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Sample records for hoxc8 involves dna

  1. Molecular characterization of HOXC8 gene and methylation status analysis of its exon 1 associated with the length of cashmere fiber in Liaoning cashmere goat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Wen L; Wang, Jiao J; Yin, Rong H; Dang, Yun L; Wang, Ze Y; Zhu, Yu B; Cong, Yu Y; Deng, Liang; Guo, Dan; Wang, Shi Q; Yang, Shu H; Xue, Hui L

    2017-02-01

    Homeobox protein Hox-C8 (HOXC8) is a member of Hox family. It is expressed in the dermal papilla of the skin and is thought to be associated with the hair inductive capacity of dermal papilla cells. In the present study, we isolated and characterized a full-length open reading frame of HOXC8 cDNA from the skin tissue of Liaoning cashmere goat, as well as, established a phylogenetic relationship of goat HOXC8 with that of other species. Also, we investigated the effect of methylation status of HOXC8 exon 1 at anagen secondary hair follicle on the cashmere fiber traits in Liaoning cashmere goat. The sequence analysis indicated that the obtained cDNA was 1134-bp in length containing a complete ORF of 729-bp. It encoded a peptide of 242 amino acid residues in length. The structural analysis indicated that goat HOXC8 contained a typical homeobox domain. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that Capra hircus HOXC8 had a closer genetic relationship with that of Ovis aries, followed by Bos Taurus and Bubalus bubalis. The methylation analysis suggested that the methylation degree of HOXC8 exon 1 in anagen secondary hair follicle might be involved in regulating the growth of cashmere fiber in Liaoning cashmere goat. Our results provide new evidence for understanding the molecular structural and evolutionary characteristics of HOXC8 in Liaoning cashmere goat, as well as, for further insight into the role of methylation degree of HOXC8 exon 1 regulates the growth of cashmere fiber in goat.

  2. Normal proliferation and differentiation of Hoxc-8 transgenic chondrocytes in vitro

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    Mello Maria

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hox genes encode transcription factors that are involved in pattern formation in the skeleton, and recent evidence suggests that they also play a role in the regulation of endochondral ossification. To analyze the role of Hoxc-8 in this process in more detail, we applied in vitro culture systems, using high density cultures of primary chondrocytes from neonatal mouse ribs. Results Cultured cells were characterized on the basis of morphology (light microscopy and production of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (sulfated proteoglycans and type II Collagen. Hypertrophy was demonstrated by increase in cell size, alkaline phosphatase activity and type X Collagen immunohistochemistry. Proliferation was assessed by BrdU uptake and flow cytometry. Unexpectedly, chondrocytes from Hoxc-8 transgenic mice, which exhibit delayed cartilage maturation in vivo 1, were able to proliferate and differentiate normally in our culture systems. This was the case even though freshly isolated Hoxc-8 transgenic chondrocytes exhibited significant molecular differences as measured by real-time quantitative PCR. Conclusions The results demonstrate that primary rib chondrocytes behave similar to published reports for chondrocytes from other sources, validating in vitro approaches for studies of Hox genes in the regulation of endochondral ossification. Our analysis of cartilage-producing cells from Hoxc-8 transgenic mice provides evidence that the cellular phenotype induced by Hoxc-8 overexpression in vivo is reversible in vitro.

  3. The third helix of the murine Hoxc8 homeodomain facilitates protein transduction in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Kyoung-Ah; Gadi, Jogeswar; Park, Hyoung Woo; Bok, Jinwoong; Kim, Myoung Hee

    2008-01-01

    Previously, we have demonstrated that purified Hoxc8 homeoprotein has the ability to penetrate the cellular membrane and can be transduced efficiently into COS-7 cells. Moreover, the Hoxc8 protein is able to form a complex with DNA molecules in vitro and helps the DNA be delivered intracellularly, serving as a gene delivery vehicle. Here, we further analyzed the membrane transduction activity of Hoxc8 protein and provide the evidence that the 16 amino acid (a.a.191-206, 2.23 kDa) third helix of murine Hoxc8 protein is an efficient protein transduction domain (PTD). When the 16 amino acid peptide was fused at the carboxyl terminal of enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP), the fusion proteins were transduced efficiently into the primary pig fetal fibroblast cells. The transduction efficiency increased in a concentration-dependent manner up to 1 μM, and appeared to plateau above a concentration of 1 μM. When tandem multimers of PTD, EGFP-PTD(2), EGFP-PTD(3), EGFP-PTD(4), and EGFP-PTD(5), were analyzed at 500 nM of concentration, the penetrating efficiency increased in a dose-dependent manner. As the number of PTDs increased, the EGFP signal also increased, although the signal maintained plateau after EGFP-PTD(3). These results indicate that the 16 amino acid third helix is the key element responsible for the membrane transduction activity of Hoxc8 proteins, and further suggest that the small peptide could serve as a therapeutic delivery vehicle for large cargo proteins

  4. Mouse Homologue of the Schizophrenia Susceptibility Gene ZNF804A as a Target of Hoxc8

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    Hyun Joo Chung

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a ChIP-cloning technique, we identified a Zinc finger protein 804a (Zfp804a as one of the putative Hoxc8 downstream target genes. We confirmed binding of Hoxc8 to an intronic region of Zfp804a by ChIP-PCR in F9 cells as well as in mouse embryos. Hoxc8 upregulated Zfp804a mRNA levels and augmented minimal promoter activity in vitro. In E11.5 mouse embryos, Zfp804a and Hoxc8 were coexpressed. Recent genome-wide studies identified Zfp804a (or ZNF804A in humans as a plausible marker for schizophrenia, leading us to hypothesize that this embryogenic regulatory control might also exert influence in development of complex traits such as psychosis.

  5. Expression of cartilage developmental genes in Hoxc8- and Hoxd4-transgenic mice.

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    Claudia Kruger

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Hox genes encode transcription factors, which regulate skeletal patterning and chondrocyte differentiation during the development of cartilage, the precursor to mature bone. Overexpression of the homeobox transcription factors Hoxc8 and Hoxd4 causes severe cartilage defects due to delay in cartilage maturation. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs and fibroblastic growth factors (FGFs are known to play important roles in skeletal development and endochondral bone formation and remodeling. In order to investigate whether these molecules are aberrantly expressed in Hoxc8- and/or Hoxd4-transgenic cartilage, we performed quantitative RT-PCR on chondrocytes from Hox-transgenic mice. Gene expression levels of Bmp4, Fgf8, Fgf10, Mmp9, Mmp13, Nos3, Timp3, Wnt3a and Wnt5a were altered in Hoxc8-transgenic chondrocytes, and Fgfr3, Ihh, Mmp8, and Wnt3a expression levels were altered in Hoxd4-transgenic chondrocytes, respectively. Notably, Wnt3a expression was elevated in Hoxc8- and reduced in Hoxd4-transgenic cartilage. These results suggest that both transcription factors affect cartilage maturation through different molecular mechanisms, and provide the basis for future studies into the role of these genes and possible interactions in pathogenesis of cartilage defects in Hoxc8- and Hoxd4-transgenic mice.

  6. Enzymes involved in organellar DNA replication in photosynthetic eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Takashi; Sato, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Plastids and mitochondria possess their own genomes. Although the replication mechanisms of these organellar genomes remain unclear in photosynthetic eukaryotes, several organelle-localized enzymes related to genome replication, including DNA polymerase, DNA primase, DNA helicase, DNA topoisomerase, single-stranded DNA maintenance protein, DNA ligase, primer removal enzyme, and several DNA recombination-related enzymes, have been identified. In the reference Eudicot plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the replication-related enzymes of plastids and mitochondria are similar because many of them are dual targeted to both organelles, whereas in the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae, plastids and mitochondria contain different replication machinery components. The enzymes involved in organellar genome replication in green plants and red algae were derived from different origins, including proteobacterial, cyanobacterial, and eukaryotic lineages. In the present review, we summarize the available data for enzymes related to organellar genome replication in green plants and red algae. In addition, based on the type and distribution of replication enzymes in photosynthetic eukaryotes, we discuss the transitional history of replication enzymes in the organelles of plants.

  7. Altered DNA methylation: a secondary mechanism involved in carcinogenesis.

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    Goodman, Jay I; Watson, Rebecca E

    2002-01-01

    This review focuses on the role that DNA methylation plays in the regulation of normal and aberrant gene expression and on how, in a hypothesis-driven fashion, altered DNA methylation may be viewed as a secondary mechanism involved in carcinogenesis. Research aimed at discerning the mechanisms by which chemicals can transform normal cells into frank carcinomas has both theoretical and practical implications. Through an increased understanding of the mechanisms by which chemicals affect the carcinogenic process, we learn more about basic biology while, at the same time, providing the type of information required to make more rational safety assessment decisions concerning their actual potential to cause cancer under particular conditions of exposure. One key question is: does the mechanism of action of the chemical in question involve a secondary mechanism and, if so, what dose may be below its threshold?

  8. Involvement of DNA mismatch repair in the maintenance of heterochromatic DNA stability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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    Basanta K Dahal

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Heterochromatin contains a significant part of nuclear DNA. Little is known about the mechanisms that govern heterochromatic DNA stability. We show here that in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (i DNA mismatch repair (MMR is required for the maintenance of heterochromatic DNA stability, (ii MutLα (Mlh1-Pms1 heterodimer, MutSα (Msh2-Msh6 heterodimer, MutSβ (Msh2-Msh3 heterodimer, and Exo1 are involved in MMR at heterochromatin, (iii Exo1-independent MMR at heterochromatin frequently leads to the formation of Pol ζ-dependent mutations, (iv MMR cooperates with the proofreading activity of Pol ε and the histone acetyltransferase Rtt109 in the maintenance of heterochromatic DNA stability, (v repair of base-base mismatches at heterochromatin is less efficient than repair of base-base mismatches at euchromatin, and (vi the efficiency of repair of 1-nt insertion/deletion loops at heterochromatin is similar to the efficiency of repair of 1-nt insertion/deletion loops at euchromatin.

  9. DNA damage tolerance pathway involving DNA polymerase ι and the tumor suppressor p53 regulates DNA replication fork progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampp, Stephanie; Kiessling, Tina; Buechle, Kerstin; Mansilla, Sabrina F; Thomale, Jürgen; Rall, Melanie; Ahn, Jinwoo; Pospiech, Helmut; Gottifredi, Vanesa; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    2016-07-26

    DNA damage tolerance facilitates the progression of replication forks that have encountered obstacles on the template strands. It involves either translesion DNA synthesis initiated by proliferating cell nuclear antigen monoubiquitination or less well-characterized fork reversal and template switch mechanisms. Herein, we characterize a novel tolerance pathway requiring the tumor suppressor p53, the translesion polymerase ι (POLι), the ubiquitin ligase Rad5-related helicase-like transcription factor (HLTF), and the SWI/SNF catalytic subunit (SNF2) translocase zinc finger ran-binding domain containing 3 (ZRANB3). This novel p53 activity is lost in the exonuclease-deficient but transcriptionally active p53(H115N) mutant. Wild-type p53, but not p53(H115N), associates with POLι in vivo. Strikingly, the concerted action of p53 and POLι decelerates nascent DNA elongation and promotes HLTF/ZRANB3-dependent recombination during unperturbed DNA replication. Particularly after cross-linker-induced replication stress, p53 and POLι also act together to promote meiotic recombination enzyme 11 (MRE11)-dependent accumulation of (phospho-)replication protein A (RPA)-coated ssDNA. These results implicate a direct role of p53 in the processing of replication forks encountering obstacles on the template strand. Our findings define an unprecedented function of p53 and POLι in the DNA damage response to endogenous or exogenous replication stress.

  10. Involvement of DNA polymerase δ in DNA repair synthesis in human fibroblasts at late times after ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresler, S.L.; Gowans, B.J.; Robinson-Hill, R.M.; Hunting, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    DNA repair synthesis following UV irradiation of confluent human fibroblasts has a biphasic time course with an early phase of rapid nucleotide incorporation and a late phase of much slower nucleotide incorporation. The biphasic nature of this curve suggests that two distinct DNA repair systems may be operative. Previous studies have specifically implicated DNA polymerase δ as the enzyme involved in DNA repair synthesis occurring immediately after UV damage. In this paper, the authors describe studies of DNA polymerase involvement in DNA repair synthesis in confluent human fibroblasts at late times after UV irradiation. Late UV-induced DNA repair synthesis in both intact and permeable cells was found to be inhibited by aphidicolin, indicating the involvement of one of the aphidicolin-sensitive DNA polymerases, α or δ. In permeable cells, the process was further analyzed by using the nucleotide analogue (butylphenyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-triphosphate, which inhibits DNA polymerase α several hundred times more strongly than it inhibits DNA polymerase δ. The (butylphenyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-triphosphate inhibition curve for late UV-induced repair synthesis was very similar to that for polymerase δ. It appears that repair synthesis at late time after UV irradiation, like repair synthesis at early times, is mediated by DNA polymerase δ

  11. Folate, colorectal cancer and the involvement of DNA methylation.

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    Williams, Elizabeth A

    2012-11-01

    Diet is a major factor in the aetiology of colorectal cancer (CRC). Epidemiological evidence suggests that folate confers a modest protection against CRC risk. However, the relationship is complex, and evidence from human intervention trials and animal studies suggests that a high-dose of folic acid supplementation may enhance the risk of colorectal carcinogenesis in certain circumstances. The molecular mechanisms underlying the apparent dual modulatory effect of folate on colorectal carcinogenesis are not fully understood. Folate is central to C1 metabolism and is needed for both DNA synthesis and DNA methylation, providing plausible biological mechanisms through which folate could modulate cancer risk. Aberrant DNA methylation is an early event in colorectal carcinogenesis and is typically associated with the transcriptional silencing of tumour suppressor genes. Folate is required for the production of S-adenosyl methionine, which serves as a methyl donor for DNA methylation events; thereby folate availability is proposed to modulate DNA methylation status. The evidence for an effect of folate on DNA methylation in the human colon is limited, but a modulation of DNA methylation in response to folate has been demonstrated. More research is required to clarify the optimum intake of folate for CRC prevention and to elucidate the effect of folate availability on DNA methylation and the associated impact on CRC biology.

  12. An assay system for factors involved in mammalian DNA replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhard, P.; Maillart, P.; Schluchter, M.; Gautschi, J.R.; Schindler, R.

    1979-01-01

    An assay for cellular factors stimulating DNA synthesis by partially lysed CHO cells is presented. The assay is based on the observation that in highly lysed cells, DNA synthesis, as determined by [ 3 H]dTTP incorporation, was only 2-5% of that in gently lysed cells, and that this low level of DNA synthesis could be increased by a factor of approx. 50 by the addition of CHO cell extract (i.e. supernatant of a cell homogenate subjected to high-speed centrifugation.) (Auth.)

  13. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA polymerase IV: possible involvement in double strand break DNA repair.

    OpenAIRE

    Leem, S H; Ropp, P A; Sugino, A

    1994-01-01

    We identified and purified a new DNA polymerase (DNA polymerase IV), which is similar to mammalian DNA polymerase beta, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and suggested that it is encoded by YCR14C (POLX) on chromosome III. Here, we provided a direct evidence that the purified DNA polymerase IV is indeed encoded by POLX. Strains harboring a pol4 deletion mutation exhibit neither mitotic growth defect nor a meiosis defect, suggesting that DNA polymerase IV participates in nonessential functions in ...

  14. Identification of genes involved in DNA replication of the Autographa californica baculovirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, M.; Ahrens, C. H.; Goldbach, R. W.; Rohrmann, G. F.; Vlak, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    By use of a transient replication assay, nine genes involved in DNA replication were identified in the genome of the Autographa californica baculovirus. Six genes encoding helicase, DNA polymerase, IE-1, LEF-1, LEF-2, and LEF-3 are essential for DNA replication while three genes encoding P35, IE-2,

  15. Involvement of DNA gyrase in replication and transcription of bacteriophage T7 DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Wyngaert, M.A.; Hinkle, D.C.

    1979-01-01

    Growth of bacteriophage T7 is inhibited by the antibiotic coumermycin A 1 , an inhibitor of the Escherichia coli DNA gyrase. Since growth of the phage is insensitive to the antibiotic in strains containing a coumermycin-resistent DNA gyrase, this enzyme appears to be required for phage growth. We have investigated the effect of coumermycin on the kinetics of DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis during T7 infection. DNA synthesis is completely inhibited by the antibiotic. In addition, coumermycin significantly inhibits transcription of late but not early genes. Thus, E. coli DNA gyrase may play an important role in transcription as well as in replication of T7 DNA

  16. DnaA protein DNA-binding domain binds to Hda protein to promote inter-AAA+ domain interaction involved in regulatory inactivation of DnaA.

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    Keyamura, Kenji; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2011-08-19

    Chromosomal replication is initiated from the replication origin oriC in Escherichia coli by the active ATP-bound form of DnaA protein. The regulatory inactivation of DnaA (RIDA) system, a complex of the ADP-bound Hda and the DNA-loaded replicase clamp, represses extra initiations by facilitating DnaA-bound ATP hydrolysis, yielding the inactive ADP-bound form of DnaA. However, the mechanisms involved in promoting the DnaA-Hda interaction have not been determined except for the involvement of an interaction between the AAA+ domains of the two. This study revealed that DnaA Leu-422 and Pro-423 residues within DnaA domain IV, including a typical DNA-binding HTH motif, are specifically required for RIDA-dependent ATP hydrolysis in vitro and that these residues support efficient interaction with the DNA-loaded clamp·Hda complex and with Hda in vitro. Consistently, substitutions of these residues caused accumulation of ATP-bound DnaA in vivo and oriC-dependent inhibition of cell growth. Leu-422 plays a more important role in these activities than Pro-423. By contrast, neither of these residues is crucial for DNA replication from oriC, although they are highly conserved in DnaA orthologues. Structural analysis of a DnaA·Hda complex model suggested that these residues make contact with residues in the vicinity of the Hda AAA+ sensor I that participates in formation of a nucleotide-interacting surface. Together, the results show that functional DnaA-Hda interactions require a second interaction site within DnaA domain IV in addition to the AAA+ domain and suggest that these interactions are crucial for the formation of RIDA complexes that are active for DnaA-ATP hydrolysis.

  17. DnaA Protein DNA-binding Domain Binds to Hda Protein to Promote Inter-AAA+ Domain Interaction Involved in Regulatory Inactivation of DnaA*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyamura, Kenji; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomal replication is initiated from the replication origin oriC in Escherichia coli by the active ATP-bound form of DnaA protein. The regulatory inactivation of DnaA (RIDA) system, a complex of the ADP-bound Hda and the DNA-loaded replicase clamp, represses extra initiations by facilitating DnaA-bound ATP hydrolysis, yielding the inactive ADP-bound form of DnaA. However, the mechanisms involved in promoting the DnaA-Hda interaction have not been determined except for the involvement of an interaction between the AAA+ domains of the two. This study revealed that DnaA Leu-422 and Pro-423 residues within DnaA domain IV, including a typical DNA-binding HTH motif, are specifically required for RIDA-dependent ATP hydrolysis in vitro and that these residues support efficient interaction with the DNA-loaded clamp·Hda complex and with Hda in vitro. Consistently, substitutions of these residues caused accumulation of ATP-bound DnaA in vivo and oriC-dependent inhibition of cell growth. Leu-422 plays a more important role in these activities than Pro-423. By contrast, neither of these residues is crucial for DNA replication from oriC, although they are highly conserved in DnaA orthologues. Structural analysis of a DnaA·Hda complex model suggested that these residues make contact with residues in the vicinity of the Hda AAA+ sensor I that participates in formation of a nucleotide-interacting surface. Together, the results show that functional DnaA-Hda interactions require a second interaction site within DnaA domain IV in addition to the AAA+ domain and suggest that these interactions are crucial for the formation of RIDA complexes that are active for DnaA-ATP hydrolysis. PMID:21708944

  18. Identification of Bicarbonate as a Trigger and Genes Involved with Extracellular DNA Export in Mycobacterial Biofilms

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    Sasha J. Rose

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular DNA (eDNA is an integral biofilm matrix component of numerous pathogens, including nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM. Cell lysis is the source of eDNA in certain bacteria, but the source of eDNA remains unidentified for NTM, as well as for other eDNA-containing bacterial species. In this study, conditions affecting eDNA export were examined, and genes involved with the eDNA export mechanism were identified. After a method for monitoring eDNA in real time in undisturbed biofilms was established, different conditions affecting eDNA were investigated. Bicarbonate positively influenced eDNA export in a pH-independent manner in Mycobacterium avium, M. abscessus, and M. chelonae. The surface-exposed proteome of M. avium in eDNA-containing biofilms revealed abundant carbonic anhydrases. Chemical inhibition of carbonic anhydrases with ethoxzolamide significantly reduced eDNA export. An unbiased transposon mutant library screen for eDNA export in M. avium identified many severely eDNA-attenuated mutants, including one not expressing a unique FtsK/SpoIIIE-like DNA-transporting pore, two with inactivation of carbonic anhydrases, and nine with inactivation of genes belonging to a unique genomic region, as well as numerous mutants involved in metabolism and energy production. Complementation of nine mutants that included the FtsK/SpoIIIE and carbonic anhydrase significantly restored eDNA export. Interestingly, several attenuated eDNA mutants have mutations in genes encoding proteins that were found with the surface proteomics, and many more mutations are localized in operons potentially encoding surface proteins. Collectively, our data strengthen the evidence of eDNA export being an active mechanism that is activated by the bacterium responding to bicarbonate.

  19. DNA repair in human cells: Methods for the determination of calmodulin involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charp, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    Exposure of DNA to either physical or chemical agents can result in the formation of a number of different lesions which must be repaired enzymatically in order for DNA to carry on normal replication and transcription. In most cases, the enzymes involved in this repair of damaged DNA include endonucleases, exonucleases, glycosylases, polymerases, and ligases. Each group of enzymes is involved in precise steps in DNA repair. Exposure to physical agents such as ultraviolet light (UV) at a wavelength of 254 nm is repaired by two distinct and different mechanisms. One mode of enzymatic repair of pyrimidine dimers is accomplished in situ by photoreactivation of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers by photoreactivating light. The second mode of enzymatic repair is the excision repair of pyrimidine dimers involving several different enzymes including endonuclease, exonuclease, and DNA ligase. A summary of the sequence of enzymatic steps involved is shown. It has been observed that specific drugs which bind to and alter the action of calmodulin in cells block DNA synthesis. This suggests that calmodulin may play a role both in normal DNA replication and repair. Others using an indirect method measuring the degree of DNA nucleoid sedimentation, showed that the specific anti-calmodulin agent W-13 slowed the rate of DNA repair. Others showed that DNA synthesis in T51B rat liver cells could be blocked with the addition of either chlorpromazine or trifluoperazine

  20. Involvement of the yeast DNA polymerase delta in DNA repair in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giot, L. [State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY. (United States); Chanet, R.; Simon, M.; Facca, C.; Faye, G.

    1997-08-15

    The POL3 encoded catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase delta possesses a highly conserved C-terminal cysteine-rich domain in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mutations in some of its cysteine codons display a lethal phenotype, which demonstrates an essential function of this domain. The thermosensitive mutant pol3-13, in which a serine replaces a cysteine of this domain, exhibits a range of defects in DNA repair, such as hypersensitivity to different DNA-damaging agents and deficiency for induced mutagenesis and for recombination. These phenotypes are observed at 24 degrees, a temperature at which DNA replication is almost normal; this differentiates the functions of POL3 in DNA repair and DNA replication. Since spontaneous mutagenesis and spontaneous recombination are efficient in pol3-13, we propose that POL3 plays an important role in DNA repair after irradiation, particularly in the error-prone and recombinational pathways. Extragenic suppressors of pol3-13 are allelic to sdp5-1, previously identified as an extragenic suppressor of pol3-11. SDP5, which is identical to HYS2, encodes a protein homologous to the p50 subunit of bovine and human DNA polymerase delta. SDP5 is most probably the p55 subunit of Pol delta of S. cerevisiae and seems to be associated with the catalytic subunit for both DNA replication and DNA repair. (author)

  1. Inactivating UBE2M impacts the DNA damage response and genome integrity involving multiple cullin ligases.

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    Scott Cukras

    Full Text Available Protein neddylation is involved in a wide variety of cellular processes. Here we show that the DNA damage response is perturbed in cells inactivated with an E2 Nedd8 conjugating enzyme UBE2M, measured by RAD51 foci formation kinetics and cell based DNA repair assays. UBE2M knockdown increases DNA breakages and cellular sensitivity to DNA damaging agents, further suggesting heightened genomic instability and defective DNA repair activity. Investigating the downstream Cullin targets of UBE2M revealed that silencing of Cullin 1, 2, and 4 ligases incurred significant DNA damage. In particular, UBE2M knockdown, or defective neddylation of Cullin 2, leads to a blockade in the G1 to S progression and is associated with delayed S-phase dependent DNA damage response. Cullin 4 inactivation leads to an aberrantly high DNA damage response that is associated with increased DNA breakages and sensitivity of cells to DNA damaging agents, suggesting a DNA repair defect is associated. siRNA interrogation of key Cullin substrates show that CDT1, p21, and Claspin are involved in elevated DNA damage in the UBE2M knockdown cells. Therefore, UBE2M is required to maintain genome integrity by activating multiple Cullin ligases throughout the cell cycle.

  2. Inactivating UBE2M impacts the DNA damage response and genome integrity involving multiple cullin ligases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukras, Scott; Morffy, Nicholas; Ohn, Takbum; Kee, Younghoon

    2014-01-01

    Protein neddylation is involved in a wide variety of cellular processes. Here we show that the DNA damage response is perturbed in cells inactivated with an E2 Nedd8 conjugating enzyme UBE2M, measured by RAD51 foci formation kinetics and cell based DNA repair assays. UBE2M knockdown increases DNA breakages and cellular sensitivity to DNA damaging agents, further suggesting heightened genomic instability and defective DNA repair activity. Investigating the downstream Cullin targets of UBE2M revealed that silencing of Cullin 1, 2, and 4 ligases incurred significant DNA damage. In particular, UBE2M knockdown, or defective neddylation of Cullin 2, leads to a blockade in the G1 to S progression and is associated with delayed S-phase dependent DNA damage response. Cullin 4 inactivation leads to an aberrantly high DNA damage response that is associated with increased DNA breakages and sensitivity of cells to DNA damaging agents, suggesting a DNA repair defect is associated. siRNA interrogation of key Cullin substrates show that CDT1, p21, and Claspin are involved in elevated DNA damage in the UBE2M knockdown cells. Therefore, UBE2M is required to maintain genome integrity by activating multiple Cullin ligases throughout the cell cycle.

  3. Action of some drugs on enzymes involved in DNA-repair and semiconservative DNA-synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wawra, E.; Klein, W.; Kocsis, F.; Weniger, P.

    1975-07-01

    Different antirheumatic and cytostatic drugs had been tested by measurement of the thymidine incorporation into DNA of spleen cells under conditions, under which either DNA-synthesis or repair after gamma- or UV-irradiation takes place. There are substances, which inhibit either only the semiconservative DNA-synthesis (vinblastine, isonicotinic acid hydracide) or only DNA-repair after gamma-irradiation (mixture of penicillin-G and procaine-penicillin-G) or both (cyclophosphamide, phenylbutazone, procarbazine, nalidixic acid). Vincristine shows no effect on the thymidine incorporation in DNA, but by density gradient centrifugation it has been found that it influences the ligase reaction. Two DNA polymerases had been isolated from spleen cells, one of the low molecular and one of the high molecular weight type. The influences of the described drugs on these enzymes and on a deoxyribonuclease I from beef pancreas have been tested in ''in vitro'' systems. In all cases, it has been found that there is no effect or only a very small one, compared with the action of well known inhibitors as e.g. ethidium bromide and p-chloromercuribenzoate, and this cannot be responsible for the suppressions found in DNA-repair and semiconservative DNA-synthesis. (author)

  4. Distinct DNA repair pathways involving RecA and nonhomologous end joining in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korycka-Machala, Malgorzata; Brzostek, Anna; Rozalska, Sylwia; Rumijowska-Galewicz, Anna; Dziedzic, Renata; Bowater, Richard; Dziadek, Jaroslaw

    2006-05-01

    Mycobacterium smegmatis was used to study the relationship between DNA repair processes involving RecA and nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). The effect of gene deletions in recA and/or in two genes involved in NHEJ (ku and ligD) was tested on the ability of bacteria to join breaks in plasmids transformed into them and in their response to chemicals that damage DNA. The results provide in vivo evidence that only NHEJ is required for the repair of noncompatible DNA ends. By contrast, the response of mycobacteria to mitomycin C preferentially involved a RecA-dependent pathway.

  5. Involvement of specialized DNA polymerases Pol II, Pol IV and DnaE2 in DNA replication in the absence of Pol I in Pseudomonas putida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidorenko, Julia; Jatsenko, Tatjana; Saumaa, Signe; Teras, Riho; Tark-Dame, Mariliis; Horak, Rita; Kivisaar, Maia

    2011-01-01

    The majority of bacteria possess a different set of specialized DNA polymerases than those identified in the most common model organism Escherichia coli. Here, we have studied the ability of specialized DNA polymerases to substitute Pol I in DNA replication in Pseudomonas putida. Our results revealed that P. putida Pol I-deficient cells have severe growth defects in LB medium, which is accompanied by filamentous cell morphology. However, growth of Pol I-deficient bacteria on solid rich medium can be restored by reduction of reactive oxygen species in cells. Also, mutants with improved growth emerge rapidly. Similarly to the initial Pol I-deficient P. putida, its adapted derivatives express a moderate mutator phenotype, which indicates that DNA replication carried out in the absence of Pol I is erroneous both in the original Pol I-deficient bacteria and the adapted derivatives. Analysis of the spectra of spontaneous Rif r mutations in P. putida strains lacking different DNA polymerases revealed that the presence of specialized DNA polymerases Pol II and Pol IV influences the frequency of certain base substitutions in Pol I-proficient and Pol I-deficient backgrounds in opposite ways. Involvement of another specialized DNA polymerase DnaE2 in DNA replication in Pol I-deficient bacteria is stimulated by UV irradiation of bacteria, implying that DnaE2-provided translesion synthesis partially substitutes the absence of Pol I in cells containing heavily damaged DNA.

  6. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA polymerase IV: possible involvement in double strand break DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leem, S H; Ropp, P A; Sugino, A

    1994-08-11

    We identified and purified a new DNA polymerase (DNA polymerase IV), which is similar to mammalian DNA polymerase beta, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and suggested that it is encoded by YCR14C (POLX) on chromosome III. Here, we provided a direct evidence that the purified DNA polymerase IV is indeed encoded by POLX. Strains harboring a pol4 deletion mutation exhibit neither mitotic growth defect nor a meiosis defect, suggesting that DNA polymerase IV participates in nonessential functions in DNA metabolism. The deletion strains did not exhibit UV-sensitivity. However, they did show weak sensitivity to MMS-treatment and exhibited a hyper-recombination phenotype when intragenic recombination was measured during meiosis. Furthermore, MAT alpha pol4 delta segregants had a higher frequency of illegitimate mating with a MAT alpha tester strain than that of wild-type cells. These results suggest that DNA polymerase IV participates in a double-strand break repair pathway. A 3.2kb of the POL4 transcript was weakly expressed in mitotically growing cells. During meiosis, a 2.2 kb POL4 transcript was greatly induced, while the 3.2 kb transcript stayed at constant levels. This induction was delayed in a swi4 delta strain during meiosis, while no effect was observed in a swi6 delta strain.

  7. Distinct DNA repair pathways involving RecA and nonhomologous end joining in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    OpenAIRE

    Korycka-Machala, M; Brzostek, A; Rozalska, S; Rumijowska-Galewicz, A; Dziedzic, R; Bowater, R; Dziadek, J

    2006-01-01

    Mycobacterium smegmatis was used to study the relationship between DNA repair processes involving RecA and nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). The effect of gene deletions in recA and/or in two genes involved in NHEJ (ku and ligD) was tested on the ability of bacteria to join breaks in plasmids transformed into them and in their response to chemicals that damage DNA. The results provide in vivo evidence that only NHEJ is required for the repair of noncompatible DNA ends. By contrast, the respon...

  8. Isolation of proteins involved in the replication of adenoviral DNA in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichy, J.H.; Nagata, K.; Friefeld, B.R.; Enomoto, T.; Field, J.; Guggenheimer, R.A.; Ikeda, J.E.; Horwitz, M.S.; Hurwitz, J.

    1983-01-01

    The simple mechanism of replication of adenoviral DNA has made adenovirus an especially useful model system for studies of eukaryotic replication mechanisms. The availability of this in vitro system that replicates exogenously added Ad DNA-pro has made it possible to characterize the factors involved in replication. The results presented in this paper summarize our further fractionation of the in vitro system. First, the properties of two factors purified from the uninfected nuclear extract are described. Second, the separation of the pTP/Ad Pol complex into subunits and the properties of the isolated subunits are presented. The 140K protein is shown to possess the Ad DNA polymerase activity. The results suggest that the only DNA polymerase required for adenoviral DNA replication in vitro is the 140K Ad DNA polymerase and that this enzyme is probably a viral gene product. 50 references, 10 figures, 3 tables

  9. Are glutathione S transferases involved in DNA damage signalling? Interactions with DNA damage and repair revealed from molecular epidemiology studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dusinska, Maria, E-mail: Maria.DUSINSKA@nilu.no [CEE-Health Effects Group, NILU - Norwegian Institute for Air Research, Kjeller (Norway); Staruchova, Marta; Horska, Alexandra [Department of Experimental and Applied Genetics, Slovak Medical University, Bratislava (Slovakia); Smolkova, Bozena [Laboratory of Cancer Genetics, Cancer Research Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava (Slovakia); Collins, Andrew [Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo (Norway); Bonassi, Stefano [Unit of Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology, IRCCS San Raffaele Pisana, Rome (Italy); Volkovova, Katarina [Department of Experimental and Applied Genetics, Slovak Medical University, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2012-08-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are members of a multigene family of isoenzymes that are important in the control of oxidative stress and in phase II metabolism. Acting non-enzymically, GSTs can modulate signalling pathways of cell proliferation, cell differentiation and apoptosis. Using a molecular epidemiology approach, we have investigated a potential involvement of GSTs in DNA damage processing, specifically the modulation of DNA repair in a group of 388 healthy adult volunteers; 239 with at least 5 years of occupational exposure to asbestos, stone wool or glass fibre, and 149 reference subjects. We measured DNA damage in lymphocytes using the comet assay (alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis): strand breaks (SBs) and alkali-labile sites, oxidised pyrimidines with endonuclease III, and oxidised purines with formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. We also measured GST activity in erythrocytes, and the capacity for base excision repair (BER) in a lymphocyte extract. Polymorphisms in genes encoding three GST isoenzymes were determined, namely deletion of GSTM1 and GSTT1 and single nucleotide polymorphism Ile105Val in GSTP1. Consumption of vegetables and wine correlated negatively with DNA damage and modulated BER. GST activity correlated with oxidised bases and with BER capacity, and differed depending on polymorphisms in GSTP1, GSTT1 and GSTM1. A significantly lower BER rate was associated with the homozygous GSTT1 deletion in all asbestos site subjects and in the corresponding reference group. Multifactorial analysis revealed effects of sex and exposure in GSTP1 Ile/Val heterozygotes but not in Ile/Ile homozygotes. These variants affected also SBs levels, mainly by interactions of GSTP1 genotype with exposure, with sex, and with smoking habit; and by an interaction between sex and smoking. Our results show that GST polymorphisms and GST activity can apparently influence DNA stability and repair of oxidised bases, suggesting a potential new role for these

  10. Are glutathione S transferases involved in DNA damage signalling? Interactions with DNA damage and repair revealed from molecular epidemiology studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dusinska, Maria; Staruchova, Marta; Horska, Alexandra; Smolkova, Bozena; Collins, Andrew; Bonassi, Stefano; Volkovova, Katarina

    2012-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are members of a multigene family of isoenzymes that are important in the control of oxidative stress and in phase II metabolism. Acting non-enzymically, GSTs can modulate signalling pathways of cell proliferation, cell differentiation and apoptosis. Using a molecular epidemiology approach, we have investigated a potential involvement of GSTs in DNA damage processing, specifically the modulation of DNA repair in a group of 388 healthy adult volunteers; 239 with at least 5 years of occupational exposure to asbestos, stone wool or glass fibre, and 149 reference subjects. We measured DNA damage in lymphocytes using the comet assay (alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis): strand breaks (SBs) and alkali-labile sites, oxidised pyrimidines with endonuclease III, and oxidised purines with formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. We also measured GST activity in erythrocytes, and the capacity for base excision repair (BER) in a lymphocyte extract. Polymorphisms in genes encoding three GST isoenzymes were determined, namely deletion of GSTM1 and GSTT1 and single nucleotide polymorphism Ile105Val in GSTP1. Consumption of vegetables and wine correlated negatively with DNA damage and modulated BER. GST activity correlated with oxidised bases and with BER capacity, and differed depending on polymorphisms in GSTP1, GSTT1 and GSTM1. A significantly lower BER rate was associated with the homozygous GSTT1 deletion in all asbestos site subjects and in the corresponding reference group. Multifactorial analysis revealed effects of sex and exposure in GSTP1 Ile/Val heterozygotes but not in Ile/Ile homozygotes. These variants affected also SBs levels, mainly by interactions of GSTP1 genotype with exposure, with sex, and with smoking habit; and by an interaction between sex and smoking. Our results show that GST polymorphisms and GST activity can apparently influence DNA stability and repair of oxidised bases, suggesting a potential new role for these

  11. Phosphorylation of human INO80 is involved in DNA damage tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Dai; Waki, Mayumi; Umezawa, Masaki; Aoki, Yuka; Utsugi, Takahiko; Ohtsu, Masaya; Murakami, Yasufumi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Depletion of hINO80 significantly reduced PCNA ubiquitination. ► Depletion of hINO80 significantly reduced nuclear dots intensity of RAD18 after UV irradiation. ► Western blot analyses showed phosphorylated hINO80 C-terminus. ► Overexpression of phosphorylation mutant hINO80 reduced PCNA ubiquitination. -- Abstract: Double strand breaks (DSBs) are the most serious type of DNA damage. DSBs can be generated directly by exposure to ionizing radiation or indirectly by replication fork collapse. The DNA damage tolerance pathway, which is conserved from bacteria to humans, prevents this collapse by overcoming replication blockages. The INO80 chromatin remodeling complex plays an important role in the DNA damage response. The yeast INO80 complex participates in the DNA damage tolerance pathway. The mechanisms regulating yINO80 complex are not fully understood, but yeast INO80 complex are necessary for efficient proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) ubiquitination and for recruitment of Rad18 to replication forks. In contrast, the function of the mammalian INO80 complex in DNA damage tolerance is less clear. Here, we show that human INO80 was necessary for PCNA ubiquitination and recruitment of Rad18 to DNA damage sites. Moreover, the C-terminal region of human INO80 was phosphorylated, and overexpression of a phosphorylation-deficient mutant of human INO80 resulted in decreased ubiquitination of PCNA during DNA replication. These results suggest that the human INO80 complex, like the yeast complex, was involved in the DNA damage tolerance pathway and that phosphorylation of human INO80 was involved in the DNA damage tolerance pathway. These findings provide new insights into the DNA damage tolerance pathway in mammalian cells.

  12. Biochemical studies of DNA strand break repair and molecular characterization of mei-41, a gene involved in DNA break repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveri, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    The ability to repair X-irradiation induced single-strand DNA breaks was examined in mutagen-sensitive mutants of Drosophila melanogaster. This analysis demonstrated that examined stocks possess a normal capacity to repair X-ray induced single-strand breaks. One of the mutants in this study, mei-41, has been shown to be involved in a number of DNA metabolizing functions. A molecular characterization of this mutant is presented. A cDNA hybridizing to genomic DNA both proximal and distal to a P element inducing a mei-41 mutation was isolated from both embryonic and adult female recombinant lambda phage libraries. A 2.2 kilobase embryonic cDNA clone was sequenced; the sequence of an open reading frame was identified which would predict a protein of 384 amino acids with a molecular weight of 43,132 daltons. An examination of homologies to sequences in protein and nucleic acid data bases revealed no sequences with significant homology to mei-41, however, two potential Zinc-finger domains were identified. Analysis of RNA hybridizing to the embryonic cDNA demonstrated the existence of a major 2.2 kilobase transcript expressed primarily in embryos and adult flies. An examination of the transcription of this gene in mei-41 mutants revealed significant variation from wild-type, an indication that the embryonic cDNA does represent a mei-41 transcript. Expression in tissues from adult animals demonstrated that the 2.2 kilobase RNA is expressed primarily in reproductive tissues. A 3.8kb transcript is the major species of RNA in the adult head and thorax. Evidence is presented which implies that expression of the mei-41 gene is strongly induced by exposure of certain cells to mutagens

  13. Effect of DNA polymerase inhibitors on DNA repair in intact and permeable human fibroblasts: Evidence that DNA polymerases δ and β are involved in DNA repair synthesis induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammond, R.A.; Miller, M.R.; McClung, J.K.

    1990-01-01

    The involvement of DNA polymerases α, β, and δ in DNA repair synthesis induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) was investigated in human fibroblasts (HF). The effects of anti-(DNA polymerase α) monoclonal antibody, (p-n-butylphenyl)deoxyguanosine triphosphate (BuPdGTP), dideoxythymidine triphosphate (ddTTP), and aphidicolin on MNNG-induced DNA repair synthesis were investigated to dissect the roles of the different DNA polymerases. A subcellular system (permeable cells), in which DNA repair synthesis and DNA replication were differentiated by CsCl gradient centrifugation of BrdUMP density-labeled DNA, was used to examine the effects of the polymerase inhibitors. Another approach investigated the effects of several of these inhibitors of MNNG-induced DNA repair synthesis in intact cells by measuring the amount of [ 3 H]thymidine incorporated into repair DNA as determined by autoradiography and quantitation with an automated video image analysis system. In permeable cells, MNNG-induced DNA repair synthesis was inhibited 56% by 50 μg of aphidicolin/mL, 6% by 10 μM BuPdGTP, 13% by anti-(DNA polymerse α) monoclonal antibodies, and 29% by ddTTP. In intact cells, MNNG-induced DNA repair synthesis was inhibited 57% by 50 μg of aphidicolin/mL and was not significantly inhibited by microinjecting anti-(DNA polymerase α) antibodies into HF nuclei. These results indicate that both DNA polymerase δ and β are involved in repairing DNA damage caused by MNNG

  14. DNA supercoiling in Escherichia coli is under tight and subtle homeostatic control, involving gene-expression and metabolic regulation of both topoisomerase I and DNA gyrase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoep, J.L.; van der Weijden, C.C.; Andersen, H.W.

    2002-01-01

    DNA of prokaryotes is in a nonequilibrium. structural state, characterized as 'active' DNA supercoiling. Alterations in this state affect many life processes and a homeostatic control of DNA supercoiling has been suggested [Menzel, R. & Gellert. M. (1983) Cell 34, 105-113]. We here report on a ne...... of the nonequilibrium DNA structure in wild-type Escherichia coli is almost complete and subtle (i.e. involving at least three regulatory mechanisms)....

  15. Mycobacterium smegmatis PafBC is involved in regulation of DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudrini Olivencia, Begonia; Müller, Andreas U; Roschitzki, Bernd; Burger, Sibylle; Weber-Ban, Eilika; Imkamp, Frank

    2017-10-25

    Two genes, pafB and pafC, are organized in an operon with the Pup-ligase gene pafA, which is part of the Pup-proteasome system (PPS) present in mycobacteria and other actinobacteria. The PPS is crucial for Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance towards reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI). However, pafB and pafC apparently play only a minor role in RNI resistance. To characterize their function, we generated a pafBC deletion in Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msm). Proteome analysis of the mutant strain revealed decreased cellular levels of various proteins involved in DNA damage repair, including recombinase A (RecA). In agreement with this finding, Msm ΔpafBC displayed increased sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. In mycobacteria two pathways regulate DNA repair genes: the LexA/RecA-dependent SOS response and a predominant pathway that controls gene expression via a LexA/RecA-independent promoter, termed P1. PafB and PafC feature winged helix-turn-helix DNA binding motifs and we demonstrate that together they form a stable heterodimer in vitro, implying a function as a heterodimeric transcriptional regulator. Indeed, P1-driven transcription of recA was decreased in Msm ΔpafBC under standard conditions and induction of recA expression upon DNA damage was strongly impaired. Taken together, our data indicate an important regulatory function of PafBC in the mycobacterial DNA damage response.

  16. Structure of a preternary complex involving a prokaryotic NHEJ DNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissett, Nigel C; Martin, Maria J; Pitcher, Robert S; Bianchi, Julie; Juarez, Raquel; Green, Andrew J; Fox, Gavin C; Blanco, Luis; Doherty, Aidan J

    2011-01-21

    In many prokaryotes, a specific DNA primase/polymerase (PolDom) is required for nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Here, we report the crystal structure of a catalytically active conformation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis PolDom, consisting of a polymerase bound to a DNA end with a 3' overhang, two metal ions, and an incoming nucleotide but, significantly, lacking a primer strand. This structure represents a polymerase:DNA complex in a preternary intermediate state. This polymerase complex occurs in solution, stabilizing the enzyme on DNA ends and promoting nucleotide extension of short incoming termini. We also demonstrate that the invariant Arg(220), contained in a conserved loop (loop 2), plays an essential role in catalysis by regulating binding of a second metal ion in the active site. We propose that this NHEJ intermediate facilitates extension reactions involving critically short or noncomplementary DNA ends, thus promoting break repair and minimizing sequence loss during DSB repair. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. DNA-binding protects p53 from interactions with cofactors involved in transcription-independent functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrughi, Matteo; De Gioia, Luca; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Nussinov, Ruth; Urani, Chiara; Bruschi, Maurizio; Papaleo, Elena

    2016-11-02

    Binding-induced conformational changes of a protein at regions distant from the binding site may play crucial roles in protein function and regulation. The p53 tumour suppressor is an example of such an allosterically regulated protein. Little is known, however, about how DNA binding can affect distal sites for transcription factors. Furthermore, the molecular details of how a local perturbation is transmitted through a protein structure are generally elusive and occur on timescales hard to explore by simulations. Thus, we employed state-of-the-art enhanced sampling atomistic simulations to unveil DNA-induced effects on p53 structure and dynamics that modulate the recruitment of cofactors and the impact of phosphorylation at Ser215. We show that DNA interaction promotes a conformational change in a region 3 nm away from the DNA binding site. Specifically, binding to DNA increases the population of an occluded minor state at this distal site by more than 4-fold, whereas phosphorylation traps the protein in its major state. In the minor conformation, the interface of p53 that binds biological partners related to p53 transcription-independent functions is not accessible. Significantly, our study reveals a mechanism of DNA-mediated protection of p53 from interactions with partners involved in the p53 transcription-independent signalling. This also suggests that conformational dynamics is tightly related to p53 signalling. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Involvement of the DNA mismatch repair system in cisplatin sensitivity of testicular germ cell tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolph, Christiane; Melau, Cecilie; Nielsen, John E.

    2017-01-01

    in the majority of tumours, although the underlying mechanism largely remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system in the cisplatin sensitivity of TGCT. MethodsThe expression pattern of key MMR proteins, including MSH2, MSH6, MLH1 and PMS2...... proteins, in particular MSH2 and MLH1, which are involved in the recognition of cisplatin adducts and in activation of the DNA damage response pathway to initiate apoptosis....

  19. In vitro gap-directed translesion DNA synthesis of an abasic site involving human DNA polymerases epsilon, lambda, and beta

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Villani, G.; Hübscher, U.; Gironis, N.; Parkkinen, S.; Pospiech, H.; Shevelev, Igor; di Cicco, G.; Markennen, E.; Syvaaja, J.E.; Le Gac, N.T.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 286, č. 37 (2011), s. 32094-32104 ISSN 0021-9258 Grant - others:Academy of Finland(FI) 106986; Academy of Finland(FI) 123082 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : DNA damage * DNA polymerase * DNA repair * DNA replication * DNA -protein interaction Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.773, year: 2011

  20. Trans-Lesion DNA Polymerases May Be Involved in Yeast Meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbel-Eden, Ayelet; Joseph-Strauss, Daphna; Masika, Hagit; Printzental, Oxana; Rachi, Eléanor; Simchen, Giora

    2013-01-01

    Trans-lesion DNA polymerases (TLSPs) enable bypass of DNA lesions during replication and are also induced under stress conditions. Being only weakly dependent on their template during replication, TLSPs introduce mutations into DNA. The low processivity of these enzymes ensures that they fall off their template after a few bases are synthesized and are then replaced by the more accurate replicative polymerase. We find that the three TLSPs of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rev1, PolZeta (Rev3 and Rev7), and Rad30 are induced during meiosis at a time when DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are formed and homologous chromosomes recombine. Strains deleted for one or any combination of the three TLSPs undergo normal meiosis. However, in the triple-deletion mutant, there is a reduction in both allelic and ectopic recombination. We suggest that trans-lesion polymerases are involved in the processing of meiotic double-strand breaks that lead to mutations. In support of this notion, we report significant yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) associations in meiosis-arrested cells between the TLSPs and DSB proteins Rev1-Spo11, Rev1-Mei4, and Rev7-Rec114, as well as between Rev1 and Rad30. We suggest that the involvement of TLSPs in processing of meiotic DSBs could be responsible for the considerably higher frequency of mutations reported during meiosis compared with that found in mitotically dividing cells, and therefore may contribute to faster evolutionary divergence than previously assumed. PMID:23550131

  1. DHX9 helicase is involved in preventing genomic instability induced by alternatively structured DNA in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Aklank; Bacolla, Albino; Del Mundo, Imee M; Zhao, Junhua; Wang, Guliang; Vasquez, Karen M

    2013-12-01

    Sequences that have the capacity to adopt alternative (i.e. non-B) DNA structures in the human genome have been implicated in stimulating genomic instability. Previously, we found that a naturally occurring intra-molecular triplex (H-DNA) caused genetic instability in mammals largely in the form of DNA double-strand breaks. Thus, it is of interest to determine the mechanism(s) involved in processing H-DNA. Recently, we demonstrated that human DHX9 helicase preferentially unwinds inter-molecular triplex DNA in vitro. Herein, we used a mutation-reporter system containing H-DNA to examine the relevance of DHX9 activity on naturally occurring H-DNA structures in human cells. We found that H-DNA significantly increased mutagenesis in small-interfering siRNA-treated, DHX9-depleted cells, affecting mostly deletions. Moreover, DHX9 associated with H-DNA in the context of supercoiled plasmids. To further investigate the role of DHX9 in the recognition/processing of H-DNA, we performed binding assays in vitro and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in U2OS cells. DHX9 recognized H-DNA, as evidenced by its binding to the H-DNA structure and enrichment at the H-DNA region compared with a control region in human cells. These composite data implicate DHX9 in processing H-DNA structures in vivo and support its role in the overall maintenance of genomic stability at sites of alternatively structured DNA.

  2. DNA ligase III is involved in a DNA-PK independent pathway of NHEJ in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.; Perrault, A.R.; Qin, W.; Wang, H.; Iliakis, G.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Double strand breaks (DSB) induced by ionizing radiation (IR) and other cytotoxic agents in the genome of higher eukaryotes are thought to be repaired either by homologous recombination repair (HRR), or non-homologous endjoining (NHEJ). We previously reported the operation of two components of NHEJ in vivo: a DNA-PK dependent component that operates with fast kinetics (D-NHEJ), and a DNA-PK independent component that acts as a backup (basic or B-NHEJ) and operates with kinetics an order of magnitude slower. To gain further insight into the mechanisms of B-NHEJ, we investigated DNA endjoining in extracts 180BR, a human cell line deficient in DNA ligase IV, using an in vitro plasmid-based DNA endjoining assay. An anti DNA ligase III antibody inhibited almost completely DNA endjoining activity in these extracts. On the other hand, an anti DNA ligase I antibody had no measurable effect in DNA endjoining activity. Immunodepletion of DNA ligase III from 180BR cell extracts abolished the DNA endjoining activity, which could be restored by addition of purified human DNA ligase IIIb. Full-length DNA ligase III bound to double stranded DNA and stimulated DNA endjoining in both intermolecular and intramolecular ligation. Furthermore, fractionation of HeLa cell extracts demonstrated the presence of an activity stimulating the function of DNA ligase III. Based on these observations we propose that DNA ligase III is the ligase operating in B-NHEJ

  3. Persistent Amplification of DNA Damage Signal Involved in Replicative Senescence of Normal Human Diploid Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masatoshi Suzuki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Foci of phosphorylated histone H2AX and ATM are the surrogate markers of DNA double strand breaks. We previously reported that the residual foci increased their size after irradiation, which amplifies DNA damage signals. Here, we addressed whether amplification of DNA damage signal is involved in replicative senescence of normal human diploid fibroblasts. Large phosphorylated H2AX foci (>1.5 μm diameter were specifically detected in presenescent cells. The frequency of cells with large foci was well correlated with that of cells positive for senescence-associated β-galactosidase staining. Hypoxic cell culture condition extended replicative life span of normal human fibroblast, and we found that the formation of large foci delayed in those cells. Our immuno-FISH analysis revealed that large foci partially localized at telomeres in senescent cells. Importantly, large foci of phosphorylated H2AX were always colocalized with phosphorylated ATM foci. Furthermore, Ser15-phosphorylated p53 showed colocalization with the large foci. Since the treatment of senescent cells with phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor, wortmannin, suppressed p53 phosphorylation, it is suggested that amplification of DNA damage signaling sustains persistent activation of ATM-p53 pathway, which is essential for replicative senescence.

  4. Involvement of DNA topoisomerase I in transcription of human ribosomal RNA genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, H.; Wang, J.C.; Liu, L.F.

    1988-01-01

    Treatment of HeLa cells with a DNA topoisomerase I-specific inhibitor, camptothecin, results in rapid cessation of the synthesis of the 45S rRNA precursor. The inhibition of rRNA synthesis is reversible following drug removal and correlates with the presence of camptothecin-trapped topoisomerase I-DNA abortive complexes, which can be detected as topoisomerase I-linked DNA breaks upon lysis with sodium dodecyl sulfate. These breaks were found to be concentrated within the transcribed region of human rRNA genes. No such sites can be detected in the inactive human rRNA genes in mouse-human hybrid cells, suggesting a preferential association of topoisomerase I with actively transcribed genes. The distribution of RNA polymerase molecules along the transcription unit of human rRNA genes in camptothecin-treated HeLa cells, as assayed by nuclear run-on transcription, shows a graded decrease of the RNA polymerase density toward the 3' end of the transcription unit; the density is minimally affected near the 5' start of the transcription unit. These results suggest that DNA topoisomerase I is normally involved in the elongation step of transcription, especially when the transcripts are long, and that camptothecin interferes with this role

  5. Targeting GLI by GANT61 involves mechanisms dependent on inhibition of both transcription and DNA licensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruowen; Wu, Jiahui; Ferrandon, Sylvain; Glowacki, Katie J; Houghton, Janet A

    2016-12-06

    The GLI genes are transcription factors and in cancers are oncogenes, aberrantly and constitutively activated. GANT61, a specific GLI inhibitor, has induced extensive cytotoxicity in human models of colon cancer. The FOXM1 promoter was determined to be a transcriptional target of GLI1. In HT29 cells, inhibition of GLI1 binding at the GLI consensus sequence by GANT61 led to inhibited binding of Pol II, the pause-release factors DSIF, NELF and p-TEFb. The formation of R-loops (RNA:DNA hybrids, ssDNA), were reduced by GANT61 at the FOXM1 promoter. Pretreatment of HT29 cells with α-amanitin reduced GANT61-induced γH2AX foci. Co-localization of GLI1 and BrdU foci, inhibited by GANT61, indicated GLI1 and DNA replication to be linked. By co-immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy, GLI1 co-localized with the DNA licensing factors ORC4, CDT1, and MCM2. Significant co-localization of GLI1 and ORC4 was inhibited by GANT61, and enrichment of ORC4 occurred at the GLI binding site in the FOXM1 promoter. CDT1 was found to be a transcription target of GLI1. Overexpression of CDT1 in HT29 and SW480 cells reduced GANT61-induced cell death, gH2AX foci, and cleavage of caspase-3. Data demonstrate involvement of transcription and of DNA replication licensing factors by non-transcriptional and transcriptional mechanisms in the GLI-dependent mechanism of action of GANT61.

  6. A newly identified DNA ligase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae involved in RAD52-independent repair of DNA double-strand breaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schär, Primo; Herrmann, Gernot; Daly, Graham; Lindahl, Tomas

    1997-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA ligases are ATP-dependent DNA strand-joining enzymes that participate in DNA replication, repair, and recombination. Whereas mammalian cells contain several different DNA ligases, encoded by at least three distinct genes, only one DNA ligase has been detected previously in either budding yeast or fission yeast. Here, we describe a newly identified nonessential Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene that encodes a DNA ligase distinct from the CDC9 gene product. This DNA ligase shares significant amino acid sequence homology with human DNA ligase IV; accordingly, we designate the yeast gene LIG4. Recombinant LIG4 protein forms a covalent enzyme-AMP complex and can join a DNA single-strand break in a DNA/RNA hybrid duplex, the preferred substrate in vitro. Disruption of the LIG4 gene causes only marginally increased cellular sensitivity to several DNA damaging agents, and does not further sensitize cdc9 or rad52 mutant cells. In contrast, lig4 mutant cells have a 1000-fold reduced capacity for correct recircularization of linearized plasmids by illegitimate end-joining after transformation. Moreover, homozygous lig4 mutant diploids sporulate less efficiently than isogenic wild-type cells, and show retarded progression through meiotic prophase I. Spore viability is normal, but lig4 mutants appear to produce a higher proportion of tetrads with only three viable spores. The mutant phenotypes are consistent with functions of LIG4 in an illegitimate DNA end-joining pathway and ensuring efficient meiosis. PMID:9271115

  7. Xanthorrhizol induced DNA fragmentation in HepG2 cells involving Bcl-2 family proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tee, Thiam-Tsui, E-mail: thiamtsu@yahoo.com [School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Cheah, Yew-Hoong [School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Bioassay Unit, Herbal Medicine Research Center, Institute for Medical Research, Jalan Pahang, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Meenakshii, Nallappan [Biology Department, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Mohd Sharom, Mohd Yusof; Azimahtol Hawariah, Lope Pihie [School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We isolated xanthorrhizol, a sesquiterpenoid compound from Curcuma xanthorrhiza. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Xanthorrhizol induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells as observed using SEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Apoptosis in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells involved Bcl-2 family proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA fragmentation was observed in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA fragmentation maybe due to cleavage of PARP and DFF45/ICAD proteins. -- Abstract: Xanthorrhizol is a plant-derived pharmacologically active sesquiterpenoid compound isolated from Curcuma xanthorrhiza. Previously, we have reported that xanthorrhizol inhibited the proliferation of HepG2 human hepatoma cells by inducing apoptotic cell death via caspase activation. Here, we attempt to further elucidate the mode of action of xanthorrhizol. Apoptosis in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells as observed by scanning electron microscopy was accompanied by truncation of BID; reduction of both anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-X{sub L} expression; cleavage of PARP and DFF45/ICAD proteins and DNA fragmentation. Taken together, these results suggest xanthorrhizol as a potent antiproliferative agent on HepG2 cells by inducing apoptosis via Bcl-2 family members. Hence we proposed that xanthorrhizol could be used as an anti-liver cancer drug for future studies.

  8. Xanthorrhizol induced DNA fragmentation in HepG2 cells involving Bcl-2 family proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tee, Thiam-Tsui; Cheah, Yew-Hoong; Meenakshii, Nallappan; Mohd Sharom, Mohd Yusof; Azimahtol Hawariah, Lope Pihie

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We isolated xanthorrhizol, a sesquiterpenoid compound from Curcuma xanthorrhiza. ► Xanthorrhizol induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells as observed using SEM. ► Apoptosis in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells involved Bcl-2 family proteins. ► DNA fragmentation was observed in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells. ► DNA fragmentation maybe due to cleavage of PARP and DFF45/ICAD proteins. -- Abstract: Xanthorrhizol is a plant-derived pharmacologically active sesquiterpenoid compound isolated from Curcuma xanthorrhiza. Previously, we have reported that xanthorrhizol inhibited the proliferation of HepG2 human hepatoma cells by inducing apoptotic cell death via caspase activation. Here, we attempt to further elucidate the mode of action of xanthorrhizol. Apoptosis in xanthorrhizol-treated HepG2 cells as observed by scanning electron microscopy was accompanied by truncation of BID; reduction of both anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-X L expression; cleavage of PARP and DFF45/ICAD proteins and DNA fragmentation. Taken together, these results suggest xanthorrhizol as a potent antiproliferative agent on HepG2 cells by inducing apoptosis via Bcl-2 family members. Hence we proposed that xanthorrhizol could be used as an anti-liver cancer drug for future studies.

  9. DUBbing Cancer: Deubiquitylating Enzymes Involved in Epigenetics, DNA Damage and the Cell Cycle As Therapeutic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto-Fernandez, Adan; Kessler, Benedikt M

    2016-01-01

    Controlling cell proliferation is one of the hallmarks of cancer. A number of critical checkpoints ascertain progression through the different stages of the cell cycle, which can be aborted when perturbed, for instance by errors in DNA replication and repair. These molecular checkpoints are regulated by a number of proteins that need to be present at the right time and quantity. The ubiquitin system has emerged as a central player controlling the fate and function of such molecules such as cyclins, oncogenes and components of the DNA repair machinery. In particular, proteases that cleave ubiquitin chains, referred to as deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs), have attracted recent attention due to their accessibility to modulation by small molecules. In this review, we describe recent evidence of the critical role of DUBs in aspects of cell cycle checkpoint control, associated DNA repair mechanisms and regulation of transcription, representing pathways altered in cancer. Therefore, DUBs involved in these processes emerge as potentially critical targets for the treatment of not only hematological, but potentially also solid tumors.

  10. DUBbing cancer: Deubiquitylating enzymes involved in epigenetics, DNA damage and the cell cycle as therapeutic targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt M Kessler

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Controlling cell proliferation is one of the hallmarks of cancer. A number of critical checkpoints ascertain progression through the different stages of the cell cycle, which can be aborted when perturbed, for instance by errors in DNA replication and repair. These molecular checkpoints are regulated by a number of proteins that need to be present at the right time and quantity. The ubiquitin system has emerged as a central player controlling the fate and function of such molecules such as cyclins, oncogenes and components of the DNA repair machinery. In particular, proteases that cleave ubiquitin chains, referred to as deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs, have attracted recent attention due to their accessibility to modulation by small molecules. In this review, we describe recent evidence of the critical role of DUBs in aspects of cell cycle checkpoint control, associated DNA repair mechanisms and regulation of transcription, representing pathways altered in cancer. Therefore, DUBs involved in these processes emerge as potentially critical targets for the treatment of not only hematological, but potentially also solid tumors.

  11. Thymine DNA Glycosylase (TDG) is involved in the pathogenesis of intestinal tumors with reduced APC expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinfei; Cortellino, Salvatore; Tricarico, Rossella; Chang, Wen-Chi; Scher, Gabrielle; Devarajan, Karthik; Slifker, Michael; Moore, Robert; Bassi, Maria Rosaria; Caretti, Elena; Clapper, Margie; Cooper, Harry; Bellacosa, Alfonso

    2017-10-27

    Thymine DNA Glycosylase (TDG) is a base excision repair enzyme that acts as a thymine and uracil DNA N-glycosylase on G:T and G:U mismatches, thus protecting CpG sites in the genome from mutagenesis by deamination. In addition, TDG has an epigenomic function by removing the novel cytosine derivatives 5-formylcytosine and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) generated by Ten-Eleven Translocation (TET) enzymes during active DNA demethylation. We and others previously reported that TDG is essential for mammalian development. However, its involvement in tumor formation is unknown. To study the role of TDG in tumorigenesis, we analyzed the effects of its inactivation in a well-characterized model of tumor predisposition, the Apc Min mouse strain. Mice bearing a conditional Tdg flox allele were crossed with Fabpl ::Cre transgenic mice, in the context of the Apc Min mutation, in order to inactivate Tdg in the small intestinal and colonic epithelium. We observed an approximately 2-fold increase in the number of small intestinal adenomas in the test Tdg -mutant Apc Min mice in comparison to control genotypes (p=0.0001). This increase occurred in female mice, and is similar to the known increase in intestinal adenoma formation due to oophorectomy. In the human colorectal cancer (CRC) TCGA database, the subset of patients with TDG and APC expression in the lowest quartile exhibits an excess of female cases. We conclude that TDG inactivation plays a role in intestinal tumorigenesis initiated by mutation/underexpression of APC . Our results also indicate that TDG may be involved in sex-specific protection from CRC.

  12. A novel human AP endonuclease with conserved zinc-finger-like motifs involved in DNA strand break responses

    OpenAIRE

    Kanno, Shin-ichiro; Kuzuoka, Hiroyuki; Sasao, Shigeru; Hong, Zehui; Lan, Li; Nakajima, Satoshi; Yasui, Akira

    2007-01-01

    DNA damage causes genome instability and cell death, but many of the cellular responses to DNA damage still remain elusive. We here report a human protein, PALF (PNK and APTX-like FHA protein), with an FHA (forkhead-associated) domain and novel zinc-finger-like CYR (cysteine–tyrosine–arginine) motifs that are involved in responses to DNA damage. We found that the CYR motif is widely distributed among DNA repair proteins of higher eukaryotes, and that PALF, as well as a Drosophila protein with...

  13. Dideoxynucleoside triphosphate-sensitive DNA polymerase from rice is involved in base excision repair and immunologically similar to mammalian DNA pol beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sailendra Nath; Bakshi, Sankar; Mokkapati, Sanath K; Roy, Sujit; Sengupta, Dibyendu N

    2004-07-16

    A single polypeptide with ddNTP-sensitive DNA polymerase activity was purified to near homogeneity from the shoot tips of rice seedlings and analysis of the preparations by SDS-PAGE followed by silver staining showed a polypeptide of 67 kDa size. The DNA polymerase activity was found to be inhibitory by ddNTP in both in vitro DNA polymerase activity assay and activity gel analysis. Aphidicolin, an inhibitor of other types of DNA polymerases, had no effect on plant enzyme. The 67 kDa rice DNA polymerase was found to be recognized by the polyclonal antibody (purified IgG) made against rat DNA polymerase beta (pol beta) both in solution and also on Western blot. The recognition was found to be very specific as the activity of Klenow enzyme was unaffected by the antibody. The ability of rice nuclear extract to correct G:U mismatch of oligo-duplex was observed when oligo-duplex with 32P-labeled lower strand containing U (at 22nd position) was used as substrate. Differential appearance of bands at 21-mer, 22-mer, and 51-mer position in presence of dCTP was visible only with G:U mismatch oligo-duplex, but not with G:C oligo-duplex. While ddCTP or polyclonal antibody against rat-DNA pol beta inhibits base excision repair (BER), aphidicolin had no effect. These results for the first time clearly demonstrate the ability of rice nuclear extract to run BER and the involvement of ddNTP-sensitive pol beta type DNA polymerase. Immunological similarity of the ddNTP-sensitive DNA polymerase beta of rice and rat and its involvement in BER revealed the conservation of structure and function of ddNTP-sensitive DNA pol beta in plant and animal.

  14. Molecular interactions and residues involved in force generation in the T4 viral DNA packaging motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliori, Amy D; Smith, Douglas E; Arya, Gaurav

    2014-12-12

    Many viruses utilize molecular motors to package their genomes into preformed capsids. A striking feature of these motors is their ability to generate large forces to drive DNA translocation against entropic, electrostatic, and bending forces resisting DNA confinement. A model based on recently resolved structures of the bacteriophage T4 motor protein gp17 suggests that this motor generates large forces by undergoing a conformational change from an extended to a compact state. This transition is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions between complementarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal domains of gp17. Here we use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to investigate in detail the molecular interactions and residues involved in such a compaction transition of gp17. We find that although electrostatic interactions between charged residues contribute significantly to the overall free energy change of compaction, interactions mediated by the uncharged residues are equally if not more important. We identify five charged residues and six uncharged residues at the interface that play a dominant role in the compaction transition and also reveal salt bridging, van der Waals, and solvent hydrogen-bonding interactions mediated by these residues in stabilizing the compact form of gp17. The formation of a salt bridge between Glu309 and Arg494 is found to be particularly crucial, consistent with experiments showing complete abrogation in packaging upon Glu309Lys mutation. The computed contributions of several other residues are also found to correlate well with single-molecule measurements of impairments in DNA translocation activity caused by site-directed mutations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Direct Involvement of Retinoblastoma Family Proteins in DNA Repair by Non-homologous End-Joining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Cook

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Deficiencies in DNA double-strand break (DSB repair lead to genetic instability, a recognized cause of cancer initiation and evolution. We report that the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB1 is required for DNA DSB repair by canonical non-homologous end-joining (cNHEJ. Support of cNHEJ involves a mechanism independent of RB1’s cell-cycle function and depends on its amino terminal domain with which it binds to NHEJ components XRCC5 and XRCC6. Cells with engineered loss of RB family function as well as cancer-derived cells with mutational RB1 loss show substantially reduced levels of cNHEJ. RB1 variants disabled for the interaction with XRCC5 and XRCC6, including a cancer-associated variant, are unable to support cNHEJ despite being able to confer cell-cycle control. Our data identify RB1 loss as a candidate driver of structural genomic instability and a causative factor for cancer somatic heterogeneity and evolution.

  16. 55K isoform of CDK9 associates with Ku70 and is involved in DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hongbing; Herrmann, Christine H.; Chiang, Karen; Sung, Tzu-Ling; Moon, Sung-Hwan; Donehower, Lawrence A.; Rice, Andrew P.

    2010-01-01

    Positive elongation factor b (P-TEFb) is a cellular protein kinase that is required for RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) transcriptional elongation of protein coding genes. P-TEFb is a set of different molecular complexes, each containing CDK9 as the catalytic subunit. There are two isoforms of the CDK9 protein - the major 42 KDa CDK9 isoform and the minor 55KDa isoform that is translated from an in-frame mRNA that arises from an upstream transcriptional start site. We found that shRNA depletion of the 55K CDK9 protein in HeLa cells induces apoptosis and double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs). The levels of apoptosis and DSBs induced by the depletion were reduced by expression of a 55K CDK9 protein variant resistant to the shRNA, indicating that these phenotypes are the consequence of depletion of the 55K protein and not off-target effects. We also found that the 55K CDK9 protein, but not the 42K CDK9 protein, specifically associates with Ku70, a protein involved in DSB repair. Our findings suggest that the 55K CDK9 protein may function in repair of DNA through an association with Ku70.

  17. RPA-Binding Protein ETAA1 Is an ATR Activator Involved in DNA Replication Stress Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yuan-Cho; Zhou, Qing; Chen, Junjie; Yuan, Jingsong

    2016-12-19

    ETAA1 (Ewing tumor-associated antigen 1), also known as ETAA16, was identified as a tumor-specific antigen in the Ewing family of tumors. However, the biological function of this protein remains unknown. Here, we report the identification of ETAA1 as a DNA replication stress response protein. ETAA1 specifically interacts with RPA (Replication protein A) via two conserved RPA-binding domains and is therefore recruited to stalled replication forks. Interestingly, further analysis of ETAA1 function revealed that ETAA1 participates in the activation of ATR signaling pathway via a conserved ATR-activating domain (AAD) located near its N terminus. Importantly, we demonstrate that both RPA binding and ATR activation are required for ETAA1 function at stalled replication forks to maintain genome stability. Therefore, our data suggest that ETAA1 is a new ATR activator involved in replication checkpoint control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. DNA repair pathways involved in determining the level of cytotoxicity of environmentally relevant UV radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, L.

    2000-01-01

    The sensitivity of cell lines with defects in various DNA repair processes to different wavelengths of UV has been assessed in order to determine the importance of these repair pathways to the cytotoxicity of UV light. The cell lines used in this work were xrs-6 (a Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell line) mutant for XRCC5/Ku80, EM9 a CHO cell line mutant for XRCC1, UV61 a CHO cell line mutant for ERCC6/CSB, and E3p53-/-, a mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line null for p53. Xrs-6 (defective in Non Homologous End-Joining) was found to be sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of broadband UVA, but not narrowband UVA or narrowband UVB. EM9 (defective in Base Excision Repair/Single-Strand Break Repair) was not sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of both broadband and narrowband UVA, narrowband UVB or narrowband UVC. UV61 (defective in the Transcription Coupled Repair branch of Nucleotide Excision Repair) was sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of narrowband UVA, UVB and UVC. E3p53-/- was sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of narrowband UVA and UVB. Broadband UVA was found to induce high levels of chromosomal damage in xrs-6, as quantified by the micronucleus assay, most likely as a result of this cell lines inability to repair DNA double strand breaks. EM9 was found to be defective in the repair of broadband UVA-induced single strand breaks, as measured by the alkaline gel electrophoresis ('comet') assay. UV61 was unable to repair broadband UVB-induced DNA damage as measured by the alkaline gel electrophoresis ('comet') assay. These results provide evidence that: 1. DNA double-strand breaks contribute to the cytotoxicity of UVA to a greater extent than single-strand breaks. 2. Repair mechanisms that operate in response to UVA may be coupled to transcription. 3. UVB may directly induce SSBs. 4. P53 is involved in the response of the cell to both UVA and UVB radiation. (author)

  19. Role of DNA repair in repair of cytogenetic damages. Slowly repaired DNA injuries involved in cytogenetic damages repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaichkina, S.I.; Rozanova, O.M.; Aptikaev, G.F.; Ganassi, E.Eh.

    1989-01-01

    Caffeine was used to study the kinetics of cytogenetic damages repair in Chinese hamster fibroblasts. Its half-time (90 min) was shown to correlate with that of repair of slowly repaired DNA damages. The caffeine-induced increase in the number of irreparable DNA damages, attributed to inhibition of double-strand break repair, is in a quantitative correlation with the effect of the cytogenetic damage modification

  20. Double-stranded DNA-dependent ATPase Irc3p is directly involved in mitochondrial genome maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedman, Tiina; Gaidutšik, Ilja; Villemson, Karin; Hou, YingJian; Sedman, Juhan

    2014-12-01

    Nucleic acid-dependent ATPases are involved in nearly all aspects of DNA and RNA metabolism. Previous studies have described a number of mitochondrial helicases. However, double-stranded DNA-dependent ATPases, including translocases or enzymes remodeling DNA-protein complexes, have not been identified in mitochondria of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisae. Here, we demonstrate that Irc3p is a mitochondrial double-stranded DNA-dependent ATPase of the Superfamily II. In contrast to the other mitochondrial Superfamily II enzymes Mss116p, Suv3p and Mrh4p, which are RNA helicases, Irc3p has a direct role in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance. Specific Irc3p-dependent mtDNA metabolic intermediates can be detected, including high levels of double-stranded DNA breaks that accumulate in irc3Δ mutants. irc3Δ-related topology changes in rho- mtDNA can be reversed by the deletion of mitochondrial RNA polymerase RPO41, suggesting that Irc3p counterbalances adverse effects of transcription on mitochondrial genome stability. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. DNA Polymerases ImuC and DinB Are Involved in DNA Alkylation Damage Tolerance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatsenko, Tatjana; Sidorenko, Julia; Saumaa, Signe; Kivisaar, Maia

    2017-01-01

    Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), facilitated by low-fidelity polymerases, is an important DNA damage tolerance mechanism. Here, we investigated the role and biological function of TLS polymerase ImuC (former DnaE2), generally present in bacteria lacking DNA polymerase V, and TLS polymerase DinB in response to DNA alkylation damage in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and P. putida. We found that TLS DNA polymerases ImuC and DinB ensured a protective role against N- and O-methylation induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) in both P. aeruginosa and P. putida. DinB also appeared to be important for the survival of P. aeruginosa and rapidly growing P. putida cells in the presence of methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). The role of ImuC in protection against MMS-induced damage was uncovered under DinB-deficient conditions. Apart from this, both ImuC and DinB were critical for the survival of bacteria with impaired base excision repair (BER) functions upon alkylation damage, lacking DNA glycosylases AlkA and/or Tag. Here, the increased sensitivity of imuCdinB double deficient strains in comparison to single mutants suggested that the specificity of alkylated DNA lesion bypass of DinB and ImuC might also be different. Moreover, our results demonstrated that mutagenesis induced by MMS in pseudomonads was largely ImuC-dependent. Unexpectedly, we discovered that the growth temperature of bacteria affected the efficiency of DinB and ImuC in ensuring cell survival upon alkylation damage. Taken together, the results of our study disclosed the involvement of ImuC in DNA alkylation damage tolerance, especially at low temperatures, and its possible contribution to the adaptation of pseudomonads upon DNA alkylation damage via increased mutagenesis.

  2. Constitutional chromothripsis rearrangements involve clustered double-stranded DNA breaks and nonhomologous repair mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloosterman, Wigard P; Tavakoli-Yaraki, Masoumeh; van Roosmalen, Markus J; van Binsbergen, Ellen; Renkens, Ivo; Duran, Karen; Ballarati, Lucia; Vergult, Sarah; Giardino, Daniela; Hansson, Kerstin; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A L; Jager, Myrthe; van Haeringen, Arie; Ippel, Elly F; Haaf, Thomas; Passarge, Eberhard; Hochstenbach, Ron; Menten, Björn; Larizza, Lidia; Guryev, Victor; Poot, Martin; Cuppen, Edwin

    2012-06-28

    Chromothripsis represents a novel phenomenon in the structural variation landscape of cancer genomes. Here, we analyze the genomes of ten patients with congenital disease who were preselected to carry complex chromosomal rearrangements with more than two breakpoints. The rearrangements displayed unanticipated complexity resembling chromothripsis. We find that eight of them contain hallmarks of multiple clustered double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) on one or more chromosomes. In addition, nucleotide resolution analysis of 98 breakpoint junctions indicates that break repair involves nonhomologous or microhomology-mediated end joining. We observed that these eight rearrangements are balanced or contain sporadic deletions ranging in size between a few hundred base pairs and several megabases. The two remaining complex rearrangements did not display signs of DSBs and contain duplications, indicative of rearrangement processes involving template switching. Our work provides detailed insight into the characteristics of chromothripsis and supports a role for clustered DSBs driving some constitutional chromothripsis rearrangements. Copyright © 2012 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Involvement of DNA-PK and ATM in radiation- and heat-induced DNA damage recognition and apoptotic cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Masanori

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation and hyperthermia results in important biological consequences, e.g. cell death, chromosomal aberrations, mutations, and DNA strand breaks. There is good evidence that the nucleus, specifically cellular DNA, is the principal target for radiation-induced cell lethality. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are considered to be the most serious type of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation. On the other hand, verifiable mechanisms which can lead to heat-induced cell death are damage to the plasma membrane and/or inactivation of heat-labile proteins caused by protein denaturation and subsequent aggregation. Recently, several reports have suggested that DSBs can be induced after hyperthermia because heat-induced phosphorylated histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) foci formation can be observed in several mammalian cell lines. In mammalian cells, DSBs are repaired primarily through two distinct and complementary mechanisms: non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), and homologous recombination (HR) or homology-directed repair (HDR). DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) are key players in the initiation of DSB repair and phosphorylate and/or activate many substrates, including themselves. These phosphorylated substrates have important roles in the functioning of cell cycle checkpoints and in cell death, as well as in DSB repair. Apoptotic cell death is a crucial cell suicide mechanism during development and in the defense of homeostasis. If DSBs are unrepaired or misrepaired, apoptosis is a very important system which can protect an organism against carcinogenesis. This paper reviews recently obtained results and current topics concerning the role of DNA-PK and ATM in heat- or radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. (author)

  4. A polycomb group protein, PHF1, is involved in the response to DNA double-strand breaks in human cell

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Zehui; Jiang, Jie; Lan, Li; Nakajima, Satoshi; Kanno, Shin-ichiro; Koseki, Haruhiko; Yasui, Akira

    2008-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) represent the most toxic DNA damage arisen from endogenous and exogenous genotoxic stresses and are known to be repaired by either homologous recombination or nonhomologous end-joining processes. Although many proteins have been identified to participate in either of the processes, the whole processes still remain elusive. Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are epigenetic chromatin modifiers involved in gene silencing, cancer development and the maintenance of embry...

  5. Stimulation of ribosomal RNA gene promoter by transcription factor Sp1 involves active DNA demethylation by Gadd45-NER pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Pallavi; Pandey, Vijaya; Kumar, Vijay

    2016-08-01

    The well-studied Pol II transcription factor Sp1 has not been investigated for its regulatory role in rDNA transcription. Here, we show that Sp1 bound to specific sites on rDNA and localized into the nucleoli during the G1 phase of cell cycle to activate rDNA transcription. It facilitated the recruitment of Pol I pre-initiation complex and impeded the binding of nucleolar remodeling complex (NoRC) to rDNA resulting in the formation of euchromatin active state. More importantly, Sp1 also orchestrated the site-specific binding of Gadd45a-nucleotide excision repair (NER) complex resulting in active demethylation and transcriptional activation of rDNA. Interestingly, knockdown of Sp1 impaired rDNA transcription due to reduced engagement of the Gadd45a-NER complex and hypermethylation of rDNA. Thus, the present study unveils a novel role of Sp1 in rDNA transcription involving promoter demethylation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Aging-dependent DNA hypermethylation and gene expression of GSTM1 involved in T cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Shu-Hui; Liu, Cheng-Ling; Chang, Ren-Chieh; Wu, Chih-Chiang; Lin, Chia-Hsueh; Yang, Kuender D

    2017-07-25

    This study investigated whether aging was associated with epigenetic changes of DNA hypermethylation on immune gene expression and lymphocyte differentiation. We screened CG sites of methylation in blood leukocytes from different age populations, picked up genes with age-related increase of CG methylation content more than 15%, and validated immune related genes with CG hypermethylation involved in lymphocyte differentiation in the aged population. We found that 12 genes (EXHX1、 IL-10、 TSP50、 GSTM1、SLC5A5、SPI1、F2R、LMO2、PTPN6、FGFR2、MMP9、MET) were associated with promoter or exon one DNA hypermethylation in the aged group. Two immune related genes, GSTM1 and LMO2, were chosen to validate its aging-related CG hypermethylation in different leukocytes. We are the first to validate that GSTM1_P266 and LMO2_E128 CG methylation contents in T lymphocytes but not polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) or mononuclear cells (MNCs) were significantly increased in the aged population. The GSTM1 mRNA expression in T lymphocytes but not PMNs or MNCs was inversely associated with the GSTM1 CG hypermethylation levels in the aged population studied. Further studies showed that lower GSTM1 CG methylation content led to the higher GSTM1 mRNA expression in T cells and knockdown of GSTM1 mRNA expression decreased type 1 T helper cell (Th1) differentiation in Jurkat T cells and normal adult CD4 T cells. The GSTM1_P266 hypermethylation in the aged population associated with lower GSTM1 mRNA expression was involved in Th1 differentiation, highlighting that modulation of aging-associated GSTM1 methylation may be able to enhance T helper cell immunity in the elders.

  7. Involvement of DNA methylation in memory processing in the honey bee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockett, Gabrielle A; Helliwell, Paul; Maleszka, Ryszard

    2010-08-23

    DNA methylation, an important and evolutionarily conserved epigenetic mechanism, is implicated in learning and memory processes in vertebrates, but its role in behaviour in invertebrates is unknown. We examined the role of DNA methylation in memory in the honey bee using an appetitive Pavlovian olfactory discrimination task, and by assessing the expression of DNA methyltransferase3, a key driver of epigenetic reprogramming. Here we report that DNA methyltransferase inhibition reduces acquisition retention and alters the extinction depending on treatment time, and DNA methyltransferase3 is upregulated after training. Our findings add to the understanding of epigenetic mechanisms in learning and memory, extending known roles of DNA methylation to appetitive and extinction memory, and for the first time implicate DNA methylation in memory in invertebrates.

  8. DNA transfer-a never ending story. A study on scenarios involving a second person as carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmus, Janine; Bajanowski, Thomas; Poetsch, Micaela

    2016-01-01

    The transfer of DNA directly from one item to another has been shown in many studies with elaborate discussions on the nature of the DNA donor as well as material and surface of the items or surrounding features. Every DNA transfer scenario one can imagine seems to be possible. This evokes more and more intricate scenarios proposed by lawyers or attorneys searching for an explanation of the DNA of a certain person on a distinct item with impact on a crime. At court, the forensic genetic scientist has to comment on the probability of these scenarios thus calling for extensive studies on such settings. Here, the possibility of an involvement of a second person as a carrier of the donor's DNA in a variety of different scenarios including three pairs of people and two kinds of items (textiles and plastic bags) was investigated. All transfer settings were executed with and without gloves on the carrier's hands. DNA left on the items was isolated and analyzed using the Powerplex® ESX17 kit. In 21 out of 180 samples, all alleles of the donor DNA could be obtained on the second item (12%), on eight samples, the donor's DNA was dominant compared to all other alleles (38% of samples with complete donor profile). Additionally, 51 samples displayed at least more than half of the donor's alleles (28%). The complete DNA profile of the carrier was found in 47 out of 180 samples (42 partial profiles). In summary, it could be shown that a transfer of donor DNA from epithelial cells through a carrier to a second item is possible, even if the carrier does not wear gloves.

  9. TbPIF5 is a Trypanosoma brucei mitochondrial DNA helicase involved in processing of minicircle Okazaki fragments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beiyu Liu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei's mitochondrial genome, kinetoplast DNA (kDNA, is a giant network of catenated DNA rings. The network consists of a few thousand 1 kb minicircles and several dozen 23 kb maxicircles. Here we report that TbPIF5, one of T. brucei's six mitochondrial proteins related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial DNA helicase ScPIF1, is involved in minicircle lagging strand synthesis. Like its yeast homolog, TbPIF5 is a 5' to 3' DNA helicase. Together with other enzymes thought to be involved in Okazaki fragment processing, TbPIF5 localizes in vivo to the antipodal sites flanking the kDNA. Minicircles in wild type cells replicate unidirectionally as theta-structures and are unusual in that Okazaki fragments are not joined until after the progeny minicircles have segregated. We now report that overexpression of TbPIF5 causes premature removal of RNA primers and joining of Okazaki fragments on theta structures. Further elongation of the lagging strand is blocked, but the leading strand is completed and the minicircle progeny, one with a truncated H strand (ranging from 0.1 to 1 kb, are segregated. The minicircles with a truncated H strand electrophorese on an agarose gel as a smear. This replication defect is associated with kinetoplast shrinkage and eventual slowing of cell growth. We propose that TbPIF5 unwinds RNA primers after lagging strand synthesis, thus facilitating processing of Okazaki fragments.

  10. Kin3 protein, a NIMA-related kinase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is involved in DNA adduct damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Dinara J; Castilhos, Bruna; Immich, Bruna F; Cañedo, Andrés D; Henriques, João A P; Lenz, Guido; Saffi, Jenifer

    2010-06-01

    Kin3 is a nonessential serine/threonine protein kinase of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with unknown cellular role. It is an ortholog of the Aspergillus nidulans protein kinase NIMA (Never-In Mitosis, gene A), which is involved in the regulation of G2/M phase progression, DNA damage response and mitosis. The aim of this study was to determine whether Kin3 is required for proper checkpoint activation and DNA repair. Here we show that KIN3 gene deficient cells present sensitivity and fail to arrest properly at G2/M-phase checkpoint in response to the DNA damage inducing agents MMS, cisplatin, doxorubicin and nitrogen mustard, suggesting that Kin3 can be involved in DNA strand breaks recognition or signaling. In addition, there is an increase in KIN3 gene expression in response to the mutagenic treatment, which was confirmed by the increase of Kin3 protein. We also showed that co-treatment with caffeine induces a slight increase in the susceptibility to genotoxic agents in kin3 cells and abolishes KIN3 gene expression in wild-type strain, suggesting that Kin3p can play a role in Tel1/Mec1-dependent pathway activation induced after genotoxic stress. These data provide the first evidence of the involvement of S. cerevisiae Kin3 in the DNA damage response.

  11. The role of hnRPUL1 involved in DNA damage response is related to PARP1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehui Hong

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U-like 1 (hnRPUL1 -also known as adenovirus early region 1B-associated proteins 5 (E1B-AP5 - plays a role in RNA metabolism. Recently, hnRPUL1 has also been shown to be involved in DNA damage response, but the function of hnRPUL1 in response to DNA damage remains unclear. Here, we have demonstrated that hnRPUL1 is associated with PARP1 and recruited to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs sites in a PARP1-mediated poly (ADP-ribosyl ation dependent manner. In turn, hnRPUL1 knockdown enhances the recruitment of PARP1 to DSBs sites. Specifically, we showed that hnRPUL1 is also implicated in the transcriptional regulation of PARP1 gene. Thus, we propose hnRPUL1 as a new component related to PARP1 in DNA damage response and repair.

  12. Involvement of the DNA mismatch repair system in cisplatin sensitivity of testicular germ cell tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Christiane; Melau, Cecilie; Nielsen, John E; Vile Jensen, Kristina; Liu, Dekang; Pena-Diaz, Javier; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Jørgensen, Anne

    2017-08-01

    particular MSH2 and MLH1, which are involved in the recognition of cisplatin adducts and in activation of the DNA damage response pathway to initiate apoptosis.

  13. Nucleotide sequence determination of the region in adenovirus 5 DNA involved in cell transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maat, J.

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of investigations into the primary structure of the transforming region of adenovirus type 5 DNA. The phenomenon of cell transformation is discussed in general terms and the principles of a number of fairly recent techniques, which have been in use for DNA sequence determination since 1975 are dealt with. A few of the author's own techniques are described which deal both with nucleotide sequence analysis and with the determination of DNA cleavage sites of restriction endonucleases. The results are given of the mapping of cleavage sites in the HpaI-E fragment of adenovirus DNA of HpaII, HaeIII, AluI, HinfI and TaqI and of the determination of the nucleotide sequence in the transforming region of adenovirus type 5 DNA. The results of the sequence determination of the Ad5 HindIII-G fragment are discussed in relation with the investigation on the transforming proteins isolated from in vitro and in vivo synthesizing systems. Labelling procedures of DNA are described including the exonuclease III/DNA polymerase 1 method and TA polynucleotide kinase labelling of DNA fragments. (Auth.)

  14. Gene activation of heavy ion treated bacillus subtilis 168 endospores during germination involved DNA-repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, R.; Berger, T.; Reitz, G.; Okayasu, Ryuichi

    2006-01-01

    This research project is aimed at correlating radiation effects induced DNA damage in Bacillus subtilis endospores with the linear energy transfer (LET) of the used radiation by investigating survival and gene activation after irradiation with high-LET particles. During the stationary growth phase Bacillus subtilis change their metabolic active state from the vegetative cells to the metabolic inactive but even more resistant endospores. If spores find optimal conditions, they could germinate and switch to the vegetative growth. With these outgrowth spores can and/or must repair the induced formed DNA damage. During germination spores lose their most resistance. In more detail, DNA repair and mutation induction events investigated will include the survivability, behaviour against specific antibiotics and their germination. DNA repair pattern will be detected during germination by using DNA microarrays, which contain the whole genome of Bacillus subtilis 168. (author)

  15. Dumbbell DNA-templated CuNPs as a nano-fluorescent probe for detection of enzymes involved in ligase-mediated DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Taiping; He, Xiaoxiao; He, Dinggeng; Ye, Xiaosheng; Shangguan, Jingfang; Liu, Jinquan; Yuan, Baoyin; Wang, Kemin

    2017-08-15

    DNA repair processes are responsible for maintaining genome stability. Ligase and polynucleotide kinase (PNK) have important roles in ligase-mediated DNA repair. The development of analytical methods to monitor these enzymes involved in DNA repair pathways is of great interest in biochemistry and biotechnology. In this work, we reported a new strategy for label-free monitoring PNK and ligase activity by using dumbbell-shaped DNA templated copper nanoparticles (CuNPs). In the presence of PNK and ligase, the dumbbell-shaped DNA probe (DP) was locked and could resist the digestion of exonucleases and then served as an efficient template for synthesizing fluorescent CuNPs. However, in the absence of ligase or PNK, the nicked DP could be digested by exonucleases and failed to template fluorescent CuNPs. Therefore, the fluorescence changes of CuNPs could be used to evaluate these enzymes activity. Under the optimal conditions, highly sensitive detection of ligase activity of about 1U/mL and PNK activity down to 0.05U/mL is achieved. To challenge the practical application capability of this strategy, the detection of analyte in dilute cells extracts was also investigated and showed similar linear relationships. In addition to ligase and PNK, this sensing strategy was also extended to the detection of phosphatase, which illustrates the versatility of this strategy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Multiple and variable NHEJ-like genes are involved in resistance to DNA damage in Streptomyces ambofaciens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégory Hoff

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Non homologous end-joining (NHEJ is a double strand break (DSB repair pathway which does not require any homologous template and can ligate two DNA ends together. The basic bacterial NHEJ machinery involves two partners: the Ku protein, a DNA end binding protein for DSB recognition and the multifunctional LigD protein composed a ligase, a nuclease and a polymerase domain, for end processing and ligation of the broken ends. In silico analyses performed in the 38 sequenced genomes of Streptomyces species revealed the existence of a large panel of NHEJ-like genes. Indeed, ku genes or ligD domain homologues are scattered throughout the genome in multiple copies and can be distinguished in two categories: the core NHEJ gene set constituted of conserved loci and the variable NHEJ gene set constituted of NHEJ-like genes present in only a part of the species. In Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC 23877, not only the deletion of core genes but also that of variable genes led to an increased sensitivity to DNA damage induced by electron beam irradiation. Multiple mutants of ku, ligase or polymerase encoding genes showed an aggravated phenotype compared to single mutants. Biochemical assays revealed the ability of Ku-like proteins to protect and to stimulate ligation of DNA ends. RT-qPCR and GFP fusion experiments suggested that ku-like genes show a growth phase dependent expression profile consistent with their involvement in DNA repair during spores formation and/or germination.

  17. A novel human AP endonuclease with conserved zinc-finger-like motifs involved in DNA strand break responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Shin-ichiro; Kuzuoka, Hiroyuki; Sasao, Shigeru; Hong, Zehui; Lan, Li; Nakajima, Satoshi; Yasui, Akira

    2007-01-01

    DNA damage causes genome instability and cell death, but many of the cellular responses to DNA damage still remain elusive. We here report a human protein, PALF (PNK and APTX-like FHA protein), with an FHA (forkhead-associated) domain and novel zinc-finger-like CYR (cysteine–tyrosine–arginine) motifs that are involved in responses to DNA damage. We found that the CYR motif is widely distributed among DNA repair proteins of higher eukaryotes, and that PALF, as well as a Drosophila protein with tandem CYR motifs, has endo- and exonuclease activities against abasic site and other types of base damage. PALF accumulates rapidly at single-strand breaks in a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1)-dependent manner in human cells. Indeed, PALF interacts directly with PARP1 and is required for its activation and for cellular resistance to methyl-methane sulfonate. PALF also interacts directly with KU86, LIGASEIV and phosphorylated XRCC4 proteins and possesses endo/exonuclease activity at protruding DNA ends. Various treatments that produce double-strand breaks induce formation of PALF foci, which fully coincide with γH2AX foci. Thus, PALF and the CYR motif may play important roles in DNA repair of higher eukaryotes. PMID:17396150

  18. Lead-induced DNA damage in Vicia faba root cells: Potential involvement of oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    Pourrut, Bertrand; Jean, Séverine; Silvestre, Jérôme; Pinelli, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Genotoxic effects of lead (0–20 µM) were investigated in whole-plant roots of Vicia faba L., grown hydroponically under controlled conditions. Lead-induced DNA damage in V. faba roots was evaluated by use of the comet assay, which allowed the detection of DNA strand-breakage and with the V. faba micronucleus test, which revealed chromosome aberrations. The results clearly indicate that lead induced DNA fragmentation in a dose-dependant manner with a maximum effect at 10 µM. In addition, at th...

  19. A polycomb group protein, PHF1, is involved in the response to DNA double-strand breaks in human cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Zehui; Jiang, Jie; Lan, Li; Nakajima, Satoshi; Kanno, Shin-ichiro; Koseki, Haruhiko; Yasui, Akira

    2008-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) represent the most toxic DNA damage arisen from endogenous and exogenous genotoxic stresses and are known to be repaired by either homologous recombination or nonhomologous end-joining processes. Although many proteins have been identified to participate in either of the processes, the whole processes still remain elusive. Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are epigenetic chromatin modifiers involved in gene silencing, cancer development and the maintenance of embryonic and adult stem cells. By screening proteins responding to DNA damage using laser micro-irradiation, we found that PHF1, a human homolog of Drosophila polycomb-like, Pcl, protein, was recruited to DSBs immediately after irradiation and dissociated within 10 min. The accumulation at DSBs is Ku70/Ku80-dependent, and knockdown of PHF1 leads to X-ray sensitivity and increases the frequency of homologous recombination in HeLa cell. We found that PHF1 interacts physically with Ku70/Ku80, suggesting that PHF1 promotes nonhomologous end-joining processes. Furthermore, we found that PHF1 interacts with a number of proteins involved in DNA damage responses, RAD50, SMC1, DHX9 and p53, further suggesting that PHF1, besides the function in PcG, is involved in genome maintenance processes. PMID:18385154

  20. Proteomic Identification of DNA-PK Involvement within the RET Signaling Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyle J Burdine

    Full Text Available Constitutive activation of the Rearranged during Transfection (RET proto-oncogene leads to the development of MEN2A medullary thyroid cancer (MTC. The relatively clear genotype/phenotype relationship seen with RET mutations and the development of MEN2A is unusual in the fact that a single gene activity can drive the progression towards metastatic disease. Despite knowing the oncogene responsible for MEN2A, MTC, like most tumors of neural crest origin, remains largely resistant to chemotherapy. Constitutive activation of RET in a SK-N-MC cell line model reduces cell sensitivity to chemotherapy. In an attempt to identify components of the machinery responsible for the observed RET induced chemoresistance, we performed a proteomic screen of histones and associated proteins in cells with a constitutively active RET signaling pathway. The proteomic approach identified DNA-PKcs, a DNA damage response protein, as a target of the RET signaling pathway. Active DNA-PKcs, which is phosphorylated at site serine 2056 and localized to chromatin, was elevated within our model. Treatment with the RET inhibitor RPI-1 significantly reduced s2056 phosphorylation in RET cells as well as in a human medullary thyroid cancer cell line. Additionally, inhibition of DNA-PKcs activity diminished the chemoresistance observed in both cell lines. Importantly, we show that activated DNA-PKcs is elevated in medullary thyroid tumor samples and that expression correlates with expression of RET in thyroid tumors. These results highlight one mechanism by which RET signaling likely primes cells for rapid response to DNA damage and suggests DNA-PKcs as an additional target in MTC.

  1. The involvement of nuclear nucleases in rat thymocyte DNA degradation after γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikonova, L.V.; Nelipovich, P.A.; Umansky, S.R.

    1982-01-01

    Possible mechanisms of internucleosomal DNA fragmentation in thymocytes of irradiated rats were studied. It was shown that thymocyte nuclei contain at least two nucleases that cleave DNA between nucleosomes - a Ca 2+ /Mg 2+ -dependent nuclease and an acidic one which does not depend on bivalent ions. 2 and 3 h after irradiation at a dose of 10 Gy the initial rate of DNA cleavage by Ca 2+ /Mg 2+ -dependent nuclease in isolated nuclei increased three and seven times, respectively, but the kinetics of DNA digestion by acidic nuclease did not change. The experiments with cycloheximide indicated that Ca 2+ /Mg 2+ -dependent endonuclease turns over at a high rate. The activity of the cytoplasmic acidic and Mg 2+ -dependent nucleases was shown to increase (by 40 and 50%, respectively) 3h after irradiation. The effect is caused by the de novo synthesis of the nucleases. At the same time the activity of nuclear nucleases did not essentially change. The chromatin isolated from rat thymocytes 3 h after irradiation did not differ in its sensitivity to some exogenic nucleases (DNAase I, micrococcal nuclease and nuclease from Serratia marcescens) from the control. Thus, Ca 2+ /Mg 2+ -dependent endonuclease seems to be responsible for the postirradiation internucleosomal DNA fragmentation in dying thymocytes. (Auth.)

  2. Ionizing radiation-induced modulation of activities of the enzymes involved in DNA methylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batra, Vipen; Kesavan, V.; Mishra, K.P.

    2004-01-01

    Studies have indicated that radiation might create a state of folate insufficiency by mobilization of cellular folate in DNA repair pathways. The present result indicates an optimization between methylation reaction versus deoxithymidylate synthesis took place in vivo after whole body irradiation as both the reaction depended upon folate, which possibly was a limiting factor under radiation stress

  3. DNA methylation in the human cerebral cortex is dynamically regulated throughout the life span and involves differentiated neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly D Siegmund

    Full Text Available The role of DNA cytosine methylation, an epigenetic regulator of chromatin structure and function, during normal and pathological brain development and aging remains unclear. Here, we examined by MethyLight PCR the DNA methylation status at 50 loci, encompassing primarily 5' CpG islands of genes related to CNS growth and development, in temporal neocortex of 125 subjects ranging in age from 17 weeks of gestation to 104 years old. Two psychiatric disease cohorts--defined by chronic neurodegeneration (Alzheimer's or lack thereof (schizophrenia--were included. A robust and progressive rise in DNA methylation levels across the lifespan was observed for 8/50 loci (GABRA2, GAD1, HOXA1, NEUROD1, NEUROD2, PGR, STK11, SYK typically in conjunction with declining levels of the corresponding mRNAs. Another 16 loci were defined by a sharp rise in DNA methylation levels within the first few months or years after birth. Disease-associated changes were limited to 2/50 loci in the Alzheimer's cohort, which appeared to reflect an acceleration of the age-related change in normal brain. Additionally, methylation studies on sorted nuclei provided evidence for bidirectional methylation events in cortical neurons during the transition from childhood to advanced age, as reflected by significant increases at 3, and a decrease at 1 of 10 loci. Furthermore, the DNMT3a de novo DNA methyl-transferase was expressed across all ages, including a subset of neurons residing in layers III and V of the mature cortex. Therefore, DNA methylation is dynamically regulated in the human cerebral cortex throughout the lifespan, involves differentiated neurons, and affects a substantial portion of genes predominantly by an age-related increase.

  4. Histone Modification Is Involved in Okadaic Acid (OA Induced DNA Damage Response and G2-M Transition Arrest in Maize.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zhang

    Full Text Available Histone modifications are involved in regulation of chromatin structure. To investigate the relationship between chromatin modification and cell cycle regulation during plant cell proliferation, Okadaic acid (OA, a specific inhibitor of serine/threonine protein phosphatase, was applied in this study. The results showed that OA caused the cell cycle arrest at preprophase, leading to seedling growth inhibition. Western blotting assay revealed that the spatial distribution of phosphorylation of Ser10 histone H3 tails (H3S10ph signals was altered under OA treatment. Reactive oxygen species (ROS was found to be at higher levels and TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL assay displayed DNA breaks happened at the chromatin after treatment with OA, companied with an increase in the acetylation of histone H4 at lysine 5 (H4K5ac level. From these observations, we speculated that the alteration of the spatial distribution of H3S10ph and the level of H4K5ac was involved in the procedure that OA induced DNA breaks and G2-M arrested by the accumulation of ROS, and that the histone H3S10ph and H4K5ac might facilitate DNA repair by their association with the chromatin decondensation.

  5. Involvement of aberrant DNA methylation on reduced expression of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-1 gene in rat tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi; Shimizu, Kyoko; Onishi, Mariko; Sugata, Eriko; Fujii, Hiromasa; Mori, Toshio; Honoki, Kanya; Fukushima, Nobuyuki

    2006-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid that stimulates cell proliferation, migration, and protects cells from apoptosis. It interacts with specific G protein-coupled transmembrane receptors. Recently, it has been reported that alterations of LPA receptor expression might be important in the malignant transformation of tumor cells. Therefore, to assess an involvement of DNA methylation in reduced expression of the LPA receptor-1 (lpa1) gene, we investigated the expression of the lpa1 gene and its DNA methylation patterns in rat tumor cell lines. Both rat brain-derived neuroblastoma B103 and liver-derived hepatoma RH7777 cells used in this study indicated no expression of lpa1. For the analysis of methylation status, bisulfite sequencing was performed with B103 and RH7777 cells, comparing with other lpa1 expressed cells and normal tissues of brain and liver. The lpa1 expressed cells and tissues were all unmethylated in this region of lpa1. In contrast, both B103 and RH7777 cells were highly methylated, correlating with reduced expression of the lpa1. Treatment with 5-aza 2'-deoxycytidine induced expression of lpa1 gene in B103 and RH7777 cells after 24 h. In RH7777 cells treated with 5-aza 2'-deoxycytidine, stress fiber formation was also observed in response to LPA in RH7777 cells, but not in untreated RH7777 cells. These results suggest that aberrant DNA methylation of the lpa1 gene may be involved in its reduced expression in rat tumor cells

  6. Micrococcus luteus correndonucleases. III. Evidence for involvement in repair in vivo of two endonucleases specific for DNA containing pyrimidine dimers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riazuddin, S.; Grossman, L.; Mahler, I.

    1977-01-01

    Involvement of Py--Py correndonucleases I and II in repair of ultraviolet radiation damage in vivo by Micrococcus luteus has been demonstrated by their absence in the ultraviolet-sensitive mutant DB-7 derived by treatment of the wild type parent with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. The necessity for their combined action in DNA repair in M. luteus is shown by: (a) reactivation of ultraviolet-damaged phiX174 RFI DNA in incision-defective hosts after in vivo treatment with both enzymes, (b) correlation between survival after ultraviolet irradiation and the level of the two enzymes, and (c) increased levels of repair synthesis after ultraviolet irradiation of toluenized cells DB-400 with wild type correndonuclease levels when compared with the transformant DB-200 and the mutant DB-7, which lack one or both enzymes

  7. A small interfering RNA screen of genes involved in DNA repair identifies tumor-specific radiosensitization by POLQ knockdown

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Higgins, Geoff S; Prevo, Remko; Lee, Yin-Fai

    2010-01-01

    The effectiveness of radiotherapy treatment could be significantly improved if tumor cells could be rendered more sensitive to ionizing radiation (IR) without altering the sensitivity of normal tissues. However, many of the key therapeutically exploitable mechanisms that determine intrinsic tumor...... radiosensitivity are largely unknown. We have conducted a small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen of 200 genes involved in DNA damage repair aimed at identifying genes whose knockdown increased tumor radiosensitivity. Parallel siRNA screens were conducted in irradiated and unirradiated tumor cells (SQ20B......) and irradiated normal tissue cells (MRC5). Using gammaH2AX foci at 24 hours after IR, we identified several genes, such as BRCA2, Lig IV, and XRCC5, whose knockdown is known to cause increased cell radiosensitivity, thereby validating the primary screening end point. In addition, we identified POLQ (DNA...

  8. Involvement of Werner syndrome protein in MUTYH-mediated repair of oxidative DNA damage

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kanagaraj, R.; Parasuraman, P.; Mihaljevic, B.; van Loon, B.; Burdová, Kamila; König, C.; Furrer, A.; Bohr, V.A.; Hübscher, U.; Janscak, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 17 (2012), s. 8449-8459 ISSN 0305-1048 Grant - others:Swiss National Science Foundation(CH) 31003A-129747/1; Swiss National Science Foundation(CH) 3100-109312/2; Oncosuisse(CH) KLS-02344-02-2009; NIH(US) Z01-AG000726-17 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : DNA repair * oxidative stress * MUTYH * WRN * Pol lambda Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 8.278, year: 2012

  9. The involvement of human RECQL4 in DNA double-strand break repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Karmakar, Parimal; Aamann, Maria Diget

    2010-01-01

    Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS) is an autosomal recessive hereditary disorder associated with mutation in RECQL4 gene, a member of the human RecQ helicases. The disease is characterized by genomic instability, skeletal abnormalities and predisposition to malignant tumors, especially osteosarcomas......-induced DSBs and remains for a shorter duration than WRN and BLM, indicating its distinct role in repair of DSBs. Endogenous RECQL4 also colocalizes with gammaH2AX at the site of DSBs. The RECQL4 domain responsible for its DNA damage localization has been mapped to the unique N-terminus domain between amino...

  10. A leucine aminopeptidase is involved in kinetoplast DNA segregation in Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peña-Diaz, Priscila; Vancová, Marie; Resl, C.; Field, M.C.; Lukeš, Julius

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 4 (2017), č. článku e1006310. E-ISSN 1553-7374 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-18699S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : site-specific recombination * basal body movements * mitochondrial-dna * leucyl aminopeptidase * crithidia-fasciculata * escherichia-coli * cell-cycle * minicircle replication * phylogenetic analysis * genome segregation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Genetics and heredity (medical genetics to be 3) Impact factor: 7.003, year: 2015

  11. Genes Involved in DNA Double-Strand Break Repair: Implications for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-10-01

    dependent kinase (p350) as a cietv of America Scholar. W.K.R. is a Howard Hughes Medical Insti- candidate gene for the murine SCID defect. Science 267:1178...Howard Hughes Medical Institute (W. K. R.). 26), are rescued by transfection of Ku86 cDNA (27, 28), and have 2 To whom requests for reprints should be... Jackman . J.. Wang. M. G., McBride. 0. W., and Fornace, 40. Papathanasiou. M. A.. Kerr, N. C. K., Robbins, J. H., McBride. 0. W., Alamo, I., A. J

  12. DNA methylation perturbations in genes involved in polyunsaturated Fatty Acid biosynthesis associated with depression and suicide risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighi, Fatemeh; Galfalvy, Hanga; Chen, Sean; Huang, Yung-Yu; Cooper, Thomas B; Burke, Ainsley K; Oquendo, Maria A; Mann, J John; Sublette, M Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) status has been associated with neuropsychiatric disorders, including depression and risk of suicide. Long-chain PUFAs (LC-PUFAs) are obtained in the diet or produced by sequential desaturation and elongation of shorter-chain precursor fatty acids linoleic acid (LA, 18:2n-6) and α-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3n-3). We compared DNA methylation patterns in genes involved in LC-PUFA biosynthesis in major depressive disorder (MDD) with (n = 22) and without (n = 39) history of suicide attempt, and age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers (n = 59). Plasma levels of selected PUFAs along the LC-PUFA biosynthesis pathway were determined by transesterification and gas chromatography. CpG methylation levels for the main human LC-PUFA biosynthetic genes, fatty acid desaturases 1 (Fads1) and 2 (Fads2), and elongation of very long-chain fatty acids protein 5 (Elovl5), were assayed by bisulfite pyrosequencing. Associations between PUFA levels and diagnosis or suicide attempt status did not survive correction for multiple testing. However, MDD diagnosis and suicide attempts were significantly associated with DNA methylation in Elovl5 gene regulatory regions. Also the relative roles of PUFA levels and DNA methylation with respect to diagnostic and suicide attempt status were determined by least absolute shrinkage and selection operator logistic regression analyses. We found that PUFA associations with suicide attempt status were explained by effects of Elovl5 DNA methylation within the regulatory regions. The observed link between plasma PUFA levels, DNA methylation, and suicide risk may have implications for modulation of disease-associated epigenetic marks by nutritional intervention.

  13. DNA methylation perturbations in genes involved in polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis associated with depression and suicide risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh eHaghighi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA status has been associated with neuropsychiatric disorders, including depression and risk of suicide. Long-chain PUFAs (LC-PUFAs are obtained in the diet or produced by sequential desaturation and elongation of shorter-chain precursor fatty acids linoleic acid (LA, 18:2n-6 and α-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3n-3. We compared DNA methylation patterns in genes involved in LC-PUFA biosynthesis in major depressive disorder (MDD with (n=22 and without (n=39 history of suicide attempt, and age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers (n=59. Plasma levels of selected PUFAs along the LC-PUFA biosynthesis pathway were determined by transesterification and gas chromatography. CpG methylation levels for the main human LC-PUFA biosynthetic genes, fatty acid desaturases 1 (Fads1 and 2 (Fads2, and elongation of very long chain fatty acids protein 5 (Elovl5, were assayed by bisulfite pyrosequencing. Associations between PUFA levels and diagnosis or suicide attempt status did not survive correction for multiple testing. However, MDD diagnosis and suicide attempts were significantly associated with DNA methylation in Elovl5 gene regulatory regions. Also the relative roles of PUFA levels and DNA methylation with respect to diagnostic and suicide attempt status were determined by least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO logistic regression analyses. We found that PUFA associations with suicide attempt status were explained by effects of Elovl5 DNA methylation within the regulatory regions. The observed link between plasma PUFA levels, DNA methylation, and suicide risk may have implications for modulation of disease-associated epigenetic marks by nutritional intervention.

  14. 77 FR 54584 - Final Action Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-05

    ... changes. Human gene transfer also raises scientific, medical, social, and ethical considerations that... currently reviewed under Section III-B-1, Experiments Involving the Cloning of Toxin Molecules with LD50 of...

  15. Possible mechanism of psoralen phototoxicity not involving direct interaction with DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskin, J.D.; Lee, E.; Yurkow, E.J.; Laskin, D.L.; Gallo, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    Psoralens in combination with ultraviolet light (UVA; 320-400 nm) are used in the photochemical treatment of a variety of skin diseases including vitiligo, a skin depigmentational disorder, and psoriasis, a disease of accelerated epidermal cell proliferation. Although it is generally assumed that the major site of action of the psoralens is DNA, the authors have obtained evidence that another site may be the primary target for these compounds. They have identified specific, saturable, high-affinity binding sites for 8-methoxypsoralen on HeLa cells and have detected specific binding of 8-methoxypsoralen to four other human cell lines and five mouse cell lines. In HeLa cells, specific binding is reversible and independent of the ability of the compound to intercalate into DNA. In addition, binding sites become covalently modified by the psoralen after UVA exposure. Specific binding of 8-[methyoxy- 3 H]methoxypsoralen constitutes 79% of the label bound to the cells. Scatchard analysis indicated two classes of psoralen binding sites. Based on these findings, the authors hypothesize that specific binding sites for psoralens on mammalian cells mediate, at least in part, psoralen-induced phototoxicity

  16. Involvement of sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol in DNA synthesis in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoki Motohide

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol (SQDG is present in the membranes of cyanobacteria and their postulated progeny, plastids, in plants. A cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, requires SQDG for growth: its mutant (SD1 with the sqdB gene for SQDG synthesis disrupted can grow with external supplementation of SQDG. However, upon removal of SQDG from the medium, its growth is retarded, with a decrease in the cellular content of SQDG throughout cell division, and finally ceases. Concomitantly with the decrease in SQDG, the maximal activity of photosynthesis at high-light intensity is repressed by 40%. Findings We investigated effects of SQDG-defect on physiological aspects in Synechocystis with the use of SD1. SD1 cells defective in SQDG exhibited normal photosynthesis at low-light intensity as on culturing. Meanwhile, SD1 cells defective in SQDG were impaired in light-activated heterotrophic growth as well as in photoautotrophic growth. Flow cytometric analysis of the photoautotrophically growing cells gave similar cell size histograms for the wild type and SD1 supplemented with SQDG. However, the profile of SD1 defective in SQDG changed such that large part of the cell population was increased in size. Of particular interest was the microscopic observation that the mitotic index, i.e., population of dumbbell-like cells with a septum, increased from 14 to 29% in the SD1 culture without SQDG. Flow cytometric analysis also showed that the enlarged cells of SD1 defective in SQDG contained high levels of Chl, however, the DNA content was low. Conclusions Our experiments strongly support the idea that photosynthesis is not the limiting factor for the growth of SD1 defective in SQDG, and that SQDG is responsible for some physiologically fundamental process common to both photoautotrophic and light-activated heterotrophic growth. Our findings suggest that the SQDG-defect allows construction of the photosynthetic machinery at an

  17. Involvement of DNA repair in telomere maintenance and chromosomal instability in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayouaz, Ali

    2008-01-01

    Telomeres are a major actor of cell immortalization, precursor of a carcinogenesis process. Thus, it appears that the maintenance of telomeres is crucial in the implementation of carcinogenesis process. Due to their structures and under some conditions, telomeres can be assimilated in some respects to chromosomal breakages. Within this perspective, this research thesis aims at determining under which circumstances telomeres can be taken as targets by DNA repair mechanisms. More precisely, the author addressed the respective contributions of two repair mechanisms (the Non-Homologous End-Joining or NHEJ, and Homologous Recombination or HR) in the maintenance of telomere integrity. The author first discusses knowledge related to the interaction between chromosomal extremities and repair mechanisms. Then, he defines the behaviour of these mechanisms with respect to telomeres. He shows that, in absence of recombination mechanisms, the integrity of telomeres is not affected. Finally, he reports the attempt to determine their respective contributions in telomeric homeostasis [fr

  18. Critical involvement of the ATM-dependent DNA damage response in the apoptotic demise of HIV-1-elicited syncytia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Luc Perfettini

    Full Text Available DNA damage can activate the oncosuppressor protein ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM, which phosphorylates the histone H2AX within characteristic DNA damage foci. Here, we show that ATM undergoes an activating phosphorylation in syncytia elicited by the envelope glycoprotein complex (Env of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 in vitro. This was accompanied by aggregation of ATM in discrete nuclear foci that also contained phospho-histone H2AX. DNA damage foci containing phosphorylated ATM and H2AX were detectable in syncytia present in the brain or lymph nodes from patients with HIV-1 infection, as well as in a fraction of blood leukocytes, correlating with viral status. Knockdown of ATM or of its obligate activating factor NBS1 (Nijmegen breakage syndrome 1 protein, as well as pharmacological inhibition of ATM with KU-55933, inhibited H2AX phosphorylation and prevented Env-elicited syncytia from undergoing apoptosis. ATM was found indispensable for the activation of MAP kinase p38, which catalyzes the activating phosphorylation of p53 on serine 46, thereby causing p53 dependent apoptosis. Both wild type HIV-1 and an HIV-1 mutant lacking integrase activity induced syncytial apoptosis, which could be suppressed by inhibiting ATM. HIV-1-infected T lymphoblasts from patients with inactivating ATM or NBS1 mutations also exhibited reduced syncytial apoptosis. Altogether these results indicate that apoptosis induced by a fusogenic HIV-1 Env follows a pro-apoptotic pathway involving the sequential activation of ATM, p38MAPK and p53.

  19. The essential DNA polymerases δ and ε are involved in repair of UV-damaged DNA in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halas, A.; Policinska, Z.; Baranowska, H.; Jachymczyk, W.J.

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the ability of yeast DNA polymerases to carry out repair of lesions caused by UV irradiation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By the analysis of postirradiation relative molecular mass changes in cellular DNA of different DNA polymerases mutant strains, it was established that mutations in DNA polymerases δ and ε showed accumulation of single-strand breaks indicating defective repair. Mutations in other DNA polymerase genes exhibited no defects in DNA repair. Thus, the data obtained suggest that DNA polymerases δ and ε are both necessary for DNA replication and for repair of lesions caused by UV irradiation. The results are discussed in the light of current concepts concerning the specificity of DNA polymerases in DNA repair. (author)

  20. Involvement of two microRNAs in the early immune response to DNA vaccination against a fish rhabdovirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bela-ong, Dennis Berbulla; Schyth, Brian Dall; Zou, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms that account for the high protective efficacy in teleost fish of a DNA vaccine expressing the glycoprotein (G) of Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) are thought to involve early innate immune responses mediated by interferons (IFNs). Microribonucleic acids (miRNAs) are a diverse...... class of small (18–22 nucleotides) endogenous RNAs that potently mediate post-transcriptional silencing of a wide range of genes and are emerging as critical regulators of cellular processes, including immune responses. We have recently reported that miR-462 and miR-731 were strongly induced in rainbow......RNAs using anti-miRNA oligonucleotides was conducted in poly I:C-treated rainbow trout fingerlings. Following VHSV challenge, anti-miRNA-injected fish had faster development of disease and higher mortalities than control fish, indicating that miR-462/731 may be involved in IFN-mediated protection conferred...

  1. The Q Motif Is Involved in DNA Binding but Not ATP Binding in ChlR1 Helicase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Ding

    Full Text Available Helicases are molecular motors that couple the energy of ATP hydrolysis to the unwinding of structured DNA or RNA and chromatin remodeling. The conversion of energy derived from ATP hydrolysis into unwinding and remodeling is coordinated by seven sequence motifs (I, Ia, II, III, IV, V, and VI. The Q motif, consisting of nine amino acids (GFXXPXPIQ with an invariant glutamine (Q residue, has been identified in some, but not all helicases. Compared to the seven well-recognized conserved helicase motifs, the role of the Q motif is less acknowledged. Mutations in the human ChlR1 (DDX11 gene are associated with a unique genetic disorder known as Warsaw Breakage Syndrome, which is characterized by cellular defects in genome maintenance. To examine the roles of the Q motif in ChlR1 helicase, we performed site directed mutagenesis of glutamine to alanine at residue 23 in the Q motif of ChlR1. ChlR1 recombinant protein was overexpressed and purified from HEK293T cells. ChlR1-Q23A mutant abolished the helicase activity of ChlR1 and displayed reduced DNA binding ability. The mutant showed impaired ATPase activity but normal ATP binding. A thermal shift assay revealed that ChlR1-Q23A has a melting point value similar to ChlR1-WT. Partial proteolysis mapping demonstrated that ChlR1-WT and Q23A have a similar globular structure, although some subtle conformational differences in these two proteins are evident. Finally, we found ChlR1 exists and functions as a monomer in solution, which is different from FANCJ, in which the Q motif is involved in protein dimerization. Taken together, our results suggest that the Q motif is involved in DNA binding but not ATP binding in ChlR1 helicase.

  2. Involvement of DNA methylation in the control of cell growth during heat stress in tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centomani, Isabella; Sgobba, Alessandra; D'Addabbo, Pietro; Dipierro, Nunzio; Paradiso, Annalisa; De Gara, Laura; Dipierro, Silvio; Viggiano, Luigi; de Pinto, Maria Concetta

    2015-11-01

    The alteration of growth patterns, through the adjustment of cell division and expansion, is a characteristic response of plants to environmental stress. In order to study this response in more depth, the effect of heat stress on growth was investigated in tobacco BY-2 cells. The results indicate that heat stress inhibited cell division, by slowing cell cycle progression. Cells were stopped in the pre-mitotic phases, as shown by the increased expression of CycD3-1 and by the decrease in the NtCycA13, NtCyc29 and CDKB1-1 transcripts. The decrease in cell length and the reduced expression of Nt-EXPA5 indicated that cell expansion was also inhibited. Since DNA methylation plays a key role in controlling gene expression, the possibility that the altered expression of genes involved in the control of cell growth, observed during heat stress, could be due to changes in the methylation state of their promoters was investigated. The results show that the altered expression of CycD3-1 and Nt-EXPA5 was consistent with changes in the methylation state of the upstream region of these genes. These results suggest that DNA methylation, controlling the expression of genes involved in plant development, contributes to growth alteration occurring in response to environmental changes.

  3. Identification of BC005512 as a DNA damage responsive murine endogenous retrovirus of GLN family involved in cell growth regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanfeng Wu

    Full Text Available Genotoxicity assessment is of great significance in drug safety evaluation, and microarray is a useful tool widely used to identify genotoxic stress responsive genes. In the present work, by using oligonucleotide microarray in an in vivo model, we identified an unknown gene BC005512 (abbreviated as BC, official full name: cDNA sequence BC005512, whose expression in mouse liver was specifically induced by seven well-known genotoxins (GTXs, but not by non-genotoxins (NGTXs. Bioinformatics revealed that BC was a member of the GLN family of murine endogenous retrovirus (ERV. However, the relationship to genotoxicity and the cellular function of GLN are largely unknown. Using NIH/3T3 cells as an in vitro model system and quantitative real-time PCR, BC expression was specifically induced by another seven GTXs, covering diverse genotoxicity mechanisms. Additionally, dose-response and linear regression analysis showed that expression level of BC in NIH/3T3 cells strongly correlated with DNA damage, measured using the alkaline comet assay,. While in p53 deficient L5178Y cells, GTXs could not induce BC expression. Further functional studies using RNA interference revealed that down-regulation of BC expression induced G1/S phase arrest, inhibited cell proliferation and thus suppressed cell growth in NIH/3T3 cells. Together, our results provide the first evidence that BC005512, a member from GLN family of murine ERV, was responsive to DNA damage and involved in cell growth regulation. These findings could be of great value in genotoxicity predictions and contribute to a deeper understanding of GLN biological functions.

  4. A ketoreductase gene from Streptomyces mycarofaciens 1748 DNA involved in biosynthesis of a spore pigment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏焕章; 王以光

    1997-01-01

    An efficient plasmid transformation system for S. mycarofaciens 1748 has been established. In order to determine the function of MKR gene in S. mycarofaciens 1748, the gene disruption experiment was carried out. For this purpose the plasmid pKC1139 was used. A recombinant strain with white spore appeared, in contrast to the grey-colour spore of S. mycarofaciens 1748. This suggested that homologous recombination between plasmid-borne MKR gene sequence and the chromosome of S. mycarofaciens 1748 had occurred. A Southern hybridization experiment using α- P-labelled MKR gene as probe indicated that the desired integration event had occurred in the re-combinant. The result of gene disruption showed that the alteration of this gene in the chromosome of S. mycarofa-ciens 1748 made sporulating colonies remain white instead of taking on the typical grey colour of sporulating wild type colonies, suggesting that MKR gene is involved in the biosynthesis of a spore pigment. The recombinant strain was in-cubated wit

  5. cDNA Library Screening Identifies Protein Interactors Potentially Involved in Non-telomeric Roles of Arabidopsis Telomerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav eDokládal

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase-reverse transcriptase (TERT plays an essential catalytic role in maintaining telomeres. However, in animal systems telomerase plays additional non-telomeric functional roles. We previously screened an Arabidopsis cDNA library for proteins that interact with the C-terminal extension (CTE TERT domain and identified a nuclear-localized protein that contains a RNA recognition motif (RRM. This RRM-protein forms homodimers in both plants and yeast. Mutation of the gene encoding the RRM-protein had no detectable effect on plant growth and development, nor did it affect telomerase activity or telomere length in vivo, suggesting a non-telomeric role for TERT/RRM-protein complexes. The gene encoding the RRM-protein is highly expressed in leaf and reproductive tissues. We further screened an Arabidopsis cDNA library for proteins that interact with the RRM-protein and identified five interactors. These proteins are involved in numerous non-telomere-associated cellular activities. In plants, the RRM-protein, both alone and in a complex with its interactors, localizes to nuclear speckles. Transcriptional analyses in wild-type and rrm mutant plants, as well as transcriptional co-analyses, suggest that TERT, the RRM-protein, and the RRM-protein interactors may play important roles in non-telomeric cellular functions.

  6. DNA rearrangement in human follicular lymphoma can involve the 5' or the 3' region of the bcl-2 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimoto, Y.; Bashir, M.M.; Givol, I.; Cossman, J.; Jaffe, E.; Croce, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    In most human lymphomas, the chromosome translocation t(14;18) occurs within two breakpoint clustering regions on chromosome 18, the major one at the 3' untranslated region of the bcl-2 gene and the minor one at 3' of the gene. Analysis of a panel of follicular lymphoma DNAs using probes for the first exon of the bcl-2 gene indicates that DNA rearrangements may also occur 5' to the involved bcl-2 gene. In this case the IgH locus and the bcl-2 gene are found in an order suggesting that an inversion also occurred during the translocation process. The coding region of the bcl-2 gene, however, are left intact in all cases of follicular lymphoma studied to date

  7. TLR9 and NF-κB are partially involved in activation of human neutrophils by Helicobacter pylori and its purified DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Alvarez-Arellano

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection represents one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide. The inflammatory response to this bacterium involves a large influx of neutrophils to the lamina propria of the gastric mucosa. However, little is known about the receptors and molecular mechanisms involved in activation of these neutrophils. In this study, we aimed to determine the role of toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9 in the response of human neutrophils to H. pylori and purified H. pylori DNA (Hp-DNA. Neutrophils were isolated from the blood of adult volunteers and challenged with either H. pylori or Hp-DNA. We found that both, H. pylori and Hp-DNA induced increased expression and release of IL-8. Furthermore, we showed that TLR9 is involved in the induction of IL-8 production by H. pylori and Hp-DNA. IL-8 production induced by H. pylori but not by Hp-DNA was partially mediated by NF-κB. In conclusion, this study showed for first time that both, H. pylori and Hp-DNA activate TLR9 and induce a different inflammatory response that leads to activation of neutrophils.

  8. Secreted single‐stranded DNA is involved in the initial phase of biofilm formation by Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zweig, Maria; Schork, Sabine; Koerdt, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    plays an important role in biofilm formation. Many clinical isolates contain a gonococcal genetic island that encodes a type IV secretion system (T4SS). The T4SS of N. gonorrhoeae strain MS11 secretes ssDNA directly into the medium. Biofilm formation, studied in continuous flow‐chamber systems...... was developed in which thermostable fluorescently labelled ssDNA‐ and ss/dsDNA‐binding proteins were used to visualize ssDNA and total DNA in biofilms and planktonic cultures. Remarkably, mainly dsDNA was detected in biofilms of the ssDNA secreting strain. We conclude that the secreted ssDNA facilitates initial...

  9. Responses of genes involved in cell cycle control to diverse DNA damaging chemicals in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gooderham Nigel J

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many anticancer agents and carcinogens are DNA damaging chemicals and exposure to such chemicals results in the deregulation of cell cycle progression. The molecular mechanisms of DNA damage-induced cell cycle alteration are not well understood. We have studied the effects of etoposide (an anticancer agent, cryptolepine (CLP, a cytotoxic alkaloid, benzo [a]pyrene (BaP, a carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo [4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP, a cooked-meat derived carcinogen on the expression of cell cycle regulatory genes to understand the molecular mechanisms of the cell cycle disturbance. Results A549 cells were treated with DMSO or chemicals for up to 72 h and periodically sampled for cell cycle analysis, mRNA and protein expression. DMSO treated cells showed a dominant G1 peak in cell cycle at all times examined. Etoposide and CLP both induced G2/M phase arrest yet the former altered the expression of genes functioning at multiple phases, whilst the latter was more effective in inhibiting the expression of genes in G2-M transition. Both etoposide and CLP induced an accumulation of p53 protein and upregulation of p53 transcriptional target genes. Neither BaP nor PhIP had substantial phase-specific cell cycle effect, however, they induced distinctive changes in gene expression. BaP upregulated the expression of CYP1B1 at 6–24 h and downregulated many cell cycle regulatory genes at 48–72 h. By contrast, PhIP increased the expression of many cell cycle regulatory genes. Changes in the expression of key mRNAs were confirmed at protein level. Conclusion Our experiments show that DNA damaging agents with different mechanisms of action induced distinctive changes in the expression pattern of a panel of cell cycle regulatory genes. We suggest that examining the genomic response to chemical exposure provides an exceptional opportunity to understand the molecular mechanism involved in cellular

  10. Copy number variations of genes involved in stress responses reflect the redox state and DNA damage in brewing yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Jagoda; Deregowska, Anna; Skoneczny, Marek; Skoneczna, Adrianna; Natkanska, Urszula; Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Rawska, Ewa; Potocki, Leszek; Kuna, Ewelina; Panek, Anita; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2016-09-01

    The yeast strains of the Saccharomyces sensu stricto complex involved in beer production are a heterogeneous group whose genetic and genomic features are not adequately determined. Thus, the aim of the present study was to provide a genetic characterization of selected group of commercially available brewing yeasts both ale top-fermenting and lager bottom-fermenting strains. Molecular karyotyping revealed that the diversity of chromosome patterns and four strains with the most accented genetic variabilities were selected and subjected to genome-wide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) analysis. The differences in the gene copy number were found in five functional gene categories: (1) maltose metabolism and transport, (2) response to toxin, (3) siderophore transport, (4) cellular aldehyde metabolic process, and (5) L-iditol 2-dehydrogenase activity (p < 0.05). In the Saflager W-34/70 strain (Fermentis) with the most affected array-CGH profile, loss of aryl-alcohol dehydrogenase (AAD) gene dosage correlated with an imbalanced redox state, oxidative DNA damage and breaks, lower levels of nucleolar proteins Nop1 and Fob1, and diminished tolerance to fermentation-associated stress stimuli compared to other strains. We suggest that compromised stress response may not only promote oxidant-based changes in the nucleolus state that may affect fermentation performance but also provide novel directions for future strain improvement.

  11. Structural factors involved in the recognition of helix distortions in uv-damaged DNA by model peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, H; Zimmer, C [Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Jena. Forschungszentrum fuer Molekularbiologie und Medizin

    1977-02-28

    On the basis of our previous and present results concerning conformational changes of DNA after uv-irradiation some conclusions on the structure of DNA double helix in uv-damaged regions were drawn. From the results it appears that local distortions like denaturation or premelting should be excluded. Furthermore it was shown that the thymine dimerization strongly depends on the adjacent nucleic acid bases. By means of a strong binding effect of the oligopeptide netropsin to DNA irradiated at low uv-doses it is concluded that such local distortions in DNA together with a specific sequence-dependent variation of the conformation could act as recognition sites for endonucleases.

  12. E2F1 induces p19INK4d, a protein involved in the DNA damage response, following UV irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcagno, Abel L; Giono, Luciana E; Marazita, Mariela C; Castillo, Daniela S; Pregi, Nicolás; Cánepa, Eduardo T

    2012-07-01

    Central to the maintenance of genomic integrity is the cellular DNA damage response. Depending on the type of genotoxic stress and through the activation of multiple signaling cascades, it can lead to cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, senescence, and apoptosis. p19INK4d, a member of the INK4 family of CDK inhibitors, plays a dual role in the DNA damage response, inhibiting cell proliferation and promoting DNA repair. Consistently, p19INK4d has been reported to become upregulated in response to UV irradiation and a great variety of genotoxic agents. Here, this induction is shown to result from a transcriptional stimulatory mechanism that can occur at every phase of the cell cycle except during mitosis. Moreover, evidence is presented that demonstrates that E2F1 is involved in the induction of p19INK4d following UV treatment, as it is prevented by E2F1 protein ablation and DNA-binding inhibition. Specific inhibition of this regulation using triplex-forming oligonucleotides that target the E2F response elements present in the p19INK4d promoter also block p19INK4d upregulation and sensitize cells to DNA damage. These results constitute the first description of a mechanism for the induction of p19INK4d in response to UV irradiation and demonstrate the physiological relevance of this regulation following DNA damage.

  13. Public involvement in pharmacogenomics research: a national survey on public attitudes towards pharmacogenomics research and the willingness to donate DNA samples to a DNA bank in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Eriko; Satoh, Nobunori

    2009-11-01

    To assess the attitudes of the Japanese general public towards pharmacogenomics research and a DNA bank for identifying genomic markers associated with ADRs and their willingness to donate DNA samples, we conducted a national survey for 1,103 Japanese adults from the general public, not a patient population. The response rate was 36.8%. The majority of the respondents showed a positive attitude towards pharmacogenomics research (81.0%) and a DNA bank (70.4%). Considering fictitious clinical situations such as taking medications and experiencing ADRs, the willingness to donate DNA samples when experiencing ADRs (61.7%) was higher than when taking medications (45.3%). Older generations were significantly associated with a decreased willingness to donate (OR = 0.45, CI 0.28-0.72 in 50s. OR = 0.49, CI: 0.31-0.77 in 60s). Positive attitudes towards pharmacogenomics research, a DNA bank, blood/bone marrow/organ donation were significantly associated with an increased willingness. However, the respondents had the following concerns regarding a DNA bank: the confidentiality of their personal information, the manner by which research results were utilized and simply the use of their own DNA for research. In order to attain public understanding to overcome these concerns, a process of public awareness should be put into place to emphasize the beneficial aspects of identifying genomic markers associated with ADRs and to address these concerns raised in our study. Further study is needed to assess the willingness of actual patients taking medications in real situations, since the respondents in our study were from the general public, not a patient population, and their willingness was assessed on the condition of assuming that they were patients taking medications.

  14. DNA Glycosylases Involved in Base Excision Repair May Be Associated with Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osorio, Ana; Milne, Roger L; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline

    2014-01-01

    Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in the DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway could be associated with cancer risk in carriers of mutations in the high-penetrance susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, given the relation of synthetic lethality that exists between one of th...

  15. DNA Glycosylases Involved in Base Excision Repair May Be Associated with Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Osorio (Ana); R.L. Milne (Roger); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); T. Vaclová (Tereza); G. Pita (Guillermo); R. Alonso (Rosario); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); I. Blanco (Ignacio); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); M. Durán (Mercedes); O. Díez (Orland); T. Ramon Y Cajal; I. Konstantopoulou (I.); C. Martínez-Bouzas (Cristina); R. Andrés Conejero (Raquel); P. Soucy (Penny); L. McGuffog (Lesley); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); A. Lee (Andrew); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); J. Rantala (Johanna); N. Loman (Niklas); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); M.S. Beattie (Mary); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B.K. Arun (Banu); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); C.S. Walsh (Christine); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); E.M. John (Esther); A.S. Whittemore (Alice); M.B. Daly (Mary); M.C. Southey (Melissa); J.L. Hopper (John); M.-B. Terry (Mary-Beth); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); L. Steele (Linda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); L. Jønson (Lars); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); J. Infante (Jon); B. Herráez (Belén); L.T. Moreno (Leticia Thais); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); J. Herzog (Josef); K. Weeman (Kisa); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); F. Mariette (F.); S. Volorio (Sara); A. Viel (Alessandra); L. Varesco (Liliana); L. Papi (Laura); L. Ottini (Laura); M.G. Tibiletti (Maria Grazia); P. Radice (Paolo); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); J. Garber; S.D. Ellis (Steve); D. Frost (Debra); R. Platte (Radka); E. Fineberg (Elena); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); L. Izatt (Louise); R. Eeles (Rosalind); J.W. Adlard (Julian); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); T.J. Cole (Trevor); D. Eccles (Diana); J. Cook (Jackie); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); C. Brewer (Carole); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); F. Douglas (Fiona); M.E. Porteous (Mary); L. Side (Lucy); L.J. Walker (Lisa); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); A. Donaldson (Alan); J. Kennedy (John); C. Foo (Claire); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); C.W. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); D. Niederacher (Dieter); C. Sutter (Christian); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); D. Steinemann (Doris); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); K. Kast (Karin); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); F. Damiola (Francesca); B. Poppe (Bruce); K. Claes (Kathleen); M. Piedmonte (Marion); K. Tucker (Kathryn); F.J. Backes (Floor); P.M. Rodríguez; W. Brewster (Wendy); K. Wakeley (Katie); T. Rutherford (Thomas); T. Caldes (Trinidad); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); M.A. Rookus (Matti); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); L. van der Kolk (Lizet); J.L. de Lange (J.); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); N. Hoogerbrugge (Nicoline); J.M. Collée (Margriet); C.H.M. van Deurzen (Carolien); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); P. Devilee (Peter); E. Olah (Edith); C. Lazaro (Conxi); A. Teulé (A.); M. Menéndez (Mireia); A. Jakubowska (Anna); C. Cybulski (Cezary); J. Gronwald (Jacek); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Durda (Katarzyna); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); O.T. Johannson (Oskar); C. Maugard; M. Montagna (Marco); S. Tognazzo (Silvia); P.J. Teixeira; S. Healey (Sue); C. Olswold (Curtis); L. Guidugli (Lucia); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); S. Slager (Susan); C. Szabo (Csilla); J. Vijai (Joseph); M. Robson (Mark); N. Kauff (Noah); L. Zhang (Lingling); R. Rau-Murthy (Rohini); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D. Geschwantler Kaulich (Daphne); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; A. Berger (Annemarie); C. Phelan (Catherine); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); F. Lejbkowicz (Flavio); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); A.E. Toland (Amanda); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); L. Sunde (Lone); M. Thomassen (Mads); T.A. Kruse (Torben); U.B. Jensen; E. Friedman (Eitan); Y. Laitman (Yael); S.P. Shimon (Shani Paluch); J. Simard (Jacques); D.F. Easton (Douglas); K. Offit (Kenneth); F.J. Couch (Fergus); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); J. Benítez (Javier)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractSingle Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in the DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway could be associated with cancer risk in carriers of mutations in the high-penetrance susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, given the relation of synthetic lethality that exists between

  16. DNA glycosylases involved in base excision repair may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osorio, A.; Milne, R.L.; Kuchenbaecker, K.; Vaclova, T.; Pita, G.; Alonso, R.; Peterlongo, P.; Blanco, I.; Hoya, M. de la; Duran, M.; Diez, O.; Ramon, Y.C.T.; Konstantopoulou, I.; Martinez-Bouzas, C.; Conejero, R. Andres; Soucy, P.; McGuffog, L.; Barrowdale, D.; Lee, A.; Swe, B.; Arver, B.; Rantala, J.; Loman, N.; Ehrencrona, H.; Olopade, O.I.; Beattie, M.S.; Domchek, S.M.; Nathanson, K.; Rebbeck, T.R.; Arun, B.K.; Karlan, B.Y.; Walsh, C.; Lester, J.; John, E.M.; Whittemore, A.S.; Daly, M.B.; Southey, M.; Hopper, J.; Terry, M.B.; Buys, S.S.; Janavicius, R.; Dorfling, C.M.; Rensburg, E.J. van; Steele, L.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Ding, Y.C.; Hansen, T.V.; Jonson, L.; Ejlertsen, B.; Gerdes, A.M.; Infante, M.; Herraez, B.; Moreno, L.T.; Weitzel, J.N.; Herzog, J.; Weeman, K.; Manoukian, S.; Peissel, B.; Zaffaroni, D.; Scuvera, G.; Bonanni, B.; Mariette, F.; Volorio, S.; Viel, A.; Varesco, L.; Papi, L.; Ottini, L.; Tibiletti, M.G.; Radice, P.; Yannoukakos, D.; Garber, J.; Ellis, S.; Frost, D.; Platte, R.; Fineberg, E.; Evans, G.; Lalloo, F.; Izatt, L.; Eeles, R.; Adlard, J.; Davidson, R.; Cole, T.; Eccles, D.; Cook, J; Hodgson, S.; Brewer, C.; Tischkowitz, M.; Douglas, F.; Porteous, M.; Side, L.; Walker, L.; Morrison, P.; Donaldson, A.; Kennedy, J.; Foo, C.; Godwin, A.K.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Wappenschmidt, B.; Rhiem, K.; Engel, C.; Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.; et al.,

    2014-01-01

    Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in the DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) pathway could be associated with cancer risk in carriers of mutations in the high-penetrance susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, given the relation of synthetic lethality that exists between one of the

  17. p44 and p34 subunits of the BTF2/TFIIH transcription factor have homologies with SSL1, a yeast protein involved in DNA repair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Humbert; H. van Vuuren; Y. Lutz; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc); V. Moncollin

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe human BTF2 (TFIIH) transcription factor is a multisubunit protein involved in transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II (B) as well as in DNA repair. In addition to the previously characterized p62 and p89/ERCC3 subunits, we have cloned two other subunits of BTF2, p44 and p34.

  18. Public involvement in pharmacogenomics research: a national survey on patients' attitudes towards pharmacogenomics research and the willingness to donate DNA samples to a DNA bank in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Eriko; Sakurada, Tomoya; Ueda, Shiro; Satoh, Nobunori

    2011-05-01

    To assess the attitude of Japanese patients towards pharmacogenomics research and a DNA bank for identifying genomic markers associated with adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and their willingness to donate DNA samples, we conducted a survey of 550 male and female patients. The majority of the respondents showed a positive attitude towards pharmacogenomics research (87.6%) and a DNA bank (75.1%). The willingness to donate DNA samples when experiencing severe ADRs (55.8%) was higher than when taking medications (40.4%). Positive attitudes towards a DNA bank and organ donation were significantly associated with an increased willingness to donate. Though the level of positive attitude in the patient population was higher than that in the general public in our former study (81.0 and 70.4%, respectively), the level of the willingness of patients to donate was 40.4% when taking medications and 55.8% when experiencing severe ADRs which was lower than that of the general public in our former study (45.3 and 61.7%). The results suggested that the level of true willingness in the patient population was lower than that of the general public considering the fictitious situation presented to the public (to suppose that they were patients receiving medication). It is important to assess the willingness of patients who are true potential donors, not the general public.

  19. Homology-dependent repair is involved in 45S rDNA loss in plant CAF-1 mutants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Muchová, V.; Amiard, S.; Mozgová, I.; Dvořáčková, Martina; Gallego, M.E.; White, C.; Fajkus, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 2 (2015), s. 198-209 ISSN 0960-7412 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP13-11563P Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : DNA repair * genome instability * 45S rDNA Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 5.468, year: 2015

  20. Involvement of DNA polymerase beta in repair of ionizing radiation damage as measured by in vitro plasmid assays.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vens, C.; Hofland, I.; Begg, A.C.

    2007-01-01

    Characteristic of damage introduced in DNA by ionizing radiation is the induction of a wide range of lesions. Single-strand breaks (SSBs) and base damages outnumber double-strand breaks (DSBs). If unrepaired, these lesions can lead to DSBs and increased mutagenesis. XRCC1 and DNA polymerase beta

  1. SIRT3 restricts HBV transcription and replication via epigenetic regulation of cccDNA involving SUV39H1 and SETD1A histone methyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ji-Hua; Hu, Jie-Li; Cheng, Sheng-Tao; Yu, Hai-Bo; Wong, Vincent Kam Wai; Law, Betty Yuen Kwan; Yang, Yong-Feng; Huang, Ying; Liu, Yi; Chen, Wei-Xian; Cai, Xue-Fei; Tang, Hua; Hu, Yuan; Zhang, Wen-Lu; Liu, Xiang; Long, Quan-Xin; Zhou, Li; Tao, Na-Na; Zhou, Hong-Zhong; Yang, Qiu-Xia; Ren, Fang; He, Lin; Gong, Rui; Huang, Ai-Long; Chen, Juan

    2018-04-06

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major health problem worldwide. Maintenance of the covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) which serves as a template for HBV RNA transcription is responsible for the failure of eradicating chronic HBV during current antiviral therapy. cccDNA is assembled with cellular histone proteins into chromatin, but little is known about the regulation of HBV chromatin by histone posttranslational modifications. In this study, we identified SIRT3 as a host factor restricting HBV transcription and replication by screening seven members of Sirtuin family which is the class III histone deacetylase. Ectopic SIRT3 expression significantly reduced total HBV RNAs, 3.5-kb RNA as well as replicative intermediate DNA in HBV-infected HepG2-NTCP cells and PHH. In contrast, gene silencing of SIRT3 promoted HBV transcription and replication. Mechanistic study found nuclear SIRT3 was recruited to the HBV cccDNA, where it deacetylated histone 3 lysine 9 (H3K9). Importantly, occupancy of SIRT3 onto cccDNA could increase the recruitment of histone methyltransferase SUV39H1 to cccDNA and decrease recruitment of SETD1A, leading to a marked increase of H3K9me3 and a decrease of H3K4me3 on cccDNA. Moreover, SIRT3-mediated HBV cccDNA transcriptional repression involved decreased binding of host RNA polymerase II and transcription factor YY1 to cccDNA. Finally, viral protein HBx could relieve SIRT3-mediated cccDNA transcriptional repression by inhibiting both SIRT3 expression and its recruitment to cccDNA. SIRT3 is a novel host factor epigenetically restricting HBV cccDNA transcription by acting cooperatively with histone methyltransferase. These data provided a rational for the use of SIRT3 activators in the prevention or treatment of HBV infection. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  2. In situ analysis of Bacillus licheniformis biofilms: amyloid-like polymers and eDNA are involved in the adherence and aggregation of the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randrianjatovo-Gbalou, I; Rouquette, P; Lefebvre, D; Girbal-Neuhauser, E; Marcato-Romain, C-E

    2017-05-01

    This study attempts to determine which of the exopolymeric substances are involved in the adherence and aggregation of a Bacillus licheniformis biofilm. The involvement of extracellular proteins and eDNA were particularly investigated using DNase and proteinase K treatment. The permeability of the biofilms increased fivefold after DNase I treatment. The quantification of the matrix components showed that, irrespective to the enzyme tested, eDNA and amyloid-like polymers were removed simultaneously. Size-exclusion chromatography analyses supported these observations and revealed the presence of associated nucleic acid and protein complexes in the biofilm lysates. These data suggest that some extracellular DNA and amyloid-like proteins were closely interlaced within the matrix. Finally, confocal laser scanning microscopy imaging gave supplementary clues about the 3D organization of the biofilms, confirming that eDNA and exoproteins were essentially layered under and around the bacterial cells, whereas the amyloid-like fractions were homogeneously distributed within the matrix. These results confirm that some DNA-amyloid complexes play a key role in the modulation of the mechanical resistance of B. licheniformis biofilms. The study highlights the need to consider the whole structure of biofilms and to target the interactions between matrix components. A better understanding of B. licheniformis biofilm physiology and the structural organization of the matrix will strengthen strategies of biofilm control. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. The RTR Complex Partner RMI2 and the DNA Helicase RTEL1 Are Both Independently Involved in Preserving the Stability of 45S rDNA Repeats in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Röhrig

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The stability of repetitive sequences in complex eukaryotic genomes is safeguarded by factors suppressing homologues recombination. Prominent in this is the role of the RTR complex. In plants, it consists of the RecQ helicase RECQ4A, the topoisomerase TOP3α and RMI1. Like mammals, but not yeast, plants harbor an additional complex partner, RMI2. Here, we demonstrate that, in Arabidopsis thaliana, RMI2 is involved in the repair of aberrant replication intermediates in root meristems as well as in intrastrand crosslink repair. In both instances, RMI2 is involved independently of the DNA helicase RTEL1. Surprisingly, simultaneous loss of RMI2 and RTEL1 leads to loss of male fertility. As both the RTR complex and RTEL1 are involved in suppression of homologous recombination (HR, we tested the efficiency of HR in the double mutant rmi2-2 rtel1-1 and found a synergistic enhancement (80-fold. Searching for natural target sequences we found that RTEL1 is required for stabilizing 45S rDNA repeats. In the double mutant with rmi2-2 the number of 45S rDNA repeats is further decreased sustaining independent roles of both factors in this process. Thus, loss of suppression of HR does not only lead to a destabilization of rDNA repeats but might be especially deleterious for tissues undergoing multiple cell divisions such as the male germline.

  4. The RTR Complex Partner RMI2 and the DNA Helicase RTEL1 Are Both Independently Involved in Preserving the Stability of 45S rDNA Repeats in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhrig, Sarah; Schröpfer, Susan; Knoll, Alexander; Puchta, Holger

    2016-10-01

    The stability of repetitive sequences in complex eukaryotic genomes is safeguarded by factors suppressing homologues recombination. Prominent in this is the role of the RTR complex. In plants, it consists of the RecQ helicase RECQ4A, the topoisomerase TOP3α and RMI1. Like mammals, but not yeast, plants harbor an additional complex partner, RMI2. Here, we demonstrate that, in Arabidopsis thaliana, RMI2 is involved in the repair of aberrant replication intermediates in root meristems as well as in intrastrand crosslink repair. In both instances, RMI2 is involved independently of the DNA helicase RTEL1. Surprisingly, simultaneous loss of RMI2 and RTEL1 leads to loss of male fertility. As both the RTR complex and RTEL1 are involved in suppression of homologous recombination (HR), we tested the efficiency of HR in the double mutant rmi2-2 rtel1-1 and found a synergistic enhancement (80-fold). Searching for natural target sequences we found that RTEL1 is required for stabilizing 45S rDNA repeats. In the double mutant with rmi2-2 the number of 45S rDNA repeats is further decreased sustaining independent roles of both factors in this process. Thus, loss of suppression of HR does not only lead to a destabilization of rDNA repeats but might be especially deleterious for tissues undergoing multiple cell divisions such as the male germline.

  5. Overexpression of transcription factor AP-2 stimulates the PA promoter of the human uracil-DNA glycosylase (UNG) gene through a mechanism involving derepression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aas, Per Arne; Pena Diaz, Javier; Liabakk, Nina Beate

    2009-01-01

    within the region of DNA marked by PA. Footprinting analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays of PA and putative AP-2 binding regions with HeLa cell nuclear extract and recombinant AP-2alpha protein indicate that AP-2 transcription factors are central in the regulated expression of UNG2 m......The PA promoter in the human uracil-DNA glycosylase gene (UNG) directs expression of the nuclear form (UNG2) of UNG proteins. Using a combination of promoter deletion and mutation analyses, and transient transfection of HeLa cells, we show that repressor and derepressor activities are contained......alpha, lacking the activation domain but retaining the DNA binding and dimerization domains, stimulated PA to a level approaching that of full-length AP-2, suggesting that AP-2 overexpression stimulates PA activity by a mechanism involving derepression rather than activation, possibly by neutralizing...

  6. DNA-Binding Properties of African Swine Fever Virus pA104R, a Histone-Like Protein Involved in Viral Replication and Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frouco, Gonçalo; Freitas, Ferdinando B; Coelho, João; Leitão, Alexandre; Martins, Carlos; Ferreira, Fernando

    2017-06-15

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) codes for a putative histone-like protein (pA104R) with extensive sequence homology to bacterial proteins that are implicated in genome replication and packaging. Functional characterization of purified recombinant pA104R revealed that it binds to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) over a wide range of temperatures, pH values, and salt concentrations and in an ATP-independent manner, with an estimated binding site size of about 14 to 16 nucleotides. Using site-directed mutagenesis, the arginine located in pA104R's DNA-binding domain, at position 69, was found to be relevant for efficient DNA-binding activity. Together, pA104R and ASFV topoisomerase II (pP1192R) display DNA-supercoiling activity, although none of the proteins by themselves do, indicating that the two cooperate in this process. In ASFV-infected cells, A104R transcripts were detected from 2 h postinfection (hpi) onward, reaching a maximum concentration around 16 hpi. pA104R was detected from 12 hpi onward, localizing with viral DNA replication sites and being found exclusively in the Triton-insoluble fraction. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown experiments revealed that pA104R plays a critical role in viral DNA replication and gene expression, with transfected cells showing lower viral progeny numbers (up to a reduction of 82.0%), lower copy numbers of viral genomes (-78.3%), and reduced transcription of a late viral gene (-47.6%). Taken together, our results strongly suggest that pA104R participates in the modulation of viral DNA topology, probably being involved in viral DNA replication, transcription, and packaging, emphasizing that ASFV mutants lacking the A104R gene could be used as a strategy to develop a vaccine against ASFV. IMPORTANCE Recently reintroduced in Europe, African swine fever virus (ASFV) causes a fatal disease in domestic pigs, causing high economic losses in affected countries, as no vaccine or treatment is currently

  7. Systematic analysis of DEMETER-like DNA glycosylase genes shows lineage-specific Smi-miR7972 involved in SmDML1 regulation in Salvia miltiorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiang; Li, Caili; Lu, Shanfa

    2018-05-08

    DEMETER-like DNA glycosylases (DMLs) initiate the base excision repair-dependent DNA demethylation to regulate a wide range of biological processes in plants. Six putative SmDML genes, termed SmDML1-SmDML6, were identified from the genome of S. miltiorrhiza, an emerging model plant for Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) studies. Integrated analysis of gene structures, sequence features, conserved domains and motifs, phylogenetic analysis and differential expression showed the conservation and divergence of SmDMLs. SmDML1, SmDML2 and SmDML4 were significantly down-regulated by the treatment of 5Aza-dC, a general DNA methylation inhibitor, suggesting involvement of SmDMLs in genome DNA methylation change. SmDML1 was predicted and experimentally validated to be target of Smi-miR7972. Computational analysis of forty whole genome sequences and almost all of RNA-seq data from Lamiids revealed that MIR7972s were only distributed in some plants of the three orders, including Lamiales, Solanales and Boraginales, and the number of MIR7972 genes varied among species. It suggests that MIR7972 genes underwent expansion and loss during the evolution of some Lamiids species. Phylogenetic analysis of MIR7972s showed closer evolutionary relationships between MIR7972s in Boraginales and Solanales in comparison with Lamiales. These results provide a valuable resource for elucidating DNA demethylation mechanism in S. miltiorrhiza.

  8. Gestational Diabetes Alters Offspring DNA Methylation Profiles in Human and Rat: Identification of Key Pathways Involved in Endocrine System Disorders, Insulin Signaling, Diabetes Signaling, and ILK Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulos, Sophie; Guillemin, Claire; Ergaz, Zivanit; Dimov, Sergiy; Suderman, Matthew; Weinstein-Fudim, Liza; Ornoy, Asher; Szyf, Moshe

    2015-06-01

    Gestational diabetes is associated with risk for metabolic disease later in life. Using a cross-species approach in rat and humans, we examined the hypothesis that gestational diabetes during pregnancy triggers changes in the methylome of the offspring that might be mediating these risks. We show in a gestation diabetes rat model, the Cohen diabetic rat, that gestational diabetes triggers wide alterations in DNA methylation in the placenta in both candidate diabetes genes and genome-wide promoters, thus providing evidence for a causal relationship between diabetes during pregnancy and DNA methylation alterations. There is a significant overlap between differentially methylated genes in the placenta and the liver of the rat offspring. Several genes differentially methylated in rat placenta exposed to maternal diabetes are also differentially methylated in the human placenta of offspring exposed to gestational diabetes in utero. DNA methylation changes inversely correlate with changes in expression. The changes in DNA methylation affect known functional gene pathways involved in endocrine function, metabolism, and insulin responses. These data provide support to the hypothesis that early-life exposures and their effects on metabolic disease are mediated by DNA methylation changes. This has important diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

  9. Two Sets of Piwi Proteins Are Involved in Distinct sRNA Pathways Leading to Elimination of Germline-Specific DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique I. Furrer

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Piwi proteins and piRNAs protect eukaryotic germlines against the spread of transposons. During development in the ciliate Paramecium, two Piwi-dependent sRNA classes are involved in the elimination of transposons and transposon-derived DNA: scan RNAs (scnRNAs, associated with Ptiwi01 and Ptiwi09, and iesRNAs, whose binding partners we now identify as Ptiwi10 and Ptiwi11. scnRNAs derive from the maternal genome and initiate DNA elimination during development, whereas iesRNAs continue DNA targeting until the removal process is complete. Here, we show that scnRNAs and iesRNAs are processed by distinct Dicer-like proteins and bind Piwi proteins in a mutually exclusive manner, suggesting separate biogenesis pathways. We also demonstrate that the PTIWI10 gene is transcribed from the developing nucleus and that its transcription depends on prior DNA excision, suggesting a mechanism of gene expression control triggered by the removal of short DNA segments interrupting the gene.

  10. Fibroblast growth factor 2 and DNA repair involvement in the keratinocyte stem cells response to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harfouche, L'Emira Ghida

    2010-02-01

    Keratinocyte stem cells (KSCs) from the human inter follicular epidermis are regarded as the major target to radiation during radiotherapy. We found herein that KSCs are more resistant to ionizing radiation than their direct progeny, and presented more rapid DNA damage repair kinetics than the progenitors. Furthermore, we provided evidence describing the effect of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) signaling on the ability of KSCs and progenitors to repair damaged DNA. Despite our knowledge of the fact, that FGF is an anti-apoptotic factor in multiple cell types, the direct link between DNA repair and FGF2 signaling has rarely been shown. Existence of such link is an important issue with implications not only to stem cell field but also to cancer therapy. (author)

  11. Fumarase is involved in DNA double-strand break resection through a functional interaction with Sae2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leshets, Michael; Ramamurthy, Dharanidharan; Lisby, Michael

    2018-01-01

    One of the most severe forms of DNA damage is the double-strand break (DSB). Failure to properly repair the damage can cause mutation, gross chromosomal rearrangements and lead to the development of cancer. In eukaryotes, homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) are the......One of the most severe forms of DNA damage is the double-strand break (DSB). Failure to properly repair the damage can cause mutation, gross chromosomal rearrangements and lead to the development of cancer. In eukaryotes, homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ......) are the main DSB repair pathways. Fumarase is a mitochondrial enzyme which functions in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Intriguingly, the enzyme can be readily detected in the cytosolic compartment of all organisms examined, and we have shown that cytosolic fumarase participates in the DNA damage response...

  12. Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP-1 is not involved in DNA double-strand break recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernet Marie

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cytotoxicity and the rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks induced by γ-rays, H2O2 and neocarzinostatin, were investigated in normal and PARP-1 knockout mouse 3T3 fibroblasts to determine the role of poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP-1 in DNA double-strand break repair. Results PARP-1-/- were considerably more sensitive than PARP-1+/+ 3T3s to induced cell kill by γ-rays and H2O2. However, the two cell lines did not show any significant difference in the susceptibility to neocarzinostatin below 1.5 nM drug. Restoration of PARP-1 expression in PARP-1-/- 3T3s by retroviral transfection of the full PARP-1 cDNA did not induce any change in neocarzinostatin response. Moreover the incidence and the rejoining kinetics of neocarzinostatin-induced DNA double-strand breaks were identical in PARP-1+/+ and PARP-1-/- 3T3s. Poly(ADP-ribose synthesis following γ-rays and H2O2 was observed in PARP-1-proficient cells only. In contrast neocarzinostatin, even at supra-lethal concentration, was unable to initiate PARP-1 activation yet it induced H2AX histone phosphorylation in both PARP1+/+ and PARP-1-/- 3T3s as efficiently as γ-rays and H2O2. Conclusions The results show that PARP-1 is not a major determinant of DNA double-strand break recovery with either strand break rejoining or cell survival as an endpoint. Even though both PARP-1 and ATM activation are major determinants of the cell response to γ-rays and H2O2, data suggest that PARP-1-dependent poly(ADP-ribose synthesis and ATM-dependent H2AX phosphorylation, are not inter-related in the repair pathway of neocarzinostatin-induced DNA double-strand breaks.

  13. DNA glycosylases involved in base excision repair may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Osorio

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs in genes involved in the DNA Base Excision Repair (BER pathway could be associated with cancer risk in carriers of mutations in the high-penetrance susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, given the relation of synthetic lethality that exists between one of the components of the BER pathway, PARP1 (poly ADP ribose polymerase, and both BRCA1 and BRCA2. In the present study, we have performed a comprehensive analysis of 18 genes involved in BER using a tagging SNP approach in a large series of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. 144 SNPs were analyzed in a two stage study involving 23,463 carriers from the CIMBA consortium (the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2. Eleven SNPs showed evidence of association with breast and/or ovarian cancer at p<0.05 in the combined analysis. Four of the five genes for which strongest evidence of association was observed were DNA glycosylases. The strongest evidence was for rs1466785 in the NEIL2 (endonuclease VIII-like 2 gene (HR: 1.09, 95% CI (1.03-1.16, p = 2.7 × 10(-3 for association with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers, and rs2304277 in the OGG1 (8-guanine DNA glycosylase gene, with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR: 1.12 95%CI: 1.03-1.21, p = 4.8 × 10(-3. DNA glycosylases involved in the first steps of the BER pathway may be associated with cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and should be more comprehensively studied.

  14. Comparison of alkylating agent and radiation carcinogenesis: some aspects of the possible involvement of effects on DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawley, P.D.

    1976-01-01

    A series of alkylating agents was classified in terms of increasing relative ability to react at O-atom sites in DNA, MMS 6 -alkylguanines are directly miscoding bases. This series of agents was also used in a study of comparative carcinogenicity with respect to induction of thymic lymphoma in mice, a system in which x-irradiation yields tumors. A positive correlation between ability of agents to alkylate O-6 of guanine in DNA of thymus and carcinogenic potency was found. Although MMS was not active in this system, it was noted that it can induce tumors in other systems. The relationship between repair of alkylation and radiation induced damage in DNA was briefly discussed. The methylating agents induce single-strand breaks in DNA, and the principal repair system appears to fall into the category of short repair as denoted by Regan and Setlow (1974). These single-strand breaks may result from spontaneous hydrolytic depurinations of 3- and 7-methylpurines, or from enzymatic depurinations, e.g., of 3-alkyladenine and O 6 -alkylguanine. Aralkylating agents, which are also carcinogens, can evoke an alternative repair response of the uvr type

  15. ThrR, a DNA-binding transcription factor involved in controlling threonine biosynthesis in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Jonathan; Müller, Peter; Lentes, Sabine; Thiele, Martin J; Zeigler, Daniel R; Tödter, Dominik; Paulus, Henry; Brantl, Sabine; Stülke, Jörg; Commichau, Fabian M

    2016-09-01

    The threonine dehydratase IlvA is part of the isoleucine biosynthesis pathway in the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Consequently, deletion of ilvA causes isoleucine auxotrophy. It has been reported that ilvA pseudo-revertants having a derepressed hom-thrCB operon appear in the presence of threonine. Here we have characterized two classes of ilvA pseudo-revertants. In the first class the hom-thrCB operon was derepressed unmasking the threonine dehydratase activity of the threonine synthase ThrC. In the second class of mutants, threonine biosynthesis was more broadly affected. The first class of ilvA pseudo-revertants had a mutation in the Phom promoter (P*hom ), resulting in constitutive expression of the hom-thrCB operon. In the second class of ilvA pseudo-revertants, the thrR gene encoding a putative DNA-binding protein was inactivated, also resulting in constitutive expression of the hom-thrCB operon. Here we demonstrate that ThrR is indeed a DNA-binding transcription factor that regulates the hom-thrCB operon and the thrD aspartokinase gene. DNA binding assays uncovered the DNA-binding site of ThrR and revealed that the repressor competes with the RNA polymerase for DNA binding. This study also revealed that ThrR orthologs are ubiquitous in genomes from the Gram-positive phylum Firmicutes and in some Gram-negative bacteria. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The Effect of Small Cosolutes that Mimic Molecular Crowding Conditions on the Stability of Triplexes Involving Duplex DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Aviñó

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Triplex stability is studied in crowding conditions using small cosolutes (ethanol, acetonitrile and dimethylsulfoxide by ultraviolet (UV, circular dichroism (CD and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopies. The results indicate that the triplex is formed preferentially when the triplex forming oligonucleotide (TFO is RNA. In addition, DNA triplexes (D:D·D are clearly less stable in cosolute solutions while the stability of the RNA triplexes (R:D·D is only slightly decreased. The kinetic of triplex formation with RNA-TFO is slower than with DNA-TFO and the thermal stability of the triplex is increased with the salt concentration in EtOH-water solutions. Accordingly, RNA could be considered a potential molecule to form a stable triplex for regulatory purposes in molecular crowding conditions.

  17. The involvement of DNA repair genes in the hypoxia-dependent NLCQ-1 (NSC 709257) toxicity and its synergistic interaction with cisplatin or melphalan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadopoulou, M.V.; Xue, C.-J.; Bloomer, W.D.

    2003-01-01

    4-[3-(2-Nitro-1-imidazolyl)-propylamino]-7-chloro-quinoline hydrochloride (NLCQ-1) is a weakly DNA-intercalating hypoxia selective cytotoxin, which synergistically enhances the antitumor effect of several chemotherapeutic agents or radiation against mouse tumors or human xenografts. Synergy with melphalan (L-PAM) or cisplatin (cisPt) requires hypoxic pre-exposure of cells to NLCQ-1 or, in mice, administration of NLCQ-1 about 1 h before L-PAM or cisPt. This suggests that NLCQ-1 may cause DNA lesions upon reductive metabolism. To indirectly identify such lesions, rodent cell lines defective in specific DNA repair genes (EM9 and UV41) and their repair-proficient parental AA8, were exposed to NLCQ-1 alone and in combination with L-PAM or cisPt under hypoxic/aerobic conditions and appropriate routes, and assessed for clonogenicity. Selected comparisons with tirapazamine (TPZ) were also performed. DNA ssbs were identified by using the alkaline comet assay. Synergism was assessed by isobologramic analysis. EM9, which lack the functional XRCC1 gene and are unable to efficiently repair DNA ssbs, were 3.7x and 4.5x more sensitive to NLCQ-1 and TPZ, respectively, than the parental AA8 cells. Similarly, UV41, which are defective in the ERCC4/XPF gene and thus, hypersensitive to DNA cross-linking agents, were 4.1x more sensitive than AA8 cells to NLCQ-1. Equitoxic concentrations of NLCQ-1 and TPZ gave similar numbers of ssbs in AA8 and EM9 cells exposed to each compound for 1 h under hypoxic conditions. In combination with L-PAM or cisPt, synergy was observed in AA8 but not in EM9 or UV41 cells, with either NLCQ-1 or TPZ. These results suggest that NLCQ-1 is involved in the formation of DNA ssbs and interstrand crosslinks, with the latter being most likely responsible for NLCQ-1 hypoxic toxicity. The synergistic interaction of NLCQ-1 with L-PAM or cisPt is probably due to an enhancement in the L-PAM/cisPt-induced DNA interstrand crosslinks, possibly as a result of an inhibited

  18. The involvement of topoisomerases and DNA polymerase I in the mechanism of induced thermal and radiation resistance in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boreham, D.R.; Trivedi, A.; Weinberger, P.; Mitchel, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    Either an ionizing radiation exposure or a heat shock is capable of inducing both thermal tolerance and radiation resistance in yeast. Yeast mutants, deficient in topoisomerase I, in topoisomerase II, or in DNA polymerase I, were used to investigate the mechanism of these inducible resistances. The absence of either or both topoisomerase activities did not prevent induction of either heat or radiation resistance. However, if both topoisomerase I and II activities were absent, the sensitivity of yeast to become thermally tolerant (in response to a heat stress) was markedly increased. The absence of only topoisomerase I activity (top1) resulted in the constitutive expression of increased radiation resistance equivalent to that induced by a heat shock in wild-type cells, and the topoisomerase I-deficient cells were not further inducible by heat. This heat-inducible component of radiation resistance (or its equivalent constitutive expression in top1 cells) was, in turn, only a portion of the full response inducible by radiation. The absence of polymerase I activity had no detectable effect on either response. Our results indicate that the actual systems that confer resistance to heat or radiation are independent of either topoisomerase activity or DNA polymerase function, but suggest that topoisomerases may have a regulatory role during the signaling of these mechanisms. The results of our experiments imply that maintenance of correct DNA topology prevents induction of the heat-shock response, and that heat-shock induction of a component of the full radiation resistance in yeast may be the consequence of topoisomerase I inactivation

  19. Involvement of the 5'-leader sequence in coupling the stability of a human H3 histone mRNA with DNA replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, T.; Marashi, F.; Weber, L.; Hickey, E.; Greenspan, D.; Bonner, J.; Stein, J.; Stein, G.

    1986-01-01

    Two lines of evidence derived from fusion gene constructs indicate that sequences residing in the 5'-nontranslated region of a cell cycle-dependent human H3 histone mRNA are involved in the selective destabilization that occurs when DNA synthesis is terminated. The experimental approach was to construct chimeric genes in which fragments of the mRNA coding regions of the H3 histone gene were fused with fragments of genes not expressed in a cell cycle-dependent manner. After transfection in HeLa S3 cells with the recombinant plasmids, levels of fusion mRNAs were determined by S1 nuclease analysis prior to and following DNA synthesis inhibition. When the first 20 nucleotides of an H3 histone mRNA leader were replaced with 89 nucleotides of the leader from a Drosophila heat-shock (hsp70) mRNA, the fusion transcript remained stable during inhibition of DNA synthesis, in contrast to the rapid destabilization of the endogenous histone mRNA in these cells. In a reciprocal experiment, a histone-globin fusion gene was constructed that produced a transcript with the initial 20 nucleotides of the H3 histone mRNA substituted for the human β-globin mRNA leader. In HeLa cells treated with inhibitors of DNA synthesis and/or protein synthesis, cellular levels of this histone-globin fusion mRNA appeared to be regulated in a manner similar to endogenous histone mRNA levels. These results suggest that the first 20 nucleotides of the leader are sufficient to couple histone mRNA stability with DNA replication

  20. Effects of expression level of DNA repair-related genes involved in the NHEJ pathway on radiation-induced cognitive impairment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Liyuan; Chen Liesong; Sun Rui; Ji Shengjun; Ding Yanyan; Wu Jia; Tian Ye

    2013-01-01

    Cranial radiation therapy can induce cognitive decline. Impairments of hippocampal neurogenesis are thought to be a paramountly important mechanism underlying radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction. In the mature nervous system, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are mainly repaired by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathways. It has been demonstrated that NHEJ deficiencies are associated with impaired neurogenesis. In our study, rats were randomly divided into five groups to be irradiated by single doses of 0 (control), 0 (anesthesia control), 2, 10, and 20 Gy, respectively. The cognitive function of the irradiated rats was measured by open field, Morris water maze and passive avoidance tests. Real-time PCR was also used to detect the expression level of DNA DSB repair-related genes involved in the NHEJ pathway, such as XRCC4, XRCC5 and XRCC6, in the hippocampus. The influence of different radiation doses on cognitive function in rats was investigated. From the results of the behavior tests, we found that rats receiving 20 Gy irradiation revealed poorer learning and memory, while no significant loss of learning and memory existed in rats receiving irradiation from 0-10 Gy. The real-time PCR and Western blot results showed no significant difference in the expression level of DNA repair-related genes between the 10 and 20 Gy groups, which may help to explain the behavioral results, id est (i.e.) DNA damage caused by 0-10 Gy exposure was appropriately repaired, however, damage induced by 20 Gy exceeded the body's maximum DSB repair ability. Ionizing radiation-induced cognitive impairments depend on the radiation dose, and more directly on the body's own ability to repair DNA DSBs via the NHEJ pathway. (author)

  1. Mechanism for iron control of the Vibrio fischeri luminescence system: involvement of cyclic AMP and cyclic AMP receptor protein and modulation of DNA level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, P V

    1992-07-01

    Iron controls luminescence in Vibrio fischeri by an indirect but undefined mechanism. To gain insight into that mechanism, the involvement of cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cAMP receptor protein (CRP) and of modulation of DNA levels in iron control of luminescence were examined in V. fischeri and in Escherichia coli containing the cloned V. fischeri lux genes on plasmids. For V. fischeri and E. coli adenylate cyclase (cya) and CRP (crp) mutants containing intact lux genes (luxR luxICDABEG), presence of the iron chelator ethylenediamine-di(o-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid) (EDDHA) increased expression of the luminescence system like in the parent strains only in the cya mutants in the presence of added cAMP. In the E. coli strains containing a plasmid with a Mu dl(lacZ) fusion in luxR, levels of beta-galactosidase activity (expression from the luxR promoter) and luciferase activity (expression from the lux operon promoter) were both 2-3-fold higher in the presence of EDDHA in the parent strain, and for the mutants this response to EDDHA was observed only in the cya mutant in the presence of added cAMP. Therefore, cAMP and CRP are required for the iron restriction effect on luminescence, and their involvement in iron control apparently is distinct from the known differential control of transcription from the luxR and luxICDABEG promoters by cAMP-CRP. Furthermore, plasmid and chromosomal DNA levels were higher in E. coli and V. fischeri in the presence of EDDHA. The higher DNA levels correlated with an increase in expression of chromosomally encoded beta-galactosidase in E. coli and with a higher level of autoinducer in cultures of V. fischeri. These results implicate cAMP-CRP and modulation of DNA levels in the mechanism of iron control of the V. fischeri luminescence system.

  2. Development and applications of Bacillus subtilis test systems for mutagens, involving DNA-repair deficiency and suppressible auxotrophic mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanooka, H.

    1977-01-01

    A mutagen-tester of Bacillus subtilis was constructed and tested with known carcinogens. The parental strain HA101 of Okubo and Yanagida carrying suppressible nonsense mutations in his and met genes was transformed to carry an excision-repair deficiency mutation. The constructed strain TKJ5211 showed a 20-30-fold higher sensitivity for His + reversion than the parental strain when treated with UV and UV-mimetic chemicals but unchanged mutation frequency with X-rays and methyl methanesulfonate. The tester strain was used in a spot test of 30 selected chemicals and also for testing with liver homogenate activation. The results showed an almost equivalent but somewhat broader detection spectrum than the Salmonella typhimurium TA100 system. Another test method used a pair of B. subtilis strains differing in their DNA-repair capacity, i.e. the most UV-sensitive mutant HJ-15 and a wild-type strain, to detect repair-dependent DNA damage produced by chemicals. Spores could be used in either test

  3. A centrosome-autonomous signal that involves centriole disengagement permits centrosome duplication in G2 phase after DNA damage.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2010-11-15

    DNA damage can induce centrosome overduplication in a manner that requires G2-to-M checkpoint function, suggesting that genotoxic stress can decouple the centrosome and chromosome cycles. How this happens is unclear. Using live-cell imaging of cells that express fluorescently tagged NEDD1\\/GCP-WD and proliferating cell nuclear antigen, we found that ionizing radiation (IR)-induced centrosome amplification can occur outside S phase. Analysis of synchronized populations showed that significantly more centrosome amplification occurred after irradiation of G2-enriched populations compared with G1-enriched or asynchronous cells, consistent with G2 phase centrosome amplification. Irradiated and control populations of G2 cells were then fused to test whether centrosome overduplication is allowed through a diffusible stimulatory signal, or the loss of a duplication-inhibiting signal. Irradiated G2\\/irradiated G2 cell fusions showed significantly higher centrosome amplification levels than irradiated G2\\/unirradiated G2 fusions. Chicken-human cell fusions demonstrated that centrosome amplification was limited to the irradiated partner. Our finding that only the irradiated centrosome can duplicate supports a model where a centrosome-autonomous inhibitory signal is lost upon irradiation of G2 cells. We observed centriole disengagement after irradiation. Although overexpression of dominant-negative securin did not affect IR-induced centrosome amplification, Plk1 inhibition reduced radiation-induced amplification. Together, our data support centriole disengagement as a licensing signal for DNA damage-induced centrosome amplification.

  4. Involvement of a bifunctional, paired-like DNA-binding domain and a transpositional enhancer in Sleeping Beauty transposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Khare, Dheeraj; Behlke, Joachim; Heinemann, Udo; Plasterk, Ronald H; Ivics, Zoltán

    2002-09-13

    Sleeping Beauty (SB) is the most active Tc1/mariner-like transposon in vertebrate species. Each of the terminal inverted repeats (IRs) of SB contains two transposase-binding sites (DRs). This feature, termed the IR/DR structure, is conserved in a group of Tc1-like transposons. The DNA-binding region of SB transposase, similar to the paired domain of Pax proteins, consists of two helix-turn-helix subdomains (PAI + RED = PAIRED). The N-terminal PAI subdomain was found to play a dominant role in contacting the DRs. Transposase was able to bind to mutant sites retaining the 3' part of the DRs; thus, primary DNA binding is not sufficient to determine the specificity of the transposition reaction. The PAI subdomain was also found to bind to a transpositional enhancer-like sequence within the left IR of SB, and to mediate protein-protein interactions between transposase subunits. A tetrameric form of the transposase was detected in solution, consistent with an interaction between the IR/DR structure and a transposase tetramer. We propose a model in which the transpositional enhancer and the PAI subdomain stabilize complexes formed by a transposase tetramer bound at the IR/DR. These interactions may result in enhanced stability of synaptic complexes, which might explain the efficient transposition of Sleeping Beauty in vertebrate cells.

  5. Translocation and gross deletion breakpoints in human inherited disease and cancer II: Potential involvement of repetitive sequence elements in secondary structure formation between DNA ends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuzhanova, Nadia; Abeysinghe, Shaun S; Krawczak, Michael; Cooper, David N

    2003-09-01

    Translocations and gross deletions are responsible for a significant proportion of both cancer and inherited disease. Although such gene rearrangements are nonuniformly distributed in the human genome, the underlying mutational mechanisms remain unclear. We have studied the potential involvement of various types of repetitive sequence elements in the formation of secondary structure intermediates between the single-stranded DNA ends that recombine during rearrangements. Complexity analysis was used to assess the potential of these ends to form secondary structures, the maximum decrease in complexity consequent to a gross rearrangement being used as an indicator of the type of repeat and the specific DNA ends involved. A total of 175 pairs of deletion/translocation breakpoint junction sequences available from the Gross Rearrangement Breakpoint Database [GRaBD; www.uwcm.ac.uk/uwcm/mg/grabd/grabd.html] were analyzed. Potential secondary structure was noted between the 5' flanking sequence of the first breakpoint and the 3' flanking sequence of the second breakpoint in 49% of rearrangements and between the 5' flanking sequence of the second breakpoint and the 3' flanking sequence of the first breakpoint in 36% of rearrangements. Inverted repeats, inversions of inverted repeats, and symmetric elements were found in association with gross rearrangements at approximately the same frequency. However, inverted repeats and inversions of inverted repeats accounted for the vast majority (83%) of deletions plus small insertions, symmetric elements for one-half of all antigen receptor-mediated translocations, while direct repeats appear only to be involved in mediating simple deletions. These findings extend our understanding of illegitimate recombination by highlighting the importance of secondary structure formation between single-stranded DNA ends at breakpoint junctions. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Neighborhood characteristics influence DNA methylation of genes involved in stress response and inflammation: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jennifer A; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Xu; Ratliff, Scott M; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Kardia, Sharon L R; Liu, Yongmei; Roux, Ava V Diez; Needham, Belinda L

    2017-08-01

    Living in a disadvantaged neighborhood is associated with poor health outcomes even after accounting for individual-level socioeconomic factors. The chronic stress of unfavorable neighborhood conditions may lead to dysregulation of the stress reactivity and inflammatory pathways, potentially mediated through epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation. We used multi-level models to examine the relationship between 2 neighborhood conditions and methylation levels of 18 genes related to stress reactivity and inflammation in purified monocytes from 1,226 participants of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), a population-based sample of US adults. Neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage, a summary of 16 census-based metrics, was associated with DNA methylation [False discovery rate (FDR) q-value ≤ 0.1] in 2 out of 7 stress-related genes evaluated (CRF, SLC6A4) and 2 out of 11 inflammation-related genes (F8, TLR1). Neighborhood social environment, a summary measure of aesthetic quality, safety, and social cohesion, was associated with methylation in 4 of the 7 stress-related genes (AVP, BDNF, FKBP5, SLC6A4) and 7 of the 11 inflammation-related genes (CCL1, CD1D, F8, KLRG1, NLRP12, SLAMF7, TLR1). High socioeconomic disadvantage and worse social environment were primarily associated with increased methylation. In 5 genes with significant associations between neighborhood and methylation (FKBP5, CD1D, F8, KLRG1, NLRP12), methylation was associated with gene expression of at least one transcript. These results demonstrate that multiple dimensions of neighborhood context may influence methylation levels and subsequent gene expression of stress- and inflammation-related genes, even after accounting for individual socioeconomic factors. Further elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying these relationships will be important for understanding the etiology of health disparities.

  7. Paramecium tetraurelia chromatin assembly factor-1-like protein PtCAF-1 is involved in RNA-mediated control of DNA elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignarski, Michael; Singh, Aditi; Swart, Estienne C; Arambasic, Miroslav; Sandoval, Pamela Y; Nowacki, Mariusz

    2014-10-29

    Genome-wide DNA remodelling in the ciliate Paramecium is ensured by RNA-mediated trans-nuclear crosstalk between the germline and the somatic genomes during sexual development. The rearrangements include elimination of transposable elements, minisatellites and tens of thousands non-coding elements called internally eliminated sequences (IESs). The trans-nuclear genome comparison process employs a distinct class of germline small RNAs (scnRNAs) that are compared against the parental somatic genome to select the germline-specific subset of scnRNAs that subsequently target DNA elimination in the progeny genome. Only a handful of proteins involved in this process have been identified so far and the mechanism of DNA targeting is unknown. Here we describe chromatin assembly factor-1-like protein (PtCAF-1), which we show is required for the survival of sexual progeny and localizes first in the parental and later in the newly developing macronucleus. Gene silencing shows that PtCAF-1 is required for the elimination of transposable elements and a subset of IESs. PTCAF-1 depletion also impairs the selection of germline-specific scnRNAs during development. We identify specific histone modifications appearing during Paramecium development which are strongly reduced in PTCAF-1 depleted cells. Our results demonstrate the importance of PtCAF-1 for the epigenetic trans-nuclear cross-talk mechanism. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Involvement of CD8+ T cell-mediated immune responses in LcrV DNA vaccine induced protection against lethal Yersinia pestis challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shixia; Goguen, Jon D; Li, Fusheng; Lu, Shan

    2011-09-09

    Yersinia pestis (Y. pestis) is the causative pathogen of plague, a highly fatal disease for which an effective vaccine, especially against mucosal transmission, is still not available. Like many bacterial infections, antigen-specific antibody responses have been traditionally considered critical, if not solely responsible, for vaccine-induced protection against Y. pestis. Studies in recent years have suggested the importance of T cell immune responses against Y. pestis infection but information is still limited about the details of Y. pestis antigen-specific T cell immune responses. In current report, studies are conducted to identify the presence of CD8+ T cell epitopes in LcrV protein, the leading antigen of plague vaccine development. Furthermore, depletion of CD8+ T cells in LcrV DNA vaccinated Balb/C mice led to reduced protection against lethal intranasal challenge of Y. pestis. These findings establish that an LcrV DNA vaccine is able to elicit CD8+ T cell immune responses against specific epitopes of this key plague antigen and that a CD8+ T cell immune response is involved in LcrV DNA vaccine-elicited protection. Future studies in plague vaccine development will need to examine if the presence of detectable T cell immune responses, in particular CD8+ T-cell immune responses, will enhance the protection against Y. pestis in higher animal species or humans. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. DNA fingerprinting tags novel altered chromosomal regions and identifies the involvement of SOX5 in the progression of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Stephanie; Chan, Yuen Piu; Woolcock, Bruce; Hu, Liang; Wong, Kai Yau; Ling, Ming Tat; Bainbridge, Terry; Webber, Douglas; Chan, Tim Hon Man; Guan, Xin-Yuan; Lam, Wan; Vielkind, Juergen; Chan, Kwok Wah

    2009-05-15

    Identification of genomic alterations associated with the progression of prostate cancer may facilitate the better understanding of the development of this highly variable disease. Matched normal, premalignant high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive prostate carcinoma cells were procured by laser capture microdissection (LCM) from human radical prostatectomy specimens. From these cells, comparative DNA fingerprints were generated by a modified PCR-based technique called scanning of microdissected archival lesion (SMAL)-PCR. Recurrent polymorphic fingerprint fragments were used in tagging altered chromosomal regions. Altered regions were found at cytobands 1p31.3, 1q44, 2p23.1, 3p26.3, 3q22.3, 4q22.3, 4q35.2, 5q23.2, 8q22.3, 8q24.13, 9q21.3, 9q22.32, 10q11.21, 11p13, 12p12.1, 13q12.1, 16q12.2 and 18q21.31. Candidate genes in the surrounding area that may possibly harbor mutations that change normal prostatic cells to progress into their tumor stages were proposed. Of these fragments, a 420 bp alteration, absent in all 26 normal samples screened, was observed in 2 tumors. This fragment was cloned, sequenced and localized to chromosome 12p12.1. Within this region, candidate gene sex determining region Y-box 5 (SOX5) was proposed. Further studies of SOX5 in cell lines, xenografts and human prostate specimens, at both the RNA and protein levels, found overexpression of the gene in tumors. This overexpression was then subsequently found by fluorescent in situ hybridization to be caused by amplification of the region. In conclusion, our results suggest LCM coupled with SMAL-PCR DNA fingerprinting is a useful method for the screening and identification of chromosomal regions and genes associated with cancer development. Further, overexpression of SOX5 is associated with prostate tumor progression and early development of distant metastasis. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Phylogeny of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains constructed from polymorphisms in genes involved in DNA replication, recombination and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, Olga; Luo, Tao; Dos Vultos, Tiago; Kremer, Kristin; Murray, Alan; Namouchi, Amine; Jackson, Céline; Rauzier, Jean; Bifani, Pablo; Warren, Rob; Rasolofo, Voahangy; Mei, Jian; Gao, Qian; Gicquel, Brigitte

    2011-01-20

    The Beijing family is a successful group of M. tuberculosis strains, often associated with drug resistance and widely distributed throughout the world. Polymorphic genetic markers have been used to type particular M. tuberculosis strains. We recently identified a group of polymorphic DNA repair replication and recombination (3R) genes. It was shown that evolution of M. tuberculosis complex strains can be studied using 3R SNPs and a high-resolution tool for strain discrimination was developed. Here we investigated the genetic diversity and propose a phylogeny for Beijing strains by analyzing polymorphisms in 3R genes. A group of 3R genes was sequenced in a collection of Beijing strains from different geographic origins. Sequence analysis and comparison with the ones of non-Beijing strains identified several SNPs. These SNPs were used to type a larger collection of Beijing strains and allowed identification of 26 different sequence types for which a phylogeny was constructed. Phylogenetic relationships established by sequence types were in agreement with evolutionary pathways suggested by other genetic markers, such as Large Sequence Polymorphisms (LSPs). A recent Beijing genotype (Bmyc10), which included 60% of strains from distinct parts of the world, appeared to be predominant. We found SNPs in 3R genes associated with the Beijing family, which enabled discrimination of different groups and the proposal of a phylogeny. The Beijing family can be divided into different groups characterized by particular genetic polymorphisms that may reflect pathogenic features. These SNPs are new, potential genetic markers that may contribute to better understand the success of the Beijing family.

  11. Phylogeny of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains constructed from polymorphisms in genes involved in DNA replication, recombination and repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Mestre

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Beijing family is a successful group of M. tuberculosis strains, often associated with drug resistance and widely distributed throughout the world. Polymorphic genetic markers have been used to type particular M. tuberculosis strains. We recently identified a group of polymorphic DNA repair replication and recombination (3R genes. It was shown that evolution of M. tuberculosis complex strains can be studied using 3R SNPs and a high-resolution tool for strain discrimination was developed. Here we investigated the genetic diversity and propose a phylogeny for Beijing strains by analyzing polymorphisms in 3R genes.A group of 3R genes was sequenced in a collection of Beijing strains from different geographic origins. Sequence analysis and comparison with the ones of non-Beijing strains identified several SNPs. These SNPs were used to type a larger collection of Beijing strains and allowed identification of 26 different sequence types for which a phylogeny was constructed. Phylogenetic relationships established by sequence types were in agreement with evolutionary pathways suggested by other genetic markers, such as Large Sequence Polymorphisms (LSPs. A recent Beijing genotype (Bmyc10, which included 60% of strains from distinct parts of the world, appeared to be predominant.We found SNPs in 3R genes associated with the Beijing family, which enabled discrimination of different groups and the proposal of a phylogeny. The Beijing family can be divided into different groups characterized by particular genetic polymorphisms that may reflect pathogenic features. These SNPs are new, potential genetic markers that may contribute to better understand the success of the Beijing family.

  12. Identification of transcription coactivator OCA-B-dependent genes involved in antigen-dependent B cell differentiation by cDNA array analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Unkyu; Siegel, Rachael; Ren, Xiaodi; Gunther, Cary S; Gaasterland, Terry; Roeder, Robert G

    2003-07-22

    The tissue-specific transcriptional coactivator OCA-B is required for antigen-dependent B cell differentiation events, including germinal center formation. However, the identity of OCA-B target genes involved in this process is unknown. This study has used large-scale cDNA arrays to monitor changes in gene expression patterns that accompany mature B cell differentiation. B cell receptor ligation alone induces many genes involved in B cell expansion, whereas B cell receptor and helper T cell costimulation induce genes associated with B cell effector function. OCA-B expression is induced by both B cell receptor ligation alone and helper T cell costimulation, suggesting that OCA-B is involved in B cell expansion as well as B cell function. Accordingly, several genes involved in cell proliferation and signaling, such as Lck, Kcnn4, Cdc37, cyclin D3, B4galt1, and Ms4a11, have been identified as OCA-B-dependent genes. Further studies on the roles played by these genes in B cells will contribute to an understanding of B cell differentiation.

  13. Activation of eNOS in endothelial cells exposed to ionizing radiation involves components of the DNA damage response pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagane, Masaki; Yasui, Hironobu; Sakai, Yuri; Yamamori, Tohru [Laboratory of Radiation Biology, Department of Environmental Veterinary Sciences, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0818 (Japan); Niwa, Koichi [Laboratory of Biochemistry, Department of Food and Cosmetic Science, Faculty of Bioindustry, Tokyo University of Agriculture, Abashiri 099-2493 (Japan); Hattori, Yuichi [Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Kondo, Takashi [Department of Radiological Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Inanami, Osamu, E-mail: inanami@vetmed.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Radiation Biology, Department of Environmental Veterinary Sciences, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0818 (Japan)

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • eNOS activity is increased in BAECs exposed to X-rays. • ATM is involved in this increased eNOS activity. • HSP90 modulates the radiation-induced activation of ATM and eNOS. - Abstract: In this study, the involvement of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase and heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation was investigated in X-irradiated bovine aortic endothelial cells. The activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and the phosphorylation of serine 1179 of eNOS (eNOS-Ser1179) were significantly increased in irradiated cells. The radiation-induced increases in NOS activity and eNOS-Ser1179 phosphorylation levels were significantly reduced by treatment with either an ATM inhibitor (Ku-60019) or an HSP90 inhibitor (geldanamycin). Geldanamycin was furthermore found to suppress the radiation-induced phosphorylation of ATM-Ser1181. Our results indicate that the radiation-induced eNOS activation in bovine aortic endothelial cells is regulated by ATM and HSP90.

  14. DNA methylation of the gonadal aromatase (cyp19a promoter is involved in temperature-dependent sex ratio shifts in the European sea bass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Navarro-Martín

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Sex ratio shifts in response to temperature are common in fish and reptiles. However, the mechanism linking temperature during early development and sex ratios has remained elusive. We show in the European sea bass (sb, a fish in which temperature effects on sex ratios are maximal before the gonads form, that juvenile males have double the DNA methylation levels of females in the promoter of gonadal aromatase (cyp19a, the enzyme that converts androgens into estrogens. Exposure to high temperature increased the cyp19a promoter methylation levels of females, indicating that induced-masculinization involves DNA methylation-mediated control of aromatase gene expression, with an observed inverse relationship between methylation levels and expression. Although different CpGs within the sb cyp19a promoter exhibited different sensitivity to temperature, we show that the increased methylation of the sb cyp19a promoter, which occurs in the gonads but not in the brain, is not a generalized effect of temperature. Importantly, these effects were also observed in sexually undifferentiated fish and were not altered by estrogen treatment. Thus, methylation of the sb cyp19a promoter is the cause of the lower expression of cyp19a in temperature-masculinized fish. In vitro, induced methylation of the sb cyp19a promoter suppressed the ability of SF-1 and Foxl2 to stimulate transcription. Finally, a CpG differentially methylated by temperature and adjacent to a Sox transcription factor binding site is conserved across species. Thus, DNA methylation of the aromatase promoter may be an essential component of the long-sought-after mechanism connecting environmental temperature and sex ratios in vertebrate species with temperature-dependent sex determination.

  15. DNA methylation affects the lifespan of honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) workers - Evidence for a regulatory module that involves vitellogenin expression but is independent of juvenile hormone function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso-Júnior, Carlos A M; Guidugli-Lazzarini, Karina R; Hartfelder, Klaus

    2018-01-01

    The canonic regulatory module for lifespan of honey bee (Apis mellifera) workers involves a mutual repressor relationship between juvenile hormone (JH) and vitellogenin (Vg). Compared to vertebrates, however, little is known about a possible role of epigenetic factors. The full genomic repertoire of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) makes the honey bee an attractive emergent model for studying the role of epigenetics in the aging process of invertebrates, and especially so in social insects. We first quantified the transcript levels of the four DNMTs encoding genes in the head thorax and abdomens of workers of different age, showing that dnmt1a and dnmt3 expression is up-regulated in abdomens of old workers, whereas dnmt1b and dnmt2 are down-regulated in heads of old workers. Pharmacological genome demethylation by RG108 treatment caused an increase in worker lifespan. Next, we showed that the genomic DNA methylation status indirectly affects vitellogenin gene expression both in vitro and in vivo in young workers, and that this occurs independent of caloric restriction or JH levels, suggesting that a non-canonical circuitry may be acting in parallel with the JH/Vg module to regulate the adult life cycle of honey bee workers. Our data provide evidence that epigenetic factors play a role in regulatory networks associated with complex life history traits of a social insect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Transcriptomic identification of candidate genes involved in sunflower responses to chilling and salt stresses based on cDNA microarray analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paniego Norma

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considering that sunflower production is expanding to arid regions, tolerance to abiotic stresses as drought, low temperatures and salinity arises as one of the main constrains nowadays. Differential organ-specific sunflower ESTs (expressed sequence tags were previously generated by a subtractive hybridization method that included a considerable number of putative abiotic stress associated sequences. The objective of this work is to analyze concerted gene expression profiles of organ-specific ESTs by fluorescence microarray assay, in response to high sodium chloride concentration and chilling treatments with the aim to identify and follow up candidate genes for early responses to abiotic stress in sunflower. Results Abiotic-related expressed genes were the target of this characterization through a gene expression analysis using an organ-specific cDNA fluorescence microarray approach in response to high salinity and low temperatures. The experiment included three independent replicates from leaf samples. We analyzed 317 unigenes previously isolated from differential organ-specific cDNA libraries from leaf, stem and flower at R1 and R4 developmental stage. A statistical analysis based on mean comparison by ANOVA and ordination by Principal Component Analysis allowed the detection of 80 candidate genes for either salinity and/or chilling stresses. Out of them, 50 genes were up or down regulated under both stresses, supporting common regulatory mechanisms and general responses to chilling and salinity. Interestingly 15 and 12 sequences were up regulated or down regulated specifically in one stress but not in the other, respectively. These genes are potentially involved in different regulatory mechanisms including transcription/translation/protein degradation/protein folding/ROS production or ROS-scavenging. Differential gene expression patterns were confirmed by qRT-PCR for 12.5% of the microarray candidate sequences. Conclusion

  17. The chemopreventive activity of the histone deacetylase inhibitor tributyrin in colon carcinogenesis involves the induction of apoptosis and reduction of DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidor, Renato [Laboratory of Diet, Nutrition and Cancer, Department of Food and Experimental Nutrition, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo (Brazil); Advanced Research Center in Food Science and Nutrition (NAPAN) and Food Research Center (FoRC), Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo (Brazil); Furtado, Kelly Silva; Ortega, Juliana Festa [Laboratory of Diet, Nutrition and Cancer, Department of Food and Experimental Nutrition, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo (Brazil); Oliveira, Tiago Franco de [Department of Clinical and Toxicological Analyses, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo (Brazil); Tavares, Paulo Eduardo Latorre Martins; Vieira, Alessandra; Miranda, Mayara Lilian Paulino [Laboratory of Diet, Nutrition and Cancer, Department of Food and Experimental Nutrition, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo (Brazil); Purgatto, Eduardo [Laboratory of Food Chemistry and Biochemistry, Department of Food and Experimental Nutrition, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo (Brazil); Advanced Research Center in Food Science and Nutrition (NAPAN) and Food Research Center (FoRC), Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo (Brazil); Moreno, Fernando Salvador, E-mail: rmoreno@usp.br [Laboratory of Diet, Nutrition and Cancer, Department of Food and Experimental Nutrition, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo (Brazil); Advanced Research Center in Food Science and Nutrition (NAPAN) and Food Research Center (FoRC), Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-04-15

    The chemopreventive activity of the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) tributyrin (TB), a prodrug of butyric acid (BA), was evaluated in a rat model of colon carcinogenesis. The animals were treated with TB (TB group: 200 mg/100 g of body weight, b.w.) or maltodextrin (MD isocaloric control group: 300 mg/100 g b.w.) daily for 9 consecutive weeks. In the 3rd and 4th weeks of treatment, the rats in the TB and MD groups were given DMH (40 mg/kg b.w.) twice a week. After 9 weeks, the animals were euthanized, and the distal colon was examined. Compared with the control group (MD group), TB treatment reduced the total number of aberrant crypt foci (ACF; p < 0.05) as well as the ACF with ≥ 4 crypts (p < 0.05), which are considered more aggressive, but not inhibited the formation of DMH-induced O6-methyldeoxyguanosine DNA adducts. The TB group also showed a higher apoptotic index (p < 0.05) and reduced DNA damage (p < 0.05) compared with MD group. TB acted as a HDACi, as rats treated with the prodrug of BA had higher levels of histone H3K9 acetylation compared with the MD group (p < 0.05). TB administration resulted in increased colonic tissue concentrations of BA (p < 0.05) compared with the control animals. These results suggest that TB can be considered a promising chemopreventive agent for colon carcinogenesis because it reduced the number of ACF, including those that were more aggressive. Induction of apoptosis and reduction of DNA damage are cellular mechanisms that appear to be involved in the chemopreventive activity of TB. - Highlights: • Tributyrin is a chemopreventive agent for rat colon aberrant crypt foci. • Tributyrin increased apoptosis in an experimental rat colon carcinogenesis model. • Tributyrin treatment in a rat colon carcinogenesis model decreased DNA damage. • Tributyrin treatment induced H3K9 acetylation in a rat colon carcinogenesis model.

  18. The chemopreventive activity of the histone deacetylase inhibitor tributyrin in colon carcinogenesis involves the induction of apoptosis and reduction of DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidor, Renato; Furtado, Kelly Silva; Ortega, Juliana Festa; Oliveira, Tiago Franco de; Tavares, Paulo Eduardo Latorre Martins; Vieira, Alessandra; Miranda, Mayara Lilian Paulino; Purgatto, Eduardo; Moreno, Fernando Salvador

    2014-01-01

    The chemopreventive activity of the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) tributyrin (TB), a prodrug of butyric acid (BA), was evaluated in a rat model of colon carcinogenesis. The animals were treated with TB (TB group: 200 mg/100 g of body weight, b.w.) or maltodextrin (MD isocaloric control group: 300 mg/100 g b.w.) daily for 9 consecutive weeks. In the 3rd and 4th weeks of treatment, the rats in the TB and MD groups were given DMH (40 mg/kg b.w.) twice a week. After 9 weeks, the animals were euthanized, and the distal colon was examined. Compared with the control group (MD group), TB treatment reduced the total number of aberrant crypt foci (ACF; p < 0.05) as well as the ACF with ≥ 4 crypts (p < 0.05), which are considered more aggressive, but not inhibited the formation of DMH-induced O6-methyldeoxyguanosine DNA adducts. The TB group also showed a higher apoptotic index (p < 0.05) and reduced DNA damage (p < 0.05) compared with MD group. TB acted as a HDACi, as rats treated with the prodrug of BA had higher levels of histone H3K9 acetylation compared with the MD group (p < 0.05). TB administration resulted in increased colonic tissue concentrations of BA (p < 0.05) compared with the control animals. These results suggest that TB can be considered a promising chemopreventive agent for colon carcinogenesis because it reduced the number of ACF, including those that were more aggressive. Induction of apoptosis and reduction of DNA damage are cellular mechanisms that appear to be involved in the chemopreventive activity of TB. - Highlights: • Tributyrin is a chemopreventive agent for rat colon aberrant crypt foci. • Tributyrin increased apoptosis in an experimental rat colon carcinogenesis model. • Tributyrin treatment in a rat colon carcinogenesis model decreased DNA damage. • Tributyrin treatment induced H3K9 acetylation in a rat colon carcinogenesis model

  19. AMP-activated protein kinase is involved in the activation of the Fanconi anemia/BRCA pathway in response to DNA interstrand crosslinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Min Jeong; Kim, Sunshin; Hwang, Soo Kyung; Kim, Bong Sub; Kim, Hyoun Geun; Choi, Hae In; Kim, Jong Heon; Goh, Sung Ho; Lee, Chang-Hun

    2016-08-16

    Fanconi anemia complementation group (FANC) proteins constitute the Fanconi Anemia (FA)/BRCA pathway that is activated in response to DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). We previously performed yeast two-hybrid screening to identify novel FANC-interacting proteins and discovered that the alpha subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPKα1) was a candidate binding partner of the FANCG protein, which is a component of the FA nuclear core complex. We confirmed the interaction between AMPKα and both FANCG using co-immunoprecipitation experiments. Additionally, we showed that AMPKα interacted with FANCA, another component of the FA nuclear core complex. AMPKα knockdown in U2OS cells decreased FANCD2 monoubiquitination and nuclear foci formation upon mitomycin C-induced ICLs. Furthermore, AMPKα knockdown enhanced cellular sensitivity to MMC. MMC treatment resulted in an increase in AMPKα phosphorylation/activation, indicating AMPK is involved in the cellular response to ICLs. FANCA was phosphorylated by AMPK at S347 and phosphorylation increased with MMC treatment. MMC-induced FANCD2 monoubiquitination and nuclear foci formation were compromised in a U2OS cell line that stably overexpressed the S347A mutant form of FANCA compared to wild-type FANCA-overexpressing cells, indicating a requirement for FANCA phosphorylation at S347 for proper activation of the FA/BRCA pathway. Our data suggest AMPK is involved in the activation of the FA/BRCA pathway.

  20. Mediator binds to boundaries of chromosomal interaction domains and to proteins involved in DNA looping, RNA metabolism, chromatin remodeling, and actin assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chereji, Razvan V; Bharatula, Vasudha; Elfving, Nils; Blomberg, Jeanette; Larsson, Miriam; Morozov, Alexandre V; Broach, James R; Björklund, Stefan

    2017-09-06

    Mediator is a multi-unit molecular complex that plays a key role in transferring signals from transcriptional regulators to RNA polymerase II in eukaryotes. We have combined biochemical purification of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mediator from chromatin with chromatin immunoprecipitation in order to reveal Mediator occupancy on DNA genome-wide, and to identify proteins interacting specifically with Mediator on the chromatin template. Tandem mass spectrometry of proteins in immunoprecipitates of mediator complexes revealed specific interactions between Mediator and the RSC, Arp2/Arp3, CPF, CF 1A and Lsm complexes in chromatin. These factors are primarily involved in chromatin remodeling, actin assembly, mRNA 3'-end processing, gene looping and mRNA decay, but they have also been shown to enter the nucleus and participate in Pol II transcription. Moreover, we have found that Mediator, in addition to binding Pol II promoters, occupies chromosomal interacting domain (CID) boundaries and that Mediator in chromatin associates with proteins that have been shown to interact with CID boundaries, such as Sth1, Ssu72 and histone H4. This suggests that Mediator plays a significant role in higher-order genome organization. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. Haloperidol induces pharmacoepigenetic response by modulating miRNA expression, global DNA methylation and expression profiles of methylation maintenance genes and genes involved in neurotransmission in neuronal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu Swathy

    Full Text Available Haloperidol has been extensively used in various psychiatric conditions. It has also been reported to induce severe side effects. We aimed to evaluate whether haloperidol can influence host methylome, and if so what are the possible mechanisms for it in neuronal cells. Impact on host methylome and miRNAs can have wide spread alterations in gene expression, which might possibly help in understanding how haloperidol may impact treatment response or induce side effects.SK-N-SH, a neuroblasoma cell line was treated with haloperidol at 10μm concentration for 24 hours and global DNA methylation was evaluated. Methylation at global level is maintained by methylation maintenance machinery and certain miRNAs. Therefore, the expression of methylation maintenance genes and their putative miRNA expression profiles were assessed. These global methylation alterations could result in gene expression changes. Therefore genes expressions for neurotransmitter receptors, regulators, ion channels and transporters were determined. Subsequently, we were also keen to identify a strong candidate miRNA based on biological and in-silico approach which can reflect on the pharmacoepigenetic trait of haloperidol and can also target the altered neuroscience panel of genes used in the study.Haloperidol induced increase in global DNA methylation which was found to be associated with corresponding increase in expression of various epigenetic modifiers that include DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B and MBD2. The expression of miR-29b that is known to putatively regulate the global methylation by modulating the expression of epigenetic modifiers was observed to be down regulated by haloperidol. In addition to miR-29b, miR-22 was also found to be downregulated by haloperidol treatment. Both these miRNA are known to putatively target several genes associated with various epigenetic modifiers, pharmacogenes and neurotransmission. Interestingly some of these putative target genes involved in

  2. Haloperidol induces pharmacoepigenetic response by modulating miRNA expression, global DNA methylation and expression profiles of methylation maintenance genes and genes involved in neurotransmission in neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swathy, Babu; Banerjee, Moinak

    2017-01-01

    Haloperidol has been extensively used in various psychiatric conditions. It has also been reported to induce severe side effects. We aimed to evaluate whether haloperidol can influence host methylome, and if so what are the possible mechanisms for it in neuronal cells. Impact on host methylome and miRNAs can have wide spread alterations in gene expression, which might possibly help in understanding how haloperidol may impact treatment response or induce side effects. SK-N-SH, a neuroblasoma cell line was treated with haloperidol at 10μm concentration for 24 hours and global DNA methylation was evaluated. Methylation at global level is maintained by methylation maintenance machinery and certain miRNAs. Therefore, the expression of methylation maintenance genes and their putative miRNA expression profiles were assessed. These global methylation alterations could result in gene expression changes. Therefore genes expressions for neurotransmitter receptors, regulators, ion channels and transporters were determined. Subsequently, we were also keen to identify a strong candidate miRNA based on biological and in-silico approach which can reflect on the pharmacoepigenetic trait of haloperidol and can also target the altered neuroscience panel of genes used in the study. Haloperidol induced increase in global DNA methylation which was found to be associated with corresponding increase in expression of various epigenetic modifiers that include DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B and MBD2. The expression of miR-29b that is known to putatively regulate the global methylation by modulating the expression of epigenetic modifiers was observed to be down regulated by haloperidol. In addition to miR-29b, miR-22 was also found to be downregulated by haloperidol treatment. Both these miRNA are known to putatively target several genes associated with various epigenetic modifiers, pharmacogenes and neurotransmission. Interestingly some of these putative target genes involved in neurotransmission

  3. Mutual enhancement of IL-2 and IL-7 on DNA vaccine immunogenicity mainly involves regulations on their receptor expression and receptor-expressing lymphocyte generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yonghong; Liang, Shuang; Li, Xiujin; Wang, Liyue; Zhang, Jianlou; Xu, Jian; Huo, Shanshan; Cao, Xuebin; Zhong, Zhenyu; Zhong, Fei

    2015-07-09

    Our previous study showed that IL-2 and IL-7 could mutually enhance the immunogenicity of canine parvovirus VP2 DNA vaccine, although the underlying mechanism remained unknown. Here, we used the OVA gene as a DNA vaccine in a mouse model to test their enhancement on DNA vaccine immunogenicity and to explore the molecular mechanism. Results showed that both IL-2 and IL-7 genes significantly increased the immunogenicity of OVA DNA vaccine in mice. Co-administration of IL-2 and IL-7 genes with OVA DNA significantly increased OVA-specific antibody titers, T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production compared with IL-2 or IL-7 alone, confirming that IL-2 and IL-7 mutually enhanced DNA vaccine immunogenicity. Mechanistically, we have shown that IL-2 significantly stimulated generation of IL-7 receptor-expressing lymphocytes, and that IL-7 significantly induced IL-2 receptor expression. These results contribute to an explanation of the mechanism of the mutual effects of IL-2 and IL-7 on enhancing DNA vaccine immunogenicity and provided a basis for further investigation on their mutual effects on adjuvant activity and immune regulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. AtMMS21, an SMC5/6 complex subunit, is involved in stem cell niche maintenance and DNA damage responses in Arabidopsis roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Panglian; Yuan, Dongke; Liu, Ming; Li, Chunxin; Liu, Yiyang; Zhang, Shengchun; Yao, Nan; Yang, Chengwei

    2013-04-01

    Plants maintain stem cells in meristems to sustain lifelong growth; these stem cells must have effective DNA damage responses to prevent mutations that can propagate to large parts of the plant. However, the molecular links between stem cell functions and DNA damage responses remain largely unexplored. Here, we report that the small ubiquitin-related modifier E3 ligase AtMMS21 (for methyl methanesulfonate sensitivity gene21) acts to maintain the root stem cell niche by mediating DNA damage responses in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Mutation of AtMMS21 causes defects in the root stem cell niche during embryogenesis and postembryonic stages. AtMMS21 is essential for the proper expression of stem cell niche-defining transcription factors. Moreover, mms21-1 mutants are hypersensitive to DNA-damaging agents, have a constitutively increased DNA damage response, and have more DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the roots. Also, mms21-1 mutants exhibit spontaneous cell death within the root stem cell niche, and treatment with DSB-inducing agents increases this cell death, suggesting that AtMMS21 is required to prevent DSB-induced stem cell death. We further show that AtMMS21 functions as a subunit of the STRUCTURAL MAINTENANCE OF CHROMOSOMES5/6 complex, an evolutionarily conserved chromosomal ATPase required for DNA repair. These data reveal that AtMMS21 acts in DSB amelioration and stem cell niche maintenance during Arabidopsis root development.

  5. Differential Salt-Induced Dissociation of the p53 Protein Complexes with Circular and Linear Plasmid DNA Substrates Suggest Involvement of a Sliding Mechanism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šebest, Peter; Brázdová, Marie; Fojta, Miroslav; Pivoňková, Hana

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 2 (2015), s. 3163-3177 E-ISSN 1422-0067 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/2076; GA ČR(CZ) GBP206/12/G151 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : TUMOR-SUPPRESSOR P53 * CISPLATIN -DAMAGED DNA * SUPERCOILED DNA Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.257, year: 2015

  6. OGG1 Involvement in High Glucose-Mediated Enhancement of Bupivacaine-Induced Oxidative DNA Damage in SH-SY5Y Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhong-Jie; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Qing-Guo; Li, Le; Lai, Lu-Ying; Jiang, Shan; Xu, Shi-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Hyperglycemia can inhibit expression of the 8-oxoG-DNA glycosylase (OGG1) which is one of the key repair enzymes for DNA oxidative damage. The effect of hyperglycemia on OGG1 expression in response to local anesthetics-induced DNA damage is unknown. This study was designed to determine whether high glucose inhibits OGG1 expression and aggravates bupivacaine-induced DNA damage via reactive oxygen species (ROS). SH-SY5Y cells were cultured with or without 50 mM glucose for 8 days before they were treated with 1.5 mM bupivacaine for 24 h. OGG1 expression was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and western blot. ROS was estimated using the redox-sensitive fluorescent dye DCFH-DA. DNA damage was investigated with immunostaining for 8-oxodG and comet assays. OGG1 expression was inhibited in cells exposed to high glucose with concomitant increase in ROS production and more severe DNA damage as compared to control culture conditions, and these changes were further exacerbated by bupivacaine. Treatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) prevented high glucose and bupivacaine mediated increase in ROS production and restored functional expression of OGG1, which lead to attenuated high glucose-mediated exacerbation of bupivacaine neurotoxicity. Our findings indicate that subjects with diabetes may experience more detrimental effects following bupivacaine use. PMID:26161242

  7. OGG1 Involvement in High Glucose-Mediated Enhancement of Bupivacaine-Induced Oxidative DNA Damage in SH-SY5Y Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Jie Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperglycemia can inhibit expression of the 8-oxoG-DNA glycosylase (OGG1 which is one of the key repair enzymes for DNA oxidative damage. The effect of hyperglycemia on OGG1 expression in response to local anesthetics-induced DNA damage is unknown. This study was designed to determine whether high glucose inhibits OGG1 expression and aggravates bupivacaine-induced DNA damage via reactive oxygen species (ROS. SH-SY5Y cells were cultured with or without 50 mM glucose for 8 days before they were treated with 1.5 mM bupivacaine for 24 h. OGG1 expression was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and western blot. ROS was estimated using the redox-sensitive fluorescent dye DCFH-DA. DNA damage was investigated with immunostaining for 8-oxodG and comet assays. OGG1 expression was inhibited in cells exposed to high glucose with concomitant increase in ROS production and more severe DNA damage as compared to control culture conditions, and these changes were further exacerbated by bupivacaine. Treatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC prevented high glucose and bupivacaine mediated increase in ROS production and restored functional expression of OGG1, which lead to attenuated high glucose-mediated exacerbation of bupivacaine neurotoxicity. Our findings indicate that subjects with diabetes may experience more detrimental effects following bupivacaine use.

  8. G-Quadruplexes Involving Both Strands of Genomic DNA Are Highly Abundant and Colocalize with Functional Sites in the Human Genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej S Kudlicki

    Full Text Available The G-quadruplex is a non-canonical DNA structure biologically significant in DNA replication, transcription and telomere stability. To date, only G4s with all guanines originating from the same strand of DNA have been considered in the context of the human nuclear genome. Here, I discuss interstrand topological configurations of G-quadruplex DNA, consisting of guanines from both strands of genomic DNA; an algorithm is presented for predicting such structures. I have identified over 550,000 non-overlapping interstrand G-quadruplex forming sequences in the human genome--significantly more than intrastrand configurations. Functional analysis of interstrand G-quadruplex sites shows strong association with transcription initiation, the results are consistent with the XPB and XPD transcriptional helicases binding only to G-quadruplex DNA with interstrand topology. Interstrand quadruplexes are also enriched in origin of replication sites. Several topology classes of interstrand quadruplex-forming sequences are possible, and different topologies are enriched in different types of structural elements. The list of interstrand quadruplex forming sequences, and the computer program used for their prediction are available at the web address http://moment.utmb.edu/allquads.

  9. Sensitization of Tumor to {sup 212}Pb Radioimmunotherapy by Gemcitabine Involves Initial Abrogation of G2 Arrest and Blocked DNA Damage Repair by Interference With Rad51

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yong, Kwon Joong; Milenic, Diane E.; Baidoo, Kwamena E. [Radioimmune and Inorganic Chemistry Section, Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Brechbiel, Martin W., E-mail: martinwb@mail.nih.gov [Radioimmune and Inorganic Chemistry Section, Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To elucidate the mechanism of the therapeutic efficacy of targeted α-particle radiation therapy using {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab together with gemcitabine for treatment of disseminated peritoneal cancers. Methods and Materials: Mice bearing human colon cancer LS-174T intraperitoneal xenografts were pretreated with gemcitabine, followed by {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab and compared with controls. Results: Treatment with {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab increased the apoptotic rate in the S-phase-arrested tumors induced by gemcitabine at earlier time points (6 to 24 hours). {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab after gemcitabine pretreatment abrogated G2/M arrest at the same time points, which may be associated with the inhibition of Chk1 phosphorylation and, in turn, cell cycle perturbation, resulting in apoptosis. {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab treatment after gemcitabine pretreatment caused depression of DNA synthesis, DNA double-strand breaks, accumulation of unrepaired DNA, and down-regulation of Rad51 protein, indicating that DNA damage repair was blocked. In addition, modification in the chromatin structure of p21 may be associated with transcriptionally repressed chromatin states, indicating that the open structure was delayed at earlier time points. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the cell-killing efficacy of {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab after gemcitabine pretreatment may be associated with abrogation of the G2/M checkpoint, inhibition of DNA damage repair, and chromatin remodeling.

  10. Sensitization of Tumor to 212Pb Radioimmunotherapy by Gemcitabine Involves Initial Abrogation of G2 Arrest and Blocked DNA Damage Repair by Interference With Rad51

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong, Kwon Joong; Milenic, Diane E.; Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To elucidate the mechanism of the therapeutic efficacy of targeted α-particle radiation therapy using 212 Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab together with gemcitabine for treatment of disseminated peritoneal cancers. Methods and Materials: Mice bearing human colon cancer LS-174T intraperitoneal xenografts were pretreated with gemcitabine, followed by 212 Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab and compared with controls. Results: Treatment with 212 Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab increased the apoptotic rate in the S-phase-arrested tumors induced by gemcitabine at earlier time points (6 to 24 hours). 212 Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab after gemcitabine pretreatment abrogated G2/M arrest at the same time points, which may be associated with the inhibition of Chk1 phosphorylation and, in turn, cell cycle perturbation, resulting in apoptosis. 212 Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab treatment after gemcitabine pretreatment caused depression of DNA synthesis, DNA double-strand breaks, accumulation of unrepaired DNA, and down-regulation of Rad51 protein, indicating that DNA damage repair was blocked. In addition, modification in the chromatin structure of p21 may be associated with transcriptionally repressed chromatin states, indicating that the open structure was delayed at earlier time points. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the cell-killing efficacy of 212 Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab after gemcitabine pretreatment may be associated with abrogation of the G2/M checkpoint, inhibition of DNA damage repair, and chromatin remodeling

  11. DNA repair in the c-myc proto-oncogene locus: Possible involvement in susceptibility or resistance to plasmacytoma induction in BALB/c mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beecham, E.J.; Mushinski, J.F.; Shacter, E.; Potter, M.; Bohr, V.A.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes an unexpected difference in the efficiency of removal of UV-induced DNA damage in the c-myc locus in splenic B lymphoblasts from two inbred strains of mice. In cells from plasmacytoma-resistant DBA/2N mice, 35% of UV-induced damage in the regulatory and 5' flank of c-myc is removed by 12 h. However, in cells from plasmacytoma-susceptible BALB/cAn mice, damage is not removed from this region. In the protein-encoding region and 3' flank of c-myc as well as in two dihydrofolate reductase gene fragments, UV damage is repaired with similar efficiency in B lymphoblasts from both strains of mice. Furthermore, in the protein-encoding portion and 3' flank of c-myc, damage is selectively removed from only the transcribed strand. No repair is detected in the nontranscribed strand. In contrast, DNA repair in the 5' flank of c-myc is not strand specific; in DNA from DBA/2N cells, UV damage is rapidly removed from both the transcribed and nontranscribed strands. In BALB/cAn cells no repair was detected in either strand in the 5'flank, consistent with the results with double-stranded, nick-translated probes to this region of c-myc. In addition to the repair studies, we have detected post-UV-damage formation: in most of the genes studied, we find that additional T4 endonuclease-sensitive sites are formed in the DNA 2 h after irradiation. Our findings provide new insights into the details of gene-specific and strand-specific DNA repair and suggest that there may be close links between DNA repair and B-cell neoplastic development

  12. DNA methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Kristine; Christensen, Jesper; Helin, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation is involved in key cellular processes, including X-chromosome inactivation, imprinting and transcriptional silencing of specific genes and repetitive elements. DNA methylation patterns are frequently perturbed in human diseases such as imprinting disorders and cancer. The recent...... discovery that the three members of the TET protein family can convert 5-methylcytosine (5mC) into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) has provided a potential mechanism leading to DNA demethylation. Moreover, the demonstration that TET2 is frequently mutated in haematopoietic tumours suggests that the TET...... proteins are important regulators of cellular identity. Here, we review the current knowledge regarding the function of the TET proteins, and discuss various mechanisms by which they contribute to transcriptional control. We propose that the TET proteins have an important role in regulating DNA methylation...

  13. The rnf168 paralog rnf169 defines a new class of ubiquitylated histone reader involved in the response to dna damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kitevski-Leblanc, Julianne; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Kukic, Predrag; Wilson, Marcus D.; Portella, Guillem; Yuwen, Tairan; Panier, Stephanie; Duan, Shili; Canny, Marella D.; Van Ingen, Hugo; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Rubinstein, John L.; Vendruscolo, Michele; Durocher, Daniel; Kay, Lewis E

    2017-01-01

    Site-specific histone ubiquitylation plays a central role in orchestrating the response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). DSBs elicit a cascade of events controlled by the ubiquitin ligase RNF168, which promotes the accumulation of repair factors such as 53BP1 and BRCA1 on the chromatin flanking

  14. DNA Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Ellen S.; Bertino, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a simulation activity that allow students to work through the exercise of DNA profiling and to grapple with some analytical and ethical questions involving a couple arranging with a surrogate mother to have a baby. Can be used to teach the principles of restriction enzyme digestion, gel electrophoresis, and probe hybridization. (MDH)

  15. Transcriptional Response of Human Neurospheres to Helper-Dependent CAV-2 Vectors Involves the Modulation of DNA Damage Response, Microtubule and Centromere Gene Groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Piersanti

    Full Text Available Brain gene transfer using viral vectors will likely become a therapeutic option for several disorders. Helper-dependent (HD canine adenovirus type 2 vectors (CAV-2 are well suited for this goal. These vectors are poorly immunogenic, efficiently transduce neurons, are retrogradely transported to afferent structures in the brain and lead to long-term transgene expression. CAV-2 vectors are being exploited to unravel behavior, cognition, neural networks, axonal transport and therapy for orphan diseases. With the goal of better understanding and characterizing HD-CAV-2 for brain therapy, we analyzed the transcriptomic modulation induced by HD-CAV-2 in human differentiated neurospheres derived from midbrain progenitors. This 3D model system mimics several aspects of the dynamic nature of human brain. We found that differentiated neurospheres are readily transduced by HD-CAV-2 and that transduction generates two main transcriptional responses: a DNA damage response and alteration of centromeric and microtubule probes. Future investigations on the biochemistry of processes highlighted by probe modulations will help defining the implication of HD-CAV-2 and CAR receptor binding in enchaining these functional pathways. We suggest here that the modulation of DNA damage genes is related to viral DNA, while the alteration of centromeric and microtubule probes is possibly enchained by the interaction of the HD-CAV-2 fibre with CAR.

  16. C. elegans ring finger protein RNF-113 is involved in interstrand DNA crosslink repair and interacts with a RAD51C homolog.

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    Hyojin Lee

    Full Text Available The Fanconi anemia (FA pathway recognizes interstrand DNA crosslinks (ICLs and contributes to their conversion into double-strand DNA breaks, which can be repaired by homologous recombination. Seven orthologs of the 15 proteins associated with Fanconi anemia are functionally conserved in the model organism C. elegans. Here we report that RNF-113, a ubiquitin ligase, is required for RAD-51 focus formation after inducing ICLs in C. elegans. However, the formation of foci of RPA-1 or FCD-2/FANCD2 in the FA pathway was not affected by depletion of RNF-113. Nevertheless, the RPA-1 foci formed did not disappear with time in the depleted worms, implying serious defects in ICL repair. As a result, RNF-113 depletion increased embryonic lethality after ICL treatment in wild-type worms, but it did not increase the ICL-induced lethality of rfs-1/rad51C mutants. In addition, the persistence of RPA-1 foci was suppressed in doubly-deficient rnf-113;rfs-1 worms, suggesting that there is an epistatic interaction between the two genes. These results lead us to suggest that RNF-113 and RFS-1 interact to promote the displacement of RPA-1 by RAD-51 on single-stranded DNA derived from ICLs.

  17. Identification of DNA-binding sites for the activator involved in late transcription of the temperate lactococcal phage TP901-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Margit; Kilstrup, Mogens; Hammer, Karin

    2006-01-01

    Alt, encoded by the lactococcal phage TP901-1, is needed for late transcription. We identify Alt as a DNA-binding protein, and footprint analysis shows that Alt binds to a region containing four imperfect direct repeats (ALT boxes) located -76 to -32 relative to the P-late transcriptional start...... site. The importance of the ALT boxes was confirmed by deletion of one or two ALT boxes and by introducing mutations in ALT boxes 1 and 4. Alt is proposed to act as a tetramer or higher multimer activating transcription of TP901-1 late genes by binding to the four ALT boxes, and bending of the DNA may...... be important for transcriptional activation of P-late. Furthermore, our results suggest that DNA replication may be required for late transcription in TP901-1. Additionally, we identify gp28 of the related lactococcal phage Tuc2009 as an activator and show that the activators required for late transcription...

  18. nuvA, an Aspergillus nidulans gene involved in DNA repair and recombination, is a homologue of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD18 and Neurospora crassa uvs-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanejko, L; Cotton, C; Jones, G; Tomsett, B; Strike, P

    1996-03-01

    A 40 kb genomic clone and 2.3 kb EcoRI subclone that rescued the DNA repair and recombination defects of the Aspergillus nidulans nuvA11 mutant were isolated and the subclone sequenced. The subclone hybridized to a cosmid in a chromosome-specific library confirming the assignment of nuvA to linkage group IV and indicating its closeness to bimD. Amplification by PCR clarified the relative positions of nuvA and bimD. A region identified within the subclone, encoding a C3HC4 zinc finger motif, was used as a probe to retrieve a cDNA clone. Sequencing of this clone showed that the nuvA gene has an ORF of 1329 bp with two introns of 51 bp and 60 bp. Expression of nuvA appears to be extremely low. The putative NUVA polypeptide has two zinc finger motifs, a molecular mass of 48906 Da and has 39% identity with the Neurospora crassa uvs-2 and 25% identity with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD18 translation products. Although mutations in nuvA, uvs-2 and RAD18 produce similar phenotypes, only the nuvA11 mutation affects meiotic recombination. A role for nuvA in both DNA repair and genetic recombination is proposed.

  19. Ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2004-01-01

    ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair......ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair...

  20. Cell-to-cell transformation in Escherichia coli: a novel type of natural transformation involving cell-derived DNA and a putative promoting pheromone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rika Etchuuya

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli is not assumed to be naturally transformable. However, several recent reports have shown that E. coli can express modest genetic competence in certain conditions that may arise in its environment. We have shown previously that spontaneous lateral transfer of non-conjugative plasmids occurs in a colony biofilm of mixed E. coli strains (a set of a donor strain harbouring a plasmid and a plasmid-free recipient strain. In this study, with high-frequency combinations of strains and a plasmid, we constructed the same lateral plasmid transfer system in liquid culture. Using this system, we demonstrated that this lateral plasmid transfer was DNase-sensitive, indicating that it is a kind of transformation in which DNase-accessible extracellular naked DNA is essential. However, this transformation did not occur with purified plasmid DNA and required a direct supply of plasmid from co-existing donor cells. Based on this feature, we have termed this transformation type as 'cell-to-cell transformation'. Analyses using medium conditioned with the high-frequency strain revealed that this strain released a certain factor(s that promoted cell-to-cell transformation and arrested growth of the other strains. This factor is heat-labile and protease-sensitive, and its roughly estimated molecular mass was between ∼9 kDa and ∼30 kDa, indicating that it is a polypeptide factor. Interestingly, this factor was effective even when the conditioned medium was diluted 10(-5-10(-6, suggesting that it acts like a pheromone with high bioactivity. Based on these results, we propose that cell-to-cell transformation is a novel natural transformation mechanism in E. coli that requires cell-derived DNA and is promoted by a peptide pheromone. This is the first evidence that suggests the existence of a peptide pheromone-regulated transformation mechanism in E. coli and in Gram-negative bacteria.

  1. DNA sequencing confirms the involvement of Leishmania (L. amazonensis in american tegumentary leishmaniasis in the state of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Rapela Medeiros

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: American tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL represents one of the most important public health issues in the world. An increased number of autochthonous cases of ATL in the Northeastern region of São Paulo State has been documented in the last few years, leading to a desire to determine the Leishmania species implicated. METHODS: PCR followed by DNA sequencing was carried out to identify a 120bp fragment from the universal kDNA minicircle of the genus Leishmania in 61 skin or mucosal biopsies from patients with ATL. RESULTS: DNA sequencing permitted the identification of a particular 15bp fragment (5' …GTC TTT GGG GCA AGT... 3' in all samples. Analysis by the neighbor-joining method showed the occurrence of two distinct groups related to the genus Viannia (V and Leishmania (L, each with two subgroups. Autochthonous cases with identity to a special Leishmania sequence not referenced in Genbank predominated in subgroup V.1, suggesting the possible existence of a subtype or mutation of Leishmania Viannia in this region. In the subgroup L.2, which showed identity with a known sequence of L. (L. amazonensis, there was a balanced distribution of autochthonous and non-autochthonous cases, including the mucosal and mucocutaneus forms in four patients. The last observation may direct us to new concepts, since the mucosal compromising has commonly been attributed to L. (V. braziliensis, even though L. (L. amazonensis is more frequent in the Amazonian region. CONCLUSIONS: These results confirm the pattern of distribution and possible mutations of these species, as well as the change in the clinical form presentation of ATL in the São Paulo State.

  2. Protection by DABCO against inactivation of transforming DNA by near-ultraviolet light: action spectra and implications for involvement of singlet oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peak, J.G.; Peak, M.J.; Foote, C.S.

    1981-01-01

    Diazobicyclo (2.2.2) octane (DABCO) protects the genetic activity of purified transforming Bacillus subtilis DNA against inactivation by near-, but not far-, UV light. The maximum dose-modifying factor is 0.4, at 0.1 M DABCO. Maximal protection is at about 350 nm and no protection occurs below 313 nm. The spectrum for protection is similar to that described for 2-aminoethylisothiouronium bromide hydrobromide. The relevance of these observations with regard to the role of singlet oxygen in near-UV effects is discussed. (author)

  3. An overlap case of Parry–Romberg syndrome and en coup de sabre with striking ocular involvement and anti-double-stranded DNA positivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Atas

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Parry–Romberg syndrome (PRS may overlap localized scleroderma (morphea lesions with linear depression (en coup de sabre [ECDS]. Overlap case with PRS and ECDS was presented. Enophthalmos, uveitis, ocular torticollis, keratic linear precipitates, and anti-double-stranded DNA positivity were identified. Subendothelial keratic precipitates detected by an in vivo laser scanning confocal microscopy were the first profiled in the literature. Patients must be evaluated and followed up carefully by their clinics to prevent misdiagnosis and unnecessary procedures such as surgery of ocular torticollis as muscular torticollis.

  4. Cooperativity effect involving drug-DNA/RNA intermolecular interaction: A B3LYP-D3 and MP2 theoretical investigation on ketoprofen⋯cytosine⋯H2O system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Jun-Ping; Wei, Xiao-Chun; Shi, Wen-Jing; Huang, Zhu-Yuan; Jin, Bo; Zhou, Yu-Kun

    2017-11-14

    In order to examine the origin of the drug action and design new DNA/RNA-targeted drugs, the cooperativity effect involving drug-DNA/RNA intermolecular interaction in ketoprofen⋯cytosine⋯H 2 O ternary system were investigated by the B3LYP, B3LYP-D3, and MP2 methods with the 6-311++G(2d,p) basis set. The thermodynamic cooperativity was also evaluated at 310.15 K. The N-H⋯O, O-H⋯O, O-H⋯N, C-H⋯N, and C-H⋯O H bonds coexist in ternary complexes. The intermolecular interactions obtained by B3LYP-D3 are close to those calculated by MP2. The steric effects and van der Waals interactions have little influence on the cooperativity effects. The anti-cooperativity effect in ket⋯cyt⋯H 2 O is far more notable than the cooperativity effect, and the stability of the cyclic structure with anti-cooperativity effect is higher than that of the linear structure with cooperativity effect, as is confirmed by the AIM (atoms in molecules) and RDG (reduced density gradient) analysis. Thus, it can be inferred that, in the presence of H 2 O, the anti-cooperativity effect plays a dominant role in the drug-DNA/RNA interaction, and the nature of the hydration in the binding of drugs to DNA/RNA bases is the H-bonding anti-cooperativity effect. Furthermore, the drug always links simultaneously with DNA/RNA base and H 2 O, and only in this way can the biological activity of drugs play a role. In most cases, the enthalpy change is the major factor driving the cooperativity, as is different from most of biomacromolecule complexes.

  5. Aag Hypoxanthine-DNA Glycosylase Is Synthesized in the Forespore Compartment and Involved in Counteracting the Genotoxic and Mutagenic Effects of Hypoxanthine and Alkylated Bases in DNA during Bacillus subtilis Sporulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-García, Víctor M; Valenzuela-García, Luz I; Setlow, Peter; Pedraza-Reyes, Mario

    2016-12-15

    Aag from Bacillus subtilis has been implicated in in vitro removal of hypoxanthine and alkylated bases from DNA. The regulation of expression of aag in B. subtilis and the resistance to genotoxic agents and mutagenic properties of an Aag-deficient strain were studied here. A strain with a transcriptional aag-lacZ fusion expressed low levels of β-galactosidase during growth and early sporulation but exhibited increased transcription during late stages of this developmental process. Notably, aag-lacZ expression was higher inside the forespore than in the mother cell compartment, and this expression was abolished in a sigG-deficient background, suggesting a forespore-specific mechanism of aag transcription. Two additional findings supported this suggestion: (i) expression of an aag-yfp fusion was observed in the forespore, and (ii) in vivo mapping of the aag transcription start site revealed the existence of upstream regulatory sequences possessing homology to σ G -dependent promoters. In comparison with the wild-type strain, disruption of aag significantly reduced survival of sporulating B. subtilis cells following nitrous acid or methyl methanesulfonate treatments, and the Rif r mutation frequency was significantly increased in an aag strain. These results suggest that Aag protects the genome of developing B. subtilis sporangia from the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of base deamination and alkylation. In this study, evidence is presented revealing that aag, encoding a DNA glycosylase implicated in processing of hypoxanthine and alkylated DNA bases, exhibits a forespore-specific pattern of gene expression during B. subtilis sporulation. Consistent with this spatiotemporal mode of expression, Aag was found to protect the sporulating cells of this microorganism from the noxious and mutagenic effects of base deamination and alkylation. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Involvement of stress-activated protein kinase in the cellular response to 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine and other DNA-damaging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, A; Datta, R; Yuan, Z M; Kharbanda, S; Kufe, D

    1995-12-01

    The cellular response to 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (ara-C) includes activation of Jun/AP-1, induction of c-jun transcription, and programmed cell death. The stress-activated protein (SAP) kinases stimulate the transactivation function of c-jun by amino terminal phosphorylation. The present work demonstrates that ara-C activates p54 SAP kinase. The finding that SAP kinase is also activated by alkylating agents (mitomycin C and cisplatinum) and the topoisomerase I inhibitor 9-amino-camptothecin supports DNA damage as an initial signal in this cascade. The results demonstrate that ara-C also induces binding of SAP kinase to the SH2/SH3-containing adapter protein Grb2. SAP kinase binds to the SH3 domains of Grb2, while interaction of the p85 alpha-subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase complex. The results also demonstrate that ara-C treatment is associated with inhibition of lipid and serine kinase activities of PI 3-kinase. The potential significance of the ara-C-induced interaction between SAP kinase and PI 3-kinase is further supported by the demonstration that Wortmannin, an inhibitor of PI 3-kinase, stimulates SAP kinase activity. The finding that Wortmannin treatment is also associated with internucleosomal DNA fragmentation may support a potential link between PI 3-kinase and regulation of both SAP kinase and programmed cell death.

  7. De novo transcriptome sequence assembly from coconut leaves and seeds with a focus on factors involved in RNA-directed DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ya-Yi; Lee, Chueh-Pai; Fu, Jason L; Chang, Bill Chia-Han; Matzke, Antonius J M; Matzke, Marjori

    2014-09-04

    Coconut palm (Cocos nucifera) is a symbol of the tropics and a source of numerous edible and nonedible products of economic value. Despite its nutritional and industrial significance, coconut remains under-represented in public repositories for genomic and transcriptomic data. We report de novo transcript assembly from RNA-seq data and analysis of gene expression in seed tissues (embryo and endosperm) and leaves of a dwarf coconut variety. Assembly of 10 GB sequencing data for each tissue resulted in 58,211 total unigenes in embryo, 61,152 in endosperm, and 33,446 in leaf. Within each unigene pool, 24,857 could be annotated in embryo, 29,731 could be annotated in endosperm, and 26,064 could be annotated in leaf. A KEGG analysis identified 138, 138, and 139 pathways, respectively, in transcriptomes of embryo, endosperm, and leaf tissues. Given the extraordinarily large size of coconut seeds and the importance of small RNA-mediated epigenetic regulation during seed development in model plants, we used homology searches to identify putative homologs of factors required for RNA-directed DNA methylation in coconut. The findings suggest that RNA-directed DNA methylation is important during coconut seed development, particularly in maturing endosperm. This dataset will expand the genomics resources available for coconut and provide a foundation for more detailed analyses that may assist molecular breeding strategies aimed at improving this major tropical crop. Copyright © 2014 Huang et al.

  8. Pre-apoptotic response to therapeutic DNA damage involves protein modulation of Mcl-1, Hdm2 and Flt3 in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hovland Randi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells are characterized by non-mutated TP53, high levels of Hdm2, and frequent mutation of the Flt3 receptor tyrosine kinase. The juxtamembrane mutation of FLT3 is the strongest independent marker for disease relapse and is associated with elevated Bcl-2 protein and p53 hyper-phosphorylation in AML. DNA damage forms the basic mechanism of cancer cell eradication in current therapy of AML. Hdm2 and pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 members are among the most intensely induced genes immediately after chemotherapy and Hdm2 is proposed a role in receptor tyrosine kinase regulation. Thus we examined the DNA damage related modulation of these proteins in relation to FLT3 mutational status and induction of apoptosis. Results Within one hour after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR, the AML cells (NB4, MV4-11, HL-60, primary AML cells showed an increase in Flt3 protein independent of mRNA levels, while the Hdm2 protein decreased. The FLT3 mutant MV4-11 cells were resistant to IR accompanied by presence of both Mcl-1 and Hdm2 protein three hours after IR. In contrast, the FLT3 wild type NB4 cells responded to IR with apoptosis and pre-apoptotic Mcl-1 down regulation. Daunorubicin (DNR induced continuing down regulation of Hdm2 and Mcl-1 in both cell lines followed by apoptosis. Conclusion Both IR and DNR treatment resulted in concerted protein modulations of Mcl-1, Hdm2 and Flt3. Cell death induction was associated with persistent attenuation of Mcl-1 and Hdm2. These observations suggest that defining the pathway(s modulating Flt3, Hdm2 and Mcl-1 may propose new strategies to optimize therapy for the relapse prone FLT3 mutated AML patients.

  9. The uvsI gene of Aspergillus nidulans required for UV-mutagenesis encodes a homolog to REV3, a subunit of the DNA polymerase zeta of yeast involved in translesion DNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, K Y; Chae, S K; Han, D M

    1998-07-01

    Defects in the uvsI gene of Aspergillus nidulans resulted in high UV sensitivity and reductions of spontaneous and UV-induced reversion of certain alleles, uvsl;uvsA double mutants exhibited high methyl methane sulfonate (MMS)-sensitivity in contrast to the slight sensitivity of the component single mutants. Using such a double mutant as recipient, a clone complementing uvsI501 has been isolated from a chromosome III specific library. The deduced amino acid sequence from the 1.1-kb sequenced region, a part of the 5.2-kb DNA fragment showing uvsI-complementing activity, had a 62% identity with REV3 of yeast. Disruptants of the cloned gene demonstrated the same level of sensitivity to UV light as uvsI and failed to complement uvsI501 in heterozygous diploids.

  10. miR-125b targets DNMT3b and mediates p53 DNA methylation involving in the vascular smooth muscle cells proliferation induced by homocysteine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, ChengJian; Zhang, HuiPing; Zhao, Li; Zhou, Longxia; Zhang, Minghao; Xu, Hua; Han, Xuebo; Li, Guizhong; Yang, Xiaoling; Jiang, YiDeng

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNA and play crucial roles in a wide array of biological processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Our previous studies found that homocysteine(Hcy) can stimulate the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), however, the underlying mechanisms were not fully elucidated. Here, we found proliferation of VSMCs induced by Hcy was of correspondence to the miR-125b expression reduced both in vitro and in the ApoE knockout mice, the hypermethylation of p53, its decreased expression, and DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 3b (DNMT3b) up-regulated. And, we found DNMT3b is a target of miR-125b, which was verified by the Dual-Luciferase reporter assay and western blotting. Besides, the siRNA interference for DNMT3b significantly decreased the methylation level of p53, which unveiled the causative role of DNMT3b in p53 hypermethylation. miR-125b transfection further confirmed its regulative roles on p53 gene methylation status and the VSMCs proliferation. Our data suggested that a miR-125b-DNMT3b-p53 signal pathway may exist in the VSMCs proliferation induced by Hcy.

  11. miR-125b targets DNMT3b and mediates p53 DNA methylation involving in the vascular smooth muscle cells proliferation induced by homocysteine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, ChengJian [Key Laboratory of Basic Research in Cardio-Cerebral Vascular Diseases, Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan (China); Zhang, HuiPing [Department of Prenatal Diagnosis Center, General Hospital of Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan (China); Zhao, Li [Department of Medical Laboratory, Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan (China); Zhou, Longxia [Department of Basic Medicine, Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan (China); Zhang, Minghao; Xu, Hua [Key Laboratory of Basic Research in Cardio-Cerebral Vascular Diseases, Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan (China); Department of Basic Medicine, Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan (China); Han, Xuebo [Department of Medical Laboratory, Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan (China); Li, Guizhong; Yang, Xiaoling [Key Laboratory of Basic Research in Cardio-Cerebral Vascular Diseases, Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan (China); Department of Basic Medicine, Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan (China); Jiang, YiDeng, E-mail: jyjcyxy@yeah.net [Key Laboratory of Basic Research in Cardio-Cerebral Vascular Diseases, Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan (China); Department of Basic Medicine, Ningxia Medical University, Yinchuan (China)

    2016-09-10

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNA and play crucial roles in a wide array of biological processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Our previous studies found that homocysteine(Hcy) can stimulate the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), however, the underlying mechanisms were not fully elucidated. Here, we found proliferation of VSMCs induced by Hcy was of correspondence to the miR-125b expression reduced both in vitro and in the ApoE knockout mice, the hypermethylation of p53, its decreased expression, and DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 3b (DNMT3b) up-regulated. And, we found DNMT3b is a target of miR-125b, which was verified by the Dual-Luciferase reporter assay and western blotting. Besides, the siRNA interference for DNMT3b significantly decreased the methylation level of p53, which unveiled the causative role of DNMT3b in p53 hypermethylation. miR-125b transfection further confirmed its regulative roles on p53 gene methylation status and the VSMCs proliferation. Our data suggested that a miR-125b-DNMT3b-p53 signal pathway may exist in the VSMCs proliferation induced by Hcy.

  12. Adverse effects of reduced oxygen tension on the proliferative capacity of rat kidney and insulin-secreting cell lines involve DNA damage and stress responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jianhua; Jones, R. Huw; Tarry-Adkins, Jane; Smith, Noel H.; Ozanne, Susan E.

    2008-01-01

    Standard cell culture conditions do not reflect the physiological environment in terms of oxygen tension (20% vs 3%). The effects of lowering oxygen tension on cell proliferation in culture can be beneficial as well as detrimental depending on the cell line studied, but the molecular mechanism underlying such effects is not fully understood. We observed that the proliferative capacity of the rat cell lines NRK and INS-1 was inhibited when cultured under 3% oxygen as compared to 20% oxygen. Suppression of proliferation in NRK cells was accompanied by induction of DNA double strand breaks whereas in INS-1 cells it was accompanied by up-regulation of p53 and p27. Although Sirt1 was up-regulated in both cell lines by 3% oxygen the effects on antioxidant enzymes (MnSOD, CuZnSOD and catalase) were cell line specific. Marked up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was detected in both NRK and INS-1 cells when cultured in 3% oxygen. HO-1 expression can be readily induced by exposure to hydrogen peroxide in culture. These results suggest that reduced oxygen tension suppresses the proliferative capacity of these two cell lines through a stress response that is similar to an oxidative stress response but the molecular events that lead to the reduced cell proliferation are cell line specific

  13. Reduction of spontaneous somatic mutation frequency by a low-dose X irradiation of Drosophila larvae and possible involvement of DNA single-strand damage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koana, Takao; Takahashi, Takashi; Tsujimura, Hidenobu

    2012-03-01

    The third instar larvae of Drosophila were irradiated with X rays, and the somatic mutation frequency in their wings was measured after their eclosion. In the flies with normal DNA repair and apoptosis functions, 0.2 Gy irradiation at 0.05 Gy/min reduced the frequency of the so-called small spot (mutant cell clone with reduced reproductive activity) compared with that in the sham-irradiated flies. When apoptosis was suppressed using the baculovirus p35 gene, the small spot frequency increased four times in the sham-irradiated control group, but the reduction by the 0.2-Gy irradiation was still evident. In a non-homologous end joining-deficient mutant, the small spot frequency was also reduced by 0.2 Gy radiation. In a mutant deficient in single-strand break repair, no reduction in the small spot frequency by 0.2 Gy radiation was observed, and the small spot frequency increased with the radiation dose. Large spot (mutant cell clone with normal reproductive activity) frequency was not affected by suppression of apoptosis and increased monotonically with radiation dose in wild-type larvae and in mutants for single- or double-strand break repair. It is hypothesized that some of the small spots resulted from single-strand damage and, in wild-type larvae, 0.2 Gy radiation activated the normal single-strand break repair gene, which reduced the background somatic mutation frequency.

  14. Regulation of the G1/S Transition in Hepatocytes: Involvement of the Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Cdk1 in the DNA Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Corlu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A singular feature of adult differentiated hepatocytes is their capacity to proliferate allowing liver regeneration. This review emphasizes the literature published over the last 20 years that established the most important pathways regulating the hepatocyte cell cycle. Our article also aimed at illustrating that many discoveries in this field benefited from the combined use of in vivo models of liver regeneration and in vitro models of primary cultures of human and rodent hepatocytes. Using these models, our laboratory has contributed to decipher the different steps of the progression into the G1 phase and the commitment to S phase of proliferating hepatocytes. We identified the mitogen dependent restriction point located at the two-thirds of the G1 phase and the concomitant expression and activation of both Cdk1 and Cdk2 at the G1/S transition. Furthermore, we demonstrated that these two Cdks contribute to the DNA replication. Finally, we provided strong evidences that Cdk1 expression and activation is correlated to extracellular matrix degradation upon stimulation by the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα leading to the identification of a new signaling pathway regulating Cdk1 expression at the G1/S transition. It also further confirms the well-orchestrated regulation of liver regeneration via multiple extracellular signals and pathways.

  15. Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type I-Mediated Repression of PDZ-LIM Domain-Containing Protein 2 Involves DNA Methylation But Independent of the Viral Oncoprotein Tax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengrong Yan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I is the etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL. Our recent studies have shown that one important mechanism of HTLV-I-Mediated tumorigenesis is through PDZ-LIM domain-containing protein 2 (PDLIM2 repression, although the involved mechanism remains unknown. Here, we further report that HTLV-I-Mediated PDLIM2 repression was a pathophysiological event and the PDLIM2 repression involved DNA methylation. Whereas DNA methyltransferases 1 and 3b but not 3a were upregulated in HTLV-I-transformed T cells, the hypomethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC restored PDLIM2 expression and induced death of these malignant cells. Notably, the PDLIM2 repression was independent of the viral regulatory protein Tax because neither short-term induction nor long-term stable expression of Tax could downregulate PDLIM2 expression. These studies provide important insights into PDLIM2 regulation, HTLV-I leukemogenicity, long latency, and cancer health disparities. Given the efficient antitumor activity with no obvious toxicity of 5-aza-dC, these studies also suggest potential therapeutic strategies for ATL.

  16. The ANGULATA7 gene encodes a DnaJ-like zinc finger-domain protein involved in chloroplast function and leaf development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Nortes, Tamara; Pérez-Pérez, José Manuel; Ponce, María Rosa; Candela, Héctor; Micol, José Luis

    2017-03-01

    The characterization of mutants with altered leaf shape and pigmentation has previously allowed the identification of nuclear genes that encode plastid-localized proteins that perform essential functions in leaf growth and development. A large-scale screen previously allowed us to isolate ethyl methanesulfonate-induced mutants with small rosettes and pale green leaves with prominent marginal teeth, which were assigned to a phenotypic class that we dubbed Angulata. The molecular characterization of the 12 genes assigned to this phenotypic class should help us to advance our understanding of the still poorly understood relationship between chloroplast biogenesis and leaf morphogenesis. In this article, we report the phenotypic and molecular characterization of the angulata7-1 (anu7-1) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, which we found to be a hypomorphic allele of the EMB2737 gene, which was previously known only for its embryonic-lethal mutations. ANU7 encodes a plant-specific protein that contains a domain similar to the central cysteine-rich domain of DnaJ proteins. The observed genetic interaction of anu7-1 with a loss-of-function allele of GENOMES UNCOUPLED1 suggests that the anu7-1 mutation triggers a retrograde signal that leads to changes in the expression of many genes that normally function in the chloroplasts. Many such genes are expressed at higher levels in anu7-1 rosettes, with a significant overrepresentation of those required for the expression of plastid genome genes. Like in other mutants with altered expression of plastid-encoded genes, we found that anu7-1 exhibits defects in the arrangement of thylakoidal membranes, which appear locally unappressed. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Meta-analysis of archived DNA microarrays identifies genes regulated by hypoxia and involved in a metastatic phenotype in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierre, Michael; DeHertogh, Benoît; Gaigneaux, Anthoula; DeMeulder, Bertrand; Berger, Fabrice; Bareke, Eric; Michiels, Carine; Depiereux, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Metastasis is a major cancer-related cause of death. Recent studies have described metastasis pathways. However, the exact contribution of each pathway remains unclear. Another key feature of a tumor is the presence of hypoxic areas caused by a lack of oxygen at the center of the tumor. Hypoxia leads to the expression of pro-metastatic genes as well as the repression of anti-metastatic genes. As many Affymetrix datasets about metastasis and hypoxia are publicly available and not fully exploited, this study proposes to re-analyze these datasets to extract new information about the metastatic phenotype induced by hypoxia in different cancer cell lines. Affymetrix datasets about metastasis and/or hypoxia were downloaded from GEO and ArrayExpress. AffyProbeMiner and GCRMA packages were used for pre-processing and the Window Welch t test was used for processing. Three approaches of meta-analysis were eventually used for the selection of genes of interest. Three complementary approaches were used, that eventually selected 183 genes of interest. Out of these 183 genes, 99, among which the well known JUNB, FOS and TP63, have already been described in the literature to be involved in cancer. Moreover, 39 genes of those, such as SERPINE1 and MMP7, are known to regulate metastasis. Twenty-one genes including VEGFA and ID2 have also been described to be involved in the response to hypoxia. Lastly, DAVID classified those 183 genes in 24 different pathways, among which 8 are directly related to cancer while 5 others are related to proliferation and cell motility. A negative control composed of 183 random genes failed to provide such results. Interestingly, 6 pathways retrieved by DAVID with the 183 genes of interest concern pathogen recognition and phagocytosis. The proposed methodology was able to find genes actually known to be involved in cancer, metastasis and hypoxia and, thus, we propose that the other genes selected based on the same methodology are of prime interest in

  18. Regulating DNA Self-assembly by DNA-Surface Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Longfei; Li, Yulin; Wang, Yong; Zheng, Jianwei; Mao, Chengde

    2017-12-14

    DNA self-assembly provides a powerful approach for preparation of nanostructures. It is often studied in bulk solution and involves only DNA-DNA interactions. When confined to surfaces, DNA-surface interactions become an additional, important factor to DNA self-assembly. However, the way in which DNA-surface interactions influence DNA self-assembly is not well studied. In this study, we showed that weak DNA-DNA interactions could be stabilized by DNA-surface interactions to allow large DNA nanostructures to form. In addition, the assembly can be conducted isothermally at room temperature in as little as 5 seconds. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. DNA topology and transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouzine, Fedor; Levens, David; Baranello, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is a complex assembly that compacts DNA inside the nucleus while providing the necessary level of accessibility to regulatory factors conscripted by cellular signaling systems. In this superstructure, DNA is the subject of mechanical forces applied by variety of molecular motors. Rather than being a rigid stick, DNA possesses dynamic structural variability that could be harnessed during critical steps of genome functioning. The strong relationship between DNA structure and key genomic processes necessitates the study of physical constrains acting on the double helix. Here we provide insight into the source, dynamics, and biology of DNA topological domains in the eukaryotic cells and summarize their possible involvement in gene transcription. We emphasize recent studies that might inspire and impact future experiments on the involvement of DNA topology in cellular functions. PMID:24755522

  20. Involvement of pectin methyl-esterase during the ripening of grape berries: partial cDNA isolation, transcript expression and changes in the degree of methyl-esterification of cell wall pectins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnavon, L; Doco, T; Terrier, N; Ageorges, A; Romieu, C; Pellerin, P

    2001-11-01

    Grape berries (Vitis vinifera L., cv Ugni blanc) were harvested at 12 different weeks of development in 1996 and 1997. Ripening was induced at veraison, the crucial stage of berry softening, and was followed by a rapid accumulation of glucose and fructose and an increase of pH. Total RNAs, crude proteins and cell wall material were isolated from each developmental stage. A partial length cDNA (pme1, accession number AF159122, GenBank) encoding a pectin methyl-esterase (PME, EC 3.1.1.11) was cloned by RT-PCR with degenerate primers. Northern blots revealed that mRNAs coding for PME accumulate from one week before the onset of ripening until complete maturity, indicating that this transcript represents an early marker of veraison and could be involved in berry softening. However, PME activity was detected during all developmental stages. Total activity per berry increased, whereas "specific" activity, on a fresh weight basis, decreased during development. The amount of cell wall material (per berry and per g of berry) followed the same pattern as that of PME activity (total and "specific" respectively), indicating they were tightly correlated and that PME levels varied very little in the cell walls. Nevertheless, the degree of methyl-esterification of insoluble pectins decreased throughout the development from 68% in green stages to less than 20% for the ripe berries, and this observation is consistent with the induction of PME mRNAs during ripening. Relations between transcript expression, PME activity, the DE of insoluble pectic polysaccharides and their involvement in grape berry ripening are discussed.

  1. DNA-based machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fuan; Willner, Bilha; Willner, Itamar

    2014-01-01

    The base sequence in nucleic acids encodes substantial structural and functional information into the biopolymer. This encoded information provides the basis for the tailoring and assembly of DNA machines. A DNA machine is defined as a molecular device that exhibits the following fundamental features. (1) It performs a fuel-driven mechanical process that mimics macroscopic machines. (2) The mechanical process requires an energy input, "fuel." (3) The mechanical operation is accompanied by an energy consumption process that leads to "waste products." (4) The cyclic operation of the DNA devices, involves the use of "fuel" and "anti-fuel" ingredients. A variety of DNA-based machines are described, including the construction of "tweezers," "walkers," "robots," "cranes," "transporters," "springs," "gears," and interlocked cyclic DNA structures acting as reconfigurable catenanes, rotaxanes, and rotors. Different "fuels", such as nucleic acid strands, pH (H⁺/OH⁻), metal ions, and light, are used to trigger the mechanical functions of the DNA devices. The operation of the devices in solution and on surfaces is described, and a variety of optical, electrical, and photoelectrochemical methods to follow the operations of the DNA machines are presented. We further address the possible applications of DNA machines and the future perspectives of molecular DNA devices. These include the application of DNA machines as functional structures for the construction of logic gates and computing, for the programmed organization of metallic nanoparticle structures and the control of plasmonic properties, and for controlling chemical transformations by DNA machines. We further discuss the future applications of DNA machines for intracellular sensing, controlling intracellular metabolic pathways, and the use of the functional nanostructures for drug delivery and medical applications.

  2. DNA replication stress restricts ribosomal DNA copy number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Devika; Bradford, William D.; Freeland, Amy; Cady, Gillian; Wang, Jianmin

    2017-01-01

    Ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) in budding yeast are encoded by ~100–200 repeats of a 9.1kb sequence arranged in tandem on chromosome XII, the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus. Copy number of rDNA repeat units in eukaryotic cells is maintained far in excess of the requirement for ribosome biogenesis. Despite the importance of the repeats for both ribosomal and non-ribosomal functions, it is currently not known how “normal” copy number is determined or maintained. To identify essential genes involved in the maintenance of rDNA copy number, we developed a droplet digital PCR based assay to measure rDNA copy number in yeast and used it to screen a yeast conditional temperature-sensitive mutant collection of essential genes. Our screen revealed that low rDNA copy number is associated with compromised DNA replication. Further, subculturing yeast under two separate conditions of DNA replication stress selected for a contraction of the rDNA array independent of the replication fork blocking protein, Fob1. Interestingly, cells with a contracted array grew better than their counterparts with normal copy number under conditions of DNA replication stress. Our data indicate that DNA replication stresses select for a smaller rDNA array. We speculate that this liberates scarce replication factors for use by the rest of the genome, which in turn helps cells complete DNA replication and continue to propagate. Interestingly, tumors from mini chromosome maintenance 2 (MCM2)-deficient mice also show a loss of rDNA repeats. Our data suggest that a reduction in rDNA copy number may indicate a history of DNA replication stress, and that rDNA array size could serve as a diagnostic marker for replication stress. Taken together, these data begin to suggest the selective pressures that combine to yield a “normal” rDNA copy number. PMID:28915237

  3. DNA replication stress restricts ribosomal DNA copy number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Devika; Bradford, William D; Freeland, Amy; Cady, Gillian; Wang, Jianmin; Pruitt, Steven C; Gerton, Jennifer L

    2017-09-01

    Ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) in budding yeast are encoded by ~100-200 repeats of a 9.1kb sequence arranged in tandem on chromosome XII, the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus. Copy number of rDNA repeat units in eukaryotic cells is maintained far in excess of the requirement for ribosome biogenesis. Despite the importance of the repeats for both ribosomal and non-ribosomal functions, it is currently not known how "normal" copy number is determined or maintained. To identify essential genes involved in the maintenance of rDNA copy number, we developed a droplet digital PCR based assay to measure rDNA copy number in yeast and used it to screen a yeast conditional temperature-sensitive mutant collection of essential genes. Our screen revealed that low rDNA copy number is associated with compromised DNA replication. Further, subculturing yeast under two separate conditions of DNA replication stress selected for a contraction of the rDNA array independent of the replication fork blocking protein, Fob1. Interestingly, cells with a contracted array grew better than their counterparts with normal copy number under conditions of DNA replication stress. Our data indicate that DNA replication stresses select for a smaller rDNA array. We speculate that this liberates scarce replication factors for use by the rest of the genome, which in turn helps cells complete DNA replication and continue to propagate. Interestingly, tumors from mini chromosome maintenance 2 (MCM2)-deficient mice also show a loss of rDNA repeats. Our data suggest that a reduction in rDNA copy number may indicate a history of DNA replication stress, and that rDNA array size could serve as a diagnostic marker for replication stress. Taken together, these data begin to suggest the selective pressures that combine to yield a "normal" rDNA copy number.

  4. DNA replication stress restricts ribosomal DNA copy number.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devika Salim

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs in budding yeast are encoded by ~100-200 repeats of a 9.1kb sequence arranged in tandem on chromosome XII, the ribosomal DNA (rDNA locus. Copy number of rDNA repeat units in eukaryotic cells is maintained far in excess of the requirement for ribosome biogenesis. Despite the importance of the repeats for both ribosomal and non-ribosomal functions, it is currently not known how "normal" copy number is determined or maintained. To identify essential genes involved in the maintenance of rDNA copy number, we developed a droplet digital PCR based assay to measure rDNA copy number in yeast and used it to screen a yeast conditional temperature-sensitive mutant collection of essential genes. Our screen revealed that low rDNA copy number is associated with compromised DNA replication. Further, subculturing yeast under two separate conditions of DNA replication stress selected for a contraction of the rDNA array independent of the replication fork blocking protein, Fob1. Interestingly, cells with a contracted array grew better than their counterparts with normal copy number under conditions of DNA replication stress. Our data indicate that DNA replication stresses select for a smaller rDNA array. We speculate that this liberates scarce replication factors for use by the rest of the genome, which in turn helps cells complete DNA replication and continue to propagate. Interestingly, tumors from mini chromosome maintenance 2 (MCM2-deficient mice also show a loss of rDNA repeats. Our data suggest that a reduction in rDNA copy number may indicate a history of DNA replication stress, and that rDNA array size could serve as a diagnostic marker for replication stress. Taken together, these data begin to suggest the selective pressures that combine to yield a "normal" rDNA copy number.

  5. Modeling DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is life's most amazing molecule. It carries the genetic instructions that almost every organism needs to develop and reproduce. In the human genome alone, there are some three billion DNA base pairs. The most difficult part of teaching DNA structure, however, may be getting students to visualize something as small as a…

  6. Parental involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezra S Simon

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Parent-Teacher Associations and other community groups can play a significant role in helping to establish and run refugee schools; their involvement can also help refugee adults adjust to their changed circumstances.

  7. Thioredoxin suppresses microscopic hopping of T7 DNA polymerase on duplex DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etson, Candice M.; Hamdan, Samir M.; Richardson, Charles C.; Oijen, Antoine M. van; Richardson, Charles C.

    2010-01-01

    The DNA polymerases involved in DNA replication achieve high processivity of nucleotide incorporation by forming a complex with processivity factors. A model system for replicative DNA polymerases, the bacteriophage T7 DNA polymerase (gp5), encoded by gene 5, forms a tight, 1:1 complex with

  8. Retroviral DNA Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The integration of a DNA copy of the viral RNA genome into host chromatin is the defining step of retroviral replication. This enzymatic process is catalyzed by the virus-encoded integrase protein, which is conserved among retroviruses and LTR-retrotransposons. Retroviral integration proceeds via two integrase activities: 3′-processing of the viral DNA ends, followed by the strand transfer of the processed ends into host cell chromosomal DNA. Herein we review the molecular mechanism of retroviral DNA integration, with an emphasis on reaction chemistries and architectures of the nucleoprotein complexes involved. We additionally discuss the latest advances on anti-integrase drug development for the treatment of AIDS and the utility of integrating retroviral vectors in gene therapy applications. PMID:27198982

  9. DNA damage and carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stelow, R.B.

    1980-01-01

    Although cancer may arise as a result of many different types of molecular changes, there is little reason to doubt that changes to DNA are one of the more important ones in cancer initiation. Although DNA repair mechanisms seem able to eliminate a very large fraction of deleterious changes to DNA, we not only have little insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in such repair, but have a negligible amount of information to permit us to estimate the shape of dose response relations at low doses. The case of skin cancer is a special one, in that the average population is exposed to sufficient solar uv so that the effects of small increments in uv dose may be estimated. An approximate 85% reduction in DNA repair increases skin cancer incidence 10 4 fold

  10. DNA Camouflage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-08

    1 DNA Camouflage Supplementary Information Bijan Zakeri1,2*, Timothy K. Lu1,2*, Peter A. Carr2,3* 1Department of Electrical Engineering and...ll.mit.edu). Distribution A: Public Release   2 Supplementary Figure 1 DNA camouflage with the 2-state device. (a) In the presence of Cre, DSD-2[α...10 1 + Cre 1 500 1,000 length (bp) chromatogram alignment template − Cre   4 Supplementary Figure 3 DNA camouflage with a switchable

  11. DNA glue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filichev, Vyacheslav V; Astakhova, Irina V.; Malakhov, Andrei D.

    2008-01-01

    Significant alterations in thermal stability of parallel DNA triplexes and antiparallel duplexes were observed upon changing the attachment of ethynylpyrenes from para to ortho in the structure of phenylmethylglycerol inserted as a bulge into DNA (TINA). Insertions of two ortho-TINAs as a pseudo...

  12. Hyperstretching DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schakenraad, Koen; Biebricher, Andreas S.; Sebregts, Maarten; Ten Bensel, Brian; Peterman, Erwin J.G.; Wuite, Gijs J L; Heller, Iddo; Storm, Cornelis; Van Der Schoot, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of DNA is highly susceptible to changes by mechanical and biochemical cues in vivo and in vitro. In particular, large increases in base pair spacing compared to regular B-DNA are effected by mechanical (over)stretching and by intercalation of compounds that are widely

  13. Dynamics of DNA conformations and DNA-protein interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metzler, R.; Ambjörnsson, T.; Lomholt, Michael Andersen

    2005-01-01

    Optical tweezers, atomic force microscopes, patch clamping, or fluorescence techniques make it possible to study both the equilibrium conformations and dynamics of single DNA molecules as well as their interaction with binding proteins. In this paper we address the dynamics of local DNA...... denaturation (bubble breathing), deriving its dynamic response to external physical parameters and the DNA sequence in terms of the bubble relaxation time spectrum and the autocorrelation function of bubble breathing. The interaction with binding proteins that selectively bind to the DNA single strand exposed...... in a denaturation bubble are shown to involve an interesting competition of time scales, varying between kinetic blocking of protein binding up to full binding protein-induced denaturation of the DNA. We will also address the potential to use DNA physics for the design of nanosensors. Finally, we report recent...

  14. Evaluation of genotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of ions chelator Fe2+ (2,2'-dipyridyl) and of Cu2+(neocuproine), in Escherichia coli: involvement of DNA repair mechanisms in the bacteria survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Carlos Eduardo Bonacossa de

    1998-01-01

    Prior incubation of the E. coli cultures with the iron ions chelator 2,2'-dipyridyl (1 mM) caused an intensification of the lethality and the mutagenesis induced by the hydrogen peroxide, mainly at high concentrations (20 mM). It was also detected an enhancement of DNA strand breaks in this condition. The addition of the copper ions chelator neocuproine blocked partially this phenomenon. The enzymes XthA and Nfo act alternatively in the repair of the lesions induced by H 2 O 2 in the presence of 2,2'-dipyridyl. H 2 O 2 can act synergistically with neocuproine in killing E. coli, causing an enhancement in DNA strand breaks. The recombinational repair, the UvrABC excinuclease and Fpg function appeared to participate in the repair of the synergistic lesions. (author)

  15. Mechanism of metformin action in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells involves oxidative stress generation, DNA damage, and transforming growth factor β1 induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinello, Poliana Camila; da Silva, Thamara Nishida Xavier; Panis, Carolina; Neves, Amanda Fouto; Machado, Kaliana Larissa; Borges, Fernando Henrique; Guarnier, Flávia Alessandra; Bernardes, Sara Santos; de-Freitas-Junior, Júlio Cesar Madureira; Morgado-Díaz, José Andrés; Luiz, Rodrigo Cabral; Cecchini, Rubens; Cecchini, Alessandra Lourenço

    2016-04-01

    The participation of oxidative stress in the mechanism of metformin action in breast cancer remains unclear. We investigated the effects of clinical (6 and 30 μM) and experimental concentrations of metformin (1000 and 5000 μM) in MCF-7 and in MDA-MB-231 cells, verifying cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, DNA damage, and intracellular pathways related to cell growth and survival after 24 h of drug exposure. Clinical concentrations of metformin decreased metabolic activity of MCF-7 cells in the MTT assay, which showed increased oxidative stress and DNA damage, although cell death and impairment in the proliferative capacity were observed only at higher concentrations. The reduction in metabolic activity and proliferation in MDA-MB-231 cells was present only at experimental concentrations after 24 h of drug exposition. Oxidative stress and DNA damage were induced in this cell line at experimental concentrations. The drug decreased cytoplasmic extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and AKT and increased nuclear p53 and cytoplasmic transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) in both cell lines. These findings suggest that metformin reduces cell survival by increasing reactive oxygen species, which induce DNA damage and apoptosis. A relationship between the increase in TGF-β1 and p53 levels and the decrease in ERK1/2 and AKT was also observed. These findings suggest the mechanism of action of metformin in both breast cancer cell lineages, whereas cell line specific undergoes redox changes in the cells in which proliferation and survival signaling are modified. Taken together, these results highlight the potential clinical utility of metformin as an adjuvant during the treatment of luminal and triple-negative breast cancer.

  16. Certain amplified genomic-DNA fragments (AGFs) may be involved in cell cycle progression and chloroquine is found to induce the production of cell-cycle-associated AGFs (CAGFs) in Plasmodium falciparum

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Gao-De

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that cyclins are a family of proteins that control cell-cycle progression by activating cyclin-dependent kinase. Based on our experimental results, we propose here a novel hypothesis that certain amplified genomic-DNA fragments (AGFs) may also be required for the cell cycle progression of eukaryotic cells and thus can be named as cell-cycle-associated AGFs (CAGFs). Like fluctuation in cyclin levels during cell cycle progression, these CAGFs are amplified and degraded at diffe...

  17. IBM1, a JmjC domain-containing histone demethylase, is involved in the regulation of RNA-directed DNA methylation through the epigenetic control of RDR2 and DCL3 expression in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Di; Dai, Yan; Wang, Xuncheng; Wang, Zhenjie; He, Hang; Yang, Hongchun; Cao, Ying; Deng, Xing Wang; Ma, Ligeng

    2012-01-01

    Small RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) is an important epigenetic pathway in Arabidopsis that controls the expression of multiple genes and several developmental processes. RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE 2 (RDR2) and DICER-LIKE 3 (DCL3) are necessary factors in 24-nt small interfering RNA (siRNA) biogenesis, which is part of the RdDM pathway. Here, we found that Increase in BONSAI Methylation 1 (IBM1), a conserved JmjC family histone demethylase, is directly associated with RDR2 and DCL3 chromatin. The mutation of IBM1 induced the hypermethylation of H3K9 and DNA non-CG sites within RDR2 and DCL3, which repressed their expression. A genome-wide analysis suggested that the reduction in RDR2 and DCL3 expression affected siRNA biogenesis in a locus-specific manner and disrupted RdDM-directed gene repression. Together, our results suggest that IBM1 regulates gene expression through two distinct pathways: direct association to protect genes from silencing by preventing the coupling of histone and DNA methylation, and indirect silencing of gene expression through RdDM-directed repression. PMID:22772985

  18. Extracellular DNA metabolism in Haloferax volcanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott eChimileski

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular DNA is found in all environments and is a dynamic component of the micro-bial ecosystem. Microbial cells produce and interact with extracellular DNA through many endogenous mechanisms. Extracellular DNA is processed and internalized for use as genetic information and as a major source of macronutrients, and plays several key roles within prokaryotic biofilms. Hypersaline sites contain some of the highest extracellular DNA con-centrations measured in nature–a potential rich source of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus for halophilic microorganisms. We conducted DNA growth studies for the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii DS2 and show that this model Halobacteriales strain is capable of using exogenous double-stranded DNA as a nutrient. Further experiments with varying medium composition, DNA concentration and DNA types revealed that DNA is utilized primarily as a phosphorus source, that growth on DNA is concentration-dependent and that DNA isolated from different sources is metabolized selectively, with a bias against highly divergent methylated DNA sources. Additionally, fluorescence microscopy experiments showed that labeled DNA colocalized with Haloferax volcanii cells. The gene Hvo_1477 was also identified using a comparative genomic approach as a factor likely to be involved in extracellular DNA processing at the cell surface, and deletion of Hvo_1477 created an H. volcanii strain deficient in its ability to grow on extracellular DNA. Widespread distribution of Hvo_1477 homologs in archaea suggests metabolism of extracellular DNA may be of broad ecological and physiological relevance in this domain of life.

  19. DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelino, J.

    1992-01-01

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with 32 P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism's genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens

  20. DNA probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castelino, J

    1993-12-31

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with {sup 32}P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism`s genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens 10 figs, 2 tabs

  1. High frequency of the IVS2-2A>G DNA sequence variation in SLC26A5, encoding the cochlear motor protein prestin, precludes its involvement in hereditary hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Fred A

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cochlear outer hair cells change their length in response to variations in membrane potential. This capability, called electromotility, is believed to enable the sensitivity and frequency selectivity of the mammalian cochlea. Prestin is a transmembrane protein required for electromotility. Homozygous prestin knockout mice are profoundly hearing impaired. In humans, a single nucleotide change in SLC26A5, encoding prestin, has been reported in association with hearing loss. This DNA sequence variation, IVS2-2A>G, occurs in the exon 3 splice acceptor site and is expected to abolish splicing of exon 3. Methods To further explore the relationship between hearing loss and the IVS2-2A>G transition, and assess allele frequency, genomic DNA from hearing impaired and control subjects was analyzed by DNA sequencing. SLC26A5 genomic DNA sequences from human, chimp, rat, mouse, zebrafish and fruit fly were aligned and compared for evolutionary conservation of the exon 3 splice acceptor site. Alternative splice acceptor sites within intron 2 of human SLC26A5 were sought using a splice site prediction program from the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project. Results The IVS2-2A>G variant was found in a heterozygous state in 4 of 74 hearing impaired subjects of Hispanic, Caucasian or uncertain ethnicity and 4 of 150 Hispanic or Caucasian controls (p = 0.45. The IVS2-2A>G variant was not found in 106 subjects of Asian or African American descent. No homozygous subjects were identified (n = 330. Sequence alignment of SLC26A5 orthologs demonstrated that the A nucleotide at position IVS2-2 is invariant among several eukaryotic species. Sequence analysis also revealed five potential alternative splice acceptor sites in intron 2 of human SLC26A5. Conclusion These data suggest that the IVS2-2A>G variant may not occur more frequently in hearing impaired subjects than in controls. The identification of five potential alternative splice acceptor sites in

  2. Functional roles of DNA polymerases β and γ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebscher, U.; Kuenzle, C.C.; Spadari, S.

    1979-01-01

    The physiological functions of DNA polymerases (deoxynucleosidetriphosphate:DNA deoxynucleotidyltransferase, EC2.7.7.7)β and γ were investigated by using neuronal nuclei and synaptosomes isolated from rat brain. uv irradiation of neuronal nuclei from 60-day-old rats resulted in a 7- to 10-fold stimulation of DNA repair synthesis attributable to DNA polymerase β which, at this developmental stage, is virtually the only DNA polymerase present in the nuclei. No repair synthesis could be elicited by treating the nuclei with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, but this was probably due to the inability of brain tissue to excise alkylated bases from DNA. The role of DNA polymerase γ was studied in synaptosomes by using a system mimicking in vivo mitochondrial DNA synthesis. By showing that under these conditions, DNA replication occurs in miatochondria, and exploiting the fact that DNA polymerase γ is the only DNA polymerase present in mitochondria, evidence was obtained for a role of DNA polymerase γ in mitochondrial DNA replication. Based on these results and on the wealth of literature on DNA polymerase α, we conclude that DNA polymerase α is mainly responsible for DNA replication in nuclei, DNA polymerase β is involved in nuclear DNA repair, and DNA polymerase γ is the mitochondrial replicating enzyme. However, minor roles for DNA polymerase α in DNA repair or for DNA polymerase β in DNA replication cannot be excluded

  3. Duplication in DNA Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masami; Kari, Lila; Kincaid, Zachary; Seki, Shinnosuke

    The duplication and repeat-deletion operations are the basis of a formal language theoretic model of errors that can occur during DNA replication. During DNA replication, subsequences of a strand of DNA may be copied several times (resulting in duplications) or skipped (resulting in repeat-deletions). As formal language operations, iterated duplication and repeat-deletion of words and languages have been well studied in the literature. However, little is known about single-step duplications and repeat-deletions. In this paper, we investigate several properties of these operations, including closure properties of language families in the Chomsky hierarchy and equations involving these operations. We also make progress toward a characterization of regular languages that are generated by duplicating a regular language.

  4. Biological activity of SV40 DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahams, P.J.

    1978-01-01

    This thesis deals with a study on the biological activity of SV40 DNA. The transforming activity of SV40 DNA and DNA fragments is investigated in order to define as precisely as possible the area of the viral genome that is involved in the transformation. The infectivity of SV40 DNA is used to study the defective repair mechanisms of radiation damages of human xeroderma pigmentosum cells. (C.F.)

  5. DNA data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Raw DNA chromatogram data produced by the ABI 373, 377, 3130 and 3730 automated sequencing machines in ABI format. These are from fish (primarily Sebastes spp.,...

  6. DNA nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, Nadrian C.; Sleiman, Hanadi F.

    2018-01-01

    DNA is the molecule that stores and transmits genetic information in biological systems. The field of DNA nanotechnology takes this molecule out of its biological context and uses its information to assemble structural motifs and then to connect them together. This field has had a remarkable impact on nanoscience and nanotechnology, and has been revolutionary in our ability to control molecular self-assembly. In this Review, we summarize the approaches used to assemble DNA nanostructures and examine their emerging applications in areas such as biophysics, diagnostics, nanoparticle and protein assembly, biomolecule structure determination, drug delivery and synthetic biology. The introduction of orthogonal interactions into DNA nanostructures is discussed, and finally, a perspective on the future directions of this field is presented.

  7. Involving women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbo, J

    1994-01-01

    I am a primary health care (PHC) coordinator working with the May Day Rural project, a local NGO involved in integrated approaches and programs with rural communities in the Ga District of the Greater-Accra region in Ghana. When we talk about the community development approach we must first and foremost recognize that we are talking about women, because in the developing world frequent childbirths mean that her burden of mortality is higher than a man's; her workload is extremely heavy--whether in gardening, farming, other household duties, caring for the sick, or the rearing of children; she has a key role in PHC and community development, because men are always looking for greener pastures elsewhere, leaving the women behind. Women's concerns are critical in most health care projects and women and children are their main beneficiaries. Why not include women in the management team, project design, implementation and evaluation processes? That is what the May Day Rural project is practicing, encouraging women's participation and creating a relationship of trust. full text

  8. DNA expressions - A formal notation for DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, Rudy van

    2015-01-01

    We describe a formal notation for DNA molecules that may contain nicks and gaps. The resulting DNA expressions denote formal DNA molecules. Different DNA expressions may denote the same molecule. Such DNA expressions are called equivalent. We examine which DNA expressions are minimal, which

  9. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  10. DNA mimic proteins: functions, structures, and bioinformatic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao-Ching; Ho, Chun-Han; Hsu, Kai-Cheng; Yang, Jinn-Moon; Wang, Andrew H-J

    2014-05-13

    DNA mimic proteins have DNA-like negative surface charge distributions, and they function by occupying the DNA binding sites of DNA binding proteins to prevent these sites from being accessed by DNA. DNA mimic proteins control the activities of a variety of DNA binding proteins and are involved in a wide range of cellular mechanisms such as chromatin assembly, DNA repair, transcription regulation, and gene recombination. However, the sequences and structures of DNA mimic proteins are diverse, making them difficult to predict by bioinformatic search. To date, only a few DNA mimic proteins have been reported. These DNA mimics were not found by searching for functional motifs in their sequences but were revealed only by structural analysis of their charge distribution. This review highlights the biological roles and structures of 16 reported DNA mimic proteins. We also discuss approaches that might be used to discover new DNA mimic proteins.

  11. Radicals of DNA and DNA nucleotides generated by ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przybytniak, G.

    2004-01-01

    A first stage of cell processes leading to DNA damage of initiated by radical reactions. In a model system such transformations were generated by ionising radiation which involves production of electron loss and electron gain centers of the substrate and radical formation. Using cryogenic ESR spectroscopy it was found that the DNA nucleotides, which convert to radical anions upon electron capture undergo the separation of unpaired spin and charge due to protonation. Circular and linear dichroism studies enabled to conclude that iron ions(III) induce strong changes in the DNA helical structure indicating their coordination with nitrogen bases. The repair of DNA radicals produced via radiolytic oxidation, i.e. the guanine radical cation and the allyl type radical of thymine, is possible at elevated temperatures due to the involvement of sulphydryl groups. The influence of the thiol charge is then limited

  12. DNA2—An Important Player in DNA Damage Response or Just Another DNA Maintenance Protein?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzbieta Pawłowska

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The human DNA2 (DNA replication helicase/nuclease 2 protein is expressed in both the nucleus and mitochondria, where it displays ATPase-dependent nuclease and helicase activities. DNA2 plays an important role in the removing of long flaps in DNA replication and long-patch base excision repair (LP-BER, interacting with the replication protein A (RPA and the flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1. DNA2 can promote the restart of arrested replication fork along with Werner syndrome ATP-dependent helicase (WRN and Bloom syndrome protein (BLM. In mitochondria, DNA2 can facilitate primer removal during strand-displacement replication. DNA2 is involved in DNA double strand (DSB repair, in which it is complexed with BLM, RPA and MRN for DNA strand resection required for homologous recombination repair. DNA2 can be a major protein involved in the repair of complex DNA damage containing a DSB and a 5′ adduct resulting from a chemical group bound to DNA 5′ ends, created by ionizing radiation and several anticancer drugs, including etoposide, mitoxantrone and some anthracyclines. The role of DNA2 in telomere end maintenance and cell cycle regulation suggests its more general role in keeping genomic stability, which is impaired in cancer. Therefore DNA2 can be an attractive target in cancer therapy. This is supported by enhanced expression of DNA2 in many cancer cell lines with oncogene activation and premalignant cells. Therefore, DNA2 can be considered as a potential marker, useful in cancer therapy. DNA2, along with PARP1 inhibition, may be considered as a potential target for inducing synthetic lethality, a concept of killing tumor cells by targeting two essential genes.

  13. Depressive-like effect of prenatal exposure to DDT involves global DNA hypomethylation and impairment of GPER1/ESR1 protein levels but not ESR2 and AHR/ARNT signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajta, Malgorzata; Wnuk, Agnieszka; Rzemieniec, Joanna; Litwa, Ewa; Lason, Wladyslaw; Zelek-Molik, Agnieszka; Nalepa, Irena; Rogóż, Zofia; Grochowalski, Adam; Wojtowicz, Anna K

    2017-07-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that exposures to Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) such as pesticides increase the risks of neuropsychiatric disorders. Despite extended residual persistence of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) in the environment, the mechanisms of perinatal actions of DDT that could account for adult-onset of depression are largely unknown. This study demonstrated the isomer-specific induction of depressive-like behavior and impairment of Htr1a/serotonin signaling in one-month-old mice that were prenatally exposed to DDT. The effects were reversed by the antidepressant citalopram as evidenced in the forced swimming (FST) and tail suspension (TST) tests in the male and female mice. Prenatally administered DDT accumulated in mouse brain as determined with gas chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry, led to global DNA hypomethylation, and altered the levels of methylated DNA in specific genes. The induction of depressive-like behavior and impairment of Htr1a/serotonin signaling were accompanied by p,p'-DDT-specific decrease in the levels of estrogen receptors i.e. ESR1 and/or GPER1 depending on sex. In contrast, o,p'-DDT did not induce depressive-like effects and exhibited quite distinct pattern of biochemical alterations that was related to aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), its nuclear translocator ARNT, and ESR2. Exposure to o,p'-DDT increased AHR expression in male and female brains, and reduced expression levels of ARNT and ESR2 in the female brains. The evolution of p,p'-DDT-induced depressive-like behavior was preceded by attenuation of Htr1a and Gper1/GPER1 expression as observed in the 7-day-old mouse pups. Because p,p'-DDT caused sex- and age-independent attenuation of GPER1, we suggest that impairment of GPER1 signaling plays a key role in the propagation of DDT-induced depressive-like symptoms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The escherichia coli chromosome replication initiator protein, DnaA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyborg, Malene

    The experimental work presented in this thesis involve mutational analysis of the DNA binding domain of the DnaA protein and analysis of the A184V substitution in the ATP area of domain III and other amino acid substitutions found in the DnaA5 and DnaA4G proteins....

  15. Multiscale modelling of DNA mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dršata, Tomáš; Lankaš, Filip

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical properties of DNA are important not only in a wide range of biological processes but also in the emerging field of DNA nanotechnology. We review some of the recent developments in modeling these properties, emphasizing the multiscale nature of the problem. Modern atomic resolution, explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations have contributed to our understanding of DNA fine structure and conformational polymorphism. These simulations may serve as data sources to parameterize rigid base models which themselves have undergone major development. A consistent buildup of larger entities involving multiple rigid bases enables us to describe DNA at more global scales. Free energy methods to impose large strains on DNA, as well as bead models and other approaches, are also briefly discussed. (topical review)

  16. Structural organization of DNA in chlorella viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Wulfmeyer

    Full Text Available Chlorella viruses have icosahedral capsids with an internal membrane enclosing their large dsDNA genomes and associated proteins. Their genomes are packaged in the particles with a predicted DNA density of ca. 0.2 bp nm(-3. Occasionally infection of an algal cell by an individual particle fails and the viral DNA is dynamically ejected from the capsid. This shows that the release of the DNA generates a force, which can aid in the transfer of the genome into the host in a successful infection. Imaging of ejected viral DNA indicates that it is intimately associated with proteins in a periodic fashion. The bulk of the protein particles detected by atomic force microscopy have a size of ∼60 kDa and two proteins (A278L and A282L of about this size are among 6 basic putative DNA binding proteins found in a proteomic analysis of DNA binding proteins packaged in the virion. A combination of fluorescence images of ejected DNA and a bioinformatics analysis of the DNA reveal periodic patterns in the viral DNA. The periodic distribution of GC rich regions in the genome provides potential binding sites for basic proteins. This DNA/protein aggregation could be responsible for the periodic concentration of fluorescently labeled DNA observed in ejected viral DNA. Collectively the data indicate that the large chlorella viruses have a DNA packaging strategy that differs from bacteriophages; it involves proteins and share similarities to that of chromatin structure in eukaryotes.

  17. DNA Uptake by Transformable Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacks, Sanford A.

    1999-03-31

    The various processes of DNA uptake by cells can be categorized as: viral DNA entry, conjugation, or transformation. Within each category, a variety of mechanisms have been found. However, considerable similarities occur among the different mechanisms of conjugation and, especially, transformation. All of these natural mechanisms of DNA transfer are quite elaborate and involve multiple protein components, as the case may be, of the virus, the donor cell, and the recipient cell. The mechanisms of viral infection and conjugation will be discussed mainly with respect to their relevance to transformation.

  18. DNA UPTAKE BY TRANSFORMABLE BACTERIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LACKS,S.A.

    1999-09-07

    The various processes of DNA uptake by cells can be categorized as: viral DNA entry, conjugation, or transformation. Within each category, a variety of mechanisms have been found. However, considerable similarities occur among the different mechanisms of conjugation and, especially, transformation. All of these natural mechanisms of DNA transfer are quite elaborate and involve multiple protein components, as the case may be, of the virus, the donor cell, and the recipient cell. The mechanisms of viral infection and conjugation will be discussed mainly with respect to their relevance to transformation.

  19. DNA Vaccines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    diseases. Keywords. DNA vaccine, immune response, antibodies, infectious diseases. GENERAL .... tein vaccines require expensive virus/protein purification tech- niques as ... sphere continue to remain major health hazards in developing nations. ... significance since it can be produced at a very low cost and can be stored ...

  20. Repair of Clustered Damage and DNA Polymerase Iota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belousova, E A; Lavrik, O I

    2015-08-01

    Multiple DNA lesions occurring within one or two turns of the DNA helix known as clustered damage are a source of double-stranded DNA breaks, which represent a serious threat to the cells. Repair of clustered lesions is accomplished in several steps. If a clustered lesion contains oxidized bases, an individual DNA lesion is repaired by the base excision repair (BER) mechanism involving a specialized DNA polymerase after excising DNA damage. Here, we investigated DNA synthesis catalyzed by DNA polymerase iota using damaged DNA templates. Two types of DNA substrates were used as model DNAs: partial DNA duplexes containing breaks of different length, and DNA duplexes containing 5-formyluracil (5-foU) and uracil as a precursor of apurinic/apyrimidinic sites (AP) in opposite DNA strands. For the first time, we showed that DNA polymerase iota is able to catalyze DNA synthesis using partial DNA duplexes having breaks of different length as substrates. In addition, we found that DNA polymerase iota could catalyze DNA synthesis during repair of clustered damage via the BER system by using both undamaged and 5-foU-containing templates. We found that hPCNA (human proliferating cell nuclear antigen) increased efficacy of DNA synthesis catalyzed by DNA polymerase iota.

  1. Molecular mechanism of DNA replication-coupled inactivation of the initiator protein in Escherichia coli: interaction of DnaA with the sliding clamp-loaded DNA and the sliding clamp-Hda complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su'etsugu, Masayuki; Takata, Makoto; Kubota, Toshio; Matsuda, Yusaku; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2004-06-01

    In Escherichia coli, the ATP-DnaA protein initiates chromosomal replication. After the DNA polymerase III holoenzyme is loaded on to DNA, DnaA-bound ATP is hydrolysed in a manner depending on Hda protein and the DNA-loaded form of the DNA polymerase III sliding clamp subunit, which yields ADP-DnaA, an inactivated form for initiation. This regulatory DnaA-inactivation represses extra initiation events. In this study, in vitro replication intermediates and structured DNA mimicking replicational intermediates were first used to identify structural prerequisites in the process of DnaA-ATP hydrolysis. Unlike duplex DNA loaded with sliding clamps, primer RNA-DNA heteroduplexes loaded with clamps were not associated with DnaA-ATP hydrolysis, and duplex DNA provided in trans did not rescue this defect. At least 40-bp duplex DNA is competent for the DnaA-ATP hydrolysis when a single clamp was loaded. The DnaA-ATP hydrolysis was inhibited when ATP-DnaA was tightly bound to a DnaA box-bearing oligonucleotide. These results imply that the DnaA-ATP hydrolysis involves the direct interaction of ATP-DnaA with duplex DNA flanking the sliding clamp. Furthermore, Hda protein formed a stable complex with the sliding clamp. Based on these, we suggest a mechanical basis in the DnaA-inactivation that ATP-DnaA interacts with the Hda-clamp complex with the aid of DNA binding. Copyright Blackwell Publishing Limited

  2. DNA adducts in senescent cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaubatz, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    Perturbations in DNA repair and other metabolic processes during development and aging might affect the steady-state level of genomic damage. The persistence or accumulation of DNA lesions in postmitotic cells could have a significant impact on proper cellular function, interfering with gene regulation for example. To test the notion that DNA damage increases as a function of age in non-dividing cells, DNA was purified from heart tissue of C57BL/6Nia mice at different ages and analyzed by post labeling techniques to detect DNA adducts. In the present experiments, four-dimensional, thin-layer chromatography was used to isolate aromatic adducts that were labeled with carrier-free (γ- 32 P) ATP under DNA-P excess conditions. The complexity and frequency of aromatic adducts varied between DNA samples. Several adducts were present in all preparations and were clearly more abundant in nucleotide maps of mature and old heart DNA. However, a direct correlation with age was not observed. In contrast, experiments in which aromatic adducts were first isolated by phase-transfer to 1-butanol, then labeled with excess (γ- 32 P)ATP indicated that there was an age-related increase in these adducts. The results are consistent with their earlier studies that showed alkyl adducts increased during aging of mouse myocardium and suggest that a common repair pathway might be involved

  3. Autophagy in DNA Damage Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Czarny

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage response (DDR involves DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis, but autophagy is also suggested to play a role in DDR. Autophagy can be activated in response to DNA-damaging agents, but the exact mechanism underlying this activation is not fully understood, although it is suggested that it involves the inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1. mTORC1 represses autophagy via phosphorylation of the ULK1/2–Atg13–FIP200 complex thus preventing maturation of pre-autophagosomal structures. When DNA damage occurs, it is recognized by some proteins or their complexes, such as poly(ADPribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1, Mre11–Rad50–Nbs1 (MRN complex or FOXO3, which activate repressors of mTORC1. SQSTM1/p62 is one of the proteins whose levels are regulated via autophagic degradation. Inhibition of autophagy by knockout of FIP200 results in upregulation of SQSTM1/p62, enhanced DNA damage and less efficient damage repair. Mitophagy, one form of autophagy involved in the selective degradation of mitochondria, may also play role in DDR. It degrades abnormal mitochondria and can either repress or activate apoptosis, but the exact mechanism remains unknown. There is a need to clarify the role of autophagy in DDR, as this process may possess several important biomedical applications, involving also cancer therapy.

  4. DNA Damage, Repair, and Cancer Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgeon, Marc-Olivier; Perry, Nicholas J. S.; Poulogiannis, George

    2018-01-01

    Although there has been a renewed interest in the field of cancer metabolism in the last decade, the link between metabolism and DNA damage/DNA repair in cancer has yet to be appreciably explored. In this review, we examine the evidence connecting DNA damage and repair mechanisms with cell metabolism through three principal links. (1) Regulation of methyl- and acetyl-group donors through different metabolic pathways can impact DNA folding and remodeling, an essential part of accurate double strand break repair. (2) Glutamine, aspartate, and other nutrients are essential for de novo nucleotide synthesis, which dictates the availability of the nucleotide pool, and thereby influences DNA repair and replication. (3) Reactive oxygen species, which can increase oxidative DNA damage and hence the load of the DNA-repair machinery, are regulated through different metabolic pathways. Interestingly, while metabolism affects DNA repair, DNA damage can also induce metabolic rewiring. Activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) triggers an increase in nucleotide synthesis and anabolic glucose metabolism, while also reducing glutamine anaplerosis. Furthermore, mutations in genes involved in the DDR and DNA repair also lead to metabolic rewiring. Links between cancer metabolism and DNA damage/DNA repair are increasingly apparent, yielding opportunities to investigate the mechanistic basis behind potential metabolic vulnerabilities of a substantial fraction of tumors. PMID:29459886

  5. From nonspecific DNA-protein encounter complexes to the prediction of DNA-protein interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu Gao

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA-protein interactions are involved in many essential biological activities. Because there is no simple mapping code between DNA base pairs and protein amino acids, the prediction of DNA-protein interactions is a challenging problem. Here, we present a novel computational approach for predicting DNA-binding protein residues and DNA-protein interaction modes without knowing its specific DNA target sequence. Given the structure of a DNA-binding protein, the method first generates an ensemble of complex structures obtained by rigid-body docking with a nonspecific canonical B-DNA. Representative models are subsequently selected through clustering and ranking by their DNA-protein interfacial energy. Analysis of these encounter complex models suggests that the recognition sites for specific DNA binding are usually favorable interaction sites for the nonspecific DNA probe and that nonspecific DNA-protein interaction modes exhibit some similarity to specific DNA-protein binding modes. Although the method requires as input the knowledge that the protein binds DNA, in benchmark tests, it achieves better performance in identifying DNA-binding sites than three previously established methods, which are based on sophisticated machine-learning techniques. We further apply our method to protein structures predicted through modeling and demonstrate that our method performs satisfactorily on protein models whose root-mean-square Calpha deviation from native is up to 5 A from their native structures. This study provides valuable structural insights into how a specific DNA-binding protein interacts with a nonspecific DNA sequence. The similarity between the specific DNA-protein interaction mode and nonspecific interaction modes may reflect an important sampling step in search of its specific DNA targets by a DNA-binding protein.

  6. DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlow, R.

    1978-01-01

    Some topics discussed are as follows: difficulty in extrapolating data from E. coli to mammalian systems; mutations caused by UV-induced changes in DNA; mutants deficient in excision repair; other postreplication mechanisms; kinds of excision repair systems; detection of repair by biochemical or biophysical means; human mutants deficient in repair; mutagenic effects of UV on XP cells; and detection of UV-repair defects among XP individuals

  7. Fanconi anemia (cross)linked to DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedernhofer, Laura J; Lalai, Astrid S; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J

    2005-12-29

    Fanconi anemia is characterized by hypersensitivity to DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) and susceptibility to tumor formation. Despite the identification of numerous Fanconi anemia (FANC) genes, the mechanism by which proteins encoded by these genes protect a cell from DNA interstrand crosslinks remains unclear. The recent discovery of two DNA helicases that, when defective, cause Fanconi anemia tips the balance in favor of the direct involvement of the FANC proteins in DNA repair and the bypass of DNA lesions.

  8. RAD51 interconnects between DNA replication, DNA repair and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Souparno; Srinivasan, Kalayarasan; Abdisalaam, Salim; Su, Fengtao; Raj, Prithvi; Dozmorov, Igor; Mishra, Ritu; Wakeland, Edward K; Ghose, Subroto; Mukherjee, Shibani; Asaithamby, Aroumougame

    2017-05-05

    RAD51, a multifunctional protein, plays a central role in DNA replication and homologous recombination repair, and is known to be involved in cancer development. We identified a novel role for RAD51 in innate immune response signaling. Defects in RAD51 lead to the accumulation of self-DNA in the cytoplasm, triggering a STING-mediated innate immune response after replication stress and DNA damage. In the absence of RAD51, the unprotected newly replicated genome is degraded by the exonuclease activity of MRE11, and the fragmented nascent DNA accumulates in the cytosol, initiating an innate immune response. Our data suggest that in addition to playing roles in homologous recombination-mediated DNA double-strand break repair and replication fork processing, RAD51 is also implicated in the suppression of innate immunity. Thus, our study reveals a previously uncharacterized role of RAD51 in initiating immune signaling, placing it at the hub of new interconnections between DNA replication, DNA repair, and immunity. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Transcriptome Profile Analysis of Mechanisms of Black and White Plumage Determination in Black-Bone Chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigang Yu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Melanin is a major and ubiquitous component of plumage colouration, and patterns of melanin pigmentation in birds are extremely varied. However, the molecular mechanism of pigmentation in avian plumage is still largely unknown. Methods: To elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in the formation of black and white plumage, this study takes advantage of high-throughput sequencing technology to compare differences in the transcriptome between black and white chicken feather bulbs. In total, we constructed six cDNA libraries from black (Group B and white (Group W feather bulbs in the dorsal plumage of Muchuan black-boned chickens. Results: A comparison between Groups B and W revealed 61 differentially expressed genes, with 47 displaying higher, and 14 displaying lower, levels of expression in white feather bulbs. Our results revealed a set of candidate genes and two potential metabolic pathways involved in black-bone chicken plumage melanogenesis. These include four homeobox genes (HOXB9, HOXC8, HOXA9, and HOXC 9, two glutathione (GSH metabolism-related genes (CHAC1 and GPX3, and the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β signalling pathway. Two known genes, TYR and MITF, were also shown to play a role in melanin formation. Conclusion: our data provide a valuable resource for discovering genes important in plumage melanin formation and will help further elucidate the molecular mechanisms for black and white plumage.

  10. SIRT participates at DNA damage response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Mi Yong; Joeng, Jae Min; Lee, Kee Ho [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Gil Hong [College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    Sir2 maintains genomic stability in multiple ways in yeast. As a NAD{sup +}-dependent histone deacetylase, Sir2 has been reported to control chromatin silencing. In both budding yeast and Drosophila, overexpression of Sir2 extends life span. Previous reports have also demonstrated that Sir2 participate at DNA damage repair. A protein complex containing Sir2 has been reported to translocate to DNA double-strand breaks. Following DNA damage response, SIRT1 deacetylates p53 protein and attenuates its ability as a transcription factor. Consequently, SIRT1 over-expression increases cell survival under DNA damage inducing conditions. These previous observations mean a possibility that signals generated during the process of DNA repair are delivered through SIRT1 to acetylated p53. We present herein functional evidence for the involvement of SIRT1 in DNA repair response to radiation. In addition, this modulation of DNA repair activity may be connected to deacetylation of MRN proteins.

  11. Methods for microbial DNA extraction from soil for PCR amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeates C

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Amplification of DNA from soil is often inhibited by co-purified contaminants. A rapid, inexpensive, large-scale DNA extraction method involving minimal purification has been developed that is applicable to various soil types (1. DNA is also suitable for PCR amplification using various DNA targets. DNA was extracted from 100g of soil using direct lysis with glass beads and SDS followed by potassium acetate precipitation, polyethylene glycol precipitation, phenol extraction and isopropanol precipitation. This method was compared to other DNA extraction methods with regard to DNA purity and size.

  12. DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Zeeland, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    In this chapter a series of DNA repair pathways are discussed which are available to the cell to cope with the problem of DNA damaged by chemical or physical agents. In the case of microorganisms our knowledge about the precise mechanism of each DNA repair pathway and the regulation of it has been improved considerably when mutants deficient in these repair mechanisms became available. In the case of mammalian cells in culture, until recently there were very little repair deficient mutants available, because in almost all mammalian cells in culture at least the diploid number of chromosomes is present. Therefore the frequency of repair deficient mutants in such populations is very low. Nevertheless because replica plating techniques are improving some mutants from Chinese hamsters ovary cells and L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells are now available. In the case of human cells, cultures obtained from patients with certain genetic diseases are available. A number of cells appear to be sensitive to some chemical or physical mutagens. These include cells from patients suffering from xeroderma pigmentosum, Ataxia telangiectasia, Fanconi's anemia, Cockayne's syndrome. However, only in the case of xeroderma pigmentosum cells, has the sensitivity to ultraviolet light been clearly correlated with a deficiency in excision repair of pyrimidine dimers. Furthermore the work with strains obtained from biopsies from man is difficult because these cells generally have low cloning efficiencies and also have a limited lifespan in vitro. It is therefore very important that more repair deficient mutants will become available from established cell lines from human or animal origin

  13. Regulation and function of DNA methylation in plants and animals

    KAUST Repository

    He, Xinjian

    2011-02-15

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mark involved in diverse biological processes. In plants, DNA methylation can be established through the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway, an RNA interference pathway for transcriptional gene silencing (TGS), which requires 24-nt small interfering RNAs. In mammals, de novo DNA methylation occurs primarily at two developmental stages: during early embryogenesis and during gametogenesis. While it is not clear whether establishment of DNA methylation patterns in mammals involves RNA interference in general, de novo DNA methylation and suppression of transposons in germ cells require 24-32-nt piwi-interacting small RNAs. DNA methylation status is dynamically regulated by DNA methylation and demethylation reactions. In plants, active DNA demethylation relies on the repressor of silencing 1 family of bifunctional DNA glycosylases, which remove the 5-methylcytosine base and then cleave the DNA backbone at the abasic site, initiating a base excision repair (BER) pathway. In animals, multiple mechanisms of active DNA demethylation have been proposed, including a deaminase- and DNA glycosylase-initiated BER pathway. New information concerning the effects of various histone modifications on the establishment and maintenance of DNA methylation has broadened our understanding of the regulation of DNA methylation. The function of DNA methylation in plants and animals is also discussed in this review. © 2011 IBCB, SIBS, CAS All rights reserved.

  14. DNA Topology and the Initiation of Virus DNA Packaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choon Seok Oh

    Full Text Available During progeny assembly, viruses selectively package virion genomes from a nucleic acid pool that includes host nucleic acids. For large dsDNA viruses, including tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses, immature viral DNA is recognized and translocated into a preformed icosahedral shell, the prohead. Recognition involves specific interactions between the viral packaging enzyme, terminase, and viral DNA recognition sites. Generally, viral DNA is recognized by terminase's small subunit (TerS. The large terminase subunit (TerL contains translocation ATPase and endonuclease domains. In phage lambda, TerS binds a sequence repeated three times in cosB, the recognition site. TerS binding to cosB positions TerL to cut the concatemeric DNA at the adjacent nicking site, cosN. TerL introduces staggered nicks in cosN, generating twelve bp cohesive ends. Terminase separates the cohesive ends and remains bound to the cosB-containing end, in a nucleoprotein structure called Complex I. Complex I docks on the prohead's portal vertex and translocation ensues. DNA topology plays a role in the TerSλ-cosBλ interaction. Here we show that a site, I2, located between cosN and cosB, is critically important for an early DNA packaging step. I2 contains a complex static bend. I2 mutations block DNA packaging. I2 mutant DNA is cut by terminase at cosN in vitro, but in vivo, no cos cleavage is detected, nor is there evidence for Complex I. Models for what packaging step might be blocked by I2 mutations are presented.

  15. DNA Repair Mechanisms and the Bypass of DNA Damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiteux, Serge; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2013-01-01

    DNA repair mechanisms are critical for maintaining the integrity of genomic DNA, and their loss is associated with cancer predisposition syndromes. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have played a central role in elucidating the highly conserved mechanisms that promote eukaryotic genome stability. This review will focus on repair mechanisms that involve excision of a single strand from duplex DNA with the intact, complementary strand serving as a template to fill the resulting gap. These mechanisms are of two general types: those that remove damage from DNA and those that repair errors made during DNA synthesis. The major DNA-damage repair pathways are base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair, which, in the most simple terms, are distinguished by the extent of single-strand DNA removed together with the lesion. Mistakes made by DNA polymerases are corrected by the mismatch repair pathway, which also corrects mismatches generated when single strands of non-identical duplexes are exchanged during homologous recombination. In addition to the true repair pathways, the postreplication repair pathway allows lesions or structural aberrations that block replicative DNA polymerases to be tolerated. There are two bypass mechanisms: an error-free mechanism that involves a switch to an undamaged template for synthesis past the lesion and an error-prone mechanism that utilizes specialized translesion synthesis DNA polymerases to directly synthesize DNA across the lesion. A high level of functional redundancy exists among the pathways that deal with lesions, which minimizes the detrimental effects of endogenous and exogenous DNA damage. PMID:23547164

  16. DNA AND ITS METAPHORES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Domaradzki

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present paper is to describe the main metaphors presented in genetic discourse: DNA as text, information, language, book, code, project/blueprint, map, computer, music, and cooking. It also analyses the social implication of these metaphors. The author of this article argues that metaphors are double-edged swords: while they brighten difficult and abstract genetic concepts, they also lead to the misunderstanding and misinterpretation of the reality. The reason for this is that most of these metaphors are of deterministic, reductionist, and fatalistic character. Consequently, they shift the attention from complexity of genetic processes. Moreover, as they appeal to emotions, ascetics, and morality they may involve exaggeration: while they bring hope, they also create an atmosphere of fear over the misuse of genetic knowledge. The author of this article states that the genetic metaphors do not simply reflect the social ideas on DNA, but also shape our understanding of genetics and imagination on the social application of genetic knowledge. Due to this reason, DNA should be understood not only as a biological code, but as a cultural as well.

  17. Human Parvovirus B19 Utilizes Cellular DNA Replication Machinery for Viral DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wei; Wang, Zekun; Xiong, Min; Chen, Aaron Yun; Xu, Peng; Ganaie, Safder S; Badawi, Yomna; Kleiboeker, Steve; Nishimune, Hiroshi; Ye, Shui Qing; Qiu, Jianming

    2018-03-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19V) infection of human erythroid progenitor cells (EPCs) induces a DNA damage response and cell cycle arrest at late S phase, which facilitates viral DNA replication. However, it is not clear exactly which cellular factors are employed by this single-stranded DNA virus. Here, we used microarrays to systematically analyze the dynamic transcriptome of EPCs infected with B19V. We found that DNA metabolism, DNA replication, DNA repair, DNA damage response, cell cycle, and cell cycle arrest pathways were significantly regulated after B19V infection. Confocal microscopy analyses revealed that most cellular DNA replication proteins were recruited to the centers of viral DNA replication, but not the DNA repair DNA polymerases. Our results suggest that DNA replication polymerase δ and polymerase α are responsible for B19V DNA replication by knocking down its expression in EPCs. We further showed that although RPA32 is essential for B19V DNA replication and the phosphorylated forms of RPA32 colocalized with the replicating viral genomes, RPA32 phosphorylation was not necessary for B19V DNA replication. Thus, this report provides evidence that B19V uses the cellular DNA replication machinery for viral DNA replication. IMPORTANCE Human parvovirus B19 (B19V) infection can cause transient aplastic crisis, persistent viremia, and pure red cell aplasia. In fetuses, B19V infection can result in nonimmune hydrops fetalis and fetal death. These clinical manifestations of B19V infection are a direct outcome of the death of human erythroid progenitors that host B19V replication. B19V infection induces a DNA damage response that is important for cell cycle arrest at late S phase. Here, we analyzed dynamic changes in cellular gene expression and found that DNA metabolic processes are tightly regulated during B19V infection. Although genes involved in cellular DNA replication were downregulated overall, the cellular DNA replication machinery was tightly

  18. Repair of abasic sites in DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dianov, Grigory L.; Sleeth, Kate M.; Dianova, Irina I.; Allinson, Sarah L

    2003-10-29

    Repair of both normal and reduced AP sites is activated by AP endonuclease, which recognizes and cleaves a phosphodiester bond 5' to the AP site. For a short period of time an incised AP site is occupied by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and then DNA polymerase {beta} adds one nucleotide into the repair gap and simultaneously removes the 5'-sugar phosphate. Finally, the DNA ligase III/XRCC1 complex accomplishes repair by sealing disrupted DNA ends. However, long-patch BER pathway, which is involved in the removal of reduced abasic sites, requires further DNA synthesis resulting in strand displacement and the generation of a damage-containing flap that is later removed by the flap endonuclease. Strand-displacement DNA synthesis is accomplished by DNA polymerase {delta}/{epsilon} and DNA ligase I restores DNA integrity. DNA synthesis by DNA polymerase {delta}/{epsilon} is dependent on proliferating cell nuclear antigen, which also stimulates the DNA ligase I and flap endonuclease. These repair events are supported by multiple protein-protein interactions.

  19. Deoxynucleoside salvage enzymes and tissue specific mitochondrial DNA depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L

    2010-06-01

    Adequate mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copies are required for normal mitochondria function and reductions in mtDNA copy number due to genetic alterations cause tissue-specific mtDNA depletion syndrome (MDS). There are eight nuclear genes, directly or indirectly involved in mtDNA replication and mtDNA precursor synthesis, which have been identified as the cause of MDS. However, the tissue specific pathology of these nuclear gene mutations is not well understood. Here, mtDNA synthesis, mtDNA copy number control, and mtDNA turnover, as well as the synthesis of mtDNA precursors in relation to the levels of salvage enzymes are discussed. The question why MDS caused by TK2 and p53R2 mutations are predominantly muscle specific while dGK deficiency affected mainly liver will be addressed.

  20. Enzymatic recognition of DNA replication origins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stayton, M.M.; Bertsch, L.; Biswas, S.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the process of recognition of the complementary-strand origin with emphasis on RNA polymerase action in priming M13 DNA replication, the role of primase in G4 DNA replication, and the function of protein n, a priming protein, during primosome assembly. These phage systems do not require several of the bacterial DNA replication enzymes, particularly those involved in the regulation of chromosome copy number of the initiatiion of replication of duplex DNA. 51 references, 13 figures, 1 table

  1. DNA-binding proteins essential for protein-primed bacteriophage ø29 DNA replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Salas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus subtilis phage Φ29 has a linear, double-stranded DNA 19 kb long with an inverted terminal repeat of 6 nucleotides and a protein covalently linked to the 5’ ends of the DNA. This protein, called terminal protein (TP, is the primer for the initiation of replication, a reaction catalyzed by the viral DNA polymerase at the two DNA ends. The DNA polymerase further elongates the nascent DNA chain in a processive manner, coupling strand displacement with elongation. The viral protein p5 is a single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB that binds to the single strands generated by strand displacement during the elongation process. Viral protein p6 is a double-stranded DNA binding protein (DBP that preferentially binds to the origins of replication at the Φ29 DNA ends and is required for the initiation of replication. Both SSB and DBP are essential for Φ29 DNA amplification. This review focuses on the role of these phage DNA-binding proteins in Φ29 DNA replication both in vitro and in vivo, as well as on the implication of several B. subtilis DNA-binding proteins in different processes of the viral cycle. We will revise the enzymatic activities of the Φ29 DNA polymerase: TP-deoxynucleotidylation, processive DNA polymerization coupled to strand displacement, 3’-5’ exonucleolysis and pyrophosphorolysis. The resolution of the Φ29 DNA polymerase structure has shed light on the translocation mechanism and the determinants responsible for processivity and strand displacement. These two properties have made Φ29 DNA polymerase one of the main enzymes used in the current DNA amplification technologies. The determination of the structure of Φ29 TP revealed the existence of three domains: the priming domain, where the primer residue Ser232, as well as Phe230, involved in the determination of the initiating nucleotide, are located, the intermediate domain, involved in DNA polymerase binding, and the N-terminal domain, responsible for DNA binding

  2. Fanconi anemia and DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grompe, M; D'Andrea, A

    2001-10-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by defects in at least eight distinct genes FANCA, B, C, D1, D2, E, F and G. The clinical phenotype of all FA complementation groups is similar and is characterized by progressive bone marrow failure, cancer proneness and typical birth defects. The principal cellular phenotype is hypersensitivity to DNA damage, particularly interstrand DNA crosslinks. The FA proteins constitute a multiprotein pathway whose precise biochemical function(s) remain unknown. Five of the FA proteins (FANCA, C, E, F and G) interact in a nuclear complex upstream of FANCD2. FANCB and FANCD1 have not yet been cloned, but it is likely that FANCB is part of the nuclear complex and that FANCD1 acts downstream of FANCD2. The FA nuclear complex regulates the mono-ubiquitination of FANCD2 in response to DNA damage, resulting in targeting of this protein into nuclear foci. These foci also contain BRCA1 and other DNA damage response proteins. In male meiosis, FANCD2 also co-localizes with BRCA1 at synaptonemal complexes. Together, these data suggest that the FA pathway functions primarily as a DNA damage response system, although its exact role (direct involvement in DNA repair versus indirect, facilitating role) has not yet been defined.

  3. DNA Damage and Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Meloche, Jolyane; Paulin, Roxane; Boucherat, Olivier; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure over 25 mmHg at rest and is diagnosed by right heart catheterization. Among the different groups of PH, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by a progressive obstruction of distal pulmonary arteries, related to endothelial cell dysfunction and vascular cell proliferation, which leads to an increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy, and right heart failure. Although the primary trigger of PAH remains unknown, oxidative stress and inflammation have been shown to play a key role in the development and progression of vascular remodeling. These factors are known to increase DNA damage that might favor the emergence of the proliferative and apoptosis-resistant phenotype observed in PAH vascular cells. High levels of DNA damage were reported to occur in PAH lungs and remodeled arteries as well as in animal models of PH. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated that impaired DNA-response mechanisms may lead to an increased mutagen sensitivity in PAH patients. Finally, PAH was linked with decreased breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA1) and DNA topoisomerase 2-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) expression, both involved in maintaining genome integrity. This review aims to provide an overview of recent evidence of DNA damage and DNA repair deficiency and their implication in PAH pathogenesis. PMID:27338373

  4. Small molecules, inhibitors of DNA-PK, targeting DNA repair and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eDavidson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many current chemotherapies function by damaging genomic DNA in rapidly dividing cells ultimately leading to cell death. This therapeutic approach differentially targets cancer cells that generally display rapid cell division compared to normal tissue cells. However, although these treatments are initially effective in arresting tumor growth and reducing tumor burden, resistance and disease progression eventually occur. A major mechanism underlying this resistance is increased levels of cellular DNA repair. Most cells have complex mechanisms in place to repair DNA damage that occurs due to environmental exposures or normal metabolic processes. These systems, initially overwhelmed when faced with chemotherapy induced DNA damage, become more efficient under constant selective pressure and as a result chemotherapies become less effective. Thus, inhibiting DNA repair pathways using target specific small molecule inhibitors may overcome cellular resistance to DNA damaging chemotherapies. Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ a major mechanism for the repair of double strand breaks (DSB in DNA is regulated in part by the serine/threonine kinase, DNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK. The DNA-PK holoenzyme acts as a scaffold protein tethering broken DNA ends and recruiting other repair molecules. It also has enzymatic activity that may be involved in DNA damage signaling. Because of its’ central role in repair of DSBs, DNA-PK has been the focus of a number of small molecule studies. In these studies specific DNA-PK inhibitors have shown efficacy in synergizing chemotherapies in vitro. However, compounds currently known to specifically inhibit DNA-PK are limited by poor pharmacokinetics: these compounds have poor solubility and have high metabolic lability in vivo leading to short serum half-lives. Future improvement in DNA-PK inhibition will likely be achieved by designing new molecules based on the recently reported crystallographic structure of DNA

  5. Applications of DNA-Stable Isotope Probing in Bioremediation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yin; Vohra, Jyotsna; Murrell, J. Colin

    DNA-stable isotope probing, a method to identify active microorganisms without the prerequisite of cultivation, has been widely applied in the study of microorganisms involved in the degradation of environmental pollutants. Recent advances and technique considerations in applying DNA-SIP in bioremediation are highlighted. A detailed protocol of a DNA-SIP experiment is provided.

  6. DNA Repair Systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DNA molecule which makes it ideal for storage and propagation of genetic information. ... of these errors are broadly referred to as DNA repair. DNA can ... changes occur in the human genome per day. ..... nails, frequent physical and mental.

  7. Synthesis of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    2008-11-18

    A method of synthesizing a desired double-stranded DNA of a predetermined length and of a predetermined sequence. Preselected sequence segments that will complete the desired double-stranded DNA are determined. Preselected segment sequences of DNA that will be used to complete the desired double-stranded DNA are provided. The preselected segment sequences of DNA are assembled to produce the desired double-stranded DNA.

  8. UVA photoactivation of DNA containing halogenated thiopyrimidines induces cytotoxic DNA lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brem, Reto; Zhang, Xiaohui; Xu, Yao-Zhong; Karran, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Photochemotherapy, the combination of a photosensitiser and ultraviolet (UV) or visible light, is an effective treatment for skin conditions including cancer. The high mutagenicity and non-selectivity of photochemotherapy regimes warrants the development of alternative approaches. We demonstrate that the thiopyrimidine nucleosides 5-bromo-4-thiodeoxyuridine (SBrdU) and 5-iodo-4-thiodeoxyuridine (SIdU) are incorporated into the DNA of cultured human and mouse cells where they synergistically sensitise killing by low doses of UVA radiation. The DNA halothiopyrimidine/UVA combinations induce DNA interstrand crosslinks, DNA-protein crosslinks, DNA strand breaks, nucleobase damage and lesions that resemble UV-induced pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone photoproducts. These are potentially lethal DNA lesions and cells defective in their repair are hypersensitive to killing by SBrdU/UVA and SIdU/UVA. DNA SIdU and SBrdU generate lethal DNA photodamage by partially distinct mechanisms that reflect the different photolabilities of their C–I and C–Br bonds. Although singlet oxygen is involved in photolesion formation, DNA SBrdU and SIdU photoactivation does not detectably increase DNA 8-oxoguanine levels. The absence of significant collateral damage to normal guanine suggests that UVA activation of DNA SIdU or SBrdU might offer a strategy to target hyperproliferative skin conditions that avoids the extensive formation of a known mutagenic DNA lesion. PMID:25747491

  9. Radiation-induced DNA damage as a function of DNA hydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swarts, S.G.; Miao, L.; Wheeler, K.T.; Sevilla, M.D.; Becker, D.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation-induced DNA damage is produced from the sum of the radicals generated by the direct ionization of the DNA (direct effect) and by the reactions of the DNA with free radicals formed in the surrounding environment (indirect effect). The indirect effect has been believed to be the predominant contributor to radiation-induced intracellular DNA damage, mainly as the result of reactions of bulk water radicals (e.g., OH·) with DNA. However, recent evidence suggests that DNA damage, derived from the irradiation of water molecules that are tightly bound in the hydration layer, may occur as the result of the transfer of electron-loss centers (e.g. holes) and electrons from these water molecules to the DNA. Since this mechanism for damaging DNA more closely parallels that of the direct effect, the irradiation of these tightly bound water molecules may contribute to a quasi-direct effect. These water molecules comprise a large fraction of the water surrounding intracellular DNA and could account for a significant proportion of intracellular radiation-induced DNA damage. Consequently, the authors have attempted to characterize this quasi-direct effect to determine: (1) the extent of the DNA hydration layer that is involved with this effect, and (2) what influence this effect has on the types and quantities of radiation-induced DNA damage

  10. Structure and function of DNA polymerase μ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Takuro; Maezawa, So

    2013-01-01

    DNA polymerases are enzymes playing the central role in DNA metabolism, including DNA replication, DNA repair and recombination. DNA polymerase μ (pol μ DNA polymerase λ (pol λ) and terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase (TdT) in X family DNA polymerases function in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), which is the predonmiant repair pathway for DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). NHEJ involves enzymes that capture both ends of the broken DNA strand, bring them together in a synaptic DNA-protein complex, and repair the DSB. Pol μ and pol λ fill in the gaps at the junction to maintain the genomic integrity. TdT synthesizes N region at the junction during V(D)J recombination and promotes diversity of immunoglobulin or T-cell receptor gene. Among these three polymerases, the regulatory mechanisms of pol μ remain rather unclear. We have approached the mechanism of pol μ from both sides of structure and cellular dynamics. Here, we propose some new insights into pol μ and the probable NHEJ model including our findings. (author)

  11. Chromatin remodelling: the industrial revolution of DNA around histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Anjanabha; Wittmeyer, Jacqueline; Cairns, Bradley R

    2006-06-01

    Chromatin remodellers are specialized multi-protein machines that enable access to nucleosomal DNA by altering the structure, composition and positioning of nucleosomes. All remodellers have a catalytic ATPase subunit that is similar to known DNA-translocating motor proteins, suggesting DNA translocation as a unifying aspect of their mechanism. Here, we explore the diversity and specialization of chromatin remodellers, discuss how nucleosome modifications regulate remodeller activity and consider a model for the exposure of nucleosomal DNA that involves the use of directional DNA translocation to pump 'DNA waves' around the nucleosome.

  12. DNA-dependent protein kinase in nonhomologous end joining: a lock with multiple keys?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weterings, Eric; Chen, David J

    2007-10-22

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is one of the central enzymes involved in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. It facilitates proper alignment of the two ends of the broken DNA molecule and coordinates access of other factors to the repair complex. We discuss the latest findings on DNA-PK phosphorylation and offer a working model for the regulation of DNA-PK during DSB repair.

  13. Mitochondrial DNA alteration in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacedonia, Donato; Carpagnano, Giovanna E; Crisetti, Elisabetta; Cotugno, Grazia; Palladino, Grazia P; Patricelli, Giulia; Sabato, Roberto; Foschino Barbaro, Maria P

    2015-04-07

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSAS) is a disease associated with the increase of cardiovascular risk and it is characterized by repeated episodes of Intermittent Hypoxia (IH) which inducing oxidative stress and systemic inflammation. Mitochondria are cell organelles involved in the respiratory that have their own DNA (MtDNA). The aim of this study was to investigate if the increase of oxidative stress in OSAS patients can induce also MtDNA alterations. 46 OSAS patients (age 59.27 ± 11.38; BMI 30.84 ± 3.64; AHI 36.63 ± 24.18) were compared with 36 control subjects (age 54.42 ± 6.63; BMI 29.06 ± 4.7; AHI 3.8 ± 1.10). In blood cells Content of MtDNA and nuclear DNA (nDNA) was measured in OSAS patients by Real Time PCR. The ratio between MtDNA/nDNA was then calculated. Presence of oxidative stress was evaluated by levels of Reactive Oxygen Metabolites (ROMs), measured by diacron reactive oxygen metabolite test (d-ROM test). MtDNA/nDNA was higher in patients with OSAS than in the control group (150.94 ± 49.14 vs 128.96 ± 45.8; p = 0.04), the levels of ROMs were also higher in OSAS subjects (329.71 ± 70.17 vs 226 ± 36.76; p = 0.04) and they were positively correlated with MtDNA/nDNA (R = 0.5, p DNA damage induced by the increase of oxidative stress. Intermittent hypoxia seems to be the main mechanism which leads to this process.

  14. Carcinogen-induced damage to DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, B.; Altamirano, M.; Bose, K.; Sklar, R.; Tatsumi, K.

    1979-01-01

    Human cells respond to carcinogen-induced damage in their DNA in at least two ways. The first response, excision repair, proceeds by at least three variations, depending on the nature of the damage. Nucleotide excision results in relatively large repair patches but few free DNA breaks, since the endonuclease step is limiting. Apurinic repair is characterized by the appearance of numerous breaks in the DNA and by short repair patches. The pathways behave as though they function independently. Lymphoic cells derived from a xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C patient are deficient in their ability to perform nucleotide excision and also to excise 6 methoxyguanine adducts, but they are apurinic repair competent. Organisms may bypass damage in their DNA. Lymphoblastoid cells, including those derived from xeroderma pigmentosum treated with 3 H-anti-BPDE, can replicate their DNA at low doses of carcinogen. Unexcised 3 H is found in the light or parental strand of the resulting hybrid DNA when replication occurs in medium with BrdUrd. This observation indicates a bypass reaction occurring by a mechanism involving branch migration at DNA growing points. Branch migration in DNA preparations have been observed, but the evidence is that most occurs in BrdUrd-containing DNA during cell lysis. The measurement of the bifilarly substituted DNA resulting from branch migration is a convenient method of estimating the proportion of new synthesis remaining in the vicinity of the DNA growing point. Treatment with carcinogens or caffeine results in accumulation of DNA growing points accompanied by the synthesis of shortened pieces of daughter DNA

  15. Radiation damage to DNA constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergene, R.

    1977-01-01

    The molecular changes of the DNA molecule, in various systems exposed to inoizing radiation, have been the subject of a great number of studies. In the present work electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) has been applied to irradiated crystalline systems, in particular single crystals of DNA subunits and their derivatives. The main conclusions about the molecular damage are based on this technique in combination with molecular orbital calculations. It should be emphasized that the ESR technique is restricted to damage containing unpaired electrons. These unstable intermediates called free radicals seem, however, to be involved in all molecular models describing the action of radiation on DNA. One of the premises for a detailed theory of the radiation induced reactions at the physico-chemical level seems to involve exact knowledge of the induced free radicals as well as the modes of their formation and fate. For DNA, as such, it is hardly possible to arrive at such a level of knowledge since the molecular complexity prevents selective studies of the many different radiation induced products. One possible approach is to study the free radicals formed in the constituents of DNA. In the present work three lines of approach should be mentioned. The first is based on the observation that radical formation in general causes only minor structural alterations to the molecule in question. The use of isotopes with different spin and magnetic moment (in particular deuterium) may also serve a source of information. Deuteration leads to a number of protons, mainly NH - and OH, becoming substituted, and if any of these are involved in interactions with unpaired protons the resonance pattern is influeneed. The third source of information is molecular orbital calculation. The electron spin density distribution is a function in the three dimensional space based on the system's electronic wave functions. This constitutes the basis for the idea that ESR data can be correlated with

  16. DNA-membrane complex restoration in Micrococcus radiodurans after X-irradiation: relation to repair, DNA synthesis and DNA degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dardalhon-Samsonoff, M; Averbeck, D [Institut du Radium, 75 - Paris (France). Lab. Curie

    1980-07-01

    The DNA-membrane complex in Micrococcus radiodurans was shown to be essentially constituted of proteins, lipids and DNA. The complex was dissociated immediately after X-irradiation of cells and restored during post-incubation in complete medium. In X-irradiated protoplasts some DNA remained associated with the complex. Restoration of the complex during post-incubation was only seen in a medium favouring DNA polymerase and ligase activities. Under this condition no DNA synthesis occurred, suggesting that complex restoration may involve ligase activity. The complex restoration in the wild type and the X-ray sensitive mutant UV17 of M. radiodurans was strictly dependent on the X-ray dose. It was correlated with survival and DNA degradation but always preceded the onset of DNA synthesis after X-irradiation. At the same dose the complex restoration was about 2 fold lower in mutant than in wild type cells indicating that the restoration of the complex is related to repair capacity. The results are consistent with the idea that the complex protects X-irradiated DNA of M. radiodurans from further breakdown and, subsequently, permits DNA synthesis and repair to occur.

  17. Structure of human DNA polymerase iota and the mechanism of DNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, A V; Kulbachinskiy, A V

    2012-06-01

    Cellular DNA polymerases belong to several families and carry out different functions. Highly accurate replicative DNA polymerases play the major role in cell genome replication. A number of new specialized DNA polymerases were discovered at the turn of XX-XXI centuries and have been intensively studied during the last decade. Due to the special structure of the active site, these enzymes efficiently perform synthesis on damaged DNA but are characterized by low fidelity. Human DNA polymerase iota (Pol ι) belongs to the Y-family of specialized DNA polymerases and is one of the most error-prone enzymes involved in DNA synthesis. In contrast to other DNA polymerases, Pol ι is able to use noncanonical Hoogsteen interactions for nucleotide base pairing. This allows it to incorporate nucleotides opposite various lesions in the DNA template that impair Watson-Crick interactions. Based on the data of X-ray structural analysis of Pol ι in complexes with various DNA templates and dNTP substrates, we consider the structural peculiarities of the Pol ι active site and discuss possible mechanisms that ensure the unique behavior of the enzyme on damaged and undamaged DNA.

  18. Flexible DNA Path in the MCM Double Hexamer Loaded on DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hizume, Kohji; Kominami, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Kei; Yamada, Hirofumi; Araki, Hiroyuki

    2017-05-16

    The formation of the pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) during the G1 phase, which is also called the licensing of DNA replication, is the initial and essential step of faithful DNA replication during the subsequent S phase. It is widely accepted that in the pre-RC, double-stranded DNA passes through the holes of two ring-shaped minichromosome maintenance (MCM) 2-7 hexamers; however, the spatial organization of the DNA and proteins involved in pre-RC formation is unclear. Here we reconstituted the pre-RC from purified DNA and proteins and visualized the complex using atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM revealed that the MCM double hexamers formed elliptical particles on DNA. Analysis of the angle of binding of DNA to the MCM double hexamer suggests that the DNA does not completely pass through both holes of the MCM hexamers, possibly because the DNA exited from the gap between Mcm2 and Mcm5. A DNA loop fastened by the MCM double hexamer was detected in pre-RC samples reconstituted from purified proteins as well as those purified from yeast cells, suggesting a higher-order architecture of the loaded MCM hexamers and DNA strands.

  19. Bypass of a psoralen DNA interstrand cross-link by DNA polymerases beta, iota, and kappa in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Leigh A.; Makarova, Alena V.; Samson, Laura; Thiesen, Katherine E.; Dhar, Alok; Bessho, Tadayoshi

    2012-01-01

    Repair of DNA inter-strand cross-links in mammalian cells involves several biochemically distinctive processes, including the release of one of the cross-linked strands and translesion DNA synthesis (TLS). In this report, we investigated in vitro TLS activity of psoralen DNA inter-strand cross-link by three DNA repair polymerases, DNA polymerase beta, kappa and iota. DNA polymerase beta is capable of bypassing a psoralen cross-link with a low efficiency. Cell extracts prepared from DNA polymerase beta knockout mouse embryonic fibroblast showed a reduced bypass activity of the psoralen cross-link and purified DNA polymerase beta restored the bypass activity. In addition, DNA polymerase iota mis-incorporated thymine across the psoralen cross-link and DNA polymerase kappa extended these mis-paired primer ends, suggesting that DNA polymerase iota may serve as an inserter and DNA polymerase kappa may play a role as an extender in the repair of psoralen DNA inter-strand cross-links. The results demonstrated here indicate that multiple DNA polymerases could participate in TLS steps in mammalian DNA inter-strand cross-link repair. PMID:23106263

  20. Modes of DNA repair and replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanawalt, P.; Kondo, S.

    1979-01-01

    Modes of DNA repair and replication require close coordination as well as some overlap of enzyme functions. Some classes of recovery deficient mutants may have defects in replication rather than repair modes. Lesions such as the pyrimidine dimers produced by ultraviolet light irradiation are the blocks to normal DNA replication in vivo and in vitro. The DNA synthesis by the DNA polymerase 1 of E. coli is blocked at one nucleotide away from the dimerized pyrimidines in template strands. Thus, some DNA polymerases seem to be unable to incorporate nucleotides opposite to the non-pairing lesions in template DNA strands. The lesions in template DNA strands may block the sequential addition of nucleotides in the synthesis of daughter strands. Normal replication utilizes a constitutive ''error-free'' mode that copies DNA templates with high fidelity, but which may be totally blocked at a lesion that obscures the appropriate base pairing specificity. It might be expected that modified replication system exhibits generally high error frequency. The error rate of DNA polymerases may be controlled by the degree of phosphorylation of the enzyme. Inducible SOS system is controlled by recA genes that also control the pathways for recombination. It is possible that SOS system involves some process other than the modification of a blocked replication apparatus to permit error-prone transdimer synthesis. (Yamashita, S.)

  1. Who and What Does Involvement Involve?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jeppe Oute; Petersen, Anders; Huniche, Lotte

    2015-01-01

    This article gives an account of aspects of a multi-sited field study of involvement of relatives in Danish psychiatry. By following metaphors of involvement across three sites of the psychiatric systema family site, a clinical site and a policy sitethe first author (J.O.) investigated how...... theoretical perspective laid out by Ernesto Laclau and Chantal Mouffe, the aim of this study is to show how the dominant discourse about involvement at the political and clinical sites is constituted by understandings of mentally ill individuals and by political objectives of involvement. The analysis...... the responsibility toward the mental health of the ill individual as well as toward the psychological milieu of the family....

  2. Benzo(a)pyrene-DNA adduct formation in cells: time-dependent differences in the benzo(a)pyrene-DNA adducts present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baird, W.M.; Dumaswala, R.U.

    1980-01-01

    Procedures involving isolation of the DNA from tritium labelled hydrocarbon-treated cells are discussed. Enzymatic degradation of the DNA to deoxyribonucleosides, and chromatography of the adducts on columns of water gradients were covered as well

  3. Cloning human DNA repair genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeggo, P.A.; Carr, A.M.; Lehmann, A.R.

    1994-01-01

    Many human genes involved in the repair of UV damage have been cloned using different procedures and they have been of great value in assisting the understanding of the mechanism of nucleotide excision-repair. Genes involved in repair of ionizing radiation damage have proved more difficult to isolate. Positional cloning has localized the XRCC5 gene to a small region of chromosome 2q33-35, and a series of yeast artificial chromosomes covering this region have been isolated. Very recent work has shown that the XRCC5 gene encodes the 80 kDa subunit of the Ku DNA-binding protein. The Ku80 gene also maps to this region. Studies with fission yeast have shown that radiation sensitivity can result not only from defective DNA repair but also from abnormal cell cycle control following DNA damage. Several genes involved in this 'check-point' control in fission yeast have been isolated and characterized in detail. It is likely that a similar checkpoint control mechanism exists in human cells. (author)

  4. Dietary Berries and Ellagic Acid Prevent Oxidative DNA Damage and Modulate Expression of DNA Repair Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh C. Gupta

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage is a pre-requisite for the initiation of cancer and agents that reduce this damage are useful in cancer prevention. In this study, we evaluated the ability of whole berries and berry phytochemical, ellagic acid to reduce endogenous oxidative DNA damage. Ellagic acid was selected based on > 95% inhibition of 8-oxodeoxyguosine (8-oxodG and other unidentified oxidative DNA adducts induced by 4-hydroxy-17B;-estradiol and CuCl2 in vitro. Inhibition of the latter occurred at lower concentrations (10 u(microM than that for 8-oxodG (100 u(microM. In the in vivo study, female CD-1 mice (n=6 were fed either a control diet or diet supplemented with ellagic acid (400 ppm and dehydrated berries (5% w/w with varying ellagic acid contents -- blueberry (low, strawberry (medium and red raspberry (high, for 3 weeks. Blueberry and strawberry diets showed moderate reductions in endogenous DNA adducts (25%. However, both red raspberry and ellagic acid diets showed a significant reduction of 59% (p < 0.001 and 48% (p < 0.01, respectively. Both diets also resulted in a 3-8 fold over-expression of genes involved in DNA repair such as xeroderma pigmentosum group A complementing protein (XPA, DNA excision repair protein (ERCC5 and DNA ligase III (DNL3. These results suggest that red raspberry and ellagic acid reduce endogenous oxidative DNA damage by mechanisms which may involve increase in DNA repair.

  5. Molecular mechanisms in radiation damage to DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this work are to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for radiation-induced DNA damage. The overall goal is to understand the relationship between the chemical and structural changes produced by ionizing radiation in DNA and the resulting impairment of biological function expressed as carcinogenesis or cell death. The studies are based on theoretical explorations of possible mechanisms that link initial radiation damage in the form of base and sugar damage to conformational changes in DNA. These mechanistic explorations should lead to the formulation of testable hypothesis regarding the processes of impairment of regulation of gene expression, alternation in DNA repair, and damage to DNA structure involved in cell death or cancer

  6. DNA hybridization sensing for cytogenetic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Dapra, Johannes; Brøgger, Anna Line

    2013-01-01

    are rearrangements between two chromosome arms that results in two derivative chromosomes having a mixed DNA sequence. The current detection method is a Fluorescent In situ Hybridization, which requires a use of expensive, fluorescently labeled probes that target the DNA sequences of two chromosomes involved...... in the translocation (Kwasny et al., 2012). We have developed a new double hybridization assay that allows for sorting of the DNA chromosomal fragments into separate compartment, moreover allowing for detection of the translocation. To detect the translocation it is necessary to determine that the two DNA sequences...... forming a derivative chromosome are connected, which is achieved by two subsequent hybridization steps. The first example of the translocation detection was presented on lab-on-a-disc using fluorescently labeled DNA fragments, representing the derivative chromosome (Brøgger et al., 2012). To allow...

  7. Acetone facilitated DNA sampling from electrical tapes improves DNA recovery and enables latent fingerprints development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feine, Ilan; Shpitzen, Moshe; Geller, Boris; Salmon, Eran; Peleg, Tsach; Roth, Jonathan; Gafny, Ron

    2017-07-01

    Electrical tapes (ETs) are a common component of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) used by terrorists or criminal organizations and represent a valuable forensic resource for DNA and latent fingerprints recovery. However, DNA recovery rates are typically low and usually below the minimal amount required for amplification. In addition, most DNA extraction methods are destructive and do not allow further latent fingerprints development. In the present study a cell culture based touch DNA model was used to demonstrate a two-step acetone-water DNA recovery protocol from ETs. This protocol involves only the adhesive side of the ET and increases DNA recovery rates by up to 70%. In addition, we demonstrated partially successful latent fingerprints development from the non-sticky side of the ETs. Taken together, this protocol maximizes the forensic examination of ETs and is recommended for routine casework processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. DNA Polymerases λ and β: The Double-Edged Swords of DNA Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Mentegari

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available DNA is constantly exposed to both endogenous and exogenous damages. More than 10,000 DNA modifications are induced every day in each cell’s genome. Maintenance of the integrity of the genome is accomplished by several DNA repair systems. The core enzymes for these pathways are the DNA polymerases. Out of 17 DNA polymerases present in a mammalian cell, at least 13 are specifically devoted to DNA repair and are often acting in different pathways. DNA polymerases β and λ are involved in base excision repair of modified DNA bases and translesion synthesis past DNA lesions. Polymerase λ also participates in non-homologous end joining of DNA double-strand breaks. However, recent data have revealed that, depending on their relative levels, the cell cycle phase, the ratio between deoxy- and ribo-nucleotide pools and the interaction with particular auxiliary proteins, the repair reactions carried out by these enzymes can be an important source of genetic instability, owing to repair mistakes. This review summarizes the most recent results on the ambivalent properties of these enzymes in limiting or promoting genetic instability in mammalian cells, as well as their potential use as targets for anticancer chemotherapy.

  9. DNA Polymerases λ and β: The Double-Edged Swords of DNA Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentegari, Elisa; Kissova, Miroslava; Bavagnoli, Laura; Maga, Giovanni; Crespan, Emmanuele

    2016-08-31

    DNA is constantly exposed to both endogenous and exogenous damages. More than 10,000 DNA modifications are induced every day in each cell's genome. Maintenance of the integrity of the genome is accomplished by several DNA repair systems. The core enzymes for these pathways are the DNA polymerases. Out of 17 DNA polymerases present in a mammalian cell, at least 13 are specifically devoted to DNA repair and are often acting in different pathways. DNA polymerases β and λ are involved in base excision repair of modified DNA bases and translesion synthesis past DNA lesions. Polymerase λ also participates in non-homologous end joining of DNA double-strand breaks. However, recent data have revealed that, depending on their relative levels, the cell cycle phase, the ratio between deoxy- and ribo-nucleotide pools and the interaction with particular auxiliary proteins, the repair reactions carried out by these enzymes can be an important source of genetic instability, owing to repair mistakes. This review summarizes the most recent results on the ambivalent properties of these enzymes in limiting or promoting genetic instability in mammalian cells, as well as their potential use as targets for anticancer chemotherapy.

  10. Effect of γ-irradiated DNA on the activity of DNA polymerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leadon, S.A.; Ward, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    A cell-free assay was developed to measure the effect of γ-irradiated DNA template on the ability of DNA polymerase to copy unirradiated template. Doses as low as 1 krad were able to decrease (approx. 15%) the activity of both bacterial and mammalian DNA polymerases in the assay. The percentage of polymerase activity decreased as the dose received by the template increased. The reduction in DNA polymerase activity was shown to be due to an inhibition of the enzyme by the irradiated DNA. Irradiated poly(dA-dT) was more effective in reducing polymerase activity than calf thymus DNA. Thus the polymerase-inhibition site(s) appears to be associated with base damage, specifically adenine or thymine. Using a free-radical scavenger, OH radicals were found to be involved in producing the damage sites. The interaction between irradiated DNA and DNA polymerase was found to be specific for the enzyme and not for other proteins present in the assay. The inhibition of DNA polymerase occurred prior to or during the initiation of DNA synthesis rather than after initiation of synthesis, i.e., during elongation

  11. DNA repair mechanism in radioresistant bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitayama, Shigeru

    1992-01-01

    Many radiation resistant bacteria have been isolated from various sources which are not in high background field. Since Deinococcus radiodurans had been isolated first in 1956, studies on the mechanism for radioresistance were carried out mostly using this bacterium. DNA in this bacterium isn't protected against injury induced by not only ionizing radiation but also ultraviolet light. Therefore, DNA damages induced by various treatments are efficiently and accurately repaired in this cells. Damages in base and/or sugar in DNA are removed by endonucleases which, if not all, are synthesized during postirradiation incubation. Following the endonucleolytic cleavage the strand scissions in DNA are seemed to be rejoined by a process common for the repair of strand scissions induced by such as ionizing radiations. Induce protein(s) is also involved in this rejoining process of strand scissions. DNA repair genes were classified into three phenotypic groups. (1)Genes which are responsible for the endonucleolytic activities. (2) Genes involved in the rejoining of DNA strand scissions. (3) Genes which participate in genetic recombination and repair. Three genes belong to (1) and (2) were cloned onto approximately 1 kbp DNA fragments which base sequences have been determined. (author)

  12. DNA repair mechanism in radioresistant bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitayama, Shigeru

    1992-01-01

    Many radiation resistant bacteria have been isolated from various sources which are not in high background field. Since Deinococcus radiodurans had been isolated first in 1956, the studies on the mechanism of radioresistance were mostly carried out using this bacterium. DNA in this bacterium isn't protected against injury induced by not only ionizing radiation but also ultraviolet light. Therefore, DNA damages induced by various treatments are efficiently and accurately repaired in this cells. Damages in base and/or sugar in DNA are removed by endonucleases which, if not all, are synthesized during postirradiation incubation. Following the endonucleolytic cleavage the strand scissions in DNA are seemed to be rejoined by a process common for the repair of strand scissions induced by such as ionizing radiations. Induce protein(s) is also involved in this rejoining process of strand scissions. DNA repair genes were classified into three phenotypic groups. (1) Genes which are responsible for the endonucleolytic activities. (2) Genes involved in the rejoining of DNA strand scissions. (3) Genes which participate in genetic recombination and repair. Three genes belong to (1) and (2) were cloned onto approximately 1 kbp DNA fragments which base sequences have been determined. (author)

  13. Interaction of E. coli DNA with tobacco mesophyll protoplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyn, R.F.

    1975-01-01

    This chapter is part of a dissertation dealing with the interaction of DNA with protoplasts. Having established the length of time during which tobacco mesophyll protoplasts do not synthesize DNA following their isolation, it is important to know the extent of DNA uptake just before the onset of DNA synthesis (and possible integration) and to find optimal conditions for this uptake. Therefore, the association of E. coli DNA with tobacco protoplasts was studied. Care should be taken with the interpretation of ''uptake'' results: adsorption phenomena play a very important role and may do so at the plasmalemma of naked protoplasts. To solve the problems involved, the use of radiation-damaged DNA was attempted. With E. coli DNA possessing a large number of thymine containing pyrimidine dimers, the loss of dimers from DNA recovered from treated protoplasts was tested in order to obtain an indication of ''real'' uptake. The results are reported

  14. DNA preservation in silk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yawen; Zheng, Zhaozhu; Gong, He; Liu, Meng; Guo, Shaozhe; Li, Gang; Wang, Xiaoqin; Kaplan, David L

    2017-06-27

    The structure of DNA is susceptible to alterations at high temperature and on changing pH, irradiation and exposure to DNase. Options to protect and preserve DNA during storage are important for applications in genetic diagnosis, identity authentication, drug development and bioresearch. In the present study, the stability of total DNA purified from human dermal fibroblast cells, as well as that of plasmid DNA, was studied in silk protein materials. The DNA/silk mixtures were stabilized on filter paper (silk/DNA + filter) or filter paper pre-coated with silk and treated with methanol (silk/DNA + PT-filter) as a route to practical utility. After air-drying and water extraction, 50-70% of the DNA and silk could be retrieved and showed a single band on electrophoretic gels. 6% silk/DNA + PT-filter samples provided improved stability in comparison with 3% silk/DNA + filter samples and DNA + filter samples for DNA preservation, with ∼40% of the band intensity remaining at 37 °C after 40 days and ∼10% after exposure to UV light for 10 hours. Quantitative analysis using the PicoGreen assay confirmed the results. The use of Tris/borate/EDTA (TBE) buffer enhanced the preservation and/or extraction of the DNA. The DNA extracted after storage maintained integrity and function based on serving as a functional template for PCR amplification of the gene for zinc finger protein 750 (ZNF750) and for transgene expression of red fluorescence protein (dsRed) in HEK293 cells. The high molecular weight and high content of a crystalline beta-sheet structure formed on the coated surfaces likely accounted for the preservation effects observed for the silk/DNA + PT-filter samples. Although similar preservation effects were also obtained for lyophilized silk/DNA samples, the rapid and simple processing available with the silk-DNA-filter membrane system makes it appealing for future applications.

  15. Force induced DNA melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santosh, Mogurampelly; Maiti, Prabal K

    2009-01-01

    When pulled along the axis, double-strand DNA undergoes a large conformational change and elongates by roughly twice its initial contour length at a pulling force of about 70 pN. The transition to this highly overstretched form of DNA is very cooperative. Applying a force perpendicular to the DNA axis (unzipping), double-strand DNA can also be separated into two single-stranded DNA, this being a fundamental process in DNA replication. We study the DNA overstretching and unzipping transition using fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and argue that the conformational changes of double-strand DNA associated with either of the above mentioned processes can be viewed as force induced DNA melting. As the force at one end of the DNA is increased the DNA starts melting abruptly/smoothly above a critical force depending on the pulling direction. The critical force f m , at which DNA melts completely decreases as the temperature of the system is increased. The melting force in the case of unzipping is smaller compared to the melting force when the DNA is pulled along the helical axis. In the case of melting through unzipping, the double-strand separation has jumps which correspond to the different energy minima arising due to sequence of different base pairs. The fraction of Watson-Crick base pair hydrogen bond breaking as a function of force does not show smooth and continuous behavior and consists of plateaus followed by sharp jumps.

  16. DNA damage and autophagy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely; Panayiotidis, Mihalis I.; Franco, Rodrigo

    2011-01-01

    Both exogenous and endogenous agents are a threat to DNA integrity. Exogenous environmental agents such as ultraviolet (UV) and ionizing radiation, genotoxic chemicals and endogenous byproducts of metabolism including reactive oxygen species can cause alterations in DNA structure (DNA damage). Unrepaired DNA damage has been linked to a variety of human disorders including cancer and neurodegenerative disease. Thus, efficient mechanisms to detect DNA lesions, signal their presence and promote their repair have been evolved in cells. If DNA is effectively repaired, DNA damage response is inactivated and normal cell functioning resumes. In contrast, when DNA lesions cannot be removed, chronic DNA damage triggers specific cell responses such as cell death and senescence. Recently, DNA damage has been shown to induce autophagy, a cellular catabolic process that maintains a balance between synthesis, degradation, and recycling of cellular components. But the exact mechanisms by which DNA damage triggers autophagy are unclear. More importantly, the role of autophagy in the DNA damage response and cellular fate is unknown. In this review we analyze evidence that supports a role for autophagy as an integral part of the DNA damage response.

  17. DNA Open states and DNA hydratation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lema-Larre, B. de; Martin-Landrove, M

    1995-01-01

    It is a very well-known fact that an protonic exchange exists among natural DNA filaments and synthetic polynucleotides with the solvent (1--2). The existence of DNA open states, that is to say states for which the interior of the DNA molecule is exposed to the external environment, it has been demonstrated by means of proton-deuterium exchange (3). This work has carried out experiments measuring the dispersion of the traverse relaxation rate (4), as a pulsation rate function in a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulses sequence rate, to determine changes in the moist layer of the DNA molecule. The experiments were carried out under different experimental conditions in order to vary the probability that open states occurs, such as temperature or the exposure to electromagnetic fields. Some theoretical models were supposed to adjust the experimental results including those related to DNA non linear dynamic [es

  18. The DNA damage response during mitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heijink, Anne Margriet; Krajewska, Małgorzata; Vugt, Marcel A.T.M. van

    2013-01-01

    Cells are equipped with a cell-intrinsic signaling network called the DNA damage response (DDR). This signaling network recognizes DNA lesions and initiates various downstream pathways to coordinate a cell cycle arrest with the repair of the damaged DNA. Alternatively, the DDR can mediate clearance of affected cells that are beyond repair through apoptosis or senescence. The DDR can be activated in response to DNA damage throughout the cell cycle, although the extent of DDR signaling is different in each cell cycle phase. Especially in response to DNA double strand breaks, only a very marginal response was observed during mitosis. Early on it was recognized that cells which are irradiated during mitosis continued division without repairing broken chromosomes. Although these initial observations indicated diminished DNA repair and lack of an acute DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest, insight into the mechanistic re-wiring of DDR signaling during mitosis was only recently provided. Different mechanisms appear to be at play to inactivate specific signaling axes of the DDR network in mitosis. Importantly, mitotic cells not simply inactivate the entire DDR, but appear to mark their DNA damage for repair after mitotic exit. Since the treatment of cancer frequently involves agents that induce DNA damage as well as agents that block mitotic progression, it is clinically relevant to obtain a better understanding of how cancer cells deal with DNA damage during interphase versus mitosis. In this review, the molecular details concerning DDR signaling during mitosis as well as the consequences of encountering DNA damage during mitosis for cellular fate are discussed

  19. The DNA damage response during mitosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijink, Anne Margriet; Krajewska, Małgorzata; Vugt, Marcel A.T.M. van, E-mail: m.vugt@umcg.nl

    2013-10-15

    Cells are equipped with a cell-intrinsic signaling network called the DNA damage response (DDR). This signaling network recognizes DNA lesions and initiates various downstream pathways to coordinate a cell cycle arrest with the repair of the damaged DNA. Alternatively, the DDR can mediate clearance of affected cells that are beyond repair through apoptosis or senescence. The DDR can be activated in response to DNA damage throughout the cell cycle, although the extent of DDR signaling is different in each cell cycle phase. Especially in response to DNA double strand breaks, only a very marginal response was observed during mitosis. Early on it was recognized that cells which are irradiated during mitosis continued division without repairing broken chromosomes. Although these initial observations indicated diminished DNA repair and lack of an acute DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest, insight into the mechanistic re-wiring of DDR signaling during mitosis was only recently provided. Different mechanisms appear to be at play to inactivate specific signaling axes of the DDR network in mitosis. Importantly, mitotic cells not simply inactivate the entire DDR, but appear to mark their DNA damage for repair after mitotic exit. Since the treatment of cancer frequently involves agents that induce DNA damage as well as agents that block mitotic progression, it is clinically relevant to obtain a better understanding of how cancer cells deal with DNA damage during interphase versus mitosis. In this review, the molecular details concerning DDR signaling during mitosis as well as the consequences of encountering DNA damage during mitosis for cellular fate are discussed.

  20. The DNA damage response during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijink, Anne Margriet; Krajewska, Małgorzata; van Vugt, Marcel A T M

    2013-10-01

    Cells are equipped with a cell-intrinsic signaling network called the DNA damage response (DDR). This signaling network recognizes DNA lesions and initiates various downstream pathways to coordinate a cell cycle arrest with the repair of the damaged DNA. Alternatively, the DDR can mediate clearance of affected cells that are beyond repair through apoptosis or senescence. The DDR can be activated in response to DNA damage throughout the cell cycle, although the extent of DDR signaling is different in each cell cycle phase. Especially in response to DNA double strand breaks, only a very marginal response was observed during mitosis. Early on it was recognized that cells which are irradiated during mitosis continued division without repairing broken chromosomes. Although these initial observations indicated diminished DNA repair and lack of an acute DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest, insight into the mechanistic re-wiring of DDR signaling during mitosis was only recently provided. Different mechanisms appear to be at play to inactivate specific signaling axes of the DDR network in mitosis. Importantly, mitotic cells not simply inactivate the entire DDR, but appear to mark their DNA damage for repair after mitotic exit. Since the treatment of cancer frequently involves agents that induce DNA damage as well as agents that block mitotic progression, it is clinically relevant to obtain a better understanding of how cancer cells deal with DNA damage during interphase versus mitosis. In this review, the molecular details concerning DDR signaling during mitosis as well as the consequences of encountering DNA damage during mitosis for cellular fate are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Eye Involvement in TSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eye involvement. Nonretinal and Retinal Eye Findings Facial angiofibromas may involve the eyelids of individuals with TSC, ... the hamartomas have many blood vessels (as are angiofibromas of the skin). Less than half of the ...

  2. Immunoassay of DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparro, F.P.; Santella, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    The direct photomodification of DNA by ultraviolet light or the photo-induced addition of exogenous compounds to DNA components results in alterations of DNA structure ranging from subtle to profound. There are two consequences of these conformational changes. First, cells in which the DNA has been damaged are capable of executing repair steps. Second, the DNA which is usually of very low immunogenicity now becomes highly antigenic. This latter property has allowed the production of a series of monoclonal antibodies that recognize photo-induced DNA damage. Monoclonal antibodies have been generated that recognize the 4',5'-monoadduct and the crosslink of 8-methoxypsoralen in DNA. In addition, another antibody has been prepared which recognizes the furan-side monoadduct of 6,4,4'-trimethylangelicin in DNA. These monoclonal antibodies have been characterized as to sensitivity and specificity using non-competitive and competitive enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assays (ELISA). (author)

  3. Immunoassay of DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasparro, F P; Santella, R M

    1988-09-01

    The direct photomodification of DNA by ultraviolet light or the photo-induced addition of exogenous compounds to DNA components results in alterations of DNA structure ranging from subtle to profound. There are two consequences of these conformational changes. First, cells in which the DNA has been damaged are capable of executing repair steps. Second, the DNA which is usually of very low immunogenicity now becomes highly antigenic. This latter property has allowed the production of a series of monoclonal antibodies that recognize photo-induced DNA damage. Monoclonal antibodies have been generated that recognize the 4',5'-monoadduct and the crosslink of 8-methoxypsoralen in DNA. In addition, another antibody has been prepared which recognizes the furan-side monoadduct of 6,4,4'-trimethylangelicin in DNA. These monoclonal antibodies have been characterized as to sensitivity and specificity using non-competitive and competitive enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assays (ELISA).

  4. DNA computing models

    CERN Document Server

    Ignatova, Zoya; Zimmermann, Karl-Heinz

    2008-01-01

    In this excellent text, the reader is given a comprehensive introduction to the field of DNA computing. The book emphasizes computational methods to tackle central problems of DNA computing, such as controlling living cells, building patterns, and generating nanomachines.

  5. DNA tagged microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquar, George Roy; Leif, Roald N; Wheeler, Elizabeth

    2015-05-05

    A simulant that includes a carrier and DNA encapsulated in the carrier. Also a method of making a simulant including the steps of providing a carrier and encapsulating DNA in the carrier to produce the simulant.

  6. Modeling DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  7. UV and ionizing radiations induced DNA damage, differences and similarities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Douki, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    Both UV and ionizing radiations damage DNA. Two main mechanisms, so-called direct and indirect pathways, are involved in the degradation of DNA induced by ionizing radiations. The direct effect of radiation corresponds to direct ionization of DNA (one electron ejection) whereas indirect effects are produced by reactive oxygen species generated through water radiolysis, including the highly reactive hydroxyl radicals, which damage DNA. UV (and visible) light damages DNA by again two distinct mechanisms. UVC and to a lesser extend UVB photons are directly absorbed by DNA bases, generating their excited states that are at the origin of the formation of pyrimidine dimers. UVA (and visible) light by interaction with endogenous or exogenous photosensitizers induce the formation of DNA damage through photosensitization reactions. The excited photosensitizer is able to induce either a one-electron oxidation of DNA (type I) or to produce singlet oxygen (type II) that reacts with DNA. In addition, through an energy transfer from the excited photosensitizer to DNA bases (sometime called type III mechanism) formation of pyrimidine dimers could be produced. Interestingly it has been shown recently that pyrimidine dimers are also produced by direct absorption of UVA light by DNA, even if absorption of DNA bases at these wavelengths is very low. It should be stressed that some excited photosensitizers (such as psoralens) could add directly to DNA bases to generate adducts. The review will described the differences and similarities in terms of damage formation (structure and mechanisms) between these two physical genotoxic agents.

  8. DNA: Structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinden, Richard R.; E. Pearson, Christopher; N. Potaman, Vladimir

    1998-01-01

    This chapter discusses the structure and function of DNA. DNA occupies a critical role in cells, because it is the source of all intrinsic genetic information. Chemically, DNA is a very stable molecule, a characteristic important for a macromolecule that may have to persist in an intact form...

  9. Replicating animal mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. McKinney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication has been experiencing incredible progress in recent years, and yet little is certain about the mechanism(s used by animal cells to replicate this plasmid-like genome. The long-standing strand-displacement model of mammalian mtDNA replication (for which single-stranded DNA intermediates are a hallmark has been intensively challenged by a new set of data, which suggests that replication proceeds via coupled leading-and lagging-strand synthesis (resembling bacterial genome replication and/or via long stretches of RNA intermediates laid on the mtDNA lagging-strand (the so called RITOLS. The set of proteins required for mtDNA replication is small and includes the catalytic and accessory subunits of DNA polymerase y, the mtDNA helicase Twinkle, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein, and the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (which most likely functions as the mtDNA primase. Mutations in the genes coding for the first three proteins are associated with human diseases and premature aging, justifying the research interest in the genetic, biochemical and structural properties of the mtDNA replication machinery. Here we summarize these properties and discuss the current models of mtDNA replication in animal cells.

  10. Specific DNA-binding proteins and DNA sequences involved in steroid hormone regulation of gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spelsberg, T.; Hora, J.; Horton, M.; Goldberger, A.; Littlefield, B.; Seelke, R.; Toyoda, H.

    1987-01-01

    Steroid hormones circulate in the blood and are taken by target cells via complexes with intracellular binding proteins termed receptors, that are hormone and tissue specific. Each receptor binds it specific steroid with very high affinity, having an equilibrium dissociation constant (K/sub d/) in the range of 10 -9 to 10 -10 M. Once bound by their specific steroid hormones, the steroid receptors undergo a conformational change which allows them to bind with high affinity to sites on chromatin, termed nuclear acceptor sites. There are estimated 5,000 to 10,000 of these sites expressed with an equal number not expressed (''masked'') in intact chromatin. The result of the binding to nuclear acceptor sites is an alteration of gene transcription or, in some cases, gene expression as measured by the changing levels of specific RNAs and proteins in that target tissue. Each steroid regulates specific effects on the RNA and protein profiles. The chronology of the above mechanism of action after injection of radiolabelled steroid as is follows: Steroid-receptor complex formation (1 minute), nuclear acceptor sites (2 minutes), effects on RNA synthesis (10 to 30 minutes), and finally the changing protein profiles via changes in protein synthesis and protein turnover (1 to 6 hours). Thus steroid receptors represent one of the first identified intracellular gene regulation proteins. The receptor molecules themselves are regulated by the presence or absence of the steroid molecule

  11. Organizing Patient Involvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brehm Johansen, Mette

    hospitals. During the last 25 years, patient involvement and quality improvement have become connected in Danish healthcare policy. However, the ideal of involving patients in quality improvement is described in very general terms and with only few specific expectations of how it is to be carried out...... in practice, as I show in the thesis. In the patient involvement literature, the difficulties of getting patient involvement in quality improvement to have in an impact on the planning and development of healthcare services is, for example, ascribed to conceptual vagueness of patient involvement, differences...... in perspectives, values and understandings between patients and healthcare professionals, or the lack of managerial attention and prioritization....

  12. Perinatal transmission of human papilomavirus DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serafini Eduardo P

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose was to study the perinatal transmission of human papillomavirus DNA (HPV-DNA in 63 mother-newborn pairs, besides looking at the epidemiological factors involved in the viral DNA transmission. The following sampling methods were used: (1 in the pregnant woman, when was recruited, in cervix and clinical lesions of the vagina, vulva and perineal region; (2 in the newborn, (a buccal, axillary and inguinal regions; (b nasopharyngeal aspirate, and (c cord blood; (3 in the children, buccal was repeated in the 4th week and 6th and 12th month of life. HPV-DNA was identified using two methodologies: multiplex PCR (PGMY09 and MY11 primers and nested-PCR (genotypes 6/11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 42, 52 and 58. Perinatal transmission was considered when concordance was found in type-specific HPV between mother/newborn or mother/child. HPV-DNA genital was detected in 49 pregnant women submitted to delivery. Eleven newborns (22.4%, n = 11/49 were HPV-DNA positive. In 8 cases (16.3%, n = 8/49 there was type specific HPV concordance between mother/newborn samples. At the end of the first month of life three children (6.1%, n = 3/49 became HPV-DNA positive, while two remained positive from birth. In 3 cases (100%, n = 3/3 there was type specific HPV concordance between mother/newborn samples. In the 6th month, a child (2%, n = 1/49 had become HPV-DNA positive between the 1st and 6th month of life, and there was type specific HPV concordance of mother/newborn samples. All the HPV-DNA positive children (22.4%, n = 11/49 at birth and at the end first month of life (6.1%, n = 3/49 became HPV-DNA negative at the age of 6 months. The HPV-DNA positive child (2%, n = 1/49 from 1st to the 6th month of life became HPV-DNA negative between the 6th and 12th month of life and one child had anogenital warts. In the twelfth month all (100%, n = 49/49 the children studied were HPV-DNA negative. A positive and significant correlation was observed between perinatal

  13. Advances in forensic DNA quantification: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Steven B; McCord, Bruce; Buel, Eric

    2014-11-01

    This review focuses upon a critical step in forensic biology: detection and quantification of human DNA from biological samples. Determination of the quantity and quality of human DNA extracted from biological evidence is important for several reasons. Firstly, depending on the source and extraction method, the quality (purity and length), and quantity of the resultant DNA extract can vary greatly. This affects the downstream method as the quantity of input DNA and its relative length can determine which genotyping procedure to use-standard short-tandem repeat (STR) typing, mini-STR typing or mitochondrial DNA sequencing. Secondly, because it is important in forensic analysis to preserve as much of the evidence as possible for retesting, it is important to determine the total DNA amount available prior to utilizing any destructive analytical method. Lastly, results from initial quantitative and qualitative evaluations permit a more informed interpretation of downstream analytical results. Newer quantitative techniques involving real-time PCR can reveal the presence of degraded DNA and PCR inhibitors, that provide potential reasons for poor genotyping results and may indicate methods to use for downstream typing success. In general, the more information available, the easier it is to interpret and process the sample resulting in a higher likelihood of successful DNA typing. The history of the development of quantitative methods has involved two main goals-improving precision of the analysis and increasing the information content of the result. This review covers advances in forensic DNA quantification methods and recent developments in RNA quantification. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Photosensitized oxidation of DNA and its components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decarroz, Chantal.

    1982-09-01

    Chemical changes in DNA components during the photodynamic effect are responsible for Mutagenic and carcinogenic phenomena. Basically two competitive mechanisns involving respectively a charge transfer (type I) and singlet oxygen (type II) are implicated in reactions photo-sensitized by different agents (acridines, phenothiazines, porphyrins, flavins, psoralenes...). A study of the photosensitized oxidation of DNA itself was approached through characterization of the main final products in the case of purine nucleosides. Methyl-2 naphthoquinone - 1,4 (vitamin K 3 ) displays a special photosensitization mechanism involving a cation radical type of intermediary [fr

  15. Hemi-methylated DNA regulates DNA methylation inheritance through allosteric activation of H3 ubiquitylation by UHRF1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Joseph S; Cornett, Evan M; Goldfarb, Dennis; DaRosa, Paul A; Li, Zimeng M; Yan, Feng; Dickson, Bradley M; Guo, Angela H; Cantu, Daniel V; Kaustov, Lilia; Brown, Peter J; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Erie, Dorothy A; Major, Michael B; Klevit, Rachel E; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Kuhlman, Brian; Strahl, Brian D; Rothbart, Scott B

    2016-09-06

    The epigenetic inheritance of DNA methylation requires UHRF1, a histone- and DNA-binding RING E3 ubiquitin ligase that recruits DNMT1 to sites of newly replicated DNA through ubiquitylation of histone H3. UHRF1 binds DNA with selectivity towards hemi-methylated CpGs (HeDNA); however, the contribution of HeDNA sensing to UHRF1 function remains elusive. Here, we reveal that the interaction of UHRF1 with HeDNA is required for DNA methylation but is dispensable for chromatin interaction, which is governed by reciprocal positive cooperativity between the UHRF1 histone- and DNA-binding domains. HeDNA recognition activates UHRF1 ubiquitylation towards multiple lysines on the H3 tail adjacent to the UHRF1 histone-binding site. Collectively, our studies are the first demonstrations of a DNA-protein interaction and an epigenetic modification directly regulating E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. They also define an orchestrated epigenetic control mechanism involving modifications both to histones and DNA that facilitate UHRF1 chromatin targeting, H3 ubiquitylation, and DNA methylation inheritance.

  16. Fast phylogenetic DNA barcoding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkelsen, Kasper Munch; Boomsma, Wouter Krogh; Willerslev, Eske

    2008-01-01

    We present a heuristic approach to the DNA assignment problem based on phylogenetic inferences using constrained neighbour joining and non-parametric bootstrapping. We show that this method performs as well as the more computationally intensive full Bayesian approach in an analysis of 500 insect...... DNA sequences obtained from GenBank. We also analyse a previously published dataset of environmental DNA sequences from soil from New Zealand and Siberia, and use these data to illustrate the fact that statistical approaches to the DNA assignment problem allow for more appropriate criteria...... for determining the taxonomic level at which a particular DNA sequence can be assigned....

  17. Radiation and DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riabchenko, N I

    1979-01-01

    Consideration is given to the effects of ionizing radiation on the structure of DNA. Physical and chemical methods of determining radiation damage to the primary (polynucleotide chain and nitrogenous base) and secondary (helical) structure of DNA are discussed, and the effects of ionizing radiation on deoxyribonucleoprotein complexes are considered. The radiolysis of DNA in vitro and in bacterial and mammalian cells is examined and cellular mechanisms for the repair of radiation-damaged DNA are considered, taking into account single-strand and double-strand breaks, gamma-radiation damage and deoxyribonucleoprotein-membrane complex damage. Postradiation DNA degradation in bacteria and lymphatic cells is also discussed.

  18. DNA-Mediated Electrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorodetsky, Alon A.; Buzzeo, Marisa C.

    2009-01-01

    The base pair stack of DNA has been demonstrated as a medium for long range charge transport chemistry both in solution and at DNA-modified surfaces. This chemistry is exquisitely sensitive to structural perturbations in the base pair stack as occur with lesions, single base mismatches, and protein binding. We have exploited this sensitivity for the development of reliable electrochemical assays based on DNA charge transport at self-assembled DNA monolayers. Here we discuss the characteristic features, applications, and advantages of DNA-mediated electrochemistry. PMID:18980370

  19. Mechanistic Studies with DNA Polymerases Reveal Complex Outcomes following Bypass of DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Eoff

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA is a chemically reactive molecule that is subject to many different covalent modifications from sources that are both endogenous and exogenous in origin. The inherent instability of DNA is a major obstacle to genomic maintenance and contributes in varying degrees to cellular dysfunction and disease in multi-cellular organisms. Investigations into the chemical and biological aspects of DNA damage have identified multi-tiered and overlapping cellular systems that have evolved as a means of stabilizing the genome. One of these pathways supports DNA replication events by in a sense adopting the mantra that one must “make the best of a bad situation” and tolerating covalent modification to DNA through less accurate copying of the damaged region. Part of this so-called DNA damage tolerance pathway involves the recruitment of specialized DNA polymerases to sites of stalled or collapsed replication forks. These enzymes have unique structural and functional attributes that often allow bypass of adducted template DNA and successful completion of genomic replication. What follows is a selective description of the salient structural features and bypass properties of specialized DNA polymerases with an emphasis on Y-family members.

  20. DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rex, A S; Aagaard, J.; Fedder, J

    2017-01-01

    Sperm DNA Fragmentation has been extensively studied for more than a decade. In the 1940s the uniqueness of the spermatozoa protein complex which stabilizes the DNA was discovered. In the fifties and sixties, the association between unstable chromatin structure and subfertility was investigated....... In the seventies, the impact of induced DNA damage was investigated. In the 1980s the concept of sperm DNA fragmentation as related to infertility was introduced as well as the first DNA fragmentation test: the Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA). The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick end labelling...... (TUNEL) test followed by others was introduced in the nineties. The association between DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa and pregnancy loss has been extensively investigated spurring the need for a therapeutic tool for these patients. This gave rise to an increased interest in the aetiology of DNA damage...

  1. Biophysics of DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Vologodskii, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Surveying the last sixty years of research, this book describes the physical properties of DNA in the context of its biological functioning. It is designed to enable both students and researchers of molecular biology, biochemistry and physics to better understand the biophysics of DNA, addressing key questions and facilitating further research. The chapters integrate theoretical and experimental approaches, emphasising throughout the importance of a quantitative knowledge of physical properties in building and analysing models of DNA functioning. For example, the book shows how the relationship between DNA mechanical properties and the sequence specificity of DNA-protein binding can be analyzed quantitatively by using our current knowledge of the physical and structural properties of DNA. Theoretical models and experimental methods in the field are critically considered to enable the reader to engage effectively with the current scientific literature on the physical properties of DNA.

  2. Differential sensitivity to aphidicolin of replicative DNA synthesis and ultraviolet-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis in vivo in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Shuji; Hosogi, Nobuo; Oda, Takuzo

    1984-01-01

    In vivo in mammalian cells, ultraviolet-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis was less sensitive to aphidicolin than was replicative DNA synthesis. Replicative DNA synthesis in HeLa, HEp-2, WI-38 VA-13 and CV-1 cells was inhibited more than 97 % by aphidicolin at 10 μg/ml, whereas aphidicolin inhibition of DNA synthesis in ultraviolet-irradiated cells varied between 30 % and 90 % depending on cell types and assay conditions. Aphidicolin inhibition of unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in HeLa cells increased gradually with increasing aphidicolin concentration and reached approximately 90 % at 100 μg/ml aphidicolin. A significant fraction of UDS in ultraviolet-irradiated HEp-2 cells was resistant to aphidicolin even at 300 μg/ml. Considered along with related information reported previously, the present results suggest that both aphidicolin-sensitive and insensitive DNA polymerases, DNA polymerase α and a non-α DNA polymerase (possibly DNA polymerase β), are involved in in situ UDS in these ultraviolet-irradiated cells. Comparison of staphylococcal nuclease sensitivity between DNAs repaired in the presence and in the absence of aphidicolin in HEp-2 cells suggested that the involvement of DNA polymerase α in UDS favored DNA synthesis in the intranucleosomal region. (author)

  3. Phosphoramide mustard exposure induces DNA adduct formation and the DNA damage repair response in rat ovarian granulosa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganesan, Shanthi, E-mail: shanthig@iastate.edu; Keating, Aileen F., E-mail: akeating@iastate.edu

    2015-02-01

    Phosphoramide mustard (PM), the ovotoxic metabolite of the anti-cancer agent cyclophosphamide (CPA), destroys rapidly dividing cells by forming NOR-G-OH, NOR-G and G-NOR-G adducts with DNA, potentially leading to DNA damage. A previous study demonstrated that PM induces ovarian DNA damage in rat ovaries. To investigate whether PM induces DNA adduct formation, DNA damage and induction of the DNA repair response, rat spontaneously immortalized granulosa cells (SIGCs) were treated with vehicle control (1% DMSO) or PM (3 or 6 μM) for 24 or 48 h. Cell viability was reduced (P < 0.05) after 48 h of exposure to 3 or 6 μM PM. The NOR-G-OH DNA adduct was detected after 24 h of 6 μM PM exposure, while the more cytotoxic G-NOR-G DNA adduct was formed after 48 h by exposure to both PM concentrations. Phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX), a marker of DNA double stranded break occurrence, was also increased by PM exposure, coincident with DNA adduct formation. Additionally, induction of genes (Atm, Parp1, Prkdc, Xrcc6, and Brca1) and proteins (ATM, γH2AX, PARP-1, PRKDC, XRCC6, and BRCA1) involved in DNA repair were observed in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. These data support that PM induces DNA adduct formation in ovarian granulosa cells, induces DNA damage and elicits the ovarian DNA repair response. - Highlights: • PM forms ovarian DNA adducts. • DNA damage marker γH2AX increased by PM exposure. • PM induces ovarian DNA double strand break repair.

  4. DNA repair in Mycobacterium tuberculosis revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Vultos, Tiago; Mestre, Olga; Tonjum, Tone; Gicquel, Brigitte

    2009-05-01

    Our understanding of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA repair mechanisms is still poor compared with that of other bacterial organisms. However, the publication of the first complete M. tuberculosis genome sequence 10 years ago boosted the study of DNA repair systems in this organism. A first step in the elucidation of M. tuberculosis DNA repair mechanisms was taken by Mizrahi and Andersen, who identified homologs of genes involved in the reversal or repair of DNA damage in Escherichia coli and related organisms. Genes required for nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair, recombination, and SOS repair and mutagenesis were identified. Notably, no homologs of genes involved in mismatch repair were identified. Novel characteristics of the M. tuberculosis DNA repair machinery have been found over the last decade, such as nonhomologous end joining, the presence of Mpg, ERCC3 and Hlr - proteins previously presumed to be produced exclusively in mammalian cells - and the recently discovered bifunctional dCTP deaminase:dUTPase. The study of these systems is important to develop therapeutic agents that can counteract M. tuberculosis evolutionary changes and to prevent adaptive events resulting in antibiotic resistance. This review summarizes our current understanding of the M. tuberculosis DNA repair system.

  5. Relevance of extracellular DNA in rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietramellara, Giacomo; Ascher, Judith; Baraniya, Divyashri; Arfaioli, Paola; Ceccherini, Maria Teresa; Hawes, Martha

    2013-04-01

    One of the most promising areas for future development is the manipulation of the rhizosphere to produce sustainable and efficient agriculture production systems. Using Omics approaches, to define the distinctive features of eDNA systems and structures, will facilitate progress in rhizo-enforcement and biocontrol studies. The relevance of these studies results clear when we consider the plethora of ecological functions in which eDNA is involved. This fraction can be actively extruded by living cells or discharged during cellular lysis and may exert a key role in the stability and variability of the soil bacterial genome, resulting also a source of nitrogen and phosphorus for plants due to the root's capacity to directly uptake short DNA fragments. The adhesive properties of the DNA molecule confer to eDNA the capacity to inhibit or kill pathogenic bacteria by cation limitation induction, and to facilitate formation of biofilm and extracellular traps (ETs), that may protect microorganisms inhabiting biofilm and plant roots against pathogens and allelopathic substances. The ETs are actively extruded by root border cells when they are dispersed in the rhizosphere, conferring to plants the capacity to extend an endogenous pathogen defence system outside the organism. Moreover, eDNA could be involved in rhizoremediation in heavy metal polluted soil acting as a bioflotation reagent.

  6. JOINT INVOLVEMENT IN SYPHILIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Zlobina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Joint involvement in syphilis has been considered as casuistry in recent years. At the same time, the high incidence of primary syphilis and the notified cases of late neurosyphilis may suggest that joint involvement in this disease is by no means always verified. Traditionally there are two forms of syphilitic arthritis: primary synovial (involving the articular membranes and sac and primary bone (involving the articular bones and cartilages ones. The paper describes the authors' clinical case of the primary bone form of articular syphilis in a 34-year-old man. 

  7. DNA Tumor Virus Regulation of Host DNA Methylation and Its Implications for Immune Evasion and Oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuss-Duerkop, Sharon K; Westrich, Joseph A; Pyeon, Dohun

    2018-02-13

    Viruses have evolved various mechanisms to evade host immunity and ensure efficient viral replication and persistence. Several DNA tumor viruses modulate host DNA methyltransferases for epigenetic dysregulation of immune-related gene expression in host cells. The host immune responses suppressed by virus-induced aberrant DNA methylation are also frequently involved in antitumor immune responses. Here, we describe viral mechanisms and virus-host interactions by which DNA tumor viruses regulate host DNA methylation to evade antiviral immunity, which may contribute to the generation of an immunosuppressive microenvironment during cancer development. Recent trials of immunotherapies have shown promising results to treat multiple cancers; however, a significant number of non-responders necessitate identifying additional targets for cancer immunotherapies. Thus, understanding immune evasion mechanisms of cancer-causing viruses may provide great insights for reversing immune suppression to prevent and treat associated cancers.

  8. DNA Tumor Virus Regulation of Host DNA Methylation and Its Implications for Immune Evasion and Oncogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon K. Kuss-Duerkop

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Viruses have evolved various mechanisms to evade host immunity and ensure efficient viral replication and persistence. Several DNA tumor viruses modulate host DNA methyltransferases for epigenetic dysregulation of immune-related gene expression in host cells. The host immune responses suppressed by virus-induced aberrant DNA methylation are also frequently involved in antitumor immune responses. Here, we describe viral mechanisms and virus–host interactions by which DNA tumor viruses regulate host DNA methylation to evade antiviral immunity, which may contribute to the generation of an immunosuppressive microenvironment during cancer development. Recent trials of immunotherapies have shown promising results to treat multiple cancers; however, a significant number of non-responders necessitate identifying additional targets for cancer immunotherapies. Thus, understanding immune evasion mechanisms of cancer-causing viruses may provide great insights for reversing immune suppression to prevent and treat associated cancers.

  9. Mitochondrial DNA levels in Huntington disease leukocytes and dermal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jędrak, Paulina; Krygier, Magdalena; Tońska, Katarzyna; Drozd, Małgorzata; Kaliszewska, Magdalena; Bartnik, Ewa; Sołtan, Witold; Sitek, Emilia J; Stanisławska-Sachadyn, Anna; Limon, Janusz; Sławek, Jarosław; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Barańska, Sylwia

    2017-08-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the huntingtin gene. Involvement of mitochondrial dysfunctions in, and especially influence of the level of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) on, development of this disease is unclear. Here, samples of blood from 84 HD patients and 79 controls, and dermal fibroblasts from 10 HD patients and 9 controls were analysed for mtDNA levels. Although the type of mitochondrial haplogroup had no influence on the mtDNA level, and there was no correlation between mtDNA level in leukocytes in HD patients and various parameters of HD severity, some considerable differences between HD patients and controls were identified. The average mtDNA/nDNA relative copy number was significantly higher in leukocytes, but lower in fibroblasts, of symptomatic HD patients relative to the control group. Moreover, HD women displayed higher mtDNA levels in leukocytes than HD men. Because this is the largest population analysed to date, these results might contribute to explanation of discrepancies between previously published studies concerning levels of mtDNA in cells of HD patients. We suggest that the size of the investigated population and type of cells from which DNA is isolated could significantly affect results of mtDNA copy number estimation in HD. Hence, these parameters should be taken into consideration in studies on mtDNA in HD, and perhaps also in other diseases where mitochondrial dysfunction occurs.

  10. The relationship of transcription and repair of radioinduced DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhestyanikov, V.D.; Igusheva, O.A.

    1997-01-01

    The data are discussed which has become a basement of such important findings as involvement of transcription into repair or existence of transcription-coupling repair factors. Thymine glycols which are appear under ionizing radiation exposure, are repaired preferentially in transcribed DNA. In present review the preferential repair of ionizing radiation-induced singlestrand breaks (SSBa) in transcribed DNA of human cells. Discontinuous distribution of DNA repair along hole genome has a grate role in biological processes

  11. Induced Polarization Influences the Fundamental Forces in DNA Base Flipping

    OpenAIRE

    Lemkul, Justin A.; Savelyev, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2014-01-01

    Base flipping in DNA is an important process involved in genomic repair and epigenetic control of gene expression. The driving forces for these processes are not fully understood, especially in the context of the underlying dynamics of the DNA and solvent effects. We studied double-stranded DNA oligomers that have been previously characterized by imino proton exchange NMR using both additive and polarizable force fields. Our results highlight the importance of induced polarization on the base...

  12. A DNA barcode for land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-04

    DNA barcoding involves sequencing a standard region of DNA as a tool for species identification. However, there has been no agreement on which region(s) should be used for barcoding land plants. To provide a community recommendation on a standard plant barcode, we have compared the performance of 7 leading candidate plastid DNA regions (atpF-atpH spacer, matK gene, rbcL gene, rpoB gene, rpoC1 gene, psbK-psbI spacer, and trnH-psbA spacer). Based on assessments of recoverability, sequence quality, and levels of species discrimination, we recommend the 2-locus combination of rbcL+matK as the plant barcode. This core 2-locus barcode will provide a universal framework for the routine use of DNA sequence data to identify specimens and contribute toward the discovery of overlooked species of land plants.

  13. Regulation Mechanism of HBV cccDNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Jun

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Covalently closed circular (ccc DNA of hepatitis B virus (HBV existed in the nuclei of HBV infected hepatocytes with a half-life time of 14.3 years in a mathematic model. Viral protein feedback regulation in HBV life cycle to maintain vital viral replication is an important mechanism. Interleukin-6, epithelial growth factor, heme oxygenase-1, histones, and hepatocyte nuclear factors are demonstrated as the key regulators for HBV life cycle. CpG island structure and methylation status are involved in the regulation of HBV DNA replication. Nucleos(tide analogues are widely used in the clinical practice for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B patients, although no evidence indicating a direct inhibiton of HBV cccDNA. In the future, along with the study of HBV life cycle, new drugs including RNA interference technique, will pave the way to eliminate the HBV cccDNA from infected hepatocytes resulting final cure of chronic hepatitis B.

  14. A DNA barcode for land plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Peter M.; Forrest, Laura L.; Spouge, John L.; Hajibabaei, Mehrdad; Ratnasingham, Sujeevan; van der Bank, Michelle; Chase, Mark W.; Cowan, Robyn S.; Erickson, David L.; Fazekas, Aron J.; Graham, Sean W.; James, Karen E.; Kim, Ki-Joong; Kress, W. John; Schneider, Harald; van AlphenStahl, Jonathan; Barrett, Spencer C.H.; van den Berg, Cassio; Bogarin, Diego; Burgess, Kevin S.; Cameron, Kenneth M.; Carine, Mark; Chacón, Juliana; Clark, Alexandra; Clarkson, James J.; Conrad, Ferozah; Devey, Dion S.; Ford, Caroline S.; Hedderson, Terry A.J.; Hollingsworth, Michelle L.; Husband, Brian C.; Kelly, Laura J.; Kesanakurti, Prasad R.; Kim, Jung Sung; Kim, Young-Dong; Lahaye, Renaud; Lee, Hae-Lim; Long, David G.; Madriñán, Santiago; Maurin, Olivier; Meusnier, Isabelle; Newmaster, Steven G.; Park, Chong-Wook; Percy, Diana M.; Petersen, Gitte; Richardson, James E.; Salazar, Gerardo A.; Savolainen, Vincent; Seberg, Ole; Wilkinson, Michael J.; Yi, Dong-Keun; Little, Damon P.

    2009-01-01

    DNA barcoding involves sequencing a standard region of DNA as a tool for species identification. However, there has been no agreement on which region(s) should be used for barcoding land plants. To provide a community recommendation on a standard plant barcode, we have compared the performance of 7 leading candidate plastid DNA regions (atpF–atpH spacer, matK gene, rbcL gene, rpoB gene, rpoC1 gene, psbK–psbI spacer, and trnH–psbA spacer). Based on assessments of recoverability, sequence quality, and levels of species discrimination, we recommend the 2-locus combination of rbcL+matK as the plant barcode. This core 2-locus barcode will provide a universal framework for the routine use of DNA sequence data to identify specimens and contribute toward the discovery of overlooked species of land plants. PMID:19666622

  15. Evaluation of genotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of ions chelator Fe{sup 2+} (2,2'-dipyridyl) and of Cu{sup 2+}(neocuproine), in Escherichia coli: involvement of DNA repair mechanisms in the bacteria survival; Avaliacao da genotoxicidade induzida pelo peroxido de hidrogenio na presenca dos quelantes de ions Fe{sup 2+} (2,2'-dipiridil) e de ions Cu{sup 2+} (neocuproina), em Escherichia coli: envolvimento de mecanismos de reparo de DNA na sobrevivencia bacteriana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Carlos Eduardo Bonacossa de

    1998-07-01

    Prior incubation of the E. coli cultures with the iron ions chelator 2,2'-dipyridyl (1 mM) caused an intensification of the lethality and the mutagenesis induced by the hydrogen peroxide, mainly at high concentrations (20 mM). It was also detected an enhancement of DNA strand breaks in this condition. The addition of the copper ions chelator neocuproine blocked partially this phenomenon. The enzymes XthA and Nfo act alternatively in the repair of the lesions induced by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in the presence of 2,2'-dipyridyl. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} can act synergistically with neocuproine in killing E. coli, causing an enhancement in DNA strand breaks. The recombinational repair, the UvrABC excinuclease and Fpg function appeared to participate in the repair of the synergistic lesions. (author)

  16. DNA repair mechanisms in cancer development and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgovnick, Alessandro; Schumacher, Björn

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage has been long recognized as causal factor for cancer development. When erroneous DNA repair leads to mutations or chromosomal aberrations affecting oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, cells undergo malignant transformation resulting in cancerous growth. Genetic defects can predispose to cancer: mutations in distinct DNA repair systems elevate the susceptibility to various cancer types. However, DNA damage not only comprises a root cause for cancer development but also continues to provide an important avenue for chemo- and radiotherapy. Since the beginning of cancer therapy, genotoxic agents that trigger DNA damage checkpoints have been applied to halt the growth and trigger the apoptotic demise of cancer cells. We provide an overview about the involvement of DNA repair systems in cancer prevention and the classes of genotoxins that are commonly used for the treatment of cancer. A better understanding of the roles and interactions of the highly complex DNA repair machineries will lead to important improvements in cancer therapy.

  17. DNA Repair Mechanisms in Cancer Development and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro eTorgovnick

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage has been long recognized as causal factor for cancer development. When erroneous DNA repair leads to mutations or chromosomal aberrations affecting oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, cells undergo malignant transformation resulting in cancerous growth. Genetic defects can predispose to cancer: Mutations in distinct DNA repair systems elevate the susceptibility to various cancer types. However, DNA damage not only comprises a root cause for cancer development but also continues to provide an important avenue for chemo- and radiotherapy. Since the beginning of cancer therapy, genotoxic agents have been applied that trigger DNA damage checkpoints that halt the growth and trigger the apoptotic demise of cancer cells. We provide an overview about the involvement of DNA repair systems in cancer prevention and the classes of genotoxins that are commonly used for the treatment of cancer. A better understanding of the roles and interactions of the highly complex DNA repair machineries will lead to important improvements in cancer therapy.

  18. Polymorphism and mutation analysis of genomic DNA on cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Tsutomu

    2003-01-01

    DNA repair is a universal process in living cells that maintains the structural integrity of chromosomal DNA molecules in face of damage. A deficiency in DNA damage repair is associated with an increased cancer risk by increasing a mutation frequency of cancer-related genes. Variation in DNA repair capacity may be genetically determined. Therefore, we searched single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in major DNA repair genes. This led to the finding of 600 SNPs and mutations including many novel SNPs in Japanese population. Case-control studies to explore the contribution of the SNPs in DNA repair genes to the risk of lung cancer revealed that five SNPs are associated with lung carcinogenesis. One of these SNPs is found in RAD54L gene, which is involved in double-strand DNA repair. We analyzed and reported activities of Rad54L protein with SNP and mutations. (authors)

  19. Structure of the Cpf1 endonuclease R-loop complex after target DNA cleavage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stella, Stefano; Alcón, Pablo; Montoya, Guillermo

    2017-01-01

    involved in DNA unwinding to form a CRISPR RNA (crRNA)-DNA hybrid and a displaced DNA strand. The protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) is recognized by the PAM-interacting domain. The loop-lysine helix-loop motif in this domain contains three conserved lysine residues that are inserted in a dentate manner...... and the crRNA-DNA hybrid, avoiding DNA re-annealing. Mutations in key residues reveal a mechanism linking the PAM and DNA nuclease sites. Analysis of the Cpf1 structures proposes a singular working model of RNA-guided DNA cleavage, suggesting new avenues for redesign of Cpf1....

  20. Parent Involvement Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Arna

    This handbook on parent involvement, designed to be used with preschool programs, was developed by the Jefferson County Public Schools in Lakewood, Colorado. Included are: (1) a general statement about parent involvement in an early childhood program, (2) a description of the Jefferson County Early Childhood Program, (3) a description of the…

  1. The Involved Ostrich

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Andrea; Dobscha, Susan; Geiger, Susi

    2008-01-01

    that the transition into parenthood can be difficult for men due to their lack of a physical connection to the pregnancy, a perception that the baby industry is not designed for them, the continuance of male stereotypes in the media, and also the time available to men to become involved in consumption activities......-natal data. Data revealed that men, according to their partner’s perceptions, used consumption as a virtual umbilical cord, although levels of consumption involvement varied from co-involvement for most purchases, to limited involvement, and/or involvement for ‘large’ items, particularly travel systems...... and technical items. This research also revealed that men partook in highly masculinized forms of “nesting,” and in general shunned pregnancy book reading; although some did engage in “research” activities such as searching the internet for product safety information. We conclude from this study...

  2. Beyond DNA repair: DNA-PK function in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Goodwin, Jonathan F.; Knudsen, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a pivotal component of the DNA repair machinery that governs the response to DNA damage, serving to maintain genome integrity. However, the DNA-PK kinase component was initially isolated with transcriptional complexes, and recent findings have illuminated the impact of DNA-PK-mediated transcriptional regulation on tumor progression and therapeutic response. DNA-PK expression has also been correlated with poor outcome in selected tumor types, furthe...

  3. The logic of DNA replication in double-stranded DNA viruses: insights from global analysis of viral genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazlauskas, Darius; Krupovic, Mart; Venclovas, Česlovas

    2016-06-02

    Genomic DNA replication is a complex process that involves multiple proteins. Cellular DNA replication systems are broadly classified into only two types, bacterial and archaeo-eukaryotic. In contrast, double-stranded (ds) DNA viruses feature a much broader diversity of DNA replication machineries. Viruses differ greatly in both completeness and composition of their sets of DNA replication proteins. In this study, we explored whether there are common patterns underlying this extreme diversity. We identified and analyzed all major functional groups of DNA replication proteins in all available proteomes of dsDNA viruses. Our results show that some proteins are common to viruses infecting all domains of life and likely represent components of the ancestral core set. These include B-family polymerases, SF3 helicases, archaeo-eukaryotic primases, clamps and clamp loaders of the archaeo-eukaryotic type, RNase H and ATP-dependent DNA ligases. We also discovered a clear correlation between genome size and self-sufficiency of viral DNA replication, the unanticipated dominance of replicative helicases and pervasive functional associations among certain groups of DNA replication proteins. Altogether, our results provide a comprehensive view on the diversity and evolution of replication systems in the DNA virome and uncover fundamental principles underlying the orchestration of viral DNA replication. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. DNA polymerase-beta is expressed early in neurons of Alzheimer's disease brain and is loaded into DNA replication forks in neurons challenged with beta-amyloid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Copani, Agata; Hoozemans, Jeroen J. M.; Caraci, Filippo; Calafiore, Marco; van Haastert, Elise S.; Veerhuis, Robert; Rozemuller, Annemieke J. M.; Aronica, Eleonora; Sortino, Maria Angela; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2006-01-01

    Cultured neurons exposed to synthetic beta-amyloid (Abeta) fragments reenter the cell cycle and initiate a pathway of DNA replication that involves the repair enzyme DNA polymerase-beta (DNA pol-beta) before undergoing apoptotic death. In this study, by performing coimmunoprecipitation experiments

  5. RNA Study Using DNA Nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadakuma, Hisashi; Masubuchi, Takeya; Ueda, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    Transcription is one of the fundamental steps of gene expression, where RNA polymerases (RNAPs) bind to their template genes and make RNAs. In addition to RNAP and the template gene, many molecules such as transcription factors are involved. The interaction and the effect of these factors depend on the geometry. Molecular layout of these factors, RNAP and gene is thus important. DNA nanotechnology is a promising technology that allows controlling of the molecular layout in the range of nanometer to micrometer scale with nanometer resolution; thus, it is expected to expand the RNA study beyond the current limit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. cDNA structure, genomic organization and expression patterns of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Visfatin was a newly identified adipocytokine, which was involved in various physiologic and pathologic processes of organisms. The cDNA structure, genomic organization and expression patterns of silver Prussian carp visfatin were described in this report. The silver Prussian carp visfatin cDNA cloned from the liver was ...

  7. LAMMPS Framework for Dynamic Bonding and an Application Modeling DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svaneborg, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    and bond types. When breaking bonds, all angular and dihedral interactions involving broken bonds are removed. The framework allows chemical reactions to be modeled, and use it to simulate a simplistic, coarse-grained DNA model. The resulting DNA dynamics illustrates the power of the present framework....

  8. DNA Cleavage Activity of Diazonium Salts: Chemical Nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    KIZIL, Murat

    2014-01-01

    4-Fenoldiazonium tetrafluoroborate and 4-benzoicaciddiazonium tetrafluoroborate was prepared and was shown to be an effective DNA cleavage agent in the presence of the 1-electron donor copper(II) chloride. Its mechanism involves the generation of the aryl radical cleaving DNA by hydrogen atom abstraction from deoxyribose sugar.

  9. Rapid DNA extraction of bacterial genome using laundry detergents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-03

    Jan 3, 2012 ... Genomic DNA extraction from bacterial cells involves processes normally performed in most biological laboratories. Therefore, various methods have been offered, manually and kit, but these methods may be time consuming and costly. In this paper, genomic DNA extraction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ...

  10. Toward efficient modification of large gold nanoparticles with DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gill, R.; Göeken, Kristian L; Subramaniam, V.

    2014-01-01

    DNA-coated gold nanoparticles are one of the most researched nano-bio hybrid systems. Traditionally their synthesis has been a long and tedious process, involving slow salt addition and long incubation steps. This stems from the fact that both DNA and gold particles are negatively charged, therefore

  11. Rapid DNA extraction of bacterial genome using laundry detergents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genomic DNA extraction from bacterial cells involves processes normally performed in most biological laboratories. Therefore, various methods have been offered, manually and kit, but these methods may be time consuming and costly. In this paper, genomic DNA extraction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated ...

  12. Uncoupling of Sister Replisomes during Eukaryotic DNA Replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yardimci, Hasan; Loveland, Anna B.; Habuchi, Satoshi; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Walter, Johannes C.

    2010-01-01

    The duplication of eukaryotic genomes involves the replication of DNA from multiple origins of replication. In S phase, two sister replisomes assemble at each active origin, and they replicate DNA in opposite directions. Little is known about the functional relationship between sister replisomes.

  13. Comparison of protocols for genomic DNA extraction from 'velame ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    usuario

    2013-07-24

    Jul 24, 2013 ... involving C. linearifolius, we compared the efficiency of six protocols for genomic DNA extraction previously ... phytic, with diverse aspect and floristics, average rainfall between ..... The variation observed for DNA concentrations estimated with .... performed with protocol 1 (data not shown), or still, bands.

  14. Eukaryotic DNA Replication Fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgers, Peter M J; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2017-06-20

    This review focuses on the biogenesis and composition of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork, with an emphasis on the enzymes that synthesize DNA and repair discontinuities on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Physical and genetic methodologies aimed at understanding these processes are discussed. The preponderance of evidence supports a model in which DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) carries out the bulk of leading strand DNA synthesis at an undisturbed replication fork. DNA polymerases α and δ carry out the initiation of Okazaki fragment synthesis and its elongation and maturation, respectively. This review also discusses alternative proposals, including cellular processes during which alternative forks may be utilized, and new biochemical studies with purified proteins that are aimed at reconstituting leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis separately and as an integrated replication fork.

  15. The DnaA N-terminal domain interacts with Hda to facilitate replicase clamp-mediated inactivation of DnaA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su'etsugu, Masayuki; Harada, Yuji; Keyamura, Kenji; Matsunaga, Chika; Kasho, Kazutoshi; Abe, Yoshito; Ueda, Tadashi; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2013-12-01

    DnaA activity for replication initiation of the Escherichia coli chromosome is negatively regulated by feedback from the DNA-loaded form of the replicase clamp. In this process, called RIDA (regulatory inactivation of DnaA), ATP-bound DnaA transiently assembles into a complex consisting of Hda and the DNA-clamp, which promotes inter-AAA+ domain association between Hda and DnaA and stimulates hydrolysis of DnaA-bound ATP, producing inactive ADP-DnaA. Using a truncated DnaA mutant, we previously demonstrated that the DnaA N-terminal domain is involved in RIDA. However, the precise role of the N-terminal domain in RIDA has remained largely unclear. Here, we used an in vitro reconstituted system to demonstrate that the Asn-44 residue in the N-terminal domain of DnaA is crucial for RIDA but not for replication initiation. Moreover, an assay termed PDAX (pull-down after cross-linking) revealed an unstable interaction between a DnaA-N44A mutant and Hda. In vivo, this mutant exhibited an increase in the cellular level of ATP-bound DnaA. These results establish a model in which interaction between DnaA Asn-44 and Hda stabilizes the association between the AAA+ domains of DnaA and Hda to facilitate DnaA-ATP hydrolysis during RIDA. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. DNA repair and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathore, Shakuntla; Joshi, Pankaj Kumar; Gaur, Sudha

    2012-01-01

    DNA repair refers to a collection of processes by which a cell identifies and corrects damage to the DNA molecule that encode it's genome. In human cells, both normal metabolic activities and environmental factors such as UV light and radiation can cause DNA damage, resulting in as many one million individual molecular lesions per day. Many of these lesions cause structural damage to the DNA molecule and can alter or eliminate the cell's ability to transcribe the gene that the affected DNA encodes. Other lesions include potentially harmful mutation in cell's genome which affect the survival of it's daughter cells after it undergoes mitosis. As a consequence, the DNA repair process is constantly active as it responds to damage in the DNA structure. Inherited mutation that affect DNA repair genes are strongly associated with high cancer risks in humans. Hereditary non polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is strongly associated with specific mutation in the DNA mismatch repair pathway. BRCA1, BRCA2 two famous mutation conferring a hugely increased risk of breast cancer on carrier, are both associated with a large number of DNA repair pathway, especially NHEJ and homologous recombination. Cancer therapy procedures such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy work by overwhelming the capacity of the cell to repair DNA damage, resulting in cell death. Cells that are most rapidly dividing most typically cancer cells are preferentially affected. The side effect is that other non-cancerous but rapidly dividing cells such as stem cells in the bone marrow are also affected. Modern cancer treatment attempt to localize the DNA damage to cells and tissue only associated with cancer, either by physical means (concentrating the therapeutic agent in the region of the tumor) or by biochemical means (exploiting a feature unique to cancer cells in the body). (author)

  17. IDEA and Family Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Emin Öztürk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA gives many rights to parents with special needs in terms of involvement and participation. Given the importance of family involvement in the special education process, and federal legislation that increasingly mandated and supported such involvement over time, considerable research has focused on the multiple ways that relationships between schools and families in the special education decision making process have played out. Educational professionals should create a positive climate for CLD families so that they feel more comfortable and therefore are able to participate more authentically and meaningfully.

  18. Hysteresis in pressure-driven DNA denaturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Hernández-Lemus

    Full Text Available In the past, a great deal of attention has been drawn to thermal driven denaturation processes. In recent years, however, the discovery of stress-induced denaturation, observed at the one-molecule level, has revealed new insights into the complex phenomena involved in the thermo-mechanics of DNA function. Understanding the effect of local pressure variations in DNA stability is thus an appealing topic. Such processes as cellular stress, dehydration, and changes in the ionic strength of the medium could explain local pressure changes that will affect the molecular mechanics of DNA and hence its stability. In this work, a theory that accounts for hysteresis in pressure-driven DNA denaturation is proposed. We here combine an irreversible thermodynamic approach with an equation of state based on the Poisson-Boltzmann cell model. The latter one provides a good description of the osmotic pressure over a wide range of DNA concentrations. The resulting theoretical framework predicts, in general, the process of denaturation and, in particular, hysteresis curves for a DNA sequence in terms of system parameters such as salt concentration, density of DNA molecules and temperature in addition to structural and configurational states of DNA. Furthermore, this formalism can be naturally extended to more complex situations, for example, in cases where the host medium is made up of asymmetric salts or in the description of the (helical-like charge distribution along the DNA molecule. Moreover, since this study incorporates the effect of pressure through a thermodynamic analysis, much of what is known from temperature-driven experiments will shed light on the pressure-induced melting issue.

  19. Nonisotopic DNA probe techniques

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kricka, Larry J

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this book is to bring together descriptions of the principal nonisotopic methods for DNA hybridization assays, together with experimental details of the methods, including labelling...

  20. DNA replication and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyer, Anne-Sophie; Walter, David; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    A dividing cell has to duplicate its DNA precisely once during the cell cycle to preserve genome integrity avoiding the accumulation of genetic aberrations that promote diseases such as cancer. A large number of endogenous impacts can challenge DNA replication and cells harbor a battery of pathways...... causing DNA replication stress and genome instability. Further, we describe cellular and systemic responses to these insults with a focus on DNA replication restart pathways. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of exploiting intrinsic replicative stress in cancer cells for targeted therapy....

  1. Forensic DNA testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, John M

    2011-12-01

    Forensic DNA testing has a number of applications, including parentage testing, identifying human remains from natural or man-made disasters or terrorist attacks, and solving crimes. This article provides background information followed by an overview of the process of forensic DNA testing, including sample collection, DNA extraction, PCR amplification, short tandem repeat (STR) allele separation and sizing, typing and profile interpretation, statistical analysis, and quality assurance. The article concludes with discussions of possible problems with the data and other forensic DNA testing techniques.

  2. Structure of DNA toroids and electrostatic attraction of DNA duplexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherstvy, A G

    2005-01-01

    DNA-DNA electrostatic attraction is considered as the driving force for the formation of DNA toroids in the presence of DNA condensing cations. This attraction comes from the DNA helical charge distribution and favours hexagonal toroidal cross-sections. The latter is in agreement with recent cryo-electron microscopy studies on DNA condensed with cobalt hexammine. We treat the DNA-DNA interactions within the modern theory of electrostatic interaction between helical macromolecules. The size and thickness of the toroids is calculated within a simple model; other models of stability of DNA toroids are discussed and compared

  3. Multifluorophore DNA Origami Beacon as a Biosensing Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selnihhin, Denis; Sparvath, Steffen Møller; Preus, Søren

    2018-01-01

    -based sensors are limited by cumbersome and time-consuming readouts involving advanced experimental techniques. Here we describe design, construction, and characterization of an optical DNA origami nanobiosensor device exploiting arrays of precisely positioned organic fluorophores. Two arrays of donor...

  4. DNA cleavage agents from Schisandra propinqua var. sinensis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-15

    Sep 15, 2009 ... 2Engineering Research Center of Sustainable Development and Utilization of Biomass Energy, Ministry of ... DNA strand breakage process is involved in various bio- ..... Bioactive prenylated flavonoids from the stem bark.

  5. Decoding Non-Coding DNA: Trash or Treasure?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    that proteins, being the effector molecules of a cell, would determine ... value paradox states that the amount of cellular DNA is not ... They are also involved in nu- ... fold/matrix attachment regions (S/MARs). .... tumor suppressor gene PTEN.

  6. Parental Involvement in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstone, Tessa

    1979-01-01

    Arguments in favor of increased parental involvement, particularly in nursery education, are presented. Opposition to participation from parents and teachers is discussed and specific areas in which cooperation might be possible are suggested along with different levels of participation. (JMF)

  7. A mechanism of gene amplification driven by small DNA fragments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuntal Mukherjee

    Full Text Available DNA amplification is a molecular process that increases the copy number of a chromosomal tract and often causes elevated expression of the amplified gene(s. Although gene amplification is frequently observed in cancer and other degenerative disorders, the molecular mechanisms involved in the process of DNA copy number increase remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that small DNA fragments could be the trigger of DNA amplification events. Following our findings that small fragments of DNA in the form of DNA oligonucleotides can be highly recombinogenic, we have developed a system in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to capture events of chromosomal DNA amplification initiated by small DNA fragments. Here we demonstrate that small DNAs can amplify a chromosomal region, generating either tandem duplications or acentric extrachromosomal DNA circles. Small fragment-driven DNA amplification (SFDA occurs with a frequency that increases with the length of homology between the small DNAs and the target chromosomal regions. SFDA events are triggered even by small single-stranded molecules with as little as 20-nt homology with the genomic target. A double-strand break (DSB external to the chromosomal amplicon region stimulates the amplification event up to a factor of 20 and favors formation of extrachromosomal circles. SFDA is dependent on Rad52 and Rad59, partially dependent on Rad1, Rad10, and Pol32, and independent of Rad51, suggesting a single-strand annealing mechanism. Our results reveal a novel molecular model for gene amplification, in which small DNA fragments drive DNA amplification and define the boundaries of the amplicon region. As DNA fragments are frequently found both inside cells and in the extracellular environment, such as the serum of patients with cancer or other degenerative disorders, we propose that SFDA may be a common mechanism for DNA amplification in cancer cells, as well as a more general cause of DNA copy number variation

  8. Mutagenesis and repair of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janion, C.; Grzesiuk, E.; Fabisiewicz, A.; Tudek, B.; Ciesla, J.; Graziewicz, M.; Wojcik, A.; Speina, E.

    1998-01-01

    Full text. The discovery that the mfd gene codes for a transcription-coupling repair factor (TRCF) prompted us to re-investigate the MFD (mutation frequency decline) phenomenon in E.coli K-12 strain when mutations were induced by ultraviolet light, halogen light or MMS-treatment. These studies revealed that: (i) the process of MFD involves the proofreading activity of DNA pol III and the mismatch repair system, as well as, TRCF and the UvrABC-excinuclease (ii) a semi-rich plate test may be replaced by a rich liquid medium, (iii) the T-T pyrimidine dimers are the lesions excised with the highest activity, and (iv) overproduction of UmuD(D'C) proteins leads to a great increase in mutant frequency in irradiated and MMS-treated cells. The role of mismatch repair (MR) in MMS-induced mutagenesis is obscured by the fact that the spectra of mutational specificity are different in bacteria proficient and deficient in MR. It has been found that transposons Tn10 (and Tn5) when inserted into chromosomal DNA of E. coli influence the phenotype lowering the survival and frequency of mutations induced by UV or halogen light irradiation. This is connected with a deficiency of UmuD(D') and UmuC proteins. Transformation of bacteria with plasmids bearing the umuD(D')C genes, suppresses the effects of the transposon insertion, a phenomenon which has not been described before. Single-stranded DNA of M13mp18 phage was oxidized in vitro by a hydroxyl radical generating system including hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase/Fe3+/EDTA, and it was found that Fapy-Ade, Fapy-Gua, 8-oxyAde and thymine glycol were the main products formed. Replication of the oxidized template by T7 phage DNA polymerase, Klenow fragment of polymerase I, or polymerase beta from bovine thymus has revealed that oxidized pyrimidines are stronger blockers than oxidized purines for T7 phage and Klenow fragment polymerases and the blocking potency depends on the neighboring bases and on the type of polymerase. Studies of

  9. A model for the mechanism of strand passage by DNA gyrase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampranis, S C; Bates, A D; Maxwell, A

    1999-01-01

    this mechanism by probing the topology of the bound DNA segment at distinct steps of the catalytic cycle. We propose a model in which gyrase captures a contiguous DNA segment with high probability, irrespective of the superhelical density of the DNA substrate, setting up an equilibrium of the transported segment......The mechanism of type II DNA topoisomerases involves the formation of an enzyme-operated gate in one double-stranded DNA segment and the passage of another segment through this gate. DNA gyrase is the only type II topoisomerase able to introduce negative supercoils into DNA, a feature that requires...... the enzyme to dictate the directionality of strand passage. Although it is known that this is a consequence of the characteristic wrapping of DNA by gyrase, the detailed mechanism by which the transported DNA segment is captured and directed through the DNA gate is largely unknown. We have addressed...

  10. Fanconi anemia: a disorder defective in the DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitao, Hiroyuki; Takata, Minoru

    2011-04-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a cancer predisposition disorder characterized by progressive bone marrow failure, congenital developmental defects, chromosomal abnormalities, and cellular hypersensitivity to DNA interstrand crosslink (ICL) agents. So far mutations in 14 FANC genes were identified in FA or FA-like patients. These gene products constitute a common ubiquitin-phosphorylation network called the "FA pathway" and cooperate with other proteins involved in DNA repair and cell cycle control to repair ICL lesions and to maintain genome stability. In this review, we summarize recent exciting discoveries that have expanded our view of the molecular mechanisms operating in DNA repair and DNA damage signaling.

  11. DNA methylation abnormalities in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Juhé, Clara; Cuscó, Ivon; Homs, Aïda; Flores, Raquel; Torán, Núria; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects represent the most common malformation at birth, occurring also in ∼50% of individuals with Down syndrome. Congenital heart defects are thought to have multifactorial etiology, but the main causes are largely unknown. We have explored the global methylation profile of fetal heart DNA in comparison to blood DNA from control subjects: an absolute correlation with the type of tissue was detected. Pathway analysis revealed a significant enrichment of differential methylation at genes related to muscle contraction and cardiomyopathies in the developing heart DNA. We have also searched for abnormal methylation profiles on developing heart-tissue DNA of syndromic and non-syndromic congenital heart defects. On average, 3 regions with aberrant methylation were detected per sample and 18 regions were found differentially methylated between groups. Several epimutations were detected in candidate genes involved in growth regulation, apoptosis and folate pathway. A likely pathogenic hypermethylation of several intragenic sites at the MSX1 gene, involved in outflow tract morphogenesis, was found in a fetus with isolated heart malformation. In addition, hypermethylation of the GATA4 gene was present in fetuses with Down syndrome with or without congenital heart defects, as well as in fetuses with isolated heart malformations. Expression deregulation of the abnormally methylated genes was detected. Our data indicate that epigenetic alterations of relevant genes are present in developing heart DNA in fetuses with both isolated and syndromic heart malformations. These epimutations likely contribute to the pathogenesis of the malformation by cis-acting effects on gene expression.

  12. Extended DNA Tile Actuators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Martin; Kryger, Mille; Zhang, Zhao

    2012-01-01

    A dynamic linear DNA tile actuator is expanded to three new structures of higher complexity. The original DNA actuator was constructed from a central roller strand which hybridizes with two piston strands by forming two half-crossover junctions. A linear expansion of the actuator is obtained...

  13. Dna fingerprinting - review paper

    OpenAIRE

    Blundell, Renald

    2006-01-01

    Before the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) was established, DNA fingerprinting technology has relied for years on Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) and Variable Number of Tandom Repeats (VNTR) analysis, a very efficient technique but quite laborious and not suitable for high throughput mapping. Since its, development, PCR has provided a new and powerful tool for DNA fingerprinting.

  14. DNA Repair Systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thanks to the pioneering research work of Lindahl, Sancar, Modrich and their colleagues, we now have an holistic awareness of how DNA damage occurs and how the damage is rectified in bacteria as well as in higher organisms including human beings. A comprehensive understanding of DNA repair has proven crucial ...

  15. DNA repair genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimyo, Mitsuoki

    1995-01-01

    Fission yeast S. pombe is assumed to be a good model for cloning of human DNA repair genes, because human gene is normally expressed in S. pombe and has a very similar protein sequence to yeast protein. We have tried to elucidate the DNA repair mechanisms of S. pombe as a model system for those of mammals. (J.P.N.)

  16. DNA-cell conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Shih-Chia; Francis, Matthew B.; Bertozzi, Carolyn; Mathies, Richard; Chandra, Ravi; Douglas, Erik; Twite, Amy; Toriello, Nicholas; Onoe, Hiroaki

    2018-05-15

    The present invention provides conjugates of DNA and cells by linking the DNA to a native functional group on the cell surface. The cells can be without cell walls or can have cell walls. The modified cells can be linked to a substrate surface and used in assay or bioreactors.

  17. Characterization of muntjac DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) in muntjac chromosomes is generally proportional to the chromosomal DNA content, but the SCE frequency is reduced in the heterochromatic neck region of the X chromosome. The physical properties of muntjac DNA and the kinetics of repair of UV damage in muntjac heterochromatin and euchromatin were examined and compared with the distribution of sister chromatid exchange

  18. DNA-cell conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Shih-Chia; Francis, Matthew B.; Bertozzi, Carolyn; Mathies, Richard; Chandra, Ravi; Douglas, Erik; Twite, Amy; Toriello, Nicholas; Onoe, Hiroaki

    2016-05-03

    The present invention provides conjugates of DNA and cells by linking the DNA to a native functional group on the cell surface. The cells can be without cell walls or can have cell walls. The modified cells can be linked to a substrate surface and used in assay or bioreactors.

  19. Characterization of muntjac DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.C.

    1981-05-27

    Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) in muntjac chromosomes is generally proportional to the chromosomal DNA content, but the SCE frequency is reduced in the heterochromatic neck region of the X chromosome. The physical properties of muntjac DNA and the kinetics of repair of UV damage in muntjac heterochromatin and euchromatin were examined and compared with the distribution of sister chromatid exchange.

  20. Strand-Specific Analysis of DNA Synthesis and Proteins Association with DNA Replication Forks in Budding Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chuanhe; Gan, Haiyun; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2018-01-01

    DNA replication initiates at DNA replication origins after unwinding of double-strand DNA(dsDNA) by replicative helicase to generate single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) templates for the continuous synthesis of leading-strand and the discontinuous synthesis of lagging-strand. Therefore, methods capable of detecting strand-specific information will likely yield insight into the association of proteins at leading and lagging strand of DNA replication forks and the regulation of leading and lagging strand synthesis during DNA replication. The enrichment and Sequencing of Protein-Associated Nascent DNA (eSPAN), which measure the relative amounts of proteins at nascent leading and lagging strands of DNA replication forks, is a step-wise procedure involving the chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) of a protein of interest followed by the enrichment of protein-associated nascent DNA through BrdU immunoprecipitation. The isolated ssDNA is then subjected to strand-specific sequencing. This method can detect whether a protein is enriched at leading or lagging strand of DNA replication forks. In addition to eSPAN, two other strand-specific methods, (ChIP-ssSeq), which detects potential protein-ssDNA binding and BrdU-IP-ssSeq, which can measure synthesis of both leading and lagging strand, were developed along the way. These methods can provide strand-specific and complementary information about the association of the target protein with DNA replication forks as well as synthesis of leading and lagging strands genome wide. Below, we describe the detailed eSPAN, ChIP-ssSeq, and BrdU-IP-ssSeq protocols.

  1. DNA gyrase with a single catalytic tyrosine can catalyze DNA supercoiling by a nicking-closing mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubaev, Airat; Weidlich, Daniela; Klostermeier, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    The topological state of DNA is important for replication, recombination and transcription, and is regulated in vivo by DNA topoisomerases. Gyrase introduces negative supercoils into DNA at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. It is the accepted view that gyrase achieves supercoiling by a strand passage mechanism, in which double-stranded DNA is cleaved, and a second double-stranded segment is passed through the gap, converting a positive DNA node into a negative node. We show here that gyrase with only one catalytic tyrosine that cleaves a single strand of its DNA substrate can catalyze DNA supercoiling without strand passage. We propose an alternative mechanism for DNA supercoiling via nicking and closing of DNA that involves trapping, segregation and relaxation of two positive supercoils. In contrast to DNA supercoiling, ATP-dependent relaxation and decatenation of DNA by gyrase lacking the C-terminal domains require both tyrosines and strand passage. Our results point towards mechanistic plasticity of gyrase and might pave the way for finding novel and specific mechanism-based gyrase inhibitors. PMID:27557712

  2. Inhibition of DNA replication, DNA repair synthesis, and DNA polymerases α and δ by butylphenyl deoxyguanosine triphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreslor, S.L.; Frattini, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    Semiconservative DNA replication in growing mammalian cells and ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA repair synthesis in nongrowing mammalian cells are mediated by one or both of the aphidicolin-sensitive DNA polymerases, α and/or δ. They have studied the inhibition of replication and repair synthesis in permeable human cells by N 2 (p-n-butylphenyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine-5'-triphosphate (BuPh dGTP), an agent which inhibits polymerase α strongly and polymerase δ weakly. Both processes are inhibited by BuPh-dGTP in competition with dGTP. The K/sub i/'s are, for replication, 2-3 μM and, for repair synthesis, 3-4 μM, consistent with the involvement of the same DNA polymerase in both processes. Inhibition of isolated human polymerase α by BuPh-dGTP is also competitive with dGTP, but the K/sub i/ is approximately 10 nM, several hundred-fold lower than the K/sub i/'s of replication and repair synthesis. Isolated polymerase δ is inhibited by BuPh-dGTP at doses similar to those which inhibit replication and repair synthesis, however, attempts to determine the K/sub i/ of polymerase δ were hampered by the finding that the dependence of δ activity on deoxyribunucleotide concentration is parabolic at low doses. This behavior differs from the behavior of polymerase α and of cellular DNA replication and repair synthesis, all of which show a simple, hyperbolic relationship between activity and deoxyribonucleotide concentration. Thus, inhibition of DNA replication and UV induced DNA repair synthesis by BuPh dGTP is quantitatively similar to DNA polymerase δ, but some other characteristics of the cellular processes are more similar to those of polymerase α

  3. Whose DNA is this?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taroni, Franco; Biedermann, Alex; Vuille, Joëlle

    2013-01-01

    This communication seeks to draw the attention of researchers and practitioners dealing with forensic DNA profiling analyses to the following question: is a scientist's report, offering support to a hypothesis according to which a particular individual is the source of DNA detected during...... evoked during the international conference "The hidden side of DNA profiles. Artifacts, errors and uncertain evidence" held in Rome (April 27th to 28th, 2012). Indeed, despite the fact that this conference brought together some of the world's leading forensic DNA specialists, it appeared clearly...... talk considerably different languages. It thus is fundamental to address this issue of communication about results of forensic DNA analyses, and open a dialogue with practicing non-scientists at large who need to make meaningful use of scientific results to approach and help solve judicial cases...

  4. DNA repair protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergbæk, Lotte

    In its 3rd edition, this Methods in Molecular Biology(TM) book covers the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including advanced protocols and standard techniques in the field of DNA repair. Offers expert guidance for DNA repair, recombination, and replication. Current knowledge of the mechanisms...... that regulate DNA repair has grown significantly over the past years with technology advances such as RNA interference, advanced proteomics and microscopy as well as high throughput screens. The third edition of DNA Repair Protocols covers various aspects of the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including...... recent advanced protocols as well as standard techniques used in the field of DNA repair. Both mammalian and non-mammalian model organisms are covered in the book, and many of the techniques can be applied with only minor modifications to other systems than the one described. Written in the highly...

  5. Racemic DNA crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Pradeep K; Collie, Gavin W; Kauffmann, Brice; Huc, Ivan

    2014-12-22

    Racemates increase the chances of crystallization by allowing molecular contacts to be formed in a greater number of ways. With the advent of protein synthesis, the production of protein racemates and racemic-protein crystallography are now possible. Curiously, racemic DNA crystallography had not been investigated despite the commercial availability of L- and D-deoxyribo-oligonucleotides. Here, we report a study into racemic DNA crystallography showing the strong propensity of racemic DNA mixtures to form racemic crystals. We describe racemic crystal structures of various DNA sequences and folded conformations, including duplexes, quadruplexes, and a four-way junction, showing that the advantages of racemic crystallography should extend to DNA. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Regulation of DNA repair by parkin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, Shyan-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Mutation of parkin is one of the most prevalent causes of autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease (PD). Parkin is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that acts on a variety of substrates, resulting in polyubiquitination and degradation by the proteasome or monoubiquitination and regulation of biological activity. However, the cellular functions of parkin that relate to its pathological involvement in PD are not well understood. Here we show that parkin is essential for optimal repair of DNA damage. Parkin-deficient cells exhibit reduced DNA excision repair that can be restored by transfection of wild-type parkin, but not by transfection of a pathological parkin mutant. Parkin also protects against DNA damage-induced cell death, an activity that is largely lost in the pathological mutant. Moreover, parkin interacts with the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a protein that coordinates DNA excision repair. These results suggest that parkin promotes DNA repair and protects against genotoxicity, and implicate DNA damage as a potential pathogenic mechanism in PD.

  7. Artificial Intelligence, DNA Mimicry, and Human Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefano, George B; Kream, Richard M

    2017-08-14

    The molecular evolution of genomic DNA across diverse plant and animal phyla involved dynamic registrations of sequence modifications to maintain existential homeostasis to increasingly complex patterns of environmental stressors. As an essential corollary, driver effects of positive evolutionary pressure are hypothesized to effect concerted modifications of genomic DNA sequences to meet expanded platforms of regulatory controls for successful implementation of advanced physiological requirements. It is also clearly apparent that preservation of updated registries of advantageous modifications of genomic DNA sequences requires coordinate expansion of convergent cellular proofreading/error correction mechanisms that are encoded by reciprocally modified genomic DNA. Computational expansion of operationally defined DNA memory extends to coordinate modification of coding and previously under-emphasized noncoding regions that now appear to represent essential reservoirs of untapped genetic information amenable to evolutionary driven recruitment into the realm of biologically active domains. Additionally, expansion of DNA memory potential via chemical modification and activation of noncoding sequences is targeted to vertical augmentation and integration of an expanded cadre of transcriptional and epigenetic regulatory factors affecting linear coding of protein amino acid sequences within open reading frames.

  8. Structure of the DNA-bound BRCA1 C-terminal region from human replication factor C p140 and model of the protein-DNA complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kobayashi, M.; AB, E.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.; Siegal, G.

    2010-01-01

    BRCA1 C-terminal domain (BRCT)-containing proteins are found widely throughout the animal and bacteria kingdoms where they are exclusively involved in cell cycle regulation and DNA metabolism. Whereas most BRCT domains are involved in protein-protein interactions, a small subset has bona fide DNA

  9. Spermine attenuates the action of the DNA intercalator, actinomycin D, on DNA binding and the inhibition of transcription and DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-Yu; Lee, Alan Yueh-Luen; Lee, Yueh-Luen; Lai, Yi-Hua; Chen, Jeremy J W; Wu, Wen-Lin; Yuann, Jeu-Ming P; Su, Wang-Lin; Chuang, Show-Mei; Hou, Ming-Hon

    2012-01-01

    The anticancer activity of DNA intercalators is related to their ability to intercalate into the DNA duplex with high affinity, thereby interfering with DNA replication and transcription. Polyamines (spermine in particular) are almost exclusively bound to nucleic acids and are involved in many cellular processes that require nucleic acids. Until now, the effects of polyamines on DNA intercalator activities have remained unclear because intercalation is the most important mechanism employed by DNA-binding drugs. Herein, using actinomycin D (ACTD) as a model, we have attempted to elucidate the effects of spermine on the action of ACTD, including its DNA-binding ability, RNA and DNA polymerase interference, and its role in the transcription and replication inhibition of ACTD within cells. We found that spermine interfered with the binding and stabilization of ACTD to DNA. The presence of increasing concentrations of spermine enhanced the transcriptional and replication activities of RNA and DNA polymerases, respectively, in vitro treated with ActD. Moreover, a decrease in intracellular polyamine concentrations stimulated by methylglyoxal-bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) enhanced the ACTD-induced inhibition of c-myc transcription and DNA replication in several cancer cell lines. The results indicated that spermine attenuates ACTD binding to DNA and its inhibition of transcription and DNA replication both in vitro and within cells. Finally, a synergistic antiproliferative effect of MGBG and ACTD was observed in a cell viability assay. Our findings will be of significant relevance to future developments in combination with cancer therapy by enhancing the anticancer activity of DNA interactors through polyamine depletion.

  10. Spermine attenuates the action of the DNA intercalator, actinomycin D, on DNA binding and the inhibition of transcription and DNA replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Yu Wang

    Full Text Available The anticancer activity of DNA intercalators is related to their ability to intercalate into the DNA duplex with high affinity, thereby interfering with DNA replication and transcription. Polyamines (spermine in particular are almost exclusively bound to nucleic acids and are involved in many cellular processes that require nucleic acids. Until now, the effects of polyamines on DNA intercalator activities have remained unclear because intercalation is the most important mechanism employed by DNA-binding drugs. Herein, using actinomycin D (ACTD as a model, we have attempted to elucidate the effects of spermine on the action of ACTD, including its DNA-binding ability, RNA and DNA polymerase interference, and its role in the transcription and replication inhibition of ACTD within cells. We found that spermine interfered with the binding and stabilization of ACTD to DNA. The presence of increasing concentrations of spermine enhanced the transcriptional and replication activities of RNA and DNA polymerases, respectively, in vitro treated with ActD. Moreover, a decrease in intracellular polyamine concentrations stimulated by methylglyoxal-bis(guanylhydrazone (MGBG enhanced the ACTD-induced inhibition of c-myc transcription and DNA replication in several cancer cell lines. The results indicated that spermine attenuates ACTD binding to DNA and its inhibition of transcription and DNA replication both in vitro and within cells. Finally, a synergistic antiproliferative effect of MGBG and ACTD was observed in a cell viability assay. Our findings will be of significant relevance to future developments in combination with cancer therapy by enhancing the anticancer activity of DNA interactors through polyamine depletion.

  11. The cutting edges in DNA repair, licensing, and fidelity: DNA and RNA repair nucleases sculpt DNA to measure twice, cut once.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutakawa, Susan E; Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien; Tainer, John A

    2014-07-01

    To avoid genome instability, DNA repair nucleases must precisely target the correct damaged substrate before they are licensed to incise. Damage identification is a challenge for all DNA damage response proteins, but especially for nucleases that cut the DNA and necessarily create a cleaved DNA repair intermediate, likely more toxic than the initial damage. How do these enzymes achieve exquisite specificity without specific sequence recognition or, in some cases, without a non-canonical DNA nucleotide? Combined structural, biochemical, and biological analyses of repair nucleases are revealing their molecular tools for damage verification and safeguarding against inadvertent incision. Surprisingly, these enzymes also often act on RNA, which deserves more attention. Here, we review protein-DNA structures for nucleases involved in replication, base excision repair, mismatch repair, double strand break repair (DSBR), and telomere maintenance: apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), Endonuclease IV (Nfo), tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase (TDP2), UV Damage endonuclease (UVDE), very short patch repair endonuclease (Vsr), Endonuclease V (Nfi), Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1), exonuclease 1 (Exo1), RNase T and Meiotic recombination 11 (Mre11). DNA and RNA structure-sensing nucleases are essential to life with roles in DNA replication, repair, and transcription. Increasingly these enzymes are employed as advanced tools for synthetic biology and as targets for cancer prognosis and interventions. Currently their structural biology is most fully illuminated for DNA repair, which is also essential to life. How DNA repair enzymes maintain genome fidelity is one of the DNA double helix secrets missed by James Watson and Francis Crick, that is only now being illuminated though structural biology and mutational analyses. Structures reveal motifs for repair nucleases and mechanisms whereby these enzymes follow the old carpenter adage: measure twice, cut once. Furthermore, to measure

  12. Cardiovascular involvement in myositis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Louise P

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this review is to provide an update on cardiovascular involvement in idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIM). Studies from the past 18 months are identified and reviewed. Finally, the clinical impact of these findings is discussed. RECENT FINDINGS: Epidemiological...... on cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging suggests that CMR should be considered as a potentially viable diagnostic tool to evaluate the possibility of silent myocardial inflammation in IIM with normal routine noninvasive evaluation. SUMMARY: Updated literature on cardiovascular involvement in IIM has...... identified an increased risk for subclinical and clinical cardiovascular disease in these rare inflammatory muscle diseases....

  13. RPA homologs and ssDNA processing during meiotic recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Jonathan; Abby, Emilie; Livera, Gabriel; Martini, Emmanuelle

    2016-06-01

    Meiotic homologous recombination is a specialized process that involves homologous chromosome pairing and strand exchange to guarantee proper chromosome segregation and genetic diversity. The formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) during meiotic recombination differs from those during mitotic recombination in that the homologous chromosome rather than the sister chromatid is the preferred repair template. The processing of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) formed on intermediate recombination structures is central to driving the specific outcomes of DSB repair during meiosis. Replication protein A (RPA) is the main ssDNA-binding protein complex involved in DNA metabolism. However, the existence of RPA orthologs in plants and the recent discovery of meiosis specific with OB domains (MEIOB), a widely conserved meiosis-specific RPA1 paralog, strongly suggest that multiple RPA complexes evolved and specialized to subdivide their roles during DNA metabolism. Here we review ssDNA formation and maturation during mitotic and meiotic recombination underlying the meiotic specific features. We describe and discuss the existence and properties of MEIOB and multiple RPA subunits in plants and highlight how they can provide meiosis-specific fates to ssDNA processing during homologous recombination. Understanding the functions of these RPA homologs and how they interact with the canonical RPA subunits is of major interest in the fields of meiosis and DNA repair.

  14. Alterations in mtDNA, gastric carcinogenesis and early diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues-Antunes, S; Borges, B N

    2018-05-26

    Gastric cancer remains one of the most prevalent cancers in the world. Due to this, efforts are being made to improve the diagnosis of this neoplasm and the search for molecular markers that may be involved in its genesis. Within this perspective, the mitochondrial DNA is considered as a potential candidate, since it has several well documented changes and is readily accessible. However, numerous alterations have been reported in mtDNA, not facilitating the visualization of which alterations and molecular markers are truly involved with gastric carcinogenesis. This review presents a compilation of the main known changes relating mtDNA to gastric cancer and their clinical significance.

  15. Analysis of DNA interactions using single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzefeld, Markus; Walhorn, Volker; Anselmetti, Dario; Sewald, Norbert

    2013-06-01

    Protein-DNA interactions are involved in many biochemical pathways and determine the fate of the corresponding cell. Qualitative and quantitative investigations on these recognition and binding processes are of key importance for an improved understanding of biochemical processes and also for systems biology. This review article focusses on atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single-molecule force spectroscopy and its application to the quantification of forces and binding mechanisms that lead to the formation of protein-DNA complexes. AFM and dynamic force spectroscopy are exciting tools that allow for quantitative analysis of biomolecular interactions. Besides an overview on the method and the most important immobilization approaches, the physical basics of the data evaluation is described. Recent applications of AFM-based force spectroscopy to investigate DNA intercalation, complexes involving DNA aptamers and peptide- and protein-DNA interactions are given.

  16. A Model of H-NS Mediated Compaction of Bacterial DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joyeux, M.; Vreede, J.

    2013-01-01

    The histone-like nucleoid structuring protein (H-NS) is a nucleoid-associated protein, which is involved in both gene regulation and DNA compaction. H-NS can bind to DNA in two different ways: in trans, by binding to two separate DNA duplexes, or in cis, by binding to different sites on the same

  17. Developing Inhibitors of Translesion DNA Synthesis as Therapeutic Agents Against Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    pol eta when replicating damaged DNA. 1S. SUBJECT TERMS: Mutagenesis, DNA polymerases, nucleoside analogs, chemotherapeutic agents 16. SECURITY ...such as polymerase eta, iota , and kappa that are involved in replicating damaged DNA. Our kinetic data obtained under Task 1B indicates that pol eta

  18. How hyperthermophiles adapt to change their lives : DNA exchange in extreme conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wolferen, Marleen; Ajon, Malgorzata; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Ajon, Małgorzata; Huang, L.

    Transfer of DNA has been shown to be involved in genome evolution. In particular with respect to the adaptation of bacterial species to high temperatures, DNA transfer between the domains of bacteria and archaea seems to have played a major role. In addition, DNA exchange between similar species

  19. Infantile presentation of the mtDNA A3243G tRNA(Leu (UUR)) mutation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okhuijsen-Kroes, E.J.; Trijbels, J.M.F.; Sengers, R.C.A.; Mariman, E.C.M.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Wendel, U.A.H.; Koch, G.; Smeitink, J.A.M.

    2001-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) disorders are clinically very heterogeneous, ranging from single organ involvement to severe multisystem disease. One of the most frequently observed mtDNA mutations is the A-to-G transition at position 3243 of the tRNA(Leu (UUR)) gene. This mutation is often related to

  20. Proteomics reveals dynamic assembly of repair complexes during bypass of DNA cross-links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Räschle, Markus; Smeenk, Godelieve; Hansen, Rebecca K

    2015-01-01

    DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs) block replication fork progression by inhibiting DNA strand separation. Repair of ICLs requires sequential incisions, translesion DNA synthesis, and homologous recombination, but the full set of factors involved in these transactions remains unknown. We devised ...

  1. Role of Rad54, Rad54b and Snm1 in DNA damage repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Wesoly (Joanna)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this thesis is to investigate the function of a number of genes involved in mammalian DNA damage repair, in particular in repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Among a large number of different damages that can be introduced to DNA, DSBs are especially toxic. If

  2. Extracellular DNA Contributes to Dental Biofilm Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Meyer, Rikke Louise; Dige, Irene

    2017-01-01

    dental biofilms. This study aimed to determine whether eDNA was part of the matrix in biofilms grown in situ in the absence of sucrose and whether treatment with DNase dispersed biofilms grown for 2.5, 5, 7.5, 16.5, or 24 h. Three hundred biofilms from 10 study participants were collected and treated...... the amount of biofilm in very early stages of growth (up to 7.5 h), but the treatment effect decreased with increasing biofilm age. This study proves the involvement of eDNA in dental biofilm formation and its importance for biofilm stability in the earliest stages. Further research is required to uncover...

  3. Discovery of DNA repair inhibitors by combinatorial library profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Benjamin J.; Sidman, Richard L.; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2011-01-01

    Small molecule inhibitors of DNA repair are emerging as potent and selective anti-cancer therapies, but the sheer magnitude of the protein networks involved in DNA repair processes poses obstacles to discovery of effective candidate drugs. To address this challenge, we used a subtractive combinatorial selection approach to identify a panel of peptide ligands that bind DNA repair complexes. Supporting the concept that these ligands have therapeutic potential, we show that one selected peptide specifically binds and non-competitively inactivates DNA-PKcs, a protein kinase critical in double-strand DNA break repair. In doing so, this ligand sensitizes BRCA-deficient tumor cells to genotoxic therapy. Our findings establish a platform for large-scale parallel screening for ligand-directed DNA repair inhibitors, with immediate applicability to cancer therapy. PMID:21343400

  4. Non-destructive sampling of ancient insect DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Philip Francis; Elias, Scott; Gilbert, Tom

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A major challenge for ancient DNA (aDNA) studies on insect remains is that sampling procedures involve at least partial destruction of the specimens. A recent extraction protocol reveals the possibility of obtaining DNA from past insect remains without causing visual morphological...... of 77-204 base pairs (-bp) in size using species-specific and general insect primers. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The applied non-destructive DNA extraction method shows promising potential on insect museum specimens of historical age as far back as AD 1820, but less so on the ancient permafrost......-preserved insect fossil remains tested, where DNA was obtained from samples up to ca. 26,000 years old. The non-frozen sediment DNA approach appears to have great potential for recording the former presence of insect taxa not normally preserved as macrofossils and opens new frontiers in research on ancient...

  5. Who Involves Whom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Clifford

    1979-01-01

    The author reviews the development of a parents' group at the Bradford Grange School (Manchester, United Kingdom) for ESN (educationally subnormal) children. Problems with the initial parents' group are pointed out, successful approaches are considered, and the importance of parent involvement is stressed. (SBH)

  6. PATTERNS AND FACTORS INVOLVED

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Between 1*' of July 1996 and 30'h of June 2000 a total of 3583 patients were registered at the accident and emergency unit of Nnamdi. Azikiwe ... The case files of these were reviewed with a view to ascertaining the causes and factors involved in the deaths of these patients. The .... H.I.V/AIDS related complications 23 6.8.

  7. Radiation induced degradation of DNA in photodynamic therapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion, Rodica; Scarlat, F.; Niculescu, V.I.R.; Scarlat, Fl.; Gunaydin, Keriman

    2001-01-01

    DNA is a critical cellular target for oxidative processes induced by physical and chemical stresses. It is known that the direct effect of ionizing radiation on DNA results mainly in base ionization and may lead to mutation, carcinogenesis and cell death. The degradation of DNA induced by laser and ionizing radiation (electron and photon beam) is analyzed in this paper. The ionizing radiation degradation of DNA is a radical process. A series of lesions among the major base degradation product has been measured in isolated DNA exposed to gamma radiation in aerated aqueous solution. Degradation can be accounted for by the formation of hydroxyl radicals upon radiolysis of water (indirect effect). The production of DNA damage by ionizing radiation involves two mechanisms, direct and indirect effects. Direct effect leads to ionization and excitation of DNA molecules, while indirect effect is due to the interaction of reactive species, in particular of OH radicals produced by water radiolysis, with targets in DNA. The relative contribution of the two mechanisms in damaging DNA depends on the type of radiation. Single strand breaks and base damage seem to be mainly produced by the attack of hydroxyl radicals on DNA, whereas double strand breaks result predominantly of direct energy deposition. The four bases are degraded in high yield. Direct effect has been mimicked by photo-induced electron abstraction from the bases producing their radical cation. The base damage may also occur from the formation of radical cation of purine and pyrimidine components. When DNA is irradiated in solution, single strand breaks are mainly due to the abstraction of an H atom from the 4 ' position of 2 ' -deoxyribose by the attack of OH radicals produced by water radiolysis. Quantification of the modified bases showed the guanine is the preferential target. Ionizing radiation induces several types of DNA modifications, including chain breaks, DNA-protein cross-links, oxidized DNA bases

  8. Nanostructures via DNA scaffold metallization

    OpenAIRE

    Ning, C.; Zinchenko, A.; Baigl, D.; Pyshkina, O.; Sergeyev, V.; Endo, Kazunaka; Yoshikawa, K.

    2005-01-01

    The critical role of polymers in process of noble metals nanostructures formation is well known, however, the use of DNA chain template in this process is yet largely unknown. In this study we demonstrate different ways of silver deposition on DNA template and report the influence of silver nanostructures formation on DNA conformational state. Metallization of DNA chain proceeds by two different scenarios depending on DNA conformation. If DNA chain is unfolded (elongated) chain, silver reduct...

  9. DNA damage and polyploidization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Jeremy; Poon, Randy Y C

    2010-01-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that polyploidization triggers chromosomal instability and contributes to tumorigenesis. DNA damage is increasingly being recognized for its roles in promoting polyploidization. Although elegant mechanisms known as the DNA damage checkpoints are responsible for halting the cell cycle after DNA damage, agents that uncouple the checkpoints can induce unscheduled entry into mitosis. Likewise, defects of the checkpoints in several disorders permit mitotic entry even in the presence of DNA damage. Forcing cells with damaged DNA into mitosis causes severe chromosome segregation defects, including lagging chromosomes, chromosomal fragments and chromosomal bridges. The presence of these lesions in the cleavage plane is believed to abort cytokinesis. It is postulated that if cytokinesis failure is coupled with defects of the p53-dependent postmitotic checkpoint pathway, cells can enter S phase and become polyploids. Progress in the past several years has unraveled some of the underlying principles of these pathways and underscored the important role of DNA damage in polyploidization. Furthermore, polyploidization per se may also be an important determinant of sensitivity to DNA damage, thereby may offer an opportunity for novel therapies.

  10. Quantitive DNA Fiber Mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Mei; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.

    2008-01-28

    Several hybridization-based methods used to delineate single copy or repeated DNA sequences in larger genomic intervals take advantage of the increased resolution and sensitivity of free chromatin, i.e., chromatin released from interphase cell nuclei. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping (QDFM) differs from the majority of these methods in that it applies FISH to purified, clonal DNA molecules which have been bound with at least one end to a solid substrate. The DNA molecules are then stretched by the action of a receding meniscus at the water-air interface resulting in DNA molecules stretched homogeneously to about 2.3 kb/{micro}m. When non-isotopically, multicolor-labeled probes are hybridized to these stretched DNA fibers, their respective binding sites are visualized in the fluorescence microscope, their relative distance can be measured and converted into kilobase pairs (kb). The QDFM technique has found useful applications ranging from the detection and delineation of deletions or overlap between linked clones to the construction of high-resolution physical maps to studies of stalled DNA replication and transcription.

  11. PCNA mono-ubiquitination and activation of translesion DNA polymerases by DNA polymerase {alpha}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Motoshi; Niimi, Atsuko; Limsirichaikul, Siripan; Tomida, Shuta; Miao Huang, Qin; Izuta, Shunji; Usukura, Jiro; Itoh, Yasutomo; Hishida, Takashi; Akashi, Tomohiro; Nakagawa, Yoshiyuki; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Pavlov, Youri; Murate, Takashi; Takahashi, Takashi

    2009-07-01

    Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) involves PCNA mono-ubiquitination and TLS DNA polymerases (pols). Recent evidence has shown that the mono-ubiquitination is induced not only by DNA damage but also by other factors that induce stalling of the DNA replication fork. We studied the effect of spontaneous DNA replication errors on PCNA mono-ubiquitination and TLS induction. In the pol1L868F strain, which expressed an error-prone pol alpha, PCNA was spontaneously mono-ubiquitinated. Pol alpha L868F had a rate-limiting step at the extension from mismatched primer termini. Electron microscopic observation showed the accumulation of a single-stranded region at the DNA replication fork in yeast cells. For pol alpha errors, pol zeta participated in a generation of +1 frameshifts. Furthermore, in the pol1L868F strain, UV-induced mutations were lower than in the wild-type and a pol delta mutant strain (pol3-5DV), and deletion of the RAD30 gene (pol eta) suppressed this defect. These data suggest that nucleotide misincorporation by pol alpha induces exposure of single-stranded DNA, PCNA mono-ubiquitination and activates TLS pols.

  12. Chimeric proteins for detection and quantitation of DNA mutations, DNA sequence variations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric proteins having both DNA mutation binding activity and nuclease activity are synthesized by recombinant technology. The proteins are of the general formula A-L-B and B-L-A where A is a peptide having DNA mutation binding activity, L is a linker and B is a peptide having nuclease activity. The chimeric proteins are useful for detection and identification of DNA sequence variations including DNA mutations (including DNA damage and mismatches) by binding to the DNA mutation and cutting the DNA once the DNA mutation is detected.

  13. Formation and repair of DNA-protein cross-links (DPCs) in newly replicated DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, S.; Friedman, L.R.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1987-01-01

    DPCs preferentially involve proteins of the nuclear matrix, the site of replication and transcription. To elucidate the relationship with replication, the formation and repair of DPCs has been studied in newly replicated DNA. Log-phase V79 cells were pulsed with /sup 3/H-TdR (10-20 μCi/ml) for 30-90 sec at 22 0 followed by up to a 60 min chase at 37 0 . Irradiation (0-100 Gy) immediately after the pulse increases the labeled DNA in DPCs with a dose-dependence that is unaffected by the initial level of labeled DPC or by chase time. When cells are irradiated before the pulse, DNA synthesis is inhibited; however, release of pulse-labeled DPCs appears normal. The data suggest that during replication, DNA is cross-linked to (matrix) protein, contributing to background DPCs

  14. High-speed detection of DNA translocation in nanopipettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraccari, Raquel L.; Ciccarella, Pietro; Bahrami, Azadeh; Carminati, Marco; Ferrari, Giorgio; Albrecht, Tim

    2016-03-01

    We present a high-speed electrical detection scheme based on a custom-designed CMOS amplifier which allows the analysis of DNA translocation in glass nanopipettes on a microsecond timescale. Translocation of different DNA lengths in KCl electrolyte provides a scaling factor of the DNA translocation time equal to p = 1.22, which is different from values observed previously with nanopipettes in LiCl electrolyte or with nanopores. Based on a theoretical model involving electrophoresis, hydrodynamics and surface friction, we show that the experimentally observed range of p-values may be the result of, or at least be affected by DNA adsorption and friction between the DNA and the substrate surface.We present a high-speed electrical detection scheme based on a custom-designed CMOS amplifier which allows the analysis of DNA translocation in glass nanopipettes on a microsecond timescale. Translocation of different DNA lengths in KCl electrolyte provides a scaling factor of the DNA translocation time equal to p = 1.22, which is different from values observed previously with nanopipettes in LiCl electrolyte or with nanopores. Based on a theoretical model involving electrophoresis, hydrodynamics and surface friction, we show that the experimentally observed range of p-values may be the result of, or at least be affected by DNA adsorption and friction between the DNA and the substrate surface. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Gel electrophoresis confirming lengths and purity of DNA samples, comparison between Axopatch 200B and custom-built setup, comprehensive low-noise amplifier characterization, representative I-V curves of nanopipettes used, typical scatter plots of τ vs. peak amplitude for the four LDNA's used, table of most probable τ values, a comparison between different fitting models for the DNA translocation time distribution, further details on the stochastic numerical simulation of the scaling statistics and the derivation of the extended

  15. "Artifactual" arsenate DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E

    2012-01-01

    The recent claim by Wolfe-Simon et al. that the Halomonas bacterial strain GFAJ-1 when grown in arsenate-containing medium with limiting phosphate is able to substitute phosphate with arsenate in biomolecules including nucleic acids and in particular DNA(1) arose much skepticism, primarily due...... to the very limited chemical stability of arsenate esters (see ref. 2 and references therein). A major part of the criticisms was concerned with the insufficient (bio)chemical evidence in the Wolfe-Simon study for the actual chemical incorporation of arsenate in DNA (and/or RNA). Redfield et al. now present...... evidence that the identification of arsenate DNA was artifactual....

  16. Transcription and DNA Damage: Holding Hands or Crossing Swords?

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Giuseppina; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2017-10-27

    Transcription has classically been considered a potential threat to genome integrity. Collision between transcription and DNA replication machinery, and retention of DNA:RNA hybrids, may result in genome instability. On the other hand, it has been proposed that active genes repair faster and preferentially via homologous recombination. Moreover, while canonical transcription is inhibited in the proximity of DNA double-strand breaks, a growing body of evidence supports active non-canonical transcription at DNA damage sites. Small non-coding RNAs accumulate at DNA double-strand break sites in mammals and other organisms, and are involved in DNA damage signaling and repair. Furthermore, RNA binding proteins are recruited to DNA damage sites and participate in the DNA damage response. Here, we discuss the impact of transcription on genome stability, the role of RNA binding proteins at DNA damage sites, and the function of small non-coding RNAs generated upon damage in the signaling and repair of DNA lesions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Visualization of complex DNA damage along accelerated ions tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikova, Elena; Boreyko, Alla; Bulanova, Tatiana; Ježková, Lucie; Zadneprianetc, Mariia; Smirnova, Elena

    2018-04-01

    The most deleterious DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation are clustered DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). Clustered or complex DNA damage is a combination of a few simple lesions (single-strand breaks, base damage etc.) within one or two DNA helix turns. It is known that yield of complex DNA lesions increases with increasing linear energy transfer (LET) of radiation. For investigation of the induction and repair of complex DNA lesions, human fibroblasts were irradiated with high-LET 15N ions (LET = 183.3 keV/μm, E = 13MeV/n) and low-LET 60Co γ-rays (LET ≈ 0.3 keV/μm) radiation. DNA DSBs (γH2AX and 53BP1) and base damage (OGG1) markers were visualized by immunofluorecence staining and high-resolution microscopy. The obtained results showed slower repair kinetics of induced DSBs in cells irradiated with accelerated ions compared to 60Co γ-rays, indicating induction of more complex DNA damage. Confirming previous assumptions, detailed 3D analysis of γH2AX/53BP1 foci in 15N ions tracks revealed more complicated structure of the foci in contrast to γ-rays. It was shown that proteins 53BP1 and OGG1 involved in repair of DNA DSBs and modified bases, respectively, were colocalized in tracks of 15N ions and thus represented clustered DNA DSBs.

  18. Chromosomal location of the human gene for DNA polymerase β

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBride, O.W.; Zmudzka, B.Z.; Wilson, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    Inhibition studies indicate that DNA polymerase β has a synthetic role in DNA repair after exposure of mammalian cells to some types of DNA-damaging agents. The primary structure of the enzyme is highly conserved in vertebrates, and nearly full-length cDNAs for the enzyme were recently cloned from mammalian cDNA libraries. Southern blot analysis of DNA from a panel of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids, using portions of the cDNA as probe, indicates that the gene for human DNA polymerase β is single copy and located on the short arm or proximal long arm of chromosome 8 (8pter-8q22). A restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was detected in normal individuals by using a probe from the 5' end of the cDNA, and this RFLP probably is due to an insertion or duplication of DNA in 20-25% of the population. This restriction site can be used as one marker for chromosome 8 genetic linkage studies and for family studies of traits potentially involving this DNA repair gene

  19. DNA repair processes and their impairment in some human diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleaver, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    Some human diseases show enhanced sensitivity to the action of environmental mutagens, and among these several are known which are defective in the repair of damaged DNA. Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is mainly defective in excision repair of a large variety of damaged DNA bases caused by ultraviolet light and chemical mutagens. XP involves at least 6 distinct groups, some of which may lack cofactors required for excising damage from chromatin. As a result of these defects the sensitivity of XP cells to many mutagens is increased 5- to 10-fold. Ataxia telangiectasia and Fanconi's anemia may similarly involve defects in repair of certain DNA base damage or cross-links, respectively. But most of these and other mutagen-sensitive diseases only show increases of about 2-fold in sensitivity to mutagens, and the biochemical defects in the diseases may be more complex and less directly involved in DNA repair than in XP. (Auth.)

  20. Microorganisms involved in MIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, K. [Danish Technological Institute (Denmark)

    2011-07-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) is a widespread problem that is difficult to detect and assess because of its complex mechanism. This paper presents the involvement of microorganisms in MIC. Some of the mechanisms that cause MIC include hydrogen consumption, production of acids, anode-cathode formation and electron shuttling. A classic bio-corrosive microorganism in the oil and gas industry is sulphate-reducing prokaryotes (SRP). Methanogens also increase corrosion rates in metals. Some of the phylogenetic orders detected while studying SRP and methanogens are archaeoglobales, clostridiales, methanosarcinales and methanothermococcus. There were some implications, such as growth of SRP not being correlated with growth of methanogens; methanogens were included in MIC risk assessment. A few examples are used to display how microorganisms are involved in topside corrosion and microbial community in producing wells. From the study, it can be concluded that, MIC risk assessment includes system data and empirical knowledge of the distribution and number of microorganisms in the system.

  1. Involved Node Radiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, Maja V; Aznar, Marianne C; Vogelius, Ivan R

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The involved node radiation therapy (INRT) strategy was introduced for patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) to reduce the risk of late effects. With INRT, only the originally involved lymph nodes are irradiated. We present treatment outcome in a retrospective analysis using this strategy...... to 36 Gy). Patients attended regular follow-up visits until 5 years after therapy. RESULTS: The 4-year freedom from disease progression was 96.4% (95% confidence interval: 92.4%-100.4%), median follow-up of 50 months (range: 4-71 months). Three relapses occurred: 2 within the previous radiation field......, and 1 in a previously uninvolved region. The 4-year overall survival was 94% (95% confidence interval: 88.8%-99.1%), median follow-up of 58 months (range: 4-91 months). Early radiation therapy toxicity was limited to grade 1 (23.4%) and grade 2 (13.8%). During follow-up, 8 patients died, none from HL, 7...

  2. Reactors also involve people

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurt, H.B.

    1975-01-01

    As the nuclear industry develops it is to be hoped that high quality occupational health programs will evolve along with other sound operational procedures and practices. The immediate involvement of occupational health personnel may well afford a safety factor which will minimize the likelihood of either the selection of personnel not adequate for the full responsibilities of their work or the continuation in responsible positions of personnel who develop handicaps of either a physical or mental nature

  3. Involvement through photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, J

    2016-12-01

    As a photographer living in Tokyo, I have been visiting Suetsugi village regularly to take photographs and show the printed photographs to the residents. What is the role of photography? What does it mean to be involved in the life of Suetsugi through photography? This article discusses some of the answers to these questions 5 years after the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

  4. Getting involved in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banner, Davina; Grant, Lyle G

    2011-01-01

    The need for quality nursing research to promote evidence-based practice and optimize patient care is well recognized. This is particularly pertinent in cardiovascular nursing, where cardiovascular disease continues to be the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide (World Health Organization, 2007). Across the spectrum of academic, clinical, and health care administration nursing roles, research remains fundamental to bridging theory, practice, and education (LoBiondo-Wood, Haber, Cameron, & Singh, 2009). Despite recognition of the importance of nursing research, the gap between research and practice continues to be an ongoing issue (Funk, Tornquist, & Champagne, 1995; Pettengill, Gillies, & Clark, 1994; Rizzuto, Bostrom, Suterm, & Chenitz, 1994; Rolfe, 1998). Nurses are appropriately situated to contribute to research that improves clinical outcomes and health service delivery. However, the majority of nurses in clinical practice do not have a significant research component structured into their nursing role. In this research column, the authors outline the importance of nurses being engaged in research and present some different levels of involvement that nurses may assume. A continuum of nursing research involvement includes asking researchable questions, being a savvy consumer of research evidence, finding your own level of research involvement, and aspiring to lead.

  5. DNA cytosine methylation in the bovine leukemia virus promoter is associated with latency in a lymphoma-derived B-cell line: potential involvement of direct inhibition of cAMP-responsive element (CRE)-binding protein/CRE modulator/activation transcription factor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierard, Valérie; Guiguen, Allan; Colin, Laurence; Wijmeersch, Gaëlle; Vanhulle, Caroline; Van Driessche, Benoît; Dekoninck, Ann; Blazkova, Jana; Cardona, Christelle; Merimi, Makram; Vierendeel, Valérie; Calomme, Claire; Nguyên, Thi Liên-Anh; Nuttinck, Michèle; Twizere, Jean-Claude; Kettmann, Richard; Portetelle, Daniel; Burny, Arsène; Hirsch, Ivan; Rohr, Olivier; Van Lint, Carine

    2010-06-18

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) proviral latency represents a viral strategy to escape the host immune system and allow tumor development. Besides the previously demonstrated role of histone deacetylation in the epigenetic repression of BLV expression, we showed here that BLV promoter activity was induced by several DNA methylation inhibitors (such as 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine) and that overexpressed DNMT1 and DNMT3A, but not DNMT3B, down-regulated BLV promoter activity. Importantly, cytosine hypermethylation in the 5'-long terminal repeat (LTR) U3 and R regions was associated with true latency in the lymphoma-derived B-cell line L267 but not with defective latency in YR2 cells. Moreover, the virus-encoded transactivator Tax(BLV) decreased DNA methyltransferase expression levels, which could explain the lower level of cytosine methylation observed in the L267(LTaxSN) 5'-LTR compared with the L267 5'-LTR. Interestingly, DNA methylation inhibitors and Tax(BLV) synergistically activated BLV promoter transcriptional activity in a cAMP-responsive element (CRE)-dependent manner. Mechanistically, methylation at the -154 or -129 CpG position (relative to the transcription start site) impaired in vitro binding of CRE-binding protein (CREB) transcription factors to their respective CRE sites. Methylation at -129 CpG alone was sufficient to decrease BLV promoter-driven reporter gene expression by 2-fold. We demonstrated in vivo the recruitment of CREB/CRE modulator (CREM) and to a lesser extent activating transcription factor-1 (ATF-1) to the hypomethylated CRE region of the YR2 5'-LTR, whereas we detected no CREB/CREM/ATF recruitment to the hypermethylated corresponding region in the L267 cells. Altogether, these findings suggest that site-specific DNA methylation of the BLV promoter represses viral transcription by directly inhibiting transcription factor binding, thereby contributing to true proviral latency.

  6. Repair of UV-damaged incoming plasmid DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keszenman-Pereyra, David

    1990-01-01

    A whole-cell transformation assay was used for the repair of UV-damaged plasma DNA in highly-transformable haploid strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae having different repair capabilities. The experiments described demonstrate that three epistasis groups (Friedberg 1988) are involved in the repair of UV-incoming DNA and that the repair processes act less efficiently on incoming DNA than they do on chromosomal DNA. The implications of these findings for UV repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are discussed. (author)

  7. DNA from keratinous tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsson, Camilla F.; Olsen, Maja E.; Brandt, Luise Ørsted

    2011-01-01

    Keratinous tissues such as nail, hair, horn, scales and feather have been used as a source of DNA for over 20 years. Particular benefits of such tissues include the ease with which they can be sampled, the relative stability of DNA in such tissues once sampled, and, in the context of ancient...... genetic analyses, the fact that sampling generally causes minimal visual damage to valuable specimens. Even when freshly sampled, however, the DNA quantity and quality in the fully keratinized parts of such tissues is extremely poor in comparison to other tissues such as blood and muscle – although little...... systematic research has been undertaken to characterize how such degradation may relate to sample source. In this review paper we present the current understanding of the quality and limitations of DNA in two key keratinous tissues, nail and hair. The findings indicate that although some fragments of nuclear...

  8. DNA fusion gene vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Bassi, Maria Rosaria; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2010-01-01

    DNA vaccines are versatile and safe, but limited immunogenicity has prevented their use in the clinical setting. Experimentally, immunogenicity may be enhanced by the use of new delivery technologies, by coadministration of cytokines and pathogen-associated molecular patterns, or by fusion...... of antigens into molecular domains that enhance antigen presentation. More specifically, the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines may benefit from increased protein synthesis, increased T-cell help and MHC class I presentation, and the addition of a range of specific cytokines and pathogen-associated molecular...... with viral-vectored vaccines, various synergistic components may need to be incorporated into DNA vaccines. From the perspective of the future clinical use of DNA vaccines, it has been suggested that antigen presentation should be improved and cytokine coadministration attempted. However, even...

  9. DNA Sampling Hook

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The DNA Sampling Hook is a significant improvement on a method of obtaining a tissue sample from a live fish in situ from an aquatic environment. A tissue sample...

  10. DNA-Origami

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voigt, Niels Vinther; Tørring, Thomas; Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager

    2010-01-01

    DNA-nanostrukturer giver nye muligheder for studier af individuelle molekyler. Ved at udnytte DNAs unikke selvsamlende egenskaber kan man designe systemer, hvorpå der kan studeres kemiske reaktioner, fluoroforer og biiomolekyler på enkeltmolekyle-niveau....

  11. DNA Microarray Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content DNA Microarray Technology Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research News Features Funding Divisions Funding ...

  12. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook-Deegan, R.M. [Georgetown Univ., Kennedy Inst. of Ethics, Washington, DC (United States); Venter, J.C. [National Inst. of Neurological Disorders and Strokes, Bethesda, MD (United States); Gilbert, W. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Mulligan, J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Mansfield, B.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  13. Close encounters with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffeo, C.; Yoo, J.; Comer, J.; Wells, D. B.; Luan, B.; Aksimentiev, A.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past ten years, the all-atom molecular dynamics method has grown in the scale of both systems and processes amenable to it and in its ability to make quantitative predictions about the behavior of experimental systems. The field of computational DNA research is no exception, witnessing a dramatic increase in the size of systems simulated with atomic resolution, the duration of individual simulations and the realism of the simulation outcomes. In this topical review, we describe the hallmark physical properties of DNA from the perspective of all-atom simulations. We demonstrate the amazing ability of such simulations to reveal the microscopic physical origins of experimentally observed phenomena and we review the frustrating limitations associated with imperfections of present atomic force fields and inadequate sampling. The review is focused on the following four physical properties of DNA: effective electric charge, response to an external mechanical force, interaction with other DNA molecules and behavior in an external electric field. PMID:25238560

  14. Gomphid DNA sequence data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — DNA sequence data for several genetic loci. This dataset is not publicly accessible because: It's already publicly available on GenBank. It can be accessed through...

  15. HPV DNA test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... test; Cancer of cervix - HPV DNA test References Hacker NF. Cervical dysplasia and cancer. In: Hacker NF, Gambone JC, Hobel CJ, eds. Hacker and Moore's Essentials of Obstetrics and Gynecology . 6th ...

  16. Close encounters with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffeo, C; Yoo, J; Comer, J; Wells, D B; Luan, B; Aksimentiev, A

    2014-10-15

    Over the past ten years, the all-atom molecular dynamics method has grown in the scale of both systems and processes amenable to it and in its ability to make quantitative predictions about the behavior of experimental systems. The field of computational DNA research is no exception, witnessing a dramatic increase in the size of systems simulated with atomic resolution, the duration of individual simulations and the realism of the simulation outcomes. In this topical review, we describe the hallmark physical properties of DNA from the perspective of all-atom simulations. We demonstrate the amazing ability of such simulations to reveal the microscopic physical origins of experimentally observed phenomena. We also discuss the frustrating limitations associated with imperfections of present atomic force fields and inadequate sampling. The review is focused on the following four physical properties of DNA: effective electric charge, response to an external mechanical force, interaction with other DNA molecules and behavior in an external electric field.

  17. FBI's DNA analysis program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, John R.

    1994-03-01

    Forensic DNA profiling technology is a significant law enforcement tool due to its superior discriminating power. Applying the principles of population genetics to the DNA profile obtained in violent crime investigations results in low frequency of occurrence estimates for the DNA profile. These estimates often range from a frequency of occurrence of 1 in 50 unrelated individuals to 1 in a million unrelated individuals or even smaller. It is this power to discriminate among individuals in the population that has propelled forensic DNA technology to the forefront of forensic testing in violent crime cases. Not only is the technology extremely powerful in including or excluding a criminal suspect as the perpetrator, but it also gives rise to the potential of identifying criminal suspects in cases where the investigators of unknown suspect cases have exhausted all other available leads.

  18. Making DNA Fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunley, Kathie F.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an activity to simulate electrophoresis using everyday items. Uses adding machine paper to construct a set of DNA fingerprints that can be used to solve crime cases designed by students in any biology class. (JRH)

  19. Radiation damage in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafleur, V.

    1978-01-01

    A number of experiments are described with the purpose to obtain a better insight in the chemical nature and the biological significance of radiation-induced damage in DNA, with some emphasis on the significance of alkali-labile sites. It is shown that not only reactions of OH radicals but also of H radicals introduce breaks and other inactivating damage in single-standed phiX174 DNA. It is found that phosphate buffer is very suitable for the study of the reactions of H radicals with DNA, as the H 2 PO 4 - ions convert the hydrated electrons into H radicals. The hydrated electron, which does react with DNA, does not cause a detectable inactivation. (Auth.)

  20. DNA to DNA transcription might exist in eukaryotic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Gao-De

    2016-01-01

    Till now, in biological sciences, the term, transcription, mainly refers to DNA to RNA transcription. But our recently published experimental findings obtained from Plasmodium falciparum strongly suggest the existence of DNA to DNA transcription in the genome of eukaryotic cells, which could shed some light on the functions of certain noncoding DNA in the human and other eukaryotic genomes.

  1. Patterning nanocrystals using DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Shara Carol [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    One of the goals of nanotechnology is to enable programmed self-assembly of patterns made of various materials with nanometer-sized control. This dissertation describes the results of experiments templating arrangements of gold and semiconductor nanocrystals using 2'-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Previously, simple DNA-templated linear arrangements of two and three nanocrystals structures have been made.[1] Here, we have sought to assemble larger and more complex nanostructures. Gold-DNA conjugates with 50 to 100 bases self-assembled into planned arrangements using strands of DNA containing complementary base sequences. We used two methods to increase the complexity of the arrangements: using branched synthetic doublers within the DNA covalent backbone to create discrete nanocrystal groupings, and incorporating the nanocrystals into a previously developed DNA lattice structure [2][3] that self-assembles from tiles made of DNA double-crossover molecules to create ordered nanoparticle arrays. In the first project, the introduction of a covalently-branched synthetic doubler reagent into the backbone of DNA strands created a branched DNA ''trimer.'' This DNA trimer templated various structures that contained groupings of three and four gold nanoparticles, giving promising, but inconclusive transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. Due to the presence of a variety of possible structures in the reaction mixtures, and due to the difficulty of isolating the desired structures, the TEM and gel electrophoresis results for larger structures having four particles, and for structures containing both 5 and 10 nm gold nanoparticles were inconclusive. Better results may come from using optical detection methods, or from improved sample preparation. In the second project, we worked toward making two-dimensional ordered arrays of nanocrystals. We replicated and improved upon previous results for making DNA lattices, increasing the size of the lattices

  2. Das DNA-Puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Stefan

    Im Jahre 1953 wurde von James Watson und Francis Crick erstmalig der strukturelle Aufbau der sogenannten DNA (Desoxyribonukleinsäure) beschrieben, welche das Erbgut jedes Lebewesens enthält. Der wesentliche Teil des Erbguts wird dabei durch eine sehr lange Folge der vier Basen Adenin (A), Cytosin (C), Guanin (G) und Thymin (T) codiert. Seit einigen Jahren ist es möglich, die Folge der vier Basen zu einer gegebenen DNA zu bestimmen. Biologen bezeichnen diesen Vorgang als Sequenzierung.

  3. PDA: Pooled DNA analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chin-Yu

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Association mapping using abundant single nucleotide polymorphisms is a powerful tool for identifying disease susceptibility genes for complex traits and exploring possible genetic diversity. Genotyping large numbers of SNPs individually is performed routinely but is cost prohibitive for large-scale genetic studies. DNA pooling is a reliable and cost-saving alternative genotyping method. However, no software has been developed for complete pooled-DNA analyses, including data standardization, allele frequency estimation, and single/multipoint DNA pooling association tests. This motivated the development of the software, 'PDA' (Pooled DNA Analyzer, to analyze pooled DNA data. Results We develop the software, PDA, for the analysis of pooled-DNA data. PDA is originally implemented with the MATLAB® language, but it can also be executed on a Windows system without installing the MATLAB®. PDA provides estimates of the coefficient of preferential amplification and allele frequency. PDA considers an extended single-point association test, which can compare allele frequencies between two DNA pools constructed under different experimental conditions. Moreover, PDA also provides novel chromosome-wide multipoint association tests based on p-value combinations and a sliding-window concept. This new multipoint testing procedure overcomes a computational bottleneck of conventional haplotype-oriented multipoint methods in DNA pooling analyses and can handle data sets having a large pool size and/or large numbers of polymorphic markers. All of the PDA functions are illustrated in the four bona fide examples. Conclusion PDA is simple to operate and does not require that users have a strong statistical background. The software is available at http://www.ibms.sinica.edu.tw/%7Ecsjfann/first%20flow/pda.htm.

  4. Racemic DNA Crystallography

    OpenAIRE

    Mandal , Pradeep K.; Collie , Gavin W.; Kauffmann , Brice; Huc , Ivan

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Racemates increase the chances of crystallization by allowing molecular contacts to be formed in a greater number of ways. With the advent of protein synthesis, the production of protein racemates and racemic-protein crystallography are now possible. Curiously, racemic DNA crystallography had not been investigated despite the commercial availability of Land D-deoxyribo-oligonucleotides. Here, we report a study into racemic DNA crystallography showing the strong propens...

  5. Celebrating DNA's Repair Crew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Thomas A

    2015-12-03

    This year, the Nobel Prize in Chemistry has been awarded to Tomas Lindahl, Aziz Sancar, and Paul Modrich for their seminal studies of the mechanisms by which cells from bacteria to man repair DNA damage that is generated by normal cellular metabolism and stress from the environment. These studies beautifully illustrate the remarkable power of DNA repair to influence life from evolution through disease susceptibility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Introduction to DNA methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delincee, H.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this session is to discuss the various possibilities for detecting modifications in DNA after irradiation and whether these changes can be utilized as an indicator for the irradiation treatment of foods. The requirement to be fulfilled is that the method be able to distinguish irradiated food without the presence of a control sample, thus the measured response after irradiation must be large enough to supersede background levels from other treatments. Much work has been performed on the effects of radiation on DNA, particularly due to its importance in radiation biology. The main lesions of DNA as a result of irradiation are base damage, damage of the sugar moiety, single strand and double strand breaks. Crosslinking between bases also occurs, e.g. production of thymine dimers, or between DNA and protein. A valuable review on how to utilize these DNA changes for detection purposes has already appeared. Tables 1, 2 and 3 list the proposed methods of detecting changes in irradiated DNA, some identified products as examples for a possible irradiation indicator, in the case of immunoassay the substance used as antigen, and some selected literature references. In this short review, it is not intended to provide a complete literature survey

  7. Variations in brain DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus eAvila

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available It is assumed that DNA sequences are conserved in the diverse cell types present in a multicellular organism like the human being. Thus, in order to compare the sequences in the genome of DNA from different individuals, nucleic acid is commonly isolated from a single tissue. In this regard, blood cells are widely used for this purpose because of their availability. Thus blood DNA has been used to study genetic familiar diseases that affect other tissues and organs, such as the liver, heart, and brain. While this approach is valid for the identification of familial diseases in which mutations are present in parental germinal cells and, therefore, in all the cells of a given organism, it is not suitable to identify sporadic diseases in which mutations might occur in specific somatic cells. This review addresses somatic DNA variations in different tissues or cells (mainly in the brain of single individuals and discusses whether the dogma of DNA invariance between cell types is indeed correct. We will also discuss how single nucleotide somatic variations arise, focusing on the presence of specific DNA mutations in the brain.

  8. Epigenetics in Alzheimer's Disease: Perspective of DNA Methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qazi, Talal Jamil; Quan, Zhenzhen; Mir, Asif; Qing, Hong

    2018-02-01

    Research over the years has shown that causes of Alzheimer's disease are not well understood, but over the past years, the involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in the developing memory formation either under pathological or physiological conditions has become clear. The term epigenetics represents the heredity of changes in phenotype that are independent of altered DNA sequences. Different studies validated that cytosine methylation of genomic DNA decreases with age in different tissues of mammals, and therefore, the role of epigenetic factors in developing neurological disorders in aging has been under focus. In this review, we summarized and reviewed the involvement of different epigenetic mechanisms especially the DNA methylation in Alzheimer's disease (AD), late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD), familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD), and autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease (ADAD). Down to the minutest of details, we tried to discuss the methylation patterns like mitochondrial DNA methylation and ribosomal DNA (rDNA) methylation. Additionally, we mentioned some therapeutic approaches related to epigenetics, which could provide a potential cure for AD. Moreover, we reviewed some recent studies that validate DNA methylation as a potential biomarker and its role in AD. We hope that this review will provide new insights into the understanding of AD pathogenesis from the epigenetic perspective especially from the perspective of DNA methylation.

  9. Extrachromosomal circles of satellite repeats and 5S ribosomal DNA in human cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen Sarit

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extrachomosomal circular DNA (eccDNA is ubiquitous in eukaryotic organisms and was detected in every organism tested, including in humans. A two-dimensional gel electrophoresis facilitates the detection of eccDNA in preparations of genomic DNA. Using this technique we have previously demonstrated that most of eccDNA consists of exact multiples of chromosomal tandemly repeated DNA, including both coding genes and satellite DNA. Results Here we report the occurrence of eccDNA in every tested human cell line. It has heterogeneous mass ranging from less than 2 kb to over 20 kb. We describe eccDNA homologous to human alpha satellite and the SstI mega satellite. Moreover, we show, for the first time, circular multimers of the human 5S ribosomal DNA (rDNA, similar to previous findings in Drosophila and plants. We further demonstrate structures that correspond to intermediates of rolling circle replication, which emerge from the circular multimers of 5S rDNA and SstI satellite. Conclusions These findings, and previous reports, support the general notion that every chromosomal tandem repeat is prone to generate eccDNA in eukryoric organisms including humans. They suggest the possible involvement of eccDNA in the length variability observed in arrays of tandem repeats. The implications of eccDNA on genome biology may include mechanisms of centromere evolution, concerted evolution and homogenization of tandem repeats and genomic plasticity.

  10. Involvement Without Participation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsén, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The article presents a case study of a knowledge-intensive company that launched a 2-year project to improve their psychosocial working environment. All parties agreed on the project, and the methods used aimed to promote the involvement of the employees. Surprisingly, the psychosocial working...... environment did not improve; on the contrary, it deteriorated. The article highlights cultural and structural obstacles to the process, including an inadequate understanding of organisational learning and a narrow focus on market and competition. The endeavours did not consistently increase delegation...

  11. Exploring translocation of proteins on DNA by NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marius Clore, G.

    2011-01-01

    While an extensive body of knowledge has accumulated on the structures of transcription factors, DNA and their complexes from both NMR and crystallography, much less is known at a molecular level regarding the mechanisms whereby transcription factors locate their specific DNA target site within an overwhelming sea of non-specific DNA sites. Indirect kinetic data suggested that three processes are involved in the search procedure: jumping by dissociation of the protein from the DNA followed by re-association at another site, direct transfer from one DNA molecule or segment to another, and one-dimensional sliding. In this brief perspective I summarize recent NMR developments from our laboratory that have permitted direct characterization of the species and molecular mechanisms involved in the target search process, including the detection of highly transient sparsely-populated states. The main tool in these studies involves the application of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement, supplemented by z-exchange spectroscopy, lineshape analysis and residual dipolar couplings. These studies led to the first direct demonstration of rotation-coupled sliding of a protein along the DNA and the direct transfer of a protein from one DNA molecule to another without dissociating into free solution.

  12. Functions and Dynamics of DNA Repair Proteins in Mitosis and Meiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Uringa

    2005-01-01

    textabstractMy PhD project encompassed studies on the functions of several different proteins, all involved in DNA repair, in somatic and germ-line cells. Hr6b and Rad18Sc are involved in a DNA repair mechanism called ‘Replicative Damage Bypass’ (RDB), and function as ubiquitin conjugating

  13. Role of fetal DNA in preeclampsia (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konečná, Barbora; Vlková, Barbora; Celec, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Preeclampsia is an autoimmune disorder characterized by hypertension. It begins with abnormal cytotrophoblast apoptosis, which leads to inflammation and an increase in the levels of anti-angiogenic factors followed by the disruption of the angiogenic status. Increased levels of fetal DNA and RNA coming from the placenta, one of the most commonly affected organs in pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia, have been found in pregnant women with the condition. However, it remains unknown as to whether this is a cause or a consequence of preeclampsia. Few studies have been carried out on preeclampsia in which an animal model of preeclampsia was induced by an injection of different types of DNA that are mimic fetal DNA and provoke inflammation through Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) or cyclic guanosine monophosphate-adenosine monophosphate (cGAMP). The specific mechanisms involved in the development of preeclampsia are not yet fully understood. It is hypothesized that the presence of different fragments of fetal DNA in maternal plasma may cause for the development of preeclampsia. The function of DNase during preeclampsia also remains unresolved. Studies have suggested that its activity is decreased or the DNA is protected against its effects. Further research is required to uncover the pathogenesis of preeclampsia and focus more on the condition of patients with the condition.

  14. Identification of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) as a novel target of bisphenol A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuki; Ito, Takumi; Karasawa, Satoki; Enomoto, Teruya; Nashimoto, Akihiro; Hase, Yasuyoshi; Sakamoto, Satoshi; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Handa, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) forms the backbone of plastics and epoxy resins used to produce packaging for various foods and beverages. BPA is also an estrogenic disruptor, interacting with human estrogen receptors (ER) and other related nuclear receptors. Nevertheless, the effects of BPA on human health remain unclear. The present study identified DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) as a novel BPA-binding protein. DNA-PKcs, in association with the Ku heterodimer (Ku70/80), is a critical enzyme involved in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Low levels of DNA-PK activity are previously reported to be associated with an increased risk of certain types of cancer. Although the Kd for the interaction between BPA and a drug-binding mutant of DNA-PKcs was comparatively low (137 nM), high doses of BPA were required before cellular effects were observed (100-300 μM). The results of an in vitro kinase assay showed that BPA inhibited DNA-PK kinase activity in a concentration-dependent manner. In M059K cells, BPA inhibited the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs at Ser2056 and H2AX at Ser139 in response to ionizing radiation (IR)-irradiation. BPA also disrupted DNA-PKcs binding to Ku70/80 and increased the radiosensitivity of M059K cells, but not M059J cells (which are DNA-PKcs-deficient). Taken together, these results provide new evidence of the effects of BPA on DNA repair in mammalian cells, which are mediated via inhibition of DNA-PK activity. This study may warrant the consideration of the possible carcinogenic effects of high doses of BPA, which are mediated through its action on DNA-PK.

  15. Study on a hidden protein-DNA binding in salmon sperm DNA sample by dynamic kinetic capillary isoelectric focusing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Liang; Dou Peng; Dong Mingming; Ke Xiaokang; Bian Ningsheng; Liu Zhen

    2009-01-01

    Nuclease P1 is an important enzyme that hydrolyzes RNA or single-stranded DNA into nucleotides, and complete digestion is an essential basis for assays based on this enzyme. To digest a doubled-stranded DNA, the enzyme is usually combined with heat denaturing, which breaks doubled-stranded DNA into single strands. This paper presents an un-expected phenomenon that nuclease P1, in combination with heat denaturing, fails to completely digest a DNA sample extracted from salmon sperm. Under the experimental conditions used, at which nuclease P1 can completely digest calf thymus DNA, the digestion yield of salmon sperm DNA was only 89.5%. Spectrometric measurement indicated that a total protein of 4.7% is present in the DNA sample. To explain the reason for this phenomenon, the dynamic kinetic capillary isoelectric focusing (DK-CIEF) approach proposed previously, which allows for the discrimination of different types of protein-DNA interactions and the measurement of the individual dissociation rate constants, was modified and applied to examine possible protein-DNA interactions involved. It was found that a non-specific DNA-protein binding occurs in the sample, the dissociation rate constant for which was measured to be 7.05 ± 0.83 x 10 -3 s -1 . The formation of DNA-protein complex was suggested to be the main reason for the incomplete digestion of the DNA sample. The modified DK-CIEF approach can be applied as general DNA samples, with the advantages of fast speed and low sample consumption.

  16. Blood extracellular DNA after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirov, V.G.; Tishchenko, L.I.; Surkova, E.A.; Vasil'eva, I.N.

    1993-01-01

    It has been shown that blood extracellular DNA of irradiated rats largely consists of the low-molecular DNA and its oligomers. Molecular masses of oligomers are multiple to molecular mass of monomer fragment with nucleosome size. The low-molecular DNA has linear form. The average content of GC-pairs in low-molecular DNA is higher than in total rat's DNA (48.5% against 41.5%). The low-molecular DNA is a part of complex containing RNA, acidic proteins and lipids. It is assumed that the formation of low-molecular DNA is a result of Ca/Mg - dependent nuclear endonuclease action

  17. Involvement in Physical Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Gavin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A total of 1,096 adolescents participated in 123 focus groups regarding the perceived outcomes of their involvement in sports and physical activity (PA. The groups, segmented by grade level, sex, and school types, were conducted in both public and private high schools in Montreal, Quebec. We sought to understand, through the participants’ own words, their perception of the outcome matrix of involvement in sports and PA. Focus group questions emphasized changes that adolescents associated with such engagement. In particular, participants were asked how sports and PA might influence behaviors, emotional states, personal characteristics, and other outcomes. Twelve themes were identified in the responses: Positive Health and Physical Changes (18.5%, Activity-Related Positive Emotions (15.6%, and Personal Learning (11.3% were most prevalent in the discussions. A cluster of deeper personal changes thematically described as Self-Identity, Autonomy, and Positive Character Development accounted for another 16.5% of the responses. Relatively few commentaries emphasized negative effects (7.1%. Converting the proportions of qualitative data into a quantitative index allowed us to analyze potential differences in emphasis according to sex, age, and school type. Though a few significant findings emerged, the larger pattern was of a uniform perceptual map across the variables for this adolescent sample. Implications drawn from this investigation highlight the need to clearly articulate concrete pathways to positive nonphysical changes (e.g., mood states, autonomy, positive character development from engagements in sports and PA.

  18. Public interest group involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelley, P.

    1986-01-01

    Including public interest groups in the siting process for nuclear waste disposal facilities is of great importance. Controversial sitings often result in litigation, but involving public interest groups early in the process will lessen the change of this. They act as surrogates for the general public and should be considered as members of the team. It is important to remember though, that all public interest groups are different. In choosing public panels such as public advisory committees, members should not be chosen on the basis of some quota. Opposition groups should not be excluded. Also, it is important to put the right person in charge of the committee. The goal of public involvement is to identify the conflicts. This must be done during the decision process, because conflicts must be known before they can be eliminated. Regarding litigation, it is important to ease through and around legal battles. If the siting process has integrity and a good faith effort has been shown, the court should uphold the effort. In addition, it is important to be negotiable and to eliminate shortcuts

  19. DNA Knots: Theory and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumners, D. W.

    Cellular DNA is a long, thread-like molecule with remarkably complex topology. Enzymes that manipulate the geometry and topology of cellular DNA perform many vital cellular processes (including segregation of daughter chromosomes, gene regulation, DNA repair, and generation of antibody diversity). Some enzymes pass DNA through itself via enzyme-bridged transient breaks in the DNA; other enzymes break the DNA apart and reconnect it to different ends. In the topological approach to enzymology, circular DNA is incubated with an enzyme, producing an enzyme signature in the form of DNA knots and links. By observing the changes in DNA geometry (supercoiling) and topology (knotting and linking) due to enzyme action, the enzyme binding and mechanism can often be characterized. This paper will discuss some personal research history, and the tangle model for the analysis of site-specific recombination experiments on circular DNA.

  20. Force regulated dynamics of RPA on a DNA fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmerich, Felix E; Daldrop, Peter; Pinto, Cosimo; Levikova, Maryna; Cejka, Petr; Seidel, Ralf

    2016-07-08

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a single-stranded DNA binding protein, involved in most aspects of eukaryotic DNA metabolism. Here, we study the behavior of RPA on a DNA substrate that mimics a replication fork. Using magnetic tweezers we show that both yeast and human RPA can open forked DNA when sufficient external tension is applied. In contrast, at low force, RPA becomes rapidly displaced by the rehybridization of the DNA fork. This process appears to be governed by the binding or the release of an RPA microdomain (toehold) of only few base-pairs length. This gives rise to an extremely rapid exchange dynamics of RPA at the fork. Fork rezipping rates reach up to hundreds of base-pairs per second, being orders of magnitude faster than RPA dissociation from ssDNA alone. Additionally, we show that RPA undergoes diffusive motion on ssDNA, such that it can be pushed over long distances by a rezipping fork. Generally the behavior of both human and yeast RPA homologs is very similar. However, in contrast to yeast RPA, the dissociation of human RPA from ssDNA is greatly reduced at low Mg(2+) concentrations, such that human RPA can melt DNA in absence of force. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. MICA: desktop software for comprehensive searching of DNA databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glick Benjamin S

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular biologists work with DNA databases that often include entire genomes. A common requirement is to search a DNA database to find exact matches for a nondegenerate or partially degenerate query. The software programs available for such purposes are normally designed to run on remote servers, but an appealing alternative is to work with DNA databases stored on local computers. We describe a desktop software program termed MICA (K-Mer Indexing with Compact Arrays that allows large DNA databases to be searched efficiently using very little memory. Results MICA rapidly indexes a DNA database. On a Macintosh G5 computer, the complete human genome could be indexed in about 5 minutes. The indexing algorithm recognizes all 15 characters of the DNA alphabet and fully captures the information in any DNA sequence, yet for a typical sequence of length L, the index occupies only about 2L bytes. The index can be searched to return a complete list of exact matches for a nondegenerate or partially degenerate query of any length. A typical search of a long DNA sequence involves reading only a small fraction of the index into memory. As a result, searches are fast even when the available RAM is limited. Conclusion MICA is suitable as a search engine for desktop DNA analysis software.

  2. Criminal Genomic Pragmatism: Prisoners' Representations of DNA Technology and Biosecurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Helena; Silva, Susana

    2012-01-01

    Background. Within the context of the use of DNA technology in crime investigation, biosecurity is perceived by different stakeholders according to their particular rationalities and interests. Very little is known about prisoners' perceptions and assessments of the uses of DNA technology in solving crime. Aim. To propose a conceptual model that serves to analyse and interpret prisoners' representations of DNA technology and biosecurity. Methods. A qualitative study using an interpretative approach based on 31 semi-structured tape-recorded interviews was carried out between May and September 2009, involving male inmates in three prisons located in the north of Portugal. The content analysis focused on the following topics: the meanings attributed to DNA and assessments of the risks and benefits of the uses of DNA technology and databasing in forensic applications. Results. DNA was described as a record of identity, an exceptional material, and a powerful biometric identifier. The interviewees believed that DNA can be planted to incriminate suspects. Convicted offenders argued for the need to extend the criteria for the inclusion of DNA profiles in forensic databases and to restrict the removal of profiles. Conclusions. The conceptual model entitled criminal genomic pragmatism allows for an understanding of the views of prison inmates regarding DNA technology and biosecurity. PMID:22791960

  3. Criminal Genomic Pragmatism: Prisoners' Representations of DNA Technology and Biosecurity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Machado

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Within the context of the use of DNA technology in crime investigation, biosecurity is perceived by different stakeholders according to their particular rationalities and interests. Very little is known about prisoners’ perceptions and assessments of the uses of DNA technology in solving crime. Aim. To propose a conceptual model that serves to analyse and interpret prisoners’ representations of DNA technology and biosecurity. Methods. A qualitative study using an interpretative approach based on 31 semi-structured tape-recorded interviews was carried out between May and September 2009, involving male inmates in three prisons located in the north of Portugal. The content analysis focused on the following topics: the meanings attributed to DNA and assessments of the risks and benefits of the uses of DNA technology and databasing in forensic applications. Results. DNA was described as a record of identity, an exceptional material, and a powerful biometric identifier. The interviewees believed that DNA can be planted to incriminate suspects. Convicted offenders argued for the need to extend the criteria for the inclusion of DNA profiles in forensic databases and to restrict the removal of profiles. Conclusions. The conceptual model entitled criminal genomic pragmatism allows for an understanding of the views of prison inmates regarding DNA technology and biosecurity.

  4. Criminal genomic pragmatism: prisoners' representations of DNA technology and biosecurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Helena; Silva, Susana

    2012-01-01

    Within the context of the use of DNA technology in crime investigation, biosecurity is perceived by different stakeholders according to their particular rationalities and interests. Very little is known about prisoners' perceptions and assessments of the uses of DNA technology in solving crime. To propose a conceptual model that serves to analyse and interpret prisoners' representations of DNA technology and biosecurity. A qualitative study using an interpretative approach based on 31 semi-structured tape-recorded interviews was carried out between May and September 2009, involving male inmates in three prisons located in the north of Portugal. The content analysis focused on the following topics: the meanings attributed to DNA and assessments of the risks and benefits of the uses of DNA technology and databasing in forensic applications. DNA was described as a record of identity, an exceptional material, and a powerful biometric identifier. The interviewees believed that DNA can be planted to incriminate suspects. Convicted offenders argued for the need to extend the criteria for the inclusion of DNA profiles in forensic databases and to restrict the removal of profiles. The conceptual model entitled criminal genomic pragmatism allows for an understanding of the views of prison inmates regarding DNA technology and biosecurity.

  5. Transcription-induced DNA supercoiling: New roles of intranucleosomal DNA loops in DNA repair and transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimova, N S; Pestov, N A; Kulaeva, O I; Clark, D J; Studitsky, V M

    2016-05-26

    RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcription through chromatin is accompanied by formation of small intranucleosomal DNA loops. Pol II captured within a small loop drives accumulation of DNA supercoiling, facilitating further transcription. DNA breaks relieve supercoiling and induce Pol II arrest, allowing detection of DNA damage hidden in chromatin structure.

  6. [Father involvement in childbirth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalón, H; Toro, R; Riesco, I; Pinto, M; Silva, C

    2014-10-01

    Recent initiatives have promoted the participation of fathers in the early care of their children. To assess the results of a program to encourage parental involvement in childbirth. Parents of healthy term newborns were randomly allocated to participate either in the birth experience or control. The protocol included: to dry the skin, umbilical cord cutting off, weight, height, and finally give him/her to the mother for the skin-to-skin contact. Heart rate (HR), respiratory (RR) and temperature were evaluated one hour later. In the first outpatient clinic assessment, mothers completed a questionnaire. 127 fathers participated either in the birth experience or control. 62 followed the protocol and 65 the control. Both newborn groups were comparable. Also were fathers in age, education and rurality; mothers in primiparity. Significant differences: night care (37/62, 10/65 59.6% vs 15.4%, pfathers at birth, even belonging to a discouraging socio cultural environment.

  7. Rapid DNA analysis for automated processing and interpretation of low DNA content samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turingan, Rosemary S; Vasantgadkar, Sameer; Palombo, Luke; Hogan, Catherine; Jiang, Hua; Tan, Eugene; Selden, Richard F

    2016-01-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) analysis of casework samples with low DNA content include those resulting from the transfer of epithelial cells from the skin to an object (e.g., cells on a water bottle, or brim of a cap), blood spatter stains, and small bone and tissue fragments. Low DNA content (LDC) samples are important in a wide range of settings, including disaster response teams to assist in victim identification and family reunification, military operations to identify friend or foe, criminal forensics to identify suspects and exonerate the innocent, and medical examiner and coroner offices to identify missing persons. Processing LDC samples requires experienced laboratory personnel, isolated workstations, and sophisticated equipment, requires transport time, and involves complex procedures. We present a rapid DNA analysis system designed specifically to generate STR profiles from LDC samples in field-forward settings by non-technical operators. By performing STR in the field, close to the site of collection, rapid DNA analysis has the potential to increase throughput and to provide actionable information in real time. A Low DNA Content BioChipSet (LDC BCS) was developed and manufactured by injection molding. It was designed to function in the fully integrated Accelerated Nuclear DNA Equipment (ANDE) instrument previously designed for analysis of buccal swab and other high DNA content samples (Investigative Genet. 4(1):1-15, 2013). The LDC BCS performs efficient DNA purification followed by microfluidic ultrafiltration of the purified DNA, maximizing the quantity of DNA available for subsequent amplification and electrophoretic separation and detection of amplified fragments. The system demonstrates accuracy, precision, resolution, signal strength, and peak height ratios appropriate for casework analysis. The LDC rapid DNA analysis system is effective for the generation of STR profiles from a wide range of sample types. The technology broadens the range of sample

  8. The discovery of the structure of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, G. L.

    2003-04-01

    On 25 April 1953, Nature published a letter by Francis Crick and James Watson, at the Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge, proposing a structure for DNA. This letter marked the beginning of a revolution in biology. Besides Crick and Watson, two other scientists, Rosalind Franklin and Maurice Wilkins, played key roles in the discovery. After sketching the early careers of the four scientists, the present article gives an account of the physics and chemistry involved in the discovery, and the events leading up to it.

  9. Eukaryotic DNA Replicases

    KAUST Repository

    Zaher, Manal S.; Oke, Muse; Hamdan, Samir

    2014-01-01

    The current model of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork includes three replicative DNA polymerases, polymerase α/primase complex (Pol α), polymerase δ (Pol δ), and polymerase ε (Pol ε). The primase synthesizes 8–12 nucleotide RNA primers that are extended by the DNA polymerization activity of Pol α into 30–35 nucleotide RNA-DNA primers. Replication factor C (RFC) opens the polymerase clamp-like processivity factor, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and loads it onto the primer-template. Pol δ utilizes PCNA to mediate highly processive DNA synthesis, while Pol ε has intrinsic high processivity that is modestly stimulated by PCNA. Pol ε replicates the leading strand and Pol δ replicates the lagging strand in a division of labor that is not strict. The three polymerases are comprised of multiple subunits and share unifying features in their large catalytic and B subunits. The remaining subunits are evolutionarily not related and perform diverse functions. The catalytic subunits are members of family B, which are distinguished by their larger sizes due to inserts in their N- and C-terminal regions. The sizes of these inserts vary among the three polymerases, and their functions remain largely unknown. Strikingly, the quaternary structures of Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ε are arranged similarly. The catalytic subunits adopt a globular structure that is linked via its conserved C-terminal region to the B subunit. The remaining subunits are linked to the catalytic and B subunits in a highly flexible manner.

  10. Eukaryotic DNA Replicases

    KAUST Repository

    Zaher, Manal S.

    2014-11-21

    The current model of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork includes three replicative DNA polymerases, polymerase α/primase complex (Pol α), polymerase δ (Pol δ), and polymerase ε (Pol ε). The primase synthesizes 8–12 nucleotide RNA primers that are extended by the DNA polymerization activity of Pol α into 30–35 nucleotide RNA-DNA primers. Replication factor C (RFC) opens the polymerase clamp-like processivity factor, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and loads it onto the primer-template. Pol δ utilizes PCNA to mediate highly processive DNA synthesis, while Pol ε has intrinsic high processivity that is modestly stimulated by PCNA. Pol ε replicates the leading strand and Pol δ replicates the lagging strand in a division of labor that is not strict. The three polymerases are comprised of multiple subunits and share unifying features in their large catalytic and B subunits. The remaining subunits are evolutionarily not related and perform diverse functions. The catalytic subunits are members of family B, which are distinguished by their larger sizes due to inserts in their N- and C-terminal regions. The sizes of these inserts vary among the three polymerases, and their functions remain largely unknown. Strikingly, the quaternary structures of Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ε are arranged similarly. The catalytic subunits adopt a globular structure that is linked via its conserved C-terminal region to the B subunit. The remaining subunits are linked to the catalytic and B subunits in a highly flexible manner.

  11. Nek1 silencing slows down DNA repair and blocks DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelegrini, Alessandra Luíza; Moura, Dinara Jaqueline; Brenner, Bethânia Luise; Ledur, Pitia Flores; Maques, Gabriela Porto; Henriques, João Antônio Pegas; Saffi, Jenifer; Lenz, Guido

    2010-09-01

    Never in mitosis A (NIMA)-related kinases (Nek) are evolutionarily conserved proteins structurally related to the Aspergillus nidulans mitotic regulator NIMA. Nek1 is one of the 11 isoforms of the Neks identified in mammals. Different lines of evidence suggest the participation of Nek1 in response to DNA damage, which is also supported by the interaction of this kinase with proteins involved in DNA repair pathways and cell cycle regulation. In this report, we show that cells with Nek1 knockdown (KD) through stable RNA interference present a delay in DNA repair when treated with methyl-methanesulfonate (MMS), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and cisplatin (CPT). In particular, interstrand cross links induced by CPT take much longer to be resolved in Nek1 KD cells when compared to wild-type (WT) cells. In KD cells, phosphorylation of Chk1 in response to CPT was strongly reduced. While WT cells accumulate in G(2)/M after DNA damage with MMS and H(2)O(2), Nek1 KD cells do not arrest, suggesting that G(2)/M arrest induced by the DNA damage requires Nek1. Surprisingly, CPT-treated Nek1 KD cells arrest with a 4N DNA content similar to WT cells. This deregulation in cell cycle control in Nek1 KD cells leads to an increased sensitivity to genotoxic agents when compared to WT cells. These results suggest that Nek1 is involved in the beginning of the cellular response to genotoxic stress and plays an important role in preventing cell death induced by DNA damage.

  12. Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I can disrupt G-quadruplex structures during DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Fang-Yuan; Hou, Xi-Miao; Fan, San-Hong; Rety, Stephane; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Xi, Xu-Guang

    2017-12-01

    Non-canonical four-stranded G-quadruplex (G4) DNA structures can form in G-rich sequences that are widely distributed throughout the genome. The presence of G4 structures can impair DNA replication by hindering the progress of replicative polymerases (Pols), and failure to resolve these structures can lead to genetic instability. In the present study, we combined different approaches to address the question of whether and how Escherichia coli Pol I resolves G4 obstacles during DNA replication and/or repair. We found that E. coli Pol I-catalyzed DNA synthesis could be arrested by G4 structures at low protein concentrations and the degree of inhibition was strongly dependent on the stability of the G4 structures. Interestingly, at high protein concentrations, E. coli Pol I was able to overcome some kinds of G4 obstacles without the involvement of other molecules and could achieve complete replication of G4 DNA. Mechanistic studies suggested that multiple Pol I proteins might be implicated in G4 unfolding, and the disruption of G4 structures requires energy derived from dNTP hydrolysis. The present work not only reveals an unrealized function of E. coli Pol I, but also presents a possible mechanism by which G4 structures can be resolved during DNA replication and/or repair in E. coli. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  13. DNA repair is responsible for the presence of oxidatively damaged DNA lesions in urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooke, Marcus S.; Evans, Mark D.; Dove, Rosamund; Rozalski, Rafal; Gackowski, Daniel; Siomek, Agnieszka; Lunec, Joseph; Olinski, Ryszard

    2005-01-01

    The repair of oxidatively damaged DNA is integral to the maintenance of genomic stability, and hence prevention of a wide variety of pathological conditions, such as aging, cancer and cardiovascular disease. The ability to non-invasively assess DNA repair may provide information regarding repair pathways, variability in repair capacity, and susceptibility to disease. The development of assays to measure urinary DNA lesions offered this potential, although it rapidly became clear that possible contribution from diet and cell turnover may influence urinary lesion levels. Whilst early studies attempted to address these issues, up until now, much of the data appears conflicting. However, recent work from our laboratories, in which human volunteers were fed highly oxidatively modified 15 N-labelled DNA demonstrates that diet does not appear to contribute to urinary levels of 8-hydroxyguanine and 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine. Furthermore, we propose that a number of literature reports form an argument against a contribution from cell death. Indeed we, and others, have presented evidence, which strongly suggests the involvement of cell death to be minimal. Taken together, these data would appear to rule out various confounding factors, leaving DNA repair pathways as the principal source of urinary purine, if not DNA, lesions enabling such measurements to be used as indicators of repair

  14. DNA repair synthesis in human fibroblasts requires DNA polymerase delta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, C.; Reinhard, P.; Linn, S.

    1988-01-01

    When UV-irradiated cultured diploid human fibroblasts were permeabilized with Brij-58 then separated from soluble material by centrifugation, conservative DNA repair synthesis could be restored by a soluble factor obtained from the supernatant of similarly treated HeLa cells. Extensive purification of this factor yielded a 10.2 S, 220,000-dalton polypeptide with the DNA polymerase and 3'- to 5'-exonuclease activities reported for DNA polymerase delta II. Monoclonal antibody to KB cell DNA polymerase alpha, while binding to HeLa DNA polymerase alpha, did not bind to the HeLa DNA polymerase delta. Moreover, at micromolar concentrations N2-(p-n-butylphenyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-triphosphate (BuPdGTP) and 2-(p-n-butylanilino)-2'-deoxyadenosine 5'-triphosphate (BuAdATP) were potent inhibitors of DNA polymerase alpha, but did not inhibit the DNA polymerase delta. Neither purified DNA polymerase alpha nor beta could promote repair DNA synthesis in the permeabilized cells. Furthermore, under conditions which inhibited purified DNA polymerase alpha by greater than 90%, neither monoclonal antibodies to DNA polymerase alpha, BuPdGTP, nor BuAdATP was able to inhibit significantly the DNA repair synthesis mediated by the DNA polymerase delta. Thus, it appears that a major portion of DNA repair synthesis induced by UV irradiation might be catalyzed by DNA polymerase delta. When xeroderma pigmentosum human diploid fibroblasts were utilized, DNA repair synthesis dependent upon ultraviolet light could be restored by addition of both T4 endonuclease V and DNA polymerase delta, but not by addition of either one alone

  15. Probing the DNA Structural Requirements for Facilitated Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    DNA glycosylases perform a genome-wide search to locate damaged nucleotides among a great excess of undamaged nucleotides. Many glycosylases are capable of facilitated diffusion, whereby multiple sites along the DNA are sampled during a single binding encounter. Electrostatic interactions between positively charged amino acids and the negatively charged phosphate backbone are crucial for facilitated diffusion, but the extent to which diffusing proteins rely on the double-helical structure DNA is not known. Kinetic assays were used to probe the DNA searching mechanism of human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) and to test the extent to which diffusion requires B-form duplex DNA. Although AAG excises εA lesions from single-stranded DNA, it is not processive on single-stranded DNA because dissociation is faster than N-glycosidic bond cleavage. However, the AAG complex with single-stranded DNA is sufficiently stable to allow for DNA annealing when a complementary strand is added. This observation provides evidence of nonspecific association of AAG with single-stranded DNA. Single-strand gaps, bubbles, and bent structures do not impede the search by AAG. Instead, these flexible or bent structures lead to the capture of a nearby site of damage that is more efficient than that of a continuous B-form duplex. The ability of AAG to negotiate these helix discontinuities is inconsistent with a sliding mode of diffusion but can be readily explained by a hopping mode that involves microscopic dissociation and reassociation. These experiments provide evidence of relatively long-range hops that allow a searching protein to navigate around DNA binding proteins that would serve as obstacles to a sliding protein. PMID:25495964

  16. Sequence periodicity in nucleosomal DNA and intrinsic curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, T Murlidharan

    2010-05-17

    Most eukaryotic DNA contained in the nucleus is packaged by wrapping DNA around histone octamers. Histones are ubiquitous and bind most regions of chromosomal DNA. In order to achieve smooth wrapping of the DNA around the histone octamer, the DNA duplex should be able to deform and should possess intrinsic curvature. The deformability of DNA is a result of the non-parallelness of base pair stacks. The stacking interaction between base pairs is sequence dependent. The higher the stacking energy the more rigid the DNA helix, thus it is natural to expect that sequences that are involved in wrapping around the histone octamer should be unstacked and possess intrinsic curvature. Intrinsic curvature has been shown to be dictated by the periodic recurrence of certain dinucleotides. Several genome-wide studies directed towards mapping of nucleosome positions have revealed periodicity associated with certain stretches of sequences. In the current study, these sequences have been analyzed with a view to understand their sequence-dependent structures. Higher order DNA structures and the distribution of molecular bend loci associated with 146 base nucleosome core DNA sequence from C. elegans and chicken have been analyzed using the theoretical model for DNA curvature. The curvature dispersion calculated by cyclically permuting the sequences revealed that the molecular bend loci were delocalized throughout the nucleosome core region and had varying degrees of intrinsic curvature. The higher order structures associated with nucleosomes of C.elegans and chicken calculated from the sequences revealed heterogeneity with respect to the deviation of the DNA axis. The results points to the possibility of context dependent curvature of varying degrees to be associated with nucleosomal DNA.

  17. Analysis of the distribution of DNA repair patches in the DNA-nuclear matrix complex from human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullenders, L.H.F.

    1983-01-01

    The distribution of ultraviolet-induced repair patches along DNA loops attached to the nuclear matrix, was investigated by digestion with DNA-degrading enzymes and neutral sucrose gradient centrifugation. When DNA was gradually removed by DNAase 1, pulse label incorporated by ultraviolet-irradiated cells during 10 min in the presence of hydroxyurea or hydroxyurea/arabinosylcytosine showed similar degradation kinetics as prelabelled DNA. No preferential association of pulse label with the nuclear matrix was observed, neither within 30 min nor 13 h after iiradiation. When the pulse label was incorporated by replicative synthesis under the same conditions, a preferential association of newly-synthesized DNA with the nuclear matrix was observed. Single-strand specific digestion with nuclease S 1 of nuclear lysates from ultraviolet-irradiated cells, pulse labelled in the presence of hydroxyurea/arabinosylcytosine, caused a release of about 70% of the prelabelled DNA and 90% of the pulse-labelled DNA from the rapidly sedimenting material in sucrose gradients. The results suggest no specific involvement of the nuclear matrix in repair synthesis, a random distribution of repair patches along the DNA loops, and simultaneously multiple incision events per DNA loop. (Auth.)

  18. Analysis of the distribution of DNA repair patches in the DNA-nuclear matrix complex from human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullenders, L.H.F. (Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands). Lab. voor Stralengenetica en Chemische Mutagenese); Zeeland, A.A. van; Natarajan, A.T. (Cohen (J.A.) Inst. voor Radiopathologie en Stralenbescherming, Leiden (Netherlands))

    1983-09-09

    The distribution of ultraviolet-induced repair patches along DNA loops attached to the nuclear matrix, was investigated by digestion with DNA-degrading enzymes and neutral sucrose gradient centrifugation. When DNA was gradually removed by DNAase 1, pulse label incorporated by ultraviolet-irradiated cells during 10 min in the presence of hydroxyurea or hydroxyurea/arabinosylcytosine showed similar degradation kinetics as prelabelled DNA. No preferential association of pulse label with the nuclear matrix was observed, neither within 30 min nor 13 h after irradiation. When the pulse label was incorporated by replicative synthesis under the same conditions, a preferential association of newly-synthesized DNA with the nuclear matrix was observed. Single-strand specific digestion with nuclease S/sub 1/ of nuclear lysates from ultraviolet-irradiated cells, pulse labelled in the presence of hydroxyurea/arabinosylcytosine, caused a release of about 70% of the prelabelled DNA and 90% of the pulse-labelled DNA from the rapidly sedimenting material in sucrose gradients. The results suggest no specific involvement of the nuclear matrix in repair synthesis, a random distribution of repair patches along the DNA loops, and simultaneously multiple incision events per DNA loop.

  19. Principles of DNA architectonics: design of DNA-based nanoobjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinogradova, O A; Pyshnyi, D V

    2012-01-01

    The methods of preparation of monomeric DNA blocks that serve as key building units for the construction of complex DNA objects are described. Examples are given of the formation of DNA blocks based on native and modified oligonucleotide components using hydrogen bonding and nucleic acid-specific types of bonding and also some affinity interactions with RNA, proteins, ligands. The static discrete and periodic two- and three-dimensional DNA objects reported to date are described systematically. Methods used to prove the structures of DNA objects and the prospects for practical application of nanostructures based on DNA and its analogues in biology, medicine and biophysics are considered. The bibliography includes 195 references.

  20. DNA Topoisomerases in Transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødgaard, Morten Terpager

    2015-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most of the ex......This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most...... topoisomerase-DNA cleavage complex. The second study is an investigation of how topoisomerases influence gene regulation by keeping the genome in an optimal topological state....

  1. DNA methylation in obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Pokrywka

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The number of overweight and obese people is increasing at an alarming rate, especially in the developed and developing countries. Obesity is a major risk factor for diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer, and in consequence for premature death. The development of obesity results from the interplay of both genetic and environmental factors, which include sedentary life style and abnormal eating habits. In the past few years a number of events accompanying obesity, affecting expression of genes which are not directly connected with the DNA base sequence (e.g. epigenetic changes, have been described. Epigenetic processes include DNA methylation, histone modifications such as acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and sumoylation, as well as non-coding micro-RNA (miRNA synthesis. In this review, the known changes in the profile of DNA methylation as a factor affecting obesity and its complications are described.

  2. Mgm101p is a novel component of the mitochondrial nucleoid that binds DNA and is required for the repair of oxidatively damaged mitochondrial DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meeusen, S.; Tieu, Q.; Wong, E.; Weiss, E.; Schieltz, D.; Yates, J.R.; Nunnari, J.

    1999-01-01

    Maintenance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) during cell division is required for progeny to be respiratory competent. Maintenance involves the replication, repair, assembly, segregation, and partitioning of the mitochondrial nucleoid. MGM101 has been identified as a gene essential for mtDNA maintenance in S. cerevisiae, but its role is unknown. Using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry, we identified Mgm101p as a component of highly enriched nucleoids, suggesting that it plays a nucleoid-specific role in maintenance. Subcellular fractionation, indirect immunofluorescence and GFP tagging show that Mgm101p is exclusively associated with the mitochondrial nucleoid structure in cells. Furthermore, DNA affinity chromatography of nucleoid extracts indicates that Mgm101p binds to DNA, suggesting that its nucleoid localization is in part due to this activity. Phenotypic analysis of cells containing a temperature sensitive mgm101 allele suggests that Mgm101p is not involved in mtDNA packaging, segregation, partitioning or required for ongoing mtDNA replication. We examined Mgm101p's role in mtDNA repair. As compared with wild-type cells, mgm101 cells were more sensitive to mtDNA damage induced by UV irradiation and were hypersensitive to mtDNA damage induced by gamma rays and H2O2 treatment. Thus, we propose that Mgm101p performs an essential function in the repair of oxidatively damaged mtDNA that is required for the maintenance of the mitochondrial genome. (author)

  3. Nuclear translocation contributes to regulation of DNA excision repair activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Nina Østergaard; Andersen, Sofie Dabros; Lützen, Anne

    2009-01-01

    for regulation of nuclear import that is necessary for proper localization of the repair proteins. This review summarizes the current knowledge on nuclear import mechanisms of DNA excision repair proteins and provides a model that categorizes the import by different mechanisms, including classical nuclear import......DNA mutations are circumvented by dedicated specialized excision repair systems, such as the base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER), and mismatch repair (MMR) pathways. Although the individual repair pathways have distinct roles in suppressing changes in the nuclear DNA......, it is evident that proteins from the different DNA repair pathways interact [Y. Wang, D. Cortez, P. Yazdi, N. Neff, S.J. Elledge, J. Qin, BASC, a super complex of BRCA1-associated proteins involved in the recognition and repair of aberrant DNA structures, Genes Dev. 14 (2000) 927-939; M. Christmann, M...

  4. Molecular mechanisms in radiation damage to DNA. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, R.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this work are to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for radiation-induced DNA damage. The overall goal is to understand the relationship between the chemical and structural changes produced by ionizing radiation in DNA and the resulting impairment of biological function expressed as carcinogenesis or cell death. The studies are based on theoretical explorations of possible mechanisms that link initial radiation damage in the form of base and sugar damage to conformational changes in DNA. These mechanistic explorations should lead to the formulation of testable hypotheses regarding the processes of impairment of regulation of gene expression, alteration in DNA repair, and damage to DNA structure involved in cell death or cancer

  5. Extended HSR/CARD domain mediates AIRE binding to DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maslovskaja, Julia, E-mail: julia.maslovskaja@ut.ee; Saare, Mario; Liiv, Ingrid; Rebane, Ana; Peterson, Pärt

    2015-12-25

    Autoimmune regulator (AIRE) activates the transcription of many genes in an unusual promiscuous and stochastic manner. The mechanism by which AIRE binds to the chromatin and DNA is not fully understood, and the regulatory elements that AIRE target genes possess are not delineated. In the current study, we demonstrate that AIRE activates the expression of transiently transfected luciferase reporters that lack defined promoter regions, as well as intron and poly(A) signal sequences. Our protein-DNA interaction experiments with mutated AIRE reveal that the intact homogeneously staining region/caspase recruitment domain (HSR/CARD) and amino acids R113 and K114 are key elements involved in AIRE binding to DNA. - Highlights: • Promoter and mRNA processing elements are not important for AIRE to activate gene expression from reporter plasmids. • AIRE protein fragment aa 1–138 mediates direct binding to DNA. • Integrity of the HSR/CARD domain is needed for AIRE binding to DNA.

  6. Extended HSR/CARD domain mediates AIRE binding to DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslovskaja, Julia; Saare, Mario; Liiv, Ingrid; Rebane, Ana; Peterson, Pärt

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune regulator (AIRE) activates the transcription of many genes in an unusual promiscuous and stochastic manner. The mechanism by which AIRE binds to the chromatin and DNA is not fully understood, and the regulatory elements that AIRE target genes possess are not delineated. In the current study, we demonstrate that AIRE activates the expression of transiently transfected luciferase reporters that lack defined promoter regions, as well as intron and poly(A) signal sequences. Our protein-DNA interaction experiments with mutated AIRE reveal that the intact homogeneously staining region/caspase recruitment domain (HSR/CARD) and amino acids R113 and K114 are key elements involved in AIRE binding to DNA. - Highlights: • Promoter and mRNA processing elements are not important for AIRE to activate gene expression from reporter plasmids. • AIRE protein fragment aa 1–138 mediates direct binding to DNA. • Integrity of the HSR/CARD domain is needed for AIRE binding to DNA.

  7. Charge Migration in DNA Perspectives from Physics, Chemistry, and Biology

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Tapash

    2007-01-01

    Charge migration through DNA has been the focus of considerable interest in recent years. A deeper understanding of the nature of charge transfer and transport along the double helix is important in fields as diverse as physics, chemistry and nanotechnology. It has also important implications in biology, in particular in DNA damage and repair. This book presents contributions from an international team of researchers active in this field. It contains a wide range of topics that includes the mathematical background of the quantum processes involved, the role of charge transfer in DNA radiation damage, a new approach to DNA sequencing, DNA photonics, and many others. This book should be of value to researchers in condensed matter physics, chemical physics, physical chemistry, and nanoscale sciences.

  8. Repair of endogenous and ionizing radiation-induced DNA damages: mechanisms and biological functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boiteux, S.

    2002-01-01

    The cellular DNA is continuously exposed to endogenous and exogenous stress. Oxidative stress due to cellular metabolism is the major cause of endogenous DNA damage. On the other hand, ionizing radiation (IR) is an important exogenous stress. Both induce similar DNA damages: damaged bases, abasic sites and strand breakage. Most of these lesions are lethal and/or mutagenic. The survival of the cell is managed by efficient and accurate DNA repair mechanisms that remove lesions before their replication or transcription. DNA repair pathways involved in the removal of IR-induced lesions are briefly described. Base excision repair (BER) is mostly involved in the removal of base damage, abasic sites and single strand breaks. In contrast, DNA double strand breaks are mostly repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR). How DNA repair pathways prevent cancer process is also discussed. (author)

  9. Repeated DNA sequences in fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, S K

    1974-11-01

    Several fungal species, representatives of all broad groups like basidiomycetes, ascomycetes and phycomycetes, were examined for the nature of repeated DNA sequences by DNA:DNA reassociation studies using hydroxyapatite chromatography. All of the fungal species tested contained 10 to 20 percent repeated DNA sequences. There are approximately 100 to 110 copies of repeated DNA sequences of approximately 4 x 10/sup 7/ daltons piece size of each. Repeated DNA sequence homoduplexes showed on average 5/sup 0/C difference of T/sub e/50 (temperature at which 50 percent duplexes dissociate) values from the corresponding homoduplexes of unfractionated whole DNA. It is suggested that a part of repetitive sequences in fungi constitutes mitochondrial DNA and a part of it constitutes nuclear DNA. (auth)

  10. Fostering employee involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beecher, G P

    1997-11-01

    Every year, the ODA's Economics of Practice Committee, with the help of an independent consulting firm, carries out the Cost of Practice Monitor which tracks the various costs of running a dental practice in Ontario. This article is the result of a joint ODA-Arthur Andersen initiative to provide members with detailed information from the Monitor. Over the next year, there will be a series of articles published under the heading "Best practises for Ontario's Dental Practices." The article featured in this issue focuses on wage expenses in dental practices and how to foster employee involvement as a means of addressing cost-productivity issues. Furthermore, information relating to wage expenses may be used by practitioners to benchmark their practice against the average Ontario dental practice. Appendix C was developed for this purpose. Through benchmarking, the practitioner may gain insight into ways of evaluating their practice and in addressing issues that could improve the management of the practice. For a long time, concepts of best business practises were applied only to manufacturing organizations or large multi-national corporations but experience has demonstrated that these activities are universal to all organizations, including service companies, schools, government and not-for-profit organizations.

  11. Laboratory of Mutagenesis and DNA Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Two main lines of research were continued: the first one concerned the mechanisms controlling the fidelity of DNA replication in Escherichia coli; the second concerned cellular responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to DNA damaging agents. We have been investigating the question whether during chromosomal DNA replication in Escherichia coli the two DNA strands may be replicated with differential accuracy. To address this question we set up a new system that allows the examination of mutagenesis either of the leading strand or the lagging strand. Our results suggest that the lagging strand replication of the E. coli chromosome may be more accurate than leading strand replication. More recently, we studied mutagenesis of the two strands in recA730 strains which exhibit constitutive expression of the SOS system. Our results clearly indicate that in recA730 strains there is a significant difference in the fidelity of replication between the two replicating strands. Based on our data we propose a model describing a possible mechanism of SOS mutagenesis. To get more insight into cellular responses to DNA damage we have isolated several novel genes of S. cerevisiae, the transcription of which is induced by DNA lesions. Main effort was concentrated on the characterization of the DIN7 gene. We found that Din7p specifically affects the metabolism of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The elevated level of Din7p results in an increased frequency of mitochondrial petite mutants, as well as in a higher frequency of mitochondrial point mutations. Din7p affects also the stability of microsatellite sequences present in the mitochondrial genome. As expected, Din7p was found to be located in mitochondria. In another project, we found that the DIN8 gene isolated in our laboratory is identical with the UMP1 gene encoding a chaperone-like protein involved in 20S proteasome maturation. Interestingly, induction of UMP1 expression in response to DNA damage is subject to regulation

  12. Horizontal gene transfer of a chloroplast DnaJ-Fer protein to Thaumarchaeota and the evolutionary history of the DnaK chaperone system in Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitjean, Céline; Moreira, David; López-García, Purificación; Brochier-Armanet, Céline

    2012-11-26

    In 2004, we discovered an atypical protein in metagenomic data from marine thaumarchaeotal species. This protein, referred as DnaJ-Fer, is composed of a J domain fused to a Ferredoxin (Fer) domain. Surprisingly, the same protein was also found in Viridiplantae (green algae and land plants). Because J domain-containing proteins are known to interact with the major chaperone DnaK/Hsp70, this suggested that a DnaK protein was present in Thaumarchaeota. DnaK/Hsp70, its co-chaperone DnaJ and the nucleotide exchange factor GrpE are involved, among others, in heat shocks and heavy metal cellular stress responses. Using phylogenomic approaches we have investigated the evolutionary history of the DnaJ-Fer protein and of interacting proteins DnaK, DnaJ and GrpE in Thaumarchaeota. These proteins have very complex histories, involving several inter-domain horizontal gene transfers (HGTs) to explain the contemporary distribution of these proteins in archaea. These transfers include one from Cyanobacteria to Viridiplantae and one from Viridiplantae to Thaumarchaeota for the DnaJ-Fer protein, as well as independent HGTs from Bacteria to mesophilic archaea for the DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE system, followed by HGTs among mesophilic and thermophilic archaea. We highlight the chimerical origin of the set of proteins DnaK, DnaJ, GrpE and DnaJ-Fer in Thaumarchaeota and suggest that the HGT of these proteins has played an important role in the adaptation of several archaeal groups to mesophilic and thermophilic environments from hyperthermophilic ancestors. Finally, the evolutionary history of DnaJ-Fer provides information useful for the relative dating of the diversification of Archaeplastida and Thaumarchaeota.

  13. Horizontal gene transfer of a chloroplast DnaJ-Fer protein to Thaumarchaeota and the evolutionary history of the DnaK chaperone system in Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petitjean Céline

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2004, we discovered an atypical protein in metagenomic data from marine thaumarchaeotal species. This protein, referred as DnaJ-Fer, is composed of a J domain fused to a Ferredoxin (Fer domain. Surprisingly, the same protein was also found in Viridiplantae (green algae and land plants. Because J domain-containing proteins are known to interact with the major chaperone DnaK/Hsp70, this suggested that a DnaK protein was present in Thaumarchaeota. DnaK/Hsp70, its co-chaperone DnaJ and the nucleotide exchange factor GrpE are involved, among others, in heat shocks and heavy metal cellular stress responses. Results Using phylogenomic approaches we have investigated the evolutionary history of the DnaJ-Fer protein and of interacting proteins DnaK, DnaJ and GrpE in Thaumarchaeota. These proteins have very complex histories, involving several inter-domain horizontal gene transfers (HGTs to explain the contemporary distribution of these proteins in archaea. These transfers include one from Cyanobacteria to Viridiplantae and one from Viridiplantae to Thaumarchaeota for the DnaJ-Fer protein, as well as independent HGTs from Bacteria to mesophilic archaea for the DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE system, followed by HGTs among mesophilic and thermophilic archaea. Conclusions We highlight the chimerical origin of the set of proteins DnaK, DnaJ, GrpE and DnaJ-Fer in Thaumarchaeota and suggest that the HGT of these proteins has played an important role in the adaptation of several archaeal groups to mesophilic and thermophilic environments from hyperthermophilic ancestors. Finally, the evolutionary history of DnaJ-Fer provides information useful for the relative dating of the diversification of Archaeplastida and Thaumarchaeota.

  14. Hsp90: A New Player in DNA Repair?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Pennisi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 is an evolutionary conserved molecular chaperone that, together with Hsp70 and co-chaperones makes up the Hsp90 chaperone machinery, stabilizing and activating more than 200 proteins, involved in protein homeostasis (i.e., proteostasis, transcriptional regulation, chromatin remodeling, and DNA repair. Cells respond to DNA damage by activating complex DNA damage response (DDR pathways that include: (i cell cycle arrest; (ii transcriptional and post-translational activation of a subset of genes, including those associated with DNA repair; and (iii triggering of programmed cell death. The efficacy of the DDR pathways is influenced by the nuclear levels of DNA repair proteins, which are regulated by balancing between protein synthesis and degradation as well as by nuclear import and export. The inability to respond properly to either DNA damage or to DNA repair leads to genetic instability, which in turn may enhance the rate of cancer development. Multiple components of the DNA double strand breaks repair machinery, including BRCA1, BRCA2, CHK1, DNA-PKcs, FANCA, and the MRE11/RAD50/NBN complex, have been described to be client proteins of Hsp90, which acts as a regulator of the diverse DDR pathways. Inhibition of Hsp90 actions leads to the altered localization and stabilization of DDR proteins after DNA damage and may represent a cell-specific and tumor-selective radiosensibilizer. Here, the role of Hsp90-dependent molecular mechanisms involved in cancer onset and in the maintenance of the genome integrity is discussed and highlighted.

  15. Site-specific DNA Inversion by Serine Recombinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Reversible site-specific DNA inversion reactions are widely distributed in bacteria and their viruses. They control a range of biological reactions that most often involve alterations of molecules on the surface of cells or phage. These programmed DNA rearrangements usually occur at a low frequency, thereby preadapting a small subset of the population to a change in environmental conditions, or in the case of phages, an expanded host range. A dedicated recombinase, sometimes with the aid of additional regulatory or DNA architectural proteins, catalyzes the inversion of DNA. RecA or other components of the general recombination-repair machinery are not involved. This chapter discusses site-specific DNA inversion reactions mediated by the serine recombinase family of enzymes and focuses on the extensively studied serine DNA invertases that are stringently controlled by the Fis-bound enhancer regulatory system. The first section summarizes biological features and general properties of inversion reactions by the Fis/enhancer-dependent serine invertases and the recently described serine DNA invertases in Bacteroides. Mechanistic studies of reactions catalyzed by the Hin and Gin invertases are then discussed in more depth, particularly with regards to recent advances in our understanding of the function of the Fis/enhancer regulatory system, the assembly of the active recombination complex (invertasome) containing the Fis/enhancer, and the process of DNA strand exchange by rotation of synapsed subunit pairs within the invertasome. The role of DNA topological forces that function in concert with the Fis/enhancer controlling element in specifying the overwhelming bias for DNA inversion over deletion and intermolecular recombination is emphasized. PMID:25844275

  16. DNA Nanotechnology for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinit; Palazzolo, Stefano; Bayda, Samer; Corona, Giuseppe; Toffoli, Giuseppe; Rizzolio, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    DNA nanotechnology is an emerging and exciting field, and represents a forefront frontier for the biomedical field. The specificity of the interactions between complementary base pairs makes DNA an incredible building material for programmable and very versatile two- and three-dimensional nanostructures called DNA origami. Here, we analyze the DNA origami and DNA-based nanostructures as a drug delivery system. Besides their physical-chemical nature, we dissect the critical factors such as stability, loading capability, release and immunocompatibility, which mainly limit in vivo applications. Special attention was dedicated to highlighting the boundaries to be overcome to bring DNA nanostructures closer to the bedside of patients. PMID:27022418

  17. Fetal hemoglobin is much less prone to DNA cleavage compared to the adult protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Chakane

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobin (Hb is well protected inside the red blood cells (RBCs. Upon hemolysis and when free in circulation, Hb can be involved in a range of radical generating reactions and may thereby attack several different biomolecules. In this study, we have examined the potential damaging effects of cell-free Hb on plasmid DNA (pDNA. Hb induced cleavage of supercoiled pDNA (sc pDNA which was proportional to the concentration of Hb applied. Almost 70% of sc pDNA was converted to open circular or linear DNA using 10 µM of Hb in 12 h. Hb can be present in several different forms. The oxy (HbO2 and met forms are most reactive, while the carboxy-protein shows only low hydrolytic activity. Hemoglobin A (HbA could easily induce complete pDNA cleavage while fetal hemoglobin (HbF was three-fold less reactive. By inserting, a redox active cysteine residue on the surface of the alpha chain of HbF by site-directed mutagenesis, the DNA cleavage reaction was enhanced by 82%. Reactive oxygen species were not directly involved in the reaction since addition of superoxide dismutase and catalase did not prevent pDNA cleavage. The reactivity of Hb with pDNA can rather be associated with the formation of protein based radicals. Keywords: Adult hemoglobin, Fetal hemoglobin, Supercoiled plasmid DNA, DNA cleavage, Cysteine, Protein radicals

  18. MELAS Syndrome with Cardiac Involvement: A Multimodality Imaging Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Seitun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 49-year-old man presented with chest pain, dyspnea, and lactic acidosis. Left ventricular hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis were detected. The sequencing of mitochondrial genome (mtDNA revealed the presence of A to G mtDNA point mutation at position 3243 (m.3243A>G in tRNALeu(UUR gene. Diagnosis of cardiac involvement in a patient with Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-like episodes syndrome (MELAS was made. Due to increased risk of sudden cardiac death, cardioverter defibrillator was implanted.

  19. The intersection between DNA damage response and cell death pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowsheen, S; Yang, E S

    2012-10-01

    Apoptosis is a finely regulated process that serves to determine the fate of cells in response to various stresses. One such stress is DNA damage, which not only can signal repair processes but is also intimately involved in regulating cell fate. In this review we examine the relationship between the DNA damage/repair response in cell survival and apoptosis following insults to the DNA. Elucidating these pathways and the crosstalk between them is of great importance, as they eventually contribute to the etiology of human disease such as cancer and may play key roles in determining therapeutic response. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Apoptosis: Four Decades Later".

  20. Cementum as a source of DNA in challenging forensic cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Hussam; Krebs, Oliver; Sperhake, Jan Peter; Augustin, Christa; Koehne, Till; Amling, Michael; Püschel, Klaus

    2018-02-01

    Each forensic case is characterized by its own uniqueness. Deficient forensic cases require additional sources of human identifiers to assure the identity. We report on two different cases illustrating the role of teeth in answering challenging forensic questions. The first case involves identification of an adipocere male found in a car submersed in water for approximately 2 years. The second scenario, which involves paternity DNA testing of an exhumed body, was performed approximately 2.8 years post-mortem. The difficulty in anticipating the degradation of the DNA is one of the main obstacles. DNA profiling of dental tissues, DNA quantification by using real-time PCR (PowerQuant™ System/Promega) and a histological dental examination have been performed to address the encountered impediments of adverse post-mortem changes. Our results demonstrate that despite the adverse environmental conditions, a successful STR profile of DNA isolated from the root of teeth can be generated with respect to tooth type and apportion. We conclude that cementocytes are a fruitful source of DNA. Cementum resists DNA degradation in comparison to other tissues with respect to the intra- and inter-individual variation of histological and anatomical structures. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.