals from a GWAS of 945 clinically defined gout cases and 1213 controls from Japanese males were replicated with 1396 cases and 1268 controls using a custom chip of 1961 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We also first conducted GWASs of gout subtypes. Replication with Caucasian and New Zealand Polynesian samples was done to further validate the loci identified in this study. In addition to the five loci we reported previously, further susceptibility loci were identified at a genome-wide significance level (pgout cases, and NIPAL1 and FAM35A for the renal underexcretion gout subtype. While NIPAL1 encodes a magnesium transporter, functional analysis did not detect urate transport via NIPAL1, suggesting an indirect association with urate handling. Localisation analysis in the human kidney revealed expression of NIPAL1 and FAM35A mainly in the distal tubules, which suggests the involvement of the distal nephron in urate handling in humans. Clinically ascertained male patients with gout and controls of Caucasian and Polynesian ancestries were also genotyped, and FAM35A was associated with gout in all cases. A meta-analysis of the three populations revealed FAM35A to be associated with gout at a genome-wide level of significance (p meta =3.58×10-8). Our findings including novel gout risk loci provide further understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of gout and lead to a novel concept for the therapeutic target of gout/hyperuricaemia. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. GWAS of clinically defined gout and subtypes identifies multiple susceptibility loci that include urate transporter genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Ken; Sakiyama, Masayuki; Shaukat, Amara; Toyoda, Yu; Okada, Yukinori; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Nakamura, Takahiro; Takada, Tappei; Inoue, Katsuhisa; Yasujima, Tomoya; Yuasa, Hiroaki; Shirahama, Yuko; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Seiko; Higashino, Toshihide; Kawamura, Yusuke; Ogata, Hiraku; Kawaguchi, Makoto; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Danjoh, Inaho; Tokumasu, Atsumi; Ooyama, Keiko; Ito, Toshimitsu; Kondo, Takaaki; Wakai, Kenji; Stiburkova, Blanka; Pavelka, Karel; Stamp, Lisa K; Dalbeth, Nicola; Sakurai, Yutaka; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Hosoyamada, Makoto; Fujimori, Shin; Yokoo, Takashi; Hosoya, Tatsuo; Inoue, Ituro; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kubo, Michiaki; Ooyama, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Toru; Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi; Merriman, Tony R; Matsuo, Hirotaka

    2017-01-01

    Objective A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of gout and its subtypes was performed to identify novel gout loci, including those that are subtype-specific. Methods Putative causal association signals from a GWAS of 945 clinically defined gout cases and 1213 controls from Japanese males were replicated with 1396 cases and 1268 controls using a custom chip of 1961 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We also first conducted GWASs of gout subtypes. Replication with Caucasian and New Zealand Polynesian samples was done to further validate the loci identified in this study. Results In addition to the five loci we reported previously, further susceptibility loci were identified at a genome-wide significance level (pgout cases, and NIPAL1 and FAM35A for the renal underexcretion gout subtype. While NIPAL1 encodes a magnesium transporter, functional analysis did not detect urate transport via NIPAL1, suggesting an indirect association with urate handling. Localisation analysis in the human kidney revealed expression of NIPAL1 and FAM35A mainly in the distal tubules, which suggests the involvement of the distal nephron in urate handling in humans. Clinically ascertained male patients with gout and controls of Caucasian and Polynesian ancestries were also genotyped, and FAM35A was associated with gout in all cases. A meta-analysis of the three populations revealed FAM35A to be associated with gout at a genome-wide level of significance (pmeta=3.58×10−8). Conclusions Our findings including novel gout risk loci provide further understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of gout and lead to a novel concept for the therapeutic target of gout/hyperuricaemia. PMID:27899376

  1. Association of genetic loci with sleep apnea in European Americans and African-Americans: the Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay R Patel

    Full Text Available Although obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is known to have a strong familial basis, no genetic polymorphisms influencing apnea risk have been identified in cross-cohort analyses. We utilized the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe to identify sleep apnea susceptibility loci. Using a panel of 46,449 polymorphisms from roughly 2,100 candidate genes on a customized Illumina iSelect chip, we tested for association with the apnea hypopnea index (AHI as well as moderate to severe OSA (AHI≥15 in 3,551 participants of the Cleveland Family Study and two cohorts participating in the Sleep Heart Health Study.Among 647 African-Americans, rs11126184 in the pleckstrin (PLEK gene was associated with OSA while rs7030789 in the lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 (LPAR1 gene was associated with AHI using a chip-wide significance threshold of p-value<2×10(-6. Among 2,904 individuals of European ancestry, rs1409986 in the prostaglandin E2 receptor (PTGER3 gene was significantly associated with OSA. Consistency of effects between rs7030789 and rs1409986 in LPAR1 and PTGER3 and apnea phenotypes were observed in independent clinic-based cohorts.Novel genetic loci for apnea phenotypes were identified through the use of customized gene chips and meta-analyses of cohort data with replication in clinic-based samples. The identified SNPs all lie in genes associated with inflammation suggesting inflammation may play a role in OSA pathogenesis.

  2. Meta-analysis of gene-environment-wide association scans accounting for education level identifies additional loci for refractive error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Qiao; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Wojciechowski, Robert; Barathi, Veluchamy A; Hysi, Pirro G; Guggenheim, Jeremy A; Höhn, René; Vitart, Veronique; Khawaja, Anthony P; Yamashiro, Kenji; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lu, Yi; Haller, Toomas; Xie, Jing; Delcourt, Cécile; Pirastu, Mario; Wedenoja, Juho; Gharahkhani, Puya; Venturini, Cristina; Miyake, Masahiro; Hewitt, Alex W; Guo, Xiaobo; Mazur, Johanna; Huffman, Jenifer E; Williams, Katie M; Polasek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Vatavuk, Zoran; Wilson, James F; Joshi, Peter K; McMahon, George; St Pourcain, Beate; Evans, David M; Simpson, Claire L; Schwantes-An, Tae-Hwi; Igo, Robert P; Mirshahi, Alireza; Cougnard-Gregoire, Audrey; Bellenguez, Céline; Blettner, Maria; Raitakari, Olli; Kähönen, Mika; Seppala, Ilkka; Zeller, Tanja; Meitinger, Thomas; Ried, Janina S; Gieger, Christian; Portas, Laura; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Amin, Najaf; Uitterlinden, André G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Vingerling, Johannes R; Wang, Ya Xing; Wang, Xu; Tai-Hui Boh, Eileen; Ikram, M Kamran; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Gupta, Preeti; Tan, Vincent; Zhou, Lei; Ho, Candice E H; Lim, Wan'e; Beuerman, Roger W; Siantar, Rosalynn; Tai, E-Shyong; Vithana, Eranga; Mihailov, Evelin; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Hayward, Caroline; Luben, Robert N; Foster, Paul J; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Wong, Hoi-Suen; Mitchell, Paul; Metspalu, Andres; Aung, Tin; Young, Terri L; He, Mingguang; Pärssinen, Olavi; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Jin Wang, Jie; Williams, Cathy; Jonas, Jost B; Teo, Yik-Ying; Mackey, David A; Oexle, Konrad; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Paterson, Andrew D; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Wong, Tien-Yin; Baird, Paul N; Stambolian, Dwight; Wilson, Joan E Bailey; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Hammond, Christopher J; Klaver, Caroline C W; Saw, Seang-Mei; Rahi, Jugnoo S; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Kemp, John P; Timpson, Nicholas J; Smith, George Davey; Craig, Jamie E; Burdon, Kathryn P; Fogarty, Rhys D; Iyengar, Sudha K; Chew, Emily; Janmahasatian, Sarayut; Martin, Nicholas G; MacGregor, Stuart; Xu, Liang; Schache, Maria; Nangia, Vinay; Panda-Jonas, Songhomitra; Wright, Alan F; Fondran, Jeremy R; Lass, Jonathan H; Feng, Sheng; Zhao, Jing Hua; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick J; Rantanen, Taina; Kaprio, Jaakko; Pang, Chi Pui; Chen, Li Jia; Tam, Pancy O; Jhanji, Vishal; Young, Alvin L; Döring, Angela; Raffel, Leslie J; Cotch, Mary-Frances; Li, Xiaohui; Yip, Shea Ping; Yap, Maurice K H; Biino, Ginevra; Vaccargiu, Simona; Fossarello, Maurizio; Fleck, Brian; Yazar, Seyhan; Tideman, Jan Willem L; Tedja, Milly; Deangelis, Margaret M; Morrison, Margaux; Farrer, Lindsay; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Wei; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Meguro, Akira; Mäkelä, Kari Matti

    2016-03-29

    Myopia is the most common human eye disorder and it results from complex genetic and environmental causes. The rapidly increasing prevalence of myopia poses a major public health challenge. Here, the CREAM consortium performs a joint meta-analysis to test single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) main effects and SNP × education interaction effects on refractive error in 40,036 adults from 25 studies of European ancestry and 10,315 adults from 9 studies of Asian ancestry. In European ancestry individuals, we identify six novel loci (FAM150B-ACP1, LINC00340, FBN1, DIS3L-MAP2K1, ARID2-SNAT1 and SLC14A2) associated with refractive error. In Asian populations, three genome-wide significant loci AREG, GABRR1 and PDE10A also exhibit strong interactions with education (P<8.5 × 10(-5)), whereas the interactions are less evident in Europeans. The discovery of these loci represents an important advance in understanding how gene and environment interactions contribute to the heterogeneity of myopia.

  3. The contribution of RNA decay quantitative trait loci to inter-individual variation in steady-state gene expression levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athma A Pai

    Full Text Available Recent gene expression QTL (eQTL mapping studies have provided considerable insight into the genetic basis for inter-individual regulatory variation. However, a limitation of all eQTL studies to date, which have used measurements of steady-state gene expression levels, is the inability to directly distinguish between variation in transcription and decay rates. To address this gap, we performed a genome-wide study of variation in gene-specific mRNA decay rates across individuals. Using a time-course study design, we estimated mRNA decay rates for over 16,000 genes in 70 Yoruban HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs, for which extensive genotyping data are available. Considering mRNA decay rates across genes, we found that: (i as expected, highly expressed genes are generally associated with lower mRNA decay rates, (ii genes with rapid mRNA decay rates are enriched with putative binding sites for miRNA and RNA binding proteins, and (iii genes with similar functional roles tend to exhibit correlated rates of mRNA decay. Focusing on variation in mRNA decay across individuals, we estimate that steady-state expression levels are significantly correlated with variation in decay rates in 10% of genes. Somewhat counter-intuitively, for about half of these genes, higher expression is associated with faster decay rates, possibly due to a coupling of mRNA decay with transcriptional processes in genes involved in rapid cellular responses. Finally, we used these data to map genetic variation that is specifically associated with variation in mRNA decay rates across individuals. We found 195 such loci, which we named RNA decay quantitative trait loci ("rdQTLs". All the observed rdQTLs are located near the regulated genes and therefore are assumed to act in cis. By analyzing our data within the context of known steady-state eQTLs, we estimate that a substantial fraction of eQTLs are associated with inter-individual variation in mRNA decay rates.

  4. Identification of Gene Loci That Overlap Between Schizophrenia and Educational Attainment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Hellard, Stéphanie; Wang, Yunpeng; Witoelar, Aree

    2017-01-01

    . Here we investigated the shared genetic architecture between SCZ and educational attainment, which is regarded as a "proxy phenotype" for cognitive abilities, but may also reflect other traits. We applied a conditional false discovery rate (condFDR) method to GWAS of SCZ (n = 82 315), college...... completion ("College," n = 95 427), and years of education ("EduYears," n = 101 069). Variants associated with College or EduYears showed enrichment of association with SCZ, demonstrating polygenic overlap. This was confirmed by an increased replication rate in SCZ. By applying a condFDR threshold ... of these loci had effects in opposite directions. Our results provide evidence for polygenic overlap between SCZ and educational attainment, and identify novel pleiotropic loci. Other studies have reported genetic overlap between SCZ and cognition, or SCZ and educational attainment, with negative correlation...

  5. Berry and phenology-related traits in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.: From Quantitative Trait Loci to underlying genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanizza Girolamo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The timing of grape ripening initiation, length of maturation period, berry size and seed content are target traits in viticulture. The availability of early and late ripening varieties is desirable for staggering harvest along growing season, expanding production towards periods when the fruit gets a higher value in the market and ensuring an optimal plant adaptation to climatic and geographic conditions. Berry size determines grape productivity; seedlessness is especially demanded in the table grape market and is negatively correlated to fruit size. These traits result from complex developmental processes modified by genetic, physiological and environmental factors. In order to elucidate their genetic determinism we carried out a quantitative analysis in a 163 individuals-F1 segregating progeny obtained by crossing two table grape cultivars. Results Molecular linkage maps covering most of the genome (2n = 38 for Vitis vinifera were generated for each parent. Eighteen pairs of homologous groups were integrated into a consensus map spanning over 1426 cM with 341 markers (mainly microsatellite, AFLP and EST-derived markers and an average map distance between loci of 4.2 cM. Segregating traits were evaluated in three growing seasons by recording flowering, veraison and ripening dates and by measuring berry size, seed number and weight. QTL (Quantitative Trait Loci analysis was carried out based on single marker and interval mapping methods. QTLs were identified for all but one of the studied traits, a number of them steadily over more than one year. Clusters of QTLs for different characters were detected, suggesting linkage or pleiotropic effects of loci, as well as regions affecting specific traits. The most interesting QTLs were investigated at the gene level through a bioinformatic analysis of the underlying Pinot noir genomic sequence. Conclusion Our results revealed novel insights into the genetic control of relevant

  6. Integrative Transcriptome, Genome and Quantitative Trait Loci Resources Identify Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Candidate Genes for Growth Traits in Turbot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Robledo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Growth traits represent a main goal in aquaculture breeding programs and may be related to adaptive variation in wild fisheries. Integrating quantitative trait loci (QTL mapping and next generation sequencing can greatly help to identify variation in candidate genes, which can result in marker-assisted selection and better genetic structure information. Turbot is a commercially important flatfish in Europe and China, with available genomic information on QTLs and genome mapping. Muscle and liver RNA-seq from 18 individuals was carried out to obtain gene sequences and markers functionally related to growth, resulting in a total of 20,447 genes and 85,344 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Many growth-related genes and SNPs were identified and placed in the turbot genome and genetic map to explore their co-localization with growth-QTL markers. Forty-five SNPs on growth-related genes were selected based on QTL co-localization and relevant function for growth traits. Forty-three SNPs were technically feasible and validated in a wild Atlantic population, where 91% were polymorphic. The integration of functional and structural genomic resources in turbot provides a practical approach for QTL mining in this species. Validated SNPs represent a useful set of growth-related gene markers for future association, functional and population studies in this flatfish species.

  7. Integrative Transcriptome, Genome and Quantitative Trait Loci Resources Identify Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Candidate Genes for Growth Traits in Turbot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo, Diego; Fernández, Carlos; Hermida, Miguel; Sciara, Andrés; Álvarez-Dios, José Antonio; Cabaleiro, Santiago; Caamaño, Rubén; Martínez, Paulino; Bouza, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Growth traits represent a main goal in aquaculture breeding programs and may be related to adaptive variation in wild fisheries. Integrating quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping and next generation sequencing can greatly help to identify variation in candidate genes, which can result in marker-assisted selection and better genetic structure information. Turbot is a commercially important flatfish in Europe and China, with available genomic information on QTLs and genome mapping. Muscle and liver RNA-seq from 18 individuals was carried out to obtain gene sequences and markers functionally related to growth, resulting in a total of 20,447 genes and 85,344 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Many growth-related genes and SNPs were identified and placed in the turbot genome and genetic map to explore their co-localization with growth-QTL markers. Forty-five SNPs on growth-related genes were selected based on QTL co-localization and relevant function for growth traits. Forty-three SNPs were technically feasible and validated in a wild Atlantic population, where 91% were polymorphic. The integration of functional and structural genomic resources in turbot provides a practical approach for QTL mining in this species. Validated SNPs represent a useful set of growth-related gene markers for future association, functional and population studies in this flatfish species. PMID:26901189

  8. Expression quantitative trait loci reveals genes and pathways associated with boar taint in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drag, Markus; Hansen, Mathias Brygger; Kadarmideen, Haja

    Boar taint (BT) is an offensive odour or taste of meat from a proportion of non-castrated male pigs due to skatole and androstenone accumulation in adipose tissue. Castration is an effective strategy to avoid BT but is currently under debate due to animal welfare concerns. This study aimed...... to functionally characterise and evaluate important expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) to identify potential causal mechanisms of BT for use in optimised breeding for reduced BT without castration. Danish Landrace male pigs (n=48) with low, medium and high genetic merit of BT were slaughtered at 100 kg...

  9. Physical Localization and DNA Methylation of 45S rRNA Gene Loci in Jatropha curcas L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhiyun; Xue, Chao; Zhang, Mingliang; Guo, Rui; Zhou, Yong; Shi, Guoxin

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, 45S rRNA genes are arranged in tandem arrays of repeat units, and not all copies are transcribed during mitosis. DNA methylation is considered to be an epigenetic marker for rDNA activation. Here, we established a clear and accurate karyogram for Jatropha curcas L. The chromosomal formula was found to be 2n = 2x = 22 = 12m+10sm. We found that the 45S rDNA loci were located at the termini of chromosomes 7 and 9 in J. curcas. The distribution of 45S rDNA has no significant difference in J. curcas from different sources. Based on the hybridization signal patterns, there were two forms of rDNA - dispersed and condensed. The dispersed type of signals appeared during interphase and prophase, while the condensed types appeared during different stages of mitosis. DNA methylation analysis showed that when 45S rDNA stronger signals were dispersed and connected to the nucleolus, DNA methylation levels were lower at interphase and prophase. However, when the 45S rDNA loci were condensed, especially during metaphase, they showed different forms of DNA methylation. PMID:24386362

  10. Physical localization and DNA methylation of 45S rRNA gene loci in Jatropha curcas L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyun Gong

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, 45S rRNA genes are arranged in tandem arrays of repeat units, and not all copies are transcribed during mitosis. DNA methylation is considered to be an epigenetic marker for rDNA activation. Here, we established a clear and accurate karyogram for Jatropha curcas L. The chromosomal formula was found to be 2n=2x=22=12m+10 sm. We found that the 45S rDNA loci were located at the termini of chromosomes 7 and 9 in J. curcas. The distribution of 45S rDNA has no significant difference in J. curcas from different sources. Based on the hybridization signal patterns, there were two forms of rDNA - dispersed and condensed. The dispersed type of signals appeared during interphase and prophase, while the condensed types appeared during different stages of mitosis. DNA methylation analysis showed that when 45S rDNA stronger signals were dispersed and connected to the nucleolus, DNA methylation levels were lower at interphase and prophase. However, when the 45S rDNA loci were condensed, especially during metaphase, they showed different forms of DNA methylation.

  11. The influence of the NOD Nss1/Idd5 loci on sialadenitis and gene expression in salivary glands of congenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelmervik, Trond Ove R; Lindqvist, Anna-Karin; Petersen, Kjell; Johannesson, Martina; Stavrum, Anne-Kristin; Johansson, Asa; Jonsson, Roland; Holmdahl, Rikard; Bolstad, Anne Isine

    2007-01-01

    The nonobese diabetic (NOD) Nss1 and Idd5 loci have been associated with sialadenitis development in mice. In this study the NOD Nss1 and Idd5 loci were backcrossed onto the healthy control strain B10.Q by using the speed congenic breeding strategy, resulting in three congenic strains: B10.Q.Nss1, B10.Q.Nss1/Idd5 heterozygous and B10.Q.Nss1/Idd5 homozygous. We investigated the effects of the Nss1 and Idd5 loci on sialadenitis and gene expression in NOD congenic mice. One submandibular salivary gland from each mouse was used for histological analysis of sialadenitis, whereas the contralateral salivary gland was used for gene expression profiling with the Applied Biosystems Mouse Genome Survey chip v.1.0. The results were validated using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. The NOD Nss1 and Idd5 loci had clear influence on the onset and progression of sialadenitis in congenic mice. Double congenic mice exhibited the most severe phenotype. We successfully identified several genes that are located in the NOD congenic regions to be differentially expressed between the congenic strains and the control strain. Several of these were found to be co-regulated, such as Stat1, complement component C1q genes and Tlr12. Also, a vast contingency of interferon-regulated genes (such as Ltb, Irf7 and Irf8) and cytokine and chemokine genes (such as Ccr7 and Ccl19) were differentially expressed between the congenic strains and the control strain. Over-representation of inflammatory signalling pathways was observed among the differentially expressed genes. We have found that the introgression of the NOD loci Nss1 and Idd5 on a healthy background caused sialadenitis in NOD congenic mouse strains, and we propose that genes within these loci are important factors in the pathogenesis. Furthermore, gene expression profiling has revealed several differentially expressed genes within and outside the NOD loci that are similar to genes found to be differentially expressed in patients with Sj

  12. Neurotransmitter and their metabolite concentrations in different areas of the HPRT knockout mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschirner, Sarah K; Gutzki, Frank; Schneider, Erich H; Seifert, Roland; Kaever, Volkhard

    2016-06-15

    Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS) is characterized by uric acid overproduction and severe neurobehavioral symptoms, such as recurrent self-mutilative behavior. To learn more about the pathophysiology of the disease, we quantified neurotransmitters and their metabolites in the cerebral hemisphere, cerebellum and the medulla oblongata of HPRT knockout mice, an animal model for LNS, in comparison to the corresponding wild-type. Our analyses included l-glutamate, 4-aminobutanoic acid (GABA), acetylcholine, serotonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), norepinephrine, l-normetanephrine, epinephrine and l-metanephrine and were conducted via high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Among these neurotransmitter systems, we did not find any abnormalities in the HPRT knockout mouse brains. On one side, this might indicate that HPRT deficiency most severely affects dopamine signaling, while brain functioning based on other neurotransmitters is more or less spared. On the other hand, our findings may reflect a compensating mechanism for impaired purine salvage that protects the brain in HPRT-deficient mice but not in LNS patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Environmental and seasonal influences on red raspberry flavour volatiles and identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) and candidate genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Alistair; Kassim, Angzzas; McCallum, Susan; Woodhead, Mary; Smith, Kay; Zait, Dzeti; Graham, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Raspberry volatiles are important for perceptions of sensory quality, mould resistance and some have nutraceutical activities. Twelve raspberry character volatiles were quantified, 11 of them in fruit from two seasons, from plants from the Glen Moy × Latham mapping population growing in both open field and under cover (polytunnels). Effects of season and environment were examined for their impact on the content of α-ionone, α-ionol, β-ionone, β-damascenone, linalool, geraniol, benzyl alcohol, (Z)-3-hexenol, acetoin, acetic and hexanoic acids, whilst raspberry ketone was measured in one season. A significant variation was observed in fruit volatiles in all progeny between seasons and method of cultivation. Quantitative trait loci were determined and mapped to six of the seven linkage groups, as were candidate genes in the volatiles pathways.

  14. A candidate gene survey of quantitative trait loci affecting chemical composition in tomato fruit

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    L. Bermúdez; U. Urias; D. Milstein; L. Kamenetzky; R. Asis; A. R. Fernie; M. A. Van Sluys; F. Carrari; M. Rossi

    2008-01-01

    In tomato, numerous wild-related species have been demonstrated to be untapped sources of valuable genetic variability, including pathogen-resistance genes, nutritional, and industrial quality traits...

  15. Gene stacking strategies with doubled haploids derived from biparental crosses: theory and simulations assuming a finite number of loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchinger, Albrecht E; Technow, Frank; Dhillon, Baldev S

    2011-12-01

    Recent progress in genotyping and doubled haploid (DH) techniques has created new opportunities for development of improved selection methods in numerous crops. Assuming a finite number of unlinked loci (ℓ) and a given total number (n) of individuals to be genotyped, we compared, by theory and simulations, three methods of marker-assisted selection (MAS) for gene stacking in DH lines derived from biparental crosses: (1) MAS for high values of the marker score (T, corresponding to the total number of target alleles) in the F(2) generation and subsequently among DH lines derived from the selected F(2) individual (Method 1), (2) MAS for augmented F(2) enrichment and subsequently for T among DH lines from the best carrier F(2) individual (Method 2), and (3) MAS for T among DH lines derived from the F(1) generation (Method 3). Our objectives were to (a) determine the optimum allocation of resources to the F(2) ([Formula: see text]) and DH generations [Formula: see text] for Methods 1 and 2 by simulations, (b) compare the efficiency of all three methods for gene stacking by simulations, and (c) develop theory to explain the general effect of selection on the segregation variance and interpret our simulation results. By theory, we proved that for smaller values of ℓ, the segregation variance of T among DH lines derived from F(2) individuals, selected for high values of T, can be much smaller than expected in the absence of selection. This explained our simulation results, showing that for Method 1, it is best to genotype more F(2) individuals than DH lines ([Formula: see text]), whereas under Method 2, the optimal ratio [Formula: see text] was close to 0.5. However, for ratios deviating moderately from the optimum, the mean [Formula: see text] of T in the finally selected DH line ([Formula: see text]) was hardly reduced. Method 3 had always the lowest mean [Formula: see text] of [Formula: see text] except for small numbers of loci (ℓ = 4) and is favorable only if

  16. Linkage disequilibrium between the juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis gene and marker loci on chromosome 16p12. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerner, T.J.; MacCormack, K.; Gleitsman, J.; Schlumpf, K.; Breakefield, X.O.; Gusella, J.F.; Haines, J.L. (Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA (United States))

    1994-01-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL; Batten disease) are a collection of autosomal recessive disorders characterized by the accumulation of autofluorescent lipopigments in the neurons and other cell types. Clinically, these disorders are characterized by progressive encephalopathy, loss of vision, and seizures. CLN3, the gene responsible for juvenile NCL, has been mapped to a 15-cM region flanked by the marker loci D16S148 and D16S150 on human chromosome 16. CLN2, the gene causing the late-infantile form of NCL (LNCL), is not yet mapped. The authors have used highly informative dinucleoide repeat markers mapping between D16S148 and D16S150 to refine the localization of CLN3 and to test for linkage to CLN2. The authors find significant linkage disequilibrium between CLN3 and the dinucleotide repeat marker loci D16S288 (X[sup 2](7) = 46.5, P < .005), D16S298 (X[sup 2](6) = 36.6, P < .005), and D16S299 (X[sup 2](7) = 73.8, P < .005), and also a novel RFLP marker at the D16S272 locus (X[sup 2](1) = 5.7, P = .02). These markers all map to 16p12.1. The D16S298/D16S299 haplotype [open quotes]5/4[close quotes] is highly overrepresented, accounting for 54% of CLN3 chromosomes as compared with 8% of control chromosomes (X[sup 2] = 117, df = 1, P < .001). Examination of the haplotypes suggests that the CLN3 locus can be narrowed to the region immediately surrounding these markers in 16p12.1. Analysis of D16S299 in LNCL pedigrees supports the previous finding that CLN3 and CLN2 are different genetic loci. This study also indicates that dinucleotide repeat markers play a valuable role in disequilibrium studies. 23 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  17. Genes and quality trait loci (QTLs) associated with firmness in Malus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ctm

    2013-03-06

    Mar 6, 2013 ... candidate markers that can be implemented in marker assisted selection and breeding for trees and/or cultivars that ... and genes associated with firmness and their importance to biotechnology, the breeding industry and eventually the .... study, the other two genes in the Md-ACS3 family, Md-. ACS3b and ...

  18. Genomic and Population Analyses of the Mating Type Loci in Coccidioides Species Reveal Evidence for Sexual Reproduction and Gene Acquisition▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, M. Alejandra; Barker, Bridget M.; Kroken, Scott; Rounsley, Steven D.; Orbach, Marc J.

    2007-01-01

    Coccidioides species, the fungi responsible for the valley fever disease, are known to reproduce asexually through the production of arthroconidia that are the infectious propagules. The possible role of sexual reproduction in the survival and dispersal of these pathogens is unexplored. To determine the potential for mating of Coccidioides, we analyzed genome sequences and identified mating type loci characteristic of heterothallic ascomycetes. Coccidioides strains contain either a MAT1-1 or a MAT1-2 idiomorph, which is 8.1 or 9 kb in length, respectively, the longest reported for any ascomycete species. These idiomorphs contain four or five genes, respectively, more than are present in the MAT loci of most ascomycetes. Along with their cDNA structures, we determined that all genes in the MAT loci are transcribed. Two genes frequently found in common sequences flanking MAT idiomorphs, APN2 and COX13, are within the MAT loci in Coccidioides, but the MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 copies have diverged dramatically from each other. Data indicate that the acquisition of these genes in the MAT loci occurred prior to the separation of Coccidioides from Uncinocarpus reesii. An analysis of 436 Coccidioides isolates from patients and the environment indicates that in both Coccidioides immitis and C. posadasii, there is a 1:1 distribution of MAT loci, as would be expected for sexually reproducing species. In addition, an analysis of isolates obtained from 11 soil samples demonstrated that at three sampling sites, strains of both mating types were present, indicating that compatible strains were in close proximity in the environment. PMID:17513566

  19. Candidate genes and favoured loci: strategies for molecular genetic research into schizophrenia, manic depression, autism, alcoholism and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurling, H

    1986-01-01

    It is argued that further research to achieve more detailed diagnostic systems in many psychiatric disorders is unlikely to be productive without taking genetic effects into account. Even when this is done, for example when carrying out segregation analysis to determine a mode of genetic transmission, mental illnesses often pose specific problems that preclude accurate analysis. Because techniques in molecular biology and genetics have made it possible to study gene effects in human disease systematically it should now be possible to specify the genes that are involved. When this has been achieved then a diagnostic system based on genetic causation can develop. This will have the advantage of helping to pinpoint environmental factors more accurately. Specific strategies will need to be adopted to overcome uncertain modes of inheritance, incomplete or non-penetrance of disease alleles and disease heterogeneity. Highly speculative hypotheses can be put forward for a locus causing Alzheimer's disease on a portion of the long arm of chromosome 21. For autism it is plausible that there is a disease locus at or near the fragile X site on the X chromosome. A locus for manic depression has been very tentatively mapped using DNA markers to chromosome 11 and in a small proportion of families DNA markers have also shown some evidence for X linkage. Schizophrenia does not seem to be associated with any favoured loci. Candidate genes for schizophrenia include those encoding dopamine, other neurotransmitter receptors or enzymes and various neuropeptides such as enkephalin and beta endorphin.

  20. Ranking and characterization of established BMI and lipid associated loci as candidates for gene-environment interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shungin, Dmitry; Deng, Wei Q; Varga, Tibor V

    2017-01-01

    Phenotypic variance heterogeneity across genotypes at a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) may reflect underlying gene-environment (G×E) or gene-gene interactions. We modeled variance heterogeneity for blood lipids and BMI in up to 44,211 participants and investigated relationships between vari...... (Pbinomial = 8.63×10-9 and 8.52×10-7 for SNP × smoking and SNP × physical activity, respectively). We conclude that some loci with strong marginal effects may be good candidates for G×E, and variance-based prioritization can be used to identify them....... variance effects (Pv), G×E interaction effects (with smoking and physical activity), and marginal genetic effects (Pm). Correlations between Pv and Pm were stronger for SNPs with established marginal effects (Spearman's ρ = 0.401 for triglycerides, and ρ = 0.236 for BMI) compared to all SNPs. When Pv...... and Pm were compared for all pruned SNPs, only BMI was statistically significant (Spearman's ρ = 0.010). Overall, SNPs with established marginal effects were overrepresented in the nominally significant part of the Pv distribution (Pbinomial

  1. Identification of Gene Loci That Overlap Between Schizophrenia and Educational Attainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Hellard, Stéphanie; Wang, Yunpeng; Witoelar, Aree; Zuber, Verena; Bettella, Francesco; Hugdahl, Kenneth; Espeseth, Thomas; Steen, Vidar M; Melle, Ingrid; Desikan, Rahul; Schork, Andrew J; Thompson, Wesley K; Dale, Anders M; Djurovic, Srdjan; Andreassen, Ole A

    2017-05-01

    There is evidence for genetic overlap between cognitive abilities and schizophrenia (SCZ), and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) demonstrate that both SCZ and general cognitive abilities have a strong polygenic component with many single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) each with a small effect. Here we investigated the shared genetic architecture between SCZ and educational attainment, which is regarded as a "proxy phenotype" for cognitive abilities, but may also reflect other traits. We applied a conditional false discovery rate (condFDR) method to GWAS of SCZ (n = 82 315), college completion ("College," n = 95 427), and years of education ("EduYears," n = 101 069). Variants associated with College or EduYears showed enrichment of association with SCZ, demonstrating polygenic overlap. This was confirmed by an increased replication rate in SCZ. By applying a condFDR threshold educational attainment, and identify novel pleiotropic loci. Other studies have reported genetic overlap between SCZ and cognition, or SCZ and educational attainment, with negative correlation. Importantly, our methods enable identification of bi-directional effects, which highlight the complex relationship between SCZ and educational attainment, and support polygenic mechanisms underlying both cognitive dysfunction and creativity in SCZ. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Impact of genetic risk loci for multiple sclerosis on expression of proximal genes in patients

    KAUST Repository

    James, Tojo

    2018-01-06

    Despite advancements in genetic studies, it is difficult to understand and characterize the functional relevance of disease-associated genetic variants, especially in the context of a complex multifactorial disease such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Since a large proportion of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) are context-specific, we performed RNA-Seq in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from MS patients (n=145) to identify eQTLs in regions centered on 109 MS risk SNPs and seven associated HLA variants. We identified 77 statistically significant eQTL associations, including pseudogenes and non-coding RNAs. Thirty-eight out of 40 testable eQTL effects were colocalised with the disease association signal. Since many eQTLs are tissue specific, we aimed to detail their significance in different cell types. Approximately 70% of the eQTLs were replicated and characterized in at least one major PBMC derived cell type. Furthermore, 40% of eQTLs were found to be more pronounced in MS patients compared to noninflammatory neurological diseases patients. In addition, we found two SNPs to be significantly associated with the proportions of three different cell types. Mapping to enhancer histone marks and predicted transcription factor binding sites added additional functional evidence for eight eQTL regions. As an example, we found that rs71624119, shared with three other autoimmune diseases and located in a primed enhancer (H3K4me1) with potential binding for STAT transcription factors, significantly associates with ANKRD55 expression. This study provides many novel and validated targets for future functional characterization of MS and other diseases.

  3. Genomic Deletions Correlate with Underexpression of Novel Candidate Genes at Six Loci in Pediatric Pilocytic Astrocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Potter

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The molecular pathogenesis of pediatric pilocytic astrocytoma (PA is not well defined. Previous cytogenetic and molecular studies have not identified nonrandom genetic aberrations. To correlate differential gene expression and genomic copy number aberrations (CNAs in PA, we have used Affymetrix GeneChip HG_U133A to generate gene expression profiles of 19 pediatric patients and the SpectralChip 2600 to investigate CNAs in 11 of these tumors. Hierarchical clustering according to expression profile similarity grouped tumors and controls separately. We identified 1844 genes that showed significant differential expression between tumor and normal controls, with a large number clearly influencing phosphatidylinositol and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in PA. Most CNAs identified in this study were single-clone alterations. However, a small region of loss involving up to seven adjacent clones at 7q11.23 was observed in seven tumors and correlated with the underexpression of BCL7B. Loss of four individual clones was also associated with reduced gene expression including SH3GL2 at 9p21.2-p23, BCL7A (which shares 90% sequence homology with BCL7B at 12q24.33, DRD1IP at 10q26.3, and TUBG2 and CNTNAP1 at 17q21.31. Moreover, the down-regulation of FOXG1B at 14q12 correlated with loss within the gene promoter region in most tumors. This is the first study to correlate differential gene expression with CNAs in PA.

  4. Identification of the Bovine Growth Hormone Gene and Alui Loci Polymorphism by PCR – RFLP Method

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    Nina Moravčíková

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe aim of this study was detection of polymorphism in the bovine growth hormone gene using PCR – RFLP asan efficient method for genetic analysis of polymorphism. A polymorphic site of the growth hormone gene (AluIpolymorphism that results in an amino acid change at position 127 of the protein chain (leucine, L to valine, V hasbeen linked to differences in circulating metabolites and metabolic hormones and to milk yield traits. The growthhormone gene is a candidate gene for body weight and weight gain in cattle since it plays a fundamental role ingrowth regulation. The polymorphism of growth hormone gene was studied in a group of 58 bulls of Slovak spottedbreed. A strategy employing PCR was used to amplify 428 bp products from blood samples. Digestion of PCRproducts with restriction enzyme AluI revealed two alleles: allele L was 265, 96, 51, 16 fragments and allele V was265, 147 and 16. Three patterns were observed and with frequencies 0.404, 0.473 and 0.123 for LL, LV and VV,respectively. The frequency of alleles L was 0.6404 and V was 0.3596.

  5. Quantitative trait loci and underlying candidate genes controlling agronomical and fruit quality traits in octoploid strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorrilla-Fontanesi, Yasmín; Cabeza, Amalia; Domínguez, Pedro; Medina, Juan Jesús; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Denoyes-Rothan, Beatrice; Sánchez-Sevilla, José F; Amaya, Iraida

    2011-09-01

    Breeding for fruit quality traits in strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa, 2n = 8x = 56) is complex due to the polygenic nature of these traits and the octoploid constitution of this species. In order to improve the efficiency of genotype selection, the identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) and associated molecular markers will constitute a valuable tool for breeding programs. However, the implementation of these markers in breeding programs depends upon the complexity and stability of QTLs across different environments. In this work, the genetic control of 17 agronomical and fruit quality traits was investigated in strawberry using a F(1) population derived from an intraspecific cross between two contrasting selection lines, '232' and '1392'. QTL analyses were performed over three successive years based on the separate parental linkage maps and a pseudo-testcross strategy. The integrated strawberry genetic map consists of 338 molecular markers covering 37 linkage groups, thus exceeding the 28 chromosomes. 33 QTLs were identified for 14 of the 17 studied traits and approximately 37% of them were stable over time. For each trait, 1-5 QTLs were identified with individual effects ranging between 9.2 and 30.5% of the phenotypic variation, indicating that all analysed traits are complex and quantitatively inherited. Many QTLs controlling correlated traits were co-located in homoeology group V, indicating linkage or pleiotropic effects of loci. Candidate genes for several QTLs controlling yield, anthocyanins, firmness and L-ascorbic acid are proposed based on both their co-localization and predicted function. We also report conserved QTLs among strawberry and other Rosaceae based on their syntenic location.

  6. From selective full-length genes isolation by TAR cloning in yeast to their expression from HAC vectors in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouprina, Natalay; Lee, Nicholas C O; Kononenko, Artem V; Samoshkin, Alexander; Larionov, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Transformation-associated recombination (TAR) cloning allows selective isolation of full-length genes and genomic loci as large circular Yeast Artificial Chromosomes (YACs) in yeast. The method has a broad application for structural and functional genomics, long-range haplotyping, characterization of chromosomal rearrangements, and evolutionary studies. In this paper, we describe a basic protocol for gene isolation by TAR as well as a method to convert TAR isolates into Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes (BACs) using a retrofitting vector. The retrofitting vector contains a 3' HPRT-loxP cassette to allow subsequent gene loading into a unique loxP site of the HAC-based (Human Artificial Chromosome) gene delivery vector. The benefit of combining the TAR gene cloning technology with the HAC gene delivery system for gene expression studies is discussed.

  7. Microspatial genetic heterogeneity and gene flow in stray cats (Felis catus L.): a comparison of coat colour and microsatellite loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Say, Ludovic; Bonhomme, François; Desmarais, Eric; Pontier, Dominique

    2003-06-01

    We analysed levels of genetic differentiation between nine local urban colonies of stray cats using eight coat colour and nine microsatellite loci. Both types of markers revealed a strong differentiation between colonies (FST = 0.15 and 0.09 for coat colour and microsatellite loci, respectively). Three coat colour loci showed extreme levels of genetic differentiation comparatively to other loci and are strongly suspected to be under divergent selective pressures. Microsatellite loci showed significant heterozygote deficiency within colonies (FIS = 0.14), suggesting that coat colour loci are not appropriate to investigate genetic structure at a fine scale because coat colour allele frequencies are based on Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The reported pattern conformed to that predicted from the social structuring of cat colonies: aggressive exclusion of immigrants, inbreeding and very low dispersal rate.

  8. Characterization of the neurohypophysial hormone gene loci in elephant shark and the Japanese lamprey: origin of the vertebrate neurohypophysial hormone genes

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    Brenner Sydney

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vasopressin and oxytocin are mammalian neurohypophysial hormones with distinct functions. Vasopressin is involved mainly in osmoregulation and oxytocin is involved primarily in parturition and lactation. Jawed vertebrates contain at least one homolog each of vasopressin and oxytocin, whereas only a vasopressin-family hormone, vasotocin, has been identified in jawless vertebrates. The genes encoding vasopressin and oxytocin are closely linked tail-to-tail in eutherian mammals whereas their homologs in chicken, Xenopus and coelacanth (vasotocin and mesotocin are linked tail-to-head. In contrast, their pufferfish homologs, vasotocin and isotocin, are located on the same strand of DNA with isotocin located upstream of vasotocin and separated by five genes. These differences in the arrangement of the two genes in different bony vertebrate lineages raise questions about their origin and ancestral arrangement. To trace the origin of these genes, we have sequenced BAC clones from the neurohypophysial gene loci in a cartilaginous fish, the elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii, and in a jawless vertebrate, the Japanese lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum. We have also analyzed the neurohypophysial hormone gene locus in an invertebrate chordate, the amphioxus (Branchiostoma floridae. Results The elephant shark neurohypophysial hormone genes encode vasotocin and oxytocin, and are linked tail-to-head like their homologs in coelacanth and non-eutherian tetrapods. Besides the hypothalamus, the two genes are also expressed in the ovary. In addition, the vasotocin gene is expressed in the kidney, rectal gland and intestine. These expression profiles indicate a paracrine role for the two hormones. The lamprey locus contains a single neurohypophysial hormone gene, the vasotocin. The synteny of genes in the lamprey locus is conserved in elephant shark, coelacanth and tetrapods but disrupted in teleost fishes. The amphioxus locus encodes a single

  9. Cold sweetening in diploid potato: mapping quantitative trait loci and candidate genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, Cristina M; Ritter, Enrique; Schäfer-Pregl, Ralf; Walkemeier, Birgit; Kalde, Alexandra; Salamini, Francesco; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2002-01-01

    A candidate gene approach has been used as a first step to identify the molecular basis of quantitative trait variation in potato. Sugar content of tubers upon cold storage was the model trait chosen because the metabolic pathways involved in starch and sugar metabolism are well known and many of the genes have been cloned. Tubers of two F(1) populations of diploid potato grown in six environments were evaluated for sugar content after cold storage. The populations were genotyped with RFLP, AFLP, and candidate gene markers. QTL analysis revealed that QTL for glucose, fructose, and sucrose content were located on all potato chromosomes. Most QTL for glucose content mapped to the same positions as QTL for fructose content. QTL explaining >10% of the variability for reducing sugars were located on linkage groups I, III, VII, VIII, IX, and XI. QTL consistent across populations and/or environments were identified. QTL were linked to genes encoding invertase, sucrose synthase 3, sucrose phosphate synthase, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, sucrose transporter 1, and a putative sucrose sensor. The results suggest that allelic variants of enzymes operating in carbohydrate metabolic pathways contribute to the genetic variation in cold sweetening. PMID:12454085

  10. Multiple loci with different cancer specificities within the 8q24 gene desert

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghoussaini, M.; Song, H.; Koessler, T.

    2008-01-01

    this gene desert were specifically associated with risks of different cancers. One block was solely associated with risk of breast cancer, three others were associated solely with the risk of prostate cancer, and a fifth was associated with the risk of prostate, colorectal, and ovarian cancer...

  11. CrEdit: CRISPR mediated multi-loci gene integration in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronda, Carlotta; Maury, Jérôme; Jakočiunas, Tadas; Jacobsen, Simo Abdessamad Baallal; Germann, Susanne Manuela; Harrison, Scott James; Borodina, Irina; Keasling, Jay D; Jensen, Michael Krogh; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard

    2015-07-07

    One of the bottlenecks in production of biochemicals and pharmaceuticals in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is stable and homogeneous expression of pathway genes. Integration of genes into the genome of the production organism is often a preferred option when compared to expression from episomal vectors. Existing approaches for achieving stable simultaneous genome integrations of multiple DNA fragments often result in relatively low integration efficiencies and furthermore rely on the use of selection markers. Here, we have developed a novel method, CrEdit (CRISPR/Cas9 mediated genome Editing), which utilizes targeted double strand breaks caused by CRISPR/Cas9 to significantly increase the efficiency of homologous integration in order to edit and manipulate genomic DNA. Using CrEdit, the efficiency and locus specificity of targeted genome integrations reach close to 100% for single gene integration using short homology arms down to 60 base pairs both with and without selection. This enables direct and cost efficient inclusion of homology arms in PCR primers. As a proof of concept, a non-native β-carotene pathway was reconstructed in S. cerevisiae by simultaneous integration of three pathway genes into individual intergenic genomic sites. Using longer homology arms, we demonstrate highly efficient and locus-specific genome integration even without selection with up to 84% correct clones for simultaneous integration of three gene expression cassettes. The CrEdit approach enables fast and cost effective genome integration for engineering of S. cerevisiae. Since the choice of the targeting sites is flexible, CrEdit is a powerful tool for diverse genome engineering applications.

  12. Genetics of susceptibility to leishmaniasis in mice: four novel loci and functional heterogeneity of gene effects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Havelková, Helena; Badalová, Jana; Svobodová, M.; Vojtíšková, Jarmila; Kurey, Irina; Vladimirov, Vladimir; Demant, P.; Lipoldová, Marie

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 3 (2006), s. 220-233 ISSN 1466-4879 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA310/03/1381; GA ČR(CZ) GD310/03/H147 Grant - others:HHMI(US) 55000323 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : leishmaniasis * host response * gene effect Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.533, year: 2006

  13. Genome-wide association analysis reveals genetic loci and candidate genes for feeding behavior and eating efficiency in Duroc boars.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongrong Ding

    Full Text Available Efficient use of feed resources is a challenge in the pork industry because the largest variability in expenditure is attributed to the cost of fodder. Efficiency of feeding is directly related to feeding behavior. In order to identify genomic regions controlling feeding behavior and eating efficiency traits, 338 Duroc boars were used in this study. The Illumina Porcine SNP60K BeadChip was used for genotyping. Data pertaining to individual daily feed intake (DFI, total daily time spent in feeder (TPD, number of daily visits to feeder (NVD, average duration of each visit (TPV, mean feed intake per visit (FPV, mean feed intake rate (FR, and feed conversion ratio (FCR were collected for these pigs. Despite the limited sample size, the genome-wide association study was acceptable to detect candidate regions association with feeding behavior and eating efficiency traits in pigs. We detected three genome-wide (P < 1.40E-06 and 11 suggestive (P < 2.79E-05 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP-trait associations. Six SNPs were located in genomic regions where quantitative trait loci (QTLs have previously been reported for feeding behavior and eating efficiency traits in pigs. Five candidate genes (SERPINA3, MYC, LEF1, PITX2, and MAP3K14 with biochemical and physiological roles that were relevant to feeding behavior and eating efficiency were discovered proximal to significant or suggestive markers. Gene ontology analysis indicated that most of the candidate genes were involved in the development of the hypothalamus (GO:0021854, P < 0.0398. Our results provide new insights into the genetic basis of feeding behavior and eating efficiency in pigs. Furthermore, some significant SNPs identified in this study could be incorporated into artificial selection programs for Duroc-related pigs to select for increased feeding efficiency.

  14. Ranking and characterization of established BMI and lipid associated loci as candidates for gene-environment interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Shungin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic variance heterogeneity across genotypes at a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP may reflect underlying gene-environment (G×E or gene-gene interactions. We modeled variance heterogeneity for blood lipids and BMI in up to 44,211 participants and investigated relationships between variance effects (Pv, G×E interaction effects (with smoking and physical activity, and marginal genetic effects (Pm. Correlations between Pv and Pm were stronger for SNPs with established marginal effects (Spearman's ρ = 0.401 for triglycerides, and ρ = 0.236 for BMI compared to all SNPs. When Pv and Pm were compared for all pruned SNPs, only BMI was statistically significant (Spearman's ρ = 0.010. Overall, SNPs with established marginal effects were overrepresented in the nominally significant part of the Pv distribution (Pbinomial <0.05. SNPs from the top 1% of the Pm distribution for BMI had more significant Pv values (PMann-Whitney = 1.46×10-5, and the odds ratio of SNPs with nominally significant (<0.05 Pm and Pv was 1.33 (95% CI: 1.12, 1.57 for BMI. Moreover, BMI SNPs with nominally significant G×E interaction P-values (Pint<0.05 were enriched with nominally significant Pv values (Pbinomial = 8.63×10-9 and 8.52×10-7 for SNP × smoking and SNP × physical activity, respectively. We conclude that some loci with strong marginal effects may be good candidates for G×E, and variance-based prioritization can be used to identify them.

  15. Detecting population structure in a high gene-flow species, Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus): direct, simultaneous evaluation of neutral vs putatively selected loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    André, C.; Larsson, L. C.; Laikre, L.

    2010-01-01

    In many marine fish species, genetic population structure is typically weak because populations are large, evolutionarily young and have a high potential for gene flow. We tested whether genetic markers influenced by natural selection are more efficient than the presumed neutral genetic markers...... presumed neutral microsatellite loci, sample sizes could be reduced by up to a tenth while still retaining high statistical power. Our results show that the loci influenced by selection can serve as powerful markers for detecting population structure in high gene-flow marine fish species....... DNA, with one microsatellite locus, Cpa112, previously shown to be influenced by divergent selection associated with salinity, and one locus located in the major histocompatibility complex class IIA (MHC-IIA) gene, using the same individuals across analyses. Samples were collected in 2002 and 2003...

  16. Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) and Candidate Genes for Cadmium Tolerance in Populus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Induri, Brahma R [West Virginia University; Ellis, Danielle R [West Virginia University; Slavov, Gancho [West Virginia University; Yin, Tongming [ORNL; Muchero, Wellington [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; DiFazio, Stephen P [West Virginia University

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of genetic variation in response of Populus to heavy metals like cadmium (Cd) is an important step in understanding the underlying mechanisms of tolerance. In this study, a pseudo-backcross pedigree of Populus trichocarpa and Populus deltoides was characterized for Cd exposure. The pedigree showed significant variation for Cd tolerance thus enabling the identification of relatively tolerant and susceptible genotypes for intensive characterization. A total of 16 QTLs at logarithm of odds (LOD) ratio > 2.5, were found to be associated with total dry weight, its components, and root volume. Four major QTLs for total dry weight were mapped to different linkage groups in control (LG III) and Cd conditions (LG XVI) and had opposite allelic effects on Cd tolerance, suggesting that these genomic regions were differentially controlled. The phenotypic variation explained by Cd QTL for all traits under study varied from 5.9% to 11.6% and averaged 8.2% across all QTL. Leaf Cd contents also showed significant variation suggesting the phytoextraction potential of Populus genotypes, though heritability of this trait was low (0.22). A whole-genome microarray study was conducted by using two genotypes with extreme responses for Cd tolerance in the above study and differentially expressed genes were identified. Candidate genes including CAD2 (CADMIUM SENSITIVE 2), HMA5 (HEAVY METAL ATPase5), ATGTST1 (Arabidopsis thaliana Glutathione S-Transferase1), ATGPX6 (Glutathione peroxidase 6), and ATMRP 14 (Arabidopsis thaliana Multidrug Resistance associated Protein 14) were identified from QTL intervals and microarray study. Functional characterization of these candidate genes could enhance phytoremediation capabilities of Populus.

  17. [Polymorphisms of rs4906902 and rs8179184 loci in the promoter of the GABRB3 gene and their relevance with schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xue-fei; Ding, Mei; Sun, Ying; Pang, Hao; Xuan, Jin-feng; Xing, Jia-xin; Li, Chun-mei; Wang, Bao-jie

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the polymorphisms of rs4906902 and rs8179184 loci in the promoter of the gamma-aminobutyric acid(GABA) receptor A, beta3 subunit gene (GABRB3), and their relevance with schizophrenia. PCR and DNA sequencing were used to detect the polymorphisms of rs4906902 and rs8179184 loci in 210 healthy individuals (control group) and 206 schizophrenic patients (case group) of the Han population in northern China. The chi2 test was used to identify Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium of the genotype distribution in the control group followed by comparing differences in genotype and haplotype frequency distributions between two groups. Distributions of the genotype frequencies fit the law of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in the control group. rs4906902 and rs8179184 loci were in linkage disequilibrium and showed two haplotypes which were T-G and C-A. The differences of genotypic frequencies and haplotype frequencies were statistically significant between the two groups (P < 0.05). The frequency of haplotype C-A in the case group was significantly higher than in the control group. Genotypic and haplotype frequencies in the maternal line and paternal line were statistically significant in the case group (P < 0.05). The haplotype of C-A in rs4906902 and rs8179184 loci in the promoter of GABRB3 gene may be maternally inherited and positively associated with schizophrenia and may be a useful tool in the forensic identification of schizophrenia.

  18. Identifying genetic loci affecting antidepressant drug response in depression using drug–gene interaction models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordam, Raymond; Avery, Christy L; Visser, Loes E; Stricker, Bruno H

    2016-01-01

    Antidepressants are often only moderately successful in decreasing the severity of depressive symptoms. In part, antidepressant treatment response in patients with depression is genetically determined. However, although a large number of studies have been conducted aiming to identify genetic variants associated with antidepressant drug response in depression, only a few variants have been repeatedly identified. Within the present review, we will discuss the methodological challenges and limitations of the studies that have been conducted on this topic to date (e.g., ‘treated-only design’, statistical power) and we will discuss how specifically drug–gene interaction models can be used to be better able to identify genetic variants associated with antidepressant drug response in depression. PMID:27248517

  19. Gene-education interactions identify novel blood pressure loci in the Framingham Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basson, Jacob; Sung, Yun Ju; Schwander, Karen; Kume, Rezart; Simino, Jeannette; de las Fuentes, Lisa; Rao, Dabeeru

    2014-03-01

    Blood pressure (BP) variability has a genetic component, most of which has yet to be attributed to specific variants. One promising strategy for gene discovery is analysis of interactions between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and BP-related factors, including age, sex, and body mass index (BMI). Educational attainment, a marker for socioeconomic status, has effects on both BP and BMI. We investigated SNP-education interaction effects on BP in genome-wide data on 3,836 subjects in families from the Framingham Heart Study. The ABEL suite was used to adjust for age, sex, BMI, medication use, and kinship and to perform 1 degree-of-freedrom (df) and 2 df SNP-education interaction tests. An SNP in PTN was associated with increased systolic BP (5.4mm Hg per minor allele) in those without a bachelor's degree but decreased systolic BP (1.6mm Hg per allele) in those with a bachelor's degree (2 df; P = 2.08 × 10(-8)). An SNP in TOX2 was associated with increased diastolic BP (DBP; 4.1mm Hg per minor allele) in those with no more educational attainment than high school but decreased DBP in those with education past high school (-0.7; 1 df; P = 3.74 × 10(-8)). Three suggestive associations were also found: in MYO16 (pulse pressure: 2 df; P = 2.89 × 10(-7)), in HAS2 (DBP: 1 df; P = 1.41 × 10(-7)), and in DLEU2 (DBP: 2 df; P = 1.93 × 10(-7)). All 5 genes are related to BP, including roles in vasodilation and angiogenesis for PTN and TOX2. PTN and TOX2 are associated with BP. Analyzing SNP-education interactions may detect novel associations. Education may be a surrogate for unmeasured exposures and behaviors modifying SNP effects on BP.

  20. Functional annotations of diabetes nephropathy susceptibility loci through analysis of genome-wide renal gene expression in rat models of diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrall Martin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperglycaemia in diabetes mellitus (DM alters gene expression regulation in various organs and contributes to long term vascular and renal complications. We aimed to generate novel renal genome-wide gene transcription data in rat models of diabetes in order to test the responsiveness to hyperglycaemia and renal structural changes of positional candidate genes at selected diabetic nephropathy (DN susceptibility loci. Methods Both Affymetrix and Illumina technologies were used to identify significant quantitative changes in the abundance of over 15,000 transcripts in kidney of models of spontaneous (genetically determined mild hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance (Goto-Kakizaki-GK and experimentally induced severe hyperglycaemia (Wistar-Kyoto-WKY rats injected with streptozotocin [STZ]. Results Different patterns of transcription regulation in the two rat models of diabetes likely underlie the roles of genetic variants and hyperglycaemia severity. The impact of prolonged hyperglycaemia on gene expression changes was more profound in STZ-WKY rats than in GK rats and involved largely different sets of genes. These included genes already tested in genetic studies of DN and a large number of protein coding sequences of unknown function which can be considered as functional and, when they map to DN loci, positional candidates for DN. Further expression analysis of rat orthologs of human DN positional candidate genes provided functional annotations of known and novel genes that are responsive to hyperglycaemia and may contribute to renal functional and/or structural alterations. Conclusion Combining transcriptomics in animal models and comparative genomics provides important information to improve functional annotations of disease susceptibility loci in humans and experimental support for testing candidate genes in human genetics.

  1. Integration of gene-based markers in a pearl millet genetic map for identification of candidate genes underlying drought tolerance quantitative trait loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehgal Deepmala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of genes underlying drought tolerance (DT quantitative trait loci (QTLs will facilitate understanding of molecular mechanisms of drought tolerance, and also will accelerate genetic improvement of pearl millet through marker-assisted selection. We report a map based on genes with assigned functional roles in plant adaptation to drought and other abiotic stresses and demonstrate its use in identifying candidate genes underlying a major DT-QTL. Results Seventy five single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP and conserved intron spanning primer (CISP markers were developed from available expressed sequence tags (ESTs using four genotypes, H 77/833-2, PRLT 2/89-33, ICMR 01029 and ICMR 01004, representing parents of two mapping populations. A total of 228 SNPs were obtained from 30.5 kb sequenced region resulting in a SNP frequency of 1/134 bp. The positions of major pearl millet linkage group (LG 2 DT-QTLs (reported from crosses H 77/833-2 × PRLT 2/89-33 and 841B × 863B were added to the present consensus function map which identified 18 genes, coding for PSI reaction center subunit III, PHYC, actin, alanine glyoxylate aminotransferase, uridylate kinase, acyl-CoA oxidase, dipeptidyl peptidase IV, MADS-box, serine/threonine protein kinase, ubiquitin conjugating enzyme, zinc finger C- × 8-C × 5-C × 3-H type, Hd3, acetyl CoA carboxylase, chlorophyll a/b binding protein, photolyase, protein phosphatase1 regulatory subunit SDS22 and two hypothetical proteins, co-mapping in this DT-QTL interval. Many of these candidate genes were found to have significant association with QTLs of grain yield, flowering time and leaf rolling under drought stress conditions. Conclusions We have exploited available pearl millet EST sequences to generate a mapped resource of seventy five new gene-based markers for pearl millet and demonstrated its use in identifying candidate genes underlying a major DT-QTL in this species. The reported gene

  2. RFLP mapping of five major genes and eight quantitative trait loci controlling flowering time in a winter x spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cross.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurie, D A; Pratchett, N; Snape, J W; Bezant, J H

    1995-06-01

    A genetic map of 92 RFLP loci and two storage protein loci was made using 94 doubled-haploid lines from a cross between the winter barley variety Igri and the spring variety Triumph. The markers were combined with data from two field experiments (one spring sown and one autumn (fall) sown) and a glasshouse experiment to locate a total of 13 genes (five major genes and eight quantitative trait loci (QTL)) controlling flowering time. Two photoperiod response genes were found; Ppd-H1 on chromosome 2(2H)S regulated flowering time under long days, while Ppd-H2 on chromosome 5(1H)L was detected only under short days. In the field experiments Ppd-H1 strongly affected flowering time from spring and autumn sowings, while Ppd-H2 was detected only in the autumn sowing. The glasshouse experiment also located two vernalization response genes, probably Sh and Sh2, on chromosomes 4(4H)L and 7(5H)L, respectively. The vernalization response genes had little effect on flowering time in the field. Variation in flowering time was also affected by nine additional genes, whose effects were not specifically dependent on photoperiod or vernalization. One was the denso dwarfing gene on chromosome 3(3H)L. The remaining eight were QTLs of smaller effect. One was located on chromosome 2(2H), one on 3(3H), one on 4(4H), one on 7(5H), two on 6(6H), and two on 1(7H). Model fitting showed that the 13 putative genes, and their interactions, could account for all the observed genetical variation from both spring and autumn sowings, giving a complete model for the control of flowering time in this cross.

  3. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies and Network Analysis-Based Integration with Gene Expression Data Identify New Suggestive Loci and Unravel a Wnt-Centric Network Associated with Dupuytren's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, Kerstin; Siegert, Sabine; Toliat, Mohammad Reza; Du, Juanjiangmeng; Casper, Ramona; Dolmans, Guido H.; Werker, Paul M.; Tinschert, Sigrid; Franke, Andre; Gieger, Christian; Strauch, Konstantin; Nothnagel, Michael; Nuernberg, Peter; Hennies, Hans Christian

    2016-01-01

    Dupuytren's disease, a fibromatosis of the connective tissue in the palm, is a common complex disease with a strong genetic component. Up to date nine genetic loci have been found to be associated with the disease. Six of these loci contain genes that code for Wnt signalling proteins. In spite of

  4. Identification of rRNA gene loci in the wild mouse (Mus musculus molossinus) captured at Hachioji, Tokyo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tsuyoshi; Osawa, Susumu; Shibata, Hideshi; Kanda, Naotoshi

    2007-12-01

    Mus musculus (M. m.) molossinus has been considered an independent subspecies of Mus musculus. To elucidate the evolutional origin of this subspecies, we carried out double-color FISH using 18s-28s ribosomal DNA and mouse chromosome paint probes. Among eleven rDNA loci detected, five loci on chromosomes 12, 15, 16, 18 and 19 were common to both Mus musculus (M. m.) musculus and M. m. molossinus and the other six loci, on chromosomes 1, 5, 10, 11, 13 and 17, were characteristic in M. m. molossinus. As M. m. molossinus is thought to originate from a hybrid between ancestral colonies of M. m. musculus and Mus musculus castaneus, we supposed that these six rDNA loci might have evolved after geographical isolation of the ancestral hybrid animals from M. m. musculus and M. m. castaneus.

  5. Genetic diversity of MHC class I loci in six non-model frogs is shaped by positive selection and gene duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiemnec-Tyburczy, K M; Richmond, J Q; Savage, A E; Lips, K R; Zamudio, K R

    2012-09-01

    Comparative studies of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes across vertebrate species can reveal the evolutionary processes that shape the structure and function of immune regulatory proteins. In this study, we characterized MHC class I sequences from six frog species representing three anuran families (Hylidae, Centrolenidae and Ranidae). Using cDNA from our focal species, we amplified a total of 79 unique sequences spanning exons 2-4 that encode the extracellular domains of the functional alpha chain protein. We compared intra- and interspecific nucleotide and amino-acid divergence, tested for recombination, and identified codon sites under selection by estimating the rate of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions with multiple codon-based maximum likelihood methods. We determined that positive (diversifying) selection was acting on specific amino-acid sites located within the domains that bind pathogen-derived peptides. We also found significant signals of recombination across the physical distance of the genes. Finally, we determined that all the six species expressed two or three putative classical class I loci, in contrast to the single locus condition of Xenopus laevis. Our results suggest that MHC evolution in anurans is a dynamic process and that variation in numbers of loci and genetic diversity can exist among taxa. Thus, the accumulation of genetic data for more species will be useful in further characterizing the relative importance of processes such as selection, recombination and gene duplication in shaping MHC loci among amphibian lineages.

  6. Population genetic structure of the African elephant in Uganda based on variation at mitochondrial and nuclear loci: evidence for male-biased gene flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyakaana, S; Arctander, P

    1999-07-01

    A drastic decline has occurred in the size of the Uganda elephant population in the last 40 years, exacerbated by two main factors; an increase in the size of the human population and poaching for ivory. One of the attendant consequences of such a decline is a reduction in the amount of genetic diversity in the surviving populations due to increased effects of random genetic drift. Information about the amount of genetic variation within and between the remaining populations is vital for their future conservation and management. The genetic structure of the African elephant in Uganda was examined using nucleotide variation of mitochondrial control region sequences and four nuclear microsatellite loci in 72 individuals from three localities. Eleven mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes were observed, nine of which were geographically localized. We found significant genetic differentiation between the three populations at the mitochondrial locus while three out of the four microsatellite loci differentiated KV and QE, one locus differentiated KV and MF and no loci differentiated MF and QE. Expected heterozygosity at the four loci varied between 0.51 and 0.84 while nucleotide diversity at the mitochondrial locus was 1.4%. Incongruent patterns of genetic variation within and between populations were revealed by the two genetic systems, and we have explained these in terms of the differences in the effective population sizes of the two genomes and male-biased gene flow between populations.

  7. Evidence of gene-environment interactions between common breast cancer susceptibility loci and established environmental risk factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Nickels

    Full Text Available Various common genetic susceptibility loci have been identified for breast cancer; however, it is unclear how they combine with lifestyle/environmental risk factors to influence risk. We undertook an international collaborative study to assess gene-environment interaction for risk of breast cancer. Data from 24 studies of the Breast Cancer Association Consortium were pooled. Using up to 34,793 invasive breast cancers and 41,099 controls, we examined whether the relative risks associated with 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms were modified by 10 established environmental risk factors (age at menarche, parity, breastfeeding, body mass index, height, oral contraceptive use, menopausal hormone therapy use, alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, physical activity in women of European ancestry. We used logistic regression models stratified by study and adjusted for age and performed likelihood ratio tests to assess gene-environment interactions. All statistical tests were two-sided. We replicated previously reported potential interactions between LSP1-rs3817198 and parity (Pinteraction = 2.4 × 10(-6 and between CASP8-rs17468277 and alcohol consumption (Pinteraction = 3.1 × 10(-4. Overall, the per-allele odds ratio (95% confidence interval for LSP1-rs3817198 was 1.08 (1.01-1.16 in nulliparous women and ranged from 1.03 (0.96-1.10 in parous women with one birth to 1.26 (1.16-1.37 in women with at least four births. For CASP8-rs17468277, the per-allele OR was 0.91 (0.85-0.98 in those with an alcohol intake of <20 g/day and 1.45 (1.14-1.85 in those who drank ≥ 20 g/day. Additionally, interaction was found between 1p11.2-rs11249433 and ever being parous (Pinteraction = 5.3 × 10(-5, with a per-allele OR of 1.14 (1.11-1.17 in parous women and 0.98 (0.92-1.05 in nulliparous women. These data provide first strong evidence that the risk of breast cancer associated with some common genetic variants may vary with environmental risk factors.

  8. Gene-alcohol interactions identify several novel blood pressure loci including a promising locus near SLC16A9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannette eSimino

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol consumption is a known risk factor for hypertension, with recent candidate studies implicating gene-alcohol interactions in blood pressure (BP regulation. We used 6,882 (predominantly Caucasian participants aged 20 to 80 years from the Framingham SHARe (SNP Health Association Resource to perform a genome-wide analysis of SNP-alcohol interactions on BP traits. We used a two-step approach in the ABEL suite to examine genetic interactions with three alcohol measures [ounces of alcohol consumed per week, drinks consumed per week, and the number of days drinking alcohol per week] on four BP traits [systolic (SBP, diastolic (DBP, mean arterial (MAP, and pulse (PP pressure]. In the first step, we fit a linear mixed model of each BP trait onto age, sex, BMI, and antihypertensive medication while accounting for the phenotypic correlation among relatives. In the second step, we conducted 1 degree-of-freedom (df score tests of the SNP main effect, alcohol main effect, and SNP-alcohol interaction using the maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters from the first step. We then calculated the joint 2 df score test of the SNP main effect and SNP-alcohol interaction using MixABEL. The effect of SNP rs10826334 (near SLC16A9 on SBP was significantly modulated by both the number of alcoholic drinks and the ounces of alcohol consumed per week (p-values of 1.27E-08 and 3.92E-08, respectively. Each copy of the G-allele decreased SBP by 3.79 mmHg in those consuming 14 drinks per week versus a 0.461 mmHg decrease in non-drinkers. Index SNPs in 20 other loci exhibited suggestive (p-value≤1E-06 associations with BP traits by the 1 df interaction test or joint 2df test, including 3 rare variants, one low-frequency variant, and SNPs near/in genes ESRRG, FAM179A, CRIPT-SOCS5, KAT2B,ADCY2, GLI3, ZNF716, SLIT1, PDE3A, KERA-LUM, RNF219-AS1, CLEC3A , FBX015, and IGSF5. SNP -alcohol interactions may enhance discovery of novel variants with large effects that can

  9. WR-2721 protects against cytoxan-induced hprt mutagenesis without affecting therapeutic effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kataoka, Yasushi [Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology; Perrin, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Hunter, N.; Milas, L. [Univ. of Texas, Houston, TX (United States); Grdina, D. [Univ. of Chicago, Chicadgo, IL (United States). Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The radioprotector S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) was evaluated for its ability to protect against cytoxan-induced mutagenesis at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus in mouse splenocytes under conditions that would not interfere with the therapeutic effectiveness of cytoxan in the treatment of fibrosarcoma lung tumors. Mutations at the hprt locus increase in frequency as a function of the dose of cytoxan used. With a spontaneous mutation frequency in C3H mice of 1.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}, mutation frequencies increased from 6.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to 2.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} as the dose of cytoxan increased from 50 to 200 mg/kg. C3H male mice were injected in their tail veins with 3.5 {times} 10{sup 5} viable fibrosarcoma (FSa) cells. This protocol gave rise to an average of 68 tumor colonies per mouse. Four days following injection animals were treated with cytoxan at a dose of 100 mg/kg, which gave rise to significant tumor cell killing and a reduction in tumor colony number to less than an average of one per animal. WR-2721 at a concentration of 100 mg/kg did not affect on cytoxan`s therapeutic effectiveness. However, a 100 mg/kg dose of WR-2721 was effective in reducing the cytoxan induced hprt mutation frequency in mice from 160 to 35 per 10{sup 5} viable cells regardless of whether it was administered 30 min before or 2 h following cytoxan treatment.

  10. Gene Content and Diversity of the Loci Encoding Biosynthesis of Capsular Polysaccharides of the 15 Serovar Reference Strains of Haemophilus parasuis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinert, Lucy A.; Luan, Shi-Lu; Peters, Sarah E.; Chaudhuri, Roy R.; Harris, David; Angen, Øystein; Aragon, Virginia; Parkhill, Julian; Langford, Paul R.; Rycroft, Andrew N.; Wren, Brendan W.; Tucker, Alexander W.; Maskell, Duncan J.

    2013-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is the causative agent of Glässer's disease, a systemic disease of pigs, and is also associated with pneumonia. H. parasuis can be classified into 15 different serovars. Here we report, from the 15 serotyping reference strains, the DNA sequences of the loci containing genes for the biosynthesis of the group 1 capsular polysaccharides, which are potential virulence factors of this bacterium. We contend that these loci contain genes for polysaccharide capsule structures, and not a lipopolysaccharide O antigen, supported by the fact that they contain genes such as wza, wzb, and wzc, which are associated with the export of polysaccharide capsules in the current capsule classification system. A conserved region at the 3′ end of the locus, containing the wza, ptp, wzs, and iscR genes, is consistent with the characteristic export region 1 of the model group 1 capsule locus. A potential serovar-specific region (region 2) has been found by comparing the predicted coding sequences (CDSs) in all 15 loci for synteny and homology. The region is unique to each reference strain with the exception of those in serovars 5 and 12, which are identical in terms of gene content. The identification and characterization of this locus among the 15 serovars is the first step in understanding the genetic, molecular, and structural bases of serovar specificity in this poorly studied but important pathogen and opens up the possibility of developing an improved molecular serotyping system, which would greatly assist diagnosis and control of Glässer's disease. PMID:23873912

  11. Sequencing of Pax6 loci from the elephant shark reveals a family of Pax6 genes in vertebrate genomes, forged by ancient duplications and divergences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vydianathan Ravi

    Full Text Available Pax6 is a developmental control gene essential for eye development throughout the animal kingdom. In addition, Pax6 plays key roles in other parts of the CNS, olfactory system, and pancreas. In mammals a single Pax6 gene encoding multiple isoforms delivers these pleiotropic functions. Here we provide evidence that the genomes of many other vertebrate species contain multiple Pax6 loci. We sequenced Pax6-containing BACs from the cartilaginous elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii and found two distinct Pax6 loci. Pax6.1 is highly similar to mammalian Pax6, while Pax6.2 encodes a paired-less Pax6. Using synteny relationships, we identify homologs of this novel paired-less Pax6.2 gene in lizard and in frog, as well as in zebrafish and in other teleosts. In zebrafish two full-length Pax6 duplicates were known previously, originating from the fish-specific genome duplication (FSGD and expressed in divergent patterns due to paralog-specific loss of cis-elements. We show that teleosts other than zebrafish also maintain duplicate full-length Pax6 loci, but differences in gene and regulatory domain structure suggest that these Pax6 paralogs originate from a more ancient duplication event and are hence renamed as Pax6.3. Sequence comparisons between mammalian and elephant shark Pax6.1 loci highlight the presence of short- and long-range conserved noncoding elements (CNEs. Functional analysis demonstrates the ancient role of long-range enhancers for Pax6 transcription. We show that the paired-less Pax6.2 ortholog in zebrafish is expressed specifically in the developing retina. Transgenic analysis of elephant shark and zebrafish Pax6.2 CNEs with homology to the mouse NRE/Pα internal promoter revealed highly specific retinal expression. Finally, morpholino depletion of zebrafish Pax6.2 resulted in a "small eye" phenotype, supporting a role in retinal development. In summary, our study reveals that the pleiotropic functions of Pax6 in vertebrates are served by

  12. Comparative genome-wide analysis reveals that Burkholderia contaminans MS14 possesses multiple antimicrobial biosynthesis genes but not major genetic loci required for pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Peng; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Baird, Sonya M; Showmaker, Kurt C; Smith, Leif; Peterson, Daniel G; Lu, Shien

    2016-06-01

    Burkholderia contaminans MS14 shows significant antimicrobial activities against plant and animal pathogenic fungi and bacteria. The antifungal agent occidiofungin produced by MS14 has great potential for development of biopesticides and pharmaceutical drugs. However, the use of Burkholderia species as biocontrol agent in agriculture is restricted due to the difficulties in distinguishing between plant growth-promoting bacteria and the pathogenic bacteria. The complete MS14 genome was sequenced and analyzed to find what beneficial and virulence-related genes it harbors. The phylogenetic relatedness of B. contaminans MS14 and other 17 Burkholderia species was also analyzed. To research MS14's potential virulence, the gene regions related to the antibiotic production, antibiotic resistance, and virulence were compared between MS14 and other Burkholderia genomes. The genome of B. contaminans MS14 was sequenced and annotated. The genomic analyses reveal the presence of multiple gene sets for antimicrobial biosynthesis, which contribute to its antimicrobial activities. BLAST results indicate that the MS14 genome harbors a large number of unique regions. MS14 is closely related to another plant growth-promoting Burkholderia strain B. lata 383 according to the average nucleotide identity data. Moreover, according to the phylogenetic analysis, plant growth-promoting species isolated from soils and mammalian pathogenic species are clustered together, respectively. MS14 has multiple antimicrobial activity-related genes identified from the genome, but it lacks key virulence-related gene loci found in the pathogenic strains. Additionally, plant growth-promoting Burkholderia species have one or more antimicrobial biosynthesis genes in their genomes as compared with nonplant growth-promoting soil-isolated Burkholderia species. On the other hand, pathogenic species harbor multiple virulence-associated gene loci that are not present in nonpathogenic Burkholderia species. The MS14

  13. Many inflammatory bowel disease risk loci include regions that regulate gene expression in immune cells and the intestinal epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mokry, Michal; Middendorp, Sabine; Wiegerinck, Caroline L; Witte, Merlijn; Teunissen, Hans; Meddens, Claartje A; Cuppen, Edwin; Clevers, Hans; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The contribution of genetic factors to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been established by twin, targeted-sequencing, and genome-wide association studies. These studies identified many risk loci, and research is underway to identify causal variants. These

  14. Polymorphism, selection and tandem duplication of transferrin genes in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua - Conserved synteny between fish monolobal and tetrapod bilobal transferrin loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tooming-Klunderud Ave

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The two homologous iron-binding lobes of transferrins are thought to have evolved by gene duplication of an ancestral monolobal form, but any conserved synteny between bilobal and monolobal transferrin loci remains unexplored. The important role played by transferrin in the resistance to invading pathogens makes this polymorphic gene a highly valuable candidate for studying adaptive divergence among local populations. Results The Atlantic cod genome was shown to harbour two tandem duplicated serum transferrin genes (Tf1, Tf2, a melanotransferrin gene (MTf, and a monolobal transferrin gene (Omp. Whereas Tf1 and Tf2 were differentially expressed in liver and brain, the Omp transcript was restricted to the otoliths. Fish, chicken and mammals showed highly conserved syntenic regions in which monolobal and bilobal transferrins reside, but contrasting with tetrapods, the fish transferrin genes are positioned on three different linkage groups. Sequence alignment of cod Tf1 cDNAs from Northeast (NE and Northwest (NW Atlantic populations revealed 22 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP causing the replacement of 16 amino acids, including eight surface residues revealed by the modelled 3D-structures, that might influence the binding of pathogens for removal of iron. SNP analysis of a total of 375 individuals from 14 trans-Atlantic populations showed that the Tf1-NE variant was almost fixed in the Baltic cod and predominated in the other NE Atlantic populations, whereas the NW Atlantic populations were more heterozygous and showed high frequencies of the Tf-NW SNP alleles. Conclusions The highly conserved synteny between fish and tetrapod transferrin loci infers that the fusion of tandem duplicated Omp-like genes gave rise to the modern transferrins. The multiple nonsynonymous substitutions in cod Tf1 with putative structural effects, together with highly divergent allele frequencies among different cod populations, strongly suggest

  15. Polymorphism, selection and tandem duplication of transferrin genes in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua)--conserved synteny between fish monolobal and tetrapod bilobal transferrin loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Øivind; De Rosa, Maria Cristina; Pirolli, Davide; Tooming-Klunderud, Ave; Petersen, Petra E; André, Carl

    2011-05-25

    The two homologous iron-binding lobes of transferrins are thought to have evolved by gene duplication of an ancestral monolobal form, but any conserved synteny between bilobal and monolobal transferrin loci remains unexplored. The important role played by transferrin in the resistance to invading pathogens makes this polymorphic gene a highly valuable candidate for studying adaptive divergence among local populations. The Atlantic cod genome was shown to harbour two tandem duplicated serum transferrin genes (Tf1, Tf2), a melanotransferrin gene (MTf), and a monolobal transferrin gene (Omp). Whereas Tf1 and Tf2 were differentially expressed in liver and brain, the Omp transcript was restricted to the otoliths. Fish, chicken and mammals showed highly conserved syntenic regions in which monolobal and bilobal transferrins reside, but contrasting with tetrapods, the fish transferrin genes are positioned on three different linkage groups. Sequence alignment of cod Tf1 cDNAs from Northeast (NE) and Northwest (NW) Atlantic populations revealed 22 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) causing the replacement of 16 amino acids, including eight surface residues revealed by the modelled 3D-structures, that might influence the binding of pathogens for removal of iron. SNP analysis of a total of 375 individuals from 14 trans-Atlantic populations showed that the Tf1-NE variant was almost fixed in the Baltic cod and predominated in the other NE Atlantic populations, whereas the NW Atlantic populations were more heterozygous and showed high frequencies of the Tf-NW SNP alleles. The highly conserved synteny between fish and tetrapod transferrin loci infers that the fusion of tandem duplicated Omp-like genes gave rise to the modern transferrins. The multiple nonsynonymous substitutions in cod Tf1 with putative structural effects, together with highly divergent allele frequencies among different cod populations, strongly suggest evidence for positive selection and local adaptation in

  16. Polymorphism, selection and tandem duplication of transferrin genes in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) - Conserved synteny between fish monolobal and tetrapod bilobal transferrin loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The two homologous iron-binding lobes of transferrins are thought to have evolved by gene duplication of an ancestral monolobal form, but any conserved synteny between bilobal and monolobal transferrin loci remains unexplored. The important role played by transferrin in the resistance to invading pathogens makes this polymorphic gene a highly valuable candidate for studying adaptive divergence among local populations. Results The Atlantic cod genome was shown to harbour two tandem duplicated serum transferrin genes (Tf1, Tf2), a melanotransferrin gene (MTf), and a monolobal transferrin gene (Omp). Whereas Tf1 and Tf2 were differentially expressed in liver and brain, the Omp transcript was restricted to the otoliths. Fish, chicken and mammals showed highly conserved syntenic regions in which monolobal and bilobal transferrins reside, but contrasting with tetrapods, the fish transferrin genes are positioned on three different linkage groups. Sequence alignment of cod Tf1 cDNAs from Northeast (NE) and Northwest (NW) Atlantic populations revealed 22 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) causing the replacement of 16 amino acids, including eight surface residues revealed by the modelled 3D-structures, that might influence the binding of pathogens for removal of iron. SNP analysis of a total of 375 individuals from 14 trans-Atlantic populations showed that the Tf1-NE variant was almost fixed in the Baltic cod and predominated in the other NE Atlantic populations, whereas the NW Atlantic populations were more heterozygous and showed high frequencies of the Tf-NW SNP alleles. Conclusions The highly conserved synteny between fish and tetrapod transferrin loci infers that the fusion of tandem duplicated Omp-like genes gave rise to the modern transferrins. The multiple nonsynonymous substitutions in cod Tf1 with putative structural effects, together with highly divergent allele frequencies among different cod populations, strongly suggest evidence for positive

  17. Comprehensive gene-based association study of a chromosome 20 linked region implicates novel risk loci for depressive symptoms in psychotic illness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Bernard Bigdeli

    Full Text Available Prior genomewide scans of schizophrenia support evidence of linkage to regions of chromosome 20. However, association analyses have yet to provide support for any etiologically relevant variants.We analyzed 2988 LD-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 327 genes on chromosome 20, to test for association with schizophrenia in 270 Irish high-density families (ISHDSF, N = 270 families, 1408 subjects. These SNPs were genotyped using an Illumina iSelect genotyping array which employs the Infinium assay. Given a previous report of novel linkage with chromosome 20p using latent classes of psychotic illness in this sample, association analysis was also conducted for each of five factor-derived scores based on the Operational Criteria Checklist for Psychotic Illness (delusions, hallucinations, mania, depression, and negative symptoms. Tests of association were conducted using the PDTPHASE and QPDTPHASE packages of UNPHASED. Empirical estimates of gene-wise significance were obtained by adaptive permutation of a the smallest observed P-value and b the threshold-truncated product of P-values for each locus.While no single variant was significant after LD-corrected Bonferroni-correction, our gene-dropping analyses identified loci which exceeded empirical significance criteria for both gene-based tests. Namely, R3HDML and C20orf39 are significantly associated with depressive symptoms of schizophrenia (P(emp<2×10⁻⁵ based on the minimum P-value and truncated-product methods, respectively.Using a gene-based approach to family-based association, R3HDML and C20orf39 were found to be significantly associated with clinical dimensions of schizophrenia. These findings demonstrate the efficacy of gene-based analysis and support previous evidence that chromosome 20 may harbor schizophrenia susceptibility or modifier loci.

  18. Fine mapping of type 1 diabetes susceptibility loci and evidence for colocalization of causal variants with lymphoid gene enhancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Chen, Wei-Min; Burren, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Genetic studies of type 1 diabetes (T1D) have identified 50 susceptibility regions, finding major pathways contributing to risk, with some loci shared across immune disorders. To make genetic comparisons across autoimmune disorders as informative as possible, a dense genotyping array......, the Immunochip, was developed, from which we identified four new T1D-associated regions (P T1D is more similar genetically to other autoantibody-positive diseases, significantly most similar to juvenile idiopathic arthritis...... and significantly least similar to ulcerative colitis, and provided support for three additional new T1D risk loci. Using a Bayesian approach, we defined credible sets for the T1D-associated SNPs. The associated SNPs localized to enhancer sequences active in thymus, T and B cells, and CD34(+) stem cells. Enhancer...

  19. Nitrate contamination of drinking water: relationship with HPRT variant frequency in lymphocyte DNA and urinary excretion of N-nitrosamines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Maanen, J.M.S.; Welle, I.J.; Hageman, G.J.; Dallinga, J.W.; Mertens, P.L.; Kleinjans, J.C.S.

    1996-01-01

    Nitrate contamination of drinking water: relationship with HPRT variant frequency in lymphocyte DNA and urinary excretion of N-nitrosamines. van Maanen JM, Welle IJ, Hageman G, Dallinga JW, Mertens PL, Kleinjans JC. Department of Health Risk Analysis and Toxicology, University of Limburg,

  20. Evidence based selection of housekeeping genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, Hendrik J. M.; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Gerbens, Frans; Kamps, Willem A.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; te Meerman, Gerard J.; ter Elst, Arja

    2007-01-01

    For accurate and reliable gene expression analysis, normalization of gene expression data against housekeeping genes (reference or internal control genes) is required. It is known that commonly used housekeeping genes (e. g. ACTB, GAPDH, HPRT1, and B2M) vary considerably under different experimental

  1. Genome-wide association study of self-reported food reactions in Japanese identifies shrimp and peach specific loci in the HLA-DR/DQ gene region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khor, Seik-Soon; Morino, Ryoko; Nakazono, Kazuyuki; Kamitsuji, Shigeo; Akita, Masanori; Kawajiri, Maiko; Yamasaki, Tatsuya; Kami, Azusa; Hoshi, Yuria; Tada, Asami; Ishikawa, Kenichi; Hine, Maaya; Kobayashi, Miki; Kurume, Nami; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Johnson, Todd A

    2018-01-18

    Food allergy is an increasingly important health problem in the world. Several genome-wide association studies (GWAS) focused on European ancestry samples have identified food allergy-specific loci in the HLA class II region. We conducted GWAS of self-reported reactivity with common foods using the data from 11011 Japanese women and identified shrimp and peach allergy-specific loci in the HLA-DR/DQ gene region tagged by rs74995702 (P = 6.30 × 10-17, OR = 1.91) and rs28359884 (P = 2.3 × 10-12, OR = 1.80), respectively. After HLA imputation using a Japanese population-specific reference, the most strongly associated haplotype was HLA-DRB1*04:05-HLA-DQB1*04:01 for shrimp allergy (P = 3.92 × 10-19, OR = 1.99) and HLA-DRB1*09:01-HLA-DQB1*03:03 for peach allergy (P = 1.15 × 10-7, OR = 1.68). Additionally, both allergies' associated variants were eQTLs for several HLA genes, with HLA-DQA2 the single eQTL gene shared between the two traits. Our study suggests that allergy to certain foods may be related to genetic differences that tag both HLA alleles having particular epitope binding specificities as well as variants modulating expression of particular HLA genes. Investigating this further could increase our understanding of food allergy aetiology and potentially lead to better therapeutic strategies for allergen immunotherapies.

  2. Search for genes involved in Joubert syndrome: evidence that one or more major loci are yet to be identified and exclusion of candidate genes EN1, EN2, FGF8, and BARHL1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Ian P; Gibson, Roxanne R; Bennett, Craig L; Chance, Phillip F

    2002-01-22

    Joubert syndrome (JS) is a rare autosomal recessive malformation syndrome involving agenesis or dysgenesis of the cerebellar vermis with accompanying brainstem malformations. JS is further characterized by hypotonia, developmental delay, intermittent hyperpnea, and abnormal eye movements. The biochemical and molecular basis of JS remains unknown, although several genes that are crucial in the development of the cerebellum have been proposed as attractive candidate genes. JS is clinically heterogeneous; this, together with previous linkage analyses, suggests that there may also be genetic heterogeneity. A locus for JS was previously identified on chromosome 9q34 by linkage analysis in a consanguineous family of Arabian origin. A putative second JS locus was recently suggested when a deletion on chromosome 17p11.2 was observed in a patient with Smith-Magenis syndrome and JS phenotype. We have investigated a cohort of apparently unrelated North American JS pedigrees for association with the loci on chromosomes 9q34 and 17p11.2 and excluded them in all cases where data were informative. Analysis of an additional 21 unrelated JS patients showed no evidence of homozygosity at the 9q34 and 17p11.2 loci that would suggest inheritance of founder JS mutation(s) or unreported consanguinity. Together, these data suggest that one or more major loci for JS remain to be identified. Consequently, we undertook mutation analysis of several functional candidate genes, EN1, EN2, and FGF8, in a total of 26 unrelated JS patients. Our data suggest that all of these genes may be excluded from a direct pathogenic role in JS. The BARHL1 gene, which localizes to chromosome 9q34 and has previously been proposed as a strong positional candidate gene for JS, was also investigated and excluded from involvement in JS that is linked to chromosome 9q34. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Transcriptional interference networks coordinate the expression of functionally-related genes clustered in the same genomic loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt eBoldogkoi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of gene expression is essential for normal functioning of biological systems in every form of life. Gene expression is primarily controlled at the level of transcription, especially at the phase of initiation. Non-coding RNAs are one of the major players at every level of genetic regulation, including the control of chromatin organisation, transcription, various post-transcriptional processes and translation. In this study, the Transcriptional Interference Network (TIN hypothesis was put forward in an attempt to explain the global expression of antisense RNAs and the overall occurrence of tandem gene clusters in the genomes of various biological systems ranging from viruses to mammalian cells. The TIN hypothesis suggests the existence of a novel layer of genetic regulation, based on the interactions between the transcriptional machineries of neighbouring genes at their overlapping regions, which are assumed to play a fundamental role in coordinating gene expression within a cluster of functionally-linked genes. It is claimed that the transcriptional overlaps between adjacent genes are much more widespread in genomes than is thought today. The Waterfall model of the TIN hypothesis postulates a unidirectional effect of upstream genes on the transcription of downstream genes within a cluster of tandemly-arrayed genes, while the Seesaw model proposes a mutual interdependence of gene expression between the oppositely-oriented genes. The TIN represents an auto-regulatory system with an exquisitely timed and highly synchronised cascade of gene expression in functionally-linked genes located in close physical proximity to each other. In this study, we focused on herpesviruses. The reason for this lies in the compressed nature of viral genes, which allows a tight regulation and an easier investigation of the transcriptional interactions between genes. However, I believe that the same or similar principles can be applied to cellular

  4. Ranking and characterization of established BMI and lipid associated loci as candidates for gene-environment interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shungin, Dmitry; Deng, Wei Q; Varga, Tibor V

    2017-01-01

    Phenotypic variance heterogeneity across genotypes at a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) may reflect underlying gene-environment (G×E) or gene-gene interactions. We modeled variance heterogeneity for blood lipids and BMI in up to 44,211 participants and investigated relationships between...

  5. Distinct high resolution genome profiles of early onset and late onset colorectal cancer integrated with gene expression data identify candidate susceptibility loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merok Marianne A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estimates suggest that up to 30% of colorectal cancers (CRC may develop due to an increased genetic risk. The mean age at diagnosis for CRC is about 70 years. Time of disease onset 20 years younger than the mean age is assumed to be indicative of genetic susceptibility. We have compared high resolution tumor genome copy number variation (CNV (Roche NimbleGen, 385 000 oligo CGH array in microsatellite stable (MSS tumors from two age groups, including 23 young at onset patients without known hereditary syndromes and with a median age of 44 years (range: 28-53 and 17 elderly patients with median age 79 years (range: 69-87. Our aim was to identify differences in the tumor genomes between these groups and pinpoint potential susceptibility loci. Integration analysis of CNV and genome wide mRNA expression data, available for the same tumors, was performed to identify a restricted candidate gene list. Results The total fraction of the genome with aberrant copy number, the overall genomic profile and the TP53 mutation spectrum were similar between the two age groups. However, both the number of chromosomal aberrations and the number of breakpoints differed significantly between the groups. Gains of 2q35, 10q21.3-22.1, 10q22.3 and 19q13.2-13.31 and losses from 1p31.3, 1q21.1, 2q21.2, 4p16.1-q28.3, 10p11.1 and 19p12, positions that in total contain more than 500 genes, were found significantly more often in the early onset group as compared to the late onset group. Integration analysis revealed a covariation of DNA copy number at these sites and mRNA expression for 107 of the genes. Seven of these genes, CLC, EIF4E, LTBP4, PLA2G12A, PPAT, RG9MTD2, and ZNF574, had significantly different mRNA expression comparing median expression levels across the transcriptome between the two groups. Conclusions Ten genomic loci, containing more than 500 protein coding genes, are identified as more often altered in tumors from early onset versus late

  6. Identification of candidate genes for fiber length quantitative trait loci through RNA-Seq and linkage and physical mapping in cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xihua; Wu, Man; Liu, Guoyuan; Pei, Wenfeng; Zhai, Honghong; Yu, Jiwen; Zhang, Jinfa; Yu, Shuxun

    2017-05-31

    Cotton (Gossypium spp.) fibers are single-celled elongated trichomes, the molecular aspects of genetic variation in fiber length (FL) among genotypes are currently unknown. In this study, two backcross inbred lines (BILs), i.e., NMGA-062 ("Long") and NMGA-105 ("Short") with 32.1 vs. 27.2 mm in FL, respectively, were chosen to perform RNA-Seq on developing fibers at 10 days post anthesis (DPA). The two BILs differed in 4 quantitative trait loci (QTL) for FL and were developed from backcrosses between G. hirsutum as the recurrent parent and G. barbadense. In total, 51.7 and 54.3 million reads were obtained and assembled to 49,508 and 49,448 transcripts in the two genotypes, respectively. Of 1551 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between the two BILs, 678 were up-regulated and 873 down-regulated in "Long"; and 703 SNPs were identified in 339 DEGs. Further physical mapping showed that 8 DEGs were co-localized with the 4 FL QTL identified in the BIL population containing the two BILs. Four SNP markers in 3 DEGs that showed significant correlations with FL were developed. Among the three candidate genes encoding for proline-rich protein, D-cysteine desulfhydrase, and thaumatin-like protein, a SNP of thaumatin-like protein gene showed consistent correlations with FL across all testing environments. This study represents one of the first investigations of positional candidate gene approach of QTL in cotton in integrating transcriptome and SNP identification based on RNA-Seq with linkage and physical mapping of QTL and genes, which will facilitate eventual cloning and identification of genes responsible for FL QTL. The candidate genes may serve as the foundation for further in-depth studies of the molecular mechanism of natural variation in fiber elongation.

  7. Integration of novel SSR and gene-based SNP marker loci in the chickpea genetic map and establishment of new anchor points with Medicago truncatula genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Spurthi N.; Zhu, Hongyan; Varghese, Nicy; Datta, Subhojit; Choi, Hong-Kyu; Horres, Ralf; Jüngling, Ruth; Singh, Jagbir; Kavi Kishor, P. B.; Sivaramakrishnan, S.; Hoisington, Dave A.; Kahl, Günter; Winter, Peter; Cook, Douglas R.

    2010-01-01

    This study presents the development and mapping of simple sequence repeat (SSR) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in chickpea. The mapping population is based on an inter-specific cross between domesticated and non-domesticated genotypes of chickpea (Cicer arietinum ICC 4958 × C. reticulatum PI 489777). This same population has been the focus of previous studies, permitting integration of new and legacy genetic markers into a single genetic map. We report a set of 311 novel SSR markers (designated ICCM—ICRISAT chickpea microsatellite), obtained from an SSR-enriched genomic library of ICC 4958. Screening of these SSR markers on a diverse panel of 48 chickpea accessions provided 147 polymorphic markers with 2–21 alleles and polymorphic information content value 0.04–0.92. Fifty-two of these markers were polymorphic between parental genotypes of the inter-specific population. We also analyzed 233 previously published (H-series) SSR markers that provided another set of 52 polymorphic markers. An additional 71 gene-based SNP markers were developed from transcript sequences that are highly conserved between chickpea and its near relative Medicago truncatula. By using these three approaches, 175 new marker loci along with 407 previously reported marker loci were integrated to yield an improved genetic map of chickpea. The integrated map contains 521 loci organized into eight linkage groups that span 2,602 cM, with an average inter-marker distance of 4.99 cM. Gene-based markers provide anchor points for comparing the genomes of Medicago and chickpea, and reveal extended synteny between these two species. The combined set of genetic markers and their integration into an improved genetic map should facilitate chickpea genetics and breeding, as well as translational studies between chickpea and Medicago. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00122-010-1265-1) contains supplementary material, which is

  8. Observed and predicted changes in virulence gene frequencies at 11 loci in a local barley powdery mildew population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovmøller, M.S.; Munk, L.; Østergård, H.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate observed and predicted changes in virulence gene frequencies in a local aerial powdery mildew population subject to selection by different host cultivars in a local barley area. Observed changes were based on genotypic frequencies obtained through...... a survey comprising 11 virulence loc. Predictions were based on a model where selection forces were estimated through detailed mapping in the local area of host cultivars and their resistance genes, and taking into account the changes in distribution of host cultivars during the year caused by growth...... with a constant distribution of host cultivars. Significant changes in gene frequencies were observed for virulence genes subject to strong direct selection as well as for genes subject mainly to indirect selection (hitchhiking). These patterns of changes were generally as predicted from the model. The influence...

  9. Non-coding RNAs at the Gnas and Snrpn-Ube3a imprinted gene loci and their involvement in hereditary disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonius ePlagge

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs have long been recognized at imprinted gene loci and provided early paradigms, to investigate their functions and molecular mechanisms of action. The characteristic feature of imprinted genes, their monoallelic, parental-origin-dependent expression, is achieved through complex epigenetic regulation, which is modulated by ncRNAs. This minireview focuses on two imprinted gene clusters, in which changes in ncRNA expression contribute to human disorders. At the GNAS locus loss of NESP RNA can cause autosomal dominant Pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1b (AD-PHP-Ib, while at the SNRPN-UBE3A locus a long ncRNA and processed snoRNAs play a role in Angelman-Syndrome (AS and Prader-Willi-Syndrome (PWS. The ncRNAs silence overlapping protein-coding transcripts in sense or anti-sense orientation through changes in histone modifications as well as DNA methylation at CpG-rich sequence motifs. Their epigenetic modulatory functions are required in early development in the pre-implantation embryo or already in the parental germ cells. However, it remains unclear whether the sequence homology-carrying ncRNA itself is required, or whether the process of its transcription through other promoters causes the silencing effect.

  10. Human antibody expression in transgenic rats: comparison of chimeric IgH loci with human VH, D and JH but bearing different rat C-gene regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Biao; Osborn, Michael J; Avis, Suzanne; Ouisse, Laure-Hélène; Ménoret, Séverine; Anegon, Ignacio; Buelow, Roland; Brüggemann, Marianne

    2013-12-31

    Expression of human antibody repertoires in transgenic animals has been accomplished by introducing large human Ig loci into mice and, more recently, a chimeric IgH locus into rats. With human VH, D and JH genes linked to the rat C-region antibody expression was significantly increased, similar to wild-type levels not found with fully human constructs. Here we compare four rat-lines containing the same human VH-region (comprising 22 VHs, all Ds and all JHs in natural configuration) but linked to different rat CH-genes and regulatory sequences. The endogenous IgH locus was silenced by zinc-finger nucleases. After breeding, all lines produced exclusively chimeric human H-chain with near normal IgM levels. However, in two lines poor IgG expression and inefficient immune responses were observed, implying that high expression, class-switching and hypermutation are linked to optimal enhancer function provided by the large regulatory region at the 3' end of the IgH locus. Furthermore, exclusion of Cδ and its downstream interval region may assist recombination. Highly diverse IgG and immune responses similar to normal rats were identified in two strains carrying diverse and differently spaced C-genes. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A replication study of GWAS-derived lipid genes in Asian Indians: the chromosomal region 11q23.3 harbors loci contributing to triglycerides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy R Braun

    Full Text Available Recent genome-wide association scans (GWAS and meta-analysis studies on European populations have identified many genes previously implicated in lipid regulation. Validation of these loci on different global populations is important in determining their clinical relevance, particularly for development of novel drug targets for treating and preventing diabetic dyslipidemia and coronary artery disease (CAD. In an attempt to replicate GWAS findings on a non-European sample, we examined the role of six of these loci (CELSR2-PSRC1-SORT1 rs599839; CDKN2A-2B rs1333049; BUD13-ZNF259 rs964184; ZNF259 rs12286037; CETP rs3764261; APOE-C1-C4-C2 rs4420638 in our Asian Indian cohort from the Sikh Diabetes Study (SDS comprising 3,781 individuals (2,902 from Punjab and 879 from the US. Two of the six SNPs examined showed convincing replication in these populations of Asian Indian origin. Our study confirmed a strong association of CETP rs3764261 with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C (p = 2.03×10(-26. Our results also showed significant associations of two GWAS SNPs (rs964184 and rs12286037 from BUD13-ZNF259 near the APOA5-A4-C3-A1 genes with triglyceride (TG levels in this Asian Indian cohort (rs964184: p = 1.74×10(-17; rs12286037: p = 1.58×10(-2. We further explored 45 SNPs in a ∼195 kb region within the chromosomal region 11q23.3 (encompassing the BUD13-ZNF259, APOA5-A4-C3-A1, and SIK3 genes in 8,530 Asian Indians from the London Life Sciences Population (LOLIPOP (UK and SDS cohorts. Five more SNPs revealed significant associations with TG in both cohorts individually as well as in a joint meta-analysis. However, the strongest signal for TG remained with BUD13-ZNF259 (rs964184: p = 1.06×10(-39. Future targeted deep sequencing and functional studies should enhance our understanding of the clinical relevance of these genes in dyslipidemia and hypertriglyceridemia (HTG and, consequently, diabetes and CAD.

  12. Platypus globin genes and flanking loci suggest a new insertional model for beta-globin evolution in birds and mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren Wesley C

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vertebrate alpha (α- and beta (β-globin gene families exemplify the way in which genomes evolve to produce functional complexity. From tandem duplication of a single globin locus, the α- and β-globin clusters expanded, and then were separated onto different chromosomes. The previous finding of a fossil β-globin gene (ω in the marsupial α-cluster, however, suggested that duplication of the α-β cluster onto two chromosomes, followed by lineage-specific gene loss and duplication, produced paralogous α- and β-globin clusters in birds and mammals. Here we analyse genomic data from an egg-laying monotreme mammal, the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus, to explore haemoglobin evolution at the stem of the mammalian radiation. Results The platypus α-globin cluster (chromosome 21 contains embryonic and adult α- globin genes, a β-like ω-globin gene, and the GBY globin gene with homology to cytoglobin, arranged as 5'-ζ-ζ'-αD-α3-α2-α1-ω-GBY-3'. The platypus β-globin cluster (chromosome 2 contains single embryonic and adult globin genes arranged as 5'-ε-β-3'. Surprisingly, all of these globin genes were expressed in some adult tissues. Comparison of flanking sequences revealed that all jawed vertebrate α-globin clusters are flanked by MPG-C16orf35 and LUC7L, whereas all bird and mammal β-globin clusters are embedded in olfactory genes. Thus, the mammalian α- and β-globin clusters are orthologous to the bird α- and β-globin clusters respectively. Conclusion We propose that α- and β-globin clusters evolved from an ancient MPG-C16orf35-α-β-GBY-LUC7L arrangement 410 million years ago. A copy of the original β (represented by ω in marsupials and monotremes was inserted into an array of olfactory genes before the amniote radiation (>315 million years ago, then duplicated and diverged to form orthologous clusters of β-globin genes with different expression profiles in different lineages.

  13. The Localization of Eceriferum loci in Barley. IV. Three-point Tests of Genes on Chromosome 7 in Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard-Pedersen, Bo

    1977-01-01

    Eleven three point tests are reported for chromosome 7 in barley. The tests were analysed in the F3 generation. The results permit the construction of a map for the ten genes studied.......Eleven three point tests are reported for chromosome 7 in barley. The tests were analysed in the F3 generation. The results permit the construction of a map for the ten genes studied....

  14. Distinct Loci in the CHRNA5/CHRNA3/CHRNB4 Gene Cluster Are Associated With Onset of Regular Smoking

    OpenAIRE

    Stephens, Sarah H.; Hartz, Sarah M.; Hoft, Nicole R.; Saccone, Nancy L.; Corley, Robin C.; Hewitt, John K.; Hopfer, Christian J.; Breslau, Naomi; Coon, Hilary; Chen, Xiangning; Ducci, Francesca; Dueker, Nicole; Franceschini, Nora; Frank, Josef; Han, Younghun

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) genes (CHRNA5/CHRNA3/CHRNB4) have been reproducibly associated with nicotine dependence, smoking behaviors, and lung cancer risk. Of the few reports that have focused on early smoking behaviors, association results have been mixed. This meta-analysis examines early smoking phenotypes and SNPs in the gene cluster to determine: (1) whether the most robust association signal in this region (rs16969968) for other smoking behaviors is also associat...

  15. Detection of quantitative trait loci affecting the milk fatty acid profile on sheep chromosome 22: role of the stearoyl-CoA desaturase gene in Spanish Churra sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Fernández, M; Gutiérrez-Gil, B; García-Gámez, E; Sánchez, J P; Arranz, J J

    2010-01-01

    Sheep milk fat contains several components that may provide human health benefits, such as monounsaturated fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). Most of the CLA in ruminant milk is synthesized in the mammary gland by the action of the enzyme stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) on circulating vaccenic acid (trans-11 C18:2; VA). Previous studies have found significant associations between polymorphisms in the SCD gene and the fatty acid composition of ruminant products, including sheep milk. Based on this, we performed a quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis of an ovine chromosome (22) that harbors the SCD gene for effects on milk fatty acid composition traits and classical milk production traits. We identified a suggestive QTL influencing the CLA/VA ratio with the maximum statistic at position 26 cM of the studied chromosome, whereas the SCD gene has been mapped to position 41.6 cM. The individual introduction of 4 SCD single nucleotide polymorphisms in the QTL model did not cause a reduction of the variance explained by the QTL, which suggests that the SCD gene is not directly responsible for the detected effect in the Churra population studied herein. This conclusion was supported by the lack of any significant association identified between the 4 SCD single nucleotide polymorphisms and the CLA/VA ratio. This association analysis suggested a possible effect of the SCD gene on milk fat percentage in Churra sheep. An independent confirmation of these primary results will be required before attempting its practical implementation in selection programs. Copyright 2010 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Combined analyses of the ITS loci and the corresponding 16S rRNA genes reveal high micro- and macrodiversity of SAR11 populations in the Red Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Kamanda Ngugi

    Full Text Available Bacteria belonging to the SAR11 clade are among the most abundant prokaryotes in the pelagic zone of the ocean. 16S rRNA gene-based analyses indicate that they constitute up to 60% of the bacterioplankton community in the surface waters of the Red Sea. This extremely oligotrophic water body is further characterized by an epipelagic zone, which has a temperature above 24 °C throughout the year, and a remarkable uniform temperature (~22 °C and salinity (~41 psu from the mixed layer (~200 m to the bottom at over 2000 m depth. Despite these conditions that set it apart from other marine environments, the microbiology of this ecosystem is still vastly understudied. Prompted by the limited phylogenetic resolution of the 16S rRNA gene, we extended our previous study by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS region of SAR11 in different depths of the Red Sea's water column together with the respective 16S fragment. The overall diversity captured by the ITS loci was ten times higher than that of the corresponding 16S rRNA genes. Moreover, species estimates based on the ITS showed a highly diverse population of SAR11 in the mixed layer that became diminished in deep isothermal waters, which was in contrast to results of the related 16S rRNA genes. While the 16S rRNA gene-based sequences clustered into three phylogenetic subgroups, the related ITS fragments fell into several phylotypes that showed clear depth-dependent shifts in relative abundances. Blast-based analyses not only documented the observed vertical partitioning and universal co-occurrence of specific phylotypes in five other distinct oceanic provinces, but also highlighted the influence of ecosystem-specific traits (e.g., temperature, nutrient availability, and concentration of dissolved oxygen on the population dynamics of this ubiquitous marine bacterium.

  17. Combined analyses of the ITS loci and the corresponding 16S rRNA genes reveal high micro- and macrodiversity of SAR11 populations in the Red Sea.

    KAUST Repository

    Ngugi, David

    2012-11-20

    Bacteria belonging to the SAR11 clade are among the most abundant prokaryotes in the pelagic zone of the ocean. 16S rRNA gene-based analyses indicate that they constitute up to 60% of the bacterioplankton community in the surface waters of the Red Sea. This extremely oligotrophic water body is further characterized by an epipelagic zone, which has a temperature above 24 °C throughout the year, and a remarkable uniform temperature (~22 °C) and salinity (~41 psu) from the mixed layer (~200 m) to the bottom at over 2000 m depth. Despite these conditions that set it apart from other marine environments, the microbiology of this ecosystem is still vastly understudied. Prompted by the limited phylogenetic resolution of the 16S rRNA gene, we extended our previous study by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of SAR11 in different depths of the Red Sea\\'s water column together with the respective 16S fragment. The overall diversity captured by the ITS loci was ten times higher than that of the corresponding 16S rRNA genes. Moreover, species estimates based on the ITS showed a highly diverse population of SAR11 in the mixed layer that became diminished in deep isothermal waters, which was in contrast to results of the related 16S rRNA genes. While the 16S rRNA gene-based sequences clustered into three phylogenetic subgroups, the related ITS fragments fell into several phylotypes that showed clear depth-dependent shifts in relative abundances. Blast-based analyses not only documented the observed vertical partitioning and universal co-occurrence of specific phylotypes in five other distinct oceanic provinces, but also highlighted the influence of ecosystem-specific traits (e.g., temperature, nutrient availability, and concentration of dissolved oxygen) on the population dynamics of this ubiquitous marine bacterium.

  18. Epitope tagging of proteins at the native chromosomal loci of genes in mice and in cultured vertebrate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-I G; Maika, Shanna D; Stevens, Scott W

    2006-08-18

    Adding epitope tags to proteins is an important method for biochemical analyses and is generally accomplished in metazoan cells using ectopically expressed, tagged trans-genes. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the addition of epitope tags to proteins is easily achieved at the genomic locus of a gene of interest due to the high efficiency of homologous recombination in that organism. Most metazoan cells do not exhibit this high homologous recombination efficiency, and therefore trans-genes with in-frame epitope tags are used. Although epitope tagged trans-genes have proven useful, replacing the native promoter with a heterologous promoter introduces numerous artifactual possibilities. These include overexpression, which can lead to promiscuous interactions, and the loss of native transcriptional control, which in live animals often leads to developmental defects and embryonic lethality. We describe an efficient method that overcomes the problems encountered using epitope tagged trans-genes by introducing the epitope tag into the native chromosomal gene locus in vertebrate cells, embryonic stem cells and live mice. These tagged proteins are physically associated with the expected relevant particles, and highly sensitive as shown by co-purification of homologues of the yeast pre-mRNA splicing factors Prp38p and Prp39p, not previously shown to be associated with metazoan snRNPs. These techniques will enhance the validity of conclusions made regarding epitope-tagged proteins and improve our understanding of proteomic dynamics in cultured vertebrate cells and live animals.

  19. An investigation of gene-environment interactions between 47 newly identified breast cancer susceptibility loci and environmental risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Anja; Milne, Roger L.; Truong, Thérèse; Knight, Julia A.; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Behrens, Sabine; Eilber, Ursula; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Munday, Hannah R.; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Brand, Judith S.; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine M.; Hallberg, Emily; Castelao, J. Esteban; Carracedo, Angel; Torres, Maria; Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Yesilyurt, Betul T.; Floris, Giuseppe; Leunen, Karin; Engelhardt, Ellen G.; Broeks, Annegien; Rutgers, Emiel J.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Cross, Simon; Reed, Malcolm; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Perez, José Ignacio Arias; Provenzano, Elena; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Spurdle, Amanda; Investigators, kConFab; Group, AOCS; Häberle, Lothar; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; McLean, Catriona; Baglietto, Laura; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sherman, Mark E.; Brüning, Thomas; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ashworth, Alan; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Mannermaa, Arto; Swerdlow, Anthony; Giles, Graham G.; Brenner, Hermann; Fasching, Peter A.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Hopper, John; Benítez, Javier; Cox, Angela; Andrulis, Irene L.; Lambrechts, Diether; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Couch, Fergus; Czene, Kamila; Bojesen, Stig E.; Easton, Doug F.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Guénel, Pascal; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    A large genotyping project within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) recently identified 41 associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and overall breast cancer (BC) risk. We investigated whether the effects of these 41 SNPs, as well as six SNPs associated with estrogen receptor (ER) negative BC risk are modified by 13 environmental risk factors for BC. Data from 22 studies participating in BCAC were pooled, comprising up to 26,633 cases and 30,119 controls. Interactions between SNPs and environmental factors were evaluated using an empirical Bayes-type shrinkage estimator. Six SNPs showed interactions with associated p-values (pint) risk in women ≥170cm (OR=1.22, p=0.017), but inversely associated with ER-negative BC risk in women risk was stronger for women who had had four or more pregnancies (OR=0.85, p=2.0×10−4), and absent in women who had had just one (OR=0.96, p=0.19, pint = 6.1×10−4). SNP rs11242675 was inversely associated with overall BC risk in never/former smokers (OR=0.93, p=2.8×10−5), but no association was observed in current smokers (OR=1.07, p=0.14, pint = 3.4×10−4). In conclusion, recently identified breast cancer susceptibility loci are not strongly modified by established risk factors and the observed potential interactions require confirmation in independent studies. PMID:25227710

  20. Loss of heterozygosity at the BRCA1 and BRCA2 loci detected in ductal lavage fluid from BRCA gene mutation carriers and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Imogen; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Bancroft, Elizabeth; Bullock, Sarah; Jugurnauth, Sarah; Osin, Peter; Nerurkar, Ashutosh; Izatt, Louise; Pichert, Gabriella; Gui, Gerald P H; Eeles, Rosalind A

    2006-07-01

    Female BRCA gene mutation carriers are at increased risk for developing breast cancer. Ductal lavage is a novel method for sampling breast ductal fluid, providing epithelial cells for cytologic assessment and a source of free DNA for molecular analyses. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the BRCA loci in ductal lavage fluid is a potential biomarker of breast cancer risk. The LOH rate was measured at the BRCA1/2 loci and compared with that at a control locus (APC) using free DNA from the ductal lavage fluid of BRCA carriers and predictive test negative controls. We evaluated the reproducibility of these analyses. Free DNA sufficient for PCR amplification was obtained from 33 ductal lavage samples of 17 healthy women of known BRCA status (14 BRCA carriers and 3 controls). LOH rates of 36.4% to 56.3% at the BRCA1 locus and 45% to 61.5% at the BRCA2 locus were found among BRCA carriers. The LOH rate at the APC locus was lower (18.5%). The interaliquot reproducibility for the D17S855 marker of the BRCA1 locus was 66.7%. Intraaliquot reproducibility was 90%. Although we successfully isolated sufficient free DNA from ductal lavage fluid for PCR amplification, the degree of reproducibility of these LOH studies raises questions about the robustness of this technique as a risk assessment tool in the evaluation of high-risk women. Further studies are required to evaluate the specificity and predictive value of LOH in ductal lavage fluid for breast cancer development.

  1. Identification of genes involved in a water stress response in timothy and mapping of orthologous loci in perennial ryegrass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonavičienė, Kristina; Studer, Bruno; Asp, Torben

    2012-01-01

    In order to characterize the response of selected grasses to water stress, relative water content (RWC) in leaves and quantum efficiency of photosystem 2 (Fv/Fm) were measured in Phleum pratense L., P. bertolonii DC. and P. phleoides H. Karst. during 6 d of water stress. The results indicated...... differential responses to water stress among the three Phleum species with higher water deficit sensitivity of P. pratense and P. bertolonii than that of P. phleoides. The cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) technique was applied to identify differentially expressed genes responding...... to water stress in P. pratense. Cloned and sequenced differentially expressed fragments (DEFs) were used for primer design in order to identify orthologous genes in Lolium perenne L. Twelve genes orthologous to P. pratense DEFs were mapped in the L. perenne mapping population VrnA based on a high...

  2. Large-Scale Gene-Centric Meta-Analysis across 39 Studies Identifies Type 2 Diabetes Loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saxena, Richa; Elbers, Clara C.; Guo, Yiran; Peter, Inga; Gaunt, Tom R.; Mega, Jessica L.; Lanktree, Matthew B.; Tare, Archana; Almoguera Castillo, Berta; Li, Yun R.; Johnson, Toby; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Gilbert-Diamond, Diane; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Voight, Benjamin F.; Balasubramanyam, Ashok; Barnard, John; Bauer, Florianne; Baumert, Jens; Bhangale, Tushar; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; Chandrupatla, Hareesh R.; Clarke, Robert; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M.; Crook, Errol D.; Davey-Smith, George; Day, Ian N.; de Boer, Anthonius; de Groot, Mark C. H.; Drenos, Fotios; Ferguson, Jane; Fox, Caroline S.; Furlong, Clement E.; Gibson, Quince; Gieger, Christian; Gilhuijs-Pederson, Lisa A.; Glessner, Joseph T.; Goel, Anuj; Gong, Yan; Grant, Struan F. A.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Hastie, Claire; Humphries, Steve E.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Kivimaki, Mika; Kleber, Marcus; Meisinger, Christa; Kumari, Meena; Langaee, Taimour Y.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Li, Mingyao; Lobmeyer, Maximilian T.; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke-Hilse; Meijs, Matthijs F. L.; Molony, Cliona M.; Morrow, David A.; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Musani, Solomon K.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Newhouse, Stephen J.; O'Connell, Jeffery R.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Palmen, Jutta; Patel, Sanjey R.; Pepine, Carl J.; Pettinger, Mary; Price, Thomas S.; Rafelt, Suzanne; Ranchalis, Jane; Rasheed, Asif; Rosenthal, Elisabeth; Ruczinski, Ingo; Shah, Sonia; Shen, Haiqing; Silbernagel, Guenther; Smith, Erin N.; Spijkerman, Annemieke W. M.; Stanton, Alice; Steffes, Michael W.; Thorand, Barbara; Trip, Mieke; van der Harst, Pim; van der A, Daphne L.; van Iperen, Erik P. A.; van Setten, Jessica; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Verweij, Niek; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Young, Taylor; Zafarmand, M. Hadi; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David; McCarthy, Mark; Kao, W. H. Linda; Pankow, James S.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Sever, Peter; Poulter, Neil; Caulfield, Mark; Dominiczak, Anna; Shields, Denis C.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Zhang, Li; Curtis, Sean P.; Danesh, John; Casas, Juan P.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Dorn, Gerald W.; Farrall, Martin; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Hamsten, Anders; Hegele, Robert; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Hofker, Marten H.; Huggins, Gordon S.; Illig, Thomas; Jarvik, Gail P.; Johnson, Julie A.; Klungel, Olaf H.; Knowler, William C.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Maerz, Winfried; Meigs, James B.; Melander, Olle; Munroe, Patricia B.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Bielinski, Susan J.; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Rich, Stephen S.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Saleheen, Danish; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schadt, Eric E.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Silverstein, Roy; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Talmud, Philippa J.; Watkins, Hugh; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; McCaffery, Jeanne; Wijmenga, Cisca; Sabatine, Marc S.; Wilson, James G.; Reiner, Alex; Bowden, Donald W.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Siscovick, David S.; Keating, Brendan J.

    2012-01-01

    To identify genetic factors contributing to type 2 diabetes (T2D), we performed large-scale meta-analyses by using a custom similar to 50,000 SNP genotyping array (the ITMAT-Broad-CARe array) with similar to 2000 candidate genes in 39 multiethnic population-based studies, case-control studies, and

  3. Identification of loci and functional characterization of trichothecene biosynthesis genes in the filamentous fungus of the genus Trichoderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichothecenes are mycotoxins produced by Trichoderma, Fusarium and at least four other genera in the fungal order Hypocreales. Fusarium has a trichothecene biosynthetic gene (TRI) cluster that encodes transport and regulatory proteins as well as most enzymes required for formation of the mycotoxin...

  4. The Localization of Eceriferum Loci in Barley V. Three Point Tests of Genes on Chromosome 1 and 3 in Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard-Pedersen, Bo

    1977-01-01

    Five three point tests are reported for chromosome 1 and four three point tests for chromosome 3. The tests were analysed in the F3 generation. Maps for two regions on chromosome 1 comprising five and four genes respectively, can be constructed from the data obtained. The map spanning...

  5. Interferon-γ gene polymorphisms at +874T/A loci associated with response to treatment with hepatitis C virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Norozian

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV is a worldwide health problem, which associated with cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Interferon-α and Ribavirin are only acceptable treatment regimen for these patients. These regimen are effective only on 50% of the patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the response to treatment with interferon gamma gene polymorphism in patients with hepatitis C. Materials and Methods: In this study, a cross - sectional study, response or lack of response to treatment in 78 patients treated with interferon gamma gene polymorphism were studied at Shiraz Namazi Hospital from 2011-2012 . DNA samples extract by salt (salting out and interferon gamma gene polymorphism (+874T/A IFN–gamma was evaluate with ARMS-PCR technique. Data were analyzed using EPI Info2000 and SPSS 16 software (chi-square test. Results: Results showed that 39 patients (50% out of 78 studied patients had TT alleles, 11 patients (1.14% had AA alleles and 28 patients (9.39% had TA alleles. 49 patients (62.82% responded to treatment. TT genotype and allele frequencies between the studied groups showed significant differencey (P=0.002. Conclusion: Interferon gamma is a key cytokine in the immune response against hepatitis C. Polymorphism in the interferon-gamma gene is (+874T/AIFN–gamma One of the most important factors interferes with treatment response in hepatitis C patients.

  6. Distinct Loci in the CHRNA5/CHRNA3/CHRNB4 Gene Cluster Are Associated With Onset of Regular Smoking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stephens, S.H.; Hartz, S.M.; Hoft, N.R.; Saccone, N.L.; Corley, R.C.; Hewitt, J.K.; Hopfer, C.J.; Breslau, N.; Coon, H.; Chen, X.; Ducci, F.; Dueker, N.; Franceschini, N.; Frank, J.; Han, Y.; Hansel, N.N.; Jiang, C.; Korhonen, T.; Lind, P.A.; Liu, J.; Lyytikäinen, L.P.; Michel, M.; Shaffer, J.R.; Short, S.E.; Sun, J.; Teumer, A.; Thompson, J.R.; Vogelzangs, N.; Vink, J.M.; Wenzlaff, A.S.; Wheeler, W.; Yang, B.Z.; Aggen, S.H.; Balmforth, A.J.; Baumeister, S.E.; Beaty, T.; Benjamin, D.J.; Bergen, A.W.; Broms, U.; Cesarini, D.; Chatterjee, N.; Chen, J.; Cheng, Y.C.; Cichon, S.; Couper, D.; Cucca, F.; Dick, D.; Foroud, T.; Furberg, H.; Giegling, I.; Gillespie, N.A.; Gu, F.; Hall, A.S.; Hällfors, J.; Han, S.; Hartmann, A.M.; Heikkilä, K.; Hickie, I.B.; Hottenga, J.J.; Jousilahti, P.; Kaakinen, M.; Kähönen, M.; Koellinger, P.D.; Kittner, S.J.; Konte, B.; Landi, M.T.; Laatikainen, T.; Leppert, M.; Levy, S.M.; Mathias, R.A.; McNeil, D.W.; Medland, S.E.; Montgomery, G.W.; Murray, T.; Nauck, M.; North, K.E.; Paré, P.D.; Pergadia, M.L.; Ruczinski, I.; Salomaa, V.; Viikari, J.; Willemsen, G.; Barnes, K.C.; Boerwinkle, E.; Boomsma, D.I.; Caporaso, N.; Edenberg, H.J.; Francks, C.; Gelernter, J.; Grabe, H.J.; Hops, H.; Järvelin, M.R.; Johannesson, M.; Kendler, K.S.; Lehtimäki, T.; Magnusson, P.K.E.; Marazita, M.L.; Marchini, J.; Mitchell, B.D.; Nöthen, M.M.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Raitakari, O.; Rietschel, M.; Rujescu, D.; Samani, N.J.; Schwartz, A.G.; Shete, S.; Spitz, M.; Swan, G.E.; Völzke, H.; Veijola, J.; Wei, Q.; Amos, C.I.; Cannon, D.S.; Grucza, R.A.; Hatsukami, D.; Heath, A.C.; Johnson, E.O.; Kaprio, J.; Madden, P.A.F.; Martin, N.G.; Stevens, V.L.; Weiss, R.B.; Kraft, P.; Bierut, L.J.; Ehringer, M.

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) genes (CHRNA5/CHRNA3/CHRNB4) have been reproducibly associated with nicotine dependence, smoking behaviors, and lung cancer risk. Of the few reports that have focused on early smoking behaviors, association results have been mixed. This meta-analysis

  7. Distinct loci in the CHRNA5/CHRNA3/CHRNB4 gene cluster are associated with onset of regular smoking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stephens, S.H.; Hartz, S.M.; Hoft, N.R.; Saccone, N.L.; Corley, R.C.; Hewitt, J.K.; Hopfer, C.J.; Breslau, N.; Coon, H.; Chen, X.; Ducci, F.; Dueker, N.; Franceschini, N.; Frank, J.; Han, Y.; Hansel, N.N.; Jiang, C.; Korhonen, T.; Lind, P.A.; Liu, J.; Lyytikäinen, L.P.; Michel, M.; Shaffer, J.R.; Short, S.E.; Sun, J.; Teumer, A.; Thompson, J.R.; Vogelzangs, N.; Vink, J.M.; Wenzlaff, A.; Wheeler, W.; Yang, B.Z.; Aggen, S.H.; Balmforth, A.J.; Baumeister, S.E.; Beaty, T.H.; Benjamin, D.J.; Bergen, A.W.; Broms, U.; Cesarini, D.; Chatterjee, N.; Chen, J.; Cheng, Y.C.; Cichon, S.; Couper, D.; Cucca, F.; Dick, D.; Foroud, T.; Furberg, H.; Giegling, I.; Gillespie, N.A.; Gu, F.; Hall, A.S.; Hällfors, J.; Han, S.; Hartmann, A.M.; Heikkilä, K.; Hickie, I.B.; Hottenga, J.J.; Jousilahti, P.; Kaakinen, M.; Kähönen, M.; Koellinger, P.D.; Kittner, S.; Konte, B.; Landi, M.T.; Laatikainen, T.; Leppert, M.; Levy, S.M.; Mathias, R.A.; McNeil, D.W.; Medland, S.E.; Montgomery, G.W.; Murray, T.; Nauck, M.; North, K.E.; Paré, P.D.; Pergadia, M.; Ruczinski, I.; Salomaa, V.; Viikari, J.; Willemsen, G.; Barnes, K.C.; Boerwinkle, E.; Boomsma, D.I.; Caporaso, N.; Edenberg, H.J.; Francks, C.; Gelernter, J.; Grabe, H.J.; Hops, H.; Jarvelin, M.R.; Johannesson, M.; Kendler, K.S.; Lehtimäki, T.; Magnusson, P.K.E.; Marazita, M.L.; Marchini, J.; Mitchell, B.D.; Nöthen, M.M.; Penninx, B.W.; Raitakari, O.; Rietschel, M.; Rujescu, D.; Samani, N.J.; Schwartz, A.G.; Shete, S.; Spitz, M.; Swan, G.E.; Völzke, H.; Veijola, J.; Wei, Q.; Amos, C.; Cannon, D.S.; Gruzca, R.; Hatsukami, D.; Heath, A.; Johnson, E.O.; Kaprio, J.; Madden, P.; Martin, N.G.; Stevens, V.L.; Weiss, R.B.; Kraft, P.; Bierut, L.J.; Ehringer, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) genes (CHRNA5/CHRNA3/CHRNB4) have been reproducibly associated with nicotine dependence, smoking behaviors, and lung cancer risk. Of the few reports that have focused on early smoking behaviors, association results have been mixed. This meta-analysis

  8. An integration of genome-wide association study and gene expression profiling to prioritize the discovery of novel susceptibility Loci for osteoporosis-related traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsiang Hsu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a complex disorder and commonly leads to fractures in elderly persons. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have become an unbiased approach to identify variations in the genome that potentially affect health. However, the genetic variants identified so far only explain a small proportion of the heritability for complex traits. Due to the modest genetic effect size and inadequate power, true association signals may not be revealed based on a stringent genome-wide significance threshold. Here, we take advantage of SNP and transcript arrays and integrate GWAS and expression signature profiling relevant to the skeletal system in cellular and animal models to prioritize the discovery of novel candidate genes for osteoporosis-related traits, including bone mineral density (BMD at the lumbar spine (LS and femoral neck (FN, as well as geometric indices of the hip (femoral neck-shaft angle, NSA; femoral neck length, NL; and narrow-neck width, NW. A two-stage meta-analysis of GWAS from 7,633 Caucasian women and 3,657 men, revealed three novel loci associated with osteoporosis-related traits, including chromosome 1p13.2 (RAP1A, p = 3.6x10(-8, 2q11.2 (TBC1D8, and 18q11.2 (OSBPL1A, and confirmed a previously reported region near TNFRSF11B/OPG gene. We also prioritized 16 suggestive genome-wide significant candidate genes based on their potential involvement in skeletal metabolism. Among them, 3 candidate genes were associated with BMD in women. Notably, 2 out of these 3 genes (GPR177, p = 2.6x10(-13; SOX6, p = 6.4x10(-10 associated with BMD in women have been successfully replicated in a large-scale meta-analysis of BMD, but none of the non-prioritized candidates (associated with BMD did. Our results support the concept of our prioritization strategy. In the absence of direct biological support for identified genes, we highlighted the efficiency of subsequent functional characterization using publicly available expression profiling relevant

  9. Effects of cell cycle position on ionizing radiation mutagenesis. I. Quantitative assays of two genetic loci in a human lymphoblastoid cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, Yao-Yu; Liber, H.L. [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Relatively little work has been done on the influence of the position of the cell in the cell cycle on ionizing radiation-induced mutagenesis. We synchronized WTK1 human lymphoblastoid cells with 200 {mu}M lovastatin for 48 h; under these conditions more than 80% of the cells were arrested in G{sub 1} phase. Upon release, there was a 12-15-h lag followed by movement of a large fraction into S phase. We irradiated cells with either 1.5 Gy X rays at 1, 15, 18, 21 or 24 h or 1.5 Gy {gamma} rays at 1, 5, 10, 15 or 24 h after release from lovastatin. We showed that WTK1 cells were most sensitive to ionizing radiation-induced toxicity in G{sub 1} and into S phase, and more resistant in mid to late S and G{sub 2}/M phase. Somewhat surprisingly, we found that the two different gene loci had different sensitivities to radiation-induced mutation through the cell cycle. Cells in late G{sub 1} through mid-S phase were most sensitive to radiation-induced mutations at the autosomal thymidine kinase (TK) locus, whereas G{sub 1} phase was the most sensitive phase at the X-linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) locus. 29 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Association study of 69 genes in the ret pathway identifies low-penetrance loci in sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Llorente, Sergio; Montero-Conde, Cristina; Milne, Roger L; Moya, Christian M; Cebrián, Arancha; Letón, Rocío; Cascón, Alberto; Mercadillo, Fátima; Landa, Iñigo; Borrego, Salud; Pérez de Nanclares, Guiomar; Alvarez-Escolá, Cristina; Díaz-Pérez, José Angel; Carracedo, Angel; Urioste, Miguel; González-Neira, Anna; Benítez, Javier; Santisteban, Pilar; Dopazo, Joaquín; Ponder, Bruce A; Robledo, Mercedes

    2007-10-01

    To date, few association studies have been done to better understand the genetic basis for the development of sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma (sMTC). To identify additional low-penetrance genes, we have done a two-stage case-control study in two European populations using high-throughput genotyping. We selected 417 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) belonging to 69 genes either related to RET signaling pathway/functions or involved in key processes for cancer development. TagSNPs and functional variants were included where possible. These SNPs were initially studied in the largest known series of sMTC cases (n = 266) and controls (n = 422), all of Spanish origin. In stage II, an independent British series of 155 sMTC patients and 531 controls was included to validate the previous results. Associations were assessed by an exhaustive analysis of individual SNPs but also considering gene- and linkage disequilibrium-based haplotypes. This strategy allowed us to identify seven low-penetrance genes, six of them (STAT1, AURKA, BCL2, CDKN2B, CDK6, and COMT) consistently associated with sMTC risk in the two case-control series and a seventh (HRAS) with individual SNPs and haplotypes associated with sMTC in the Spanish data set. The potential role of CDKN2B was confirmed by a functional assay showing a role of a SNP (rs7044859) in the promoter region in altering the binding of the transcription factor HNF1. These results highlight the utility of association studies using homogeneous series of cases for better understanding complex diseases.

  11. Identification of TSG101 functional domains and p21 loci required for TSG101-mediated p21 gene regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Shiuan Lin

    Full Text Available TSG101 (tumor susceptibility gene 101 is a multi-domain protein known to act in the cell nucleus, cytoplasm, and periplasmic membrane. Remarkably, TSG101, whose location within cells varies with the stage of the cell cycle, affects biological events as diverse as cell growth and proliferation, gene expression, cytokinesis, and endosomal trafficking. The functions of TSG101 additionally are recruited for viral and microvesicle budding and for intracellular survival of invading bacteria. Here we report that the TSG101 protein also interacts with and down-regulates the promoter of the p21 (CIP1/WAF1 tumor suppressor gene, and identify a p21 locus and TSG101 domains that mediate this interaction. TSG101 deficiency in Saos-2 human osteosarcoma cells was accompanied by an increased abundance of p21 mRNA and protein and the retardation of cell proliferation. A cis-acting element in the p21 promoter that interacts with TSG101 and is required for promoter repression was located using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP analysis and p21-driven luciferase reporter gene expression, respectively. Additional analysis of TSG101 deletion mutants lacking specific domains established the role of the central TSG101 domains in binding to the p21 promoter and demonstrated the additional essentiality of the TSG101 C-terminal steadiness box (SB in the repression of p21 promoter activity. Neither binding of TSG101 to the p21 promoter nor repression of this promoter required the TSG101 N-terminal UEV domain, which mediates the ubiquitin-recognition functions of TSG101 and its actions as a member of ESCRT endocytic trafficking complexes, indicating that regulation of the p21 promoter by TSG101 is independent of its role in such trafficking.

  12. Reduced Variance of Gene Expression at Numerous Loci in a Population of Chickens Selected for High Feather Pecking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hughes, A L; Buitenhuis, A J

    2010-01-01

    Changes in gene expression in response to selection were studied by comparing microarray expression profiles among a population of domestic chickens selected for high feather pecking (FP) with a control population and a population selected for low FP. No transcripts showed significant differences...... and gentle FP were distinct, suggesting that very distinct underlying neural mechanisms underlie these 2 behaviors, with SFP showing more signs of an association with synaptic plasticity and with an immunosuppressive stress response...

  13. Genome-wide association analysis reveals genetic loci and candidate genes for feeding behavior and eating efficiency in Duroc boars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Rongrong; Quan, Jianping; Yang, Ming; Wang, Xingwang; Zheng, Enqin; Yang, Huaqiang; Fu, Disheng; Yang, Yang; Yang, Linxue; Li, Zicong; Liu, Dewu; Cai, Gengyuan; Wu, Zhenfang; Yang, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Efficient use of feed resources is a challenge in the pork industry because the largest variability in expenditure is attributed to the cost of fodder. Efficiency of feeding is directly related to feeding behavior. In order to identify genomic regions controlling feeding behavior and eating efficiency traits, 338 Duroc boars were used in this study. The Illumina Porcine SNP60K BeadChip was used for genotyping. Data pertaining to individual daily feed intake (DFI), total daily time spent in feeder (TPD), number of daily visits to feeder (NVD), average duration of each visit (TPV), mean feed intake per visit (FPV), mean feed intake rate (FR), and feed conversion ratio (FCR) were collected for these pigs. Despite the limited sample size, the genome-wide association study was acceptable to detect candidate regions association with feeding behavior and eating efficiency traits in pigs. We detected three genome-wide (P efficiency traits in pigs. Five candidate genes (SERPINA3, MYC, LEF1, PITX2, and MAP3K14) with biochemical and physiological roles that were relevant to feeding behavior and eating efficiency were discovered proximal to significant or suggestive markers. Gene ontology analysis indicated that most of the candidate genes were involved in the development of the hypothalamus (GO:0021854, P efficiency in pigs. Furthermore, some significant SNPs identified in this study could be incorporated into artificial selection programs for Duroc-related pigs to select for increased feeding efficiency.

  14. Comprehensive Computational Analysis of GWAS Loci Identifies CCR2 as a Candidate Gene for Celiac Disease Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaganapalli, Babajan; Rashidi, Omran; Saadah, Omar I; Wang, Jun; Khan, Imran Ali; Al-Aama, Jumana Y; Shaik, Noor Ahmad; Elango, Ramu

    2017-08-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a gluten intolerance disorder with known genetic contribution. The recent fine mapping and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified up to 57 non-HLA CD susceptibility SNPs, majority of which are non-coding variants lacking any functional annotation. Therefore, we adopted multidimensional computational approach for uncovering the plausible mechanisms through which these GWAS SNPs are connected to CD pathogenesis. At initial phase, we identified that 25 (43.85%) out of 57 CD-SNPs lies in evolutionarily constrained genetic element regions. In follow-up phases, through computational (CADD, GWAVA, and FATHMM algorithms) deleterious intensity measurements, we have discovered that 42 (3.94%) out of 1065 variants (57 CD-lead and 1008-linked SNPs; r(2)  ≥ 0.8) are differentially deleterious in nature to CD. Further functional scrutinization of these CD variants by public domain eQTL mapping, gene expression, knockout mouse model, and pathway analyses revealed that deleterious SNPs of CCR2 gene influences its expression levels and may also elicit a cascade of T-cell-mediated immunological events leading to intestinal gluten intolerance in genetically susceptible individuals. This study demonstrates the utility of integrated in silico analysis of annotations, gene expression, and pathways in prioritizing the potential complex disease variants from large-scale open source genomic data. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 2193-2207, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Loci and candidate gene identification for resistance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) via association and linkage maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xue; Han, Yingpeng; Li, Yinghui; Liu, Dongyuan; Sun, Mingming; Zhao, Yue; Lv, Chunmei; Li, Dongmei; Yang, Zhijiang; Huang, Long; Teng, Weili; Qiu, Lijuan; Zheng, Hongkun; Li, Wenbin

    2015-04-01

    Soybean white mold (SWM), caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum ((Lib.) W. Phillips), is currently considered to be the second most important cause of soybean yield loss due to disease. Research is needed to identify SWM-resistant germplasm and gain a better understanding of the genetic and molecular basis of SWM resistance in soybean. Stem pigmentation after treatment with oxaloacetic acid is an effective indicator of resistance to SWM. A total of 128 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from a cross of 'Maple Arrow' (partial resistant to SWM) and 'Hefeng 25' (susceptible) and 330 diverse soybean cultivars were screened for the soluble pigment concentration of their stems, which were treated with oxalic acid. Four quantitative trait loci (QTLs) underlying soluble pigment concentration were detected by linkage mapping of the RILs. Three hundred and thirty soybean cultivars were sequenced using the whole-genome encompassing approach and 25 179 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected for the fine mapping of SWM resistance genes by genome-wide association studies. Three out of five SNP markers representing a linkage disequilibrium (LD) block and a single locus on chromosome 13 (Gm13) were significantly associated with the soluble pigment content of stems. Three more SNPs that represented three minor QTLs for the soluble pigment content of stems were identified on another three chromosomes by association mapping. A major locus with the largest effect on Gm13 was found both by linkage and association mapping. Four potential candidate genes involved in disease response or the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway were identified at the locus near the significant SNPs (<60 kbp). The beneficial allele and candidate genes should be useful in soybean breeding for improving resistance to SWM. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Mapping adipose and muscle tissue expression quantitative trait loci in African Americans to identify genes for type 2 diabetes and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajuthi, Satria P; Sharma, Neeraj K; Chou, Jeff W; Palmer, Nicholette D; McWilliams, David R; Beal, John; Comeau, Mary E; Ma, Lijun; Calles-Escandon, Jorge; Demons, Jamehl; Rogers, Samantha; Cherry, Kristina; Menon, Lata; Kouba, Ethel; Davis, Donna; Burris, Marcie; Byerly, Sara J; Ng, Maggie C Y; Maruthur, Nisa M; Patel, Sanjay R; Bielak, Lawrence F; Lange, Leslie A; Guo, Xiuqing; Sale, Michèle M; Chan, Kei Hang K; Monda, Keri L; Chen, Gary K; Taylor, Kira; Palmer, Cameron; Edwards, Todd L; North, Kari E; Haiman, Christopher A; Bowden, Donald W; Freedman, Barry I; Langefeld, Carl D; Das, Swapan K

    2016-08-01

    Relative to European Americans, type 2 diabetes (T2D) is more prevalent in African Americans (AAs). Genetic variation may modulate transcript abundance in insulin-responsive tissues and contribute to risk; yet, published studies identifying expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) in African ancestry populations are restricted to blood cells. This study aims to develop a map of genetically regulated transcripts expressed in tissues important for glucose homeostasis in AAs, critical for identifying the genetic etiology of T2D and related traits. Quantitative measures of adipose and muscle gene expression, and genotypic data were integrated in 260 non-diabetic AAs to identify expression regulatory variants. Their roles in genetic susceptibility to T2D, and related metabolic phenotypes, were evaluated by mining GWAS datasets. eQTL analysis identified 1971 and 2078 cis-eGenes in adipose and muscle, respectively. Cis-eQTLs for 885 transcripts including top cis-eGenes CHURC1, USMG5, and ERAP2 were identified in both tissues. 62.1 % of top cis-eSNPs were within ±50 kb of transcription start sites and cis-eGenes were enriched for mitochondrial transcripts. Mining GWAS databases revealed association of cis-eSNPs for more than 50 genes with T2D (e.g. PIK3C2A, RBMS1, UFSP1), gluco-metabolic phenotypes (e.g. INPP5E, SNX17, ERAP2, FN3KRP), and obesity (e.g. POMC, CPEB4). Integration of GWAS meta-analysis data from AA cohorts revealed the most significant association for cis-eSNPs of ATP5SL and MCCC1 genes, with T2D and BMI, respectively. This study developed the first comprehensive map of adipose and muscle tissue eQTLs in AAs (publically accessible at https://mdsetaa.phs.wakehealth.edu ) and identified genetically regulated transcripts for delineating genetic causes of T2D, and related metabolic phenotypes.

  17. Distinct Loci in the CHRNA5/CHRNA3/CHRNB4 Gene Cluster Are Associated With Onset of Regular Smoking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Sarah H.; Hartz, Sarah M.; Hoft, Nicole R.; Saccone, Nancy L.; Corley, Robin C.; Hewitt, John K.; Hopfer, Christian J.; Breslau, Naomi; Coon, Hilary; Chen, Xiangning; Ducci, Francesca; Dueker, Nicole; Franceschini, Nora; Frank, Josef; Han, Younghun; Hansel, Nadia N.; Jiang, Chenhui; Korhonen, Tellervo; Lind, Penelope A.; Liu, Jason; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Michel, Martha; Shaffer, John R.; Short, Susan E.; Sun, Juzhong; Teumer, Alexander; Thompson, John R.; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Wenzlaff, Angela; Wheeler, William; Yang, Bao-Zhu; Aggen, Steven H.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Beaty, Terri H.; Benjamin, Daniel J.; Bergen, Andrew W.; Broms, Ulla; Cesarini, David; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Chen, Jingchun; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Cichon, Sven; Couper, David; Cucca, Francesco; Dick, Danielle; Foroud, Tatiana; Furberg, Helena; Giegling, Ina; Gillespie, Nathan A.; Gu, Fangyi; Hall, Alistair S.; Hällfors, Jenni; Han, Shizhong; Hartmann, Annette M.; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hickie, Ian B.; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Jousilahti, Pekka; Kaakinen, Marika; Kähönen, Mika; Koellinger, Philipp D.; Kittner, Stephen; Konte, Bettina; Landi, Maria-Teresa; Laatikainen, Tiina; Leppert, Mark; Levy, Steven M.; Mathias, Rasika A.; McNeil, Daniel W.; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Murray, Tanda; Nauck, Matthias; North, Kari E.; Paré, Peter D.; Pergadia, Michele; Ruczinski, Ingo; Salomaa, Veikko; Viikari, Jorma; Willemsen, Gonneke; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Caporaso, Neil; Edenberg, Howard J.; Francks, Clyde; Gelernter, Joel; Grabe, Hans Jörgen; Hops, Hyman; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Johannesson, Magnus; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Marazita, Mary L.; Marchini, Jonathan; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Raitakari, Olli; Rietschel, Marcella; Rujescu, Dan; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Shete, Sanjay; Spitz, Margaret; Swan, Gary E.; Völzke, Henry; Veijola, Juha; Wei, Qingyi; Amos, Chris; Cannon, Dale S.; Grucza, Richard; Hatsukami, Dorothy; Heath, Andrew; Johnson, Eric O.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Madden, Pamela; Martin, Nicholas G.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Weiss, Robert B.; Kraft, Peter; Bierut, Laura J.; Ehringer, Marissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) genes (CHRNA5/CHRNA3/CHRNB4) have been reproducibly associated with nicotine dependence, smoking behaviors, and lung cancer risk. Of the few reports that have focused on early smoking behaviors, association results have been mixed. This meta-analysis examines early smoking phenotypes and SNPs in the gene cluster to determine: (1) whether the most robust association signal in this region (rs16969968) for other smoking behaviors is also associated with early behaviors, and/or (2) if additional statistically independent signals are important in early smoking. We focused on two phenotypes: age of tobacco initiation (AOI) and age of first regular tobacco use (AOS). This study included 56,034 subjects (41 groups) spanning nine countries and evaluated five SNPs including rs1948, rs16969968, rs578776, rs588765, and rs684513. Each dataset was analyzed using a centrally generated script. Meta-analyses were conducted from summary statistics. AOS yielded significant associations with SNPs rs578776 (beta = 0.02, P = 0.004), rs1948 (beta = 0.023, P = 0.018), and rs684513 (beta = 0.032, P = 0.017), indicating protective effects. There were no significant associations for the AOI phenotype. Importantly, rs16969968, the most replicated signal in this region for nicotine dependence, cigarettes per day, and cotinine levels, was not associated with AOI (P = 0.59) or AOS (P = 0.92). These results provide important insight into the complexity of smoking behavior phenotypes, and suggest that association signals in the CHRNA5/A3/B4 gene cluster affecting early smoking behaviors may be different from those affecting the mature nicotine dependence phenotype. PMID:24186853

  18. Distinct loci in the CHRNA5/CHRNA3/CHRNB4 gene cluster are associated with onset of regular smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Sarah H; Hartz, Sarah M; Hoft, Nicole R; Saccone, Nancy L; Corley, Robin C; Hewitt, John K; Hopfer, Christian J; Breslau, Naomi; Coon, Hilary; Chen, Xiangning; Ducci, Francesca; Dueker, Nicole; Franceschini, Nora; Frank, Josef; Han, Younghun; Hansel, Nadia N; Jiang, Chenhui; Korhonen, Tellervo; Lind, Penelope A; Liu, Jason; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Michel, Martha; Shaffer, John R; Short, Susan E; Sun, Juzhong; Teumer, Alexander; Thompson, John R; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Vink, Jacqueline M; Wenzlaff, Angela; Wheeler, William; Yang, Bao-Zhu; Aggen, Steven H; Balmforth, Anthony J; Baumeister, Sebastian E; Beaty, Terri H; Benjamin, Daniel J; Bergen, Andrew W; Broms, Ulla; Cesarini, David; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Chen, Jingchun; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Cichon, Sven; Couper, David; Cucca, Francesco; Dick, Danielle; Foroud, Tatiana; Furberg, Helena; Giegling, Ina; Gillespie, Nathan A; Gu, Fangyi; Hall, Alistair S; Hällfors, Jenni; Han, Shizhong; Hartmann, Annette M; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hickie, Ian B; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Jousilahti, Pekka; Kaakinen, Marika; Kähönen, Mika; Koellinger, Philipp D; Kittner, Stephen; Konte, Bettina; Landi, Maria-Teresa; Laatikainen, Tiina; Leppert, Mark; Levy, Steven M; Mathias, Rasika A; McNeil, Daniel W; Medland, Sarah E; Montgomery, Grant W; Murray, Tanda; Nauck, Matthias; North, Kari E; Paré, Peter D; Pergadia, Michele; Ruczinski, Ingo; Salomaa, Veikko; Viikari, Jorma; Willemsen, Gonneke; Barnes, Kathleen C; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I; Caporaso, Neil; Edenberg, Howard J; Francks, Clyde; Gelernter, Joel; Grabe, Hans Jörgen; Hops, Hyman; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Johannesson, Magnus; Kendler, Kenneth S; Lehtimäki, Terho; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Marazita, Mary L; Marchini, Jonathan; Mitchell, Braxton D; Nöthen, Markus M; Penninx, Brenda W; Raitakari, Olli; Rietschel, Marcella; Rujescu, Dan; Samani, Nilesh J; Schwartz, Ann G; Shete, Sanjay; Spitz, Margaret; Swan, Gary E; Völzke, Henry; Veijola, Juha; Wei, Qingyi; Amos, Chris; Cannon, Dale S; Grucza, Richard; Hatsukami, Dorothy; Heath, Andrew; Johnson, Eric O; Kaprio, Jaakko; Madden, Pamela; Martin, Nicholas G; Stevens, Victoria L; Weiss, Robert B; Kraft, Peter; Bierut, Laura J; Ehringer, Marissa A

    2013-12-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) genes (CHRNA5/CHRNA3/CHRNB4) have been reproducibly associated with nicotine dependence, smoking behaviors, and lung cancer risk. Of the few reports that have focused on early smoking behaviors, association results have been mixed. This meta-analysis examines early smoking phenotypes and SNPs in the gene cluster to determine: (1) whether the most robust association signal in this region (rs16969968) for other smoking behaviors is also associated with early behaviors, and/or (2) if additional statistically independent signals are important in early smoking. We focused on two phenotypes: age of tobacco initiation (AOI) and age of first regular tobacco use (AOS). This study included 56,034 subjects (41 groups) spanning nine countries and evaluated five SNPs including rs1948, rs16969968, rs578776, rs588765, and rs684513. Each dataset was analyzed using a centrally generated script. Meta-analyses were conducted from summary statistics. AOS yielded significant associations with SNPs rs578776 (beta = 0.02, P = 0.004), rs1948 (beta = 0.023, P = 0.018), and rs684513 (beta = 0.032, P = 0.017), indicating protective effects. There were no significant associations for the AOI phenotype. Importantly, rs16969968, the most replicated signal in this region for nicotine dependence, cigarettes per day, and cotinine levels, was not associated with AOI (P = 0.59) or AOS (P = 0.92). These results provide important insight into the complexity of smoking behavior phenotypes, and suggest that association signals in the CHRNA5/A3/B4 gene cluster affecting early smoking behaviors may be different from those affecting the mature nicotine dependence phenotype. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  19. Isolation and growth characterization of chlorate and/or bromate resistant mutants generated by spontaneous and induced foreword mutations at several gene loci in aspergillus niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanan, Ghassan J. M.; Al-Najjar, Heyam E.

    2010-01-01

    We aimed her mainly to evaluate the contribution of newly employed bromate selection system, in obtaining new Aspergillus niger nitrate/nitrite assimilation defective mutants, through Ultraviolet treatment (UV), 1, 2, 7, 8-Diepoxyoctane (DEO), phenols mixture (Phx)) and spontaneous treatments. The newly employed bromate selection system was able to specify only two putative novel mutant types designated brn (bromate resistant but chlorate sensitive (RS) strain, which may specify nitrite specific transporter) and cbrn mutants (bromate resistant and chlorate resistant strain, which may specify nitrate/nitrite bispecific system). The most relevant and innovative findings of this research work involve the isolation of the RR ( cbrn) mutants (a new type of nitrate assimilation defective mutants), that could be useful for studying the bispecific nitrate /nitrite transporter system. The majority of obtained bromate resistant mutants (93.3% of the total mutants obtained by all treatments) were of the brn type, whereas the remaining percentage (6.76%) was given to cbrn strains. The highest percentages of brn mutant strains (48% and 58.6% of the total RS strains) were obtained with UA after spontaneous and Phx treatment, whereas Trp has generated 29% and 42% of RS strains after UV and DEO treatments, respectively. The obtained ratios of cbrn mutants were higher (i.e. in the range of 8.4%-11.64% of the total bromate mutants) with chemical treatments, especially when U.A or Pro was serving as sole N-sources at 25ºC rather than 37ºC. A 69% mutants` yield of Aspergillus niger mutant strains representing nine gene loci ( niaD, cnx-6 loci , nrt and nirA) were selected on the bases of chlorate (600 mM) toxicity. All chlorate resistant mutants were completely sensitive to bromate (250 mM). The niaD mutants showed the highest percentage (73.97%) of chlorate resistant mutants obtained with all tested treatments. The UV treatment has generated the highest ratio (86.9%) of nia

  20. Isolation and growth characterization of chlorate and/or bromate resistant mutants generated by spontaneous and induced foreword mutations at several gene loci in Aspergillus niger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghassan J. M. Kanan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We aimed her mainly to evaluate the contribution of newly employed bromate selection system, in obtaining new Aspergillus niger nitrate/nitrite assimilation defective mutants, through Ultraviolet treatment (UV, 1, 2, 7, 8-Diepoxyoctane (DEO, phenols mixture (Phx and spontaneous treatments. The newly employed bromate selection system was able to specify only two putative novel mutant types designated brn (bromate resistant but chlorate sensitive (RS strain, which may specify nitrite specific transporter and cbrn mutants (bromate resistant and chlorate resistant strain, which may specify nitrate/nitrite bispecific system. The most relevant and innovative findings of this research work involve the isolation of the RR (cbrn mutants (a new type of nitrate assimilation defective mutants, that could be useful for studying the bispecific nitrate /nitrite transporter system. The majority of obtained bromate resistant mutants (93.3% of the total mutants obtained by all treatments were of the brn type, whereas the remaining percentage (6.76% was given to cbrn strains. The highest percentages of brn mutant strains (48% and 58.6% of the total RS strains were obtained with UA after spontaneous and Phx treatment, whereas Trp has generated 29% and 42% of RS strains after UV and DEO treatments, respectively. The obtained ratios of cbrn mutants were higher (i.e. in the range of 8.4%-11.64% of the total bromate mutants with chemical treatments, especially when U.A or Pro was serving as sole N-sources at 25ºC rather than 37ºC. A 69% mutants' yield of Aspergillus niger mutant strains representing nine gene loci (niaD, cnx-6 loci, nrt and nirA were selected on the bases of chlorate (600 mM toxicity. All chlorate resistant mutants were completely sensitive to bromate (250 mM. The niaD mutants showed the highest percentage (73.97% of chlorate resistant mutants obtained with all tested treatments. The UV treatment has generated the highest ratio (86.9% of niaD mutants

  1. Low penetrance breast cancer susceptibility loci are associated with specific breast tumor subtypes: findings from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Broeks, A; Schmidt, M.K; Sherman, M.E; Couch, F.J; Hopper, J.L; Dite, G.S; Apicella, C; Smith, L.D; Hammet, F; Southey, M.C; Veer, L.J. van 't; Groot, R. de; Smit, V.T; Fasching, P.A; Beckmann, M.W; Jud, S; Ekici, A.B; Hartmann, A; Hein, A; Schulz-Wendtland, R; Burwinkel, B; Marme, F; Schneeweiss, A; Sinn, H.P; Sohn, C; Tchatchou, S; Bojesen, S.E; Nordestgaard, B.G; Flyger, H; Orsted, D.D; Kaur-Knudsen, D; Milne, R.L; Perez, J.I; Zamora, P; Roiguez, P.M; Benitez, J; Brauch, H; Justenhoven, C; Ko, Y.D; Hamann, U; Fischer, H.P; Bruning, T; Pesch, B; Chang-Claude, J; Wang-Gohrke, S; Bremer, M; Karstens, J.H; Hillemanns, P; Dork, T; Nevanlinna, H.A; Heikkinen, T; Heikkila, P; Blomqvist, C; Aittomaki, K; Aaltonen, K; Lindblom, A; Margolin, S; Mannermaa, A; Kosma, V.M; Kauppinen, J.M; Kataja, V; Auvinen, P; Eskelinen, M; Soini, Y; Chenevix-Trench, G; Spurdle, A.B; Beesley, J; Chen, X; Holland, H; Lambrechts, D; Claes, B; Vandorpe, T; Neven, P; Wildiers, H; Flesch-Janys, D; Hein, R; Loning, T; Kosel, M; Fredericksen, Z.S; Wang, X; Giles, G.G; Baglietto, L; Severi, G; McLean, C; Haiman, C.A; Henderson, B.E; Marchand, L. le; Kolonel, L.N; Alnaes, G.G; Kristensen, V; Borresen-Dale, A.L; Hunter, D.J; Hankinson, S.E; Anulis, I.L; Mulligan, A.M; O'Malley, F.P; Devilee, P; Huijts, P.E; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M; Asperen, C.J. van

    2011-01-01

    .... We investigated breast cancer risk associations of eight susceptibility loci identified in GWAS and two putative susceptibility loci in candidate genes in relation to specific breast tumor subtypes...

  2. Diverse pattern of gap junction beta-2 and gap junction beta-4 genes mutations and lack of contribution of DFNB21, DFNB24, DFNB29, and DFNB42 loci in autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss patients in Hormozgan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Akbarzadeh Laleh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We aimed to determine the contribution of four DFNB loci and mutation analysis of gap junction beta-2 (GJB2 and GJB4 genes in autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL in South of Iran. Materials and Methods: A total of 36 large ARNSHL pedigrees with at least two affected subjects were enrolled in the current study. The GJB2 and GJB4 genes mutations were screened using direct sequencing method. The GJB2 and GJB4 negative families were analyzed for the linkage to DFNB21, DFNB24, DFNB29, and DFNB42 loci by genotyping the corresponding STR markers using polymerase chain reaction-PAGE method. Results: We found a homozygous nonsense mutation W77X and a homozygous missense mutation C169W in 5.55% of studied families in GJB2 and GJB4 genes, respectively. Five heterozygous mutations including V63G, A78T, and R127H in GJB2 gene, and R103C and R227W in GJB4 gene were detected. We identified two novel variations V63G in GJB2 and R227W in GJB4. In silico analysis predicted that both novel variations are deleterious mutations. We did not unveil any linkage between DFNB21, DFNB24, DFNB29, and DFNB42 loci and ARNSHL among studied families. Conclusion: This is the first report of GJB2 and GJB4 mutations from Hormozgan population. According to the previous publications regarding GJB2 and GJB4 mutations, the distribution of the mutations is different from other parts of Iran that should be considered in primary health-care programs. Further investigations are needed to evaluate the contribution of other loci in ARNSHL subjects in South of Iran.

  3. X-linked gene expression in the Virginia opossum: differences between the paternally derived Gpd and Pgk-A loci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samollow, P.B.; Ford, A.L.; VandeBerg, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    Expression of X-linked glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and phosphoglycerate kinase-A (PGK-A) in the Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) was studied electrophoretically in animals from natural populations and those produced through controlled laboratory crosses. Blood from most of the wild animals exhibited a common single-banded phenotype for both enzymes. Rare variant animals, regardless of sex, exhibited single-banded phenotypes different in mobility from the common mobility class of the respective enzyme. The laboratory crosses confirmed the allelic basis for the common and rare phenotypes. Transmission of PGK-A phenotypes followed the pattern of determinate (nonrandom) inactivation of the paternally derived Pgk-A allele, and transmission of G6PD also was consistent with this pattern. A survey of tissue-specific expression of G6PD phenotypes of heterozygous females revealed, in almost all tissues, three-banded patterns skewed in favor of the allele that was expressed in blood cells. Three-banded patterns were never observed in males or in putatively homozygous females. These patterns suggest simultaneous, but unequal, expression of the maternally and paternally derived Gpd alleles within individual cells. The absence of such partial expression was noted in a parallel survey of females heterozygous at the Pgd-A locus. Thus, it appears that Gpd and Pgk-A are X-linked in D. virginiana and subject to preferential paternal allele inactivation, but that dosage compensation may not be complete for all paternally derived X-linked genes.

  4. Integrating genome-wide association study and expression quantitative trait loci data identifies multiple genes and gene set associated with neuroticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Qianrui; Wang, Wenyu; Hao, Jingcan; He, Awen; Wen, Yan; Guo, Xiong; Wu, Cuiyan; Ning, Yujie; Wang, Xi; Wang, Sen; Zhang, Feng

    2017-08-01

    Neuroticism is a fundamental personality trait with significant genetic determinant. To identify novel susceptibility genes for neuroticism, we conducted an integrative analysis of genomic and transcriptomic data of genome wide association study (GWAS) and expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) study. GWAS summary data was driven from published studies of neuroticism, totally involving 170,906 subjects. eQTL dataset containing 927,753 eQTLs were obtained from an eQTL meta-analysis of 5311 samples. Integrative analysis of GWAS and eQTL data was conducted by summary data-based Mendelian randomization (SMR) analysis software. To identify neuroticism associated gene sets, the SMR analysis results were further subjected to gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA). The gene set annotation dataset (containing 13,311 annotated gene sets) of GSEA Molecular Signatures Database was used. SMR single gene analysis identified 6 significant genes for neuroticism, including MSRA (p value=2.27×10(-10)), MGC57346 (p value=6.92×10(-7)), BLK (p value=1.01×10(-6)), XKR6 (p value=1.11×10(-6)), C17ORF69 (p value=1.12×10(-6)) and KIAA1267 (p value=4.00×10(-6)). Gene set enrichment analysis observed significant association for Chr8p23 gene set (false discovery rate=0.033). Our results provide novel clues for the genetic mechanism studies of neuroticism. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Genetic linkage of endogenous viral loci with the B (MHC) and C histocompatibility loci in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachý, J; Korec, E; Hlozánek, I; Zdĕnková, E

    1985-01-01

    Genetic linkage of endogenous viral loci and histocompatibility loci B (MHC) and C has been demonstrated serologically in backcross progeny of inbred lines of chickens. The endogenous viral locus linked to the B complex is the first case of the localization of an endogenous viral gene to the microchromosomes in chickens.

  6. Rare CNVs in Suicide Attempt include Schizophrenia-Associated Loci and Neurodevelopmental Genes: A Pilot Genome-Wide and Family-Based Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Sokolowski

    Full Text Available Suicidal behavior (SB has a complex etiology involving genes and environment. One of the genetic components in SB could be copy number variations (CNVs, as CNVs are implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders. However, a recently published genome-wide and case-control study did not observe any significant role of CNVs in SB. Here we complemented these initial observations by instead using a family-based trio-sample that is robust to control biases, having severe suicide attempt (SA in offspring as main outcome (n = 660 trios. We first tested for CNV associations on the genome-wide Illumina 1M SNP-array by using FBAT-CNV methodology, which allows for evaluating CNVs without reliance on CNV calling algorithms, analogous to a common SNP-based GWAS. We observed association of certain T-cell receptor markers, but this likely reflected inter-individual variation in somatic rearrangements rather than association with SA outcome. Next, we used the PennCNV software to call 385 putative rare (100 kb CNVs, observed in n = 225 SA offspring. Nine SA offspring had rare CNV calls in a set of previously schizophrenia-associated loci, indicating the importance of such CNVs in certain SA subjects. Several additional, very large (>1MB sized CNV calls in 15 other SA offspring also spanned pathogenic regions or other neural genes of interest. Overall, 45 SA had CNVs enriched for 65 medically relevant genes previously shown to be affected by CNVs, which were characterized by a neurodevelopmental biology. A neurodevelopmental implication was partly congruent with our previous SNP-based GWAS, but follow-up analysis here indicated that carriers of rare CNVs had a decreased burden of common SNP risk-alleles compared to non-carriers. In conclusion, while CNVs did not show genome-wide association by the FBAT-CNV methodology, our preliminary observations indicate rare pathogenic CNVs affecting neurodevelopmental functions in a subset of SA, who were distinct from SA having

  7. A genomic island harboring arsenic resistance genes varies in gene content and is located in different chromosomal loci among Listeria monocytogenes strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, arsenic resistance has been often encountered among certain clonal groups of serotype 4b and was earlier found to be strongly associated with an arsenic resistance gene cluster within a 35 kb chromosomal region, designated Listeria genomic island 2 (...

  8. Complex loci in human and mouse genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Engstroem, P.G.; Suzuki, H.; Ninomiya, N.; Akalin, A.; Sessa, L.; Lavorgna, G.; Brozzi, A.; Luzi, L.; Tan, S.L.; Yang, L.; Kunarso, G.; Ng, E.L.C.; Batalov, S.; Wahlestedt, C.; Kai, C.

    2006-01-01

    Mammalian genomes harbor a larger than expected number of complex loci, in which multiple genes are coupled by shared transcribed regions in antisense orientation and/or by bidirectional core promoters. To determine the incidence, functional significance, and evolutionary context of mammalian complex loci, we identified and characterized 5,248 cis–antisense pairs, 1,638 bidirectional promoters, and 1,153 chains of multiple cis–antisense and/or bidirectionally promoted pairs from 36,606 mouse ...

  9. Genetic loci for serum magnesium among African-Americans and gene-environment interaction at MUC1 and TRPM6 in European-Americans: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tin, Adrienne; Köttgen, Anna; Folsom, Aaron R; Maruthur, Nisa M; Tajuddin, Salman M; Nalls, Mike A; Evans, Michele K; Zonderman, Alan B; Friedrich, Christopher A; Boerwinkle, Eric; Coresh, Josef; Kao, Wen Hong Linda

    2015-05-29

    Low serum magnesium levels have been associated with multiple chronic diseases. The regulation of serum magnesium homeostasis is not well understood. A previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) of European ancestry (EA) populations identified nine loci for serum magnesium. No such study has been conducted in African-Americans, nor has there been an evaluation of the interaction of magnesium-associated SNPs with environmental factors. The goals of this study were to identify genetic loci associated with serum magnesium in an African-American (AA) population using both genome-wide and candidate region interrogation approaches and to evaluate gene-environment interaction for the magnesium-associated variants in both EA and AA populations. We conducted a GWAS of serum magnesium in 2737 AA participants of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study and interrogated the regions of the nine published candidate loci in these results. Literature search identified the influence of progesterone on MUC1 expression and insulin on TRPM6 expression. The GWAS approach in African-American participants identified a locus near MUC1 as genome-wide significant (rs2974937, beta=-0.013, p=6.1x10(-9)). The candidate region interrogation approach identified two of the nine loci previously discovered in EA populations as containing SNPs that were significantly associated in African-American participants (SHROOM3 and TRPM6). The index variants at these three loci together explained 2.8 % of the variance in serum magnesium concentration in ARIC African-American participants. On the test of gene-environment interaction in ARIC EA participants, the index variant at MUC1 had 2.5 times stronger association in postmenopausal women with progestin use (beta=-0.028, p=7.3x10(-5)) than in those without any hormone use (beta=-0.011, p=7.0x10(-8), p for interaction 0.03). At TRPM6, the index variant had 1.6 times stronger association in those with lower fasting insulin levels (gene

  10. Importance of the geographic barriers to promote gene drift and avoid pre- and post-Columbian gene flow in Mexican native groups: Evidence from forensic STR Loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel-Villalobos, Héctor; Martínez-Sevilla, Víctor Manuel; Martínez-Cortés, Gabriela; Aguilar-Velázquez, José Alonso; Sosa-Macías, Martha; Rubi-Castellanos, Rodrigo; González-Martín, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    To analyze the origin, structure, relationships, and recent admixture in Mexican Native groups based on 15 STRs commonly used in human identification. We analyzed 39 Mexican Native population samples using STR databases based on the AmpFlSTR® Identifiler kit (n = 3,135), including Mexican-Mestizos (admixed), European and African populations, as reference. Based upon effective population size (Ne) differences, Native groups were clustered into three regions: i) Center-Southeast groups, characterized by larger Ne, migration rate (Nm), genetic diversity (He), and relative homogeneity principally in the Yucatan Peninsula; ii) Isolated southern groups from Chiapas and Oaxaca, characterized by lower Ne, Nm, and He (i.e. higher isolation and genetic differentiation); iii) North-Northwest groups, which are similar to the previous group but are characterized by generating the widest gene flow barrier in the Pre-Hispanic Mexican territory, and currently by elevated admixture in some northern Native groups. Despite the relative congruence between genetic relationships with cultural, linguistic, geographic criteria, these factors do not explain the present-day population structure of Native groups, excepting in those linguistically related to the Mayan that show higher homogeneity. The Isolation by distance model was demonstrated at long distances (>1,500 km), whereas geographic isolation stands as a determining factor to avoid both non-indigenous admixture and bottleneck processes. Different dynamics of gene flow and drift were observed among Mexican Native groups, highlighting the geographic barriers (mountains, canyons and jungle regions) as the main factor differentiating Pre-Hispanic populations, and eventually helping to avoid Post-European contact admixture and population bottleneck. Am J Phys Anthropol 160:298-316, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Delayed effects of accelerated heavy ions on the induction of HPRT mutations in V79 hamster cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bláha, Pavel; Koshlan, Nataliya A; Koshlan, Igor V; Petrova, Daria V; Bogdanova, Yulia V; Govorun, Raisa D; Múčka, Viliam; Krasavin, Evgeny A

    2017-10-01

    Fundamental research on the harmful effects of ionizing radiation on living cells continues to be of great interest. Recently, priority has been given to the study of high-charge and high-energy (HZE) ions that comprise a substantial part of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) spectra that would be encountered during long-term space flights. Moreover, predictions of the delayed genetic effects of high linear energy transfer (LET) exposure is becoming more important as heavy ion therapy use is increasing. This work focuses mainly on the basic research on the delayed effects of HZE ions on V79 Chinese hamster cells, with emphasis on the induction of HPRT mutations after prolonged expression times (ET). The research was conducted under various irradiation conditions with accelerated ions 18 O (E=35.2MeV/n), 20 Ne (E=47.7MeV/n and 51.8MeV/n), and 11 B (E=32.4MeV/n), with LET in the range from 49 to 149 keV/μm and with 60 Co γ-rays. The HPRT mutant fractions (MF) were detected in irradiated cells in regular intervals during every cell culture recultivation (every 3days) up to approximately 40days (70-80 generations) after irradiation. The MF maximum was reached at different ET depending on ionizing radiation characteristics. The position of the maximum was shifting towards longer ET with increasing LET. We speculate that the delayed mutations are created de novo and that they are the manifestation of genomic instability. Although the exact mechanisms involved in genomic instability initiation are yet to be identified, we hypothesize that differences in induction of delayed mutations by radiations with various LET values are related to variations in energy deposition along the particle track. A dose dependence of mutation yield is discussed as well. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The Differences in the Involvements of Loci of Promoter Region and Ile50Val in Interleukin-4 Receptor α Chain Gene between Atopic Dermatitis and Japanese Cedar Pollinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Tanaka

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Our data suggest that -3223 T and the -3223 T/Ile50 haplotype were risk factors for AD. Ile50 allele seems to be involved in both JCP and AD. Interactions of the IL-4RA loci may play a role both conferring susceptibility and modulating severity of AD.

  13. Genes and quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling trace element concentrations in perennial grasses grown on phytotoxic soil contaminated with heavy metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perennial grasses cover diverse soils throughout the world, including sites contaminated with heavy metals, producing forages that must be safe for livestock and wildlife. Chromosome regions known as quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling forage mineral concentrations were mapped in a populatio...

  14. Multiple var2csa-type PfEMP1 genes located at different chromosomal loci occur in many Plasmodium falciparum isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Adam F; Salanti, Ali; Lavstsen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    -telomeric position on the left arm of chromosome 12, but it is not known if this location is conserved in all parasites. Genome sequencing indicates that the var2csa gene is duplicated in HB3, but whether this is true in natural populations is uncertain. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To assess global variation...... in the VAR2CSA protein, sequence variation in the DBL2X region of var2csa genes in 54 P.falciparum samples was analyzed. Chromosome mapping of var2csa loci was carried out and a quantitative PCR assay was developed to estimate the number of var2csa genes in P.falciparum isolates from the placenta of pregnant...

  15. Identification of optimal reference genes for gene expression normalization in a wide cohort of endometrioid endometrial carcinoma tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Romani

    Full Text Available Accurate normalization is a primary component of a reliable gene expression analysis based on qRT-PCR technique. While the use of one or more reference genes as internal controls is commonly accepted as the most appropriate normalization strategy, many qPCR-based published studies still contain data poorly normalized and reference genes arbitrarily chosen irrespective of the particular tissue and the specific experimental design. To date, no validated reference genes have been identified for endometrial cancer tissues. In this study, 10 normalization genes (GAPDH, B2M, ACTB, POLR2A, UBC, PPIA, HPRT1, GUSB, TBP, H3F3A belonging to different functional and abundance classes in various tissues and used in different studies, were analyzed to determine their applicability. In total, 100 endometrioid endometrial cancer samples, which were carefully balanced according to their tumor grade, and 29 normal endometrial tissues were examined using SYBR Green Real-Time RT-PCR. The expression stability of candidate reference genes was determined and compared by means of geNorm and NormFinder softwares. Both algorithms were in agreement in identifying GAPDH, H3F3A, PPIA, and HPRT1 as the most stably expressed genes, only differing in their ranking order. Analysis performed on the expression levels of all candidate genes confirm HPRT1 and PPIA as the most stably expressed in the study groups regardless of sample type, to be used alone or better in combination. As the stable expression of HPRT1 and PPIA between normal and tumor endometrial samples fulfill the basic requirement of a reference gene to be used for normalization purposes, HPRT1 expression showed significant differences between samples from low-grade and high-grade tumors. In conclusion, our results recommend the use of PPIA as a single reference gene to be considered for improved reliability of normalization in gene expression studies involving endometrial tumor samples at different tumor degrees.

  16. Genius loci / Madis Kõiv

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kõiv, Madis, 1929-2014

    2005-01-01

    Ettekanne 37. Kreutzwaldi päevadel Tartu Kirjandusmuuseumis 18.-19. dets. 1993, pealkirjaga "Kus on see Valga, kus on see Tartu...: Genius loci B. Kangro ja V. Uibopuu romaanides". Varem ilmunud: Akadeemia, 1994, nr. 4

  17. Functional annotations of diabetes nephropathy susceptibility loci through analysis of genome-wide renal gene expression in rat models of diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yaomin; Kaisaki, Pamela J; Argoud, Karène

    2009-01-01

    of spontaneous (genetically determined) mild hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance (Goto-Kakizaki-GK) and experimentally induced severe hyperglycaemia (Wistar-Kyoto-WKY rats injected with streptozotocin [STZ]). RESULTS: Different patterns of transcription regulation in the two rat models of diabetes likely...... that are responsive to hyperglycaemia and may contribute to renal functional and/or structural alterations. CONCLUSION: Combining transcriptomics in animal models and comparative genomics provides important information to improve functional annotations of disease susceptibility loci in humans and experimental support...

  18. Selection of reference genes for gene expression studies in human neutrophils by real-time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandford Andrew J

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reference genes, which are often referred to housekeeping genes, are frequently used to normalize mRNA levels between different samples. However the expression level of these genes may vary among tissues or cells, and may change under certain circumstances. Thus the selection of reference gene(s is critical for gene expression studies. For this purpose, 10 commonly used housekeeping genes were investigated in isolated human neutrophils. Results Initial screening of the expression pattern demonstrated that 3 of the 10 genes were expressed at very low levels in neutrophils and were excluded from further analysis. The range of expression stability of the other 7 genes was (from most stable to least stable: GNB2L1 (Guanine nucleotide binding protein, beta polypeptide 2-like 1, HPRT1 (Hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase 1, RPL32 (ribosomal protein L32, ACTB (beta-actin, B2M (beta-2-microglobulin, GAPD (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and TBP (TATA-binding protein. Relative expression levels of the genes (from high to low were: B2M, ACTB, GAPD, RPL32, GNB2L1, TBP, and HPRT1. Conclusion Our data suggest that GNB2L1, HPRT1, RPL32, ACTB, and B2M may be suitable reference genes in gene expression studies of neutrophils.

  19. Prognostic relevance of urinary bladder cancer susceptibility Loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grotenhuis, A.J.; Dudek, A.M.D.; Verhaegh, G.W.C.T.; Witjes, J.A.; Aben, K.K.H.; Marel, S.L. van der; Vermeulen, S.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2014-01-01

    In the last few years, susceptibility loci have been identified for urinary bladder cancer (UBC) through candidate-gene and genome-wide association studies. Prognostic relevance of most of these loci is yet unknown. In this study, we used data of the Nijmegen Bladder Cancer Study (NBCS) to perform a

  20. Gene-mutation assays in lambda-lacZ transgenic mice : comparison of lacZ with endogenous genes in splenocytes and small intestinal epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delft, J.H.M. van; Bergmans, A.; Dam, F.J. van; Tates, A.D.; Howard, L.; Winton, D.J.; Baan, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    Comparison of results derived from transgenic animal gene-mutation assays with those from mutation analyses in endogenous genes is an important step in the validation of the former. We have used λlacZ transgenic mice to study alkylation-induced mutagenesis in vivo in (a) lacZ and hprt in spleen

  1. Genome-Wide Meta-Analyses of Breast, Ovarian, and Prostate Cancer Association Studies Identify Multiple New Susceptibility Loci Shared by at Least Two Cancer Types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kar, Siddhartha P; Beesley, Jonathan; Amin Al Olama, Ali

    2016-01-01

    -type-specific expression quantitative trait locus and enhancer-gene interaction annotations suggested target genes with potential cross-cancer roles at the new loci. Pathway analysis revealed significant enrichment of death receptor signaling genes near loci with P

  2. A mouse-to-man candidate gene study identifies association of chronic otitis media with the loci TGIF1 and FBXO11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutta, Mahmood F; Lambie, Jane; Hobson, Lindsey; Goel, Anuj; Hafrén, Lena; Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Mattila, Petri S; Farrall, Martin; Brown, Steve; Burton, Martin J

    2017-10-02

    Chronic otitis media with effusion (COME) is the most common cause of hearing loss in children, and known to have high heritability. Mutant mouse models have identified Fbxo11, Evi1, Tgif1, and Nisch as potential risk loci. We recruited children aged 10 and under undergoing surgical treatment for COME from 35 hospitals in the UK, and their nuclear family. We performed association testing with the loci FBXO11, EVI1, TGIF1 and NISCH and sought to replicate significant results in a case-control cohort from Finland. We tested 1296 families (3828 individuals), and found strength of association with the T allele at rs881835 (p = 0.006, OR 1.39) and the G allele at rs1962914 (p = 0.007, OR 1.58) at TGIF1, and the A allele at rs10490302 (p = 0.016, OR 1.17) and the G allele at rs2537742 (p = 0.038, OR 1.16) at FBXO11. Results were not replicated. This study supports smaller studies that have also suggested association of otitis media with polymorphism at FBX011, but this is the first study to report association with the locus TGIF1. Both FBX011 and TGIF1 are involved in TGF-β signalling, suggesting this pathway may be important in the transition from acute to chronic middle ear inflammation, and a potential molecular target.

  3. RNA Chimeras as a Gene Signature of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    www.plosone.org 11 August 2012 | Volume 7 | Issue 8 | e41659 Human genes Human ACTB mRNA: >gi|168480144|ref|NM_001101.3| Homo sapiens actin, beta...TCCCCCTTTTTTGTCCCCCAACTTGAGATGTATGAAGGCTTTTGGTCTCCCTGGGAGTGGGTGGAGGCAGCCAGGGCTTACCTGTACACTGACTTGAGACCAGTTGAATAAA AGTGCACACCTTAAAAATGAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA Human GAPDH mRNA: >gi|83641890|ref|NM_002046.4| Homo sapiens ... Homo sapiens hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (HPRT1), mRNA

  4. Suitability of endogenous reference genes for gene expression studies with human intraocular endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ruoxin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR has become widely applied as a method to measure transcript abundance. In order to be reflective of biological processes during health and disease this method is dependent on normalisation of data against stable endogenous controls. However, these genes can vary in their stability in different cell types. The importance of reference gene validation for a particular cell type is now well recognised and is an important step in any gene expression study. Results Cultured primary human choroidal and retinal endothelial cells were treated with the immunostimulant polyinosinic: polycytidylic acid or untreated. qRT-PCR was used to quantify the expression levels of 10 commonly used endogenous control genes, TBP, HPRT1, GAPDH, GUSB, PPIA, RPLP0, B2M, 18S rRNA, PGK1 and ACTB. Three different mathematical algorithms, GeNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper were used to analyse gene stability to give the most representative validation. In choroidal endothelial cells the most stable genes were ranked as HPRT1 and GUSB by GeNorm and NormFinder and HPRT1 and PPIA by BestKeeper. In retinal endothelial cells the most stable genes ranked were TBP and PGK1 by GeNorm and NormFinder and HPRT1 by BestKeeper. The least stable gene for both cell types was 18S with all 3 algorithms. Conclusions We have identified the most stable endogenous control genes in intraocular endothelial cells. It is suggested future qRT-PCR studies using these cells would benefit from adopting the genes identified in this study as the most appropriate endogenous control genes.

  5. Molecular evidence that the genes for dioecism and monoecism in Spinacia oleracea L. are located at different loci in a chromosomal region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K; Oda, Y; Haseda, A; Fujito, S; Mikami, T; Onodera, Y

    2014-03-01

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) is widely known to be dioecious. However, monoecious plants can also occur in this species. Sex expression in dioecious spinach plants is controlled by a single gene pair termed X and Y. Our previous study showed that a single, incompletely dominant gene, which controls the monoecious condition in spinach line 03-336, should be allelic or linked to X/Y. Here, we developed 19 AFLP markers closely linked to the monoecious gene. The AFLP markers were mapped to a 38.2-cM chromosomal region that included the monoecious gene, which is bracketed between flanking markers with a distance of 7.1 cM. The four AFLP markers developed in our studies were converted into sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers, which are linked to both the monoecious gene and Y and are common to both populations segregating for the genes. Linkage analysis using the SCAR markers suggested that the monoecious gene (M) and Y are located in different intervals, between different marker pairs. Analysis of populations segregating for both M and Y also directly demonstrates linkage of the genes at a distance of ~12 cM. The data presented in this study may be useful for breeding dioecious and highly male monoecious lines utilized as the pollen parents for hybrid seed production, as well as for studies of the evolutionary history of sexual systems in this species, and can provide a molecular basis for positional cloning of the sex-determining genes.

  6. SNP (-617C>A in ARE-like loci of the NRF2 gene: a new biomarker for prognosis of lung adenocarcinoma in Japanese non-smoking women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuko Okano

    Full Text Available The transcription factor NRF2 plays a pivotal role in protecting normal cells from external toxic challenges and oxidative stress, whereas it can also endow cancer cells resistance to anticancer drugs. At present little information is available about the genetic polymorphisms of the NRF2 gene and their clinical relevance. We aimed to investigate the single nucleotide polymorphisms in the NRF2 gene as a prognostic biomarker in lung cancer.We prepared genomic DNA samples from 387 Japanese patients with primary lung cancer and detected SNP (c.-617C>A; rs6721961 in the ARE-like loci of the human NRF2 gene by the rapid genetic testing method we developed in this study. We then analyzed the association between the SNP in the NRF2 gene and patients' overall survival.Patients harboring wild-type (WT homozygous (c.-617C/C, SNP heterozygous (c.-617C/A, and SNP homozygous (c.-617A/A alleles numbered 216 (55.8%, 147 (38.0%, and 24 (6.2%, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression models revealed that SNP homozygote (c.-617A/A was significantly related to gender. Its frequency was four-fold higher in female patients than in males (10.8% female vs 2.7% male and was associated with female non-smokers with adenocarcinoma. Interestingly, lung cancer patients carrying NRF2 SNP homozygous alleles (c.-617A/A and the 309T (WT allele in the MDM2 gene exhibited remarkable survival over 1,700 days after surgical operation (log-rank p = 0.021.SNP homozygous (c.-617A/A alleles in the NRF2 gene are associated with female non-smokers with adenocarcinoma and regarded as a prognostic biomarker for assessing overall survival of patients with lung adenocarcinoma.

  7. Confirmation of five novel susceptibility loci for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and integrated network analysis of 82 SLE susceptibility loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molineros, Julio E; Yang, Wanling; Zhou, Xu-Jie; Sun, Celi; Okada, Yukinori; Zhang, Huoru; Heng Chua, Kek; Lau, Yu-Lung; Kochi, Yuta; Suzuki, Akari; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Ma, Jianyang; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Kim, Kwangwoo; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Zhang, Hong; Shen, Nan; Looger, Loren L; Nath, Swapan K

    2017-03-15

    We recently identified ten novel SLE susceptibility loci in Asians and uncovered several additional suggestive loci requiring further validation. This study aimed to replicate five of these suggestive loci in a Han Chinese cohort from Hong Kong, followed by meta-analysis (11,656 cases and 23,968 controls) on previously reported Asian and European populations, and to perform bioinformatic analyses on all 82 reported SLE loci to identify shared regulatory signatures. We performed a battery of analyses for these five loci, as well as joint analyses on all 82 SLE loci. All five loci passed genome-wide significance: MYNN (rs10936599, Pmeta = 1.92 × 10-13, OR = 1.14), ATG16L2 (rs11235604, Pmeta = 8.87 × 10 -12, OR = 0.78), CCL22 (rs223881, Pmeta = 5.87 × 10-16, OR = 0.87), ANKS1A (rs2762340, Pmeta = 4.93 × 10-15, OR = 0.87) and RNASEH2C (rs1308020, Pmeta = 2.96 × 10-19, OR = 0.84) and co-located with annotated gene regulatory elements. The novel loci share genetic signatures with other reported SLE loci, including effects on gene expression, transcription factor binding, and epigenetic characteristics. Most (56%) of the correlated (r2 > 0.8) SNPs from the 82 SLE loci were implicated in differential expression (9.81 × 10-198 SLE loci, consistent with apoptosis playing a critical role in SLE. Enrichment analysis revealed common pathways, gene ontology, protein domains, and cell type-specific expression. In summary, we provide evidence of five novel SLE susceptibility loci. Integrated bioinformatics using all 82 loci revealed that SLE susceptibility loci share many gene regulatory features, suggestive of conserved mechanisms of SLE etiopathogenesis. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Regulation of alternative splicing in human obesity loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminska, Dorota; Käkelä, Pirjo; Nikkola, Elina; Venesmaa, Sari; Ilves, Imre; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Kolehmainen, Marjukka; Karhunen, Leila; Kuusisto, Johanna; Gylling, Helena; Pajukanta, Päivi; Laakso, Markku; Pihlajamäki, Jussi

    2016-10-01

    Multiple obesity susceptibility loci have been identified by genome-wide association studies, yet the mechanisms by which these loci influence obesity remain unclear. Alternative splicing could contribute to obesity by regulating the transcriptomic and proteomic diversity of genes in these loci. Based on a database search, 72 of the 136 genes at the 13 obesity loci encoded multiple protein isoforms. Thus, alternative splicing of these genes in adipose tissue samples was analyzed from the Metabolic Syndrome in Men population-based study and from two weight loss intervention studies (surgical and very low calorie diet). Alternative splicing was confirmed in 11 genes with PCR capillary electrophoresis in human subcutaneous adipose tissue. Interestingly, differential splicing of TRA2B, BAG6, and MSH5 was observed between lean individuals with normoglycemia and overweight individuals with type 2 diabetes. Of these genes, we detected fat depot-dependent splicing of TRA2B and BAG6 and weight loss-induced regulation of MSH5 splicing in the intervention studies. Finally, body mass index was a major determinant of TRA2B, BAG6, and MSH5 splicing in the combined data. This study provides evidence for alternative splicing in obesity loci, suggesting that alternative splicing at least in part mediates the obesity-associated risk in these loci. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  9. Identification of quantitative trait loci affecting ectomycorrhizal symbiosis in an interspecific F1 poplar cross and differential expression of genes in ectomycorrhizas of the two parents: Populus deltoides and Populus trichocarpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labbe, Jessy L [ORNL; Jorge, Veronique [INRA, Nancy, France; Vion, Patrice [INRA, Nancy, France; Marcais, Benoit [INRA, Nancy, France; Bastien, Catherine [INRA, Orleans, France; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Martin, Francis [INRA, Nancy, France; Le Tacon, F [UMR, France

    2011-01-01

    A Populus deltoides Populus trichocarpa F1 pedigree was analyzed for quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting ectomycorrhizal development and for microarray characterization of gene networks involved in this symbiosis. A 300 genotype progeny set was evaluated for its ability to form ectomycorrhiza with the basidiomycete Laccaria bicolor. The percentage of mycorrhizal root tips was determined on the root systems of all 300 progeny and their two parents. QTL analysis identified four significant QTLs, one on the P. deltoides and three on the P. trichocarpa genetic maps. These QTLs were aligned to the P. trichocarpa genome and each contained several megabases and encompass numerous genes. NimbleGen whole-genome microarray, using cDNA from RNA extracts of ectomycorrhizal root tips from the parental genotypes P. trichocarpa and P. deltoides, was used to narrow the candidate gene list. Among the 1,543 differentially expressed genes (p value 0.05; 5.0-fold change in transcript level) having different transcript levels in mycorrhiza of the two parents, 41 transcripts were located in the QTL intervals: 20 in Myc_d1, 14 in Myc_t1, and seven in Myc_t2, while no significant differences among transcripts were found in Myc_t3. Among these 41 transcripts, 25 were overrepresented in P. deltoides relative to P. trichocarpa; 16 were overrepresented in P. trichocarpa. The transcript showing the highest overrepresentation in P. trichocarpa mycorrhiza libraries compared to P. deltoides mycorrhiza codes for an ethylene-sensitive EREBP-4 protein which may repress defense mechanisms in P. trichocarpa while the highest overrepresented transcripts in P. deltoides code for proteins/genes typically associated with pathogen resistance.

  10. The genetic and molecular origin of natural variation for the fragrance trait in an elite Malaysian aromatic rice through quantitative trait loci mapping using SSR and gene-based markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golestan Hashemi, Farahnaz Sadat; Rafii, Mohd Y; Ismail, Mohd Razi; Mohamed, Mahmud Tengku Muda; Rahim, Harun A; Latif, Mohammad Abdul; Aslani, Farzad

    2015-01-25

    MRQ74, a popular aromatic Malaysian landrace, allows for charging considerably higher prices than non-aromatic landraces. Thus, breeding this profitable trait has become a priority for Malaysian rice breeding. Despite many studies on aroma genetics, ambiguities considering its genetic basis remain. It has been observed that identifying quantitative trait loci (QTLs) based on anchor markers, particularly candidate genes controlling a trait of interest, can increase the power of QTL detection. Hence, this study aimed to locate QTLs that influence natural variations in rice scent using microsatellites and candidate gene-based sequence polymorphisms. For this purpose, an F2 mapping population including 189 individual plants was developed by MRQ74 crosses with 'MR84', a non-scented Malaysian accession. Additionally, qualitative and quantitative approaches were applied to obtain a phenotype data framework. Consequently, we identified two QTLs on chromosomes 4 and 8. These QTLs explained from 3.2% to 39.3% of the total fragrance phenotypic variance. In addition, we could resolve linkage group 8 by adding six gene-based primers in the interval harboring the most robust QTL. Hence, we could locate a putative fgr allele in the QTL found on chromosome 8 in the interval RM223-SCU015RM (1.63cM). The identified QTLs represent an important step toward recognition of the rice flavor genetic control mechanism. In addition, this identification will likely accelerate the progress of the use of molecular markers for gene isolation, gene-based cloning, and marker-assisted selection breeding programs aimed at improving rice cultivars. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular cloning of the human homolog of a striatum-enriched phosphatase (STEP) gene and chromosomal mapping of the human and murine loci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xu; Luna, J. [Stanford Univ. Medical Center, CA (United States); Francke, U. [Stanford Univ. Medical Center, CA (United States)]|[Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

    1995-08-10

    A gene for a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase) was isolated from a human fetal brain cDNA library by PCR amplification. Sequence analysis revealed that the PTPase has a single phosphatase catalytic domain located at the C-terminus that includes the highly conserved amino acid domain [I/V]HCXAGXXR[S/T]GX[F/Y] found in all tyrosine phosphatases. Two proline-rich regions located at the N-terminus may contain putative Src homology domain 3 (SH3) binding motifs. Comparison of the PTPase with a previously cloned striatum enriched phosphatase (STEP) from rat and from mouse exhibited a high degree of identity ({approximately}85-90%) at both the nucleotide and the amino acid levels, indicating that the human PTPase is the homolog of the rat and murine STEP gene. By using a combination of somatic cell hybrid analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization, we have mapped the human STEP locus to chromosome 11p15.2-p15.1 and the murine STEP gene to chromosome 7B3-B5. These are two regions of known conserved synteny, providing further evidence that the human STEP is a true homolog of the murine STEP gene. Candidate disease genes in the vicinity include Usher syndrome type 1C in human and a mouse mutant locus, twister (twt). 50 refs., 3 figs.

  12. A genome-wide linkage and association study of musical aptitude identifies loci containing genes related to inner ear development and neurocognitive functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikkonen, J; Huang, Y; Onkamo, P; Ukkola-Vuoti, L; Raijas, P; Karma, K; Vieland, V J; Järvelä, I

    2015-02-01

    Humans have developed the perception, production and processing of sounds into the art of music. A genetic contribution to these skills of musical aptitude has long been suggested. We performed a genome-wide scan in 76 pedigrees (767 individuals) characterized for the ability to discriminate pitch (SP), duration (ST) and sound patterns (KMT), which are primary capacities for music perception. Using the Bayesian linkage and association approach implemented in program package KELVIN, especially designed for complex pedigrees, several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near genes affecting the functions of the auditory pathway and neurocognitive processes were identified. The strongest association was found at 3q21.3 (rs9854612) with combined SP, ST and KMT test scores (COMB). This region is located a few dozen kilobases upstream of the GATA binding protein 2 (GATA2) gene. GATA2 regulates the development of cochlear hair cells and the inferior colliculus (IC), which are important in tonotopic mapping. The highest probability of linkage was obtained for phenotype SP at 4p14, located next to the region harboring the protocadherin 7 gene, PCDH7. Two SNPs rs13146789 and rs13109270 of PCDH7 showed strong association. PCDH7 has been suggested to play a role in cochlear and amygdaloid complexes. Functional class analysis showed that inner ear and schizophrenia-related genes were enriched inside the linked regions. This study is the first to show the importance of auditory pathway genes in musical aptitude.

  13. Quantitative trait loci analysis of nitrate storage in Arabidopsis leading to an investigation of the contribution of the anion channel gene, AtCLC-c, to variation in nitrate levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Hisatomi; Kuromori, Takashi; Hirayama, Takashi; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Leigh, Roger A

    2004-09-01

    Storage of excess nitrate in the vacuole and its subsequent remobilization is an important aspect of a plant's nitrogen economy, but the genes controlling the underlying processes have not all been identified and characterized. Cape Verdi Island (Cvi)/Landsberg erecta (Ler) and Columbia (Col)/Landsberg erecta recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations of Arabidopsis thaliana were used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling natural variation in nitrate concentrations. One major and two minor QTLs were found for the Cvi/Ler population and one minor QTL for the Col/Ler RIL. These were designated NA1 to NA4. The major Cvi/Ler QTL (NA3) was located at the bottom of chromosome 5. No interaction among the QTLs was found by two-way ANOVA. By comparing in silico the locations of the QTLs with a physical map of the Arabidopsis genome, candidate genes for each QTL were identified. Several of these were anion channels of the AtCLC family. One of these, AtCLC-c, coincided with NA3 and its role was investigated using a mutant with a transposon insertion in AtCLC-c. Mutant plants homozygous for the insertion (designated clcc-1) had less than 5% of AtCLC-c mRNA compared with wild-type (WT) shoots. They also had significantly lower nitrate concentrations when grown at a range of external nitrate concentrations. The concentrations of chloride, malate, and citrate were also affected in the mutant. In wild-type plants, expression of AtCLC-c was down-regulated in the presence of nitrate, but ammonium had a much smaller effect while chloride and sulphate did not affect expression. These and published results suggest that multiple genes affect nitrate concentrations in plants and that AtCLC-c and other members of the AtCLC gene family play some role in this.

  14. Selection of reference genes for gene expression studies in pig tissues using SYBR green qPCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillig, Ann-Britt Nygaard; Jørgensen, Claus Bøttcher; Cirera, Susanna

    2007-01-01

    -monooxygenase activation protein zeta polypeptide (YWHAZ). The stability of these reference genes in different pig tissues was investigated using the geNorm application. The range of expression stability in the genes analysed was (from the most stable to the least stable): ACTB/RPL4, TBP, HPRT, HMBS, YWHAZ...... quality reference genes is of crucial importance for the interpretation of data generated by real-time qPCR. Results: In this study nine commonly used reference genes were investigated in 17 different pig tissues using real-time qPCR with SYBR green. The genes included beta-actin (ACTB), beta-2......-microglobulin (B2M), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS), hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase I (HPRT I), ribosomal protein L4 (RPL4), succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit A (SDHA), TATA box binding protein (TPB) and tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5...

  15. Gene-centric meta-analyses of 108 912 individuals confirm known body mass index loci and reveal three novel signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, Yiran; Lanktree, Matthew B.; Taylor, Kira C.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Lange, Leslie A.; Keating, Brendan J.; Fairfax, Benjamin P.; Elbers, Clara C.; Barnard, John; Farrall, Martin; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Baumert, Jens; Castillo, Berta A.; Gaunt, Tom R.; Gong, Yan; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Romaine, Simon P. R.; Kumari, Meena; Rafelt, Suzanne; Smith, Erin N.; Li, Yun R.; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; van Iperen, Erik P. A.; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Toskala, Elina; Zhang, Li; Ochs-Balcom, Heather M.; Bhangale, Tushar R.; Chandrupatla, Hareesh R.; Drenos, Fotios; Gieger, Christian; Gupta, Jayanta; Johnson, Toby; Kleber, Marcus E.; Makino, Seiko; Mangino, Massimo; Meng, Yan; Nelson, Christopher P.; Pankow, James S.; Pankratz, Nathan; Price, Tom S.; Shaffer, Jonathan; Shen, Haiqing; Tischfield, Sam; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Atwood, Larry D.; Bailey, Kristian M.; Balasubramanyam, Ashok; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Basart, Hanneke; Bauer, Florianne; Behr, Elijah R.; Beitelshees, Amber L.; Berenson, Gerald S.; Beresford, Shirley A. A.; Bezzina, Connie R.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Boer, Jolanda M. A.; Braund, Peter S.; Burke, Gregory L.; Burkley, Ben; Carty, Cara; Chen, Wei; Clarke, Robert; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M.; Curtis, Sean P.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; de Jong, Jonas S.; Delles, Christian; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Duggan, David; Feldman, Harold I.; Furlong, Clement E.; Gorski, Mathias M.; Gums, John G.; Hardwick, Robert; Hastie, Claire; Heid, Iris M.; Huang, Guan-Hua; Huggins, Gordon S.; Humphries, Steve E.; Kirkland, Susan A.; Kivimaki, Mika; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E.; Knowler, William C.; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Langaee, Taimour Y.; Li, Mingyao; Lyon, Helen N.; Maiwald, Steffi; Marshall, Julieann K.; Mehta, Amar; Meijs, Matthijs F. L.; Melander, Olle; Meyer, Nuala; Mitra, Nandita; Molony, Cliona M.; Morrow, David A.; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Nieto, Javier F.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Palmen, Jutta; Pepine, Carl J.; Ranchalis, Jane; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Rosenthal, Elisabeth A.; Scharnagl, Hubert; Schork, Nicholas J.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Shah, Tina; Shashaty, Michael; Shimbo, Daichi; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Thomas, Fridtjof; Tobin, Martin D.; Tsai, Michael Y.; Verschuren, W. M. Monique; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Young, Taylor; Yusuf, Salim; Zafarmand, Mohammad H.; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Anand, Sonia S.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Burton, Paul R.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Casas, Juan P.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Christiani, David C.; Christie, Jason; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Davey-Smith, George; Davidson, Karina W.; Day, Ian N.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Dorn, Gerald W.; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Hall, Alistair S.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofker, Marten H.; Hovingh, Kees G.; Illig, Thomas; Jamshidi, Yalda; Jarvik, Gail P.; Johnson, Julie A.; Kanetsky, Peter A.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Lawlor, Debbie A.; März, Winfried; McCaffery, Jeanne; Mega, Jessica L.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Murray, Sarah S.; O'Connell, Jeffery R.; Patel, Sanjay R.; Peters, Annette; Pettinger, Mary; Rader, Daniel J.; Redline, Susan; Reilly, Muredach P.; Sabatine, Marc S.; Schadt, Eric E.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Spector, Tim D.; Taylor, Herman A.; Thorand, Barbara; Trip, Mieke D.; Watkins, Hugh; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Fox, Caroline S.; Grant, Struan F. A.; Peter, Inga; Talmud, Philippa J.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Wilson, James G.; Knight, Julian C.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Hegele, Robert A.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Monda, Keri L.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Demerath, Ellen W.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Reiner, Alex P.; North, Kari E.; Papanicolaou, George J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent genetic association studies have made progress in uncovering components of the genetic architecture of the body mass index (BMI). We used the ITMAT-Broad-Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe) (IBC) array comprising up to 49 320 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across ~2100

  16. Haplotype-based analysis of ulcerative colitis risk loci identifies both IL2 and IL21 as susceptibility genes in Han Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jihua; Zhou, Lu; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Qian, Jiaming; Zhu, Feng; Sun, Gang; Zhu, Liming; Ma, Xuejun; Dijkstra, Gerard; Wijmenga, Cisca; Faber, Klaas Nico; Lu, Xinghua; Weersma, Rinse K

    2011-12-01

    The incidence of ulcerative colitis (UC) varies between Western and Eastern ethnicities. A distinct genetic background may play a role in the differences. Until now, very little was known of the UC genetics in Asian populations. Here we performed a haplotype-based analysis of six known UC susceptibility loci in Han Chinese patients. In all, 245 UC patients and 300 healthy controls of Han Chinese descent were genotyped for 27 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which cover the major haplotypes of the chromosome regions containing IL10, IL2/IL21, MYO9B, ECM1, MST1, and IL23R in Han Chinese. In contrast to the tight linkage disequilibrium (LD) block of the IL2/IL21 region in Caucasians, IL2 and IL21 reside in two independent LD blocks in Han Chinese. The IL2 SNP rs2069762 (P = 7.0 × 10(-4) , odds ratio [OR] = 1.54, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.20-1.99) and the IL21 SNP rs2055979 (P = 1.2 × 10(-4) , OR = 1.50, 95% CI 1.17-1.92) were independently associated with UC. We identified one risk haplotype in IL2 and another independent risk haplotype in IL21. In addition to the IL2/IL21 locus, we observed association of the TT genotype of SNP rs1545620 in MYO9B with UC (P = 0.0169; OR = 0.29, 95% CI 0.11-0.78) and association of rs17375018 in IL23R with pancolitis in Chinese UC patients (P = 0.002; OR = 2.38, 95% CI 1.41-4.02). Our study confirmed the association of the IL2/IL21 region with UC in Han Chinese patients, and further implied both IL2 and IL21 as genetic risk factors for UC. Han Chinese UC patients share part of their genetic susceptibility with Caucasian patients. Copyright © 2011 Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America, Inc.

  17. Comparative study of mutations in SNP loci of K-RAS, hMLH1 and hMSH2 genes in neoplastic intestinal polyps and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhi-Hui; Cui, Li-Hong; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Li, Chao; He, Xing

    2014-12-28

    To clarify the molecular mechanism involved in pathogenesis of colorectal cancer as well as clinical significance of genetic analysis of histological samples. A total of 480 blood and tissue specimens were collected in our hospital from January 2011 to October 2012. In the observation group, there were 120 blood specimens and 120 intestinal tract tissue specimens collected from patients with neoplastic intestinal polyps. In the control group I there were 80 blood specimens and 80 intestinal tract tissue specimens collected from patients with colorectal cancer. In the control group II there were 40 blood specimens and 40 intestinal tract tissue specimens collected from healthy individuals. The gene segments were amplified using PCR and DNA gel electrophoresis along with DNA sequence analysis were employed for the detection of the following single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): K-RAS codons 12 and 13; hMLH1 (human mutS homolog 1) gene missense mutation at Va1384Asp; hMSH2 (human mutS homolog 2) gene missense mutation at 2783C/A. The mutation rate of the SNP at Va1384Asp locus of the hMLH1 gene from blood and tissue specimens in the observation group showed no statistical difference from those in the control group I. The mutation rates of SNPs in codons 12 and 13 of K-RAS and at 2783C/A locus of the hMSH2 gene were significantly lower in the observation group than in the control group I (χ(2) = 15.476, 29.670, 10.811, 16.618, 33.538, 7.898, P gene was significantly higher in the observation group when compared to the control group II (χ(2) = 10.486, 4.876, P RAS and at 2783C/A locus of the hMSH2 gene did not show any statistical difference from those in the control group II. There may be important clinical significance and relevance between neoplastic intestinal polyps and colorectal cancer in terms of the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis.

  18. Identification of suitable reference genes for quantitative gene expression analysis in rat adipose stromal cells induced to trilineage differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Bruno Paiva Dos; da Costa Diesel, Luciana Fraga; da Silva Meirelles, Lindolfo; Nardi, Nance Beyer; Camassola, Melissa

    2016-12-15

    This study was designed to (i) identify stable reference genes for the analysis of gene expression during in vitro differentiation of rat adipose stromal cells (rASCs), (ii) recommend stable genes for individual treatment conditions, and (iii) validate these genes by comparison with normalization results from stable and unstable reference genes. On the basis of a literature review, eight genes were selected: Actb, B2m, Hprt1, Ppia, Rplp0, Rpl13a, Rpl5, and Ywhaz. Genes were ranked according to their stability under different culture conditions as assessed using GenNorm, NormFinder, and RefFinder algorithms. Although the employed algorithms returned different rankings, the most frequently top-ranked genes were: B2m and/or Ppia for all 28day treatments (ALL28); Ppia and Hprt1 (adipogenic differentiation; A28), B2m (chondrogenic differentiation; C28), Rpl5 (controls maintained in complete culture medium; CCM), Rplp0 (osteogenic differentiation for 3days; O3), Rpl13a and Actb (osteogenic differentiation for 7days; O7), Rplp0 and Ppia (osteogenic differentiation for 14days; O14), Hprt1 and Ppia (osteogenic differentiation for 28days; O28), as well as Actb (all osteogenesis time points combined; ALLOSTEO). The obtained results indicate that the performance of reference genes depends on the differentiation protocol and on the analysis time, thus providing valuable information for the design of RT-PCR experiments. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Squamate Conserved Loci (SqCL): A unified set of conserved loci for phylogenomics and population genetics of squamate reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Sonal; Grundler, Maggie; Colli, Guarino; Rabosky, Daniel L

    2017-04-18

    The identification of conserved loci across genomes, along with advances in target capture methods and high-throughput sequencing, has helped spur a phylogenomics revolution by enabling researchers to gather large numbers of homologous loci across clades of interest with minimal upfront investment in locus design. Target capture for vertebrate animals is currently dominated by two approaches-anchored hybrid enrichment (AHE) and ultraconserved elements (UCE)-and both approaches have proven useful for addressing questions in phylogenomics, phylogeography and population genomics. However, these two sets of loci have minimal overlap with each other; moreover, they do not include many traditional loci that that have been used for phylogenetics. Here, we combine across UCE, AHE and traditional phylogenetic gene locus sets to generate the Squamate Conserved Loci set, a single integrated probe set that can generate high-quality and highly complete data across all three loci types. We use these probes to generate data for 44 phylogenetically disparate taxa that collectively span approximately 33% of terrestrial vertebrate diversity. Our results generated an average of 4.29 Mb across 4709 loci per individual, of which an average of 2.99 Mb was sequenced to high enough coverage (≥10×) to use for population genetic analyses. We validate the utility of these loci for both phylogenomic and population genomic questions, provide a comparison among these locus sets of their relative usefulness and suggest areas for future improvement. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Fine mapping and candidate gene search of quantitative trait loci for growth and obesity using mouse intersubspecific subcongenic intercrosses and exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Akira; Okuno, Sin-ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Although growth and body composition traits are quantitative traits of medical and agricultural importance, the genetic and molecular basis of those traits remains elusive. Our previous genome-wide quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses in an intersubspecific backcross population between C57BL/6JJcl (B6) and wild Mus musculus castaneus mice revealed a major growth QTL (named Pbwg1) on a proximal region of mouse chromosome 2. Using the B6.Cg-Pbwg1 intersubspecific congenic strain created, we revealed 12 closely linked QTLs for body weight and body composition traits on an approximately 44.1-Mb wild-derived congenic region. In this study, we narrowed down genomic regions harboring three (Pbwg1.12, Pbwg1.3 and Pbwg1.5) of the 12 linked QTLs and searched for possible candidate genes for the QTLs. By phenotypic analyses of F2 intercross populations between B6 and each of four B6.Cg-Pbwg1 subcongenic strains with overlapping and non-overlapping introgressed regions, we physically defined Pbwg1.12 affecting body weight to a 3.8-Mb interval (61.5-65.3 Mb) on chromosome 2. We fine-mapped Pbwg1.3 for body length to an 8.0-Mb interval (57.3-65.3) and Pbwg1.5 for abdominal white fat weight to a 2.1-Mb interval (59.4-61.5). The wild-derived allele at Pbwg1.12 and Pbwg1.3 uniquely increased body weight and length despite the fact that the wild mouse has a smaller body size than that of B6, whereas it decreased fat weight at Pbwg1.5. Exome sequencing and candidate gene prioritization suggested that Gcg and Grb14 are putative candidate genes for Pbwg1.12 and that Ly75 and Itgb6 are putative candidate genes for Pbwg1.5. These genes had nonsynonymous SNPs, but the SNPs were predicted to be not harmful to protein functions. These results provide information helpful to identify wild-derived quantitative trait genes causing enhanced growth and resistance to obesity.

  1. Fine mapping and candidate gene search of quantitative trait loci for growth and obesity using mouse intersubspecific subcongenic intercrosses and exome sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Ishikawa

    Full Text Available Although growth and body composition traits are quantitative traits of medical and agricultural importance, the genetic and molecular basis of those traits remains elusive. Our previous genome-wide quantitative trait locus (QTL analyses in an intersubspecific backcross population between C57BL/6JJcl (B6 and wild Mus musculus castaneus mice revealed a major growth QTL (named Pbwg1 on a proximal region of mouse chromosome 2. Using the B6.Cg-Pbwg1 intersubspecific congenic strain created, we revealed 12 closely linked QTLs for body weight and body composition traits on an approximately 44.1-Mb wild-derived congenic region. In this study, we narrowed down genomic regions harboring three (Pbwg1.12, Pbwg1.3 and Pbwg1.5 of the 12 linked QTLs and searched for possible candidate genes for the QTLs. By phenotypic analyses of F2 intercross populations between B6 and each of four B6.Cg-Pbwg1 subcongenic strains with overlapping and non-overlapping introgressed regions, we physically defined Pbwg1.12 affecting body weight to a 3.8-Mb interval (61.5-65.3 Mb on chromosome 2. We fine-mapped Pbwg1.3 for body length to an 8.0-Mb interval (57.3-65.3 and Pbwg1.5 for abdominal white fat weight to a 2.1-Mb interval (59.4-61.5. The wild-derived allele at Pbwg1.12 and Pbwg1.3 uniquely increased body weight and length despite the fact that the wild mouse has a smaller body size than that of B6, whereas it decreased fat weight at Pbwg1.5. Exome sequencing and candidate gene prioritization suggested that Gcg and Grb14 are putative candidate genes for Pbwg1.12 and that Ly75 and Itgb6 are putative candidate genes for Pbwg1.5. These genes had nonsynonymous SNPs, but the SNPs were predicted to be not harmful to protein functions. These results provide information helpful to identify wild-derived quantitative trait genes causing enhanced growth and resistance to obesity.

  2. Putative resistance gene markers associated with quantitative trait loci for fire blight resistance in Malus ‘Robusta 5’ accessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Breeding of fire blight resistant scions and rootstocks is a goal of several international apple breeding programs, as options are limited for management of this destructive disease caused by the bacterial pathogen Erwinia amylovora. A broad, large-effect quantitative trait locus (QTL) for fire blight resistance has been reported on linkage group 3 of Malus ‘Robusta 5’. In this study we identified markers derived from putative fire blight resistance genes associated with the QTL by integrating further genetic mapping studies with bioinformatics analysis of transcript profiling data and genome sequence databases. Results When several defined E.amylovora strains were used to inoculate three progenies from international breeding programs, all with ‘Robusta 5’ as a common parent, two distinct QTLs were detected on linkage group 3, where only one had previously been mapped. In the New Zealand ‘Malling 9’ X ‘Robusta 5’ population inoculated with E. amylovora ICMP11176, the proximal QTL co-located with SNP markers derived from a leucine-rich repeat, receptor-like protein ( MxdRLP1) and a closely linked class 3 peroxidase gene. While the QTL detected in the German ‘Idared’ X ‘Robusta 5’ population inoculated with E. amylovora strains Ea222_JKI or ICMP11176 was approximately 6 cM distal to this, directly below a SNP marker derived from a heat shock 90 family protein gene ( HSP90). In the US ‘Otawa3’ X ‘Robusta5’ population inoculated with E. amylovora strains Ea273 or E2002a, the position of the LOD score peak on linkage group 3 was dependent upon the pathogen strains used for inoculation. One of the five MxdRLP1 alleles identified in fire blight resistant and susceptible cultivars was genetically associated with resistance and used to develop a high resolution melting PCR marker. A resistance QTL detected on linkage group 7 of the US population co-located with another HSP90 gene-family member and a WRKY transcription factor

  3. Putative resistance gene markers associated with quantitative trait loci for fire blight resistance in Malus ‘Robusta 5’ accessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gardiner Susan E

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breeding of fire blight resistant scions and rootstocks is a goal of several international apple breeding programs, as options are limited for management of this destructive disease caused by the bacterial pathogen Erwinia amylovora. A broad, large-effect quantitative trait locus (QTL for fire blight resistance has been reported on linkage group 3 of Malus ‘Robusta 5’. In this study we identified markers derived from putative fire blight resistance genes associated with the QTL by integrating further genetic mapping studies with bioinformatics analysis of transcript profiling data and genome sequence databases. Results When several defined E.amylovora strains were used to inoculate three progenies from international breeding programs, all with ‘Robusta 5’ as a common parent, two distinct QTLs were detected on linkage group 3, where only one had previously been mapped. In the New Zealand ‘Malling 9’ X ‘Robusta 5’ population inoculated with E. amylovora ICMP11176, the proximal QTL co-located with SNP markers derived from a leucine-rich repeat, receptor-like protein ( MxdRLP1 and a closely linked class 3 peroxidase gene. While the QTL detected in the German ‘Idared’ X ‘Robusta 5’ population inoculated with E. amylovora strains Ea222_JKI or ICMP11176 was approximately 6 cM distal to this, directly below a SNP marker derived from a heat shock 90 family protein gene ( HSP90. In the US ‘Otawa3’ X ‘Robusta5’ population inoculated with E. amylovora strains Ea273 or E2002a, the position of the LOD score peak on linkage group 3 was dependent upon the pathogen strains used for inoculation. One of the five MxdRLP1 alleles identified in fire blight resistant and susceptible cultivars was genetically associated with resistance and used to develop a high resolution melting PCR marker. A resistance QTL detected on linkage group 7 of the US population co-located with another HSP90 gene-family member and a WRKY

  4. Gene susceptibility identification in a longitudinal study confirms new loci in the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and influences lung function decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jungang; Wu, Hongxu; Xu, Yuzhu; Wu, Xiaojie; Liu, Xue; Shang, Jin; Zhao, Jianping; Zhao, Junling; Wang, Jianmiao; Dela Cruz, Charles S; Xiong, Weining; Xu, Yongjian

    2015-04-18

    To identify COPD associated gene susceptibility and lung function in a longitudinal cohort including COPD and subjects who were at risk for developing COPD, and to replicate this in two cross-sectional and longitudinal populations in Chinese Han population. Three cohorts were recruited in this study, including an 18-year follow-up population (306 COPD and 743 control subjects) in one village in 1992 and it changed to 409 COPD and 611 controls in 2010, a 2 year follow-up study in another village (374 COPD and 377 controls) and another 2 year follow-up one in a city (541 COPD and 560 controls) in 2010. Sixteen candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected for genotyping. Among them, 5SNPs in or near HHIP, 1SNP in IREB2 and 1SNP in FAM13A were previously reported to be associated with COPD susceptibility or lung function decline. And another 9SNPs were selected from HapMap website as HHIP tags. In 2010, totaling 1,324 COPD patients and 1,548 healthy controls were finally included in our genetic susceptibility analyses. We identified two new regions showing an association with COPD susceptibility in the Human Hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) rs11100865 and rs7654947, and we confirmed that the family with sequence similarity 13 member A gene (FAM13A) rs7671167 was associated with the development of COPD in Chinese Han population. And the HHIP rs7654947 and FAM13A rs7671167 were associated with lung function decline, and this result was replicated in other two populations. These results suggest an important role of the HHIP and FAM13A regions as genetic risk factors for COPD development and lung function decline in Chinese Han population. Future research on these genes should focus on the molecular mechanisms of these genes on developing COPD and creating therapies to alleviate reduced lung function.

  5. Analysis of Polymorphisms in the Merozoite Surface Protein-3a Gene and Two Microsatellite Loci in Sri Lankan Plasmodium vivax: Evidence of Population Substructure in Sri Lanka

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, Mette L; Rajakaruna, Rupika S; Amerasinghe, Priyanie H

    2011-01-01

    Abstract. The geographical distribution of genetic variation in Plasmodium vivax samples (N = 386) from nine districts across Sri Lanka is described using three markers; the P. vivax merozoite surface protein-3a (Pvmsp-3a) gene, and the two microsatellites m1501 and m3502. At Pvmsp-3a, 11 alleles....... The results show evidence of high genetic diversity and possible population substructure of P. vivax populations in Sri Lanka....

  6. Selection of Suitable Internal Control Genes for Accurate Normalization of Real-Time Quantitative PCR Data of Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) Blastocysts Produced by SCNT and IVF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Tanushri Jerath; Lagah, Swati Viviyan; Sharma, Ankita; Singla, Suresh Kumar; Mukesh, Manishi; Chauhan, Manmohan Singh; Manik, Radheysham; Palta, Prabhat

    2017-10-01

    We evaluated the suitability of 10 candidate internal control genes (ICGs), belonging to different functional classes, namely ACTB, EEF1A1, GAPDH, HPRT1, HMBS, RPS15, RPS18, RPS23, SDHA, and UBC for normalizing the real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) data of blastocyst-stage buffalo embryos produced by hand-made cloning and in vitro fertilization (IVF). Total RNA was isolated from three pools, each of cloned and IVF blastocysts (n = 50/pool) for cDNA synthesis. Two different statistical algorithms geNorm and NormFinder were used for evaluating the stability of these genes. Based on gene stability measure (M value) and pairwise variation (V value), calculated by geNorm analysis, the most stable ICGs were RPS15, HPRT1, and ACTB for cloned blastocysts, HMBS, UBC, and HPRT1 for IVF blastocysts and RPS15, GAPDH, and HPRT1 for both the embryo types analyzed together. RPS18 was the least stable gene for both cloned and IVF blastocysts. Following NormFinder analysis, the order of stability was RPS15 = HPRT1>GAPDH for cloned blastocysts, HMBS = UBC>RPS23 for IVF blastocysts, and HPRT1>GAPDH>RPS15 for cloned and IVF blastocysts together. These results suggest that despite overlapping of the three most stable ICGs between cloned and IVF blastocysts, the panel of ICGs selected for normalization of qPCR data of cloned and IVF blastocyst-stage embryos should be different.

  7. Selection of reference genes for gene expression studies in pig tissues using SYBR green qPCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredholm Merete

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR is a method for rapid and reliable quantification of mRNA transcription. Internal standards such as reference genes are used to normalise mRNA levels between different samples for an exact comparison of mRNA transcription level. Selection of high quality reference genes is of crucial importance for the interpretation of data generated by real-time qPCR. Results In this study nine commonly used reference genes were investigated in 17 different pig tissues using real-time qPCR with SYBR green. The genes included beta-actin (ACTB, beta-2-microglobulin (B2M, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (HPRT1, ribosomal protein L4 (RPL4, succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit A (SDHA, TATA box binding protein (TPBand tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxygenase activation protein zeta polypeptide (YWHAZ. The stability of these reference genes in different pig tissues was investigated using the geNorm application. The range of expression stability in the genes analysed was (from the most stable to the least stable: ACTB/RPL4, TBP, HPRT, HMBS, YWHAZ, SDHA, B2M and GAPDH. Conclusion Expression stability varies greatly between genes. ACTB, RPL4, TPB and HPRT1 were found to have the highest stability across tissues. Based on both expression stability and expression level, our data suggest that ACTB and RPL4 are good reference genes for high abundant transcripts while TPB and HPRT1 are good reference genes for low abundant transcripts in expression studies across different pig tissues.

  8. Comprehensive SNP scan of DNA repair and DNA damage response genes reveal multiple susceptibility loci conferring risk to tobacco associated leukoplakia and oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Pinaki; Datta, Sayantan; Maiti, Guru Prasad; Baral, Aradhita; Jha, Ganga Nath; Panda, Chinmay Kumar; Chowdhury, Shantanu; Ghosh, Saurabh; Roy, Bidyut; Roychoudhury, Susanta

    2013-01-01

    Polymorphic variants of DNA repair and damage response genes play major role in carcinogenesis. These variants are suspected as predisposition factors to Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). For identification of susceptible variants affecting OSCC development in Indian population, the "maximally informative" method of SNP selection from HapMap data to non-HapMap populations was applied. Three hundred twenty-five SNPs from 11 key genes involved in double strand break repair, mismatch repair and DNA damage response pathways were genotyped on a total of 373 OSCC, 253 leukoplakia and 535 unrelated control individuals. The significantly associated SNPs were validated in an additional cohort of 144 OSCC patients and 160 controls. The rs12515548 of MSH3 showed significant association with OSCC both in the discovery and validation phases (discovery P-value: 1.43E-05, replication P-value: 4.84E-03). Two SNPs (rs12360870 of MRE11A, P-value: 2.37E-07 and rs7003908 of PRKDC, P-value: 7.99E-05) were found to be significantly associated only with leukoplakia. Stratification of subjects based on amount of tobacco consumption identified SNPs that were associated with either high or low tobacco exposed group. The study reveals a synergism between associated SNPs and lifestyle factors in predisposition to OSCC and leukoplakia.

  9. Genome-Wide Linkage and Association Analysis Identifies Major Gene Loci for Guttural Pouch Tympany in Arabian and German Warmblood Horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Julia; Ohnesorge, Bernhard; Distl, Ottmar

    2012-01-01

    Equine guttural pouch tympany (GPT) is a hereditary condition affecting foals in their first months of life. Complex segregation analyses in Arabian and German warmblood horses showed the involvement of a major gene as very likely. Genome-wide linkage and association analyses including a high density marker set of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were performed to map the genomic region harbouring the potential major gene for GPT. A total of 85 Arabian and 373 German warmblood horses were genotyped on the Illumina equine SNP50 beadchip. Non-parametric multipoint linkage analyses showed genome-wide significance on horse chromosomes (ECA) 3 for German warmblood at 16–26 Mb and 34–55 Mb and for Arabian on ECA15 at 64–65 Mb. Genome-wide association analyses confirmed the linked regions for both breeds. In Arabian, genome-wide association was detected at 64 Mb within the region with the highest linkage peak on ECA15. For German warmblood, signals for genome-wide association were close to the peak region of linkage at 52 Mb on ECA3. The odds ratio for the SNP with the highest genome-wide association was 0.12 for the Arabian. In conclusion, the refinement of the regions with the Illumina equine SNP50 beadchip is an important step to unravel the responsible mutations for GPT. PMID:22848553

  10. Intercontinental long-distance dispersal of Canellaceae from the New to the Old World revealed by a nuclear single copy gene and chloroplast loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Sebastian; Salomo, Karsten; Salazar, Jackeline; Naumann, Julia; Jaramillo, M Alejandra; Neinhuis, Christoph; Feild, Taylor S; Wanke, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    Canellales, a clade consisting of Winteraceae and Canellaceae, represent the smallest order of magnoliid angiosperms. The clade shows a broad distribution throughout the Southern Hemisphere, across a diverse range of dry to wet tropical forests. In contrast to their sister-group, Winteraceae, the phylogenetic relations and biogeography within Canellaceae remain poorly studied. Here we present the phylogenetic relationships of all currently recognized genera of Canellales with a special focus on the Old World Canellaceae using a combined dataset consisting of the chloroplast trnK-matK-trnK-psbA and the nuclear single copy gene mag1 (Maigo 1). Within Canellaceae we found high statistical support for the monophyly of Warburgia and Cinnamosma. However, we also found relationships that differ from previous studies. Cinnamodendron splitted into two clades, a South American clade and a second clade confined to the Antilles and adjacent areas. Cinnamodendron from the Antilles, as well as Capsicodendron, South American Cinnamodendron and Pleodendron were not monophyletic. Consequently, Capsicodendron should be included in the South American Cinnamodendron clade and the genus Pleodendron merged with the Cinnamodendron clade from the Antilles. We also found that Warburgia (restricted to mainland eastern Africa) together with the South American Cinnamodendron and Capsicodendron are sister to the Malagasy genus Cinnamosma. In addition to the unexpected geographical relationships, both biogeographic and molecular clock analyses suggest vicariance, extinction, and at least one intercontinental long-distance-dispersal event. Our dating result contrasts previous work on Winteraceae. Diversification of Winteraceae took place in the Paleocene, predating the Canellaceae diversification by 13 MA in the Eocene. The phylogenetic relationships for Canellaceae supported here offer a solid framework for a future taxonomic revision of the Canellaceae. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published

  11. Ancient conservation of trinucleotide microsatellite loci in polistine wasps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ezenwa, V O; Peters, J M; Zhu, Y

    1998-01-01

    Microsatellites have proven to be very useful genetic markers for studies of kinship, parentage, and gene mapping. If microsatellites are conserved among species, then those developed for one species can be used on related species, which would save the time and effort of developing new loci. We...... evaluated conservation of 27 trinucleotide loci that were derived from 2 species of Polistes wasps in cross-species applications on 27 species chosen from the major lineages of the Vespidae, which diverged as much as 144 million years ago. We further investigated cross-species polymorphism levels for 18...... of the loci. There was a clear relationship between cladistic distance and both conservation of the priming sites and heterozygosity. However the loci derived from P. bellicosus were much more widely conserved and polymorphic than were those derived from P. annularis. The disparity in cross-species utility...

  12. New genetic loci implicated in fasting glucose homeostasis and their impact on type 2 diabetes risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupuis, Josée; Langenberg, Claudia; Prokopenko, Inga

    2010-01-01

    Levels of circulating glucose are tightly regulated. To identify new loci influencing glycemic traits, we performed meta-analyses of 21 genome-wide association studies informative for fasting glucose, fasting insulin and indices of beta-cell function (HOMA-B) and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in up...... to 46,186 nondiabetic participants. Follow-up of 25 loci in up to 76,558 additional subjects identified 16 loci associated with fasting glucose and HOMA-B and two loci associated with fasting insulin and HOMA-IR. These include nine loci newly associated with fasting glucose (in or near ADCY5, MADD, ADRA...... proliferation, development, glucose-sensing and circadian regulation. Our results demonstrate that genetic studies of glycemic traits can identify type 2 diabetes risk loci, as well as loci containing gene variants that are associated with a modest elevation in glucose levels but are not associated with overt...

  13. HPRT deficiency as the cause of ESRD in a 24-year-old patient: a very rare presentation of the disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassimatis, T I; Simmonds, H A; Goudas, P C; Marinaki, A M; Fairbanks, L D; Diamandopoulos, A A

    2005-01-01

    A 24-year-old male with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and disproportionately high uric acid plasma concentration was admitted to our unit. After studying the patient's medical history, as well as that of the entire family, hyperuricemia was discovered in his brother, while microscopic examination of his brother's and mother's urine revealed abundant uric acid crystals. After performing purine metabolic studies, it was determined that the two siblings suffered from partial hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) deficiency (Kelley-Seegmiller syndrome). This report highlights the importance of clinical awareness and a thorough examination of the patient's medical history for establishing an early diagnosis and commencing treatment for such rare inherited metabolic disorders to prevent renal failure.

  14. Reference gene screening for analyzing gene expression across goat tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Xing; Li, Yun-Sheng; Ding, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Rong; Zhang, Yun-Hai

    2013-12-01

    Real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) is one of the important methods for investigating the changes in mRNA expression levels in cells and tissues. Selection of the proper reference genes is very important when calibrating the results of real-time quantitative PCR. Studies on the selection of reference genes in goat tissues are limited, despite the economic importance of their meat and dairy products. We used real-time quantitative PCR to detect the expression levels of eight reference gene candidates (18S, TBP, HMBS, YWHAZ, ACTB, HPRT1, GAPDH and EEF1A2) in ten tissues types sourced from Boer goats. The optimal reference gene combination was selected according to the results determined by geNorm, NormFinder and Bestkeeper software packages. The analyses showed that tissue is an important variability factor in genes expression stability. When all tissues were considered, 18S, TBP and HMBS is the optimal reference combination for calibrating quantitative PCR analysis of gene expression from goat tissues. Dividing data set by tissues, ACTB was the most stable in stomach, small intestine and ovary, 18S in heart and spleen, HMBS in uterus and lung, TBP in liver, HPRT1 in kidney and GAPDH in muscle. Overall, this study provided valuable information about the goat reference genes that can be used in order to perform a proper normalisation when relative quantification by qRT-PCR studies is undertaken.

  15. Reference Gene Screening for Analyzing Gene Expression Across Goat Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR is one of the important methods for investigating the changes in mRNA expression levels in cells and tissues. Selection of the proper reference genes is very important when calibrating the results of real-time quantitative PCR. Studies on the selection of reference genes in goat tissues are limited, despite the economic importance of their meat and dairy products. We used real-time quantitative PCR to detect the expression levels of eight reference gene candidates (18S, TBP, HMBS, YWHAZ, ACTB, HPRT1, GAPDH and EEF1A2 in ten tissues types sourced from Boer goats. The optimal reference gene combination was selected according to the results determined by geNorm, NormFinder and Bestkeeper software packages. The analyses showed that tissue is an important variability factor in genes expression stability. When all tissues were considered, 18S, TBP and HMBS is the optimal reference combination for calibrating quantitative PCR analysis of gene expression from goat tissues. Dividing data set by tissues, ACTB was the most stable in stomach, small intestine and ovary, 18S in heart and spleen, HMBS in uterus and lung, TBP in liver, HPRT1 in kidney and GAPDH in muscle. Overall, this study provided valuable information about the goat reference genes that can be used in order to perform a proper normalisation when relative quantification by qRT-PCR studies is undertaken.

  16. GLANET: genomic loci annotation and enrichment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otlu, Burçak; Firtina, Can; Keles, Sündüz; Tastan, Oznur

    2017-09-15

    Genomic studies identify genomic loci representing genetic variations, transcription factor (TF) occupancy, or histone modification through next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. Interpreting these loci requires evaluating them with known genomic and epigenomic annotations. We present GLANET as a comprehensive annotation and enrichment analysis tool which implements a sampling-based enrichment test that accounts for GC content and/or mappability biases, jointly or separately. GLANET annotates and performs enrichment analysis on these loci with a rich library. We introduce and perform novel data-driven computational experiments for assessing the power and Type-I error of its enrichment procedure which show that GLANET has attained high statistical power and well-controlled Type-I error rate. As a key feature, users can easily extend its library with new gene sets and genomic intervals. Other key features include assessment of impact of single nucleotide variants (SNPs) on TF binding sites and regulation based pathway enrichment analysis. GLANET can be run using its GUI or on command line. GLANET's source code is available at https://github.com/burcakotlu/GLANET . Tutorials are provided at https://glanet.readthedocs.org . burcak@ceng.metu.edu.tr or oznur.tastan@cs.bilkent.edu.tr. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  17. Library Spirit and Genius Loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlkild, Nan

    2009-01-01

    The architecture and design of Nyborg Public Library in the light of the concepts "Library Spirit" and "Genius Loci", related to contemporary social and cultural movements, the development of the early welfare state and the "Scandinavian Style".......The architecture and design of Nyborg Public Library in the light of the concepts "Library Spirit" and "Genius Loci", related to contemporary social and cultural movements, the development of the early welfare state and the "Scandinavian Style"....

  18. Comprehensive annotation and evolutionary insights into the canine (Canis lupus familiaris) antigen receptor loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jolyon; Ponstingl, Hannes; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Archer, Joy; Sargan, David; Bradley, Allan

    2017-09-19

    Dogs are an excellent model for human disease. For example, the treatment of canine lymphoma has been predictive of the human response to that treatment. However, an incomplete picture of canine (Canis lupus familiaris) immunoglobulin (IG) and T cell receptor (TR)-or antigen receptor (AR)-gene loci has restricted their utility. This work advances the annotation of the canine AR loci and looks into breed-specific features of the loci. Bioinformatic analysis of unbiased RNA sequence data was used to complete the annotation of the canine AR genes. This annotation was used to query 107 whole genome sequences from 19 breeds and identified over 5500 alleles across the 550 genes of the seven AR loci: the IG heavy, kappa, and lambda loci; and the TR alpha, beta, gamma, and delta loci. Of note was the discovery that half of the IGK variable (V) genes were located downstream of, and inverted with respect to, the rest of the locus. Analysis of the germline sequences of all the AR V genes identified greater conservation between dog and human than mouse with either. This work brings our understanding of the genetic diversity and expression of AR in dogs to the same completeness as that of mice and men, making it the third species to have all AR loci comprehensively and accurately annotated. The large number of germline sequences serves as a reference for future studies, and has allowed statistically powerful conclusions to be drawn on the pressures that have shaped these loci.

  19. Identification of suitable reference genes for gene expression studies of shoulder instability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Ferreira Leal

    Full Text Available Shoulder instability is a common shoulder injury, and patients present with plastic deformation of the glenohumeral capsule. Gene expression analysis may be a useful tool for increasing the general understanding of capsule deformation, and reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR has become an effective method for such studies. Although RT-qPCR is highly sensitive and specific, it requires the use of suitable reference genes for data normalization to guarantee meaningful and reproducible results. In the present study, we evaluated the suitability of a set of reference genes using samples from the glenohumeral capsules of individuals with and without shoulder instability. We analyzed the expression of six commonly used reference genes (ACTB, B2M, GAPDH, HPRT1, TBP and TFRC in the antero-inferior, antero-superior and posterior portions of the glenohumeral capsules of cases and controls. The stability of the candidate reference gene expression was determined using four software packages: NormFinder, geNorm, BestKeeper and DataAssist. Overall, HPRT1 was the best single reference gene, and HPRT1 and B2M composed the best pair of reference genes from different analysis groups, including simultaneous analysis of all tissue samples. GenEx software was used to identify the optimal number of reference genes to be used for normalization and demonstrated that the accumulated standard deviation resulting from the use of 2 reference genes was similar to that resulting from the use of 3 or more reference genes. To identify the optimal combination of reference genes, we evaluated the expression of COL1A1. Although the use of different reference gene combinations yielded variable normalized quantities, the relative quantities within sample groups were similar and confirmed that no obvious differences were observed when using 2, 3 or 4 reference genes. Consequently, the use of 2 stable reference genes for normalization, especially

  20. Leveraging Cross- Species Transcription Factor Binding Site Patterns : From Diabetes Risk Loci to Disease Mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claussnitzer, Melina; Dankel, Simon N.; Klocke, Bernward; Grallert, Harald; Glunk, Viktoria; Berulava, Tea; Lee, Heekyoung; Oskolkov, Nikolay; Fadista, Joao; Ehlers, Kerstin; Wahl, Simone; Hoffmann, Christoph; Qian, Kun; Ronn, Tina; Riess, Helene; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Bretschneider, Nancy; Schroeder, Timm; Skurk, Thomas; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Spieler, Derek; Klingenspor, Martin; Seifert, Martin; Kern, Michael J.; Mejhert, Niklas; Dahlman, Ingrid; Hansson, Ola; Hauck, Stefanie M.; Blueher, Matthias; Arner, Peter; Groop, Leif; Illig, Thomas; Suhre, Karsten; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Mellgren, Gunnar; Hauner, Hans; Laumen, Helmut; Wijmenga, Tjitske N.; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed numerous risk loci associated with diverse diseases. However, identification of disease-causing variants within association loci remains a major challenge. Divergence in gene expression due to cis-regulatory variants in noncoding regions is central to

  1. Annotation of loci from genome-wide association studies using tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Alicia; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Steffensen, Annette B.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified thousands of loci associated with complex traits, but it is challenging to pinpoint causal genes in these loci and to exploit subtle association signals. We used tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics to map a network of five gen...

  2. Genome-wide analysis identifies 12 loci influencing human reproductive behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barban, Nicola; Jansen, Rick; de Vlaming, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    The genetic architecture of human reproductive behavior-age at first birth (AFB) and number of children ever born (NEB)-has a strong relationship with fitness, human development, infertility and risk of neuropsychiatric disorders. However, very few genetic loci have been identified......-wide association study and 4 additional loci associated in a gene-based effort. These loci harbor genes that are likely to have a role, either directly or by affecting non-local gene expression, in human reproduction and infertility, thereby increasing understanding of these complex traits....

  3. Reference gene selection for the shell gland of laying hens in response to time-points of eggshell formation and nicarbazin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiullah, Sami; Roberts, Juliet; Wu, Shu-Biao

    2017-01-01

    Ten reference genes were investigated for normalization of gene expression data in the shell gland of laying hens. Analyses performed with geNorm revealed that hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (HPRT1) and hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS) were the two most stable reference genes in response to post-oviposition time alone (POT) or with nicarbazin treatment (POT+N) of laying hens. NormFinder analyses showed that the two most stable reference genes in response to POT and POT+N were 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA), ribosomal protein L4 (RPL4) and HMBS, RPL4, respectively. BestKeeper analyses showed that 18S rRNA, RPL4 and HPRT1, HMBS were the two most stable reference genes for POT, and POT+N, respectively. Of the ten reference genes, all except B2M showed geNorm M <0.5, suggesting that they were stably expressed in the shell gland tissue. Consensus from these three programs suggested HPRT1 and HMBS could be used as the two most stable reference genes in the present study. Expression analyses of four candidate target genes with the two most and the two least stable genes showed that a combination of stable reference genes leads to more discriminable quantification of expression levels of target genes, while the least stable genes failed to do so. Therefore, HMBS and HPRT1 are recommended as the two most stable reference genes for the normalization of gene expression data at different stages of eggshell formation in brown-egg laying hens. Available statistical programs for reference gene ranking should include more robust analysis capability to analyse the gene expression data generated from factorial design experiments.

  4. Novel genetic loci associated with hippocampal volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Adams, Hieab H. H.; Jahanshad, Neda; Chauhan, Ganesh; Stein, Jason L.; Hofer, Edith; Renteria, Miguel E.; Bis, Joshua C.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Ikram, M. Kamran; Desrivières, Sylvane; Vernooij, Meike W.; Abramovic, Lucija; Alhusaini, Saud; Amin, Najaf; Andersson, Micael; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Axelsson, Tomas; Beecham, Ashley H.; Beiser, Alexa; Bernard, Manon; Blanton, Susan H.; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P.; Bralten, Janita; Brickman, Adam M.; Carmichael, Owen; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Chouraki, Vincent; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Crivello, Fabrice; Den Braber, Anouk; Doan, Nhat Trung; Ehrlich, Stefan; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L.; Gottesman, Rebecca F.; Grimm, Oliver; Griswold, Michael E.; Guadalupe, Tulio; Gutman, Boris A.; Hass, Johanna; Haukvik, Unn K.; Hoehn, David; Holmes, Avram J.; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Jørgensen, Kjetil N.; Karbalai, Nazanin; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H.; Liewald, David C. M.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Marquand, Andre F.; Matarin, Mar; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; McKay, David R.; Milaneschi, Yuri; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Nho, Kwangsik; Nugent, Allison C.; Nyquist, Paul; Loohuis, Loes M. Olde; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Papmeyer, Martina; Pirpamer, Lukas; Pütz, Benno; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Richards, Jennifer S.; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rommelse, Nanda; Ropele, Stefan; Rose, Emma J.; Royle, Natalie A.; Rundek, Tatjana; Sämann, Philipp G.; Saremi, Arvin; Satizabal, Claudia L.; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J.; Shen, Li; Shin, Jean; Shumskaya, Elena; Smith, Albert V.; Sprooten, Emma; Strike, Lachlan T.; Teumer, Alexander; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Toro, Roberto; Trabzuni, Daniah; Trompet, Stella; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Van der Grond, Jeroen; Van der Lee, Sven J.; Van der Meer, Dennis; Van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.; Van Eijk, Kristel R.; Van Erp, Theo G. M.; Van Rooij, Daan; Walton, Esther; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Windham, Beverly G.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Wittfeld, Katharina; Woldehawariat, Girma; Wolf, Christiane; Wolfers, Thomas; Yanek, Lisa R.; Yang, Jingyun; Zijdenbos, Alex; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Agartz, Ingrid; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Amouyel, Philippe; Andreassen, Ole A.; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A.; Barral, Sandra; Bastin, Mark E.; Becker, Diane M.; Becker, James T.; Bennett, David A.; Blangero, John; van Bokhoven, Hans; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Brodaty, Henry; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Bulayeva, Kazima B.; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Cichon, Sven; Cookson, Mark R.; Corvin, Aiden; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; Dale, Anders M.; Davies, Gareth E.; De Craen, Anton J. M.; De Geus, Eco J. C.; De Jager, Philip L.; De Zubicaray, Greig I.; Deary, Ian J.; Debette, Stéphanie; DeCarli, Charles; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; DeStefano, Anita; Dillman, Allissa; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drevets, Wayne C.; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Enzinger, Christian; Erk, Susanne; Espeseth, Thomas; Fedko, Iryna O.; Fernández, Guillén; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fisher, Simon E.; Fleischman, Debra A.; Ford, Ian; Fornage, Myriam; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Fox, Peter T.; Francks, Clyde; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Glahn, David C.; Gollub, Randy L.; Göring, Harald H. H.; Green, Robert C.; Gruber, Oliver; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guelfi, Sebastian; Håberg, Asta K.; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hardy, John; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hosten, Norbert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Huentelman, Matthew; Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack Jr, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Jönsson, Erik G.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kahn, René S.; Kanai, Ryota; Kloszewska, Iwona; Knopman, David S.; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Lemaître, Hervé; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Lovestone, Simon; Martinez, Oliver; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Mattay, Venkata S.; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; McMahon, Francis J.; McMahon, Katie L.; Mecocci, Patrizia; Melle, Ingrid; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Morris, Derek W.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nalls, Michael A.; Nauck, Matthias; Nichols, Thomas E.; Niessen, Wiro J.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Nyberg, Lars; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Pandolfo, Massimo; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Pike, G. Bruce; Potkin, Steven G.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Roffman, Joshua L.; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rotter, Jerome I.; Ryten, Mina; Sacco, Ralph L.; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schmidt, Helena; Schofield, Peter R.; Sigursson, Sigurdur; Simmons, Andrew; Singleton, Andrew; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smith, Colin; Smoller, Jordan W.; Soininen, Hilkka; Steen, Vidar M.; Stott, David J.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Troncoso, Juan; Tsolaki, Magda; Tzourio, Christophe; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hernández, Maria C. Valdés; Van der Brug, Marcel; van der Lugt, Aad; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; Van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; van 't Ent, Dennis; Van Tol, Marie-Jose; Vardarajan, Badri N.; Vellas, Bruno; Veltman, Dick J.; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Weale, Michael E.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; Westman, Eric; White, Tonya; Wong, Tien Y.; Wright, Clinton B.; Zielke, Ronald H.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Wright, Margaret J.; Longstreth, W. T.; Schumann, Gunter; Grabe, Hans J.; Franke, Barbara; Launer, Lenore J.; Medland, Sarah E.; Seshadri, Sudha; Thompson, Paul M.; Ikram, M. Arfan

    2017-01-01

    The hippocampal formation is a brain structure integrally involved in episodic memory, spatial navigation, cognition and stress responsiveness. Structural abnormalities in hippocampal volume and shape are found in several common neuropsychiatric disorders. To identify the genetic underpinnings of hippocampal structure here we perform a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 33,536 individuals and discover six independent loci significantly associated with hippocampal volume, four of them novel. Of the novel loci, three lie within genes (ASTN2, DPP4 and MAST4) and one is found 200 kb upstream of SHH. A hippocampal subfield analysis shows that a locus within the MSRB3 gene shows evidence of a localized effect along the dentate gyrus, subiculum, CA1 and fissure. Further, we show that genetic variants associated with decreased hippocampal volume are also associated with increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (rg=−0.155). Our findings suggest novel biological pathways through which human genetic variation influences hippocampal volume and risk for neuropsychiatric illness. PMID:28098162

  5. Novel genetic loci associated with hippocampal volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibar, Derrek P; Adams, Hieab H H; Jahanshad, Neda; Chauhan, Ganesh; Stein, Jason L; Hofer, Edith; Renteria, Miguel E; Bis, Joshua C; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Ikram, M Kamran; Desrivières, Sylvane; Vernooij, Meike W; Abramovic, Lucija; Alhusaini, Saud; Amin, Najaf; Andersson, Micael; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Axelsson, Tomas; Beecham, Ashley H; Beiser, Alexa; Bernard, Manon; Blanton, Susan H; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brickman, Adam M; Carmichael, Owen; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Chouraki, Vincent; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Crivello, Fabrice; Den Braber, Anouk; Doan, Nhat Trung; Ehrlich, Stefan; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Grimm, Oliver; Griswold, Michael E; Guadalupe, Tulio; Gutman, Boris A; Hass, Johanna; Haukvik, Unn K; Hoehn, David; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Jørgensen, Kjetil N; Karbalai, Nazanin; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Marquand, Andre F; Matarin, Mar; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; McKay, David R; Milaneschi, Yuri; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Nho, Kwangsik; Nugent, Allison C; Nyquist, Paul; Loohuis, Loes M Olde; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Papmeyer, Martina; Pirpamer, Lukas; Pütz, Benno; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Richards, Jennifer S; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rommelse, Nanda; Ropele, Stefan; Rose, Emma J; Royle, Natalie A; Rundek, Tatjana; Sämann, Philipp G; Saremi, Arvin; Satizabal, Claudia L; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shen, Li; Shin, Jean; Shumskaya, Elena; Smith, Albert V; Sprooten, Emma; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Toro, Roberto; Trabzuni, Daniah; Trompet, Stella; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Van der Grond, Jeroen; Van der Lee, Sven J; Van der Meer, Dennis; Van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; Van Eijk, Kristel R; Van Erp, Theo G M; Van Rooij, Daan; Walton, Esther; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Windham, Beverly G; Winkler, Anderson M; Wittfeld, Katharina; Woldehawariat, Girma; Wolf, Christiane; Wolfers, Thomas; Yanek, Lisa R; Yang, Jingyun; Zijdenbos, Alex; Zwiers, Marcel P; Agartz, Ingrid; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Amouyel, Philippe; Andreassen, Ole A; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Barral, Sandra; Bastin, Mark E; Becker, Diane M; Becker, James T; Bennett, David A; Blangero, John; van Bokhoven, Hans; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brodaty, Henry; Brouwer, Rachel M; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cannon, Dara M; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Cichon, Sven; Cookson, Mark R; Corvin, Aiden; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; De Craen, Anton J M; De Geus, Eco J C; De Jager, Philip L; De Zubicaray, Greig I; Deary, Ian J; Debette, Stéphanie; DeCarli, Charles; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; DeStefano, Anita; Dillman, Allissa; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drevets, Wayne C; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Enzinger, Christian; Erk, Susanne; Espeseth, Thomas; Fedko, Iryna O; Fernández, Guillén; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fisher, Simon E; Fleischman, Debra A; Ford, Ian; Fornage, Myriam; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Francks, Clyde; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Glahn, David C; Gollub, Randy L; Göring, Harald H H; Green, Robert C; Gruber, Oliver; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guelfi, Sebastian; Håberg, Asta K; Hansell, Narelle K; Hardy, John; Hartman, Catharina A; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hosten, Norbert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Huentelman, Matthew; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Jönsson, Erik G; Jukema, J Wouter; Kahn, René S; Kanai, Ryota; Kloszewska, Iwona; Knopman, David S; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Lemaître, Hervé; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; Lopez, Oscar L; Lovestone, Simon; Martinez, Oliver; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Mattay, Venkata S; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; McMahon, Francis J; McMahon, Katie L; Mecocci, Patrizia; Melle, Ingrid; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Morris, Derek W; Mosley, Thomas H; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nalls, Michael A; Nauck, Matthias; Nichols, Thomas E; Niessen, Wiro J; Nöthen, Markus M; Nyberg, Lars; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Ophoff, Roel A; Pandolfo, Massimo; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Psaty, Bruce M; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Roffman, Joshua L; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rotter, Jerome I; Ryten, Mina; Sacco, Ralph L; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schmidt, Helena; Schofield, Peter R; Sigursson, Sigurdur; Simmons, Andrew; Singleton, Andrew; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smith, Colin; Smoller, Jordan W; Soininen, Hilkka; Steen, Vidar M; Stott, David J; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Tsolaki, Magda; Tzourio, Christophe; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hernández, Maria C Valdés; Van der Brug, Marcel; van der Lugt, Aad; van der Wee, Nic J A; Van Haren, Neeltje E M; van 't Ent, Dennis; Van Tol, Marie-Jose; Vardarajan, Badri N; Vellas, Bruno; Veltman, Dick J; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Wassink, Thomas H; Weale, Michael E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; Westman, Eric; White, Tonya; Wong, Tien Y; Wright, Clinton B; Zielke, Ronald H; Zonderman, Alan B; Martin, Nicholas G; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Wright, Margaret J; Longstreth, W T; Schumann, Gunter; Grabe, Hans J; Franke, Barbara; Launer, Lenore J; Medland, Sarah E; Seshadri, Sudha; Thompson, Paul M; Ikram, M Arfan

    2017-01-18

    The hippocampal formation is a brain structure integrally involved in episodic memory, spatial navigation, cognition and stress responsiveness. Structural abnormalities in hippocampal volume and shape are found in several common neuropsychiatric disorders. To identify the genetic underpinnings of hippocampal structure here we perform a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 33,536 individuals and discover six independent loci significantly associated with hippocampal volume, four of them novel. Of the novel loci, three lie within genes (ASTN2, DPP4 and MAST4) and one is found 200 kb upstream of SHH. A hippocampal subfield analysis shows that a locus within the MSRB3 gene shows evidence of a localized effect along the dentate gyrus, subiculum, CA1 and fissure. Further, we show that genetic variants associated with decreased hippocampal volume are also associated with increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (r g =-0.155). Our findings suggest novel biological pathways through which human genetic variation influences hippocampal volume and risk for neuropsychiatric illness.

  6. Biological insights from 108 schizophrenia-associated genetic loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripke, Stephan; Neale, Benjamin M.; Corvin, Aiden

    2014-01-01

    and 113,075 controls. We identify 128 independent associations spanning 108 conservatively defined loci that meet genome-wide significance, 83 of which have not been previously reported. Associations were enriched among genes expressed in brain, providing biological plausibility for the findings. Many...

  7. Sorting duplicated loci disentangles complexities of polyploid genomes masked by genotyping by sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Limborg, Morten; Seeb, Lisa W.; Seeb, J. E.

    2016-01-01

    of duplicated loci impoverishes the interpretation of genomic data as signals from contiguous duplicated genes are ignored. We review existing strategies to genotype and map duplicated loci; we focus in detail on an overlooked strategy of using gynogenetic haploids (1N) as a part of new genotyping by sequencing...... studies. We provide guidelines on how to use this haploid strategy for studies on polyploid-origin vertebrates including how it can be used to screen duplicated loci in natural populations. We conclude by discussing areas of research that will benefit from better inclusion of polyploid loci; we...

  8. Evolution of isozyme loci and their differential tissue expression. Creatine kinase as a model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, S E; Whitt, G S

    1978-10-27

    The phylogeny of the creatine kinase (CK, EC 2.7.3.2) isozyme loci and their differential tissue expressions were determined for representatives of 65 families of vertebrates, with emphasis on the fishes. The transition from the single creatine kinase locus, characteristic of certain echinoderms, to the two creatine kinase loci which are orthologous to those present in all vertebrates, occurred early in the chordate line. The majority of pre-teleostean fishes possesses only these two CK loci (A and C). These loci are relatively generalized in their tissue expressions which are variable among species of primitive fishes. The third and fourth creatine kinase loci (B and D) arose separately in the ancestors of the bony fishes and appear to be the result of regional genome duplications. Concomitant with the increase in the number of isozyme loci has been an increase in the specificity of their tissue expression. In the advanced teleost fishes the four CK loci are differentially expressed in a characteristic manner. The A2 isozyme predominates in skeletal muscle, the B2 isozyme in eye and brain, the C2 isozyme in stomach muscle, and the D2 isozyme is found exclusively in testis. We propose a phylogeny of the creatine kinase genes in the lower chordates based on the time of appearance of new CK loci, the sequence in which the loci achieve a tissue restricted expression, and the immunochemical relatedness of the orthologous and paralogous gene products.

  9. Mendelian inheritance, linkage and genotypic disequilibrium in microsatellite loci isolated from Hymenaea courbaril (Leguminosae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, F S; Lacerda, A E B; Lemes, M R; Gribel, R; Kanashiro, M; Sebbenn, A M

    2012-07-19

    The Neotropical tree Hymenaea courbaril, locally known as Jatobá, is a valuable source of lumber and also produces comestible and medicinal fruit. We characterized Mendelian inheritance, linkage and genotypic disequilibrium at nine microsatellite loci isolated from H. courbaril, in order to determine if they would provide accurate estimates of population genetic parameters of this important Amazon species. The study was made on 250 open-pollinated offspring originated from 14 seed trees. Only one of nine loci presented significant deviation from the expected Mendelian segregation (1:1). Genotypic disequilibrium between pairwise loci was investigated based on samples from 55 adult and 56 juvenile trees. No genetic linkage between any paired loci was observed. After Bonferroni's corrections for multiple tests, we found no evidence of genotypic disequilibrium between pairs of loci. We conclude that this set of loci can be used for genetic diversity/ structure, mating system, gene flow, and parentage analyses in H. courbaril populations.

  10. Hundreds of variants clustered in genomic loci and biological pathways affect human height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lango Allen, Hana; Estrada, Karol; Lettre, Guillaume; Berndt, Sonja I.; Weedon, Michael N.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Willer, Cristen J.; Jackson, Anne U.; Vedantam, Sailaja; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Ferreira, Teresa; Wood, Andrew R.; Weyant, Robert J.; Segrè, Ayellet V.; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Wheeler, Eleanor; Soranzo, Nicole; Park, Ju-Hyun; Yang, Jian; Gudbjartsson, Daniel; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Randall, Joshua C.; Qi, Lu; Smith, Albert Vernon; Mägi, Reedik; Pastinen, Tomi; Liang, Liming; Heid, Iris M.; Luan, Jian'an; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Winkler, Thomas W.; Goddard, Michael E.; Lo, Ken Sin; Palmer, Cameron; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Johansson, Åsa; Zillikens, M.Carola; Feitosa, Mary F.; Esko, Tõnu; Johnson, Toby; Ketkar, Shamika; Kraft, Peter; Mangino, Massimo; Prokopenko, Inga; Absher, Devin; Albrecht, Eva; Ernst, Florian; Glazer, Nicole L.; Hayward, Caroline; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Knowles, Joshua W.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Monda, Keri L.; Polasek, Ozren; Preuss, Michael; Rayner, Nigel W.; Robertson, Neil R.; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Xu, Jianfeng; Zhao, Jing Hua; Nyholt, Dale R.; Pellikka, Niina; Perola, Markus; Perry, John R.B.; Surakka, Ida; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Altmaier, Elizabeth L.; Amin, Najaf; Aspelund, Thor; Bhangale, Tushar; Boucher, Gabrielle; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chen, Constance; Coin, Lachlan; Cooper, Matthew N.; Dixon, Anna L.; Gibson, Quince; Grundberg, Elin; Hao, Ke; Junttila, M. Juhani; Kaplan, Lee M.; Kettunen, Johannes; König, Inke R.; Kwan, Tony; Lawrence, Robert W.; Levinson, Douglas F.; Lorentzon, Mattias; McKnight, Barbara; Morris, Andrew P.; Müller, Martina; Ngwa, Julius Suh; Purcell, Shaun; Rafelt, Suzanne; Salem, Rany M.; Salvi, Erika; Sanna, Serena; Shi, Jianxin; Sovio, Ulla; Thompson, John R.; Turchin, Michael C.; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Verlaan, Dominique J.; Vitart, Veronique; White, Charles C.; Ziegler, Andreas; Almgren, Peter; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Campbell, Harry; Citterio, Lorena; De Grandi, Alessandro; Dominiczak, Anna; Duan, Jubao; Elliott, Paul; Elosua, Roberto; Eriksson, Johan G.; Freimer, Nelson B.; Geus, Eco J.C.; Glorioso, Nicola; Haiqing, Shen; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Havulinna, Aki S.; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hui, Jennie; Igl, Wilmar; Illig, Thomas; Jula, Antti; Kajantie, Eero; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O.; Koiranen, Markku; Kolcic, Ivana; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Laitinen, Jaana; Liu, Jianjun; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Marusic, Ana; Maschio, Andrea; Meitinger, Thomas; Mulas, Antonella; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N.; Peden, John F.; Petersmann, Astrid; Pichler, Irene; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Pouta, Anneli; Ridderstråle, Martin; Rotter, Jerome I.; Sambrook, Jennifer G.; Sanders, Alan R.; Schmidt, Carsten Oliver; Sinisalo, Juha; Smit, Jan H.; Stringham, Heather M.; Walters, G.Bragi; Widen, Elisabeth; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Zagato, Laura; Zgaga, Lina; Zitting, Paavo; Alavere, Helene; Farrall, Martin; McArdle, Wendy L.; Nelis, Mari; Peters, Marjolein J.; Ripatti, Samuli; van Meurs, Joyce B.J.; Aben, Katja K.; Ardlie, Kristin G; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Beilby, John P.; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Collins, Francis S.; Cusi, Daniele; den Heijer, Martin; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Gejman, Pablo V.; Hall, Alistair S.; Hamsten, Anders; Huikuri, Heikki V.; Iribarren, Carlos; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kiemeney, Lambertus; Kocher, Thomas; Launer, Lenore J.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Melander, Olle; Mosley, Tom H.; Musk, Arthur W.; Nieminen, Markku S.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Ohlsson, Claes; Oostra, Ben; Palmer, Lyle J.; Raitakari, Olli; Ridker, Paul M.; Rioux, John D.; Rissanen, Aila; Rivolta, Carlo; Schunkert, Heribert; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Siscovick, David S.; Stumvoll, Michael; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; Viikari, Jorma; Heath, Andrew C.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Province, Michael A.; Kayser, Manfred; Arnold, Alice M.; Atwood, Larry D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Chanock, Stephen J.; Deloukas, Panos; Gieger, Christian; Grönberg, Henrik; Hall, Per; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hoffman, Wolfgang; Lathrop, G.Mark; Salomaa, Veikko; Schreiber, Stefan; Uda, Manuela; Waterworth, Dawn; Wright, Alan F.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Barroso, Inês; Hofman, Albert; Mohlke, Karen L.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Cupples, L.Adrienne; Erdmann, Jeanette; Fox, Caroline S.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Harris, Tamara B.; Hayes, Richard B.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Mooser, Vincent; Munroe, Patricia B.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Quertermous, Thomas; Rudan, Igor; Samani, Nilesh J.; Spector, Timothy D.; Völzke, Henry; Watkins, Hugh; Wilson, James F.; Groop, Leif C.; Haritunians, Talin; Hu, Frank B.; Kaplan, Robert C.; Metspalu, Andres; North, Kari E.; Schlessinger, David; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Hunter, David J.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Strachan, David P.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Borecki, Ingrid B.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Schadt, Eric E.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Peltonen, Leena; Uitterlinden, André; Visscher, Peter M.; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Boehnke, Michael; McCarthy, Mark I.; Ingelsson, Erik; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Stefansson, Kari; Frayling, Timothy M.; Hirschhorn, Joel N

    2010-01-01

    Most common human traits and diseases have a polygenic pattern of inheritance: DNA sequence variants at many genetic loci influence phenotype. Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified >600 variants associated with human traits1, but these typically explain small fractions of phenotypic variation, raising questions about the utility of further studies. Here, using 183,727 individuals, we show that hundreds of genetic variants, in at least 180 loci, influence adult height, a highly heritable and classic polygenic trait2,3. The large number of loci reveals patterns with important implications for genetic studies of common human diseases and traits. First, the 180 loci are not random, but instead are enriched for genes that are connected in biological pathways (P=0.016), and that underlie skeletal growth defects (P<0.001). Second, the likely causal gene is often located near the most strongly associated variant: in 13 of 21 loci containing a known skeletal growth gene, that gene was closest to the associated variant. Third, at least 19 loci have multiple independently associated variants, suggesting that allelic heterogeneity is a frequent feature of polygenic traits, that comprehensive explorations of already-discovered loci should discover additional variants, and that an appreciable fraction of associated loci may have been identified. Fourth, associated variants are enriched for likely functional effects on genes, being over-represented amongst variants that alter amino acid structure of proteins and expression levels of nearby genes. Our data explain ∼10% of the phenotypic variation in height, and we estimate that unidentified common variants of similar effect sizes would increase this figure to ∼16% of phenotypic variation (∼20% of heritable variation). Although additional approaches are needed to fully dissect the genetic architecture of polygenic human traits, our findings indicate that GWA studies can identify large numbers of loci that

  11. Reference Gene Selection for Quantitative PCR Studies in Sheep Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean A. Hall

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Reference genes are essential for studying mRNA expression with quantitative PCR (qPCR. We investigated 11 potential neutrophil reference genes (RPL19, GAPDH, ACTB, B2M, HPRT, G6PD, TFRC, PGK1, YWHAZ, SDHA and GYPC for sheep under disease conditions of foot rot (FR and with or without Se supplementation. Initial screening was based on gene expression level (<28 Cq cycles and variability (SD < 1.5 Cq cycles and excluded TFRC, GYPC and HPRT from further analysis. Expression stability of the remaining genes was evaluated using four software programs: geNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper and the comparative delta Cq method. The neutrophil reference genes, G6PD, YWHAZ, GAPDH, RPL19 and SDHA, consistently ranked among the top five most stable genes under these experimental conditions. The SDHA gene expression was not stable in FR-diseased sheep receiving Se treatment and, thus, cannot be recommended as a reference gene. The commonly used genes, PGK1, ACTB and B2M, were not reliable reference genes, underscoring the need to validate neutrophil reference genes under different experimental conditions. Multiple references genes rather than a single gene may provide more robust and reliable results. The best pair of reference genes was SDHA/G6PD in healthy sheep and GADPH/YWHAZ in FR-diseased sheep.

  12. Chromosomal locations of four minor rDNA loci and a marker microsatellite sequence in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, C.; Linde-Laursen, I.

    1994-01-01

    the C-banding pattern, which enabled unequivocal chromosome identification. This study suggests that gene mapping accuracy may be improved by using probes with well-characterized and narrow hybridization sites as cytological markers which are situated close to the gene locus. One of the rDNA loci...... is located about 54% out on the short arm of chromosome 4 and it has not previously been reported in barley. We have designated the new locus Nor-I6. rDNA loci on homoeologous group 4 chromosomes have not yet been reported in other Triticeae species. The origin of these 4 minor rDNA loci is discussed...

  13. Genome-wide Association Study Identifies New Loci for Resistance to Leptosphaeria maculans in Canola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Harsh; Raman, Rosy; Coombes, Neil; Song, Jie; Diffey, Simon; Kilian, Andrzej; Lindbeck, Kurt; Barbulescu, Denise M.; Batley, Jacqueline; Edwards, David; Salisbury, Phil A.; Marcroft, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Key message “We identified both quantitative and quantitative resistance loci to Leptosphaeria maculans, a fungal pathogen, causing blackleg disease in canola. Several genome-wide significant associations were detected at known and new loci for blackleg resistance. We further validated statistically significant associations in four genetic mapping populations, demonstrating that GWAS marker loci are indeed associated with resistance to L. maculans. One of the novel loci identified for the first time, Rlm12, conveys adult plant resistance in canola.” Blackleg, caused by Leptosphaeria maculans, is a significant disease which affects the sustainable production of canola (Brassica napus). This study reports a genome-wide association study based on 18,804 polymorphic SNPs to identify loci associated with qualitative and quantitative resistance to L. maculans. Genomic regions delimited with 694 significant SNP markers, that are associated with resistance evaluated using 12 single spore isolates and pathotypes from four canola stubble were identified. Several significant associations were detected at known disease resistance loci including in the vicinity of recently cloned Rlm2/LepR3 genes, and at new loci on chromosomes A01/C01, A02/C02, A03/C03, A05/C05, A06, A08, and A09. In addition, we validated statistically significant associations on A01, A07, and A10 in four genetic mapping populations, demonstrating that GWAS marker loci are indeed associated with resistance to L. maculans. One of the novel loci identified for the first time, Rlm12, conveys adult plant resistance and mapped within 13.2 kb from Arabidopsis R gene of TIR-NBS class. We showed that resistance loci are located in the vicinity of R genes of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica napus on the sequenced genome of B. napus cv. Darmor-bzh. Significantly associated SNP markers provide a valuable tool to enrich germplasm for favorable alleles in order to improve the level of resistance to L. maculans in

  14. Genome-wide analysis identifies 12 loci influencing human reproductive behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barban, Nicola; Jansen, Rick; de Vlaming, Ronald; Vaez, Ahmad; Mandemakers, Jornt J.; Tropf, Felix C.; Shen, Xia; Wilson, James F.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Tragante, Vinicius; van der Laan, Sander W.; Perry, John R. B.; Kong, Augustine; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer; Albrecht, Eva; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura; Atzmon, Gil; Auro, Kirsi; Ayers, Kristin; Bakshi, Andrew; Ben-Avraham, Danny; Berger, Klaus; Bergman, Aviv; Bertram, Lars; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Bonder, Marc Jan; Broer, Linda; Bui, Minh; Barbieri, Caterina; Cavadino, Alana; Chavarro, Jorge E; Turman, Constance; Concas, Maria Pina; Cordell, Heather J.; Davies, Gail; Eibich, Peter; Eriksson, Nicholas; Esko, Tõnu; Eriksson, Joel; Falahi, Fahimeh; Felix, Janine F.; Fontana, Mark Alan; Franke, Lude; Gandin, Ilaria; Gaskins, Audrey J.; Gieger, Christian; Gunderson, Erica P.; Guo, Xiuqing; Hayward, Caroline; He, Chunyan; Hofer, Edith; Huang, Hongyan; Joshi, Peter K.; Kanoni, Stavroula; Karlsson, Robert; Kiechl, Stefan; Kifley, Annette; Kluttig, Alexander; Kraft, Peter; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lecoeur, Cecile; Lahti, Jari; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Lind, Penelope A.; Liu, Tian; Makalic, Enes; Mamasoula, Crysovalanto; Matteson, Lindsay; Mbarek, Hamdi; McArdle, Patrick F.; McMahon, George; Meddens, S. Fleur W.; Mihailov, Evelin; Miller, Mike; Missmer, Stacey A.; Monnereau, Claire; van der Most, Peter J.; Myhre, Ronny; Nalls, Mike A.; Nutile, Teresa; Panagiota, Kalafati Ioanna; Porcu, Eleonora; Prokopenko, Inga; Rajan, Kumar B.; Rich-Edwards, Janet; Rietveld, Cornelius A.; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M.; Rueedi, Rico; Ryan, Kathy; Saba, Yasaman; Schmidt, Daniel; Smith, Jennifer A.; Stolk, Lisette; Streeten, Elizabeth; Tonjes, Anke; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Ulivi, Sheila; Wedenoja, Juho; Wellmann, Juergen; Willeit, Peter; Yao, Jie; Yengo, Loic; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhao, Wei; Zhernakova, Daria V.; Amin, Najaf; Andrews, Howard; Balkau, Beverley; Barzilai, Nir; Bergmann, Sven; Biino, Ginevra; Bisgaard, Hans; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Buring, Julie E.; Campbell, Harry; Cappellani, Stefania; Ciullo, Marina; Cox, Simon R.; Cucca, Francesco; Daniela, Toniolo; Davey-Smith, George; Deary, Ian J.; Dedoussis, George; Deloukas, Panos; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; de Geus, Eco JC.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Evans, Denis A.; Faul, Jessica D.; Felicita, Sala Cinzia; Froguel, Philippe; Gasparini, Paolo; Girotto, Giorgia; Grabe, Hans-Jörgen; Greiser, Karin Halina; Groenen, Patrick J.F.; de Haan, Hugoline G.; Haerting, Johannes; Harris, Tamara B.; Heath, Andrew C.; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Hopper, John; Hypponen, Elina; Jacobsson, Bo; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Johannesson, Magnus; Jugessur, Astanand; Kähönen, Mika; Kajantie, Eero; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Keavney, Bernard; Kolcic, Ivana; Koponen, Päivikki; Kovacs, Peter; Kronenberg, Florian; Kutalik, Zoltan; La Bianca, Martina; Lachance, Genevieve; Iacono, William; Lai, Sandra; Lehtimäki, Terho; Liewald, David C; Lindgren, Cecilia; Liu, Yongmei; Luben, Robert; Lucht, Michael; Luoto, Riitta; Magnus, Per; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Martin, Nicholas G.; McGue, Matt; McQuillan, Ruth; Medland, Sarah E.; Meisinger, Christa; Mellström, Dan; Metspalu, Andres; Michela, Traglia; Milani, Lili; Mitchell, Paul; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis; de Mutsert, Renée; Nohr, Ellen A; Ohlsson, Claes; Olsen, Jørn; Ong, Ken K.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pattie, Alison; Penninx, Brenda WJH; Perola, Markus; Peyser, Patricia A.; Pirastu, Mario; Polasek, Ozren; Power, Chris; Kaprio, Jaakko; Raffel, Leslie J.; Räikkönen, Katri; Raitakari, Olli; Ridker, Paul M.; Ring, Susan M.; Roll, Kathryn; Rudan, Igor; Ruggiero, Daniela; Rujescu, Dan; Salomaa, Veikko; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Helena; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schupf, Nicole; Smit, Johannes; Sorice, Rossella; Spector, Tim D.; Starr, John M.; Stöckl, Doris; Strauch, Konstantin; Stumvoll, Michael; Swertz, Morris A.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Thurik, A. Roy; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tönjes, Anke; Tung, Joyce Y.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Vaccargiu, Simona; Viikari, Jorma; Vitart, Veronique; Völzke, Henry; Vollenweider, Peter; Vuckovic, Dragana; Waage, Johannes; Wagner, Gert G.; Wang, Jie Jin; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Weir, David R.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Willeit, Johann; Wright, Alan F.; Zondervan, Krina T.; Stefansson, Kari; Krueger, Robert F.; Lee, James J.; Benjamin, Daniel J.; Cesarini, David; Koellinger, Philipp D.; den Hoed, Marcel; Snieder, Harold; Mills, Melinda C.

    2017-01-01

    The genetic architecture of human reproductive behavior – age at first birth (AFB) and number of children ever born (NEB) – has a strong relationship with fitness, human development, infertility and risk of neuropsychiatric disorders. However, very few genetic loci have been identified and the underlying mechanisms of AFB and NEB are poorly understood. We report the largest genome-wide association study to date of both sexes including 251,151 individuals for AFB and 343,072 for NEB. We identified 12 independent loci that are significantly associated with AFB and/or NEB in a SNP-based genome-wide association study, and four additional loci in a gene-based effort. These loci harbor genes that are likely to play a role – either directly or by affecting non-local gene expression – in human reproduction and infertility, thereby increasing our understanding of these complex traits. PMID:27798627

  15. Identification of 12 new susceptibility loci for different histotypes of epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phelan, Catherine M; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Tyrer, Jonathan P

    2017-01-01

    , including 3,887 mutation carriers with EOC. This identified three additional susceptibility loci at 2q13, 8q24.1 and 12q24.31. Integrated analyses of genes and regulatory biofeatures at each locus predicted candidate susceptibility genes, including OBFC1, a new candidate susceptibility gene for low...

  16. Live cell imaging of single genomic loci with quantum dot-labeled TALEs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yingxin; Wang, Mingxiu; Li, Wei; Zhang, Zhiping; Zhang, Xiaowei; Tan, Tianwei; Zhang, Xian-En; Cui, Zongqiang

    2017-05-08

    Single genomic loci are often related to specific cellular functions, genetic diseases, or pathogenic infections. Visualization of single genomic loci in live human cells is currently of great interest, yet it remains challenging. Here, we describe a strategy for live cell imaging of single genomic loci by combining transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) with a quantum dot labelling technique. We design and select a pair of TALEs that specifically target HIV-1 proviral DNA sequences, and use bioorthogonal ligation reactions to label them with different colour quantum dots (QDs). These QD-labelled TALEs are able to enter the cell nucleus to provide fluorescent signals to identify single gene loci. Based on the co-localization of the pair of different coloured QD-labelled TALEs, we determine and map single-copy HIV-1 provirus loci in human chromosomes in live host cells.

  17. Association analyses of 249,796 individuals reveal eighteen new loci associated with body mass index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Willer, Cristen J.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Monda, Keri L.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Jackson, Anne U.; Allen, Hana Lango; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Luan, Jian’an; Mägi, Reedik; Randall, Joshua C.; Vedantam, Sailaja; Winkler, Thomas W.; Qi, Lu; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Heid, Iris M.; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stringham, Heather M.; Weedon, Michael N.; Wheeler, Eleanor; Wood, Andrew R.; Ferreira, Teresa; Weyant, Robert J.; Segré, Ayellet V.; Estrada, Karol; Liang, Liming; Nemesh, James; Park, Ju-Hyun; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O.; Yang, Jian; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Mangino, Massimo; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Scherag, Andre; Smith, Albert Vernon; Welch, Ryan; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aben, Katja K.; Absher, Devin M.; Amin, Najaf; Dixon, Anna L.; Fisher, Eva; Glazer, Nicole L.; Goddard, Michael E.; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Hoesel, Volker; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Ketkar, Shamika; Lamina, Claudia; Li, Shengxu; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Myers, Richard H.; Narisu, Narisu; Perry, John R.B.; Peters, Marjolein J.; Preuss, Michael; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sandholt, Camilla; Scott, Laura J.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; van Wingerden, Sophie; Watanabe, Richard M.; White, Charles C.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Barlassina, Christina; Chasman, Daniel I.; Cooper, Matthew N.; Jansson, John-Olov; Lawrence, Robert W.; Pellikka, Niina; Prokopenko, Inga; Shi, Jianxin; Thiering, Elisabeth; Alavere, Helene; Alibrandi, Maria T. S.; Almgren, Peter; Arnold, Alice M.; Aspelund, Thor; Atwood, Larry D.; Balkau, Beverley; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Bennett, Amanda J.; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Biebermann, Heike; Blakemore, Alexandra I.F.; Boes, Tanja; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Brown, Morris J.; Buchanan, Thomas A.; Busonero, Fabio; Campbell, Harry; Cappuccio, Francesco P.; Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chen, Chih-Mei; Chines, Peter S.; Clarke, Robert; Coin, Lachlan; Connell, John; Day, Ian N.M.; den Heijer, Martin; Duan, Jubao; Ebrahim, Shah; Elliott, Paul; Elosua, Roberto; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Erdos, Michael R.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Facheris, Maurizio F.; Felix, Stephan B.; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela; Folsom, Aaron R.; Friedrich, Nele; Freimer, Nelson B.; Fu, Mao; Gaget, Stefan; Gejman, Pablo V.; Geus, Eco J.C.; Gieger, Christian; Gjesing, Anette P.; Goel, Anuj; Goyette, Philippe; Grallert, Harald; Gräßler, Jürgen; Greenawalt, Danielle M.; Groves, Christopher J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guiducci, Candace; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassanali, Neelam; Hall, Alistair S.; Havulinna, Aki S.; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Andrew C.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hinney, Anke; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Hui, Jennie; Igl, Wilmar; Iribarren, Carlos; Isomaa, Bo; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jarick, Ivonne; Jewell, Elizabeth; John, Ulrich; Jørgensen, Torben; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti; Kaakinen, Marika; Kajantie, Eero; Kaplan, Lee M.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kettunen, Johannes; Kinnunen, Leena; Knowles, Joshua W.; Kolcic, Ivana; König, Inke R.; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kraft, Peter; Kvaløy, Kirsti; Laitinen, Jaana; Lantieri, Olivier; Lanzani, Chiara; Launer, Lenore J.; Lecoeur, Cecile; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lettre, Guillaume; Liu, Jianjun; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert N.; Ludwig, Barbara; Manunta, Paolo; Marek, Diana; Marre, Michel; Martin, Nicholas G.; McArdle, Wendy L.; McCarthy, Anne; McKnight, Barbara; Meitinger, Thomas; Melander, Olle; Meyre, David; Midthjell, Kristian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Morken, Mario A.; Morris, Andrew P.; Mulic, Rosanda; Ngwa, Julius S.; Nelis, Mari; Neville, Matt J.; Nyholt, Dale R.; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Ong, Ken K.; Oostra, Ben; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N.; Perola, Markus; Pichler, Irene; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Platou, Carl G.P.; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Rafelt, Suzanne; Raitakari, Olli; Rayner, Nigel W.; Ridderstråle, Martin; Rief, Winfried; Ruokonen, Aimo; Robertson, Neil R.; Rzehak, Peter; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Savolainen, Markku J.; Scherag, Susann; Schipf, Sabine; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Silander, Kaisa; Sinisalo, Juha; Siscovick, David S.; Smit, Jan H.; Soranzo, Nicole; Sovio, Ulla; Stephens, Jonathan; Surakka, Ida; Swift, Amy J.; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Teder-Laving, Maris; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Thompson, John R.; Thomson, Brian; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; van Meurs, Joyce B.J.; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; Vatin, Vincent; Viikari, Jorma; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Vitart, Veronique; Vogel, Carla I. G.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wallaschofski, Henri; Walters, G. Bragi; Widen, Elisabeth; Wiegand, Susanna; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witte, Daniel R.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.; Xu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Qunyuan; Zgaga, Lina; Ziegler, Andreas; Zitting, Paavo; Beilby, John P.; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; Hebebrand, Johannes; Huikuri, Heikki V.; James, Alan L.; Kähönen, Mika; Levinson, Douglas F.; Macciardi, Fabio; Nieminen, Markku S.; Ohlsson, Claes; Palmer, Lyle J.; Ridker, Paul M.; Stumvoll, Michael; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Boeing, Heiner; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Collins, Francis S.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Smith, George Davey; Erdmann, Jeanette; Froguel, Philippe; Grönberg, Henrik; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hall, Per; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Hayes, Richard B.; Heinrich, Joachim; Hu, Frank B.; Hveem, Kristian; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kaprio, Jaakko; Karpe, Fredrik; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krude, Heiko; Laakso, Markku; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Metspalu, Andres; Munroe, Patricia B.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Pedersen, Oluf; Penninx, Brenda W.; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Quertermous, Thomas; Reinehr, Thomas; Rissanen, Aila; Rudan, Igor; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schwarz, Peter E.H.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Spector, Timothy D.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uda, Manuela; Uitterlinden, André; Valle, Timo T.; Wabitsch, Martin; Waeber, Gérard; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Wilson, James F.; Wright, Alan F.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; McCarroll, Steven A.; Purcell, Shaun; Schadt, Eric E.; Visscher, Peter M.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S.; Groop, Leif C.; Haritunians, Talin; Hunter, David J.; Kaplan, Robert C.; Mohlke, Karen L.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Peltonen, Leena; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Frayling, Timothy M.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Barroso, Inês; Boehnke, Michael; Stefansson, Kari; North, Kari E.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Ingelsson, Erik; Loos, Ruth J.F.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is globally prevalent and highly heritable, but the underlying genetic factors remain largely elusive. To identify genetic loci for obesity-susceptibility, we examined associations between body mass index (BMI) and ~2.8 million SNPs in up to 123,865 individuals, with targeted follow-up of 42 SNPs in up to 125,931 additional individuals. We confirmed 14 known obesity-susceptibility loci and identified 18 new loci associated with BMI (P<5×10−8), one of which includes a copy number variant near GPRC5B. Some loci (MC4R, POMC, SH2B1, BDNF) map near key hypothalamic regulators of energy balance, and one is near GIPR, an incretin receptor. Furthermore, genes in other newly-associated loci may provide novel insights into human body weight regulation. PMID:20935630

  18. Selection of reference genes in different myocardial regions of an in vivo ischemia/reperfusion rat model for normalization of antioxidant gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesentini Nicoletta

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes in cardiac gene expression due to myocardial injury are usually assessed in whole heart tissue. However, as the heart is a heterogeneous system, spatial and temporal heterogeneity is expected in gene expression. Results In an ischemia/reperfusion (I/R rat model we evaluated gene expression of mitochondrial and cytoplasmatic superoxide dismutase (MnSod, Cu-ZnSod and thioredoxin reductase (trxr1 upon short (4 h and long (72 h reperfusion times in the right ventricle (RV, and in the ischemic/reperfused (IRR and the remote region (RR of the left ventricle. Gene expression was assessed by Real-time reverse-transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR. In order to select most stable reference genes suitable for normalization purposes, in each myocardial region we tested nine putative reference genes by geNorm analysis. The genes investigated were: Actin beta (actb, Glyceraldehyde-3-P-dehydrogenase (gapdh, Ribosomal protein L13A (rpl13a, Tyrosine 3-monooxygenase (ywhaz, Beta-glucuronidase (gusb, Hypoxanthine guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (hprt, TATA binding box protein (tbp, Hydroxymethylbilane synthase (hmbs, Polyadenylate-binding protein 1 (papbn1. According to our findings, most stable reference genes in the RV and RR were hmbs/hprt and hmbs/tbp/hprt respectively. In the IRR, six reference genes were recommended for normalization purposes; however, in view of experimental feasibility limitations, target gene expression could be normalized against the three most stable reference genes (ywhaz/pabp/hmbs without loss of sensitivity. In all cases MnSod and Cu-ZnSod expression decreased upon long reperfusion, the former in all myocardial regions and the latter in IRR alone. trxr1 expression did not vary. Conclusions This study provides a validation of reference genes in the RV and in the anterior and posterior wall of the LV of cardiac ischemia/reperfusion model and shows that gene expression should be assessed separately in

  19. Selection of housekeeping genes for gene expression studies in the adult rat submandibular gland under normal, inflamed, atrophic and regenerative states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osailan Samira

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Real-time PCR is a reliable tool with which to measure mRNA transcripts, and provides valuable information on gene expression profiles. Endogenous controls such as housekeeping genes are used to normalise mRNA levels between samples for sensitive comparisons of mRNA transcription. Selection of the most stable control gene(s is therefore critical for the reliable interpretation of gene expression data. For the purpose of this study, 7 commonly used housekeeping genes were investigated in salivary submandibular glands under normal, inflamed, atrophic and regenerative states. Results The program NormFinder identified the suitability of HPRT to use as a single gene for normalisation within the normal, inflamed and regenerative states, and GAPDH in the atrophic state. For normalisation to multiple housekeeping genes, for each individual state, the optimal number of housekeeping genes as given by geNorm was: ACTB/UBC in the normal, ACTB/YWHAZ in the inflamed, ACTB/HPRT in the atrophic and ACTB/GAPDH in the regenerative state. The most stable housekeeping gene identified between states (compared to normal was UBC. However, ACTB, identified as one of the most stably expressed genes within states, was found to be one of the most variable between states. Furthermore we demonstrated that normalising between states to ACTB, rather than UBC, introduced an approximately 3 fold magnitude of error. Conclusion Using NormFinder, our studies demonstrated the suitability of HPRT to use as a single gene for normalisation within the normal, inflamed and regenerative groups and GAPDH in the atrophic group. However, if normalising to multiple housekeeping genes, we recommend normalising to those identified by geNorm. For normalisation across the physiological states, we recommend the use of UBC.

  20. Selection of reference genes in different myocardial regions of an in vivo ischemia/reperfusion rat model for normalization of antioxidant gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesentini, Nicoletta; Barsanti, Cristina; Martino, Alessandro; Kusmic, Claudia; Ripoli, Andrea; Rossi, AnnaMaria; L'Abbate, Antonio

    2012-02-29

    Changes in cardiac gene expression due to myocardial injury are usually assessed in whole heart tissue. However, as the heart is a heterogeneous system, spatial and temporal heterogeneity is expected in gene expression. In an ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) rat model we evaluated gene expression of mitochondrial and cytoplasmatic superoxide dismutase (MnSod, Cu-ZnSod) and thioredoxin reductase (trxr1) upon short (4 h) and long (72 h) reperfusion times in the right ventricle (RV), and in the ischemic/reperfused (IRR) and the remote region (RR) of the left ventricle. Gene expression was assessed by Real-time reverse-transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). In order to select most stable reference genes suitable for normalization purposes, in each myocardial region we tested nine putative reference genes by geNorm analysis. The genes investigated were: Actin beta (actb), Glyceraldehyde-3-P-dehydrogenase (gapdh), Ribosomal protein L13A (rpl13a), Tyrosine 3-monooxygenase (ywhaz), Beta-glucuronidase (gusb), Hypoxanthine guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (hprt), TATA binding box protein (tbp), Hydroxymethylbilane synthase (hmbs), Polyadenylate-binding protein 1 (papbn1). According to our findings, most stable reference genes in the RV and RR were hmbs/hprt and hmbs/tbp/hprt respectively. In the IRR, six reference genes were recommended for normalization purposes; however, in view of experimental feasibility limitations, target gene expression could be normalized against the three most stable reference genes (ywhaz/pabp/hmbs) without loss of sensitivity. In all cases MnSod and Cu-ZnSod expression decreased upon long reperfusion, the former in all myocardial regions and the latter in IRR alone. trxr1 expression did not vary. This study provides a validation of reference genes in the RV and in the anterior and posterior wall of the LV of cardiac ischemia/reperfusion model and shows that gene expression should be assessed separately in each region.

  1. An Enhanced Linkage Map of the Sheep Genome Comprising More Than 1000 Loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, Jillian F.; Davies, Kizanne P.; Crawford, Allan M.; Hulme, Dennis J.; Vaiman, Daniel; Cribiu, Edmond P.; Freking, Bradley A.; Beh, Ken J.; Cockett, Noelle E.; Kang, Nina; Riffkin, Christopher D.; Drinkwater, Roger; Moore, Stephen S.; Dodds, Ken G.; Lumsden, Joanne M.; van Stijn, Tracey C.; Phua, Sin H.; Adelson, David L.; Burkin, Heather R.; Broom, Judith E.; Buitkamp, Johannes; Cambridge, Lisa; Cushwa, William T.; Gerard, Emily; Galloway, Susan M.; Harrison, Blair; Hawken, Rachel J.; Hiendleder, Stefan; Henry, Hannah M.; Medrano, Juan F.; Paterson, Korena A.; Schibler, Laurent; Stone, Roger T.; van Hest, Beryl

    2001-01-01

    A medium-density linkage map of the ovine genome has been developed. Marker data for 550 new loci were generated and merged with the previous sheep linkage map. The new map comprises 1093 markers representing 1062 unique loci (941 anonymous loci, 121 genes) and spans 3500 cM (sex-averaged) for the autosomes and 132 cM (female) on the X chromosome. There is an average spacing of 3.4 cM between autosomal loci and 8.3 cM between highly polymorphic [polymorphic information content (PIC) ≥ 0.7] autosomal loci. The largest gap between markers is 32.5 cM, and the number of gaps of >20 cM between loci, or regions where loci are missing from chromosome ends, has been reduced from 40 in the previous map to 6. Five hundred and seventy-three of the loci can be ordered on a framework map with odds of >1000 : 1. The sheep linkage map contains strong links to both the cattle and goat maps. Five hundred and seventy-two of the loci positioned on the sheep linkage map have also been mapped by linkage analysis in cattle, and 209 of the loci mapped on the sheep linkage map have also been placed on the goat linkage map. Inspection of ruminant linkage maps indicates that the genomic coverage by the current sheep linkage map is comparable to that of the available cattle maps. The sheep map provides a valuable resource to the international sheep, cattle, and goat gene mapping community. PMID:11435411

  2. Selection of reference genes for normalization of real-time PCR data in minipig heart failure model and evaluation of TNF-α mRNA expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Alessandro; Cabiati, Manuela; Campan, Manuela; Prescimone, Tommaso; Minocci, Daiana; Caselli, Chiara; Rossi, Anna Maria; Giannessi, Daniela; Del Ry, Silvia

    2011-05-20

    Real-time PCR is the benchmark method for measuring mRNA expression levels, but the accuracy and reproducibility of its data greatly depend on appropriate normalization strategies. Though the minipig model is largely used to study cardiovascular disease, no specific reference genes have been identified in porcine myocardium. The aim of the study was to identify and validate reference gene to be used in RT-PCR studies of failing (HF) and non-failing pig hearts. Eight candidate reference genes (GAPDH, ACTB, B2M, TBP, HPRT-1, PPIA, TOP2B, YWHAZ) were selected to compare cardiac tissue of normal (n=4) and HF (n=5) minipigs. The most stable genes resulted: HPRT-1, TBP, PPIA (right and left atrium); PPIA, GAPDH, ACTB (right ventricle); HPRT-1, TBP, GAPDH (left ventricle). The normalization strategy was tested analyzing mRNA expression of TNF-α, which is known to be up-regulated in HF and whose variations resulted more significant when normalized with the appropriately selected reference genes. The findings obtained in this study underline the importance to provide a set of reference genes to normalize mRNA expression in HF and control minipigs. The use of unvalidated reference genes can generate biased results because also their expression could be altered by the experimental conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Reference gene selection for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma gene expression studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raynal Caroline

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is no longer adequate to choose reference genes blindly. We present the first study that defines the suitability of 12 reference genes commonly used in cancer studies (ACT, ALAS, B2M, GAPDH, HMBS, HPRT, KALPHA, RPS18, RPL27, RPS29, SHAD and TBP for the normalization of quantitative expression data in the field of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. Results Raw expression levels were measured by RT-qPCR in HNSCC and normal matched mucosa of 46 patients. We analyzed the expression stability using geNorm and NormFinder and compared the expression levels between subgroups. In HNSCC and/or normal mucosa, the four best normalization genes were ALAS, GAPDH, RPS18 and SHAD and the most stable combination of two genes was GAPDH-SHAD. We recommend using KALPHA-TBP for the study of T1-T2 tumors, RPL27-SHAD for T3-T4 tumors, KALPHA-SHAD for N0 tumors, and ALAS-TBP for N+ tumors. ACT, B2M, GAPDH, HMBS, HPRT, KALPHA, RPS18, RPS29, SHAD and TBP were slightly misregulated ( Conclusion In the field of HNSCC, this study will guide researchers in selecting the most appropriate reference genes from among 12 potentially suitable reference genes, depending on the specific setting of their experiments.

  4. Four loci explain 83% of size variation in the horse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokouh Makvandi-Nejad

    Full Text Available Horse body size varies greatly due to intense selection within each breed. American Miniatures are less than one meter tall at the withers while Shires and Percherons can exceed two meters. The genetic basis for this variation is not known. We hypothesize that the breed population structure of the horse should simplify efforts to identify genes controlling size. In support of this, here we show with genome-wide association scans (GWAS that genetic variation at just four loci can explain the great majority of horse size variation. Unlike humans, which are naturally reproducing and possess many genetic variants with weak effects on size, we show that horses, like other domestic mammals, carry just a small number of size loci with alleles of large effect. Furthermore, three of our horse size loci contain the LCORL, HMGA2 and ZFAT genes that have previously been found to control human height. The LCORL/NCAPG locus is also implicated in cattle growth and HMGA2 is associated with dog size. Extreme size diversification is a hallmark of domestication. Our results in the horse, complemented by the prior work in cattle and dog, serve to pinpoint those very few genes that have played major roles in the rapid evolution of size during domestication.

  5. Overlap of disease susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinks, Anne; Eyre, Steve; Ke, Xiayi; Barton, Anne; Martin, Paul; Flynn, Edward; Packham, Jon; Worthington, Jane; Thomson, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been extremely successful in the search for susceptibility risk factors for complex genetic autoimmune diseases. As more studies are published, evidence is emerging of considerable overlap of loci between these diseases. In juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), another complex genetic autoimmune disease, the strategy of using information from autoimmune disease GWAS or candidate gene studies to help in the search for novel JIA susceptibility loci has been successful, with confirmed association with two genes, PTPN22 and IL2RA. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that shares similar clinical and pathological features with JIA and, therefore, recently identified confirmed RA susceptibility loci are also excellent JIA candidate loci. Objective To determine the overlap of disease susceptibility loci for RA and JIA. Methods Fifteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at nine RA-associated loci were genotyped in Caucasian patients with JIA (n=1054) and controls (n=3531) and tested for association with JIA. Allele and genotype frequencies were compared between cases and controls using the genetic analysis software, PLINK. Results Two JIA susceptibility loci were identified, one of which was a novel JIA association (STAT4) and the second confirmed previously published associations of the TRAF1/C5 locus with JIA. Weak evidence of association of JIA with three additional loci (Chr6q23, KIF5A and PRKCQ) was also obtained, which warrants further investigation. Conclusion All these loci are good candidates in view of the known pathogenesis of JIA, as genes within these regions (TRAF1, STAT4, TNFAIP3, PRKCQ) are known to be involved in T-cell receptor signalling or activation pathways. PMID:19674979

  6. GLOSSI: a method to assess the association of genetic loci-sets with complex diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmann Yan W

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The developments of high-throughput genotyping technologies, which enable the simultaneous genotyping of hundreds of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP have the potential to increase the benefits of genetic epidemiology studies. Although the enhanced resolution of these platforms increases the chance of interrogating functional SNPs that are themselves causative or in linkage disequilibrium with causal SNPs, commonly used single SNP-association approaches suffer from serious multiple hypothesis testing problems and provide limited insights into combinations of loci that may contribute to complex diseases. Drawing inspiration from Gene Set Enrichment Analysis developed for gene expression data, we have developed a method, named GLOSSI (Gene-loci Set Analysis, that integrates prior biological knowledge into the statistical analysis of genotyping data to test the association of a group of SNPs (loci-set with complex disease phenotypes. The most significant loci-sets can be used to formulate hypotheses from a functional viewpoint that can be validated experimentally. Results In a simulation study, GLOSSI showed sufficient power to detect loci-sets with less than 10% of SNPs having moderate-to-large effect sizes and intermediate minor allele frequency values. When applied to a biological dataset where no single SNP-association was found in a previous study, GLOSSI was able to identify several loci-sets that are significantly related to blood pressure response to an antihypertensive drug. Conclusion GLOSSI is valuable for association of SNPs at multiple genetic loci with complex disease phenotypes. In contrast to methods based on the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistic, the approach is parametric and only utilizes information from within the interrogated loci-set. It properly accounts for dependency among SNPs and allows the testing of loci-sets of any size.

  7. Identification of Suitable Reference Genes for Normalization of Real-Time Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction in an Intestinal Graft-Versus-Host Disease Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; Qiao, J; Yang, N; Mi, H; Chu, P; Xia, Y; Yao, H; Liu, Y; Qi, K; Yan, Z; Zeng, L; Xu, K

    2015-01-01

    With the development of real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and intensive research on acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), selecting the best reference gene for normalization of RT-qPCR analysis in a GVHD model becomes more and more important. In this study, we aimed to identify suitable reference genes for mRNA studies in an intestinal GVHD mouse model after bone marrow transplantation (BMT). BALB/c recipients received 7.5 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) followed by injection of 5 × 10(6) bone marrow cells, without infusion of spleen cells for BMT, with infusion of 5 × 10(5) or 2.5 × 10(6) spleen cells for mild or moderate GVHD, respectively. Healthy mice were chosen as normal control subjects. Duodenum, jejunum, ileum, colon, and small intestine were collected at days 7, 14, 21, and 28 after transplantation. Transcription levels of 9 candidate genes, B2M, SDHA, HPRT, ACTB, GAPDH, HMBS, TBP, YWHAZ, and RPLP0, in each tissue were measured with the use of RT-qPCR. Combined data from these tissues in each group were defined as all samples. The expression stability of these genes was analyzed with the use of Genorm, Normfinder, Bestkeeper, and ΔCt. Our results showed that in all samples, ACTB and HMBS displayed the highest and lowest expression levels, respectively. Genorm identified HRPT and SDHA as the most stable reference genes, whereas Normfinder and ΔCt method showed HPRT as the most stably expressed gene. Bestkeeper ranked YWHAZ and HPRT as the top 2 most suitable genes. In conclusion, HPRT was recommended as the most suitable reference gene after comprehensive ranking, suggesting that it could be used as an internal control for mRNA studies in intestinal GVHD after BMT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Novel Associations of Nonstructural Loci with Paraoxonase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen E. Quillen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The high-density-lipoprotein-(HDL- associated esterase paraoxonase 1 (PON1 is a likely contributor to the antioxidant and antiatherosclerotic capabilities of HDL. Two nonsynonymous mutations in the structural gene, PON1, have been associated with variation in activity levels, but substantial interindividual differences remain unexplained and are greatest for substrates other than the eponymous paraoxon. PON1 activity levels were measured for three substrates—organophosphate paraoxon, arylester phenyl acetate, and lactone dihydrocoumarin—in 767 Mexican American individuals from San Antonio, Texas. Genetic influences on activity levels for each substrate were evaluated by association with approximately one million single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs while conditioning on PON1 genotypes. Significant associations were detected at five loci including regions on chromosomes 4 and 17 known to be associated with atherosclerosis and lipoprotein regulation and loci on chromosome 3 that regulate ubiquitous transcription factors. These loci explain 7.8% of variation in PON1 activity with lactone as a substrate, 5.6% with the arylester, and 3.0% with paraoxon. In light of the potential importance of PON1 in preventing cardiovascular disease/events, these novel loci merit further investigation.

  9. Reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction reference genes in the spared nerve injury model of neuropathic pain: validation and literature search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piller, Nicolas; Decosterd, Isabelle; Suter, Marc R

    2013-07-10

    The reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is a widely used, highly sensitive laboratory technique to rapidly and easily detect, identify and quantify gene expression. Reliable RT-qPCR data necessitates accurate normalization with validated control genes (reference genes) whose expression is constant in all studied conditions. This stability has to be demonstrated.We performed a literature search for studies using quantitative or semi-quantitative PCR in the rat spared nerve injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain to verify whether any reference genes had previously been validated. We then analyzed the stability over time of 7 commonly used reference genes in the nervous system - specifically in the spinal cord dorsal horn and the dorsal root ganglion (DRG). These were: Actin beta (Actb), Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), ribosomal proteins 18S (18S), L13a (RPL13a) and L29 (RPL29), hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (HPRT1) and hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS). We compared the candidate genes and established a stability ranking using the geNorm algorithm. Finally, we assessed the number of reference genes necessary for accurate normalization in this neuropathic pain model. We found GAPDH, HMBS, Actb, HPRT1 and 18S cited as reference genes in literature on studies using the SNI model. Only HPRT1 and 18S had been once previously demonstrated as stable in RT-qPCR arrays. All the genes tested in this study, using the geNorm algorithm, presented gene stability values (M-value) acceptable enough for them to qualify as potential reference genes in both DRG and spinal cord. Using the coefficient of variation, 18S failed the 50% cut-off with a value of 61% in the DRG. The two most stable genes in the dorsal horn were RPL29 and RPL13a; in the DRG they were HPRT1 and Actb. Using a 0.15 cut-off for pairwise variations we found that any pair of stable reference gene was sufficient for the normalization process

  10. Microsatellite loci isolated from the tropical tree Hymenaea courbaril L. (Fabaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonamici, Anna; Cavers, Stephen; Vendramin, G G

    2008-09-01

    We developed 11 microsatellite markers for Hymenaea courbaril for the purpose of studying spatial genetic structure and gene flow. The microsatellite loci were screened in 44 trees from two populations. All loci were polymorphic, exhibiting between two and 16 alleles, and levels of expected heterozygosity from 0.174 to 0.909. Departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were detected for all loci in one population. The estimated null allele frequency is low or moderate. No locus combinations exhibited linkage disequilibrium. © 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Nine Loci for Ocular Axial Length Identified through Genome-wide Association Studies, Including Shared Loci with Refractive Error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-Yu; Schache, Maria; Ikram, M. Kamran; Young, Terri L.; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Vitart, Veronique; MacGregor, Stuart; Verhoeven, Virginie J.M.; Barathi, Veluchamy A.; Liao, Jiemin; Hysi, Pirro G.; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; St. Pourcain, Beate; Kemp, John P.; McMahon, George; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Evans, David M.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mishra, Aniket; Wang, Ya Xing; Wang, Jie Jin; Rochtchina, Elena; Polasek, Ozren; Wright, Alan F.; Amin, Najaf; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Wilson, James F.; Pennell, Craig E.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; de Jong, Paulus T.V.M.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Peng; Li, Ruoying; Tay, Wan-Ting; Zheng, Yingfeng; Chew, Merwyn; Rahi, Jugnoo S.; Hysi, Pirro G.; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Yamashiro, Kenji; Miyake, Masahiro; Delcourt, Cécile; Maubaret, Cecilia; Williams, Cathy; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Northstone, Kate; Ring, Susan M.; Davey-Smith, George; Craig, Jamie E.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Fogarty, Rhys D.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Igo, Robert P.; Chew, Emily; Janmahasathian, Sarayut; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Igo, Robert P.; Chew, Emily; Janmahasathian, Sarayut; Stambolian, Dwight; Wilson, Joan E. Bailey; MacGregor, Stuart; Lu, Yi; Jonas, Jost B.; Xu, Liang; Saw, Seang-Mei; Baird, Paul N.; Rochtchina, Elena; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Jonas, Jost B.; Nangia, Vinay; Hayward, Caroline; Wright, Alan F.; Vitart, Veronique; Polasek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Vitart, Veronique; Rudan, Igor; Vatavuk, Zoran; Vitart, Veronique; Paterson, Andrew D.; Hosseini, S. Mohsen; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Igo, Robert P.; Fondran, Jeremy R.; Young, Terri L.; Feng, Sheng; Verhoeven, Virginie J.M.; Klaver, Caroline C.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Metspalu, Andres; Haller, Toomas; Mihailov, Evelin; Pärssinen, Olavi; Wedenoja, Juho; Wilson, Joan E. Bailey; Wojciechowski, Robert; Baird, Paul N.; Schache, Maria; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Höhn, René; Pang, Chi Pui; Chen, Peng; Meitinger, Thomas; Oexle, Konrad; Wegner, Aharon; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Yamashiro, Kenji; Miyake, Masahiro; Pärssinen, Olavi; Yip, Shea Ping; Ho, Daniel W.H.; Pirastu, Mario; Murgia, Federico; Portas, Laura; Biino, Genevra; Wilson, James F.; Fleck, Brian; Vitart, Veronique; Stambolian, Dwight; Wilson, Joan E. Bailey; Hewitt, Alex W.; Ang, Wei; Verhoeven, Virginie J.M.; Klaver, Caroline C.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Saw, Seang-Mei; Wong, Tien-Yin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Wong, Tien-Yin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Wong, Tien-Yin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Tai, E-Shyong; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Saw, Seang-Mei; Teo, Yik-Ying; Fan, Qiao; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Mackey, David A.; MacGregor, Stuart; Hammond, Christopher J.; Hysi, Pirro G.; Deangelis, Margaret M.; Morrison, Margaux; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Wei; Paterson, Andrew D.; Hosseini, S. Mohsen; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Meguro, Akira; Lehtimäki, Terho; Mäkelä, Kari-Matti; Raitakari, Olli; Kähönen, Mika; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Craig, Jamie E.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Igo, Robert P.; Lass, Jonathan H.; Reinhart, William; Belin, Michael W.; Schultze, Robert L.; Morason, Todd; Sugar, Alan; Mian, Shahzad; Soong, Hunson Kaz; Colby, Kathryn; Jurkunas, Ula; Yee, Richard; Vital, Mark; Alfonso, Eduardo; Karp, Carol; Lee, Yunhee; Yoo, Sonia; Hammersmith, Kristin; Cohen, Elisabeth; Laibson, Peter; Rapuano, Christopher; Ayres, Brandon; Croasdale, Christopher; Caudill, James; Patel, Sanjay; Baratz, Keith; Bourne, William; Maguire, Leo; Sugar, Joel; Tu, Elmer; Djalilian, Ali; Mootha, Vinod; McCulley, James; Bowman, Wayne; Cavanaugh, H. Dwight; Verity, Steven; Verdier, David; Renucci, Ann; Oliva, Matt; Rotkis, Walter; Hardten, David R.; Fahmy, Ahmad; Brown, Marlene; Reeves, Sherman; Davis, Elizabeth A.; Lindstrom, Richard; Hauswirth, Scott; Hamilton, Stephen; Lee, W. Barry; Price, Francis; Price, Marianne; Kelly, Kathleen; Peters, Faye; Shaughnessy, Michael; Steinemann, Thomas; Dupps, B.J.; Meisler, David M.; Mifflin, Mark; Olson, Randal; Aldave, Anthony; Holland, Gary; Mondino, Bartly J.; Rosenwasser, George; Gorovoy, Mark; Dunn, Steven P.; Heidemann, David G.; Terry, Mark; Shamie, Neda; Rosenfeld, Steven I.; Suedekum, Brandon; Hwang, David; Stone, Donald; Chodosh, James; Galentine, Paul G.; Bardenstein, David; Goddard, Katrina; Chin, Hemin; Mannis, Mark; Varma, Rohit; Borecki, Ingrid; Chew, Emily Y.; Haller, Toomas; Mihailov, Evelin; Metspalu, Andres; Wedenoja, Juho; Simpson, Claire L.; Wojciechowski, Robert; Höhn, René; Mirshahi, Alireza; Zeller, Tanja; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Lackner, Karl J.; Donnelly, Peter; Barroso, Ines; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Bramon, Elvira; Brown, Matthew A.; Casas, Juan P.; Corvin, Aiden; Deloukas, Panos; Duncanson, Audrey; Jankowski, Janusz; Markus, Hugh S.; Mathew, Christopher G.; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Plomin, Robert; Rautanen, Anna; Sawcer, Stephen J.; Trembath, Richard C.; Viswanathan, Ananth C.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Band, Gavin; Bellenguez, Céline; Freeman, Colin; Hellenthal, Garrett; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Pirinen, Matti; Pearson, Richard; Strange, Amy; Su, Zhan; Vukcevic, Damjan; Donnelly, Peter; Langford, Cordelia; Hunt, Sarah E.; Edkins, Sarah; Gwilliam, Rhian; Blackburn, Hannah; Bumpstead, Suzannah J.; Dronov, Serge; Gillman, Matthew; Gray, Emma; Hammond, Naomi; Jayakumar, Alagurevathi; McCann, Owen T.; Liddle, Jennifer; Potter, Simon C.; Ravindrarajah, Radhi; Ricketts, Michelle; Waller, Matthew; Weston, Paul; Widaa, Sara; Whittaker, Pamela; Barroso, Ines; Deloukas, Panos; Mathew, Christopher G.; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Brown, Matthew A.; Corvin, Aiden; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Bettecken, Thomas; Meitinger, Thomas; Oexle, Konrad; Pirastu, Mario; Portas, Laura; Nag, Abhishek; Williams, Katie M.; Yonova-Doing, Ekaterina; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E.; Hosseini, S. Mohsen; Paterson, Andrew D.; Genuth, S.; Nathan, D.M.; Zinman, B.; Crofford, O.; Crandall, J.; Reid, M.; Brown-Friday, J.; Engel, S.; Sheindlin, J.; Martinez, H.; Shamoon, H.; Engel, H.; Phillips, M.; Gubitosi-Klug, R.; Mayer, L.; Pendegast, S.; Zegarra, H.; Miller, D.; Singerman, L.; Smith-Brewer, S.; Novak, M.; Quin, J.; Dahms, W.; Genuth, Saul; Palmert, M.; Brillon, D.; Lackaye, M.E.; Kiss, S.; Chan, R.; Reppucci, V.; Lee, T.; Heinemann, M.; Whitehouse, F.; Kruger, D.; Jones, J.K.; McLellan, M.; Carey, J.D.; Angus, E.; Thomas, A.; Galprin, A.; Bergenstal, R.; Johnson, M.; Spencer, M.; Morgan, K.; Etzwiler, D.; Kendall, D.; Aiello, Lloyd Paul; Golden, E.; Jacobson, A.; Beaser, R.; Ganda, O.; Hamdy, O.; Wolpert, H.; Sharuk, G.; Arrigg, P.; Schlossman, D.; Rosenzwieg, J.; Rand, L.; Nathan, D.M.; Larkin, M.; Ong, M.; Godine, J.; Cagliero, E.; Lou, P.; Folino, K.; Fritz, S.; Crowell, S.; Hansen, K.; Gauthier-Kelly, C.; Service, J.; Ziegler, G.; Luttrell, L.; Caulder, S.; Lopes-Virella, M.; Colwell, J.; Soule, J.; Fernandes, J.; Hermayer, K.; Kwon, S.; Brabham, M.; Blevins, A.; Parker, J.; Lee, D.; Patel, N.; Pittman, C.; Lindsey, P.; Bracey, M.; Lee, K.; Nutaitis, M.; Farr, A.; Elsing, S.; Thompson, T.; Selby, J.; Lyons, T.; Yacoub-Wasef, S.; Szpiech, M.; Wood, D.; Mayfield, R.; Molitch, M.; Schaefer, B.; Jampol, L.; Lyon, A.; Gill, M.; Strugula, Z.; Kaminski, L.; Mirza, R.; Simjanoski, E.; Ryan, D.; Kolterman, O.; Lorenzi, G.; Goldbaum, M.; Sivitz, W.; Bayless, M.; Counts, D.; Johnsonbaugh, S.; Hebdon, M.; Salemi, P.; Liss, R.; Donner, T.; Gordon, J.; Hemady, R.; Kowarski, A.; Ostrowski, D.; Steidl, S.; Jones, B.; Herman, W.H.; Martin, C.L.; Pop-Busui, R.; Sarma, A.; Albers, J.; Feldman, E.; Kim, K.; Elner, S.; Comer, G.; Gardner, T.; Hackel, R.; Prusak, R.; Goings, L.; Smith, A.; Gothrup, J.; Titus, P.; Lee, J.; Brandle, M.; Prosser, L.; Greene, D.A.; Stevens, M.J.; Vine, A.K.; Bantle, J.; Wimmergren, N.; Cochrane, A.; Olsen, T.; Steuer, E.; Rath, P.; Rogness, B.; Hainsworth, D.; Goldstein, D.; Hitt, S.; Giangiacomo, J.; Schade, D.S.; Canady, J.L.; Chapin, J.E.; Ketai, L.H.; Braunstein, C.S.; Bourne, P.A.; Schwartz, S.; Brucker, A.; Maschak-Carey, B.J.; Baker, L.; Orchard, T.; Silvers, N.; Ryan, C.; Songer, T.; Doft, B.; Olson, S.; Bergren, R.L.; Lobes, L.; Rath, P. Paczan; Becker, D.; Rubinstein, D.; Conrad, P.W.; Yalamanchi, S.; Drash, A.; Morrison, A.; Bernal, M.L.; Vaccaro-Kish, J.; Malone, J.; Pavan, P.R.; Grove, N.; Iyer, M.N.; Burrows, A.F.; Tanaka, E.A.; Gstalder, R.; Dagogo-Jack, S.; Wigley, C.; Ricks, H.; Kitabchi, A.; Murphy, M.B.; Moser, S.; Meyer, D.; Iannacone, A.; Chaum, E.; Yoser, S.; Bryer-Ash, M.; Schussler, S.; Lambeth, H.; Raskin, P.; Strowig, S.; Zinman, B.; Barnie, A.; Devenyi, R.; Mandelcorn, M.; Brent, M.; Rogers, S.; Gordon, A.; Palmer, J.; Catton, S.; Brunzell, J.; Wessells, H.; de Boer, I.H.; Hokanson, J.; Purnell, J.; Ginsberg, J.; Kinyoun, J.; Deeb, S.; Weiss, M.; Meekins, G.; Distad, J.; Van Ottingham, L.; Dupre, J.; Harth, J.; Nicolle, D.; Driscoll, M.; Mahon, J.; Canny, C.; May, M.; Lipps, J.; Agarwal, A.; Adkins, T.; Survant, L.; Pate, R.L.; Munn, G.E.; Lorenz, R.; Feman, S.; White, N.; Levandoski, L.; Boniuk, I.; Grand, G.; Thomas, M.; Joseph, D.D.; Blinder, K.; Shah, G.; Boniuk; Burgess; Santiago, J.; Tamborlane, W.; Gatcomb, P.; Stoessel, K.; Taylor, K.; Goldstein, J.; Novella, S.; Mojibian, H.; Cornfeld, D.; Lima, J.; Bluemke, D.; Turkbey, E.; van der Geest, R.J.; Liu, C.; Malayeri, A.; Jain, A.; Miao, C.; Chahal, H.; Jarboe, R.; Maynard, J.; Gubitosi-Klug, R.; Quin, J.; Gaston, P.; Palmert, M.; Trail, R.; Dahms, W.; Lachin, J.; Cleary, P.; Backlund, J.; Sun, W.; Braffett, B.; Klumpp, K.; Chan, K.; Diminick, L.; Rosenberg, D.; Petty, B.; Determan, A.; Kenny, D.; Rutledge, B.; Younes, Naji; Dews, L.; Hawkins, M.; Cowie, C.; Fradkin, J.; Siebert, C.; Eastman, R.; Danis, R.; Gangaputra, S.; Neill, S.; Davis, M.; Hubbard, L.; Wabers, H.; Burger, M.; Dingledine, J.; Gama, V.; Sussman, R.; Steffes, M.; Bucksa, J.; Nowicki, M.; Chavers, B.; O’Leary, D.; Polak, J.; Harrington, A.; Funk, L.; Crow, R.; Gloeb, B.; Thomas, S.; O’Donnell, C.; Soliman, E.; Zhang, Z.M.; Prineas, R.; Campbell, C.; Ryan, C.; Sandstrom, D.; Williams, T.; Geckle, M.; Cupelli, E.; Thoma, F.; Burzuk, B.; Woodfill, T.; Low, P.; Sommer, C.; Nickander, K.; Budoff, M.; Detrano, R.; Wong, N.; Fox, M.; Kim, L.; Oudiz, R.; Weir, G.; Espeland, M.; Manolio, T.; Rand, L.; Singer, D.; Stern, M.; Boulton, A.E.; Clark, C.; D’Agostino, R.; Lopes-Virella, M.; Garvey, W.T.; Lyons, T.J.; Jenkins, A.; Virella, G.; Jaffa, A.; Carter, Rickey; Lackland, D.; Brabham, M.; McGee, D.; Zheng, D.; Mayfield, R.K.; Boright, A.; Bull, S.; Sun, L.; Scherer, S.; Zinman, B.; Natarajan, R.; Miao, F.; Zhang, L.; Chen;, Z.; Nathan, D.M.; Makela, Kari-Matti; Lehtimaki, Terho; Kahonen, Mika; Raitakari, Olli; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Chen, Li Jia; Pang, Chi Pui; Yip, Shea Ping; Yap, Maurice K.H.; Meguro, Akira; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Foster, Paul J.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Vithana, Eranga; Tai, E-Shyong; Fan, Qiao; Xu, Liang; Campbell, Harry; Fleck, Brian; Rudan, Igor; Aung, Tin; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G.; Bencic, Goran; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Forward, Hannah; Pärssinen, Olavi; Mitchell, Paul; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hewitt, Alex W.; Williams, Cathy; Oostra, Ben A.; Teo, Yik-Ying; Hammond, Christopher J.; Stambolian, Dwight; Mackey, David A.; Klaver, Caroline C.W.; Wong, Tien-Yin; Saw, Seang-Mei; Baird, Paul N.

    2013-01-01

    Refractive errors are common eye disorders of public health importance worldwide. Ocular axial length (AL) is the major determinant of refraction and thus of myopia and hyperopia. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for AL, combining 12,531 Europeans and 8,216 Asians. We identified eight genome-wide significant loci for AL (RSPO1, C3orf26, LAMA2, GJD2, ZNRF3, CD55, MIP, and ALPPL2) and confirmed one previously reported AL locus (ZC3H11B). Of the nine loci, five (LAMA2, GJD2, CD55, ALPPL2, and ZC3H11B) were associated with refraction in 18 independent cohorts (n = 23,591). Differential gene expression was observed for these loci in minus-lens-induced myopia mouse experiments and human ocular tissues. Two of the AL genes, RSPO1 and ZNRF3, are involved in Wnt signaling, a pathway playing a major role in the regulation of eyeball size. This study provides evidence of shared genes between AL and refraction, but importantly also suggests that these traits may have unique pathways. PMID:24144296

  12. Bystander effect-induced mutagenicity in HPRT locus of CHO cells following BNCT neutron irradiation: Characteristics of point mutations by sequence analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinashi, Yuko [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka (Japan)], E-mail: kinashi@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Ono, Koji [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka (Japan)

    2009-07-15

    To investigate bystander mutagenic effects induced by alpha particles during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), we mixed cells that were electroporated with borocaptate sodium (BSH), which led to the accumulation of {sup 10}B inside the cells, with cells that did not contain the boron compound. BSH-containing cells were irradiated with {alpha} particles produced by the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction, whereas cells without boron were only affected by the {sup 1}H(n,{gamma}){sup 2}H and {sup 14}N(n,{rho}){sup 14}C reactions. The frequency of mutations induced in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) locus was examined in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells irradiated with neutrons (Kyoto University Research Reactor: 5 MW). Neutron irradiation of 1:1 mixtures of cells with and without BSH resulted in a survival fraction of 0.1, and the cells that did not contain BSH made up 99.4% of the surviving cell population. Using multiplex polymerase chain reactions (PCRs), molecular structural analysis indicated that most of the mutations induced by the bystander effect were point mutations and that the frequencies of total and partial deletions induced by the bystander effect were lower than those resulting from the {alpha} particles produced by the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction or the neutron beam from the {sup 1}H(n,{gamma}){sup 2}H and {sup 14}N(n,{rho}){sup 14}C reactions. The types of point mutations induced by the BNCT bystander effect were analyzed by cloning and sequencing methods. These mutations were comprised of 65.5% base substitutions, 27.5% deletions, and 7.0% insertions. Sequence analysis of base substitutions showed that transversions and transitions occurred in 64.7% and 35.3% of cases, respectively. G:C{yields}T:A transversion induced by 8-oxo-guanine in DNA occurred in 5.9% of base substitution mutants in the BNCT bystander group. The characteristic mutations seen in this group, induced by BNCT {alpha} particles

  13. Genome-wide Association Study Identifies New Loci for Resistance to Leptosphaeria maculans in Canola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsh Raman

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Blackleg, caused by Leptosphaeria maculans, is a significant disease which affects the sustainable production of canola. This study reports a genome-wide association study based on 18,804 polymorphic SNPs to identify loci associated with qualitative and quantitative resistance to L. maculans. Genomic regions delimited with 503 significant SNP markers, that are associated with resistance evaluated using 12 single spore isolates and pathotypes from four canola stubble were identified. Several significant associations were detected at known disease resistance loci including in the vicinity of recently cloned Rlm2/LepR3 genes, and at new loci on chromosomes A01/C01, A02/C02, A03/C03, A05/C05, A06, A08, and A09. In addition, we validated statistically significant associations on A01, A07 and A10 in four genetic mapping populations, demonstrating that GWAS marker loci are indeed associated with resistance to L. maculans. One of the novel loci identified for the first time, Rlm12, conveys adult plant resistance and mapped within 13.2 kb from Arabidopsis R gene of TIR-NBS class. We showed that resistance loci are located in the vicinity of R genes of A. thaliana and B. napus on the sequenced genome of B. napus cv. Darmor-bzh. Significantly associated SNP markers provide a valuable tool to enrich germplasm for favorable alleles in order to improve the level of resistance to L. maculans in canola.

  14. Large-scale association analysis identifies new lung cancer susceptibility loci and heterogeneity in genetic susceptibility across histological subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, James D; Hung, Rayjean J; Han, Younghun; Zong, Xuchen; Carreras-Torres, Robert; Christiani, David C; Caporaso, Neil E; Johansson, Mattias; Xiao, Xiangjun; Li, Yafang; Byun, Jinyoung; Dunning, Alison; Pooley, Karen A; Qian, David C; Ji, Xuemei; Liu, Geoffrey; Timofeeva, Maria N; Bojesen, Stig E; Wu, Xifeng; Le Marchand, Loic; Albanes, Demetrios; Bickeböller, Heike; Aldrich, Melinda C; Bush, William S; Tardon, Adonina; Rennert, Gad; Teare, M Dawn; Field, John K; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Lazarus, Philip; Haugen, Aage; Lam, Stephen; Schabath, Matthew B; Andrew, Angeline S; Shen, Hongbing; Hong, Yun-Chul; Yuan, Jian-Min; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Pesatori, Angela C; Ye, Yuanqing; Diao, Nancy; Su, Li; Zhang, Ruyang; Brhane, Yonathan; Leighl, Natasha; Johansen, Jakob S; Mellemgaard, Anders; Saliba, Walid; Haiman, Christopher A; Wilkens, Lynne R; Fernandez-Somoano, Ana; Fernandez-Tardon, Guillermo; van der Heijden, Henricus F M; Kim, Jin Hee; Dai, Juncheng; Hu, Zhibin; Davies, Michael P A; Marcus, Michael W; Brunnström, Hans; Manjer, Jonas; Melander, Olle; Muller, David C; Overvad, Kim; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Tumino, Rosario; Doherty, Jennifer A; Barnett, Matt P; Chen, Chu; Goodman, Gary E; Cox, Angela; Taylor, Fiona; Woll, Penella; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, H-Erich; Manz, Judith; Muley, Thomas R; Risch, Angela; Rosenberger, Albert; Grankvist, Kjell; Johansson, Mikael; Shepherd, Frances A; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Arnold, Susanne M; Haura, Eric B; Bolca, Ciprian; Holcatova, Ivana; Janout, Vladimir; Kontic, Milica; Lissowska, Jolanta; Mukeria, Anush; Ognjanovic, Simona; Orlowski, Tadeusz M; Scelo, Ghislaine; Swiatkowska, Beata; Zaridze, David; Bakke, Per; Skaug, Vidar; Zienolddiny, Shanbeh; Duell, Eric J; Butler, Lesley M; Koh, Woon-Puay; Gao, Yu-Tang; Houlston, Richard S; McLaughlin, John; Stevens, Victoria L; Joubert, Philippe; Lamontagne, Maxime; Nickle, David C; Obeidat, Ma'en; Timens, Wim; Zhu, Bin; Song, Lei; Kachuri, Linda; Artigas, María Soler; Tobin, Martin D; Wain, Louise V; Rafnar, Thorunn; Thorgeirsson, Thorgeir E; Reginsson, Gunnar W; Stefansson, Kari; Hancock, Dana B; Bierut, Laura J; Spitz, Margaret R; Gaddis, Nathan C; Lutz, Sharon M; Gu, Fangyi; Johnson, Eric O; Kamal, Ahsan; Pikielny, Claudio; Zhu, Dakai; Lindströem, Sara; Jiang, Xia; Tyndale, Rachel F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Bossé, Yohan; Chanock, Stephen; Brennan, Paul; Landi, Maria Teresa; Amos, Christopher I

    2017-07-01

    Although several lung cancer susceptibility loci have been identified, much of the heritability for lung cancer remains unexplained. Here 14,803 cases and 12,262 controls of European descent were genotyped on the OncoArray and combined with existing data for an aggregated genome-wide association study (GWAS) analysis of lung cancer in 29,266 cases and 56,450 controls. We identified 18 susceptibility loci achieving genome-wide significance, including 10 new loci. The new loci highlight the striking heterogeneity in genetic susceptibility across the histological subtypes of lung cancer, with four loci associated with lung cancer overall and six loci associated with lung adenocarcinoma. Gene expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis in 1,425 normal lung tissue samples highlights RNASET2, SECISBP2L and NRG1 as candidate genes. Other loci include genes such as a cholinergic nicotinic receptor, CHRNA2, and the telomere-related genes OFBC1 and RTEL1. Further exploration of the target genes will continue to provide new insights into the etiology of lung cancer.

  15. Mapping of five candidate sex-determining loci in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew Robert E

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rainbow trout have an XX/XY genetic mechanism of sex determination where males are the heterogametic sex. The homology of the sex-determining gene (SDG in medaka to Dmrt1 suggested that SDGs evolve from downstream genes by gene duplication. Orthologous sequences of the major genes of the mammalian sex determination pathway have been reported in the rainbow trout but the map position for the majority of these genes has not been assigned. Results Five loci of four candidate genes (Amh, Dax1, Dmrt1 and Sox6 were tested for linkage to the Y chromosome of rainbow trout. We exclude the role of all these loci as candidates for the primary SDG in this species. Sox6i and Sox6ii, duplicated copies of Sox6, mapped to homeologous linkage groups 10 and 18 respectively. Genotyping fishes of the OSU × Arlee mapping family for Sox6i and Sox6ii alleles indicated that Sox6i locus might be deleted in the Arlee lineage. Conclusion Additional candidate genes should be tested for their linkage to the Y chromosome. Mapping data of duplicated Sox6 loci supports previously suggested homeology between linkage groups 10 and 18. Enrichment of the rainbow trout genomic map with known gene markers allows map comparisons with other salmonids. Mapping of candidate sex-determining loci is important for analyses of potential autosomal modifiers of sex-determination in rainbow trout.

  16. High density genetic mapping identifies new susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Diogo, Dorothée; Lee, Annette; Barton, Anne; Martin, Paul; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Stahl, Eli; Viatte, Sebastien; McAllister, Kate; Amos, Christopher I.; Padyukov, Leonid; Toes, Rene E.M.; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Westra, Harm-Jan; Alfredsson, Lars; Hu, Xinli; Sandor, Cynthia; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Davila, Sonia; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Heng, Khai Koon; Andrews, Robert; Edkins, Sarah; Hunt, Sarah E; Langford, Cordelia; Symmons, Deborah; Concannon, Pat; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rich, Stephen S; Deloukas, Panos; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Ärlsetig, Lisbeth; Martin, Javier; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Plenge, Robert; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K; Worthington, Jane

    2012-01-01

    Summary Using the Immunochip custom single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, designed for dense genotyping of 186 genome wide association study (GWAS) confirmed loci we analysed 11,475 rheumatoid arthritis cases of European ancestry and 15,870 controls for 129,464 markers. The data were combined in meta-analysis with GWAS data from additional independent cases (n=2,363) and controls (n=17,872). We identified fourteen novel loci; nine were associated with rheumatoid arthritis overall and 5 specifically in anti-citrillunated peptide antibody positive disease, bringing the number of confirmed European ancestry rheumatoid arthritis loci to 46. We refined the peak of association to a single gene for 19 loci, identified secondary independent effects at six loci and association to low frequency variants (minor allele frequency <0.05) at 4 loci. Bioinformatic analysis of the data generated strong hypotheses for the causal SNP at seven loci. This study illustrates the advantages of dense SNP mapping analysis to inform subsequent functional investigations. PMID:23143596

  17. New genetic loci implicated in fasting glucose homeostasis and their impact on type 2 diabetes risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, Josée; Langenberg, Claudia; Prokopenko, Inga; Saxena, Richa; Soranzo, Nicole; Jackson, Anne U; Wheeler, Eleanor; Glazer, Nicole L; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Gloyn, Anna L; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Mägi, Reedik; Morris, Andrew P; Randall, Joshua; Johnson, Toby; Elliott, Paul; Rybin, Denis; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Henneman, Peter; Grallert, Harald; Dehghan, Abbas; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Franklin, Christopher S; Navarro, Pau; Song, Kijoung; Goel, Anuj; Perry, John R B; Egan, Josephine M; Lajunen, Taina; Grarup, Niels; Sparsø, Thomas; Doney, Alex; Voight, Benjamin F; Stringham, Heather M; Li, Man; Kanoni, Stavroula; Shrader, Peter; Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine; Kumari, Meena; Qi, Lu; Timpson, Nicholas J; Gieger, Christian; Zabena, Carina; Rocheleau, Ghislain; Ingelsson, Erik; An, Ping; O’Connell, Jeffrey; Luan, Jian'an; Elliott, Amanda; McCarroll, Steven A; Payne, Felicity; Roccasecca, Rosa Maria; Pattou, François; Sethupathy, Praveen; Ardlie, Kristin; Ariyurek, Yavuz; Balkau, Beverley; Barter, Philip; Beilby, John P; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Benediktsson, Rafn; Bennett, Amanda J; Bergmann, Sven; Bochud, Murielle; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnefond, Amélie; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Böttcher, Yvonne; Brunner, Eric; Bumpstead, Suzannah J; Charpentier, Guillaume; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chines, Peter; Clarke, Robert; Coin, Lachlan J M; Cooper, Matthew N; Cornelis, Marilyn; Crawford, Gabe; Crisponi, Laura; Day, Ian N M; de Geus, Eco; Delplanque, Jerome; Dina, Christian; Erdos, Michael R; Fedson, Annette C; Fischer-Rosinsky, Antje; Forouhi, Nita G; Fox, Caroline S; Frants, Rune; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Galan, Pilar; Goodarzi, Mark O; Graessler, Jürgen; Groves, Christopher J; Grundy, Scott; Gwilliam, Rhian; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hadjadj, Samy; Hallmans, Göran; Hammond, Naomi; Han, Xijing; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassanali, Neelam; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Simon C; Hercberg, Serge; Herder, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A; Hillman, David R; Hingorani, Aroon D; Hofman, Albert; Hui, Jennie; Hung, Joe; Isomaa, Bo; Johnson, Paul R V; Jørgensen, Torben; Jula, Antti; Kaakinen, Marika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesaniemi, Y Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Knight, Beatrice; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Lathrop, G Mark; Lawlor, Debbie A; Le Bacquer, Olivier; Lecoeur, Cécile; Li, Yun; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Mahley, Robert; Mangino, Massimo; Manning, Alisa K; Martínez-Larrad, María Teresa; McAteer, Jarred B; McCulloch, Laura J; McPherson, Ruth; Meisinger, Christa; Melzer, David; Meyre, David; Mitchell, Braxton D; Morken, Mario A; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Naitza, Silvia; Narisu, Narisu; Neville, Matthew J; Oostra, Ben A; Orrù, Marco; Pakyz, Ruth; Palmer, Colin N A; Paolisso, Giuseppe; Pattaro, Cristian; Pearson, Daniel; Peden, John F; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Perola, Markus; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Pichler, Irene; Polasek, Ozren; Posthuma, Danielle; Potter, Simon C; Pouta, Anneli; Province, Michael A; Psaty, Bruce M; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Rayner, Nigel W; Rice, Kenneth; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Roden, Michael; Rolandsson, Olov; Sandbaek, Annelli; Sandhu, Manjinder; Sanna, Serena; Sayer, Avan Aihie; Scheet, Paul; Scott, Laura J; Seedorf, Udo; Sharp, Stephen J; Shields, Beverley; Sigurðsson, Gunnar; Sijbrands, Erik J G; Silveira, Angela; Simpson, Laila; Singleton, Andrew; Smith, Nicholas L; Sovio, Ulla; Swift, Amy; Syddall, Holly; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tanaka, Toshiko; Thorand, Barbara; Tichet, Jean; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Uitterlinden, André G; van Dijk, Ko Willems; van Hoek, Mandy; Varma, Dhiraj; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Vitart, Veronique; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Waeber, Gérard; Wagner, Peter J; Walley, Andrew; Walters, G Bragi; Ward, Kim L; Watkins, Hugh; Weedon, Michael N; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witteman, Jaqueline C M; Yarnell, John W G; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zelenika, Diana; Zethelius, Björn; Zhai, Guangju; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zillikens, M Carola; Borecki, Ingrid B; Loos, Ruth J F; Meneton, Pierre; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Nathan, David M; Williams, Gordon H; Hattersley, Andrew T; Silander, Kaisa; Salomaa, Veikko; Smith, George Davey; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter; Spranger, Joachim; Karpe, Fredrik; Shuldiner, Alan R; Cooper, Cyrus; Dedoussis, George V; Serrano-Ríos, Manuel; Morris, Andrew D; Lind, Lars; Palmer, Lyle J; Hu, Frank B.; Franks, Paul W; Ebrahim, Shah; Marmot, Michael; Kao, W H Linda; Pankow, James S; Sampson, Michael J; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Hansen, Torben

    2010-01-01

    Circulating glucose levels are tightly regulated. To identify novel glycemic loci, we performed meta-analyses of 21 genome-wide associations studies informative for fasting glucose (FG), fasting insulin (FI) and indices of β-cell function (HOMA-B) and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in up to 46,186 non-diabetic participants. Follow-up of 25 loci in up to 76,558 additional subjects identified 16 loci associated with FG/HOMA-B and two associated with FI/HOMA-IR. These include nine new FG loci (in or near ADCY5, MADD, ADRA2A, CRY2, FADS1, GLIS3, SLC2A2, PROX1 and FAM148B) and one influencing FI/HOMA-IR (near IGF1). We also demonstrated association of ADCY5, PROX1, GCK, GCKR and DGKB/TMEM195 with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Within these loci, likely biological candidate genes influence signal transduction, cell proliferation, development, glucose-sensing and circadian regulation. Our results demonstrate that genetic studies of glycemic traits can identify T2D risk loci, as well as loci that elevate FG modestly, but do not cause overt diabetes. PMID:20081858

  18. Genetic loci for retinal arteriolar microcirculation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueling Sim

    Full Text Available Narrow arterioles in the retina have been shown to predict hypertension as well as other vascular diseases, likely through an increase in the peripheral resistance of the microcirculatory flow. In this study, we performed a genome-wide association study in 18,722 unrelated individuals of European ancestry from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium and the Blue Mountain Eye Study, to identify genetic determinants associated with variations in retinal arteriolar caliber. Retinal vascular calibers were measured on digitized retinal photographs using a standardized protocol. One variant (rs2194025 on chromosome 5q14 near the myocyte enhancer factor 2C MEF2C gene was associated with retinal arteriolar caliber in the meta-analysis of the discovery cohorts at genome-wide significance of P-value <5×10(-8. This variant was replicated in an additional 3,939 individuals of European ancestry from the Australian Twins Study and Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (rs2194025, P-value = 2.11×10(-12 in combined meta-analysis of discovery and replication cohorts. In independent studies of modest sample sizes, no significant association was found between this variant and clinical outcomes including coronary artery disease, stroke, myocardial infarction or hypertension. In conclusion, we found one novel loci which underlie genetic variation in microvasculature which may be relevant to vascular disease. The relevance of these findings to clinical outcomes remains to be determined.

  19. Association analysis identifies 65 new breast cancer risk loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Lindström, Sara; Dennis, Joe; Beesley, Jonathan; Hui, Shirley; Kar, Siddhartha; Lemaçon, Audrey; Soucy, Penny; Glubb, Dylan; Rostamianfar, Asha; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Tyrer, Jonathan; Dicks, Ed; Lee, Andrew; Wang, Zhaoming; Allen, Jamie; Keeman, Renske; Eilber, Ursula; French, Juliet D; Qing Chen, Xiao; Fachal, Laura; McCue, Karen; McCart Reed, Amy E; Ghoussaini, Maya; Carroll, Jason S; Jiang, Xia; Finucane, Hilary; Adams, Marcia; Adank, Muriel A; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Arndt, Volker; Aronson, Kristan J; Arun, Banu; Auer, Paul L; Bacot, François; Barrdahl, Myrto; Baynes, Caroline; Beckmann, Matthias W; Behrens, Sabine; Benitez, Javier; Bermisheva, Marina; Bernstein, Leslie; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bonanni, Bernardo; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith S; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brennan, Paul; Brenner, Hermann; Brinton, Louise; Broberg, Per; Brock, Ian W; Broeks, Annegien; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Brucker, Sara Y; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Butterbach, Katja; Cai, Qiuyin; Cai, Hui; Caldés, Trinidad; Canzian, Federico; Carracedo, Angel; Carter, Brian D; Castelao, Jose E; Chan, Tsun L; David Cheng, Ting-Yuan; Seng Chia, Kee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Christiansen, Hans; Clarke, Christine L; Collée, Margriet; Conroy, Don M; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Cornelissen, Sten; Cox, David G; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Cunningham, Julie M; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; Devilee, Peter; Doheny, Kimberly F; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Durcan, Lorraine; Dwek, Miriam; Eccles, Diana M; Ekici, Arif B; Eliassen, A Heather; Ellberg, Carolina; Elvira, Mingajeva; Engel, Christoph; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Fritschi, Lin; Gaborieau, Valerie; Gabrielson, Marike; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M; García-Sáenz, José A; Gaudet, Mia M; Georgoulias, Vassilios; Giles, Graham G; Glendon, Gord; Goldberg, Mark S; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Grenaker Alnæs, Grethe I; Grip, Mervi; Gronwald, Jacek; Grundy, Anne; Guénel, Pascal; Haeberle, Lothar; Hahnen, Eric; Haiman, Christopher A; Håkansson, Niclas; Hamann, Ute; Hamel, Nathalie; Hankinson, Susan; Harrington, Patricia; Hart, Steven N; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Hartman, Mikael; Hein, Alexander; Heyworth, Jane; Hicks, Belynda; Hillemanns, Peter; Ho, Dona N; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J; Hoover, Robert N; Hopper, John L; Hou, Ming-Feng; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Huang, Guanmengqian; Humphreys, Keith; Ishiguro, Junko; Ito, Hidemi; Iwasaki, Motoki; Iwata, Hiroji; Jakubowska, Anna; Janni, Wolfgang; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nichola; Jones, Kristine; Jones, Michael; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kabisch, Maria; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Kang, Daehee; Kasuga, Yoshio; Kerin, Michael J; Khan, Sofia; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Kiiski, Johanna I; Kim, Sung-Won; Knight, Julia A; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela N; Krüger, Ute; Kwong, Ava; Lambrechts, Diether; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Eunjung; Lee, Min Hyuk; Lee, Jong Won; Neng Lee, Chuen; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Li, Jingmei; Lilyquist, Jenna; Lindblom, Annika; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lo, Wing-Yee; Loibl, Sibylle; Long, Jirong; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Lubinski, Jan; Luccarini, Craig; Lux, Michael P; Ma, Edmond S K; MacInnis, Robert J; Maishman, Tom; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E; Kostovska, Ivana Maleva; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Manson, JoAnn E; Margolin, Sara; Mariapun, Shivaani; Martinez, Maria Elena; Matsuo, Keitaro; Mavroudis, Dimitrios; McKay, James; McLean, Catriona; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Meindl, Alfons; Menéndez, Primitiva; Menon, Usha; Meyer, Jeffery; Miao, Hui; Miller, Nicola; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Muir, Kenneth; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Mulot, Claire; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Nielsen, Sune F; Noh, Dong-Young; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Norman, Aaron; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Olsson, Håkan; Olswold, Curtis; Orr, Nick; Pankratz, V Shane; Park, Sue K; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Lloyd, Rachel; Perez, Jose I A; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Pinchev, Mila; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Prentice, Ross; Presneau, Nadege; Prokofyeva, Darya; Pugh, Elizabeth; Pylkäs, Katri; Rack, Brigitte; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rennert, Gadi; Rennert, Hedy S; Rhenius, Valerie; Romero, Atocha; Romm, Jane; Ruddy, Kathryn J; Rüdiger, Thomas; Rudolph, Anja; Ruebner, Matthias; Rutgers, Emiel J T; Saloustros, Emmanouil; Sandler, Dale P; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Schumacher, Fredrick; Schürmann, Peter; Scott, Rodney J; Scott, Christopher; Seal, Sheila; Seynaeve, Caroline; Shah, Mitul; Sharma, Priyanka; Shen, Chen-Yang; Sheng, Grace; Sherman, Mark E; Shrubsole, Martha J; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Smeets, Ann; Sohn, Christof; Southey, Melissa C; Spinelli, John J; Stegmaier, Christa; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Stone, Jennifer; Stram, Daniel O; Surowy, Harald; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tamimi, Rulla; Taylor, Jack A; Tengström, Maria; Teo, Soo H; Beth Terry, Mary; Tessier, Daniel C; Thanasitthichai, Somchai; Thöne, Kathrin; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Tong, Ling; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Ursin, Giske; Untch, Michael; Vachon, Celine; van Asperen, Christi J; Van Den Berg, David; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van der Kolk, Lizet; van der Luijt, Rob B; Vincent, Daniel; Vollenweider, Jason; Waisfisz, Quinten; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weinberg, Clarice R; Wendt, Camilla; Whittemore, Alice S; Wildiers, Hans; Willett, Walter; Winqvist, Robert; Wolk, Alicja; Wu, Anna H; Xia, Lucy; Yamaji, Taiki; Yang, Xiaohong R; Har Yip, Cheng; Yoo, Keun-Young; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Zheng, Wei; Zheng, Ying; Zhu, Bin; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ziv, Elad; Lakhani, Sunil R; Antoniou, Antonis C; Droit, Arnaud; Andrulis, Irene L; Amos, Christopher I; Couch, Fergus J; Pharoah, Paul D P; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hall, Per; Hunter, David J; Milne, Roger L; García-Closas, Montserrat; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Chanock, Stephen J; Dunning, Alison M; Edwards, Stacey L; Bader, Gary D; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Simard, Jacques; Kraft, Peter; Easton, Douglas F

    2017-11-02

    Breast cancer risk is influenced by rare coding variants in susceptibility genes, such as BRCA1, and many common, mostly non-coding variants. However, much of the genetic contribution to breast cancer risk remains unknown. Here we report the results of a genome-wide association study of breast cancer in 122,977 cases and 105,974 controls of European ancestry and 14,068 cases and 13,104 controls of East Asian ancestry. We identified 65 new loci that are associated with overall breast cancer risk at P < 5 × 10-8. The majority of credible risk single-nucleotide polymorphisms in these loci fall in distal regulatory elements, and by integrating in silico data to predict target genes in breast cells at each locus, we demonstrate a strong overlap between candidate target genes and somatic driver genes in breast tumours. We also find that heritability of breast cancer due to all single-nucleotide polymorphisms in regulatory features was 2-5-fold enriched relative to the genome-wide average, with strong enrichment for particular transcription factor binding sites. These results provide further insight into genetic susceptibility to breast cancer and will improve the use of genetic risk scores for individualized screening and prevention.

  20. Identification of heart rate-associated loci and their effects on cardiac conduction and rhythm disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hoed, Marcel; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Esko, Tõnu; Brundel, Bianca J J M; Peal, David S; Evans, David M; Nolte, Ilja M; Segrè, Ayellet V; Holm, Hilma; Handsaker, Robert E; Westra, Harm-Jan; Johnson, Toby; Isaacs, Aaron; Yang, Jian; Lundby, Alicia; Zhao, Jing Hua; Kim, Young Jin; Go, Min Jin; Almgren, Peter; Bochud, Murielle; Boucher, Gabrielle; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Gudbjartsson, Daniel; Hadley, David; van der Harst, Pim; Hayward, Caroline; den Heijer, Martin; Igl, Wilmar; Jackson, Anne U; Kutalik, Zoltán; Luan, Jian'an; Kemp, John P; Kristiansson, Kati; Ladenvall, Claes; Lorentzon, Mattias; Montasser, May E; Njajou, Omer T; O'Reilly, Paul F; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; St Pourcain, Beate; Rankinen, Tuomo; Salo, Perttu; Tanaka, Toshiko; Timpson, Nicholas J; Vitart, Veronique; Waite, Lindsay; Wheeler, William; Zhang, Weihua; Draisma, Harmen H M; Feitosa, Mary F; Kerr, Kathleen F; Lind, Penelope A; Mihailov, Evelin; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Song, Ci; Weedon, Michael N; Xie, Weijia; Yengo, Loic; Absher, Devin; Albert, Christine M; Alonso, Alvaro; Arking, Dan E; de Bakker, Paul I W; Balkau, Beverley; Barlassina, Cristina; Benaglio, Paola; Bis, Joshua C; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Brage, Søren; Chanock, Stephen J; Chines, Peter S; Chung, Mina; Darbar, Dawood; Dina, Christian; Dörr, Marcus; Elliott, Paul; Felix, Stephan B; Fischer, Krista; Fuchsberger, Christian; de Geus, Eco J C; Goyette, Philippe; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Havulinna, Aki S; Heckbert, Susan R; Hicks, Andrew A; Hofman, Albert; Holewijn, Suzanne; Hoogstra-Berends, Femke; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Jensen, Majken K; Johansson, Asa; Junttila, Juhani; Kääb, Stefan; Kanon, Bart; Ketkar, Shamika; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Knowles, Joshua W; Kooner, Angrad S; Kors, Jan A; Kumari, Meena; Milani, Lili; Laiho, Päivi; Lakatta, Edward G; Langenberg, Claudia; Leusink, Maarten; Liu, Yongmei; Luben, Robert N; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Lynch, Stacey N; Markus, Marcello R P; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Mateo Leach, Irene; McArdle, Wendy L; McCarroll, Steven A; Medland, Sarah E; Miller, Kathryn A; Montgomery, Grant W; Morrison, Alanna C; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Navarro, Pau; Nelis, Mari; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Ong, Ken K; Newman, Anne B; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P; Psaty, Bruce M; Rao, Dabeeru C; Ring, Susan M; Rossin, Elizabeth J; Rudan, Diana; Sanna, Serena; Scott, Robert A; Sehmi, Jaban S; Sharp, Stephen; Shin, Jordan T; Singleton, Andrew B; Smith, Albert V; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Tim D; Stewart, Chip; Stringham, Heather M; Tarasov, Kirill V; Uitterlinden, André G; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Whitfield, John B; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Wong, Andrew; Wong, Quenna; Jamshidi, Yalda; Zitting, Paavo; Boer, Jolanda M A; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Ekelund, Ulf; Forouhi, Nita G; Froguel, Philippe; Hingorani, Aroon; Ingelsson, Erik; Kivimaki, Mika; Kronmal, Richard A; Kuh, Diana; Lind, Lars; Martin, Nicholas G; Oostra, Ben A; Pedersen, Nancy L; Quertermous, Thomas; Rotter, Jerome I; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Verschuren, W M Monique; Walker, Mark; Albanes, Demetrius; Arnar, David O; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bandinelli, Stefania; Boehnke, Michael; de Boer, Rudolf A; Bouchard, Claude; Caulfield, W L Mark; Chambers, John C; Curhan, Gary; Cusi, Daniele; Eriksson, Johan; Ferrucci, Luigi; van Gilst, Wiek H; Glorioso, Nicola; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Groop, Leif; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hsueh, Wen-Chi; Hu, Frank B; Huikuri, Heikki V; Hunter, David J; Iribarren, Carlos; Isomaa, Bo; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; van der Klauw, Melanie M; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kraft, Peter; Iacoviello, Licia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lokki, Marja-Liisa L; Mitchell, Braxton D; Navis, Gerjan; Nieminen, Markku S; Ohlsson, Claes; Poulter, Neil R; Qi, Lu; Raitakari, Olli T; Rimm, Eric B; Rioux, John D; Rizzi, Federica; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Sever, Peter S; Shields, Denis C; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sinisalo, Juha; Stanton, Alice V; Stolk, Ronald P; Strachan, David P; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tuomilehto, Jaako; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Virtamo, Jarmo; Viikari, Jorma; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Widen, Elisabeth; Cho, Yoon Shin; Olsen, Jesper V; Visscher, Peter M; Willer, Cristen; Franke, Lude; Erdmann, Jeanette; Thompson, John R; Pfeufer, Arne; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Ellinor, Patrick T; Stricker, Bruno H Ch; Metspalu, Andres; Perola, Markus; Beckmann, Jacques S; Smith, George Davey; Stefansson, Kari; Wareham, Nicholas J; Munroe, Patricia B; Sibon, Ody C M; Milan, David J; Snieder, Harold; Samani, Nilesh J; Loos, Ruth J F

    2013-06-01

    Elevated resting heart rate is associated with greater risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. In a 2-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in up to 181,171 individuals, we identified 14 new loci associated with heart rate and confirmed associations with all 7 previously established loci. Experimental downregulation of gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster and Danio rerio identified 20 genes at 11 loci that are relevant for heart rate regulation and highlight a role for genes involved in signal transmission, embryonic cardiac development and the pathophysiology of dilated cardiomyopathy, congenital heart failure and/or sudden cardiac death. In addition, genetic susceptibility to increased heart rate is associated with altered cardiac conduction and reduced risk of sick sinus syndrome, and both heart rate-increasing and heart rate-decreasing variants associate with risk of atrial fibrillation. Our findings provide fresh insights into the mechanisms regulating heart rate and identify new therapeutic targets.

  1. Identification of heart rate–associated loci and their effects on cardiac conduction and rhythm disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hoed, Marcel; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Esko, Tõnu; Brundel, Bianca J J M; Peal, David S; Evans, David M; Nolte, Ilja M; Segrè, Ayellet V; Holm, Hilma; Handsaker, Robert E; Westra, Harm-Jan; Johnson, Toby; Isaacs, Aaron; Yang, Jian; Lundby, Alicia; Zhao, Jing Hua; Kim, Young Jin; Go, Min Jin; Almgren, Peter; Bochud, Murielle; Boucher, Gabrielle; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Gudbjartsson, Daniel; Hadley, David; Van Der Harst, Pim; Hayward, Caroline; Heijer, Martin Den; Igl, Wilmar; Jackson, Anne U; Kutalik, Zoltán; Luan, Jian’an; Kemp, John P; Kristiansson, Kati; Ladenvall, Claes; Lorentzon, Mattias; Montasser, May E; Njajou, Omer T; O’Reilly, Paul F; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pourcain, Beate St.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Salo, Perttu; Tanaka, Toshiko; Timpson, Nicholas J; Vitart, Veronique; Waite, Lindsay; Wheeler, William; Zhang, Weihua; Draisma, Harmen H M; Feitosa, Mary F; Kerr, Kathleen F; Lind, Penelope A; Mihailov, Evelin; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Song, Ci; Weedon, Michael N; Xie, Weijia; Yengo, Loic; Absher, Devin; Albert, Christine M; Alonso, Alvaro; Arking, Dan E; de Bakker, Paul I W; Balkau, Beverley; Barlassina, Cristina; Benaglio, Paola; Bis, Joshua C; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Brage, Søren; Chanock, Stephen J; Chines, Peter S; Chung, Mina; Darbar, Dawood; Dina, Christian; Dörr, Marcus; Elliott, Paul; Felix, Stephan B; Fischer, Krista; Fuchsberger, Christian; de Geus, Eco J C; Goyette, Philippe; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B; Hartikainen, Anna-liisa; Havulinna, Aki S; Heckbert, Susan R; Hicks, Andrew A; Hofman, Albert; Holewijn, Suzanne; Hoogstra-Berends, Femke; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Jensen, Majken K; Johansson, Åsa; Junttila, Juhani; Kääb, Stefan; Kanon, Bart; Ketkar, Shamika; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Knowles, Joshua W; Kooner, Angrad S; Kors, Jan A; Kumari, Meena; Milani, Lili; Laiho, Päivi; Lakatta, Edward G; Langenberg, Claudia; Leusink, Maarten; Liu, Yongmei; Luben, Robert N; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Lynch, Stacey N; Markus, Marcello R P; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Leach, Irene Mateo; McArdle, Wendy L; McCarroll, Steven A; Medland, Sarah E; Miller, Kathryn A; Montgomery, Grant W; Morrison, Alanna C; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Navarro, Pau; Nelis, Mari; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; O’Donnell, Christopher J; Ong, Ken K; Newman, Anne B; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P; Psaty, Bruce M; Rao, Dabeeru C; Ring, Susan M; Rossin, Elizabeth J; Rudan, Diana; Sanna, Serena; Scott, Robert A; Sehmi, Jaban S; Sharp, Stephen; Shin, Jordan T; Singleton, Andrew B; Smith, Albert V; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Tim D; Stewart, Chip; Stringham, Heather M; Tarasov, Kirill V; Uitterlinden, André G; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Whitfield, John B; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Wong, Andrew; Wong, Quenna; Jamshidi, Yalda; Zitting, Paavo; Boer, Jolanda M A; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Ekelund, Ulf; Forouhi, Nita G; Froguel, Philippe; Hingorani, Aroon; Ingelsson, Erik; Kivimaki, Mika; Kronmal, Richard A; Kuh, Diana; Lind, Lars; Martin, Nicholas G; Oostra, Ben A; Pedersen, Nancy L; Quertermous, Thomas; Rotter, Jerome I; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Verschuren, W M Monique; Walker, Mark; Albanes, Demetrius; Arnar, David O; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bandinelli, Stefania; Boehnke, Michael; de Boer, Rudolf A; Bouchard, Claude; Caulfield, W L Mark; Chambers, John C; Curhan, Gary; Cusi, Daniele; Eriksson, Johan; Ferrucci, Luigi; van Gilst, Wiek H; Glorioso, Nicola; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Groop, Leif; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hsueh, Wen-Chi; Hu, Frank B; Huikuri, Heikki V; Hunter, David J; Iribarren, Carlos; Isomaa, Bo; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; van der Klauw, Melanie M; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kraft, Peter; Iacoviello, Licia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lokki, Marja-Liisa L; Mitchell, Braxton D; Navis, Gerjan; Nieminen, Markku S; Ohlsson, Claes; Poulter, Neil R; Qi, Lu; Raitakari, Olli T; Rimm, Eric B; Rioux, John D; Rizzi, Federica; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Sever, Peter S; Shields, Denis C; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sinisalo, Juha; Stanton, Alice V; Stolk, Ronald P; Strachan, David P; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tuomilehto, Jaako; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Virtamo, Jarmo; Viikari, Jorma; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Widen, Elisabeth; Cho, Yoon Shin; Olsen, Jesper V; Visscher, Peter M; Willer, Cristen; Franke, Lude; Erdmann, Jeanette; Thompson, John R; Pfeufer, Arne; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Ellinor, Patrick T; Stricker, Bruno H Ch; Metspalu, Andres; Perola, Markus; Beckmann, Jacques S; Smith, George Davey; Stefansson, Kari; Wareham, Nicholas J; Munroe, Patricia B; Sibon, Ody C M; Milan, David J; Snieder, Harold; Samani, Nilesh J; Loos, Ruth J F

    2013-01-01

    Elevated resting heart rate is associated with greater risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. In a 2-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in up to 181,171 individuals, we identified 14 new loci associated with heart rate and confirmed associations with all 7 previously established loci. Experimental downregulation of gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster and Danio rerio identified 20 genes at 11 loci that are relevant for heart rate regulation and highlight a role for genes involved in signal transmission, embryonic cardiac development and the pathophysiology of dilated cardiomyopathy, congenital heart failure and/or sudden cardiac death. In addition, genetic susceptibility to increased heart rate is associated with altered cardiac conduction and reduced risk of sick sinus syndrome, and both heart rate–increasing and heart rate–decreasing variants associate with risk of atrial fibrillation. Our findings provide fresh insights into the mechanisms regulating heart rate and identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:23583979

  2. Selection of reliable reference genes for qPCR studies on chondroprotective action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldring Mary B

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chondroprotective agents (CPA such as glucosamine, curcumin and diacerein represent potential remedies for the management of osteoarthritis and several studies have been performed on their effects in-vitro and in-vivo. For the investigation of chondroprotective action on chondrocyte gene expression, quantitative real-time RT-PCR is the method of choice. However, validation of applied normalization strategies represents a crucial and sometimes neglected step in the analysis process. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine the expression stability of common reference genes (ACTB, Beta actin; GAPDH, Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate; B2M, Beta-2-microglobulin; HPRT1, Hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl-transferase I; SDHA, Succinate dehydrogenase complex, subunit A; YWHAZ, Tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxygenase activation protein, zeta polypeptide under the influence of glucosamine, curcumin and diacerein in the IL-1β-stimulated C-28/I2 chondrocyte model, using the geNorm software tool. Results CPA treatment of C-28/I2 chondrocytes significantly affected the expression level of many reference genes (p GAPDH, B2M and SDHA in glucosamine treated samples and HPRT1, GAPDH and B2M in curcumin or diacerein treated samples. Interestingly, ACTB was one of the most variably expressed genes throughout all experiments. Conclusion Our study points out the problem of relying on commonly used reference genes without an accurate validation process. For normalization purposes in gene profiling studies on glucosamine action, the genes GAPDH, B2M and SDHA are recommended as single reference genes depending on the expression level of the target gene or more favourably in combination. For experiments with curcumin and diacerein the use of HPRT1, GAPDH and B2M should be considered.

  3. Genetic data for 15 STR loci in a Kadazan-Dusun population from East Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kee, B P; Lian, L H; Lee, P C; Lai, T X; Chua, K H

    2011-04-26

    Allele frequencies of 15 short tandem repeat (STR) loci, namely D5S818, D7S820, D13S317, D16S539, TH01, TPOX, Penta D, Penta E, D3S1358, D8S1179, D18S51, D21S11, CSF1PO, vWA, and FGA, were determined for 154 individuals from the Kadazan-Dusun tribe, an indigenous population of East Malaysia. All loci were amplified by polymerase chain reaction, using the Powerplex 16 system. Alleles were typed using a gene analyzer and the Genemapper ID software. Various statistical parameters were calculated and the combined power of discrimination for the 15 loci in the population was calculated as 0.999999999999999. These loci are thus, informative and can be used effectively in forensic and genetic studies of this indigenous population.

  4. List of isozyme loci - RGP gmap98 | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us RGP gmap98 List of isozyme loci Data detail Data name List of isozyme loci DOI 10.18908/lsdb...he present high-density linkage map, and that were putatively identified as isozyme genes. Data file File name: rgp_gmap98_iso...gmap98/LATEST/rgp_gmap98_isozyme_loci.zip File size: 611 B Simple search URL http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/...0001 were considered as functionally identical clones. And we have selected the ones that hit the isozyme ge...his Database Database Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us List of isozyme loci - RGP gmap98 | LSDB Archive ...

  5. Mapping autism risk loci using genetic linkage and chromosomal rearrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szatmari, Peter; Paterson, Andrew; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Roberts, Wendy; Brian, Jessica; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Vincent, John; Skaug, Jennifer; Thompson, Ann; Senman, Lili; Feuk, Lars; Qian, Cheng; Bryson, Susan; Jones, Marshall; Marshall, Christian; Scherer, Stephen; Vieland, Veronica; Bartlett, Christopher; Mangin, La Vonne; Goedken, Rhinda; Segre, Alberto; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Cuccaro, Michael; Gilbert, John; Wright, Harry; Abramson, Ruth; Betancur, Catalina; Bourgeron, Thomas; Gillberg, Christopher; Leboyer, Marion; Buxbaum, Joseph; Davis, Kenneth; Hollander, Eric; Silverman, Jeremy; Hallmayer, Joachim; Lotspeich, Linda; Sutcliffe, James; Haines, Jonathan; Folstein, Susan; Piven, Joseph; Wassink, Thomas; Sheffield, Val; Geschwind, Daniel; Bucan, Maja; Brown, Ted; Cantor, Rita; Constantino, John; Gilliam, Conrad; Herbert, Martha; Lajonchere, Clara; Ledbetter, David; Lese-Martin, Christa; Miller, Janet; Nelson, Stan; Samango-Sprouse, Carol; Spence, Sarah; State, Matthew; Tanzi, Rudolph; Coon, Hilary; Dawson, Geraldine; Devlin, Bernie; Estes, Annette; Flodman, Pamela; Klei, Lambertus; Mcmahon, William; Minshew, Nancy; Munson, Jeff; Korvatska, Elena; Rodier, Patricia; Schellenberg, Gerard; Smith, Moyra; Spence, Anne; Stodgell, Chris; Tepper, Ping Guo; Wijsman, Ellen; Yu, Chang-En; Rogé, Bernadette; Mantoulan, Carine; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Poustka, Annemarie; Felder, Bärbel; Klauck, Sabine; Schuster, Claudia; Poustka, Fritz; Bölte, Sven; Feineis-Matthews, Sabine; Herbrecht, Evelyn; Schmötzer, Gabi; Tsiantis, John; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Maestrini, Elena; Bacchelli, Elena; Blasi, Francesca; Carone, Simona; Toma, Claudio; Van Engeland, Herman; De Jonge, Maretha; Kemner, Chantal; Koop, Frederieke; Langemeijer, Marjolein; Hijmans, Channa; Staal, Wouter; Baird, Gillian; Bolton, Patrick; Rutter, Michael; Weisblatt, Emma; Green, Jonathan; Aldred, Catherine; Wilkinson, Julie-Anne; Pickles, Andrew; Le Couteur, Ann; Berney, Tom; Mcconachie, Helen; Bailey, Anthony; Francis, Kostas; Honeyman, Gemma; Hutchinson, Aislinn; Parr, Jeremy; Wallace, Simon; Monaco, Anthony; Barnby, Gabrielle; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Lamb, Janine; Sousa, Ines; Sykes, Nuala; Cook, Edwin; Guter, Stephen; Leventhal, Bennett; Salt, Jeff; Lord, Catherine; Corsello, Christina; Hus, Vanessa; Weeks, Daniel; Volkmar, Fred; Tauber, Maïté; Fombonne, Eric; Shih, Andy; Meyer, Kacie

    2007-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are common, heritable neurodevelopmental conditions. The genetic architecture of ASD is complex, requiring large samples to overcome heterogeneity. Here we broaden coverage and sample size relative to other studies of ASD by using Affymetrix 10K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays and 1168 families with ≥ 2 affected individuals to perform the largest linkage scan to date, while also analyzing copy number variation (CNV) in these families. Linkage and CNV analyses implicate chromosome 11p12-p13 and neurexins, respectively, amongst other candidate loci. Neurexins team with previously-implicated neuroligins for glutamatergic synaptogenesis, highlighting glutamate-related genes as promising candidates for ASD. PMID:17322880

  6. Brugada syndrome risk loci seem protective against atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Laura; Nielsen, Jonas B; Darkner, Stine

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have shown an overlap between genes involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms of atrial fibrillation (AF) and Brugada Syndrome (BrS). We investigated whether three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs11708996; G>C located intronic to SCN5A, rs10428132; T>G located in SCN...... associated with BrS was lower in AF patients than in patients free of AF, suggesting a protective role of these loci in developing AF.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 26 March 2014; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2014.46....

  7. Functional copies of a human gene can be directly isolated by transformation-associated recombination cloning with a small 3′ end target sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouprina, Natalay; Annab, Lois; Graves, Joan; Afshari, Cynthia; Barrett, J. Carl; Resnick, Michael A.; Larionov, Vladimir

    1998-01-01

    Unique, small sequences (sequence tag sites) have been identified at the 3′ ends of most human genes that serve as landmarks in genome mapping. We investigated whether a single copy gene could be isolated directly from total human DNA by transformation-associated recombination (TAR) cloning in yeast using a short, 3′ unique target. A TAR cloning vector was constructed that, when linearized, contained a small amount (381 bp) of 3′ hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) sequence at one end and an 189-bp Alu repeat at the other end. Transformation with this vector along with human DNA led to selective isolations of the entire HPRT gene as yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) that extended from the 3′ end sequence to various Alu positions as much as 600 kb upstream. These YACs were retrofitted with a NeoR and a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) sequence to transfer the YACs to bacteria and subsequently the BACs to mouse cells by using a Neo selection. Most of the HPRT isolates were functional, demonstrating that TAR cloning retains the functional integrity of the isolated material. Thus, this modified version of TAR cloning, which we refer to as radial TAR cloning, can be used to isolate large segments of the human genome accurately and directly with only a small amount of sequence information. PMID:9539761

  8. Large-scale association analyses identify new loci influencing glycemic traits and provide insight into the underlying biological pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Robert A; Lagou, Vasiliki; Welch, Ryan P; Wheeler, Eleanor; Montasser, May E; Luan, Jian’an; Mägi, Reedik; Strawbridge, Rona J; Rehnberg, Emil; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Yengo, Loïc; Lecoeur, Cecile; Shungin, Dmitry; Sanna, Serena; Sidore, Carlo; Johnson, Paul C D; Jukema, J Wouter; Johnson, Toby; Mahajan, Anubha; Verweij, Niek; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Shah, Sonia; Smith, Albert V; Sennblad, Bengt; Gieger, Christian; Salo, Perttu; Perola, Markus; Timpson, Nicholas J; Evans, David M; Pourcain, Beate St; Wu, Ying; Andrews, Jeanette S; Hui, Jennie; Bielak, Lawrence F; Zhao, Wei; Horikoshi, Momoko; Navarro, Pau; Isaacs, Aaron; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; Stirrups, Kathleen; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Esko, Tönu; Mihailov, Evelin; Fraser, Ross M; Fall, Tove; Voight, Benjamin F; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Chen, Han; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Morris, Andrew P; Rayner, Nigel W; Robertson, Neil; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Beckmann, Jacques S; Willems, Sara M; Chines, Peter S; Jackson, Anne U; Kang, Hyun Min; Stringham, Heather M; Song, Kijoung; Tanaka, Toshiko; Peden, John F; Goel, Anuj; Hicks, Andrew A; An, Ping; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Folkersen, Lasse; Marullo, Letizia; Jansen, Hanneke; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Pankow, James S; North, Kari E; Forouhi, Nita G; Loos, Ruth J F; Edkins, Sarah; Varga, Tibor V; Hallmans, Göran; Oksa, Heikki; Antonella, Mulas; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Bakker, Stephan J L; Kong, Augustine; Kumari, Meena; Gigante, Bruna; Herder, Christian; Munroe, Patricia B; Caulfield, Mark; Antti, Jula; Mangino, Massimo; Small, Kerrin; Miljkovic, Iva; Liu, Yongmei; Atalay, Mustafa; Kiess, Wieland; James, Alan L; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Palmer, Colin N A; Doney, Alex S F; Willemsen, Gonneke; Smit, Johannes H; Campbell, Susan; Polasek, Ozren; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Hercberg, Serge; Dimitriou, Maria; Bolton, Jennifer L; Fowkes, Gerard R; Kovacs, Peter; Lindström, Jaana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Bandinelli, Stefania; Wild, Sarah H; Basart, Hanneke V; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Grallert, Harald; Maerz, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E; Boehm, Bernhard O; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Province, Michael A; Borecki, Ingrid B; Hastie, Nicholas D; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Stumvoll, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Waterworth, Dawn M; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Watanabe, Richard M; de Geus, Eco J C; Penninx, Brenda W; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A; Psaty, Bruce M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Hovingh, G Kees; Metspalu, Andres; Uusitupa, Matti; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Kaprio, Jaakko; Price, Jackie F; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Meneton, Pierre; Lind, Lars; Boehnke, Michael; Shuldiner, Alan R; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Morris, Andrew D; Toenjes, Anke; Peyser, Patricia A; Beilby, John P; Körner, Antje; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter E H; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Adair, Linda S; Smith, George Davey; Spector, Tim D; Illig, Thomas; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Hingorani, Aroon; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Saaristo, Timo E; Boomsma, Dorret I; Stefansson, Kari; van der Harst, Pim; Dupuis, Josée; Pedersen, Nancy L; Sattar, Naveed; Harris, Tamara B; Cucca, Francesco; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Mohlke, Karen L; Balkau, Beverley; Froguel, Philippe; Pouta, Anneli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wareham, Nicholas J; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; McCarthy, Mark I; Franks, Paul W; Meigs, James B; Teslovich, Tanya M; Florez, Jose C; Langenberg, Claudia; Ingelsson, Erik; Prokopenko, Inga; Barroso, Inês

    2012-01-01

    Through genome-wide association meta-analyses of up to 133,010 individuals of European ancestry without diabetes, including individuals newly genotyped using the Metabochip, we have raised the number of confirmed loci influencing glycemic traits to 53, of which 33 also increase type 2 diabetes risk (q < 0.05). Loci influencing fasting insulin showed association with lipid levels and fat distribution, suggesting impact on insulin resistance. Gene-based analyses identified further biologically plausible loci, suggesting that additional loci beyond those reaching genome-wide significance are likely to represent real associations. This conclusion is supported by an excess of directionally consistent and nominally significant signals between discovery and follow-up studies. Functional follow-up of these newly discovered loci will further improve our understanding of glycemic control. PMID:22885924

  9. Allele frequencies for 12 autosomal short tandem repeat loci in two Bolivian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes, L; Jorquera, H; Acuña, M; Ordóñez, J; Sierra, A L

    2008-03-18

    Two hundred and sixty unrelated subjects who asked for paternity testing at two Bolivian Laboratories in La Paz and Santa Cruz were studied. The loci D3S1358, vWA, FGA, D8S1179, D21S11, D18S51, D5S818, D13S317, D7S820, TH01, TPOX, and CSF1PO were typed from blood samples, amplifying DNA by polymerase chain reactions and electrophoresis. Allele frequencies were estimated by simple counting and the unbiased heterozygosity was calculated. Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was studied and gene frequencies were compared between the two samples. All loci conformed to the Hardy-Weinberg law and allele frequencies were similar in samples from the two cities. The Bolivian gene frequencies estimated were significantly different from those described for Chile and the United States Hispanic-Americans for most of the loci.

  10. Incorporation of covariates in simultaneous localization of two linked loci using affected relative pairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Kung-Yee

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many dichotomous traits for complex diseases are often involved more than one locus and/or associated with quantitative biomarkers or environmental factors. Incorporating these quantitative variables into linkage analysis as well as localizing two linked disease loci simultaneously could therefore improve the efficiency in mapping genes. We extended the robust multipoint Identity-by-Descent (IBD approach with incorporation of covariates developed previously to simultaneously estimate two linked loci using different types of affected relative pairs (ARPs. Results We showed that the efficiency was enhanced by incorporating a quantitative covariate parametrically or non-parametrically while localizing two disease loci using ARPs. In addition to its help in identifying factors associated with the disease and in improving the efficiency in estimating disease loci, this extension also allows investigators to account for heterogeneity in risk-ratios for different ARPs. Data released from the collaborative study on the genetics of alcoholism (COGA for Genetic Analysis Workshop 14 (GAW 14 were used to illustrate the application of this extended method. Conclusions The simulation studies and example illustrated that the efficiency in estimating disease loci was demonstratively enhanced by incorporating a quantitative covariate and by using all relative pairs while mapping two linked loci simultaneously.

  11. Validation of commonly used reference genes for sleep-related gene expression studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castro Rosa MRPS

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sleep is a restorative process and is essential for maintenance of mental and physical health. In an attempt to understand the complexity of sleep, multidisciplinary strategies, including genetic approaches, have been applied to sleep research. Although quantitative real time PCR has been used in previous sleep-related gene expression studies, proper validation of reference genes is currently lacking. Thus, we examined the effect of total or paradoxical sleep deprivation (TSD or PSD on the expression stability of the following frequently used reference genes in brain and blood: beta-actin (b-actin, beta-2-microglobulin (B2M, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, and hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT. Results Neither TSD nor PSD affected the expression stability of all tested genes in both tissues indicating that b-actin, B2M, GAPDH and HPRT are appropriate reference genes for the sleep-related gene expression studies. In order to further verify these results, the relative expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase1 (GPD1 was evaluated in brain and blood, respectively. The normalization with each of four reference genes produced similar pattern of expression in control and sleep deprived rats, but subtle differences in the magnitude of expression fold change were observed which might affect the statistical significance. Conclusion This study demonstrated that sleep deprivation does not alter the expression stability of commonly used reference genes in brain and blood. Nonetheless, the use of multiple reference genes in quantitative RT-PCR is required for the accurate results.

  12. Validation of four reference genes for quantitative mRNA expression studies in a rat model of inflammatory injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walder, Roxanne Y; Wattiez, Anne-Sophie; White, Stephanie R; Marquez de Prado, Blanca; Hamity, Marta V; Hammond, Donna L

    2014-09-04

    Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) is a technique frequently used to measure changes in mRNA expression. To ensure validity of experimental findings, it is important to normalize the qPCR data to reference genes that are stable and unaffected by the experimental treatment to correct for variability among samples. Unlike in some models of neuropathic pain, reference genes for models of inflammatory injury have not been validated. This study examined four candidate reference genes in an effort to identify and validate optimal genes for normalization of transcriptional changes occurring in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) following intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). The expression of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (Hprt1), beta-actin (Actb), mitogen-activated protein kinase 6 (Mapk6), and beta-2-microglobulin (B2m) was quantified in the dorsal horn and RVM of rats four days or two weeks after intraplantar injection of CFA or saline. The range of expression levels among these four genes differed by as much as 16-fold within the dorsal horn and the RVM. All four of these reference genes were stably expressed in both tissues and did not differ between saline and CFA-treated animals. Analyses using the statistical algorithms in geNorm and NormFinder programs determined that Mapk6 was the most stable gene and recommended the combination of Mapk6 and Actb, or Mapk6 and Hprt1, in such experimental conditions. This study validated the four genes Hprt1, Actb, Mapk6 or B2m and showed that any one or combination of two of them are good reference genes for normalization of mRNA expression in qPCR experiments in the spinal cord and RVM in the CFA model of inflammatory injury.

  13. Inhibitory effect of streptococci on the growth of M. catarrhalis strains and the diversity of putative bacteriocin-like gene loci in the genomes of S. pneumoniae and its relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikryannikova, L N; Malakhova, M V; Lominadze, G G; Karpova, I Yu; Kostryukova, E S; Mayansky, N A; Kruglov, A N; Klimova, E A; Lisitsina, E S; Ilina, E N; Govorun, V M

    2017-12-13

    S. pneumoniae is a facultative human pathogen causing a wide range of infections including the life-threatening pneumoniae or meningitis. It colonizes nasopharynx as well as its closest phylogenetic relatives S. pseudopneumoniae and S. mitis. Both the latter, despite the considerable morphological and phenotypic similarity with the pneumococcus, are considerably less pathogenic for humans and cause infections mainly in the immunocompromized hosts. In this work, we compared the inhibitory effect of S. pneumoniae and its relatives on the growth of Moraxella catarrhalis strains using the culture-based antagonistic test. We observed that the inhibitory effect of S. mitis strains is kept when a hydrogen peroxide produced by cells is inactivated by catalase, and even when the live cells are killed in chloroform vapors, in contrast to the pneumococcus whose inhibiting ability disappeared when the cells die. It was suggested that this effect may be due to the production of bacterial antimicrobial peptides by S. mitis, so we examined the genomes of our strains for the presence of bacteriocin-like peptides encoding genes. We observed that a set of bacteriocin-like genes in the genome of S. mitis is greatly poorer in comparison with S. pneumoniae one; moreover, in one S. mitis strain we found no bacteriocin-like genes. It could mean that there are probably some additional opportunities of S. mitis to inhibit the growth of competing neighbors which are still have to be discovered.

  14. Identification of valid endogenous control genes for determining gene expression in C6 glioma cell line treated with conditioned medium from adipose-derived stem cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iser, I C; de Campos, R P; Bertoni, A P S; Wink, M R

    2015-10-01

    There is growing evidence that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be important players in the tumor microenvironment. They can affect the glioma progression through the modulation of different genes. This modulation can be evaluated through a very useful model, treating the tumor cells with MSC-conditioned medium. However, for an accurate and reliable gene expression analysis, normalization of gene expression data against reference genes is a prerequisite. We performed a systematic review in an attempt to find a reference gene to use when analyzing gene expression in C6 glioma cells lines. Considering that we were not able to find a reference gene originated by an appropriate validation, in this study we evaluated candidate genes to be used as reference gene in C6 cells under different treatments with adipose-derived stem cells conditioned medium (CM-ADSCs). β-actin (ACTB); glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH); hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase I (HPRT-1); TATA box binding protein (TBP) and beta-2-microglobulin (B2M) were evaluated by real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR). The mean Cq, the maximum fold change (MFC) and NormFinder software were used for reference gene evaluation and selection. The GAPDH and ACTB genes have been the most widely used reference genes to normalize among the different investigated genes in our review, however, controversially these genes underwent a substantial variability among the genes evaluated in the present work. Individually, TBP gene was more stable when compared with other genes analyzed and the combination of TBP and HPRT-1 was even more stable. These results evidence the importance of appropriate validation of reference genes before performing qPCR experiments. Besides, our data will contribute with researchers that work analyzing the role of ADSCs in glioma microenvironment through gene expression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Genome wide association identifies novel loci involved in fungal communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma-Guerrero, Javier; Hall, Charles R; Kowbel, David; Welch, Juliet; Taylor, John W; Brem, Rachel B; Glass, N Louise

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how genomes encode complex cellular and organismal behaviors has become the outstanding challenge of modern genetics. Unlike classical screening methods, analysis of genetic variation that occurs naturally in wild populations can enable rapid, genome-scale mapping of genotype to phenotype with a medium-throughput experimental design. Here we describe the results of the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) used to identify novel loci underlying trait variation in a microbial eukaryote, harnessing wild isolates of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. We genotyped each of a population of wild Louisiana strains at 1 million genetic loci genome-wide, and we used these genotypes to map genetic determinants of microbial communication. In N. crassa, germinated asexual spores (germlings) sense the presence of other germlings, grow toward them in a coordinated fashion, and fuse. We evaluated germlings of each strain for their ability to chemically sense, chemotropically seek, and undergo cell fusion, and we subjected these trait measurements to GWAS. This analysis identified one gene, NCU04379 (cse-1, encoding a homolog of a neuronal calcium sensor), at which inheritance was strongly associated with the efficiency of germling communication. Deletion of cse-1 significantly impaired germling communication and fusion, and two genes encoding predicted interaction partners of CSE1 were also required for the communication trait. Additionally, mining our association results for signaling and secretion genes with a potential role in germling communication, we validated six more previously unknown molecular players, including a secreted protease and two other genes whose deletion conferred a novel phenotype of increased communication and multi-germling fusion. Our results establish protein secretion as a linchpin of germling communication in N. crassa and shed light on the regulation of communication molecules in this fungus. Our study demonstrates the power

  16. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies in Celiac Disease and Rheumatoid Arthritis Identifies Fourteen Non-HLA Shared Loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhernakova, Alexandra; Stahl, Eli A.; Trynka, Gosia; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Festen, Eleanora A.; Franke, Lude; Westra, Harm-Jan; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Kurreeman, Fina A. S.; Thomson, Brian; Gupta, Namrata; Romanos, Jihane; McManus, Ross; Ryan, Anthony W.; Turner, Graham; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Posthumus, Marcel D.; Remmers, Elaine F.; Tucci, Francesca; Toes, Rene; Grandone, Elvira; Mazzilli, Maria Cristina; Rybak, Anna; Cukrowska, Bozena; Coenen, Marieke J. H.; Radstake, Timothy R. D. J.; van Riel, Piet L. C. M.; Li, Yonghong; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Worthington, Jane; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Klareskog, Lars; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Plenge, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiology and candidate gene studies indicate a shared genetic basis for celiac disease (CD) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but the extent of this sharing has not been systematically explored. Previous studies demonstrate that 6 of the established non-HLA CD and RA risk loci (out of 26 loci for

  17. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in celiac disease and rheumatoid arthritis identifies fourteen non-HLA shared loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhernakova, A.; Stahl, E.A.; Trynka, G.; Raychaudhuri, S.; Festen, E.A.; Franke, L.; Westra, H.J.; Fehrmann, R.S.; Kurreeman, F.A.; Thomson, B.; Gupta, N.; Romanos, J.; McManus, R.; Ryan, A.W.; Turner, G.; Brouwer, E.; Posthumus, M.D.; Remmers, E.F.; Tucci, F.; Toes, R.; Grandone, E.; Mazzilli, M.C.; Rybak, A.; Cukrowska, B.; Coenen, M.J.H.; Radstake, T.R.D.J.; Riel, P.L. van; Li, Y.; Bakker, P.I. de; Gregersen, P.K.; Worthington, J.; Siminovitch, K.A.; Klareskog, L.; Huizinga, T.W.J.; Wijmenga, C.; Plenge, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiology and candidate gene studies indicate a shared genetic basis for celiac disease (CD) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but the extent of this sharing has not been systematically explored. Previous studies demonstrate that 6 of the established non-HLA CD and RA risk loci (out of 26 loci for

  18. Genome-wide association analysis of self-reported events in 6135 individuals and 252 827 controls identifies 8 loci associated with thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinds, David A; Buil, Alfonso; Ziemek, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    belonging to the 23andMe cohort of research participants. Eight loci exceeded genome-wide significance. Among the genome-wide significant results, our study replicated previously known venous thromboembolism (VTE) loci near the F5, FGA-FGG, F11, F2, PROCR and ABO genes, and the more recently discovered...

  19. Connecting SNPs in Diabetes: a spatial analysis of meta-GWAS Loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Stewart Schierding

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies (GWAS have improved our understanding of the genetic foundations of a number of diseases, including diabetes. However, SNPs that are identified by GWAS, especially those that fall outside of gene regions, do not always clearly link to the underlying biology. Despite this, these SNPs have often been validated through re-sequencing efforts as not just tag SNPs, but as causative SNPs, and so must play a role in disease development or progression. In this study, we show how the 3D genome (spatial connections and trans-expression Quantitative Trait Loci (trans-eQTL connect diabetes loci from different GWAS meta-analyses, informing the backbone of regulatory networks. Our findings include a three-way functional-spatial connection between the TM6SF2, CTRB1-BCAR1, and CELSR2-PSRC1 loci (rs201189528, rs7202844, and rs7202844, respectively connected through the KCNIP3 and BCAR1/BCAR3 loci, respectively. These spatial hubs serve as an example of how loci in genes with little biological connection to disease come together to contribute to the diabetes phenotype.

  20. Sequencing Chromosomal Abnormalities Reveals Neurodevelopmental Loci that Confer Risk across Diagnostic Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talkowski, Michael E.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Blumenthal, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Sequencing of balanced chromosomal abnormalities, combined with convergent genomic studies of gene expression, copy-number variation, and genome-wide association, identifies 22 new loci that contribute to autism and related neurodevelopmental disorders. These data support a polygenic risk model f...

  1. Biallelic and Genome Wide Association Mapping of Germanium Tolerant Loci in Rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Partha; Douglas, Alex; Price, Adam H; Norton, Gareth J

    2015-01-01

    Rice plants accumulate high concentrations of silicon. Silicon has been shown to be involved in plant growth, high yield, and mitigating biotic and abiotic stresses. However, it has been demonstrated that inorganic arsenic is taken up by rice through silicon transporters under anaerobic conditions, thus the ability to efficiently take up silicon may be considered either a positive or a negative trait in rice. Germanium is an analogue of silicon that produces brown lesions in shoots and leaves, and germanium toxicity has been used to identify mutants in silicon and arsenic transport. In this study, two different genetic mapping methods were performed to determine the loci involved in germanium sensitivity in rice. Genetic mapping in the biparental cross of Bala × Azucena (an F6 population) and a genome wide association (GWA) study with 350 accessions from the Rice Diversity Panel 1 were conducted using 15 μM of germanic acid. This identified a number of germanium sensitive loci: some co-localised with previously identified quantitative trait loci (QTL) for tissue silicon or arsenic concentration, none co-localised with Lsi1 or Lsi6, while one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was detected within 200 kb of Lsi2 (these are genes known to transport silicon, whose identity was discovered using germanium toxicity). However, examining candidate genes that are within the genomic region of the loci detected above reveals genes homologous to both Lsi1 and Lsi2, as well as a number of other candidate genes, which are discussed.

  2. Genome-wide meta-analysis uncovers novel loci influencing circulating leptin levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.O. Kilpeläinen (Tuomas)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractLeptin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone, the circulating levels of which correlate closely with overall adiposity. Although rare mutations in the leptin (LEP) gene are well known to cause leptin deficiency and severe obesity, no common loci regulating circulating leptin levels have been

  3. Biallelic and Genome Wide Association Mapping of Germanium Tolerant Loci in Rice (Oryza sativa L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Talukdar

    Full Text Available Rice plants accumulate high concentrations of silicon. Silicon has been shown to be involved in plant growth, high yield, and mitigating biotic and abiotic stresses. However, it has been demonstrated that inorganic arsenic is taken up by rice through silicon transporters under anaerobic conditions, thus the ability to efficiently take up silicon may be considered either a positive or a negative trait in rice. Germanium is an analogue of silicon that produces brown lesions in shoots and leaves, and germanium toxicity has been used to identify mutants in silicon and arsenic transport. In this study, two different genetic mapping methods were performed to determine the loci involved in germanium sensitivity in rice. Genetic mapping in the biparental cross of Bala × Azucena (an F6 population and a genome wide association (GWA study with 350 accessions from the Rice Diversity Panel 1 were conducted using 15 μM of germanic acid. This identified a number of germanium sensitive loci: some co-localised with previously identified quantitative trait loci (QTL for tissue silicon or arsenic concentration, none co-localised with Lsi1 or Lsi6, while one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP was detected within 200 kb of Lsi2 (these are genes known to transport silicon, whose identity was discovered using germanium toxicity. However, examining candidate genes that are within the genomic region of the loci detected above reveals genes homologous to both Lsi1 and Lsi2, as well as a number of other candidate genes, which are discussed.

  4. Genome-wide meta-analysis uncovers novel loci influencing circulating leptin levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O.; Carli, Jayne F. Martin; Skowronski, Alicja A.; Sun, Qi; Kriebel, Jennifer; Feitosa, Mary F.; Hedman, Åsa K.; Drong, Alexander W.; Hayes, James E.; Zhao, Jinghua; Pers, Tune H.; Schick, Ursula; Grarup, Niels; Kutalik, Zoltán; Trompet, Stella; Mangino, Massimo; Kristiansson, Kati; Beekman, Marian; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Eriksson, Joel; Henneman, Peter; Lahti, Jari; Tanaka, Toshiko; Luan, Jian'an; del Greco M, Fabiola; Pasko, Dorota; Renström, Frida; Willems, Sara M.; Mahajan, Anubha; Rose, Lynda M.; Guo, Xiuqing; Liu, Yongmei; Kleber, Marcus E.; Pérusse, Louis; Gaunt, Tom; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Ju Sung, Yun; Ramos, Yolande F.; Amin, Najaf; Amuzu, Antoinette; Barroso, Inês; Bellis, Claire; Blangero, John; Buckley, Brendan M.; Böhringer, Stefan; I Chen, Yii-Der; de Craen, Anton J. N.; Crosslin, David R.; Dale, Caroline E.; Dastani, Zari; Day, Felix R.; Deelen, Joris; Delgado, Graciela E.; Demirkan, Ayse; Finucane, Francis M.; Ford, Ian; Garcia, Melissa E.; Gieger, Christian; Gustafsson, Stefan; Hallmans, Göran; Hankinson, Susan E.; Havulinna, Aki S.; Herder, Christian; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hunter, David J.; Illig, Thomas; Ingelsson, Erik; Ioan-Facsinay, Andreea; Jansson, John-Olov; Jenny, Nancy S.; Jørgensen, Marit E.; Jørgensen, Torben; Karlsson, Magnus; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kraft, Peter; Kwekkeboom, Joanneke; Laatikainen, Tiina; Ladwig, Karl-Heinz; LeDuc, Charles A.; Lowe, Gordon; Lu, Yingchang; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Meisinger, Christa; Menni, Cristina; Morris, Andrew P.; Myers, Richard H.; Männistö, Satu; Nalls, Mike A.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Peters, Annette; Pradhan, Aruna D.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Rice, Treva K.; Brent Richards, J.; Ridker, Paul M.; Sattar, Naveed; Savage, David B.; Söderberg, Stefan; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Vandenput, Liesbeth; van Heemst, Diana; Uh, Hae-Won; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Walker, Mark; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Widén, Elisabeth; Wood, Andrew R.; Yao, Jie; Zeller, Tanja; Zhang, Yiying; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Astrup, Arne; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.; Sarzynski, Mark A.; Rao, D. C.; Jousilahti, Pekka; Vartiainen, Erkki; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G.; Kajantie, Eero; Osmond, Clive; Palotie, Aarno; Eriksson, Johan G.; Heliövaara, Markku; Knekt, Paul B.; Koskinen, Seppo; Jula, Antti; Perola, Markus; Huupponen, Risto K.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitakari, Olli T.; Mellström, Dan; Lorentzon, Mattias; Casas, Juan P.; Bandinelli, Stefanie; März, Winfried; Isaacs, Aaron; van Dijk, Ko W.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Harris, Tamara B.; Bouchard, Claude; Allison, Matthew A.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Ohlsson, Claes; Lind, Lars; Scott, Robert A.; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Frayling, Timothy M.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Bergmann, Sven; Waeber, Gérard; Vollenweider, Peter; Vestergaard, Henrik; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Hu, Frank B.; Eline Slagboom, P.; Grallert, Harald; Spector, Tim D.; Jukema, J. W.; Klein, Robert J.; Schadt, Erik E.; Franks, Paul W.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Leibel, Rudolph L.; Loos, Ruth J. F.

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone, the circulating levels of which correlate closely with overall adiposity. Although rare mutations in the leptin (LEP) gene are well known to cause leptin deficiency and severe obesity, no common loci regulating circulating leptin levels have been uncovered.

  5. Genome-wide meta-analysis uncovers novel loci influencing circulating leptin levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Carli, Jayne F Martin; Skowronski, Alicja A

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone, the circulating levels of which correlate closely with overall adiposity. Although rare mutations in the leptin (LEP) gene are well known to cause leptin deficiency and severe obesity, no common loci regulating circulating leptin levels have been uncovered...

  6. Arthropod phylogeny based on eight molecular loci and morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giribet, G.; Edgecombe, G. D.; Wheeler, W. C.

    2001-01-01

    The interrelationships of major clades within the Arthropoda remain one of the most contentious issues in systematics, which has traditionally been the domain of morphologists. A growing body of DNA sequences and other types of molecular data has revitalized study of arthropod phylogeny and has inspired new considerations of character evolution. Novel hypotheses such as a crustacean-hexapod affinity were based on analyses of single or few genes and limited taxon sampling, but have received recent support from mitochondrial gene order, and eye and brain ultrastructure and neurogenesis. Here we assess relationships within Arthropoda based on a synthesis of all well sampled molecular loci together with a comprehensive data set of morphological, developmental, ultrastructural and gene-order characters. The molecular data include sequences of three nuclear ribosomal genes, three nuclear protein-coding genes, and two mitochondrial genes (one protein coding, one ribosomal). We devised new optimization procedures and constructed a parallel computer cluster with 256 central processing units to analyse molecular data on a scale not previously possible. The optimal 'total evidence' cladogram supports the crustacean-hexapod clade, recognizes pycnogonids as sister to other euarthropods, and indicates monophyly of Myriapoda and Mandibulata.

  7. Characteristics of Lipo-Oligosaccharide Loci of Campylobacter jejuni Isolates Associated with Guillain-Barré Syndrome from Hebei, China

    OpenAIRE

    Jian-Zhong Zhang; Yi-Xin Gu; Xin-Ying Tian; Rui-Chun Liu; Mao-Jun Zhang; Hai Jiang

    2010-01-01

    Ganglioside mimicry by C. jejuni lipo-oligosaccharides (LOS) could induce the production of autoantibodies against gangliosides and the development of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). The LOS biosynthesis region exhibits significant variation with different strains. Using PCR amplifications of genes from published LOS loci and sequencing the LOS biosynthesis loci, the eight GBS-associated C. jejuni strains from HeBei could be classified into four classes. The expression of sialylated LOS struct...

  8. Efficient assembly of de novo human artificial chromosomes from large genomic loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stromberg Gregory

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Artificial Chromosomes (HACs are potentially useful vectors for gene transfer studies and for functional annotation of the genome because of their suitability for cloning, manipulating and transferring large segments of the genome. However, development of HACs for the transfer of large genomic loci into mammalian cells has been limited by difficulties in manipulating high-molecular weight DNA, as well as by the low overall frequencies of de novo HAC formation. Indeed, to date, only a small number of large (>100 kb genomic loci have been reported to be successfully packaged into de novo HACs. Results We have developed novel methodologies to enable efficient assembly of HAC vectors containing any genomic locus of interest. We report here the creation of a novel, bimolecular system based on bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs for the construction of HACs incorporating any defined genomic region. We have utilized this vector system to rapidly design, construct and validate multiple de novo HACs containing large (100–200 kb genomic loci including therapeutically significant genes for human growth hormone (HGH, polycystic kidney disease (PKD1 and ß-globin. We report significant differences in the ability of different genomic loci to support de novo HAC formation, suggesting possible effects of cis-acting genomic elements. Finally, as a proof of principle, we have observed sustained ß-globin gene expression from HACs incorporating the entire 200 kb ß-globin genomic locus for over 90 days in the absence of selection. Conclusion Taken together, these results are significant for the development of HAC vector technology, as they enable high-throughput assembly and functional validation of HACs containing any large genomic locus. We have evaluated the impact of different genomic loci on the frequency of HAC formation and identified segments of genomic DNA that appear to facilitate de novo HAC formation. These genomic loci

  9. The mating type-like loci of Candida glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yáñez-Carrillo, Patricia; Robledo-Márquez, Karina A; Ramírez-Zavaleta, Candy Y; De Las Peñas, Alejandro; Castaño, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Candida glabrata, a haploid and opportunistic fungal pathogen that has not known sexual cycle, has conserved the majority of the genes required for mating and cell type identity. The C. glabrata genome contains three mating-type-like loci called MTL1, MTL2 and MTL3. The three loci encode putative transcription factors, a1, α1 and α2 that regulate cell type identity and sexual reproduction in other fungi like the closely related Saccharomyces cerevisiae. MTL1 can contain either a or α information. MTL2, which contains a information and MTL3 with α information, are relatively close to two telomeres. MTL1 and MTL2 are transcriptionally active, while MTL3 is subject to an incomplete silencing nucleated at the telomere that depends on the silencing proteins Sir2, Sir3, Sir4, yKu70/80, Rif1, Rap1 and Sum1. C. glabrata does not seem to maintain cell type identity, as cell type-specific genes are expressed regardless of the type (or even absence) of mating information. These data highlight important differences in the control of mating and cell type identity between the non-pathogenic yeast S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata, which might explain the absence of a sexual cycle in C. glabrata. The fact that C. glabrata has conserved the vast majority of the genes involved in mating might suggest that some of these genes perhaps have been rewired to control other processes important for the survival inside the host as a commensal or as a human pathogen. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012). Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Functional mapping imprinted quantitative trait loci underlying developmental characteristics

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    Li Gengxin

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic imprinting, a phenomenon referring to nonequivalent expression of alleles depending on their parental origins, has been widely observed in nature. It has been shown recently that the epigenetic modification of an imprinted gene can be detected through a genetic mapping approach. Such an approach is developed based on traditional quantitative trait loci (QTL mapping focusing on single trait analysis. Recent studies have shown that most imprinted genes in mammals play an important role in controlling embryonic growth and post-natal development. For a developmental character such as growth, current approach is less efficient in dissecting the dynamic genetic effect of imprinted genes during individual ontology. Results Functional mapping has been emerging as a powerful framework for mapping quantitative trait loci underlying complex traits showing developmental characteristics. To understand the genetic architecture of dynamic imprinted traits, we propose a mapping strategy by integrating the functional mapping approach with genomic imprinting. We demonstrate the approach through mapping imprinted QTL controlling growth trajectories in an inbred F2 population. The statistical behavior of the approach is shown through simulation studies, in which the parameters can be estimated with reasonable precision under different simulation scenarios. The utility of the approach is illustrated through real data analysis in an F2 family derived from LG/J and SM/J mouse stains. Three maternally imprinted QTLs are identified as regulating the growth trajectory of mouse body weight. Conclusion The functional iQTL mapping approach developed here provides a quantitative and testable framework for assessing the interplay between imprinted genes and a developmental process, and will have important implications for elucidating the genetic architecture of imprinted traits.

  11. Retraction: "Screening of candidate genes and fine mapping of drought tolerance quantitative trait loci on chromosome 4 in rice (Oryza sativa L.) under drought stress" by Nie, Y. Y., L. Zhang, Y. H. Wu, H. J. Liu, W. W. Mao, J. Du, et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The above article, published online on 15 October 2015 in Wiley Online Library (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ece3.1786/abstract), has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the journal Editor in Chief, Allen Moore, and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. The authors have requested the retraction of their paper because they mistakenly analyzed the wrong backcross lines. This mistake was only recently discovered and they are now in the process of repeating the experiment using the correct Backcross Introgression Lines. The authors apologize for this mistake. Nie, Y. Y., L. Zhang, Y. H. Wu, H. J. Liu, W. W. Mao, J. Du, et al. 2015. Screening of candidate genes and fine mapping of drought tolerance quantitative trait loci on chromosome 4 in rice (Oryza sativa L.) under drought stress. Ecology and Evolution 5(21):5007-5015. doi: 10.1002/ece3.1786. [This retracts the article DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1786.].

  12. Multiple Loci Are Associated with White Blood Cell Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiong; Greinacher, Andreas; Wood, Andrew R.; Garcia, Melissa; Gasparini, Paolo; Liu, Yongmei; Lumley, Thomas; Folsom, Aaron R.; Reiner, Alex P.; Gieger, Christian; Lagou, Vasiliki; Felix, Janine F.; Völzke, Henry; Gouskova, Natalia A.; Biffi, Alessandro; Döring, Angela; Völker, Uwe; Chong, Sean; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Rendon, Augusto; Dehghan, Abbas; Moore, Matt; Taylor, Kent; Wilson, James G.; Lettre, Guillaume; Hofman, Albert; Bis, Joshua C.; Pirastu, Nicola; Fox, Caroline S.; Meisinger, Christa; Sambrook, Jennifer; Arepalli, Sampath; Nauck, Matthias; Prokisch, Holger; Stephens, Jonathan; Glazer, Nicole L.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Okada, Yukinori; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Matsuda, Koichi; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Kubo, Michiaki; Nakamura, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Stumvoll, Michael; Tönjes, Anke; Prokopenko, Inga; Illig, Thomas; Patel, Kushang V.; Garner, Stephen F.; Kuhnel, Brigitte; Mangino, Massimo; Oostra, Ben A.; Thein, Swee Lay; Coresh, Josef; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Menzel, Stephan; Lin, JingPing; Pistis, Giorgio; Uitterlinden, André G.; Spector, Tim D.; Teumer, Alexander; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Bandinelli, Stefania; Frayling, Timothy M.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Melzer, David; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Levy, Daniel; Boerwinkle, Eric; Singleton, Andrew B.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Longo, Dan L.; Soranzo, Nicole; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Harris, Tamara B.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Ganesh, Santhi K.

    2011-01-01

    White blood cell (WBC) count is a common clinical measure from complete blood count assays, and it varies widely among healthy individuals. Total WBC count and its constituent subtypes have been shown to be moderately heritable, with the heritability estimates varying across cell types. We studied 19,509 subjects from seven cohorts in a discovery analysis, and 11,823 subjects from ten cohorts for replication analyses, to determine genetic factors influencing variability within the normal hematological range for total WBC count and five WBC subtype measures. Cohort specific data was supplied by the CHARGE, HeamGen, and INGI consortia, as well as independent collaborative studies. We identified and replicated ten associations with total WBC count and five WBC subtypes at seven different genomic loci (total WBC count—6p21 in the HLA region, 17q21 near ORMDL3, and CSF3; neutrophil count—17q21; basophil count- 3p21 near RPN1 and C3orf27; lymphocyte count—6p21, 19p13 at EPS15L1; monocyte count—2q31 at ITGA4, 3q21, 8q24 an intergenic region, 9q31 near EDG2), including three previously reported associations and seven novel associations. To investigate functional relationships among variants contributing to variability in the six WBC traits, we utilized gene expression- and pathways-based analyses. We implemented gene-clustering algorithms to evaluate functional connectivity among implicated loci and showed functional relationships across cell types. Gene expression data from whole blood was utilized to show that significant biological consequences can be extracted from our genome-wide analyses, with effect estimates for significant loci from the meta-analyses being highly corellated with the proximal gene expression. In addition, collaborative efforts between the groups contributing to this study and related studies conducted by the COGENT and RIKEN groups allowed for the examination of effect homogeneity for genome-wide significant associations across populations

  13. Neocentromeres form efficiently at multiple possible loci in Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie Ketel

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Centromeres are critically important for chromosome stability and integrity. Most eukaryotes have regional centromeres that include long tracts of repetitive DNA packaged into pericentric heterochromatin. Neocentromeres, new sites of functional kinetochore assembly, can form at ectopic loci because no DNA sequence is strictly required for assembly of a functional kinetochore. In humans, neocentromeres often arise in cells with gross chromosome rearrangements that rescue an acentric chromosome. Here, we studied the properties of centromeres in Candida albicans, the most prevalent fungal pathogen of humans, which has small regional centromeres that lack pericentric heterochromatin. We functionally delimited centromere DNA on Chromosome 5 (CEN5 and then replaced the entire region with the counter-selectable URA3 gene or other marker genes. All of the resulting cen5Delta::URA3 transformants stably retained both copies of Chr5, indicating that a functional neocentromere had assembled efficiently on the homolog lacking CEN5 DNA. Strains selected to maintain only the cen5Delta::URA3 homolog and no wild-type Chr5 homolog also grew well, indicating that neocentromere function is independent of the presence of any wild-type CEN5 DNA. Two classes of neocentromere (neoCEN strains were distinguishable: "proximal neoCEN" and "distal neoCEN" strains. Neocentromeres in the distal neoCEN strains formed at loci about 200-450 kb from cen5Delta::URA3 on either chromosome arm, as detected by massively parallel sequencing of DNA isolated by CENP-A(Cse4p chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP. In the proximal neoCEN strains, the neocentromeres formed directly adjacent to cen5Delta::URA3 and moved onto the URA3 DNA, resulting in silencing of its expression. Functional neocentromeres form efficiently at several possible loci that share properties of low gene density and flanking repeated DNA sequences. Subsequently, neocentromeres can move locally, which can be detected by

  14. Multiple loci are associated with white blood cell phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Nalls

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available White blood cell (WBC count is a common clinical measure from complete blood count assays, and it varies widely among healthy individuals. Total WBC count and its constituent subtypes have been shown to be moderately heritable, with the heritability estimates varying across cell types. We studied 19,509 subjects from seven cohorts in a discovery analysis, and 11,823 subjects from ten cohorts for replication analyses, to determine genetic factors influencing variability within the normal hematological range for total WBC count and five WBC subtype measures. Cohort specific data was supplied by the CHARGE, HeamGen, and INGI consortia, as well as independent collaborative studies. We identified and replicated ten associations with total WBC count and five WBC subtypes at seven different genomic loci (total WBC count-6p21 in the HLA region, 17q21 near ORMDL3, and CSF3; neutrophil count-17q21; basophil count- 3p21 near RPN1 and C3orf27; lymphocyte count-6p21, 19p13 at EPS15L1; monocyte count-2q31 at ITGA4, 3q21, 8q24 an intergenic region, 9q31 near EDG2, including three previously reported associations and seven novel associations. To investigate functional relationships among variants contributing to variability in the six WBC traits, we utilized gene expression- and pathways-based analyses. We implemented gene-clustering algorithms to evaluate functional connectivity among implicated loci and showed functional relationships across cell types. Gene expression data from whole blood was utilized to show that significant biological consequences can be extracted from our genome-wide analyses, with effect estimates for significant loci from the meta-analyses being highly corellated with the proximal gene expression. In addition, collaborative efforts between the groups contributing to this study and related studies conducted by the COGENT and RIKEN groups allowed for the examination of effect homogeneity for genome-wide significant associations across

  15. Validation of endogenous control genes for gene expression studies on human ocular surface epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bina Kulkarni

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate a panel of ten known endogenous control genes (ECG with quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qPCR, for identification of stably expressed endogenous control genes in the ocular surface (OS epithelial regions including cornea, limbus, limbal epithelial crypt and conjunctiva to normalise the quantitative reverse transcription PCR data of genes of interest expressed in above-mentioned regions. METHOD: The lasermicrodissected (LMD OS epithelial regions of cryosectioned corneoscleral buttons from the cadaver eyes were processed for RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis to detect genes of interest with qPCR. Gene expression of 10 known ECG--glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, beta actin (ACTB, peptidylprolyl isomerase (PPIA, TATA-box binding protein (TBP1, hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT1, beta glucuronidase (GUSB, Eucaryotic 18S ribosomal RNA (18S, phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK1, beta-2-microglobulin (B2M, ribosomal protein, large, P0 (RPLP0--was measured in the OS epithelial regions by qPCR method and the data collected was further analysed using geNorm software. RESULTS: The expression stability of ecgs in the os epithelial regions in increasing order as determined with genorm software is as follows: ACTB<18SHPRT1HPRT1-TBP in cornea, GUSB-PPIA in limbus, B2M-PPIA and RPLP0-TBP in LEC and conjunctiva respectively. However, across the entire ocular surface including all the regions mentioned above, PPIA-RPLP0 pair was shown to be most stable. CONCLUSION: This study has identified stably expressed ECGs on the OS epithelial regions for effective qPCR results in genes of interest. The results from this study are broadly applicable to quantitative reverse transcription PCR studies on human OS epithelium and provide evidence for the use

  16. An R package "VariABEL" for genome-wide searching of potentially interacting loci by testing genotypic variance heterogeneity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.V. Struchalin (Maksim); N. Amin (Najaf); P.H.C. Eilers (Paul); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Hundreds of new loci have been discovered by genome-wide association studies of human traits. These studies mostly focused on associations between single locus and a trait. Interactions between genes and between genes and environmental factors are of interest as they can

  17. Phenotypic associations of genetic susceptibility loci in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Elena; Nadig, Ajay; Richardson, Bruce C; Freedman, Barry I; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Kelly, Jennifer A; Niewold, Timothy B; Kamen, Diane L; Gilkeson, Gary S; Ziegler, Julie T; Langefeld, Carl D; Alarcón, Graciela S; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Petri, Michelle; Brown, Elizabeth E; Kimberly, Robert P; Reveille, John D; Vilá, Luis M; Merrill, Joan T; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; James, Judith A; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A; Martin, Javier; Park, So-Yeon; Bang, So-Young; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Moser, Kathy L; Vyse, Timothy J; Criswell, Lindsey A; Gaffney, Patrick M; Tsao, Betty P; Jacob, Chaim O; Harley, John B; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Sawalha, Amr H

    2011-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a clinically heterogeneous autoimmune disease. A number of genetic loci that increase lupus susceptibility have been established. This study examines if these genetic loci also contribute to the clinical heterogeneity in lupus. 4001 European-derived, 1547 Hispanic, 1590 African-American and 1191 Asian lupus patients were genotyped for 16 confirmed lupus susceptibility loci. Ancestry informative markers were genotyped to calculate and adjust for admixture. The association between the risk allele in each locus was determined and compared in patients with and without the various clinical manifestations included in the ACR criteria. Renal disorder was significantly correlated with the lupus risk allele in ITGAM (p=5.0 × 10(-6), OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.35) and in TNFSF4 (p=0.0013, OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.25). Other significant findings include the association between risk alleles in FCGR2A and malar rash (p=0.0031, OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.17 to 1.33), ITGAM and discoid rash (p=0.0020, OR 1.20, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.33), STAT4 and protection from oral ulcers (p=0.0027, OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.83 to 0.96) and IL21 and haematological disorder (p=0.0027, OR 1.13, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.22). All these associations are significant with a false discovery rate of manifestations and the FCGR2A, ITGAM, STAT4, TNSF4 and IL21 genes. The findings suggest that genetic profiling might be a useful tool to predict disease manifestations in lupus patients in the future.

  18. Alzheimer Disease Susceptibility Loci: Evidence for a Protein Network under Natural Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Towfique; Shulman, Joshua M.; Keenan, Brendan T.; Chibnik, Lori B.; Evans, Denis A.; Bennett, David A.; Stranger, Barbara E.; De Jager, Philip L.

    2012-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have identified a number of susceptibility loci for Alzheimer disease (AD). To understand the functional consequences and potential interactions of the associated loci, we explored large-scale data sets interrogating the human genome for evidence of positive natural selection. Our findings provide significant evidence for signatures of recent positive selection acting on several haplotypes carrying AD susceptibility alleles; interestingly, the genes found in these selected haplotypes can be assembled, independently, into a molecular complex via a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network approach. These results suggest a possible coevolution of genes encoding physically-interacting proteins that underlie AD susceptibility and are coexpressed in different tissues. In particular, PICALM, BIN1, CD2AP, and EPHA1 are interconnected through multiple interacting proteins and appear to have coordinated evidence of selection in the same human population, suggesting that they may be involved in the execution of a shared molecular function. This observation may be AD-specific, as the 12 loci associated with Parkinson disease do not demonstrate excess evidence of natural selection. The context for selection is probably unrelated to AD itself; it is likely that these genes interact in another context, such as in immune cells, where we observe cis-regulatory effects at several of the selected AD loci. PMID:22482808

  19. Polymorphic Microsatellite Loci for Virola sebifera (Myristicaceae Derived from Shotgun 454 Pyrosequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Wei

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Polymorphic microsatellite loci were characterized in the dioecious neotropical rainforest tree Virola sebifera. The markers will be used to study ecological and genetic impacts of hunting and landscape change in this vertebrate-dispersed, insect-pollinated tree species. Methods and Results: Simple sequence repeat (SSR markers were screened from genomic libraries of South American V. sebifera obtained by shotgun 454 pyrosequencing. Primer pairs were tested on Panamanian samples (N = 42. Approximately 52% of the 61 tested SSR markers amplified, and 16% were polymorphic. Ten selected polymorphic SSR loci contained seven to 15 alleles per locus, and polymorphic information content averaged 0.694. Observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.465 to 0.905, and expected heterozygosity was between 0.477 and 0.876. Conclusions: The 10 polymorphic loci will be useful in studying gene flow and genetic structure at local and regional spatial scales in V. sebifera.

  20. Mutations of short tandem repeat loci in cases of paternity testing in Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mao; Zhang, XiaoNan; Wu, Dan; Shen, Qi; Wu, YuanMing; Fu, ShanMin

    2016-09-01

    In order to find out the characteristics of genetic mutations in 15 short tandem repeat (STR) loci, 3734 parentage cases were analyzed using AmpFlSTR Sinofiler kit. The allele source, mutation rate, and mutation rule of the STR loci were determined. Seventy mutations were observed in all cases for paternity testing. Among 15 STR loci, the highest mutation rate was observed in D12S391 (0.21 %), but the D5S818 gene mutation rate was relatively low (0.02 %). One-step mutation cases accounted for 95.7 % of all of the cases monitored. And the mutations in this study mainly showed paternal mutation (64/70). The research results are of great significance for identification and paternity tests and for the improvement of genetic studies on Chinese population in the future.

  1. Bicistronic and fused monocistronic transcripts are derived from adjacent loci in the Arabidopsis genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Duan, Hui; Liu, Lei; Schuler, Mary A

    2005-02-01

    Comparisons of full-length cDNAs and genomic DNAs available for Arabidopsis thaliana described here indicate that some adjacent loci are transcribed into extremely long RNAs spanning two annotated genes. Once expressed, some of these transcripts are post-transcriptionally spliced within their coding and intergenic sequences to generate bicistronic transcripts containing two complete open reading frames. Others are spliced to generate monocistronic transcripts coding for fusion proteins with sequences derived from both loci. RT-PCR of several P450 transcripts in this collection indicates that these extended transcripts exist side by side with shorter monocistronic transcripts derived from the individual loci in each pair. The existence of these unusual transcripts highlights variations in the processes of transcription and splicing that could not possibly have been predicted in the algorithms used for genome annotation and splice site predictions.

  2. Role of 108 schizophrenia-associated loci in modulating psychopathological dimensions in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Chiara; Serretti, Alessandro

    2017-10-01

    The Schizophrenia Working Group of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC) identified 108 loci associated with schizophrenia, but their role in modulating specific psychopathological dimensions of the disease is unknown. This study investigated which symptom dimensions may be affected by these loci in schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. Positive, negative and depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation, cognition, violent behaviors, quality of life, and early onset were investigated in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder using the clinical antipsychotic trials of intervention effectiveness (CATIE) and systematic treatment enhancement program for bipolar disorder (STEP-BD) studies. Individual loci were investigated, then genes within 50 Kbp from polymorphisms with p schizophrenia-associated variant (rs75059851) may modulate negative symptoms. Multi-locus models may provide interesting insights about the biological mechanisms that mediate psychopathological dimensions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Six new loci associated with body mass index highlight a neuronal influence on body weight regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willer, Cristen J; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Loos, Ruth J F; Li, Shengxu; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Heid, Iris M; Berndt, Sonja I; Elliott, Amanda L; Jackson, Anne U; Lamina, Claudia; Lettre, Guillaume; Lim, Noha; Lyon, Helen N; McCarroll, Steven A; Papadakis, Konstantinos; Qi, Lu; Randall, Joshua C; Roccasecca, Rosa Maria; Sanna, Serena; Scheet, Paul; Weedon, Michael N; Wheeler, Eleanor; Zhao, Jing Hua; Jacobs, Leonie C; Prokopenko, Inga; Soranzo, Nicole; Tanaka, Toshiko; Timpson, Nicholas J; Almgren, Peter; Bennett, Amanda; Bergman, Richard N; Bingham, Sheila A; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brown, Morris; Burtt, Noël P; Chines, Peter; Coin, Lachlan; Collins, Francis S; Connell, John M; Cooper, Cyrus; Smith, George Davey; Dennison, Elaine M; Deodhar, Parimal; Elliott, Paul; Erdos, Michael R; Estrada, Karol; Evans, David M; Gianniny, Lauren; Gieger, Christian; Gillson, Christopher J; Guiducci, Candace; Hackett, Rachel; Hadley, David; Hall, Alistair S; Havulinna, Aki S; Hebebrand, Johannes; Hofman, Albert; Isomaa, Bo; Jacobs, Kevin B; Johnson, Toby; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jovanovic, Zorica; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kraft, Peter; Kuokkanen, Mikko; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laitinen, Jaana; Lakatta, Edward G; Luan, Jian'an; Luben, Robert N; Mangino, Massimo; McArdle, Wendy L; Meitinger, Thomas; Mulas, Antonella; Munroe, Patricia B; Narisu, Narisu; Ness, Andrew R; Northstone, Kate; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Purmann, Carolin; Rees, Matthew G; Ridderstråle, Martin; Ring, Susan M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ruokonen, Aimo; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Saramies, Jouko; Scott, Laura J; Scuteri, Angelo; Silander, Kaisa; Sims, Matthew A; Song, Kijoung; Stephens, Jonathan; Stevens, Suzanne; Stringham, Heather M; Tung, Y C Loraine; Valle, Timo T; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vimaleswaran, Karani S; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Wallace, Chris; Watanabe, Richard M; Waterworth, Dawn M; Watkins, Nicholas; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zhai, Guangju; Zillikens, M Carola; Altshuler, David; Caulfield, Mark J; Chanock, Stephen J; Farooqi, I Sadaf; Ferrucci, Luigi; Guralnik, Jack M; Hattersley, Andrew T; Hu, Frank B; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Laakso, Markku; Mooser, Vincent; Ong, Ken K; Ouwehand, Willem H; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J; Spector, Timothy D; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uda, Manuela; Uitterlinden, André G; Wareham, Nicholas J; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Frayling, Timothy M; Groop, Leif C; Hayes, Richard B; Hunter, David J; Mohlke, Karen L; Peltonen, Leena; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P; Wichmann, H-Erich; McCarthy, Mark I; Boehnke, Michael; Barroso, Inês; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Hirschhorn, Joel N

    2009-01-01

    Common variants at only two loci, FTO and MC4R, have been reproducibly associated with body mass index (BMI) in humans. To identify additional loci, we conducted meta-analysis of 15 genome-wide association studies for BMI (n > 32,000) and followed up top signals in 14 additional cohorts (n > 59,000). We strongly confirm FTO and MC4R and identify six additional loci (P < 5 x 10(-8)): TMEM18, KCTD15, GNPDA2, SH2B1, MTCH2 and NEGR1 (where a 45-kb deletion polymorphism is a candidate causal variant). Several of the likely causal genes are highly expressed or known to act in the central nervous system (CNS), emphasizing, as in rare monogenic forms of obesity, the role of the CNS in predisposition to obesity.

  4. Six new loci associated with body mass index highlight a neuronal influence on body weight regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willer, Cristen J; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Loos, Ruth J F; Li, Shengxu; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Heid, Iris M; Berndt, Sonja I; Elliott, Amanda L; Jackson, Anne U; Lamina, Claudia; Lettre, Guillaume; Lim, Noha; Lyon, Helen N; McCarroll, Steven A; Papadakis, Konstantinos; Qi, Lu; Randall, Joshua C; Roccasecca, Rosa Maria; Sanna, Serena; Scheet, Paul; Weedon, Michael N; Wheeler, Eleanor; Zhao, Jing Hua; Jacobs, Leonie C; Prokopenko, Inga; Soranzo, Nicole; Tanaka, Toshiko; Timpson, Nicholas J; Almgren, Peter; Bennett, Amanda; Bergman, Richard N; Bingham, Sheila A; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brown, Morris; Burtt, Noël P; Chines, Peter; Coin, Lachlan; Collins, Francis S; Connell, John M; Cooper, Cyrus; Smith, George Davey; Dennison, Elaine M; Deodhar, Parimal; Elliott, Paul; Erdos, Michael R; Estrada, Karol; Evans, David M; Gianniny, Lauren; Gieger, Christian; Gillson, Christopher J; Guiducci, Candace; Hackett, Rachel; Hadley, David; Hall, Alistair S; Havulinna, Aki S; Hebebrand, Johannes; Hofman, Albert; Isomaa, Bo; Jacobs, Kevin B; Johnson, Toby; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jovanovic, Zorica; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kraft, Peter; Kuokkanen, Mikko; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laitinen, Jaana; Lakatta, Edward G; Luan, Jian'an; Luben, Robert N; Mangino, Massimo; McArdle, Wendy L; Meitinger, Thomas; Mulas, Antonella; Munroe, Patricia B; Narisu, Narisu; Ness, Andrew R; Northstone, Kate; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Purmann, Carolin; Rees, Matthew G; Ridderstråle, Martin; Ring, Susan M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ruokonen, Aimo; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Saramies, Jouko; Scott, Laura J; Scuteri, Angelo; Silander, Kaisa; Sims, Matthew A; Song, Kijoung; Stephens, Jonathan; Stevens, Suzanne; Stringham, Heather M; Tung, Y C Loraine; Valle, Timo T; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vimaleswaran, Karani S; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Wallace, Chris; Watanabe, Richard M; Waterworth, Dawn M; Watkins, Nicholas; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zhai, Guangju; Zillikens, M Carola; Altshuler, David; Caulfield, Mark J; Chanock, Stephen J; Farooqi, I Sadaf; Ferrucci, Luigi; Guralnik, Jack M; Hattersley, Andrew T; Hu, Frank B; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Laakso, Markku; Mooser, Vincent; Ong, Ken K; Ouwehand, Willem H; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J; Spector, Timothy D; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uda, Manuela; Uitterlinden, André G; Wareham, Nicholas J; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Frayling, Timothy M; Groop, Leif C; Hayes, Richard B; Hunter, David J; Mohlke, Karen L; Peltonen, Leena; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P; Wichmann, H-Erich; McCarthy, Mark I; Boehnke, Michael; Barroso, Inês; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Hirschhorn, Joel N

    2009-01-01

    Common variants at only two loci, FTO and MC4R, have been reproducibly associated with body mass index (BMI) in humans. To identify additional loci, we conducted meta-analysis of 15 genome-wide association studies for BMI (n > 32,000) and followed up top signals in 14 additional cohorts (n > 59,000). We strongly confirm FTO and MC4R and identify six additional loci (P < 5 × 10−8): TMEM18, KCTD15, GNPDA2, SH2B1, MTCH2 and NEGR1 (where a 45-kb deletion polymorphism is a candidate causal variant). Several of the likely causal genes are highly expressed or known to act in the central nervous system (CNS), emphasizing, as in rare monogenic forms of obesity, the role of the CNS in predisposition to obesity. PMID:19079261

  5. Development and characterization of eight polymorphic microsatellite loci from Pistacia lentiscus L. (Anacardiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaladejo, Rafael G; Sebastiani, F; Aparicio, A; Buonamici, A; González-Martínez, S C; Vendramin, G G

    2008-07-01

    We have developed a set of eight polymorphic nuclear microsatellite markers for the Mediterranean shrub Pistacia lentiscus by means of an enriched library method. Characterization for the eight loci was carried out on 42 individuals from two populations sampled in southern Spain. The overall number of alleles detected was 59, ranging from three to 13 per locus. Expected heterozygosity per locus and population ranged from 0.139 to 0.895. Two loci albeit only in one population (Seville) departed significantly from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations and no linkage disequilibrium between pairs of loci was detected. These markers will be used in studies of gene flow across a fragmented landscape. © 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Parent-of-origin-specific allelic associations among 106 genomic loci for age at menarche

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, John R. B.; Day, Felix; Elks, Cathy E.

    2014-01-01

    robust evidence (P signals at 106 genomic loci associated with age at menarche. Many loci were associated with other pubertal traits in both sexes, and there was substantial overlap with genes implicated in body mass index and various diseases, including rare disorders of puberty....... Menarche signals were enriched in imprinted regions, with three loci (DLK1-WDR25, MKRN3-MAGEL2 and KCNK9) demonstrating parent-of-origin-specific associations concordant with known parental expression patterns. Pathway analyses implicated nuclear hormone receptors, particularly retinoic acid and gamma......Age at menarche is a marker of timing of puberty in females. It varies widely between individuals, is a heritable trait and is associated with risks for obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, breast cancer and all-causemortality(1). Studies of rare human disorders of puberty and animal...

  7. Novel loci affecting iron homeostasis and their effects in individuals at risk for hemochromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyamin, Beben; Esko, Tonu; Ried, Janina S; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Vermeulen, Sita H; Traglia, Michela; Gögele, Martin; Anderson, Denise; Broer, Linda; Podmore, Clara; Luan, Jian’an; Kutalik, Zoltan; Sanna, Serena; van der Meer, Peter; Tanaka, Toshiko; Wang, Fudi; Westra, Harm-Jan; Franke, Lude; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Häldin, Jonas; Winkelmann, Juliane; Meitinger, Thomas; Thiery, Joachim; Peters, Annette; Waldenberger, Melanie; Rendon, Augusto; Jolley, Jennifer; Sambrook, Jennifer; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Sweep, Fred C; Sala, Cinzia F; Schwienbacher, Christine; Pichler, Irene; Hui, Jennie; Demirkan, Ayse; Isaacs, Aaron; Amin, Najaf; Steri, Maristella; Waeber, Gérard; Verweij, Niek; Powell, Joseph E; Nyholt, Dale R; Heath, Andrew C; Madden, Pamela AF; Visscher, Peter M; Wright, Margaret J; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Hernandez, Dena; Bandinelli, Stefania; van der Harst, Pim; Uda, Manuela; Vollenweider, Peter; Scott, Robert A; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J; van Duijn, Cornelia; Beilby, John; Pramstaller, Peter P; Hicks, Andrew A; Ouwehand, Willem H; Oexle, Konrad; Gieger, Christian; Metspalu, Andres; Camaschella, Clara; Toniolo, Daniela; Swinkels, Dorine W; Whitfield, John B

    2014-01-01

    Variation in body iron is associated with or causes diseases, including anaemia and iron overload. Here we analyse genetic association data on biochemical markers of iron status from eleven European-population studies, with replication in eight additional cohorts (total up to 48,972 subjects). We find eleven genome-wide-significant (p < 5 × 10−8) loci, some including known iron-related genes (HFE, SLC40A1, TF, TFR2, TFRC, TMPRSS6) and others novel (ABO, ARNTL, FADS2, NAT2, TEX14). SNPs at ARNTL, TF, and TFR2 affect iron markers in HFE C282Y homozygotes at risk for hemochromatosis. There is substantial overlap between our iron loci and loci affecting erythrocyte and lipid phenotypes. These results will facilitate investigation of the roles of iron in disease. PMID:25352340

  8. Complete absence of linkage disequilibrium between enzyme loci in natural populations of Drosophila ananassae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Linkage disequilibrium has been studied among three linked enzyme loci of second chromosome of D. ananassae collected from five natural populations. Each of the three enzyme loci, that is Acph1, Acph 2 and Xdh was represented by two distinct alleles and in three genotypic forms. Thus nine genotypic combinations were recorded for each enzyme pair. The results clearly show absence of non-random occurrence of different genotypic combinations in all the populations studied. The occurrence of all possible genotypic combinations indicates enough frequency of crossing over among these enzyme loci. The absence of linkage disequilibrium in this study thus indicates that selection did not play any role and free recombination among the genes resulted random occurrence of all combinations.

  9. Interval Mapping of Multiple Quantitative Trait Loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Ritsert C.

    1993-01-01

    The interval mapping method is widely used for the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in segregating generations derived from crosses between inbred lines. The efficiency of detecting and the accuracy of mapping multiple QTLs by using genetic markers are much increased by employing multiple

  10. Development and characterization of microsatellite loci for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eight novel microsatellite loci from the genome of Fenneropenaeus penicillatus Alcock were developed using the protocol of fast isolation by amplified fragment length polymorphism of sequences containing repeats (FIASCO). Thirty (30) wild individuals were used to analyze the polymorphism of these eight microsatellite ...

  11. Network-based group variable selection for detecting expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xuegong

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL aims to identify the genetic loci associated with the expression level of genes. Penalized regression with a proper penalty is suitable for the high-dimensional biological data. Its performance should be enhanced when we incorporate biological knowledge of gene expression network and linkage disequilibrium (LD structure between loci in high-noise background. Results We propose a network-based group variable selection (NGVS method for QTL detection. Our method simultaneously maps highly correlated expression traits sharing the same biological function to marker sets formed by LD. By grouping markers, complex joint activity of multiple SNPs can be considered and the dimensionality of eQTL problem is reduced dramatically. In order to demonstrate the power and flexibility of our method, we used it to analyze two simulations and a mouse obesity and diabetes dataset. We considered the gene co-expression network, grouped markers into marker sets and treated the additive and dominant effect of each locus as a group: as a consequence, we were able to replicate results previously obtained on the mouse linkage dataset. Furthermore, we observed several possible sex-dependent loci and interactions of multiple SNPs. Conclusions The proposed NGVS method is appropriate for problems with high-dimensional data and high-noise background. On eQTL problem it outperforms the classical Lasso method, which does not consider biological knowledge. Introduction of proper gene expression and loci correlation information makes detecting causal markers more accurate. With reasonable model settings, NGVS can lead to novel biological findings.

  12. Comprehensive Functional Annotation of Seventy-One Breast Cancer Risk Loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhie, Suhn Kyong; Coetzee, Simon G.; Noushmehr, Houtan; Yan, Chunli; Kim, Jae Mun; Haiman, Christopher A.; Coetzee, Gerhard A.

    2013-01-01

    Breast Cancer (BCa) genome-wide association studies revealed allelic frequency differences between cases and controls at index single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). To date, 71 loci have thus been identified and replicated. More than 320,000 SNPs at these loci define BCa risk due to linkage disequilibrium (LD). We propose that BCa risk resides in a subgroup of SNPs that functionally affects breast biology. Such a shortlist will aid in framing hypotheses to prioritize a manageable number of likely disease-causing SNPs. We extracted all the SNPs, residing in 1 Mb windows around breast cancer risk index SNP from the 1000 genomes project to find correlated SNPs. We used FunciSNP, an R/Bioconductor package developed in-house, to identify potentially functional SNPs at 71 risk loci by coinciding them with chromatin biofeatures. We identified 1,005 SNPs in LD with the index SNPs (r2≥0.5) in three categories; 21 in exons of 18 genes, 76 in transcription start site (TSS) regions of 25 genes, and 921 in enhancers. Thirteen SNPs were found in more than one category. We found two correlated and predicted non-benign coding variants (rs8100241 in exon 2 and rs8108174 in exon 3) of the gene, ANKLE1. Most putative functional LD SNPs, however, were found in either epigenetically defined enhancers or in gene TSS regions. Fifty-five percent of these non-coding SNPs are likely functional, since they affect response element (RE) sequences of transcription factors. Functionality of these SNPs was assessed by expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis and allele-specific enhancer assays. Unbiased analyses of SNPs at BCa risk loci revealed new and overlooked mechanisms that may affect risk of the disease, thereby providing a valuable resource for follow-up studies. PMID:23717510

  13. Genome-Wide Association Identifies Regulatory Loci Associated with Distinct Local Histogram Emphysema Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Michael H.; San José Estépar, Raúl; McDonald, Merry-Lynn N.; Laird, Nan; Beaty, Terri H.; Washko, George; Crapo, James D.; Silverman, Edwin K.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Emphysema is a heritable trait that occurs in smokers with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Emphysema occurs in distinct pathologic patterns, but the genetic determinants of these patterns are unknown. Objectives: To identify genetic loci associated with distinct patterns of emphysema in smokers and investigate the regulatory function of these loci. Methods: Quantitative measures of distinct emphysema patterns were generated from computed tomography scans from smokers in the COPDGene Study using the local histogram emphysema quantification method. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) were performed in 9,614 subjects for five emphysema patterns, and the results were referenced against enhancer and DNase I hypersensitive regions from ENCODE and Roadmap Epigenomics cell lines. Measurements and Main Results: Genome-wide significant associations were identified for seven loci. Two are novel associations (top single-nucleotide polymorphism rs379123 in MYO1D and rs9590614 in VMA8) located within genes that function in cell-cell signaling and cell migration, and five are in loci previously associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease susceptibility (HHIP, IREB2/CHRNA3, CYP2A6/ADCK, TGFB2, and MMP12). Five of these seven loci lay within enhancer or DNase I hypersensitivity regions in lung fibroblasts or small airway epithelial cells, respectively. Enhancer enrichment analysis for top GWAS associations (single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated at P emphysema quantified by computed tomography scan. Enhancer regions are significantly enriched among these GWAS results, with pulmonary fibroblasts among the cell types showing the strongest enrichment. PMID:25006744

  14. In-silico analysis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD GWAS loci to novel connections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Mesbah-Uddin

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWASs for many complex diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, produced hundreds of disease-associated loci-the majority of which are noncoding. The number of GWAS loci is increasing very rapidly, but the process of translating single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs from these loci to genomic medicine is lagging. In this study, we investigated 4,734 variants from 152 IBD associated GWAS loci (IBD associated 152 lead noncoding SNPs identified from pooled GWAS results + 4,582 variants in strong linkage-disequilibrium (LD (r2 ≥0.8 for EUR population of 1K Genomes Project using four publicly available bioinformatics tools, e.g. dbPSHP, CADD, GWAVA, and RegulomeDB, to annotate and prioritize putative regulatory variants. Of the 152 lead noncoding SNPs, around 11% are under strong negative selection (GERP++ RS ≥2; and ~30% are under balancing selection (Tajima's D score >2 in CEU population (1K Genomes Project--though these regions are positively selected (GERP++ RS <0 in mammalian evolution. The analysis of 4,734 variants using three integrative annotation tools produced 929 putative functional SNPs, of which 18 SNPs (from 15 GWAS loci are in concordance with all three classifiers. These prioritized noncoding SNPs may contribute to IBD pathogenesis by dysregulating the expression of nearby genes. This study showed the usefulness of integrative annotation for prioritizing fewer functional variants from a large number of GWAS markers.

  15. Microsatellite Loci for Orthophytum ophiuroides (Bromelioideae, Bromeliaceae Species Adapted to Neotropical Rock Outcrops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Aoki-Gonçalves

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were developed for Orthophytum ophiuroides, a rupicolous bromeliad species endemic to neotropical rocky fields. These microsatellite loci will be used to investigate population differentiation and species cohesion in such fragmented environments. The loci were tested for cross-amplification in related bromeliad species. Methods and Results: Eleven polymorphic microsatellite markers were isolated and characterized from an enriched library of O. ophiuroides. The loci were tested on 42 individuals from two populations of this species. The number of alleles per locus ranged from three to nine and the expected and observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.167 to 0.870 and from 0.369 to 0.958, respectively. Seven loci successfully amplified in other related bromeliad species. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the microsatellite loci developed here will be useful to assess genetic diversity and gene flow in O. ophiuroides for the investigation of population differentiation and species cohesion in neotropical mountainous habitats.

  16. Multi-ethnic analysis of lipid-associated loci: the NHLBI CARe project.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Musunuru

    Full Text Available Whereas it is well established that plasma lipid levels have substantial heritability within populations, it remains unclear how many of the genetic determinants reported in previous studies (largely performed in European American cohorts are relevant in different ethnicities.We tested a set of ∼50,000 polymorphisms from ∼2,000 candidate genes and genetic loci from genome-wide association studies (GWAS for association with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, and triglycerides (TG in 25,000 European Americans and 9,000 African Americans in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe. We replicated associations for a number of genes in one or both ethnicities and identified a novel lipid-associated variant in a locus harboring ICAM1. We compared the architecture of genetic loci associated with lipids in both African Americans and European Americans and found that the same genes were relevant across ethnic groups but the specific associated variants at each gene often differed.We identify or provide further evidence for a number of genetic determinants of plasma lipid levels through population association studies. In many loci the determinants appear to differ substantially between African Americans and European Americans.

  17. Biological Insights From 108 Schizophrenia-Associated Genetic Loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripke, Stephan; Neale, Benjamin M; Corvin, Aiden; Walters, James TR; Farh, Kai-How; Holmans, Peter A; Lee, Phil; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Collier, David A; Huang, Hailiang; Pers, Tune H; Agartz, Ingrid; Agerbo, Esben; Albus, Margot; Alexander, Madeline; Amin, Farooq; Bacanu, Silviu A; Begemann, Martin; Belliveau, Richard A; Bene, Judit; Bergen, Sarah E; Bevilacqua, Elizabeth; Bigdeli, Tim B; Black, Donald W; Bruggeman, Richard; Buccola, Nancy G; Buckner, Randy L; Byerley, William; Cahn, Wiepke; Cai, Guiqing; Campion, Dominique; Cantor, Rita M; Carr, Vaughan J; Carrera, Noa; Catts, Stanley V; Chambert, Kimberley D; Chan, Raymond CK; Chan, Ronald YL; Chen, Eric YH; Cheng, Wei; Cheung, Eric FC; Chong, Siow Ann; Cloninger, C Robert; Cohen, David; Cohen, Nadine; Cormican, Paul; Craddock, Nick; Crowley, James J; Curtis, David; Davidson, Michael; Davis, Kenneth L; Degenhardt, Franziska; Del Favero, Jurgen; Demontis, Ditte; Dikeos, Dimitris; Dinan, Timothy; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drapeau, Elodie; Duan, Jubao; Dudbridge, Frank; Durmishi, Naser; Eichhammer, Peter; Eriksson, Johan; Escott-Price, Valentina; Essioux, Laurent; Fanous, Ayman H; Farrell, Martilias S; Frank, Josef; Franke, Lude; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B; Friedl, Marion; Friedman, Joseph I; Fromer, Menachem; Genovese, Giulio; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Giegling, Ina; Giusti-Rodríguez, Paola; Godard, Stephanie; Goldstein, Jacqueline I; Golimbet, Vera; Gopal, Srihari; Gratten, Jacob; de Haan, Lieuwe; Hammer, Christian; Hamshere, Marian L; Hansen, Mark; Hansen, Thomas; Haroutunian, Vahram; Hartmann, Annette M; Henskens, Frans A; Herms, Stefan; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hoffmann, Per; Hofman, Andrea; Hollegaard, Mads V; Hougaard, David M; Ikeda, Masashi; Joa, Inge; Julià, Antonio; Kahn, René S; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Karachanak-Yankova, Sena; Karjalainen, Juha; Kavanagh, David; Keller, Matthew C; Kennedy, James L; Khrunin, Andrey; Kim, Yunjung; Klovins, Janis; Knowles, James A; Konte, Bettina; Kucinskas, Vaidutis; Kucinskiene, Zita Ausrele; Kuzelova-Ptackova, Hana; Kähler, Anna K; Laurent, Claudine; Lee, Jimmy; Lee, S Hong; Legge, Sophie E; Lerer, Bernard; Li, Miaoxin; Li, Tao; Liang, Kung-Yee; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Limborska, Svetlana; Loughland, Carmel M; Lubinski, Jan; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Macek, Milan; Magnusson, Patrik KE; Maher, Brion S; Maier, Wolfgang; Mallet, Jacques; Marsal, Sara; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; McCarley, Robert W; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; Meier, Sandra; Meijer, Carin J; Melegh, Bela; Melle, Ingrid; Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle I; Metspalu, Andres; Michie, Patricia T; Milani, Lili; Milanova, Vihra; Mokrab, Younes; Morris, Derek W; Mors, Ole; Murphy, Kieran C; Murray, Robin M; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nelis, Mari; Nenadic, Igor; Nertney, Deborah A; Nestadt, Gerald; Nicodemus, Kristin K; Nikitina-Zake, Liene; Nisenbaum, Laura; Nordin, Annelie; O’Callaghan, Eadbhard; O’Dushlaine, Colm; O’Neill, F Anthony; Oh, Sang-Yun; Olincy, Ann; Olsen, Line; Van Os, Jim; Pantelis, Christos; Papadimitriou, George N; Papiol, Sergi; Parkhomenko, Elena; Pato, Michele T; Paunio, Tiina; Pejovic-Milovancevic, Milica; Perkins, Diana O; Pietiläinen, Olli; Pimm, Jonathan; Pocklington, Andrew J; Powell, John; Price, Alkes; Pulver, Ann E; Purcell, Shaun M; Quested, Digby; Rasmussen, Henrik B; Reichenberg, Abraham; Reimers, Mark A; Richards, Alexander L; Roffman, Joshua L; Roussos, Panos; Ruderfer, Douglas M; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R; Schall, Ulrich; Schubert, Christian R; Schulze, Thomas G; Schwab, Sibylle G; Scolnick, Edward M; Scott, Rodney J; Seidman, Larry J; Shi, Jianxin; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Silagadze, Teimuraz; Silverman, Jeremy M; Sim, Kang; Slominsky, Petr; Smoller, Jordan W; So, Hon-Cheong; Spencer, Chris C A; Stahl, Eli A; Stefansson, Hreinn; Steinberg, Stacy; Stogmann, Elisabeth; Straub, Richard E; Strengman, Eric; Strohmaier, Jana; Stroup, T Scott; Subramaniam, Mythily; Suvisaari, Jaana; Svrakic, Dragan M; Szatkiewicz, Jin P; Söderman, Erik; Thirumalai, Srinivas; Toncheva, Draga; Tosato, Sarah; Veijola, Juha; Waddington, John; Walsh, Dermot; Wang, Dai; Wang, Qiang; Webb, Bradley T; Weiser, Mark; Wildenauer, Dieter B; Williams, Nigel M; Williams, Stephanie; Witt, Stephanie H; Wolen, Aaron R; Wong, Emily HM; Wormley, Brandon K; Xi, Hualin Simon; Zai, Clement C; Zheng, Xuebin; Zimprich, Fritz; Wray, Naomi R; Stefansson, Kari; Visscher, Peter M; Adolfsson, Rolf; Andreassen, Ole A; Blackwood, Douglas HR; Bramon, Elvira; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Børglum, Anders D; Cichon, Sven; Darvasi, Ariel; Domenici, Enrico; Ehrenreich, Hannelore; Esko, Tõnu; Gejman, Pablo V; Gill, Michael; Gurling, Hugh; Hultman, Christina M; Iwata, Nakao; Jablensky, Assen V; Jönsson, Erik G; Kendler, Kenneth S; Kirov, George; Knight, Jo; Lencz, Todd; Levinson, Douglas F; Li, Qingqin S; Liu, Jianjun; Malhotra, Anil K; McCarroll, Steven A; McQuillin, Andrew; Moran, Jennifer L; Mortensen, Preben B; Mowry, Bryan J; Nöthen, Markus M; Ophoff, Roel A; Owen, Michael J; Palotie, Aarno; Pato, Carlos N; Petryshen, Tracey L; Posthuma, Danielle; Rietschel, Marcella; Riley, Brien P; Rujescu, Dan; Sham, Pak C; Sklar, Pamela; St Clair, David; Weinberger, Daniel R; Wendland, Jens R; Werge, Thomas; Daly, Mark J; Sullivan, Patrick F; O’Donovan, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Summary Schizophrenia is a highly heritable disorder. Genetic risk is conferred by a large number of alleles, including common alleles of small effect that might be detected by genome-wide association studies. Here, we report a multi-stage schizophrenia genome-wide association study of up to 36,989 cases and 113,075 controls. We identify 128 independent associations spanning 108 conservatively defined loci that meet genome-wide significance, 83 of which have not been previously reported. Associations were enriched among genes expressed in brain providing biological plausibility for the findings. Many findings have the potential to provide entirely novel insights into aetiology, but associations at DRD2 and multiple genes involved in glutamatergic neurotransmission highlight molecules of known and potential therapeutic relevance to schizophrenia, and are consistent with leading pathophysiological hypotheses. Independent of genes expressed in brain, associations were enriched among genes expressed in tissues that play important roles in immunity, providing support for the hypothesized link between the immune system and schizophrenia. PMID:25056061

  18. Identification of Suitable Reference Genes for Investigating Gene Expression in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury by Using Reverse Transcription-Quantitative PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Ferreira Leal

    Full Text Available The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL is one of the most frequently injured structures during high-impact sporting activities. Gene expression analysis may be a useful tool for understanding ACL tears and healing failure. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR has emerged as an effective method for such studies. However, this technique requires the use of suitable reference genes for data normalization. Here, we evaluated the suitability of six reference genes (18S, ACTB, B2M, GAPDH, HPRT1, and TBP by using ACL samples of 39 individuals with ACL tears (20 with isolated ACL tears and 19 with ACL tear and combined meniscal injury and of 13 controls. The stability of the candidate reference genes was determined by using the NormFinder, geNorm, BestKeeper DataAssist, and RefFinder software packages and the comparative ΔCt method. ACTB was the best single reference gene and ACTB+TBP was the best gene pair. The GenEx software showed that the accumulated standard deviation is reduced when a larger number of reference genes is used for gene expression normalization. However, the use of a single reference gene may not be suitable. To identify the optimal combination of reference genes, we evaluated the expression of FN1 and PLOD1. We observed that at least 3 reference genes should be used. ACTB+HPRT1+18S is the best trio for the analyses involving isolated ACL tears and controls. Conversely, ACTB+TBP+18S is the best trio for the analyses involving (1 injured ACL tears and controls, and (2 ACL tears of patients with meniscal tears and controls. Therefore, if the gene expression study aims to compare non-injured ACL, isolated ACL tears and ACL tears from patients with meniscal tear as three independent groups ACTB+TBP+18S+HPRT1 should be used. In conclusion, 3 or more genes should be used as reference genes for analysis of ACL samples of individuals with and without ACL tears.

  19. Integrating Genetic, Transcriptional, and Functional Analyses to Identify 5 Novel Genes for Atrial Fibrillation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sinner, Moritz F; Tucker, Nathan R; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Ozaki, Kouichi; Smith, J Gustav; Trompet, Stella; Bis, Joshua C; Lin, Honghuang; Chung, Mina K; Nielsen, Jonas B; Lubitz, Steven A; Krijthe, Bouwe P; Magnani, Jared W; Ye, Jiangchuan; Gollob, Michael H; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Lichtner, Peter; Peters, Annette; Dolmatova, Elena; Kubo, Michiaki; Smith, Jonathan D; Psaty, Bruce M; Smith, Nicholas L; Jukema, J Wouter; Chasman, Daniel I; Albert, Christine M; Ebana, Yusuke; Furukawa, Tetsushi; Macfarlane, Peter W; Harris, Tamara B; Darbar, Dawood; Dörr, Marcus; Holst, Anders G; Svendsen, Jesper H; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Malik, Rainer; Dichgans, Martin; Rosand, Jonathan; Van Wagoner, David R; Benjamin, Emelia J; Milan, David J; Melander, Olle; Heckbert, Susan R; Ford, Ian; Liu, Yongmei; Barnard, John; Olesen, Morten S; Stricker, Bruno H.C; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Kääb, Stefan; Ellinor, Patrick T

    2014-01-01

    ... (expression quantitative trait loci) mapping, and functional validation. Four novel loci were identified in individuals of European descent near the genes NEURL (rs12415501; relative risk [RR]=1.18; 95...

  20. Selection of internal control genes for real-time quantitative PCR in ovary and uterus of sows across pregnancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Martínez-Giner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Reproductive traits play a key role in pig production in order to reduce costs and increase economic returns. Among others, gene expression analyses represent a useful approach to study genetic mechanisms underlying reproductive traits in pigs. The application of reverse-transcription quantitative PCR requires the selection of appropriate reference genes, whose expression levels should not be affected by the experimental conditions, especially when comparing gene expression across different physiological stages. RESULTS: The gene expression stability of ten potential reference genes was studied by three different methods (geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper in ovary and uterus collected at five different physiological time points (heat, and 15, 30, 45 and 60 days of pregnancy. Although final ranking differed, the three algorithms gave very similar results. Thus, the most stable genes across time were TBP and UBC in uterus and TBP and HPRT1 in ovary, while HMBS and ACTB showed the less stable expression in uterus and ovary, respectively. When studied as a systematic effect, the reproductive stage did not significantly affect the expression of the candidate reference genes except at 30d and 60d of pregnancy, when a general drop in expression was observed in ovary. CONCLUSIONS: Based in our results, we propose the use of TBP, UBC and SDHA in uterus and TBP, GNB2L1 and HPRT1 in ovary for normalization of longitudinal expression studies using quantitative PCR in sows.

  1. Gene

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes,...

  2. Detection of the introgression loci in Triticum aestivum transferred ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of A. tauschii SQ-214 introgression loci in the two derived populations. The result shows that 82.35% loci of A. tauschii SQ-214 were detected in BC1F2 population, while the frequency of introgression loci was 51.47% in the advanced lines of BC1F2-F7 after artificial selection for stripe rust resistance and agronomic traits.

  3. [Genetic diversity of microsatellite loci in captive Amur tigers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Gaung; Li, Di-Qiang; Xiao, Qi-Ming; Rao, Li-Qun; Zhang, Xue-Wen

    2004-09-01

    The tiger is one of the most threatened wildlife species since the abundance and distribution of tiger have decreased dramatically in the last century. The wild Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) only distributed in northeast China, the far east area of Russia and the north Korea and its size of wild population is about 450 in the world and 20 in China. Several hundred captive populations of Amur tigers are the main source to protect gene library of tiger and the source of recovering the wild populations. The Breeding Center for Felidae at Hengdaohezi and Haoerbin Tiger Park in Heilongjiang Province is the biggest captive breeding base in China. How to make clear the genetic pedigree and establish reasonable breeding system is the urgent issues. So we use the microsatellite DNA markers and non-invasive technology to research on the genetic diversity of captive Amur tiger in this study. Ten microsatellite loci (Fca005, Fca075, Fca094, Fca152, Fca161, Fca294, Pti002, Pti003, Pti007 and Pti010), highly variable nuclear markers, were studied their genetic diversity in 113 captive Amur tigers. The PCR amplified products of microsatellite loci were detected by non-denatured polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Allele numbers, allelic frequency, gene heterozygosity(H(e)), polymorphism information content(PIC) and effective number of allele(N(e)) were calculated. 41 alleles were found and their size were ranged from 110bp to 250bp in ten microsatellite loci, Fca152 had 6 alleles, Fca075, Fca094 and Fca294 had 5 alleles, Fca005 and Pti002 had 4 alleles and the others had 3 alleles in all tiger samples, respectively. The allelic frequencies were from 0.009 to 0.767; The He ranged from 0.385 to 0.707, and Fca294 and Pti010 locus had the highest and lowest value; the PIC were from 0.353 to 0.658, Fca294 and Pti010 locus had the highest and lowest value; and N(e) were from 1.626 to 3.409, Fca294 and Pti010 locus had the highest and lowest value, which showed the ten

  4. Conserved piRNA Expression from a Distinct Set of piRNA Cluster Loci in Eutherian Mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gung-Wei Chirn

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Piwi pathway is deeply conserved amongst animals because one of its essential functions is to repress transposons. However, many Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs do not base-pair to transposons and remain mysterious in their targeting function. The sheer number of piRNA cluster (piC loci in animal genomes and infrequent piRNA sequence conservation also present challenges in determining which piC loci are most important for development. To address this question, we determined the piRNA expression patterns of piC loci across a wide phylogenetic spectrum of animals, and reveal that most genic and intergenic piC loci evolve rapidly in their capacity to generate piRNAs, regardless of known transposon silencing function. Surprisingly, we also uncovered a distinct set of piC loci with piRNA expression conserved deeply in Eutherian mammals. We name these loci Eutherian-Conserved piRNA cluster (ECpiC loci. Supporting the hypothesis that conservation of piRNA expression across ~100 million years of Eutherian evolution implies function, we determined that one ECpiC locus generates abundant piRNAs antisense to the STOX1 transcript, a gene clinically associated with preeclampsia. Furthermore, we confirmed reduced piRNAs in existing mouse mutations at ECpiC-Asb1 and -Cbl, which also display spermatogenic defects. The Asb1 mutant testes with strongly reduced Asb1 piRNAs also exhibit up-regulated gene expression profiles. These data indicate ECpiC loci may be specially adapted to support Eutherian reproduction.

  5. Quantifying Genome Editing Outcomes at Endogenous Loci using SMRT Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Joseph; Punjya, Niraj; Sebastiano, Vittorio; Bao, Gang; Porteus, Matthew H

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Targeted genome editing with engineered nucleases has transformed the ability to introduce precise sequence modifications at almost any site within the genome. A major obstacle to probing the efficiency and consequences of genome editing is that no existing method enables the frequency of different editing events to be simultaneously measured across a cell population at any endogenous genomic locus. We have developed a novel method for quantifying individual genome editing outcomes at any site of interest using single molecule real time (SMRT) DNA sequencing. We show that this approach can be applied at various loci, using multiple engineered nuclease platforms including TALENs, RNA guided endonucleases (CRISPR/Cas9), and ZFNs, and in different cell lines to identify conditions and strategies in which the desired engineering outcome has occurred. This approach facilitates the evaluation of new gene editing technologies and permits sensitive quantification of editing outcomes in almost every experimental system used. PMID:24685129

  6. Characterization of 10 Microsatellite Loci for Bathysa australis (Rubiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talita S. Reis

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Bathysa australis is a common subcanopy tree from the Atlantic Forest that is pollinated by bees and wasps and produces autochoric seeds. This species exhibits great phenotypic plasticity along the elevational gradient of Serra do Mar in southeastern Brazil. We expect to assess the genetic diversity and gene flow between populations of this species along the elevational gradient. Methods and Results: We developed a microsatellite-enriched genomic library for B. australis, and 10 microsatellite loci were successfully amplified, ranging from one to 13 alleles per locus. The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.333 to 0.900 (average: 0.629 and 0.564 to 0.900 (average: 0.742, respectively. Conclusions: These are the first microsatellite markers developed for the genus Bathysa and may be useful in other species of the Condamineeae tribe. These primers will be an important tool for studies of population ecology and conservation genetics.

  7. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci from an endangered tree species, Toona ciliata var. pubescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J; Sun, Z-X; Chen, Y-T; Jiang, J-M

    2012-12-17

    Toona ciliata var. pubescens is considered an endangered tree species native to China. In order to help develop a conservation program for this species, we evaluated its genetic diversity and population genetics. We isolated microsatellite DNA loci using streptavidin beads. A genomic library, enriched with microsatellites, was constructed and screened by sequencing. We detected 8 polymorphic microsatellite loci from the tree tissue samples. The population of T. ciliata var. pubescens used in this study is located within the Guanshan National Nature Reserve, Jiangxi Province, China. Sixty-five individuals were collected for the study. The Guanshan population was split into two subpopulations due to terrain. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 6, with expected heterozygosity from 0.2386 to 0.6772. Four of the 8 loci, except loci Tc02, Tc04, Tc05, and Tc07 showed no significant departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The mean observed heterozygosity was 0.59. The average coefficient of genetic differentiation between the two subpopulations was quite low (F(ST) = 0.0235). The level of gene flow (N(m)) was 10.39, reflecting a high degree of gene flow between the two subpopulations.

  8. Evolutionary and functional implications of hypervariable loci within the skin virome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey D. Hannigan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Localized genomic variability is crucial for the ongoing conflicts between infectious microbes and their hosts. An understanding of evolutionary and adaptive patterns associated with genomic variability will help guide development of vaccines and antimicrobial agents. While most analyses of the human microbiome have focused on taxonomic classification and gene annotation, we investigated genomic variation of skin-associated viral communities. We evaluated patterns of viral genomic variation across 16 healthy human volunteers. Human papillomavirus (HPV and Staphylococcus phages contained 106 and 465 regions of diversification, or hypervariable loci, respectively. Propionibacterium phage genomes were minimally divergent and contained no hypervariable loci. Genes containing hypervariable loci were involved in functions including host tropism and immune evasion. HPV and Staphylococcus phage hypervariable loci were associated with purifying selection. Amino acid substitution patterns were virus dependent, as were predictions of their phenotypic effects. We identified diversity generating retroelements as one likely mechanism driving hypervariability. We validated these findings in an independently collected skin metagenomic sequence dataset, suggesting that these features of skin virome genomic variability are widespread. Our results highlight the genomic variation landscape of the skin virome and provide a foundation for better understanding community viral evolution and the functional implications of genomic diversification of skin viruses.

  9. Differential DNA methylation regions in cytokine and transcription factor genomic loci associate with childhood physical aggression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Provençal

    Full Text Available Animal and human studies suggest that inflammation is associated with behavioral disorders including aggression. We have recently shown that physical aggression of boys during childhood is strongly associated with reduced plasma levels of cytokines IL-1α, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10, later in early adulthood. This study tests the hypothesis that there is an association between differential DNA methylation regions in cytokine genes in T cells and monocytes DNA in adult subjects and a trajectory of physical aggression from childhood to adolescence.We compared the methylation profiles of the entire genomic loci encompassing the IL-1α, IL-6, IL-4, IL-10 and IL-8 and three of their regulatory transcription factors (TF NFkB1, NFAT5 and STAT6 genes in adult males on a chronic physical aggression trajectory (CPA and males with the same background who followed a normal physical aggression trajectory (control group from childhood to adolescence. We used the method of methylated DNA immunoprecipitation with comprehensive cytokine gene loci and TF loci microarray hybridization, statistical analysis and false discovery rate correction. We found differentially methylated regions to associate with CPA in both the cytokine loci as well as in their transcription factors loci analyzed. Some of these differentially methylated regions were located in known regulatory regions whereas others, to our knowledge, were previously unknown as regulatory areas. However, using the ENCODE database, we were able to identify key regulatory elements in many of these regions that indicate that they might be involved in the regulation of cytokine expression.We provide here the first evidence for an association between differential DNA methylation in cytokines and their regulators in T cells and monocytes and male physical aggression.

  10. Reconstruction of a functional human gene network, with an application for prioritizing positional candidate genes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franke, L.; Bakel, H. van; Fokkens, L.; Jong, E.D. de; Egmont-Peterson, M.; Wijmenga, C.

    2006-01-01

    Most common genetic disorders have a complex inheritance and may result from variants in many genes, each contributing only weak effects to the disease. Pinpointing these disease genes within the myriad of susceptibility loci identified in linkage studies is difficult because these loci may contain

  11. Recombinant protein expression by targeting pre-selected chromosomal loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krömer Wolfgang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant protein expression in mammalian cells is mostly achieved by stable integration of transgenes into the chromosomal DNA of established cell lines. The chromosomal surroundings have strong influences on the expression of transgenes. The exploitation of defined loci by targeting expression constructs with different regulatory elements is an approach to design high level expression systems. Further, this allows to evaluate the impact of chromosomal surroundings on distinct vector constructs. Results We explored antibody expression upon targeting diverse expression constructs into previously tagged loci in CHO-K1 and HEK293 cells that exhibit high reporter gene expression. These loci were selected by random transfer of reporter cassettes and subsequent screening. Both, retroviral infection and plasmid transfection with eGFP or antibody expression cassettes were employed for tagging. The tagged cell clones were screened for expression and single copy integration. Cell clones producing > 20 pg/cell in 24 hours could be identified. Selected integration sites that had been flanked with heterologous recombinase target sites (FRTs were targeted by Flp recombinase mediated cassette exchange (RMCE. The results give proof of principle for consistent protein expression upon RMCE. Upon targeting antibody expression cassettes 90-100% of all resulting cell clones showed correct integration. Antibody production was found to be highly consistent within the individual cell clones as expected from their isogenic nature. However, the nature and orientation of expression control elements revealed to be critical. The impact of different promoters was examined with the tag-and-targeting approach. For each of the chosen promoters high expression sites were identified. However, each site supported the chosen promoters to a different extent, indicating that the strength of a particular promoter is dominantly defined by its chromosomal context

  12. Novel susceptibility loci for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Christiane

    2015-12-01

    Late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD), a highly prevalent neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive deterioration in cognition, function and behavior terminating in incapacity and death, is a clinically and pathologically heterogeneous disease with a substantial heritable component. During the past 5 years, the technological developments in next-generation high-throughput genome technologies have led to the identification of more than 20 novel susceptibility loci for AD, and have implicated specific pathways in the disease, in particular intracellular trafficking/endocytosis, inflammation and immune response and lipid metabolism. These observations have significantly advanced our understanding of underlying pathogenic mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets. This review article summarizes these recent advances in AD genomics and discusses the value of identified susceptibility loci for diagnosis and prognosis of AD.

  13. Novel genetic loci associated with hippocampal volume.

    OpenAIRE

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Adams, Hieab H.H.; Jahanshad, Neda; Chauhan, Ganesh; Stein, Jason L.; Hofer, Edith; Renteria, Miguel E.; Bis, Joshua C; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Ikram, M. Kamran; Desrivières, Sylvane; Vernooij, Meike W; Abramovic, Lucija; Alhusaini, Saud; Amin, Najaf

    2017-01-01

    International audience; The hippocampal formation is a brain structure integrally involved in episodic memory, spatial navigation, cognition and stress responsiveness. Structural abnormalities in hippocampal volume and shape are found in several common neuropsychiatric disorders. To identify the genetic underpinnings of hippocampal structure here we perform a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 33,536 individuals and discover six independent loci significantly associated with hippocampal ...

  14. Characterization of microsatellite loci isolated in trumpeter swan (Cygnus buccinator)

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, J. St; Ransler, F.A.; Quinn, T.W.; Oyler-McCance, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    Primers for 16 microsatellite loci were developed for the trumpeter swan (Cygnus buccinator), a species recovering from a recent population bottleneck. In a screen of 158 individuals, the 16 loci were found to have levels of variability ranging from two to seven alleles. No loci were found to be linked, although two loci repeatedly revealed significant departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Amplification in the closely related tundra swan (Cygnus columbianus) was successful for all except one locus. These microsatellite loci will be applicable for population genetic analyses and ultimately aid in management efforts. ?? 2006 The Authors.

  15. Screening of duplicated loci reveals hidden divergence patterns in a complex salmonid genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limborg, Morten T.; Larson, Wesley; Seeb, Lisa W.; Seeb, James E.

    2017-01-01

    A whole-genome duplication (WGD) doubles the entire genomic content of a species and is thought to have catalysed adaptive radiation in some polyploid-origin lineages. However, little is known about general consequences of a WGD because gene duplicates (i.e., paralogs) are commonly filtered in genomic studies; such filtering may remove substantial portions of the genome in data sets from polyploid-origin species. We demonstrate a new method that enables genome-wide scans for signatures of selection at both nonduplicated and duplicated loci by taking locus-specific copy number into account. We apply this method to RAD sequence data from different ecotypes of a polyploid-origin salmonid (Oncorhynchus nerka) and reveal signatures of divergent selection that would have been missed if duplicated loci were filtered. We also find conserved signatures of elevated divergence at pairs of homeologous chromosomes with residual tetrasomic inheritance, suggesting that joint evolution of some nondiverged gene duplicates may affect the adaptive potential of these genes. These findings illustrate that including duplicated loci in genomic analyses enables novel insights into the evolutionary consequences of WGDs and local segmental gene duplications.

  16. Thirty new loci for age at menarche identified by a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elks, Cathy E; Perry, John R B; Sulem, Patrick; Chasman, Daniel I; Franceschini, Nora; He, Chunyan; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Visser, Jenny A; Byrne, Enda M; Cousminer, Diana L; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Esko, Tõnu; Feenstra, Bjarke; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Koller, Daniel L; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lin, Peng; Mangino, Massimo; Marongiu, Mara; McArdle, Patrick F; Smith, Albert V; Stolk, Lisette; van Wingerden, Sophie H; Zhao, Jing Hua; Albrecht, Eva; Corre, Tanguy; Ingelsson, Erik; Hayward, Caroline; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Smith, Erin N; Ulivi, Shelia; Warrington, Nicole M; Zgaga, Lina; Alavere, Helen; Amin, Najaf; Aspelund, Thor; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barroso, Inês; Berenson, Gerald S; Bergmann, Sven; Blackburn, Hannah; Boerwinkle, Eric; Buring, Julie E; Busonero, Fabio; Campbell, Harry; Chanock, Stephen J; Chen, Wei; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Couper, David; Coviello, Andrea D; d'Adamo, Pio; de Faire, Ulf; de Geus, Eco J C; Deloukas, Panos; Döring, Angela; Smith, George Davey; Easton, Douglas F; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Emilsson, Valur; Eriksson, Johan; Ferrucci, Luigi; Folsom, Aaron R; Foroud, Tatiana; Garcia, Melissa; Gasparini, Paolo; Geller, Frank; Gieger, Christian; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hall, Per; Hankinson, Susan E; Ferreli, Liana; Heath, Andrew C; Hernandez, Dena G; Hofman, Albert; Hu, Frank B; Illig, Thomas; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Johnson, Andrew D; Karasik, David; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kiel, Douglas P; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Kolcic, Ivana; Kraft, Peter; Launer, Lenore J; Laven, Joop S E; Li, Shengxu; Liu, Jianjun; Levy, Daniel; Martin, Nicholas G; McArdle, Wendy L; Melbye, Mads; Mooser, Vincent; Murray, Jeffrey C; Murray, Sarah S; Nalls, Michael A; Navarro, Pau; Nelis, Mari; Ness, Andrew R; Northstone, Kate; Oostra, Ben A; Peacock, Munro; Palmer, Lyle J; Palotie, Aarno; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N; Pedersen, Nancy L; Peltonen, Leena; Pennell, Craig E; Pharoah, Paul; Polasek, Ozren; Plump, Andrew S; Pouta, Anneli; Porcu, Eleonora; Rafnar, Thorunn; Rice, John P; Ring, Susan M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Sala, Cinzia; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Schork, Nicholas J; Scuteri, Angelo; Segrè, Ayellet V; Shuldiner, Alan R; Soranzo, Nicole; Sovio, Ulla; Srinivasan, Sathanur R; Strachan, David P; Tammesoo, Mar-Liis; Tikkanen, Emmi; Toniolo, Daniela; Tsui, Kim; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Tyrer, Jonathon; Uda, Manuela; van Dam, Rob M; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Wareham, Nicholas J; Waterworth, Dawn M; Weedon, Michael N; Wichmann, H Erich; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Young, Lauren; Zhai, Guangju; Zhuang, Wei Vivian; Bierut, Laura J; Boomsma, Dorret I; Boyd, Heather A; Crisponi, Laura; Demerath, Ellen W; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Econs, Michael J; Harris, Tamara B; Hunter, David J; Loos, Ruth J F; Metspalu, Andres; Montgomery, Grant W; Ridker, Paul M; Spector, Tim D; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Stefansson, Kari; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Uitterlinden, André G; Widen, Elisabeth; Murabito, Joanne M; Ong, Ken K; Murray, Anna

    2010-12-01

    To identify loci for age at menarche, we performed a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies in 87,802 women of European descent, with replication in up to 14,731 women. In addition to the known loci at LIN28B (P = 5.4 × 10⁻⁶⁰) and 9q31.2 (P = 2.2 × 10⁻³³), we identified 30 new menarche loci (all P < 5 × 10⁻⁸) and found suggestive evidence for a further 10 loci (P < 1.9 × 10⁻⁶). The new loci included four previously associated with body mass index (in or near FTO, SEC16B, TRA2B and TMEM18), three in or near other genes implicated in energy homeostasis (BSX, CRTC1 and MCHR2) and three in or near genes implicated in hormonal regulation (INHBA, PCSK2 and RXRG). Ingenuity and gene-set enrichment pathway analyses identified coenzyme A and fatty acid biosynthesis as biological processes related to menarche timing.

  17. Genome-wide Association Study Identifies New Loci for Resistance to Sclerotinia Stem Rot in Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian; Zhao, Qing; Liu, Sheng; Shahid, Muhammad; Lan, Lei; Cai, Guangqin; Zhang, Chunyu; Fan, Chuchuan; Wang, Youping; Zhou, Yongming

    2016-01-01

    Sclerotinia stem rot (SSR) caused by the necrotrophic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is a major disease in rapeseed (Brassica napus) worldwide. Breeding for SSR resistance in B. napus, as in other crops, relies only on germplasms with quantitative resistance genes. A better understanding of the genetic basis for SSR resistance in B. napus thus holds promise for the genetic improvement of disease resistance. In the present study, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for SSR resistance in B. napus were performed using an association panel of 448 accessions genotyped with the Brassica 60K Infinium® single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. A total of 26 SNPs corresponding to three loci, DSRC4, DSRC6, and DSRC8 were associated with SSR resistance. Haplotype analysis showed that the three favorable alleles for SSR resistance exhibited cumulative effects. After aligning SSR resistance quantitative trait loci (QTL) identified in the present and previous studies to the B. napus reference genome, one locus (DSRC6) was found to be located within the confidence interval of a QTL identified in previous QTL mapping studies and another two loci (DSRC4 and DSRC8) were considered novel loci for SSR resistance. A total of 39 candidate genes were predicted for the three loci based on the GWAS combining with the differentially expressed genes identified in previous transcriptomics analyses.

  18. Genome-wide association study identifies new loci for resistance to Sclerotinia stem rot in Brassica napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sclerotinia stem rot (SSR caused by the necrotrophic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is a major disease in rapeseed (Brassica napus worldwide. Breeding for SSR resistance in B. napus, as in other crops, relies only on germplasms with quantitative resistance genes. A better understanding of the genetic basis for SSR resistance in B. napus thus holds promise for the genetic improvement of disease resistance. In the present study, a genome-wide association study (GWAS for SSR resistance in B. napus were performed using an association panel of 448 accessions genotyped with the Brassica 60K Infinium® single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array. A total of 26 SNPs corresponding to 3 loci, DSRC4, DSRC6 and DSRC8 were associated with SSR resistance. Haplotype analysis showed that the 3 favourable alleles for SSR resistance exhibited cumulative effects. After aligning SSR resistance quantitative trait loci (QTL identified in the present and previous studies to the B. napus reference genome, one locus (DSRC6 was found to be located within the confidence interval of a QTL identified in previous QTL mapping studies and another two loci (DSRC4 and DSRC8 were considered novel loci for SSR resistance. A total of 39 candidate genes were predicted for the 3 loci based on the GWAS combining with the differentially expressed genes identified in previous transcriptomics analyses.

  19. Allozyme frequency distribution patterns at two gene loci of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Allele frequencies for PGM1*-1, PGM2*-1 and FH1*-1 were highest in the deciduous forest zone. The alleles PGM1*-2, PGM2*-2 and FH1*-2 were highest in the Guinea savanna zone, while the highest frequencies for alleles PGM1*-3, PGM2*-3, PGM2*-4 and FH1*-3 occurred in the Sudan savanna zone. Alleles PGM2*-3 ...

  20. Uncovering novel loci for mesocotyl elongation and shoot length in indica rice through genome-wide association mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qing; Zhang, Mengchen; Niu, Xiaojun; Wang, Caihong; Xu, Qun; Feng, Yue; Wang, Shan; Yuan, Xiaoping; Yu, Hanyong; Wang, Yiping; Wei, Xinghua

    2016-03-01

    Totally, 23 loci were detected, and 383 candidate genes were identified, and four of these candidate genes, Os01g0392100, Os04g0630000, Os01g0904700 and Os07g0615000, were regarded as promising targets. Direct-seeding cultivation is becoming popular in rice (Oryza sativa L.)-planting countries because it is labor- and time-efficient. However, low seedling establishment and slow seedling emergence have restricted the application and popularity of the technique. Mesocotyl elongation and shoot length are two important traits that can enhance rice seedling emergence. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is a genome sequence variation caused by a single base within a population, and SNPs evenly distributed throughout the genomes of plant species. In this study, a genome-wide association study (GWAS), based on 4136 SNPs, was performed using a compressed mixed linear model that accounted for population structure and relative kinship to detect novel loci for the two traits. Totally, 23 loci were identified, including five loci located known QTLs region. For the mesocotyl elongation, 17 major loci were identified, explaining ~19.31 % of the phenotypic variation. For the shoot length, six major loci were detected, explaining ~ 39.79 % of the phenotypic variation. In total, 383 candidate genes were included in a 200-kb genomic region (± 100 kb of each locus). Additionally, 32 SNPs were identified in 30 candidate genes. Relative expression level analyses indicated that four candidate genes containing SNP variations, Os01g0392100, Os04g0630000, Os01g0904700 and Os07g0615000, represented promising targets. Finally, eight elite accessions with long mesocotyl and shoot lengths were chosen as breeding donors for further rice direct-seeding variety modifications.

  1. OS046. Genome-wide association scans identify novel maternalsusceptibility loci for preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M; Brennecke, S; Iversen, A-C; East, C; Olsen, G; Kent, J; Dyer, T; Said, J; Roten, L; Abraham, L; Zwart, J-A; Winsvold, B; Håberg, A; Huentelman, M; Krokan, H; Gabrielsen, M; Austgulen, R; Blangero, J; Moses, E

    2012-07-01

    We have successfully utilized a family-based study design to localize several positional candidate preeclampsia susceptibility genes to chromosomes 2q22(ACVR2A,LCT,LRP1B,RND3,GCA),5q (ERAP2) and 13q(TNFSF13B). We now report on our continued positional cloning efforts using an alternative genome-wide association (GWA) mapping strategy in large Caucasian case-control cohorts from Australia and Norway. To identify maternal genetic risk loci for preeclampsia. The unrelated Australian samples (545 cases,547 controls) were genotyped using Illumina BeadChip technology (700K loci) and have been analyzed using PLINK. All unrelated Norwegian samples were genotyped across several Illumina BeadChip substrates and consist of 847 cases (700K loci) and 638 controls. The Norwegian control samples originate from other HUNT studies pertaining to migraine (n=95,700K loci), lung cancer (n=89,370K loci) and normal brain pathology (n=454,2.5M loci). To analyze a concordant set of 2.5-3 million genotypes across all Norwegian samples we are currently using MaCH to impute those loci not directly genotyped. The Norwegian GWA data will be analyzed in SOLAR utilizing empirical kinship estimates to account for any distant relatedness. 1078 Australian samples (538 cases,540 controls) and 648, 175 SNPs passed our quality control metrics. Two SNP associations (rs7579169,p=3.6×10(-7); rs12711941,p=4.3×10(-7)) satisfied our genome-wide significant threshold (p1.56) and are in strong linkage disequilibrium with each other (r(2)>0.9) but not with any other genotyped SNP ±200kb. The analysis of the Norwegian GWAS is underway. The Australian GWAS has identified a novel preeclampsia risk locus on chromosome 2q. The INHBB gene closest to our SNP associations is a plausible positional candidate susceptibility gene. There is a substantive body of evidence implicating inhibins, activins and other members of the TGF-βsuperfamily to have a role in the development of preeclampsia. The biological connection

  2. Genetic evidence of multiple loci in dystocia - difficult labour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westgren Magnus

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dystocia, difficult labour, is a common but also complex problem during childbirth. It can be attributed to either weak contractions of the uterus, a large infant, reduced capacity of the pelvis or combinations of these. Previous studies have indicated that there is a genetic component in the susceptibility of experiencing dystocia. The purpose of this study was to identify susceptibility genes in dystocia. Methods A total of 104 women in 47 families were included where at least two sisters had undergone caesarean section at a gestational length of 286 days or more at their first delivery. Study of medical records and a telephone interview was performed to identify subjects with dystocia. Whole-genome scanning using Affymetrix genotyping-arrays and non-parametric linkage (NPL analysis was made in 39 women exhibiting the phenotype of dystocia from 19 families. In 68 women re-sequencing was performed of candidate genes showing suggestive linkage: oxytocin (OXT on chromosome 20 and oxytocin-receptor (OXTR on chromosome 3. Results We found a trend towards linkage with suggestive NPL-score (3.15 on chromosome 12p12. Suggestive linkage peaks were observed on chromosomes 3, 4, 6, 10, 20. Re-sequencing of OXT and OXTR did not reveal any causal variants. Conclusions Dystocia is likely to have a genetic component with variations in multiple genes affecting the patient outcome. We found 6 loci that could be re-evaluated in larger patient cohorts.

  3. Selection of reference genes for quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in concanavalin A-induced hepatitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Guojun; Zhang, Zhijian; Feng, Dechun; Xu, Yan; Lu, Yan; Wang, Jiqiu; Jiang, Jingjing; Zhang, Zhiguo; Li, Xiaoying; Ning, Guang

    2010-06-01

    Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) has become an indispensable technique for accurate determination of gene expression in various samples. In mice, intravenous injection of concanavalin A (ConA) leads to acute hepatitis and liver injury. Functional studies based on this model have provided insights for understanding the mechanisms of liver injury. However, no data have been reported to validate reference genes during the progression of ConA-induced hepatitis (CIH). In this study, IkappaBalpha and C/EBPbeta messenger RNA (mRNA) levels were examined using Q-PCR with ACTB as the reference gene after ConA injection. However, we got inconsistent results with previous reports determining IkappaBalpha and C/EBPbeta mRNA expression levels. The results indicate the necessity for stability analysis of candidate reference genes in the CIH model. geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper software analysis indicates that ACTB is the most unstable gene during CIH progression among the 10 reference genes tested, whereas RPLP0 or HPRT1 is the most stable one. This study demonstrates that some of the commonly used reference genes are inadequate for normalization of Q-PCR data due to their expression instability. Furthermore, this study validates HPRT1 and RPLP0 as appropriate reference genes for Q-PCR analysis in the CIH model. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Multi-ethnic genome-wide association study of 21,000 cases and 95,000 controls identifies new risk loci for atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waage, Johannes; Baurecht, Hansjörg; Hotze, Melanie; Strachan, David P; Curtin, John A; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Tian, Chao; Takahashi, Atsushi; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Thyssen, Jacob P; den Dekker, Herman T; Ferreira, Manuel A; Altmaier, Elisabeth; Sleiman, Patrick MA; Xiao, Feng Li; Gonzalez, Juan R; Marenholz, Ingo; Kalb, Birgit; Yanes, Maria Pino; Xu, Cheng-Jian; Carstensen, Lisbeth; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M; Venturini, Cristina; Pennell, Craig E; Barton, Sheila J; Levin, Albert M; Curjuric, Ivan; Bustamante, Mariona; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Lockett, Gabrielle A; Bacelis, Jonas; Bunyavanich, Supinda; Myers, Rachel A; Matanovic, Anja; Kumar, Ashish; Tung, Joyce Y; Hirota, Tomomitsu; Kubo, Michiaki; McArdle, Wendy L; Henderson, A J; Kemp, John P; Zheng, Jie; Smith, George Davey; Rüschendorf, Franz; Bauerfeind, Anja; Lee-Kirsch, Min Ae; Arnold, Andreas; Homuth, Georg; Schmidt, Carsten O; Mangold, Elisabeth; Cichon, Sven; Keil, Thomas; Rodríguez, Elke; Peters, Annette; Franke, Andre; Lieb, Wolfgang; Novak, Natalija; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Horikoshi, Momoko; Pekkanen, Juha; Sebert, Sylvain; Husemoen, Lise L; Grarup, Niels; de Jongste, Johan C; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Jaddoe, Vincent WV; Pasmans, Suzanne GMA; Elbert, Niels J; Uitterlinden, André G; Marks, Guy B; Thompson, Philip J; Matheson, Melanie C; Robertson, Colin F; Ried, Janina S; Li, Jin; Zuo, Xian Bo; Zheng, Xiao Dong; Yin, Xian Yong; Sun, Liang Dan; McAleer, Maeve A; O'Regan, Grainne M; Fahy, Caoimhe MR; Campbell, Linda E; Macek, Milan; Kurek, Michael; Hu, Donglei; Eng, Celeste; Postma, Dirkje S; Feenstra, Bjarke; Geller, Frank; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Middeldorp, Christel M; Hysi, Pirro; Bataille, Veronique; Spector, Tim; Tiesler, Carla MT; Thiering, Elisabeth; Pahukasahasram, Badri; Yang, James J; Imboden, Medea; Huntsman, Scott; Vilor-Tejedor, Natàlia; Relton, Caroline L; Myhre, Ronny; Nystad, Wenche; Custovic, Adnan; Weiss, Scott T; Meyers, Deborah A; Söderhäll, Cilla; Melén, Erik; Ober, Carole; Raby, Benjamin A; Simpson, Angela; Jacobsson, Bo; Holloway, John W; Bisgaard, Hans; Sunyer, Jordi; Hensch, Nicole M Probst; Williams, L Keoki; Godfrey, Keith M; Wang, Carol A; Boomsma, Dorret I; Melbye, Mads; Koppelman, Gerard H; Jarvis, Deborah; McLean, WH Irwin; Irvine, Alan D; Zhang, Xue Jun; Hakonarson, Hakon; Gieger, Christian; Burchard, Esteban G; Martin, Nicholas G; Duijts, Liesbeth; Linneberg, Allan; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Noethen, Markus M; Lau, Susanne; Hübner, Norbert; Lee, Young-Ae; Tamari, Mayumi; Hinds, David A; Glass, Daniel; Brown, Sara J; Heinrich, Joachim; Evans, David M; Weidinger, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Genetic association studies have identified 21 loci associated with atopic dermatitis risk predominantly in populations of European ancestry. To identify further susceptibility loci for this common complex skin disease, we performed a meta-analysis of >15 million genetic variants in 21,399 cases and 95,464 controls from populations of European, African, Japanese and Latino ancestry, followed by replication in 32,059 cases and 228,628 controls from 18 studies. We identified 10 novel risk loci, bringing the total number of known atopic dermatitis risk loci to 31 (with novel secondary signals at 4 of these). Notably, the new loci include candidate genes with roles in regulation of innate host defenses and T-cell function, underscoring the important contribution of (auto-)immune mechanisms to atopic dermatitis pathogenesis. PMID:26482879

  5. Polymorphism at expressed DQ and DR loci in five common equine MHC haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Donald; Tallmadge, Rebecca L; Binns, Matthew; Zhu, Baoli; Mohamoud, Yasmin Ali; Ahmed, Ayeda; Brooks, Samantha A; Antczak, Douglas F

    2017-03-01

    The polymorphism of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II DQ and DR genes in five common equine leukocyte antigen (ELA) haplotypes was determined through sequencing of mRNA transcripts isolated from lymphocytes of eight ELA homozygous horses. Ten expressed MHC class II genes were detected in horses of the ELA-A3 haplotype carried by the donor horses of the equine bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library and the reference genome sequence: four DR genes and six DQ genes. The other four ELA haplotypes contained at least eight expressed polymorphic MHC class II loci. Next generation sequencing (NGS) of genomic DNA of these four MHC haplotypes revealed stop codons in the DQA3 gene in the ELA-A2, ELA-A5, and ELA-A9 haplotypes. Few NGS reads were obtained for the other MHC class II genes that were not amplified in these horses. The amino acid sequences across haplotypes contained locus-specific residues, and the locus clusters produced by phylogenetic analysis were well supported. The MHC class II alleles within the five tested haplotypes were largely non-overlapping between haplotypes. The complement of equine MHC class II DQ and DR genes appears to be well conserved between haplotypes, in contrast to the recently described variation in class I gene loci between equine MHC haplotypes. The identification of allelic series of equine MHC class II loci will aid comparative studies of mammalian MHC conservation and evolution and may also help to interpret associations between the equine MHC class II region and diseases of the horse.

  6. Characterization of Microsatellite Loci in Castilleja sessiliflora and Transferability to 24 Castilleja Species (Orobanchaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremie B. Fant

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were developed in the hemiparasitic perennial forb Castilleja sessiliflora to investigate patterns of gene flow and genetic diversity within and among populations. Methods and Results: Twelve polymorphic loci were identified in C. sessiliflora and tested on three populations (32 individuals each sampled across the range of the species. The loci amplified di- and trinucleotide repeats with 3–14 alleles per locus. To assess cross-amplification, primer pairs were also tested on 24 additional Castilleja species that represent the morphological and geographic diversity of the genus. We provide reports of their effectiveness in all 25 taxa. Conclusions: These results indicate the utility of these primers in C. sessiliflora for future studies of genetic structure and gene flow, as well as their widespread applicability in other members of the diverse and complex genus Castilleja.

  7. Evaluation of two putative susceptibility loci for oral clefts in the Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, L E; Murray, J C; O'Brien, S

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that the risk of nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL+/-P) and isolated cleft palate (CP) is influenced by genetic variation at several loci and that the relation between specific genetic variants and disease risk may be modified by environmental factors....... The present study evaluated potential associations between CL+/-P and CP and two putative clefting susceptibility loci, MSX1 and TGFB3, using data from a nationwide case-control study conducted in Denmark from 1991 to 1994. The potential effects of interactions between these genes and two common environmental...... exposures, first trimester exposure to maternal cigarette smoke and alcohol intake, were also examined. Analyses of these data provide evidence of an association between the risk of CP and variation at the TGFB3 locus. However, there is no evidence that the risk of CL+/-P or CP is influenced by gene...

  8. Genetic variations among Indonesian native cattle breeds based on polymorphisms analysis in the growth hormone loci and mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUTARNO

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sutarno (2010 Genetic variations among Indonesian native cattle breeds based on polymorphisms analysis in the growth hormone loci and mitochondrial DNA. Biodiversitas 11: 1-5. Genetic variation within breeds is important and its study has become a subject of interest in livestock species, as it has many applications in animal breeding and genetics, such as the identification of animals and parentage testing, gene mapping and identifying markers for performance traits. Two loci of bovine growth hormone genes, and two regions of mitochondrial DNA, D-loop and ND-5 were characterized using polymerase chain reaction – restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP involving 120 Indonesian native cattle of Bali, Madura, PO and West Sumatra breeds. The results indicated that sequence variations were detected both in the growth hormone loci and mitochondrial DNA.

  9. CASFISH: CRISPR/Cas9-mediated in situ labeling of genomic loci in fixed cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wulan; Shi, Xinghua; Tjian, Robert; Lionnet, Timothée; Singer, Robert H

    2015-09-22

    Direct visualization of genomic loci in the 3D nucleus is important for understanding the spatial organization of the genome and its association with gene expression. Various DNA FISH methods have been developed in the past decades, all involving denaturing dsDNA and hybridizing fluorescent nucleic acid probes. Here we report a novel approach that uses in vitro constituted nuclease-deficient clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated caspase 9 (Cas9) complexes as probes to label sequence-specific genomic loci fluorescently without global DNA denaturation (Cas9-mediated fluorescence in situ hybridization, CASFISH). Using fluorescently labeled nuclease-deficient Cas9 (dCas9) protein assembled with various single-guide RNA (sgRNA), we demonstrated rapid and robust labeling of repetitive DNA elements in pericentromere, centromere, G-rich telomere, and coding gene loci. Assembling dCas9 with an array of sgRNAs tiling arbitrary target loci, we were able to visualize nonrepetitive genomic sequences. The dCas9/sgRNA binary complex is stable and binds its target DNA with high affinity, allowing sequential or simultaneous probing of multiple targets. CASFISH assays using differently colored dCas9/sgRNA complexes allow multicolor labeling of target loci in cells. In addition, the CASFISH assay is remarkably rapid under optimal conditions and is applicable for detection in primary tissue sections. This rapid, robust, less disruptive, and cost-effective technology adds a valuable tool for basic research and genetic diagnosis.

  10. Bicistronic and fused monocistronic transcripts are derived from adjacent loci in the Arabidopsis genome

    OpenAIRE

    Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Duan, Hui; Liu, Lei; Schuler, Mary A.

    2004-01-01

    Comparisons of full-length cDNAs and genomic DNAs available for Arabidopsis thaliana described here indicate that some adjacent loci are transcribed into extremely long RNAs spanning two annotated genes. Once expressed, some of these transcripts are post-transcriptionally spliced within their coding and intergenic sequences to generate bicistronic transcripts containing two complete open reading frames. Others are spliced to generate monocistronic transcripts coding for fusion proteins with s...

  11. Newly discovered breast cancer susceptibility loci on 3p24 and 17q23.2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Shahana; Thomas, Gilles; Ghoussaini, Maya

    2009-01-01

    strong evidence for additional susceptibility loci on 3p (rs4973768: per-allele OR = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.08-1.13, P = 4.1 x 10(-23)) and 17q (rs6504950: per-allele OR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.92-0.97, P = 1.4 x 10(-8)). Potential causative genes include SLC4A7 and NEK10 on 3p and COX11 on 17q....

  12. Fifteen new risk loci for coronary artery disease highlight arterial-wall-specific mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howson, Joanna M. M.; Zhao, Wei; Barnes, Daniel R

    2017-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although 58 genomic regions have been associated with CAD thus far, most of the heritability is unexplained, indicating that additional susceptibility loci await identification. An efficient discovery strategy ...... and inflammation (PROCR, rs867186 (p.Ser219Gly)) and vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation (LMOD1, rs2820315). Correlation of these regions with cell-type-specific gene expression and plasma protein levels sheds light on potential disease mechanisms....

  13. Panel of polymorphic heterologous microsatellite loci to genotype critically endangered Bengal tiger: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sudhanshu; Singh, Sujeet Kumar; Munjal, Ashok Kumar; Aspi, Jouni; Goyal, Surendra Prakash

    2014-01-03

    In India, six landscapes and source populations that are important for long-term conservation of Bengal tigers (Panthera tigris tigris) have been identified. Except for a few studies, nothing is known regarding the genetic structure and extent of gene flow among most of the tiger populations across India as the majority of them are small, fragmented and isolated. Thus, individual-based relationships are required to understand the species ecology and biology for planning effective conservation and genetics-based individual identification has been widely used. But this needs screening and describing characteristics of microsatellite loci from DNA from good-quality sources so that the required number of loci can be selected and the genotyping error rate minimized. In the studies so far conducted on the Bengal tiger, a very small number of loci (n = 35) have been tested with high-quality source of DNA, and information on locus-specific characteristics is lacking. The use of such characteristics has been strongly recommended in the literature to minimize the error rate and by the International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG) for forensic purposes. Therefore, we describe for the first time locus-specific genetic and genotyping profile characteristics, crucial for population genetic studies, using high-quality source of DNA of the Bengal tiger. We screened 39 heterologous microsatellite loci (Sumatran tiger, domestic cat, Asiatic lion and snow leopard) in captive individuals (n = 8), of which 21 loci are being reported for the first time in the Bengal tiger, providing an additional choice for selection. The mean relatedness coefficient (R = -0.143) indicates that the selected tigers were unrelated. Thirty-four loci were polymorphic, with the number of alleles ranging from 2 to 7 per locus, and the remaining five loci were monomorphic. Based on the PIC values (> 0.500), and other characteristics, we suggest that 16 loci (3 to 7 alleles) be used for genetic

  14. Genomic signatures of local directional selection in a high gene flow marine organism; the Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nielsen, Einar E; Hemmer-Hansen, Jakob; Poulsen, Nina A; Loeschcke, Volker; Moen, Thomas; Johansen, Torild; Mittelholzer, Christian; Taranger, Geir-Lasse; Ogden, Rob; Carvalho, Gary R

    2009-01-01

    .... Our global genome scan analysis identified eight outlier gene loci with very high statistical support, likely to be subject to directional selection in local demes, or closely linked to loci under selection...

  15. Selection of suitable reference genes for normalization of quantitative RT-PCR in peripheral blood samples of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, I-Hua; Chou, Lien-Siang; Chou, Shih-Jen; Wang, Jiann-Hsiung; Stott, Jeffrey; Blanchard, Myra; Jen, I-Fan; Yang, Wei-Cheng

    2015-10-21

    Quantitative RT-PCR is often used as a research tool directed at gene transcription. Selection of optimal housekeeping genes (HKGs) as reference genes is critical to establishing sensitive and reproducible qRT-PCR-based assays. The current study was designed to identify the appropriate reference genes in blood leukocytes of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) for gene transcription research. Seventy-five blood samples collected from 7 bottlenose dolphins were used to analyze 15 candidate HKGs (ACTB, B2M, GAPDH, HPRT1, LDHB, PGK1, RPL4, RPL8, RPL18, RPS9, RPS18, TFRC, YWHAZ, LDHA, SDHA). HKG stability in qRT-PCR was determined using geNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper and comparative delta Ct algorithms. Utilization of RefFinder, which combined all 4 algorithms, suggested that PGK1, HPRT1 and RPL4 were the most stable HKGs in bottlenose dolphin blood. Gene transcription perturbations in blood can serve as an indication of health status in cetaceans as it occurs prior to alterations in hematology and chemistry. This study identified HKGs that could be used in gene transcript studies, which may contribute to further mRNA relative quantification research in the peripheral blood leukocytes in captive cetaceans.

  16. Binding of doa kinase to specific loci in polytene chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kováciková, Michaela; Raska, Ivan; Mateásik, Anton; Chase, Bruce A; Farkas, Robert

    2006-03-01

    Highly conserved LAMMER kinases belong to the family of dual-specific proteins phosphorylating enzymes with homologues in yeast, plants, Drosophila and mammals. SR proteins, several members of which are components of the spliceosomal complex and have been implicated in the control of alternative splicing, were identified among first targets of LAMMER kinases. The Drosophila locus Darkener of apricot (Doa) encodes best known representative of the LAMMER family of kinases, which is essential for embryonic and postembryonic development, neurogenesis, differentiation of photoreceptors, and sex determination. DOA kinase was detected on squash preparations of polythene chromosomes using anti-DOA antibodies in combination with indirect immunofluorescence. Here we provide evidence for active chromosomal presence of DOA kinase in Drosophila salivary glands, and increased abundance of DOA at eleven specific loci of polythene chromosomes where it can be involved in on-site control of splicing process. Many genes that may be found at the loci with increased abundance fall into three major groups based on their known functions. First group contains genes that code for transcription factors, RNA-binding proteins or chromatin modifying enzymes. Second group of genes encode proteins which belong to proteasomal components, lipid enzymes, stress-sensitive ER proteins and caspases which are all early/proximal components of apoptotic process. Third group of genes comprises of tRNA coding genes or genes of tRNA synthases (ligases), all involved in protein synthesis. Some of the encoded protein products are confirmed or potential substrates of DOA kinase activity. Data indicate that genes encoding proteins involved in closely related pathways are concentrated at certain loci to achieve more efficient regulation of their expression as exemplified from distribution of DOA protein on Drosophila polythene chromosomes.

  17. Variation in the complex carbohydrate biosynthesis loci of Acinetobacter baumannii genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna J Kenyon

    Full Text Available Extracellular polysaccharides are major immunogenic components of the bacterial cell envelope. However, little is known about their biosynthesis in the genus Acinetobacter, which includes A. baumannii, an important nosocomial pathogen. Whether Acinetobacter sp. produce a capsule or a lipopolysaccharide carrying an O antigen or both is not resolved. To explore these issues, genes involved in the synthesis of complex polysaccharides were located in 10 complete A. baumannii genome sequences, and the function of each of their products was predicted via comparison to enzymes with a known function. The absence of a gene encoding a WaaL ligase, required to link the carbohydrate polymer to the lipid A-core oligosaccharide (lipooligosaccharide forming lipopolysaccharide, suggests that only a capsule is produced. Nine distinct arrangements of a large capsule biosynthesis locus, designated KL1 to KL9, were found in the genomes. Three forms of a second, smaller variable locus, likely to be required for synthesis of the outer core of the lipid A-core moiety, were designated OCL1 to OCL3 and also annotated. Each K locus includes genes for capsule export as well as genes for synthesis of activated sugar precursors, and for glycosyltransfer, glycan modification and oligosaccharide repeat-unit processing. The K loci all include the export genes at one end and genes for synthesis of common sugar precursors at the other, with a highly variable region that includes the remaining genes in between. Five different capsule loci, KL2, KL6, KL7, KL8 and KL9 were detected in multiply antibiotic resistant isolates belonging to global clone 2, and two other loci, KL1 and KL4, in global clone 1. This indicates that this region is being substituted repeatedly in multiply antibiotic resistant isolates from these clones.

  18. Isolation and Characterization of Microsatellite Loci in the Chinese Cobra Naja atra (Elapidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Ji

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We characterize thirteen polymorphic microsatellite loci isolated from Naja atra genomic libraries, which were enriched for AC-motif microsatellites. The thirteen loci were screened on a group of 48 individuals from two populations, one in Yong’an and the other in Ganzhou. These markers revealed a relatively high degree of genetic diversity (4–12 alleles per locus and heterozygosity (Ho ranged from 0.213–0.854 and He ranged from 0.301–0.838. Tests for departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and for linkage disequilibrium were conducted for each of the two populations separately. After sequential Bonferroni correction, none of the 13 loci showed significant departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Hierarchical analysis of molecular variance indicated that a small but significant (P < 0.001 proportion (16.0% of the total variation in the microsatellite DNA data were attributable to differences among populations, indicating geographical structuring and restricted gene flow. It could be attributable to the Wuyi mountains in the area having a sufficiently isolating effect to significantly reduce gene flow. Our microsatellite data also showed a low Nm (1.31 value in the two populations from mainland China. Thus, the Yong’an and Ganzhou populations could be treated as distinct evolutionarily significant units (ESUs. The high level of polymorphism revealed by these microsatellite markers will be useful for the study of gene flow, population structure and evolutionary history of N. atra.

  19. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in the Chinese Cobra Naja atra (Elapidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Long-Hui; Mao, Lu-Xi; Luo, Xia; Qu, Yan-Fu; Ji, Xiang

    2011-01-01

    We characterize thirteen polymorphic microsatellite loci isolated from Naja atra genomic libraries, which were enriched for AC-motif microsatellites. The thirteen loci were screened on a group of 48 individuals from two populations, one in Yong'an and the other in Ganzhou. These markers revealed a relatively high degree of genetic diversity (4-12 alleles per locus) and heterozygosity (Ho ranged from 0.213-0.854 and He ranged from 0.301-0.838). Tests for departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and for linkage disequilibrium were conducted for each of the two populations separately. After sequential Bonferroni correction, none of the 13 loci showed significant departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Hierarchical analysis of molecular variance indicated that a small but significant (P < 0.001) proportion (16.0%) of the total variation in the microsatellite DNA data were attributable to differences among populations, indicating geographical structuring and restricted gene flow. It could be attributable to the Wuyi mountains in the area having a sufficiently isolating effect to significantly reduce gene flow. Our microsatellite data also showed a low N(m) (1.31) value in the two populations from mainland China. Thus, the Yong'an and Ganzhou populations could be treated as distinct evolutionarily significant units (ESUs). The high level of polymorphism revealed by these microsatellite markers will be useful for the study of gene flow, population structure and evolutionary history of N. atra.

  20. Six quantitative trait loci influence task thresholds for hygienic behaviour in honeybees (Apis mellifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxley, Peter R; Spivak, Marla; Oldroyd, Benjamin P

    2010-04-01

    Honeybee hygienic behaviour provides colonies with protection from many pathogens and is an important model system of the genetics of a complex behaviour. It is a textbook example of complex behaviour under simple genetic control: hygienic behaviour consists of two components--uncapping a diseased brood cell, followed by removal of the contents--each of which are thought to be modulated independently by a few loci of medium to large effect. A worker's genetic propensity to engage in hygienic tasks affects the intensity of the stimulus required before she initiates the behaviour. Genetic diversity within colonies leads to task specialization among workers, with a minority of workers performing the majority of nest-cleaning tasks. We identify three quantitative trait loci that influence the likelihood that workers will engage in hygienic behaviour and account for up to 30% of the phenotypic variability in hygienic behaviour in our population. Furthermore, we identify two loci that influence the likelihood that a worker will perform uncapping behaviour only, and one locus that influences removal behaviour. We report the first candidate genes associated with engaging in hygienic behaviour, including four genes involved in olfaction, learning and social behaviour, and one gene involved in circadian locomotion. These candidates will allow molecular characterization of this distinctive behavioural mode of disease resistance, as well as providing the opportunity for marker-assisted selection for this commercially significant trait.

  1. A novel eQTL-based analysis reveals the biology of breast cancer risk loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiyuan; Seo, Ji-Heui; Stranger, Barbara; McKenna, Aaron; Pe'er, Itsik; LaFramboise, Thomas; Brown, Myles; Tyekucheva, Svitlana; Freedman, Matthew L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Germline determinants of gene expression in tumors are less studied due to the complexity of transcript regulation caused by somatically acquired alterations. We performed expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) based analyses using the multi-level information provided in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Of the factors we measured, cis-acting eQTL saccounted for 1.2% of the total variation of tumor gene expression, while somatic copy number alteration and CpG methylation accounted for 7.3% and 3.3%, respectively. eQTL analyses of 15 previously reported breast cancer risk loci resulted in discovery of three variants that are significantly associated with transcript levels (FDR<0.1). In a novel trans- based analysis, an additional three risk loci were identified to act through ESR1, MYC, and KLF4. These findings provide a more comprehensive picture of gene expression determinants in breast cancer as well as insights into the underlying biology of breast cancer risk loci. PMID:23374354

  2. Chromatin condensation of Xist genomic loci during oogenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Atsushi; Mitani, Atsushi; Miyashita, Toshiyuki; Umezawa, Akihiro; Akutsu, Hidenori

    2015-12-01

    Repression of maternal Xist (Xm-Xist) during preimplantation in mouse embryos is essential for establishing imprinted X chromosome inactivation. Nuclear transplantation (NT) studies using nuclei derived from non-growing (ng) and full-grown (fg) oocytes have indicated that maternal-specific repressive modifications are imposed on Xm-Xist during oogenesis, as well as on autosomal imprinted genes. Recent studies have revealed that histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) enrichments on Xm-Xist promoter regions are involved in silencing at the preimplantation stages. However, whether H3K9me3 is imposed on Xm-Xist during oogenesis is not known. Here, we dissected the chromatin states in ng and fg oocytes and early preimplantation stage embryos. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments against H3K9me3 revealed that there was no significant enrichment within the Xm-Xist region during oogenesis. However, NT embryos with ng nuclei (ngNT) showed extensive Xm-Xist derepression and H3K9me3 hypomethylation of the promoter region at the 4-cell stage, which corresponds to the onset of paternal Xist expression. We also found that the chromatin state at the Xist genomic locus became markedly condensed as oocyte growth proceeded. Although the condensed Xm-Xist genomic locus relaxed during early preimplantation phases, the extent of the relaxation across Xm-Xist loci derived from normally developed oocytes was significantly smaller than those of paternal-Xist and ngNT-Xist genomic loci. Furthermore, Xm-Xist from 2-cell metaphase nuclei became derepressed following NT. We propose that chromatin condensation is associated with imprinted Xist repression and that skipping of the condensation step by NT leads to Xist activation during the early preimplantation phase. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. New genetic loci link adipose and insulin biology to body fat distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shungin, Dmitry; Winkler, Thomas W; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C; Ferreira, Teresa; Locke, Adam E; Mägi, Reedik; Strawbridge, Rona J; Pers, Tune H; Fischer, Krista; Justice, Anne E; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Wu, Joseph M W; Buchkovich, Martin L; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Roman, Tamara S; Drong, Alexander W; Song, Ci; Gustafsson, Stefan; Day, Felix R; Esko, Tonu; Fall, Tove; Kutalik, Zoltán; Luan, Jian'an; Randall, Joshua C; Scherag, André; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wood, Andrew R; Chen, Jin; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Karjalainen, Juha; Kahali, Bratati; Liu, Ching-Ti; Schmidt, Ellen M; Absher, Devin; Amin, Najaf; Anderson, Denise; Beekman, Marian; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Buyske, Steven; Demirkan, Ayse; Ehret, Georg B; Feitosa, Mary F; Goel, Anuj; Jackson, Anne U; Johnson, Toby; Kleber, Marcus E; Kristiansson, Kati; Mangino, Massimo; Leach, Irene Mateo; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Palmer, Cameron D; Pasko, Dorota; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Peters, Marjolein J; Prokopenko, Inga; Stančáková, Alena; Sung, Yun Ju; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Yengo, Loïc; Zhang, Weihua; Albrecht, Eva; Ärnlöv, Johan; Arscott, Gillian M; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barrett, Amy; Bellis, Claire; Bennett, Amanda J; Berne, Christian; Blüher, Matthias; Böhringer, Stefan; Bonnet, Fabrice; Böttcher, Yvonne; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Carba, Delia B; Caspersen, Ida H; Clarke, Robert; Daw, E Warwick; Deelen, Joris; Deelman, Ewa; Delgado, Graciela; Doney, Alex Sf; Eklund, Niina; Erdos, Michael R; Estrada, Karol; Eury, Elodie; Friedrich, Nele; Garcia, Melissa E; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Gigante, Bruna; Go, Alan S; Golay, Alain; Grallert, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B; Gräßler, Jürgen; Grewal, Jagvir; Groves, Christopher J; Haller, Toomas; Hallmans, Goran; Hartman, Catharina A; Hassinen, Maija; Hayward, Caroline; Heikkilä, Kauko; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Helmer, Quinta; Hillege, Hans L; Holmen, Oddgeir; Hunt, Steven C; Isaacs, Aaron; Ittermann, Till; James, Alan L; Johansson, Ingegerd; Juliusdottir, Thorhildur; Kalafati, Ioanna-Panagiota; Kinnunen, Leena; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kooner, Ishminder K; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Lamina, Claudia; Leander, Karin; Lee, Nanette R; Lichtner, Peter; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Lobbens, Stéphane; Lorentzon, Mattias; Mach, François; Magnusson, Patrik Ke; Mahajan, Anubha; McArdle, Wendy L; Menni, Cristina; Merger, Sigrun; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Mills, Rebecca; Moayyeri, Alireza; Monda, Keri L; Mooijaart, Simon P; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Mulas, Antonella; Müller, Gabriele; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Nalls, Michael A; Narisu, Narisu; Glorioso, Nicola; Nolte, Ilja M; Olden, Matthias; Rayner, Nigel W; Renstrom, Frida; Ried, Janina S; Robertson, Neil R; Rose, Lynda M; Sanna, Serena; Scharnagl, Hubert; Scholtens, Salome; Sennblad, Bengt; Seufferlein, Thomas; Sitlani, Colleen M; Smith, Albert Vernon; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stringham, Heather M; Sundström, Johan; Swertz, Morris A; Swift, Amy J; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tayo, Bamidele O; Thorand, Barbara; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Troffa, Chiara; van Oort, Floor Va; Verweij, Niek; Vonk, Judith M; Waite, Lindsay L; Wennauer, Roman; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wojczynski, Mary K; Wong, Andrew; Zhang, Qunyuan; Zhao, Jing Hua; Brennan, Eoin P; Choi, Murim; Eriksson, Per; Folkersen, Lasse; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Gharavi, Ali G; Hedman, Åsa K; Hivert, Marie-France; Huang, Jinyan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Karpe, Fredrik; Keildson, Sarah; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Liang, Liming; Lifton, Richard P; Ma, Baoshan; McKnight, Amy J; McPherson, Ruth; Metspalu, Andres; Min, Josine L; Moffatt, Miriam F; Montgomery, Grant W; Murabito, Joanne M; Nicholson, George; Nyholt, Dale R; Olsson, Christian; Perry, John Rb; Reinmaa, Eva; Salem, Rany M; Sandholm, Niina; Schadt, Eric E; Scott, Robert A; Stolk, Lisette; Vallejo, Edgar E; Westra, Harm-Jan; Zondervan, Krina T; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Bakker, Stephan Jl; Beilby, John; Bergman, Richard N; Blangero, John; Brown, Morris J; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chines, Peter S; Claudi-Boehm, Simone; Collins, Francis S; Crawford, Dana C; Danesh, John; de Faire, Ulf; de Geus, Eco Jc; Dörr, Marcus; Erbel, Raimund; Eriksson, Johan G; Farrall, Martin; Ferrannini, Ele; Ferrières, Jean; Forouhi, Nita G; Forrester, Terrence; Franco, Oscar H; Gansevoort, Ron T; Gieger, Christian; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Haiman, Christopher A; Harris, Tamara B; Hattersley, Andrew T; Heliövaara, Markku; Hicks, Andrew A; Hingorani, Aroon D; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Humphries, Steve E; Hyppönen, Elina; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Johansen, Berit; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti M; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kee, Frank; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kooperberg, Charles; Kovacs, Peter; Kraja, Aldi T; Kumari, Meena; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lakka, Timo A; Langenberg, Claudia; Le Marchand, Loic; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Männistö, Satu; Marette, André; Matise, Tara C; McKenzie, Colin A; McKnight, Barbara; Musk, Arthur W; Möhlenkamp, Stefan; Morris, Andrew D; Nelis, Mari; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Ong, Ken K; Palmer, Lyle J; Penninx, Brenda W; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Raitakari, Olli T; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, D C; Rice, Treva K; Ridker, Paul M; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J; Saramies, Jouko; Sarzynski, Mark A; Schwarz, Peter Eh; Shuldiner, Alan R; Staessen, Jan A; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stolk, Ronald P; Strauch, Konstantin; Tönjes, Anke; Tremblay, Angelo; Tremoli, Elena; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Völker, Uwe; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Witteman, Jacqueline C; Adair, Linda S; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bouchard, Claude; Cauchi, Stéphane; Caulfield, Mark J; Chambers, John C; Chasman, Daniel I; Cooper, Richard S; Dedoussis, George; Ferrucci, Luigi; Froguel, Philippe; Grabe, Hans-Jörgen; Hamsten, Anders; Hui, Jennie; Hveem, Kristian; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kivimaki, Mika; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Liu, Yongmei; März, Winfried; Munroe, Patricia B; Njølstad, Inger; Oostra, Ben A; Palmer, Colin Na; Pedersen, Nancy L; Perola, Markus; Pérusse, Louis; Peters, Ulrike; Power, Chris; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Saaristo, Timo E; Saleheen, Danish; Sinisalo, Juha; Slagboom, P Eline; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Tim D; Stefansson, Kari; Stumvoll, Michael; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, André G; Uusitupa, Matti; van der Harst, Pim; Veronesi, Giovanni; Walker, Mark; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watkins, Hugh; Wichmann, H-Erich; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Assimes, Themistocles L; Berndt, Sonja I; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B; Deloukas, Panos; Franke, Lude; Frayling, Timothy M; Groop, Leif C; Hunter, David J; Kaplan, Robert C; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Qi, Lu; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Willer, Cristen J; Visscher, Peter M; Yang, Jian; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Zillikens, M Carola; McCarthy, Mark I; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; North, Kari E; Fox, Caroline S; Barroso, Inês; Franks, Paul W; Ingelsson, Erik; Heid, Iris M; Loos, Ruth Jf; Cupples, L Adrienne; Morris, Andrew P; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Mohlke, Karen L

    2015-02-12

    Body fat distribution is a heritable trait and a well-established predictor of adverse metabolic outcomes, independent of overall adiposity. To increase our understanding of the genetic basis of body fat distribution and its molecular links to cardiometabolic traits, here we conduct genome-wide association meta-analyses of traits related to waist and hip circumferences in up to 224,459 individuals. We identify 49 loci (33 new) associated with waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for body mass index (BMI), and an additional 19 loci newly associated with related waist and hip circumference measures (P < 5 × 10(-8)). In total, 20 of the 49 waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for BMI loci show significant sexual dimorphism, 19 of which display a stronger effect in women. The identified loci were enriched for genes expressed in adipose tissue and for putative regulatory elements in adipocytes. Pathway analyses implicated adipogenesis, angiogenesis, transcriptional regulation and insulin resistance as processes affecting fat distribution, providing insight into potential pathophysiological mechanisms.

  4. New genetic loci link adipose and insulin biology to body fat distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawbridge, Rona J; Pers, Tune H; Fischer, Krista; Justice, Anne E; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Wu, Joseph M.W.; Buchkovich, Martin L; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Roman, Tamara S; Drong, Alexander W; Song, Ci; Gustafsson, Stefan; Day, Felix R; Esko, Tonu; Fall, Tove; Kutalik, Zoltán; Luan, Jian’an; Randall, Joshua C; Scherag, André; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wood, Andrew R; Chen, Jin; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Karjalainen, Juha; Kahali, Bratati; Liu, Ching-Ti; Schmidt, Ellen M; Absher, Devin; Amin, Najaf; Anderson, Denise; Beekman, Marian; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Buyske, Steven; Demirkan, Ayse; Ehret, Georg B; Feitosa, Mary F; Goel, Anuj; Jackson, Anne U; Johnson, Toby; Kleber, Marcus E; Kristiansson, Kati; Mangino, Massimo; Leach, Irene Mateo; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Palmer, Cameron D; Pasko, Dorota; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Peters, Marjolein J; Prokopenko, Inga; Stančáková, Alena; Sung, Yun Ju; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Yengo, Loïc; Zhang, Weihua; Albrecht, Eva; Ärnlöv, Johan; Arscott, Gillian M; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barrett, Amy; Bellis, Claire; Bennett, Amanda J; Berne, Christian; Blüher, Matthias; Böhringer, Stefan; Bonnet, Fabrice; Böttcher, Yvonne; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Carba, Delia B; Caspersen, Ida H; Clarke, Robert; Daw, E Warwick; Deelen, Joris; Deelman, Ewa; Delgado, Graciela; Doney, Alex SF; Eklund, Niina; Erdos, Michael R; Estrada, Karol; Eury, Elodie; Friedrich, Nele; Garcia, Melissa E; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Gigante, Bruna; Go, Alan S; Golay, Alain; Grallert, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B; Gräßler, Jürgen; Grewal, Jagvir; Groves, Christopher J; Haller, Toomas; Hallmans, Goran; Hartman, Catharina A; Hassinen, Maija; Hayward, Caroline; Heikkilä, Kauko; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Helmer, Quinta; Hillege, Hans L; Holmen, Oddgeir; Hunt, Steven C; Isaacs, Aaron; Ittermann, Till; James, Alan L; Johansson, Ingegerd; Juliusdottir, Thorhildur; Kalafati, Ioanna-Panagiota; Kinnunen, Leena; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kooner, Ishminder K; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Lamina, Claudia; Leander, Karin; Lee, Nanette R; Lichtner, Peter; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Lobbens, Stéphane; Lorentzon, Mattias; Mach, François; Magnusson, Patrik KE; Mahajan, Anubha; McArdle, Wendy L; Menni, Cristina; Merger, Sigrun; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Mills, Rebecca; Moayyeri, Alireza; Monda, Keri L; Mooijaart, Simon P; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Mulas, Antonella; Müller, Gabriele; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Nalls, Michael A; Narisu, Narisu; Glorioso, Nicola; Nolte, Ilja M; Olden, Matthias; Rayner, Nigel W; Renstrom, Frida; Ried, Janina S; Robertson, Neil R; Rose, Lynda M; Sanna, Serena; Scharnagl, Hubert; Scholtens, Salome; Sennblad, Bengt; Seufferlein, Thomas; Sitlani, Colleen M; Smith, Albert Vernon; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stringham, Heather M; Sundström, Johan; Swertz, Morris A; Swift, Amy J; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tayo, Bamidele O; Thorand, Barbara; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Troffa, Chiara; van Oort, Floor VA; Verweij, Niek; Vonk, Judith M; Waite, Lindsay L; Wennauer, Roman; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wojczynski, Mary K; Wong, Andrew; Zhang, Qunyuan; Zhao, Jing Hua; Brennan, Eoin P.; Choi, Murim; Eriksson, Per; Folkersen, Lasse; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Gharavi, Ali G; Hedman, Åsa K; Hivert, Marie-France; Huang, Jinyan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Karpe, Fredrik; Keildson, Sarah; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Liang, Liming; Lifton, Richard P; Ma, Baoshan; McKnight, Amy J; McPherson, Ruth; Metspalu, Andres; Min, Josine L; Moffatt, Miriam F; Montgomery, Grant W; Murabito, Joanne M; Nicholson, George; Nyholt, Dale R; Olsson, Christian; Perry, John RB; Reinmaa, Eva; Salem, Rany M; Sandholm, Niina; Schadt, Eric E; Scott, Robert A; Stolk, Lisette; Vallejo, Edgar E.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Zondervan, Krina T; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Bakker, Stephan JL; Beilby, John; Bergman, Richard N; Blangero, John; Brown, Morris J; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chines, Peter S; Claudi-Boehm, Simone; Collins, Francis S; Crawford, Dana C; Danesh, John; de Faire, Ulf; de Geus, Eco JC; Dörr, Marcus; Erbel, Raimund; Eriksson, Johan G; Farrall, Martin; Ferrannini, Ele; Ferrières, Jean; Forouhi, Nita G; Forrester, Terrence; Franco, Oscar H; Gansevoort, Ron T; Gieger, Christian; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Haiman, Christopher A; Harris, Tamara B; Hattersley, Andrew T; Heliövaara, Markku; Hicks, Andrew A; Hingorani, Aroon D; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Humphries, Steve E; Hyppönen, Elina; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Johansen, Berit; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti M; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kee, Frank; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kooperberg, Charles; Kovacs, Peter; Kraja, Aldi T; Kumari, Meena; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lakka, Timo A; Langenberg, Claudia; Le Marchand, Loic; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Männistö, Satu; Marette, André; Matise, Tara C; McKenzie, Colin A; McKnight, Barbara; Musk, Arthur W; Möhlenkamp, Stefan; Morris, Andrew D; Nelis, Mari; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Ong, Ken K; Palmer, Lyle J; Penninx, Brenda W; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Raitakari, Olli T; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, DC; Rice, Treva K; Ridker, Paul M; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J; Saramies, Jouko; Sarzynski, Mark A; Schwarz, Peter EH; Shuldiner, Alan R; Staessen, Jan A; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stolk, Ronald P; Strauch, Konstantin; Tönjes, Anke; Tremblay, Angelo; Tremoli, Elena; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Völker, Uwe; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Witteman, Jacqueline C; Adair, Linda S; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bouchard, Claude; Cauchi, Stéphane; Caulfield, Mark J; Chambers, John C; Chasman, Daniel I; Cooper, Richard S; Dedoussis, George; Ferrucci, Luigi; Froguel, Philippe; Grabe, Hans-Jörgen; Hamsten, Anders; Hui, Jennie; Hveem, Kristian; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kivimaki, Mika; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Liu, Yongmei; März, Winfried; Munroe, Patricia B; Njølstad, Inger; Oostra, Ben A; Palmer, Colin NA; Pedersen, Nancy L; Perola, Markus; Pérusse, Louis; Peters, Ulrike; Power, Chris; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Saaristo, Timo E; Saleheen, Danish; Sinisalo, Juha; Slagboom, P Eline; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Tim D; Stefansson, Kari; Stumvoll, Michael; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, André G; Uusitupa, Matti; van der Harst, Pim; Veronesi, Giovanni; Walker, Mark; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watkins, Hugh; Wichmann, H-Erich; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Assimes, Themistocles L; Berndt, Sonja I; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B; Deloukas, Panos; Franke, Lude; Frayling, Timothy M; Groop, Leif C; Hunter, David J.; Kaplan, Robert C; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; Qi, Lu; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Willer, Cristen J; Visscher, Peter M; Yang, Jian; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Zillikens, M Carola; McCarthy, Mark I; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; North, Kari E; Fox, Caroline S; Barroso, Inês; Franks, Paul W; Ingelsson, Erik; Heid, Iris M; Loos, Ruth JF; Cupples, L Adrienne; Morris, Andrew P; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Mohlke, Karen L

    2014-01-01

    Body fat distribution is a heritable trait and a well-established predictor of adverse metabolic outcomes, independent of overall adiposity. To increase our understanding of the genetic basis of body fat distribution and its molecular links to cardiometabolic traits, we conducted genome-wide association meta-analyses of waist and hip circumference-related traits in up to 224,459 individuals. We identified 49 loci (33 new) associated with waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for body mass index (WHRadjBMI) and an additional 19 loci newly associated with related waist and hip circumference measures (P<5×10−8). Twenty of the 49 WHRadjBMI loci showed significant sexual dimorphism, 19 of which displayed a stronger effect in women. The identified loci were enriched for genes expressed in adipose tissue and for putative regulatory elements in adipocytes. Pathway analyses implicated adipogenesis, angiogenesis, transcriptional regulation, and insulin resistance as processes affecting fat distribution, providing insight into potential pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:25673412

  5. Sensitivity of quantitative traits to mutational effects and number of loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraiber, Joshua G; Landis, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    When models of quantitative genetic variation are built from population genetic first principles, several assumptions are often made. One of the most important assumptions is that traits are controlled by many genes of small effect. This leads to a prediction of a Gaussian trait distribution in the population, via the Central Limit Theorem. Since these biological assumptions are often unknown or untrue, we characterized how finite numbers of loci or large mutational effects can impact the sampling distribution of a quantitative trait. To do so, we developed a neutral coalescent-based framework, allowing us to gain a detailed understanding of how number of loci and the underlying mutational model impacts the distribution of a quantitative trait. Through both analytical theory and simulation we found the normality assumption was highly sensitive to the details of the mutational process, with the greatest discrepancies arising when the number of loci was small or the mutational kernel was heavy-tailed. In particular, skewed mutational effects will produce skewed trait distributions and fat-tailed mutational kernels result in multimodal sampling distributions, even for traits controlled by a large number of loci. Since selection models and robust neutral models may produce qualitatively similar sampling distributions, we advise extra caution should be taken when interpreting model-based results for poorly understood systems of quantitative traits. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Congruent population structure across paralogous and nonparalogous loci in Salish Sea chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waples, R K; Seeb, J E; Seeb, L W

    2017-08-01

    Whole-genome duplications are major evolutionary events with a lasting impact on genome structure. Duplication events complicate genetic analyses as paralogous sequences are difficult to distinguish; consequently, paralogs are often excluded from studies. The effects of an ancient whole-genome duplication (approximately 88 MYA) are still evident in salmonids through the persistence of numerous paralogous gene sequences and partial tetrasomic inheritance. We use restriction site-associated DNA sequencing on 10 collections of chum salmon from the Salish Sea in the USA and Canada to investigate genetic diversity and population structure in both tetrasomic and rediploidized regions of the genome. We use a pedigree and high-density linkage map to identify paralogous loci and to investigate genetic variation across the genome. By applying multivariate statistical methods, we show that it is possible to characterize paralogous loci and that they display similar patterns of population structure as the diploidized portion of the genome. We find genetic associations with the adaptively important trait of run-timing in both sets of loci. By including paralogous loci in genome scans, we can observe evolutionary signals in genomic regions that have routinely been excluded from population genetic studies in other polyploid-derived species. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new breast cancer susceptibility loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoussaini, Maya; Fletcher, Olivia; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Turnbull, Clare; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Dicks, Ed; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Humphreys, Manjeet K; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Conroy, Don; Maranian, Melanie; Ahmed, Shahana; Driver, Kristy; Johnson, Nichola; Orr, Nicholas; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Lichtner, Peter; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hein, Rebecca; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Tsimiklis, Helen; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel; Bui, Minh; Hopper, John L; Apicella, Carmel; Park, Daniel J; Southey, Melissa; Hunter, David J; Chanock, Stephen J; Broeks, Annegien; Verhoef, Senno; Hogervorst, Frans BL; Fasching, Peter A.; Lux, Michael P.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L.; Alonso, M. Rosario; González-Neira, Anna; Benítez, Javier; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Dur, Christina Clarke; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Justenhoven, Christina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Eilber, Ursula; Dörk, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Bremer, Michael; Hillemanns, Peter; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Rogov, Yuri I.; Karstens, Johann H.; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokofieva, Darya; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Lambrechts, Diether; Yesilyurt, Betul T.; Floris, Giuseppe; Leunen, Karin; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bonanni, Bernardo; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Peterlongo, Paolo; Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; Stevens, Kristen; Lee, Adam; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; McLean, Catriona; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Kristensen, Vessela; Børrensen-Dale, Anne-Lise; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Devilee, Peter; van Asperen, Christie J.; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Figueroa, Jonine D; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Brinton, Louise; Lissowska, Jolanta; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; van den Ouweland, Ans M.W.; Cox, Angela; Reed, Malcolm WR; Shah, Mitul; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Jones, Michael; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Muir, Kenneth R; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Rattanamongkongul, Suthee; Chaiwerawattana, Arkom; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Shen, Chen-Yang; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Wu, Pei-Ei; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Perkins, Annie; Swann, Ruth; Velentzis, Louiza; Eccles, Diana M; Tapper, Will J; Gerty, Susan M; Graham, Nikki J; Ponder, Bruce A. J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Lathrop, Mark; Dunning, Alison M.; Rahman, Nazneen; Peto, Julian; Easton, Douglas F

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. To date, 22 common breast cancer susceptibility loci have been identified accounting for ~ 8% of the heritability of the disease. We followed up 72 promising associations from two independent Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) in ~70,000 cases and ~68,000 controls from 41 case-control studies and nine breast cancer GWAS. We identified three new breast cancer risk loci on 12p11 (rs10771399; P=2.7 × 10−35), 12q24 (rs1292011; P=4.3×10−19) and 21q21 (rs2823093; P=1.1×10−12). SNP rs10771399 was associated with similar relative risks for both estrogen receptor (ER)-negative and ER-positive breast cancer, whereas the other two loci were associated only with ER-positive disease. Two of the loci lie in regions that contain strong plausible candidate genes: PTHLH (12p11) plays a crucial role in mammary gland development and the establishment of bone metastasis in breast cancer, while NRIP1 (21q21) encodes an ER co-factor and has a role in the regulation of breast cancer cell growth. PMID:22267197

  8. Identification of Ganoderma Disease Resistance Loci Using Natural Field Infection of an Oil Palm Multiparental Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisné, Sébastien; Pomiès, Virginie; Riou, Virginie; Syahputra, Indra; Cochard, Benoît; Denis, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Multi-parental populations are promising tools for identifying quantitative disease resistance loci. Stem rot caused by Ganoderma boninense is a major threat to palm oil production, with yield losses of up to 80% prompting premature replantation of palms. There is evidence of genetic resistance sources, but the genetic architecture of Ganoderma resistance has not yet been investigated. This study aimed to identify Ganoderma resistance loci using an oil palm multi-parental population derived from nine major founders of ongoing breeding programs. A total of 1200 palm trees of the multi-parental population was planted in plots naturally infected by Ganoderma, and their health status was assessed biannually over 25 yr. The data were treated as survival data, and modeled using the Cox regression model, including a spatial effect to take the spatial component in the spread of Ganoderma into account. Based on the genotypes of 757 palm trees out of the 1200 planted, and on pedigree information, resistance loci were identified using a random effect with identity-by-descent kinship matrices as covariance matrices in the Cox model. Four Ganoderma resistance loci were identified, two controlling the occurrence of the first Ganoderma symptoms, and two the death of palm trees, while favorable haplotypes were identified among a major gene pool for ongoing breeding programs. This study implemented an efficient and flexible QTL mapping approach, and generated unique valuable information for the selection of oil palm varieties resistant to Ganoderma disease. PMID:28592650

  9. Comparative analysis of methods for detecting interacting loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Xiguo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interactions among genetic loci are believed to play an important role in disease risk. While many methods have been proposed for detecting such interactions, their relative performance remains largely unclear, mainly because different data sources, detection performance criteria, and experimental protocols were used in the papers introducing these methods and in subsequent studies. Moreover, there have been very few studies strictly focused on comparison of existing methods. Given the importance of detecting gene-gene and gene-environment interactions, a rigorous, comprehensive comparison of performance and limitations of available interaction detection methods is warranted. Results We report a comparison of eight representative methods, of which seven were specifically designed to detect interactions among single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, with the last a popular main-effect testing method used as a baseline for performance evaluation. The selected methods, multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR, full interaction model (FIM, information gain (IG, Bayesian epistasis association mapping (BEAM, SNP harvester (SH, maximum entropy conditional probability modeling (MECPM, logistic regression with an interaction term (LRIT, and logistic regression (LR were compared on a large number of simulated data sets, each, consistent with complex disease models, embedding multiple sets of interacting SNPs, under different interaction models. The assessment criteria included several relevant detection power measures, family-wise type I error rate, and computational complexity. There are several important results from this study. First, while some SNPs in interactions with strong effects are successfully detected, most of the methods miss many interacting SNPs at an acceptable rate of false positives. In this study, the best-performing method was MECPM. Second, the statistical significance assessment criteria, used by some of the

  10. Sequential Elimination of Major-Effect Contributors Identifies Additional Quantitative Trait Loci Conditioning High-Temperature Growth in Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Himanshu; David, Lior; Pascon, Renata C.; Clauder-Münster, Sandra; Krishnakumar, Sujatha; Nguyen, Michelle; Shi, Getao; Dean, Jed; Davis, Ronald W.; Oefner, Peter J.; McCusker, John H.; Steinmetz, Lars M.

    2008-01-01

    Several quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping strategies can successfully identify major-effect loci, but often have poor success detecting loci with minor effects, potentially due to the confounding effects of major loci, epistasis, and limited sample sizes. To overcome such difficulties, we used a targeted backcross mapping strategy that genetically eliminated the effect of a previously identified major QTL underlying high-temperature growth (Htg) in yeast. This strategy facilitated the mapping of three novel QTL contributing to Htg of a clinically derived yeast strain. One QTL, which is linked to the previously identified major-effect QTL, was dissected, and NCS2 was identified as the causative gene. The interaction of the NCS2 QTL with the first major-effect QTL was background dependent, revealing a complex QTL architecture spanning these two linked loci. Such complex architecture suggests that more genes than can be predicted are likely to contribute to quantitative traits. The targeted backcrossing approach overcomes the difficulties posed by sample size, genetic linkage, and epistatic effects and facilitates identification of additional alleles with smaller contributions to complex traits. PMID:18780730

  11. Androgenetic Alopecia: Identification of Four Genetic Risk Loci and Evidence for the Contribution of WNT Signaling to Its Etiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heilmann, S.; Kiefer, A.K.; Fricker, N.; Drichel, D.; Hillmer, A.M.; Herold, C.; Tung, J.Y.; Eriksson, N.; Redler, S.; Betz, R.C.; Li, R.; Karason, A.; Nyholt, D.R.; Song, K.; Vermeulen, S.; Kanoni, S.; Dedoussis, G.; Martin, N.G.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Mooser, V.; Stefansson, K.; Richards, J.B.; Becker, T.; Brockschmidt, F.F.; Hinds, D.A.; Nothen, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenesis of androgenetic alopecia (AGA, male-pattern baldness) is driven by androgens, and genetic predisposition is the major prerequisite. Candidate gene and genome-wide association studies have reported that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at eight different genomic loci are

  12. Genome-wide association study of primary tooth eruption identifies pleiotropic loci associated with height and craniofacial distances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Hoggart, Clive J; Paternoster, Lavinia

    2013-01-01

    -coding region of BMP4 (rs17563, P = 9.080 × 10(-17)). Three of these loci, containing the genes HMGA2, AJUBA and ADK, also showed evidence of association with craniofacial distances, particularly those indexing facial width. Our results suggest that the genome-wide association approach is a powerful strategy...

  13. Meta-analysis identifies 29 additional ulcerative colitis risk loci, increasing the number of confirmed associations to 47

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Carl A; Boucher, Gabrielle; Lees, Charlie W

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies and candidate gene studies in ulcerative colitis have identified 18 susceptibility loci. We conducted a meta-analysis of six ulcerative colitis genome-wide association study datasets, comprising 6,687 cases and 19,718 controls, and followed up the top association s...

  14. CTCF and ncRNA regulate the 3-dimensional structure of antigen receptor loci to facilitate V(DJ recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy M Choi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available At both the immunoglobulin (Ig heavy and kappa light chain loci, there are >100 functional variable (V genes spread over >2 Mb that must move into close proximity in 3D space to the (DJ genes to create a diverse repertoire of antibodies. Similar events take place at the T cell receptor (TCR loci to create a wide repertoire of TCRs. In this review, we will discuss the role of CTCF in forming rosette-like structures at the antigen receptor (AgR loci, and the varied roles it plays in alternately facilitating and repressing V(DJ rearrangements. In addition, non-coding RNAs (ncRNA, also known as germline transcription, can shape the 3D configuration of the Igh locus, and presumably that of the other AgR loci. At the Igh locus, this could occur by gathering the regions being transcribed in the VH locus into the same transcription factory where Iμ is being transcribed. Since the Iμ promoter, Eμ, is adjacent to the DJH rearrangement to which one V gene will ultimately rearrange, the process of germline transcription itself, prominent in the distal half of the VH locus, may play an important and direct role in locus compaction. Finally, we will discuss the impact of the transcriptional and epigenetic landscape of the Igh locus on VH gene rearrangement frequencies.

  15. An integrative genetic study of rice metabolism, growth and stochastic variation reveals potential C/N partitioning loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Baohua; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Mohammadi, Seyed Abolghasem

    2016-01-01

    on identifying genes controlling major effect loci. To complement these studies, we conducted a replicated metabolomics analysis on a japonica (Lemont) by indica (Teqing) rice recombinant inbred line population and focused on the genetic variation for primary metabolism. Using independent replicated studies, we...

  16. PEMETAAN QUANTITATIVE TRAIT LOCI UNTUK SIFAT BERSKALA KATEGORIK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farit Mochamad Afendi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Genes or regions on chromosome underlying a quantitative trait are called quantitative trait loci (QTL. Characterizing genes controlling quantitative trait on their position in chromosome and their effect on trait is through a process called QTL mapping. In estimating the QTL position and its effect, QTL mapping utilizes the association between QTL and DNA makers. However, many important traits are obtained in categorical scale, such as resistance from certain disease. From a theoritical point of view, QTL mapping method assuming continuous trait could not be applied to categorical trait. This research was facusing on the assessment of the performance of maximum likehood (ML and regression (REG approach employed in QTL mapping for binary trait by means of simulation study. The simulation study to evaluate the performance of ML and REG approach was conducted by taking into accounte several factors that may affecting the performance of both approaches. The factors are (1 maker density, (2 QTL effect, (3 sample size, and (4 shape of phenotypic distribution. Form simulation study, it was obtained that the two approaches showing comparable performance. Hence, QTL analysis could be performed using these two approaches due to their similar performance

  17. Tissue-specific tagging of endogenous loci in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Koles

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent protein tags have revolutionized cell and developmental biology, and in combination with binary expression systems they enable diverse tissue-specific studies of protein function. However these binary expression systems often do not recapitulate endogenous protein expression levels, localization, binding partners and/or developmental windows of gene expression. To address these limitations, we have developed a method called T-STEP (tissue-specific tagging of endogenous proteins that allows endogenous loci to be tagged in a tissue specific manner. T-STEP uses a combination of efficient CRISPR/Cas9-enhanced gene targeting and tissue-specific recombinase-mediated tag swapping to temporally and spatially label endogenous proteins. We have employed this method to GFP tag OCRL (a phosphoinositide-5-phosphatase in the endocytic pathway and Vps35 (a Parkinson's disease-implicated component of the endosomal retromer complex in diverse Drosophila tissues including neurons, glia, muscles and hemocytes. Selective tagging of endogenous proteins allows, for the first time, cell type-specific live imaging and proteomics in complex tissues.

  18. Chromatin loops, gene positioning, and gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holwerda, S.; de Laat, W.

    2012-01-01

    Technological developments and intense research over the last years have led to a better understanding of the 3D structure of the genome and its influence on genome function inside the cell nucleus. We will summarize topological studies performed on four model gene loci: the alpha- and beta-globin

  19. Genome-wide association study identifies shared risk loci common to two malignancies in golden retrievers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Tonomura

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Dogs, with their breed-determined limited genetic background, are great models of human disease including cancer. Canine B-cell lymphoma and hemangiosarcoma are both malignancies of the hematologic system that are clinically and histologically similar to human B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and angiosarcoma, respectively. Golden retrievers in the US show significantly elevated lifetime risk for both B-cell lymphoma (6% and hemangiosarcoma (20%. We conducted genome-wide association studies for hemangiosarcoma and B-cell lymphoma, identifying two shared predisposing loci. The two associated loci are located on chromosome 5, and together contribute ~20% of the risk of developing these cancers. Genome-wide p-values for the top SNP of each locus are 4.6×10-7 and 2.7×10-6, respectively. Whole genome resequencing of nine cases and controls followed by genotyping and detailed analysis identified three shared and one B-cell lymphoma specific risk haplotypes within the two loci, but no coding changes were associated with the risk haplotypes. Gene expression analysis of B-cell lymphoma tumors revealed that carrying the risk haplotypes at the first locus is associated with down-regulation of several nearby genes including the proximal gene TRPC6, a transient receptor Ca2+-channel involved in T-cell activation, among other functions. The shared risk haplotype in the second locus overlaps the vesicle transport and release gene STX8. Carrying the shared risk haplotype is associated with gene expression changes of 100 genes enriched for pathways involved in immune cell activation. Thus, the predisposing germ-line mutations in B-cell lymphoma and hemangiosarcoma appear to be regulatory, and affect pathways involved in T-cell mediated immune response in the tumor. This suggests that the interaction between the immune system and malignant cells plays a common role in the tumorigenesis of these relatively different cancers.

  20. Genome-wide Association Study Identifies Shared Risk Loci Common to Two Malignancies in Golden Retrievers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonomura, Noriko; Elvers, Ingegerd; Thomas, Rachael; Megquier, Kate; Turner-Maier, Jason; Howald, Cedric; Sarver, Aaron L.; Swofford, Ross; Frantz, Aric M.; Ito, Daisuke; Mauceli, Evan; Arendt, Maja; Noh, Hyun Ji; Koltookian, Michele; Biagi, Tara; Fryc, Sarah; Williams, Christina; Avery, Anne C.; Kim, Jong-Hyuk; Barber, Lisa; Burgess, Kristine; Lander, Eric S.; Karlsson, Elinor K.; Azuma, Chieko

    2015-01-01

    Dogs, with their breed-determined limited genetic background, are great models of human disease including cancer. Canine B-cell lymphoma and hemangiosarcoma are both malignancies of the hematologic system that are clinically and histologically similar to human B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and angiosarcoma, respectively. Golden retrievers in the US show significantly elevated lifetime risk for both B-cell lymphoma (6%) and hemangiosarcoma (20%). We conducted genome-wide association studies for hemangiosarcoma and B-cell lymphoma, identifying two shared predisposing loci. The two associated loci are located on chromosome 5, and together contribute ~20% of the risk of developing these cancers. Genome-wide p-values for the top SNP of each locus are 4.6×10-7 and 2.7×10-6, respectively. Whole genome resequencing of nine cases and controls followed by genotyping and detailed analysis identified three shared and one B-cell lymphoma specific risk haplotypes within the two loci, but no coding changes were associated with the risk haplotypes. Gene expression analysis of B-cell lymphoma tumors revealed that carrying the risk haplotypes at the first locus is associated with down-regulation of several nearby genes including the proximal gene TRPC6, a transient receptor Ca2+-channel involved in T-cell activation, among other functions. The shared risk haplotype in the second locus overlaps the vesicle transport and release gene STX8. Carrying the shared risk haplotype is associated with gene expression changes of 100 genes enriched for pathways involved in immune cell activation. Thus, the predisposing germ-line mutations in B-cell lymphoma and hemangiosarcoma appear to be regulatory, and affect pathways involved in T-cell mediated immune response in the tumor. This suggests that the interaction between the immune system and malignant cells plays a common role in the tumorigenesis of these relatively different cancers. PMID:25642983