WorldWideScience

Sample records for hp2-20 antimicrobial peptide

  1. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms.

  2. Antimicrobial peptides in action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leontiadou, Hari; Mark, Alan E.; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2006-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of the magainin MG-H2 peptide interacting with a model phospholipid membrane have been used to investigate the mechanism by which antimicrobial peptides act. Multiple copies of the peptide were randomly placed in solution close to the membrane. The peptide readily

  3. Antimicrobial Peptides in Reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoek, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles are among the oldest known amniotes and are highly diverse in their morphology and ecological niches. These animals have an evolutionarily ancient innate-immune system that is of great interest to scientists trying to identify new and useful antimicrobial peptides. Significant work in the last decade in the fields of biochemistry, proteomics and genomics has begun to reveal the complexity of reptilian antimicrobial peptides. Here, the current knowledge about antimicrobial peptides in reptiles is reviewed, with specific examples in each of the four orders: Testudines (turtles and tortosises), Sphenodontia (tuataras), Squamata (snakes and lizards), and Crocodilia (crocodilans). Examples are presented of the major classes of antimicrobial peptides expressed by reptiles including defensins, cathelicidins, liver-expressed peptides (hepcidin and LEAP-2), lysozyme, crotamine, and others. Some of these peptides have been identified and tested for their antibacterial or antiviral activity; others are only predicted as possible genes from genomic sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the reptile genomes is presented, revealing many predicted candidate antimicrobial peptides genes across this diverse class. The study of how these ancient creatures use antimicrobial peptides within their innate immune systems may reveal new understandings of our mammalian innate immune system and may also provide new and powerful antimicrobial peptides as scaffolds for potential therapeutic development. PMID:24918867

  4. Descriptors for antimicrobial peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, Håvard

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: A frightening increase in the number of isolated multidrug resistant bacterial strains linked to the decline in novel antimicrobial drugs entering the market is a great cause for concern. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have lately been introduced as a potential new class...... of antimicrobial drugs, and computational methods utilizing molecular descriptors can significantly accelerate the development of new peptide drug candidates. Areas covered: This paper gives a broad overview of peptide and amino-acid scale descriptors available for AMP modeling and highlights which...... examples of different peptide QSAR studies, this review highlights some of the missing links and illuminates some of the questions that would be interesting to challenge in a more systematic fashion. Expert opinion: Computer-aided peptide QSAR using molecular descriptors may provide the necessary edge...

  5. Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrzad Sadredinamin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are extensive group of molecules that produced by variety tissues of invertebrate, plants, and animal species which play an important role in their immunity response. AMPs have different classifications such as; biosynthetic machines, biological sources, biological functions, molecular properties, covalent bonding patterns, three dimensional structures, and molecular targets.These molecules have multidimensional properties including antimicrobial activity, antiviral activity, antifungal activity, anti-parasite activity, biofilm control, antitumor activity, mitogens activity and linking innate to adaptive immunity that making them promising agents for therapeutic drugs. In spite of this advantage of AMPs, their clinical developments have some limitation for commercial development. But some of AMPs are under clinical trials for the therapeutic purpose such as diabetic foot ulcers, different bacterial infections and tissue damage. In this review, we emphasized on the source, structure, multidimensional properties, limitation and therapeutic applications of various antimicrobial peptides.

  6. Antimicrobial peptides in annelids

    OpenAIRE

    Tasiemski, A.

    2008-01-01

    Gene encoded antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are widely distributed among living organisms including plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. They constitute important effectors of the innate immune response by exerting multiple roles as mediators of inflammation with impact on epithelial and inflammatory cells influencing diverse processes such as cytokine release, cell proliferation, angiogenesis, wound healing, chemotaxis and immune induction. In invertebrates, most of the data describe the ch...

  7. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P. Tam

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic, lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms.

  8. Hemolytic Activity of Antimicrobial Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddo, Alberto; Hansen, Paul R

    2017-01-01

    For antimicrobial peptides to be interesting for systemic applications, they must show low toxicity against erythrocytes. In this chapter, we describe a protocol for measuring the ability of AMPs to lyse human red blood cells, using melittin as positive control.

  9. Novel Formulations for Antimicrobial Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Carmona-Ribeiro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Peptides in general hold much promise as a major ingredient in novel supramolecular assemblies. They may become essential in vaccine design, antimicrobial chemotherapy, cancer immunotherapy, food preservation, organs transplants, design of novel materials for dentistry, formulations against diabetes and other important strategical applications. This review discusses how novel formulations may improve the therapeutic index of antimicrobial peptides by protecting their activity and improving their bioavailability. The diversity of novel formulations using lipids, liposomes, nanoparticles, polymers, micelles, etc., within the limits of nanotechnology may also provide novel applications going beyond antimicrobial chemotherapy.

  10. Novel Formulations for Antimicrobial Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana Maria; Carrasco, Letícia Dias de Melo

    2014-01-01

    Peptides in general hold much promise as a major ingredient in novel supramolecular assemblies. They may become essential in vaccine design, antimicrobial chemotherapy, cancer immunotherapy, food preservation, organs transplants, design of novel materials for dentistry, formulations against diabetes and other important strategical applications. This review discusses how novel formulations may improve the therapeutic index of antimicrobial peptides by protecting their activity and improving their bioavailability. The diversity of novel formulations using lipids, liposomes, nanoparticles, polymers, micelles, etc., within the limits of nanotechnology may also provide novel applications going beyond antimicrobial chemotherapy. PMID:25302615

  11. Delivery systems for antimicrobial peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordström, Randi; Malmsten, Martin

    2017-01-01

    are likely to play a key role in the development of potent and safe AMP-based therapeutics, e.g., through reducing chemical or biological degradation of AMPs either in the formulation or after administration, by reducing adverse side-effects, by controlling AMP release rate, by promoting biofilm penetration......Due to rapidly increasing resistance development against conventional antibiotics, finding novel approaches for the treatment of infections has emerged as a key health issue. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have attracted interest in this context, and there is by now a considerable literature...... on the identification such peptides, as well as on their optimization to reach potent antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effects at simultaneously low toxicity against human cells. In comparison, delivery systems for antimicrobial peptides have attracted considerably less interest. However, such delivery systems...

  12. Antimicrobial peptides: old molecules with new ideas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nakatsuji, Teruaki; Gallo, Richard L

    2012-01-01

    .... So far, more than 1,200 types of peptides with antimicrobial activity have been isolated from various cells and tissues, and it appears that all living organisms use these antimicrobial peptides (AMPs...

  13. Antimicrobial Peptides from Marine Proteobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Fleury

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available After years of inadequate use and the emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR strains, the efficiency of “classical” antibiotics has decreased significantly. New drugs to fight MDR strains are urgently needed. Bacteria hold much promise as a source of unusual bioactive metabolites. However, the potential of marine bacteria, except for Actinomycetes and Cyanobacteria, has been largely underexplored. In the past two decades, the structures of several antimicrobial compounds have been elucidated in marine Proteobacteria. Of these compounds, polyketides (PKs, synthesised by condensation of malonyl-coenzyme A and/or acetyl-coenzyme A, and non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs, obtained through the linkage of (unusual amino acids, have recently generated particular interest. NRPs are good examples of naturally modified peptides. Here, we review and compile the data on the antimicrobial peptides isolated from marine Proteobacteria, especially NRPs.

  14. Antimicrobial peptides from Capsicum sp.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-12-30

    Dec 30, 2011 ... alternative: Antimicrobial peptides from Capsicum sp. Moguel-Salazar Fernando, Brito-Argáez Ligia, Díaz-Brito Mayra and Islas-Flores Ignacio*. Unidad de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular de Plantas del Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán A.C. Calle 43. No. 130, Colonia Chuburná de Hidalgo, ...

  15. Antibacterial synergism of novel antibiotic peptides with chloramphenicol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoonkyung; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Hahm, Kyung-Soo

    2004-08-13

    HP (2-20) is an antimicrobial sequence derived from the N-terminus of Helicobacter pylori ribosomal protein L1. We previously tested whether several analogues of HP (2-20), with amino acid substitutions that increased or decreased net hydrophobicity, could be useful as therapeutic agents. In the present study, we show that substituting Gln and Asp for Trp at positions 17 and 19, respectively, of HP (2-20) (peptide A3) had potent antibacterial activity in minimal inhibition concentration and minimal bactericidal concentration without having hemolytic activity. In contrast, when we decreased hydrophobicity by substituting Leu or Phe for Ser at positions 12 and 19, respectively, of HP (2-20) (Anal 4, Anal 5), there was no significant effect on antibacterial activity. We found that A3 acted synergistically with chloramphenicol against bacterial cells. Fluorescence activated flow cytometry showed that A3-treated cells had higher fluorescence intensity than untreated cells, similar to that of melittin-treated cells. Furthermore, A3 caused significant morphological alterations of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as shown by scanning electron microscopy. Our results suggest that peptide A3 may be useful for the design of novel antibiotic peptides that possess high bacterial cell selectively and synergistic effects with conventional antibiotic agents but lack hemolytic activity.

  16. Antimicrobial peptides interact with peptidoglycan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelay, Om P.; Peterson, Christian A.; Snavely, Mary E.; Brown, Taylor C.; TecleMariam, Ariam F.; Campbell, Jennifer A.; Blake, Allison M.; Schneider, Sydney C.; Cremeens, Matthew E.

    2017-10-01

    Traditional therapeutics are losing effectiveness as bacterial resistance increases, and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) can serve as an alternative source for antimicrobial agents. Their mode of action is commonly hypothesized to involve pore formation in the lipid membrane, thereby leading to cell death. However, bacterial cell walls are much more complex than just the lipid membrane. A large portion of the wall is comprised of peptidoglycan, yet we did not find any report of AMP-peptidoglycan interactions. Consequently, this work evaluated AMP-peptidoglycan and AMP-phospholipid (multilamellar vesicles) interactions through tryptophan fluorescence. Given that peptidoglycan is insoluble and vesicles are large particles, we took advantage of the unique properties of Trp-fluorescence to use one technique for two very different systems. Interestingly, melittin and cecropin A interacted with peptidoglycan to a degree similar to vancomycin, a positive control. Whether these AMP-peptidoglycan interactions relate to a killing mode of action requires further study.

  17. Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As the key components of innate immunity, human host defense antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs play a critical role in warding off invading microbial pathogens. In addition, AMPs can possess other biological functions such as apoptosis, wound healing, and immune modulation. This article provides an overview on the identification, activity, 3D structure, and mechanism of action of human AMPs selected from the antimicrobial peptide database. Over 100 such peptides have been identified from a variety of tissues and epithelial surfaces, including skin, eyes, ears, mouths, gut, immune, nervous and urinary systems. These peptides vary from 10 to 150 amino acids with a net charge between −3 and +20 and a hydrophobic content below 60%. The sequence diversity enables human AMPs to adopt various 3D structures and to attack pathogens by different mechanisms. While α-defensin HD-6 can self-assemble on the bacterial surface into nanonets to entangle bacteria, both HNP-1 and β-defensin hBD-3 are able to block cell wall biosynthesis by binding to lipid II. Lysozyme is well-characterized to cleave bacterial cell wall polysaccharides but can also kill bacteria by a non-catalytic mechanism. The two hydrophobic domains in the long amphipathic α-helix of human cathelicidin LL-37 lays the basis for binding and disrupting the curved anionic bacterial membrane surfaces by forming pores or via the carpet model. Furthermore, dermcidin may serve as ion channel by forming a long helix-bundle structure. In addition, the C-type lectin RegIIIα can initially recognize bacterial peptidoglycans followed by pore formation in the membrane. Finally, histatin 5 and GAPDH(2-32 can enter microbial cells to exert their effects. It appears that granulysin enters cells and kills intracellular pathogens with the aid of pore-forming perforin. This arsenal of human defense proteins not only keeps us healthy but also inspires the development of a new generation of personalized

  18. The Potential of Antimicrobial Peptides as Biocides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan F. Gilmore

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides constitute a diverse class of naturally occurring antimicrobial molecules which have activity against a wide range of pathogenic microorganisms. Antimicrobial peptides are exciting leads in the development of novel biocidal agents at a time when classical antibiotics are under intense pressure from emerging resistance, and the global industry in antibiotic research and development stagnates. This review will examine the potential of antimicrobial peptides, both natural and synthetic, as novel biocidal agents in the battle against multi-drug resistant pathogen infections.

  19. Computer-Aided Design of Antimicrobial Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjell, Christopher D.; Hancock, Robert E.W.; Jenssen, Håvard

    2010-01-01

    An increasing number of reported cases of drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, demonstrate the urgent need for new therapeutics that are effective against such and other multi-drug resistant bacteria. Antimicrobial peptides have for two decades now been looked upon...... in antimicrobial activity. Consequently, the majority of peptides put into clinical trials have failed at some point, underlining the importance of a thorough peptide optimization. An important tool in peptide design and optimization is quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis, correlating...... library, to ensure a successful prediction. In contrast, the neural network model, though significantly less explored in relation to antimicrobial peptide design, has proven extremely promising, demonstrating impressive prediction success and ranking of random peptide libraries correlating well...

  20. Plant Antimicrobial Peptides as Potential Anticancer Agents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guzmán-Rodríguez, Jaquelina Julia; Ochoa-Zarzosa, Alejandra; López-Gómez, Rodolfo; López-Meza, Joel E

    2015-01-01

      Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are part of the innate immune defense mechanism of many organisms and are promising candidates to treat infections caused by pathogenic bacteria to animals and humans...

  1. Antimicrobial peptides in innate immune responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, O.E.; Borregaard, N.; Cole, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are ancient effector molecules in the innate immune response of eukaryotes. These peptides are important for the antimicrobial efficacy of phagocytes and for the innate immune response mounted by epithelia of humans and other mammals. AMPs are generated either by de...... novo synthesis or by proteolytic cleavage from antimicrobially inactive proproteins. Studies of human diseases and animal studies have given important clues to the in vivo role of AMPs. It is now evident that dysregulation of the generation of AMPs in innate immune responses plays a role in certain...

  2. Antimicrobial Peptides for Therapeutic Applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsogbadrakh Mishig-Ochir

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs have been considered as potential therapeutic sources of future antibiotics because of their broad-spectrum activities and different mechanisms of action compared to conventional antibiotics. Although AMPs possess considerable benefits as new generation antibiotics, their clinical and commercial development still have some limitations, such as potential toxicity, susceptibility to proteases, and high cost of peptide production. In order to overcome those obstacles, extensive efforts have been carried out. For instance, unusual amino acids or peptido-mimetics are introduced to avoid the proteolytic degradation and the design of short peptides retaining antimicrobial activities is proposed as a solution for the cost issue. In this review, we focus on small peptides, especially those with less than twelve amino acids, and provide an overview of the relationships between their three-dimensional structures and antimicrobial activities. The efforts to develop highly active AMPs with shorter sequences are also described.

  3. Antimicrobial peptides with stability toward tryptic degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenson, Johan; Stensen, Wenche; Brandsdal, Bjørn-Olav; Haug, Bengt Erik; Monrad, Johnny; Svendsen, John S

    2008-03-25

    The inherent instability of peptides toward metabolic degradation is an obstacle on the way toward bringing potential peptide drugs onto the market. Truncation can be one way to increase the proteolytic stability of peptides, and in the present study the susceptibility against trypsin, which is one of the major proteolytic enzymes in the gastrointestinal tract, was investigated for several short and diverse libraries of promising cationic antimicrobial tripeptides. Quite surprisingly, trypsin was able to cleave very small cationic antimicrobial peptides at a substantial rate. Isothermal titration calorimetry studies revealed stoichiometric interactions between selected peptides and trypsin, with dissociation constants ranging from 1 to 20 microM. Introduction of hydrophobic C-terminal amide modifications and likewise bulky synthetic side chains on the central amino acid offered an effective way to increased half-life in our assays. Analysis of the degradation products revealed that the location of cleavage changed when different end-capping strategies were employed to increase the stability and the antimicrobial potency. This suggests that trypsin prefers a bulky hydrophobic element in S1' in addition to a positively charged side chain in S1 and that this binding dictates the mode of cleavage for these substrates. Molecular modeling studies supported this hypothesis, and it is shown that small alterations of the tripeptide result in two very different modes of trypsin binding and degradation. The data presented allows for the design of stable cationic antibacterial peptides and/or peptidomimetics based on several novel design principles.

  4. Chemical Synthesis of Antimicrobial Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münzker, Lena; Oddo, Alberto; Hansen, Paul R

    2017-01-01

    Solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) is the method of choice for chemical synthesis of peptides. In this nonspecialist review, we describe commonly used resins, linkers, protecting groups, and coupling reagents in 9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl (Fmoc) SPPS. Finally, a detailed protocol for manual Fmoc SPPS is presented.

  5. Antimicrobial peptides design by evolutionary multiobjective optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccari, Giuseppe; Di Luca, Mariagrazia; Nifosí, Riccardo; Cardarelli, Francesco; Signore, Giovanni; Boccardi, Claudia; Bifone, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an abundant and wide class of molecules produced by many tissues and cell types in a variety of mammals, plant and animal species. Linear alpha-helical antimicrobial peptides are among the most widespread membrane-disruptive AMPs in nature, representing a particularly successful structural arrangement in innate defense. Recently, AMPs have received increasing attention as potential therapeutic agents, owing to their broad activity spectrum and their reduced tendency to induce resistance. The introduction of non-natural amino acids will be a key requisite in order to contrast host resistance and increase compound's life. In this work, the possibility to design novel AMP sequences with non-natural amino acids was achieved through a flexible computational approach, based on chemophysical profiles of peptide sequences. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) descriptors were employed to code each peptide and train two statistical models in order to account for structural and functional properties of alpha-helical amphipathic AMPs. These models were then used as fitness functions for a multi-objective evolutional algorithm, together with a set of constraints for the design of a series of candidate AMPs. Two ab-initio natural peptides were synthesized and experimentally validated for antimicrobial activity, together with a series of control peptides. Furthermore, a well-known Cecropin-Mellitin alpha helical antimicrobial hybrid (CM18) was optimized by shortening its amino acid sequence while maintaining its activity and a peptide with non-natural amino acids was designed and tested, demonstrating the higher activity achievable with artificial residues.

  6. Antimicrobial peptides design by evolutionary multiobjective optimization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Maccari

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are an abundant and wide class of molecules produced by many tissues and cell types in a variety of mammals, plant and animal species. Linear alpha-helical antimicrobial peptides are among the most widespread membrane-disruptive AMPs in nature, representing a particularly successful structural arrangement in innate defense. Recently, AMPs have received increasing attention as potential therapeutic agents, owing to their broad activity spectrum and their reduced tendency to induce resistance. The introduction of non-natural amino acids will be a key requisite in order to contrast host resistance and increase compound's life. In this work, the possibility to design novel AMP sequences with non-natural amino acids was achieved through a flexible computational approach, based on chemophysical profiles of peptide sequences. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR descriptors were employed to code each peptide and train two statistical models in order to account for structural and functional properties of alpha-helical amphipathic AMPs. These models were then used as fitness functions for a multi-objective evolutional algorithm, together with a set of constraints for the design of a series of candidate AMPs. Two ab-initio natural peptides were synthesized and experimentally validated for antimicrobial activity, together with a series of control peptides. Furthermore, a well-known Cecropin-Mellitin alpha helical antimicrobial hybrid (CM18 was optimized by shortening its amino acid sequence while maintaining its activity and a peptide with non-natural amino acids was designed and tested, demonstrating the higher activity achievable with artificial residues.

  7. Labeled Antimicrobial Peptides for Detection of Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    beef, chicken carcass, and lettuce samples with an 7 imrnunomagnetic chemiluminescence fiber-optic biosensor. J. Food Protection, 66: 512-517. Maloy, W...Antimicrobial Peptides in Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Disease , 31: 467-473. Wiemer, B. C, Walsh, M. K

  8. Design and Application of Antimicrobial Peptide Conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Andre; Neundorf, Ines

    2016-05-11

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an interesting class of antibiotics characterized by their unique antibiotic activity and lower propensity for developing resistance compared to common antibiotics. They belong to the class of membrane-active peptides and usually act selectively against bacteria, fungi and protozoans. AMPs, but also peptide conjugates containing AMPs, have come more and more into the focus of research during the last few years. Within this article, recent work on AMP conjugates is reviewed. Different aspects will be highlighted as a combination of AMPs with antibiotics or organometallic compounds aiming to increase antibacterial activity or target selectivity, conjugation with photosensitizers for improving photodynamic therapy (PDT) or the attachment to particles, to name only a few. Owing to the enormous resonance of antimicrobial conjugates in the literature so far, this research topic seems to be very attractive to different scientific fields, like medicine, biology, biochemistry or chemistry.

  9. Design and Application of Antimicrobial Peptide Conjugates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Reinhardt

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are an interesting class of antibiotics characterized by their unique antibiotic activity and lower propensity for developing resistance compared to common antibiotics. They belong to the class of membrane-active peptides and usually act selectively against bacteria, fungi and protozoans. AMPs, but also peptide conjugates containing AMPs, have come more and more into the focus of research during the last few years. Within this article, recent work on AMP conjugates is reviewed. Different aspects will be highlighted as a combination of AMPs with antibiotics or organometallic compounds aiming to increase antibacterial activity or target selectivity, conjugation with photosensitizers for improving photodynamic therapy (PDT or the attachment to particles, to name only a few. Owing to the enormous resonance of antimicrobial conjugates in the literature so far, this research topic seems to be very attractive to different scientific fields, like medicine, biology, biochemistry or chemistry.

  10. Peptides with Dual Antimicrobial and Anticancer Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felício, Mário R.; Silva, Osmar N.; Gonçalves, Sônia; Santos, Nuno C.; Franco, Octávio L.

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, the number of people suffering from cancer and multi-resistant infections has increased, such that both diseases are already seen as current and future major causes of death. Moreover, chronic infections are one of the main causes of cancer, due to the instability in the immune system that allows cancer cells to proliferate. Likewise, the physical debility associated with cancer or with anticancer therapy itself often paves the way for opportunistic infections. It is urgent to develop new therapeutic methods, with higher efficiency and lower side effects. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found in the innate immune system of a wide range of organisms. Identified as the most promising alternative to conventional molecules used nowadays against infections, some of them have been shown to have dual activity, both as antimicrobial and anticancer peptides (ACPs). Highly cationic and amphipathic, they have demonstrated efficacy against both conditions, with the number of nature-driven or synthetically designed peptides increasing year by year. With similar properties, AMPs that can also act as ACPs are viewed as future chemotherapeutic drugs, with the advantage of low propensity to resistance, which started this paradigm in the pharmaceutical market. These peptides have already been described as molecules presenting killing mechanisms at the membrane level, but also acting towards intracellular targets, which increases their success comparatively to specific one-target drugs. This review will approach the desirable characteristics of small peptides that demonstrated dual activity against microbial infections and cancer, as well as the peptides engaged in clinical trials.

  11. Comparative Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Activity of Different Antimicrobial Peptides against a Range of Pathogenic Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbensgaard, Anna Elisabeth; Mordhorst, Hanne; Overgaard, Michael Toft

    2015-01-01

    The rapid emergence of resistance to classical antibiotics has increased the interest in novel antimicrobial compounds. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) represent an attractive alternative to classical antibiotics and a number of different studies have reported antimicrobial activity data of various...

  12. Biologically Active and Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos E. Salas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive peptides are part of an innate response elicited by most living forms. In plants, they are produced ubiquitously in roots, seeds, flowers, stems, and leaves, highlighting their physiological importance. While most of the bioactive peptides produced in plants possess microbicide properties, there is evidence that they are also involved in cellular signaling. Structurally, there is an overall similarity when comparing them with those derived from animal or insect sources. The biological action of bioactive peptides initiates with the binding to the target membrane followed in most cases by membrane permeabilization and rupture. Here we present an overview of what is currently known about bioactive peptides from plants, focusing on their antimicrobial activity and their role in the plant signaling network and offering perspectives on their potential application.

  13. Antimicrobial Peptides: Mechanisms of Action and Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechinger, B; Gorr, S-U

    2017-03-01

    More than 40 antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) are expressed in the oral cavity. These AMPs have been organized into 6 functional groups, 1 of which, cationic AMPs, has received extensive attention in recent years for their promise as potential antibiotics. The goal of this review is to describe recent advances in our understanding of the diverse mechanisms of action of cationic AMPs and the bacterial resistance against these peptides. The recently developed peptide GL13K is used as an example to illustrate many of the discussed concepts. Cationic AMPs typically exhibit an amphipathic conformation, which allows increased interaction with negatively charged bacterial membranes. Peptides undergo changes in conformation and aggregation state in the presence of membranes; conversely, lipid conformation and packing can adapt to the presence of peptides. As a consequence, a single peptide can act through several mechanisms depending on the peptide's structure, the peptide:lipid ratio, and the properties of the lipid membrane. Accumulating evidence shows that in addition to acting at the cell membrane, AMPs may act on the cell wall, inhibit protein folding or enzyme activity, or act intracellularly. Therefore, once a peptide has reached the cell wall, cell membrane, or its internal target, the difference in mechanism of action on gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria may be less pronounced than formerly assumed. While AMPs should not cause widespread resistance due to their preferential attack on the cell membrane, in cases where specific protein targets are involved, the possibility exists for genetic mutations and bacterial resistance. Indeed, the potential clinical use of AMPs has raised the concern that resistance to therapeutic AMPs could be associated with resistance to endogenous host-defense peptides. Current evidence suggests that this is a rare event that can be overcome by subtle structural modifications of an AMP.

  14. Plant Antimicrobial Peptides as Potential Anticancer Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Jaquelina Julia Guzmán-Rodríguez; Alejandra Ochoa-Zarzosa; Rodolfo López-Gómez; López-Meza, Joel E.

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are part of the innate immune defense mechanism of many organisms and are promising candidates to treat infections caused by pathogenic bacteria to animals and humans. AMPs also display anticancer activities because of their ability to inactivate a wide range of cancer cells. Cancer remains a cause of high morbidity and mortality worldwide. Therefore, the development of methods for its control is desirable. Attractive alternatives include plant AMP thionins, defe...

  15. Pro-Moieties of Antimicrobial Peptide Prodrugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eanna Forde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are a promising class of antimicrobial agents that have been garnering increasing attention as resistance renders many conventional antibiotics ineffective. Extensive research has resulted in a large library of highly-active AMPs. However, several issues serve as an impediment to their clinical development, not least the issue of host toxicity. An approach that may allow otherwise cytotoxic AMPs to be used is to deliver them as a prodrug, targeting antimicrobial activity and limiting toxic effects on the host. The varied library of AMPs is complemented by a selection of different possible pro-moieties, each with their own characteristics. This review deals with the different pro-moieties that have been used with AMPs and discusses the merits of each.

  16. Antimicrobial peptides: a review of how peptide structure impacts antimicrobial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Jason W.; Mello, Charlene M.

    2004-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been discovered in insects, mammals, reptiles, and plants to protect against microbial infection. Many of these peptides have been isolated and studied exhaustively to decipher the molecular mechanisms that impart protection against infectious bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Unfortunately, the molecular mechanisms are still being debated within the scientific community but valuable clues have been obtained through structure/function relationship studies1. Biophysical studies have revealed that cecropins, isolated from insects and pigs, exhibit random structure in solution but undergo a conformational change to an amphipathic α-helix upon interaction with a membrane surface2. The lack of secondary structure in solution results in an extremely durable peptide able to survive exposure to high temperatures, organic solvents and incorporation into fibers and films without compromising antibacterial activity. Studies to better understand the antimicrobial action of cecropins and other AMPs have provided insight into the importance of peptide sequence and structure in antimicrobial activities. Therefore, enhancing our knowledge of how peptide structure imparts function may result in customized peptide sequences tailored for specific applications such as targeted cell delivery systems, novel antibiotics and food preservation additives. This review will summarize the current state of knowledge with respect to cell binding and antimicrobial activity of AMPs focusing primarily upon cecropins.

  17. Antimicrobial activity of human salivary mucin-derived peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wei, G.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated: a) relationships between molecular properties and antimicrobial functions of MUC7 peptides, b) effects of host physiological factors on the antimicrobial activity of MUC7 peptides, c) enhancement of antifungal activity by combination of MUC7 peptides with EDTA or other agents, d)

  18. Antimicrobial peptides: promising alternatives to conventional antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltzer, Sylvia A; Brown, Melissa H

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (APs) have been described as evolutionary ancient weapons. Produced by a wide variety of organisms as part of a non-specific immune response, these peptides are involved in the direct destruction of various microorganisms. Several APs have been shown to have broad activity spectra against microorganisms such as Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, enveloped viruses, fungi and parasites. Given that resistance to a number of antibiotics has developed in a wide range of microbes, the potential of APs as novel therapeutic agents is being evaluated. However, optimisation of APs designed for therapy will need to focus on such factors as their susceptibility to proteolytic degradation and reduction of toxicity to mammalian cells. Strict guidelines pertaining to their use should also be established to prevent or hinder future development of bacterial resistance to such peptides. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Functions of Antimicrobial Peptides in Vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Eva Edilia

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this review is to examine the multiple activities of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in vertebrates. The largest AMP families are the cathelicidins and defensins, but several peptides derived from bigger proteins have also been reported. Cathelicidins are characterized by a conserved Nterminal pro-region and a variable region that encodes the C-terminal mature peptide. The β-defensins comprise a large family of AMPs that have diversified their functions, apparently without losing their antimicrobial activity. Cathelicidins and β-defensins are present in all vertebrates studied so far; α- defensins are present in mammals, while θ-defensins are only present in some non-human primates. The AMPs are regulated by posttranslational modifications that mainly include proteolysis, amidation, ADP-ribosylation, glycosylation and phosphorylation. In addition to their antimicrobial effects, AMPs show activity against viral particles and interfere in different steps of virus replication. Moreover, AMPs may both promote and inhibit cancer growth: several vertebrate AMPs kill cancer cells, and some tumors grow in an environment wherein the expression of β-defensins is reduced; however, human cathelicidin and some β-defensins are overexpressed in several types of cancer and are correlated with tumor growth. AMPs are part of the complex network of cells and molecules that forms the vertebrate innate defense system and they induce adaptive responses. In addition, they participate in sperm maturation and male reproduction. AMPs are multifunctional peptides that participate in immune responses, wound healing, angiogenesis, toxin neutralization, iron metabolism, male reproduction, among other functions. However, AMPs may also contribute to excessive inflammation and tumorigenesis. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Effect of Fatty Acid Conjugation on Antimicrobial Peptide Activity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chu-Kung, Alexander F; Bozzelli, Kristen N; Nguyen, Rose; Tirrell, Matthew V

    2004-01-01

    ... or the conjugate of the nonamphipathic peptide, KAK. The induction of helicity corresponds to a significant improvement in antimicrobial activity as measured by a minimum bactericidal concentration test...

  1. In silico design of antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccari, Giuseppe; Di Luca, Mariagrazia; Nifosì, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    The rapid spread of drug-resistant pathogenic microbial strains has created an urgent need for the development of new anti-infective molecules, having different mechanism of action in comparison to existing drugs. Natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) represent a novel class of molecules with a broad spectrum of activity and a low rate in inducing bacterial resistance. In particular, linear alpha-helical cationic antimicrobial peptides are among the most widespread membrane-disruptive AMPs in nature, representing a particularly successful structural arrangement of the innate defense against microbes. However, until now, many AMPs have failed in clinical trials because of several drawbacks that strongly limit their applicability such as degradation, cytotoxicity, and high production cost. Thus, to overcome the limitations of native peptides, a rational in silico approach to AMPs design becomes a promising strategy that drastically reduce production costs and the time required for evaluation of activity and toxicity. This chapter focuses on the strategies and methods for de novo design of potentially active AMPs. In particular, statistical-based design strategies and MD methods for modelling AMPs are elucidated.

  2. Antimicrobial peptides in the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Won Gi; Lee, Joon Ha; Shin, Younhee; Shim, Jae-Young; Jung, Myunghee; Kang, Byeong-Chul; Oh, Jaedon; Seong, Jiyeon; Lee, Hak Kyo; Kong, Hong Sik; Song, Ki-Duk; Yun, Eun-Young; Kim, In-Woo; Kwon, Young-Nam; Lee, Dong Gun; Hwang, Ui-Wook; Park, Junhyung; Hwang, Jae Sam

    2014-06-01

    The centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans is an environmentally beneficial and medically important arthropod species. Although this species is increasingly applied as a reliable source of new antimicrobial peptides, the transcriptome of this species is a prerequisite for more rational selection of antimicrobial peptides. In this report, we isolated total RNA from the whole body of adult centipedes, S. subspinipes mutilans, that were nonimmunized and immunized against Escherichia coli, and we generated a total of 77,063 pooled contigs and singletons using high-throughput sequencing. To screen putative antimicrobial peptides, in silico analyses of the S. subspinipes mutilans transcriptome were performed based on the physicochemical evidence of length, charge, isoelectric point, and in vitro and in vivo aggregation scores together with the existence of continuous antimicrobial peptide stretches. Moreover, we excluded some transcripts that showed similarity with both previously known antimicrobial peptides and the human proteome, had a proteolytic cleavage site, and had downregulated expression compared with the nonimmunized sample. As a result, we selected 17 transcripts and tested their antimicrobial activity with a radial diffusion assay. Among them, ten synthetic peptides experimentally showed antimicrobial activity against microbes and no toxicity to mouse erythrocytes. Our results provide not only a useful set of antimicrobial peptide candidates and an efficient strategy for novel antimicrobial peptide development but also the transcriptome data of a big centipede as a valuable resource.

  3. Interaction of antimicrobial peptides with lipid membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanulova, Maria

    2008-12-15

    This study aims to investigate the difference in the interaction of antimicrobial peptides with two classes of zwitterionic peptides, phosphatidylethanolamines (PE) and phosphatidylcholines (PC). Further experiments were performed on model membranes prepared from specific bacterial lipids, lipopolysaccharides (LPS) isolated from Salmonella minnesota. The structure of the lipid-peptide aqueous dispersions was studied by small-and wide-angle X-ray diffraction during heating and cooling from 5 to 85 C. The lipids and peptides were mixed at lipid-to-peptide ratios 10-10000 (POPE and POPC) or 2-50 (LPS). All experiments were performed at synchrotron soft condensed matter beamline A2 in Hasylab at Desy in Hamburg, Germany. The phases were identified and the lattice parameters were calculated. Alamethicin and melittin interact in similar ways with the lipids. Pure POPC forms only lamellar phases. POPE forms lamellar phases at low temperatures that upon heating transform into a highly curved inverse hexagonal phase. Insertion of the peptide induced inverse bicontinuous cubic phases which are an ideal compromise between the curvature stress and the packing frustration. Melittin usually induced a mixture of two cubic phases, Im3m and Pn3m, with a ratio of lattice parameters close to 1.279, related to the underlying minimal surfaces. They formed during the lamellar to hexagonal phase transition and persisted during cooling till the onset of the gel phase. The phases formed at different lipid-to-peptide ratios had very similar lattice parameters. Epitaxial relationships existed between coexisting cubic phases and hexagonal or lamellar phases due to confinement of all phases to an onion vesicle, a vesicle with several layers consisting of different lipid phases. Alamethicin induced the same cubic phases, although their formation and lattice parameters were dependent on the peptide concentration. The cubic phases formed during heating from the lamellar phase and their onset

  4. Plant Antimicrobial Peptides as Potential Anticancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaquelina Julia Guzmán-Rodríguez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are part of the innate immune defense mechanism of many organisms and are promising candidates to treat infections caused by pathogenic bacteria to animals and humans. AMPs also display anticancer activities because of their ability to inactivate a wide range of cancer cells. Cancer remains a cause of high morbidity and mortality worldwide. Therefore, the development of methods for its control is desirable. Attractive alternatives include plant AMP thionins, defensins, and cyclotides, which have anticancer activities. Here, we provide an overview of plant AMPs anticancer activities, with an emphasis on their mode of action, their selectivity, and their efficacy.

  5. Plant antimicrobial peptides as potential anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Rodríguez, Jaquelina Julia; Ochoa-Zarzosa, Alejandra; López-Gómez, Rodolfo; López-Meza, Joel E

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are part of the innate immune defense mechanism of many organisms and are promising candidates to treat infections caused by pathogenic bacteria to animals and humans. AMPs also display anticancer activities because of their ability to inactivate a wide range of cancer cells. Cancer remains a cause of high morbidity and mortality worldwide. Therefore, the development of methods for its control is desirable. Attractive alternatives include plant AMP thionins, defensins, and cyclotides, which have anticancer activities. Here, we provide an overview of plant AMPs anticancer activities, with an emphasis on their mode of action, their selectivity, and their efficacy.

  6. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs): peptide structure and mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoonkyung; Hahm, Kyung-Soo

    2005-09-30

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been isolated and characterized from tissues and organisms representing virtually every kingdom and phylum. Their amino acid composition, amphipathicity, cationic charge, and size allow them to attach to and insert into membrane bilayers to form pores by 'barrel-stave', 'carpet' or 'toroidal-pore' mechanisms. Although these models are helpful for defining mechanisms of AMP activity, their relevance to resolving how peptides damage and kill microorganisms still needs to be clarified. Moreover, many AMPs employ sophisticated and dynamic mechanisms of action to carry out their likely roles in antimicrobial host defense. Recently, it has been speculated that transmembrane pore formation is not the only mechanism of microbial killing by AMPs. In fact, several observations suggest that translocated AMPs can alter cytoplasmic membrane septum formation, reduce cell-wall, nucleic acid, and protein synthesis, and inhibit enzymatic activity. In this review, we present the structures of several AMPs as well as models of how AMPs induce pore formation. AMPs have received special attention as a possible alternative way to combat antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains. It may be possible to design synthetic AMPs with enhanced activity for microbial cells, especially those with antibiotic resistance, as well as synergistic effects with conventional antibiotic agents that lack cytotoxic or hemolytic activity.

  7. Antimicrobial beta-peptides and alpha-peptoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godballe, Troels; Nilsson, Line L.; Petersen, Pernille D.

    2011-01-01

    candidates is derived from naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides. However, despite promising results in early-stage clinical trials, these molecules have faced some difficulties securing FDA approval, which can be linked to their poor metabolic stability. Hence, mimetics of these antimicrobial peptides...

  8. Antimicrobial activity of synthetic salivary peptides against voice prosthetic microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elving, GJ; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ; Amerongen, AV; Veerman, ECI; Van Weissenbruch, R; Albers, FWJ

    Objectives: To investigate whether synthetic salivary antimicrobial peptides have an inhibitory effect on the growth of bacteria and yeasts isolated from used silicone rubber voice prostheses. Methods: The antimicrobial activities of six synthetic salivary peptides (histatin 5, dhvar1, dhvar4,

  9. DAMPD: A manually curated antimicrobial peptide database

    KAUST Repository

    Seshadri Sundararajan, Vijayaraghava

    2011-11-21

    The demand for antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) is rising because of the increased occurrence of pathogens that are tolerant or resistant to conventional antibiotics. Since naturally occurring AMPs could serve as templates for the development of new anti-infectious agents to which pathogens are not resistant, a resource that contains relevant information on AMP is of great interest. To that extent, we developed the Dragon Antimicrobial Peptide Database (DAMPD, http://apps.sanbi.ac.za/dampd) that contains 1232 manually curated AMPs. DAMPD is an update and a replacement of the ANTIMIC database. In DAMPD an integrated interface allows in a simple fashion querying based on taxonomy, species, AMP family, citation, keywords and a combination of search terms and fields (Advanced Search). A number of tools such as Blast, ClustalW, HMMER, Hydrocalculator, SignalP, AMP predictor, as well as a number of other resources that provide additional information about the results are also provided and integrated into DAMPD to augment biological analysis of AMPs. The Author(s) 2011. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. Design and engineering of antimicrobial peptide based on LPcin-YK3, an antimicrobial peptide derivative frombovine milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Sun; Jeong, Ji-Ho; Kim, Yongae

    2018-01-11

    We have previously derived a novel antimicrobial peptide, LPcin-YK3(YK3), based on lactophoricin and have successfully studied and reported on the relationship between structure and function.In this study, antimicrobial peptides with improved antimicrobial activity, less cytotoxicity and shorter length were devised and characterized based on YK3, and named YK5, YK8, YK11.The peptide design was based on a variety of knowledge, and a total of nine analog peptides consist of one to three amino acid substitutions and C-terminal deletions.In detail, tryptophan substitution improved membrane perturbation, lysine substitution increased net charge, and excessive amphipathicity decreased.Analog peptides were examined for structural characteristics through spectroscopic analytical techniques and antimicrobial susceptibility tests were used to confirm activity and safety.We expect that these studies will provide a platform for systematic engineering of new antibiotic peptides and generate libraries of various antibiotic peptides.

  11. Quantitative studies of antimicrobial peptide-lipid membrane interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper

    The increasing occurrence of multi-drug-resistant bacteria poses a serious threat to modern society. Therefore, novel types of anti-infective therapeutics are highly warranted. Antimicrobial peptides are a class of naturally occurring host-defense molecules that potentially might be developed...... into such novel therapeutics. However, limited understanding of the mechanisms underlying microbicidal activity of antimicrobial peptides has slowed down this development. A central step toward understanding the microbicidal mechanisms of action of antimicrobial peptides is to understand the mechanisms by which...... antimicrobial peptides interact with phospholipid membranes. Motivated by that fact, the scope of this thesis is to study these antimicrobial peptide-lipid membrane interactions. In particular, we attempt to study these interactions with a quantitative approach. For that purpose, we consider the three...

  12. Antimicrobial Peptides in Biomedical Device Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riool, Martijn; de Breij, Anna; Drijfhout, Jan W.; Nibbering, Peter H.; Zaat, Sebastian A. J.

    2017-08-01

    Over the past decades the use of medical devices, such as catheters, artificial heart valves, prosthetic joints and other implants, has grown significantly. Despite continuous improvements in device design, surgical procedures and wound care, biomaterial-associated infections (BAI) are still a major problem in modern medicine. Conventional antibiotic treatment often fails due to the low levels of antibiotic at the site of infection. The presence of biofilms on the biomaterial and/or the multidrug-resistant phenotype of the bacteria further impair the efficacy of antibiotic treatment. Removal of the biomaterial is then the last option to control the infection. Clearly, there is a pressing need for alternative strategies to prevent and treat BAI. Synthetic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are considered promising candidates as they are active against a broad spectrum of (antibiotic-resistant) planktonic bacteria and biofilms. Moreover, bacteria are less likely to develop resistance to these rapidly-acting peptides. In this review we highlight the four main strategies, three of which applying AMPs, in biomedical device manufacturing to prevent BAI. The first involves modification of the physicochemical characteristics of the surface of implants. Immobilization of AMPs on surfaces of medical devices with a variety of chemical techniques is essential in the second strategy. The main disadvantage of these two strategies relates to the limited antibacterial effect in the tissue surrounding the implant. This limitation is addressed by the third strategy that releases AMPs from a coating in a controlled fashion. Lastly, AMPs can be integrated in the design and manufacturing of additively manufactured / 3D-printed implants, owing to the physicochemical characteristics of the implant material and the versatile manufacturing technologies compatible with antimicrobials incorporation. These novel technologies utilizing AMPs will contribute to development of novel and safe

  13. Human antimicrobial peptides in ocular surface defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Imran; Said, Dalia G; Dua, Harminder S

    2017-06-03

    Sight depends on the passage of light through the transparent cornea and being focused on the fovea. Its exposed position renders it vulnerable to microbial infection. The cornea has developed a wide array of defense mechanisms against infection, of which endogenous antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are key. AMPs are essentially small molecular weight cationic peptides with a wide range of activity against virus, bacteria, fungi and parasites. Some proteins such as RNases and S100As are also included in this group. Several AMPs act synergistically allowing low expression of multiple AMPs to act efficiently. AMPs also have a range of non-microbicidal functions and serve as signaling molecules, immunomodulators; show anti-tumour activity, and influence vascularization and wound healing. Different toll-like receptors (TLR) have been implicated in the preferential induction of specific AMPs. A range of bacteria, including mycobacteria tuberculosis, viruses including herpes virus, fungi and parasites including acanthamoeba, that cause ocular infections have been shown to induce specific AMPs via TLR activation. Non-TLR mediated induction of AMP expression can occur and several molecules such as L-isoleucine, sodium butyrate, vitamin D3, phenylbutyrate, vasoactive intestinal peptide, and etinostat have been identified in this regard. Given the rising microbe resistance to antibiotics, the slow rate of development of new antibiotics and the limited access to effective antibiotics by patients living in the developing world, an ideal solution would be to find AMPs that are effective singly or in combination with each other or other antimicrobial proteins to reduce, if possible eliminate reliance on antibiotics alone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cell-penetrating antimicrobial peptides - prospectives for targeting intracellular infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahnsen, Jesper S; Franzyk, Henrik; Sayers, Edward J

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the suitability of three antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as cell-penetrating antimicrobial peptides. METHODS: Cellular uptake of three AMPs (PK-12-KKP, SA-3 and TPk) and a cell-penetrating peptide (penetratin), all 5(6)-carboxytetramethylrhodamine-labeled, were tested in He......La WT cells and analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Furthermore, the effects of the peptides on eukaryotic cell viability as well as their antimicrobial effect were tested. In addition, the disrupting ability of the peptides in the presence of bilayer membranes of different composition...... the cellular viability to an unacceptable degree. TPk showed acceptable uptake efficiency, high antimicrobial activity and relatively low toxicity, and it is the best potential lead peptide for further development....

  15. From antimicrobial to anticancer peptides. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Diana; Veiga, A Salomé; Castanho, Miguel A R B

    2013-10-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are part of the innate immune defense mechanism of many organisms. Although AMPs have been essentially studied and developed as potential alternatives for fighting infectious diseases, their use as anticancer peptides (ACPs) in cancer therapy either alone or in combination with other conventional drugs has been regarded as a therapeutic strategy to explore. As human cancer remains a cause of high morbidity and mortality worldwide, an urgent need of new, selective, and more efficient drugs is evident. Even though ACPs are expected to be selective toward tumor cells without impairing the normal body physiological functions, the development of a selective ACP has been a challenge. It is not yet possible to predict antitumor activity based on ACPs structures. ACPs are unique molecules when compared to the actual chemotherapeutic arsenal available for cancer treatment and display a variety of modes of action which in some types of cancer seem to co-exist. Regardless the debate surrounding the definition of structure-activity relationships for ACPs, great effort has been invested in ACP design and the challenge of improving effective killing of tumor cells remains. As detailed studies on ACPs mechanisms of action are crucial for optimizing drug development, in this review we provide an overview of the literature concerning peptides' structure, modes of action, selectivity, and efficacy and also summarize some of the many ACPs studied and/or developed for targeting different solid and hematologic malignancies with special emphasis on the first group. Strategies described for drug development and for increasing peptide selectivity toward specific cells while reducing toxicity are also discussed.

  16. Coleopteran Antimicrobial Peptides: Prospects for Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monde Ntwasa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are activated in response to septic injury and have important roles in vertebrate and invertebrate immune systems. AMPs act directly against pathogens and have both wound healing and antitumor activities. Although coleopterans comprise the largest and most diverse order of eukaryotes and occupy an earlier branch than Drosophila in the holometabolous lineage of insects, their immune system has not been studied extensively. Initial research reports, however, indicate that coleopterans possess unique immune response mechanisms, and studies of these novel mechanisms may help to further elucidate innate immunity. Recently, the complete genome sequence of Tribolium was published, boosting research on coleopteran immunity and leading to the identification of Tribolium AMPs that are shared by Drosophila and mammals, as well as other AMPs that are unique. AMPs have potential applicability in the development of vaccines. Here, we review coleopteran AMPs, their potential impact on clinical medicine, and the molecular basis of immune defense.

  17. Bacteriocins: New generation of antimicrobial peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Motahari

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are used as a first-choice to inhibit microbial growth since the discovery in the first half of the 19th century. Nevertheless, the widespread use of antibiotics has resulted in the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains that is one of our century problems. Concerns about antibiotic resistant is so serious which huge budget is allocated for discovery of alternative drugs in many countries. Bacteriocin is one of these compounds which was first discovered in 1925, released into the medium by E. coli. Bacteriocins are antimicrobial peptides or proteins ribosomally synthesized by many bacterial species. The use of this antimicrobial molecules in food industry obviate consumers need to safe food with least interference of chemical substances. Nisin, the most well-known bacteriocin, is the first bacteriocin found its way to food industry. Despite the widespread application of bacteriocins, resistance is seen in some species. Although it’s exact mechanism is not clear. So according to the today’s world need to find effective methods to control pathogens, studies of bacteriocins as a substitute for antibiotics are so important. The present review has studied the structure and activity of five classes of bacteriocins from gene to function in gram positive bacteria.

  18. Distinct Profiling of Antimicrobial Peptide Families

    KAUST Repository

    Khamis, Abdullah M.

    2014-11-10

    Motivation: The increased prevalence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) pathogens heightens the need to design new antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) exhibit broad-spectrum potent activity against MDR pathogens and kills rapidly, thus giving rise to AMPs being recognized as a potential substitute for conventional antibiotics. Designing new AMPs using current in-silico approaches is, however, challenging due to the absence of suitable models, large number of design parameters, testing cycles, production time and cost. To date, AMPs have merely been categorized into families according to their primary sequences, structures and functions. The ability to computationally determine the properties that discriminate AMP families from each other could help in exploring the key characteristics of these families and facilitate the in-silico design of synthetic AMPs. Results: Here we studied 14 AMP families and sub-families. We selected a specific description of AMP amino acid sequence and identified compositional and physicochemical properties of amino acids that accurately distinguish each AMP family from all other AMPs with an average sensitivity, specificity and precision of 92.88%, 99.86% and 95.96%, respectively. Many of our identified discriminative properties have been shown to be compositional or functional characteristics of the corresponding AMP family in literature. We suggest that these properties could serve as guides for in-silico methods in design of novel synthetic AMPs. The methodology we developed is generic and has a potential to be applied for characterization of any protein family.

  19. Neutralization of bacterial endotoxins by frog antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadich, Ermin; Mason, Drusilla; Cole, Anthony L

    2013-02-01

    The ability of skin antimicrobial peptides of the southern bell frog, Litoria raniformis, to neutralize in vitro the endotoxin, proinflammatory lipopolysaccharide (LPS) complex, from two different gram-negative bacterial pathogens, human pathogen Escherichia coli (0111:B4) and frog pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae, was investigated. The LPS neutralization activity of the natural mixture of skin antimicrobial peptides was measured using chromogenic Limulus amebocyte lysate assays. These skin antimicrobial peptides neutralized the LPSs from both pathogens at physiologically relevant concentrations (IC(50)  endotoxin agents. © 2012 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Screening And Optimizing Antimicrobial Peptides By Using SPOT-Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Pérez, Paula M.; Grimsey, Elizabeth; Bourne, Luc; Mikut, Ralf; Hilpert, Kai

    2017-04-01

    Peptide arrays on cellulose are a powerful tool to investigate peptide interactions with a number of different molecules, for examples antibodies, receptors or enzymes. Such peptide arrays can also be used to study interactions with whole cells. In this review, we focus on the interaction of small antimicrobial peptides with bacteria. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) can kill multidrug-resistant (MDR) human pathogenic bacteria and therefore could be next generation antibiotics targeting MDR bacteria. We describe the screen and the result of different optimization strategies of peptides cleaved from the membrane. In addition, screening of antibacterial activity of peptides that are tethered to the surface is discussed. Surface-active peptides can be used to protect surfaces from bacterial infections, for example implants.

  1. Studies on Anticancer Activities of Antimicrobial Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskin, David W.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2008-01-01

    In spite of great advances in cancer therapy, there is considerable current interest in developing anticancer agents with a new mode of action because of the development of resistance by cancer cells towards current anticancer drugs. A growing number of studies have shown that some of the cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which are toxic to bacteria but not to normal mammalian cells, exhibit a broad spectrum of cytotoxic activity against cancer cells. Such studies have considerably enhanced the significance of AMPs, both synthetic and from natural sources, which have been of importance both for an increased understanding of the immune system and for their potential as clinical antibiotics. The electrostatic attraction between the negatively charged components of bacterial and cancer cells and the positively charged AMPs is believed to play a major role in the strong binding and selective disruption of bacterial and cancer cell membranes, respectively. However, it is unclear why some host defense peptides are able to kill cancer cells when others do not. In addition, it is not clear whether the molecular mechanism(s) underlying the antibacterial and anticancer activities of AMPs are the same or different. In this article, we review various studies on different AMPs that exhibit cytotoxic activity against cancer cells. The suitability of cancer cell-targeting AMPs as cancer therapeutics is also discussed. PMID:18078805

  2. From antimicrobial to anticancer peptides. A review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana eGaspar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are part of the innate immune defense mechanism of many organisms. Although AMPs have been essentially studied and developed as potential alternatives for fighting infectious diseases, their use as anticancer peptides (ACPs in cancer therapy either alone or in combination with other conventional drugs has been regarded as a therapeutic strategy to explore. As human cancer remains a cause of high morbidity and mortality worldwide, an urgent need of new, selective and more efficient drugs is evident. Even though ACPs are expected to be selective towards tumor cells without impairing the normal body physiological functions, the development of a selective ACP has been a challenge. It is not yet possible to predict antitumor activity based on ACPs structures. ACPs are unique molecules when compared to the actual chemotherapeutic arsenal available for cancer treatment and display a variety of modes of action which in some types of cancer seem to co-exist. Regardless the debate surrounding the definition of structure-activity relationships for ACPs, great effort has been invested in ACP design and the challenge of improving effective killing of tumor cells remains. As detailed studies on ACPs mechanisms of action are crucial for optimizing drug development, in this review we provide an overview of the literature concerning peptides’ structure, modes of action, selectivity and efficacy and also summarize some of the many ACPs studied and/or developed for targeting different solid and hematologic malignancies with special emphasis on the first group. Strategies described for drug development and for increasing peptide selectivity towards specific cells while reducing toxicity are also discussed.

  3. Synthesis of antimicrobial peptides using the SPOT technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Dirk F H; Hilpert, Kai

    2010-01-01

    Developing new lead structures for drugs against multiresistant bacteria is an urgent need for modern medicine. Antimicrobial peptides are a class of drugs that can be used to discover such structures. In order to support development of this research, a fast, easy, and inexpensive method to synthesize peptides is necessary. The SPOT synthesis has the potential to produce the required peptide arrays, synthesizing up to 8,000 peptides, peptide mixtures, or other organic compounds on cellulose or other planar surfaces in a positionally addressable and multiple manner. Protocols for the preparation of cellulose membranes and the SPOT synthesis as well as cleavage of peptides from the support are described.

  4. The role of antimicrobial peptides in chronic inflammatory skin diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Marcinkiewicz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are effector molecules of the innate immune system of the skin. They present an activity against a broad spectrum of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as some fungi, parasites and enveloped viruses. Several inflammatory skin diseases including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, acne vulgaris and rosacea are characterized by a dysregulated expression of AMPs. Antimicrobial peptides are excessively produced in lesional psoriatic scales or rosacea in contrast to the atopic skin that shows lower AMP levels when compared with psoriasis. The importance of the AMPs contribution to host immunity is indisputable as alterations in the antimicrobial peptide expression have been associated with various pathologic processes. This review discusses the biology and clinical relevance of antimicrobial peptides expressed in the skin and their role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory skin diseases.

  5. Role of Antimicrobial Peptides in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Vordenbäumen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD are characterized by a chronic relapsing inflammation of the gastrointestinal mucosa. The etiology and pathogenesis of these disorders such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are incompletely understood. Recently, antimicrobial peptides, which are expressed by leukocytes and epithelia, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of IBD. Antimicrobial peptides are pivotal for intestinal defense, shaping the composition of the luminal flora and contributing thereby to the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis. Apart from their antimicrobial activity affecting commensal bacteria, immunomodulatory properties of antimicrobial peptides have been identified, which link innate and adaptive immune response. There is increasing evidence that alterations in mucosal levels of these peptides contribute to IBD pathogenensis.

  6. De-novo design of antimicrobial peptides for plant protection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Zeitler

    Full Text Available This work describes the de-novo design of peptides that inhibit a broad range of plant pathogens. Four structurally different groups of peptides were developed that differ in size and position of their charged and hydrophobic clusters and were assayed for their ability to inhibit bacterial growth and fungal spore germination. Several peptides are highly active at concentrations between 0,1 and 1 µg/ml against plant pathogenic bacteria, such as Pseudomonas syringae, Pectobacterium carotovorum, and Xanthomonas vesicatoria. Importantly, no hemolytic activity could be detected for these peptides at concentrations up to 200 µg/ml. Moreover, the peptides are also active after spraying on the plant surface demonstrating a possible way of application. In sum, our designed peptides represent new antimicrobial agents and with the increasing demand for antimicrobial compounds for production of "healthy" food, these peptides might serve as templates for novel antibacterial and antifungal agents.

  7. Antimicrobial peptides from the hemolymph of the prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuthirapandian Ravichandran

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out to find the antimicrobial activity of hemolymph of Macrobrachium rosenbergii and to evaluate the antimicrobial compounds. The highest inhibition against Staphylococcus aureus, Lactobacillus vulgaris and Klebsiella pneumonia (12 mm and antifungal activity was observed only against Fusarium moniliforme (11 mm. Antimicrobial peptide was characterized in molecular size ranging from 22 to 91KDa with antimicrobial activity against various infectious pathogens. Hemolymph plays a vital role in the disease prevention in crustaceans and there is no report on antimicrobial activities of the prawn M. rosenbergii.

  8. Use of Peptide Libraries for Identification and Optimization of Novel Antimicrobial Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Martin; Petkova, Asya; Gani, Jurnorain; Mikut, Ralf; Hilpert, Kai

    2017-01-01

    The increasing rates of resistance among bacteria and to a lesser extent fungi have resulted in an urgent need to find new molecules that hold therapeutic promise against multidrug-resistant strains. Antimicrobial peptides have proven very effective against a variety of multidrug-resistant bacteria. Additionally, the low levels of resistance reported towards these molecules are an attractive feature for antimicrobial drug development. Here we summarise information on diverse peptide libraries used to discover or to optimize antimicrobial peptides. Chemical synthesized peptide libraries, for example split and mix method, tea bag method, multi-pin method and cellulose spot method are discussed. In addition biological peptide library screening methods are summarized, like phage display, bacterial display, mRNA-display and ribosomal display. A few examples are given for small peptide libraries, which almost exclusively follow a rational design of peptides of interest rather than a combinatorial approach.

  9. [Innate antimicrobial peptides in the skin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Jens-Michael; Harder, Jürgen

    2006-02-01

    Human skin is always in contact with the environment and is covered with a characteristic microflora, but it is usually not infected. Although desquamation and secretion of mucus lead to a permanent renewal of these body surfaces and simultaneous elimination of microorganisms adhering to these layers, another reason for this natural resistance might be the existence of a "chemical barrier" consisting in constitutively and inducibly produced antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs), which include some ss-defensins, RNase 7, the S100-protein psoriasin and the cathelicidin LL-37. Most of these AMPs can be induced in vitro in epithelial cells by proinflammatory cytokines or bacteria. In vivo, AMPs are mainly expressed in uppermost and differentiated parts of inflammatory lesions and wounds, but some are also focally expressed in skin in the absence of inflammation, suggesting that apart from inflammatory mediators, also non-inflammatory stimuli of endogenous and/or exogenous origin can stimulate AMP-synthesis. Increased levels of AMPs in psoriatic lesions may explain why psoriasis patients rarely suffer from skin infections. Further, an increased infection rate in atopic dermatitis patients could be the consequence of decreased levels of AMPs in atopic lesions. These observations may indicate an important role of the "chemical skin barrier" in prevention of skin infection and suggest that artificial stimulation of this system, without inflammation, would be beneficial as "immune stimulus".

  10. Antimicrobial peptides: Possible anti-infective agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmaiah Narayana, Jayaram; Chen, Jyh-Yih

    2015-10-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacterial, fungal, viral, and parasitic infections are major health threats. The Infectious Diseases Society of America has expressed concern on the decrease of pharmaceutical companies working on antibiotic research and development. However, small companies, along with academic research institutes, are stepping forward to develop novel therapeutic methods to overcome the present healthcare situation. Among the leading alternatives to current drugs are antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which are abundantly distributed in nature. AMPs exhibit broad-spectrum activity against a wide variety of bacteria, fungi, viruses, and parasites, and even cancerous cells. They also show potential immunomodulatory properties, and are highly responsive to infectious agents and innate immuno-stimulatory molecules. In recent years, many AMPs have undergone or are undergoing clinical development, and a few are commercially available for topical and other applications. In this review, we outline selected anion and cationic AMPs which are at various stages of development, from preliminary analysis to clinical drug development. Moreover, we also consider current production methods and delivery tools for AMPs, which must be improved for the effective use of these agents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Biofilm induced tolerance towards antimicrobial peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Folkesson

    Full Text Available Increased tolerance to antimicrobial agents is thought to be an important feature of microbes growing in biofilms. We address the question of how biofilm organization affects antibiotic susceptibility. We established Escherichia coli biofilms with differential structural organization due to the presence of IncF plasmids expressing altered forms of the transfer pili in two different biofilm model systems. The mature biofilms were subsequently treated with two antibiotics with different molecular targets, the peptide antibiotic colistin and the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin. The dynamics of microbial killing were monitored by viable count determination, and confocal laser microscopy. Strains forming structurally organized biofilms show an increased bacterial survival when challenged with colistin, compared to strains forming unstructured biofilms. The increased survival is due to genetically regulated tolerant subpopulation formation and not caused by a general biofilm property. No significant difference in survival was detected when the strains were challenged with ciprofloxacin. Our data show that biofilm formation confers increased colistin tolerance to cells within the biofilm structure, but the protection is conditional being dependent on the structural organization of the biofilm, and the induction of specific tolerance mechanisms.

  12. Prediction of Antibacterial Activity from Physicochemical Properties of Antimicrobial Peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Sousa Pereira Simoes de Melo, Manuel; Ferre, Rafael; Feliu, Lidia; Bardaji, Eduard; Planas, Marta; Castanho, Miguel A. R. B.

    2011-01-01

    Consensus is gathering that antimicrobial peptides that exert their antibacterial action at the membrane level must reach a local concentration threshold to become active. Studies of peptide interaction with model membranes do identify such disruptive thresholds but demonstrations of the possible

  13. Membrane interactions of antimicrobial peptides from Australian frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, David I; Gehman, John D; Separovic, Frances

    2009-08-01

    The membrane interactions of four antimicrobial peptides, aurein 1.2, citropin 1.1, maculatin 1.1 and caerin 1.1, isolated from Australian tree frogs, are reviewed. All four peptides are amphipathic alpha-helices with a net positive charge and range in length from 13 to 25 residues. Despite several similar sequence characteristics, these peptides compromise the integrity of model membrane bilayers via different mechanisms; the shorter peptides exhibit a surface interaction mechanism while the longer peptides may form pores in membranes.

  14. Evolution of Antimicrobial Peptides to Self-Assembled Peptides for Biomaterial Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice P. McCloskey

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Biomaterial-related infections are a persistent burden on patient health, recovery, mortality and healthcare budgets. Self-assembled antimicrobial peptides have evolved from the area of antimicrobial peptides. Peptides serve as important weapons in nature, and increasingly medicine, for combating microbial infection and biofilms. Self-assembled peptides harness a “bottom-up” approach, whereby the primary peptide sequence may be modified with natural and unnatural amino acids to produce an inherently antimicrobial hydrogel. Gelation may be tailored to occur in the presence of physiological and infective indicators (e.g. pH, enzymes and therefore allow local, targeted antimicrobial therapy at the site of infection. Peptides demonstrate inherent biocompatibility, antimicrobial activity, biodegradability and numerous functional groups. They are therefore prime candidates for the production of polymeric molecules that have the potential to be conjugated to biomaterials with precision. Non-native chemistries and functional groups are easily incorporated into the peptide backbone allowing peptide hydrogels to be tailored to specific functional requirements. This article reviews an area of increasing interest, namely self-assembled peptides and their potential therapeutic applications as innovative hydrogels and biomaterials in the prevention of biofilm-related infection.

  15. The role of antimicrobial peptides in skin tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Marcinkiewicz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, known as “natural antibiotics”, are the first line of defense in humans as effector molecules of the innate immune system of the skin. They present activity against a broad spectrum of bacteria, fungi, parasites and enveloped viruses. An increasing number of studies report altered expression of AMPs in human cancers. Antimicrobial peptides such as human β defensins, human cathelicidin, ribonuclease 7 and psoriasin, a member of S100 proteins, are suggested to play a role in tumor progression and tumor suppression in pre-malignant skin lesions and malignancies. Noticeable changes in AMPs expression in skin tumorigenesis suggest a correlation between peptides and cutaneous cancers, though it is still a matter of discussion. In this article we review recent studies on the relationship between antimicrobial peptides and skin tumorigenesis.

  16. Antimicrobial peptides from the venoms of Vespa bicolor Fabricius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenhu; Yang, Xinbo; Yang, Xiaolong; Zhai, Lei; Lu, Zekuan; Liu, Jingze; Yu, Haining

    2008-11-01

    Hornets possess highly toxic venoms, which are rich in toxins, enzymes and biologically active peptides. Many bioactive substances have been identified from wasp venoms. Vespa mastoparan (MP-VBs) and Vespa chemotatic peptide presenting antimicrobial action (VESP-VBs) were purified and characterized from the venom of the wasp, Vespa bicolor Fabricius. The precursors encoding VESP-VBs and MP-VBs were cloned from the cDNA library of the venomous glands. Analyzed by FAB-MS, the amino acid sequence and molecular mass for VESP-VB1 were FMPIIGRLMSGSL and 1420.6, for MP-VB1 were INMKASAAVAKKLL and 1456.5, respectively. The primary structures of these peptides are homologous to those of chemotactic peptides and mastoparans isolated from other vespid venoms. These peptides showed strong antimicrobial activities against bacteria and fungi and induced mast cell degranulation, but displayed almost no hemolytic activity towards human blood red cells.

  17. Cathelicidin peptides as candidates for a novel class of antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Margherita; Gennaro, Renato; Skerlavaj, Barbara; Tomasinsig, Linda; Circo, Raffaella

    2002-01-01

    Cathelicidin peptides are a numerous group of mammalian cationic antimicrobial peptides. Despite a common evolutionary origin of their genes, peptides display a remarkable variety of sizes, sequences and structures. Their spectra of antimicrobial activity are varied and cover a range of organisms that includes bacteria, fungi and enveloped viruses. In addition, they bind to and neutralize the effects of endotoxin. These features make this family of peptides good candidates in view of a therapeutic use. The most promising ones are currently under evaluation as leads for the development of novel anti-infectives, and synthetic variants are in an advanced stage of development for specific clinical applications. This review focuses on recent studies on the structure and in vitro and in vivo biological activities of these peptides.

  18. Improved methods for classification, prediction, and design of antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangshun

    2015-01-01

    Peptides with diverse amino acid sequences, structures, and functions are essential players in biological systems. The construction of well-annotated databases not only facilitates effective information management, search, and mining but also lays the foundation for developing and testing new peptide algorithms and machines. The antimicrobial peptide database (APD) is an original construction in terms of both database design and peptide entries. The host defense antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) registered in the APD cover the five kingdoms (bacteria, protists, fungi, plants, and animals) or three domains of life (bacteria, archaea, and eukaryota). This comprehensive database ( http://aps.unmc.edu/AP ) provides useful information on peptide discovery timeline, nomenclature, classification, glossary, calculation tools, and statistics. The APD enables effective search, prediction, and design of peptides with antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal, antiparasitic, insecticidal, spermicidal, anticancer activities, chemotactic, immune modulation, or antioxidative properties. A universal classification scheme is proposed herein to unify innate immunity peptides from a variety of biological sources. As an improvement, the upgraded APD makes predictions based on the database-defined parameter space and provides a list of the sequences most similar to natural AMPs. In addition, the powerful pipeline design of the database search engine laid a solid basis for designing novel antimicrobials to combat resistant superbugs, viruses, fungi, or parasites. This comprehensive AMP database is a useful tool for both research and education.

  19. Antimicrobial activity of GN peptides and their mode of action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godballe, Troels; Mojsoska, Biljana; Nielsen, Hanne M

    2015-01-01

    and the observed anti-bacterial and cytotoxic activity for this set of peptides. In conjunction, these findings provide strong indications of membrane disruption as the primary mechanism of bacterial growth inhibition for the tested peptides. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....... peptides due to their characteristics as naturally derived compounds with antimicrobial activity. In this study we aimed at characterizing the mechanism of action of a small set of in silico optimized peptides. Following determination of peptide activity against E. coli, S. aureus and P. aeruginosa...... demonstrated bacterial membrane disruption after 10 minutes for the most active peptides. The membrane disrupting effect was verified by measuring the release of calcein from bacterial mimicking liposomes. This revealed the most active peptides as inducers of immediate release, indicating the kinetics...

  20. Antimicrobial peptides derived from goose egg white lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thammasirirak, Sompong; Pukcothanung, Yuwatida; Preecharram, Sutthidech; Daduang, Sakda; Patramanon, Rina; Fukamizo, Tamo; Araki, Tomohiro

    2010-01-01

    Peptide fragments possessing antimicrobial activity were obtained by protease digestion of goose egg white lysozyme. Digested peptide purified from RP-HPLC which showed no lysozyme activity exhibited bactericidal activity toward Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. LC/MS-MS and automated Edman degradation revealed the amino acid sequence to be Thr-Ala-Lys-Pro-Glu-Gly-Leu-Ser-Tyr. This sequence corresponds to amino acid positions 20-28, located at the N-terminal outer part of goose lysozyme. The peptide acted on bacterial membrane as shown by scanning electron microscopy. The mechanism of action could be explained from a helical structure that may be formed by the centered Pro residue and the terminal Lys residue after the peptide attaches to a cell membrane. This is the first study to report that a peptide derived from the protease digests of G-type lysozyme possesses antimicrobial activity with broad spectrum activity. Our result is comparative to the previous reports of Chicken lysozyme and T4 phage lysozyme, which showed antimicrobial activity after digestion with protease. These results might contribute to the usage of antimicrobial peptides engineered by genetic or chemical synthesis.

  1. Bacterial resistance and susceptibility to antimicrobial peptides and peptidomimetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Citterio, Linda

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics has become a global challenge and there is urgent need for new and alternative compounds. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are under investigation as novel antibiotics. These are part of the immune defense of all living organisms; hence, they represent...... are one class of such synthetic modified peptides. The purpose of this PhD project was to determine the antibacterial spectrum and potential use of synthetic antimicrobial peptides and peptidomimetics. Another key investigation has been the experimental development of resistance to these novel...... in vivo may be lower than predicted from standard antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Unfortunately bacteria can easily adapt to AMPs in laboratory settings and we found (Manuscript 2) that in Escherichia coli through an adaptive evolution experiment. We hypothesized that evolution of resistance...

  2. The role of antimicrobial peptides in selected dermatoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Błażewicz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are natural components of the immune system of organisms from the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms. The human body is equipped with more than 100 antimicrobial peptides that are an integral part of innate immunity. The main AMP families in human skin are β-defensins and cathelicidins. They are produced in cells such as keratinocytes, sweat glands, neutrophils, monocytes, NK cells and mast cells. Their particular function is a broad spectrum of antibacterial as well as antifungal, antiviral and antiprotozoal activity. The ability to kill bacteria involves penetration and destruction of the cell membrane, as opposed to traditional antibiotics that act by binding to specific cell structure. The antimicrobial peptides are involved in the pathogenesis of various skin diseases, including atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and rosacea. The lack of a specific molecular target in a bacterial cell minimizes the risk of resistance development; hence the AMPs have become the target of intensive research in the last two decades.

  3. Buwchitin: a ruminal peptide with antimicrobial potential against Enterococcus faecalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Linda B.; Crochet, Jean-Adrien; Edwards, Joan E.; Girdwood, Susan E.; Cookson, Alan R.; Fernandez-Fuentes, Narcis; Hilpert, Kai; Golyshin, Peter N.; Golyshina, Olga V.; Privé, Florence; Hess, Matthias; Mantovani, Hilario C.; Creevey, Christopher J.; Huws, Sharon A.

    2017-07-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are gaining popularity as alternatives for treatment of bacterial infections and recent advances in omics technologies provide new platforms for AMP discovery. We sought to determine the antibacterial activity of a novel antimicrobial peptide, buwchitin, against Enterococcus faecalis. Buwchitin was identified from a rumen bacterial metagenome library, cloned, expressed and purified. The antimicrobial activity of the recombinant peptide was assessed using a broth microdilution susceptibility assay to determine the peptide's killing kinetics against selected bacterial strains. The killing mechanism of buwchitin was investigated further by monitoring its ability to cause membrane depolarization (diSC3(5) method) and morphological changes in E. faecalis cells. Transmission electron micrographs of buwchitin treated E. faecalis cells showed intact outer membranes with blebbing, but no major damaging effects and cell morphology changes. Buwchitin had negligible cytotoxicity against defibrinated sheep erythrocytes. Although no significant membrane leakage and depolarization was observed, buwchitin at minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was bacteriostatic against E. faecalis cells and inhibited growth in vitro by 70% when compared to untreated cells. These findings suggest that buwchitin, a rumen derived peptide, has potential for antimicrobial activity against E. faecalis.

  4. Antimicrobial peptides: a new class of antimalarial drugs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno eVale

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A range of antimicrobial peptides (AMP exhibit activity on malaria parasites, Plasmodium spp, in their blood or mosquito stages, or both. These peptides include a diverse array of both natural and synthetic molecules varying greatly in size, charge, hydrophobicity and secondary structure features. Along with an overview of relevant literature reports regarding AMP that display antiplasmodial activity, this review makes a few considerations about those molecules as a potential new class of antimalarial drugs.

  5. Recombinant expression and activity of cationic antimicrobial peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos, Reinaldo Rodrigues

    2011-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Engenharia Química e Biológica In the past 60 years, antibiotics have been critical in the fight against infectious disease caused by microorganisms. The increasing bacterial resistance to antibiotics is a serious public health problem. Much research has been dedicated to the development of new classes of antibiotics to overcome this situation. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are generally defined as peptides of less than 50 amino acid residues, bearing...

  6. Antimicrobial peptides and bacteriocins: alternatives to traditional antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Yongming; Blecha, Frank

    2008-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are ubiquitous, gene-encoded natural antibiotics that have gained recent attention in the search for new antimicrobials to combat infectious disease. In multicellular organisms, AMPs, such as defensins and cathelicidins, provide a coordinated protective response against infection and are a principal component of innate immunity in vertebrates. In unicellular organisms, AMPs, such as bacteriocins, function to suppress competitor species. Because many AMPs kill bacteria by disruption of membrane integrity and are thus thought to be less likely to induce resistance, AMPs are being extensively evaluated as novel antimicrobial drugs. This review summarizes and discusses the antibiotic properties of AMPs highlighting their potential as alternatives to conventional antibiotics.

  7. Prediction of antibacterial activity from physicochemical properties of antimicrobial peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel N Melo

    Full Text Available Consensus is gathering that antimicrobial peptides that exert their antibacterial action at the membrane level must reach a local concentration threshold to become active. Studies of peptide interaction with model membranes do identify such disruptive thresholds but demonstrations of the possible correlation of these with the in vivo onset of activity have only recently been proposed. In addition, such thresholds observed in model membranes occur at local peptide concentrations close to full membrane coverage. In this work we fully develop an interaction model of antimicrobial peptides with biological membranes; by exploring the consequences of the underlying partition formalism we arrive at a relationship that provides antibacterial activity prediction from two biophysical parameters: the affinity of the peptide to the membrane and the critical bound peptide to lipid ratio. A straightforward and robust method to implement this relationship, with potential application to high-throughput screening approaches, is presented and tested. In addition, disruptive thresholds in model membranes and the onset of antibacterial peptide activity are shown to occur over the same range of locally bound peptide concentrations (10 to 100 mM, which conciliates the two types of observations.

  8. Biofilm Induced Tolerance Towards Antimicrobial Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Anders; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Zampaloni, Claudia

    2008-01-01

    Increased tolerance to antimicrobial agents is thought to be an important feature of microbes growing in biofilms. We address the question of how biofilm organization affects antibiotic susceptibility. We established Escherichia coli biofilms with differential structural organization due...

  9. Toroidal pores formed by antimicrobial peptides show significant disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sengupta, Durba; Leontiadou, Hari; Mark, Alan E.; Marrink, Siewert-Jan

    2008-01-01

    A large variety of antimicrobial peptides have been shown to act, at least in vitro, by potation of the lipid membrane. The nanometre size of these pores, however, complicates their structural characterization by experimental techniques. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations, to study the

  10. Engineering Dehydrated Amino Acid Residues in the Antimicrobial Peptide Nisin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Oscar P.; Rollema, Harry S.; Yap, Wyanda M.G.J.; Boot, Hein J.; Siezen, Roland J.; Vos, Willem M. de

    1992-01-01

    The small antimicrobial peptide nisin, produced by Lactococcus lactis, contains the uncommon amino acid residues dehydroalanine and dehydrobutyrine and five thio ether bridges. Since these structures are posttranslationally formed from Ser, Thr, and Cys residues, it is feasible to study their role

  11. In vitro susceptibility of Burkholderia pseudomallei to antimicrobial peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanthawong, S.; Nazmi, K.; Wongratanacheewin, S.; Bolscher, J.G.M.; Wuthiekanun, V.; Taweechaisupapong, S.

    2009-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is intrinsically resistant to many antibiotics, resulting in high mortality rates of 19% in Australia and even 50% in Thailand. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) possess potent broad-spectrum bactericidal activities and are regarded as

  12. Peptides extracted from Artemisia herba alba have antimicrobial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key words: Ammonium sulfate precipitation, Artemisia herba alba, chromatography, Listeria monocytogenes, proteases, ultra-filtration. Abbreviations: AS-P: ammonium sulfate precipitate; MIC: minimum inhibitory concentration; PAMP: plant antimicrobial peptides ; PBC-E: phosphate buffer crude extract; RP-HPLC: reverse ...

  13. Antimicrobial Peptides with Differential Bacterial Binding Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Aedes albopictus cecropin A (CA), were synthesized by New England Peptide (batches NEP1, NEP2, and NEP3) and purified by SPE prior to screening...Eccleston, E. D., & Fallon, A. M. (1998). Peptide Sequence of an Antibiotic Cecropin from the Vector Mosquito, Aedes albopictus . Biochemical and...RGLRRLGRKIAHGVKKYGPTVLRIIRIAG Strong Strong Cecropin A, A. albopictus [18] GGLKKLGKKLEGVGKRVFKASEKALPVAVGIKALG n.d. qual. [19] Cecropin P1 [20

  14. Novel antimicrobial peptides with high anticancer activity and selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hung-Lun; Yip, Bak-Sau; Chen, Kuan-Hao; Yu, Hui-Yuan; Chih, Ya-Han; Cheng, Hsi-Tsung; Chou, Yu-Ting; Cheng, Jya-Wei

    2015-01-01

    We describe a strategy to boost anticancer activity and reduce normal cell toxicity of short antimicrobial peptides by adding positive charge amino acids and non-nature bulky amino acid β-naphthylalanine residues to their termini. Among the designed peptides, K4R2-Nal2-S1 displayed better salt resistance and less toxicity to hRBCs and human fibroblast than Nal2-S1 and K6-Nal2-S1. Fluorescence microscopic studies indicated that the FITC-labeled K4R2-Nal2-S1 preferentially binds cancer cells and causes apoptotic cell death. Moreover, a significant inhibition in human lung tumor growth was observed in the xenograft mice treated with K4R2-Nal2-S1. Our strategy provides new opportunities in the development of highly effective and selective antimicrobial and anticancer peptide-based therapeutics.

  15. Novel antimicrobial peptides with high anticancer activity and selectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Lun Chu

    Full Text Available We describe a strategy to boost anticancer activity and reduce normal cell toxicity of short antimicrobial peptides by adding positive charge amino acids and non-nature bulky amino acid β-naphthylalanine residues to their termini. Among the designed peptides, K4R2-Nal2-S1 displayed better salt resistance and less toxicity to hRBCs and human fibroblast than Nal2-S1 and K6-Nal2-S1. Fluorescence microscopic studies indicated that the FITC-labeled K4R2-Nal2-S1 preferentially binds cancer cells and causes apoptotic cell death. Moreover, a significant inhibition in human lung tumor growth was observed in the xenograft mice treated with K4R2-Nal2-S1. Our strategy provides new opportunities in the development of highly effective and selective antimicrobial and anticancer peptide-based therapeutics.

  16. INTERNALIZATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL PEPTIDE ACIPENSIN 1 INTO HUMAN TUMOR CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Umnyakova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Search for new compounds providing delivery of drugs into infected or neoplastic cells, is an important direction of biomedical research. Cell-penetrating peptides are among those compounds, due to their ability to translocate through membranes of eukaryotic cells, serving as potential carriers of various therapeutic agents to the target cells. The aim of present work was to investigate the ability of acipensin 1, an antimicrobial peptide of innate immune system, for in vitro penetration into human tumor cells. Acipensin 1 is a cationic peptide that we have previously isolated from leukocytes of the Russian sturgeon, Acipenser gueldenstaedtii. Capability of acipensin 1 to enter the human erytroleukemia K-562 cells has been investigated for the first time. A biotechnological procedure for producing a recombinant acipensin 1 peptide has been developed. The obtained peptide was conjugated with a fluorescent probe BODIPY FL. By means of confocal microscopy, we have shown that the tagged acipensin 1 rapidly enters into K-562 cells and can be detected in the intracellular space within 5 min after its addition to the cell culture. Using flow cytometry technique, penetration kinetics of the labeled peptide into K-562 cells (at nontoxic micromolar concentrations has been studied. We have observed a rapid internalization of the peptide to the target cells, thus confirming the results of microscopic analysis, i.e, the labeled acipensin was detectable in K-562 cells as soon as wihin 2-3 seconds after its addition to the incubation medium. The maximum of fluorescence was reached within a period of approx. 45 seconds, with further “plateau” at the terms of >100 seconds following cell stimulation with the test compound. These data support the concept, that the antimicrobial peptides of innate immunity system possess the features of cell-penetrating peptides, and allow us to consider the studied sturgeon peptide a promising template for development of new

  17. Adsorption of antimicrobial indolicidin-derived peptides on hydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ching-Wei; Ruaan, Ruoh-Chyu; Liu, Chih-I

    2012-07-17

    The hydrophobic interaction between antimicrobial peptides and membrane hydrophobic cores is usually related to their cytotoxicity. In this study, the adsorption mechanism of five plasma membrane-associated peptides, indolicidin (IL) and its four derivatives, with hydrophobic ligands was investigated to understand the relationship between peptide hydrophobicity and bioactivity. The hydrophobic adsorption mechanisms of IL and its derivatives were interpreted thermodynamically and kinetically by reversed-phase chromatography (RPC) analysis and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurement, respectively. IL and its derivatives possess a similar random coil structure in both aqueous and organic solvents. Thermodynamic analysis showed that the binding enthalpy of peptides with higher electropositivity was lower than those with lower electropositivity and exhibited unfavorable binding entropy. Higher electropositivity peptides adsorbed to the hydrophobic surface arising from the less bound solvent on the peptide surface. A comparison with the kinetic analysis showed that IL and its derivatives adopt a two-state binding model (i.e., adsorption onto and self-association on the hydrophobic acyl chain) to associate with the hydrophobic surface, and the binding affinity of peptide self-association correlates well with peptide hemolysis. Consequently, this study provided a novel concept for understanding the action of plasma membrane-associated peptides.

  18. Lipid selectivity in novel antimicrobial peptides: Implication on antimicrobial and hemolytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturana, P; Martinez, M; Noguera, M E; Santos, N C; Disalvo, E A; Semorile, L; Maffia, P C; Hollmann, A

    2017-05-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small cationic molecules that display antimicrobial activity against a wide range of bacteria, fungi and viruses. For an AMP to be considered as a therapeutic option, it must have not only potent antibacterial properties but also low hemolytic and cytotoxic activities [1]. Even though many studies have been conducted in order to correlate the antimicrobial activity with affinity toward model lipid membranes, the use of these membranes to explain cytotoxic effects (especially hemolysis) has been less explored. In this context, we studied lipid selectivity in two related novel AMPs, peptide 6 (P6) and peptide 6.2 (P6.2). Each peptide was designed from a previously reported AMP, and specific amino acid replacements were performed in an attempt to shift their hydrophobic moment or net charge. P6 showed no antimicrobial activity and high hemolytic activity, and P6.2 exhibited good antibacterial and low hemolytic activity. Using both peptides as a model we correlated the affinity toward membranes of different lipid composition and the antimicrobial and hemolytic activities. Our results from surface pressure and zeta potential assays showed that P6.2 exhibited a higher affinity and faster binding kinetic toward PG-containing membranes, while P6 showed this behavior for pure PC membranes. The final position and structure of P6.2 into the membrane showed an alpha-helix conversion, resulting in a parallel alignment with the Trps inserted into the membrane. On the other hand, the inability of P6 to adopt an amphipathic structure, plus its lower affinity toward PG-containing membranes seem to explain its poor antimicrobial activity. Regarding erythrocyte interactions, P6 showed the highest affinity toward erythrocyte membranes, resulting in an increased hemolytic activity. Overall, our data led us to conclude that affinity toward negatively charged lipids instead of zwitterionic ones seems to be a key factor that drives from hemolytic to

  19. Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs) with Dual Mechanisms: Membrane Disruption and Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juneyoung; Lee, Dong Gun

    2015-06-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are one of the critical components in host innate immune responses to imbalanced and invading microbial pathogens. Although the antimicrobial activity and mechanism of action have been thoroughly investigated for decades, the exact biological properties of AMPs are still elusive. Most AMPs generally exert the antimicrobial effect by targeting the microbial membrane, such as barrel stave, toroidal, and carpet mechanisms. Thus, the mode of action in model membranes and the discrimination of AMPs to discrepant lipid compositions between mammalian cells and microbial pathogens (cell selectivity) have been studied intensively. However, the latest reports suggest that not only AMPs recently isolated but also well-known membrane-disruptive AMPs play a role in intracellular killing, such as apoptosis induction. In this mini-review, we will review some representative AMPs and their antimicrobial mechanisms and provide new insights into the dual mechanism of AMPs.

  20. What can machine learning do for antimicrobial peptides, and what can antimicrobial peptides do for machine learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ernest Y; Lee, Michelle W; Fulan, Benjamin M; Ferguson, Andrew L; Wong, Gerard C L

    2017-12-06

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a diverse class of well-studied membrane-permeating peptides with important functions in innate host defense. In this short review, we provide a historical overview of AMPs, summarize previous applications of machine learning to AMPs, and discuss the results of our studies in the context of the latest AMP literature. Much work has been recently done in leveraging computational tools to design new AMP candidates with high therapeutic efficacies for drug-resistant infections. We show that machine learning on AMPs can be used to identify essential physico-chemical determinants of AMP functionality, and identify and design peptide sequences to generate membrane curvature. In a broader scope, we discuss the implications of our findings for the discovery of membrane-active peptides in general, and uncovering membrane activity in new and existing peptide taxonomies.

  1. Porphyrin-modified antimicrobial peptide indicators for detection of bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandy J. Johnson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates the potential of porphyrin modified antimicrobial peptides for indication of bacterial targets on the basis of changes in the spectrophotometric characteristics of the construct. Detection is a result of changes in the structure of the antimicrobial peptide upon target binding. Those constructs comprised of peptides that offer little or no change in conformation upon interaction with bacterial cells demonstrated negligible changes in absorbance and fluorescence when challenged using Escherichia coli or Bacillus cereus. CD analysis confirms the presence/absence of conformational changes in the porphyrin-peptide constructs. Differing spectrophotometric responses were observed for constructs utilizing different peptides. The incorporation of metals into the porphyrin component of the constructs was shown to alter their spectrophotometric characteristics as well as the resulting absorbance and fluorescence changes noted upon interaction with a target. The described constructs offer the potential to enable a new type of biosensing approach in which the porphyrin-peptide indicators offer both target recognition and optical transduction, requiring no additional reagents.

  2. Resistance of Antimicrobial Peptide Gene Transgenic Rice to Bacterial Blight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei WANG

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptide is a polypeptide with antimicrobial activity. Antimicrobial peptide genes Np3 and Np5 from Chinese shrimp (Fenneropenaeus Chinensis were integrated into Oryza sativa L. subsp. japonica cv. Aichi ashahi by Agrobacterium mediated transformation system. PCR analysis showed that the positive ratios of Np3 and Np5 were 36% and 45% in T0 generation, respectively. RT-PCR analysis showed that the antimicrobial peptide genes were expressed in T1 generation, and there was no obvious difference in agronomic traits between transgenic plants and non-transgenic plants. Four Np3 and Np5 transgenic lines in T1 generation were inoculated with Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae strain CR4, and all the four transgenic lines had significantly enhanced resistance to bacterial blight caused by the strain CR4. The Np5 transgenic lines also showed higher resistance to bacterial blight caused by strains JS97-2, Zhe 173 and OS-225. It is suggested that transgenic lines with Np5 gene might possess broad spectrum resistance to rice bacterial blight.

  3. Epithelial Antimicrobial Peptides: Guardian of the Oral Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayank Hans

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gingival epithelium provides first line of defence from the microorganisms present in dental plaque. It not only provides a mechanical barrier but also has an active immune function too. Gingival epithelial cells participate in innate immunity by producing a range of antimicrobial peptides to protect the host against oral pathogens. These epithelial antimicrobial peptides (EAPs include the β-defensin family, cathelicidin (LL-37, calprotectin, and adrenomedullin. While some are constitutively expressed in gingival epithelial cells, others are induced upon exposure to microbial insults. It is likely that these EAPs have a role in determining the initiation and progression of oral diseases. EAPs are broad spectrum antimicrobials with a different but overlapping range of activity. Apart from antimicrobial activity, they participate in several other crucial roles in host tissues. Some of these, for instance, β-defensins, are chemotactic to immune cells. Others, such as calprotectin are important for wound healing and cell proliferation. Adrenomedullin, a multifunctional peptide, has its biological action in a wide range of tissues. Not only is it a potent vasodilator but also it has several endocrine effects. Knowing in detail the various bioactions of these EAPs may provide us with useful information regarding their utility as therapeutic agents.

  4. Small cationic antimicrobial peptides delocalize peripheral membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Michaela; Chiriac, Alina Iulia; Otto, Andreas; Zweytick, Dagmar; May, Caroline; Schumacher, Catherine; Gust, Ronald; Albada, H Bauke; Penkova, Maya; Krämer, Ute; Erdmann, Ralf; Metzler-Nolte, Nils; Straus, Suzana K; Bremer, Erhard; Becher, Dörte; Brötz-Oesterhelt, Heike; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Bandow, Julia Elisabeth

    2014-04-08

    Short antimicrobial peptides rich in arginine (R) and tryptophan (W) interact with membranes. To learn how this interaction leads to bacterial death, we characterized the effects of the minimal pharmacophore RWRWRW-NH2. A ruthenium-substituted derivative of this peptide localized to the membrane in vivo, and the peptide also integrated readily into mixed phospholipid bilayers that resemble Gram-positive membranes. Proteome and Western blot analyses showed that integration of the peptide caused delocalization of peripheral membrane proteins essential for respiration and cell-wall biosynthesis, limiting cellular energy and undermining cell-wall integrity. This delocalization phenomenon also was observed with the cyclic peptide gramicidin S, indicating the generality of the mechanism. Exogenous glutamate increases tolerance to the peptide, indicating that osmotic destabilization also contributes to antibacterial efficacy. Bacillus subtilis responds to peptide stress by releasing osmoprotective amino acids, in part via mechanosensitive channels. This response is triggered by membrane-targeting bacteriolytic peptides of different structural classes as well as by hypoosmotic conditions.

  5. Redesigned Spider Peptide with Improved Antimicrobial and Anticancer Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troeira Henriques, Sónia; Lawrence, Nicole; Chaousis, Stephanie; Ravipati, Anjaneya S; Cheneval, Olivier; Benfield, Aurélie H; Elliott, Alysha G; Kavanagh, Angela Maria; Cooper, Matthew A; Chan, Lai Yue; Huang, Yen-Hua; Craik, David J

    2017-09-15

    Gomesin, a disulfide-rich antimicrobial peptide produced by the Brazilian spider Acanthoscurria gomesiana, has been shown to be potent against Gram-negative bacteria and to possess selective anticancer properties against melanoma cells. In a recent study, a backbone cyclized analogue of gomesin was shown to be as active but more stable than its native form. In the current study, we were interested in improving the antimicrobial properties of the cyclic gomesin, understanding its selectivity toward melanoma cells and elucidating its antimicrobial and anticancer mode of action. Rationally designed analogues of cyclic gomesin were examined for their antimicrobial potency, selectivity toward cancer cells, membrane-binding affinity, and ability to disrupt cell and model membranes. We improved the activity of cyclic gomesin by ∼10-fold against tested Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria without increasing toxicity to human red blood cells. In addition, we showed that gomesin and its analogues are more toxic toward melanoma and leukemia cells than toward red blood cells and act by selectively targeting and disrupting cancer cell membranes. Preference toward some cancer types is likely dependent on their different cell membrane properties. Our findings highlight the potential of peptides as antimicrobial and anticancer leads and the importance of selectively targeting cancer cell membranes for drug development.

  6. Antimicrobial Peptides: An Emerging Category of Therapeutic Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlapuu, Margit; Håkansson, Joakim; Ringstad, Lovisa; Björn, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), also known as host defense peptides, are short and generally positively charged peptides found in a wide variety of life forms from microorganisms to humans. Most AMPs have the ability to kill microbial pathogens directly, whereas others act indirectly by modulating the host defense systems. Against a background of rapidly increasing resistance development to conventional antibiotics all over the world, efforts to bring AMPs into clinical use are accelerating. Several AMPs are currently being evaluated in clinical trials as novel anti-infectives, but also as new pharmacological agents to modulate the immune response, promote wound healing, and prevent post-surgical adhesions. In this review, we provide an overview of the biological role, classification, and mode of action of AMPs, discuss the opportunities and challenges to develop these peptides for clinical applications, and review the innovative formulation strategies for application of AMPs.

  7. The therapeutic applications of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs): a patent review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hee-Kyoung; Kim, Cheolmin; Seo, Chang Ho; Park, Yoonkyung

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small molecules with a broad spectrum of antibiotic activities against bacteria, yeasts, fungi, and viruses and cytotoxic activity on cancer cells, in addition to anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. Therefore, AMPs have garnered interest as novel therapeutic agents. Because of the rapid increase in drug-resistant pathogenic microorganisms, AMPs from synthetic and natural sources have been developed using alternative antimicrobial strategies. This article presents a broad analysis of patents referring to the therapeutic applications of AMPs since 2009. The review focuses on the universal trends in the effective design, mechanism, and biological evolution of AMPs.

  8. Antimicrobial Peptides Derived from Fusion Peptides of Influenza A Viruses, a Promising Approach to Designing Potent Antimicrobial Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingyu; Zhong, Wenjing; Lin, Dongguo; Xia, Fan; Wu, Wenjiao; Zhang, Heyuan; Lv, Lin; Liu, Shuwen; He, Jian

    2015-10-01

    The emergence and dissemination of antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens have spurred the urgent need to develop novel antimicrobial agents with different mode of action. In this respect, we turned several fusogenic peptides (FPs) derived from the hemagglutinin glycoproteins (HAs) of IAV into potent antibacterials by replacing the negatively or neutrally charged residues of FPs with positively charged lysines. Their antibacterial activities were evaluated by testing the MICs against a panel of bacterial strains including S. aureus, S. mutans, P. aeruginosa, and E. coli. The results showed that peptides HA-FP-1, HA-FP-2-1, and HA-FP-3-1 were effective against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria with MICs ranging from 1.9 to 16.0 μm, while the toxicities toward mammalian cells were low. In addition, the mode of action and the secondary structure of these peptides were also discussed. These data not only provide several potent peptides displaying promising potential in development as broad antimicrobial agents, but also present a useful strategy in designing new antimicrobial agents. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. The antimicrobial peptide SAAP-148 combats drug-resistant bacteria and biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Breij, Anna; Riool, Martijn; Cordfunke, Robert A.; Malanovic, Nermina; de Boer, Leonie; Koning, Roman I.; Ravensbergen, Elisabeth; Franken, Marnix; van der Heijde, Tobias; Boekema, Bouke K.; Kwakman, Paulus H. S.; Kamp, Niels; El Ghalbzouri, Abdelouahab; Lohner, Karl; Zaat, Sebastian A. J.; Drijfhout, Jan W.; Nibbering, Peter H.

    2018-01-01

    Development of novel antimicrobial agents is a top priority in the fight against multidrug-resistant (MDR) and persistent bacteria. We developed a panel of synthetic antimicrobial and antibiofilm peptides (SAAPs) with enhanced antimicrobial activities compared to the parent peptide, human

  10. Salivary Antimicrobial Peptides in Early Detection of Periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guliz N. eGuncu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the pathogenesis of periodontitis, an infection-induced inflammatory disease of the tooth-supporting tissues, there is a complex interaction between the subgingival microbiota and host tissues. A periodontal diagnostic tool for detecting the initiation and progression of the disease, monitoring the response to therapy, or measuring the degree of susceptibility to future disease progression has been of interest for a long time. The value of various enzymes, proteins, and immunoglobulins, which are abundant constituents of saliva, as potential biomarkers has been recognized and extensively investigated for periodontal diseases. Gingival defensins and cathelicidins are small cationic antimicrobial peptides that play an important role in innate immune response. However, their applicability as salivary biomarkers is still under debate. The present review focuses on proteomic biomarkers and antimicrobial peptides, in particular, to be used at early phases of periodontitis.

  11. Multivalent Antimicrobial Peptides as Therapeutics: Design Principles and Structural Diversities

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, S.P.; Zhou, L.; Lakshminarayanan, R; Beuerman, R. W.

    2010-01-01

    This review highlights the design principles, progress and advantages attributed to the structural diversity associated with both natural and synthetic multivalent antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Natural homo- or hetero-dimers of AMPs linked by intermolecular disulfide bonds existed in the animal kingdom, but the multivalency strategy has been adopted to create synthetic branched or polymeric AMPs that do not exist in nature. The multivalent strategy for the design of multivalent AMPs provides...

  12. Driving engineering of novel antimicrobial peptides from simulations of peptide-micelle interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Langham, Allison A; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2006-01-01

    Simulations of antimicrobial peptides in membrane mimics can provide the high resolution, atomistic picture that is necessary to decipher which sequence and structure components are responsible for activity and toxicity. With such detailed insight, engineering new sequences that are active but no...

  13. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) from fish epidermis: perspectives for investigative dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakers, Sebastian; Niklasson, Lars; Steinhagen, Dieter; Kruse, Charli; Schauber, Jürgen; Sundell, Kristina; Paus, Ralf

    2013-05-01

    Mammalian and fish skin share protective activities against environments that are rich in infectious agents. Fish epidermis is endowed with an extrinsic barrier consisting of a mucus layer and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). These operate together as a protective chemical shield. As these AMPs are evolutionarily well preserved and also found in higher vertebrate skin (including human epidermis), fish skin offers a unique opportunity to study the origins of innate antimicrobial defense systems. Furthermore, the broad spectrum of fish mucus antimicrobial activities renders piscine AMPs interesting to investigative dermatology, as these may become exploitable for various indications in clinical dermatology. Therefore, this article aims at casting light on fish mucus, the evolutionary relationship between human and fish AMPs, and the latter's antibacterial, antifungal, and even antiviral activities. Moreover, we develop dermatological lessons from, and sketch potential future clinical applications of, fish mucus and piscine AMPs.

  14. Proline-rich antimicrobial peptides targeting protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Michael; Mardirossian, Mario; Nguyen, Fabian; Seefeldt, A Carolin; Guichard, Gilles; Scocchi, Marco; Innis, C Axel; Wilson, Daniel N

    2017-07-01

    Covering: up to 2017The innate immune system employs a broad array of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) to attack invading microorganisms. While most AMPs act by permeabilizing the bacterial membrane, specific subclasses of AMPs have been identified that pass through membranes and inhibit bacterial growth by targeting fundamental intracellular processes. One such subclass is the proline-rich antimicrobial peptides (PrAMPs) that bind to the ribosome and interfere with the process of protein synthesis. A diverse range of PrAMPs have been identified in insects, such as bees, wasps and beetles, and crustaceans, such as crabs, as well as in mammals, such as cows, sheep, goats and pigs. Mechanistically, the best-characterized PrAMPs are the insect oncocins, such as Onc112, and bovine bactenecins, such as Bac7. Biochemical and structural studies have revealed that these PrAMPs bind within the ribosomal exit tunnel with a reverse orientation compared to a nascent polypeptide chain. The PrAMPs allow initiation but prevent the transition into the elongation phase of translation. Insight into the interactions of PrAMPs with their ribosomal target provides the opportunity to further develop these peptides as novel antimicrobial agents.

  15. Inhibitory Effects of Antimicrobial Peptides on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yue; Shang, Dejing

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are usually small molecule peptides, which display broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, high efficiency, and stability. For the multiple-antibiotic-resistant strains, AMPs play a significant role in the development of novel antibiotics because of their broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities and specific antimicrobial mechanism. Besides broad-spectrum antibacterial activity, AMPs also have anti-inflammatory activity. The neutralization of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) plays a key role in anti-inflammatory action of AMPs. On the one hand, AMPs can readily penetrate the cell wall barrier by neutralizing LPS to remove Gram-negative bacteria that can lead to infection. On the contrary, AMPs can also inhibit the production of biological inflammatory cytokines to reduce the inflammatory response through neutralizing circulating LPS. In addition, AMPs also modulate the host immune system by chemotaxis of leukocytes, to promote immune cell proliferation, epithelialization, and angiogenesis and thus play a protective role. This review summarizes some recent researches about anti-inflammatory AMPs, with a focus on the interaction of AMPs and LPS on the past decade.

  16. Antimicrobial peptides: the role of hydrophobicity in the alpha helical structure

    OpenAIRE

    Pandurangan Perumal; Vijaya P. Pandey

    2013-01-01

    The antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a class of molecule obtained from plants, insects, animals, and humans. These peptides have been classified into five categories: 1. Anionic peptide, 2. Linear alpha helical cationic peptide, 3. Cationic peptide, 4. Anionic and cationic peptides with disulphide bonds, and 5. Anionic and cationic peptide fragments of larger proteins. Factors affecting AMPs are sequence, size, charge, hydrophobicity, amphipathicity, structure and conformation. Synthesis of ...

  17. Covalent immobilization of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) onto biomaterial surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Fabíola; Carvalho, Isabel F; Montelaro, Ronald C; Gomes, P; Martins, M Cristina L

    2011-04-01

    Bacterial adhesion to biomaterials remains a major problem in the medical devices field. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are well-known components of the innate immune system that can be applied to overcome biofilm-associated infections. Their relevance has been increasing as a practical alternative to conventional antibiotics, which are declining in effectiveness. The recent interest focused on these peptides can be explained by a group of special features, including a wide spectrum of activity, high efficacy at very low concentrations, target specificity, anti-endotoxin activity, synergistic action with classical antibiotics, and low propensity for developing resistance. Therefore, the development of an antimicrobial coating with such properties would be worthwhile. The immobilization of AMPs onto a biomaterial surface has further advantages as it also helps to circumvent AMPs' potential limitations, such as short half-life and cytotoxicity associated with higher concentrations of soluble peptides. The studies discussed in the current review report on the impact of covalent immobilization of AMPs onto surfaces through different chemical coupling strategies, length of spacers, and peptide orientation and concentration. The overall results suggest that immobilized AMPs may be effective in the prevention of biofilm formation by reduction of microorganism survival post-contact with the coated biomaterial. Minimal cytotoxicity and long-term stability profiles were obtained by optimizing immobilization parameters, indicating a promising potential for the use of immobilized AMPs in clinical applications. On the other hand, the effects of tethering on mechanisms of action of AMPs have not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, further studies are recommended to explore the real potential of immobilized AMPs in health applications as antimicrobial coatings of medical devices. Copyright © 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Challenges in Dermal Delivery of Therapeutic Antimicrobial Protein and Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalani, Rohan; Misra, Ambikanandan; Amrutiya, Jitendra; Patel, Hinal; Bhatt, Priyanka; Patel, Vivek

    2017-01-01

    Protein and peptides in biological system form an important part of innate immune system and are being explored for potential use in various diseases as therapeutics. Importance of proteins and peptides as a new class of antimicrobial agents has boosted research in the field of biotechnology as potential alternative to antibiotic agents. Protein and peptides antimicrobial as a therapeutic class are structurally diverse and exhibit potent activity against microbes by various mechanisms. However, they present formidable challenge in formulation due to requirement of specific spatial configuration for their activity and stability. Thus, encapsulation of these therapeutics in various nano-systems may sustain activity along with improvement in stability. The article highlights the need for antimicrobial peptides in dermal infections along with discussion of mechanism of their action. It highlights challenges faced for dermal delivery and research carried out for their successful delivery using nano-systems. It is widely realized that these novel classes of therapeutic agents have tremendous market potential to emerge as an alternative to conventional antibiotic agents for combating issue of multidrug resistant microbial species. Research in their delivery aspects by use of current advances made in delivery systems through use of nanoconstructs offers much needed area for exploration and achieving success. As there is an urgent need for coming up with new therapeutic agents for encompassing the increased burden of microbial diseases in human population as well as their delivery challenges, research in field will give the much-needed strategic advantage against pathogenic organisms. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Quantitative Studies of Antimicrobial Peptide Pore Formation in Large Unilamellar Vesicles by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2013-01-01

    In spite of intensive research efforts over the past decades, the mechanisms by which membrane-active antimicrobial peptides interact with phospholipid membranes are not yet fully elucidated. New tools that can be used to characterize antimicrobial peptide-lipid membrane interactions are therefore...... leakage of fluorescent probes of different sizes through transmembrane pores formed by each of the three representative antimicrobial peptides: melittin, magainin 2, and mastoparan X. The experimental results demonstrate that leakage assays based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy offer new...... and detailed insight into the size and cooperative nature of transmembrane pores formed by antimicrobial peptides that is not available from the conventional quenching-based leakage assays....

  20. Prediction of antimicrobial peptides based on sequence alignment and feature selection methods

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Ping; Hu, Lele; Liu, Guiyou; Jiang, Nan; Chen, Xiaoyun; Xu, Jianyong; Zheng, Wen; Li, Li; Tan, Ming; Chen, Zugen; Song, Hui; Cai, Yu-Dong; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) represent a class of natural peptides that form a part of the innate immune system, and this kind of 'nature's antibiotics' is quite promising for solving the problem of increasing antibiotic resistance...

  1. Prediction of antimicrobial activity of synthetic peptides by a decision tree model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, Felipe; Perez, Pedro S; Baranauskas, José A; Nozawa, Sérgio R

    2013-05-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a persistent problem in the public health sphere. However, recent attempts to find effective substitutes to combat infections have been directed at identifying natural antimicrobial peptides in order to circumvent resistance to commercial antibiotics. This study describes the development of synthetic peptides with antimicrobial activity, created in silico by site-directed mutation modeling using wild-type peptides as scaffolds for these mutations. Fragments of antimicrobial peptides were used for modeling with molecular modeling computational tools. To analyze these peptides, a decision tree model, which indicated the action range of peptides on the types of microorganisms on which they can exercise biological activity, was created. The decision tree model was processed using physicochemistry properties from known antimicrobial peptides available at the Antimicrobial Peptide Database (APD). The two most promising peptides were synthesized, and antimicrobial assays showed inhibitory activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Colossomin C and colossomin D were the most inhibitory peptides at 5 μg/ml against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The methods described in this work and the results obtained are useful for the identification and development of new compounds with antimicrobial activity through the use of computational tools.

  2. Protocols for Studying Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs) as Anticancer Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madera, Laurence; Hoskin, David W

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a class of small cationic peptides that are important for host defense. In a manner that is similar to AMP-mediated destruction of microbial pathogens, certain AMPs can physically associate with the anionic lipid membrane components of cancer cells, resulting in destabilization of the lipid membrane and subsequent peptide binding to intracellular targets, which ultimately leads to the death of the cancer cell. In comparison, normal healthy cells possess a neutral membrane charge and are therefore less affected by AMPs. Based on the selective cytotoxicity of certain AMPs for cancer cells, these peptides represent a potential reservoir of novel anticancer therapeutic agents. The development and improvement of AMPs as anticancer agents requires appropriate methods for determining the effects of these peptides on the viability and function of cancer cells. In this chapter, we describe methods to assess the ability of AMPs to cause cell membrane damage (measured by propidium iodide uptake), apoptosis and/or necrosis (measured by annexin V-FLUOS/propidium iodide staining), and mitochondrial membrane destabilization (measured by 3,3'-dihexyloxacarbocyanine iodide staining), as well as reduced motility (measured by a migration and invasion assay) of cancer cells growing in suspension or as monolayers. We also describe a tubule-forming assay that can be used to assess the effect of AMPs on angiogenesis.

  3. Expression pattern of arenicins - the antimicrobial peptides of polychaete Arenicolamarina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arina L. Maltseva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Immune responses of invertebrate animals are mediated through innate mechanisms, among which production of antimicrobial peptides play an important role. Although evolutionary Polychaetes represent an interesting group closely related to a putative common ancestor of other coelomates, their immune mechanisms still remain scarcely investigated. Previously our group has identified arenicins - new antimicrobial peptides of the lugworm Arenicola marina, since then these peptides were thoroughly characterized in terms of their structure and inhibitory potential. In the present study we addressed the question of the physiological functions of arenicins in the lugworm body. Using molecular and immunocytochemical methods we demonstrated that arencins are expressed in the wide range of the lugworm tissues - coelomocytes, body wall, extravasal tissue and the gut. The expression of arenicins is constitutive and does not depend on stimulation of various infectious stimuli. Most intensively arenicins are produced by mature coelomocytes where they function as killing agents inside the phagolysosome. In the gut and the body wall epithelia arenicins are released from producing cells via secretion as they are found both inside the epithelial cells and in the contents of the cuticle. Collectively our study showed that arenicins are found in different body compartments responsible for providing a first line of defence against infections, which implies their important role as key components of both epithelial and systemic branches of host defence.

  4. From design to screening: a new antimicrobial peptide discovery pipeline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadet Albayrak Guralp

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs belong to a class of natural microbicidal molecules that have been receiving great attention for their lower propensity for inducing drug resistance, hence, their potential as alternative drugs to conventional antibiotics. By generating AMP libraries, one can study a large number of candidates for their activities simultaneously in a timely manner. Here, we describe a novel methodology where in silico designed AMP-encoding oligonucleotide libraries are cloned and expressed in a cellular host for rapid screening of active molecules. The combination of parallel oligonucleotide synthesis with microbial expression systems not only offers complete flexibility for sequence design but also allows for economical construction of very large peptide libraries. An application of this approach to discovery of novel AMPs has been demonstrated by constructing and screening a custom library of twelve thousand plantaricin-423 mutants in Escherichia coli. Analysis of selected clones by both Sanger-sequencing and 454 high-throughput sequencing produced a significant amount of data for positionally important residues of plantaricin-423 responsible for antimicrobial activity and, moreover, resulted in identification of many novel variants with enhanced specific activities against Listeria innocua. This approach allows for generation of fully tailored peptide collections in a very cost effective way and will have countless applications from discovery of novel AMPs to gaining fundamental understanding of their biological function and characteristics.

  5. Differential activity of innate defense antimicrobial peptides against Nocardia species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Dirk

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the genus Nocardia are ubiquitous environmental saprophytes capable to cause human pulmonary, disseminated and cutaneous nocardiosis or bovine mastitis. Innate immunity appears to play an important role in early defense against Nocardia species. To elucidate the contribution of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs in innate defense against Nocardia, the activity of human α-defensins human neutrophil peptides (HNPs 1-3, human β-defensin (hBD-3 and cathelicidin LL-37 as well as bovine β-defensins lingual and tracheal antimicrobial peptides (LAP, TAP and bovine neutrophil-derived indolicidin against four important Nocardia species was investigated. Results Whereas N. farcinica ATCC 3318 and N. nova ATCC 33726 were found to be susceptible to all investigated human and bovine AMPs, N. asteroides ATCC 19247 was killed exclusively by neutrophil-derived human α-defensins HNP 1-3 and bovine indolicidin. N. brasiliensis ATCC 19296 was found to exhibit complete resistance to investigated human AMPs and to be susceptible only to bovine indolicidin. Conclusion Selected AMPs are capable to contribute to the first line of defense against Nocardia, yet, susceptibility appears to vary across different Nocardia species. Obtained results of neutrophil-derived AMPs to possess the broadest antinocardial spectrum are remarkable, since nocardiosis is characterized by a neutrophil-rich infiltrate in vivo.

  6. Differential activity of innate defense antimicrobial peptides against Nocardia species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieg, Siegbert; Meier, Benjamin; Fähnrich, Eva; Huth, Anja; Wagner, Dirk; Kern, Winfried V; Kalbacher, Hubert

    2010-02-23

    Members of the genus Nocardia are ubiquitous environmental saprophytes capable to cause human pulmonary, disseminated and cutaneous nocardiosis or bovine mastitis. Innate immunity appears to play an important role in early defense against Nocardia species. To elucidate the contribution of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in innate defense against Nocardia, the activity of human alpha-defensins human neutrophil peptides (HNPs) 1-3, human beta-defensin (hBD)-3 and cathelicidin LL-37 as well as bovine beta-defensins lingual and tracheal antimicrobial peptides (LAP, TAP) and bovine neutrophil-derived indolicidin against four important Nocardia species was investigated. Whereas N. farcinica ATCC 3318 and N. nova ATCC 33726 were found to be susceptible to all investigated human and bovine AMPs, N. asteroides ATCC 19247 was killed exclusively by neutrophil-derived human alpha-defensins HNP 1-3 and bovine indolicidin. N. brasiliensis ATCC 19296 was found to exhibit complete resistance to investigated human AMPs and to be susceptible only to bovine indolicidin. Selected AMPs are capable to contribute to the first line of defense against Nocardia, yet, susceptibility appears to vary across different Nocardia species. Obtained results of neutrophil-derived AMPs to possess the broadest antinocardial spectrum are remarkable, since nocardiosis is characterized by a neutrophil-rich infiltrate in vivo.

  7. Differential activity of innate defense antimicrobial peptides against Nocardia species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Members of the genus Nocardia are ubiquitous environmental saprophytes capable to cause human pulmonary, disseminated and cutaneous nocardiosis or bovine mastitis. Innate immunity appears to play an important role in early defense against Nocardia species. To elucidate the contribution of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in innate defense against Nocardia, the activity of human α-defensins human neutrophil peptides (HNPs) 1-3, human β-defensin (hBD)-3 and cathelicidin LL-37 as well as bovine β-defensins lingual and tracheal antimicrobial peptides (LAP, TAP) and bovine neutrophil-derived indolicidin against four important Nocardia species was investigated. Results Whereas N. farcinica ATCC 3318 and N. nova ATCC 33726 were found to be susceptible to all investigated human and bovine AMPs, N. asteroides ATCC 19247 was killed exclusively by neutrophil-derived human α-defensins HNP 1-3 and bovine indolicidin. N. brasiliensis ATCC 19296 was found to exhibit complete resistance to investigated human AMPs and to be susceptible only to bovine indolicidin. Conclusion Selected AMPs are capable to contribute to the first line of defense against Nocardia, yet, susceptibility appears to vary across different Nocardia species. Obtained results of neutrophil-derived AMPs to possess the broadest antinocardial spectrum are remarkable, since nocardiosis is characterized by a neutrophil-rich infiltrate in vivo. PMID:20178618

  8. The Role of Antimicrobial Peptides in Preventing Multidrug-Resistant Bacterial Infections and Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Soo Hahm

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, decreasing effectiveness of conventional antimicrobial-drugs has caused serious problems due to the rapid emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens. Furthermore, biofilms, which are microbial communities that cause serious chronic infections and dental plaque, form environments that enhance antimicrobial resistance. As a result, there is a continuous search to overcome or control such problems, which has resulted in antimicrobial peptides being considered as an alternative to conventional drugs. Antimicrobial peptides are ancient host defense effector molecules in living organisms. These peptides have been identified in diverse organisms and synthetically developed by using peptidomimic techniques. This review was conducted to demonstrate the mode of action by which antimicrobial peptides combat multidrug-resistant bacteria and prevent biofilm formation and to introduce clinical uses of these compounds for chronic disease, medical devices, and oral health. In addition, combinations of antimicrobial peptides and conventional drugs were considered due to their synergetic effects and low cost for therapeutic treatment.

  9. Characterization of Antimicrobial Peptides toward the Development of Novel Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Aoki

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial agents have eradicated many infectious diseases and significantly improved our living environment. However, abuse of antimicrobial agents has accelerated the emergence of multidrug-resistant microorganisms, and there is an urgent need for novel antibiotics. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs have attracted attention as a novel class of antimicrobial agents because AMPs efficiently kill a wide range of species, including bacteria, fungi, and viruses, via a novel mechanism of action. In addition, they are effective against pathogens that are resistant to almost all conventional antibiotics. AMPs have promising properties; they directly disrupt the functions of cellular membranes and nucleic acids, and the rate of appearance of AMP-resistant strains is very low. However, as pharmaceuticals, AMPs exhibit unfavorable properties, such as instability, hemolytic activity, high cost of production, salt sensitivity, and a broad spectrum of activity. Therefore, it is vital to improve these properties to develop novel AMP treatments. Here, we have reviewed the basic biochemical properties of AMPs and the recent strategies used to modulate these properties of AMPs to enhance their safety.

  10. Spermicidal Activity of the Safe Natural Antimicrobial Peptide Subtilosin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L. Chikindas

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis (BV, a condition affecting millions of women each year, is primarily caused by the gram-variable organism Gardnerella vaginalis. A number of organisms associated with BV cases have been reported to develop multidrug resistance, leading to the need for alternative therapies. Previously, we reported the antimicrobial peptide subtilosin has proven antimicrobial activity against G. vaginalis, but not against the tested healthy vaginal microbiota of lactobacilli. After conducting tissue sensitivity assays using an ectocervical tissue model, we determined that human cells remained viable after prolonged exposures to partially-purified subtilosin, indicating the compound is safe for human use. Subtilosin was shown to eliminate the motility and forward progression of human spermatozoa in a dose-dependent manner, and can therefore be considered a general spermicidal agent. These results suggest subtilosin would be a valuable component in topical personal care products aimed at contraception and BV prophylaxis and treatment.

  11. Machine learning in the rational design of antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondón-Villarreal, Paola; Sierra, Daniel A; Torres, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important public health issues is the microbial and bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics by pathogen microorganisms. In recent years, many researches have been focused on the development of new antibiotics. Among these, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have raised as a promising alternative to combat antibioticresistant microorganisms. For this reason, many theoretical efforts have been done in the development of new computational tools for the rational design of both better and effective AMPs. In this review, we present an overview of the rational design of AMPs using machine learning techniques and new research fields.

  12. Sequence diversity and evolution of antimicrobial peptides in invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Somboonwiwat, Kunlaya; Amparyup, Piti

    2015-02-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are evolutionarily ancient molecules that act as the key components in the invertebrate innate immunity against invading pathogens. Several AMPs have been identified and characterized in invertebrates, and found to display considerable diversity in their amino acid sequence, structure and biological activity. AMP genes appear to have rapidly evolved, which might have arisen from the co-evolutionary arms race between host and pathogens, and enabled organisms to survive in different microbial environments. Here, the sequence diversity of invertebrate AMPs (defensins, cecropins, crustins and anti-lipopolysaccharide factors) are presented to provide a better understanding of the evolution pattern of these peptides that play a major role in host defense mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. InverPep: A database of invertebrate antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Esteban A; Giraldo, Paula; Orduz, Sergio

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this work was to construct InverPep, a database specialised in experimentally validated antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) from invertebrates. AMP data contained in InverPep were manually curated from other databases and the scientific literature. MySQL was integrated with the development platform Laravel; this framework allows to integrate programming in PHP with HTML and was used to design the InverPep web page's interface. InverPep contains 18 separated fields, including InverPep code, phylum and species source, peptide name, sequence, peptide length, secondary structure, molar mass, charge, isoelectric point, hydrophobicity, Boman index, aliphatic index and percentage of hydrophobic amino acids. CALCAMPI, an algorithm to calculate the physicochemical properties of multiple peptides simultaneously, was programmed in PERL language. To date, InverPep contains 702 experimentally validated AMPs from invertebrate species. All of the peptides contain information associated with their source, physicochemical properties, secondary structure, biological activity and links to external literature. Most AMPs in InverPep have a length between 10 and 50 amino acids, a positive charge, a Boman index between 0 and 2 kcal/mol, and 30-50% hydrophobic amino acids. InverPep includes 33 AMPs not reported in other databases. Besides, CALCAMPI and statistical analysis of InverPep data is presented. The InverPep database is available in English and Spanish. InverPep is a useful database to study invertebrate AMPs and its information could be used for the design of new peptides. The user-friendly interface of InverPep and its information can be freely accessed via a web-based browser at http://ciencias.medellin.unal.edu.co/gruposdeinvestigacion/prospeccionydisenobiomoleculas/InverPep/public/home_en. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Chemotherapy of Infection and Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Common mechanism unites membrane poration by amyloid and antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Last, Nicholas B; Miranker, Andrew D

    2013-04-16

    Poration of bacterial membranes by antimicrobial peptides such as magainin 2 is a significant activity performed by innate immune systems. Pore formation by soluble forms of amyloid proteins such as islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) is implicated in cell death in amyloidoses. Similarities in structure and poration activity of these two systems suggest a commonality of mechanism. Here, we investigate and compare the mechanisms by which these peptides induce membrane leakage and bacterial cell death through the measurement of liposome leakage kinetics and bacterial growth inhibition. For both systems, leakage occurs through the nucleation-dependent formation of stable membrane pores. Remarkably, we observe IAPP and magainin 2 to be fully cross-cooperative in the induction of leakage and inhibition of bacterial growth. The effects are dramatic, with mixtures of these peptides showing activities >100-fold greater than simple sums of the activities of individual peptides. Direct protein-protein interactions cannot be the origin of cooperativity, as IAPP and its enantiomer D-IAPP are equally cross-cooperative. We conclude that IAPP and magainin 2 induce membrane leakage and cytotoxicity through a shared, cross-cooperative, tension-induced poration mechanism.

  15. Structural basis for the enhanced activity of cyclic antimicrobial peptides : The case of BPC194

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mika, Jacek T.; Moiset, Gemma; Cirac, Anna D.; Feliu, Lidia; Bardaji, Eduard; Planas, Marta; Sengupta, Durba; Marrink, Siewert J.; Poolman, Bert

    We report the molecular basis for the differences in activity of cyclic and linear antimicrobial peptides. We iteratively performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and biophysical measurements to probe the interaction of a cyclic antimicrobial peptide and its inactive linear analogue with

  16. The Molecular Basis for Antimicrobial Activity of Pore-Forming Cyclic Peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cirac, Anna D.; Moiset, Gemma; Mika, Jacek T.; Kocer, Armagan; Salvador, Pedro; Poolman, Bert; Marrink, Siewert J.; Sengupta, Durba

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides is, to our knowledge, still poorly understood. To probe the biophysical characteristics that confer activity, we present here a molecular-dynamics and biophysical study of a cyclic antimicrobial peptide and its inactive linear analog. In the

  17. Neuropeptide-derived antimicrobial peptides from invertebrates for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzet, Michel

    2005-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century, important medicinal progress has led medical doctors to think that the end of devastating epidemics has arrived. In 1930, the discovery of sulfamides and penicillin opened a wide area of applications able to fight against bacterial infections. However, almost all antibiotics were baffled by the great ability to adaptation of bacteria (1) and the emergence of new bacterial agents, discovered with up-dated technologies. The living world is perpetually in co-evolution and since more than 3 billion years, bacteria have developed resistance mechanisms to overcome external aggressions. Thus, in the middle of the 80th century, multi-resistant bacteria appeared and disseminated out from hospitals. In this context, researches have been developed in order to find new antimicrobial substances to destroy such new types of bacteria. Thus, several groups have turned their focus on invertebrates, which co-evoluad with human and have appeared on the planet since a long time. Evidence of new families of antimicrobial substances isolated from invertebrates different to the classical cationic peptide family i.e. dipeptides and anionic peptides been given. Moreover, these molecules are also present in human and may serve in the innate immune response as an important survival strategy.

  18. Fitness of Salmonella mutants resistant to antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofton, Hava; Anwar, Naeem; Rhen, Mikael; Andersson, Dan I

    2015-02-01

    To examine the effects of mutations in the waaY, phoP and pmrB genes, which confer resistance to antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), on fitness of Salmonella Typhimurium. Survival during low pH, oxidative stress, stationary-phase incubation, exposure to serum and bile and growth in mice and laboratory media were determined by time-kills, disc inhibition assays, competition experiments and optical density measurements. Individual mutations in the waaY gene (involved in LPS core biosynthesis) and in the phoP and pmrB genes (part of two different two-component regulatory systems, phoPQ and pmrAB) conferred no or minor effects on bacterial survival during stressful in vitro conditions or in mice. In contrast, a waaY-phoP-pmrB triple mutant was compromised under most assay conditions. Results from this study show that AMP resistance can be cost-free, as assessed by several assays that attempt to mimic the conditions a bacterium might encounter within a host. Our findings imply that future therapeutic use of AMPs could select for fit mutants with cross-resistance to human defence peptides and that potential resistance development in response to therapeutic use of AMPs needs to be carefully monitored. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Antimicrobial peptides in marine invertebrate health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destoumieux-Garzón, Delphine; Rosa, Rafael Diego; Schmitt, Paulina; Barreto, Cairé; Vidal-Dupiol, Jeremie; Mitta, Guillaume; Gueguen, Yannick; Bachère, Evelyne

    2016-05-26

    Aquaculture contributes more than one-third of the animal protein from marine sources worldwide. A significant proportion of aquaculture products are derived from marine protostomes that are commonly referred to as 'marine invertebrates'. Among them, penaeid shrimp (Ecdysozosoa, Arthropoda) and bivalve molluscs (Lophotrochozoa, Mollusca) are economically important. Mass rearing of arthropods and molluscs causes problems with pathogens in aquatic ecosystems that are exploited by humans. Remarkably, species of corals (Cnidaria) living in non-exploited ecosystems also suffer from devastating infectious diseases that display intriguing similarities with those affecting farmed animals. Infectious diseases affecting wild and farmed animals that are present in marine environments are predicted to increase in the future. This paper summarizes the role of the main pathogens and their interaction with host immunity, with a specific focus on antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and pathogen resistance against AMPs. We provide a detailed review of penaeid shrimp AMPs and their role at the interface between the host and its resident/pathogenic microbiota. We also briefly describe the relevance of marine invertebrate AMPs in an applied context.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolutionary ecology of arthropod antimicrobial peptides'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  20. Bioactive Antimicrobial Peptides as Therapeutics for Corneal Wounds and Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Gina L.; Kasus-Jacobi, Anne; Pereira, H. Anne

    2017-01-01

    Significance: More than 2 million eye injuries and infections occur each year in the United States that leave civilians and military members with reduced or complete vision loss due to the lack of effective therapeutics. Severe ocular injuries and infections occur in varied settings including the home, workplace, and battlefields. In this review, we discuss the potential of developing antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as therapeutics for the treatment of corneal wounds and infections for which the current treatment options are inadequate. Recent Advances: Standard-of-care employs the use of fluorescein dye for the diagnosis of ocular defects and is followed by the use of antibiotics and/or steroids to treat the infection and reduce inflammation. Recent advances for treating corneal wounds include the development of amniotic membrane therapies, wound chambers, and drug-loaded hydrogels. In this review, we will discuss an innovative approach using AMPs with the dual effect of promoting corneal wound healing and clearing infections. Critical Issues: An important aspect of treating ocular injuries is that treatments need to be effective and administered expeditiously. This is especially important for injuries that occur during combat and in individuals who demonstrate delayed wound healing. To overcome gaps in current treatment modalities, bioactive peptides based on naturally occurring cationic antimicrobial proteins are being investigated as new therapeutics. Future Directions: The development of new therapeutics that can treat ocular infections and promote corneal wound healing, including the healing of persistent corneal epithelial defects, would be of great clinical benefit. PMID:28616359

  1. Bioactive Antimicrobial Peptides as Therapeutics for Corneal Wounds and Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Gina L; Kasus-Jacobi, Anne; Pereira, H Anne

    2017-06-01

    Significance: More than 2 million eye injuries and infections occur each year in the United States that leave civilians and military members with reduced or complete vision loss due to the lack of effective therapeutics. Severe ocular injuries and infections occur in varied settings including the home, workplace, and battlefields. In this review, we discuss the potential of developing antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as therapeutics for the treatment of corneal wounds and infections for which the current treatment options are inadequate. Recent Advances: Standard-of-care employs the use of fluorescein dye for the diagnosis of ocular defects and is followed by the use of antibiotics and/or steroids to treat the infection and reduce inflammation. Recent advances for treating corneal wounds include the development of amniotic membrane therapies, wound chambers, and drug-loaded hydrogels. In this review, we will discuss an innovative approach using AMPs with the dual effect of promoting corneal wound healing and clearing infections. Critical Issues: An important aspect of treating ocular injuries is that treatments need to be effective and administered expeditiously. This is especially important for injuries that occur during combat and in individuals who demonstrate delayed wound healing. To overcome gaps in current treatment modalities, bioactive peptides based on naturally occurring cationic antimicrobial proteins are being investigated as new therapeutics. Future Directions: The development of new therapeutics that can treat ocular infections and promote corneal wound healing, including the healing of persistent corneal epithelial defects, would be of great clinical benefit.

  2. Cationic antimicrobial peptide resistance mechanisms of streptococcal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRock, Christopher N; Nizet, Victor

    2015-11-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) are critical front line contributors to host defense against invasive bacterial infection. These immune factors have direct killing activity toward microbes, but many pathogens are able to resist their effects. Group A Streptococcus, group B Streptococcus and Streptococcus pneumoniae are among the most common pathogens of humans and display a variety of phenotypic adaptations to resist CAMPs. Common themes of CAMP resistance mechanisms among the pathogenic streptococci are repulsion, sequestration, export, and destruction. Each pathogen has a different array of CAMP-resistant mechanisms, with invasive disease potential reflecting the utilization of several mechanisms that may act in synergy. Here we discuss recent progress in identifying the sources of CAMP resistance in the medically important Streptococcus genus. Further study of these mechanisms can contribute to our understanding of streptococcal pathogenesis, and may provide new therapeutic targets for therapy and disease prevention. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Bacterial Resistance to Antimicrobial Peptides. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. High-Throughput Identification of Antimicrobial Peptides from Amphibious Mudskippers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yunhai; You, Xinxin; Bian, Chao; Chen, Shixi; Lv, Zhao; Qiu, Limei; Shi, Qiong

    2017-11-22

    Widespread existence of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) has been reported in various animals with comprehensive biological activities, which is consistent with the important roles of AMPs as the first line of host defense system. However, no big-data-based analysis on AMPs from any fish species is available. In this study, we identified 507 AMP transcripts on the basis of our previously reported genomes and transcriptomes of two representative amphibious mudskippers, Boleophthalmus pectinirostris (BP) and Periophthalmus magnuspinnatus (PM). The former is predominantly aquatic with less time out of water, while the latter is primarily terrestrial with extended periods of time on land. Within these identified AMPs, 449 sequences are novel; 15 were reported in BP previously; 48 are identically overlapped between BP and PM; 94 were validated by mass spectrometry. Moreover, most AMPs presented differential tissue transcription patterns in the two mudskippers. Interestingly, we discovered two AMPs, hemoglobin β1 and amylin, with high inhibitions on Micrococcus luteus. In conclusion, our high-throughput screening strategy based on genomic and transcriptomic data opens an efficient pathway to discover new antimicrobial peptides for ongoing development of marine drugs.

  4. High-Throughput Identification of Antimicrobial Peptides from Amphibious Mudskippers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhai Yi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Widespread existence of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs has been reported in various animals with comprehensive biological activities, which is consistent with the important roles of AMPs as the first line of host defense system. However, no big-data-based analysis on AMPs from any fish species is available. In this study, we identified 507 AMP transcripts on the basis of our previously reported genomes and transcriptomes of two representative amphibious mudskippers, Boleophthalmus pectinirostris (BP and Periophthalmus magnuspinnatus (PM. The former is predominantly aquatic with less time out of water, while the latter is primarily terrestrial with extended periods of time on land. Within these identified AMPs, 449 sequences are novel; 15 were reported in BP previously; 48 are identically overlapped between BP and PM; 94 were validated by mass spectrometry. Moreover, most AMPs presented differential tissue transcription patterns in the two mudskippers. Interestingly, we discovered two AMPs, hemoglobin β1 and amylin, with high inhibitions on Micrococcus luteus. In conclusion, our high-throughput screening strategy based on genomic and transcriptomic data opens an efficient pathway to discover new antimicrobial peptides for ongoing development of marine drugs.

  5. A molecular dynamics and circular dichroism study of a novel synthetic antimicrobial peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodina, N. P.; Yudenko, A. N.; Terterov, I. N.; Eliseev, I. E.

    2013-08-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are a class of small, usually positively charged amphiphilic peptides that are used by the innate immune system to combat bacterial infection in multicellular eukaryotes. Antimicrobial peptides are known for their broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and thus can be used as a basis for a development of new antibiotics against multidrug-resistant bacteria. The most challengeous task on the way to a therapeutic use of antimicrobial peptides is a rational design of new peptides with enhanced activity and reduced toxicity. Here we report a molecular dynamics and circular dichroism study of a novel synthetic antimicrobial peptide D51. This peptide was earlier designed by Loose et al. using a linguistic model of natural antimicrobial peptides. Molecular dynamics simulation of the peptide folding in explicit solvent shows fast formation of two antiparallel beta strands connected by a beta-turn that is confirmed by circular dichroism measurements. Obtained from simulation amphipatic conformation of the peptide is analysed and possible mechanism of it's interaction with bacterial membranes together with ways to enhance it's antibacterial activity are suggested.

  6. Macromolecule biosynthesis assay and fluorescence spectroscopy methods to explore antimicrobial peptide mode(s) of action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jana, Bimal; Baker, Kristin Renee; Guardabassi, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are viable alternatives to the currently available antimicrobials, and numerous studies have investigated their possible use as therapeutic agents for specific clinical applications. AMPs are a diverse class of antimicrobials that often act upon the bacterial cell me...

  7. Production of cecropin A antimicrobial peptide in rice seed endosperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Cecropin A is a natural antimicrobial peptide that exhibits rapid, potent and long-lasting lytic activity against a broad spectrum of pathogens, thus having great biotechnological potential. Here, we report a system for producing bioactive cecropin A in rice seeds. Results Transgenic rice plants expressing a codon-optimized synthetic cecropin A gene drived by an endosperm-specific promoter, either the glutelin B1 or glutelin B4 promoter, were generated. The signal peptide sequence from either the glutelin B1 or the glutelin B4 were N-terminally fused to the coding sequence of the cecropin A. We also studied whether the presence of the KDEL endoplasmic reticulum retention signal at the C-terminal has an effect on cecropin A subcellular localization and accumulation. The transgenic rice plants showed stable transgene integration and inheritance. We show that cecropin A accumulates in protein storage bodies in the rice endosperm, particularly in type II protein bodies, supporting that the glutelin N-terminal signal peptides play a crucial role in directing the cecropin A to this organelle, independently of being tagged with the KDEL endoplasmic reticulum retention signal. The production of cecropin A in transgenic rice seeds did not affect seed viability or seedling growth. Furthermore, transgenic cecropin A seeds exhibited resistance to infection by fungal and bacterial pathogens (Fusarium verticillioides and Dickeya dadantii, respectively) indicating that the in planta-produced cecropin A is biologically active. Conclusions Rice seeds can sustain bioactive cecropin A production and accumulation in protein bodies. The system might benefit the production of this antimicrobial agent for subsequent applications in crop protection and food preservation. PMID:24755305

  8. Discovery of novel antimicrobial peptides with unusual cysteine motifs in dandelion Taraxacum officinale Wigg. flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astafieva, A A; Rogozhin, E A; Odintsova, T I; Khadeeva, N V; Grishin, E V; Egorov, Ts A

    2012-08-01

    Three novel antimicrobial peptides designated ToAMP1, ToAMP2 and ToAMP3 were purified from Taraxacum officinale flowers. Their amino acid sequences were determined. The peptides are cationic and cysteine-rich and consist of 38, 44 and 42 amino acid residues for ToAMP1, ToAMP2 and ToAMP3, respectively. Importantly, according to cysteine motifs, the peptides are representatives of two novel previously unknown families of plant antimicrobial peptides. ToAMP1 and ToAMP2 share high sequence identity and belong to 6-Cys-containing antimicrobial peptides, while ToAMP3 is a member of a distinct 8-Cys family. The peptides were shown to display high antimicrobial activity both against fungal and bacterial pathogens, and therefore represent new promising molecules for biotechnological and medicinal applications. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Antimicrobial peptides with selective antitumor mechanisms: prospect for anticancer applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslouches, Berthony; Di, Y. Peter

    2017-01-01

    In the last several decades, there have been significant advances in anticancer therapy. However, the development of resistance to cancer drugs and the lack of specificity related to actively dividing cells leading to toxic side effects have undermined these achievements. As a result, there is considerable interest in alternative drugs with novel antitumor mechanisms. In addition to the recent approach using immunotherapy, an effective but much cheaper therapeutic option of pharmaceutical drugs would still provide the best choice for cancer patients as the first line treatment. Ribosomally synthesized cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) or host defense peptides (HDP) display broad-spectrum activity against bacteria based on electrostatic interactions with negatively charged lipids on the bacterial surface. Because of increased proportions of phosphatidylserine (negatively charged) on the surface of cancer cells compared to normal cells, cationic amphipathic peptides could be an effective source of anticancer agents that are both selective and refractory to current resistance mechanisms. We reviewed herein the prospect for AMP application to cancer treatment, with a focus on modes of action of cationic AMPs. PMID:28422728

  10. Antimicrobial peptides with selective antitumor mechanisms: prospect for anticancer applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslouches, Berthony; Di, Y Peter

    2017-07-11

    In the last several decades, there have been significant advances in anticancer therapy. However, the development of resistance to cancer drugs and the lack of specificity related to actively dividing cells leading to toxic side effects have undermined these achievements. As a result, there is considerable interest in alternative drugs with novel antitumor mechanisms. In addition to the recent approach using immunotherapy, an effective but much cheaper therapeutic option of pharmaceutical drugs would still provide the best choice for cancer patients as the first line treatment. Ribosomally synthesized cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) or host defense peptides (HDP) display broad-spectrum activity against bacteria based on electrostatic interactions with negatively charged lipids on the bacterial surface. Because of increased proportions of phosphatidylserine (negatively charged) on the surface of cancer cells compared to normal cells, cationic amphipathic peptides could be an effective source of anticancer agents that are both selective and refractory to current resistance mechanisms. We reviewed herein the prospect for AMP application to cancer treatment, with a focus on modes of action of cationic AMPs.

  11. Development of novel LL-37 derived antimicrobial peptides with LPS and LTA neutralizing and antimicrobial activities for therapeutic application.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nell, M.J.; Tjabringa, G.S.; Wafelman, A.R.; Verrijk, R.; Hiemstra, P.S.; Drijfhout, J.W.; Grote, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    New peptides for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) neutralization in upper respiratory tract infections were developed and evaluated in terms of efficacy and safety for application in humans. Based on the sequence of the human antimicrobial peptide LL-37 we developed and

  12. Solution NMR studies of amphibian antimicrobial peptides: linking structure to function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Evan F; Hunter, Howard N; Matsuzaki, Katsumi; Vogel, Hans J

    2009-08-01

    The high-resolution three-dimensional structure of an antimicrobial peptide has implications for the mechanism of its antimicrobial activity, as the conformation of the peptide provides insights into the intermolecular interactions that govern the binding to its biological target. For many cationic antimicrobial peptides the negatively charged membranes surrounding the bacterial cell appear to be a main target. In contrast to what has been found for other classes of antimicrobial peptides, solution NMR studies have revealed that in spite of the wide diversity in the amino acid sequences of amphibian antimicrobial peptides (AAMPs), they all adopt amphipathic alpha-helical structures in the presence of membrane-mimetic micelles, bicelles or organic solvent mixtures. In some cases the amphipathic AAMP structures are directly membrane-perturbing (e.g. magainin, aurein and the rana-box peptides), in other instances the peptide spontaneously passes through the membrane and acts on intracellular targets (e.g. buforin). Armed with a high-resolution structure, it is possible to relate the peptide structure to other relevant biophysical and biological data to elucidate a mechanism of action. While many linear AAMPs have significant antimicrobial activity of their own, mixtures of peptides sometimes have vastly improved antibiotic effects. Thus, synergy among antimicrobial peptides is an avenue of research that has recently attracted considerable attention. While synergistic relationships between AAMPs are well described, it is becoming increasingly evident that analyzing the intermolecular interactions between these peptides will be essential for understanding the increased antimicrobial effect. NMR structure determination of hybrid peptides composed of known antimicrobial peptides can shed light on these intricate synergistic relationships. In this work, we present the first NMR solution structure of a hybrid peptide composed of magainin 2 and PGLa bound to SDS and DPC

  13. Conformational Aspects of High Content Packing of Antimicrobial Peptides in Polymer Microgels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Shalini; Datta, Aritreyee; Borro, Bruno C

    2017-01-01

    Successful use of microgels as delivery systems of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) requires control of factors determining peptide loading and release to/from the microgels as well as of membrane interactions of both microgel particles and released peptides. Addressing these, we here investigate ef...

  14. Arginine and Tryptophan rich antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) : modifications, application and mode of action

    OpenAIRE

    Penkova, Maya

    2010-01-01

    Da multiresistente Bakterienstämme ein häufiges Problem darstellen, besteht Bedarf an neuen Verbindungen, die keine Resistenzen hervorrufen. Eine solche Verbindungsklasse stellen die kationischen antimikrobiellen Peptide dar (cationic antimicrobial peptides, AMPs). Mithilfe von Festphasenpeptidsynthese wurden Peptide und deren Metallocenanaloga (Ferrocen- und Ruthenocenbiokonjugate) hergestellt und auf ihre biologische Aktivität untersucht. Alle hergestellten Verbindungen zeigten ...

  15. A novel antimicrobial peptide from skin secretions of the tree frog Theloderma kwangsiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hongli; Liu, Yingying; Tang, Jing; Mo, Guoxiang; Song, Yuzhu; Yan, Xiuwen; Wei, Lin; Lai, Ren

    2013-09-01

    Most of amphibians belonging to family Rhacophoridae live in arboreal habitats. A large number of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been identified from amphibian skins. No antimicrobial peptide from Rhacophoridae amphibians has been reported. In this study, we purified and characterized a novel antimicrobial peptide, pleurain-a1-thel from skin secretions of the tree frog, Theloderma kwangsiensis. Its amino acid sequence was determined as RILTMTKRVKMPQLYKQIVCRLFKTC by Edman degradation, mass spectrometry analysis and cDNA cloning. There are two cysteines, which form an intra-molecular disulfide bridge, in the sequence of pleurain-a1-thel. Pleurain-a1-thel exerted potential antimicrobial activities against wide spectrum of microorganisms, including Gram-negative and -positive bacteria and fungi. It exerted little hemolytic activity in human or rabbit red cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of antimicrobial peptide from Rhacophoridae amphibians.

  16. Antimicrobial activity and interactions of cationic peptides derived from Galleria mellonella cecropin D-like peptide with model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oñate-Garzón, José; Manrique-Moreno, Marcela; Trier, Steven; Leidy, Chad; Torres, Rodrigo; Patiño, Edwin

    2017-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are effector molecules of the innate immune system against invading pathogens. The cationic charge in their structures has a strong correlation with antimicrobial activity, being responsible for the initial electrostatic interaction between peptides and the anionic microbial surface. This paper contains evidence that charge modification in the neutral peptide Gm cecropin D-like (WT) improved the antimicrobial activity of the modified peptides. Two cationic peptides derived from WT sequence named as ΔM1 and ΔM2, with net charge of +5 and +9, respectively, showed at least an eightfold increase in their antimicrobial activity in comparison to WT. The mechanism of action of these peptides was investigated using small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) as model membranes. To study permeabilization effects of the peptides on cell membranes, entrapped calcein liposomes were used and the results showed that all peptides induced calcein release from 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (POPG) SUVs, whereas in 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), POPC/POPG and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE)/POPG SUVs, only ΔM1 and ΔM2 induced a notable permeabilization. In addition, interactions of these peptides with phospholipids at the level of the glycerol backbone and hydrophobic domain were studied through observed changes in generalized polarization and fluorescence anisotropy using probes such as Laurdan and DPH, respectively. The results suggest that peptides slightly ordered the bilayer structure at the level of glycerol backbone and on the hydrophobic core in 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DMPG) SUVs, whereas in 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC)/DMPG SUVs, only ΔM1 and ΔM2 peptides increased the order of bilayers. Thus, peptides would be inducing clustering of phospholipids creating phospholipid domains with a higher phase transition temperature.

  17. The heterologous expression strategies of antimicrobial peptides in microbial systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Ting; Ge, Haoran; He, Huahua; Liu, Yao; Zhai, Chao; Feng, Liang; Yi, Li

    2017-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) consist of molecules acting on the defense systems of numerous organisms toward tumor and multiple pathogens, such as bacteria, fungi, viruses, and parasites. Compared to traditional antibiotics, AMPs are more stable and have lower propensity for developing resistance through functioning in the innate immune system, thus having important applications in the fields of medicine, food and so on. However, despite of their high economic values, the low yield and the cumbersome extraction process in AMPs production are problems that limit their industrial application and scientific research. To conquer these obstacles, optimized heterologous expression technologies were developed that could provide effective ways to increase the yield of AMPs. In this review, the research progress on heterologous expression of AMPs using Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Pichia pastoris and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as host cells was mainly summarized, which might guide the expression strategies of AMPs in these cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Antimicrobial peptides in marine invertebrate health and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destoumieux-Garzón, Delphine; Rosa, Rafael Diego; Schmitt, Paulina; Barreto, Cairé; Vidal-Dupiol, Jeremie; Mitta, Guillaume; Gueguen, Yannick; Bachère, Evelyne

    2016-01-01

    Aquaculture contributes more than one-third of the animal protein from marine sources worldwide. A significant proportion of aquaculture products are derived from marine protostomes that are commonly referred to as ‘marine invertebrates’. Among them, penaeid shrimp (Ecdysozosoa, Arthropoda) and bivalve molluscs (Lophotrochozoa, Mollusca) are economically important. Mass rearing of arthropods and molluscs causes problems with pathogens in aquatic ecosystems that are exploited by humans. Remarkably, species of corals (Cnidaria) living in non-exploited ecosystems also suffer from devastating infectious diseases that display intriguing similarities with those affecting farmed animals. Infectious diseases affecting wild and farmed animals that are present in marine environments are predicted to increase in the future. This paper summarizes the role of the main pathogens and their interaction with host immunity, with a specific focus on antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and pathogen resistance against AMPs. We provide a detailed review of penaeid shrimp AMPs and their role at the interface between the host and its resident/pathogenic microbiota. We also briefly describe the relevance of marine invertebrate AMPs in an applied context. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolutionary ecology of arthropod antimicrobial peptides’. PMID:27160602

  19. Short antimicrobial peptides as cosmetic ingredients to deter dermatological pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahnamaeian, Mohammad; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are components of the innate immune system in many species of animals. Their diverse spectrum of activity against microbial pathogens, both as innate defense molecules and immunomodulators, makes them attractive candidates for the development of a new generation of antibiotics. Although the potential immunogenicity of AMPs means they are not suitable for injection and their susceptibility to digestive peptidases is likely to reduce their oral efficacy, they are ideal for topical formulations such as lotions, creams, shampoos, and wound dressings and could therefore be valuable products for the cosmetic industry. In this context, short AMPs (<20 amino acids) lacking disulfide bonds combine optimal antimicrobial activity with inexpensive chemical synthesis and are therefore more compatible with large-scale production and the modifications required to ensure stability, low toxicity, and microbial specificity. Proof-of-concept for the application of AMPs as novel anti-infectives has already been provided in clinical trials. This perspective considers the anti-infective properties of short AMPs lacking disulfide bonds, which are active against dermatologically important microflora. We consider the challenges that need to be addressed to facilitate the prophylactic application of AMPs in personal care products.

  20. Intestinal antimicrobial peptides during homeostasis, infection and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana R Muniz

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, including defensins and cathelicidins, constitute an arsenal of innate regulators of paramount importance in the gut. The intestinal epithelium is exposed to myriad of enteric pathogens and these endogenous peptides are essential to fend off microbes and protect against infections. It is becoming increasingly evident that AMPs shape the composition of the commensal microbiota and help maintain intestinal homeostasis. They contribute to innate immunity, hence playing important functions in health and disease. AMP expression is tightly controlled by the engagement of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs and their impairment is linked to abnormal host responses to infection and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. In this review, we provide an overview of the mucosal immune barriers and the intricate crosstalk between the host and the microbiota during homeostasis. We focus on the AMPs and pay particular attention to how PRRs promote their secretion in the intestine. Furthermore, we discuss their production and main functions in three different scenarios, at steady state, throughout infection with enteric pathogens and IBD.

  1. Immune Signaling and Antimicrobial Peptide Expression in Lepidoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Goodrich-Blair

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Many lepidopteran insects are agricultural pests that affect stored grains, food and fiber crops. These insects have negative ecological and economic impacts since they lower crop yield, and pesticides are expensive and can have off-target effects on beneficial arthropods. A better understanding of lepidopteran immunity will aid in identifying new targets for the development of specific insect pest management compounds. A fundamental aspect of immunity, and therefore a logical target for control, is the induction of antimicrobial peptide (AMP expression. These peptides insert into and disrupt microbial membranes, thereby promoting pathogen clearance and insect survival. Pathways leading to AMP expression have been extensively studied in the dipteran Drosophila melanogaster. However, Diptera are an important group of pollinators and pest management strategies that target their immune systems is not recommended. Recent advances have facilitated investigation of lepidopteran immunity, revealing both conserved and derived characteristics. Although the general pathways leading to AMP expression are conserved, specific components of these pathways, such as recognition proteins have diverged. In this review we highlight how such comparative immunology could aid in developing pest management strategies that are specific to agricultural insect pests.

  2. Membrane Active Antimicrobial Peptides: Translating Mechanistic Insights to Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianguo; Koh, Jun-Jie; Liu, Shouping; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Verma, Chandra S.; Beuerman, Roger W.

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are promising next generation antibiotics that hold great potential for combating bacterial resistance. AMPs can be both bacteriostatic and bactericidal, induce rapid killing and display a lower propensity to develop resistance than do conventional antibiotics. Despite significant progress in the past 30 years, no peptide antibiotic has reached the clinic yet. Poor understanding of the action mechanisms and lack of rational design principles have been the two major obstacles that have slowed progress. Technological developments are now enabling multidisciplinary approaches including molecular dynamics simulations combined with biophysics and microbiology toward providing valuable insights into the interactions of AMPs with membranes at atomic level. This has led to increasingly robust models of the mechanisms of action of AMPs and has begun to contribute meaningfully toward the discovery of new AMPs. This review discusses the detailed action mechanisms that have been put forward, with detailed atomistic insights into how the AMPs interact with bacterial membranes. The review further discusses how this knowledge is exploited toward developing design principles for novel AMPs. Finally, the current status, associated challenges, and future directions for the development of AMP therapeutics are discussed. PMID:28261050

  3. Focal Targeting of the Bacterial Envelope by Antimicrobial Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafi eRashid

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are utilized by both eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. AMPs such as the human beta defensins, human neutrophil peptides, human cathelicidin, and many bacterial bacteriocins are cationic and capable of binding to anionic regions of the bacterial surface. Cationic AMPs (CAMPs target anionic lipids (e.g. phosphatidylglycerol (PG and cardiolipins (CL in the cell membrane and anionic components (e.g. lipopolysaccharide (LPS and lipoteichoic acid (LTA of the cell envelope. Bacteria have evolved mechanisms to modify these same targets in order to resist CAMP killing, e.g. lysinylation of PG to yield cationic lysyl-PG and alanylation of LTA. Since CAMPs offer a promising therapeutic alternative to conventional antibiotics, which are becoming less effective due to rapidly emerging antibiotic resistance, there is a strong need to improve our understanding about the AMP mechanism of action. Recent literature suggests that AMPs often interact with the bacterial cell envelope at discrete foci. Here we review recent AMP literature, with an emphasis on focal interactions with bacteria, including (1 CAMP disruption mechanisms, (2 delocalization of membrane proteins and lipids by CAMPs, and (3 CAMP sensing systems and resistance mechanisms. We conclude with new approaches for studying the bacterial membrane, e.g., lipidomics, high resolution imaging and non-detergent-based membrane domain extraction.

  4. Molecular Design, Structures, and Activity of Antimicrobial Peptide-Mimetic Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Haruko; Palermo, Edmund F.; Yasuhara, Kazuma; Caputo, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent need for new antibiotics which are effective against drug-resistant bacteria without contributing to resistance development. We have designed and developed antimicrobial copolymers with cationic amphiphilic structures based on the mimicry of naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides. These copolymers exhibit potent antimicrobial activity against a broad spectrum of bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with no adverse hemolytic activity. Notably, these polymers also did not result in any measurable resistance development in E. coli. The peptide-mimetic design principle offers significant flexibility and diversity in the creation of new antimicrobial materials and their potential biomedical applications. PMID:23832766

  5. The pseudokinase NIPI-4 is a novel regulator of antimicrobial peptide gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sid Ahmed Labed

    Full Text Available Hosts have developed diverse mechanisms to counter the pathogens they face in their natural environment. Throughout the plant and animal kingdoms, the up-regulation of antimicrobial peptides is a common response to infection. In C. elegans, infection with the natural pathogen Drechmeria coniospora leads to rapid induction of antimicrobial peptide gene expression in the epidermis. Through a large genetic screen we have isolated many new mutants that are incapable of upregulating the antimicrobial peptide nlp-29 in response to infection (i.e. with a Nipi or 'no induction of peptide after infection' phenotype. More than half of the newly isolated Nipi mutants do not correspond to genes previously associated with the regulation of antimicrobial peptides. One of these, nipi-4, encodes a member of a nematode-specific kinase family. NIPI-4 is predicted to be catalytically inactive, thus to be a pseudokinase. It acts in the epidermis downstream of the PKC∂ TPA-1, as a positive regulator of nlp antimicrobial peptide gene expression after infection. It also controls the constitutive expression of antimicrobial peptide genes of the cnc family that are targets of TGFß regulation. Our results open the way for a more detailed understanding of how host defense pathways can be molded by environmental pathogens.

  6. Antimicrobial Peptide-Driven Colloidal Transformations in Liquid-Crystalline Nanocarriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gontsarik, Mark; Buhmann, Matthias T; Yaghmur, Anan

    2016-01-01

    Designing efficient colloidal systems for the delivery of membrane active antimicrobial peptides requires in-depth understanding of their structural and morphological characteristics. Using dispersions of inverted type bicontinuous cubic phase (cubosomes), we examine the effect of integrating...... guide the design of new nanocarriers for antimicrobial peptides and may provide essential knowledge on the mechanisms underlying the bacterial membrane disruption with peptide-loaded nanostructures....... the amphiphilic peptide LL-37 at different concentrations on the self-assembled structure and evaluate its bactericidal ability against Escherichia coli. Small-angle X-ray scattering, dynamic light scattering, and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy show that LL-37 integrates into the bicontinuous cubic...

  7. Selective Acylation Enhances Membrane Charge Sensitivity of the Antimicrobial Peptide Mastoparan-X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Etzerodt, Thomas Povl; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Rasmussen, Palle

    2011-01-01

    to previous reports where peptide acylation enhanced membrane affinity but also resulted in impaired selectivity. Our result may provide a method of enhancing selectivity of antimicrobial peptides toward bacterial membranes due to their high negative charge—a finding that should be investigated for other......, more potent antimicrobial peptides in future studies.......The partitioning of the wasp venom peptide mastoparan-X (MPX) into neutral and negatively charged lipid membranes has been compared with two new synthetic analogs of MPX where the Nα-terminal of MPX was acylated with propanoic acid (PA) and octanoic acid (OA). The acylation caused a considerable...

  8. Strategies and molecular tools to fight antimicrobial resistance: resistome, transcriptome and antimicrobial peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Stephan Tavares

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The increasing number of antibiotic resistant bacteria motivates prospective research towards discovery of new antimicrobial active substances. There are, however, controversies concerning the cost-effectiveness of such research with regards to the description of new substances with novel cellular interactions, or description of new uses of existing substances to overcome resistance. Although examination of bacteria isolated from remote locations with limited exposure to humans has revealed an absence of antibiotic resistance genes, it is accepted that antibiotic resistance genes were both abundant and diverse in ancient living organisms, as detected in DNA recovered from Pleistocene deposits (30,000 years ago. Indeed, even before the first clinical use of antibiotics more than 60 years ago, resistant organisms had been isolated. Bacteria can exhibit different strategies for resistance against antibiotics. New genetic information may lead to the modification of protein structure affecting the antibiotic carriage into the cell, enzymatic inactivation of drugs, or even modification of cellular structure interfering in the drug-bacteria interaction. There are still plenty of new genes out there in the environment that can be appropriated by putative pathogenic bacteria to resist antimicrobial agents. On the other hand, there are compounds with antibiotic activity just waiting to be discovered. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are molecules which are wide-spread in all forms of life, from multi-cellular organisms to bacterial cells used to interfere with microbial growth. Several AMPs have been shown to be effective against multi-drug resistant bacteria and have low propensity to resistance development, probably due to their unique mode of action, different from well known antimicrobial drugs. These substances may interact in different ways with bacterial cell membrane, protein synthesis, protein modulation and protein folding.

  9. The evolution of antimicrobial peptide resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is shaped by strong epistatic interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochumsen, Nicholas; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Pedersen, Søren Damkiær

    2016-01-01

    Colistin is an antimicrobial peptide that has become the only remaining alternative for the treatment of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections, but little is known of how clinical levels of colistin resistance evolve. We use in vitro experimental evolution and whole...... resistance by functionalizing and increasing the effect of the other mutations. These results add to our understanding of clinical antimicrobial peptide resistance and the prediction of resistance evolution....

  10. Design of embedded-hybrid antimicrobial peptides with enhanced cell selectivity and anti-biofilm activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xu

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides have attracted considerable attention because of their broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and their low prognostic to induce antibiotic resistance which is the most common source of failure in bacterial infection treatment along with biofilms. The method to design hybrid peptide integrating different functional domains of peptides has many advantages. In this study, we designed an embedded-hybrid peptide R-FV-I16 by replacing a functional defective sequence RR7 with the anti-biofilm sequence FV7 embedded in the middle position of peptide RI16. The results demonstrated that the synthetic hybrid the peptide R-FV-I16 had potent antimicrobial activity over a wide range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, as well as anti-biofilm activity. More importantly, R-FV-I16 showed lower hemolytic activity and cytotoxicity. Fluorescent assays demonstrated that R-FV-I16 depolarized the outer and the inner bacterial membranes, while scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy further indicated that this peptide killed bacterial cells by disrupting the cell membrane, thereby damaging membrane integrity. Results from SEM also provided evidence that R-FV-I16 inherited anti-biofilm activity from the functional peptide sequence FV7. Embedded-hybrid peptides could provide a new pattern for combining different functional domains and showing an effective avenue to screen for novel antimicrobial agents.

  11. Novel cathelicidin-derived antimicrobial peptides from Equus asinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zekuan; Wang, Yipeng; Zhai, Lei; Che, Qiaolin; Wang, Hui; Du, Shuyuan; Wang, Duo; Feng, Feifei; Liu, Jingze; Lai, Ren; Yu, Haining

    2010-05-01

    In the present study, EA-CATH1 and EA-CATH2 were identified from a constructed lung cDNA library of donkey (Equus asinus) as members of cathelicidin-derived antimicrobial peptides, using a nested PCR-based cloning strategy. Composed of 25 and 26 residues, respectively, EA-CATH1 and EA-CATH2 are smaller than most other cathelicidins and have no sequence homology to other cathelicidins identified to date. Chemically synthesized EA-CATH1 exerted potent antimicrobial activity against most of the 32 strains of bacteria and fungi tested, especially the clinically isolated drug-resistant strains, and minimal inhibitory concentration values against Gram-positive bacteria were mostly in the range of 0.3-2.4 microg mL(-1). EA-CATH1 showed an extraordinary serum stability and no haemolytic activity against human erythrocytes in a dose up to 20 microg mL(-1). CD spectra showed that EA-CATH1 mainly adopts an alpha-helical conformation in a 50% trifluoroethanol/water solution, but a random coil in aqueous solution. Scanning electron microscope observations of Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC2592) treated with EA-CATH1 demonstrated that EA-CATH could cause rapid disruption of the bacterial membrane, and in turn lead to cell lysis. This might explain the much faster killing kinetics of EA-CATH1 than conventional antibiotics revealed by killing kinetics data. In the presence of CaCl(2), EA-CATH1 exerted haemagglutination activity, which might potentiate an inhibition against the bacterial polyprotein interaction with the host erythrocyte surface, thereby possibly restricting bacterial colonization and spread.

  12. Design of potent, non-toxic anticancer peptides based on the structure of the antimicrobial peptide, temporin-1CEa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qing-Zhu; Wang, Che; Lang, Lei; Zhou, Yang; Wang, He; Shang, De-Jing

    2013-11-01

    Recent advances in the search for novel anticancer agents have indicated that the positively charged antimicrobial peptides have emerged as promising agents offering several advantages over the conventional anticancer drugs. As a naturally occurring, cationic, α-helical antimicrobial peptide, temproin-1CEa has been proved to exhibit a potent anticancer effect and a moderate hemolytic activity. In order to reduce the hemolytic activity of temporin-1CEa and improve its anticancer potency towards a range of human breast cancer cells, in the present study, six analogs of temporin-1CEa were rationally designed and synthesized. The amphipathicity levels and α-helical structural patterns of peptides were reserved, while their cationic property and hydrophobicity were changed. The results of MTT and hemolysis assay indicated that the analog peptides displayed an improved anticancer activity and showed an overall optimized therapeutic index. The hydrophobicity of peptides was positively correlated with their hemolytic and antitumor activities. Moreover, the data suggest a strategy of increasing the cationicity while maintaining the moderate hydrophobicity of naturally occurring amphipathic α-helical peptides to generate analogs with improved cytotoxicity against tumor cells but decreased activity against non-neoplastic cells such as human erythrocytes. This work highlights the potential for rational design and synthesis of improved antimicrobial peptides that have the capability to be used therapeutically for treatment of cancers.

  13. A novel cysteine-rich antimicrobial peptide from the mucus of the snail of Achatina fulica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jian; Wang, Wenhong; Yang, Xiaomei; Yan, Xiuwen; Liu, Rui

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are important components of the innate immunity. Many antimicrobial peptides have been found from marine mollusks. Little information about AMPs of mollusks living on land is available. A novel cysteine-rich antimicrobial peptide (mytimacin-AF) belonging to the peptide family of mytimacins was purified and characterized from the mucus of the snail of Achatina fulica. Its cDNA was also cloned from the cDNA library. Mytimacin-AF is composed of 80 amino acid residues including 10 cysteines. Mytimacin-AF showed potent antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria and the fungus Candida albicans. Among tested microorganisms, it exerted strongest antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus with a minimal peptide concentration (MIC) of 1.9 μg/ml. Mytimacin-AF had little hemolytic activity against human blood red cells. The current work confirmed the presence of mytimacin-like antimicrobial peptide in land-living mollusks. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Serum Stabilities of Short Tryptophan-and Arginine-Rich Antimicrobial Peptide Analogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, L.T.; Chau, J.K.; Perry, N.A.; de Boer, L.; Zaat, S.A.J.; Vogel, H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Several short antimicrobial peptides that are rich in tryptophan and arginine residues were designed with a series of simple modifications such as end capping and cyclization. The two sets of hexapeptides are based on the Trp- and Arg-rich primary sequences from the "antimicrobial

  15. Structural and biophysical characterization of an antimicrobial peptide chimera comprised of lactoferricin and lactoferrampin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haney, E.F.; Nazmi, K.; Bolscher, J.G.M.; Vogel, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    Lactoferricin and lactoferrampin are two antimicrobial peptides found in the N-terminal lobe of bovine lactoferrin with broad spectrum antimicrobial activity against a range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as Candida albicans. A heterodimer comprised of lactoferrampin joined to a

  16. Antimicrobial peptide scolopendrasin VII, derived from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates macrophage chemotaxis via formyl peptide receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoo Jung; Lee, Ha Young; Jung, Young Su; Park, Joon Seong; Hwang, Jae Sam; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we report that one of the antimicrobial peptides scolopendrasin VII, derived from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates actin polymerization and the subsequent chemotactic migration of macrophages through the activation of ERK and protein kinase B (Akt) activity. The scolopendrasin VII-induced chemotactic migration of macrophages is inhibited by the formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) antagonist cyclosporine H. We also found that scolopendrasin VII stimulate the chemotactic migration of FPR1-transfected RBL-2H3 cells, but not that of vector-transfected cells; moreover, scolopendrasin VII directly binds to FPR1. Our findings therefore suggest that the antimicrobial peptide scolopendrasin VII, derived from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates macrophages, resulting in chemotactic migration via FPR1 signaling, and the peptide can be useful in the study of FPR1-related biological responses.

  17. The Role Of Milk Peptide As Antimicrobial Agent In Supporting Health Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eni Kusumaningtyas

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptide is commonly present in all species as a component of their innate immune defense against infection. Antimicrobial peptides derived from milk such as isracidin, casocidin, casecidin and other fragments with variety of amino acid sequence are released upon enzymatic hydrolysis from milk protein К-casein, α-casein, β-casein, α-lactalbumin and β- lactoglobulin. These peptides were produced by the activity of digestive or microbial protease such as trypsin, pepsin, chymosin or alcalase. The mode of action of these peptides is by interaction of their positive with negative charge of target cell membrane leading to disruption of membrane associated with physiological event such as cell division or translocation of peptide across the membrane to interact with cytoplasmic target. Modification of charged or nonpolar aliphatic residues within peptides can enhance or reduce the activities of the peptides against a number of microbial strains and it seems to be strain dependent. Several peptides act not only as an antimicrobial but also as an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, antioxidant, immunomodulator, antiinflamation, food and feed preservative. Although the commercial production of these peptides is still limited due to lack of suitable large-scale technologies, fast development of some methods for peptide production will hopefully increase the possibility for mass production.

  18. A consistent nomenclature of antimicrobial peptides isolated from frogs of the subfamily Phyllomedusinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiche, Mohamed; Ladram, Ali; Nicolas, Pierre

    2008-11-01

    A growing number of cationic antimicrobial peptides have been isolated from the skin of hylid frogs belonging to the Phyllomedusinae subfamily. The amino acid sequences of these peptides are currently located in several databases under identifiers with no consistent system of nomenclature to describe them. In order to provide a workable terminology for antimicrobial peptides from Phyllomedusid frogs, we have made a systematic effort to collect, analyze, and classify all the Phyllomedusid peptide sequences available in databases. We propose that frogs belonging to the Phyllomedusinae subfamily should be described by the species names set out in Amphibian Species of the World: http://research.amnh.org/herpetology/amphibia/index.php, American Museum of Natural History, New York, USA. Multiple alignments analysis of at least 80 antimicrobial peptides isolated from 12 Phyllomedusinae species were distributed in seven distinct peptide families including dermaseptin, phylloseptin, plasticin, dermatoxin, phylloxin, hyposin and orphan peptides, and will be considered as the name of the headgroup of each family. The parent peptide's name should be followed by the first upper letter of the species for orthologous peptides and publication date determines priority. For example, the abbreviation B for bicolor and H for hypochondrialis. When two species begin with the same letter, two letters in upper case should be used (the first letter followed by the second or the third letter and so on). For example, the abbreviation DI for distincta, DU for duellmani, VA for vaillanti and VN for vanzolinii. Paralogous peptides should bear letter(s) in upper case followed by numbers.

  19. Endogenous Antimicrobial Peptide Expression in Response to Bacterial Epidermal Colonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Brandwein

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial commensal colonization of human skin is vital for the training and maintenance of the skin’s innate and adaptive immune functions. In addition to its physical barrier against pathogen colonization, the skin expresses a variety of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs which are expressed constitutively and induced in response to pathogenic microbial stimuli. These AMPs are differentially effective against a suite of microbial skin colonizers, including both bacterial and fungal residents of the skin. We review the breadth of microorganism-induced cutaneous AMP expression studies and their complementary findings on the efficacy of skin AMPs against different bacterial and fungal species. We suggest further directions for skin AMP research based on emerging skin microbiome knowledge in an effort to advance our understanding of the nuanced host–microbe balance on human skin. Such advances should enable the scientific community to bridge the gap between descriptive disease-state AMP studies and experimental single-species in vitro studies, thereby enabling research endeavors that more closely mimic the natural skin environs.

  20. Potential Use of Antimicrobial Peptides as Vaginal Spermicides/Microbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nongnuj Tanphaichitr

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The concurrent increases in global population and sexually transmitted infection (STI demand a search for agents with dual spermicidal and microbicidal properties for topical vaginal application. Previous attempts to develop the surfactant spermicide, nonoxynol-9 (N-9, into a vaginal microbicide were unsuccessful largely due to its inefficiency to kill microbes. Furthermore, N-9 causes damage to the vaginal epithelium, thus accelerating microbes to enter the women’s body. For this reason, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, naturally secreted by all forms of life as part of innate immunity, deserve evaluation for their potential spermicidal effects. To date, twelve spermicidal AMPs have been described including LL-37, magainin 2 and nisin A. Human cathelicidin LL-37 is the most promising spermicidal AMP to be further developed for vaginal use for the following reasons. First, it is a human AMP naturally produced in the vagina after intercourse. Second, LL-37 exerts microbicidal effects to numerous microbes including those that cause STI. Third, its cytotoxicity is selective to sperm and not to the female reproductive tract. Furthermore, the spermicidal effects of LL-37 have been demonstrated in vivo in mice. Therefore, the availability of LL-37 as a vaginal spermicide/microbicide will empower women for self-protection against unwanted pregnancies and STI.

  1. Reactive Oxygen Species, Apoptosis, Antimicrobial Peptides and Human Inflammatory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babatunji Emmanuel Oyinloye

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Excessive free radical generation, especially reactive oxygen species (ROS leading to oxidative stress in the biological system, has been implicated in the pathogenesis and pathological conditions associated with diverse human inflammatory diseases (HIDs. Although inflammation which is considered advantageous is a defensive mechanism in response to xenobiotics and foreign pathogen; as a result of cellular damage arising from oxidative stress, if uncontrolled, it may degenerate to chronic inflammation when the ROS levels exceed the antioxidant capacity. Therefore, in the normal resolution of inflammatory reactions, apoptosis is acknowledged to play a crucial role, while on the other hand, dysregulation in the induction of apoptosis by enhanced ROS production could also result in excessive apoptosis identified in the pathogenesis of HIDs. Apparently, a careful balance must be maintained in this complex environment. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs have been proposed in this review as an excellent candidate capable of playing prominent roles in maintaining this balance. Consequently, in novel drug design for the treatment and management of HIDs, AMPs are promising candidates owing to their size and multidimensional properties as well as their wide spectrum of activities and indications of reduced rate of resistance.

  2. Biosynthesis of the Polycyclic Antimicrobial Peptides Lacticin 481, Haloduracin, and Cinnamycin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lisa E.

    2009-01-01

    Lantibiotics are bacterial-derived polycyclic antimicrobial peptides. They are genetically encoded and ribosomally synthesized as precursor peptides containing a structural region that undergoes post-translational modification and a leader sequence that is not modified. Specific serine and threonine residues in the pre-lantibiotic structural…

  3. Side Chain Hydrophobicity Modulates Therapeutic Activity and Membrane Selectivity of Antimicrobial Peptide Mastoparan-X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Etzerodt, Thomas Povl; Gjetting, Torben

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of new anti-infective compounds is stagnating and multi-resistant bacteria continue to emerge, threatening to end the "antibiotic era''. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and lipo-peptides such as daptomycin offer themselves as a new potential class of antibiotics; however, further opti...

  4. Label-free detection of biomolecular interaction — DNA — Antimicrobial peptide binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fojan, Peter; Jensen, Kasper Risgaard; Gurevich, Leonid

    2011-01-01

    of plasmon based biosensors to the study of the interaction of Antimicrobial peptide IL4 and DNA. Our results indicate high affinity binding between IL4 and DNA thereby preventing DNA replication and eventually killing the affected cell. We speculate that this is common for a large class of Antimicrobial...... an interest in Antimicrobial peptides that are active against broad range of infections including bacteria, fungi and viruses and were shown to be capable of treating multi-resistant infection either alone or in combination with the conventional antibiotics. In this paper , we demonstrate an application...

  5. Antimicrobial peptides: the role of hydrophobicity in the alpha helical structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandurangan Perumal

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are a class of molecule obtained from plants, insects, animals, and humans. These peptides have been classified into five categories: 1. Anionic peptide, 2. Linear alpha helical cationic peptide, 3. Cationic peptide, 4. Anionic and cationic peptides with disulphide bonds, and 5. Anionic and cationic peptide fragments of larger proteins. Factors affecting AMPs are sequence, size, charge, hydrophobicity, amphipathicity, structure and conformation. Synthesis of these peptides is convenient by using solid phase peptide synthesis by using FMOC chemistry protocol. The secondary structures of three synthetic peptides were determined by circular dichroism. Also, it was compared the stability of the α-helical structure and confirmed the percentage of helix of these peptides by using circular dichroism. Some of these AMPs show therapeutic properties like antimicrobial, antiviral, contraceptive, and anticancer. The formulations of some peptides have been entered into the phase I, II, or III of clinical trials. This article to review briefly the sources, classification, factors affecting AMPs activity, synthesis, characterization, mechanism of action and therapeutic concern of AMPs and mainly focussed on percentage of α-helical structure in various medium.

  6. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs): The quintessential 'offense and defense' molecules are more than antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Seema; Akhtar, Nadeem

    2017-09-18

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are cationic amphiphilic molecules with α-helix or β-sheet linear motifs and linear or cyclic configurations. For their role in 'defense and offense', they are present in all living organisms. AMPs are named so, as they inhibit a wide array of microbes by membrane pore formation and subsequent perturbation of mitochondrial membrane ionic balance. However, their functional repertoire is expanding with validated roles in cytotoxicity, wound healing, angiogenesis, apoptosis, and chemotaxis [1]. A number of endogenous AMPs have been characterized in human body such as defensins, cathelicidins, histatins etc. They mediate critical functions, but when homeostasis is broken, they turn hostile and initiate inflammatory diseases. This review discusses the sources of therapeutic AMPs; auto-immunity risks of endogenous AMPs, and their dermatological applications; normally overlooked risks of the peptides; and scopes ahead. This holistic work is expected to be a valuable reference for further research in this field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Cellular Membrane Composition Requirement by Antimicrobial and Anticancer Peptide GA-K4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishig-Ochir, Tsogbadrakh; Gombosuren, Davaadulam; Jigjid, Altanchimeg; Tuguldur, Badamkhatan; Chuluunbaatar, Galbadrakh; Urnukhsaikhan, Enerelt; Pathak, Chinar; Lee, Bong-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides important for innate immunity are widely studied for their antimicrobial and anticancer activity. The primary target of these AMPs is believed to be the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. However, the interaction between cytoplasmic membrane and the antimicrobial peptides remains poorly understood. Therefore to focus on the target membrane composition that is required by AMPs to interact with membranes, we have examined the interaction of the antimicrobial and anticancer active 11-residue GA-K4 (FLKWLFKWAKK) peptide with model and intact cell membranes. Effect on the structural conformational properties of GA-K4 peptide was investigated by means of far-UV CD and fluorescence spectroscopic methods. The different conformation of GA-K4 peptide in large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) bilayer and micelle environment suggest that the curvature has an influence on the secondary structure acquired by the peptide. Furthermore, the leakage experiment result confirmed that GA-K4 induced the leakage of cytoplasmic membrane in Staphylococcus аureus bacterial cells. Fluorescence data revealed the interfacial location of GA-K4 peptide in the model membranes. The blue-shift in emission wavelength by tryptophan residues in fluorescence data indicated the penetration of GA-K4 peptide in micelles and phospholipid bilayers. These results showed that the GA-K4 peptide is a membrane-active peptide and its activity depends on membrane curvature and lipid composition. Although further studies are required to confirm the mechanism of action, the data suggest mechanism of toroidal pore formation for the interaction of GA-K4 peptide with membranes. Our studies will be helpful in better understanding of the membrane requirment of peptides to express their therapeutic effects. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Shifting gear in antimicrobial and anticancer peptides biophysical studies: from vesicles to cells

    OpenAIRE

    João M. Freire; Gaspar, Diana; Veiga, Ana Salomé; Castanho, Miguel A. R. B.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Despite the intensive study on the mechanism of action of membrane-activemolecules such as antimicrobial and anticancer peptides, most of the biophysical work has been performed using artificial model systems, mainly lipid vesicles. The use of these systems allows full control of the experimental parameters, and to obtain molecular-level detail on the action of peptides, the correlation with biological action is intangible. Recent...

  9. Quantitative single-vesicle analysis of antimicrobial peptide-induced leakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Ehrlich, Nicky; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager

    2013-01-01

    Although the research field of antimicrobial peptides has attracted considerable scientific attention in the past decades, the microbicidal mechanisms of antimicrobial peptides still remain elusive. One of the keys to a more profound comprehension of the function of these peptides is a deeper...... was combined with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to quantify leakage from a bulk collection of lipid vesicles in aqueous solution. Quantitative correlation between the two techniques was achieved through a detailed experimental protocol. The potential of combining the two techniques was tested using...

  10. Biological Applications of Designed Hairpin Peptides: As Antimicrobials and as Inhibitors of Amyloidogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivanesam, Kalkena

    More than 40 diseases have been associated with the misfolding of peptides (or proteins) that form fibrils with a very specific morphology. These peptides classified as amyloidogenic peptides have been implicated in the development of Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, Type II Diabetes, Hungtinton's Disease etc. To date, these diseases have no cure, only therapies that can ameliorate the symptoms to a degree. Inhibition of the amyloidogenesis of these peptides has been proposed as a possible treatment option. While small molecules have been heavily tested as inhibitors of amyloidogenesis, peptides have emerged as potential inhibitors. In this work, the ability of a set of designed hairpin peptides to inhibit the amyloidogenesis of two different systems, alpha-synuclein (implicated in Parkinson's Disease) and human amylin (implicated in Type II Diabetes) is tested. Using circular dichroism and thioflavin T fluorescence, the ability of these peptides to inhibit amyloidogenesis is tested. The binding loci of these inhibitors to alpha-synuclein are also explored. The use of peptides as antimicrobials on the other hand is not a novel concept. However, most antimicrobial peptides, both natural and designed, rely heavily on covalent stabilizations in order to maintain secondary structure. In this study, non-covalent stabilizations are applied to a couple of natural as well as designed antimicrobials in order to study the effects of secondary structure stabilization on biological activity.

  11. Antimicrobial activity of the scolopendrasin V peptide identified from the centipede, Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joon Ha; Kim, In-Woo; Kim, Mi-Ae; Ahn, Mi-Young; Yun, Eun-Young; Hwang, Jae Sam

    2016-10-25

    In a previous study, we analyzed the transcriptome of Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans using next generation sequencing technology and identified several antimicrobial peptide candidates. One of peptides, scolopendrasin V, was selected based on the physicochemical properties of antimicrobial peptides using a bioinformatics strategy. In this study, we assessed the antimicrobial activities of scolopendrasin V by using radial diffusion assay and colony count assay. We also investigated the mode of action of scolopendrasin V using flow cytometry. We found that scolopendrasin V's mechanism of action involved binding to the surface of microorganisms via a specific interaction with lipopolysaccharides, lipoteichoic acid, and peptidoglycans, which are components of the bacterial membrane. These results provide a basis for developing peptide antibiotics.

  12. Antifungal activity of synthetic peptides derived from Impatiens balsamina antimicrobial peptides Ib-AMP1 and Ib-AMP4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thevissen, K.; Francois, E.J.A.; Sijtsma, L.; Amerongen, van A.; Schaaper, W.M.M.; Meloen, R.; Posthuma-Trumpie, G.A.; Broekaert, W.F.; Cammue, B.P.A.

    2005-01-01

    Seeds of Impatiens balsamina contain a set of related antimicrobial peptides (Ib-AMPs). We have produced a synthetic variant of Ib-AMP1, oxidized to the bicyclic native conformation, which was fully active on yeast and fungal strains; and four linear 20-mer Ib-AMP variants, including two all-d

  13. Human antimicrobial peptide histatin 5 is a cell-penetrating peptide targeting mitochondrial ATP synthesis in Leishmania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luque-Ortega, R.J.; van 't Hof, W.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Saugar, J.M.; Rivas, L.

    2008-01-01

    Histatin 5 (Hst5) is a human salivary antimicrobial peptide that targets fungal mitochondria. In the human parasitic protozoa Leishmania, the mitochondrial ATP production is essential, as it lacks the bioenergetic switch between glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation described in some yeasts. On

  14. Tissue expression and developmental regulation of chicken cathelicidin antimicrobial peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achanta Mallika

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cathelicidins are a major family of antimicrobial peptides present in vertebrate animals with potent microbicidal and immunomodulatory activities. Four cathelicidins, namely fowlicidins 1 to 3 and cathelicidin B1, have been identified in chickens. As a first step to understand their role in early innate host defense of chickens, we examined the tissue and developmental expression patterns of all four cathelicidins. Real-time PCR revealed an abundant expression of four cathelicidins throughout the gastrointestinal, respiratory, and urogenital tracts as well as in all primary and secondary immune organs of chickens. Fowlicidins 1 to 3 exhibited a similar tissue expression pattern with the highest expression in the bone marrow and lung, while cathelicidin B1 was synthesized most abundantly in the bursa of Fabricius. Additionally, a tissue-specific regulatory pattern was evident for all four cathelicidins during the first 28 days after hatching. The expression of fowlicidins 1 to 3 showed an age-dependent increase both in the cecal tonsil and lung, whereas all four cathelicidins were peaked in the bursa on day 4 after hatching, with a gradual decline by day 28. An abrupt augmentation in the expression of fowlicidins 1 to 3 was also observed in the cecum on day 28, while the highest expression of cathelicidin B1 was seen in both the lung and cecal tonsil on day 14. Collectively, the presence of cathelicidins in a broad range of tissues and their largely enhanced expression during development are suggestive of their potential important role in early host defense and disease resistance of chickens.

  15. A Mig-14-like protein (PA5003) affects antimicrobial peptide recognition in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochumsen, Nicholas; Liu, Yang; Molin, Søren

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria is a growing global health problem which is gradually making the treatment of infectious diseases less efficient. Antimicrobial peptides are small charged molecules found in organisms from the complete phylogenetic spectrum. The peptides...... are attractive candidates for novel drug development due to their activity against bacteria that are resistant to conventional antibiotics, and reports of peptide resistance are rare in the clinical setting. Paradoxically, many clinically relevant bacteria have mechanisms that can recognize and respond...... to the presence of cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) in the environment by changing the properties of the microbial surface thereby increasing the tolerance of the microbes towards the peptides. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa an essential component of this inducible tolerance mechanism is the lipopolysaccharide...

  16. Antimicrobial peptide-based treatment for endodontic infections--biotechnological innovation in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Stella Maris de Freitas; de Pádua, Gabriela Martins; Sousa, Maurício Gonçalves da Costa; Freire, Mirna de Souza; Franco, Octávio Luiz; Rezende, Taia Maria Berto

    2015-01-01

    The presence/persistence of microorganisms in the pulp and periapical area corresponds to the maintenance of an exacerbated immune response that leads to the start of periradicular bone resorption and its perpetuation. In endodontic treatment, the available intracanal medications do not have all the desirable properties in the context of endodontic infection and apical periodontitis; they need to include not only strong antimicrobial performance but also an immunomodulatory and reparative activity, without host damage. In addition, there are various levels of resistance to root canal medications. Thus, antimicrobial agents that effectively eliminate resistant species in root canals could potentially improve endodontic treatment. In the emergence of new therapies, an increasing number of studies on antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been seen over the past few years. AMPs are defense biomolecules produced in response to infection, and they have a wide spectrum of action against many oral microorganisms. There are some studies that correlate peptides and oral infections, including oral peptides, neuropeptides, and bacterial, fish, bovine and synthetic peptides. So far, there are around 120 published studies correlating endodontic microbiota with AMPs but, according to our knowledge, there are no registered patents in the American patent database. There are a considerable number of AMPs that exhibit excellent antimicrobial activity against endodontic microbiota at a small inhibitory concentration and modulate an exacerbated immune response, down-regulating bone resorption. All these reasons indicate the antimicrobial peptide-based endodontic treatment as an emerging and promising option. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Derivatives of the antimicrobial peptide BP100 for expression in plant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badosa, Esther; Moiset, Gemma; Montesinos, Laura; Talleda, Montserrat; Bardají, Eduard; Feliu, Lidia; Planas, Marta; Montesinos, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    Production of antimicrobial peptides in plants constitutes an approach for obtaining them in high amounts. However, their heterologous expression in a practical and efficient manner demands some structural requirements such as a minimum size, the incorporation of retention signals to assure their accumulation in specific tissues, and the presence of protease cleavage amino acids and of target sequences to facilitate peptide detection. Since any sequence modification may influence the biological activity, peptides that will be obtained from the expression must be screened prior to the synthesis of the genes for plant transformation. We report herein a strategy for the modification of the antimicrobial undecapeptide BP100 that allowed the identification of analogues that can be expressed in plants and exhibit optimum biological properties. We prepared 40 analogues obtained by incorporating repeated units of the antimicrobial undecapeptide, fragments of natural peptides, one or two AGPA hinges, a Gly or Ser residue at the N-terminus, and a KDEL fragment and/or the epitope tag54 at the C-terminus. Their antimicrobial, hemolytic and phytotoxic activities, and protease susceptibility were evaluated. Best sequences contained a magainin fragment linked to the antimicrobial undecapeptide through an AGPA hinge. Moreover, since the presence of a KDEL unit or of tag54 did not influence significantly the biological activity, these moieties can be introduced when designing compounds to be retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and detected using a complementary epitope. These findings may contribute to the design of peptides to be expressed in plants.

  18. Derivatives of the antimicrobial peptide BP100 for expression in plant systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Badosa

    Full Text Available Production of antimicrobial peptides in plants constitutes an approach for obtaining them in high amounts. However, their heterologous expression in a practical and efficient manner demands some structural requirements such as a minimum size, the incorporation of retention signals to assure their accumulation in specific tissues, and the presence of protease cleavage amino acids and of target sequences to facilitate peptide detection. Since any sequence modification may influence the biological activity, peptides that will be obtained from the expression must be screened prior to the synthesis of the genes for plant transformation. We report herein a strategy for the modification of the antimicrobial undecapeptide BP100 that allowed the identification of analogues that can be expressed in plants and exhibit optimum biological properties. We prepared 40 analogues obtained by incorporating repeated units of the antimicrobial undecapeptide, fragments of natural peptides, one or two AGPA hinges, a Gly or Ser residue at the N-terminus, and a KDEL fragment and/or the epitope tag54 at the C-terminus. Their antimicrobial, hemolytic and phytotoxic activities, and protease susceptibility were evaluated. Best sequences contained a magainin fragment linked to the antimicrobial undecapeptide through an AGPA hinge. Moreover, since the presence of a KDEL unit or of tag54 did not influence significantly the biological activity, these moieties can be introduced when designing compounds to be retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and detected using a complementary epitope. These findings may contribute to the design of peptides to be expressed in plants.

  19. Extreme Antimicrobial Peptide and Polymyxin B Resistance in the Genus Burkholderia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loutet, Slade A.; Valvano, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides and polymyxins are a group of naturally occurring antibiotics that can also possess immunomodulatory activities. They are considered a new source of antibiotics for treating infections by bacteria that are resistant to conventional antibiotics. Members of the genus Burkholderia, which includes various human pathogens, are inherently resistant to antimicrobial peptides. The resistance is several orders of magnitude higher than that of other Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This review summarizes our current understanding of antimicrobial peptide and polymyxin B resistance in the genus Burkholderia. These bacteria possess major and minor resistance mechanisms that will be described in detail. Recent studies have revealed that many other emerging Gram-negative opportunistic pathogens may also be inherently resistant to antimicrobial peptides and polymyxins and we propose that Burkholderia sp. are a model system to investigate the molecular basis of the resistance in extremely resistant bacteria. Understanding resistance in these types of bacteria will be important if antimicrobial peptides come to be used regularly for the treatment of infections by susceptible bacteria because this may lead to increased resistance in the species that are currently susceptible and may also open up new niches for opportunistic pathogens with high inherent resistance. PMID:22919572

  20. Functional divergence among silkworm antimicrobial peptide paralogs by the activities of recombinant proteins and the induced expression profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanying Yang

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides are small-molecule proteins that are usually encoded by multiple-gene families. They play crucial roles in the innate immune response, but reports on the functional divergence of antimicrobial peptide gene families are rare. In this study, 14 paralogs of antimicrobial peptides belonging to cecropin, moricin and gloverin families were recombinantly expressed in pET expression systems. By antimicrobial activity tests, peptides representing paralogs in the same family of cecropin and moricin families, displayed remarkable differences against 10 tested bacteria. The evolutionary rates were relatively fast in the two families, which presented obvious functional divergence among paralogs of each family. Four peptides of gloverin family had similar antimicrobial spectrum and activity against tested bacteria. The gloverin family showed similar antimicrobial function and slow evolutionary rates. By induced transcriptional activity, genes encoding active antimicrobial peptides were upregulated at obviously different levels when silkworm pupae were infected by three types of microbes. Association analysis of antimicrobial activities and induced transcriptional activities indicated that the antimicrobial activities might be positively correlated with induced transcriptional activities in the cecropin and moricin families. These results suggest that representative BmcecB6, BmcecD and Bmmor as the major effector genes have broad antimicrobial spectrum, strong antimicrobial activity and high microbe-induced expression among each family and maybe play crucial roles in eliminating microbial infection.

  1. Expression analysis and identification of antimicrobial peptide transcripts from six North American frog species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Laura S.; Fellers, Gary M.; Marranca, Jamie Marie; Kleeman, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Frogs secrete antimicrobial peptides onto their skin. We describe an assay to preserve and analyze antimicrobial peptide transcripts from field-collected skin secretions that will complement existing methods for peptide analysis. We collected skin secretions from 4 North American species in the field in California and 2 species in the laboratory. Most frogs appeared healthy after release; however, Rana boylii in the Sierra Nevada foothills, but not the Coast Range, showed signs of morbidity and 2 died after handling. The amount of total RNA extracted from skin secretions was higher in R. boylii and R. sierrae compared to R. draytonii, and much higher compared to Pseudacris regilla. Interspecies variation in amount of RNA extracted was not explained by size, but for P. regilla it depended upon collection site and date. RNA extracted from skin secretions from frogs handled with bare hands had poor quality compared to frogs handled with gloves or plastic bags. Thirty-four putative antimicrobial peptide precursor transcripts were identified. This study demonstrates that RNA extracted from skin secretions collected in the field is of high quality suitable for use in sequencing or quantitative PCR (qPCR). However, some species do not secrete profusely, resulting in very little extracted RNA. The ability to measure transcript abundance of antimicrobial peptides in field-collected skin secretions complements proteomic analyses and may provide insight into transcriptional mechanisms that could affect peptide abundance.

  2. Antimicrobial and antioxidative activities of peptides from goat milk hydrolyzed with various protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eni Kusumaningtyas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Milk is highly nutritious food containing protein as a good source of bioactive peptide that beneficial for health. This research was aimed to explore potency of bioactive peptide derived from goat milk as an antimicrobial and antioxidant. Milk was hydrolyzed by trypsin, chymotrypsin, pepsin, or protease Bacillus sp. E.13. The peptides obtained were screened for antimicrobial activities through incubation with Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella thyphimurium and Escherichia coli at 106 CFU/mL at 37°C for two hours and plated on Mueller Hinton agar. Antimicrobial activities were determined by comparing the total bacterial colonies to that of bacterial control without peptides addition. Oxidative activity was determined by 2.2’-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS and 2.2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH assays. Antimicrobial activities were shown in peptides produced from hydrolysis of goat milk protein by pepsin at 37°C, pH 2 for 90 min and by Bacillus sp. E.13 protease at 55°C, pH 11 for 30 and 60 min but the activities were not detected in peptides from hydrolysis by trypsin and chymotrypsin. Peptide from protein hydrolysis by Bacillus sp. E.13 protease could inhibit Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella thyphimurium and Escherichia coli up to 5 log cycles. The antimicrobial peptides could scavenge ABTS radical up to 86 % and DPPH radical up to 9 % at 68 μg protein/mL. Results indicated that goat milk protein hydrolyzed by Bacillus sp. E.13 protease is potential as antimicrobes and antioxidant.

  3. In vitro susceptibility of the Streptococcus milleri group to antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartie, K L; Devine, D A; Wilson, M J; Lewis, M A O

    2008-07-01

    To determine the susceptibility of strains of the Streptococcus milleri group (SMG) to commercially available antimicrobial peptides. Thirty strains of SMG from a range of sources were assessed for their susceptibility to 10 antimicrobial peptides of either human, animal or insect origin, using a double layer diffusion assay. The majority of the test strains were sensitive to the amidated peptides, mastoparan (100%; n = 30), magainin 2 amide (95%; n = 21) and indolicin (91%; n = 23). Some strains were susceptible to cecropin B (30%; n = 30) and histatin (10%; n = 30), whilst no activity was observed for the defensins HNP-1 and HNP-2, histatin 8, cecropin P1 and magainin 2. The majority of strains were resistant to the human derived peptides. The ability to resist such peptides may be a factor in the colonisation of the oral cavity and the survival and initiation of infection in the pulp and root canal environment. Interestingly, the present study indicated that amidated and alpha helical peptides exhibit antimicrobial activity against SMG. Structural modification of these peptides may allow a targeted approach for the development of these substances as preventative or therapeutic agents.

  4. C- and N-truncated antimicrobial peptides from LFampin 265 - 284: Biophysical versus microbiology results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adão Regina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactoferrin is a glycoprotein with two globular lobes, each having two domains. Since the discovery of its antimicrobial properties, efforts have been made to find peptides derived from this protein showing antimicrobial properties. Most peptides initially studied were derived from Lactoferricin B, obtained from the protein by digestion with pepsin. More recently, a new family of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs derived from Lactoferrin was discovered by Bolcher et al, and named Lactoferrampin (LFampin. The original sequence of LFampin contained residues 268 - 284 from the N1 domain of Lactoferrin. From this peptide, the Bolscher′s group synthesized a collection of peptides obtained by extension and / or truncation at the C or N-terminal sides, in order to unravel the main structural features responsible for antimicrobial action. Here, we present results for three of these peptides, namely LFampin 265 - 284, LFampin 265 - 280, and LFampin 270 - 284. The peptides were tested against bacteria (E. coli and S. sanguinis, fungi (C. albicans, and model membranes of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC, 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phospho-rac-(1-glycerol] (DMPG, and their mixtures at a ratio of 3 : 1 (DMPC : DMPG (3 : 1. The ability to adopt a helical conformation was followed by a circular dichroism (CD, and the perturbation of the gel to the liquid-crystalline phase transition of the membrane was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. Distinct behavior was observed in the three peptides, both from the microbiology and model membrane studies, with the biophysical results showing excellent correlation with the microbiology activity studies. LFampin 265 - 284 was the most active peptide toward the tested microorganisms, and in the biophysical studies it showed the highest ability to form an a-helix and the strongest interaction with model membranes, followed by LFampin 265 - 280. LFampin 270 - 284 was inactive, showing

  5. Antimicrobial Peptides as Potential Alternatives to Antibiotics in Food Animal Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Zeng, Xiangfang; Yang, Qing; Qiao, Shiyan

    2016-05-03

    Over the last decade, the rapid emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens has become a global concern, which has prompted the search for alternative antibacterial agents for use in food animals. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), produced by bacteria, insects, amphibians and mammals, as well as by chemical synthesis, are possible candidates for the design of new antimicrobial agents because of their natural antimicrobial properties and a low propensity for development of resistance by microorganisms. This manuscript reviews the current knowledge of the basic biology of AMPs and their applications in non-ruminant nutrition. Antimicrobial peptides not only have broad-spectrum activity against bacteria, fungi, and viruses but also have the ability to bypass the common resistance mechanisms that are placing standard antibiotics in jeopardy. In addition, AMPs have beneficial effects on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, intestinal morphology and gut microbiota in pigs and broilers. Therefore, AMPs have good potential as suitable alternatives to conventional antibiotics used in swine and poultry industries.

  6. Catesbeianin-1, a novel antimicrobial peptide isolated from the skin of Lithobates catesbeianus (American bullfrog).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huihui; Zhang, Yang; Feng, Xin; Tie, Kunyuan; Cao, Yuan; Han, Wenyu

    2017-06-01

    To identify and characterize a novel antimicrobial peptide, catesbeianin-1. Catesbeianin-1 is 25 amino acids long and is α-helical, cationic and amphipathic. It had antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. It was resistant against trypsin and pepsin. Catesbeianin-1 exhibited moderate hemolytic activity (approx 8%) at 100 μg/ml, and its HC50 (50% hemolytic concentration) was 300 μg/ml. Its cytotoxicity was approx 10-20% at 100 μg/ml, and its CC50 (50% cytotoxic concentration) was >100 μg/ml. The LD50 of catesbeianin-1 in mice was 80 mg/kg. At 3.1 µg/ml, catesbeianin-1 significantly inhibited the growth of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. A new antimicrobial peptide from the skin of Lithobates catesbeianus (American bullfrog) may represent a template for the development of novel antimicrobial agents.

  7. Antimicrobial properties of analgesic kyotorphin peptides unraveled through atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Marta M.B.; Franquelim, Henri G.; Torcato, Ines M. [Instituto de Medicina Molecular, Faculdade de Medicina de Lisboa, Av. Professor Egas Moniz, 1649-028 Lisboa (Portugal); Ramu, Vasanthakumar G.; Heras, Montserrat; Bardaji, Eduard R. [Laboratori d' Innovacio en Processos i Productes de Sintesi Organica (LIPPSO), Departament de Quimica, Universitat de Girona, Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain); Castanho, Miguel A.R.B., E-mail: macastanho@fm.ul.pt [Instituto de Medicina Molecular, Faculdade de Medicina de Lisboa, Av. Professor Egas Moniz, 1649-028 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New kyotorphin derivatives have antimicrobial properties against S. aureus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Atomic force microscopy show membrane disturbing effects of KTP-NH{sub 2} and IbKTP-NH{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer None of the KTP derivatives are hemolytic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The minimal peptidic sequence with antimicrobial activity is Tyr-Arg, if amidated. -- Abstract: Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are promising candidates as alternatives to conventional antibiotics for the treatment of resistant pathogens. In the last decades, new AMPs have been found from the cleavage of intact proteins with no antibacterial activity themselves. Bovine hemoglobin hydrolysis, for instance, results in AMPs and the minimal antimicrobial peptide sequence was defined as Tyr-Arg plus a positively charged amino acid residue. The Tyr-Arg dipeptide alone, known as kyotorphin (KTP), is an endogenous analgesic neuropeptide but has no antimicrobial activity itself. In previous studies new KTP derivatives combining C-terminal amidation and Ibuprofen (Ib) - KTP-NH{sub 2}, IbKTP, IbKTP-NH{sub 2} - were designed in order to improve KTP brain targeting. Those modifications succeeded in enhancing peptide-cell membrane affinity towards fluid anionic lipids and higher analgesic activity after systemic injection resulted therefrom. Here, we investigated if this affinity for anionic lipid membranes also translates into antimicrobial activity because bacteria have anionic membranes. Atomic force microscopy revealed that KTP derivatives perturbed Staphylococcus aureus membrane structure by inducing membrane blebbing, disruption and lysis. In addition, these peptides bind to red blood cells but are non-hemolytic. From the KTP derivatives tested, amidated KTP proves to be the most active antibacterial agent. The combination of analgesia and antibacterial activities with absence of toxicity is highly appealing from the clinical point of view

  8. Genome-guided identification of novel head-to-tail cyclized antimicrobial peptides, exemplified by the discovery of pumilarin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heel, Auke J; Montalban-Lopez, Manuel; Oliveau, Quentin; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2017-01-01

    The need for novel antibiotics in an era where antimicrobial resistance is on the rise, and the number of new approved antimicrobial drugs reaching the market is declining, is evident. The underused potential of post-translationally modified peptides for clinical use makes this class of peptides

  9. Maturation pathway of nisin and other lantibiotics : post-translationally modified antimicrobial peptides exported by Gram-positive bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Willem M. de; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Siezen, Roland J.

    1995-01-01

    Lantibiotics form a family of highly modified peptides which are secreted by several Gram-positive bacteria. They exhibit antimicrobial activity, mainly against other Gram-positive bacteria, by forming pores in the cellular membrane. These antimicrobial peptides are ribosomally synthesized and

  10. Antimicrobial functionalization of silicone surfaces with engineered short peptides having broad spectrum antimicrobial and salt-resistant properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Li, Peng; Saravanan, Rathi; Basu, Anindya; Mishra, Biswajit; Lim, Suo Hon; Su, Xiaodi; Tambyah, Paul Anantharajah; Leong, Susanna Su Jan

    2014-01-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are often preceded by pathogen colonization on catheter surfaces and are a major health threat facing hospitals worldwide. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a class of new antibiotics that hold promise in curbing CAUTIs caused by antibiotic-resistant pathogens. This study aims to systematically evaluate the feasibility of immobilizing two newly engineered arginine/lysine/tryptophan-rich AMPs with broad antimicrobial spectra and salt-tolerant properties on silicone surfaces to address CAUTIs. The peptides were successfully immobilized on polydimethylsiloxane and urinary catheter surfaces via an allyl glycidyl ether (AGE) polymer brush interlayer, as confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and water contact angle analyses. The peptide-coated silicone surfaces exhibited excellent microbial killing activity towards bacteria and fungi in urine and in phosphate-buffered saline. Although both the soluble and immobilized peptides demonstrated membrane disruption capabilities, the latter showed a slower rate of kill, presumably due to reduced diffusivity and flexibility resulting from conjugation to the polymer brush. The synergistic effects of the AGE polymer brush and AMPs prevented biofilm formation by repelling cell adhesion. The peptide-coated surface showed no toxicity towards smooth muscle cells. The findings of this study clearly indicate the potential for the development of AMP-based coating platforms to prevent CAUTIs. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Bifidobacterium bifidum in a rat model of necrotizing enterocolitis: antimicrobial peptide and protein responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Mark A; Kananurak, Anchasa; Coursodon, Christine F; Adkins-Reick, Camille K; Chu, Hiutung; Bennett, Stephen H; Wehkamp, Jan; Castillo, Patricia A; Leonard, Brian C; Tancredi, Daniel J; Sherman, Michael P; Dvorak, Bohuslav; Bevins, Charles L

    2012-05-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating disease of premature infants. Probiotics decrease the risk of NEC in clinical and experimental studies. Antimicrobial peptides protect the gut against noxious microbes and shape the commensal microbiota, but their role in NEC remains unclear. To investigate the expression of antimicrobial peptides in experimental NEC and the impact of probiotics on their expression, premature rats were divided into three groups: dam fed (DF), hand fed with formula (FF), or hand fed with formula containing Bifidobacterium bifidum (FF + BIF). All groups were exposed to asphyxia and cold stress. Like in human ontogeny, the rat pup has low expression of Paneth cell antimicrobials, which increases rapidly during normal development. The expression of lysozyme, secretory phospholipase A(2) (sPLA(2)), pancreatic-associated proteins 1 and 3 mRNA was elevated in the FF group with a high incidence of NEC, as compared with the DF and FF + BIF groups where the disease was attenuated. We conclude that induction of antimicrobial peptides occurs in experimental NEC similar to that reported in human disease and is attenuated when disease is averted by probiotic B. bifidum. The induction of antimicrobial peptides is likely an adaptive mucosal response that is often not sufficient to prevent disease in the premature gut.

  12. Biofilms from Klebsiella pneumoniae: Matrix Polysaccharide Structure and Interactions with Antimicrobial Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Benincasa

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm matrices of two Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolates, KpTs101 and KpTs113, were investigated for their polysaccharide composition and protective effects against antimicrobial peptides. Both strains were good biofilm producers, with KpTs113 forming flocs with very low adhesive properties to supports. Matrix exopolysaccharides were isolated and their monosaccharide composition and glycosidic linkage types were defined. KpTs101 polysaccharide is neutral and composed only of galactose, in both pyranose and furanose ring configurations. Conversely, KpTs113 polysaccharide is anionic due to glucuronic acid units, and also contains glucose and mannose residues. The susceptibility of the two strains to two bovine cathelicidin antimicrobial peptides, BMAP-27 and Bac7(1–35, was assessed using both planktonic cultures and biofilms. Biofilm matrices exerted a relevant protection against both antimicrobials, which act with quite different mechanisms. Similar protection was also detected when antimicrobial peptides were tested against planktonic bacteria in the presence of the polysaccharides extracted from KpTs101 and KpTs113 biofilms, suggesting sequestering adduct formation with antimicrobials. Circular dichroism experiments on BMAP-27 in the presence of increasing amounts of either polysaccharide confirmed their ability to interact with the peptide and induce an α-helical conformation.

  13. Recombinant probiotics with antimicrobial peptides: a dual strategy to improve immune response in immunocompromised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Santi M; Silva, Osmar N; Franco, Octavio L

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial infectious diseases are currently a serious health problem, especially in patients compromised by illness or those receiving immune-suppressant drugs. In this context, it is not only essential to improve the understanding of infectious mechanisms and host response but also to discover novel therapies with extreme urgency. Probiotics and antimicrobial peptides are also favorably viewed as novel strategies in the control of resistant bacteria. The present review will shed some light on the use of probiotic microorganisms expressing antimicrobial peptides as a dual therapy to control bacterial infectious diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cost-effective expression and purification of antimicrobial and host defense peptides in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bommarius, B.; Jenssen, Håvard; Elliott, M.

    2010-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial host defense peptides (HDPs) combat infection by directly killing a wide variety of microbes, and/or modulating host immunity. HDPs have great therapeutic potential against antibioticresistant bacteria, viruses and even parasites, but there are substantial roadblocks to the...... in large-scale under Good Laboratory Manufacturing Practice (GMP) conditions for therapeutic application in humans....... to their therapeutic application. High manufacturing costs associated with amino acid precursors have limited the delivery of inexpensive therapeutics through industrial-scale chemical synthesis. Conversely, the production of peptides in bacteria by recombinant DNA technology has been impeded by the antimicrobial...

  15. Using Oral and Colon Cancer Cells for Studying the Anticancer Properties of Antimicrobial Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpornsuwan, Teerakul; Sriwai, Wimolpak; Sritanaudomchai, Hathaitip; Roytrakul, Sittiruk

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are of importance in defense mechanism of many organisms and are potential candidate for treatment of infections in animals and humans. AMPs exhibit a wide range of immunomodulatory activities related to innate immunity, wound healing, and inflammation. AMPs also serve as drug delivery vectors, antitumor agents, and mitogenic agents. Here, we describe the investigation of anticancer and cytotoxic activities of antimicrobial peptides by colorimetric MTT assay using smooth muscle, dental pulp stem cell, human colon cancer cell line (SW620), and human oral squamous carcinoma cell line (HSC4).

  16. Post-translationally modified frog skin-derived antimicrobial peptides are effective against Aeromonas sobria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tv, Vineethkumar; R, Asha; G, Shyla; George, Sanil

    2017-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (brevinin1 HYba1 and brevinin1 HYba2) identified from the skin secretion of an endemic frog species of Western Ghats were studied against fish pathogens. Post-translational modifications such as c-terminal amidation and cyclization of the peptides were enhanced on the activity against Aeromonas sobria. Based on the Minimum inhibitory concentration (3 μM), cyclic amidated brevinin Hyba2 was identified as the most promising antimicrobial agent against A. sobria and can be developed further as a lead drug molecule. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Shifting gear in antimicrobial and anticancer peptides biophysical studies: from vesicles to cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, João M; Gaspar, Diana; Veiga, Ana Salomé; Castanho, Miguel A R B

    2015-03-01

    Despite the intensive study on the mechanism of action of membrane-active molecules such as antimicrobial and anticancer peptides, most of the biophysical work has been performed using artificial model systems, mainly lipid vesicles. The use of these systems allows full control of the experimental parameters, and to obtain molecular-level detail on the action of peptides, the correlation with biological action is intangible. Recently, several biophysical methodologies have been translated to studies using bacterial and cancer cells. Here, we review biophysical studies on the mechanism of action of antimicrobial and anticancer peptides performed directly on cells. The data in these studies allow to correlate vesicle-based and cell-based studies and fill the vesicle-cell interdisciplinary gap. Copyright © 2015 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Anticancer Activity of the Antimicrobial Peptide Scolopendrasin VII Derived from the Centipede, Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joon Ha; Kim, In-Woo; Kim, Sang-Hee; Kim, Mi-Ae; Yun, Eun-Young; Nam, Sung-Hee; Ahn, Mi-Young; Kang, Dongchul; Hwang, Jae Sam

    2015-08-01

    Previously, we performed de novo RNA sequencing of Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans using high-throughput sequencing technology and identified several antimicrobial peptide candidates. Among them, a cationic antimicrobial peptide, scolopendrasin VII, was selected based on its physicochemical properties, such as length, charge, and isoelectric point. Here, we assessed the anticancer activities of scolopendrasin VII against U937 and Jurkat leukemia cell lines. The results showed that scolopendrasin VII decreased the viability of the leukemia cells in MTS assays. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining revealed that scolopendrasin VII induced necrosis in the leukemia cells. Scolopendrasin VII-induced necrosis was mediated by specific interaction with phosphatidylserine, which is enriched in the membrane of cancer cells. Taken together, these data indicated that scolopendrasin VII induced necrotic cell death in leukemia cells, probably through interaction with phosphatidylserine. The results provide a useful anticancer peptide candidate and an efficient strategy for new anticancer peptide development.

  19. Antimicrobial activity and mechanism of PDC213, an endogenous peptide from human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yazhou; Zhou, Yahui; Liu, Xiao; Zhang, Fan; Yan, Linping; Chen, Ling; Wang, Xing; Ruan, Hongjie; Ji, Chenbo; Cui, Xianwei; Wang, Jiaqin

    2017-02-26

    Human milk has always been considered an ideal source of elemental nutrients to both preterm and full term infants in order to optimally develop the infant's tissues and organs. Recently, hundreds of endogenous milk peptides were identified in human milk. These peptides exhibited angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition, immunomodulation, or antimicrobial activity. Here, we report the antimicrobial activity and mechanism of a novel type of human antimicrobial peptide (AMP), termed PDC213 (peptide derived from β-Casein 213-226 aa). PDC213 is an endogenous peptide and is present at higher levels in preterm milk than in full term milk. The inhibitory concentration curve and disk diffusion tests showed that PDC213 had obvious antimicrobial against S. aureus and Y. enterocolitica, the common nosocomial pathogens in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Fluorescent dye methods, electron microscopy experiments and DNA-binding activity assays further indicated that PDC213 can permeabilize bacterial membranes and cell walls rather than bind intracellular DNA to kill bacteria. Together, our results suggest that PDC213 is a novel type of AMP that warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Enhanced Antimicrobial Activity of AamAP1-Lysine, a Novel Synthetic Peptide Analog Derived from the Scorpion Venom Peptide AamAP1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammar Almaaytah

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available There is great interest in the development of antimicrobial peptides as a potentially novel class of antimicrobial agents. Several structural determinants are responsible for the antimicrobial and cytolytic activity of antimicrobial peptides. In our study, a new synthetic peptide analog, AamAP1-Lysine from the naturally occurring scorpion venom antimicrobial peptide AamAP1, was designed by modifying the parent peptide in order to increase the positive charge and optimize other physico-chemical parameters involved in antimicrobial activity. AamAP1-Lysine displayed potent antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentration was in the range of 5 to 15 µM with a 10 fold increase in potency over the parent peptide. The hemolytic and antiproliferative activity of AamAP1-Lysine against eukaryotic mammalian cells was minimal at the concentration range needed to inhibit bacterial growth. The antibacterial mechanism analysis indicated that AamAP1-Lysine is probably inducing bacterial cell death through membrane damage and permeabilization determined by the release of β-galactosidase enzyme from peptide treated E. coli cells. DNA binding studies revealed that AamAP1-Lysine caused complete retardation of DNA migration and could display intracellular activities in addition to the membrane permeabilization mode of action reported earlier. In conclusion, AamAP1-Lysine could prove to be a potential candidate for antimicrobial drug development in future studies.

  1. Derivatives of the Antimicrobial Peptide BP100 for Expression in Plant Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Esther Badosa; Gemma Moiset; Laura Montesinos; Montserrat Talleda; Eduard Bardají; Lidia Feliu; Marta Planas; Emilio Montesinos

    2013-01-01

    Production of antimicrobial peptides in plants constitutes an approach for obtaining them in high amounts. However, their heterologous expression in a practical and efficient manner demands some structural requirements such as a minimum size, the incorporation of retention signals to assure their accumulation in specific tissues, and the presence of protease cleavage amino acids and of target sequences to facilitate peptide detection. Since any sequence modification may influence the biologic...

  2. A novel antimicrobial peptide isolated from centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans stimulates neutrophil activity through formyl peptide receptor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoo Jung; Kim, Hyung Sik; Lee, Ha Young; Hwang, Jae Sam; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2017-12-09

    In this study, we identified scolopendrasin X, a novel antimicrobial peptide (AMP), from centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans. Scolopendrasin X strongly stimulated mouse neutrophils, resulting in intracellular calcium increase, chemotactic migration through pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein and phospholipase C pathway, and increased superoxide anion production in neutrophils. Target receptor for scolopendrasin X, formyl peptide receptor (FPR)2 mediated scolopendrasin X-induced neutrophil activation. Moreover, scolopendrasin X significantly blocked inflammatory cytokine production induced by lipopolysaccharide in mouse neutrophils. Taken together, our results suggest that the novel AMP scolopendrasin X can be used as a material to regulate neutrophil activity through FPR2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. One pathogen two stones: are Australian tree frog antimicrobial peptides synergistic against human pathogens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, Marc-Antoine; Carne, Siobhan; Overall, Sarah A; Poulhazan, Alexandre; Separovic, Frances

    2017-10-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) may act by targeting the lipid membranes and disrupting the bilayer structure. In this study, three AMPs from the skin of Australian tree frogs, aurein 1.2, maculatin 1.1 and caerin 1.1, were investigated against Gram-negative Escherichia coli, Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, and vesicles that mimic their lipid compositions. Furthermore, equimolar mixtures of the peptides were tested to identify any synergistic interactions in antimicrobial activity. Minimum inhibition concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration assays showed significant activity against S. aureus but not against E. coli. Aurein was the least active while maculatin was the most active peptide and some synergistic effects were observed against S. aureus. Circular dichroism experiments showed that, in the presence of phospholipid vesicles, the peptides transitioned from an unstructured to a predominantly helical conformation (>50%), with greater helicity for POPG/TOCL compared to POPE/POPG vesicles. The helical content, however, was less in the presence of live E. coli and S. aureus, 25 and 5%, respectively. Equimolar concentrations of the peptides did not appear to form greater supramolecular structures. Dye release assays showed that aurein required greater concentration than caerin and maculatin to disrupt the lipid bilayers, and mixtures of the peptides did not cooperate to enhance their lytic activity. Overall, aurein, maculatin, and caerin showed moderate synergy in antimicrobial activity against S. aureus without becoming more structured or enhancement of their membrane-disrupting activity in phospholipid vesicles.

  4. Interaction of antimicrobial peptide Plantaricin149a and four analogs with lipid bilayers and bacterial membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz de Souza Lopes

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The amidated analog of Plantaricin149, an antimicrobial peptide from Lactobacillus plantarum NRIC 149, directly interacts with negatively charged liposomes and bacterial membranes, leading to their lysis. In this study, four Pln149-analogs were synthesized with different hydrophobic groups at their N-terminus with the goal of evaluating the effect of the modifications at this region in the peptide's antimicrobial properties. The interaction of these peptides with membrane models, surface activity, their hemolytic effect on red blood cells, and antibacterial activity against microorganisms were evaluated. The analogs presented similar action of Plantaricin149a; three of them with no hemolytic effect (< 5% until 0.5 mM, in addition to the induction of a helical element when binding to negative liposomes. The N-terminus difference between the analogs and Plantaricin149a retained the antibacterial effect on S. aureus and P. aeruginosa for all peptides (MIC50 of 19 µM and 155 µM to Plantaricin149a, respectively but resulted in a different mechanism of action against the microorganisms, that was bactericidal for Plantaricin149a and bacteriostatic for the analogs. This difference was confirmed by a reduction in leakage action for the analogs. The lytic activity of Plantaricin149a is suggested to be a result of the peptide-lipid interactions from the amphipathic helix and the hydrophobic residues at the N-terminus of the antimicrobial peptide.

  5. Scolopendin 2, a cationic antimicrobial peptide from centipede, and its membrane-active mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heejeong; Hwang, Jae-Sam; Lee, Jaeho; Kim, Jae Il; Lee, Dong Gun

    2015-02-01

    Scolopendin 2 is a 16-mer peptide (AGLQFPVGRIGRLLRK) derived from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans. We observed that this peptide exhibited antimicrobial activity in a salt-dependent manner against various fungal and bacterial pathogens and showed no hemolytic effect in the range of 1.6 μM to 100 μM. Circular dichroism analysis showed that the peptide has an α-helical properties. Furthermore, we determined the mechanism(s) of action using flow cytometry and by investigating the release of intracellular potassium. The results showed that the peptide permeabilized the membranes of Escherichia coli O157 and Candida albicans, resulting in loss of intracellular potassium ions. Additionally, bis-(1,3-dibutylbarbituric acid) trimethine oxonol and 3,3'-dipropylthiacarbocyanine iodide assays showed that the peptide caused membrane depolarization. Using giant unilamellar vesicles encapsulating calcein and large unilamellar vesicles containing fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran, which were similar in composition to typical E. coli O157 and C. albicans membranes, we demonstrated that scolopendin 2 disrupts membranes, resulting in a pore size between 4.8 nm and 5.0 nm. Thus, we have demonstrated that a cationic antimicrobial peptide, scolopendin 2, exerts its broad-spectrum antimicrobial effects by forming pores in the cell membrane. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Antimicrobial efficacy of granulysin-derived synthetic peptides in acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hee-Sun; Chun, Seung-Min; Soung, Min-Gyu; Kim, Jenny; Kim, Seong-Jin

    2015-07-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are considered as a potential alternative to antibiotic treatment in acne vulgaris because the development of a resistant strain of Propionibacterium acnes is problematic. Granulysin can be regarded as an ideal substance with which to treat acne because it has antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effects. This study was performed to explore the effectiveness of granulysin-derived peptides (GDPs) in killing P. acnes in vitro under a standard microbiologic assay and to evaluate their potential use in a topical agent for the treatment of acne vulgaris. Twenty different peptides based on the known sequence of a GDP were synthesized and tested in vitro for antimicrobial activity. Thirty patients with facial acne vulgaris were instructed to apply a topical formulation containing synthetic GDP to acne lesions twice per day for 12 weeks. A newly synthesized peptide in which aspartic acid was substituted with arginine, and methionine was substituted with cysteine, showed the highest antimicrobial activity against P. acnes. Moreover, it was effective against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in vitro. After treatment with the topical formulation containing 50 ppm of synthetic peptide for 12 weeks, a significant reduction in the number of pustules was observed, regardless of the increase in the number of comedones. In addition, a significant reduction in the clinical grade of acne based on the Korean Acne Grading System (KAGS) was evident. Synthesized GDP shows strong antimicrobial activity against P. acnes in vitro. The clinical improvement observed suggests a topical formulation containing the GDP has therapeutic potential for the improvement of inflammatory-type acne vulgaris by its antimicrobial activity. © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

  7. Peripheral and integral membrane binding of peptides characterized by time-dependent fluorescence shifts: focus on antimicrobial peptide LAH₄.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macháň, Radek; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Olżyńska, Agnieszka; Olšinová, Marie; Cebecauer, Marek; Marquette, Arnaud; Bechinger, Burkhard; Hof, Martin

    2014-06-03

    Positioning of peptides with respect to membranes is an important parameter for biological and biophysical studies using model systems. Our experiments using five different membrane peptides suggest that the time-dependent fluorescence shift (TDFS) of Laurdan can help when distinguishing between peripheral and integral membrane binding and can be a useful, novel tool for studying the impact of transmembrane peptides (TMP) on membrane organization under near-physiological conditions. This article focuses on LAH4, a model α-helical peptide with high antimicrobial and nucleic acid transfection efficiencies. The predominantly helical peptide has been shown to orient in supported model membranes parallel to the membrane surface at acidic and, in a transmembrane manner, at basic pH. Here we investigate its interaction with fully hydrated large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) by TDFS and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). TDFS shows that at acidic pH LAH4 does not influence the glycerol region while at basic pH it makes acyl groups at the glycerol level of the membrane less mobile. TDFS experiments with antimicrobial peptides alamethicin and magainin 2, which are known to assume transmembrane and peripheral orientations, respectively, prove that changes in acyl group mobility at the glycerol level correlate with the orientation of membrane-associated peptide molecules. Analogous experiments with the TMPs LW21 and LAT show similar effects on the mobility of those acyl groups as alamethicin and LAH4 at basic pH. FCS, on the same neutral lipid bilayer vesicles, shows that the peripheral binding mode of LAH4 is more efficient in bilayer permeation than the transmembrane mode. In both cases, the addition of LAH4 does not lead to vesicle disintegration. The influence of negatively charged lipids on the bilayer permeation is also addressed.

  8. Cathelicidin peptide sheep myeloid antimicrobial peptide-29 prevents endotoxin-induced mortality in rat models of septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacometti, Andrea; Cirioni, Oscar; Ghiselli, Roberto; Mocchegiani, Federico; D'Amato, Giuseppina; Circo, Raffaella; Orlando, Fiorenza; Skerlavaj, Barbara; Silvestri, Carmela; Saba, Vittorio; Zanetti, Margherita; Scalise, Giorgio

    2004-01-15

    The present study was designed to investigate the antiendotoxin activity and therapeutic efficacy of sheep myeloid antimicrobial peptide (SMAP)-29, a cathelicidin-derived peptide. The in vitro ability of SMAP-29 to bind LPS from Escherichia coli 0111:B4 was determined using a sensitive limulus chromogenic assay. Two rat models of septic shock were performed: (1) rats were injected intraperitoneally with 1 mg E. coli 0111:B4 LPS and (2) intraabdominal sepsis was induced via cecal ligation and single puncture. All animals were randomized to receive parenterally isotonic sodium chloride solution, 1 mg/kg SMAP-29, 1 mg/kg polymyxin B or 20 mg/kg imipenem. The main outcome measures were: abdominal exudate and plasma bacterial growth, plasma endotoxin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha concentrations, and lethality. The in vitro study showed that SMAP-29 completely inhibited the LPS procoagulant activity at approximately 10 microM peptide concentration. The in vivo experiments showed that all compounds reduced the lethality when compared with control animals. SMAP-29 achieved a substantial decrease in endotoxin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha plasma concentrations when compared with imipenem and saline treatment and exhibited a slightly lower antimicrobial activity than imipenem. No statistically significant differences were noted between SMAP-29 and polymyxin B. SMAP-29, because of its double antiendotoxin and antimicrobial activities, could be an interesting compound for septic shock treatment.

  9. Antimicrobial properties of two novel peptides derived from Theobroma cacao osmotin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcao, Loeni L; Silva-Werneck, Joseilde O; Ramos, Alessandra de R; Martins, Natalia F; Bresso, Emmanuel; Rodrigues, Magali A; Bemquerer, Marcelo P; Marcellino, Lucilia H

    2016-05-01

    The osmotin proteins of several plants display antifungal activity, which can play an important role in plant defense against diseases. Thus, this protein can be useful as a source for biotechnological strategies aiming to combat fungal diseases. In this work, we analyzed the antifungal activity of a cacao osmotin-like protein (TcOsm1) and of two osmotin-derived synthetic peptides with antimicrobial features, differing by five amino acids residues at the N-terminus. Antimicrobial tests showed that TcOsm1 expressed in Escherichia coli inhibits the growth of Moniliophthora perniciosa mycelium and Pichia pastoris X-33 in vitro. The TcOsm1-derived peptides, named Osm-pepA (H-RRLDRGGVWNLNVNPGTTGARVWARTK-NH2), located at R23-K49, and Osm-pepB (H-GGVWNLNVNPGTTGARVWARTK-NH2), located at G28-K49, inhibited growth of yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae S288C and Pichia pastoris X-33) and spore germination of the phytopathogenic fungi Fusarium f. sp. glycines and Colletotrichum gossypi. Osm-pepA was more efficient than Osm-pepB for S. cerevisiae (MIC=40μM and MIC=127μM, respectively), as well as for P. pastoris (MIC=20μM and MIC=127μM, respectively). Furthermore, the peptides presented a biphasic performance, promoting S. cerevisiae growth in doses around 5μM and inhibiting it at higher doses. The structural model for these peptides showed that the five amino acids residues, RRLDR at Osm-pepA N-terminus, significantly affect the tertiary structure, indicating that this structure is important for the peptide antimicrobial potency. This is the first report of development of antimicrobial peptides from T. cacao. Taken together, the results indicate that the cacao osmotin and its derived peptides, herein studied, are good candidates for developing biotechnological tools aiming to control phytopathogenic fungi. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ultrashort peptide nanogels release in situ generated silver manoparticles to combat emerging antimicrobial resistance strains

    KAUST Repository

    Seferji, Kholoud

    2017-01-08

    Nanogels made from self-assembling ultrashort peptides (3-6 amino acids in size) are promising biomaterials for various biomedical applications such as tissue engineering, drug delivery, regenerative medicine, microbiology and biosensing.We have developed silver-releasing peptide nanogels with promising wound care applications. The peptide nanogels allow a precise control of in situ syntesized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), using soley short UV radiation and no other chemical reducing agent. We propose these silver-releasing nanogels as excellent biomaterial to combat emerging antimicrobial resistant strains.

  11. Antimicrobial Dendrimeric Peptides: Structure, Activity and New Therapeutic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scorciapino, Mariano A; Serra, Ilaria; Manzo, Giorgia; Rinaldi, Andrea C

    2017-03-03

    Microbial resistance to conventional antibiotics is one of the most outstanding medical and scientific challenges of our times. Despite the recognised need for new anti-infective agents, however, very few new drugs have been brought to the market and to the clinic in the last three decades. This review highlights the properties of a new class of antibiotics, namely dendrimeric peptides. These intriguing novel compounds, generally made of multiple peptidic sequences linked to an inner branched core, display an array of antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal activities, usually coupled to low haemolytic activity. In addition, several peptides synthesized in oligobranched form proved to be promising tools for the selective treatment of cancer cells.

  12. Current state of a dual behaviour of antimicrobial peptides-Therapeutic agents and promising delivery vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowska, Urszula; Sobczak, Marcin; Oledzka, Ewa

    2017-12-01

    Micro-organism resistance is an important challenge in modern medicine due to the global uncontrolled use of antibiotics. Natural and synthetic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) symbolize a new family of antibiotics, which have stimulated research and clinical interest as new therapeutic options for infections. They represent one of the most promising antimicrobial substances, due to their broad spectrum of biological activity, against bacteria, fungi, protozoa, viruses, yeast and even tumour cells. Besides, being antimicrobial, AMPs have been shown to bind and neutralize bacterial endotoxins, as well as possess immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, wound-healing, angiogenic and antitumour properties. In contrast to conventional antibiotics, which have very defined and specific molecular targets, host cationic peptides show varying, complex and very rapid mechanisms of actions that make it difficult to form an effective antimicrobial defence. Importantly, AMPs display their antimicrobial activity at micromolar concentrations or less. To do this, many peptide-based drugs are commercially available for the treatment of numerous diseases, such as hepatitis C, myeloma, skin infections and diabetes. Herein, we present an overview of the general mechanism of AMPs action, along with recent developments regarding carriers of AMPs and their potential applications in medical fields. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Antimicrobial peptides with therapeutic potential from skin secretions of polyploid frogs of the Pipidae family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mechkarska, M.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of pathogenic bacteria and fungi resistant to commonly used antibiotics poses a serious threat to public health and necessitates novel treatment approaches in order to control infections. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are one of the central components of the system of innate immunity

  14. Improvement of Solubility and Stability of the Antimicrobial Peptide Nisin by Protein Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rollema, Harry S.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Both, Paula; Vos, Willem M. de; Siezen, Roland J.

    1995-01-01

    Nisin is a 3.4-kDa antimicrobial peptide that, as a result of posttranslational modifications, contains unsaturated amino acids and lanthionine residues. It is applied as a preservative in various food products. The solubility and stability of nisin and nisin mutants have been studied. It is

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of the helical antimicrobial peptide ovispirin-1 in a zwitterionic dodecylphosphocholine micelle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2005-01-01

    We have carried out a 40-ns all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of the helical antimicrobial peptide ovispirin-1 (OVIS) in a zwitterionic diphosphocholine (DPC) micelle. The DPC micelle serves as an economical and effective model for a cellular membrane owing to the presence of a choline headg...

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of helical antimicrobial peptides in SDS micelles: what do point mutations achieve?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2005-01-01

    We report long time scale simulations of the 18-residue helical antimicrobial peptide ovispirin-1 and its analogs novispirin-G10 and novispirin-T7 in SDS micelles. The SDS micelle serves as an economical and effective model for a cellular membrane. Ovispirin, which is initially placed along a mic...

  17. C-di-GMP regulates antimicrobial peptide resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chua, Song Lin; Tan, Sean Yang-Yi; Rybtke, Morten Theil

    2013-01-01

    the expression of proteins required for the virulence and development of antimicrobial peptide resistance in P. aeruginosa. In accordance, P. aeruginosa cells with low c-di-GMP levels were found to be more resistant to colistin than P. aeruginosa cells with high c-di-GMP levels. This contradicts the current...

  18. Divorcing folding from function: how acylation affects the membrane-perturbing properties of an antimicrobial peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vad, Brian Stougaard; Thomsen, Line Aagot Hede; Bertelsen, Kresten

    2010-01-01

    Many small cationic peptides, which are unstructured in aqueous solution, have antimicrobial properties. These properties are assumed to be linked to their ability to permeabilize bacterial membranes, accompanied by the transition to an alpha-helical folding state. Here we show that there is no d......Many small cationic peptides, which are unstructured in aqueous solution, have antimicrobial properties. These properties are assumed to be linked to their ability to permeabilize bacterial membranes, accompanied by the transition to an alpha-helical folding state. Here we show...... that there is no direct link between folding of the antimicrobial peptide Novicidin (Nc) and its membrane permeabilization. N-terminal acylation with C8-C16 alkyl chains and the inclusion of anionic lipids both increase Nc's ability to form alpha-helical structure in the presence of vesicles. Nevertheless, both acylation...... and anionic lipids reduce the extent of permeabilization of these vesicles and lead to slower permeabilization kinetics. Furthermore, acylation significantly decreases antimicrobial activity. Although acyl chains of increasing length also increase the tendency of the peptides to aggregate in solution...

  19. Lactoferrin-derived antimicrobial peptide induces a micellar cubic phase in a model membrane system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastos, M.; Silva, T.; Teixeira, V.; Nazmi, K.; Bolscher, J.G.M.; Funari, S.S.; Uhríková, D.

    2011-01-01

    The observation of a micellar cubic phase is reported for a mixture of an antimicrobial peptide from the Lactoferrin family, LFampin 265-284, and a model membrane system of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine/dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (3:1), as derived from small-angle x-ray diffraction (SAXD)

  20. Characterization and Activity of an Immobilized Antimicrobial Peptide Containing Bactericidal PEG-Hydrogel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleophas, Rik T. C.; Sjollema, Jelmer; Busscher, Henk J.; Kruijtzer, John A. W.; Liskamp, Rob M. J.

    A single step immobilization-polymerization strategy of a highly active antimicrobial peptide into a soft hydrogel network on a poly(ethylene terephthalate) surface using thiol-ene chemistry is described. The bactericidal hydrogel was molecularly characterized via Coomassie and Lowry assay protein

  1. In vitro growth of growth of campylobacter spp. inhibited by selected antimicrobial peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Novel alternatives to traditional antibiotics are urgently needed for food-animal production. A goal of our laboratory is to develop and evaluate antimicrobial peptides (AMP) to control and reduce foodborne pathogens in poultry. AMP have been found in most every class of living organism...

  2. Multitasking antimicrobial peptides, plant development, and host defense against biotic/abiotic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crop losses due to pathogens are a major threat to global food security. Plants employ a multilayer defense system against pathogens including use of physical barriers (cell wall), induction of hypersensitive defense response (HR), resistance (R) proteins, and synthesis of antimicrobial peptides (AM...

  3. Reducing Escherichia coli growth on a composite biomaterial by a surface immobilized antimicrobial peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckholtz, Gavin A.; Reger, Nina A. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); Anderton, William D.; Schimoler, Patrick J. [Orthopaedic Biomechanics Research Laboratory, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA 15212 (United States); Roudebush, Shana L.; Meng, Wilson S. [Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); Miller, Mark C. [Orthopaedic Biomechanics Research Laboratory, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA 15212 (United States); Gawalt, Ellen S., E-mail: gawalte@duq.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15219 (United States)

    2016-08-01

    A new composite bioceramic consisting of calcium aluminum oxide (CaAlO) and hydroxyapatite (HA) was functionalized with the synthetic antimicrobial peptide Inverso-CysHHC10. CaAlO is a bioceramic that can be mold cast easily and quickly at room temperature. Improved functionality was previously achieved through surface reactions. Here, composites containing 0–5% HA (by mass) were prepared and the elastic modulus and modulus of rupture were mechanically similar to non-load bearing bone. The addition of hydroxyapatite resulted in increased osteoblast attachment (> 180%) and proliferation (> 140%) on all composites compared to 100% CaAlO. Antimicrobial peptide (AMP) immobilization was achieved using an interfacial alkene-thiol click reaction. The linked AMP persisted on the composite (> 99.6% after 24 h) and retained its activity against Escherichia coli based on N-phenylnaphthylamine uptake and bacterial turbidity tests. Overall, this simple scaffold system improves osteoblast activity and reduces bacterial activity. - Highlights: • Calcium aluminum oxide and hydroxyapatite were cast into a composite material. • Osteoblast attachment and proliferation were significantly increased on composites. • An active antimicrobial peptide was linked to and remained stable on the composite. • Bacterial turbidity and NPN uptake tests showed modified composites had an effect equal to a 10 μM Inverso-CysHHC10 solution. • Antimicrobial peptide linkage did not affect the increased osteoblast performance.

  4. Insect antimicrobial peptides: potential tools for the prevention of skin cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Tonk, Miray; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Rahnamaeian, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides/proteins (AMPs) are biologically active molecules with diverse structural properties that are produced by mammals, plants, insects, ticks, and microorganisms. They have a range of antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and even anticancer activities, and their biological properties could therefore be exploited for therapeutic and prophylactic applications. Cancer and cancer drug resistance are significant current health challenges, so the development of innovative cancer...

  5. Antimicrobial activity of bovine NK-lysin-derived peptides on Mycoplasma bovis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a diverse group of molecules which play an important role in the innate immune response in various organisms, including cattle. Bovine NK-lysins, a type of AMP, have been predominantly found in the granules of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and NK-cells. Collective results...

  6. Rational Design of Alpha-Helical Antimicrobial Peptides: Do's and Don'ts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uggerhøj, Lars Erik; Poulsen, Tanja Juul; Munk, Jens Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are promising candidates for battling multiresistant bacteria. Despite extensive research, structure–activity relationships of AMPs are not fully understood, and there is a lack of structural data relating to AMPs in lipids. Here we present the NMR structure of anopl...

  7. Lacrain: the first antimicrobial peptide from the body extract of the Brazilian centipede Scolopendra viridicornis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro, E; da Silva, P I

    2016-09-01

    Antimicrobial activities have previously been described by traditional Eastern medicine in Chilopoda body extracts, but until now no bioactive peptides have been described. In this study, a novel antimicrobial peptide, lacrain, was isolated from the body extract of the Brazilian Chilopoda Scolopendra viridicornis. The peptide was isolated by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Its activity was tested using a liquid growth inhibition assay and the peptide was characterised using mass spectrometry. Lacrain has a sequence composed of eight amino acid residues and a molecular mass of 925.5 Da. A synthetic peptide of the native lacrain had identical characteristics to those of the isolated material, confirming its sequence. The synthetic peptide was active only against Gram-negative bacteria, showing strong bactericidal activity. Moreover, the peptide did not present haemolytic activity against human erythrocytes. Lacrain represents a novel molecule with powerful antibacterial activity that could be used as a new template for the development of drugs against clinically resistant bacterial strains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  8. Analysis of concentration response curves to describe and compare tha antimicrobial activity anof model cationic alpha-helical peptides.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rautenbach, M.; Gerstner, G.D.; Vlok, N.M.; Kulenkampff, J.; Westerhoff, H.V.

    2006-01-01

    To assess and compare different model Leu-Lys-containing cationic α-helical peptides, their antimicrobial activities were tested against Escherichia coli as target organism over a broad peptide concentration range. The natural cationic α-helical peptides magainin 2 and PGLa and the cyclic cationic

  9. Anti-inflammatory Properties of Antimicrobial Peptides and Peptidomimetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbakke, Sarah Line; Franzyk, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) neutralization constitute potential non-antibiotic treatment strategies for sepsis - a systemic infection-induced inflammatory response. Studies on LPS- and LTA-neutralizing compounds are abundant in literature, and a number of peptides...

  10. Effect of BMAP-28 antimicrobial peptides on Leishmania major promastigote and amastigote growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynn, Miriam A.; Kindrachuk, Jason; Marr, Alexandra K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Protozoan parasites, such as Leishmania, still pose an enormous public health problem in many countries throughout the world. Current measures are outdated and have some associated drug resistance, prompting the search into novel therapies. Several innovative approaches are under...... investigation, including the utilization of host defence peptides (HDPs) as emerging anti-parasitic therapies. HDPs are characterised by their small size, amphipathic nature and cationicity, which induce permeabilization of cell membranes, whilst modulating the immune response of the host. Recently, members...... of the cathelicidin family of HDPs have demonstrated significant antimicrobial activities against various parasites including Leishmania. The cathelicidin bovine myeloid antimicrobial peptide 28 (BMAP-28) has broad antimicrobial activities and confers protection in animal models of bacterial infection or sepsis. We...

  11. Antimicrobial Activity of Lactoferrin-Related Peptides and Applications in Human and Veterinary Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natascia Bruni

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs represent a vast array of molecules produced by virtually all living organisms as natural barriers against infection. Among AMP sources, an interesting class regards the food-derived bioactive agents. The whey protein lactoferrin (Lf is an iron-binding glycoprotein that plays a significant role in the innate immune system, and is considered as an important host defense molecule. In search for novel antimicrobial agents, Lf offers a new source with potential pharmaceutical applications. The Lf-derived peptides Lf(1–11, lactoferricin (Lfcin and lactoferrampin exhibit interesting and more potent antimicrobial actions than intact protein. Particularly, Lfcin has demonstrated strong antibacterial, anti-fungal and antiparasitic activity with promising applications both in human and veterinary diseases (from ocular infections to osteo-articular, gastrointestinal and dermatological diseases.

  12. Novel Antimicrobial Peptides That Inhibit Gram Positive Bacterial Exotoxin Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriman, Joseph A.; Nemeth, Kimberly A.; Schlievert, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus, cause serious human illnesses through combinations of surface virulence factors and secretion of exotoxins. Our prior studies using the protein synthesis inhibitor clindamycin and signal transduction inhibitors glycerol monolaurate and α-globin and β-globin chains of hemoglobin indicate that their abilities to inhibit exotoxin production by S. aureus are separable from abilities to inhibit growth of the organism. Additionally, our previous studies suggest that inhibition of exotoxin production, in absence of ability to kill S. aureus and normal flora lactobacilli, will prevent colonization by pathogenic S. aureus, while not interfering with lactobacilli colonization. These disparate activities may be important in development of novel anti-infective agents that do not alter normal flora. We initiated studies to explore the exotoxin-synthesis-inhibition activity of hemoglobin peptides further to develop potential agents to prevent S. aureus infections. We tested synthesized α-globin chain peptides, synthetic variants of α-globin chain peptides, and two human defensins for ability to inhibit exotoxin production without significantly inhibiting S. aureus growth. All of these peptides were weakly or not inhibitory to bacterial growth. However, the peptides were inhibitory to exotoxin production with increasing activity dependent on increasing numbers of positively-charged amino acids. Additionally, the peptides could be immobilized on agarose beads or have amino acid sequences scrambled and still retain exotoxin-synthesis-inhibition. The peptides are not toxic to human vaginal epithelial cells and do not inhibit growth of normal flora L. crispatus. These peptides may interfere with plasma membrane signal transduction in S. aureus due to their positive charges. PMID:24748386

  13. Inhibition of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) by antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and plant essential oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouhir, Abdelmajid; Jridi, Taoufik; Nefzi, Adel; Ben Hamida, Jeannette; Sebei, Khaled

    2016-12-01

    Drug-resistant bacterial infections cause considerable patient mortality and morbidity. The annual frequency of deaths from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has surpassed those caused by human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome. The antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), plant essential oils (EOs) and their combinations have proven to be quite effective in killing a wide selection of bacterial pathogens including MRSA. This review summarizes the studies in the use of AMPs, plant EOs and their combinations for coping with MRSA bacteria, and to formulate new prospects for future studies on this topic. The sources of scientific literature such as PubMed, library search, Google Scholar, Science Direct and electronic databases such as 'The Antimicrobial Peptide Database', 'Collection of Anti-Microbial Peptides' and 'YADAMP'. Physicochemical data of anti-MRSA peptides were determined by Scientific DataBase Maker software. Of the 118 peptides, 88 exhibited an activity against MRSA with the highest activity of minimum inhibitory concentration values. Various plant EOs have been effective against MRSA. Remarkably, lemongrass EOs completely inhibited all MRSA growth on the plate. Lemon myrtle, Mountain savory, Cinnamon bark and Melissa EOs showed a significant inhibition. Several of these AMPs, EOs and their combinations were effective against MRSA. Their activities have implications for the development of new drugs for medical use.

  14. Purification and characterization of a novel antimicrobial peptide from Brevibacillus laterosporus strain A60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Guo, Lihua; Zeng, Hongmei; Yang, Xiufen; Yuan, Jingjing; Shi, Huaixing; Xiong, Yehui; Chen, Mingjia; Han, Lei; Qiu, Dewen

    2012-02-01

    A novel antimicrobial peptide, with molecular mass of 1602.0469Da, produced by Brevibacillus laterosporus strain A60 was isolated and purified from the soil of mango plants. The purification procedure consisted of ammonium sulfate precipitation, cation exchange chromatography on an HiTrap SP HP column, thin layer chromatography and High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) on C18 reversed-phase column. After the four isolation procedures, one peptide with antimicrobial activity was obtained and named BL-A60. The determination of the complete amino acid sequences of this peptide showed that it contains eleven amino acid residues, L-Y-K-L-V-K-V-V-L-N-M, and a choline connected to the N-terminal and a tenuazonic acid modified of the C-terminal. This peptide shows relatively low identification to other antimicrobial peptides from bacteria. Purified BL-A60 showed high pH and thermal stability and a strong inhibition of different stages of the life cycle of Phytophthora capsici, including mycelial growth, sporangia formation and cystospore germination, with EC(50) values of 7.89, 0.60 and 21.96 μg ml(-1), respectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Two novel families of antimicrobial peptides from skin secretions of the Chinese torrent frog, Amolops jingdongensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhongming; Yang, Xinwang; Liu, Zichao; Zeng, Lin; Lee, Wenhui; Zhang, Yun

    2012-02-01

    The characterization of new natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) can help to solve the serious problem of bacterial resistance to currently used antibiotics. In the current study, we analyzed two families of AMPs from the Chinese torrent frog Amolops jingdongensis with a range of bioactivities. The first family of peptides, named jindongenin-1a, is 24 amino acids in length; a BLAST search of jindongenin-1a revealed no sequence similarity with other AMPs. The second family consists of two peptides containing 29 amino acid residues each. These peptides have high sequence similarity with the AMPs of palustrin-2 and are therefore designated palustrin-2AJ1 and palustrin-2AJ2. The cDNA sequences encoding these AMPs have been cloned and the deduced protein sequence of each AMP has been determined by protein sequencing. Sequence and structural analysis showed that each precursor is composed of a putative signal peptide, an N-terminal spacer, a processing site and a disulfide-bridged heptapeptide segment at the C-terminus. We synthesized jindongenin-1a and palustrin-AJ1 to test their antimicrobial, hemolytic, antioxidative and cytotoxic activities. These two peptides showed broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity to standard and clinically isolated strains of bacteria. In addition, they exhibited weak hemolytic activity to human and rabbit erythrocytes under our experimental conditions. Moreover, these peptides also displayed cytotoxic activity against the K562 and HT29 mammalian cell lines and low anti-oxidant activity. These findings provide helpful insight that will be useful in the design of anti-infective peptide agents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Antimicrobial activity of buttermilk and lactoferrin peptide extracts on poultry pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Catherine; Boulianne, Martine; Britten, Michel; Robitaille, Gilles

    2016-11-01

    Antibiotics are commonly used in poultry feed as growth promoters. This practice is questioned given the arising importance of antibiotic resistance. Antimicrobial peptides can be used as food additives for a potent alternative to synthetic or semi-synthetic antibiotics. The objective of this study was to develop a peptide production method based on membrane adsorption chromatography in order to produce extracts with antimicrobial activity against avian pathogens (Salmonella enterica var. Enteritidis, Salmonella enterica var. Typhimurium, and two Escherichia coli strains, O78:H80 and TK3 O1:K1) as well as Staphylococcus aureus. To achieve this, buttermilk powder and purified lactoferrin were digested with pepsin. The peptide extracts (<10 kDa) were fractionated depending on their charges through high-capacity cation-exchange and anion-exchange adsorptive membranes. The yields of cationic peptide extracts were 6·3 and 15·4% from buttermilk and lactoferrin total peptide extracts, respectively. Antimicrobial activity was assessed using the microdilution technique on microplates. Our results indicate that the buttermilk cationic peptide extracts were bactericidal at less than 5 mg/ml against the selected avian strains, with losses of 1·7 log CFU/ml (Salm. Typhimurium) to 3 log CFU/ml (E. coli O78:H80); viability decreased by 1·5 log CFU/ml for Staph. aureus, a Gram-positive bacterium. Anionic and non-adsorbed peptide extracts were inactive at 5 mg/ml. These results demonstrate that membrane adsorption chromatography is an effective way to prepare a cationic peptide extract from buttermilk that is active against avian pathogens.

  17. D-amino acid substitution enhances the stability of antimicrobial peptide polybia-CP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Fengjing; Wang, Jiayi; Peng, Jinxiu; Zhao, Ping; Kong, Ziqing; Wang, Kairong; Yan, Wenjin; Wang, Rui

    2017-10-01

    With the increasing emergence of resistant microbes toward conventional antimicrobial agents, there is an urgent need for the development of antimicrobial agents with novel action mode. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are believed to be one kind of ideal alternatives. However, AMPs can be easily degraded by protease, which limited their therapeutic use. In the present study, D-amino acid substitution strategy was employed to enhance the stability of polybia-CP. We investigated the stability of peptides against the degradation of trypsin and chymotrypsin by determining the antimicrobial activity or determining the HPLC profile of peptides after incubation with proteases. Our results showed that both the all D-amino acid derivative (D-CP) and partial D-lysine substitution derivative (D-lys-CP) have an improved stability against trypsin and chymotrypsin. Although D-CP takes left-hand α-helical conformation and D-lys-CP loses some α-helical content, both of the D-amino acid-substituted derivatives maintain their parental peptides' membrane active action mode. In addition, D-lys-CP showed a slight weaker antimicrobial activity than polybia-CP, but the hemolytic activity decreased greatly. These results suggest that D-CP and D-lys-CP can offer strategy to improve the property of AMPs and may be leading compounds for the development of novel antimicrobial agents. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Molecular dynamics investigation of the influence of anionic and zwitterionic interfaces on antimicrobial peptides' structure: implications for peptide toxicity and activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2006-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of three related helical antimicrobial peptides have been carried out in zwitterionic diphosphocholine (DPC) micelles and anionic sodiumdodecylsulfate (SDS) micelles. These systems can be considered as model mammalian and bacterial membrane interfaces, respectively....

  19. Antifungal effect and action mechanism of antimicrobial peptide polybia-CP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kairong; Jia, Fengjing; Dang, Wen; Zhao, Yanyan; Zhu, Ranran; Sun, Mengyang; Qiu, Shuai; An, Xiaoping; Ma, Zelin; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Yan, Jiexi; Kong, Ziqing; Yan, Wenjin; Wang, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of life-threatening invasive fungal infections increased significantly in recent years. However, the antifungal therapeutic options are very limited. Antimicrobial peptides are a class of potential lead chemical for the development of novel antifungal agents. Antimicrobial peptide polybia-CP was purified from the venom of the social wasp Polybia paulista. In this study, we synthesized polybia-CP and determined its antifungal effects against a series of Candidian species. Our results showed that polybia-CP has potent antifungal activity and fungicidal activity against the tested fungal cells with a proposed membrane-active action mode. In addition, polybia-CP could induce the increase of cellular reactive oxygen species production, which would attribute to its antifungal activity. In conclusion, the present study suggests that polybia-CP has potential as an antifungal agent or may offer a new strategy for antifungal therapeutic option. Copyright © 2015 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Significance and Diagnostic Role of Antimicrobial Cathelicidins (LL-37 Peptides in Oral Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohaib Khurshid

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cathelicidins are a group of oral antimicrobial peptides that play multiple vital roles in the human body, such as their antimicrobial (broad spectrum role against oral microbes, wound healing, and angiogenesis, with recent evidences about their role in cancer regulation. Cathelicidins are present in humans and other mammals as well. By complex interactions with the microenvironment, it results in pro-inflammatory effects. Many in vitro and in vivo experiments have been conducted to ultimately conclude that these unique peptides play an essential role in innate immunity. Peptides are released in the precursor form (defensins, which after cleavage results in cathelicidins formation. Living in the era where the major focus is on non-invasive and nanotechnology, this ultimately leads to further advancements in the field of salivaomics. Based on current spotlight innovations, we have highlighted the biochemistry, mode of action, and the importance of cathelicidins in the oral cavity.

  1. Antimicrobial Activity of Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides against Gram-Positives: Current Progress Made in Understanding the Mode of Action and the Response of Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Omardien, S.; Brul, S.; Zaat, S.A.J.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been proposed as a novel class of antimicrobials that could aid the fight against antibiotic resistant bacteria. The mode of action of AMPs as acting on the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane has often been presented as an enigma and there are doubts whether the

  2. Generation of novel cationic antimicrobial peptides from natural non-antimicrobial sequences by acid-amide substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Satoshi; Minaba, Masaomi; Nishiuchi, Yuji; Taichi, Misako; Tamada, Yasushi; Yamazaki, Toshimasa; Kato, Yusuke

    2011-03-22

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) are well recognized to be promising as novel antimicrobial and antitumor agents. To obtain novel skeletons of CAMPs, we propose a simple strategy using acid-amide substitution (i.e. Glu→Gln, Asp→Asn) to confer net positive charge to natural non-antimicrobial sequences that have structures distinct from known CAMPs. The potential of this strategy was verified by a trial study. The pro-regions of nematode cecropin P1-P3 (P1P-P3P) were selected as parent sequences. P1P-P3P and their acid-amide-substituted mutants (NP1P-NP3P) were chemically synthesized. Bactericidal and membrane-disruptive activities of these peptides were evaluated. Conformational changes were estimated from far-ultraviolet circular dichroism (CD) spectra. NP1P-NP3P acquired potent bactericidal activities via membrane-disruption although P1P-P3P were not antimicrobial. Far-ultraviolet CD spectra of NP1P-NP3P were similar to those of their parent peptides P1P-P3P, suggesting that NP1P-NP3P acquire microbicidal activity without remarkable conformational changes. NP1P-NP3P killed bacteria in almost parallel fashion with their membrane-disruptive activities, suggesting that the mode of action of those peptides was membrane-disruption. Interestingly, membrane-disruptive activity of NP1P-NP3P were highly diversified against acidic liposomes, indicating that the acid-amide-substituted nematode cecropin pro-region was expected to be a unique and promising skeleton for novel synthetic CAMPs with diversified membrane-discriminative properties. The acid-amide substitution successfully generated some novel CAMPs in our trial study. These novel CAMPs were derived from natural non-antimicrobial sequences, and their sequences were completely distinct from any categories of known CAMPs, suggesting that such mutated natural sequences could be a promising source of novel skeletons of CAMPs.

  3. Generation of novel cationic antimicrobial peptides from natural non-antimicrobial sequences by acid-amide substitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamada Yasushi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs are well recognized to be promising as novel antimicrobial and antitumor agents. To obtain novel skeletons of CAMPs, we propose a simple strategy using acid-amide substitution (i.e. Glu→Gln, Asp→Asn to confer net positive charge to natural non-antimicrobial sequences that have structures distinct from known CAMPs. The potential of this strategy was verified by a trial study. Methods The pro-regions of nematode cecropin P1-P3 (P1P-P3P were selected as parent sequences. P1P-P3P and their acid-amide-substituted mutants (NP1P-NP3P were chemically synthesized. Bactericidal and membrane-disruptive activities of these peptides were evaluated. Conformational changes were estimated from far-ultraviolet circular dichroism (CD spectra. Results NP1P-NP3P acquired potent bactericidal activities via membrane-disruption although P1P-P3P were not antimicrobial. Far-ultraviolet CD spectra of NP1P-NP3P were similar to those of their parent peptides P1P-P3P, suggesting that NP1P-NP3P acquire microbicidal activity without remarkable conformational changes. NP1P-NP3P killed bacteria in almost parallel fashion with their membrane-disruptive activities, suggesting that the mode of action of those peptides was membrane-disruption. Interestingly, membrane-disruptive activity of NP1P-NP3P were highly diversified against acidic liposomes, indicating that the acid-amide-substituted nematode cecropin pro-region was expected to be a unique and promising skeleton for novel synthetic CAMPs with diversified membrane-discriminative properties. Conclusions The acid-amide substitution successfully generated some novel CAMPs in our trial study. These novel CAMPs were derived from natural non-antimicrobial sequences, and their sequences were completely distinct from any categories of known CAMPs, suggesting that such mutated natural sequences could be a promising source of novel skeletons of CAMPs.

  4. Antimicrobial function of SHβAP, a novel hemoglobin β chain-related antimicrobial peptide, isolated from the liver of skipjack tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jung-Kil; Lee, Min Jeong; Jung, Hyun-Gyo; Go, Hye-Jin; Kim, Young Ja; Park, Nam Gyu

    2014-03-01

    A 2.3 kDa of antimicrobial peptide was purified from an acidified liver extract of skipjack tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, by preparative acid-urea-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and C18 reversed-phase HPLC. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the purified peptide with those of other known polypeptides revealed high homology with the C-terminus of hemoglobin β-chain; thus, this peptide was designated as the Skipjack Hemoglobin β chain-related Antimicrobial Peptide (SHβAP). SHβAP showed potent antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria, such as Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus iniae (minimal effective concentrations [MECs], 6.5-57.0 μg/mL), Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli D31, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica, Shigella sonnei, and two Vibrio parahaemolyticus species (MECs, 2.0-19.0 μg/mL), and against Candida albicans (MEC; 12.0 μg/mL) without significant hemolytic activity. Antimicrobial activity of this peptide was heatstable and pH resistant but is sensitive to proteases and salt. SHβAP did not show membrane permeabilization and killing ability. The secondary structural prediction and the homology modeling expected that this peptide formed an amphipathic α-helical structure. This is the first report the purification of a novel antimicrobial peptide related to the C-terminus of hemoglobin β-chain from marine fish. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Antimicrobial Dendrimeric Peptides: Structure, Activity and New Therapeutic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scorciapino, Mariano A.; Serra, Ilaria; Manzo, Giorgia; Rinaldi, Andrea C.

    2017-01-01

    Microbial resistance to conventional antibiotics is one of the most outstanding medical and scientific challenges of our times. Despite the recognised need for new anti-infective agents, however, very few new drugs have been brought to the market and to the clinic in the last three decades. This review highlights the properties of a new class of antibiotics, namely dendrimeric peptides. These intriguing novel compounds, generally made of multiple peptidic sequences linked to an inner branched core, display an array of antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal activities, usually coupled to low haemolytic activity. In addition, several peptides synthesized in oligobranched form proved to be promising tools for the selective treatment of cancer cells. PMID:28273806

  6. Antimicrobial Dendrimeric Peptides: Structure, Activity and New Therapeutic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano A. Scorciapino

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbial resistance to conventional antibiotics is one of the most outstanding medical and scientific challenges of our times. Despite the recognised need for new anti-infective agents, however, very few new drugs have been brought to the market and to the clinic in the last three decades. This review highlights the properties of a new class of antibiotics, namely dendrimeric peptides. These intriguing novel compounds, generally made of multiple peptidic sequences linked to an inner branched core, display an array of antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal activities, usually coupled to low haemolytic activity. In addition, several peptides synthesized in oligobranched form proved to be promising tools for the selective treatment of cancer cells.

  7. Purification, characterisation and cDNA cloning of an antimicrobial peptide from Macadamia integrifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, J P; Goulter, K C; Green, J L; Harrison, S J; Manners, J M

    1997-03-15

    An antimicrobial peptide with no significant amino acid sequence similarity to previously described peptides has been isolated from the nut kernels of Macadcamia integrifolia. The peptide, termed MiAMP1, is highly basic with an estimated pI of 10.1, a mass of 8.1 kDa and contains 76 amino acids including 6 cysteine residues. A cDNA clone containing the entire coding region corresponding to the peptide was obtained. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cDNA indicated a 26-amino-acid signal peptide at the N-terminus of the preprotein. Purified MiAMP1 inhibited the growth of a variety of fungal, oomycete and gram-positive bacterial phytopathogens in vitro. Some pathogens exhibited close to 100% inhibition in less than 1 microM peptide (5 microg/ml). Antimicrobial activity was diminished against most, but not all, microbes in the presence of calcium and potassium chloride salts (1 mM and 50 mM, respectively). MiAMP1 was active against bakers yeast, was inactive against Escherichia coli and was non-toxic to plant and mammalian cells. Analysis of genomic DNA indicated that MiAMP1 was encoded on a single copy gene containing no introns. The MiAMP1 gene may prove useful in genetic manipulations to increase disease resistance in transgenic plants.

  8. pH Dependence of microbe sterilization by cationic antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkenhorst, William F; Klein, J Wolfgang; Vo, Phuong; Wimley, William C

    2013-07-01

    We recently described a family of cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) selected from a combinatorial library that exhibited potent, broad-spectrum activity at neutral pH and low ionic strength. To further delimit the utility and activity profiles of these peptides, we investigated the effects of solution conditions, such as pH and ionic strength, on the efficacy of the peptide antimicrobials against a panel of microorganisms. Peptide minimum sterilizing concentrations (MSCs) varied linearly with pH for each subtype within our family of CAMPs for all organisms tested. The peptides were much less effective against Gram-negative bacteria at high pH, consistent with a decrease in net positive charge on the peptides. A similar trend was observed for the fungus Candida albicans. Surprisingly, the opposite pH trend was observed with the Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, an additive ionic strength effect was observed with increasing buffer strengths at identical pH values. The extreme difference in the observed pH behavior between Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms is attributed to the presence of native charged molecules in the much thicker peptidoglycan layer of the Gram-positive organism. The novel species-specific effects of pH observed here have important implications for applications using CAMPs and for the design of novel CAMPs.

  9. Chimeric peptides as implant functionalization agents for titanium alloy implants with antimicrobial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucesoy, Deniz T; Hnilova, Marketa; Boone, Kyle; Arnold, Paul M; Snead, Malcolm L; Tamerler, Candan

    2015-04-01

    Implant-associated infections can have severe effects on the longevity of implant devices and they also represent a major cause of implant failures. Treating these infections associated with implants by antibiotics is not always an effective strategy due to poor penetration rates of antibiotics into biofilms. Additionally, emerging antibiotic resistance poses serious concerns. There is an urge to develop effective antibacterial surfaces that prevent bacterial adhesion and proliferation. A novel class of bacterial therapeutic agents, known as antimicrobial peptides (AMP's), are receiving increasing attention as an unconventional option to treat septic infection, partly due to their capacity to stimulate innate immune responses and for the difficulty of microorganisms to develop resistance towards them. While host- and bacterial- cells compete in determining the ultimate fate of the implant, functionalization of implant surfaces with antimicrobial peptides can shift the balance and prevent implant infections. In the present study, we developed a novel chimeric peptide to functionalize the implant material surface. The chimeric peptide simultaneously presents two functionalities, with one domain binding to a titanium alloy implant surface through a titanium-binding domain while the other domain displays an antimicrobial property. This approach gains strength through control over the bio-material interfaces, a property built upon molecular recognition and self-assembly through a titanium alloy binding domain in the chimeric peptide. The efficiency of chimeric peptide both in-solution and absorbed onto titanium alloy surface was evaluated in vitro against three common human host infectious bacteria, S. mutans, S. epidermidis, and E. coli. In biological interactions such as occurs on implants, it is the surface and the interface that dictate the ultimate outcome. Controlling the implant surface by creating an interface composed chimeric peptides may therefore open up new

  10. Antimicrobial activities of chicken β -defensin (4 and 10 peptides against pathogenic bacteria and fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitham Ahmed Yacoub

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Host Defense Peptides (HDPs are small cationic peptides found in several organisms. They play a vital role in innate immunity response and immunomodulatory stimulation. This investigation was designed to study the antimicrobial activities of β-defensin peptide-4 (sAvBD-4 and 10 (sAvBD-4 derived from chickens against pathogenic organisms including bacteria and fungi. Ten bacterial strains and three fungal species were used in investigation. The results showed that the sAvBD-10 displayed a higher bactericidal potency against all the tested bacterial strains than that of sAvBD-4. The exhibited bactericidal activity was significant against almost the different bacterial strains at different peptide concentrations except for that of P. aeruginosa and Str. bovis strains where a moderate effect was noted. Both peptides were effective in the inactivation of fungal species tested yielding a killing rate of up to 95%. The results revealed that the synthetic peptides were resistant to salt at a concentration of 50mM NaCl. However, they lost antimicrobial potency when applied in the presence of high salt concentrations. Based on blood hemolysis studies, a little hemolytic effect was showed in the case of both peptides even when applied at high concentrations. The data obtained from this study indicated that synthetic avian peptides exhibit strong antibacterial and antifungal activity. In conclusion, future work and research should be tailored to a better understanding of the mechanisms of action of those peptides and their potential use in the pharmaceutical industry to help reduce the incidence and impact of infectious agent and be marketed as a naturally occurring antibiotic.

  11. Determinants of recombinant production of antimicrobial cationic peptides and creation of peptide variants in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Falla, T; Wu, M; Fidai, S; Burian, J; Kay, W; Hancock, R E

    1998-06-29

    Cationic peptides possessing antibacterial activity are virtually ubiquitous in nature, and offer exciting prospects as new therapeutic agents. We had previously demonstrated that such peptides could be produced by fusion protein technology in bacteria and several carrier proteins had been tested as fusion partners including glutathione-S-transferase, S. aureus protein A, IgG binding protein and P. aeruginosa outer membrane protein OprF. However these fusion partners, while successfully employed in peptide expression, were not optimized for high level production of cationic peptides (Piers, K., Brow, M. L., and Hancock, R. E. W. 1993, Gene 137, 7-13). In this paper we took advantage of a small replication protein RepA from E. coli and used its truncated version to construct fusion partners. The minimal elements required for high level expression of cationic peptide were defined as a DNA sequence encoding a fusion protein comprising, from the N-terminus, a 68 amino acid carrier region, an anionic prepro domain, a single methionine and the peptide of interest. The 68 amino acid carrier region was a block of three polypeptides consisting of a truncated RepA, a synthetic cellulose binding domain and a hexa histidine domain. The improved system showed high level expression and simplified downstream purification. The active peptide could be yielded by CNBr cleavage of the fusion protein. This novel vector was used to express three classes of cationic peptides including the alpha-helical peptide CEMA, the looped peptide bactenecin and the extended peptide indolicidin. In addition, mutagenesis of the peptide gene to produce peptide variants of CEMA and indolicidin using the improved vector system was shown to be successful.

  12. Antimicrobial Peptides: a promising class of antimicrobial compounds against BWA and multi-drug resistant bacteria: in the spotlight: the lactoferrin chimera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bikker, F.J.; Sijbrandij, T.; Nazmi, K.; Bolscher, J.G.M.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Jansen, H-J.

    2014-01-01

    Anti-Microbial Peptides (AMPs) are part of the innate immune defense system and considered as promising lead compounds for the development of novel anti-bacterial agents. In general, AMPs are simple, short peptides with broad-spectrum activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, fungi,

  13. Large-Scale Analysis of Antimicrobial Activities in Relation to Amphipathicity and Charge Reveals Novel Characterization of Antimicrobial Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chien-Kuo; Shih, Ling-Yi; Chang, Kuan Y

    2017-11-22

    It has been unclear to which antimicrobial activities (e.g., anti-gram-positive bacterial, anti-gram-negative bacterial, antifungal, antiparasitic, and antiviral activities) of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) a given physiochemical property matters most. This is the first computational study using large-scale AMPs to examine the relationships between antimicrobial activities and two major physiochemical properties of AMPs-amphipathicity and net charge. The results showed that among all kinds of antimicrobial activities, amphipathicity and net charge best differentiated between AMPs with and without anti-gram-negative bacterial activities. In terms of amphipathicity and charge, all the AMPs whose activities were significantly associated with amphipathicity and net charge were alike except those with anti-gram-positive bacterial activities. Furthermore, the higher the amphipathic value, the greater the proportion of AMPs possessing both antibacterial and antifungal activities. This dose-response-like pattern suggests a possible causal relationship-dual antibacterial and antifungal activities of AMPs may be attributable to amphipathicity. These novel findings could be useful for identifying potent AMPs computationally.

  14. AWRK6, A Synthetic Cationic Peptide Derived from Antimicrobial Peptide Dybowskin-2CDYa, Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuyu Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharides (LPS are major outer membrane components of Gram-negative bacteria and produce strong inflammatory responses in animals. Most antibiotics have shown little clinical anti-endotoxin activity while some antimicrobial peptides have proved to be effective in blocking LPS. Here, the anti-LPS activity of the synthetic peptide AWRK6, which is derived from antimicrobial peptide dybowskin-2CDYa, has been investigated in vitro and in vivo. The positively charged α-helical AWRK6 was found to be effective in blocking the binding of LBP (LPS binding protein with LPS in vitro using ELISA. In a murine endotoxemia model, AWRK6 offered satisfactory protection efficiency against endotoxemia death, and the serum levels of LPS, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α were found to be attenuated using ELISA. Further, histopathological analysis suggested that AWRK6 could improve the healing of liver and lung injury in endotoxemia mice. The results of real-time PCR and Western blotting showed that AWRK6 significantly reversed LPS-induced TLR4 overexpression and IκB depression, as well as the enhanced IκB phosphorylation. Additionally, AWRK6 did not produce any significant toxicity in vivo and in vitro. In summary, AWRK6 showed efficacious protection from LPS challenges in vivo and in vitro, by blocking LPS binding to LBP, without obvious toxicity, providing a promising strategy against LPS-induced inflammatory responses.

  15. Ancient antimicrobial peptides kill antibiotic-resistant pathogens: Australian mammals provide new options.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianghui Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To overcome the increasing resistance of pathogens to existing antibiotics the 10×'20 Initiative declared the urgent need for a global commitment to develop 10 new antimicrobial drugs by the year 2020. Naturally occurring animal antibiotics are an obvious place to start. The recently sequenced genomes of mammals that are divergent from human and mouse, including the tammar wallaby and the platypus, provide an opportunity to discover novel antimicrobials. Marsupials and monotremes are ideal potential sources of new antimicrobials because they give birth to underdeveloped immunologically naïve young that develop outside the sterile confines of a uterus in harsh pathogen-laden environments. While their adaptive immune system develops innate immune factors produced either by the mother or by the young must play a key role in protecting the immune-compromised young. In this study we focus on the cathelicidins, a key family of antimicrobial peptide genes. PRINCIPAL FINDING: We identified 14 cathelicidin genes in the tammar wallaby genome and 8 in the platypus genome. The tammar genes were expressed in the mammary gland during early lactation before the adaptive immune system of the young develops, as well as in the skin of the pouch young. Both platypus and tammar peptides were effective in killing a broad range of bacterial pathogens. One potent peptide, expressed in the early stages of tammar lactation, effectively killed multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter baumannii. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Marsupial and monotreme young are protected by antimicrobial peptides that are potent, broad spectrum and salt resistant. The genomes of our distant relatives may hold the key for the development of novel drugs to combat multidrug-resistant pathogens.

  16. Ancient antimicrobial peptides kill antibiotic-resistant pathogens: Australian mammals provide new options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianghui; Wong, Emily S W; Whitley, Jane C; Li, Jian; Stringer, Jessica M; Short, Kirsty R; Renfree, Marilyn B; Belov, Katherine; Cocks, Benjamin G

    2011-01-01

    To overcome the increasing resistance of pathogens to existing antibiotics the 10×'20 Initiative declared the urgent need for a global commitment to develop 10 new antimicrobial drugs by the year 2020. Naturally occurring animal antibiotics are an obvious place to start. The recently sequenced genomes of mammals that are divergent from human and mouse, including the tammar wallaby and the platypus, provide an opportunity to discover novel antimicrobials. Marsupials and monotremes are ideal potential sources of new antimicrobials because they give birth to underdeveloped immunologically naïve young that develop outside the sterile confines of a uterus in harsh pathogen-laden environments. While their adaptive immune system develops innate immune factors produced either by the mother or by the young must play a key role in protecting the immune-compromised young. In this study we focus on the cathelicidins, a key family of antimicrobial peptide genes. We identified 14 cathelicidin genes in the tammar wallaby genome and 8 in the platypus genome. The tammar genes were expressed in the mammary gland during early lactation before the adaptive immune system of the young develops, as well as in the skin of the pouch young. Both platypus and tammar peptides were effective in killing a broad range of bacterial pathogens. One potent peptide, expressed in the early stages of tammar lactation, effectively killed multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter baumannii. Marsupial and monotreme young are protected by antimicrobial peptides that are potent, broad spectrum and salt resistant. The genomes of our distant relatives may hold the key for the development of novel drugs to combat multidrug-resistant pathogens.

  17. Antimicrobial peptides from marine invertebrates as a new frontier for microbial infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero-González, Anselmo Jesus; Magalhães, Beatriz Simas; Garcia-Villarino, Monica; López-Abarrategui, Carlos; Sousa, Daniel Amaro; Dias, Simoni Campos; Franco, Octávio Luiz

    2010-05-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are widely expressed in organisms and have been linked to innate and acquired immunities in vertebrates. These compounds are constitutively expressed and rapidly induced at different cellular levels to interact directly with infectious agents and/or modulate immunoreactions involved in defense against pathogenic microorganisms. In invertebrates, antimicrobial peptides represent the major humoral defense system against infection, showing a diverse spectrum of action mechanisms, most of them related to plasma membrane disturbance and lethal alteration of microbial integrity. Marine invertebrates are widespread, extremely diverse, and constantly under an enormous microbial challenge from the ocean environment, itself altered by anthropic influences derived from industrialization and transportation. Consequently, this study reexamines the peptides isolated over the past 2 decades from different origins, bringing phyla not previously reviewed up to date. Moreover, a promising novel use of antimicrobial peptides as effective drugs in human and veterinary medicine could be based on their unusual properties and synergic counterparts as immune response humoral effectors, in addition to their direct microbicidal activity. This has been seen in many other marine proteins that are sufficiently immunogenic to humans, not necessarily in terms of antibody generation but as inflammation promoters and recruitment agents or immune enhancers.

  18. The Road from Host-Defense Peptides to a New Generation of Antimicrobial Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Boto

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Host-defense peptides, also called antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, whose protective action has been used by animals for millions of years, fulfill many requirements of the pharmaceutical industry, such as: (1 broad spectrum of activity; (2 unlike classic antibiotics, they induce very little resistance; (3 they act synergically with conventional antibiotics; (4 they neutralize endotoxins and are active in animal models. However, it is considered that many natural peptides are not suitable for drug development due to stability and biodisponibility problems, or high production costs. This review describes the efforts to overcome these problems and develop new antimicrobial drugs from these peptides or inspired by them. The discovery process of natural AMPs is discussed, as well as the development of synthetic analogs with improved pharmacological properties. The production of these compounds at acceptable costs, using different chemical and biotechnological methods, is also commented. Once these challenges are overcome, a new generation of versatile, potent and long-lasting antimicrobial drugs is expected.

  19. High-yield recombinant expression of the chicken antimicrobial peptide fowlicidin-2 in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xingjun; Xu, Wenshan; Qu, Pei; Li, Xiaochong; Xing, Liwei; Liu, Di; Jiao, Jian; Wang, Jue; Li, Zhongqiu; Liu, Chunlong

    2015-01-01

    The antimicrobial peptide fowlicidin-2 identified in chicken is a member of the cathelicidins family. The mature fowlicidin-2 possesses high antibacterial efficacy and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) neutralizing activity, and also represents an excellent candidate as an antimicrobial agent. In the present study, the recombinant fowlicidin-2 was successfully produced by Escherichia coli (E. coli) recombinant expression system. The gene encoding fowlicidin-2 with the codon preference of E. coli was designed through codon optimization and synthesized in vitro. The gene was then ligated into the plasmid pET-32a(+), which features fusion protein thioredoxin at the N-terminal. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into E. coli BL21(DE3) and cultured in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium. After isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) induction, the fowlicidin-2 fusion protein was successfully expressed as inclusion bodies. The inclusion bodies were dissolved and successfully released the peptide in 70% formic acid solution containing cyanogen bromide (CNBr) in a single step. After purification by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), ∼6.0 mg of fowlicidin-2 with purity more than 97% was obtained from 1 litre of bacteria culture. The recombinant peptide exhibited high antibacterial activity against the Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and even drug-resistant strains. This system could be used to rapidly and efficiently produce milligram quantities of a battery of recombinant antimicrobial peptides as well as for large-scale production. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  20. Sap transporter mediated import and subsequent degradation of antimicrobial peptides in Haemophilus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine L Shelton

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs contribute to host innate immune defense and are a critical component to control bacterial infection. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI is a commensal inhabitant of the human nasopharyngeal mucosa, yet is commonly associated with opportunistic infections of the upper and lower respiratory tracts. An important aspect of NTHI virulence is the ability to avert bactericidal effects of host-derived antimicrobial peptides (AMPs. The Sap (sensitivity to antimicrobial peptides ABC transporter equips NTHI to resist AMPs, although the mechanism of this resistance has remained undefined. We previously determined that the periplasmic binding protein SapA bound AMPs and was required for NTHI virulence in vivo. We now demonstrate, by antibody-mediated neutralization of AMP in vivo, that SapA functions to directly counter AMP lethality during NTHI infection. We hypothesized that SapA would deliver AMPs to the Sap inner membrane complex for transport into the bacterial cytoplasm. We observed that AMPs localize to the bacterial cytoplasm of the parental NTHI strain and were susceptible to cytoplasmic peptidase activity. In striking contrast, AMPs accumulated in the periplasm of bacteria lacking a functional Sap permease complex. These data support a mechanism of Sap mediated import of AMPs, a novel strategy to reduce periplasmic and inner membrane accumulation of these host defense peptides.

  1. Selectivity in the potentiation of antibacterial activity of α-peptide/β-peptoid peptidomimetics and antimicrobial peptides by human blood plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein-Kristensen, Line; Knapp, Kolja M.; Franzyk, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are promising leads for novel antibiotics; however, their activity is often compromised under physiological conditions. The purpose of this study was to determine the activity of alpha-peptide/beta-peptoid peptidomimetics and AMPs against Escherichia coli and Staphyl...

  2. Defense peptides secreted by helminth pathogens: antimicrobial and/or immunomodulator molecules?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie eCotton

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Host defense peptides (HDPs are an evolutionarily conserved component of the innate immune response found in all living species. They possess antimicrobial activities against a broad range of organisms including bacteria, fungi, eukaryotic parasites and viruses. HDPs also have the ability to enhance immune responses by acting as immunomodulators. We discovered a new family of HDPs derived from pathogenic helminthes (worms that cause enormous disease in animals and humans worldwide. The discovery of these peptides was based on their similar biochemical and functional characteristics to the human defense peptide LL-37. We propose that these new peptides modulate the immune response via molecular mimicry of mammalian HDPs thus providing a mechanism behind the anti-inflammatory properties of helminth infections.

  3. A cactus-derived toxin-like cystine knot Peptide with selective antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboye, Teshome L; Strömstedt, Adam A; Gunasekera, Sunithi; Bruhn, Jan G; El-Seedi, Hesham; Rosengren, K Johan; Göransson, Ulf

    2015-05-04

    Naturally occurring cystine knot peptides show a wide range of biological activity, and as they have inherent stability they represent potential scaffolds for peptide-based drug design and biomolecular engineering. Here we report the discovery, sequencing, chemical synthesis, three-dimensional solution structure determination and bioactivity of the first cystine knot peptide from Cactaceae (cactus) family: Ep-AMP1 from Echinopsis pachanoi. The structure of Ep-AMP1 (35 amino acids) conforms to that of the inhibitor cystine knot (or knottin) family but represents a novel diverse sequence; its activity was more than 500 times higher against bacterial than against eukaryotic cells. Rapid bactericidal action and liposome leakage implicate membrane permeabilisation as the mechanism of action. Sequence homology places Ec-AMP1 in the plant C6-type of antimicrobial peptides, but the three dimensional structure is highly similar to that of a spider neurotoxin. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Expression and purification of the antimicrobial peptide GSL1 in bacteria for raising antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiyalaghan, Sathiyamoorthy; Latimer, Julie M; Kralicek, Andrew V; Shaw, Martin L; Lewis, John G; Conner, Anthony J; Barrell, Philippa J

    2014-11-04

    The Gibberellin Stimulated-Like (GSL) or Snakin peptides from higher plants are cysteine-rich, with broad spectrum activity against a range of bacterial and fungal pathogens. To detect GSL peptides in applications such as western blot analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), specific antibodies that recognise GSL peptides are required. However, the intrinsic antimicrobial activity of these peptides is likely to prevent their expression alone in bacterial or yeast expression systems for subsequent antibody production in animal hosts. To overcome this issue we developed an Escherichia coli expression strategy based on the expression of the GSL1 peptide as a His-tagged thioredoxin fusion protein. The DNA sequence for the mature GSL1 peptide from potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) was cloned into the pET-32a expression vector to produce a construct encoding N-terminally tagged his6-thioredoxin-GSL1. The fusion protein was overexpressed in E. coli to produce soluble non-toxic protein. The GSL1 fusion protein could be easily purified by using affinity chromatography to yield ~1.3 mg of his6-thioredoxin-GSL1 per L of culture. The fusion protein was then injected into rabbits for antibody production. Western blot analysis showed that the antibodies obtained from rabbit sera specifically recognised the GSL1 peptide that had been expressed in a wheat germ cell-free expression system. We present here the first report of a GSL1 peptide expressed as a fusion protein with thioredoxin that has resulted in milligram quantities of soluble protein to be produced. We have also demonstrated that a wheat germ system can be used to successfully express small quantities of GSL1 peptide useful as positive control in western blot analysis. To our knowledge this is the first report of antibodies being produced against GSL1 peptide. The antibodies will be useful for analysis of GSL1peptides in western blot, localization by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and quantitation by ELISA.

  5. Potential role of an antimicrobial peptide, KLK in inhibiting lipopolysaccharide-induced macrophage inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pornpimon Jantaruk

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are attractive alternatives to antibiotics. Due to their immune modulatory properties, AMPs are at present emerging as promising agents for controlling inflammatory-mediated diseases. In this study, anti-inflammatory potential of an antimicrobial peptide, KLK (KLKLLLLLKLK and its analogs was evaluated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced RAW 264.7 macrophages. The results herein demonstrated that KLK peptide as well as its analogs significantly inhibited the pro-inflammatory mediator nitric oxide (NO, interleukin-1β (IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α production in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages in dose-dependent manners, and such inhibitory effects were not due to direct cytotoxicity. When considering inhibition potency, KLK among the test peptides exhibited the most effective activity. The inhibitory activity of KLK peptide also extended to include suppression of LPS-induced production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. KLK significantly decreased mRNA and protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 as well as mRNA expression of IL-1β and TNF-α. Moreover, KLK inhibited nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB p65 and blocked degradation and phosphorylation of inhibitor of κB (IκB. Taken together, these results suggested that the KLK peptide inhibited inflammatory response through the down-regulation of NF-κB mediated activation in macrophages. Since peptide analogs with different amino acid sequences and arrangement were investigated for their anti-inflammatory activities, the residues/structures required for activity were also discussed. Our findings therefore proved anti-inflammatory potential of the KLK peptide and provide direct evidence for therapeutic application of KLK as a novel anti-inflammatory agent.

  6. Differential Interaction of Antimicrobial Peptides with Lipid Structures Studied by Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galo E. Balatti

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work; we investigated the differential interaction of amphiphilic antimicrobial peptides with 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC lipid structures by means of extensive molecular dynamics simulations. By using a coarse-grained (CG model within the MARTINI force field; we simulated the peptide–lipid system from three different initial configurations: (a peptides in water in the presence of a pre-equilibrated lipid bilayer; (b peptides inside the hydrophobic core of the membrane; and (c random configurations that allow self-assembled molecular structures. This last approach allowed us to sample the structural space of the systems and consider cooperative effects. The peptides used in our simulations are aurein 1.2 and maculatin 1.1; two well-known antimicrobial peptides from the Australian tree frogs; and molecules that present different membrane-perturbing behaviors. Our results showed differential behaviors for each type of peptide seen in a different organization that could guide a molecular interpretation of the experimental data. While both peptides are capable of forming membrane aggregates; the aurein 1.2 ones have a pore-like structure and exhibit a higher level of organization than those conformed by maculatin 1.1. Furthermore; maculatin 1.1 has a strong tendency to form clusters and induce curvature at low peptide–lipid ratios. The exploration of the possible lipid–peptide structures; as the one carried out here; could be a good tool for recognizing specific configurations that should be further studied with more sophisticated methodologies.

  7. Effect of synthetic antimicrobial peptides on Naegleria fowleri trophozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiewcharoen, Supathra; Phurttikul, Watchara; Rabablert, Jundee; Auewarakul, Prasert; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Chetanachan, Pruksawan; Atithep, Thassanant; Junnu, Virach

    2014-05-01

    We evaluated the effect of tritrpticin, lactoferrin, killer decapeptide and scrambled peptide in vitro against Naegleria fowleri trophozoites compared with amphotericin B. Tritrpticin (100 microg/ml) caused apoptosis of N. fowleri trophozoites (2x10(5) cells/ml), while lactoferrin, killer decapeptide and scrambled peptide did not. On Gormori trichrome staining, tritrpticin affected the elasticity of the surface membrane and reduced the size of the nuclei of N. fowleri trophozoites. The ultrastructure surface membrane and food cup formation of the trophozoites were 100% inhibited. These results are consistent with inhibition of the nfa1, Mp2CL5 of the treated trophozoite, which plays a role in food cup formation. Tritrpticin 100 microg/ml was not toxic against SK-N-MC cells. Our findings suggest tritrpticin has activity against the surface membrane and nfa1 and Mp2CL5 of N. fowleri trophozoites and could be developed as a potential therapeutic agent.

  8. Antimicrobial Peptide-PNA Conjugates Selectively Targeting Bacterial Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-22

    Number: Names of personnel receiving PHDs NAME Kallenbach, Neville R. 1Total Number: Names of other research staff PERCENT_SUPPORTEDNAME FTE...pathogens that threaten patient life and health , including C. difficile. Thus, antibacterial strategies that provide timely and effective therapeutic... Staphylococcus aureus by antisense peptide nucleic acid. PLoS One. 2012; 7(1):e29886. 2. Good, L., Sandberg, R., Larsson, O., Nielsen, P.E., and Wahlestedt, C

  9. The species-specific mode of action of the antimicrobial peptide subtilosin against Listeria monocytogenes Scott A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijk, van S.J.A.; Noll, K.S.; Chikindas, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To elucidate the molecular mechanism of action of the antimicrobial peptide subtilosin against the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes Scott A. Methods and Results: Subtilosin was purified from a culture of Bacillus amylliquefaciens. The minimal inhibitory concentration of subtilosin

  10. Opposing effects of cationic antimicrobial peptides and divalent cations on bacterial lipopolysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Matthew; Rajagopal, Aruna; Liu, Wing-Ki; Ha, Bae-Yeun

    2017-10-01

    The permeability of the bacterial outer membrane, enclosing Gram-negative bacteria, depends on the interactions of the outer, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) layer, with surrounding ions and molecules. We present a coarse-grained model for describing how cationic amphiphilic molecules (e.g., antimicrobial peptides) interact with and perturb the LPS layer in a biologically relevant medium, containing monovalent and divalent salt ions (e.g., Mg2+). In our approach, peptide binding is driven by electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions and is assumed to expand the LPS layer, eventually priming it for disruption. Our results suggest that in parameter ranges of biological relevance (e.g., at micromolar concentrations) the antimicrobial peptide magainin 2 effectively disrupts the LPS layer, even though it has to compete with Mg2+ for the layer. They also show how the integrity of LPS is restored with an increasing concentration of Mg2+. Using the approach, we make a number of predictions relevant for optimizing peptide parameters against Gram-negative bacteria and for understanding bacterial strategies to develop resistance against cationic peptides.

  11. APD3: the antimicrobial peptide database as a tool for research and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangshun; Li, Xia; Wang, Zhe

    2016-01-04

    The antimicrobial peptide database (APD, http://aps.unmc.edu/AP/) is an original database initially online in 2003. The APD2 (2009 version) has been regularly updated and further expanded into the APD3. This database currently focuses on natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with defined sequence and activity. It includes a total of 2619 AMPs with 261 bacteriocins from bacteria, 4 AMPs from archaea, 7 from protists, 13 from fungi, 321 from plants and 1972 animal host defense peptides. The APD3 contains 2169 antibacterial, 172 antiviral, 105 anti-HIV, 959 antifungal, 80 antiparasitic and 185 anticancer peptides. Newly annotated are AMPs with antibiofilm, antimalarial, anti-protist, insecticidal, spermicidal, chemotactic, wound healing, antioxidant and protease inhibiting properties. We also describe other searchable annotations, including target pathogens, molecule-binding partners, post-translational modifications and animal models. Amino acid profiles or signatures of natural AMPs are important for peptide classification, prediction and design. Finally, we summarize various database applications in research and education. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Rational Design of Cyclic Antimicrobial Peptides Based on BPC194 and BPC198

    OpenAIRE

    Cirac, Anna D.; Maria Torné; Esther Badosa; Emilio Montesinos; Pedro Salvador; Lidia Feliu; Marta Planas

    2017-01-01

    A strategy for the design of antimicrobial cyclic peptides derived from the lead compounds c(KKLKKFKKLQ) (BPC194) and c(KLKKKFKKLQ) (BPC198) is reported. First, the secondary β-structure of BPC194 and BPC198 was analyzed by carrying out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Then, based on the sequence pattern and the β-structure of BPC194 or BPC198, fifteen analogues were designed and synthesized on solid-phase. The best peptides (BPC490, BPC918, and BPC924) showed minimum inhibitory concentra...

  13. Antifungal activity of synthetic peptides derived from Impatiens balsamina antimicrobial peptides Ib-AMP1 and Ib-AMP4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevissen, Karin; François, Isabelle E J A; Sijtsma, Lolke; van Amerongen, Aart; Schaaper, Wim M M; Meloen, Rob; Posthuma-Trumpie, Truus; Broekaert, Willem F; Cammue, Bruno P A

    2005-07-01

    Seeds of Impatiens balsamina contain a set of related antimicrobial peptides (Ib-AMPs). We have produced a synthetic variant of Ib-AMP1, oxidized to the bicyclic native conformation, which was fully active on yeast and fungal strains; and four linear 20-mer Ib-AMP variants, including two all-D forms. We show that the all-D variants are as active on yeast and fungal strains as native peptides. In addition, fungal growth inhibition nor salt-dependency of Ib-AMP4 could be improved by more than two-fold via replacement of amino acid residues by arginine or tryptophan. Native Ib-AMPs showed no hemolytic nor toxic activity up to a concentration of 100 microM. All these data demonstrate the potential of the native Ib-AMPs to combat fungal infections.

  14. Dynamic covalent chemistry enables formation of antimicrobial peptide quaternary assemblies in a completely abiotic manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuther, James F.; Dees, Justine L.; Kolesnichenko, Igor V.; Hernandez, Erik T.; Ukraintsev, Dmitri V.; Guduru, Rusheel; Whiteley, Marvin; Anslyn, Eric V.

    2018-01-01

    Naturally occurring peptides and proteins often use dynamic disulfide bonds to impart defined tertiary/quaternary structures for the formation of binding pockets with uniform size and function. Although peptide synthesis and modification are well established, controlling quaternary structure formation remains a significant challenge. Here, we report the facile incorporation of aryl aldehyde and acyl hydrazide functionalities into peptide oligomers via solid-phase copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SP-CuAAC) click reactions. When mixed, these complementary functional groups rapidly react in aqueous media at neutral pH to form peptide-peptide intermolecular macrocycles with highly tunable ring sizes. Moreover, sequence-specific figure-of-eight, dumbbell-shaped, zipper-like and multi-loop quaternary structures were formed selectively. Controlling the proportions of reacting peptides with mismatched numbers of complementary reactive groups results in the formation of higher-molecular-weight sequence-defined ladder polymers. This also amplified antimicrobial effectiveness in select cases. This strategy represents a general approach to the creation of complex abiotic peptide quaternary structures.

  15. Chemical and genetic characterization of bacteriocins: antimicrobial peptides for food safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Abigail B; Worobo, Randy W

    2014-01-15

    Antimicrobial peptides are produced across all domains of life. Among these diverse compounds, those produced by bacteria have been most successfully applied as agents of biocontrol in food and agriculture. Bacteriocins are ribosomally synthesized, proteinaceous compounds that inhibit the growth of closely related bacteria. Even within the subcategory of bacteriocins, the peptides vary significantly in terms of the gene cluster responsible for expression, and chemical and structural composition. The polycistronic gene cluster generally includes a structural gene and various combinations of immunity, secretion, and regulatory genes and modifying enzymes. Chemical variation can exist in amino acid identity, chain length, secondary and tertiary structural features, as well as specificity of active sites. This diversity posits bacteriocins as potential antimicrobial agents with a range of functions and applications. Those produced by food-grade bacteria and applied in normally occurring concentrations can be used as GRAS-status food additives. However, successful application requires thorough characterization. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Induced expression of the antimicrobial peptide melittin inhibits experimental infection by Mycoplasma gallisepticum in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarev, Vassili N; Stipkovits, Laszlo; Biro, Judit; Miklodi, Dora; Shkarupeta, Marina M; Titova, Galina A; Akopian, Tatiana A; Govorun, Vadim M

    2004-05-01

    The in vivo action of the antimicrobial peptide melittin, expressed from a recombinant plasmid vector, on chickens experimentally infected with Mycoplasma gallisepticum was studied. The plasmid vector pBI/mel2/rtTA includes the melittin gene under the control of an inducible tetracycline-dependent human cytomegalovirus promoter and the gene coding for the trans-activation protein rtTA. Aerosol administration of the vector, followed by infecting the chickens with M. gallisepticum 1226, is shown to inhibit development of infection. The inhibitory action was confirmed by a complex of clinical, pathomorphological, histological and serological studies, and also by comparing the M. gallisepticum reisolation frequency from the respiratory tract and internal organs. The data suggest that plasmid vectors expressing genes of antimicrobial peptides can be considered as potential agents for the prevention and treatment of mycoplasma infections in poultry farming.

  17. Novel Naja atra cardiotoxin 1 (CTX-1) derived antimicrobial peptides with broad spectrum activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Andrea; Cabassi, Clotilde Silvia; Santospirito, Davide; Polverini, Eugenia; Flisi, Sara; Cavirani, Sandro; Taddei, Simone

    2018-01-01

    Naja atra subsp. atra cardiotoxin 1 (CTX-1), produced by Chinese cobra snakes, belonging to Elapidae family, is included in the three-finger toxin family and exerts high cytotoxicity and antimicrobial activity too. Using as template mainly the tip and the subsequent β-strand of the first "finger" of this toxin, different sequences of 20 amino acids linear peptides have been designed in order to avoid toxic effects but to maintain or even strengthen the partial antimicrobial activity already seen for the complete toxin. As a result, the sequence NCP-0 (Naja Cardiotoxin Peptide-0) was designed as ancestor and subsequently 4 other variant sequences of NCP-0 were developed. These synthesized variant sequences have shown microbicidal activity towards a panel of reference and field strains of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The sequence named NCP-3, and its variants NCP-3a and NCP-3b, have shown the best antimicrobial activity, together with low cytotoxicity against eukaryotic cells and low hemolytic activity. Bactericidal activity has been demonstrated by minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) assay at values below 10 μg/ml for most of the tested bacterial strains. This potent antimicrobial activity was confirmed even for unicellular fungi Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Malassezia pachydermatis (MBC 50-6.3 μg/ml), and against the fast-growing mycobacteria Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium fortuitum. Moreover, NCP-3 has shown virucidal activity on Bovine Herpesvirus 1 (BoHV1) belonging to Herpesviridae family. The bactericidal activity is maintained even in a high salt concentration medium (125 and 250 mM NaCl) and phosphate buffer with 20% Mueller Hinton (MH) medium against E. coli, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa reference strains. Considering these in vitro obtained data, the search for active sequences within proteins presenting an intrinsic microbicidal activity could provide a new way for

  18. Isolation and identification of a new intracellular antimicrobial peptide produced by Paenibacillus alvei AN5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkotaini, Bassam; Anuar, Nurina; Kadhum, Abdul Amir Hassan; Sani, Asmahani Azira Abdu

    2014-04-01

    A wild-type, Gram-positive, rod-shaped, endospore-forming and motile bacteria has been isolated from palm oil mill sludge in Malaysia. Molecular identification using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that the bacteria belonged to genus Paenibacillus. With 97 % similarity to P. alvei (AUG6), the isolate was designated as P. alvei AN5. An antimicrobial compound was extracted from P. alvei AN5-pelleted cells using 95 % methanol and was then lyophilized. Precipitates were re-suspended in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), producing an antimicrobial crude extract (ACE). The ACE showed antimicrobial activity against Salmonella enteritidis ATCC 13076, Escherichia coli ATCC 29522, Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 and Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 8014. By using SP-Sepharose cation exchange chromatography, Sephadex G-25 gel filtration and Tricine SDS-PAGE, the ACE was purified, which produced a ~2-kDa active band. SDS-PAGE and infrared (IR) spectroscopy indicated the proteinaceous nature of the antimicrobial compound in the ACE, and liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy and de novo sequencing using an automatic, Q-TOF premier system detected a peptide with the amino acid sequence F-C-K-S-L-P-L-P-L-S-V-K (1,330.7789 Da). This novel peptide was designated as AN5-2. The antimicrobial peptide exhibited stability from pH 3 to 12 and maintained its activity after being heated to 90 °C. It also remained active after incubation with denaturants (urea, SDS and EDTA).

  19. CAMPR3: a database on sequences, structures and signatures of antimicrobial peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Waghu, Faiza Hanif; Barai, Ram Shankar; Gurung, Pratima; Idicula-Thomas, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are known to have family-specific sequence composition, which can be mined for discovery and design of AMPs. Here, we present CAMPR3; an update to the existing CAMP database available online at www.camp3.bicnirrh.res.in. It is a database of sequences, structures and family-specific signatures of prokaryotic and eukaryotic AMPs. Family-specific sequence signatures comprising of patterns and Hidden Markov Models were generated for 45 AMP families by analysing 1386 ...

  20. Surveying the potential of secreted antimicrobial peptides to enhance plant disease resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Breen, Susan; Solomon, Peter S.; Bedon, Frank; Vincent, Delphine

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are natural products found across diverse taxa as part of the innate immune system against pathogen attacks. Some AMPs are synthesized through the canonical gene expression machinery and are called ribosomal AMPs. Other AMPs are assembled by modular enzymes generating nonribosomal AMPs and harbor unusual structural diversity. Plants synthesize an array of AMPs, yet are still subject to many pathogen invasions. Crop breeding programs struggle to release new cultiv...

  1. Surveying the potential of secreted antimicrobial peptides to enhance plant disease resistance.

    OpenAIRE

    Susan eBreen; Peter eSolomon; Frank eBedon; Delphine eVincent

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are natural products found across diverse taxa as part of the innate immune system against pathogen attacks. Some AMPs are synthesised through the canonical gene expression machinery and are called ribosomal AMPs. Other AMPs are assembled by modular enzymes generating nonribosomal AMPs and harbour unusual structural diversity. Plants synthesise an array of AMPs, yet are still subject to many pathogen invasions. Crop breeding programs struggle to release new culti...

  2. Toll-like receptor and antimicrobial peptide expression in the bovine endometrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conlan R Steven

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The endometrium is commonly infected with bacteria leading to severe disease of the uterus in cattle and humans. The endometrial epithelium is the first line of defence for this mucosal surface against bacteria and Toll-like receptors (TLRs are a critical component of the innate immune system for detection of pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs. Antimicrobial peptides, acute phase proteins and Mucin-1 (MUC-1 also provide non-specific defences against microbes on mucosal surfaces. The present study examined the expression of innate immune defences in the bovine endometrium and tested the hypothesis that endometrial epithelial cells express functional receptors of the TLR family and the non-specific effector molecules for defence against bacteria. Methods Bovine endometrial tissue and purified populations of primary epithelial and stromal cells were examined using RT-PCR for gene expression of TLRs, antimicrobial peptides and MUC-1. Functional responses were tested by evaluating the secretion of prostaglandin E2 and acute phase proteins when cells were treated with bacterial PAMPs such as bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS and lipoproteins. Results The endometrium expressed TLRs 1 to 10, whilst purified populations of epithelial cells expressed TLRs 1 to 7 and 9, and stromal cells expressed TLRs 1 to 4, 6, 7, 9 and 10. The TLRs appear to be functional as epithelial cells secreted prostaglandin E2 in response to bacterial PAMPs. In addition, the epithelial cells expressed antimicrobial peptides, such as Tracheal and Lingual Antimicrobial Peptides (TAP and LAP and MUC-1, which were upregulated when the cells were treated with LPS. However, the epithelial cells did not express appreciable amounts of the acute phase proteins haptoglobin or serum amyloid A. Conclusion Epithelial cells have an essential role in the orchestration of innate immune defence of the bovine endometrium and are likely to be the key to prevention of

  3. Antimicrobial Peptides Containing Unnatural Amino Acid Exhibit Potent Bactericidal Activity against ESKAPE Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory Standards broth microdilution method. MIC is defined as the lowest concentration of the test antimicrobial that would inhibit the growth of the...idues exhibit negative hydrophobicity and by shortening the side chain the protonated nitrogen is moved closer to the peptide back- bone . This...it appears that back- bone flexibility after the hydrophobic or charged residue and the following Tic residue is more important in the interactions

  4. Self-assembled arginine-rich peptides as effective antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Gujie; Shi, Di; Herchek, Whitney; Webster, Thomas J

    2017-04-01

    Bacteria can adapt to their ever-changing environment to develop a resistance to commonly used antibiotics. This escalating evolution of bacteria coupled with a diminished number of effective antibiotics has caused a global healthcare crisis. New antimicrobials and novel approaches to tackle this problem are urgently needed. Antimicrobial peptides are of particular interest in this endeavor due to their broad spectrum antimicrobial properties as well as ability to combat multi-drug resistant bacteria. Most peptides have both hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions that enable them to be soluble in an aqueous solution, yet can insert into and subsequently disintegrate lipid rich membranes through diverse mechanisms. In this study, a novel class of cationic nanoparticles (formed by the self-assembly of an amphiphilic peptide) were shown to have strong antimicrobial properties against gram-positive bacteria, specifically Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with minimal toxicity to human dermal fibroblasts. The particular self-assembled structure tested here included an arginine rich nanoparticle (C17 H35 GR7RGDS or amphiphilic peptide nanoparticles, APNPs) which incorporated seven arginine residues (imparting a positive charge to improve membrane interactions), a hydrophobic block which drove the self-assembly process, and the presence of an amino acid quadruplet arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-serine (RGDS) which may render these nanoparticles capable of attracting healthy cells while competing bacterial adherence to fibronectin, an adhesive protein found on cell surfaces. As such, this in vitro study demonstrated that the presently formulated APNPs should be further studied for a wide range of antibacterial applications where antibiotics are no longer useful. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1046-1054, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Alarin but not its alternative-splicing form, GALP (Galanin-like peptide) has antimicrobial activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Akihiro, E-mail: a-wada@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Department of Bacteriology, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan); Wong, Pooi-Fong [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Hojo, Hironobu [Department of Applied Biochemistry, Institute of Glycoscience, Tokai University, Kanagawa 2591292 (Japan); Hasegawa, Makoto [Department of Bioscience, Faculty of Bioscience, Nagahama Institute of Bio-Science and Technology, Shiga 5260829 (Japan); Ichinose, Akitoyo [Electron Microscopy Shop Central Laboratory, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan); Llanes, Rafael [Institute Pedro Kouri, Havana (Cuba); Kubo, Yoshinao [Division of Cytokine Signaling, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan); Senba, Masachika [Department of Pathology, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan); Ichinose, Yoshio [Kenya Research Station, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan)

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: • Alarin inhibits the growth of E. coli but not S. aureus. • Alarin’s potency is comparable to LL-37 in inhibiting the growth of E. coli. • Alarin can cause bacterial membrane blebbing. • Alalin does not induce hemolysis on erythrocytes. -- Abstract: Alarin is an alternative-splicing form of GALP (galanin-like peptide). It shares only 5 conserved amino acids at the N-terminal region with GALP which is involved in a diverse range of normal brain functions. This study seeks to investigate whether alarin has additional functions due to its differences from GALP. Here, we have shown using a radial diffusion assay that alarin but not GALP inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli (strain ML-35). The conserved N-terminal region, however, remained essential for the antimicrobial activity of alarin as truncated peptides showed reduced killing effect. Moreover, alarin inhibited the growth of E. coli in a similar potency as human cathelicidin LL-37, a well-studied antimicrobial peptide. Electron microscopy further showed that alarin induced bacterial membrane blebbing but unlike LL-37, it did not cause hemolysis of erythrocytes. In addition, alarin is only active against the gram-negative bacteria, E. coli but not the gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus. Thus, these data suggest that alarin has potentials as an antimicrobial and should be considered for the development in human therapeutics.

  6. Screening, Expression, Purification and Functional Characterization of Novel Antimicrobial Peptide Genes from Hermetia illucens (L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Elhag

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides from a wide spectrum of insects possess potent microbicidal properties against microbial-related diseases. In this study, seven new gene fragments of three types of antimicrobial peptides were obtained from Hermetia illucens (L, and were named cecropinZ1, sarcotoxin1, sarcotoxin (2a, sarcotoxin (2b, sarcotoxin3, stomoxynZH1, and stomoxynZH1(a. Among these genes, a 189-basepair gene (stomoxynZH1 was cloned into the pET32a expression vector and expressed in the Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with thioredoxin. Results show that Trx-stomoxynZH1 exhibits diverse inhibitory activity on various pathogens, including Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli, fungus Rhizoctonia solani Khün (rice-10, and fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib. de Bary-14. The minimum inhibitory concentration of Trx-stomoxynZH1 is higher against Gram-positive bacteria than against Gram-negative bacteria but similar between the fungal strains. These results indicate that H. illucens (L. could provide a rich source for the discovery of novel antimicrobial peptides. Importantly, stomoxynZH1 displays a potential benefit in controlling antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  7. Screening, Expression, Purification and Functional Characterization of Novel Antimicrobial Peptide Genes from Hermetia illucens (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhag, Osama; Zhou, Dingzhong; Song, Qi; Soomro, Abdul Aziz; Cai, Minmin; Zheng, Longyu; Yu, Ziniu; Zhang, Jibin

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides from a wide spectrum of insects possess potent microbicidal properties against microbial-related diseases. In this study, seven new gene fragments of three types of antimicrobial peptides were obtained from Hermetia illucens (L), and were named cecropinZ1, sarcotoxin1, sarcotoxin (2a), sarcotoxin (2b), sarcotoxin3, stomoxynZH1, and stomoxynZH1(a). Among these genes, a 189-basepair gene (stomoxynZH1) was cloned into the pET32a expression vector and expressed in the Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with thioredoxin. Results show that Trx-stomoxynZH1 exhibits diverse inhibitory activity on various pathogens, including Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli, fungus Rhizoctonia solani Khün (rice)-10, and fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary-14. The minimum inhibitory concentration of Trx-stomoxynZH1 is higher against Gram-positive bacteria than against Gram-negative bacteria but similar between the fungal strains. These results indicate that H. illucens (L.) could provide a rich source for the discovery of novel antimicrobial peptides. Importantly, stomoxynZH1 displays a potential benefit in controlling antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  8. Investigation of Antimicrobial Peptide Genes Associated with Fungus and Insect Resistance in Maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonan, Joseph; Williams, William Paul; Shan, Xueyan

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small defense proteins present in various organisms. Major groups of AMPs include beta-barrelin, hevein, knottin, lipid transfer protein (LTP), thionin, defensin, snakin, and cyclotide. Most plant AMPs involve host plant resistance to pathogens such as fungi, viruses, and bacteria, whereas a few plant AMPs from the cyclotide family carry insecticidal functions. In this research, a genome-wide investigation on antimicrobial peptide genes in maize genome was conducted. AMPs previously identified from various plant species were used as query sequences for maize genome data mining. Thirty-nine new maize AMPs were identified in addition to seven known maize AMPs. Protein sequence analysis revealed 10 distinguishable maize AMP groups. Analysis of mRNA expression of maize AMP genes by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) revealed different expression patterns in a panel of 10 maize inbred lines. Five maize AMP genes were found significantly associated with insect or fungus resistance. Identification of maize antimicrobial peptide genes will facilitate the breeding of host plant resistance and improve maize production. PMID:28914754

  9. Spermicidal efficacy of VRP, a synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptide, inducing apoptosis and membrane disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Prasanta; Bhoumik, Arpita; Saha, Sudipta; Mukherjee, Sandipan; Azmi, Sarfuddin; Ghosh, Jimut K; Dungdung, Sandhya R

    2018-02-01

    Presently available contraceptives are mostly hormonal or detergent in nature with numerous side effects like irritation, lesion, inflammation in vagina, alteration of body homeostasis, etc. Antimicrobial peptides with spermicidal activity but without adverse effects may be suitable alternatives. In the present study, spermicidal activity of a cationic antimicrobial peptide VRP on human spermatozoa has been elucidated. Progressive forward motility of human spermatozoa was instantly stopped after 100 μM VRP treatment and at 350 μM, all kinds of sperm motility ceased within 20 s as assessed by the Sander-Cramer assay. The spermicidal effect was confirmed by eosin-nigrosin assay and HOS test. VRP treatment (100 μM) in human spermatozoa induced both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis. TUNEL assay showed VRP treatment significantly disrupted the DNA integrity and changed the mitochondrial membrane permeability as evident from MPTP assay. AFM and SEM results depicted ultra structural changes including disruption of the acrosomal cap and plasma membrane of the head and midpiece region after treatment with 350 μM VRP. MTT assay showed after treatments with 100 and 350 μM of VRP for 24 hr, a substantial amount of Lactobacillus acidophilus (about 90% and 75%, respectively) remained viable. Hence, VRP being a small synthetic peptide with antimicrobial and spermicidal activity but tolerable to normal vaginal microflora, may be a suitable target for elucidating its contraceptive potentiality. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Differential expression of antimicrobial peptides in active and latent tuberculosis and its relationship with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Curiel, Irma; Castañeda-Delgado, Julio; Lopez-Lopez, Nallely; Araujo, Zaida; Hernandez-Pando, Rogelio; Gandara-Jasso, Benjamin; Macias-Segura, Noe; Enciso-Moreno, Antonio; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno

    2011-08-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most important infectious diseases, causing 1.8 million deaths annually worldwide. This problem has increased because of the association with human immmunodeficiency virus and diabetes mellitus type 2, mainly in developing countries. In the past few years it has been highlighted the significance of antimicrobial peptides in the immunopathogenesis of TB ex vivo and in experimental models studies. In this study we analyzed the expression of CAMP, DEFA1, DEFB4, and DEFB103A in patients with latent TB and progressive TB with and without comorbidity with diabetes mellitus type 2. Antimicrobial peptide gene expression increased during progressive TB, which could be used as a biomarker for reactivation. By contrast, patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 have lower antimicrobial peptides gene expression, suggesting that the lack of its proper production in these patients contribute to enhance the risk for TB reactivation. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Rhinovirus infection induces degradation of antimicrobial peptides and secondary bacterial infection in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallia, Patrick; Footitt, Joseph; Sotero, Rosa; Jepson, Annette; Contoli, Marco; Trujillo-Torralbo, Maria-Belen; Kebadze, Tatiana; Aniscenko, Julia; Oleszkiewicz, Gregory; Gray, Katrina; Message, Simon D; Ito, Kazuhiro; Barnes, Peter J; Adcock, Ian M; Papi, Alberto; Stanciu, Luminita A; Elkin, Sarah L; Kon, Onn M; Johnson, Malcolm; Johnston, Sebastian L

    2012-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations are associated with virus (mostly rhinovirus) and bacterial infections, but it is not known whether rhinovirus infections precipitate secondary bacterial infections. To investigate relationships between rhinovirus infection and bacterial infection and the role of antimicrobial peptides in COPD exacerbations. We infected subjects with moderate COPD and smokers and nonsmokers with normal lung function with rhinovirus. Induced sputum was collected before and repeatedly after rhinovirus infection and virus and bacterial loads measured with quantitative polymerase chain reaction and culture. The antimicrobial peptides secretory leukoprotease inhibitor (SLPI), elafin, pentraxin, LL-37, α-defensins and β-defensin-2, and the protease neutrophil elastase were measured in sputum supernatants. After rhinovirus infection, secondary bacterial infection was detected in 60% of subjects with COPD, 9.5% of smokers, and 10% of nonsmokers (P rhinovirus infection exclusively in subjects with COPD with secondary bacterial infections, and SLPI and elafin levels correlated inversely with bacterial load. Rhinovirus infections are frequently followed by secondary bacterial infections in COPD and cleavage of the antimicrobial peptides SLPI and elafin by virus-induced neutrophil elastase may precipitate these secondary bacterial infections. Therapy targeting neutrophil elastase or enhancing innate immunity may be useful novel therapies for prevention of secondary bacterial infections in virus-induced COPD exacerbations.

  12. Scolopendin, an antimicrobial peptide from centipede, attenuates mitochondrial functions and triggers apoptosis in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heejeong; Hwang, Jae-Sam; Lee, Dong Gun

    2017-02-20

    Centipedes, a type of arthropod, reportedly produce antimicrobial peptides as part of an innate immune response. Scolopendin (SPSEKAGLQPVGRIGRMLKK) is a novel antimicrobial peptide derived from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans Many antifungal agents have more than one type of cell death mechanism. Although scolopendin is involved in membrane perturbation, the corresponding intracellular changes require further investigation. Therefore, we assessed the cell morphology and calcium ion concentration of the cytosol and mitochondria of scolopendin-treated cells. The treated cells were shrunken, and calcium ion homeostasis was disrupted in both the cytosol and mitochondria. These conditions attenuated mitochondrial homeostasis, disrupting mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome c levels. Fungal cells treated with scolopendin exhibited various apoptotic phenotypes such as reactive oxygen species accumulation, phosphatidylserine exposure, chromatin condensation, and nuclear fragmentation. Scolopendin-induced cell death also triggered metacaspase activation. In conclusion, treatment of Candida albicans with scolopendin induced the apoptotic response, which in turn led to mitochondrial dysfunction, metacaspase activation, and cell death. The antimicrobial peptide scolopendin from the centipede S.s. mutilans demonstrated a novel apoptotic mechanism as an antifungal agent. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  13. Increased survival of experimentally evolved antimicrobial peptide-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in an animal host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Adam J; Purves, Joanne; Rolff, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been proposed as new class of antimicrobial drugs, following the increasing prevalence of bacteria resistant to antibiotics. Synthetic AMPs are functional analogues of highly evolutionarily conserved immune effectors in animals and plants, produced in response to microbial infection. Therefore, the proposed therapeutic use of AMPs bears the risk of ‘arming the enemy’: bacteria that evolve resistance to AMPs may be cross-resistant to immune effectors (AMPs) in their hosts. We used a panel of populations of Staphylococcus aureus that were experimentally selected for resistance to a suite of individual AMPs and antibiotics to investigate the ‘arming the enemy’ hypothesis. We tested whether the selected strains showed higher survival in an insect model (Tenebrio molitor) and cross-resistance against other antimicrobials in vitro. A population selected for resistance to the antimicrobial peptide iseganan showed increased in vivo survival, but was not more virulent. We suggest that increased survival of AMP-resistant bacteria almost certainly poses problems to immune-compromised hosts. PMID:25469169

  14. Antibacterial Efficacy of Gold and Silver Nanoparticles Functionalized with the Ubiquicidin (29–41 Antimicrobial Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Morales-Avila

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated that drug antimicrobial activity is enhanced when metallic nanoparticles are used as an inorganic support, obtaining synergic effects against microorganisms. The cationic antimicrobial peptide ubiquicidin 29–41 (UBI has demonstrated high affinity and sensitivity towards fungal and bacterial infections. The aim of this research was to prepare and evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of engineered multivalent nanoparticle systems based on silver or gold nanoparticles functionalized with UBI. Spectroscopy techniques demonstrated that NPs were functionalized with UBI mainly through interactions with the -NH2 groups. A significant increase in the antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was obtained with the conjugate AgNP-UBI with regard to that of AgNP. No inhibition of bacterial growth was observed with AuNP and AuNP-UBI using a nanoparticle concentration of up to 182 μg mL−1. Nonetheless, silver nanoparticles conjugated to the UBI antimicrobial peptide may provide an alternative therapy for topical infections.

  15. Antibacterial Peptide Nucleic Acid-Antimicrobial Peptide (PNA-AMP) Conjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anna Mette; Bonke, Gitte; Larsen, Camilla Josephine

    2016-01-01

    Antisense peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligomers constitute a novel class of potential antibiotics that inhibit bacterial growth via specific knockdown of essential gene expression. However, discovery of efficient, nontoxic delivery vehicles for such PNA oligomers has remained a challenge...

  16. Development of a catheter functionalized by a polydopamine peptide coating with antimicrobial and antibiofilm properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kaiyang; Chua, Ray Rong Yuan; Bow, Ho; Tambyah, Paul Anantharajah; Hadinoto, Kunn; Leong, Susanna Su Jan

    2015-03-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are the most common hospital-acquired infections worldwide, aggravating the problem of antimicrobial resistance and patient morbidity. There is a need for a potent and robust antimicrobial coating for catheters to prevent these infections. An ideal coating agent should possess high antimicrobial efficacy and be easily and economically conjugated to the catheter surface. In this study, we report a simple yet effective immobilization strategy to tether a potent synthetic antimicrobial peptide, CWR11, onto catheter-relevant surfaces. Polydopamine (PD) was deposited as a thin adherent film onto a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface to facilitate attachment of CWR11 onto the PD-functionalized polymer. Surface characterization of the CWR11-tethered surfaces confirmed the successful immobilization of peptides onto the PD-coated PDMS. The CWR11-immobilized PDMS slides displayed excellent antimicrobial (significant inhibition of 5×10(4) colony-forming units of CAUTI-relevant microbes) and antibiofilm (∼92% enhanced antibacterial adherence) properties. To assess its clinical relevance, the PD-based immobilization platform was translated onto commercial silicone-coated Foley catheters. The CWR11-impregnated catheter displayed potent bactericidal properties against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and retained its antimicrobial functionality for at least 21days, showing negligible cytotoxicity against human erythrocyte and uroepithelial cells. The outcome of this study demonstrates the proof-of-concept potential of a polydopamine-CWR11-functionalized catheter to combat CAUTIs. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Antiadhesive Polymer Brush Coating Functionalized with Antimicrobial and RGD Peptides to Reduce Biofilm Formation and Enhance Tissue Integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muszanska, Agnieszka K.; Rochford, Edward T. J.; Gruszka, Agnieszka; Bastian, Andreas A.; Busscher, Hendrik; Norde, Willem; van der Mei, Henny C.; Herrmann, Andreas

    This paper describes the synthesis and characterization of polymer peptide conjugates to be used as infection-resistant coating for biomaterial implants and devices. Antiadhesive polymer brushes composed of block copolymer Pluronic F-127 (PF127) were functionalized with antimicrobial peptides (AMP),

  18. Cation-pi interactions stabilize the structure of the antimicrobial peptide indolicidin near membranes: molecular dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2007-01-01

    We implemented molecular dynamics simulations of the 13-residue antimicrobial peptide indolicidin (ILPWKWPWWPWRR-NH2) in dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles. In DPC, a persistent cation-pi interaction between TRP11 and ARG13 defined the structure of the peptide n...

  19. Enhancement of host defense against pathogens by antimicrobial peptides : a new approach to combat microbial drug resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Does, Anne Margaretha van der

    2011-01-01

    Due to their abilities to eliminate pathogens and modulate host’s immune responses, antimicrobial peptides are considered as potential alternatives for the treatment of infections with (multi-drug resistant) pathogens. In this thesis the immunomodulatory actions of two peptides have been

  20. Investigating the cationic side chains of the antimicrobial peptide tritrpticin: hydrogen bonding properties govern its membrane-disruptive activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Leonard T.; de Boer, Leonie; Zaat, Sebastian A. J.; Vogel, Hans J.

    2011-01-01

    The positively charged side chains of cationic antimicrobial peptides are generally thought to provide the initial long-range electrostatic attractive forces that guide them towards the negatively charged bacterial membranes. Peptide analogs were designed to examine the role of the four Arg side

  1. The effect of C-terminal amidation on the efficacy and selectivity of antimicrobial and anticancer peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, Sarah Rachel; Harris, Frederick; Bhatt, Tailap; Singh, Jaipaul; Phoenix, David Andrew

    2009-12-01

    Cationic defence peptides show high therapeutic potential as antimicrobial and anticancer agents. Some of these peptides carry a C-terminal amide moiety which has been shown to be required for antimicrobial activity. However, whether this is a general requirement or whether C-terminal amidation is required for the anticancer activity of defence peptides is unclear. In response, this study analyses the toxicity of a series of C-terminally amidated defence peptides and their non-amidated isoforms to normal fibroblast cells, a variety of tumour cells and bacterial cells. The toxicities of these peptides to microbial and cancer cells were generally <200 microM. Peptides were either unaffected by C-terminal amidation or showed up to 10-fold decreases or increases in efficacy. However, these peptides all showed toxicity to normal fibroblast cells with levels (generally <150 microM) that were comparable to those of their antimicrobial and anticancer activities. In contrast to previous claims which have been based on analysis of single amidation events, the results of this study clearly show that the C-terminal amidation of defence peptides has a variable effect on their antimicrobial and anticancer efficacy and no clear effect on their selectivity for these cell types.

  2. Penetration of Milk-Derived Antimicrobial Peptides into Phospholipid Monolayers as Model Biomembranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalska, Ewa; Więcław-Czapla, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Three antimicrobial peptides derived from bovine milk proteins were examined with regard to penetration into insoluble monolayers formed with 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) or 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-rac-(1-glycerol) sodium salt (DPPG). Effects on surface pressure (Π) and electric surface potential (ΔV) were measured, Π with a platinum Wilhelmy plate and ΔV with a vibrating plate. The penetration measurements were performed under stationary diffusion conditions and upon the compression of the monolayers. The two type measurements showed greatly different effects of the peptide-lipid interactions. Results of the stationary penetration show that the peptide interactions with DPPC monolayer are weak, repulsive, and nonspecific while the interactions with DPPG monolayer are significant, attractive, and specific. These results are in accord with the fact that antimicrobial peptides disrupt bacteria membranes (negative) while no significant effect on the host membranes (neutral) is observed. No such discrimination was revealed from the compression isotherms. The latter indicate that squeezing the penetrant out of the monolayer upon compression does not allow for establishing the penetration equilibrium, so the monolayer remains supersaturated with the penetrant and shows an under-equilibrium orientation within the entire compression range, practically. PMID:24455264

  3. Salivary concentration of the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 in patients with oral lichen planus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotiria Davidopoulou

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The antimicrobial peptide LL-37 is a significant molecule of innate immunity and recent studies indicate that it plays an important role in maintaining oral health. Yet limited knowledge exists on its role in oral diseases and oral lichen planus (OLP in particular. Objective: The study aimed to examine: 1 the salivary concentration of LL-37 in patients with OLP and healthy subjects, 2 the relation between the type (reticular or erosive and size of OLP lesions and LL-37 concentration, and 3 the effect of the therapeutic modalities on LL-37 levels. Design: The salivary peptide concentration in samples from 20 patients and 30 healthy subjects at the same age range was determined by ELISA. Results: Despite the wide variation in peptide concentration found in both groups, the healthy subjects exhibited significantly lower levels than patients. Patients with the erosive form had significantly higher peptide concentrations than patients with the reticular form. Systemic treatment with corticosteroids resulted in a significant decrease of the salivary peptide concentration, while other treatment modalities, such as administration of vitamins A and E or local application of corticosteroids had no effect. Improved clinical appearance of the lesions was followed by a decrease in the salivary LL-37 level. Conclusions: Salivary concentration of LL-37 correlates to the manifestation of mucosa lesions in OLP patients, the highest levels being observed in the most severe cases. This increase in peptide levels may protect against lesion infection and promote a quick wound healing.

  4. Overexpression of Antimicrobial, Anticancer, and Transmembrane Peptides in Escherichia coli through a Calmodulin-Peptide Fusion System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Hiroaki; Nguyen, Leonard T; Gopal, Ramamourthy; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Vogel, Hans J

    2016-09-07

    In recent years, the increasing number of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has become a serious health concern. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an important component of the innate immune system of most organisms. A better understanding of their structures and mechanisms of action would lead to the design of more potent and safer AMPs as alternatives for current antibiotics. For detailed investigations, effective recombinant production which allows the facile modification of the amino acid sequence, the introduction of unnatural amino acids, and labeling with stable isotopes for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies is desired. Several expression strategies have been introduced in previous reports; however, their effectiveness has been limited to a select few AMPs. Here, we have studied calmodulin (CaM) as a more universal carrier protein to express many types of AMPs in E. coli. We have discovered that the unique architecture of CaM, consisting of two independent target binding domains with malleable methionine-rich interaction surfaces, can accommodate numerous amino acid sequences containing basic and hydrophobic residues. This effectively masks the toxic antimicrobial activities of many amphipathic AMPs and protects them from degradation during expression and purification. Here, we demonstrate the expression of various AMPs using a CaM-fusion expression system, including melittin, fowlicidin-1, tritrpticin, indolicidin, puroindoline A peptide, magainin II F5W, lactoferrampin B, MIP3α51-70, and human β-defensin 3 (HBD-3), the latter requiring three disulfide bonds for proper folding. In addition, our approach was extended to the transmembrane domain of the cell adhesion protein l-selectin. We propose the use of the CaM-fusion system as a universal approach to express many cationic amphipathic peptides that are normally toxic and would kill the bacterial host cells.

  5. Prediction of binding free energy for adsorption of antimicrobial peptide lactoferricin B on a POPC membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivcharuk, Victor; Tomberli, Bruno; Tolokh, Igor S.; Gray, C. G.

    2008-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to study the interaction of a zwitterionic palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayer with the cationic antimicrobial peptide bovine lactoferricin (LFCinB) in a 100 mM NaCl solution at 310 K. The interaction of LFCinB with POPC is used as a model system for studying the details of membrane-peptide interactions, with the peptide selected because of its antimicrobial nature. Seventy-two 3 ns MD simulations, with six orientations of LFCinB at 12 different distances from a POPC membrane, are carried out to determine the potential of mean force (PMF) or free energy profile for the peptide as a function of the distance between LFCinB and the membrane surface. To calculate the PMF for this relatively large system a new variant of constrained MD and thermodynamic integration is developed. A simplified method for relating the PMF to the LFCinB-membrane binding free energy is described and used to predict a free energy of adsorption (or binding) of -1.05±0.39kcal/mol , and corresponding maximum binding force of about 20 pN, for LFCinB-POPC. The contributions of the ions-LFCinB and the water-LFCinB interactions to the PMF are discussed. The method developed will be a useful starting point for future work simulating peptides interacting with charged membranes and interactions involved in the penetration of membranes, features necessary to understand in order to rationally design peptides as potential alternatives to traditional antibiotics.

  6. What is the role of antimicrobial peptides (AMP) in acne vulgaris?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Jürgen; Tsuruta, Daisuke; Murakami, Masamoto; Kurokawa, Ichiro

    2013-06-01

    Acne vulgaris is the most common disorder of the pilosebaceous unit leading to inflamed skin characterized by the formation of comedones, papules, pustules and scarring. There is increasing evidence that the abundance of Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) in the inflamed acne lesions triggers inflammation. Therefore, in addition to treatment with retinoids, the use of antimicrobial agents has been established as a treatment option for acne. This indicates that antimicrobial mechanisms to control the growth of P. acnes may have an important influence on the severity of inflammatory acne. One import antimicrobial innate defense system comprises the production of antimicrobial peptides (AMP), small molecules with a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity as well as immunomodulatory properties. Although the role of AMP in acne is still emerging, there is increasing evidence that AMP may be of importance in acne. The aim of this viewpoint is to provide some hypotheses about the potential function of AMP in the pathogenesis of acne and to discuss potential AMP-based therapies for the treatment of acne. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The Alzheimer's disease-associated amyloid beta-protein is an antimicrobial peptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie J Soscia

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The amyloid beta-protein (Abeta is believed to be the key mediator of Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology. Abeta is most often characterized as an incidental catabolic byproduct that lacks a normal physiological role. However, Abeta has been shown to be a specific ligand for a number of different receptors and other molecules, transported by complex trafficking pathways, modulated in response to a variety of environmental stressors, and able to induce pro-inflammatory activities.Here, we provide data supporting an in vivo function for Abeta as an antimicrobial peptide (AMP. Experiments used established in vitro assays to compare antimicrobial activities of Abeta and LL-37, an archetypical human AMP. Findings reveal that Abeta exerts antimicrobial activity against eight common and clinically relevant microorganisms with a potency equivalent to, and in some cases greater than, LL-37. Furthermore, we show that AD whole brain homogenates have significantly higher antimicrobial activity than aged matched non-AD samples and that AMP action correlates with tissue Abeta levels. Consistent with Abeta-mediated activity, the increased antimicrobial action was ablated by immunodepletion of AD brain homogenates with anti-Abeta antibodies.Our findings suggest Abeta is a hitherto unrecognized AMP that may normally function in the innate immune system. This finding stands in stark contrast to current models of Abeta-mediated pathology and has important implications for ongoing and future AD treatment strategies.

  8. SCREENING OF ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY AND GENES CODING POLYKETIDE SYNTHETASE AND NONRIBOSOMAL PEPTIDE SYNTHETASE OF ACTINOMYCETE ISOLATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Kovácsová

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to observe antimicrobial activity using agar plate diffusion method and screening genes coding polyketide synthetase (PKS-I and nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS from actinomycetes. A total of 105 actinomycete strains were isolated from arable soil. Antimicrobial activity was demonstrated at 54 strains against at least 1 of total 12 indicator organisms. Antifungal properties were recorded more often than antibacterial properties. The presence of PKS-I and NRPS genes were founded at 61 of total 105 strains. The number of strains with mentioned biosynthetic enzyme gene fragments matching the anticipated length were 19 (18% and 50 (47% respectively. Overall, five actinomycete strains carried all the biosynthetical genes, yet no antimicrobial activity was found against any of tested pathogens. On the other hand, twenty-one strains showed antimicrobial activity even though we were not able to amplify any of the PKS or NRPS genes from them. Combination of the two methods showed broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity of actinomycetes isolated from arable soil, which indicate that actinomycetes are valuable reservoirs of novel bioactive compounds.

  9. An overview of antimicrobial peptides and the latest advances in their development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Josep M; Fusté, Ester; Rabanal, Francesc; Vinuesa, Teresa; Viñas, Miguel

    2017-06-01

    The recent dramatic increase in the incidence of antimicrobial resistance has been recognized by organizations such as the United Nations and World Health Organization as well as the governments of the USA and several European countries. A relatively new weapon in the fight against severe infections caused by multi-drug resistant bacteria is antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). These include colistin, currently regarded as the last line of antimicrobial therapy against multi-drug resistant microorganisms. Areas covered: Here, the authors provide an overview of the current research on AMPs. The focus is AMPs currently being developed for the treatment of recalcitrant bacterial infections, the synergies of AMPs and antibiotics, and the activity of AMPs against biofilm. This review also includes a brief introduction into the use of AMPs in infections caused by Mycobacterium, fungi, and parasites. Expert opinion: In research into new antimicrobials, AMPs are gaining increasing attention. While many are natural and are produced by a wide variety of organisms, others are being newly designed and chemically synthesized in the laboratory to achieve novel antimicrobial agents. The same strategy to fight infections in nature is thus being effectively exploited to safeguard human and animal health.

  10. Novel method to identify the optimal antimicrobial peptide in a combination matrix, using anoplin as an example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Jens; Ritz, Christian; Fliedner, Frederikke Petrine

    2014-01-01

    Microbial resistance is an increasing health concern and a true danger to human wellbeing. A worldwide search for new compounds is ongoing and antimicrobial peptides are promising lead candidates for tomorrow's antibiotics. The decapeptide anoplin, GLLKRIKTLL-NH2, is an especially interesting...... candidate because of its small size as well as its antimicrobial and nonhemolytic properties. Optimization of the properties of an antimicrobial peptide such as anoplin requires multidimensional searching in a complex chemical space. Typically such optimization is performed by labor-intensive and costly...... trial and error. In this study we show the benefit of fractional factorial design for identification of the optimal antimicrobial peptide in a combination matrix. We synthesize and analyze a training set of 12 anoplin analogs, representative of 64 analogs in total. Using MIC, hemolysis and HPLC...

  11. Chemokine-Derived Peptides: Novel Antimicrobial and Antineoplasic Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Valdivia-Silva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are a burgeoning family of chemotactic cytokines displaying a broad array of functions such as regulation of homeostatic leukocyte traffic and development, as well as activating the innate immune system. Their role in controlling early and late inflammatory stages is now well recognized. An improper balance either in chemokine synthesis or chemokine receptor expression contributes to various pathological disorders making chemokines and their receptors a useful therapeutic target. Research in this area is progressing rapidly, and development of novel agents based on chemokine/ chemokine receptors antagonist functions are emerging as attractive alternative drugs. Some of these novel agents include generation of chemokine-derived peptides (CDP with potential agonist and antagonist effects on inflammation, cancer and against bacterial infections. CDP have been generated mainly from N- and C-terminus chemokine sequences with subsequent modifications such as truncations or elongations. In this review, we present a glimpse of the different pharmacological actions reported for CDP and our current understanding regarding the potential use of CDP alone or as part of the novel therapies proposed in the treatment of microbial infections and cancer.

  12. Effects of cationic antimicrobial peptides on liquid-preserved boar spermatozoa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Schulze

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are mandatory additives in semen extenders to control bacterial contamination. The worldwide increase in resistance to conventional antibiotics requires the search for alternatives not only for animal artificial insemination industries, but also for veterinary and human medicine. Cationic antimicrobial peptides are of interest as a novel class of antimicrobial additives for boar semen preservation. The present study investigated effects of two synthetic cyclic hexapeptides (c-WFW, c-WWW and a synthetic helical magainin II amide derivative (MK5E on boar sperm during semen storage at 16 °C for 4 days. The standard extender, Beltsville Thawing Solution (BTS containing 250 µg/mL gentamicin (standard, was compared to combinations of BTS with each of the peptides in a split-sample procedure. Examination revealed peptide- and concentration-dependent effects on sperm integrity and motility. Negative effects were more pronounced for MK5E than in hexapeptide-supplemented samples. The cyclic hexapeptides were partly able to stimulate a linear progressive sperm movement. When using low concentrations of cyclic hexapeptides (4 µM c-WFW, 2 µM c-WWW sperm quality was comparable to the standard extender over the course of preservation. C-WFW-supplemented boar semen resulted in normal fertility rates after AI. In order to investigate the interaction of peptides with the membrane, electron spin resonance spectroscopic measurements were performed using spin-labeled lipids. C-WWW and c-WFW reversibly immobilized an analog of phosphatidylcholine (PC, whereas MK5E caused an irreversible increase of PC mobility. These results suggest testing the antimicrobial efficiency of non-toxic concentrations of selected cyclic hexapeptides as potential candidates to supplement/replace common antibiotics in semen preservation.

  13. Blastocystis Isolate B Exhibits Multiple Modes of Resistance against Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yason, John Anthony; Ajjampur, Sitara Swarna Rao

    2016-01-01

    Blastocystis is one of the most common eukaryotic organisms found in humans and many types of animals. Several reports have identified its role in gastrointestinal disorders, although its pathogenicity is yet to be clarified. Blastocystis is transmitted via the fecal-to-oral route and colonizes the large intestines. Epithelial cells lining the intestine secrete antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), including beta-defensins and cathelicidin, as a response to infection. This study explores the effects of host colonic antimicrobial peptides, particularly LL-37, a fragment of cathelicidin, on different Blastocystis subtypes. Blastocystis is composed of several subtypes that have genetic, metabolic, and biological differences. These subtypes also have various outcomes in terms of drug treatment and immune response. In this study, Blastocystis isolates from three different subtypes were found to induce intestinal epithelial cells to secrete LL-37. We also show that among the antimicrobial peptides tested, only LL-37 has broad activity on all the subtypes. LL-37 causes membrane disruption and causes Blastocystis to change shape. Blastocystis subtype 7 (ST7), however, showed relative resistance to LL-37. An isolate, ST7 isolate B (ST7-B), from this subtype releases proteases that can degrade the peptide. It also makes the environment acidic, which causes attenuation of LL-37 activity. The Blastocystis ST7-B isolate was also observed to have a thicker surface coat, which may protect the parasite from direct killing by LL-37. This study determined the effects of LL-37 on different Blastocystis isolates and indicates that AMPs have significant roles in Blastocystis infections. PMID:27217421

  14. Spatial structure and activity mechanism of a novel spider antimicrobial peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubovskii, Peter V; Volynsky, Pavel E; Polyansky, Anton A; Chupin, Vladimir V; Efremov, Roman G; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2006-09-05

    Latarcins (Ltc), linear peptides (ca. 25 amino acid long) isolated from the venom of the Lachesana tarabaevi spider, exhibit a broad-spectrum antibacterial activity, most likely acting on the bacterial plasmatic membrane. We study the structure-activity relationships in the series of these compounds. At the first stage, we investigated the spatial structure of one of the peptides, Ltc2a, and its mode of membrane perturbation. This was done by a combination of experimental and theoretical methods. The approach includes (i) structural study of the peptide by CD spectroscopy in phospholipid liposomes and by (1)H NMR in detergent micelles, (ii) determination of the effect on the liposomes by a dye leakage fluorescent assay and (31)P NMR spectroscopy, (iii) refinement of the NMR-derived spatial structure via Monte Carlo simulations in an implicit water-octanol slab, and (iv) calculation of the molecular hydrophobicity potential. The molecule of Ltc2a was found to consist of two helical regions (residues 3-9 and 13-21) connected via a poorly ordered fragment. The effect of the peptide on the liposomes suggests the carpet mechanism of the membrane deterioration. This is also supported by the analysis of hydrophobic/hydrophilic characteristics of Ltc2a and homologous antimicrobial peptides. These peptides exhibiting a helix-hinge-helix structural motif are characterized by a distinct and feebly marked amphiphilicity of their N- and C-terminal helices, respectively, and by a hydrophobicity gradient along the peptide chain. The approach we suggested may be useful in studying not only other latarcins but also a wider class of membrane-active peptides.

  15. Adsorption mechanism of an antimicrobial peptide on carbonaceous surfaces: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roccatano, Danilo; Sarukhanyan, Edita; Zangi, Ronen

    2017-02-01

    Peptides are versatile molecules with applications spanning from biotechnology to nanomedicine. They exhibit a good capability to unbundle carbon nanotubes (CNT) by improving their solubility in water. Furthermore, they are a powerful drug delivery system since they can easily be uptaken by living cells, and their high surface-to-volume ratio facilitates the adsorption of molecules of different natures. Therefore, understanding the interaction mechanism between peptides and CNT is important for designing novel therapeutical agents. In this paper, the mechanisms of the adsorption of antimicrobial peptide Cecropin A-Magainin 2 (CA-MA) on a graphene nanosheet (GNS) and on an ultra-short single-walled CNT are characterized using molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that the peptide coats both GNS and CNT surfaces through preferential contacts with aromatic side chains. The peptide packs compactly on the carbon surfaces where the polar and functionalizable Lys side chains protrude into the bulk solvent. It is shown that the adsorption is strongly correlated to the loss of the peptide helical structure. In the case of the CNT, the outer surface is significantly more accessible for adsorption. Nevertheless when the outer surface is already covered by other peptides, a spontaneous diffusion, via the amidated C-terminus into the interior of the CNT, was observed within 150 ns of simulation time. We found that this spontaneous insertion into the CNT interior can be controlled by the polarity of the entrance rim. For the positively charged CA-MA peptide studied, hydrogenated and fluorinated rims, respectively, hinder and promote the insertion.

  16. Cationic peptides from peptic hydrolysates of rice endosperm protein exhibit antimicrobial, LPS-neutralizing, and angiogenic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Masayuki; Kawabe, Junya; Toyoda, Ryu; Namae, Toshiki; Ochiai, Akihito; Saitoh, Eiichi; Tanaka, Takaaki

    2017-11-01

    In this study, we hydrolyzed rice endosperm protein (REP) with pepsin and generated 20 fractions containing multifunctional cationic peptides with varying isoelectric point (pI) values using ampholyte-free isoelectric focusing (autofocusing). Subsequently, we determined antimicrobial activities of each fraction against the pathogens Prophyromonas gingivalis, Propionibacterium acnes, Streptocossus mutans, and Candida albicans. Fractions 18, 19, and 20 had pI values greater than 12 and exhibited antimicrobial activity against P. gingivalis, P. acnes, and C. albicans, but not against S. mutans. In further experiments, we purified and identified cationic peptides from fractions 18, 19, and 20 using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and matrix-assisted laser/desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectroscopy. We also chemically synthesized five identified peptides (RSVSKSR, RRVIEPR, ERFQPMFRRPG, RVRQNIDNPNRADTYNPRAG, and VVRRVIEPRGLL) with pI values greater than 10.5 and evaluated antimicrobial, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-neutralizing, and angiogenic activities. Among these synthetic peptides, only VVRRVIEPRGLL exhibited antimicrobial activity against P. gingivalis, with an IC 50 value of 87μM. However, all five cationic peptides exhibited LPS-neutralizing and angiogenic activities with little or no hemolytic activity against mammalian red blood cells at functional concentrations. These present data show dual or multiple functions of the five identified cationic peptides with little or no hemolytic activity. Therefore, fractions containing cationic peptides from REP hydrolysates have the potential to be used as dietary supplements and functional ingredients in food products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Computer aided identification of a Hevein-like antimicrobial peptide of bell pepper leaves for biotechnological use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Games, Patrícia Dias; daSilva, Elói Quintas Gonçalves; Barbosa, Meire de Oliveira; Almeida-Souza, Hebréia Oliveira; Fontes, Patrícia Pereira; deMagalhães, Marcos Jorge; Pereira, Paulo Roberto Gomes; Prates, Maura Vianna; Franco, Gloria Regina; Faria-Campos, Alessandra; Campos, Sérgio Vale Aguiar; Baracat-Pereira, Maria Cristina

    2016-12-15

    Antimicrobial peptides from plants present mechanisms of action that are different from those of conventional defense agents. They are under-explored but have a potential as commercial antimicrobials. Bell pepper leaves ('Magali R') are discarded after harvesting the fruit and are sources of bioactive peptides. This work reports the isolation by peptidomics tools, and the identification and partially characterization by computational tools of an antimicrobial peptide from bell pepper leaves, and evidences the usefulness of records and the in silico analysis for the study of plant peptides aiming biotechnological uses. Aqueous extracts from leaves were enriched in peptide by salt fractionation and ultrafiltration. An antimicrobial peptide was isolated by tandem chromatographic procedures. Mass spectrometry, automated peptide sequencing and bioinformatics tools were used alternately for identification and partial characterization of the Hevein-like peptide, named HEV-CANN. The computational tools that assisted to the identification of the peptide included BlastP, PSI-Blast, ClustalOmega, PeptideCutter, and ProtParam; conventional protein databases (DB) as Mascot, Protein-DB, GenBank-DB, RefSeq, Swiss-Prot, and UniProtKB; specific for peptides DB as Amper, APD2, CAMP, LAMPs, and PhytAMP; other tools included in ExPASy for Proteomics; The Bioactive Peptide Databases, and The Pepper Genome Database. The HEV-CANN sequence presented 40 amino acid residues, 4258.8 Da, theoretical pI-value of 8.78, and four disulfide bonds. It was stable, and it has inhibited the growth of phytopathogenic bacteria and a fungus. HEV-CANN presented a chitin-binding domain in their sequence. There was a high identity and a positive alignment of HEV-CANN sequence in various databases, but there was not a complete identity, suggesting that HEV-CANN may be produced by ribosomal synthesis, which is in accordance with its constitutive nature. Computational tools for proteomics and databases are

  18. Influence of Amphibian Antimicrobial Peptides and Short Lipopeptides on Bacterial Biofilms Formed on Contact Lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Maciejewska

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The widespread use of contact lenses is associated with several complications, including ocular biofilm-related infections. They are very difficult to manage with standard antimicrobial therapies, because bacterial growth in a biofilm is associated with an increased antibiotic resistance. The principal aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs in eradication of bacterial biofilms formed on commercially available contact lenses. AMPs were synthesized according to Fmoc/tBu chemistry using the solid-phase method. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC of the compounds were determined. Anti-biofilm activity of the antimicrobial peptides determined at different temperatures (25 °C and 37 °C were compared with the effectiveness of commercially available contact lens solutions. All of the tested compounds exhibited stronger anti-biofilm properties as compared to those of the tested lens solutions. The strongest activity of AMPs was noticed against Gram-positive strains at a temperature of 25 °C. Conclusions: The results of our experiments encourage us toward further studies on AMPs and their potential application in the prophylaxis of contact lens-related eye infections.

  19. New perspectives for natural antimicrobial peptides: application as antinflammatory drugs in a murine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capparelli Rosanna

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are an ancient group of defense molecules. AMPs are widely distributed in nature (being present in mammals, birds, amphibians, insects, plants, and microorganisms. They display bactericidal as well as immunomodulatory properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities of a combination of two AMPs (temporin B and the royal jellein I against Staphylococcus epidermidis. Results The temporin B (TB-KK and the royal jelleins I, II, III chemically modified at the C terminal (RJI-C, RJII-C, RJIII-C, were tested for their activity against 10 different Staphylococcus epidermidis strains, alone and in combination. Of the three royal jelleins, RJI-C showed the highest activity. Moreover, the combination of RJI-C and TB-KK (MIX displayed synergistic activity. In vitro, the MIX displayed low hemolytic activity, no NO2- production and the ability to curb the synthesis of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ to the same extent as acetylsalicylic acid. In vivo, the MIX sterilized mice infected with Staphylococcus epidermidis in eleven days and inhibited the expression of genes encoding the prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (COX-2 and CD64, two important parameters of inflammation. Conclusion The study shows that the MIX – a combination of two naturally occurring peptides - displays both antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities.

  20. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as drug candidates: a patent review (2003-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosikowska, Paulina; Lesner, Adam

    2016-06-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) represent the large group of endogenous compounds widely distributed in nature. Due to their broad spectrum of antibiotic activity, as well as anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties, AMPs became a model for the discovery of novel antimicrobial drugs that could answer the problem of the increasing antibiotic resistance of pathogenic microorganisms. The review represents a comprehensive analysis of patents and patent applications from the year 2003 to 2015 referring to the therapeutic use of AMPs. The article highlights the general trends in the design, potential mode of action, and methods of biological evaluation of AMPs. The existing discord between the upcoming list of antimicrobial peptides claimed in the patents or related scientific articles as the potent drug candidates and the frequent failures of AMPs in clinical trials emphasize the need of a better understanding of their pleiotropic nature and mechanisms of host defense in general. Nevertheless, the encouraging examples of AMPs already introduced into the market, like Polymyxin or Fuzeon®, give some reason for optimism that development of AMPs as a novel class of antibiotics is still considered viable.

  1. A novel antimicrobial peptide, scolopendin, from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans and its microbicidal mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonyoung; Hwang, Jae-Sam; Lee, Dong Gun

    2015-11-01

    A novel antimicrobial peptide (AMP) was identified from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans by RNA sequencing, and the amino acid sequences predicted from the sequenced mRNAs were compared with those of known AMPs. We named this peptide scolopendin, according to its origin, and investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying its antimicrobial activity. Our findings showed that scolopendin had antimicrobial activity against several pathogenic microorganisms, but did not produce hemolysis of human erythrocytes. In addition, disturbances in the cell membrane potential, induction of potassium release from the cytosol, and increased membrane permeability of the microbes Candida albicans and Escherichia coli O157 were detected by the use of 3,3'-dipropylthiacarbocyanine iodide [DiSC3(5)] dye, potassium leakage assay, and propidium iodide influx assay, respectively, following scolopendin treatment. Further evidence to support the membrane-targeted action of scolopendin was obtained using artificial liposomes as models of the cell membrane. Use of calcein and FITC-labeled dextran leakage assays from scolopendin-treated giant unilamellar vesicles and large unilamellar vesicles showed that scolopendin has a pore-forming action on microbial membrane, with an estimated pore radius of 2.3-3.3 nm. In conclusion, scolopendin is a novel and potent AMP with a membrane-targeted mechanism of action. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  2. Tethering antimicrobial peptides onto chitosan: Optimization of azide-alkyne "click" reaction conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Mariana; Vale, Nuno; Costa, Fabíola M T A; Martins, M Cristina L; Gomes, Paula

    2017-06-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMP) are promising alternatives to classical antibiotics, due to their high specificity and potency at low concentrations, and low propensity to elicit pathogen resistance. Immobilization of AMP onto biomaterials is an emergent field of research, towards creation of novel antimicrobial materials able to avoid formation of biofilms on the surfaces of medical devices. Herein, we report the chemical route towards one such material, where chitosan was used as biocompatible carrier for the covalent grafting of Dhvar-5, a well-known potent AMP, via the chemoselective ("click") Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC). The material's structure, as well as peptide loading, were confirmed by Fourier-transformed infra-red (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopies, and by Amino Acid Analysis (AAA), respectively. Results herein reported demonstrate that, with proper optimization, the "click" CuAAC is an attractive approach for the tethering of AMP onto chitosan, in order to create novel antimicrobial materials potentially valuable for biomedical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Side chain hydrophobicity modulates therapeutic activity and membrane selectivity of antimicrobial peptide mastoparan-X.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas R Henriksen

    Full Text Available The discovery of new anti-infective compounds is stagnating and multi-resistant bacteria continue to emerge, threatening to end the "antibiotic era". Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs and lipo-peptides such as daptomycin offer themselves as a new potential class of antibiotics; however, further optimization is needed if AMPs are to find broad use as antibiotics. In the present work, eight analogues of mastoparan-X (MPX were investigated, having side chain modifications in position 1, 8 and 14 to modulate peptide hydrophobicity. The self-association properties of the peptides were characterized, and the peptide-membrane interactions in model membranes were compared with the bactericidal and haemolytic properties. Alanine substitution at position 1 and 14 resulted in higher target selectivity (red blood cells versus bacteria, but also decreased bactericidal potency. For these analogues, the gain in target selectivity correlated to biophysical parameters showing an increased effective charge and reduction in the partitioning coefficient for membrane insertion. Introduction of an unnatural amino acid, with an octyl side chain by amino acid substitution, at positions 1, 8 and 14 resulted in increased bactericidal potency at the expense of radically reduced membrane target selectivity. Overall, optimized membrane selectivity or bactericidal potency was achieved by changes in side chain hydrophobicity of MPX. However, enhanced potency was achieved at the expense of selectivity and vice versa in all cases.

  4. The interaction of the antimicrobial peptide cLEAP-2 and the bacterial membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townes, Claire L; Michailidis, Georgios; Hall, Judith

    2009-09-25

    Chicken Liver Expressed Antimicrobial Peptide-2 (cLEAP-2) is known to have killing activities against Salmonella spp., but the mechanism by which killing occurs remains to be elucidated. The ability of cLEAP-2 to disrupt the outer membrane of several Salmonella spp. was assessed using the fluorescent probe N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine (NPN). A rapid dose-dependent permeabilization of the outer membranes of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium phoP, and S. enterica serovar Typhimurium SL1344 was observed although no significant permeabilisation of the S. enteriditis membrane was detected. These data suggested that the ability of the mature cLEAP-2 peptide to permeabilise the Salmonella outer membrane is important in mediating its killing activities. The ability of the peptide to kill Gram-positive bacteria, specifically Streptococcus spp. and Staphylococcus spp. was also investigated using recombinant peptide and a time-kill assay. Of the strains analysed the Streptococcus pyogenes M1 strain appeared the most resistant to LEAP-2 killing although S. pyogenes mutants deficient in Sortase and M1 activities showed increased sensitivity to the mature peptide. This suggested the involvement of specific Streptococcus cell wall proteins including M1 in the resistance of the bacteria to cLEAP-2 killing. cLEAP-2 showed no significant toxicity towards mammalian erythrocytes indicating selectivity for bacterial over eukaryote cell membranes. These data provide further support for mature cLEAP-2 functioning in protecting the chicken against microbial attack.

  5. Inhibition of equine arteritis virus by an antimicrobial peptide produced by Bacillus sp. P34

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Scopel e Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT P34 is an antimicrobial peptide produced by Bacillus sp. P34, isolated from the intestinal contents of a fish from the Amazon basin. This peptide showed antibacterial properties against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and was characterized as a bacteriocin like substance. It was demonstrated that the peptide P34 exhibited antiviral activity against feline herpesvirus type 1 in vitro. The aim of this work was to evaluate P34 for its antiviral properties in vitro, using RK 13 cells, against the equine arteritis virus, since it has no specific treatment and a variable proportion of stallions may become persistently infected. The results obtained show that P34 exerts antiviral and virucidal activities against equine arteritis virus, probably in the viral envelope. The antiviral assays performed showed that P34 reduces significantly the viral titers of treated cell cultures. The mechanism of action of P34 seems to be time/temperature-dependent. This peptide tends to be a promising antiviral compound for the prevention and treatment of arteriviral infections since it has a high therapeutic index. However, more detailed studies must be performed to address the exact step of viral infection where P34 acts, in order to use this peptide as an antiviral drug in vivo in the future.

  6. β-Boomerang Antimicrobial and Antiendotoxic Peptides: Lipidation and Disulfide Bond Effects on Activity and Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harini Mohanram

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Drug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial pathogens and endotoxin- or lipopolysaccharide (LPS-mediated inflammations are among some of the most  prominent health issues globally. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are eminent molecules that can kill drug-resistant strains and neutralize LPS toxicity. LPS, the outer layer of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria safeguards cell integrity against hydrophobic compounds, including antibiotics and AMPs. Apart from maintaining structural integrity, LPS, when released into the blood stream, also induces inflammatory pathways leading to septic shock. In previous works, we have reported the de novo design of a set of 12-amino acid long cationic/hydrophobic peptides for LPS binding and activity. These peptides adopt β-boomerang like conformations in complex with LPS. Structure-activity studies demonstrated some critical features of the β-boomerang scaffold that may be utilized for the further development of potent analogs. In this work, β-boomerang lipopeptides were designed and structure-activity correlation studies were carried out. These lipopeptides were homo-dimerized through a disulfide bridge to stabilize conformations and for improved activity. The designed peptides exhibited potent antibacterial activity and efficiently neutralized LPS toxicity under in vitro assays. NMR structure of C4YI13C in aqueous solution demonstrated the conserved folding of the lipopeptide with a boomerang aromatic lock stabilized with disulfide bond at the C-terminus and acylation at the N-terminus. These lipo-peptides displaying bacterial sterilization and low hemolytic activity may be useful for future applications as antimicrobial and antiendotoxin molecules.

  7. The Spider Venom Peptide Lycosin-II Has Potent Antimicrobial Activity against Clinically Isolated Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides have been accepted as excellent candidates for developing novel antibiotics against drug-resistant bacteria. Recent studies indicate that spider venoms are the source for the identification of novel antimicrobial peptides. In the present study, we isolated and characterized an antibacterial peptide named lycosin-II from the venom of the spider Lycosa singoriensis. It contains 21 amino acid residue lacking cysteine residues and forms a typical linear amphipathic and cationic α-helical conformation. Lycosin-II displays potent bacteriostatic effect on the tested drug-resistant bacterial strains isolated from hospital patients, including multidrug-resistant A. baumannii, which has presented a huge challenge for the infection therapy. The inhibitory ability of lycosin-II might derive from its binding to cell membrane, because Mg2+ could compete with the binding sites to reduce the bacteriostatic potency of lycosin-II. Our data suggest that lycosin-II might be a lead in the development of novel antibiotics for curing drug-resistant bacterial infections.

  8. Activity of Genital Tract Secretions and Synthetic Antimicrobial Peptides against Group B Streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Nidhi; Buckley, Niall; Nakra, Natasha; Gialanella, Philip; Yuan, Weirong; Ghartey, Jeny P

    2015-12-01

    Genital tract secretions inhibit Escherichia coli (E. coli) through antimicrobial peptides (AMP) secreted by the host and vaginal microbiota. However, there are limited data against group B Streptococcus (GBS). Group B Streptococcus were incubated with cervico-vaginal lavage (CVL) samples from healthy non-pregnant women (n = 12) or synthetic AMP and monitored for bacterial growth using a turbidimetric approach. E. coli inhibitory activity was determined by a colony-forming unit assay. None of the CVL samples inhibited GBS. The human neutrophil peptide-1 and human defensin 5 inhibited GBS growth by ≥80% at concentrations ≥20 μg/mL and ≥50 μg/mL, respectively, while human beta-defensin 2 and LL-37 did not inhibit at highest concentration tested (100 μg/mL). In contrast, all AMP inhibited E. coli. Antimicrobial peptides may protect against E. coli colonization but have more limited activity against GBS. Future studies will focus on augmenting host defense with specific AMP to prevent genitourinary infection with these pathogenic organisms. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Multiple Functions of the New Cytokine-Based Antimicrobial Peptide Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin (TSLP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Bjerkan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP is a pleiotropic cytokine, hitherto mostly known to be involved in inflammatory responses and immunoregulation. The human tslp gene gives rise to two transcription and translation variants: a long form (lfTSLP that is induced by inflammation, and a short, constitutively-expressed form (sfTSLP, that appears to be downregulated by inflammation. The TSLP forms can be produced by a number of cell types, including epithelial and dendritic cells (DCs. lfTSLP can activate mast cells, DCs, and T cells through binding to the lfTSLP receptor (TSLPR and has a pro-inflammatory function. In contrast, sfTSLP inhibits cytokine secretion of DCs, but the receptor mediating this effect is unknown. Our recent studies have demonstrated that both forms of TSLP display potent antimicrobial activity, exceeding that of many other known antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, with sfTSLP having the strongest effect. The AMP activity is primarily mediated by the C-terminal region of the protein and is localized within a 34-mer peptide (MKK34 that spans the C-terminal α-helical region in TSLP. Fluorescent studies of peptide-treated bacteria, electron microscopy, and liposome leakage models showed that MKK34 exerted membrane-disrupting effects comparable to those of LL-37. Expression of TSLP in skin, oral mucosa, salivary glands, and intestine is part of the defense barrier that aids in the control of both commensal and pathogenic microbes.

  10. Prediction of antimicrobial peptides based on the adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Fabiano C; Rigden, Daniel J; Franco, Octavio L

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are widely distributed defense molecules and represent a promising alternative for solving the problem of antibiotic resistance. Nevertheless, the experimental time required to screen putative AMPs makes computational simulations based on peptide sequence analysis and/or molecular modeling extremely attractive. Artificial intelligence methods acting as simulation and prediction tools are of great importance in helping to efficiently discover and design novel AMPs. In the present study, state-of-the-art published outcomes using different prediction methods and databases were compared to an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) model. Data from our study showed that ANFIS obtained an accuracy of 96.7% and a Matthew's Correlation Coefficient (MCC) of0.936, which proved it to be an efficient model for pattern recognition in antimicrobial peptide prediction. Furthermore, a lower number of input parameters were needed for the ANFIS model, improving the speed and ease of prediction. In summary, due to the fuzzy nature ofAMP physicochemical properties, the ANFIS approach presented here can provide an efficient solution for screening putative AMP sequences and for exploration of properties characteristic of AMPs.

  11. Peptoids that mimic the structure, function, and mechanism of helical antimicrobial peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chongsiriwatana, Nathaniel P.; Patch, James A.; Czyzewski, Ann M.; Dohm, Michelle T.; Ivankin, Andrey; Gidalevitz, David; Zuckermann, Ronald N.; Barron, Annelise E. (IIT); (NWU); (LBNL)

    2008-04-02

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and their mimics are emerging as promising antibiotic agents. We present a library of 'ampetoids' (antimicrobial peptoid oligomers) with helical structures and biomimetic sequences, several members of which have low-micromolar antimicrobial activities, similar to cationic AMPs like pexiganan. Broad-spectrum activity against six clinically relevant BSL2 pathogens is also shown. This comprehensive structure-activity relationship study, including circular dichroism spectroscopy, minimum inhibitory concentration assays, hemolysis and mammalian cell toxicity studies, and specular x-ray reflectivity measurements shows that the in vitro activities of ampetoids are strikingly similar to those of AMPs themselves, suggesting a strong mechanistic analogy. The ampetoids' antibacterial activity, coupled with their low cytotoxicity against mammalian cells, make them a promising class of antimicrobials for biomedical applications. Peptoids are biostable, with a protease-resistant N-substituted glycine backbone, and their sequences are highly tunable, because an extensive diversity of side chains can be incorporated via facile solid-phase synthesis. Our findings add to the growing evidence that nonnatural foldamers will emerge as an important class of therapeutics.

  12. Antimicrobial Peptide Mimicking Primary Amine and Guanidine Containing Methacrylamide Copolymers Prepared by Raft Polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Sarah E.; Paslay, Lea C.; Sahukhal, Gyan S.; Abel, Brooks A.; Brown, Tyler D.; McCormick, Charles L.; Heinhorst, Sabine; Koul, Veena; Choudhary, Veena; Elasri, Mohamed O.; Morgan, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) display the ability to eliminate a wide variety of bacteria, without toxicity to the host eukaryotic cells. Synthetic polymers containing moieties mimicking lysine and arginine components found in AMPs have been reported to show effectiveness against specific bacteria, with the mechanism of activity purported to depend on the nature of the amino acid mimic. In an attempt to incorporate the antimicrobial activity of both amino acids into a single water-soluble copolymer, a series of copolymers containing lysine mimicking aminopropyl methacrylamide (APMA) and arginine mimicking guanadinopropyl methacrylamide (GPMA) were prepared via aqueous RAFT polymerization. Copolymers were prepared with varying ratios of the comonomers, with degree of polymerization of 35–40 and narrow molecular weight distribution to simulate naturally occurring AMPs. Antimicrobial activity was determined against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria under conditions with varying salt concentration. Toxicity to mammalian cells was assessed by hemolysis of red blood cells and MTT assays of MCF-7 cells. Antimicrobial activity was observed for APMA homopolymer and copolymers with low concentrations of GPMA against all bacteria tested, with low toxicity toward mammalian cells. PMID:26558609

  13. Synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptides bind with their hydrophobic parts to drug site II of human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivertsen, Annfrid; Isaksson, Johan; Leiros, Hanna-Kirsti S; Svenson, Johan; Svendsen, John-Sigurd; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2014-01-23

    Many biologically active compounds bind to plasma transport proteins, and this binding can be either advantageous or disadvantageous from a drug design perspective. Human serum albumin (HSA) is one of the most important transport proteins in the cardiovascular system due to its great binding capacity and high physiological concentration. HSA has a preference for accommodating neutral lipophilic and acidic drug-like ligands, but is also surprisingly able to bind positively charged peptides. Understanding of how short cationic antimicrobial peptides interact with human serum albumin is of importance for developing such compounds into the clinics. The binding of a selection of short synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs) to human albumin with binding affinities in the μM range is described. Competitive isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and NMR WaterLOGSY experiments mapped the binding site of the CAPs to the well-known drug site II within subdomain IIIA of HSA. Thermodynamic and structural analysis revealed that the binding is exclusively driven by interactions with the hydrophobic moieties of the peptides, and is independent of the cationic residues that are vital for antimicrobial activity. Both of the hydrophobic moieties comprising the peptides were detected to interact with drug site II by NMR saturation transfer difference (STD) group epitope mapping (GEM) and INPHARMA experiments. Molecular models of the complexes between the peptides and albumin were constructed using docking experiments, and support the binding hypothesis and confirm the overall binding affinities of the CAPs. The biophysical and structural characterizations of albumin-peptide complexes reported here provide detailed insight into how albumin can bind short cationic peptides. The hydrophobic elements of the peptides studied here are responsible for the main interaction with HSA. We suggest that albumin binding should be taken into careful consideration in antimicrobial peptide

  14. Purification and characterization of avian beta-defensin 11, an antimicrobial peptide of the hen egg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervé-Grépinet, Virginie; Réhault-Godbert, Sophie; Labas, Valérie; Magallon, Thierry; Derache, Chrystelle; Lavergne, Marion; Gautron, Joël; Lalmanach, Anne-Christine; Nys, Yves

    2010-10-01

    Natural antimicrobial peptides are present in different compartments (eggshell, egg white, and vitelline membranes) of the hen egg and are expected to be involved in the protection of the embryo during its development and to contribute to the production of pathogen-free eggs. In the present study, we used vitelline membranes from hen (Gallus gallus) eggs as a source of avian β-defensin 11 (AvBD11). A purification scheme using affinity chromatography and reverse-phase chromatography was developed. Purified AvBD11 was analyzed by a combination of mass spectrometry approaches to characterize its primary sequence and structure. A monoisotopic molecular species at [M + H](+) of 9,271.56 Da was obtained, and its N- and C-terminal sequences were determined. We also examined posttranslational modifications and identified the presence of 6 internal disulfide bonds. AvBD11 was found to exhibit antimicrobial activity toward both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  15. Insect proteins as a potential source of antimicrobial peptides in livestock production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Józefiak, A; Engberg, Ricarda Margarete

    2017-01-01

    been identified in different organisms, including plants, fungi, bacteria and animals. Insects are a primary source of AMPs which are considered as not resulting in the development of natural bacterial resistance. In general, they are characterized as heat-stable with no adverse effects on eukaryotic......, fungi as well as certain parasites and viruses. It is known that in addition to their antimicrobial effect, they boost host specific innate immune responses and exert selective immunomodulatory effects involved in angiogenesis and wound healing. More than 1,500 proteins with antimicrobial activity have...... cells. These characteristics contribute to the potential use of these proteins in human and veterinary medicine and in animal nutrition. Depending on their mode of action, insect AMPs may be applied as single peptides, as a complex of different AMPs and as an active fraction of insect proteins...

  16. CecropinXJ, a silkworm antimicrobial peptide, induces cytoskeleton disruption in esophageal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lijie; Wu, Yanling; Kang, Su; Ma, Ji; Yang, Jianhua; Zhang, Fuchun

    2014-10-01

    Antimicrobial peptides exist in the non-specific immune system of organism and participate in the innate host defense of each species. CecropinXJ, a cationic antimicrobial peptide, possesses potent anticancer activity and acts preferentially on cancer cells instead of normal cells, but the mechanism of cancer cell death induced by cecropinXJ remains largely unknown. This study was performed to investigate the cytoskeleton-disrupting effects of cecropinXJ on human esophageal carcinoma cell line Eca109 using scanning electron microscopy observation, fluorescence imaging, cell migration and invasion assays, western blotting, and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis. The electronic microscope and fluorescence imaging observation suggested that cecropinXJ could result in morphological changes and induce damage to microtubules and actin of Eca109 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The cell migration and invasion assays demonstrated that cecropinXJ could inhibit migration and invasion of tumor cells. Western blot and qRT-PCR analysis showed that there was obvious correlation between microtubule depolymerization and actin polymerization induced by cecropinXJ. Moreover, cecropinXJ might also cause decreased expression of α-actin, β-actin, γ-actin, α-tubulin, and β-tubulin genes in concentration- and time-dependent manners. In summary, this study indicates that cecropinXJ triggers cytotoxicity in Eca109 cells through inducing the cytoskeleton destruction and regulating the expression of cytoskeleton proteins. This cecropinXJ-mediated cytoskeleton-destruction effect is instrumental in our understanding of the detailed action of antimicrobial peptides in human cancer cells and cecropinXJ might be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of cancer in the future. © The Author 2014. Published by ABBS Editorial Office in association with Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

  17. ANTISTAPHYBASE: database of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and essential oils (EOs) against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouhir, Abdelmajid; Taieb, Malek; Lamine, Mohamed Ashraf; Cherif, Ammar; Jridi, Taoufik; Mahjoubi, Basma; Mbarek, Sarra; Fliss, Ismail; Nefzi, Adel; Sebei, Khaled; Ben Hamida, Jeannette

    2017-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus are major pathogens. The antimicrobial peptides and essential oils (EOs) display narrow- or broad-spectrum activity against bacteria including these strains. A centralized resource, such as a database, designed specifically for anti-S. aureus/anti-methicillin-resistant S. aureus antimicrobial peptides and EOs is therefore needed to facilitate the comprehensive investigation of their structure/activity associations and combinations. The database ANTISTAPHYBASE is created to facilitate access to important information on antimicrobial peptides and essential peptides against methicillin-resistant S. aureus and S. aureus. At the moment, the database contains 596 sequences of antimicrobial peptides produced by diverse organisms and 287 essential oil records. It permits a quick and easy search of peptides based on their activity as well as their general, physicochemical properties and literature data. These data are very useful to perform further bioinformatic or chemometric analysis and would certainly be useful for the development of new drugs for medical use. The ANTISTAPHYBASE database is freely available at: https://www.antistaphybase.com/ .

  18. Antimicrobial effects of GL13K peptide coatings on S. mutans and L. casei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitt, Rebecca Ann

    Background: Enamel breakdown around orthodontic brackets, so-called "white spot lesions", is the most common complication of orthodontic treatment. White spot lesions are caused by bacteria such as Streptococci and Lactobacilli, whose acidic byproducts cause demineralization of enamel crystals. Aims: The aim of this project was to develop an antimicrobial peptide coating for titanium alloy that is capable of killing acidogenic bacteria, specifically Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus casei. The long-term goal is to create an antimicrobial-coated orthodontic bracket with the ability to reduce or prevent the formation of white spot lesions in orthodontic patients thereby improving clinical outcomes. Methods: First, an alkaline etching method with NaOH was established to allow effective coating of titanium discs with GL13K, an antimicrobial peptide derived from human saliva. Coatings were verified by contact angle measures, and treated discs were characterized using scanning electron microscopy. Secondly, GL13K coatings were tested against hydrolytic, proteolytic and mechanical challenges to ensure robust coatings. Third, a series of qualitative and quantitative microbiology experiments were performed to determine the effects of GL13K--L and GL13K--D on S. mutans and L. casei, both in solution and coated on titanium. Results: GL13K-coated discs were stable after two weeks of challenges. GL13K--D was effective at killing S. mutans in vitro at low doses. GL13K--D also demonstrated a bactericidal effect on L. casei, however, in contrast to S. mutans, the effect on L. casei was not statistically significant. Conclusion: GL13K--D is a promising candidate for antimicrobial therapy with possible applications for prevention of white spot lesions in orthodontics.

  19. Nanovesicle encapsulation of antimicrobial peptide P34: physicochemical characterization and mode of action on Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Malheiros, Patrícia; Sant'Anna, Voltaire; Micheletto, Yasmine Miguel Serafini; da Silveira, Nadya Pesce; Brandelli, Adriano

    2011-08-01

    Antimicrobial peptide P34, a substance showing antibacterial activity against pathogenic and food spoilage bacteria, was encapsulated in liposomes prepared from partially purified soybean phosphatidylcholine, and their physicochemical characteristics were evaluated. The antimicrobial activity was estimated by agar diffusion assay using Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 7644 as indicator strain. A concentration of 3,200 AU/mL of P34 was encapsulated in nanovesicles and stocked at 4 °C. No significant difference ( p > 0.05) in the biological activity of free and encapsulated P34 was observed through 24 days. Size and PDI of liposomes, investigated by light scattering analysis, were on average 150 nm and 0.22 respectively. Zeta potential was -27.42 mV. There was no significant change ( p > 0.05) in the physicochemical properties of liposomes during the time of evaluation. The liposomes presented closed spherical morphology as visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The mode of action of liposome-encapsulated P34 under L. monocytogenes cells was investigated by TEM. Liposomes appeared to adhere but not fuse with the bacterial cell wall, suggesting that the antimicrobial is released from nanovesicles to act against the microorganism. The effect of free and encapsulated P34 was tested against L. monocytogenes, showing that free bacteriocin inhibited the pathogen more quickly than the encapsulated P34. Liposomes prepared with low-cost lipid showed high encapsulation efficiency for a new antimicrobial peptide and were stable during storage. The mode of action against the pathogen L. monocytogenes was characterized.

  20. Synthetic antimicrobial peptides of the halictines family disturb the membrane integrity of Candida cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kodedová, Marie; Sychrová, Hana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 1859, č. 10 (2017), s. 1851-1858 ISSN 0005-2736 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TA04010638; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-03398S; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : antimicrobial peptide * Candida * diS-C3(3) assay * membrane potential * membrane lipids * halictine Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.498, year: 2016

  1. Impact of the antimicrobial peptide Novicidin on membrane structure and integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren B; Otzen, Daniel Erik

    2010-01-01

    We have studied the impact of an 18-residue cationic antimicrobial peptide Novicidin (Nc) on the structure and integrity of partially anionic lipid membranes using oriented circular dichroism (OCD), quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D), dual polarization interferometry (DPI...... fluorescence spectroscopy and by loss of lipid alignment in DPI analysis. Laurdan generalized polarity shows a decrease in water accessibility or mobility in the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface of the lipid membrane, consistent with rearrangement of lipid packing. QCM-D studies on the interaction of Nc...

  2. Cathelicidins: peptides with antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, angiogenic, anticancer and procancer activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jack Ho; Ye, Xiu Juan; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2013-09-01

    The family of peptides designated as cathelicidins was identified over a decade ago. Cathelicidins have since gained increasing recognition, both as endogenous antibiotics and as effector molecules of the innate immune system. The human cathelicidin LL-37 is widely expressed in human tissues and plays diverse biological roles. It contributes substantially to host defense and impacts multiple aspects of immunity. In view of the escalating importance of cathelicidins, the activities of LL-37 with an emphasis on antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, angiogenic, anticancer and procancer effects are discussed in this review article.

  3. The antimicrobial peptide pardaxin exerts potent anti-tumor activity against canine perianal gland adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chieh-Yu; Lin, Chao-Nan; Chiou, Ming-Tang; Yu, Chao Yuan; Chen, Jyh-Yih; Chien, Chi-Hsien

    2015-02-10

    Pardaxin is an antimicrobial peptide of 33 amino acids, originally isolated from marine fish. We previously demonstrated that pardaxin has anti-tumor activity against murine fibrosarcoma, both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we examined the anti-tumor activity, toxicity profile, and maximally-tolerated dose of pardaxin treatment in dogs with different types of refractory tumor. Local injection of pardaxin resulted in a significant reduction of perianal gland adenoma growth between 28 and 38 days post-treatment. Surgical resection of canine histiocytomas revealed large areas of ulceration, suggesting that pardaxin acts like a lytic peptide. Pardaxin treatment was not associated with significant variations in blood biochemical parameters or secretion of immune-related proteins. Our findings indicate that pardaxin has strong therapeutic potential for treating perianal gland adenomas in dogs. These data justify the veterinary application of pardaxin, and also provide invaluable information for veterinary medicine and future human clinical trials.

  4. Nanoparticle-mediated delivery of the antimicrobial peptide plectasin against Staphylococcus aureus in infected epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Water, Jorrit Jeroen; Smart, Simon; Franzyk, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    intracellularly in Calu-3 epithelial cells and in THP-1 cells, whereas A549 cells did not show significant uptake of nanoparticles. Overall, encapsulation of plectasin into PLGA-based nanoparticles appears to be a viable strategy to improve the efficacy of plectasin against infections in epithelial tissues....... epithelial cells might thus be a promising approach to combat such infections. In this work, plectasin, which is a cationic AMP of the defensin class, was encapsulated into poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles using the double emulsion solvent evaporation method. The nanoparticles displayed...... high plectasin encapsulation efficiency (71-90%) and mediated release of the peptide over 24h. The antimicrobial efficacy of the peptide-loaded nanoparticles was investigated using bronchiolar epithelial Calu-3 cell monolayers infected with S. aureus. The plectasin-loaded nanoparticles displayed...

  5. Antimicrobial activity of the synthetic peptide scolopendrasin ii from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Young-Nam; Lee, Joon Ha; Kim, In-Woo; Kim, Sang-Hee; Yun, Eun-Young; Nam, Sung-Hee; Ahn, Mi-Young; Jeong, Mihye; Kang, Dong-Chul; Lee, In Hee; Hwang, Jae Sam

    2013-10-28

    The centipede Scolopendra subpinipes mutilans is a medicinally important arthropod species. However, its transcriptome is not currently available and transcriptome analysis would be useful in providing insight into a molecular level approach. Hence, we performed de novo RNA sequencing of S. subpinipes mutilans using next-generation sequencing. We generated a novel peptide (scolopendrasin II) based on a SVM algorithm, and biochemically evaluated the in vitro antimicrobial activity of scolopendrasin II against various microbes. Scolopendrasin II showed antibacterial activities against gram-positive and -negative bacterial strains, including the yeast Candida albicans and antibiotic-resistant gram-negative bacteria, as determined by a radial diffusion assay and colony count assay without hemolytic activity. In addition, we confirmed that scolopendrasin II bound to the surface of bacteria through a specific interaction with lipoteichoic acid and a lipopolysaccharide, which was one of the bacterial cell-wall components. In conclusion, our results suggest that scolopendrasin II may be useful for developing peptide antibiotics.

  6. Promotion of formyl peptide receptor 1-mediated neutrophil chemotactic migration by antimicrobial peptides isolated from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoo Jung; Lee, Sung Kyun; Jung, Young Su; Lee, Mingyu; Lee, Ha Young; Kim, Sang Doo; Park, Joon Seong; Koo, JaeHyung; Hwang, Jae Sam; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the effects of two antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) isolated from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans on neutrophil activity. Stimulation of mouse neutrophils with the two AMPs elicited chemotactic migration of the cells in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner. The two AMPs also stimulated activation of ERK and Akt, which contribute to chemotactic migration of neutrophils. We found that AMP-stimulated neutrophil chemotaxis was blocked by a formyl peptide receptor (FPR) 1 antagonist (cyclosporin H); moreover the two AMPs stimulated the chemotactic migration of FPR1-expressing RBL-2H3 cells but not of vector-expressing RBL-2H3 cells. We also found that the two AMPs stimulate neutrophil migration in vivo, and that this effect is blocked in FPR1-deficient mice. Taken together, our results suggest that the two AMPs stimulate neutrophils, leading to chemotactic migration through FPR1, and the two AMPs will be useful for the study of FPR1 signaling and neutrophil activation. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(9): 520-525].

  7. Construction of strain engineered for expression of porcine β-defensin-2/cecropin P1 fusion antimicrobial peptides and its growth-promoting effect and antimicrobial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Xu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To generate recombinant Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis engineered for expression of porcine β-defensin-2 (pBD-2 and cecropin P1 (CP1 fusion antimicrobial peptide and investigate their anti-bacterial activity in vitro and their growth-promoting and disease resisting activity in vivo. Methods The pBD-2 and CP1 fused gene was synthesized using the main codons of B. subtilis and inserted into plasmid pMK4 vector to construct their expression vector. The fusion peptide-expressing B. subtilis was constructed by transformation with the vector. The expressed fusion peptide was detected with Western blot. The antimicrobial activity of the expressed fusion peptide and the recovered pBD-2 and CP1 by enterokinase digestion in vitro was analyzed by the bacterial growth-inhibitory activity assay. To analyze the engineered B. subtilis on growth promotion and disease resistance, the weaned piglets were fed with basic diet supplemented with the recombinant B. subtilis. Then the piglets were challenged by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli. The weight gain and diarrhea incidence of piglets were measured after challenge. Results The recombinant B. subtilis engineered for expression of pBD-2/CP1 fusion peptide was successfully constructed using the main codons of the B. subtilis. Both expressed pBD-2/CP1 fusion peptide and their individual peptides recovered from parental fusion peptide by enterokinase digestion possessed the antimicrobial activities to a variety of the bacteria, including gram-negative bacteria (E. coli, Salmonella typhimurium, and Haemophilus parasuis and gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus. Supplementing the engineered B. subtilis to the pig feed could significantly promote the piglet growth and reduced diarrhea incidence of the piglets. Conclusion The generated B. subtilis strain can efficiently express pBD-2/CP1 fusion antimicrobial peptide, the recovered pBD-2 and CP1 peptides possess potent antimicrobial

  8. Inhibition of verocytotoxigenic Escherichia coli by antimicrobial peptides caseicin A and B and the factors affecting their antimicrobial activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Mary J; Rivas, Lucia; Burgess, Catherine M; Fanning, Séamus; Duffy, Geraldine

    2012-02-15

    The antimic robial activities of caseicin A and B antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) were assessed against a selection of verocytotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) strains (n=11), other bacterial pathogenic and spoilage bacteria (n=7), using a model broth system. The ability of the AMPs to retain their antimicrobial activities against a strain of E. coli O157:H7 380-94 under various test conditions (pH, temperature, water activity, sodium chloride concentrations, inoculum size and the presence of competitive microflora) was assessed and the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and number of surviving E. coli O157:H7 calculated. The mean number of VTEC surviving after exposure to 2 mg/ml caseicin A and B was reduced by 4.96 and 4.19 log(10) cfu/ml compared to the respective controls. The susceptibility of E. coli O157:H7 to the caseicin AMPs decreased as temperature, pH, water activity and inoculum size were reduced. The presence of sodium chloride (0.5-2.5%) did not affect the activity of caseicin A (p>0.05), however it did inhibit the activity of caseicin B. The presence of a competitive microflora cocktail did not significantly (p>0.05) affect the activities of the AMPs for the majority of the concentrations tested. Using a quantitative PCR assay, the levels of verotoxins (vt1 and vt2) expressed by E. coli O157:H7 following exposure to a sub-inhibitory concentration (0.5 mg/ml) of caseicin A showed that the verotoxin levels did not differ from the levels produced by the control cultures. The antimicrobial activity of caseicin A against E. coli O157:H7 was also tested in a model rumen system, however concentrations of ≥2 mg/ml did not significantly (p>0.05) reduce E. coli O157:H7 numbers in the model system over a 24 h period. The application of caseicin AMPs in food and/or animal production may be valuable in combination with other antimicrobials although further research is required. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Antimicrobial peptides and nitric oxide production by neutrophils from periodontitis subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.S. Mariano

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils play an important role in periodontitis by producing nitric oxide (NO and antimicrobial peptides, molecules with microbicidal activity via oxygen-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. It is unknown whether variation in the production of antimicrobial peptides such as LL-37, human neutrophil peptides (HNP 1-3, and NO by neutrophils influences the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases. We compared the production of these peptides and NO by lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated neutrophils isolated from healthy subjects and from patients with periodontitis. Peripheral blood neutrophils were cultured with or without Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-LPS (Aa-LPS, Porphyromonas gingivalis-LPS (Pg-LPS and Escherichia coli-LPS (Ec-LPS. qRT-PCR was used to determine quantities of HNP 1-3 and LL-37 mRNA in neutrophils. Amounts of HNP 1-3 and LL-37 proteins in the cell culture supernatants were also determined by ELISA. In addition, NO levels in neutrophil culture supernatants were quantitated by the Griess reaction. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients cultured with Aa-LPS, Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS expressed higher HNP 1-3 mRNA than neutrophils from healthy subjects. LL-37 mRNA expression was higher in neutrophils from patients stimulated with Aa-LPS. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients produced significantly higher LL-37 protein levels than neutrophils from healthy subjects when stimulated with Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS, but no difference was observed in HNP 1-3 production. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients cultured or not with Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS produced significantly lower NO levels than neutrophils from healthy subjects. The significant differences in the production of LL-37 and NO between neutrophils from healthy and periodontitis subjects indicate that production of these molecules might influence individual susceptibility to important periodontal pathogens.

  10. Corynebacterium glutamicum exhibits a membrane-related response to a small ferrocene-conjugated antimicrobial peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fränzel, Benjamin; Frese, Christian; Penkova, Maya; Metzler-Nolte, Nils; Bandow, Julia E; Wolters, Dirk Andreas

    2010-11-01

    Multiresistant bacteria are becoming more and more widespread. It is therefore necessary to have new compound groups in hand, such as small cationic peptides, to cope with these challenges. In this work, we present a comprehensive approach by monitoring protein expression profiles in a gram-positive bacterium (Corynebacterium glutamicum) to investigate the cellular response to such a compound, a ferrocene-conjugated arginine- and tryptophan-rich pentapeptide. To achieve this, a proteomic outline was performed where the compound-treated sample was compared with an untreated control. This study comprises more than 900 protein identifications, including numerous integral membrane proteins, and among these 185 differential expressions. Surprisingly, unregulated catalase and no elevated H(2)O(2) levels demonstrate that no oxidative stress occurs after treatment with the iron-containing compound as a consequence of the potential Fenton reaction. A sufficient iron supply is evidenced by the iron-containing protein aconitase and SufB (the latter belongs to an iron-sulfur cluster assembly system) and decreased levels of ATP-binding-cassette-type cobalamin/Fe(3+) siderophore transporters. The organometallic peptide antibiotic targets the cell membrane, which is evident by decreased levels of various integral membrane proteins, such as peptide permeases and transporters, and an altered lipid composition. Conversion to a more rigid cell membrane seems to be a relevant protective strategy of C. glutamicum against the ferrocene-conjugated antimicrobial peptide compound.

  11. Mercury-Supported Biomimetic Membranes for the Investigation of Antimicrobial Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Becucci

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs consist of a lipid bilayer interposed between an aqueous solution and a hydrophilic “spacer” anchored to a gold or mercury electrode. There is great potential for application of these biomimetic membranes for the elucidation of structure-function relationships of membrane peptides and proteins. A drawback in the use of mercury-supported tBLMs with respect to gold-supported ones is represented by the difficulty in applying surface sensitive, spectroscopic and scanning probe microscopic techniques to gather information on the architecture of these biomimetic membranes. Nonetheless, mercury-supported tBLMs are definitely superior to gold-supported biomimetic membranes for the investigation of the function of membrane peptides and proteins, thanks to a fluidity and lipid lateral mobility comparable with those of bilayer lipid membranes interposed between two aqueous phases (BLMs, but with a much higher robustness and resistance to electric fields. The different features of mercury-supported tBLMs reconstituted with functionally active membrane proteins and peptides of bacteriological or pharmacological interest may be disclosed by a judicious choice of the most appropriate electrochemical techniques. We will describe the way in which electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, potential-step chronocoulometry, cyclic voltammetry and phase-sensitive AC voltammetry are conveniently employed to investigate the structure of mercury-supported tBLMs and the mode of interaction of antimicrobial peptides reconstituted into them.

  12. Pleurocidin, a novel antimicrobial peptide, induces human mast cell activation through the FPRL1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pundir, P; Catalli, A; Leggiadro, C; Douglas, S E; Kulka, M

    2014-01-01

    Pleurocidins are a novel family of α-helical cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs) that are structurally and functionally similar to cathelicidins, one of the major CAP families. As cathelicidins stimulate mast cell chemotaxis and mediator release, we postulated that pleurocidins similarly activate mast cells. A screen of 20 pleurocidin peptides revealed that some were capable of degranulating the human mast cell line LAD2 (Laboratory of Allergic Diseases 2). Pleurocidin NRC-04 caused LAD2 to adhere, migrate, degranulate, and release cysteinyl leukotrienes and prostaglandin D2. Moreover, pleurocidin increased intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization in mast cells and induced the production of proinflammatory chemokines such as monocyte chemotactic protein-1/C-C motif chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β/CCL4. Our evaluation of possible cellular mechanisms suggested that G proteins, phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), phospholipase C (PLC), and phosphokinase C (PKC) were involved in pleurocidin-induced mast cell activation as evidenced by the inhibitory effects of pertussis toxin (G protein inhibitor), wortmanin (PI3K inhibitor), U-73122 (PLC inhibitor), and Ro-31-8220 (PKC inhibitor), respectively. We also found that human mast cells expressed the N-formyl-peptide receptor 1 (FPRL1) receptor and FPRL1-specific inhibitor affected pleurocidin-mediated activation of mast cell. Our finding that the novel CAP pleurocidin activated human mast cell through G protein-coupled receptor signaling suggests that this peptide might have immunomodulatory functions.

  13. Dye-release assay for investigation of antimicrobial peptide activity in a competitive lipid environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, Marc-Antoine; Gagne, Eve; Gehman, John D; Whitwell, Thomas C; Separovic, Frances

    2014-09-01

    A dye-release method for investigating the effect of a competitive lipid environment on the activity of two membrane-disrupting antimicrobial peptides (AMP), maculatin 1.1 and aurein 1.2, is presented. The results support the general conclusion that AMP have greater affinity for negatively charged membranes, for example bacterial membranes, than for the neutral membrane surface found in eukaryotic cells, but only within a competitive lipid environment. Indeed, in a single-model membrane environment, both peptides were more potent against neutral vesicles than against charged vesicles. The approach was also used to investigate the effect of pre-incubating the peptides in a neutral lipid environment then introducing charged lipid vesicles. Maculatin was shown to migrate from the neutral lipid bilayers, where pores had already formed, to the charged membrane bilayers. This result was also observed for charged-to-charged bilayers but, interestingly, not for neutral-to-neutral lipid interfaces. Aurein was able to migrate from either lipid environment, indicating weaker binding to lipid membranes, and a different molecular mechanism for lysis of lipid bilayers. Competitive lipid environments could be used to assess other critical conditions that modulate the activity of membrane peptides or proteins.

  14. Enhanced membrane pore formation through high-affinity targeted antimicrobial peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Arnusch

    Full Text Available Many cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs target the unique lipid composition of the prokaryotic cell membrane. However, the micromolar activities common for these peptides are considered weak in comparison to nisin, which follows a targeted, pore-forming mode of action. Here we show that AMPs can be modified with a high-affinity targeting module, which enables membrane permeabilization at low concentration. Magainin 2 and a truncated peptide analog were conjugated to vancomycin using click chemistry, and could be directed towards specific membrane embedded receptors both in model membrane systems and whole cells. Compared with untargeted vesicles, a gain in permeabilization efficacy of two orders of magnitude was reached with large unilamellar vesicles that included lipid II, the target of vancomycin. The truncated vancomycin-peptide conjugate showed an increased activity against vancomycin resistant Enterococci, whereas the full-length conjugate was more active against a targeted eukaryotic cell model: lipid II containing erythrocytes. This study highlights that AMPs can be made more selective and more potent against biological membranes that contain structures that can be targeted.

  15. Highly potent antimicrobial modified peptides derived from the Acinetobacter baumannii phage endolysin LysAB2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shih-Yi; You, Ren-In; Lai, Meng-Jiun; Lin, Nien-Tsung; Chen, Li-Kuang; Chang, Kai-Chih

    2017-09-13

    The increase in the prevalence of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAB) strains is a serious public health concern. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a possible solution to this problem. In this study, we examined whether AMPs could be derived from phage endolysins. We synthesized four AMPs based on an amphipathic helical region in the C-terminus of endolysin LysAB2 encoded by the A. baumannii phage ΦAB2. These peptides showed potent antibacterial activity against A. baumannii (minimum inhibitory concentration, 4-64 μM), including some MDR and colistin-resistant A. baumannii. Of the four peptides, LysAB2 P3, with modifications that increased its net positive charge and decreased its hydrophobicity, showed high antibacterial activity against A. baumannii but little haemolytic and no cytotoxic activity against normal eukaryotic cells. The results of electron microscopy experiments and a fluorescein isothiocyanate staining assay indicated that this peptide killed A. baumannii through membrane permeabilization. Moreover, in a mouse intraperitoneal infection model, at 4 h after the bacterial injection, LysAB2 P3 decreased the bacterial load by 13-fold in ascites and 27-fold in blood. Additionally, LysAB2 P3 rescued sixty percent of mice heavily infected with A. baumannii from lethal bacteremia. Our results confirmed that bacteriophage endolysins are a promising resource for developing effective AMPs.

  16. Antimicrobial Peptide Simulations and the Influence of Force Field on the Free Energy for Pore Formation in Lipid Bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, W F Drew; Hong, Chun Kit; Wang, Yi; Tieleman, D Peter

    2016-09-13

    Due to antimicrobial resistance, the development of new drugs to combat bacterial and fungal infections is an important area of research. Nature uses short, charged, and amphipathic peptides for antimicrobial defense, many of which disrupt the lipid membrane in addition to other possible targets inside the cell. Computer simulations have revealed atomistic details for the interactions of antimicrobial peptides and cell-penetrating peptides with lipid bilayers. Strong interactions between the polar interface and the charged peptides can induce bilayer deformations - including membrane rupture and peptide stabilization of a hydrophilic pore. Here, we performed microsecond-long simulations of the antimicrobial peptide CM15 in a POPC bilayer expecting to observe pore formation (based on previous molecular dynamics simulations). We show that caution is needed when interpreting results of equilibrium peptide-membrane simulations, given the length of time single trajectories can dwell in local energy minima for 100's of ns to microseconds. While we did record significant membrane perturbations from the CM15 peptide, pores were not observed. We explain this discrepancy by computing the free energy for pore formation with different force fields. Our results show a large difference in the free energy barrier (ca. 40 kJ/mol) against pore formation predicted by the different force fields that would result in orders of magnitude differences in the simulation time required to observe spontaneous pore formation. This explains why previous simulations using the Berger lipid parameters reported pores induced by charged peptides, while with CHARMM based models pores were not observed in our long time-scale simulations. We reconcile some of the differences in the distance dependent free energies by shifting the free energy profiles to account for thickness differences between force fields. The shifted curves show that all the models describe small defects in lipid bilayers in a

  17. pMPES: A Modular Peptide Expression System for the Delivery of Antimicrobial Peptides to the Site of Gastrointestinal Infections Using Probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geldart, Kathryn; Forkus, Brittany; McChesney, Evelyn; McCue, Madeline; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2016-10-05

    Antimicrobial peptides are a promising alternative to traditional antibiotics, but their utility is limited by high production costs and poor bioavailability profiles. Bacterial production and delivery of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) directly at the site of infection may offer a path for effective therapeutic application. In this study, we have developed a vector that can be used for the production and secretion of seven antimicrobial peptides from both Escherichia coli MC1061 F' and probiotic E.coli Nissle 1917. The vector pMPES (Modular Peptide Expression System) employs the Microcin V (MccV) secretion system and a powerful synthetic promoter to drive AMP production. Herein, we demonstrate the capacity of pMPES to produce inhibitory levels of MccV, Microcin L (MccL), Microcin N (McnN), Enterocin A (EntA), Enterocin P (EntP), Hiracin JM79 (HirJM79) and Enterocin B (EntB). To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of such a broadly-applicable secretion system for AMP production. This type of modular expression system could expedite the development of sorely needed antimicrobial technologies.

  18. Identification of peptides derived from the human antimicrobial peptide LL-37 active against biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa using a library of truncated fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagant, C.; Pitts, B.; Nazmi, K.; Vandenbranden, M.; Bolscher, J.G.; Stewart, P.S.; Dehaye, J-P.

    2012-01-01

    Persistent Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and are linked to the formation of a biofilm. The development of new biofilm inhibition strategies is thus a major challenge. LL-37 is the only human antimicrobial peptide

  19. Interactions of the antimicrobial peptide nisin Z with conventional antibiotics and the use of nanostructured lipid carriers to enhance antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewies, Angélique; Wentzel, Johannes Frederik; Jordaan, Anine; Bezuidenhout, Carlos; Du Plessis, Lissinda Hester

    2017-06-30

    Antimicrobial resistance is an imminent threat to the effective prevention and treatment of bacterial infections and alternative antimicrobial strategies are desperately needed. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) may be promising alternatives to current antibiotics or act as adjuvants to enhance antibiotic potency. Additionally, the use of biodegradable lipid nanoparticles can enhance the antibacterial activity of antibiotics and antimicrobial peptides. In this study, the interaction of the AMPs, nisin Z and melittin, with conventional antibiotics was investigated on Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Escherichia coli. The effectiveness of nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) for the entrapment of nisin Z was also evaluated. Findings revealed that nisin Z exhibited additive interactions with numerous conventional antibiotics. Notable synergism was observed for novobiocin-nisin Z combinations. The addition of the non-antibiotic adjuvant EDTA significantly improved the antimicrobial activity of free nisin Z towards E.coli. NLCs containing nisin Z were effective against Gram-positive species at physiological pH, with an increase in effectiveness in the presence of EDTA. Results indicate that nisin Z may be advantageous as an adjuvant in antimicrobial chemotherapy, while contributing in the battle against antibiotic resistance. NLCs have the potential to enhance the antibacterial activity of nisin Z towards Gram-positive bacterial species associated with skin infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Metabolic acidosis stimulates the production of the antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin in rabbit urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hu; Purkerson, Jeffrey M; Schwaderer, Andy L; Schwartz, George J

    2017-11-01

    Intercalated cells of the collecting duct (CD) are critical for acid-base homeostasis and innate immune defense of the kidney. Little is known about the impact of acidosis on innate immune defense in the distal nephron. Urinary tract infections are mainly due to Escherichia coli and are an important risk factor for development of chronic kidney disease. While the effect of urinary pH on growth of E. coli is well established, in this study, we demonstrate that acidosis increases urine antimicrobial activity due, at least in part, to induction of cathelicidin expression within the CD. Acidosis was induced in rabbits by adding NH4Cl to the drinking water and reducing food intake over 3 days or by casein supplementation. Microdissected CDs were examined for cathelicidin mRNA expression and antimicrobial activity, and cathelicidin protein levels in rabbit urine were measured. Cathelicidin expression in CD cells was detected in kidney sections. CDs from acidotic rabbits expressed three times more cathelicidin mRNA than those isolated from normal rabbits. Urine from acidotic rabbits had significantly more antimicrobial activity (vs. E. coli) than normal urine, and most of this increased activity was blocked by cathelicidin antibody. The antibody had little effect on antimicrobial activity of normal urine. Urine from acidotic rabbits had at least twice the amount of cathelicidin protein as did normal urine. We conclude that metabolic acidosis not only stimulates CD acid secretion but also induces expression of cathelicidin and, thereby, enhances innate immune defense against urinary tract infections via induction of antimicrobial peptide expression. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Immune challenge differentially affects transcript abundance of three antimicrobial peptides in hemocytes from the moth Pseudoplusia includens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavine, M D; Chen, G; Strand, M R

    2005-12-01

    Inducible expression of antimicrobial peptides and other humoral immune factors by the insect fat body is well documented. Hemocytes comprise the second essential arm of the insect immune system but it is unclear whether antimicrobial peptide genes are expressed by all or only some types of hemocytes. Here we report the cloning of cecropin A (Pi-cecA), lebocin (Pi-leb) and lysozyme (Pi-lys) homologs from the moth Pseudoplusia includens. Relative-quantitative real-time PCR (rq-rtPCR) indicated that transcript abundance for each antimicrobial gene increased in fat body and hemocytes following immune challenge with the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli. Relative transcript abundance of Pi-cecA was much higher in fat body than hemocytes. In contrast, transcript levels of Pi-leb were three-fold lower in hemocytes than fat body while transcript levels of Pi-lys were three-fold higher. Estimates for the overall contribution of the fat body and hemocytes to antimicrobial peptide expression suggested that hemocytes contribute significantly to Pi-lys transcript levels in larvae but produce much smaller amounts of Pi-cecA and Pi-leb compared to the fat body. Each antimicrobial peptide was also inducibly expressed in hemocytes following challenge with the Gram-positive bacterium Micrococcus luteus or when hemocytes formed capsules around chromatography beads. Analysis of hemocyte types indicated that granulocytes and plasmatocytes expressed all three antimicrobial peptides, whereas spherule cells and oenocytoids expressed only lysozyme. Transcriptional profiles of these antimicrobial genes were similar in granulocytes and plasmatocytes in vivo but were very different in vitro.

  2. Design and characterization of short hybrid antimicrobial peptides from pEM-2, mastoparan-VT1, and mastoparan-B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memariani, Hamed; Shahbazzadeh, Delavar; Ranjbar, Reza; Behdani, Mahdi; Memariani, Mojtaba; Pooshang Bagheri, Kamran

    2017-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are considered to be excellent templates for designing novel antibiotics because of their broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and their low prognostic to induce antibiotic resistance. In this study, for the first time, a series of short hybrid antimicrobial peptides combined by different fragments of venom-derived alpha-helical antimicrobial peptides pEM-2, mastoparan-VT1, and mastoparan-B were designed with the intent to improve the therapeutic index of the parental peptides. Short hybrid antimicrobial peptides PV, derived from pEM-2 and mastoparan-VT1, was found to possess the highest antibacterial, hemolytic, and cytotoxic activity. Short hybrid antimicrobial peptides PV3, derived from pEM-2 and three fragments of mastoparan-VT1, showed more than threefold improvement in therapeutic index compared with parental peptides pEM-2 and mastoparan-VT1. PV had the highest antimicrobial activity in stability studies. Except BVP, designed based on all three parental peptides, the other short hybrid antimicrobial peptides at their minimal inhibitory concentration and 2× minimal inhibitory concentration required less than 120 and 60 min to reduce >3log10 the initial inoculum, respectively. All peptides had membrane-disrupting activity in a time-dependent manner. Collectively, this study highlights the potential for rational design of improved short hybrid antimicrobial peptides such as PV3 that was an ideal candidate for further assessment with the ultimate purpose of development of effective antimicrobial agents. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel peptides based on antimicrobial peptides as potential agents with antitumor and multidrug resistance-reversing activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Shi, Wei; Li, Jieming; Liao, Chen; Yang, Limei; Huang, Wenlong; Qian, Hai

    2017-11-01

    Tumor chemotherapy, which plays an important role in the clinical treatment of metastatic cancer, is limited by low selectivity and drug resistance in clinical application. In our study, we selected antimicrobial peptide BP100 as a lead peptide, designed, and synthesized a series of novel antineoplastic peptides through solid-phase synthesis. Among them, B4 and B8 showed excellent anticancer activity. As revealed by further investigations, these peptides could disrupt the cell membrane, trigger the cytochrome C release into cytoplasm, and ultimately lead to apoptosis. In addition, they also showed multidrug resistance-reversing effects by performing effective antitumor activity against multidrug-resistant cells. As a result, these peptides may possibly be regarded as a promising candidate for cancer treatment. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Antimicrobial peptide exposure selects for Staphylococcus aureus resistance to human defence peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kubicek-Sutherland, Jessica Z.; Lofton, Hava; Vestergaard, Martin

    2017-01-01

    of LL-37, PR-39 or wheat germ histones. WGS and proteomic analysis by MS were used to identify the molecular mechanism associated with increased tolerance of AMPs. AMP-resistant mutants were characterized by measuring in vitro fitness, AMP and antibiotic susceptibility, and virulence in a mouse model...... of sepsis. Results: AMP-resistant Staphylococcus aureus mutants often displayed little to no fitness cost and caused invasive disease in mice. Further, this phenotype coincided with diminished susceptibility to both clinically prescribed antibiotics and human defence peptides. Conclusions: These findings...... suggest that therapeutic use of AMPs could select for virulent mutants with crossresistance to human innate immunity as well as antibiotic therapy. Thus, therapeutic use of AMPs and the implications of cross-resistance need to be carefully monitored and evaluated....

  5. Vitamin D analogs differentially control antimicrobial peptide/"alarmin" expression in psoriasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Peric

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are strongly expressed in lesional skin in psoriasis and play an important role as proinflammatory "alarmins" in this chronic skin disease. Vitamin D analogs like calcipotriol have antipsoriatic effects and might mediate this effect by changing AMP expression. In this study, keratinocytes in lesional psoriatic plaques showed decreased expression of the AMPs beta-defensin (HBD 2 and HBD3 after topical treatment with calcipotriol. At the same time, calcipotriol normalized the proinflammatory cytokine milieu and decreased interleukin (IL-17A, IL-17F and IL-8 transcript abundance in lesional psoriatic skin. In contrast, cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide expression was increased by calcipotriol while psoriasin expression remained unchanged. In cultured human epidermal keratinocytes the effect of different vitamin D analogs on the expression of AMPs was further analyzed. All vitamin D analogs tested blocked IL-17A induced HBD2 expression by increasing IkappaB-alpha protein and inhibition of NF-kappaB signaling. At the same time vitamin D analogs induced cathelicidin through activation of the vitamin D receptor and MEK/ERK signaling. These studies suggest that vitamin D analogs differentially alter AMP expression in lesional psoriatic skin and cultured keratinocytes. Balancing AMP "alarmin" expression might be a novel goal in treatment of chronic inflammatory skin diseases.

  6. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs): Ancient compounds that represent novel weapons in the fight against bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageitos, J M; Sánchez-Pérez, A; Calo-Mata, P; Villa, T G

    2017-06-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are short peptidic molecules produced by most living creatures. They help unicellular organisms to successfully compete for nutrients with other organisms sharing their biological niche, while AMPs form part of the immune system of multicellular creatures. Thus, these molecules represent biological weapons that have evolved over millions of years as a result of an escalating arms race for survival among living organisms. All AMPs share common features, such as a small size, with cationic and hydrophobic sequences within a linear or cyclic structure. AMPs can inhibit or kill bacteria at micromolar concentrations, often by non-specific mechanisms; hence the appearance of resistance to these antimicrobials is rare. Moreover, AMPs can kill antibiotic-resistant bacteria, including insidious microbes such as Acinetobacter baumannii and the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. This review gives a detailed insight into a selection of the most prominent and interesting AMPs with antibacterial activity. In the near future AMPs, due to their properties and despite their ancient origin, should represent a novel alternative to antibiotics in the struggle to control pathogenic microorganisms and maintain the current human life expectancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Prediction of antimicrobial peptides based on sequence alignment and feature selection methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Wang

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs represent a class of natural peptides that form a part of the innate immune system, and this kind of 'nature's antibiotics' is quite promising for solving the problem of increasing antibiotic resistance. In view of this, it is highly desired to develop an effective computational method for accurately predicting novel AMPs because it can provide us with more candidates and useful insights for drug design. In this study, a new method for predicting AMPs was implemented by integrating the sequence alignment method and the feature selection method. It was observed that, the overall jackknife success rate by the new predictor on a newly constructed benchmark dataset was over 80.23%, and the Mathews correlation coefficient is 0.73, indicating a good prediction. Moreover, it is indicated by an in-depth feature analysis that the results are quite consistent with the previously known knowledge that some amino acids are preferential in AMPs and that these amino acids do play an important role for the antimicrobial activity. For the convenience of most experimental scientists who want to use the prediction method without the interest to follow the mathematical details, a user-friendly web-server is provided at http://amp.biosino.org/.

  8. Mode of action and membrane specificity of the antimicrobial peptide snakin-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Herbel

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are a diverse group of short, cationic peptides which are naturally occurring molecules in the first-line defense of most living organisms. They represent promising candidates for the treatment of pathogenic microorganisms. Snakin-2 (SN2 from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum is stabilized through six intramolecular disulphide bridges; it shows broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against bacteria and fungi, and it agglomerates single cells prior to killing. In this study, we further characterized SN2 by providing time-kill curves and corresponding growth inhibition analysis of model organisms, such as E. coli or B. subtilis. SN2 was produced recombinantly in E. coli with thioredoxin as fusion protein, which was removed after affinity purification by proteolytic digestion. Furthermore, the target specificity of SN2 was investigated by means of hemolysis and hemagglutination assays; its effect on plant cell membranes of isolated protoplasts was investigated by microscopy. SN2 shows a non-specific pore-forming effect in all tested membranes. We suggest that SN2 could be useful as a preservative agent to protect food, pharmaceuticals, or cosmetics from decomposition by microbes.

  9. The antimicrobial peptide nisin Z induces selective toxicity and apoptotic cell death in cultured melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewies, Angélique; Wentzel, Johannes Frederik; Miller, Hayley Christy; Du Plessis, Lissinda Hester

    2018-01-01

    Reprogramming of cellular metabolism is now considered one of the hallmarks of cancer. Most malignant cells present with altered energy metabolism which is associated with elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. This is also evident for melanoma, the leading cause of skin cancer related deaths. Altered mechanisms affecting mitochondrial bioenergetics pose attractive targets for novel anticancer therapies. Antimicrobial peptides have been shown to exhibit selective anticancer activities. In this study, the anti-melanoma potential of the antimicrobial peptide, nisin Z, was evaluated in vitro. Nisin Z was shown to induce selective toxicity in melanoma cells compared to non-malignant keratinocytes. Furthermore, nisin Z was shown to negatively affect the energy metabolism (glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration) of melanoma cells, increase reactive oxygen species generation and cause apoptosis. Results also indicate that nisin Z can decrease the invasion and proliferation of melanoma cells demonstrating its potential use against metastasis associated with melanoma. As nisin Z seems to place a considerable extra burden on the energy metabolism of melanoma cells, combination therapies with known anti-melanoma agents may be effective treatment options. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  10. Oxidative stress induced in E. coli by the human antimicrobial peptide LL-37.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heejun Choi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are thought to kill bacterial cells by permeabilizing their membranes. However, some antimicrobial peptides inhibit E. coli growth more efficiently in aerobic than in anaerobic conditions. In the attack of the human cathelicidin LL-37 on E. coli, real-time, single-cell fluorescence imaging reveals the timing of membrane permeabilization and the onset of oxidative stress. For cells growing aerobically, a CellROX Green assay indicates that LL-37 induces rapid formation of oxidative species after entry into the periplasm, but before permeabilization of the cytoplasmic membrane (CM. A cytoplasmic Amplex Red assay signals a subsequent burst of oxidative species, most likely hydrogen peroxide, shortly after permeabilization of the CM. These signals are much stronger in the presence of oxygen, a functional electron transport chain, and a large proton motive force (PMF. They are much weaker in cells growing anaerobically, by either fermentation or anaerobic respiration. In aerobic growth, the oxidative signals are attenuated in a cytochrome oxidase-bd deletion mutant, but not in a -bo3 deletion mutant, suggesting a specific effect of LL-37 on the electron transport chain. The AMPs melittin and LL-37 induce strong oxidative signals and exhibit O2-sensitive MICs, while the AMPs indolicidin and cecropin A do not. These results suggest that AMP activity in different tissues may be tuned according to the local oxygen level. This may be significant for control of opportunistic pathogens while enabling growth of commensal bacteria.

  11. Effects of composite antimicrobial peptides in weanling piglets challenged with deoxynivalenol: II. Intestinal morphology and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, H; Tan, B E; Wu, M M; Yin, Y L; Li, T J; Yuan, D X; Li, L

    2013-10-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) affects animal and human health and targets the gastrointestinal tract. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of composite antimicrobial peptides (CAP) to repair intestinal injury in piglets challenged with DON. A total of 28 piglets (Duroc × Landrace × Large Yorkshire) weaned at 28 d of age were randomly assigned to receive 1 of 4 treatments (7 pigs/treatment): negative control, basal diet (NC), basal diet + 0.4% composite antimicrobial peptide (CAP), basal diet + 4 mg/kg DON (DON), and basal diet + 4 mg/kg DON + 0.4% CAP (DON + CAP). After an adaptation period of 7 d, blood samples were collected on d 15 and 30 after the initiation of treatment for determinations of the concentrations of D-lactate and diamine oxidase. At the end of the study, all piglets were slaughtered to obtain small intestines for the determination of intestinal morphology, epithelial cell proliferation, and protein expression in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. The results showed that DON increased serum concentrations of D-lactate and diamine oxidase, and these values in the CAP and DON + CAP treatments were less than those in the NC and DON treatments, respectively (P morphology and promoted intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and protein synthesis, indicating that CAP may repair the intestinal injury induced by DON.

  12. Liquid-crystalline ordering of antimicrobial peptide-DNA complexes controls TLR9 activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Nathan W.; Jin, Fan; Lande, Roberto; Curk, Tine; Xian, Wujing; Lee, Calvin; Frasca, Loredana; Frenkel, Daan; Dobnikar, Jure; Gilliet, Michel; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2015-07-01

    Double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) can trigger the production of type I interferon (IFN) in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) by binding to endosomal Toll-like receptor-9 (TLR9; refs , , , , ). It is also known that the formation of DNA-antimicrobial peptide complexes can lead to autoimmune diseases via amplification of pDC activation. Here, by combining X-ray scattering, computer simulations, microscopy and measurements of pDC IFN production, we demonstrate that a broad range of antimicrobial peptides and other cationic molecules cause similar effects, and elucidate the criteria for amplification. TLR9 activation depends on both the inter-DNA spacing and the multiplicity of parallel DNA ligands in the self-assembled liquid-crystalline complex. Complexes with a grill-like arrangement of DNA at the optimum spacing can interlock with multiple TLR9 like a zipper, leading to multivalent electrostatic interactions that drastically amplify binding and thereby the immune response. Our results suggest that TLR9 activation and thus TLR9-mediated immune responses can be modulated deterministically.

  13. Biofunctionalization of microgroove titanium surfaces with an antimicrobial peptide to enhance their bactericidal activity and cytocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lin; Lai, Yingzhen; Huang, Wenxiu; Huang, Sijia; Xu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Jiang; Wu, Dong

    2015-04-01

    A firm peri-implant soft tissue seal is important for the long-term survival of dental implants, which demands the properties of antibacterial and cytocompatibility of the implant surfaces. In this study, GL13K, a cationic antimicrobial peptide, was immobilized onto microgroove surfaces which were 60 μm in width and 10 μm in depth, and the modified surfaces improved both the properties of antibacterial and cytocompatibility. The method of silanization was used to immobilize the antimicrobial peptide GL13K, which was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), water contact angle measurement. Then the mechanical stability of the coatings was confirmed by ultrasonication. In vitro antibacterial tests confirmed bactericidal activity against Porphyromonas gingivalis without inhibiting its adhesion. In vitro cytocompatibility tests also confirmed that adhesion at later phase and proliferation of HGFs were greater (Pantibacterial activity simultaneously. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Antimicrobial Polymers: Mimicking Amino Acid Functionali ty, Sequence Control and Three-dimensional Structure of Host-defen se Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartlieb, Matthias; Williams, Elizabeth G L; Kuroki, Agnès; Perrier, Sébastien; Locock, Katherine E S

    2017-01-01

    Peptides and proteins control and direct all aspects of cellular function and communication. Having been honed by nature for millions of years, they also typically display an unsurpassed specificity for their biological targets. This underlies the continued focus on peptides as promising drug candidates. However, the development of peptides into viable drugs is hampered by their lack of chemical and pharmacokinetic stability and the cost of large scale production. One method to overcome such hindrances is to develop polymer systems that are able to retain the important structural features of these biologically active peptides, while being cheaper and easier to produce and manipulate chemically. This review illustrates these principles using examples of polymers designed to mimic antimicrobial host-defence peptides. The host-defence peptides have been identified as some of the most important leads for the next generation of antibiotics as they typically exhibit broad spectrum antimicrobial ability, low toxicity toward human cells and little susceptibility to currently known mechanisms of bacterial resistance. Their movement from the bench to clinic is yet to be realised, however, due to the limitations of these peptides as drugs. The literature provides a number of examples of polymers that have been able to mimic these peptides through all levels of structure, starting from specific amino acid sidechains, through to more global features such as overall charge, molecular weight and threedimensional structure (e.g. α-helical). The resulting optimised polymers are able retain the activity profile of the peptides, but within a synthetic macromolecular construct that may be better suited to the development of a new generation of antimicrobial therapeutics. Such work has not only produced important new leads to combat the growing threat of antibiotic resistance, but may also open up new ways for polymers to mimic other important classes of biologically active peptides

  15. Factors affecting antimicrobial activity of MUC7 12-mer, a human salivary mucin-derived peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobek Libuse A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MUC7 12-mer (RKSYKCLHKRCR, a cationic antimicrobial peptide derived from the human low-molecular-weight salivary mucin MUC7, possesses potent antimicrobial activity in vitro. In order to evaluate the potential therapeutic application of the MUC7 12-mer, we examined the effects of mono- and divalent cations, EDTA, pH, and temperature on its antimicrobial activity. Methods Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs were determined using a liquid growth inhibition assay in 96-well microtiter plates. MUC7 12-mer was added at concentrations of 1.56–50 μM. MICs were determined at three endpoints: MIC-0, MIC-1, and MIC-2 (the lowest drug concentration showing 10%, 25% and 50% of growth, respectively. To examine the effect of salts or EDTA, a checkerboard microdilution technique was used. Fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICi was calculated on the basis of MIC-0. The viability of microbial cells treated with MUC7 12-mer in the presence of sodium or potassium was also determined by killing assay or flow cytometry. Results The MICs of MUC7 12-mer against organisms tested ranged from 6.25–50 μM. For C. albicans, antagonism (FICi 4.5 was observed for the combination of MUC7 12-mer and calcium; however, there was synergism (FICi 0.22 between MUC7 12-mer and EDTA, and the synergism was retained in the presence of calcium at its physiological concentration (1–2 mM. No antagonism but additivity or indifference (FICi 0.55–2.5 was observed for the combination of MUC7 12-mer and each K+, Na+, Mg2+, or Zn2+. MUC7 12-mer peptide (at 25 μM also exerted killing activity in the presence of NaCl, (up to 25 mM for C. albicans and up to 150 mM for E. coli, a physiological concentration of sodium in the oral cavity and serum, respectively and retained candidacidal activity in the presence of KCl (up to 40 mM. The peptide exhibited higher inhibitory activity against C. albicans at pH 7, 8, and 9 than at pH 5 and 6, and temperature up to

  16. Anti-adhesive antimicrobial peptide coating prevents catheter associated infection in a mouse urinary infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kai; Lo, Joey C Y; Yan, Mei; Yang, Xiaoqiang; Brooks, Donald E; Hancock, Robert E W; Lange, Dirk; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N

    2017-02-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) represent one of the most common hospital acquired infections with significant economic consequences and increased patient morbidity. CAUTIs often start with pathogen adhesion and colonization on the catheter surface followed by biofilm formation. Current strategies to prevent CAUTIs are insufficiently effective and antimicrobial coatings based on antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) hold promise in curbing CAUTIs. Here we report an effective surface tethering strategy to prepare AMP coatings on polyurethane (PU), a common biomedical plastic used for catheter manufacture, by using an anti-adhesive hydrophilic polymer coating. An optimized surface active AMP, labeled with cysteine at the C-terminus (RRWRIVVIRVRRC), was used. The coated PU surface was characterized using ATR-FTIR, XPS and atomic force microscopy analyses. The tethered peptides on the PU catheter surface displayed broad spectrum antimicrobial activity and showed long term activity in vitro. The surface coating prevented bacterial adhesion by up to 99.9% for both Gram-positive and -negative bacteria, and inhibited planktonic bacterial growth by up to 70%. In vivo, the coating was tested in a mouse urinary catheter infection model; the AMP-coated PU catheter was able to prevent infection with high efficiency by reducing the bacteria adhesion on catheter surface by more than 4 logs (from 1.2 × 10 6  CFU/mL to 5 × 10 1  CFU/mL) compared to the uncoated catheter surface, and inhibit planktonic bacterial growth in the urine by nearly 3 logs (1.1 × 10 7  CFU/mL to 1.47 × 10 4  CFU/mL). The AMP-brush coating also showed good biocompatibility with bladder epithelial cells and fibroblast cells in cell culture. The new coating might find clinical applications in preventing CAUTIs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. OmpA Binding Mediates the Effect of Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37 on Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Feng Lin

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii has recently emerged as an important pathogen in nosocomial infection; thus, effective antimicrobial regimens are urgently needed. Human antimicrobial peptides (AMPs exhibit multiple functions and antimicrobial activities against bacteria and fungi and are proposed to be potential adjuvant therapeutic agents. This study examined the effect of the human cathelicidin-derived AMP LL-37 on A. baumannii and revealed the underlying mode of action. We found that LL-37 killed A. baumannii efficiently and reduced cell motility and adhesion. The bacteria-killing effect of LL-37 on A. baumannii was more efficient compared to other AMPs, including human ß-defensin 3 (hBD3 and histatin 5 (Hst5. Both flow cytometric analysis and immunofluorescence staining showed that LL-37 bound to A. baumannii cells. Moreover, far-western analysis demonstrated that LL-37 could bind to the A. baumannii OmpA (AbOmpA protein. An ELISA assay indicated that biotin-labelled LL-37 (BA-LL37 bound to the AbOmpA74-84 peptide in a dose-dependent manner. Using BA-LL37 as a probe, the ~38 kDa OmpA signal was detected in the wild type but the ompA deletion strain did not show the protein, thereby validating the interaction. Finally, we found that the ompA deletion mutant was more sensitive to LL-37 and decreased cell adhesion by 32% compared to the wild type. However, ompA deletion mutant showed a greatly reduced adhesion defect after LL-37 treatment compared to the wild strain. Taken together, this study provides evidence that LL-37 affects A. baumannii through OmpA binding.

  18. Antimicrobial peptides from arachnid venoms and their microbicidal activity in the presence of commercial antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Francia; Villegas, Elba; Espino-Solis, Gerardo Pavel; Rodriguez, Alexis; Paniagua-Solis, Jorge F; Sandoval-Lopez, Gabriel; Possani, Lourival D; Corzo, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    Two antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), named La47 and Css54, were isolated from the venom of the spider Lachesana sp. and from the scorpion Centruroides suffusus suffusus, respectively. The primary structures of both La47 and Css54 were determined using N-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry. La47 is identical to the AMP latarcin 3a obtained previously from the venom of the spider Lachesana tarabaevi, but the primary structure of Css54 is unique having 60% identities to the AMP ponericin-W2 from the venom of the ant Pachycondyla goeldii. Both La47 and Css54 have typical α-helix secondary structures in hydrophobic mimicking environments. The biological activities of both La47 and Css54 were compared with the AMP Pin2 isolated from the venom of the scorpion Pandinus imperator. La47 has lower antimicrobial and hemolytic activities compared with Css54 and Pin2. In addition, La47 and Pin2 were evaluated in the presence of the commercial antibiotics, chloramphenicol, ampicillin, novobiocin, streptomycin and kanamycin. Interestingly, the best antimicrobial combinations were obtained with mixtures of La47 and Pin2 with the antibiotics chloramphenicol, streptomycin and kanamycin, respectively. Furthermore, the novel peptide Css54 was evaluated in the presence of antibiotics used for the treatment of tuberculosis, isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide and ethambutol. Although the mixtures of Css54 with isoniazid, pyrazinamide or ethambutol inhibit the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, the best effect was found with rifampicin. Overall, these data show a motivating outlook for potential clinical treatments of bacterial infections using AMPs and commercial antibiotics.

  19. Recombinant expression and solution structure of antimicrobial peptide aurelin from jellyfish Aurelia aurita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shenkarev, Zakhar O.; Panteleev, Pavel V.; Balandin, Sergey V. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Gizatullina, Albina K.; Altukhov, Dmitry A. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Department of Physicochemical Biology and Biotechnology, Institutskii per., 9, 141700 Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Finkina, Ekaterina I. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kokryakov, Vladimir N. [Institute of Experimental Medicine, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Academica Pavlova str., 12, 197376 Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Arseniev, Alexander S. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Department of Physicochemical Biology and Biotechnology, Institutskii per., 9, 141700 Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Ovchinnikova, Tatiana V., E-mail: ovch@ibch.ru [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Department of Physicochemical Biology and Biotechnology, Institutskii per., 9, 141700 Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aurelin was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and its spatial structure was studied by NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aurelin compact structure encloses helical regions cross-linked by three disulfide bonds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aurelin shows structural homology to the BgK and ShK toxins of sea anemones. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aurelin binds to the anionic lipid vesicles, but does not interact with zwitterionic ones. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aurelin binds to DPC micelle surface with moderate affinity via two helical regions. -- Abstract: Aurelin is a 40-residue cationic antimicrobial peptide isolated from the mezoglea of a scyphoid jellyfish Aurelia aurita. Aurelin and its {sup 15}N-labeled analogue were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Antimicrobial activity of the recombinant peptide was examined, and its spatial structure was studied by NMR spectroscopy. Aurelin represents a compact globule, enclosing one 3{sub 10}-helix and two {alpha}-helical regions cross-linked by three disulfide bonds. The peptide binds to anionic lipid (POPC/DOPG, 3:1) vesicles even at physiological salt concentration, it does not interact with zwitterionic (POPC) vesicles and interacts with the DPC micelle surface with moderate affinity via two {alpha}-helical regions. Although aurelin shows structural homology to the BgK and ShK toxins of sea anemones, its surface does not possess the 'functional dyad' required for the high-affinity interaction with the K{sup +}-channels. The obtained data permit to correlate the modest antibacterial properties and membrane activity of aurelin.

  20. Mimicking and Understanding the Agglutination Effect of the Antimicrobial Peptide Thanatin Using Model Phospholipid Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Émile; Lefèvre, Thierry; Fillion, Matthieu; Martial, Benjamin; Dionne, Justine; Auger, Michèle

    2015-06-30

    Thanatin is a cationic 21-residue antimicrobial and antifongical peptide found in the spined soldier bug Podisus maculiventris. It is believed that it does not permeabilize membranes but rather induces the agglutination of bacteria and inhibits cellular respiration. To clarify its mode of action, lipid vesicle organization and aggregation propensity as well as peptide secondary structure have been studied using different membrane models. Dynamic light scattering and turbidimetry results show that specific mixtures of negatively charged and zwitterionic phospholipid vesicles are able to mimic the agglutination effect of thanatin observed on Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial cells, while monoconstituent ("conventional") models cannot reproduce this phenomenon. The model of eukaryotic cell reveals no particular interaction with thanatin, which is consistent with the literature. Infrared spectroscopy shows that under the conditions under which vesicle agglutination occurs, thanatin exhibits a particular spectral pattern in the amide I' region and in the region associated with Arg side chains. The data suggest that thanatin mainly retains its hairpin structure, Arg residues being involved in strong interactions with anionic groups of phospholipids. In the absence of vesicle agglutination, the peptide conformation and Arg side-chain environment are similar to those observed in solution. The data show that a negatively charged membrane is required for thanatin to be active, but this condition is insufficient. The activity of thanatin seems to be modulated by the charge surface density of membranes and thanatin concentration.

  1. The human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide LL-37 and mimics are potential anticancer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kengo eKuroda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs play a critical role in innate host defense against microbial pathogens in many organisms. The human cathelicidin LL-37 has a net positive charge and is amphiphilic, and can eliminate pathogenic microbes directly via electrostatic attraction toward negatively charged bacterial membranes. A number of studies have shown that LL-37 participates in various host immune systems, such as inflammatory responses and tissue repair, in addition to its antibacterial properties. Moreover, recent evidence suggests that it is also involved in the regulation of cancer. Indeed, previous studies have suggested that human LL-37 is involved in carcinogenesis via multiple reporters such as FPR2 (FPRL1, EGFR, and ERBb2, although LL-37 and its fragments and analogues also show anticancer effects in various cancer cell lines. This discrepancy can be attributed to peptide-based factors, host membrane-based factors, and signal regulation. Here, we describe the association between AMPs and cancer with a focus on anticancer peptide functions and selectivity in an effort to understand potential therapeutic implications.

  2. Improving Recognition of Antimicrobial Peptides and Target Selectivity through Machine Learning and Genetic Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltri, Daniel; Kamath, Uday; Shehu, Amarda

    2017-01-01

    Growing bacterial resistance to antibiotics is spurring research on utilizing naturally-occurring antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as templates for novel drug design. While experimentalists mainly focus on systematic point mutations to measure the effect on antibacterial activity, the computational community seeks to understand what determines such activity in a machine learning setting. The latter seeks to identify the biological signals or features that govern activity. In this paper, we advance research in this direction through a novel method that constructs and selects complex sequence-based features which capture information about distal patterns within a peptide. Comparative analysis with state-of-the-art methods in AMP recognition reveals our method is not only among the top performers, but it also provides transparent summarizations of antibacterial activity at the sequence level. Moreover, this paper demonstrates for the first time the capability not only to recognize that a peptide is an AMP or not but also to predict its target selectivity based on models of activity against only Gram-positive, only Gram-negative, or both types of bacteria. The work described in this paper is a step forward in computational research seeking to facilitate AMP design or modification in the wet laboratory.

  3. Trypanocidal and leishmanicidal activities of different antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) isolated from aquatic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfgren, S E; Miletti, L C; Steindel, M; Bachère, E; Barracco, M A

    2008-02-01

    Most of the available animal antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been tested against bacteria and fungi, but very few against protozoan parasites. In the present study, we investigated the antiparasitic activity of different AMPs isolated from aquatic animals: tachyplesin (Tach, from Tachypleus tridentatus), magainin (Mag, from Xenopus laevis), clavanin (Clav, from Styela clava), penaeidin (Pen, from Litopenaeus vannamei), mytilin (Myt, from Mytilus edulis) and anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF, from Penaeus monodon). The antiparasitic activity was evaluated against the promastigote form of Leishmania braziliensis and epi and trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi, through the MTT method. Tach was the most potent peptide, killing completely L. braziliensis and trypomastigote T. cruzi from 12.5microM, whereas Pen and Clav were weakly active against trypomastigotes and Myt against L. braziliensis, only at a high concentration (100microM). Tach and Mag were markedly hemolytic at high concentrations, whereas the other peptides caused only a slight hemolysis (<10% up to 50microM). Our results point to Tach as the only potential candidate for further investigation and potential application as a therapeutic agent.

  4. Antimicrobial Peptides: Their Role as Infection-Selective Tracers for Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Ebenhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are a heterogeneous class of compounds found in a variety of organisms including humans and, so far, hundreds of these structures have been isolated and characterised. They can be described as natural microbicide, selectively cytotoxic to bacteria, whilst showing minimal cytotoxicity towards the mammalian cells of the host organism. They act by their relatively strong electrostatic attraction to the negatively charged bacterial cells and a relatively weak interaction to the eukaryote host cells. The ability of these peptides to accumulate at sites of infection combined with the minimal host’s cytotoxicity motivated for this review to highlight the role and the usefulness of AMPs for PET with emphasis on their mechanism of action and the different interactions with the bacterial cell. These details are key information for their selective properties. We also describe the strategy, design, and utilization of these peptides as potential radiopharmaceuticals as their combination with nuclear medicine modalities such as SPECT or PET would allow noninvasive whole-body examination for detection of occult infection causing, for example, fever of unknown origin.

  5. Antimicrobial peptides in saliva of children with severe early childhood caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Natália H; Ribas, Laís F F; Pereira, Jesse A; Kreling, Paula F; Kressirer, Christine A; Tanner, Anne C R; Duque, Cristiane

    2016-09-01

    Controversies exist regarding the relationship between the concentrations of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and presence of dental caries in children. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine levels of AMPs in saliva of caries-free (CF), early childhood caries (ECC) and severe early childhood caries (S-ECC) children to determine if the levels of these salivary peptides individually or in combinations were related to caries severity and mutans streptococci levels. 36 to 60 month-old children were selected to participate in this study. Children were grouped into CF group (n=29), ECC group (n=25) and S-ECC group (n=29). Saliva was collected from children for microbiological analysis by culture. Salivary concentrations of cathelicidin LL-37, human β-defensin 2 (hBD-2), human β-defensin 3 (hBD-3) and histatin-5 (HTN-5) were determined by ELISA. Salivary concentrations of AMPs did not differ among CF, ECC and S-ECC groups. Data showed positive correlations between mutans streptococci levels and salivary hBD-2 or HTN-5. Positive correlations were found between hBD-2, hBD-3, LL-37 and HTN-5. Combinations among AMPs, mainly LL-37, were positively associated with caries levels. Salivary concentrations of AMPs individually were not associated with the severity of early childhood caries. The stimulus of caries appears to trigger a biological response, however, with a combination of these peptides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Production of phytotoxic cationic α-helical antimicrobial peptides in plant cells using inducible promoters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuri Company

    Full Text Available Synthetic linear antimicrobial peptides with cationic α-helical structures, such as BP100, have potent and specific activities against economically important plant pathogenic bacteria. They are also recognized as valuable therapeutics and preservatives. However, highly active BP100 derivatives are often phytotoxic when expressed at high levels as recombinant peptides in plants. Here we demonstrate that production of recombinant phytotoxic peptides in transgenic plants is possible by strictly limiting transgene expression to certain tissues and conditions, and specifically that minimization of this expression during transformation and regeneration of transgenic plants is essential to obtain viable plant biofactories. On the basis of whole-genome transcriptomic data available online, we identified the Os.hsp82 promoter that fulfilled this requirement and was highly induced in response to heat shock. Using this strategy, we generated transgenic rice lines producing moderate yields of severely phytotoxic BP100 derivatives on exposure to high temperature. In addition, a threshold for gene expression in selected tissues and stages was experimentally established, below which the corresponding promoters should be suitable for driving the expression of recombinant phytotoxic proteins in genetically modified plants. In view of the growing transcriptomics data available, this approach is of interest to assist promoter selection for specific purposes.

  7. Antimicrobial peptide KSL-W promotes gingival fibroblast healing properties in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun-Jin; Salem, Mabrouka; Semlali, Abdelhabib; Leung, Kai P; Rouabhia, Mahmoud

    2017-07-01

    We investigated the effect of synthetic antimicrobial decapeptide KSL-W (KKVVFWVKFK) on normal human gingival fibroblast growth, migration, collagen gel contraction, and α-smooth muscle actin protein expression. Results show that in addition to promoting fibroblast adhesion by increasing F-actin production, peptide KSL-W promoted cell growth by increasing the S and G2/M cell cycle phases, and enhanced the secretion of metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-2 by upregulating MMP inhibitors, such as tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 and TIMP-2 in fibroblasts. An in vitro wound healing assay confirmed that peptide KSL-W promoted fibroblast migration and contraction of a collagen gel matrix. We also demonstrated a high expression of α-smooth muscle actin by gingival fibroblasts being exposed to KSL-W. This work shows that peptide KSL-W enhances gingival fibroblast growth, migration, and metalloproteinase secretion, and the expression of α-smooth muscle actin, thus promoting wound healing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. SP-LL-37, human antimicrobial peptide, enhances disease resistance in transgenic rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Hye Lee

    Full Text Available Human LL-37 is a multifunctional antimicrobial peptide of cathelicidin family. It has been shown in recent studies that it can serve as a host's defense against influenza A virus. We now demonstrate in this study how signal peptide LL-37 (SP-LL-37 can be used in rice resistance against bacterial leaf blight and blast. We synthesized LL-37 peptide and subcloned in a recombinant pPZP vector with pGD1 as promoter. SP-LL-37 was introduced into rice plants by Agrobacterium mediated transformation. Stable expression of SP-LL-37 in transgenic rice plants was confirmed by RT-PCR and ELISA analyses. Subcellular localization of SP-LL-37-GFP fusion protein showed evidently in intercellular space. Our data on testing for resistance to bacterial leaf blight and blast revealed that the transgenic lines are highly resistant compared to its wildtype. Our results suggest that LL-37 can be further explored to improve wide-spectrum resistance to biotic stress in rice.

  9. Linear antimicrobial peptides with activity against herpes simplex virus 1 and Aichi virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas Boas, Liana Costa Pereira; de Lima, Lídia Maria Pinto; Migliolo, Ludovico; Mendes, Gabriele Dos Santos; de Jesus, Maianne Gonçalves; Franco, Octávio Luiz; Silva, Paula Andréia

    2017-03-01

    Viruses are the major cause of disease and mortality worldwide. Nowadays there are treatments based on antivirals or prophylaxis with vaccines. However, the rising number of reports of viral resistance to current antivirals and the emergence of new types of virus has concerned the scientific community. In this scenario, the search for alternative treatments has led scientists to the discovery of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) derived from many different sources. Since some of them have shown antiviral activities, here we challenged 10 synthetic peptides from different animal and plant sources against, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), and Aichi virus. Among them, the highlight was Pa-MAP from the polar fish Pleuronectes americanus, which caused around 90% of inhibition of the HSV with a selectivity index of 5 and a virucidal mechanism of action. Moreover, LL-37 from human neutrophils showed 96% of inhibition against the Aichi virus, showing a selectivity index of 3.4. The other evaluated peptides did not show significant antiviral activity. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that Pa-MAP seems to be a reliable candidate for a possible alternative drug to treat HSV-1 infections. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 108: 1-6, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Insights into the anticancer properties of the first antimicrobial peptide from Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaglione, Rosa; Pirone, Luciano; Farina, Biancamaria; Fusco, Salvatore; Smaldone, Giovanni; Aulitto, Martina; Dell'Olmo, Eliana; Roscetto, Emanuela; Del Gatto, Annarita; Fattorusso, Roberto; Notomista, Eugenio; Zaccaro, Laura; Arciello, Angela; Pedone, Emilia; Contursi, Patrizia

    2017-09-01

    The peptide VLL-28, identified in the sequence of an archaeal protein, the transcription factor Stf76 from Sulfolobus islandicus, was previously identified and characterized as an antimicrobial peptide, possessing a broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. Through a combined approach of NMR and Circular Dichroism spectroscopy, Dynamic Light Scattering, confocal microscopy and cell viability assays, the interaction of VLL-28 with the membranes of both parental and malignant cell lines has been characterized and peptide mechanism of action has been studied. It is here demonstrated that VLL-28 selectively exerts cytotoxic activity against murine and human tumor cells. By means of structural methodologies, VLL-28 interaction with the membranes has been proven and the binding residues have been identified. Confocal microscopy data show that VLL-28 is internalized only into tumor cells. Finally, it is shown that cell death is mainly caused by a time-dependent activation of apoptotic pathways. VLL-28, deriving from the archaeal kingdom, is here found to be endowed with selective cytotoxic activity towards both murine and human cancer cells and consequently can be classified as an ACP. VLL-28 represents the first ACP identified in an archaeal microorganism, exerting a trans-kingdom activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Prokaryotic Selectivity, Anti-endotoxic Activity and Protease Stability of Diastereomeric and Enantiomeric Analogs of Human Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nan, Yong Hai; Lee, Bongju; Shin, Song Yub [Chosun Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    LL-37 is the only antimicrobial peptide (AMP) of the human cathelicidin family. In addition to potent antimicrobial activity, LL-37 is known to have the potential to inhibit lipolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxic effects. To provide the stability to proteolytic digestion and increase prokaryotic selectivity and/or anti-endotoxic activity of two Lys/Trp-substituted 19-meric anti-microbial peptides (a4-W1 and a4-W2) designed from IG-19 (residues 13-31 of LL-37), we synthesized the diastereomeric peptides (a4-W1-D and a4-W2-D) with D-amino acid substitution at positions 3, 7, 10, 13 and 17 of a4-W1 and a4-W2, respectively and the enantiomeric peptides (a4-W1-E and a4-W2-E) composed D-amino acids. The diastereomeric peptides exhibited the best prokaryotic selectivity and effective protease stability, but no or less anti-endotoxic activity. In contrast, the enantiomeric peptides had not only prokaryotic selectivity and anti-endotoxic activity but also protease stability. Our results suggest that the hydrophobicity and α-helicity of the peptide is important for anti-endotoxic activity. In particular, the enantiomeric peptides showed potent anti-endotoxic and LPS-neutralizing activities comparable to that of LL-37. Taken together, both a4-W1-E and a4-W2-E holds promise as a template for the development of peptide antibiotics for the treatment of endotoxic shock and sepsis.

  12. Characterization of a novel piscidin-like antimicrobial peptide from Pseudosciaena crocea and its immune response to Cryptocaryon irritans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Su-Fang; Jin, Yuan; Xu, Xin; Qiao, Ying; Wu, Yang; Mao, Yong; Su, Yong-Quan; Wang, Jun

    2013-08-01

    Piscidins, important components of the innate (nonspecific) immunity system in fish, have potent, broad-spectrum antimicrobial and antiparasitic activities. In this study, we reported a novel antimicrobial cationic peptide from Pseudosciaena crocea. Although this peptide exhibited a genomic (3 exons and 2 introns) and propeptide (signal peptide, mature peptide and prodomain) organization, conserved signal peptide (22 amino acids) and consensus motif I-X5-H-X4-I-H identical to the reported fish piscidins, Pc-pis showed a relatively low overall conservation with other known piscidins, which was obviously embodied in the amino acid composition of the peptide. Pc-pis is strikingly rich in glycine residues (27.3%), which disrupted the amphipathic structure of the peptide. Relative quantitative real-time PCR revealed that Pc-pis is a typically gill-expressed peptide. The sequence analysis, structural features and tissue distribution suggested that Pc-pis was genetically related to the piscidins family and might be a novel piscidin-like antimicrobial peptide. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that the expression of Pc-pis in the spleen, head-kidney, liver, intestine, skin and gill could be regulated during Cryptocaryon irritans infection and post C. irritans falling off, implicating a role for Pc-pis in immune defense against C. irritans and secondary bacterial infections. Synthetic Pc-pis exhibited broad-spectrum activity against bacteria, fungi and C. irritans in parasitic stages. These results provided the first evidence of piscidins antiparasitic activity against marine fish ectoparasites C. irritants trophonts and further indicated that Pc-pis might be an important component of the P. crocea innate immune system against C. irritans and secondary bacterial infections. Thus, these data provided new insights into P. crocea innate immunity against external protozoan parasite and microbial infections and facilitate the evaluation of Pc-pis as a therapeutic agent against

  13. Gallin; an antimicrobial peptide member of a new avian defensin family, the ovodefensins, has been subject to recent gene duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalina Jiri

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Egg white must provide nutrients and protection to the developing avian embryo. One way in which this is achieved is an arsenal of antimicrobial proteins and peptides which are essentially extensions of the innate immune system. Gallin is a recently identified member of a family of peptides that are found in egg white. The function of this peptide family has not been identified and they are potentially antimicrobial. Results We have confirmed that there are at least 3 forms of the gallin gene in the chicken genome in 3 separate lines of chicken, all the forms are expressed in the tubular cells of the magnum region of the oviduct, consistent with its presence in egg white. mRNA expression levels are in the order 10,000 times greater in the magnum than the shell gland. The conservation between the multiple forms of gallin in the chicken genome compared with the conservation between gallin and other avian gallin like peptides, suggests that the gene duplication has occurred relatively recently in the chicken lineage. The gallin peptide family contains a six cysteine motif (C-X5-C-X3-C-X11-C-X3-C-C found in all defensins, and is most closely related to avian beta-defensins, although the cysteine spacing differs. Further support for the classification comes from the presence of a glycine at position 10 in the 41 amino acid peptide. Recombinant gallin inhibited the growth of Escherischia coli (E. coli at a concentration of 0.25 μM confirming it as part of the antimicrobial innate immune system in avian species. Conclusions The relatively recent evolution of multiple forms of a member of a new defensin related group of peptides that we have termed ovodefensins, may be an adaptation to increase expression or the first steps in divergent evolution of the gene in chickens. The potent antimicrobial activity of the peptide against E. coli increases our understanding of the antimicrobial strategies of the avian innate immune system

  14. Transcriptome analysis of the responses of Staphylococcus aureus to antimicrobial peptides and characterization of the roles of vraDE and vraSR in antimicrobial resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schrenzel Jacques

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding how pathogens respond to antimicrobial peptides, and how this compares to currently available antibiotics, is crucial for optimizing antimicrobial therapy. Staphylococcus aureus has several known resistance mechanisms against human cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs. Gene expression changes in S. aureus strain Newman exposed to linear CAMPs were analyzed by DNA microarray. Three antimicrobial peptides were used in the analysis, two are derived from frog, temporin L and dermaseptin K4-S4(1-16, and the ovispirin-1 is obtained from sheep. Results The peptides induced the VraSR cell-wall regulon and several other genes that are also up-regulated in cells treated with vancomycin and other cell wall-active antibiotics. In addition to this similarity, three genes/operons were particularly strongly induced by the peptides: vraDE, SA0205 and SAS016, encoding an ABC transporter, a putative membrane-bound lysostaphin-like peptidase and a small functionally unknown protein, respectively. Ovispirin-1 and dermaseptin K4-S4(1-16, which disrupt lipid bilayers by the carpet mechanism, appeared to be strong inducers of the vraDE operon. We show that high level induction by ovispirin-1 is dependent on the amide modification of the peptide C-terminus. This suggests that the amide group has a crucial role in the activation of the Aps (GraRS sensory system, the regulator of vraDE. In contrast, temporin L, which disrupts lipid bilayers by forming pores, revealed a weaker inducer of vraDE despite the C-terminal amide modification. Sensitivity testing with CAMPs and other antimicrobials suggested that VraDE is a transporter dedicated to resist bacitracin. We also showed that SA0205 belongs to the VraSR regulon. Furthermore, VraSR was shown to be important for resistance against a wide range of cell wall-active antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents including the amide-modified ovispirin-1, bacitracin, teicoplanin, cefotaxime and

  15. Discovery of Novel Antimicrobial Peptides from Varanus komodoensis (Komodo Dragon) by Large-Scale Analyses and De-Novo-Assisted Sequencing Using Electron-Transfer Dissociation Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Barney M; Juba, Melanie L; Russo, Paul S; Devine, Megan; Barksdale, Stephanie M; Scott, Shaylyn; Settlage, Robert; Michalak, Pawel; Gupta, Kajal; Vliet, Kent; Schnur, Joel M; van Hoek, Monique L

    2017-04-07

    Komodo dragons are the largest living lizards and are the apex predators in their environs. They endure numerous strains of pathogenic bacteria in their saliva and recover from wounds inflicted by other dragons, reflecting the inherent robustness of their innate immune defense. We have employed a custom bioprospecting approach combining partial de novo peptide sequencing with transcriptome assembly to identify cationic antimicrobial peptides from Komodo dragon plasma. Through these analyses, we identified 48 novel potential cationic antimicrobial peptides. All but one of the identified peptides were derived from histone proteins. The antimicrobial effectiveness of eight of these peptides was evaluated against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 9027) and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923), with seven peptides exhibiting antimicrobial activity against both microbes and one only showing significant potency against P. aeruginosa. This study demonstrates the power and promise of our bioprospecting approach to cationic antimicrobial peptide discovery, and it reveals the presence of a plethora of novel histone-derived antimicrobial peptides in the plasma of the Komodo dragon. These findings may have broader implications regarding the role that intact histones and histone-derived peptides play in defending the host from infection. Data are available via ProteomeXChange with identifier PXD005043.

  16. Mode of action of cationic antimicrobial peptides defines the tethering position and the efficacy of biocidal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Mojtaba; Beyermann, Michael; Dathe, Margitta

    2012-01-18

    Covalent immobilization of cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs) at sufficient density and distance from the solid matrix has been suggested as a successful strategy for the generation of biocidal surfaces. To test the hypothesis that the mode of peptide action is decisive for the selection of an appropriate tethering position on solid surfaces, melittin (MEL), a channel-forming peptide, buforin 2 (BUF2), a peptide able to translocate bacterial membranes without permeabilization and targeting nucleic acids, and tritrpticin (TP), described to be membrane-lytic and to have intracellular targets, were C- and N-terminally immobilized on TentaGel S NH(2) resin beads as model surface. The peptide termini were modified with aminooxyacetic acid (AOA) and coupled via oxime-forming ligation. The comparison of the activities of the three peptides and their AOA-modified analogues with a KLAL model peptide which permeabilizes membranes by a so-called "carpet-like" mode provided the following results: The peptides in solution state were active against Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli at micromolar concentrations. MEL and TP but not BUF2-derived peptides permeabilized the inner and outer membrane of E. coli and enhanced the permeability of lipid bilayers at concentrations around their antimicrobial values (MICs). Immobilization reduced peptide activity to millimolar MICs. The activity reduction for KLAL was independent of the tethering position and comparably low, as reflected by a low ratio of MIC(tethered)/MIC(free). In contrary, the pore-forming MEL was much less active when immobilized at the N-terminus compared with the C-terminally tethered peptide. C- and N-terminal TP tethering caused an identical but much pronounced activity decrease. The tethered BUF2 peptides were inactive at the tested concentrations suggesting that the peptides could not reach the intracellular targets. In conclusion, membrane active peptides seem to be most suitable for the generation of

  17. Identification of a novel antimicrobial peptide from human hepatitis B virus core protein arginine-rich domain (ARD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng-Li Chen

    Full Text Available The rise of multidrug-resistant (MDR pathogens causes an increasing challenge to public health. Antimicrobial peptides are considered a possible solution to this problem. HBV core protein (HBc contains an arginine-rich domain (ARD at its C-terminus, which consists of 16 arginine residues separated into four clusters (ARD I to IV. In this study, we demonstrated that the peptide containing the full-length ARD I-IV (HBc147-183 has a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity at micro-molar concentrations, including some MDR and colistin (polymyxin E-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Furthermore, confocal fluorescence microscopy and SYTOX Green uptake assay indicated that this peptide killed Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria by membrane permeabilization or DNA binding. In addition, peptide ARD II-IV (HBc153-176 and ARD I-III (HBc147-167 were found to be necessary and sufficient for the activity against P. aeruginosa and K. peumoniae. The antimicrobial activity of HBc ARD peptides can be attenuated by the addition of LPS. HBc ARD peptide was shown to be capable of direct binding to the Lipid A of lipopolysaccharide (LPS in several in vitro binding assays. Peptide ARD I-IV (HBc147-183 had no detectable cytotoxicity in various tissue culture systems and a mouse animal model. In the mouse model by intraperitoneal (i.p. inoculation with Staphylococcus aureus, timely treatment by i.p. injection with ARD peptide resulted in 100-fold reduction of bacteria load in blood, liver and spleen, as well as 100% protection of inoculated animals from death. If peptide was injected when bacterial load in the blood reached its peak, the protection rate dropped to 40%. Similar results were observed in K. peumoniae using an IVIS imaging system. The finding of anti-microbial HBc ARD is discussed in the context of commensal gut microbiota, development of intrahepatic anti-viral immunity and establishment of chronic infection with HBV. Our current results suggested that

  18. Expression of an engineered heterologous antimicrobial peptide in potato alters plant development and mitigates normal abiotic and biotic responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antimicrobial cationic peptides (AMPs) are ubiquitous small proteins used by living cells to defend against a wide spectrum of pathogens. Their amphipathic property helps their interaction with negatively charged cellular membrane of the pathogen causing cell lysis and death. AMPs also modulate sign...

  19. Novel role of the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 in the protection of neutrophil extracellular Traps against degradation by bacterial nucleases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neumann, A.; Völlger, L.; Berends, E.T.M.; Molhoek, E.M.; Stapels, D.A.C.; Midon, M.; Friães, A.; Pingoud, A.; Rooijakkers, S.H.M.; Gallo, R.L.; Mörgelin, M.; Nizet, V.; Naim, H.Y.; Köckritz-Blickwede, M. von

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have been described as a fundamental innate immune defence mechanism. They consist of a nuclear DNA backbone associated with different antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) which are able to engulf and kill pathogens. The AMP LL-37, a member of the cathelicidin family,

  20. Expression of an antimicrobial peptide, digestive enzymes and nutrient transporters in the intestine of E. praecox-infected chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccidiosis is a major intestinal disease of poultry, caused by several species of the protozoan Eimeria. The objective of this study was to examine changes in expression of digestive enzymes, nutrient transporters and an antimicrobial peptide following an Eimeria praecox challenge of chickens at d...

  1. Generic and Specific Adaptive Responses of Streptococcus pneumoniae to Challenge with Three Distinct Antimicrobial Peptides, Bacitracin, LL-37, and Nisin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majchrzykiewicz, Joanna A.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Bijlsma, Jetta J.E.

    To investigate the response of Streptococcus pneumoniae to three distinct antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), bacitracin, nisin, and LL-37, transcriptome analysis of challenged bacteria was performed. Only a limited number of genes were found to be up- or downregulated in all cases. Several of these

  2. Structure of the antimicrobial beta-hairpin peptide protegrin-1 in a DLPC lipid bilayer investigated by molecular dynamics simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2007-01-01

    All atom molecular dynamics simulations of the 18-residue beta-hairpin antimicrobial peptide protegrin-1 (PG-1, RGGRLCYCRRRFCVCVGR-NH(2)) in a fully hydrated dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC) lipid bilayer have been implemented. The goal of the reported work is to investigate the structure of t...

  3. Induction of the Antimicrobial Peptide CRAMP in the Blood-Brain Barrier and Meninges after Meningococcal Infection▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Peter; Johansson, Linda; Wan, Hong; Jones, Allison; Gallo, Richard L.; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur H.; Hökfelt, Tomas; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Agerberth, Birgitta

    2006-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are present in most living species and constitute important effector molecules of innate immunity. Recently, we and others have detected antimicrobial peptides in the brain. This is an organ that is rarely infected, which has mainly been ascribed to the protective functions of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and meninges. Since the bactericidal properties of the BBB and meninges are not known, we hypothesized that antimicrobial peptides could play a role in these barriers. We addressed this hypothesis by infecting mice with the neuropathogenic bacterium Neisseria meningitidis. Brains were analyzed for expression of the antimicrobial peptide CRAMP by immunohistochemistry in combination with confocal microscopy. After infection, we observed induction of CRAMP in endothelial cells of the BBB and in cells of the meninges. To explore the functional role of CRAMP in meningococcal disease, we infected mice deficient of the CRAMP gene. Even though CRAMP did not appear to protect the brain from invasion of meningococci, CRAMP knockout mice were more susceptible to meningococcal infection than wild-type mice and exhibited increased meningococcal growth in blood, liver, and spleen. Moreover, we could demonstrate that carbonate, a compound that accumulates in the circulation during metabolic acidosis, makes meningococci more susceptible to CRAMP. PMID:17030578

  4. The negatively charged regions of lactoferrin binding protein B, an adaptation against anti-microbial peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Morgenthau

    Full Text Available Lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB is a bi-lobed membrane bound lipoprotein that is part of the lactoferrin receptor complex in a variety of Gram-negative pathogens. Despite high sequence diversity among LbpBs from various strains and species, a cluster of negatively charged amino acids is invariably present in the protein's C-terminal lobe in all species except Moraxella bovis. The function of LbpB in iron acquisition has yet to be experimentally demonstrated, whereas in vitro studies have shown that LbpB confers protection against lactoferricin, a short cationic antimicrobial peptide released from the N- terminus of lactoferrin. In this study we demonstrate that the negatively charged regions can be removed from the Neisseria meningitidis LbpB without compromising stability, and this results in the inability of LbpB to protect against the bactericidal effects of lactoferricin. The release of LbpB from the cell surface by the autotransporter NalP reduces the protection against lactoferricin in the in vitro killing assay, attributed to removal of LbpB during washing steps, but is unlikely to have a similar impact in vivo. The protective effect of the negatively charged polysaccharide capsule in the killing assay was less than the protection conferred by LbpB, suggesting that LbpB plays a major role in protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides in vivo. The selective release of LbpB by NalP has been proposed to be a mechanism for evading the adaptive immune response, by reducing the antibody binding to the cell surface, but may also provide insights into the primary function of LbpB in vivo. Although TbpB and LbpB have been shown to be major targets of the human immune response, the selective release of LbpB suggests that unlike TbpB, LbpB may not be essential for iron acquisition, but important for protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides.

  5. Synergistic effects of antimicrobial peptide DP7 combined with antibiotics against multidrug-resistant bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu X

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Xiaozhe Wu,1 Zhan Li,1 Xiaolu Li,2,3 Yaomei Tian,1 Yingzi Fan,1 Chaoheng Yu,1 Bailing Zhou,1 Yi Liu,4 Rong Xiang,5 Li Yang1 1State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy/Collaborative Innovation Center of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, 2International Center for Translational Chinese Medicine, Sichuan Academy of Chinese Medicine Sciences, Chengdu, 3Department of Plastic and Burn Surgery, Affiliated Hospital of Southwest Medical University, Luzhou, 4Department of Microbial Examination, Sichuan Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Chengdu, 5Nankai University School of Medicine, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Antibiotic-resistant bacteria present a great threat to public health. In this study, the synergistic effects of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs and antibiotics on several multidrug-resistant bacterial strains were studied, and their synergistic effects on azithromycin (AZT-resistance genes were analyzed to determine the relationships between antimicrobial resistance and these synergistic effects. A checkerboard method was used to evaluate the synergistic effects of AMPs (DP7 and CLS001 and several antibiotics (gentamicin, vancomycin [VAN], AZT, and amoxicillin on clinical bacterial strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Escherichia coli. The AZT-resistance genes (ermA, ermB, ermC, mefA, and msrA were identified in the resistant strains using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. For all the clinical isolates tested that were resistant to different antibiotics, DP7 had high antimicrobial activity (≤32 mg/L. When DP7 was combined with VAN or AZT, the effect was most frequently synergistic. When we studied the resistance genes of the AZT-resistant isolates, the synergistic effect of DP7–AZT occurred most frequently in highly resistant strains or strains carrying more than two AZT-resistance genes. A transmission electron microscopic analysis of the S. aureus

  6. A novel beta-defensin antimicrobial peptide in Atlantic cod with stimulatory effect on phagocytic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jareeporn Ruangsri

    Full Text Available A novel defensin antimicrobial peptide gene was identified in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua. This three exon/two intron defensin gene codes for a peptide precursor consisting of two domains: a signal peptide of 26 amino acids and a mature peptide of 40 residues. The mature cod defensin has six conserved cysteine residues that form 1-5, 2-4 and 3-6 disulphide bridges. This pattern is typical of beta-defensins and this gene was therefore named cod beta-defensin (defb. The tertiary structure of Defb exhibits an α/β fold with one α helix and β1β2β3 sheets. RT-PCR analysis indicated that defb transcripts were present mainly in the swim bladder and peritoneum wall but could also be detected at moderate to low levels in skin, head- and excretory kidneys. In situ hybridisation revealed that defb was specifically expressed by cells located in the swim bladder submucosa and the oocytes. During embryonic development, defb gene transcripts were detectable from the golden eye stage onwards and their expression was restricted to the swim bladder and retina. Defb was differentially expressed in several tissues following antigenic challenge with Vibrio anguillarum, being up-regulated up to 25-fold in head kidney. Recombinant Defb displayed antibacterial activity, with a minimal inhibitory concentration of 0.4-0.8 µM and 25-50 µM against the Gram-(+ bacteria Planococcus citreus and Micrococcus luteus, respectively. In addition, Defb stimulated phagocytic activity of cod head kidney leucocytes in vitro. These findings imply that beta-defensins may play an important role in the innate immune response of Atlantic cod.

  7. A Novel Beta-Defensin Antimicrobial Peptide in Atlantic Cod with Stimulatory Effect on Phagocytic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruangsri, Jareeporn; Kitani, Yoichiro; Kiron, Viswanath; Lokesh, Jep; Brinchmann, Monica F.; Karlsen, Bård Ove; Fernandes, Jorge M. O.

    2013-01-01

    A novel defensin antimicrobial peptide gene was identified in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua. This three exon/two intron defensin gene codes for a peptide precursor consisting of two domains: a signal peptide of 26 amino acids and a mature peptide of 40 residues. The mature cod defensin has six conserved cysteine residues that form 1–5, 2–4 and 3–6 disulphide bridges. This pattern is typical of beta-defensins and this gene was therefore named cod beta-defensin (defb). The tertiary structure of Defb exhibits an α/β fold with one α helix and β1β2β3 sheets. RT-PCR analysis indicated that defb transcripts were present mainly in the swim bladder and peritoneum wall but could also be detected at moderate to low levels in skin, head- and excretory kidneys. In situ hybridisation revealed that defb was specifically expressed by cells located in the swim bladder submucosa and the oocytes. During embryonic development, defb gene transcripts were detectable from the golden eye stage onwards and their expression was restricted to the swim bladder and retina. Defb was differentially expressed in several tissues following antigenic challenge with Vibrio anguillarum, being up-regulated up to 25-fold in head kidney. Recombinant Defb displayed antibacterial activity, with a minimal inhibitory concentration of 0.4–0.8 µM and 25–50 µM against the Gram-(+) bacteria Planococcus citreus and Micrococcus luteus, respectively. In addition, Defb stimulated phagocytic activity of cod head kidney leucocytes in vitro. These findings imply that beta-defensins may play an important role in the innate immune response of Atlantic cod. PMID:23638029

  8. A novel defensin-like antimicrobial peptide from the skin secretions of the tree frog, Theloderma kwangsiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wang; Chen, Yan; Yao, Huimin; Du, Canwei; Luan, Ning; Yan, Xiuwen

    2016-01-15

    Defensins are one of the major families of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), and have been reported from prokaryotic to eukaryotic kingdoms. But defensins are seldom found in amphibian which is a major resource of novel AMPs. A novel defensin-like AMP (defensin-TK) was isolated and characterized from skin secretions of the tree frog Theloderma kwangsiensis. The cDNA encoding defensin-TK precursor was cloned from the skin cDNA library of T. kwangsiensis. The deduced precursor of defensin-TK was composed of three domains, a signal peptide of 16 residues, a spacer peptide of 1 residues and a mature peptide of 42 residues. The mature peptide of defensin-TK shared the highest identity with the salamander (Cynops fudingensis) defensin CFBD-1. The six conserved cysteines which formed intramolecular disulfide bonds of defensins also exist in defensin-TK. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that defensin-TK was closely related to fish β-defensins. Defensin-TK showed potent and broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. In addition, defensin-TK exerted a low hemolytic activity on human red cells. These results suggested defensin-TK might play an important role in defense the skin pathogenic microbes of tree frog T. kwangsiensis, and might be a promising candidate for development of novel antimicrobial agents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Antifibrogenic Effects of the Antimicrobial Peptide Cathelicidin in Murine Colitis-Associated FibrosisSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Hwan Yoo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Cathelicidin (LL-37 in human and mCRAMP in mice represents a family of endogenous antimicrobial peptides with anti-inflammatory effects. LL-37 also suppresses collagen synthesis, an important fibrotic response, in dermal fibroblasts. Here, we determined whether exogenous cathelicidin administration modulates intestinal fibrosis in two animal models of intestinal inflammation and in human colonic fibroblasts. Methods: C57BL/6J mice (n = 6 per group were administered intracolonically with a trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS enema to induce chronic (6–7 weeks colitis with fibrosis. We administered mCRAMP peptide (5 mg/kg every 3 day, week 5–7 or cathelicidin gene (Camp-expressing lentivirus (107 infectious units week 4 intracolonically or intravenously, respectively. We then infected 129Sv/J mice with Salmonella typhimurium orally to induce cecal inflammation with fibrosis. Camp-expressing lentivirus (107 infectious units day 11 was administered intravenously. Results: TNBS-induced chronic colitis was associated with increased colonic collagen (col1a2 mRNA expression. Intracolonic cathelicidin (mCRAMP peptide administration or intravenous delivery of lentivirus-overexpressing cathelicidin gene significantly reduced colonic col1a2 mRNA expression in TNBS-exposed mice compared with vehicle administration. Salmonella infection also caused increased cecal inflammation associated with collagen (col1a2 mRNA expression that was prevented by intravenous delivery of Camp-expressing lentivirus. Exposure of human primary intestinal fibroblasts and human colonic CCD-18Co fibroblasts to transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 and/or insulin-like growth factor 1 induced collagen protein and mRNA expression, which was reduced by LL-37 (3–5 μM through a MAP kinase-dependent mechanism. Conclusions: Cathelicidin can reverse intestinal fibrosis by directly inhibiting collagen synthesis in colonic fibroblasts. Keywords

  10. In vivo osseointegration of dental implants with an antimicrobial peptide coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X; Zhou, X C; Liu, S; Wu, R F; Aparicio, C; Wu, J Y

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the in vivo osseointegration of implants with hydrophobic antimicrobial GL13K-peptide coating in rabbit femoral condyles by micro-CT and histological analysis. Six male Japanese Rabbits (4 months old and weighing 2.5 kg each) were included in this study. Twelve implants (3.75 mm wide, 7 mm long) were randomly distributed in two groups, with six implants in the experimental group coated with GL13K peptide and six implants in the control group without surface coating. Each implant in the test and the control group was randomly implanted in the left or right side of femoral condyles. On one side randomly-selected of the femur, each rabbit received a drill that was left without implant as control for the natural healing of bone. After 3 weeks of healing radiographic evaluation of the implant sites was taken. After 6 weeks of healing, rabbits were sacrificed for evaluation of the short-term osseointegration of the dental implants using digital radiography, micro-CT and histology analysis. To perform evaluation of osseointegration, implant location and group was double blinded for surgeon and histology/radiology researcher. Two rabbits died of wound infection in sites with non-coated implants 2 weeks after surgery. Thus, at least four rabbits per group survived after 6 weeks of healing. The wounds healed without suppuration and inflammation. No implant was loose after 6 weeks of healing. Radiography observations showed good osseointegration after 3 and 6 weeks postoperatively, which proved that the tissues followed a natural healing process. Micro-CT reconstruction and analysis showed that there was no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05) in volume of bone around the implant between implants coated with GL13K peptide and implants without coating. Histomorphometric analysis also showed that the mineralized bone area was no statistically different (P > 0.05) between implants coated with GL13K peptide and

  11. Biophysical investigation of the membrane-disrupting mechanism of the antimicrobial and amyloid-like peptide dermaseptin S9.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Caillon

    Full Text Available Dermaseptin S9 (Drs S9 is an atypical cationic antimicrobial peptide with a long hydrophobic core and with a propensity to form amyloid-like fibrils. Here we investigated its membrane interaction using a variety of biophysical techniques. Rather surprisingly, we found that Drs S9 induces efficient permeabilisation in zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine (PC vesicles, but not in anionic phosphatidylglycerol (PG vesicles. We also found that the peptide inserts more efficiently in PC than in PG monolayers. Therefore, electrostatic interactions between the cationic Drs S9 and anionic membranes cannot explain the selectivity of the peptide towards bacterial membranes. CD spectroscopy, electron microscopy and ThT fluorescence experiments showed that the peptide adopts slightly more β-sheet and has a higher tendency to form amyloid-like fibrils in the presence of PC membranes as compared to PG membranes. Thus, induction of leakage may be related to peptide aggregation. The use of a pre-incorporation protocol to reduce peptide/peptide interactions characteristic of aggregates in solution resulted in more α-helix formation and a more pronounced effect on the cooperativity of the gel-fluid lipid phase transition in all lipid systems tested. Calorimetric data together with (2H- and (31P-NMR experiments indicated that the peptide has a significant impact on the dynamic organization of lipid bilayers, albeit slightly less for zwitterionic than for anionic membranes. Taken together, our data suggest that in particular in membranes of zwitterionic lipids the peptide binds in an aggregated state resulting in membrane leakage. We propose that also the antimicrobial activity of Drs S9 may be a result of binding of the peptide in an aggregated state, but that specific binding and aggregation to bacterial membranes is regulated not by anionic lipids but by as yet unknown factors.

  12. Antimicrobial Peptides As Biologic and Immunotherapeutic Agents against Cancer: A Comprehensive Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raheleh Roudi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are a pervasive and evolutionarily ancient component of innate host defense which is present in virtually all classes of life. In recent years, evidence has accumulated that parallel or de novo mechanisms by which AMPs curb infectious pathologies are also effective at restraining cancer cell proliferation and dissemination, and have consequently stimulated significant interest in their deployment as novel biologic and immunotherapeutic agents against human malignancies. In this review, we explicate the biochemical underpinnings of their tumor-selectivity, and discuss results of recent clinical trials (outside of oncologic indications which substantiate their safety and tolerability profiles. Next, we present evidence for their preclinical antitumor activity, systematically organized by the major and minor classes of natural AMPs. Finally, we discuss the barriers to their clinical implementation and envision directions for further development.

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Psl Exopolysaccharide Interacts with the Antimicrobial Peptide LG21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Seow Fong Chin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm formation by opportunistic pathogens serves as one of the major causes of chronic and persistent infections. Bacterial cells in the biofilms are embedded in their self-generated protective extracellular polymeric substances (EPS, which include exopolysaccharides, large adhesin proteins and extracellular DNA. In this study, we identified an antimicrobial peptide (AMP LG21 that is able to interact specifically with the Psl exopolysaccharide of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, thus it can be used as a diagnostic tool for P. aeruginosa biofilms. Molecular dynamics simulation analysis showed that residues numbered from 15 to 21 (WKRKRFG in LG21 are involved in interacting with Psl. Our study indicates that host immune systems might detect and interact with microbial biofilms through AMPs. Engineering biofilm EPS-targeting AMPs might provide novel strategies for biofilm detection and treatment.

  14. The evolution of antimicrobial peptide resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is shaped by strong epistatic interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochumsen, Nicholas; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Pedersen, Søren Damkiær

    2016-01-01

    independent loci that synergistically create the phenotype. Strong intergenic epistasis limits the number of possible evolutionary pathways to resistance. Mutations in transcriptional regulators are essential for resistance evolution and function as nodes that potentiate further evolution towards higher......Colistin is an antimicrobial peptide that has become the only remaining alternative for the treatment of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections, but little is known of how clinical levels of colistin resistance evolve. We use in vitro experimental evolution and whole......-genome sequencing of colistin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis patients to reconstruct the molecular evolutionary pathways open for high-level colistin resistance. We show that the evolution of resistance is a complex, multistep process that requires mutation in at least five...

  15. Synergistic antibiotic effect of looped antimicrobial peptide CLP-19 with bactericidal and bacteriostatic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Di; Yang, Ya; Tian, Zhiqiang; Lv, Jun; Sun, Fengjun; Wang, Qian; Liu, Yao; Xia, Peiyuan

    2017-08-22

    The treatment of drug-resistant infections is complicated and the alarming rise in infectious diseases poses a unique challenge for development of effective therapeutic strategies. Antibiotic-induced liberation of the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) may have immediate adverse effects promoting septic shock in patients. In the present study, we first confirmed our previous finding that looped antimicrobial peptide CLP-19 exerts non-specific direct antibacterial activity with no toxic to mammalian cells and second revealed that CLP-19 has synergistic effect to enhance the antibacterial activities of other conventional bactericidal (ampicillin and ceftazidime) and bacteriostatic (erythromycin and levofloxacin) agents. Third, the underlying mechanism of antibiotic effect was likely associated with stimulation of hydroxyl radical generation. Lastly, CLP-19 was shown to effectively reduce the antibiotic-induced liberation of LPS, through direct neutralization of the LPS. Thus, CLP-19 is a potential therapeutic agent for combinatorial antibiotic therapy.

  16. The application of antimicrobial peptides as growth and health promoters for swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hao; Shao, Fangyuan; Wu, Miaomiao; Ren, Wenkai; Xiong, Xia; Tan, Bie; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    With the widespread ban on the use of antibiotics in swine feed, alternative measures need to be sought to maintain swine health and performance. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are part of the nonspecific defense system and are natural antibiotics produced by plants, insects, mammalians, and micro-organisms as well as by chemical synthesis. Due to their broad microbicidal activity against various fungi, bacteria and enveloped viruses, AMPs are a potential alternative to conventional antibiotics for use in swine production. This review focuses on the structure and mechanism of action of AMPs, as well as their effects on performance, immune function and intestinal health in pigs. The aim is to provide support for the application of AMPs as feed additives replacing antibiotics in swine nutrition.

  17. Electrospun polymeric dressings functionalized with antimicrobial peptides and collagen type I for enhanced wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felgueiras, H. P.; Amorim, M. T. P.

    2017-10-01

    Modern wound dressings combine medical textiles with active compounds that stimulate wound healing while protecting against infection. Electrospun wound dressings have been extensively studied and the electrospinning technique recognized as an efficient approach for the production of nanoscale fibrous mats. The unique diverse function and architecture of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) has attracted considerable attention as a tool for the design of new anti-infective drugs. Functionalizing electrospun wound dressings with these AMPs is nowadays being researched. In the present work, we explore these new systems by highlighting the most important characteristics of electropsun wound dressings, revealing the importance of AMPs to wound healing, and the methods available to functionalize the electrospun mats with these molecules. The combined therapeutic potential of collagen type I and these AMP functionalized dressings will be highlighted as well; the significance of these new strategies for the future of wound healing will be clarified.

  18. Constitutive expression of transgenes encoding derivatives of the synthetic antimicrobial peptide BP100: impact on rice host plant fitness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadal Anna

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Biopeptide BP100 is a synthetic and strongly cationic α-helical undecapeptide with high, specific antibacterial activity against economically important plant-pathogenic bacteria, and very low toxicity. It was selected from a library of synthetic peptides, along with other peptides with activities against relevant bacterial and fungal species. Expression of the BP100 series of peptides in plants is of major interest to establish disease-resistant plants and facilitate molecular farming. Specific challenges were the small length, peptide degradation by plant proteases and toxicity to the host plant. Here we approached the expression of the BP100 peptide series in plants using BP100 as a proof-of-concept. Results Our design considered up to three tandemly arranged BP100 units and peptide accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, analyzing five BP100 derivatives. The ER retention sequence did not reduce the antimicrobial activity of chemically synthesized BP100 derivatives, making this strategy possible. Transformation with sequences encoding BP100 derivatives (bp100der was over ten-fold less efficient than that of the hygromycin phosphotransferase (hptII transgene. The BP100 direct tandems did not show higher antimicrobial activity than BP100, and genetically modified (GM plants constitutively expressing them were not viable. In contrast, inverted repeats of BP100, whether or not elongated with a portion of a natural antimicrobial peptide (AMP, had higher antimicrobial activity, and fertile GM rice lines constitutively expressing bp100der were produced. These GM lines had increased resistance to the pathogens Dickeya chrysanthemi and Fusarium verticillioides, and tolerance to oxidative stress, with agronomic performance comparable to untransformed lines. Conclusions Constitutive expression of transgenes encoding short cationic α-helical synthetic peptides can have a strong negative impact on rice fitness. However, GM

  19. Constitutive expression of transgenes encoding derivatives of the synthetic antimicrobial peptide BP100: impact on rice host plant fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal, Anna; Montero, Maria; Company, Nuri; Badosa, Esther; Messeguer, Joaquima; Montesinos, Laura; Montesinos, Emilio; Pla, Maria

    2012-09-04

    The Biopeptide BP100 is a synthetic and strongly cationic α-helical undecapeptide with high, specific antibacterial activity against economically important plant-pathogenic bacteria, and very low toxicity. It was selected from a library of synthetic peptides, along with other peptides with activities against relevant bacterial and fungal species. Expression of the BP100 series of peptides in plants is of major interest to establish disease-resistant plants and facilitate molecular farming. Specific challenges were the small length, peptide degradation by plant proteases and toxicity to the host plant. Here we approached the expression of the BP100 peptide series in plants using BP100 as a proof-of-concept. Our design considered up to three tandemly arranged BP100 units and peptide accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), analyzing five BP100 derivatives. The ER retention sequence did not reduce the antimicrobial activity of chemically synthesized BP100 derivatives, making this strategy possible. Transformation with sequences encoding BP100 derivatives (bp100der) was over ten-fold less efficient than that of the hygromycin phosphotransferase (hptII) transgene. The BP100 direct tandems did not show higher antimicrobial activity than BP100, and genetically modified (GM) plants constitutively expressing them were not viable. In contrast, inverted repeats of BP100, whether or not elongated with a portion of a natural antimicrobial peptide (AMP), had higher antimicrobial activity, and fertile GM rice lines constitutively expressing bp100der were produced. These GM lines had increased resistance to the pathogens Dickeya chrysanthemi and Fusarium verticillioides, and tolerance to oxidative stress, with agronomic performance comparable to untransformed lines. Constitutive expression of transgenes encoding short cationic α-helical synthetic peptides can have a strong negative impact on rice fitness. However, GM plants expressing, for example, BP100 based on inverted

  20. Mammalian Antimicrobial Peptides: Promising Therapeutic Targets Against Infection and Chronic Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Pujarini; Das, Santasabuj

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are integral components of the host innate immune system and functional throughout the plant and animal kingdoms. AMPs are short cationic molecules and lethal against a wide range of bacteria, viruses, fungi, yeast and protozoa due to their membranolytic effects on the negatively-charged microbial membranes. In addition, they exert multiple immunomodulatory roles like chemotaxis, modulation of cytokine and chemokine expression, leukocyte activation etc. Since AMPs suffer loss of microbicidal properties under serum and tissue environments, their capacity to modulate the immune system may predominates under the physiological conditions. Discovery of new antibiotics is lagging far behind the rapidly spreading drug resistance among the microorganisms. Both natural and synthetic AMPs have shown promise as 'next generation antibiotics' due to their unique mode of action, which minimises the chance of development of microbial resistance. In addition, they have therapeutic potential against non-infectious diseases like chronic inflammation and cancer. Many of the synthetic AMPs are currently undergoing clinical trials for the treatment of debilitating diseases, such as catheter-related infections, diabetic foot ulcers, chemotherapy-associated infections etc. Some of them have already entered the market as topical preparations. In this review, we synopsise the current literature of natural and synthetic AMPs in different infectious and inflammatory diseases of human microfloral habitats, especially the gastrointestinal, respiratory and genitourinary tracts and the skin. We also discuss the classification of AMPs, their mode action and antimicrobial spectrum, including the pathogen evasion mechanisms. In short, we tried to present the locus standi of AMPs in relation to human diseases and highlight the most promising synthetic peptides emerging from the clinical trials. Finally, we focused on the limitations and hurdles in terms of cost of

  1. Local burn injury impairs epithelial permeability and antimicrobial peptide barrier function in distal unburned skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plichta, Jennifer K; Droho, Steve; Curtis, Brenda J; Patel, Parita; Gamelli, Richard L; Radek, Katherine A

    2014-06-01

    Our objective was to characterize the mechanisms by which local burn injury compromises epithelial barrier function in burn margin, containing the elements necessary for healing of the burn site, and in distal unburned skin, which serves as potential donor tissue. Experimental mouse scald burn injury. University Research Laboratory. C57/Bl6 Male mice, 8-12 weeks old. To confirm that dehydration was not contributing to our observed barrier defects, in some experiments mice received 1 mL of saline fluid immediately after burn, while a subgroup received an additional 0.5 mL at 4 hours and 1 mL at 24 hours following burn. We then assessed skin pH and transepidermal water loss every 12 hours on the burn wounds for 72 hours postburn. Burn margin exhibited increased epidermal barrier permeability indicated by higher pH, greater transepidermal water loss, and reduced lipid synthesis enzyme expression and structural protein production up to 96 hours postburn. By contrast, antimicrobial peptide production and protease activity were elevated in burn margin. Skin extracts from burn margin did not exhibit changes in the ability to inhibit bacterial growth. However, distal unburned skin from burned mice also demonstrated an impaired response to barrier disruption, indicated by elevated transepidermal water loss and reduced lipid synthesis enzyme and structural protein expression up to 96 hours postburn. Furthermore, skin extracts from distal unburned skin exhibited greater protease activity and a reduced capacity to inhibit bacterial growth of several skin pathogens. Finally, we established that antimicrobial peptide levels were also altered in the lung and bladder, which are common sites of secondary infection in burn-injured patients. These findings reveal several undefined deficiencies in epithelial barrier function at the burn margin, potential donor skin sites, and organs susceptible to secondary infection. These functional and biochemical data provide novel insights into

  2. Induction of group A Streptococcus virulence by a human antimicrobial peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryllos, Ioannis; Tran-Winkler, Hien J; Cheng, Ming-Fang; Chung, Hachung; Bolcome, Robert; Lu, Wuyuan; Lehrer, Robert I; Wessels, Michael R

    2008-10-28

    Group A streptococci (Streptococcus pyogenes or GAS) freshly isolated from individuals with streptococcal sore throat or invasive ("flesh-eating") infection often grow as mucoid colonies on primary culture but lose this colony appearance after laboratory passage. The mucoid phenotype is due to abundant production of the hyaluronic acid capsular polysaccharide, a key virulence determinant associated with severe GAS infections. These observations suggest that signal(s) from the human host trigger increased production of capsule and perhaps other virulence factors during infection. Here we show that subinhibitory concentrations of the human antimicrobial cathelicidin peptide LL-37 stimulate expression of the GAS capsule synthesis operon (hasABC). Up-regulation is mediated by the CsrRS 2-component regulatory system: it requires a functional CsrS sensor protein and can be antagonized by increased extracellular Mg(2+), the other identified environmental signal for CsrS. Up-regulation was also evident for other CsrRS-regulated virulence genes, including the IL-8 protease PrtS/ScpC and the integrin-like/IgG protease Mac/IdeS, findings that suggest a coordinated GAS virulence response elicited by this antimicrobial immune effector peptide. LL-37 signaling through CsrRS led to a marked increase in GAS resistance to opsonophagocytic killing by human leukocytes, an in vitro measure of enhanced GAS virulence, consistent with increased expression of the antiphagocytic capsular polysaccharide and Mac/IdeS. We propose that the human cathelicidin LL-37 has the paradoxical effect of stimulating CsrRS-regulated virulence gene expression, thereby enhancing GAS pathogenicity during infection. The ability of GAS to sense and respond to LL-37 may explain, at least in part, the unique susceptibility of the human species to streptococcal infection.

  3. A novel immune evasion strategy of candida albicans: proteolytic cleavage of a salivary antimicrobial peptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy F Meiller

    Full Text Available Oropharyngeal candidiasis is an opportunistic infection considered to be a harbinger of AIDS. The etiologic agent Candida albicans is a fungal species commonly colonizing human mucosal surfaces. However, under conditions of immune dysfunction, colonizing C. albicans can become an opportunistic pathogen causing superficial or even life-threatening infections. The reasons behind this transition, however, are not clear. In the oral cavity, salivary antimicrobial peptides are considered to be an important part of the host innate defense system in the prevention of microbial colonization. Histatin-5 specifically has exhibited potent activity against C. albicans. Our previous studies have shown histatin-5 levels to be significantly reduced in the saliva of HIV+ individuals, indicating an important role for histatin-5 in keeping C. albicans in its commensal stage. The versatility in the pathogenic potential of C. albicans is the result of its ability to adapt through the regulation of virulence determinants, most notably of which are proteolytic enzymes (Saps, involved in tissue degradation. In this study, we show that C. albicans cells efficiently and rapidly degrade histatin-5, resulting in loss of its anti-candidal potency. In addition, we demonstrate that this cellular activity is due to proteolysis by a member of the secreted aspartic proteases (Sap family involved in C. albicans pathogenesis. Specifically, the proteolysis was attributed to Sap9, in turn identifying histatin-5 as the first host-specific substrate for that isoenzyme. These findings demonstrate for the first time the ability of a specific C. albicans enzyme to degrade and deactivate a host antimicrobial peptide involved in the protection of the oral mucosa against C. albicans, thereby providing new insights into the factors directing the transition of C. albicans from commensal to pathogen, with important clinical implications for alternative therapy. This report characterizes the

  4. Farrerol regulates antimicrobial peptide expression and reduces Staphylococcus aureus internalization into bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhengtao; Fu, Yunhe; Liu, Bo; Zhou, Ershun; Liu, Zhicheng; Song, Xiaojing; Li, Depeng; Zhang, Naisheng

    2013-12-01

    Mastitis, defined as inflammation of the mammary gland, is an infectious disease with a major economic influence on dairy industry. Staphylococcus aureus is a common gram-positive pathogen that frequently causes subclinical, chronic infection of the mammary gland in dairy cows. Farrerol, a traditional Chinese medicine isolated from rhododendron, has been shown to have anti-bacterial activity. However, the effect of farrerol on S. aureus infection in mammary epithelium has not been studied in detail. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of farrerol on the invasion of bovine mammary epithelial cells (bMEC) by S. aureus. The expression of antimicrobial peptide genes by bMEC were assessed in the presence or absence of S. aureus infection. Our results demonstrated that farrerol (4-16 μg/ml) reduced > 55% the internalization of S. aureus into bMEC. We also found that farrerol was able to down-regulate the mRNA expression of tracheal antimicrobial peptide (TAP) and bovine neutrophil β-defensin 5 (BNBD5) in bMEC infected with S. aureus. The Nitric oxide (NO) production of bMEC after S. aureus stimulation was decreased by farrerol treatment. Furthermore, farrerol treatment suppressed S. aureus-induced NF-κB activation in bMEC. These results demonstrated that farrerol modulated TAP and BNBD5 gene expression in mammary gland, enhances bMEC defense against S. aureus infection and could be useful in protection against bovine mastitis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The use of the antimicrobial peptide piscidin (PCD)-1 as a novel anti-nociceptive agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wu-Fu; Huang, Shi-Ying; Liao, Chang-Yi; Sung, Chun-Sung; Chen, Jyh-Yih; Wen, Zhi-Hong

    2015-06-01

    The antimicrobial peptide piscidin (PCD)-1 has been reported to have antibacterial and immunomodulatory functions. Here, we investigated the anti-neuropathic properties of PCD-1, in order to determine its potential as a compound to alleviate pain. Treatment with PCD-1 suppressed the inflammatory proteins COX-2 and iNOS in murine macrophage (RAW264.7) and microglial (BV2) cell lines stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). For studies of the effect of PCD-1 in vivo, mononeuropathy in rats was induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI), and the resulting anti-nociceptive behaviors were compared between CCI controls and CCI rats given intrathecal injections of PCD-1. Much like gabapentin, PCD-1 exerts anti-nociceptive effects against thermal hyperalgesia, with a median effective dose (ED50) of 9.5 μg in CCI rats. In CCI rats, PCD-1 exerted effects against mechanical and cold allodynia, thermal hyperalgesia, and weight-bearing deficits. Furthermore, CCI-mediated activation of microglia and astrocytes in the dorsal horn of the lumbar spinal cord were decreased by PCD-1. In addition, PCD-1 suppressed up-regulation of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and phosphorylated mammalian target of rapamycin (phospho-mTOR) in CCI rats. Finally, CCI-induced down-regulation of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in rats was attenuated by injection of PCD-1. Taken together, the present findings demonstrate that the marine antimicrobial peptide PCD-1 has anti-nociceptive effects, and thus may have potential for development as an alternative pain-alleviating agent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides Derived from Crocodylus siamensis Leukocyte Extract, Revealing Anticancer Activity and Apoptotic Induction on Human Cervical Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theansungnoen, Tinnakorn; Maijaroen, Surachai; Jangpromma, Nisachon; Yaraksa, Nualyai; Daduang, Sakda; Temsiripong, Theeranan; Daduang, Jureerut; Klaynongsruang, Sompong

    2016-06-01

    Known antimicrobial peptides KT2 and RT2 as well as the novel RP9 derived from the leukocyte extract of the freshwater crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) were used to evaluate the ability in killing human cervical cancer cells. RP9 in the extract was purified by a combination of anion exchange column and reversed-phase HPLC, and its sequence was analyzed by mass spectrometry. The novel peptide could inhibit Gram-negative Vibrio cholerae (clinical isolation) and Gram-positive Bacillus pumilus TISTR 905, and its MIC values were 61.2 µM. From scanning electron microscopy, the peptide was seen to affect bacterial surfaces directly. KT2 and RT2, which are designed antimicrobial peptides using the C. siamensis Leucrocin I template, as well as RP9 were chemically synthesized for investigation of anticancer activity. By Sulforhodamine B colorimetric assay, these antimicrobial peptides could inhibit both HeLa and CaSki cancer cell lines. The IC50 values of KT2 and RT2 for HeLa and CaSki cells showed 28.7-53.4 and 17.3-30.8 µM, while those of RP9 were 126.2 and 168.3 µM, respectively. Additionally, the best candidate peptides KT2 and RT2 were used to determine the apoptotic induction on cancer cells by human apoptosis array assay. As a result, KT2 and RT2 were observed to induce apoptotic cell death in HeLa cells. Therefore, these results indicate that KT2 and RT2 with antimicrobial activity have a highly potent ability to kill human cervical cancer cells.

  7. The antimicrobial peptide aureocin A53 as an alternative agent for biopreservation of dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagundes, P C; Farias, F M; Santos, O C S; de Oliveira, N E M; da Paz, J A S; Ceotto-Vigoder, H; Alviano, D S; Romanos, M T V; Bastos, M C F

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of aureocin A53, a staphylococcal antimicrobial peptide, for improving food safety. The antimicrobial activity of aureocin A53 against strains of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from food was tested and the bacteriocin proved to be bactericidal and bacteriolytic against the listerial strains. Aureocin A53 was neither toxic to eukaryotic cell lines nor haemolytic against sheep erythrocytes. It also exhibited a remarkable stability during storage at different temperatures and sensitivity to both simulated gastric juice and bile salts. When the antibacterial activity of aureocin A53 (256 AU ml(-1) ) was tested in skimmed milk artificially inoculated with a L. monocytogenes strain (1·0 × 10(4)  CFU ml(-1) ) isolated from food, during storage at 4°C, the bacteriocin reduced the viable counts by 7·7-log10 units up to 7 days of incubation, when compared with the controls not treated with the bacteriocin. Aureocin A53 exhibited several features considered important for biopreservation and remained fully active in a food matrix. Taken together, the results confirmed that aureocin A53 has potential to be used as a food preservative, representing an alternative to the use of nisin in biopreservation of dairy products. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Expression of antimicrobial peptides and interleukin-8 during early stages of inflammation: An experimental gingivitis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommisch, H; Staufenbiel, I; Schulze, K; Stiesch, M; Winkel, A; Fimmers, R; Dommisch, J; Jepsen, S; Miosge, N; Adam, K; Eberhard, J

    2015-12-01

    In the oral cavity, the epithelial surface is constantly exposed to a number of different microorganisms that are organized in a well-structured biofilm. The aim of this study was to monitor gingival expression of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) in an early gingivitis model. Experimental gingivitis was allowed to develop in healthy volunteers (n = 17). Bleeding on probing (BOP%) and gingival crevicular fluid volume (GCF) were assessed at baseline and day 1, 3, 5, 7 and 14. Expression of AMPs (human beta-defensin-2, hBD-2; CC-chemokine ligand 20, CCL20; psoriasin, pso/S100A7) and IL-8 was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in gingival biopsies. In addition, hBD-2 and IL-8 protein expression was monitored in GCF using the ELISA technology. Experimental gingivitis gradually developed with an increase in BOP scores and GCF volume over time. In GCF, elevated concentrations of hBD-2 and IL-8 were monitored at day 1, 5 and 7 (p ≤ 0.0002). Immunohistochemical analysis of gingival sections demonstrated increased staining for hBD-2 at day 3, whereas the CCL20, pso/S100A7, and IL-8 expression was increased at later time points (p gingival inflammation. Differential temporal expression for AMPs may ensure a constant antimicrobial activity against changes in the bacterial composition of the growing dental biofilm. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The influence of selected antimicrobial peptides on the physiology of the immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golab, Karolina; Mittag, Anja; Pierzchalski, Arkadiusz; Bocsi, Jozsef; Kamysz, Wojciech; Tarnok, Attila

    2011-02-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an essential part of the innate immune system that serves as a first line of defense against invading pathogens. Recently, immunomodulatory activities of AMPs have begun to be appreciated, implying the usefulness of AMPs in the treatment of infectious disease. The aim of this strategy is the modulation of host immune responses to enhance clearance of infectious agents and reduce tissue damage due to inflammation. Although AMPs could be used as therapeutic agents, a more detailed understanding of how they affect host cells is needed. Hence, several AMPs have been investigated for their potential as a new class of antimicrobial drugs in this study. Synthetic AMPs and AMPs of natural origin were tested on human leukocytes by flow cytometry. Dose- and time-dependent cytotoxic effects could be observed by propidium iodide staining. Different leukocyte subtypes seem to be susceptible to AMP treatment while others were not affected, even in high concentrations. In conclusion, AMPs have an impact on host immune cells. However, their role in stimulation of chemokine production and enhanced leukocyte recruitment remains a crucial aspect and further studies are needed.

  10. Expression profiles of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and their regulation by Relish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongdong; Li, Fuhua; Li, Shihao; Wen, Rong; Xiang, Jianhai

    2012-07-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), as key immune effectors, play important roles in the innate immune system of invertebrates. Different types of AMPs, including Penaeidin, Crustin, ALF (antilipopolysaccharide factor) have been identified in different penaeid shrimp; however, systematic analyses on the function of different AMPs in shrimp responsive to different types of bacteria are very limited. In this study, we analyzed the expression profiles of AMPs in the Chinese shrimps, Fenneropenaeus chinensis, simultaneously by real-time RT-PCR (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction) when shrimp were challenged with Micrococcus lysodeikticus (Gram-positive, G+) or Vibrio anguillarium (Gram-negative, G-). Different AMPs showed different expression profiles when shrimp were injected with one type of bacterium, and one AMP also showed different expression profiles when shrimp were challenged with different bacteria. Furthermore, the expression of these AMPs showed temporal expression profiles, suggesting that different AMPs function coordinately in bacteria-infected shrimp. An RNA interference approach was used to study the function of the Relish transcription factor in regulating the transcription of different AMPs. The current study showed that Relish could regulate the transcription of different AMPs in shrimp. Differential expression profiles of AMPs in shrimp injected with different types of bacteria indicated that a complicated antimicrobial response network existed in shrimp. These data contribute to our understanding of immunity in shrimp and may provide a strategy for the control of disease in shrimp.

  11. Use of Natural Antimicrobial Peptides and Bacterial Biopolymers for Cultured Pearl Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Simon-Colin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cultured pearls are the product of grafting and rearing of Pinctada margaritifera pearl oysters in their natural environment. Nucleus rejections and oyster mortality appear to result from bacterial infections or from an inappropriate grafting practice. To reduce the impact of bacterial infections, synthetic antibiotics have been applied during the grafting practice. However, the use of such antibiotics presents a number of problems associated with their incomplete biodegradability, limited efficacy in some cases, and an increased risk of selecting for antimicrobial resistant bacteria. We investigated the application of a marine antimicrobial peptide, tachyplesin, which is present in the Japanese horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus, in combination with two marine bacterial exopolymers as alternative treatment agents. In field studies, the combination treatment resulted in a significant reduction in graft failures vs. untreated controls. The combination of tachyplesin (73 mg/L with two bacterial exopolysaccharides (0.5% w/w acting as filming agents, reduces graft-associated bacterial contamination. The survival data were similar to that reported for antibiotic treatments. These data suggest that non-antibiotic treatments of pearl oysters may provide an effective means of improving oyster survival following grafting procedures.

  12. Expression of Caenorhabditis elegans antimicrobial peptide NLP-31 in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Mei-Perng; Nathan, Sheila

    2014-09-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a fulminant disease endemic in Southeast Asia and Northern Australia. The standardized form of therapy is antibiotics treatment; however, the bacterium has become increasingly resistant to these antibiotics. This has spurred the need to search for alternative therapeutic agents. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small proteins that possess broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. In a previous study, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was infected by B. pseudomallei and a whole animal transcriptome analysis identified a number of AMP-encoded genes which were induced significantly in the infected worms. One of the AMPs identified is NLP-31 and to date, there are no reports of anti-B. pseudomallei activity demonstrated by NLP-31. To produce NLP-31 protein for future studies, the gene encoding for NLP-31 was cloned into the pET32b expression vector and transformed into Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). Protein expression was induced with 1 mM IPTG for 20 hours at 20°C and recombinant NLP-31 was detected in the soluble fraction. Taken together, a simple optimized heterologous production of AMPs in an E. coli expression system has been successfully developed.

  13. Effect of a novel antimicrobial peptide chrysophsin-1 on oral pathogens and Streptococcus mutans biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Tao, Rui; Tong, Zhongchun; Ding, Yonglin; Kuang, Rong; Zhai, Shafei; Liu, Jun; Ni, Longxing

    2012-02-01

    Dental caries and pulpal diseases are common oral bacterial infectious diseases. Controlling and reducing the causative pathogens, such as Streptococcus mutans and Enterococcus faecalis, is a key step toward prevention and treatment of the two diseases. Chrysophsin-1 is a cationic antimicrobial peptide having broad-spectrum bactericidal activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, we investigated the antibacterial activity of chrysophsin-1 against several oral pathogens and S. mutans biofilms and performed a preliminary study of the antimicrobial mechanism. Cytotoxic activity of chrysophsin-1 against human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) was investigated. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) and time-kill assay were used to evaluate the killing effect of chrysophsin-1. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to analyze morphological and membrane change in oral pathogens. Live/Dead staining, in conjunction with confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM), was used to observe and analyze S. mutans biofilms. MIC and MBC results demonstrated that chrysophsin-1 had different antimicrobial activities against the tested oral microbes. Lysis and pore formation of the cytomembrane were observed following treatment of the bacteria with chrysophsin-1 for 4h or 24h by SEM. Furthermore, CLSM images showed that chrysophsin-1 remarkably reduced the viability of cells within biofilms and had a significantly lethal effect against S. mutans biofilms. Toxicity studies showed that chrysophsin-1 at concentration between 8 μg/ml and 32 μg/ml had little effect on viability of HGFs in 5 min. Our findings suggest that chrysophsin-1 may have potential clinical applications in the prevention and treatment of dental caries and pulpal diseases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Design of novel antimicrobial peptide dimer analogues with enhanced antimicrobial activity in vitro and in vivo by intermolecular triazole bridge strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Beijun; Huang, Haifeng; Yang, Zhibin; Liu, Beiyin; Gou, Sanhu; Zhong, Chao; Han, Xiufeng; Zhang, Yun; Ni, Jingman; Wang, Rui

    2017-02-01

    Currently, antimicrobial peptides have attracted considerable attention because of their broad-sprectum activity and low prognostic to induce antibiotic resistance. In our study, for the first time, a series of side-chain hybrid dimer peptides J-AA (Anoplin-Anoplin), J-RR (RW-RW), and J-AR (Anoplin-RW) based on the wasp peptide Anoplin and the arginine- and tryptophan-rich hexapeptide RW were designed and synthesized by click chemistry, with the intent to improve the antimicrobial efficacy of peptides against bacterial pathogens. The results showed that all dimer analogues exhibited up to a 4-16 fold increase in antimicrobial activity compared to the parental peptides against bacterial strains. Furthermore, the antimicrobial activity was confirmed by time-killing kinetics assay with two strains which showed that these dimer analogues at 1, 2×MIC were rapidly bactericidal and reduced the initial inoculum significantly during the first 2-6h. Notably, dimer peptides showed synergy and additivity effects when used in combination with conventional antibiotics rifampin or penicillin respectively against the multidrug-resistant strains. In the Escherichia coli-infected mouse model, all of hybrid dimer analogues had significantly lower degree of bacterial load than the untreated control group when injected once i.p. at 5mg/kg. In addition, the infected mice by methicillin-resistant (MRSA) strain could be effectively treated with J-RR. All of dimer analogues had membrane-active action mode. And the membrane-dependent mode of action signifies that peptides functions freely and without regard to conventional resistant mechanisms. Circular dichroism analyses of all dimer analogues showed a general predominance of α-helix conformation in 50% trifluoroethanol (TFE). Additionally, the acute toxicities study indicated that J-RR or J-AR did not show the signs of toxicity when adult mice exposed to concentration up to 120mg/kg. The 50% lethal dose (LD50) of J-AA was 53.6mg/kg. In

  15. Two Novel Dermaseptin-Like Antimicrobial Peptides with Anticancer Activities from the Skin Secretion of Pachymedusa dacnicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Daning; Hou, Xiaojuan; Wang, Lei; Gao, Yitian; Wu, Di; Xi, Xinping; Zhou, Mei; Kwok, Hang Fai; Duan, Jinao; Chen, Tianbao; Shaw, Chris

    2016-05-12

    The dermaseptin antimicrobial peptide family contains members of 27-34 amino acids in length that have been predominantly isolated from the skins/skin secretions of phyllomedusine leaf frogs. By use of a degenerate primer in Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) PCR designed to a common conserved domain within the 5'-untranslated regions of previously-characterized dermaseptin encoding cDNAs, two novel members of this peptide family, named dermaseptin-PD-1 and dermaseptin-PD-2, were identified in the skin secretion of the phyllomedusine frog, Pachymedusa dacnicolor. The primary structures of both peptides were predicted from cloned cDNAs, as well as being confirmed by mass spectral analysis of crude skin secretion fractions resulted from reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Chemically-synthesized replicates of dermaseptin-PD-1 and dermaseptin-PD-2 were investigated for antimicrobial activity using standard model microorganisms (Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria and a yeast) and for cytotoxicity using mammalian red blood cells. The possibility of synergistic effects between the two peptides and their anti-cancer cell proliferation activities were assessed. The peptides exhibited moderate to high inhibition against the growth of the tested microorganisms and cancer cell lines with low haemolytic activity. Synergistic interaction between the two peptides in inhibiting the proliferation of Escherichia coli and human neuronal glioblastoma cell line, U251MG was also manifested.

  16. Two Novel Dermaseptin-Like Antimicrobial Peptides with Anticancer Activities from the Skin Secretion of Pachymedusa dacnicolor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daning Shi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The dermaseptin antimicrobial peptide family contains members of 27–34 amino acids in length that have been predominantly isolated from the skins/skin secretions of phyllomedusine leaf frogs. By use of a degenerate primer in Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE PCR designed to a common conserved domain within the 5′-untranslated regions of previously-characterized dermaseptin encoding cDNAs, two novel members of this peptide family, named dermaseptin-PD-1 and dermaseptin-PD-2, were identified in the skin secretion of the phyllomedusine frog, Pachymedusa dacnicolor. The primary structures of both peptides were predicted from cloned cDNAs, as well as being confirmed by mass spectral analysis of crude skin secretion fractions resulted from reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Chemically-synthesized replicates of dermaseptin-PD-1 and dermaseptin-PD-2 were investigated for antimicrobial activity using standard model microorganisms (Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria and a yeast and for cytotoxicity using mammalian red blood cells. The possibility of synergistic effects between the two peptides and their anti-cancer cell proliferation activities were assessed. The peptides exhibited moderate to high inhibition against the growth of the tested microorganisms and cancer cell lines with low haemolytic activity. Synergistic interaction between the two peptides in inhibiting the proliferation of Escherichia coli and human neuronal glioblastoma cell line, U251MG was also manifested.

  17. Orally Delivered Scorpion Antimicrobial Peptides Exhibit Activity against Pea Aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum and Its Bacterial Symbionts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Luna-Ramirez

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aphids are severe agricultural pests that damage crops by feeding on phloem sap and vectoring plant pathogens. Chemical insecticides provide an important aphid control strategy, but alternative and sustainable control measures are required to avoid rapidly emerging resistance, environmental contamination, and the risk to humans and beneficial organisms. Aphids are dependent on bacterial symbionts, which enable them to survive on phloem sap lacking essential nutrients, as well as conferring environmental stress tolerance and resistance to parasites. The evolution of aphids has been accompanied by the loss of many immunity-related genes, such as those encoding antibacterial peptides, which are prevalent in other insects, probably because any harm to the bacterial symbionts would inevitably affect the aphids themselves. This suggests that antimicrobial peptides (AMPs could replace or at least complement conventional insecticides for aphid control. We fed the pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum with AMPs from the venom glands of scorpions. The AMPs reduced aphid survival, delayed their reproduction, displayed in vitro activity against aphid bacterial symbionts, and reduced the number of symbionts in vivo. Remarkably, we found that some of the scorpion AMPs compromised the aphid bacteriome, a specialized organ that harbours bacterial symbionts. Our data suggest that scorpion AMPs holds the potential to be developed as bio-insecticides, and are promising candidates for the engineering of aphid-resistant crops.

  18. Safety Study of an Antimicrobial Peptide Lactocin 160, Produced by the Vaginal Lactobacillus rhamnosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara E. Dover

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the safety of the antimicrobial peptide, lactocin 160. Methods. Lactocin 160, a product of vaginal probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus 160 was evaluated for toxicity and irritation. An in vitro human organotypic vaginal-ectocervical tissue model (EpiVaginal was employed for the safety testing by determining the exposure time to reduce tissue viability to 50% (ET-50. Hemolytic activity of lactocin160 was tested using 8% of human erythrocyte suspension. Susceptibility of lactobacilli to lactocin160 was also studied. Rabbit vaginal irritation (RVI model was used for an in vivo safety evaluation. Results. The ET-50 value was 17.5 hours for lactocin 160 (4.9 hours for nonoxynol 9, N9. Hemolytic activity of lactocin 160 was 8.2% (N9 caused total hemolysis. Lactobacilli resisted to high concentrations of peptide preparation. The RVI model revealed slight vaginal irritation. An average irritation index grade was evaluated as “none.” Conclusions. Lactocin 160 showed minimal irritation and has a good potential for intravaginal application.

  19. Surveying the potential of secreted antimicrobial peptides to enhance plant disease resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Susan; Solomon, Peter S; Bedon, Frank; Vincent, Delphine

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are natural products found across diverse taxa as part of the innate immune system against pathogen attacks. Some AMPs are synthesized through the canonical gene expression machinery and are called ribosomal AMPs. Other AMPs are assembled by modular enzymes generating nonribosomal AMPs and harbor unusual structural diversity. Plants synthesize an array of AMPs, yet are still subject to many pathogen invasions. Crop breeding programs struggle to release new cultivars in which complete disease resistance is achieved, and usually such resistance becomes quickly overcome by the targeted pathogens which have a shorter generation time. AMPs could offer a solution by exploring not only plant-derived AMPs, related or unrelated to the crop of interest, but also non-plant AMPs produced by bacteria, fungi, oomycetes or animals. This review highlights some promising candidates within the plant kingdom and elsewhere, and offers some perspectives on how to identify and validate their bioactivities. Technological advances, particularly in mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), have been instrumental in identifying and elucidating the structure of novel AMPs, especially nonribosomal peptides which cannot be identified through genomics approaches. The majority of non-plant AMPs showing potential for plant disease immunity are often tested using in vitro assays. The greatest challenge remains the functional validation of candidate AMPs in plants through transgenic experiments, particularly introducing nonribosomal AMPs into crops.

  20. Orally Delivered Scorpion Antimicrobial Peptides Exhibit Activity against Pea Aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) and Its Bacterial Symbionts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Ramirez, Karen; Skaljac, Marisa; Grotmann, Jens; Kirfel, Phillipp; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Aphids are severe agricultural pests that damage crops by feeding on phloem sap and vectoring plant pathogens. Chemical insecticides provide an important aphid control strategy, but alternative and sustainable control measures are required to avoid rapidly emerging resistance, environmental contamination, and the risk to humans and beneficial organisms. Aphids are dependent on bacterial symbionts, which enable them to survive on phloem sap lacking essential nutrients, as well as conferring environmental stress tolerance and resistance to parasites. The evolution of aphids has been accompanied by the loss of many immunity-related genes, such as those encoding antibacterial peptides, which are prevalent in other insects, probably because any harm to the bacterial symbionts would inevitably affect the aphids themselves. This suggests that antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) could replace or at least complement conventional insecticides for aphid control. We fed the pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum) with AMPs from the venom glands of scorpions. The AMPs reduced aphid survival, delayed their reproduction, displayed in vitro activity against aphid bacterial symbionts, and reduced the number of symbionts in vivo. Remarkably, we found that some of the scorpion AMPs compromised the aphid bacteriome, a specialized organ that harbours bacterial symbionts. Our data suggest that scorpion AMPs holds the potential to be developed as bio-insecticides, and are promising candidates for the engineering of aphid-resistant crops. PMID:28837113

  1. Development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) for use in self-decontaminating coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulmer, Preston A; Lundin, Jeffrey G; Wynne, James H

    2010-04-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a class of short polypeptides usually associated with the host organism's innate immune system. AMPs have been identified in a wide range of host organisms, including plants, amphibians, fish, and humans. These peptides usually consist of 30-100 amino acids and are most often cationic. In addition to a net positive charge, AMPs often are amphipathic, containing both hydrophobic and hydrophilic domains. This property allows for increased interaction with and insertion into negatively charged cell walls and membranes of microbes. Because of the prevalence of antibiotic resistance among common human pathogens, recent research into AMPs has revolved around the attempt to increase the availability of drugs to which microbes are susceptible. Because the mechanism of kill for AMPs is different from that of most conventional antibiotics, which tend to be very specific in their targets, AMPs are thought to be a very attractive future substitute for traditional antibiotics. The development of novel self-decontaminating surfaces containing two AMPs previously isolated from Chrysophrys major is reported. These AMPs, Chrysophsin-1 and -3, demonstrated 1-4 logs kill of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria when incorporated into control acrylic coating systems.

  2. Friends or Foes? Host defense (antimicrobial) peptides and proteins in human skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niyonsaba, François; Kiatsurayanon, Chanisa; Chieosilapatham, Panjit; Ogawa, Hideoki

    2017-02-13

    Host defense peptides/proteins (HDPs), also known as antimicrobial peptides/proteins (AMPs), are key molecules in the cutaneous innate immune system. AMPs/HDPs historically exhibit broad-spectrum killing activity against bacteria, enveloped viruses, fungi and several parasites. Recently, AMPs/HDPs were shown to have important biological functions, including inducing cell proliferation, migration and differentiation; regulating inflammatory responses; controlling the production of various cytokines/chemokines; promoting wound healing; and improving skin barrier function. Despite the fact that AMPs/HDPs protect our body, several studies have hypothesized that these molecules actively contribute to the pathogenesis of various skin diseases. For example, AMPs/HDPs play crucial roles in the pathological processes of psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, rosacea, acne vulgaris, systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic sclerosis. Thus, AMPs/HDPs may be a double-edged sword, promoting cutaneous immunity while simultaneously initiating the pathogenesis of some skin disorders. This review will describe the most common skin-derived AMPs/HDPs (defensins, cathelicidins, S100 proteins, ribonucleases and dermcidin) and discuss the biology and both the positive and negative aspects of these AMPs/HDPs in skin inflammatory/infectious diseases. Understanding the regulation, functions and mechanisms of AMPs/HDPs may offer new therapeutic opportunities in the treatment of various skin disorders. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Comparison of Cytotoxic Activity in Leukemic Lineages Reveals Important Features of β-Hairpin Antimicrobial Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buri, Marcus V; Torquato, Heron F Vieira; Barros, Carlos Castilho; Ide, Jaime S; Miranda, Antonio; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J

    2017-07-01

    Several reports described different modes of cell death triggered by antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) due to direct effects on membrane disruption, and more recently by apoptosis and necrosis-like patterns. Cytotoxic curves of four β-hairpin AMPs (gomesin, protegrin, tachyplesin, and polyphemusin) were obtained from several human leukemic lineages and normal monocytes and Two cell lines were then selected based on their cytotoxic sensitivity. One was sensitive to AMPs (K562) and the other resistant (KG-1) and their effect compared between these lineages. Thus, these lineages were chosen to further investigate biological features related with their cytotoxicities to AMPs. Stimulation with AMPs produced cell death, with activation of caspase-3, in K562 lineage. Increase on the fluidity of plasmatic membrane by reducing cholesterol potentiated cytotoxicity of AMPs in both lineages. Quantification of internal and external gomesin binding to the cellular membrane of both K562 and KG-1 cells showed that more peptide is accumulated inside of K562 cells. Additionally, evaluation of multi-drug resistant pumps activity showed that KG-1 has more activity than K562 lineage. A comparison of intrinsic gene patterns showed great differences between K562 and KG-1, but stimulation with gomesin promoted few changes in gene expression patterns. Differences in internalization process through the plasma membrane, multidrug resistance pumps activity, and gene expression pattern are important features to AMPs regulated cell death. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1764-1773, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The Human Antimicrobial Peptides Dermcidin and LL-37 Show Novel Distinct Pathways in Membrane Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornelius Zeth

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mammals protect themselves from inflammation triggered by microorganisms through secretion of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs. One mechanism by which AMPs kill bacterial cells is perforating their membranes. Membrane interactions and pore formation were investigated for α-helical AMPs leading to the formulation of three basic mechanistic models: the barrel stave, toroidal, and carpet model. One major drawback of these models is their simplicity. They do not reflect the real in vitro and in vivo conditions. To challenge and refine these models using a structure-based approach we set out to investigate how human cathelicidin (LL-37 and dermcidin (DCD interact with membranes. Both peptides are α-helical and their structures have been solved at atomic resolution. DCD assembles in solution into a hexameric pre-channel complex before the actual membrane targeting and integration step can occur, and the complex follows a deviation of the barrel stave model. LL-37 interacts with lipids and shows the formation of oligomers generating fibril-like supramolecular structures on membranes. LL-37 further assembles into transmembrane pores with yet unknown structure expressing a deviation of the toroidal pore model. Both of their specific targeting mechanisms will be discussed in the context of the “old” models propagated in the literature.

  5. Pardaxin, a Fish Antimicrobial Peptide, Exhibits Antitumor Activity toward Murine Fibrosarcoma in Vitro and in Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shu-Ping; Huang, Tsui-Chin; Lin, Ching-Chun; Hui, Cho-Fat; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Chen, Jyh-Yih

    2012-01-01

    The antitumor activity of pardaxin, a fish antimicrobial peptide, has not been previously examined in in vitro and in vivo systems for treating murine fibrosarcoma. In this study, the antitumor activity of synthetic pardaxin was tested using murine MN-11 tumor cells as the study model. We show that pardaxin inhibits the proliferation of MN-11 cells and reduces colony formation in a soft agar assay. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that pardaxin altered the membrane structure similar to what a lytic peptide does, and also produced apoptotic features, such as hollow mitochondria, nuclear condensation, and disrupted cell membranes. A qRT-PCR and ELISA showed that pardaxin induced apoptosis, activated caspase-7 and interleukin (IL)-7r, and downregulated caspase-9, ATF 3, SOCS3, STAT3, cathelicidin, p65, and interferon (IFN)-γ suggesting that pardaxin induces apoptosis through the death receptor/nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathway after 14 days of treatment in tumor-bearing mice. An antitumor effect was observed when pardaxin (25 mg/kg; 0.5 mg/day) was used to treat mice for 14 days, which caused significant inhibition of MN-11 cell growth in mice. Overall, these results indicate that pardaxin has the potential to be a novel therapeutic agent to treat fibrosarcomas. PMID:23015777

  6. Surveying the potential of secreted antimicrobial peptides to enhance plant disease resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan eBreen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are natural products found across diverse taxa as part of the innate immune system against pathogen attacks. Some AMPs are synthesised through the canonical gene expression machinery and are called ribosomal AMPs. Other AMPs are assembled by modular enzymes generating nonribosomal AMPs and harbour unusual structural diversity. Plants synthesise an array of AMPs, yet are still subject to many pathogen invasions. Crop breeding programs struggle to release new cultivars in which complete disease resistance is achieved, and usually such resistance becomes quickly overcome by the targeted pathogens which have a shorter generation time. AMPs could offer a solution by exploring not only plant-derived AMPs, related or unrelated to the crop of interest, but also non-plant AMPs produced by bacteria, fungi, oomycetes or animals. This review highlights some promising candidates within the plant kingdom and elsewhere, and offers some perspectives on how to identify and validate their bioactivities. Technological advances, particularly in mass spectrometry (MS and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, have been instrumental in identifying and elucidating the structure of novel AMPs, especially nonribosomal peptides which cannot be identified through genomics approaches. The majority of non-plant AMPs showing potential for plant disease immunity are often tested using in vitro assays. The greatest challenge remains the functional validation of candidate AMPs in plants through transgenic experiments, particularly introducing nonribosomal AMPs into crops.

  7. Covalent modification of a ten-residue cationic antimicrobial peptide with levofloxacin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Carlos; Papanastasiou, Emilios; Juba, Melanie; Bishop, Barney

    2014-09-01

    The rampant spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria has spurred interest in alternative strategies for developing next-generation antibacterial therapies. As such, there has been growing interest in cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) and their therapeutic applications. Modification of CAMPs via conjugation to auxiliary compounds, including small molecule drugs, is a new approach to developing effective, broad-spectrum antibacterial agents with novel physicochemical properties and versatile antibacterial mechanisms. Here, we’ve explored design parameters for engineering CAMPs conjugated to small molecules with favorable physicochemical and antibacterial properties by covalently affixing a fluoroquinolone antibiotic, levofloxacin, to the ten-residue CAMP Pep-4. Relative to the unmodified Pep-4, the conjugate was found to demonstrate substantially increased antibacterial potency under high salt concentrations. Historically, it has been observed that most CAMPs lose antibacterial effectiveness in such high ionic strength environments, a fact that has presented a challenge to their development as therapeutics. Physicochemical studies revealed that P4LC was more hydrophobic than Pep-4, while mechanistic findings indicated that the conjugate was more effective at disrupting bacterial membrane integrity. Although the inherent antibacterial effect of the incorporated levofloxacin molecules did not appear to be substantially realized in this conjugate, these findings nevertheless suggest that covalent attachment of small molecule antibiotics with favorable physicochemical properties to CAMPs could be a promising strategy for enhancing peptide performance and overall therapeutic potential. These results have broader applicability to the development of future CAMP-antibiotic conjugates for potential therapeutic applications.

  8. The influence of the N-terminal region of antimicrobial peptide pleurocidin on fungal apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyemin; Lee, Dong Gun

    2013-10-28

    In our previous study, the 25-mer antimicrobial peptide pleurocidin (Ple) had been thought to induce apoptosis in Candida albicans. This study demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was a major cause of Ple-induced apoptosis. Four truncated analogs were synthesized to understand the functional roles in the N- and C-terminal regions of Ple on the apoptosis. Ple, Ple (4-25), Ple (1-22), and Ple (1-19) produced ROS, including hydroxyl radicals, on the order of [Ple > Ple (1-22) > Ple (4-25) > Ple (1-19)], whereas Ple (7-25) did not induce any ROS production. The results suggested that the N-terminal deletion affected the ROS-inducing activities much more than that of the C-terminal deletion, and net hydrophobicity [Ple > Ple (1-22) > Ple (4-25) > Ple (1-19) > Ple (7-25)] was related to ROS generation rather than other primary factors like net charge. Hence, we focused on the N-terminal-truncated peptides, Ple (4-25) and Ple (7-25), and examined other apoptotic features, including mitochondrial membrane depolarization, caspase activation, phosphatidylserine externalization, and DNA and nuclear fragmentation. The results also confirmed the disappearance of apoptotic activity of Ple (7-25) by the truncation of the N-terminal region (1-6) and the specific activity patterns between Ple and analogs. In conclusion, the N-terminal region of Ple played an important role in apoptosis.

  9. Multitasking antimicrobial peptides in plant development and host defense against biotic/abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Ravinder K; Mattoo, Autar K

    2014-11-01

    Crop losses due to pathogens are a major threat to global food security. Plants employ a multilayer defense against a pathogen including the use of physical barriers (cell wall), induction of hypersensitive defense response (HR), resistance (R) proteins, and synthesis of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Unlike a complex R gene-mediated immunity, AMPs directly target diverse microbial pathogens. Many a times, R-mediated immunity breaks down and plant defense is compromised. Although R-gene dependent pathogen resistance has been well studied, comparatively little is known about the interactions of AMPs with host defense and physiology. AMPs are ubiquitous, low molecular weight peptides that display broad spectrum resistance against bacteria, fungi and viruses. In plants, AMPs are mainly classified into cyclotides, defensins, thionins, lipid transfer proteins, snakins, and hevein-like vicilin-like and knottins. Genetic distance lineages suggest their conservation with minimal effect of speciation events during evolution. AMPs provide durable resistance in plants through a combination of membrane lysis and cellular toxicity of the pathogen. Plant hormones - gibberellins, ethylene, jasmonates, and salicylic acid, are among the physiological regulators that regulate the expression of AMPs. Transgenically produced AMP-plants have become a means showing that AMPs are able to mitigate host defense responses while providing durable resistance against pathogens. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  10. Effects of the substitution of amino acid residues, through chemical synthesis, on the conformation and activity of antimicrobial peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina C. Adão

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides make up an assorted group of molecules which contain from 12 to 50 amino acid residues and which may be produced by microorganisms, plants and animals. From the discovery that these biomolecules are lethal to bacteria, inhibiting the pathogenic organism’s growth, and are also related to innate and adapted defense mechanisms, the investigation of such molecules came to be an emergent research field, in which more than 1800 antimicrobial peptides have so far been discovered throughout the last three decades. These molecules are potential representatives of a new generation of antibiotic agents and the main motivation for such use is their activity against a wide variety of pathogens, including Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as fungi and viruses. An important class of comprising some of these peptides may be found in anurans, from which it has been isolated, a considerable number of antimicrobial peptides with diverse sequences and structures, including linear and dimeric ones. In this work monomeric chains (CH1 e CH2 of the heterodimeric antimicrobial peptide distinctin (isolated in 1999 from Phyllomedusa distincta anurans, as well as its mutated monomers (CH1-S and CH2-S and the heterodimer itself were synthesized. The distinctin is the peptide with two chains of different sequences (Table 1 bound each other by disulfide bond from the cystein residues constituting the heterodimer. To investigate the effects on the biological activity by amino acids substitution at normal distinctin CH1 and CH2 chains, both were synthesized as well as their similar chains (CH1-S and CH2-S in which the cystein (Fig.1 a residues of each chain were changed by serin residues (Fig. 1 b. The new chains were named mutants. The synthesis was carried out in solid phase, using Fmoc strategy. The heterodimer distinctin was obtained from CH1 and CH2 chains coupling through cystein residues air oxidation. The results from HPLC

  11. Two interdependent mechanisms of antimicrobial activity allow for efficient killing in nylon-3-based polymeric mimics of innate immunity peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michelle W; Chakraborty, Saswata; Schmidt, Nathan W; Murgai, Rajan; Gellman, Samuel H; Wong, Gerard C L

    2014-09-01

    Novel synthetic mimics of antimicrobial peptides have been developed to exhibit structural properties and antimicrobial activity similar to those of natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) of the innate immune system. These molecules have a number of potential advantages over conventional antibiotics, including reduced bacterial resistance, cost-effective preparation, and customizable designs. In this study, we investigate a family of nylon-3 polymer-based antimicrobials. By combining vesicle dye leakage, bacterial permeation, and bactericidal assays with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we find that these polymers are capable of two interdependent mechanisms of action: permeation of bacterial membranes and binding to intracellular targets such as DNA, with the latter necessarily dependent on the former. We systemically examine polymer-induced membrane deformation modes across a range of lipid compositions that mimic both bacteria and mammalian cell membranes. The results show that the polymers' ability to generate negative Gaussian curvature (NGC), a topological requirement for membrane permeation and cellular entry, in model Escherichia coli membranes correlates with their ability to permeate membranes without complete membrane disruption and kill E. coli cells. Our findings suggest that these polymers operate with a concentration-dependent mechanism of action: at low concentrations permeation and DNA binding occur without membrane disruption, while at high concentrations complete disruption of the membrane occurs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Interfacially Active Peptides and Proteins. Guest Editors: William C. Wimley and Kalina Hristova. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Antimicrobial peptide production and plant-based expression systems for medical and agricultural biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holaskova, Edita; Galuszka, Petr; Frebort, Ivo; Oz, M Tufan

    2015-11-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are vital components of the innate immune system of nearly all living organisms. They generally act in the first line of defense against various pathogenic bacteria, parasites, enveloped viruses and fungi. These low molecular mass peptides are considered prospective therapeutic agents due to their broad-spectrum rapid activity, low cytotoxicity to mammalian cells and unique mode of action which hinders emergence of pathogen resistance. In addition to medical use, AMPs can also be employed for development of innovative approaches for plant protection in agriculture. Conferred disease resistance by AMPs might help us surmount losses in yield, quality and safety of agricultural products due to plant pathogens. Heterologous expression in plant-based systems, also called plant molecular farming, offers cost-effective large-scale production which is regarded as one of the most important factors for clinical or agricultural use of AMPs. This review presents various types of AMPs as well as plant-based platforms ranging from cell suspensions to whole plants employed for peptide production. Although AMP production in plants holds great promises for medicine and agriculture, specific technical limitations regarding product yield, function and stability still remain. Additionally, establishment of particular stable expression systems employing plants or plant tissues generally requires extended time scale for platform development compared to certain other heterologous systems. Therefore, fast and promising tools for evaluation of plant-based expression strategies and assessment of function and stability of the heterologously produced AMPs are critical for molecular farming and plant protection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Production of an antimicrobial peptide derived from slaughterhouse by-product and its potential application on meat as preservative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybylski, Rémi; Firdaous, Loubna; Châtaigné, Gabrielle; Dhulster, Pascal; Nedjar, Naïma

    2016-11-15

    Bovine cruor, a slaughterhouse by-product, contains mainly hemoglobin, broadly described as a rich source of antimicrobial peptides. In the current context of food safety, bioactive peptides could be of interest as preservatives in the distribution of food products. The aim of this work was to study the α137-141 fragment of hemoglobin (Thr-Ser-Lys-Tyr-Arg), a small (653Da) and hydrophilic antimicrobial peptide. Its production was fast, with more 65% finally produced at 24h already produced after 30min of hydrolysis with pepsin. Moreover, increasing substrate concentration (from 1 to 8% (w/v)) resulted in a proportional augmentation of α137-141 production (to 807.95±41.03mgL(-1)). The α137-141 application on meat as preservative (0.5%, w/w) reduced the lipid oxidation about 60% to delay meat rancidity. The α137-141 peptide also inhibited the microbial growths under refrigeration during 14days. These antimicrobial effects were close to those of the butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Selective phenylalanine to proline substitution for improved antimicrobial and anticancer activities of peptides designed on phenylalanine heptad repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Amit Kumar; Kumari, Tripti; Tandon, Anshika; Sayeed, Mohd; Afshan, Tayyaba; Kathuria, Manoj; Shukla, P K; Mitra, Kalyan; Ghosh, Jimut Kanti

    2017-07-15

    Introducing cell-selectivity in antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) without compromising the antimicrobial and anti-endotoxin properties is a crucial step towards the development of new antimicrobial agents. A peptide designed on phenylalanine heptad repeat possesses significant cytotoxicity along with desired antimicrobial and anti-endotoxin properties. Amino acid substitutions at 'a' and/or 'd' positions of heptad repeats of AMPs could alter their helical structure in mammalian membrane-mimetic environments and cytotoxicity towards mammalian cells. Since proline is a helix breaker, effects of selective proline substitution(s) at 'a' and/or 'd' positions of a 15-residue peptide designed on phenylalanine heptad repeat (FR-15) were investigated. Proline-substituted FR-15 variants were highly selective toward bacteria and fungi over hRBCs and murine 3T3 cells and also retained their antibacterial activities at high salt, serum and elevated temperatures. These non-cytotoxic variants also inhibited LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines in human monocytes, THP-1, RAW 264.7 and in BALB/c mice. The two non-cytotoxic variants (FR8P and FR11P) showed potent anti-cancer activity against highly metastatic human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 with IC50 values less than 10μM. At sub-IC50 concentrations, FR8P and FR11P also showed anti-migratory and anti-invasive effects against MDA-MB-231 cells. FR8P and FR11P induced cellular apoptosis by triggering intrinsic apoptotic pathway through depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of caspases. Overall the results demonstrated the utilization of selective phenylalanine to proline substitution in a heptad repeat of phenylalanine residues for the design of cell-selective, broad-spectrum AMPs with significant anti-cancer properties. We have demonstrated a methodology to design cell-selective potent antimicrobial and anti-endotoxin peptides by utilizing phenylalanine zipper as a template

  15. Nasal Levels of Antimicrobial Peptides in Allergic Asthma Patients and Healthy Controls: Differences and Effect of a Short 1,25(OH2 Vitamin D3 Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willemien Thijs

    Full Text Available Allergy is often accompanied by infections and lower levels of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs. Vitamin D has been shown to increase expression of selected AMPs. In this study we investigated whether antimicrobial peptide levels in nasal secretions of allergic asthma patients are lower than in healthy controls, and whether administration of the active form of vitamin D (1,25(OH2D3 affects these antimicrobial peptide levels.The levels of antimicrobial peptides in nasal secretions were compared between 19 allergic asthma patients and 23 healthy controls. The effect of seven days daily oral treatment with 2 μg 1,25(OH2D3 on antimicrobial peptides in nasal secretions was assessed in a placebo-controlled cross-over clinical study.Levels of neutrophil α-defensins (human neutrophil peptides 1-3; HNP1-3 and lipocalin 2 (LCN2; also known as NGAL were significantly lower in asthmatics, but no differences in LL-37 and SLPI were detected. Treatment with a short-term 1,25(OH2D3 caused a small increase in HNP1-3, but not when the asthma and control groups were analyzed separately. LL-37, LCN2 and SLPI did not change after treatment with 1,25(OH2D3.Levels of the antimicrobial peptides HNP1-3 and LCN2 are lower in nasal secretions in asthmatics and are not substantially affected by a short-term treatment with active vitamin D.

  16. Rational modification of a dendrimeric peptide with antimicrobial activity: consequences on membrane-binding and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batoni, Giovanna; Casu, Mariano; Giuliani, Andrea; Luca, Vincenzo; Maisetta, Giuseppantonio; Mangoni, Maria Luisa; Manzo, Giorgia; Pintus, Manuela; Pirri, Giovanna; Rinaldi, Andrea C; Scorciapino, Mariano A; Serra, Ilaria; Ulrich, Anne S; Wadhwani, Parvesh

    2016-03-01

    Peptide-based antibiotics might help containing the rising tide of antimicrobial resistance. We developed SB056, a semi-synthetic peptide with a dimeric dendrimer scaffold, active against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Being the mechanism of SB056 attributed to disruption of bacterial membranes, we enhanced the amphiphilic profile of the original, empirically derived sequence [WKKIRVRLSA-NH2] by interchanging the first two residues [KWKIRVRLSA-NH2], and explored the effects of this modification on the interaction of peptide, both in linear and dimeric forms, with model membranes and on antimicrobial activity. Results obtained against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus planktonic strains, with or without salts at physiological concentrations, confirmed the added value of dendrimeric structure over the linear one, especially at physiological ionic strength, and the impact of the higher amphipathicity obtained through sequence modification on enhancing peptide performances. SB056 peptides also displayed intriguing antibiofilm properties. Staphylococcus epidermidis was the most susceptible strain in sessile form, notably to optimized linear analog lin-SB056-1 and the wild-type dendrimer den-SB056. Membrane affinity of all peptides increased with the percentage of negatively charged lipids and was less influenced by the presence of salt in the case of dendrimeric peptides. The analog lin-SB056-1 displayed the highest overall affinity, even for zwitterionic PC bilayers. Thus, in addition to electrostatics, distribution of charged/polar and hydrophobic residues along the sequence might have a significant role in driving peptide-lipid interaction. Supporting this view, dendrimeric analog den-SB056-1 retained greater membrane affinity in the presence of salt than den-SB056, despite the fact that they bear exactly the same net positive charge.

  17. Longipin: An Amyloid Antimicrobial Peptide from the Harvestman Acutisoma longipes (Arachnida: Opiliones) with Preferential Affinity for Anionic Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayegh, Raphael Santa Rosa; Batista, Isabel de Fátima Correia; Melo, Robson Lopes de; Riske, Karin A; Daffre, Sirlei; Montich, Guillermo; da Silva Junior, Pedro Ismael

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to vertebrate immune systems, invertebrates lack an adaptive response and rely solely on innate immunity in which antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) play an essential role. Most of them are membrane active molecules that are typically unstructured in solution and adopt secondary/tertiary structures upon binding to phospholipid bilayers. This work presents the first characterization of a constitutive AMP from the hemolymph of an Opiliones order animal: the harvestman Acutisoma longipes. This peptide was named longipin. It presents 18 aminoacid residues (SGYLPGKEYVYKYKGKVF) and a positive net charge at neutral pH. No similarity with other AMPs was observed. However, high sequence similarity with heme-lipoproteins from ticks suggested that longipin might be a protein fragment. The synthetic peptide showed enhanced antifungal activity against Candida guilliermondii and C. tropicalis yeasts (MIC: 3.8-7.5 μM) and did not interfered with VERO cells line viability at all concentrations tested (200-0.1 μM). This selectivity against microbial cells is related to the highest affinity of longipin for anionic charged vesicles (POPG:POPC) compared to zwitterionic ones (POPC), once microbial plasma membrane are generally more negatively charged compared to mammalian cells membrane. Dye leakage from carboxyfluorescein-loaded POPG:POPC vesicles suggested that longipin is a membrane active antimicrobial peptide and FT-IR spectroscopy showed that the peptide chain is mainly unstructured in solution or in the presence of POPC vesicles. However, upon binding to POPG:POPC vesicles, the FT-IR spectrum showed bands related to β-sheet and amyloid-like fibril conformations in agreement with thioflavin-T binding assays, indicating that longipin is an amyloid antimicrobial peptide.

  18. Construction and expression of an antimicrobial peptide scolopin 1 from the centipede venoms of Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans in Escherichia coli using SUMO fusion partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Huanhuan; Yan, Weili; Du, Kexing; Ye, Yangjing; Cao, Qianqian; Ren, Wenhua

    2013-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptide scolopin 1 (AMP-scolopin 1) is a small cationic peptide identified from centipede venoms of Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans. It has broad-spectrum activities against bacteria, fungi, and tumor cells, which may possibly be used as an antimicrobial agent. We first report here the application of small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) fusion technology to the expression and purification of cationic antimicrobial peptide AMP-scolopin 1. The fusion protein expressed in a soluble form was purified to a purity of 95% by Ni-IDA chromatography. After the SUMO-scolopin 1 fusion protein was cleaved by the SUMO protease at 30°C for 1 h, the cleaved sample was reapplied to a Ni-IDA. The recombinant scolopin1 had similar antimicrobial properties to the synthetic scolopin 1. Thus, we successfully established a system for purifying peptide of centipede, which could be used for further research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. High CO2 concentration as an inductor agent to drive production of recombinant phytotoxic antimicrobial peptides in plant biofactories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Cristina; Pla, Maria; Company, Nuri; Riudavets, Jordi; Nadal, Anna

    2016-03-01

    Cationic α-helical antimicrobial peptides such as BP100 are of increasing interest for developing novel phytosanitary or therapeutic agents and products with industrial applications. Biotechnological production of these peptides in plants can be severely impaired due to the toxicity exerted on the host by high-level expression. This can be overcome by using inducible promoters with extremely low activity throughout plant development, although the yields are limited. We examined the use of modified atmospheres using the increased levels of [CO2], commonly used in the food industry, as the inductor agent to biotechnologically produce phytotoxic compounds with higher yields. Here we show that 30% [CO2] triggered a profound transcriptional response in rice leaves, including a change in the energy provision from photosynthesis to glycolysis, and the activation of stress defense mechanisms. Five genes with central roles in up-regulated pathways were initially selected and their promoters successfully used to drive the expression of phytotoxic BP100 in genetically modified (GM) rice. GM plants had a normal phenotype on development and seed production in non-induction conditions. Treatment with 30 % [CO2] led to recombinant peptide accumulation of up to 1 % total soluble protein when the Os.hb2 promoter was used. This is within the range of biotechnological production of other peptides in plants. Using BP100 as a proof-of-concept we demonstrate that very high [CO2] can be considered an economically viable strategy to drive production of recombinant phytotoxic antimicrobial peptides in plant biofactories.

  20. Development of a Novel Biosensor Using Cationic Antimicrobial Peptide and Nickel Phthalocyanine Ultrathin Films for Electrochemical Detection of Dopamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maysa F. Zampa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial peptide dermaseptin 01 (DS 01, from the skin secretion of Phyllomedusa hypochondrialis frogs, was immobilized in nanostructured layered films in conjunction with nickel tetrasulfonated phthalocyanines (NiTsPc, widely used in electronic devices, using layer-by-layer technique. The films were used as a biosensor to detect the presence of dopamine (DA, a neurotransmitter associated with diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, with detection limits in the order of 10−6 mol L−1. The use of DS 01 in LbL film generated selectivity in the detection of DA despite the presence of ascorbic acid found in biological fluids. This work is the first to report that the antimicrobial peptide and NiTsPc LbL film exhibits electroanalytical activity to DA oxidation. The selectivity in the detection of DA is a fundamental aspect for the development of electrochemical sensors with potential applications in the biomedical and pharmaceutical industries.