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Sample records for hoxb5b acts downstream

  1. Gata3 acts downstream of beta-catenin signaling to prevent ectopic metanephric kidney induction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Grote

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Metanephric kidney induction critically depends on mesenchymal-epithelial interactions in the caudal region of the nephric (or Wolffian duct. Central to this process, GDNF secreted from the metanephric mesenchyme induces ureter budding by activating the Ret receptor expressed in the nephric duct epithelium. A failure to regulate this pathway is believed to be responsible for a large proportion of the developmental anomalies affecting the urogenital system. Here, we show that the nephric duct-specific inactivation of the transcription factor gene Gata3 leads to massive ectopic ureter budding. This results in a spectrum of urogenital malformations including kidney adysplasia, duplex systems, and hydroureter, as well as vas deferens hyperplasia and uterine agenesis. The variability of developmental defects is reminiscent of the congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT observed in human. We show that Gata3 inactivation causes premature nephric duct cell differentiation and loss of Ret receptor gene expression. These changes ultimately affect nephric duct epithelium homeostasis, leading to ectopic budding of interspersed cells still expressing the Ret receptor. Importantly, the formation of these ectopic buds requires both GDNF/Ret and Fgf signaling activities. We further identify Gata3 as a central mediator of beta-catenin function in the nephric duct and demonstrate that the beta-catenin/Gata3 pathway prevents premature cell differentiation independently of its role in regulating Ret expression. Together, these results establish a genetic cascade in which Gata3 acts downstream of beta-catenin, but upstream of Ret, to prevent ectopic ureter budding and premature cell differentiation in the nephric duct.

  2. WRKY62 transcription factor acts downstream of cytosolic NPR1 and negatively regulates jasmonate-responsive gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Peng; Duan, Mingrui; Wei, Chunhong; Li, Yi

    2007-06-01

    Cytosolic NPR1 has been shown to be essential for the salicylic acid (SA)-mediated suppression of jasmonic acid (JA)-responsive gene expression. However, factors downstream of NPR1 in the cross-talk between SA and JA signaling are unclear. Here we show that Arabidopsis WRKY62, a member of WRKY group III transcription factors, was induced by methyl jasmonate (MeJA) and SA treatment. The presence of basal SA is required for the MeJA-induced WRKY62 expression, and both chemicals exhibit a synergistic effect on WRKY62 induction. In addition, upon treatment with an extremely low concentration of SA, cytosolic NPR1 controls the MeJA-induced expression of WRKY62. TGA transcription factors, which up-regulate SA-induced expression of WRKY62, are dispensable for the induction of WRKY62 in JA signaling. Genetic dissection of both wrky62 mutants and WRKY62-overexpressing plants indicated that WRKY62 down-regulates JA-responsive LOX2 and VSP2 expression. Our results demonstrate that WRKY62 acts downstream of cytosolic NPR1 and negatively regulates JA-responsive gene expression, suggesting that WRKY62 may be involved in the SA-mediated suppression of JA signaling.

  3. Grainyhead-like 2 downstream targets act to suppress epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition during neural tube closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Heather J; Niswander, Lee A

    2016-04-01

    The transcription factor grainyhead-like 2 (GRHL2) is expressed in non-neural ectoderm (NNE) and Grhl2 loss results in fully penetrant cranial neural tube defects (NTDs) in mice. GRHL2 activates expression of several epithelial genes; however, additional molecular targets and functional processes regulated by GRHL2 in the NNE remain to be determined, as well as the underlying cause of the NTDs in Grhl2 mutants. Here, we find that Grhl2 loss results in abnormal mesenchymal phenotypes in the NNE, including aberrant vimentin expression and increased cellular dynamics that affects the NNE and neural crest cells. The resulting loss of NNE integrity contributes to an inability of the cranial neural folds to move toward the midline and results in NTD. Further, we identified Esrp1, Sostdc1, Fermt1, Tmprss2 and Lamc2 as novel NNE-expressed genes that are downregulated in Grhl2 mutants. Our in vitro assays show that they act as suppressors of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Thus, GRHL2 promotes the epithelial nature of the NNE during the dynamic events of neural tube formation by both activating key epithelial genes and actively suppressing EMT through novel downstream EMT suppressors. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. OsDi19-4 acts downstream of OsCDPK14 to positively regulate ABA response in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lili; Yu, Changchun; Xu, Shanglin; Zhu, Yingguo; Huang, Wenchao

    2016-12-01

    The drought-induced 19 protein family consists of several atypical Cys2/His2-type zinc finger proteins in plants and plays an important role in abiotic stress. In this study, we found that overexpressing OsDi19-4 in rice altered the expression of a series of abscisic acid (ABA)-responsive genes, resulting in strong ABA-hypersensitive phenotypes including ABA-induced seed germination inhibition, early seedling growth inhibition and stomatal closure. On the contrary, OsDi19-4 knockdown lines were less sensitive to ABA. Additionally, OsCDPK14 was identified to interact with OsDi19-4 and be responsible for the phosphorylation of OsDi19-4, and the phosphorylation of OsDi19-4 was further enhanced after the treatment of ABA. Apart from these, OsDi19-4 was shown to directly bind to the promoters of OsASPG1 and OsNAC18 genes, two ABA-responsive genes, and regulate their expression. Transient expression assays confirmed the direct regulation role of OsDi19-4, and the regulation was further enhanced by the increased phosphorylation of OsDi19-4 after the treatment of ABA. Taken together, these data demonstrate that OsDi19-4 acts downstream of OsCDPK14 to positively regulate ABA response by modulating the expression of ABA-responsive genes in rice. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. E. coli mismatch repair acts downstream of replication fork stalling to stabilize the expanded (GAA.TTC)(n) sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourn, Rebecka L; Rindler, Paul M; Pollard, Laura M; Bidichandani, Sanjay I

    2009-02-10

    Expanded triplet repeat sequences are known to cause at least 16 inherited neuromuscular diseases. In addition to short-length changes, expanded triplet repeat tracts frequently undergo large changes, often amounting to hundreds of base-pairs. Such changes might occur when template or primer slipping creates insertion/deletion loops (IDLs), which are normally repaired by the mismatch repair system (MMR). However, in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, MMR promotes large changes in the length of (CTG.CAG)(n) sequences, the motif most commonly associated with human disease. We tested the effect of MMR on instability of the expanded (GAA.TTC)(n) sequence, which causes Friedreich ataxia, by comparing repeat instability in wild-type and MMR-deficient strains of Escherichia coli. As expected, the prevalence of small mutations increased in the MMR-deficient strains. However, the prevalence of large contractions increased in the MMR mutants specifically when GAA was the lagging strand template, the orientation in which replication fork stalling is known to occur. After hydroxyurea-induced stalling, both orientations of replication showed significantly more large contractions in MMR mutants than in the wild-type, suggesting that fork stalling may be responsible for the large contractions. Deficiency of MMR promoted large contractions independently of RecA status, a known determinant of (GAA.TTC)(n) instability. These data suggest that two independent mechanisms act in response to replication stalling to prevent instability of the (GAA.TTC)(n) sequence in E. coli, when GAA serves as the lagging strand template: one that is dependent on RecA-mediated restart of stalled forks, and another that is dependent on MMR-mediated repair of IDLs. While MMR destabilizes the (CTG.CAG)(n) sequence, it is involved in stabilization of the (GAA.TTC)(n) sequence. The role of MMR in triplet repeat instability therefore depends on the repeat sequence and the orientation of replication.

  6. WNT4 acts downstream of BMP2 to mediate the regulation of ATRA signaling on RUNX1 expression: Implications for terminal differentiation of antler chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Liang; Yang, Zhan-Qing; Duan, Cui-Cui; Geng, Shuang; Wang, Kai; Yu, Hai-Fan; Yue, Zhan-Peng; Guo, Bin

    2017-04-24

    Although ATRA is involved in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of chondrocytes, its underlying mechanism remains unknown. Here we showed that ATRA could stimulate the proliferation of antler chondrocytes and expression of COL X and MMP13 which were two well-known markers for hypertrophic chondrocytes. Silencing of CRABP2 prevented the induction of ATRA on chondrocyte terminal differentiation, while overexpression of CRABP2 exhibited the opposite effects. CYP26A1 and CYP26B1 weakened the sensitivity of antler chondrocytes to ATRA. Further analysis evidenced that ATRA might induce chondrocyte terminal differentiation and modulate the expression of BMP2, WNT4, and RUNX1 through RARα/RXRα. Knockdown of BMP2 enhanced the induction of ATRA on the expression of COL X and MMP13, whereas overexpression of BMP2 abrogated this effectiveness. WNT4 might mediate the effects of ATRA and BMP2 on chondrocyte terminal differentiation. Dysregulation of BMP2 impaired the regulation of ATRA on WNT4 expression. Administration of ATRA to antler chondrocytes transfected with RUNX1 siRNA failed to induce the differentiation. Conversely, rRUNX1 strengthened the stimulation of ATRA on the expression of COL X and MMP13. Simultaneously, RUNX1 was a downstream effector of BMP2 and WNT4 in chondrocyte terminal differentiation. Moreover, WNT4 might play an important role in the crosstalk between BMP2 and RUNX1. Attenuation of BMP2 or WNT4 enhanced the interaction between ATRA and RUNX1, while constitutive expression of BMP2 or WNT4 reversed the regulation of ATRA on RUNX1. Collectively, WNT4 may act downstream of BMP2 to mediate the effects of ATRA on the terminal differentiation of antler chondrocytes through targeting RUNX1. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A differentially regulated AP2/ERF transcription factor gene cluster acts downstream of a MAP kinase cascade to modulate terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Priyanka; Singh, Sanjay K; Patra, Barunava; Sui, Xueyi; Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Yuan, Ling

    2017-02-01

    Catharanthus roseus produces bioactive terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs), including the chemotherapeutics, vincristine and vinblastine. Transcriptional regulation of TIA biosynthesis is not fully understood. The jasmonic acid (JA)-responsive AP2/ERF transcription factor (TF), ORCA3, and its regulator, CrMYC2, play key roles in TIA biosynthesis. ORCA3 forms a physical cluster with two uncharacterized AP2/ERFs, ORCA4 and 5. Here, we report that (1) the ORCA gene cluster is differentially regulated; (2) ORCA4, while overlapping functionally with ORCA3, modulates an additional set of TIA genes. Unlike ORCA3, ORCA4 overexpression resulted in dramatic increase of TIA accumulation in C. roseus hairy roots. In addition, CrMYC2 is capable of activating ORCA3 and co-regulating TIA pathway genes concomitantly with ORCA3. The ORCA gene cluster and CrMYC2 act downstream of a MAP kinase cascade that includes a previously uncharacterized MAP kinase kinase, CrMAPKK1. Overexpression of CrMAPKK1 in C. roseus hairy roots upregulated TIA pathways genes and increased TIA accumulation. This work provides detailed characterization of a TF gene cluster and advances our understanding of the transcriptional and post-translational regulatory mechanisms that govern TIA biosynthesis in C. roseus. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  8. KNAT1, KNAT2 and KNAT6 act downstream in the IDA-HAE/HSL2 signaling pathway to regulate floral organ abscission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butenko, Melinka A; Shi, Chun-Lin; Aalen, Reidunn B

    2012-01-01

    Cell separation processes, such as abscission, are critical for plant development and play key roles from sculpting the form of the plant to scattering seeds. It is however essential that such processes are under tight temporal and spatial regulation. Floral organ abscission in Arabidopsis thaliana is regulated by a ligand-receptor module consisting of the signaling peptide INFLORESCENCE DEFICIENT IN ABSCISSION (IDA) and the two receptor-like kinases HAESA (HAE) and HAESA-LIKE 2 (HSL2), and it is the restricted expression pattern of IDA that hinders cell separation from occurring in the abscission zones (AZs) of other organs where HAE and HSL2 are present. In the July issue of The Plant Cell we report on the identification of additional components acting downstream in the IDA signaling pathway. Through a screen for mutations that restore floral organ abscission in ida mutants, we identified two new alleles of the KNOTTED-LIKE HOMEOBOX gene BREVIPEDICELLUS (BP)/KNOTTED-LIKE FROM ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA1 (KNAT1) and show that BP/KNAT1 is important in regulating the timing of floral abscission by controlling AZ cell size and by regulating KNAT2 and KNAT6.

  9. DDX3 directly regulates TRAF3 ubiquitination and acts as a scaffold to co-ordinate assembly of signalling complexes downstream from MAVS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Lili; Fullam, Anthony; McCormack, Niamh; Höhn, Yvette; Schröder, Martina

    2017-02-15

    The human DEAD-box helicase 3 (DDX3) has been shown to contribute to type I interferon (IFN) induction downstream from antiviral pattern recognition receptors. It binds to TANK-binding kinase 1 and IκB-kinase-ε (IKKε), the two key kinases mediating activation of IFN regulatory factor (IRF) 3 and IRF7. We previously demonstrated that DDX3 facilitates IKKε activation downstream from RIG-I and then links the activated kinase to IRF3. In the present study, we probed the interactions between DDX3 and other key signalling molecules in the RIG-I pathway and identified a novel direct interaction between DDX3 and TNF receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) mediated by a TRAF-interaction motif in the N-terminus of DDX3, which was required for TRAF3 ubiquitination. Interestingly, we observed two waves of K63-linked TRAF3 ubiquitination following RIG-I activation by Sendai virus (SeV) infection, both of which were suppressed by DDX3 knockdown. We also investigated the spatiotemporal formation of endogenous downstream signalling complexes containing the mitochondrial antiviral signalling (MAVS) adaptor, DDX3, IκB-kinase-ε (IKKε), TRAF3 and IRF3. DDX3 was recruited to MAVS early after SeV infection, suggesting that it might mediate subsequent recruitment of other molecules. Indeed, knockdown of DDX3 prevented the formation of TRAF3-MAVS and TRAF3-IKKε complexes. Based on our data, we propose that early TRAF3 ubiquitination is required for the formation of a stable MAVS-TRAF3 complex, while the second wave of TRAF3 ubiquitination mediates IRF3 recruitment and activation. Our study characterises DDX3 as a multifunctional adaptor molecule that co-ordinates assembly of different TRAF3, IKKε and IRF3-containing signalling complexes downstream from MAVS. Additionally, it provides novel insights into the role of TRAF3 in RIG-I signalling. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  10. The AP2/EREBP gene PUCHI Co-Acts with LBD16/ASL18 and LBD18/ASL20 downstream of ARF7 and ARF19 to regulate lateral root development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Na Young; Lee, Han Woo; Kim, Jungmook

    2013-08-01

    The developmental process of lateral root formation consists of priming, initiation, primordium development and the emergence of lateral roots from the primary root. Molecular genetic studies with Arabidopsis have revealed several key transcriptional regulators involved in lateral root development. However, their functional interaction has not been fully characterized yet. Here we utilized a genetic approach to understand some of these interactions, revealing that PUCHI functioning in morphogenesis of early lateral root primordium is regulated downstream of ARF7/ARF19 and acts with LBD16(ASL18)/LBD18(ASL20) to regulate lateral root development. We showed that auxin-responsive expression of PUCHI was significantly reduced in arf7 or arf19 single mutants and completely abolished in arf7 arf19 double mutants. Consistent with this, β-glucuronidase (GUS) expression under the PUCHI promoter in arf7 arf19 was greatly reduced in the lateral root primordium compared with that in the wild type and did not respond to exogenous auxin. Results of GUS expression analyses under the PUCHI, LBD16 or LBD18 promoter in lbd16, lbd18 single and double mutants or puchi demonstrated that PUCHI and LBD16 or LBD18 do not regulate each other's expression. Lateral root phenotypes of double and triple mutants of lbd16, lbd18 and puchi showed that the puchi mutation in lbd16 and lbd18 mutants synergistically decreased the number of emerged lateral roots. These analyses also showed that puchi affected lateral root primordium development of lbd16 or lbd18 additively but differentially. Taken together, these results suggest that PUCHI co-acts with LBD16 and LBD18 to control lateral root primordium development and lateral root emergence.

  11. Operational optimization in the downstream; Otimizacao operacional no downstream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silberman, Luis; Cunha, Filipe Silveira Ramos da [Petroleo Ipiranga, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    On the present competitive down stream's market, there is a great necessity of optimization aiming to guarantee the best price and quality of our clients. Our goal is to attend these expectations while we guarantee an efficient operation. The greatest question is how far we are from the ideal model. This way, a lot of projects have been executed during the last years aiming the operational optimization of all our activities. We divide the projects in 4 areas: Logistic (new modals distribution), Transport (transport optimization - quality and more deliveries with less trucks), Client Support (Internet Ipiranga and Support Center), Distribution Terminals Productivity (automation and environment). This work intend to present our ideal, perfect and complete Downstream Operation model. We will talk about how close we are of this ideal model and we will present the projects that we had already developed and implanted on the automation of the terminals and the logistics area. (author)

  12. Auxin perception and downstream events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strader, Lucia C; Zhao, Yunde

    2016-10-01

    Auxin responses have been arbitrarily divided into two categories: genomic and non-genomic effects. Genomic effects are largely mediated by SCFTIR1/AFB-Aux/IAA auxin receptor complexes whereas it has been postulated that AUXIN BINDING PROTEIN 1 (ABP1) controls the non-genomic effects. However, the roles of ABP1 in auxin signaling and plant development were recently called into question. In this paper, we present recent progress in understanding the SCFTIR1/AFB-Aux/IAA pathway. In more detail, we discuss the current understanding of ABP1 research and provide an updated view of ABP1-related genetic materials. Further, we propose a model in which auxin efflux carriers may play a role in auxin perception and we briefly describe recent insight on processes downstream of auxin perception. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A downstream voyage with mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Retrospective essay for the Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology.As I look back on my paper, “Effects of Low Dietary Levels of Methyl Mercury on Mallard Reproduction,” published in 1974 in the Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, a thought sticks in my mind. I realize just how much my mercury research was not unlike a leaf in a stream, carried this way and that, sometimes stalled in an eddy, restarted, and carried downstream at a pace and path that was not completely under my control. I was hired in 1969 by the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center to study the effects of environmental pollutants on the behavior of wildlife. A colleague was conducting a study on the reproductive effects of methylmercury on mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), and he offered to give me some of the ducklings. I conducted a pilot study, testing how readily ducklings approached a tape-recorded maternal call. Sample sizes were small, but the results suggested that ducklings from mercury-treated parents behaved differently than controls. That’s how I got into mercury research—pretty much by chance.

  14. 'Patents and Downstream Innovation Suppression - Fact or Fiction?'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howells, John

    of that empirical evidence. They present alleged historical examples of downstream innovation suppression in such important technologies as: Edison's carbon filament light bulb; the automobile; radio; aircraft; the transistor; the computer. This paper presents a contrary interpretation of the role of patents......Merges and Nelson have provided an empirically grounded argument that firms use pioneer patents of 'broad' scope to block downstream technological development (Merges and Nelson 1990). If this is a regular occurrence then, as they claim, they have faulted Kitch's 'prospect theory' of patents (Kitch...... in any of the examples. I therefore draw the strong conclusion that their general thesis is unsupported by their selection of empirical evidence. The article then argues that although a subset of their cases illustrates patents acting to hinder developers (but not development of the relevant technology...

  15. Scleroglucan: Fermentative Production, Downstream Processing and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikant A. Survase

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Exopolysaccharides produced by a variety of microorganisms find multifarious industrial applications in foods, pharmaceutical and other industries as emulsifiers, stabilizers, binders, gelling agents, lubricants, and thickening agents. One such exopolysaccharide is scleroglucan, produced by pure culture fermentation from filamentous fungi of genus Sclerotium. The review discusses the properties, fermentative production, downstream processing and applications of scleroglucan.

  16. Downstream bioprocess characterisation within microfluidic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marques, Marco; Krühne, Ulrich; Szita, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Miniaturising bioprocess unit operation steps is a well-established approach to find novel routes for process intensification and improved process economics. While a number of microbioreactors have been presented over the last 15 years, miniaturised downstream unit operations (mDUO) are less...

  17. DARHT-II Downstream Beam Transport Beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westenskow, G A; Bertolini, L R; Duffy, P T; Paul, A C

    2000-08-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design of the downstream beam transport line for the second axis of the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT II) Facility. The DARHT-II project is a collaboration between LANL, LBNL and LLNL. DARHT II is a 20-MeV, 2000-Amperes, 2-{micro}sec linear induction accelerator designed to generate short bursts of x-rays for the purpose of radiographing dense objects. The downstream beam transport line is approximately 20-meter long region extending from the end of the accelerator to the bremsstrahlung target. Within this proposed transport line there are 15 conventional solenoid, quadrupole and dipole magnets; as well as several specialty magnets, which transport and focus the beam to the target and to the beam dumps. There are two high power beam dumps, which are designed to absorb 80-kJ per pulse during accelerator start-up and operation. Aspects of the mechanical design of these elements are presented.

  18. India's Downstream Petroleum Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This study provides a holistic examination of pricing and investment dynamics in India's downstream petroleum sector. It analyses the current pricing practices, highlights the tremendous fiscal cost of current pricing and regulatory arrangements, and examines the sectoral investment dynamics. It also looks at potential paths towards market-based reform along which the Indian government may move, while at the same time protecting energy market access for India's large poor population.

  19. DARHT-II Downstream Transport Beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westenskow, G A; Bertolini, L R; Duffy, P T; Paul, A C

    2001-06-06

    This paper describes the mechanical design of the downstream beam transport line for the second axis of the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT II) Facility. The DARHT-II project is a collaboration between LANL, LBNL and LLNL. DARHT II is a 18.4-MeV, 2000-Amperes, 2-{micro}sec linear induction accelerator designed to generate short bursts of x-rays for the purpose of radiographing dense objects. The downstream beam transport line is approximately 22-meter long region extending from the end of the accelerator to the bremsstrahlung target. Within this proposed transport line there are 12 conventional solenoid, quadrupole and dipole magnets; as well as several specialty magnets, which transport and focus the beam to the target and to the beam dumps. There are two high power beam dumps, which are designed to absorb 80-kJ per pulse during accelerator start-up and operation. Aspects of the mechanical design of these elements are presented.

  20. Upstream and Downstream Influence in STBLI Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Pino; Priebe, Stephan; Helm, Clara

    2016-11-01

    Priebe and Martín (JFM, 2012) show that the low-frequency unsteadiness in shockwave and turbulent boundary layer interactions (STBLI) is governed by an inviscid instability. Priebe, Tu, Martín and Rowley (JFM, 2016) show that the instability is an inviscid centrifugal one, i.e Görtlerlike vortices. Previous works had given differing conclusions as to whether the low-frequency unsteadiness in STBLI is caused by an upstream or downstream mechanism. In this paper, we reconcile these opposite views and show that upstream and downstream correlations co-exist in the context of the nature of Görtler vortices. We find that the instability is similar to that in separated subsonic and laminar flows. Since the turbulence is modulated but passive to the global mode, the turbulent separated flows are amenable to linear global analysis. As such, the characteristic length and time scales, and the receptivity of the global mode might be determined, and low-order models that represent the low-frequency dynamics in STBLI might be developed. The centrifugal instability persists even under hypersonic conditions. This work is funded by the AFOSR Grant Number AF9550-15-1-0284 with Dr. Ivett Leyva.

  1. A dulal-functional medium voltage level DVR to limit downstream fault currents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Li, Yun Wei; Vilathgamuwa, D. Mahinda

    2007-01-01

    on the other parallel feeders connected to PCC. Furthermore, if not controlled properly, the DVR might also contribute to this PCC voltage sag in the process of compensating the missing voltage, thus further worsening the fault situation. To limit the flow of large line currents, and therefore restore the PCC......, the DVR will therefore be tasked to mitigate even more faults involving downstream loads. Large fault currents would flow through the DVR during a downstream fault before the opening of a circuit breaker. This will cause the voltage at point of common coupling (PCC) to drop, which would affect the loads...... voltage as well as protect the DVR system components, a downstream fault limiting function is proposed and integrated in the DVR operation. A flux-charge-model feedback algorithm is implemented so that the DVR would act as a large virtual inductance in series with the distribution feeder in fault...

  2. Downstream Thermal Evolution of Vortex Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Barea, A.; Herrada, M. A.; Pérez-Saborid, M.; Barrero, A.

    1999-11-01

    The downstream evolution of the total temperature field in a quasi-incompressible axisymmetric vortex core has been computed. Starting at an initial station (z=0) with velocity profiles of the Burgers type and given temperature distributions, the numerical results of the evolution show that, according to experimental results, the total temperature in the near-axis region decreases substantially due to the work done by pressure and viscous forces together with the effect of both convection and conduction of heat. Depending on the values of the parameters characterizing the initial profiles and on the value of the Prandtl number, the vortex either breaks down or eventually reaches a self-similar regime. The results obtained shed light on the basic physics involved in the thermal separation phenomenon which appears inside Ranque-Hilsch vortex tubes.

  3. Downstream process options for the ABE fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedl, Anton

    2016-05-01

    Butanol is a very interesting substance both for the chemical industry and as a biofuel. The classical distillation process for the removal of butanol is far too energy demanding, at a factor of 220% of the energy content of butanol. Alternative separation processes studied are hybrid processes of gas-stripping, liquid-liquid extraction and pervaporation with distillation and a novel adsorption/drying/desorption hybrid process. Compared with the energy content of butanol, the resulting energy demand for butanol separation and concentration of optimized hybrid processes is 11%-22% for pervaporation/distillation and 11%-17% for liquid-liquid extraction/distillation. For a novel adsorption/drying/desorption process, the energy demand is 9.4%. But all downstream process options need further proof of industrial applicability. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Ammonia downstream from HH 80 North

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girart, Jose M.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Anglada, Guillem; Estalella, Robert; Torrelles, Jose, M.; Marti, Josep; Pena, Miriam; Ayala, Sandra; Curiel, Salvador; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto

    1994-01-01

    HH 80-81 are two optically visible Herbig-Haro (HH) objects located about 5 minutes south of their exciting source IRAS 18162-2048. Displaced symmetrically to the north of this luminous IRAS source, a possible HH counterpart was recently detected as a radio continuum source with the very large array (VLA). This radio source, HH 80 North, has been proposed to be a member of the Herbig-Haro class since its centimeter flux density, angular size, spectral index, and morphology are all similar to those of HH 80. However, no object has been detected at optical wavelengths at the position of HH 80 North, possibly because of high extinction, and the confirmation of the radio continuum source as an HH object has not been possible. In the prototypical Herbig-Haro objects HH 1 and 2, ammonia emission has been detected downstream of the flow in both objects. This detection has been intepreted as a result of an enhancement in the ammonia emission produced by the radiation field of the shock associated with the HH object. In this Letter we report the detection of the (1,1) and (2,2) inversion transitions of ammonia downstream HH 80 North. This detection gives strong suppport to the interpretation of HH 80 North as a heavily obscured HH object. In addition, we suggest that ammonia emission may be a tracer of embedded Herbig-Haro objects in other regions of star formation. A 60 micrometer IRAS source could be associated with HH 80 North and with the ammonia condensation. A tentative explanation for the far-infrared emission as arising in dust heated by their optical and UV radiation of the HH object is presented.

  5. Downstream Processing of Synechocystis for Biofuel Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jie

    Lipids and free fatty acids (FFA) from cyanobacterium Synechocystis can be used for biofuel (e.g. biodiesel or renewable diesel) production. In order to utilize and scale up this technique, downstream processes including culturing and harvest, cell disruption, and extraction were studied. Several solvents/solvent systems were screened for lipid extraction from Synechocystis. Chloroform + methanol-based Folch and Bligh & Dyer methods were proved to be "gold standard" for small-scale analysis due to their highest lipid recoveries that were confirmed by their penetration of the cell membranes, higher polarity, and stronger interaction with hydrogen bonds. Less toxic solvents, such as methanol and MTBE, or direct transesterification of biomass (without preextraction step) gave only slightly lower lipid-extraction yields and can be considered for large-scale application. Sustained exposure to high and low temperature extremes severely lowered the biomass and lipid productivity. Temperature stress also triggered changes of lipid quality such as the degree of unsaturation; thus, it affected the productivities and quality of Synechocystis-derived biofuel. Pulsed electric field (PEF) was evaluated for cell disruption prior to lipid extraction. A treatment intensity > 35 kWh/m3 caused significant damage to the plasma membrane, cell wall, and thylakoid membrane, and it even led to complete disruption of some cells into fragments. Treatment by PEF enhanced the potential for the low-toxicity solvent isopropanol to access lipid molecules during subsequent solvent extraction, leading to lower usage of isopropanol for the same extraction efficiency. Other cell-disruption methods also were tested. Distinct disruption effects to the cell envelope, plasma membrane, and thylakoid membranes were observed that were related to extraction efficiency. Microwave and ultrasound had significant enhancement of lipid extraction. Autoclaving, ultrasound, and French press caused significant

  6. Microbial production of scleroglucan and downstream processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Alejandra Castillo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic petroleum-based polymers and natural plant polymers have the disadvantage of restricted sources, in addition to the non-biodegradability of the former ones. In contrast, eco-sustainable microbial polysaccharides, of low-cost and standardized production, represent an alternative to address this situation. With a strong global market, they attracted worldwide attention because of their novel and unique physico-chemical properties as well as varied industrial applications, and many of them are promptly becoming economically competitive. Scleroglucan, a beta-1,3-beta-1,6-glucan secreted by Sclerotium fungi, exhibits high potential for commercialization and may show different branching frequency, side-chain length and/or molecular weight depending on the producing strain or culture conditions. Water-solubility, viscosifying ability and wide stability over temperature, pH and salinity make scleroglucan useful for different biotechnological (enhanced oil recovery, food additives, drug delivery, cosmetic and pharmaceutical products, biocompatible materials, etc., and biomedical (immunoceutical, antitumor, etc. applications. It can be copiously produced at bioreactor scale under standardized conditions, where a high EPS concentration normally governs the process optimization. Operative and nutritional conditions, as well as the incidence of scleroglucan downstream processing will be discussed in this chapter. The relevance of using standardized inocula from selected strains and experiences concerning the intricate scleroglucan scaling-up will be also herein outlined.

  7. The F-actin modifier villin regulates insulin granule dynamics and exocytosis downstream of islet cell autoantigen 512

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Mziaut

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: Our findings show that villin controls the size of the F-actin cages restricting SGs and, thus, regulates their dynamics and availability for exocytosis. Evidence that villin acts downstream of Ica512 also indicates that SGs directly influence the remodeling properties of the cortical actin cytoskeleton for tight control of insulin secretion.

  8. A floating trap for sampling downstream migrant fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl E. McLemore; Fred H. Everest; William R. Humphreys; Mario F. Solazzi

    1989-01-01

    Fishery scientists and managers are interested in obtaining information about downstream movements of fish species for biological and economic reasons. Different types of nets and traps have been used for this purpose with only partial success. The floating, self-cleaning downstream migrant trap described here proved successful for sampling several salmoniform and...

  9. Eutrophication downstream from small reservoirs in mountain rivers of Central Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Julio A; Alonso, Alvaro; de la Puente, Marcos

    2005-09-01

    In this research we examined the hypothesis that upper reaches of rivers and streams can experience eutrophication as a consequence of deep releases from dams. Field studies were conducted in four mountain rivers (Tormes, Riaza, Eresma and Miraflores Rivers) of Central Spain. The watersheds of these rivers are underlain by siliceous rocks. A small deep-release storage reservoir is found in the upper reaches of each river. Two sampling sites, upstream and downstream from the reservoir, were established in stony riffles of each impounded river. Significant (P rivers, can act as nutrient sources, causing eutrophication downstream. Nutrients would ultimately come from land/forest runoff. The fact that terrestrial vegetation was not completely removed before filling reservoirs could also contribute to the eutrophication process.

  10. Drowning in muddied waters or swimming downstream? A critical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drowning in muddied waters or swimming downstream? A critical analysis of literature reviewing in a phenomenological study through an exploration of the lifeworld, reflexivity and role of the researcher.

  11. Upstream trophic structure modulates downstream community dynamics via resource subsidies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Eric; Gounand, Isabelle; Little, Chelsea J; Fronhofer, Emanuel A; Altermatt, Florian

    2017-08-01

    In many natural systems, the physical structure of the landscape dictates the flow of resources. Despite mounting evidence that communities' dynamics can be indirectly coupled by reciprocal among ecosystem resource flows, our understanding of how directional resource flows might indirectly link biological communities is limited. We here propose that differences in community structure upstream should lead to different downstream dynamics, even in the absence of dispersal of organisms. We report an experimental test of the effect of upstream community structure on downstream community dynamics in a simplified but highly controlled setting, using protist microcosms. We implemented directional flows of resources, without dispersal, from a standard resource pool into upstream communities of contrasting interaction structure and then to further downstream communities of either one or two trophic levels. Our results demonstrate that different types of species interactions in upstream habitats may lead to different population sizes and levels of biomass in these upstream habitats. This, in turn, leads to varying levels of detritus transfer (dead biomass) to the downstream communities, thus influencing their population densities and trophic interactions in predictable ways. Our results suggest that the structure of species interactions in directionally structured ecosystems can be a key mediator of alterations to downstream habitats. Alterations to upstream habitats can thus cascade down to downstream communities, even without dispersal.

  12. Downstream-based Scheduling for Energy Conservation in Green EPONs

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Shen

    2012-05-01

    Maximizing the optical network unit’s (ONU) sleep time is an effective approach for achieving maximum energy conservation in green Ethernet passive optical networks (EPONs). While overlapping downstream and upstream ONU transmissions can maximize the ONU sleep time, it jeopardizes the quality of service (QoS) performance of the network, especially for downstream traffic in case the overlapping is based on the upstream time slot. In this paper, we study the downstream traffic performance in green EPONs under the limited service discipline and the upstream-based overlapped time window. Specifically, we first derive the expected mean packet delay, and then present a closed-form expression of the ONU sleep time, setting identical upstream/downstream transmission cycle times based on a maximum downstream traffic delay re-quirement. With the proposed system model, we present a novel downstream bandwidth allocation scheme for energy conservation in green EPONs. Simulation results verify the proposed model and highlight the advantages of our scheme over conventional approaches.

  13. Privacy Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about the Privacy Act of 1974, the Electronic Government Act of 2002, the Federal Information Security Management Act, and other information about the Environmental Protection Agency maintains its records.

  14. The effect of CD4 receptor downregulation and its downstream signaling molecules on HIV-1 latency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung-Chang [National Institute of Health, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyeon Guk [National Institute of Health, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Roh, Tae-Young [Division of Molecular and Life Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of); Division of Integrative Biosciences and Biotechnology, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jihwan [Division of Molecular and Life Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Kyung-Min; Lee, Joo-Shil [National Institute of Health, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sang-Yun [School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Soon [National Institute of Health, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Byeong-Sun, E-mail: byeongsun@korea.kr [National Institute of Health, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} CD4 receptors were downregulated on the surface of HIV-1 latently infected cells. {yields} CD4 downstream signaling molecules were suppressed in HIV-1 latently infected cells. {yields} HIV-1 progeny can be reactivated by induction of T-cell activation signal molecules. {yields} H3K4me3 and H3K9ac were highly enriched in CD4 downstream signaling molecules. {yields} HIV-1 latency can be maintained by the reduction of downstream signaling molecules. -- Abstract: HIV-1 can establish a latent infection in memory CD4 + T cells to evade the host immune response. CD4 molecules can act not only as the HIV-1 receptor for entry but also as the trigger in an intracellular signaling cascade for T-cell activation and proliferation via protein tyrosine kinases. Novel chronic HIV-1-infected A3.01-derived (NCHA) cells were used to examine the involvement of CD4 downstream signaling in HIV-1 latency. CD4 receptors in NCHA cells were dramatically downregulated on its surface but were slightly decreased in whole-cell lysates. The expression levels of CD4 downstream signaling molecules, including P56{sup Lck}, ZAP-70, LAT, and c-Jun, were sharply decreased in NCHA cells. The lowered histone modifications of H3K4me3 and H3K9ac correlated with the downregulation of P56{sup Lck}, ZAP-70, and LAT in NCHA cells. AP-1 binding activity was also reduced in NCHA cells. LAT and c-Jun suppressed in NCHA cells were highly induced after PMA treatment. In epigenetic analysis, other signal transduction molecules which are associated with active and/or latent HIV-1 infection showed normal states in HIV-1 latently infected cells compared to A3.01 cells. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the HIV-1 latent state is sustained by the reduction of downstream signaling molecules via the downregulation of CD4 and the attenuated activity of transcription factor as AP-1. The HIV-1 latency model via T-cell deactivation may provide some clues for the development of the new

  15. Autonomous regulation of the insect gut by circadian genes acting downstream of juvenile hormone signaling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bajgar, Adam; Jindra, Marek; Doležel, David

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 11 (2013), s. 4416-4421 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500960802; GA ČR GP204/08/P579; GA ČR GAP502/10/1612 Grant - others:Marie Curie Fellowship Award(CZ) 276569 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : reproductive diapuase * photoperiodism * basic helix-loop-helix protein Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 9.809, year: 2013 http://www.pnas.org/content/110/11/4416.full.pdf+html

  16. Ion energy characteristics downstream of a high power helicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prager, James; Winglee, Robert; Ziemba, Tim; Roberson, B Race; Quetin, Gregory [University of Washington, Johnson Hall 070, Box 351310, 4000 15th Avenue NE, Seattle, WA 98195-1310 (United States)], E-mail: jprager@u.washington.edu

    2008-05-01

    The High Power Helicon eXperiment operates at higher powers (37 kW) and lower background neutral pressure than other helicon experiments. The ion velocity distribution function (IVDF) has been measured at multiple locations downstream of the helicon source and a mach 3-6 flowing plasma was observed. The helicon antenna has a direct effect in accelerating the plasma downstream of the source. Also, the IVDF is affected by the cloud of neutrals from the initial gas puff, which keeps the plasma speed low at early times near the source.

  17. The NCA-1 and NCA-2 Ion Channels Function Downstream of Gq and Rho To Regulate Locomotion in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topalidou, Irini; Chen, Pin-An; Cooper, Kirsten; Watanabe, Shigeki; Jorgensen, Erik M; Ailion, Michael

    2017-05-01

    The heterotrimeric G protein Gq positively regulates neuronal activity and synaptic transmission. Previously, the Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor Trio was identified as a direct effector of Gq that acts in parallel to the canonical Gq effector phospholipase C. Here, we examine how Trio and Rho act to stimulate neuronal activity downstream of Gq in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans Through two forward genetic screens, we identify the cation channels NCA-1 and NCA-2, orthologs of mammalian NALCN, as downstream targets of the Gq-Rho pathway. By performing genetic epistasis analysis using dominant activating mutations and recessive loss-of-function mutations in the members of this pathway, we show that NCA-1 and NCA-2 act downstream of Gq in a linear pathway. Through cell-specific rescue experiments, we show that function of these channels in head acetylcholine neurons is sufficient for normal locomotion in C. elegans Our results suggest that NCA-1 and NCA-2 are physiologically relevant targets of neuronal Gq-Rho signaling in C. elegans. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  18. The Nigerian petroleum downstream sector and product pricing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research has been designed to explore critically the history of the downstream petroleum sector and the trend of pricing of Nigeria's petroleum products - looking closely at the contentious issue of subsidy and formulate a statistical model for the appropriate pricing of locally produced petroleum products.

  19. Downstream flow top width prediction in a river system | Choudhury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ANFIS, ARIMA and Hybrid Multiple Inflows Muskingum models (HMIM) were applied to simulate and forecast downstream discharge and flow top widths in a river system. The ANFIS model works on a set of linguistic rules while the ARIMA model uses a set of past values to predict the next value in a time series. The HMIM ...

  20. Imaging for monitoring downstream processing of fermentation broths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moiseyenko, Rayisa; Baum, Andreas; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini

    In relation to downstream processing of a fermentation broth coagulation/flocculation is a typical pretreatment method for separating undesirable particles/impurities from the wanted product. In the coagulation process the negatively charged impurities are destabilized by adding of a clarifying...

  1. Downstream and upstream extension of the House of Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmen, Elsebeth; Kristensen, Preben Sander

    a discussion in a diabetics end-user focus group. During a series of meetings, the production manager and the sales manager transformed attributes int characteristics and constructed Houses of Quality for a sugar-free cookie. 2. Downstream on its way to the end-user, the product passes through a chain of users...

  2. Downstream processing of Isochrysis galbana: a step towards microalgal biorefinery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilbert-López, B.; Mendiola, J.A.; Fontecha, J.; Broek, van den L.A.M.; Sijtsma, L.; Cifuentes, A.; Herrero, M.; Ibáñez, E.

    2015-01-01

    An algae-based biorefinery relies on the efficient use of algae biomass through its fractionation of several valuable/bioactive compounds that can be used in industry. If this biorefinery includes green platforms as downstream processing technologies able to fulfill the requirements of green

  3. Doublesex: a conserved downstream gene controlled by diverse ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-09-06

    Sep 6, 2010 ... The Drosophila doublesex (dsx) gene at the bottom of the sex-determination cascade is the best charac- terized candidate so far, and is .... down of tra-2 in these insects results in complete reversal of genotypically female .... tributing the antagonistic effect of sex-specific Dsx proteins on their downstream ...

  4. Extreme wave phenomena in down-stream running modulated waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andonowati, A.; Karjanto, N.; van Groesen, Embrecht W.C.

    Modulational, Benjamin-Feir, instability is studied for the down-stream evolution of surface gravity waves. An explicit solution, the soliton on finite background, of the NLS equation in physical space is used to study various phenomena in detail. It is shown that for sufficiently long modulation

  5. ACT Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Content View Sources Ask Us Also Known As ACT Activated Coagulation Time Formal Name Activated Clotting Time ... What is being tested? The activated clotting time (ACT) is a test that is used primarily to ...

  6. ACTS 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    . For the 2014 festival, the museum has entered into a collaboration with the Department for Performance Design at Roskilde University – with continued focus on sound and performance art, and social art in public spaces. With ACTS, art moves out of its usual exhibition space and instead utilizes the city, its...... various possibilities and public spaces as a stage. ACTS takes place in and around the museum and diverse locations in Roskilde city. ACTS is partly curated by the museum staff and partly by guest curators. ACTS 2014 is supported by Nordea-fonden and is a part of the project The Museum goes downtown.......Co-curator of ACTS 2014 together with Rasmus Holmboe, Judith Schwarzbart and Sanne Kofoed. ACTS is the Museum of Contemporary Art’s international bi-annual festival. ACTS was established in 2011 and, while the primary focus is on sound and performance art, it also looks toward socially oriented art...

  7. Minimizing downstream scour due to submerged hydraulic jump using corrugated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam Mohamed Ali

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Local scour downstream of hydraulic structures due to hydraulic jump is considered one of the tedious and complicated problems facing their stability. Throughout this paper, an experimental study was conducted to study the effect of using different spaced corrugated aprons on the downstream local scour due to submerged jump. Sixty runs were carried out in a horizontal rectangular flume to determine the optimal corrugation wavelength which minimizing the scour. A case of flat apron included to estimate the influence of corrugated aprons on scour holes dimensions. Two types of non-cohesive soil were used. Experiments were performed for a range of Froude numbers between 1.68 and 9.29. The results showed that using spaced triangular corrugated aprons minimize the scour depth and length of fine sand by average percentage of 63.4% and 30.2%, respectively and for coarse sand by 44.2% and 20.6% in comparing with classical jump.

  8. Patents and Downstream Innovation Suppression - Facts or Fiction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howells, John

    Merges and Nelson have proposed that pioneer patents have enabled their owners to 'block' or 'hold-up' downstream innovation in cases as important as the car, radio, aircraft and electric lighting (Merges and Nelson 1990, ; Merges and Nelson 1994). Merges and Nelson use their work to question...... the value of Kitch's prospect theory of patents, a theory that the social value of patents is that they enable the efficient coordination of technological development.    I re-examine history and legal sources bearing on Merges and Nelson's illustrative cases and find no case to illustrate downstream...... innovation suppression as claimed.  I argue instead that these cases illustrate problems in the coordination of development caused by various faults in the administration of patents by US Congress, the US Patent Office or the courts....

  9. Dead zone area at the downstream flow of barrages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed F. Sauida

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Flow separation is a natural phenomenon encountered at some cases downstream of barrages. The main flow is divided into current and dead zone flows. The percentage area of dead zone flow must be taken into consideration downstream of barrages, due to its negative effect on flow characteristics. Experimental studies were conducted in the Hydraulic Research Institute (HRI, on a physical regulator model with five vents. Theoretically the separation zone is described as a part of an ellipse which is practically verified by plotting velocity vectors. The results show that the percentage area of dead zone to the area through length of separation depends mainly on the expansion ratio [channel width to width of opened vents], with maximum value of 81% for operated side gates. A statistical analysis was derived, to predict the percentage area of dead zone flow to the area through length of separation.

  10. Analysis of Petroleum Downstream Industry Potential in Riau Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomi Erfando

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum downstream industry in Riau Province is still not optimal. The data shows that from 98,892,755 barrels lifting oil each year only 62,050,000 barrels could be processed in refinery unit II Dumai operated by PT Pertamina. There is a potential of 35-40% of downstream industry. Indonesian Government through The Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources declared the construction of a mini refinery to boost oil processing output in the downstream sector. A feasibility study of development plan mini refinery is needed. The study includes production capacity analysis, product analysis, development & operational refinery  analysis and economic analysis. The results obtained by the mini refinery capacity is planned to process crude oil 6000 BOPD with the products produced are gasoline, kerosene, diesel and oil. Investment cost consist of is capital cost US $ 104419784 and operating cost US $ 13766734 each year with net profit earned US $ 12330063/year and rate of return from investment 11.63%

  11. Heavy metals in sediments of Ganga River: up- and downstream urban influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Jitendra; Singh, Rachna

    2017-07-01

    Bottom sediment in a river often acts as a sink and indicator of changes in water column and magnitude of anthropogenic influences through air and watersheds. Heavy metal concentration in sediments of Ganga River was studied along a 37-km stretch to assess whether there is a significant difference between sites situated upstream and downstream of Varanasi urban core. Metal concentration increased consistently along the study gradient, indicating the influence of urban sources. Concentration in the river sediment was found highest for Fe followed by Mn, Zn, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Cd. Mann-Kendall trend analysis showed marked seasonality in the concentration with values being highest in summer and lowest in rainy season. Enrichment factor revealed severe enrichment of Cd and Pb at downstream sites, and principal component analysis segregated sites into four distinct groups indicating source relationships. Concentrations of Cd, Pb, Ni, Cu, and Cr did exceed WHO standards. The study has relevance designing control measures and action plans for reducing sediment contamination in anthropogenic impacted rivers.

  12. Sodic alkaline stress mitigation by exogenous melatonin in tomato needs nitric oxide as a downstream signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Na; Gong, Biao; Jin, Zhiyong; Wang, Xiufeng; Wei, Min; Yang, Fengjuan; Li, Yan; Shi, Qinghua

    2015-08-15

    The present study was designed to determine the interactive effect of exogenous melatonin and nitric oxide (NO) on sodic alkaline stress mitigation in tomato seedlings. It was observed that exogenous melatonin treatment elevated NO levels in alkaline-stressed tomato roots. However, exogenous NO had little effects on melatonin levels. Importantly, melatonin-induced NO generation was accompanied by increased tolerance to alkaline stress. Chemical scavenging of NO reduced melatonin-induced alkaline stress tolerance and defense genes' expression. However, inhibition of melatonin biosynthesis had a little effect on NO-induced alkaline stress tolerance. These results strongly suggest that NO, acting as a downstream signal, is involved in the melatonin-induced tomato tolerance to alkaline stress. This process creates a new signaling pathway for improving stress tolerance in plant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. The Legality Of Deregulating The Downstream Sector Of The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work appraises the legality of the recent deregulation of the down stream sector of te oil industry in light of the Mineral Act of 1990 and the Petroleum Products Pricing Regulation Agency (Establishment) Act 3. It appraises the general and specific principle of statutory interpretation, to see if there is a conflict between ...

  14. Geomorphic signature of a dammed Sandy River: The lower Trinity River downstream of Livingston Dam in Texas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Virginia B.; Mohrig, David

    2017-11-01

    Reservoirs behind dams act as deposition sites for much of the sediment being transported by rivers. As a result, the downstream river flow can be well below the transport capacity for bed-material. This promotes bed erosion and other geomorphic changes over some length of river located immediately downstream from a dam. These adjustments have been characterized for the Trinity River, TX, downstream of Livingston Dam. Field measurements and results from a 1D numerical model define a 50-60 river kilometer segment of river undergoing bed erosion as the transport capacity for bed material is reestablished. Consequences of this erosion include lowering of the channel bed, reduction in the sediment volume of channel bars, coarsening of sediment on bar tops, steepening of channel banks, and reduction in lateral migration rates of river bends. Repeat surveys of the river long profile reveals that 40 yr of dam closure has produced up to seven meters of channel-bottom incision downstream of the dam, transforming an initially linear profile into a convex-up long profile. The model output matches this observed change, providing confidence that calculated estimates for spatial and temporal changes in bed-material sediment flux can be used to explore the long-term signature of dam influence on the geomorphology of a sand-bed channel. Measurements of channel geometry, profile, lateral migration, and grain size of the lower Trinity River with distance downstream define both the trend and expected variability about the trend associated with the disruption to the bed-material load.

  15. Commissioning The Darht-II Accelerator Downstream Transport And Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekdahl, Carl [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schulze, Martin E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The DARHT-II accelerator produces a 2-kA, 17-MeV beam in a 1600-ns pulse. After exiting the accelerator, the pulse is sliced into four short pulses by a kicker and quadrupole septum and then transported for several meters to a tantalum target for conversion to x-rays for radiography. They describe the commissioning of the kicker, septum, transport, and multi-pulse converter target. The results of beam measurements made during the commissioning of the downstream transport are described.

  16. Downstream System for the Second Axis of the DARHT Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y-J; Bertolini, L; Caporaso, G J; Chambers, F W; Cook, E G; Falabella, S; Goldin, F J; Guethlein, G; Ho, D D-M; McCarrick, J F; Nelson, S D; Neurath, R; Paul, A C; Pincosy, P A; Poole, B R; Richardson, R A; Sampayan, S; Wang, L-F; Watson, J A; Westenskow, G A; Weir, J T

    2002-07-15

    This paper presents the physics design of the DARHT-II downstream system, which consists of a diagnostic beam stop, a fast, high-precision kicker system and the x-ray converter target assembly. The beamline configuration, the transverse resistive wall instability and the ion hose instability modeling are presented. They also discuss elimination of spot size dilution during kicker switching and implementation of the foil-barrier scheme to minimize the backstreaming ion focusing effects. Finally, they present the target converter's configuration, and the simulated DARHT-II x-ray spot sizes and doses. Some experimental results, which support the physics design, are also presented.

  17. Flame holding downstream from a co-flow injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoli, Colette; Haldenwang, Pierre; Denet, Bruno

    2006-07-01

    We present numerical results on the flame attachment in the downstream vicinity of the co-flow injector lip that separates the reactive fluids at injection. Two stability diagrams show the domains where the flame is anchored, blown off, or extinguished, in terms of separating plate thickness and injection velocities of both fluids. Different anchoring modes—stagnation point counter-flow holding or edge flame anchorage—are described, depending particularly on the plate rim thickness. To cite this article: C. Nicoli et al., C. R. Mecanique 334 (2006).

  18. Recent Molecular Advances on Downstream Plant Responses to Abiotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Regina Batista de Souza

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stresses such as extremes of temperature and pH, high salinity and drought, comprise some of the major factors causing extensive losses to crop production worldwide. Understanding how plants respond and adapt at cellular and molecular levels to continuous environmental changes is a pre-requisite for the generation of resistant or tolerant plants to abiotic stresses. In this review we aimed to present the recent advances on mechanisms of downstream plant responses to abiotic stresses and the use of stress-related genes in the development of genetically engineered crops.

  19. Natural Origin Lycopene and Its "Green" Downstream Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, Emmanouil H; Liakopoulou-Kyriakides, Maria; Karabelas, Anastasios J

    2016-01-01

    Lycopene is an abundant natural carotenoid pigment with several biological functions (well-known for its antioxidant properties) which is under intensive investigation in recent years. Lycopene chemistry, its natural distribution, bioavailability, biological significance, and toxicological effects are briefly outlined in the first part of this review. The second, major part, deals with various modern downstream processing techniques, which are assessed in order to identify promising approaches for the recovery of lycopene and of similar lipophilic compounds. Natural lycopene is synthesized in plants and by microorganisms, with main representatives of these two categories (for industrial production) tomato and its by-products and the fungus Blakeslea trispora, respectively. Currently, there is a great deal of effort to develop efficient downstream processing for large scale production of natural-origin lycopene, with trends strongly indicating the necessity for "green" and mild extraction conditions. In this review, emphasis is placed on final product safety and ecofriendly processing, which are expected to totally dominate in the field of natural-origin lycopene extraction and purification.

  20. Ferric chloride based downstream process for microalgae based biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yeong Hwan; Sung, Mina; Kim, Bohwa; Oh, You-Kwan; Kim, Dong Yeon; Han, Jong-In

    2015-04-01

    In this study, ferric chloride (FeCl3) was used to integrate downstream processes (harvesting, lipid extraction, and esterification). At concentration of 200 mg/L and at pH 3, FeCl3 exhibited an expected degree of coagulation and an increase in cell density of ten times (170 mg/10 mL). An iron-mediated oxidation reaction, Fenton-like reaction, was used to extract lipid from the harvested biomass, and efficiency of 80% was obtained with 0.5% H2O2 at 90 °C. The iron compound was also employed in the esterification step, and converted free fatty acids to fatty acid methyl esters under acidic conditions; thus, the fatal problem of saponification during esterification with alkaline catalysts was avoided, and esterification efficiency over 90% was obtained. This study clearly showed that FeCl3 in the harvesting process is beneficial in all downstream steps and have a potential to greatly reduce the production cost of microalgae-originated biodiesel. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ion Effects in the DARHT-II Downstream Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Kwok-Chi D; Ekdahl, Carl; Genoni, Thomas C; Hughes, Thomas P; Schulze, Martin E

    2005-01-01

    The DARHT-II accelerator produces an 18-MeV, 2-kA, 2-μs electron beam pulse. After the accelerator, the pulse is delivered to the final focus on an x-ray producing target via a beam transport section called the Downstream Transport. Ions produced due to beam ionization of residual gases in the Downstream Transport can affect the beam dynamics. Ions generated by the head of the pulse will cause modification of space-charge forces at the tail of the pulse so that the beam head and tail will have different beam envelopes. They may also induce ion-hose instability at the tail of the pulse. If these effects are significant, the focusing requirements of beam head and tail at the final focus will become very different. The focusing of the complete beam pulse will be time dependent and difficult to achieve, leading to less efficient x-ray production. In this paper, we will describe the results of our calculations of these ion effects at different residual-gas pressure levels. Our goal is to determine the ma...

  2. Investigation on local scour downstream of adverse st

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Farhoudi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on local scour downstream of adverse stilling basins where a submerged wall jet issued from a sluice gate. Experiments were conducted in a wide range of Froude numbers, grain sizes, tailwater depths, and stilling basin slopes. The results showed that the scour profiles at any bed slope follow shape similarity. However, the longitude evolution of scour profiles and the volume of eroded materials were increasing in accordance with slope of basin. A polynomial equation was derived to define the non-dimensional profiles under different slopes. The time evolution of scour hole dimensions and the equilibrium state were defined. It was found that under a specific condition of sediment grain size, approaching Froude number, the length and slope of adverse basin, the scour depth at the downstream of adverse basin, initially increases with tailwater depth, and after reaching its maximum value decreases to a constant value. It was also observed that the maximum depth of scour hole was decreased as the length and slope of stilling basin increased, whereas the longitudinal dimensions of the hole were increased. It was found that the maximum depth of scour hole occurs at the vicinity of side walls with slight decrease in the centerline. Finally, a power equation was expressed to fully define the dimensions of scour hole, time scale and geometry of sluice gate.

  3. Evaluation of Intracellular Signaling Downstream Chimeric Antigen Receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Karlsson

    Full Text Available CD19-targeting CAR T cells have shown potency in clinical trials targeting B cell leukemia. Although mainly second generation (2G CARs carrying CD28 or 4-1BB have been investigated in patients, preclinical studies suggest that third generation (3G CARs with both CD28 and 4-1BB have enhanced capacity. However, little is known about the intracellular signaling pathways downstream of CARs. In the present work, we have analyzed the signaling capacity post antigen stimulation in both 2G and 3G CARs. 3G CAR T cells expanded better than 2G CAR T cells upon repeated stimulation with IL-2 and autologous B cells. An antigen-driven accumulation of CAR+ cells was evident post antigen stimulation. The cytotoxicity of both 2G and 3G CAR T cells was maintained by repeated stimulation. The phosphorylation status of intracellular signaling proteins post antigen stimulation showed that 3G CAR T cells had a higher activation status than 2G. Several proteins involved in signaling downstream the TCR were activated, as were proteins involved in the cell cycle, cell adhesion and exocytosis. In conclusion, 3G CAR T cells had a higher degree of intracellular signaling activity than 2G CARs which may explain the increased proliferative capacity seen in 3G CAR T cells. The study also indicates that there may be other signaling pathways to consider when designing or evaluating new generations of CARs.

  4. Balancing Acts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section: Focus on Communication Balancing Acts Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of ... It was like watching a movie, but every couple of frames were skipping. It was disorienting," the ...

  5. Interactive Learning-driven Innovation in Upstream-Downstream Relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machikita, Tomohiro; Ueki, Yasushi

    2012-01-01

    with new technologies and new markets. However, this is not true for simple improvement of products or process innovation. Mutual exchanges with engineers between producers and suppliers within a chain can be expected to play an important role in the case of costly innovation and in situations unknown......This paper presents a simple framework of the innovations that result from interfirm learning through exchanges of engineers in upstream-downstream relations within a production chain. To examine the framework, we empirically investigate the impact of mutual knowledge exchanges on product...... and process innovation using a survey of firm's self-reporting customer and supplier data in Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam. Evidence from interconnected firms within a production chain suggests that firms with mutual exchanges between engineers and customers achieved product innovations...

  6. Efficient industry configurations in downstream gas markets. An empirical assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casarin, Ariel A. [IAE Escuela de Direccion y Negocios, Universidad Austral, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2007-03-15

    This paper examines the production technology of the downstream gas industry in order to provide some useful insights into its efficient structure by looking at the optimal size of firms and the productive efficiency reasons for and against their vertical integration. The analysis is based on a restricted cost function model estimated using firm level data for Argentina and Great Britain. The findings provide evidence for the presence of vertical diseconomies between stages. Results indicate that a single transmitter is able to produce the industry's output at lower costs for large market sizes and that several regional firms are able to operate without sacrificing scale economies if gas distribution is integrated with supply. The findings also indicate that a gas retailer experiences constant returns to scale when it supplies a large customer base. Liberalisation could thus result in oligopolistic industry configurations. (Author)

  7. Mergers and acquisitions of downstream facilities by producing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligon, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    The author discusses a phenomenon that he calls the ''re-integration'' or ''re-coupling'' of the worldwide oil industry, as foreign, particularly OPEC, producers are becoming directly involved with downstream operations in their most important markets. This phenomenon already has produced some far-reaching consequences that will become even more important and pervasive in the near future. First, he describes the factors and logic that led to these arrangements. Next, he outlines some of their practical considerations and implications. While some of the market factors described are applicable to any non-integrated producer, he spends most of his time discussing OPEC and ''neo-OPEC'' producers such as Mexico. These are the people doing the deals and are therefore probably of greatest interest.

  8. Downstream Processability of Crystal Habit-Modified Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pudasaini, Nawin; Upadhyay, Pratik Pankaj; Parker, Christian Richard

    2017-01-01

    of six representative crystal habits of 5-ASA (needles, plates, rectangular bars, rhombohedrals, elongated hexagons, and spheroids) in the context of direct compression using ring shear tester, flow rate analyzer, and instrumented tablet press. As expected, needles were very cohesive, had low flow rate...... and tabletability, creating significant processability difficulties on a production scale. However, such a habit can be adapted to the needs of downstream processing. To this end, we modified the needle-like crystal habit of the model API 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA). This study reports processability assessment...... (1.0 ± 0.08 mg/s), and low bulk density (0.14 ± 0.01 g/mL) but showed better tabletability, whereas the opposite was observed with more isotropic crystal habits. For instance, spheroids, elongated hexagons, and rhombohedrals were easy/free-flowing and had high bulk densities (≥0.5 g/mL), but final...

  9. Allogeneic cell therapy bioprocess economics and optimization: downstream processing decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Sally; Simaria, Ana S; Varadaraju, Hemanthram; Gupta, Siddharth; Warren, Kim; Farid, Suzanne S

    2015-01-01

    To develop a decisional tool to identify the most cost effective process flowsheets for allogeneic cell therapies across a range of production scales. A bioprocess economics and optimization tool was built to assess competing cell expansion and downstream processing (DSP) technologies. Tangential flow filtration was generally more cost-effective for the lower cells/lot achieved in planar technologies and fluidized bed centrifugation became the only feasible option for handling large bioreactor outputs. DSP bottlenecks were observed at large commercial lot sizes requiring multiple large bioreactors. The DSP contribution to the cost of goods/dose ranged between 20-55%, and 50-80% for planar and bioreactor flowsheets, respectively. This analysis can facilitate early decision-making during process development.

  10. From gravel to sand. Downstream fining of bed sediments in the lower river Rhine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frings, R.M.

    2007-01-01

    A common characteristic of many rivers is the tendency for bed sediments to become finer in downstream direction. This phenomenon, which is generally known as downstream fining, has a strong effect on the morphologic and hydrodynamic behaviour of a river. The fundamental causes of downstream

  11. Downstream cumulative effects of land use on freshwater communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuglerová, L.; Kielstra, B. W.; Moore, D.; Richardson, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Many streams and rivers are subject to disturbance from intense land use such as urbanization and agriculture, and this is especially obvious for small headwaters. Streams are spatially organized into networks where headwaters represent the tributaries and provide water, nutrients, and organic material to the main stems. Therefore perturbations within the headwaters might be cumulatively carried on downstream. Although we know that the disturbance of headwaters in urban and agricultural landscapes poses threats to downstream river reaches, the magnitude and severity of these changes for ecological communities is less known. We studied stream networks along a gradient of disturbance connected to land use intensity, from urbanized watersheds to watersheds placed in agricultural settings in the Greater Toronto Area. Further, we compared the patterns and processes found in the modified watershed to a control watershed, situated in a forested, less impacted landscape. Preliminary results suggest that hydrological modifications (flash floods), habitat loss (drainage and sewer systems), and water quality issues of small streams in urbanized and agricultural watersheds represent major disturbances and threats for aquatic and riparian biota on local as well as larger spatial scales. For example, communities of riparian plants are dominated by species typical of the land use on adjacent uplands as well as the dominant land use on the upstream contributing area, instead of riparian obligates commonly found in forested watersheds. Further, riparian communities in disturbed environments are dominated by invasive species. The changes in riparian communities are vital for various functions of riparian vegetation. Bank erosion control is suppressed, leading to severe channel transformations and sediment loadings in urbanized watersheds. Food sources for instream biota and thermal regimes are also changed, which further triggers alterations of in-stream biological communities

  12. Downstream evolution of unconfined vortices: mechanical and thermal aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Saborid, M.; Herrada, M. A.; Gómez-Barea, A.; Barrero, A.

    2002-11-01

    We present a numerical study of the downstream evolution (mechanical and thermal) of vortex-jet cores whose velocity and temperature fields far from the axis match a family of inviscid and non-conducting vortices. The far-velocity field is rotational, except for a particular case which corresponds to the well-known Long's vortex. The evolution of the vortex core depends on both the conditions at a certain upstream station, characterized by the dimensionless value of the velocity at the axis, and a dimensionless swirling parameter L defined as the ratio of the values of the azimuthal and axial velocities outside the vortex core. This numerical study, based on the quasi-cylindrical approximation (QC) of the Navier Stokes equations, determines the conditions under which the vortex evolution proceeds smoothly, eventually reaching an asymptotic self-similar behaviour as described in the literature (Fernández-Feria, Fernández de la Mora & Barrero 1995; Herrada, Pérez-Saborid & Barrero 1999), or breaks in a non-slender solution (vortex breakdown). In particular, the critical value L = Lb(a) beyond which vortex breakdown occurs downstream is a function of a dimensionless parameter a characterizing the axial momentum of the vortex jet at an initial upstream station. It is found numerically that for very large values of a this vortex breakdown criterion tends to an asymptote which is precisely the value L = L* predicted by the self-similar analysis, and beyond which a self-similar structure of the vortex core does not exist. In addition, the computation of the total temperature field provides useful information on the physical mechanisms responsible for the thermal separation phenomenon observed in Ranque Hilsch tubes and other swirling jet devices. In particular, the mechanical work of viscous forces which gives rise to an intense loss of kinetic energy during the initial stages of the evolution has been identified as the physical mechanism responsible for thermal

  13. A Copernicus downstream service for surface displacement monitoring in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahyadi Kalia, Andre; Frei, Michaela; Lege, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    SAR Interferometry is a powerful technique able to detect and monitor various surface displacements caused by e.g. gravitative mass movement, subrosion, groundwater extraction, fluid injection, natural gas extraction. These processes can e.g. cause damage to buildings, infrastructure, affect ecosystems, agriculture and the economic use of the geological underground by influencing the hydro(geo)logical setting. Advanced techniques of interferometric processing (Persistent Scatterer Interferometry, PSI) allow highly precise displacement measurements (mm precision) by analyzing stacks of SAR imagery. The PSI mapping coverage can be increased to entire nations by using several adjacent satellite tracks. In order to assist the operational use of this technique a German-wide, officially approved, PSI dataset is under development. The intention of this presentation is to show i) the concept of the Copernicus downstream service for surface displacement monitoring in Germany and ii) a pilot study to exemplarily demonstrate the workflow and potential products from the Copernicus downstream service. The pilot study is focusing on the built up of an officially approved wide-area PSI dataset. The study area covers an area of more than 30.000 km² and is located in the Northwest German Basin. Several natural processes (e.g. compaction of marine sediments, peat loss) and anthropogenic activities (e.g. natural gas extraction, rock salt mining) are causing surface displacements in the study area. The PSI analysis is based on six ERS-1/-2 data stacks covering the timespan from 1992 until 2001. Each data stack consists of 49 to 73 ERS-1/-2 SAR images. A comparison of the PSI results with thematic data (e.g. volume and location of extracted natural gas) strongly indicates that a part of the detected land subsidence is caused by natural gas extraction. Furthermore, land subsidence caused by e.g. fluid injection and rock salt mining were successfully detected by the PSI analysis.

  14. Dams in the Cadillac Desert: downstream effects in a geomorphic context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, John L; Bestgen, Kevin; Graf, Will; Sinha, Tushar; Wohl, Ellen E

    2012-02-01

    This paper was motivated by the 25th anniversary of the publication of Marc Reisner's book, Cadillac Desert: The American West and its Disappearing Water. Dams are ubiquitous on rivers in the United States, and large dams and storage reservoirs are the hallmark of western U.S. riverscapes. The effects of dams on downstream river ecosystems have attracted much attention and are encapsulated in the serial discontinuity concept (SDC). In the SDC, dams create abrupt shifts in continua of downstream changes in physical and biotic properties. In this paper, we develop a framework for understanding how channel geometry and network structure influence how the physical components of habitat and the biota rebound from discontinuities set up by large dams. We apply this framework to data describing the flow regime, temperature, sediment flux, and fish community composition below Garrison Dam on the Missouri River, Glen Canyon Dam on the Colorado River, and Flaming Gorge Dam on the Green River. Sediment flux in dam tailwaters is under strong control by channel geometry. By contrast, dam-related changes in temperature and flow variation are not significantly modulated by channel geometry or tributary inputs if flow volumes are small (Missouri and Colorado River tributaries). Instead, small tributaries provide near-native conditions (flow and temperature variation) and, as such, provide key refuges for biota from novel habitats in mainstem rivers below large dams. Unregulated tributaries that are large relative to their respective mainstem (e.g., Yampa River) provide refuges as well as significant amelioration of flow and temperature effects from upstream dams. Finally, the proportion of native fish increases with distance from dam and exhibits sharp increases near tributary junctions. These results suggest that tributaries-even minor ones in terms of relative discharge-act as key refugia for native species in regulated river networks. Moreover, large, unregulated tributaries

  15. Electron acceleration at nearly perpendicular collisionless shocks. 3: Downstream distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss-Varban, D.

    1994-01-01

    Spacecraft observations at the Earth's bow shock and at interplanetary shocks have established that the largest fluxes of accelerated suprathermal electrons occur in so-called shock spike events immediately downstream of the shock ramp. Previous theoretical efforts have mainly focused on explaining upstream energetic electron beams. Here we investigate the general motion and acceleration of energetic electrons in a curved, nearly perpendicular shock by numerically integrating the orbits of solar wind halo electrons in shock fields generated by a hybrid simulation (core electron fluid and kinetic ions). Close to the angle Theta(sub Bn) = 90 degs between the upstream magnetic field and shock normal, the calculations result in a (perpendicular) temperature increase proportional to the magnetic field ratio and give the highest phase space densities in the overshoot. For a steep distribution, the temperature change can correspond to an enhancement of the distribution by several orders of magnitude. These results are in agreement with predictions from adiabatic mapping. With smaller angles Theta(sub Bn), the overshoot and downstream densities fall off quickly, because the adiabatic energy gain is less and fewer electrons transmit. The shock curvature also leads to an accumulation of electrons close to 90 degs. Without pitch angle scattering, energization is only significant within a few (approximately 5 to 10 degs) degrees of the point of tangency. However, shock spike events appear to be observed more easily and farther away from 90 degs. Given that over a region of several degrees around 90 degs the theory gives enhancements of up to approximately 4 orders of magnitude, such electrons could in principle account for the typically observed enhancements of 1 to 2 orders of magnitude, if they were distributed over Theta(sub Bn). To test the idea that scattering could efficiently redistribute the energetic electrons, we have conducted test particle simulations in which

  16. Corrosion impact of reductant on DWPF and downstream facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J. I. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Imrich, K. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jantzen, C. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Murphy, T. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Wilderman, J. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-12-01

    Glycolic acid is being evaluated as an alternate reductant in the preparation of high level waste for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). During processing, the glycolic acid is not completely consumed and small quantities of the glycolate anion are carried forward to other high level waste (HLW) facilities. The impact of the glycolate anion on the corrosion of the materials of construction throughout the waste processing system has not been previously evaluated. A literature review had revealed that corrosion data in glycolate-bearing solution applicable to SRS systems were not available. Therefore, testing was recommended to evaluate the materials of construction of vessels, piping and components within DWPF and downstream facilities. The testing, conducted in non-radioactive simulants, consisted of both accelerated tests (electrochemical and hot-wall) with coupons in laboratory vessels and prototypical tests with coupons immersed in scale-up and mock-up test systems. Eight waste or process streams were identified in which the glycolate anion might impact the performance of the materials of construction. These streams were 70% glycolic acid (DWPF feed vessels and piping), SRAT/SME supernate (Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) vessels and piping), DWPF acidic recycle (DWPF condenser and recycle tanks and piping), basic concentrated recycle (HLW tanks, evaporators, and transfer lines), salt processing (ARP, MCU, and Saltstone tanks and piping), boric acid (MCU separators), and dilute waste (HLW evaporator condensate tanks and transfer line and ETF components). For each stream, high temperature limits and worst-case glycolate concentrations were identified for performing the recommended tests. Test solution chemistries were generally based on analytical results of actual waste samples taken from the various process facilities or of prototypical simulants produced in the laboratory. The materials of construction for most vessels

  17. Hydroeconomic optimization of reservoir management under downstream water quality constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidsen, Claus; Liu, Suxia; Mo, Xingguo; Holm, Peter E.; Trapp, Stefan; Rosbjerg, Dan; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2015-10-01

    A hydroeconomic optimization approach is used to guide water management in a Chinese river basin with the objectives of meeting water quantity and water quality constraints, in line with the China 2011 No. 1 Policy Document and 2015 Ten-point Water Plan. The proposed modeling framework couples water quantity and water quality management and minimizes the total costs over a planning period assuming stochastic future runoff. The outcome includes cost-optimal reservoir releases, groundwater pumping, water allocation, wastewater treatments and water curtailments. The optimization model uses a variant of stochastic dynamic programming known as the water value method. Nonlinearity arising from the water quality constraints is handled with an effective hybrid method combining genetic algorithms and linear programming. Untreated pollutant loads are represented by biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), and the resulting minimum dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration is computed with the Streeter-Phelps equation and constrained to match Chinese water quality targets. The baseline water scarcity and operational costs are estimated to 15.6 billion CNY/year. Compliance to water quality grade III causes a relatively low increase to 16.4 billion CNY/year. Dilution plays an important role and increases the share of surface water allocations to users situated furthest downstream in the system. The modeling framework generates decision rules that result in the economically efficient strategy for complying with both water quantity and water quality constraints.

  18. Gellan Gum: Fermentative Production, Downstream Processing and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishwar B. Bajaj

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The microbial exopolysaccharides are water-soluble polymers secreted by microorganisms during fermentation. The biopolymer gellan gum is a relatively recent addition to the family of microbial polysaccharides that is gaining much importance in food, pharmaceutical and chemical industries due to its novel properties. It is commercially produced by C. P. Kelco in Japan and the USA. Further research and development in biopolymer technology is expected to expand its use. This article presents a critical review of the available information on the gellan gum synthesized by Sphingomonas paucimobilis with special emphasis on its fermentative production and downstream processing. Rheological behaviour of fermentation broth during fermentative production of gellan gum and problems associated with mass transfer have been addressed. Information on the biosynthetic pathway of gellan gum, enzymes and precursors involved in gellan gum production and application of metabolic engineering for enhancement of yield of gellan gum has been specified. Characteristics of gellan gum with respect to its structure, physicochemical properties, rheology of its solutions and gel formation behaviour are discussed. An attempt has also been made to review the current and potential applications of gellan gum in food, pharmaceutical and other industries.

  19. Oxidative stress and its downstream signaling in aging eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinazo-Durán, María Dolores; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto; García-Medina, Jose Javier; Zanón-Moreno, Vicente; Nucci, Carlo; Dolz-Marco, Rosa; Martínez-Castillo, Sebastián; Galbis-Estrada, Carmen; Marco-Ramírez, Carla; López-Gálvez, Maria Isabel; Galarreta, David J; Díaz-Llópis, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) and its biomarkers are the biochemical end point of the imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the ability of the antioxidant (AOX) biological systems to fight against oxidative injury. We reviewed the role of OS and its downstream signaling in aging eyes. A search of the literature and current knowledge on the physiological and pathological mechanisms of OS were revisited in relation to the eyes and the aging process. Most prevalent ocular diseases have been analyzed herein in relation to OS and nutraceutic supplements, such as dry-eye disorders, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy. Clinical, biochemical, and molecular data from anterior and posterior eye segment diseases point to OS as the common pathogenic mechanism in the majority of these ocular disorders, many of which are pathologies causing visual impairment, blindness, and subsequent loss of life quality. Studies with nutraceutic supplements in aging eye-related pathologies have also been reviewed. OS, nutritional status, and nutraceutic supplements have to be considered within the standards of care of older ophthalmologic patients. OS biomarkers and surrogate end points may help in managing the aging population with ocular diseases.

  20. Downstream Processing, Formulation Development and Antithrombotic Evaluation of Microbial Nattokinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Rohit; Harde, Harshad; Jain, Sanyog; Panda, Amulya Kumar; Panda, Bibhu Prasad

    2015-07-01

    The present research work describes the downstreaming of nattokinase (NK) produced by Bacillus subtilis under solid state fermentation; and the role of efficient oral formulation of purified NK in the management of thrombotic disorders. Molecular weight of purified NK was estimated to be 28 kDa with specific activity of 504.4 FU/mg. Acid stable nattokinase loaded chitosan nanoparticles (sNLCN) were fabricated for oral delivery of this enzyme. Box-Behnken design (BBD) was employed to investigate and validate the effect of process (independent) variables on the quality attributes (dependent variables) of nanoparticles. The integrity, conformational stability and preservation of fibrinolytic activity of NK (in both free and sNLCN forms) were established by SDS-PAGE, CD analysis and in vitro clot lytic examination, respectively. A 'tail thrombosis model' demonstrated significant decrease in frequency of thrombosis in Wistar rats upon peroral administration of sNLCN in comparison with negative control and free NK group. Furthermore, coagulation analysis, namely the measurement of prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin time illustrated that sNLCN showed significantly (p < 0.001) higher anti-thrombotic potential in comparison to the free NK. Further, sNLCN showed anti-thrombotic profile similar to warfarin. This study signifies the potential of sNLCN in oral delivery of NK for the management of thrombotic disorders.

  1. Flume experiments on scour downstream of wood stream restoration structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliara, Stefano; Kurdistani, Sahameddin Mahmoudi

    2017-02-01

    River restoration aims to improve physical natural form and processes of a river. Techniques to control the riverbed, stabilize channel alignment, protect stream banks, and rebuild the natural habitat are an important part of river restoration projects. Rivers can be stabilized and habitat restored through techniques such as rebuilding meanders and pool-riffle sequences and managing large wood. Structures that limit channel width to accelerate the normal flows through the constricted section are referred to as stream deflectors. Single-wing, double-wing and triangular deflectors are the most commonly used types of this measure. Log-frame deflectors consist of a triangular log frame filled with rock. Deflector constructions singly or in series in low gradient meandering streams, divert base flows toward the center of the channel and, under certain conditions, increase the depth and velocity of flow thereby creating scour pools and enhancing fish habitat. Scour characteristics and morphologies downstream of log-frame deflectors have been analyzed at the hydraulic laboratory of the University of Pisa. All experiments have been carried out in clear water conditions. The results showed that the tailwater depth plays an important role on scour characteristics. In addition, it was experimentally proven that using log-frame deflectors instead of log-deflectors result in a better river bank protection. In this case, for all the tested hydraulic conditions, the scour hole never occurred close to the channel bank. Useful empirical relationships have been proposed in order to evaluate the main features of the scour geometry.

  2. Downstream migration and multiple dam passage by Atlantic Salmon smolts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyqvist, D.; McCormick, Stephen; Greenberg, L.; Ardren, W.R.; Bergman, E.; Calles, O.; Castro-Santos, Theodore R.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate behavior and survival of radio-tagged wild and hatchery-reared landlocked Atlantic Salmon Salmo salar smolts as they migrated past three hydropower dams equipped with fish bypass solutions in the Winooski River, Vermont. Among hatchery-reared smolts, those released early were more likely to initiate migration and did so after less delay than those released late. Once migration was initiated, however, the late-released hatchery smolts migrated at greater speeds. Throughout the river system, hatchery-reared fish performed similarly to wild fish. Dam passage rates varied between the three dams and was highest at the dam where unusually high spill levels occurred throughout the study period. Of the 50 fish that did migrate downstream, only 10% managed to reach the lake. Migration success was low despite the presence of bypass solutions, underscoring the need for evaluations of remedial measures; simply constructing a fishway is not synonymous with providing fish passage.

  3. Synthetic Routes to Methylerythritol Phosphate Pathway Intermediates and Downstream Isoprenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarchow-Choy, Sarah K; Koppisch, Andrew T; Fox, David T

    2014-04-01

    Isoprenoids constitute the largest class of natural products with greater than 55,000 identified members. They play essential roles in maintaining proper cellular function leading to maintenance of human health, plant defense mechanisms against predators, and are often exploited for their beneficial properties in the pharmaceutical and nutraceutical industries. Most impressively, all known isoprenoids are derived from one of two C5-precursors, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) or dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). In order to study the enzyme transformations leading to the extensive structural diversity found within this class of compounds there must be access to the substrates. Sometimes, intermediates within a biological pathway can be isolated and used directly to study enzyme/pathway function. However, the primary route to most of the isoprenoid intermediates is through chemical catalysis. As such, this review provides the first exhaustive examination of synthetic routes to isoprenoid and isoprenoid precursors with particular emphasis on the syntheses of intermediates found as part of the 2C-methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. In addition, representative syntheses are presented for the monoterpenes (C10), sesquiterpenes (C15), diterpenes (C20), triterpenes (C30) and tetraterpenes (C40). Finally, in some instances, the synthetic routes to substrate analogs found both within the MEP pathway and downstream isoprenoids are examined.

  4. Wind-Driven Ecological Flow Regimes Downstream from Hydropower Dams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, J.; Characklis, G. W.

    2012-12-01

    Conventional hydropower can be turned on and off quicker and less expensively than thermal generation (coal, nuclear, or natural gas). These advantages enable hydropower utilities to respond to rapid fluctuations in energy supply and demand. More recently, a growing renewable energy sector has underlined the need for flexible generation capacity that can complement intermittent renewable resources such as wind power. While wind power entails lower variable costs than other types of generation, incorporating it into electric power systems can be problematic. Due to variable and unpredictable wind speeds, wind power is difficult to schedule and must be used when available. As a result, integrating large amounts of wind power into the grid may result in atypical, swiftly changing demand patterns for other forms of generation, placing a premium on sources that can be rapidly ramped up and down. Moreover, uncertainty in wind power forecasts will stipulate increased levels of 'reserve' generation capacity that can respond quickly if real-time wind supply is less than expected. These changes could create new hourly price dynamics for energy and reserves, altering the short-term financial signals that hydroelectric dam operators use to schedule water releases. Traditionally, hourly stream flow patterns below hydropower dams have corresponded in a very predictable manner to electricity demand, whose primary factors are weather (hourly temperature) and economic activity (workday hours). Wind power integration has the potential to yield more variable, less predictable flows at hydro dams, flows that at times could resemble reciprocal wind patterns. An existing body of research explores the impacts of standard, demand-following hydroelectric dams on downstream ecological flows; but weighing the benefits of increased reliance on wind power against further impacts to ecological flows may be a novel challenge for the environmental community. As a preliminary step in meeting this

  5. Turtle functions downstream of Cut in differentially regulating class specific dendrite morphogenesis in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikolaj J Sulkowski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dendritic morphology largely determines patterns of synaptic connectivity and electrochemical properties of a neuron. Neurons display a myriad diversity of dendritic geometries which serve as a basis for functional classification. Several types of molecules have recently been identified which regulate dendrite morphology by acting at the levels of transcriptional regulation, direct interactions with the cytoskeleton and organelles, and cell surface interactions. Although there has been substantial progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms of dendrite morphogenesis, the specification of class-specific dendritic arbors remains largely unexplained. Furthermore, the presence of numerous regulators suggests that they must work in concert. However, presently, few genetic pathways regulating dendrite development have been defined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The Drosophila gene turtle belongs to an evolutionarily conserved class of immunoglobulin superfamily members found in the nervous systems of diverse organisms. We demonstrate that Turtle is differentially expressed in Drosophila da neurons. Moreover, MARCM analyses reveal Turtle acts cell autonomously to exert class specific effects on dendritic growth and/or branching in da neuron subclasses. Using transgenic overexpression of different Turtle isoforms, we find context-dependent, isoform-specific effects on mediating dendritic branching in class II, III and IV da neurons. Finally, we demonstrate via chromatin immunoprecipitation, qPCR, and immunohistochemistry analyses that Turtle expression is positively regulated by the Cut homeodomain transcription factor and via genetic interaction studies that Turtle is downstream effector of Cut-mediated regulation of da neuron dendrite morphology. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings reveal that Turtle proteins differentially regulate the acquisition of class-specific dendrite morphologies. In addition, we have established a

  6. Extraction and downstream processing of plant-derived recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyel, J F; Twyman, R M; Fischer, R

    2015-11-01

    Plants offer the tantalizing prospect of low-cost automated manufacturing processes for biopharmaceutical proteins, but several challenges must be addressed before such goals are realized and the most significant hurdles are found during downstream processing (DSP). In contrast to the standardized microbial and mammalian cell platforms embraced by the biopharmaceutical industry, there are many different plant-based expression systems vying for attention, and those with the greatest potential to provide inexpensive biopharmaceuticals are also the ones with the most significant drawbacks in terms of DSP. This is because the most scalable plant systems are based on the expression of intracellular proteins in whole plants. The plant tissue must therefore be disrupted to extract the product, challenging the initial DSP steps with an unusually high load of both particulate and soluble contaminants. DSP platform technologies can accelerate and simplify process development, including centrifugation, filtration, flocculation, and integrated methods that combine solid-liquid separation, purification and concentration, such as aqueous two-phase separation systems. Protein tags can also facilitate these DSP steps, but they are difficult to transfer to a commercial environment and more generic, flexible and scalable strategies to separate target and host cell proteins are preferable, such as membrane technologies and heat/pH precipitation. In this context, clarified plant extracts behave similarly to the feed stream from microbes or mammalian cells and the corresponding purification methods can be applied, as long as they are adapted for plant-specific soluble contaminants such as the superabundant protein RuBisCO. Plant-derived pharmaceutical proteins cannot yet compete directly with established platforms but they are beginning to penetrate niche markets that allow the beneficial properties of plants to be exploited, such as the ability to produce 'biobetters' with tailored

  7. Which tributaries disrupt downstream fining along gravel-bed rivers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Stephen

    1998-02-01

    Tributaries and other lateral sediment sources can have a significant impact on river bed sediment texture and, in turn, on channel form. Sufficiently voluminous or distinct sediment inputs redefine the mainstem grain-size distribution, punctuating downstream maturation and isolating a sequence of discrete sedimentary links. Within these links fining processes usually dominate, such that models of sorting and abrasion, when applied to individual links, provide reasonable predictions of grain-size change. Links represent the fundamental natural unit within which fining models can be tested, developed and applied. Identification of significant lateral sources is therefore important, yet, beyond vague references to relative tributary size, sediment load, and sediment calibre, no criteria exist for the a priori discrimination of such sources. In this paper a procedure for identifying significant lateral (tributary) sources, without the benefit of grain-size information, is outlined. A high-resolution characterisation of bed material texture along two Canadian gravel-bed rivers facilitated classification of all their perennial tributaries as either significant or insignificant. Three absolute tributary basin parameters and their relative counterparts, chosen to reflect the likely controls on tributary significance, are then used to develop a discriminant function which isolates a large proportion of significant tributaries while minimising incorrect classifications. Examination of consistently misclassified (anomalous) tributaries reveals the importance of lateral source spacing and of inconsistencies in the geomorphic history of the contributing basins. In turn, a general tributary categorisation procedure is suggested which includes a logistic regression model for attaching probability statements to individual classifications. The generality of the discriminant and logistic functions cannot be assessed because of the lack of other suitable data sets.

  8. Downstream Propagation of Thermal Pollution in Urban Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, K. A.; Urban, D. L.; Bernhardt, E. S.; Losordo, M.

    2011-12-01

    Cities create "heat islands" with air temperatures up to 12 degrees C greater than surrounding areas and impervious surface temperatures reaching 50 degrees C greater than the air. Streams that drain urban areas tend to be hotter at baseflow due to warmer air temperatures and decreased riparian canopy cover. Further, urban stormflow routes precipitation over hot impervious surfaces and through storm drains directly into streams, creating rapid changes in stream temperatures. The resulting alterations in stream thermal regimes directly stress aquatic organisms and indirectly lead to changes in stream microbial activity and dissolved oxygen concentrations. To date, there has been little work done to understand how urban heating of streams propagates downstream from thermal pollution sources. In response to this lack, we used a fiber optic distributed temperature sensor as well as multiple individual temperature loggers to measure high spatiotemporal resolution patterns of stream temperature along 1.5 km of Mud Creek in Durham, NC. Mud Creek originates in the storm drains of a suburban neighborhood, where high-density residential complexes with large amounts of impervious surface are connected directly to the stream. The stream flows in a confined channel alongside apartment complexes for 0.5 km before entering a protected forest area. At baseflow, we found temperature was heterogeneous and explained primarily by canopy openness, rather than the amount of development upstream of the location. During summer stormflows, stream temperatures became more homogeneous and increased by up to 4 degrees C due to runoff at the top of the reach. These peak temperatures were dampened to only 2 degrees C increases after 1 km of travel through mature forest. In contrast, a fully forested tributary to Mud Creek decreased in temperature for the same storm events. This spatial propagation of stormflow heat pulses will substantially limit our ability to protect urban stream ecosystems.

  9. Downstream processing and chromatography based analytical methods for production of vaccines, gene therapy vectors, and bacteriophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramberger, Petra; Urbas, Lidija; Štrancar, Aleš

    2015-01-01

    Downstream processing of nanoplexes (viruses, virus-like particles, bacteriophages) is characterized by complexity of the starting material, number of purification methods to choose from, regulations that are setting the frame for the final product and analytical methods for upstream and downstream monitoring. This review gives an overview on the nanoplex downstream challenges and chromatography based analytical methods for efficient monitoring of the nanoplex production. PMID:25751122

  10. Assessing downstream flood impacts due to a potential GLOF from Imja Tsho in Nepal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Somos-Valenzuela, M. A; McKinney, D. C; Byers, A. C; Rounce, D. R; Portocarrero, C; Lamsal, D

    2015-01-01

    Glacial-dominated areas pose unique challenges to downstream communities in adapting to recent and continuing global climate change, including increased threats of glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs...

  11. Transfer of sediment-associated metals downstream of abandoned and active mining sites in the Quesnel River catchment, British Columbia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perk, M. van der; Lipzig, M.L.H.M. van; Karimlou, G.; Owens, P.N.; Petticrew, E.L.

    2011-01-01

    Metal mining may have considerable impact on downstream water and sediment composition. The rate and extent that metals move downstream determine the magnitude and time scale of downstream sediment contamination. Conversely, the downstream metal content of sediments provide important clues of

  12. The effect of downstream perforated blanket on the safety against piping in heading-up structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona A. Hagras

    2014-03-01

    It was found that piping index (Pe is governed by perforation ration (PR, relative hole diameter (D/Lb, ratio of length of the blanket to length of the apron (Lb/La, head difference between upstream and downstream structure and the depth of downstream cutoff.

  13. Hydrodynamic properties and distribution of bait downstream of a zooplankton trap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selander, Erik; Heuschele, Jan; Larsson, Ann I.

    2017-01-01

    The flow regime around a chemically baited trap is crucial for the trapping process and distribution of bait downstream of traps. We measured the flow field downstream of a trap prototype in flume experiments and mapped the distribution of bait using laser induced fluorescence. The trap produced ...

  14. Selenium uptake and speciation in wild and caged fish downstream of a metal mining and milling discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phibbs, James; Wiramanaden, Cheryl I E; Hauck, Dominic; Pickering, Ingrid J; Liber, Karsten; Janz, David M

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the dominance of the feeding pathway with respect to selenium (Se) uptake and speciation in fish inhabiting the receiving waters downstream of a uranium processing mill in northern Saskatchewan, Canada. The experimental design included analysis of Se in the predominant fish species located in the study area, a caging validation study using wild, naïve (i.e., collected from a reference lake) lake chub (Couesius plumbeus) and spottail shiner (Notropis hudsonius), and a 21-day feeding cage study using wild naïve lake chub. Three exposure lakes located downstream of the uranium mill and one reference lake situated in an adjacent watershed were studied to investigate a gradient of Se exposure. Lake chub were identified as more suitable candidates for caging due to higher survival and condition factor at the completion of the 21-day trial. Analytical results indicated that lake chub caged in the exposure lakes had significantly greater whole-body Se concentrations after 21 days compared to fish caged in the reference lake. Selenium speciation results (obtained using X-ray absorption spectroscopy) from wild and caged lake chub indicated that organic Se modeled as selenomethionine was the dominant form of Se found in both wild and caged lake chub from the exposure lakes, and that selenomethionine (R-Se-R) acts as a marker of bioavailable Se exposure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Modeling of a severe dust event and its impacts on ozone photochemistry over the downstream Nanjing megacity of eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengmeng; Wang, Tijian; Han, Yong; Xie, Min; Li, Shu; Zhuang, Bingliang; Chen, Pulong

    2017-07-01

    Dust aerosols could affect tropospheric photochemistry by interacting with solar radiation or providing reactive surfaces for heterogeneous reactions. This study examines the effects of a typical springtime dust storm (16-18 March, 2014) on ozone photochemistry over the downstream Nanjing megacity in eastern China. The on-line coupled Weather Research and Forecasting-Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model is used, with the inclusion of eight heterogeneous reactions on dust surfaces. Comparisons with satellite data and visibility record indicate that the model is capable of reproducing the onset time and downstream transport of this dust event. Dust particles act as a sink for all these trace gases examined here. The net decreases of O3, NO2, NO3, N2O5, HNO3, rad OH, HO2rad and H2O2 in the atmosphere are estimated as -6.1%, -16.0%, -37.4%, -13.9%, -47.7%, -6.0%, -9.2% and -29.7%, of which more than 80% can be explained by heterogeneous chemistry on dust surfaces. The decreases in ground photolysis rate and rad OH concentration, along with changes in other weather variables induced by dust aerosols (i.e., radiation and temperature) lead to lower photochemical activity and a small decrease of O3 mixing ratio by roughly 0.5%. This study highlights the importance of dust interaction with ozone photochemistry, and also sets the stage for further investigation of the complicated dust impacts on tropospheric aerosol chemistry.

  16. Basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor TCF21 is a downstream target of the male sex determining gene SRY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramji K Bhandari

    Full Text Available The cascade of molecular events involved in mammalian sex determination has been shown to involve the SRY gene, but specific downstream events have eluded researchers for decades. The current study identifies one of the first direct downstream targets of the male sex determining factor SRY as the basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factor TCF21. SRY was found to bind to the Tcf21 promoter and activate gene expression. Mutagenesis of SRY/SOX9 response elements in the Tcf21 promoter eliminated the actions of SRY. SRY was found to directly associate with the Tcf21 promoter SRY/SOX9 response elements in vivo during fetal rat testis development. TCF21 was found to promote an in vitro sex reversal of embryonic ovarian cells to induce precursor Sertoli cell differentiation. TCF21 and SRY had similar effects on the in vitro sex reversal gonadal cell transcriptomes. Therefore, SRY acts directly on the Tcf21 promoter to in part initiate a cascade of events associated with Sertoli cell differentiation and embryonic testis development.

  17. The brassinosteroid receptor BRI1 can generate cGMP enabling cGMP-dependent downstream signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Wheeler, Janet I.

    2017-05-08

    The brassinosteroid receptor BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE 1 (BRI1) is a member of the leucine rich repeat receptor like kinase family. The intracellular kinase domain of BRI1 is an active kinase and also encapsulates a guanylate cyclase catalytic centre. Using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we confirmed that the recombinant cytoplasmic domain of BRI1 generates pmol amounts of cGMP per μg protein with a preference for magnesium over manganese as a co-factor. Importantly, a functional BRI1 kinase is essential for optimal cGMP generation. Therefore, the guanylate cyclase activity of BRI1 is modulated by the kinase while cGMP, the product of the guanylate cyclase, in turn inhibits BRI1 kinase activity. Furthermore, we show using Arabidopsis root cell cultures that cGMP rapidly potentiates phosphorylation of the downstream substrate BRASSINOSTEROID SIGNALING KINASE 1 (BSK1). Taken together, our results suggest that cGMP acts as a modulator that enhances downstream signaling while dampening signal generation from the receptor. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. WRKY40 and WRKY6 act downstream of the green leaf volatile E-2-hexenal in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirabella, R.; Rauwerda, H.; Allmann, S.; Scala, A.; Spyropoulou, E.A.; de Vries, M.; Boersma, M.R.; Breit, T.M.; Haring, M.A.; Schuurink, R.C.

    Plants are known to be responsive to volatiles, but knowledge about the molecular players involved in transducing their perception remains scarce. We study the response of Arabidopsis thaliana to E-2-hexenal, one of the green leaf volatiles (GLV) that is produced upon wounding, herbivory or

  19. The transcriptional repressor Blimp-1 acts downstream of BMP signaling to generate primordial germ cells in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Taro; Extavour, Cassandra G

    2016-01-15

    Segregation of the germ line from the soma is an essential event for transmission of genetic information across generations in all sexually reproducing animals. Although some well-studied systems such as Drosophila and Xenopus use maternally inherited germ determinants to specify germ cells, most animals, including mice, appear to utilize zygotic inductive cell signals to specify germ cells during later embryogenesis. Such inductive germ cell specification is thought to be an ancestral trait of Bilateria, but major questions remain as to the nature of an ancestral mechanism to induce germ cells, and how that mechanism evolved. We previously reported that BMP signaling-based germ cell induction is conserved in both the mouse Mus musculus and the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, which is an emerging model organism for functional studies of induction-based germ cell formation. In order to gain further insight into the functional evolution of germ cell specification, here we examined the Gryllus ortholog of the transcription factor Blimp-1 (also known as Prdm1), which is a widely conserved bilaterian gene known to play a crucial role in the specification of germ cells in mice. Our functional analyses of the Gryllus Blimp-1 ortholog revealed that it is essential for Gryllus primordial germ cell development, and is regulated by upstream input from the BMP signaling pathway. This functional conservation of the epistatic relationship between BMP signaling and Blimp-1 in inductive germ cell specification between mouse and cricket supports the hypothesis that this molecular mechanism regulated primordial germ cell specification in a last common bilaterian ancestor. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Genes that act downstream of sensory neurons to influence longevity, dauer formation, and pathogen responses in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta M Gaglia

    Full Text Available The sensory systems of multicellular organisms are designed to provide information about the environment and thus elicit appropriate changes in physiology and behavior. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, sensory neurons affect the decision to arrest during development in a diapause state, the dauer larva, and modulate the lifespan of the animals in adulthood. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects are incompletely understood. Using whole-genome microarray analysis, we identified transcripts whose levels are altered by mutations in the intraflagellar transport protein daf-10, which result in impaired development and function of many sensory neurons in C. elegans. In agreement with existing genetic data, the expression of genes regulated by the transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO was affected by daf-10 mutations. In addition, we found altered expression of transcriptional targets of the DAF-12/nuclear hormone receptor in the daf-10 mutants and showed that this pathway influences specifically the dauer formation phenotype of these animals. Unexpectedly, pathogen-responsive genes were repressed in daf-10 mutant animals, and these sensory mutants exhibited altered susceptibility to and behavioral avoidance of bacterial pathogens. Moreover, we found that a solute transporter gene mct-1/2, which was induced by daf-10 mutations, was necessary and sufficient for longevity. Thus, sensory input seems to influence an extensive transcriptional network that modulates basic biological processes in C. elegans. This situation is reminiscent of the complex regulation of physiology by the mammalian hypothalamus, which also receives innervations from sensory systems, most notably the visual and olfactory systems.

  1. The Drosophila Medea gene is required downstream of dpp and encodes a functional homolog of human Smad4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, J B; Podos, S D; Keith, K; Simpson, S L; Ferguson, E L

    1998-04-01

    The Transforming Growth Factor-beta superfamily member decapentaplegic (dpp) acts as an extracellular morphogen to pattern the embryonic ectoderm of the Drosophila embryo. To identify components of the dpp signaling pathway, we screened for mutations that act as dominant maternal enhancers of a weak allele of the dpp target gene zerknŁllt. In this screen, we recovered new alleles of the Mothers against dpp (Mad) and Medea genes. Phenotypic analysis of the new Medea mutations indicates that Medea, like Mad, is required for both embryonic and imaginal disc patterning. Genetic analysis suggests that Medea may have two independently mutable functions in patterning the embryonic ectoderm. Complete elimination of maternal and zygotic Medea activity in the early embryo results in a ventralized phenotype identical to that of null dpp mutants, indicating that Medea is required for all dpp-dependent signaling in embryonic dorsal-ventral patterning. Injection of mRNAs encoding DPP or a constitutively activated form of the DPP receptor, Thick veins, into embryos lacking all Medea activity failed to induce formation of any dorsal cell fates, demonstrating that Medea acts downstream of the thick veins receptor. We cloned Medea and found that it encodes a protein with striking sequence similarity to human SMAD4. Moreover, injection of human SMAD4 mRNA into embryos lacking all Medea activity conferred phenotypic rescue of the dorsal-ventral pattern, demonstrating conservation of function between the two gene products.

  2. Zinc Ions Mediate Gastrin Expression, Proliferation, and Migration Downstream of the Cholecystokinin-2 Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mike; Xiao, Lin; Shulkes, Arthur; Baldwin, Graham S; Patel, Oneel

    2016-12-01

    Gastrin, acting via the cholecystokinin-2 receptor (CCK2R), activates its own promoter in a positive-feed-forward loop that may result in hypergastrinemia. Activity of the gastrin promoter is also stimulated by exogenous Zn2+ ions. Here, the role of intracellular zinc and calcium signaling in the gastrin positive-feed-forward loop was investigated. Gastrin promoter activity was measured in the human gastric carcinoma cell line AGS-CCK2R and in Jurkat cells transfected with various gastrin promoter-luciferase constructs after treatment with gastrin in the presence and absence of zinc- and calcium-chelating agents. The free intracellular zinc ion concentrations were measured in the same cells with the fluorescent indicator FluoZin-3. Cell proliferation and migration/invasion were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide cell proliferation assay and in Boyden chamber assays, respectively. The zinc chelator N,N,N,N-tetrakis-(2-pyridylmethyl)-ethylenediamine (TPEN) abolished gastrin-stimulated gastrin promoter activity, and the inhibition was completely reversed by exogenous Zn2+ ions. In contrast, the calcium chelator 1,2-Bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetrakis(acetoxymethyl ester) (BAPTA-AM) potentiated gastrin-stimulated gastrin promoter activity. Treatment with gastrin increased the intracellular concentration of free Zn2+ ions, and the increase was blocked by TPEN, but not by BAPTA-AM. TPEN also inhibited the stimulation of cell proliferation and migration/invasion by gastrin, but BAPTA-AM had no effect. These results, which are the first report of the existence of Zn2+ signaling downstream of CCK2R activation, suggest that zinc chelation therapies may be effective in counteracting gastrin-dependent tumor growth.

  3. Downstream Antisense Transcription Predicts Genomic Features That Define the Specific Chromatin Environment at Mammalian Promoters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Lavender

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Antisense transcription is a prevalent feature at mammalian promoters. Previous studies have primarily focused on antisense transcription initiating upstream of genes. Here, we characterize promoter-proximal antisense transcription downstream of gene transcription starts sites in human breast cancer cells, investigating the genomic context of downstream antisense transcription. We find extensive correlations between antisense transcription and features associated with the chromatin environment at gene promoters. Antisense transcription downstream of promoters is widespread, with antisense transcription initiation observed within 2 kb of 28% of gene transcription start sites. Antisense transcription initiates between nucleosomes regularly positioned downstream of these promoters. The nucleosomes between gene and downstream antisense transcription start sites carry histone modifications associated with active promoters, such as H3K4me3 and H3K27ac. This region is bound by chromatin remodeling and histone modifying complexes including SWI/SNF subunits and HDACs, suggesting that antisense transcription or resulting RNA transcripts contribute to the creation and maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. Downstream antisense transcription overlays additional regulatory features, such as transcription factor binding, DNA accessibility, and the downstream edge of promoter-associated CpG islands. These features suggest an important role for antisense transcription in the regulation of gene expression and the maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment.

  4. Downstream Antisense Transcription Predicts Genomic Features That Define the Specific Chromatin Environment at Mammalian Promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavender, Christopher A; Cannady, Kimberly R; Hoffman, Jackson A; Trotter, Kevin W; Gilchrist, Daniel A; Bennett, Brian D; Burkholder, Adam B; Burd, Craig J; Fargo, David C; Archer, Trevor K

    2016-08-01

    Antisense transcription is a prevalent feature at mammalian promoters. Previous studies have primarily focused on antisense transcription initiating upstream of genes. Here, we characterize promoter-proximal antisense transcription downstream of gene transcription starts sites in human breast cancer cells, investigating the genomic context of downstream antisense transcription. We find extensive correlations between antisense transcription and features associated with the chromatin environment at gene promoters. Antisense transcription downstream of promoters is widespread, with antisense transcription initiation observed within 2 kb of 28% of gene transcription start sites. Antisense transcription initiates between nucleosomes regularly positioned downstream of these promoters. The nucleosomes between gene and downstream antisense transcription start sites carry histone modifications associated with active promoters, such as H3K4me3 and H3K27ac. This region is bound by chromatin remodeling and histone modifying complexes including SWI/SNF subunits and HDACs, suggesting that antisense transcription or resulting RNA transcripts contribute to the creation and maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. Downstream antisense transcription overlays additional regulatory features, such as transcription factor binding, DNA accessibility, and the downstream edge of promoter-associated CpG islands. These features suggest an important role for antisense transcription in the regulation of gene expression and the maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment.

  5. Upstream and Downstream Co-inhibition of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase and PI3K/Akt/mTOR Pathways in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew H. Wong

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Extensive cross talk exists between PI3K/Akt/mTOR and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways, and both are upregulated in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC. Our previous study suggested that epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor erlotinib which acts upstream of these pathways acts synergistically with PI3K inhibitors in PDAC. Horizontal combined blockade upstream and downstream of these two pathways is therefore explored. METHODS: Erlotinib paired with PI3K inhibitor (BYL719 was tested against erlotinib plus dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor BEZ-235, and MEK inhibitor (PD98059 plus BEZ235, on five primary PDAC cell lines and on two pairs of parent and erlotinib-resistant (ER cell lines. A range of in vitro assays including cell proliferation, Western blotting, migration, clonogenic, cell cycle, and apopotic assays was used to test for the efficacy of combined blockade. RESULTS: Dual downstream blockade of the MAPK and PAM pathways was more effective in attenuating downstream molecular signals. Synergy was demonstrated for erlotinib and BEZ235 and for PD-98059 and BEZ-235. This resulted in a trend of increased growth cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, cell proliferation, and colony and migration suppression. This combination showed more efficacy in cell lines with acquired resistance to erlotinib. CONCLUSIONS: The additional mTOR blockade provided by BEZ235 in combined blockade resulted in increased anticancer effect. The hypersensitivity of ER cell lines to additional mTOR blockade suggested PAM pathway oncogenic dependence via mTOR. Dual downstream combined blockade of MAPK and PAM pathways with MEK and PI3K/mTOR inhibitor appeared most effective and represents an attractive therapeutic strategy against pancreatic cancer and its associated drug resistance.

  6. Coupling of downstream RNA polymerase-promoter interactions with formation of catalytically competent transcription initiation complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekler, Vladimir; Minakhin, Leonid; Borukhov, Sergei; Mustaev, Arkady; Severinov, Konstantin

    2014-12-12

    Bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) makes extensive contacts with duplex DNA downstream of the transcription bubble in initiation and elongation complexes. We investigated the role of downstream interactions in formation of catalytically competent transcription initiation complex by measuring initiation activity of stable RNAP complexes with model promoter DNA fragments whose downstream ends extend from +3 to +21 relative to the transcription start site at +1. We found that DNA downstream of position +6 does not play a significant role in transcription initiation when RNAP-promoter interactions upstream of the transcription start site are strong and promoter melting region is AT rich. Further shortening of downstream DNA dramatically reduces efficiency of transcription initiation. The boundary of minimal downstream DNA duplex needed for efficient transcription initiation shifted further away from the catalytic center upon increasing the GC content of promoter melting region or in the presence of bacterial stringent response regulators DksA and ppGpp. These results indicate that the strength of RNAP-downstream DNA interactions has to reach a certain threshold to retain the catalytically competent conformation of the initiation complex and that establishment of contacts between RNAP and downstream DNA can be coupled with promoter melting. The data further suggest that RNAP interactions with DNA immediately downstream of the transcription bubble are particularly important for initiation of transcription. We hypothesize that these active center-proximal contacts stabilize the DNA template strand in the active center cleft and/or position the RNAP clamp domain to allow RNA synthesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Measurement of velocity deficit at the downstream of a 1:10 axial hydrokinetic turbine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunawan, Budi [ORNL; Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Hill, Craig [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; Chamorro, Leonardo [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414

    2012-01-01

    Wake recovery constrains the downstream spacing and density of turbines that can be deployed in turbine farms and limits the amount of energy that can be produced at a hydrokinetic energy site. This study investigates the wake recovery at the downstream of a 1:10 axial flow turbine model using a pulse-to-pulse coherent Acoustic Doppler Profiler (ADP). In addition, turbine inflow and outflow velocities were measured for calculating the thrust on the turbine. The result shows that the depth-averaged longitudinal velocity recovers to 97% of the inflow velocity at 35 turbine diameter (D) downstream of the turbine.

  8. Geomorphic analysis of the river response to sedimentation downstream of Mount Rainier, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czuba, Jonathan A.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Czuba, Christiana R.; Curran, Christopher A.; Johnson, Kenneth H.; Olsen, Theresa D.; Kimball, Halley K.; Gish, Casey C.

    2012-01-01

    A study of the geomorphology of rivers draining Mount Rainier, Washington, was completed to identify sources of sediment to the river network; to identify important processes in the sediment delivery system; to assess current sediment loads in rivers draining Mount Rainier; to evaluate if there were trends in streamflow or sediment load since the early 20th century; and to assess how rates of sedimentation might continue into the future using published climate-change scenarios. Rivers draining Mount Rainier carry heavy sediment loads sourced primarily from the volcano that cause acute aggradation in deposition reaches as far away as the Puget Lowland. Calculated yields ranged from 2,000 tonnes per square kilometer per year [(tonnes/km2)/yr] on the upper Nisqually River to 350 (tonnes/km2)/yr on the lower Puyallup River, notably larger than sediment yields of 50–200 (tonnes/km2)/yr typical for other Cascade Range rivers. These rivers can be assumed to be in a general state of sediment surplus. As a result, future aggradation rates will be largely influenced by the underlying hydrology carrying sediment downstream. The active-channel width of rivers directly draining Mount Rainier in 2009, used as a proxy for sediment released from Mount Rainier, changed little between 1965 and 1994 reflecting a climatic period that was relatively quiet hydrogeomorphically. From 1994 to 2009, a marked increase in geomorphic disturbance caused the active channels in many river reaches to widen. Comparing active-channel widths of glacier-draining rivers in 2009 to the distance of glacier retreat between 1913 and 1994 showed no correlation, suggesting that geomorphic disturbance in river reaches directly downstream of glaciers is not strongly governed by the degree of glacial retreat. In contrast, there was a correlation between active-channel width and the percentage of superglacier debris mantling the glacier, as measured in 1971. A conceptual model of sediment delivery processes

  9. Evaluation of a Solid Phase DNA Binding Matrix for Downstream PCR Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bader, Douglas E; Fisher, Glen R; Stratilo, Chad W

    2005-01-01

    A commercially available solid-phase DNA binding matrix (FTA cards) was evaluated for its ability to capture and release DNA for downstream gene amplification and detection assays using polymerase chain reaction (PCR...

  10. Modeling of local scour depth downstream hydraulic structures in trapezoidal channel using GEP and ANNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser Abdallah Mohamed Moussa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Local scour downstream stilling basins is so complex that it makes it difficult to establish a general empirical model to provide accurate estimation for scour depth. Lack estimation of local scour can endanger to stability of hydraulic structure and can cause risk of failure. This paper presents Gene expression program (GEP and artificial neural network (ANNs, to simulate local scour depth downstream hydraulic structures. The experimental data is collected from the literature for the scour depth downstream the stilling basin through a trapezoidal channel. Using GEP approach gives satisfactory results compared with artificial neural network (ANN and multiple linear regression (MLR modeling in predicting the scour depth downstream of hydraulic structures.

  11. Wavelength remodulation scheme using DPSK downstream and upstream for DWDM-PONs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Nebras; Anis, Hanan

    2011-08-15

    We propose a novel wavelength-division-multiplexed passive optical network (WDM-PON) architecture with enhanced tolerance toward chromatic dispersion where a DPSK-modulated downstream signal with constant intensity is remodulated at the ONU side with a return to zero (RZ-DPSK). Driving the downstream modulator with a 50% RZ data enabled us to employ the pulse carver at the ONU for both removing downstream data and generating the optical RZ signal for upstream. This offers an attractive alternative to earlier proposed schemes as it allows us to use full modulation depth (FMD) and balanced detection for downstream data restoration. We experimentally demonstrate the system with both balanced and single-ended detection at 2.5 Gb/s. Error-free operation has been achieved along a 20 Km single mode fiber without dispersion compensation. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  12. The dynamics of entrepreneurship in ICT: case of mobile phones downstream services in Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.N. Kanothi (Raphael)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe research paper explores the extent to which mobile phones downstream services, defined here as those provided using the existing connectivity, are generating opportunities for entrepreneurship development in Kenya. After identifying the services of mobile payphones, money transfer

  13. Bioactive Carbohydrates and Peptides in Foods: An Overview of Sources, Downstream Processing Steps and Associated Bioactivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Maria; Tiwari, Brijesh K

    2015-09-17

    Bioactive peptides and carbohydrates are sourced from a myriad of plant, animal and insects and have huge potential for use as food ingredients and pharmaceuticals. However, downstream processing bottlenecks hinder the potential use of these natural bioactive compounds and add cost to production processes. This review discusses the health benefits and bioactivities associated with peptides and carbohydrates of natural origin and downstream processing methodologies and novel processes which may be used to overcome these.

  14. 77 FR 74985 - Water Quality Standards for the State of Florida's Streams and Downstream Protection Values for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ... Downstream Protection Values for Lakes: Remanded Provisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... cannot be performed to derive downstream protection values (DPVs) that will ensure the attainment and... lakes, springs, flowing waters, estuaries, and coastal waters, as well as downstream protection values...

  15. UNC-18 and Tomosyn Antagonistically Control Synaptic Vesicle Priming Downstream of UNC-13 in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seungmee; Bin, Na-Ryum; Yu, Bin; Wong, Raymond; Sitarska, Ewa; Sugita, Kyoko; Ma, Ke; Xu, Junjie; Tien, Chi-Wei; Algouneh, Arash; Turlova, Ekaterina; Wang, Siyan; Siriya, Pranay; Shahid, Waleed; Kalia, Lorraine; Feng, Zhong-Ping; Monnier, Philippe P; Sun, Hong-Shuo; Zhen, Mei; Gao, Shangbang; Rizo, Josep; Sugita, Shuzo

    2017-09-06

    Munc18-1/UNC-18 is believed to prime SNARE-mediated membrane fusion, yet the underlying mechanisms remain enigmatic. Here, we examine how potential gain-of-function mutations of Munc18-1/UNC-18 affect locomotory behavior and synaptic transmission, and how Munc18-1-mediated priming is related to Munc13-1/UNC-13 and Tomosyn/TOM-1, positive and negative SNARE regulators, respectively. We show that a Munc18-1(P335A)/UNC-18(P334A) mutation leads to significantly increased locomotory activity and acetylcholine release in Caenorhabditis elegans, as well as enhanced synaptic neurotransmission in cultured mammalian neurons. Importantly, similar to tom-1 null mutants, unc-18(P334A) mutants partially bypass the requirement of UNC-13. Moreover, unc-18(P334A) and tom-1 null mutations confer a strong synergy in suppressing the phenotypes of unc-13 mutants. Through biochemical experiments, we demonstrate that Munc18-1(P335A) exhibits enhanced activity in SNARE complex formation as well as in binding to the preformed SNARE complex, and partially bypasses the Munc13-1 requirement in liposome fusion assays. Our results indicate that Munc18-1/UNC-18 primes vesicle fusion downstream of Munc13-1/UNC-13 by templating SNARE complex assembly and acts antagonistically with Tomosyn/TOM-1.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT At presynaptic sites, SNARE-mediated membrane fusion is tightly regulated by several key proteins including Munc18/UNC-18, Munc13/UNC-13, and Tomosyn/TOM-1. However, how these proteins interact with each other to achieve the precise regulation of neurotransmitter release remains largely unclear. Using Caenorhabditis elegans as an in vivo model, we found that a gain-of-function mutant of UNC-18 increases locomotory activity and synaptic acetylcholine release, that it partially bypasses the requirement of UNC-13 for release, and that this bypass is synergistically augmented by the lack of TOM-1. We also elucidated the biochemical basis for the gain-of-function caused by this mutation

  16. Downstream Intensification Effects Associated with CO2 Laser Mitigation of Fused Silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, M J; Bass, I L; Guss, G M; Widmayer, C C; Ravizza, F L

    2007-10-29

    Mitigation of 351nm laser-induced damage sites on fused silica exit surfaces by selective CO{sub 2} treatment has been shown to effectively arrest the exponential growth responsible for limiting the lifetime of optics in high-fluence laser systems. However, the perturbation to the optical surface profile following the mitigation process introduces phase contrast to the beam, causing some amount of downstream intensification with the potential to damage downstream optics. Control of the laser treatment process and measurement of the associated phase modulation is essential to preventing downstream 'fratricide' in damage-mitigated optical systems. In this work we present measurements of the surface morphology, intensification patterns and damage associated with various CO{sub 2} mitigation treatments on fused silica surfaces. Specifically, two components of intensification pattern, one on-axis and another off-axis can lead to damage of downstream optics and are related to rims around the ablation pit left from the mitigation process. It is shown that control of the rim structure around the edge of typical mitigation sites is crucial in preventing damage to downstream optics.

  17. Measurement of the airflow velocity upstream and downstream a wire mesh using constant temperature anemometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizal Frantisek

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of velocity upstream and downstream a special wire mesh was performed to ascertain the effect of the mesh on the flow. The mesh consisted of two components, a basic rectangular mesh with mesh width 1.22 mm and wire diameter 0.2 mm, and a top steel wool with random position of wires and wire diameter 0.05 mm. The velocity was measured by Constant Temperature Anemometry using single wire probe in a Plexiglas channel of rectangular cross-section. As a first step, measurement of one horizontal and one vertical measuring line was performed 10 mm upstream and 6 mm downstream the wire mesh. A spatial velocity profile upstream of the wire mesh was smooth, while the downstream velocity profile was highly disturbed. However, velocity fluctuations expressed in terms of turbulence intensity downstream of the wire mesh were attenuated down to 1%. Further measurements of the area downstream the wire mesh will be performed to describe the development of the flow.

  18. MicroRNA-184 is a downstream effector of albuminuria driving renal fibrosis in rats with diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchi, Cristina; Macconi, Daniela; Trionfini, Piera; Tomasoni, Susanna; Rottoli, Daniela; Locatelli, Monica; Rudnicki, Michael; Vandesompele, Jo; Mestdagh, Pieter; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Benigni, Ariela; Zoja, Carlamaria

    2017-06-01

    Renal fibrosis is a common complication of diabetic nephropathy and is a major cause of end-stage renal disease. Despite the suggested link between renal fibrosis and microRNA (miRNA) dysregulation in diabetic nephropathy, the identification of the specific miRNAs involved is still incomplete. The aim of this study was to investigate miRNA profiles in the diabetic kidney and to identify potential downstream targets implicated in renal fibrosis. miRNA expression profiling was investigated in the kidneys of 8-month-old Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats during overt nephropathy. Localisation of the most upregulated miRNA was established by in situ hybridisation. The candidate miRNA target was identified by in silico analysis and its expression documented in the diabetic kidney associated with fibrotic markers. Cultured tubule cells served to assess which of the profibrogenic stimuli acted as a trigger for the overexpressed miRNA, and to investigate underlying epigenetic mechanisms. In ZDF rats, miR-184 showed the strongest differential upregulation compared with lean rats (18-fold). Tubular localisation of miR-184 was associated with reduced expression of lipid phosphate phosphatase 3 (LPP3) and collagen accumulation. Transfection of NRK-52E cells with miR-184 mimic reduced LPP3, promoting a profibrotic phenotype. Albumin was a major trigger of miR-184 expression. Anti-miR-184 counteracted albumin-induced LPP3 downregulation and overexpression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. In ZDF rats, ACE-inhibitor treatment limited albuminuria and reduced miR-184, with tubular LPP3 preservation and tubulointerstitial fibrosis amelioration. Albumin-induced miR-184 expression in tubule cells was epigenetically regulated through DNA demethylation and histone lysine acetylation and was accompanied by binding of NF-κB p65 subunit to miR-184 promoter. These results suggest that miR-184 may act as a downstream effector of albuminuria through LPP3 to promote tubulointerstitial

  19. SOLUTION FOR ICHTHYOFAUNA MIGRATION UPSTREAM- DOWNSTREAM OF THE TWO SPILLWAYS LOCATED NEAR MANASTUR DAM ON THE SOMESUL MIC RIVER IN THE CLUJ NAPOCA CITY (ROMÂNIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razvan VOICU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Longitudinal connectivity represent the way in which organisms move the energy and material exchanges located throughout the water. Fragmentation the longitudinal connectivity of watercourses caused by dams or other hydrotechnical constructions represent a major impact on sediment transport, hydrological regime, downstream moving and biota migration. The hydromorphological elements (river continuity, as well as chemical, biological, physicochemical elements characterize the ecological status of rivers.Migratory fish species: nase (Chondrostoma nasus - protected by Bern Convention - Appendix III and barbel (Barbus barbus - rare species, protected Habitats Directive (Annex V, annex 4A of Low nr.462 and Red List of RBDD are blocked but the Hydrotechnical constructions (discharge sills, dams etc located across the watercourse Somes Mic River. One of the important think of this system is the gravitational fall of water. This solution will lead to the restoration of the longitudinal connection of the Someşul Mic River in the Manastur neighborhood. România is part of the European Union and it has the obligation to implement the provisions of the Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC, transposed into Romanian legislation by the Water Law 107/1996 as supplemented and amended (Act 310/2004. This engineering solution for fish fauna migration upstream – downstream of the spillways supports the Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC, transposed into Romanian legislation by the Water Law 107/1996 as supplemented and amended (Act 310/2004.

  20. Photoperiod control of downstream movements of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar smolts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zydlewski, Gayle B.; Stich, Daniel S.; McCormick, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    This study provides the first direct observations that photoperiod controls the initiation of downstream movement in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar smolts. Under simulated natural day length (LDN) conditions and seasonal increases in temperature, smolts increased their downstream movements five-fold for a period of 1 month in late spring. Under the same conditions, parr did not show changes in downstream movement behaviour. When given a shortened day length (10L:14D) beginning in late winter, smolts did not increase the number of downstream movements. An early increase in day length (16L:8D) in late winter resulted in earlier initiation and termination of downstream movements compared to the LDN group. Physiological status and behaviour were related but not completely coincident: gill Na+/K+-ATPase activity increased in all treatments and thyroid hormone was elevated prior to movement in 16L:8D treatment. The most parsimonious model describing downstream movement of smolts included synergistic effects of photoperiod treatment and temperature, indicating that peak movements occurred at colder temperatures in the 16L:8D treatment than in LDN, and temperature did not influence movement of smolts in the 10L:14D treatment. The complicated interactions of photoperiod and temperature are not surprising since many organisms have evolved to rely on correlations among environmental cues and windows of opportunity to time behaviours associated with life-history transitions. These complicated interactions, however, have serious implications for phenological adjustments and persistence ofS. salar populations in response to climate change.

  1. Estimating subcatchment runoff coefficients using weather radar and a downstream runoff sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahm, Malte; Thorndahl, Søren; Rasmussen, Michael R; Bassø, Lene

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a method for estimating runoff coefficients of urban drainage subcatchments based on a combination of high resolution weather radar data and flow measurements from a downstream runoff sensor. By utilising the spatial variability of the precipitation it is possible to estimate the runoff coefficients of the separate subcatchments. The method is demonstrated through a case study of an urban drainage catchment (678 ha) located in the city of Aarhus, Denmark. The study has proven that it is possible to use corresponding measurements of the relative rainfall distribution over the catchment and downstream runoff measurements to identify the runoff coefficients at subcatchment level.

  2. Recent hydrocarbon developments in Latin America: Key issues in the downstream oil sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, K.; Pezeshki, S.

    1995-03-01

    This report discusses the following: (1) An overview of major issues in the downstream oil sector, including oil demand and product export availability, the changing product consumption pattern, and refineries being due for major investment; (2) Recent upstream developments in the oil and gas sector in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela; (3) Recent downstream developments in the oil and gas sector in Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, Cuba, and Venezuela; (4) Pipelines in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico; and (5) Regional energy balance. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Pipe flow pattern downstream of local restrictions studied by an optical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molochnikov, V. M.; Kratirov, D. V.; Mikheev, A. N.

    2017-09-01

    An approach to the study of gas flow patterns in circular pipes using 2D methods (PIV, SIV) has been proposed. The approach is based on a special device which is similar to a closed test section of a wind tunnel. It allows measurements of flow parameters downstream of local flow restrictions in circular channels without any optical distortions caused by curved pipe walls. The test results are submitted together with some data on the flow pattern downstream of a gate valve at different channel blockage ratios.

  4. 5 X 5 rod bundle flow field measurements downstream a PWR spacer grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Higor F.P.; Silva, Vitor V A.; Santos, André A.C.; Veloso, Maria A.F., E-mail: higorfabiano@gmail.com, E-mail: mdora@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: vitors@cdtn.br, E-mail: aacs@cdtn.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The spacer grids are structures present in nuclear fuel assembly of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). They play an important structural role and also assist in heat removal through the assembly by promoting increased turbulence of the flow. Understanding the flow dynamics downstream the spacer grid is paramount for fuel element design and analysis. This paper presents water flow velocity profiles measurements downstream a spacer grid in a 5 x 5 rod bundle test rig with the objective of highlighting important fluid dynamic behavior near the grid and supplying data for CFD simulation validation. These velocity profiles were obtained at two different heights downstream the spacer grid using a LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimetry) through the top of test rig. The turbulence intensities and patterns of the swirl and cross flow were evaluated. The tests were conducted for Reynolds numbers ranging from 1.8 x 10{sup 4} to 5.4 x 10{sup 4}. This experimental research was carried out in thermo-hydraulics laboratory of Nuclear Technology Development Center – CDTN. Results show great repeatability and low uncertainties (< 1.24 %). Details of the flow field show how the mixture and turbulence induced by the spacer grid quickly decays downstream the spacer grid. It is shown that the developed methodology can supply high resolution low uncertainty results that can be used for validation of CFD simulations. (author)

  5. European downstream oil industry safety performance : statistical summary of reported incidents, 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-01

    This report is the third by CONCAWE reviewing the safety performance of the downstream oil industry in Western Europe. It includes the results of 28 companies which together represent over 90% of the oil refining capacity in Europe. It is therefore a...

  6. European downstream oil industry safety performance : statistical summary of reported incidents, 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-01

    This report is the fifth by CONCAWE reviewing the safety performance of the downstream oil industry in Europe. The area of coverage is primarily the EU, EEA and Hungary, but for some companies the data for other European countries such as Poland, Cze...

  7. Influence of peak flow changes on the macroinvertebrate drift downstream of a Brazilian hydroelectric dam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, D M P; Hughes, R M; Callisto, M

    2013-11-01

    Successive daily peak flows from hydropower plants can disrupt aquatic ecosystems and alter the composition and structure of macroinvertebrates downstream. We evaluated the influence of peak flow changes on macroinvertebrate drift downstream of a hydroelectric plant as a basis for determining ecological flows that might reduce the disturbance of aquatic biota. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of flow fluctuations on the seasonal and daily drift patterns of macroinvertebrates. We collected macroinvertebrates during fixed flow rates (323 m3.s-1 in the wet season and 111 m3.s-1 in the dry season) and when peak flows fluctuated (378 to 481 m3.s-1 in the wet season, and 109 to 173 m3.s-1 in the dry season) in 2010. We collected 31,924 organisms belonging to 46 taxa in the four sampling periods. Taxonomic composition and densities of drifting invertebrates differed between fixed and fluctuating flows, in both wet and dry seasons, but family richness varied insignificantly. We conclude that macroinvertebrate assemblages downstream of dams are influenced by daily peak flow fluctuations. When making environmental flow decisions for dams, it would be wise to consider drifting macroinvertebrates because they reflect ecological changes in downstream biological assemblages.

  8. From Process Development to Manufacturing: Lab-Intensive Courses in Downstream Bioprocessing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilleskie, Gary L.; Reeves, Baley A.

    2014-01-01

    Most chemical engineering graduates work in industry, a fact that underscores the need for courses to provide experiences that prepare them for industry. The Biomanufacturing Training and Education Center (BTEC) at North Carolina State University has addressed this need by developing and delivering a comprehensive downstream bioprocessing program…

  9. Physicochemical Characteristics of River Water Downstream of a Large Tropical Hydroelectric Dam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teck-Yee Ling

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Water quality in the downstream river of a hydroelectric dam may be affected by the structural design and operation. To date, little is known about the water quality downstream of the largest dam in Malaysia, the Bakun hydroelectric dam. Therefore, the objective of the study was to determine the water quality downstream of the dam when the spillway was closed and when it was opened. Results of the study indicate that the dam plays a significant role in regulating the water quality downstream of it. When the spillway was closed, pH and oxygen were lower in the river where DO was below 5 mg/L. When the spillway was opened, the water quality improved in terms of oxygen content (>8.0 mg/L, total sulphide (TS, and chemical oxygen demand (COD but deteriorated in terms of five-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5, total ammonia nitrogen (TAN, and total phosphorus (TP. Additionally, the intensity of the impacts, particularly BOD5, COD, and TAN, shows a declining trend as distance from the dam increases. This study shows that impacts on the water quality extend to a distance of 32 km from the dam particularly turbidity and DO and opening the spillway changes the water quality significantly.

  10. Temporal progression in migratory status and sexual maturation in European silver eels during downstream migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palstra, A.P.; Guerrero, M.A.; Klein Breteler, J.G.P.; Thillart, G.E.E.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    The onset of downstream migration of European eels is accompanied by a cessation of feeding and the start of sexual maturation which stresses the link between metabolism and sexual maturation, also suggesting an important role for exercise. Exercise has been tested with eels in swim tunnels and was

  11. Cetuximab insufficiently inhibits glioma cell growth due to persistent EGFR downstream signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Benedikte; Lassen, Ulrik; Poulsen, Hans S

    2010-01-01

    Overexpression and/or amplification of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is present in 35-45% of primary glioblastoma multiforme tumors and has been correlated with a poor prognosis. In this study, we investigated the effect of cetuximab and intracellular signaling pathways downstream...

  12. Estimating Subcatchment Runoff Coefficients using Weather Radar and a Downstream Runoff Sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahm, Malte; Thorndahl, Søren Liedtke; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a method for estimating runoff coefficients of urban drainage subcatchments based on a combination of high resolution weather radar data and flow measurements from a downstream runoff sensor. By utilising the spatial variability of the precipitation it is possible to estimate...

  13. Effect of stilling basin shape on the hydraulic characteristics of the flow downstream radial gates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelazim M. Ali

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Barrage regulators are considered as one of the most important projects in the Egyptian irrigation practice, which is obvious by its controlling of the released discharge and both of upstream and downstream water levels. In the present time, the ministry of water resources and irrigation starts to construct new barrages on the River Nile instead of the oldest ones, which are not able to withstand the requirements of increasing head difference between the upstream and downstream water levels upon the gates. The present study was focused on investigating the effect of different shapes of stilling basins of regulator on the length of the submerged hydraulic jump, velocity profiles along the apron, and local scour downstream regulator floor. Extensive experimental program was conducted on a re-circulating flume with 1.0 m wide, 26.0 m long and 1.2 m deep, with discharges range from 40 to 190 l/s. The relative velocity near bed, and shear Reynolds number were studied to fix the best shape of stilling basin that could reduce both of length of submerged hydraulic jump and local scour downstream stilling basin. Statistical equation was developed to correlate the length of submerged jump with the other independent parameters. Finally, clear matching of results from the length of jump and velocity analysis was investigated.

  14. 40 CFR 80.220 - What are the downstream standards for GPA gasoline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... GPA gasoline? 80.220 Section 80.220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Geographic Phase-in Program § 80.220 What are the downstream standards for GPA gasoline? (a) GPA gasoline. (1) During...

  15. 40 CFR 80.219 - Designation and downstream requirements for GPA gasoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for GPA gasoline. 80.219 Section 80.219 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Gasoline Sulfur Geographic Phase-in Program § 80.219 Designation and downstream requirements for GPA gasoline. The requirements and...

  16. Full-scale observation of the flow downstream of a suspension bridge deck

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheynet, Etienne; Jakobsen, Jasna Bogunović; Snæbjörnsson, Jónas

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents a full-scale observation of the flow conditions downstream of a suspension bridge by a system of synchronized short-range dual-Doppler wind lidars. The lidar units were deployed directly on the bridge walkway during a four-day pilot experiment. The wind velocity was monitored...

  17. Climate change impact on infection risks during bathing downstream of sewage emissions from CSOs or WWTPs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, Ankie; de Man, Heleen; Schijven, Jack F; de Nijs, Ton; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is expected to influence infection risks while bathing downstream of sewage emissions from combined sewage overflows (CSOs) or waste water treatment plants (WWTPs) due to changes in pathogen influx, rising temperatures and changing flow rates of the receiving waters. In this study,

  18. Climate change impact on infection risks during bathing downstream of sewage emissions from CSOs or WWTPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterk, Ankie; de Man, Heleen; Schijven, Jack F; de Nijs, Ton; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria

    2016-11-15

    Climate change is expected to influence infection risks while bathing downstream of sewage emissions from combined sewage overflows (CSOs) or waste water treatment plants (WWTPs) due to changes in pathogen influx, rising temperatures and changing flow rates of the receiving waters. In this study, climate change impacts on the surface water concentrations of Campylobacter, Cryptosporidium and norovirus originating from sewage were modelled. Quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) was used to assess changes in risks of infection. In general, infection risks downstream of WWTPs are higher than downstream CSOs. Even though model outputs show an increase in CSO influxes, in combination with changes in pathogen survival, dilution within the sewage system and bathing behaviour, the effects on the infection risks are limited. However, a decrease in dilution capacity of surface waters could have significant impact on the infection risks of relatively stable pathogens like Cryptosporidium and norovirus. Overall, average risks are found to be higher downstream WWTPs compared to CSOs. Especially with regard to decreased flow rates, adaptation measures on treatment at WWTPs may be more beneficial for human health than decreasing CSO events. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Drifting plankton from a reservoir subsidize downstream food webs and alter community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Hideyuki; Chang, Kwang-Hyeon; Ando, Takamitsu; Imai, Hiroyuki; Nakano, Shin-ichi; Kajimoto, Akio; Katano, Izumi

    2008-05-01

    Subsidy between ecosystems has been considered in many natural ecosystems, and should alter food webs and communities in human-impacted ones. We estimated how drifting plankton from a reservoir contribute to downstream food webs and showed that they alter community structures over a 10-km reach below the dam. To estimate the contribution of the drifting plankton to macroinvertebrates, we used C and N isotopes and an IsoSource mixing model. In spring and autumn, contributions of plankton to collector-filterer species were highest 0.2 km downstream of the dam, and clearly decreased from 0.2 to 10 km. At 0.2 km, the contribution of plankton to a predator stonefly was remarkably high. These results indicated that drifting plankton from a dam reservoir could subsidize downstream food webs and alter their energy base, but the importance of this subsidy decreased as distance from the reservoir increased. The general linear models indicated that the abundance of collector-filterers and predators was related positively to zooplankton density in stream water. Thus, food source alteration by drifting plankton also influenced the community structures downstream of the dam.

  20. Hes repressors are essential regulators of hematopoietic stem cell development downstream of notch signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Guiu (Jordi); R. Shimizu (Ritsuko); C. D'Altri; S.T. Fraser (Stuart); S. Hatakeyama (Shingo); E.H. Bresnick (Emery); T. Kageyama (Tsutomu); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine); M. Yamamoto (Masayuki); L. Espinosa (Lluis); A. Bigas (Anna)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPrevious studies have identified Notch as a key regulator of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) development, but the underlying downstream mechanisms remain unknown. The Notch target Hes1 is widely expressed in the aortic endothelium and hematopoietic clusters, though Hes1-deficient mice show

  1. A comparison of machine learning techniques for predicting downstream acid mine drainage

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    van Zyl, TL

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We consider the challenge of providing downstream predictions of water quality using a time-series of upstream insitu measurements and a time-series of remote sensed precipitation data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). We use a...

  2. Stress analysis of the modified Pulsed Neutron Activation system downstream shield support structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosby, W.R.

    1980-05-28

    The modified LOFT Pulsed Neutron Activation (PNA) System downstream shielding support structure was stress analyzed for deadweight and worst-case LOCE loads. No deficiencies were found in the structure. This stress analysis was performed for the PNA Shielding Configuration that has been used on Test L3-2 and that is to be used on Test L3-7.

  3. Linking Three Gorges Dam and downstream hydrological regimes along the Yangtze River, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mei, X.; Dai, Z.; Van Gelder, P.H.A.J.M.; Gao, J.

    2015-01-01

    The magnitude of anthropogenic influence, especially dam regulation, on hydrological system is of scientific and practical value for large river management. As the largest dam in the world by far, Three Gorges Dam (TGD) is expected to be a strong evidence on dam impacts on downstream hydrological

  4. Novel Techniques for Quantification of Correlation Between Primary Liquid Jet Breakup and Downstream Spray Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-05

    unlimited. 5 1. Introduction Several liquid -fuelled combustion systems, such as liquid propellant rocket engines and gas turbines... liquid sheet[1], [2], [3]. Considering the challenges in studying spray combustion due to interacting complex physical and chemical processes...AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0084 Novel techniques for quantification of correlation between primary liquid jet breakup and downstream spray characteristics

  5. LLM-Domain B-GATA Transcription Factors Promote Stomatal Development Downstream of Light Signaling Pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana Hypocotyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranftl, Quirin L.; Diener, Julia; Bastakis, Emmanouil; Richter, René

    2016-01-01

    Stomata are pores that regulate the gas and water exchange between the environment and aboveground plant tissues, including hypocotyls, leaves, and stems. Here, we show that mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana LLM-domain B-GATA genes are defective in stomata formation in hypocotyls. Conversely, stomata formation is strongly promoted by overexpression of various LLM-domain B-class GATA genes, most strikingly in hypocotyls but also in cotyledons. Genetic analyses indicate that these B-GATAs act upstream of the stomata formation regulators SPEECHLESS (SPCH), MUTE, and SCREAM/SCREAM2 and downstream or independent of the patterning regulators TOO MANY MOUTHS and STOMATAL DENSITY AND DISTRIBUTION1. The effects of the GATAs on stomata formation are light dependent but can be induced in dark-grown seedlings by red, far-red, or blue light treatments. PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR (PIF) mutants form stomata in the dark, and in this genetic background, GATA expression is sufficient to induce stomata formation in the dark. Since the expression of the LLM-domain B-GATAs GNC (GATA, NITRATE-INDUCIBLE, CARBON METABOLISM-INVOLVED) and GNC-LIKE/CYTOKININ-RESPONSIVE GATA FACTOR1 as well as that of SPCH is red light induced but the induction of SPCH is compromised in a GATA gene mutant background, we hypothesize that PIF- and light-regulated stomata formation in hypocotyls is critically dependent on LLM-domain B-GATA genes. PMID:26917680

  6. An RIG-I-Like RNA helicase mediates antiviral RNAi downstream of viral siRNA biogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Lu

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Dicer ribonucleases of plants and invertebrate animals including Caenorhabditis elegans recognize and process a viral RNA trigger into virus-derived small interfering RNAs (siRNAs to guide specific viral immunity by Argonaute-dependent RNA interference (RNAi. C. elegans also encodes three Dicer-related helicase (drh genes closely related to the RIG-I-like RNA helicase receptors which initiate broad-spectrum innate immunity against RNA viruses in mammals. Here we developed a transgenic C. elegans strain that expressed intense green fluorescence from a chromosomally integrated flock house virus replicon only after knockdown or knockout of a gene required for antiviral RNAi. Use of the reporter nematode strain in a feeding RNAi screen identified drh-1 as an essential component of the antiviral RNAi pathway. However, RNAi induced by either exogenous dsRNA or the viral replicon was enhanced in drh-2 mutant nematodes, whereas exogenous RNAi was essentially unaltered in drh-1 mutant nematodes, indicating that exogenous and antiviral RNAi pathways are genetically distinct. Genetic epistatic analysis shows that drh-1 acts downstream of virus sensing and viral siRNA biogenesis to mediate specific antiviral RNAi. Notably, we found that two members of the substantially expanded subfamily of Argonautes specific to C. elegans control parallel antiviral RNAi pathways. These findings demonstrate both conserved and unique strategies of C. elegans in antiviral defense.

  7. Autism: Why Act Early?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Autism: Why Act Early? Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ... helped the world make sense." Florida teenager with Autism Spectrum Disorder "Because my parents acted early, I ...

  8. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that affects the pancreas and other organs, and how to treat and live with this chronic disease. Role ... of your CF care team can show you how to perform many different ACTs and recommend specific ACTs ...

  9. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

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    Full Text Available ... Treatments and Therapies Airway Clearance Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs) There are different ways to clear your airways. ... or caregiver. Older kids and adults can choose ACTs that they can do on their own. Share ...

  10. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CF Treatments and Therapies Airway Clearance Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs) There are different ways to clear your ... for fitting ACTs into daily life Airway Clearance Techniques | Webcast To learn more about how you can ...

  11. Water Stress in Global Transboundary River Basins: Significance of Upstream Water Use on Downstream Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munia, H.; Guillaume, J. H. A.; Mirumachi, N.; Porkka,M.; Wada, Yoshihide; Kummu, M.

    2016-01-01

    Growing population and water demand have increased pressure on water resources in various parts of the globe, including many transboundary river basins. While the impacts of upstream water use on downstream water availability have been analyzed in many of these international river basins, this has not been systematically done at the global scale using coherent and comparable datasets. In this study, we aim to assess the change in downstream water stress due to upstream water use in the world's transboundary river basins. Water stress was first calculated considering only local water use of each sub-basin based on country-basin mesh, then compared with the situation when upstream water use was subtracted from downstream water availability. Wefound that water stress was generally already high when considering only local water use, affecting 0.95-1.44 billion people or 33%-51% of the population in transboundary river basins. After accounting for upstream water use, stress level increased by at least 1 percentage-point for 30-65 sub-basins, affecting 0.29-1.13 billion people. Altogether 288 out of 298 middle-stream and downstream sub-basin areas experienced some change in stress level. Further, we assessed whether there is a link between increased water stress due to upstream water use and the number of conflictive and cooperative events in the transboundary river basins, as captured by two prominent databases. No direct relationship was found. This supports the argument that conflicts and cooperation events originate from a combination of different drivers, among which upstream-induced water stress may play a role. Our findings contribute to better understanding of upstream-downstream dynamics in water stress to help address water allocation problems.

  12. Willingness of upstream and downstream resource managers to engage in compensation schemes for environmental services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chapika Sangkapitux

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Providing compensation for agricultural conservation practices adopted by upstream farmers is still an alien concept in the Thai political context. The governance of common-pool natural resources, such as forest and water, has traditionally been under the control of powerful government line agencies, while the contribution of local communities to natural resource conservation have been hardly recognized by policy-makers. Drawing on a case study in Mae Sa watershed, Chiang Mai province, northern Thailand, this paper discusses the potential of developing compensation schemes in a socio-political context where upland farmers – mostly belonging to ethnic minority groups – tend to be considered a threat to the natural resource base rather than providers of environmental services. Based on data obtained from 371 households in the upstream communities and 151 households in the downstream communities of the watershed, upstream resource managers’ willingness to accept compensation for the conservation measures and downstream resource managers’ willingness to pay for water resource improvements were estimated through the use of choice experiments. Results from the study suggest that downstream resource managers would be willing to provide on average nearly 1% of their annual income for a substantial improvement of the quantity and quality of water resources, which could be achieved by compensating upstream farmers’ change of their agricultural systems towards more environment-friendly practices. Both willingness to pay of downstream respondents and willingness of upstream resource managers to accept compensation were positively correlated with age, education, participation in environmental conservation activities and previous experiences with droughts and/or erosion. The paper concludes that there is a clear potential for establishing compensation schemes for provision of environmental services in northern Thai watersheds. The important policy

  13. C, N, P export regimes in rivers from headwater to downstream catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupas, Rémi; Musolff, Andreas; Jawitz, James W.; Rao, P. Suresh C.; Fleckenstein, Jan H.; Rode, Michael; Borchardt, Dietrich

    2017-04-01

    Excessive amounts of nutrients and dissolved organic matter in freshwater bodies affect aquatic ecosystems. In this study, the spatial and temporal variability of nitrate (NO3), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) was analyzed along the Selke river continuum from 1 - 3 km2 headwater catchments to 184 - 456 km2 downstream catchments, within the TERENO Harz/Central German Lowland Observatory. Three headwater catchments were selected as archetypes of the main landscape units (land use x soil type) present in the Selke catchment. Export regimes in these catchments were interpreted in terms of NO3, DOC and SRP land-to-stream transfer processes. Differences between export regimes in headwater and downstream catchments were interpreted in terms of in-stream processes and contribution of point source emissions. The results showed that the NO3 seasonal dynamics were opposite compared to DOC and SRP in all three headwater catchments. These dynamics were interpreted as the result of the interplay of hydrological and biogeochemical processes, for which riparian wetlands were hypothesized to play a determining role. In the two downstream catchments, NO3 was transported almost conservatively, except during the summer period where in-stream retention could exceed 50%. Allochtonous DOC was consumed in the upstream river section (with low light and nutrient availability) and autochthonous DOC was produced in the downstream river section (with high light and nutrients availability); the natural export regime of SRP mimicked a point source signal, which may lead to misattribution and thus overestimation of domestic contribution to phosphorus loads in rivers. Monitoring the river continuum from headwater to downstream rivers proved effective to investigate jointly land-to-stream and in-stream transport and transformation processes.

  14. Carbon and nutrient export regimes from headwater catchments to downstream reaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupas, Rémi; Musolff, Andreas; Jawitz, James W.; Rao, P. Suresh C.; Jäger, Christoph G.; Fleckenstein, Jan H.; Rode, Michael; Borchardt, Dietrich

    2017-09-01

    Excessive amounts of nutrients and dissolved organic matter in freshwater bodies affect aquatic ecosystems. In this study, the spatial and temporal variability in nitrate (NO3-), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) was analyzed in the Selke (Germany) river continuum from three headwaters draining 1-3 km2 catchments to two downstream reaches representing spatially integrated signals from 184-456 km2 catchments. Three headwater catchments were selected as archetypes of the main landscape units (land use × lithology) present in the Selke catchment. Export regimes in headwater catchments were interpreted in terms of NO3-, DOC and SRP land-to-stream transfer processes. Headwater signals were subtracted from downstream signals, with the differences interpreted in terms of in-stream processes and contributions from point sources. The seasonal dynamics for NO3- were opposite those of DOC and SRP in all three headwater catchments, and spatial differences also showed NO3- contrasting with DOC and SRP. These dynamics were interpreted as the result of the interplay of hydrological and biogeochemical processes, for which riparian zones were hypothesized to play a determining role. In the two downstream reaches, NO3- was transported almost conservatively, whereas DOC was consumed and produced in the upper and lower river sections, respectively. The natural export regime of SRP in the three headwater catchments mimicked a point-source signal (high SRP during summer low flow), which may lead to overestimation of domestic contributions in the downstream reaches. Monitoring the river continuum from headwaters to downstream reaches proved effective to jointly investigate land-to-stream and in-stream transport, and transformation processes.

  15. Favorable fragmentation: river reservoirs can impede downstream expansion of riparian weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rood, Stewart B; Braatne, Jeffrey H; Goater, Lori A

    2010-09-01

    River valleys represent biologically rich corridors characterized by natural disturbances that create moist and barren sites suitable for colonization by native riparian plants, and also by weeds. Dams and reservoirs interrupt the longitudinal corridors and we hypothesized that this could restrict downstream weed expansion. To consider this "reservoir impediment" hypothesis we assessed the occurrences and abundances of weeds along a 315-km river valley corridor that commenced with an unimpounded reach of the Snake River and extended through Brownlee, Oxbow, and Hells Canyon reservoirs and dams, and downstream along the Snake River. Sampling along 206 belt transects with 3610 quadrats revealed 16 noxious and four invasive weed species. Ten weeds were upland plants, with Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense) restricted to the upstream reaches, where field morning glory (Convolvulus arvensis) was also more common. In contrast, St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) was more abundant below the dams, and medusahead wildrye (Taeniatherum caput-medusae) occurred primarily along the reservoirs. All seven riparian species were abundant in the upstream zones but sparse or absent below the dams. This pattern was observed for the facultative riparian species, poison hemlock (Conium maculatum) and perennial pepperweed (Lepidium latifolium), the obligate riparian, yellow nut sedge (Cyperus esculentus), the invasive perennial, reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), and three invasive riparian trees, Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia), false indigo (Amorpha fruticosa), and tamarisk (Tamarix spp.). The hydrophyte purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) was also restricted to the upstream zone. These longitudinal patterns indicate that the reservoirs have impeded the downstream expansion of riparian weeds, and this may especially result from the repetitive draw-down and refilling of Brownlee Reservoir that imposes a lethal combination of drought and flood stress. The dams and

  16. Measuring Iranian Petroleum Downstream Supply Chain Management Performance; : A Combination of Analytical Hierarchy Process and Balance Score Card

    OpenAIRE

    Norouzi, Saba

    2013-01-01

    Petroleum downstream is a strategic and important industry for any nation. It supplies most of transport and travel needs and provides petrochemical business raw material, which is one of the infrastructure industries. Considering the importance of petroleum downstream and due to a very volatile crude and product market, one of the industry’s main targets is to meet customers’ requirements with administrating downstream supply chain efficiently. Supply chain management (SCM) is a strategic to...

  17. Extraction and purification methods in downstream processing of plant-based recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łojewska, Ewelina; Kowalczyk, Tomasz; Olejniczak, Szymon; Sakowicz, Tomasz

    2016-04-01

    During the last two decades, the production of recombinant proteins in plant systems has been receiving increased attention. Currently, proteins are considered as the most important biopharmaceuticals. However, high costs and problems with scaling up the purification and isolation processes make the production of plant-based recombinant proteins a challenging task. This paper presents a summary of the information regarding the downstream processing in plant systems and provides a comprehensible overview of its key steps, such as extraction and purification. To highlight the recent progress, mainly new developments in the downstream technology have been chosen. Furthermore, besides most popular techniques, alternative methods have been described. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Downstream management practices of transnational companies in institutionally vulnerable countries: Export and use of hazardous products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard; Milanez, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Analyses of social and environmental management in transnational product chains focus often upstream on suppliers in socially and institutionally vulnerable countries and these suppliers' hazardous processes. Furthermore focus is on transnational companies' responsibility when they source from...... such suppliers. On the contrary, not much focus has been on transnational companies' downstream export of hazardous products to vulnerable countries and the product use in those countries. The article uses pesticides as case of hazardous products and identifies mechanisms in the downstream social...... and environmental management of a Danish pesticide company in vulnerable countries and especially in Brazil. The identified mechanisms are: the transnational company's on-going interpretation of the regulatory and ethical obligations for development and use of its hazardous products in vulnerable countries, path...

  19. Physical modeling of the flow downstream of the butterfly valve of a carburetor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahbabi, F.Z.; Nuglish, H.J.; Couteau, G.; Charnay, G. (Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse, Toulouse (France))

    1993-07-01

    The flow downstream of the carburetor of a spark ignition piston-engine was experimentally investigated, the geometry was simplified, and single-phase flow was used. Experiments were carried out in a straight cylindrical tube in which a butterfly valve was mounted. Tests were made with water and air. Qualitative and quantitative flow-visualization techniques and hot wire anemometry were used. The existence of several zones of low downstream of the valve was shown by local velocity measurements and measurement of three-dimensional particle trajectories. These results permitted estimation of the location of regions with high, medium, and low rates of deposition of fuel droplets on the walls under actual operating conditions of engines.

  20. A novel cell autolysis system for cost-competitive downstream processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajnal, Ivan; Chen, Xiangbin; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2016-11-01

    The industrial production of low value-added biological products poses significant challenges due to cost pressures. In recent years, it has been argued that synthetic biology approaches will lead to breakthroughs that eliminate price bottlenecks for the production of a wide range of biological products including bioplastics and biofuels. One significant bottleneck lies in the necessity to break the tough cell walls of microbes in order to release intracellular products. We here report the implementation of the first synthetic biology standard part based on the lambda phage SRRz genes and a synthetic ribosome binding site (RBS) that works in Escherichia coli and Halomonas campaniensis, which enables the producer strains to induce lysis after the addition of small amounts (1-5 %) of solvents or to spontaneously lyse during the stresses of downstream processing, and thus has the potential to eliminate the mechanical cell disruption step as both an efficiency bottleneck and a significant capex barrier when implementing downstream bioprocesses.

  1. Analysis of velocity fluctuations downstream of a bileaflet mechanical heart valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forleo, Marcio; Dasi, Lakshmi

    2010-11-01

    Bileaflet mechanical heart valves are widely used to replace diseased aortic heart valves. The stresses induced by the rich and unsteady non-physiological flow structures have been the focus to evaluate red blood cells damage and platelet activation, develop flow control strategies, or improve valve designs. In this study, we analyzed the flow fields obtained downstream of a bileaflet mechanical heart valve using time-resolved particle image velocimetry under pulsatile and steady flow conditions. Our study demonstrates the rich dynamics downstream of the valve and weighs the relevance of unsteady effects vs inertia effects on the different flow structures. Power spectrum analyses of the turbulent fluctuations highlight the highly anisotropic influence and the limited applicability of classical self-similar turbulence theory in describing the small-scale structures in the immediate vicinity of the valve.

  2. Regulating water extraction in a river basin with upstream-downstream communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graversen, Mette Kildegaard

    This paper proposes a tax mechanism modelled for water extraction in a river system with upstream and downstream farmers. The tax mechanism is based on the regulator’s own estimation of aggregate extraction and for that reason the tax addresses the problem of asymmetric information....... It is demonstrated that the tax mechanism ensures approximately correct marginal extraction incentives for the individual farmer. Consequently, it is concluded that the tax mechanism proposed here has a practical application....

  3. Suitability of air sampling locations downstream of bends and static mixing elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, A R; Gupta, R; Anand, N K

    1999-12-01

    The revised standard for sampling effluent air from stacks and ducts of the nuclear industry places limits on the non-uniformity of velocity and contaminant profiles at the sampling location; namely, the coefficients of variation must not exceed 20% over an area that encompasses at least the center 2/3 of the cross sectional area. Tests were conducted to characterize the degree of mixing at downstream locations as affected by several types of flow disturbances, including 90 degree elbows and commercial static mixing devices. Flow straighteners were incorporated into the ducting upstream of the mixer to be tested to simulate the dampening of flow turbulence that might occur because of upstream HEPA filters. The coefficients of variation of velocity and tracer gas concentration measured in a straight tube at a distance of 3 diameters downstream from a 90 degree elbow were 17% and 69%, respectively. The mixing is impacted by the upstream flow turbulence. Without a flow straightener, the tracer gas concentration coefficient of variation was reduced to 33% at the 3-diameter location. The use of static mixing elements can greatly enhance the mixing process. A ring placed just downstream of a 90 degree elbow, which blocks the outer 56% of the cross sectional area, results in a coefficient of variation of 19% for tracer gas concentration at the 3-diameter location. Pressure loss across the elbow with the ring is about nine times that of the basic elbow. One of the commercially available static mixers provides coefficients of variation that are less than 10% for both velocity and tracer gas concentration at 4 diameters downstream from the mixer with a pressure loss that is only about 3.5 times as large as that of a 90 degree elbow.

  4. Production of structured lipids: acyl migration during enzymatic interesterification and downstream processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Xuebing

    1997-01-01

    -2 position or sn-1,3 positions of glycerol backbone. These kinds of lipids are reported to be promising for both enteral and parenteral nutrition. However, acyl migration occurs in the reaction stage and downstream purification process. This side-reaction causes by-products which are harmful...... to the required products. In this paper, the reasons of acyl migration and factors affecting the acyl migration were reviewed and discussed. The possible solutions were also evaluated....

  5. Combating trastuzumab resistance by targeting SRC, a common node downstream of multiple resistance pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Siyuan; Huang, Wen-Chien; Li, Ping; Guo, Hua; Poh, Say-Bee; Brady, Samuel W.; Xiong, Yan; Tseng, Ling-Ming; Li, Shau-Hsuan; Ding, Zhaoxi; Sahin, Aysegul A.; Esteva, Francisco J; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Yu, Dihua

    2011-01-01

    Trastuzumab is a successful rationally designed ERBB2-targeted therapy. However, about half of individuals with ERBB2-overexpressing breast cancer do not respond to trastuzumab-based therapies, owing to various resistance mechanisms. Clinically applicable regimens for overcoming trastuzumab resistance of different mechanisms are not yet available. We show that the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase c-SRC (SRC) is a key modulator of trastuzumab response and a common node downstream of multiple trastu...

  6. SWAT Model Prediction of Phosphorus Loading in a South Carolina Karst Watershed with a Downstream Embayment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devendra M. Amatya; Manoj K. Jha; Thomas M. Williams; Amy E. Edwards; Daniel R.. Hitchcock

    2013-01-01

    The SWAT model was used to predict total phosphorus (TP) loadings for a 1555-ha karst watershed—Chapel Branch Creek (CBC)—which drains to a lake via a reservoir-like embayment (R-E). The model was first tested for monthly streamflow predictions from tributaries draining three potential source areas as well as the downstream R-E, followed by TP loadings using data...

  7. Scleroglucan compatibility with thickeners, alcohols and polyalcohols and downstream processing implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viñarta, Silvana C; Yossen, Mariana M; Vega, Jorge R; Figueroa, Lucía I C; Fariña, Julia I

    2013-02-15

    Thickening capacity and compatibility of scleroglucan with commercial thickeners (corn starch, gum arabic, carboxymethylcellulose, gelatin, xanthan and pectin), glycols (ethylene glycol and polyethylene glycol), alcohols (methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol and isopropanol) and polyalcohols (sorbitol, xylitol and mannitol) was explored. Exopolysaccharides (EPSs) from Sclerotium rolfsii ATCC 201126 and a commercial scleroglucan were compared. Compatibility and synergism were evaluated taking into account rheology, pH and sensory properties of different thickener/scleroglucan mixtures in comparison with pure solutions. S. rolfsii ATCC 201126 EPSs induced or increased pseudoplastic behaviour with a better performance than commercial scleroglucan, showing compatibility and synergy particularly with corn starch, xanthan, pectin and carboxymethylcellulose. Compatibility and a slight synergistic behaviour were also observed with 30% (w/v) ethylene glycol whereas mixtures with polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitated. Scleroglucan was compatible with polyalcohols, whilst lower alcohols led to scleroglucan precipitation at 20% (v/v) and above. PEG-based scleroglucan downstream processing was compared to the usual alcohol precipitation. Downstream processed EPSi (with isopropanol) and EPS-p (with PEG) were evaluated on their yield, purity, rheological properties and visual aspect pointing to alcohol downstream processing as the best methodology, whilst PEG recovery would be unsuitable. The highest purified EPSi attained a recovery yield of ~23%, similar to ethanol purification, with a high degree of purity (88%, w/w vs. EPS-p, 8%, w/w) and exhibited optimal rheological properties, water solubility and appearance. With a narrower molecular weight distribution (M(w), 2.66×10(6) g/mol) and a radius of gyration (R(w), 245 nm) slightly lower than ethanol-purified EPSs, isopropanol downstream processing showed to be a proper methodology for obtaining a refined-grade scleroglucan

  8. Monitoring Thermal Pollution in Rivers Downstream of Dams with Landsat ETM+ Thermal Infrared Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Ling

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Dams play a significant role in altering the spatial pattern of temperature in rivers and contribute to thermal pollution, which greatly affects the river aquatic ecosystems. Understanding the temporal and spatial variation of thermal pollution caused by dams is important to prevent or mitigate its harmful effect. Assessments based on in-situ measurements are often limited in practice because of the inaccessibility of water temperature records and the scarcity of gauges along rivers. By contrast, thermal infrared remote sensing provides an alternative approach to monitor thermal pollution downstream of dams in large rivers, because it can cover a large area and observe the same zone repeatedly. In this study, Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+ thermal infrared imagery were applied to assess the thermal pollution caused by two dams, the Geheyan Dam and the Gaobazhou Dam, located on the Qingjiang River, a tributary of the Yangtze River downstream of the Three Gorges Reservoir in Central China. The spatial and temporal characteristics of thermal pollution were analyzed with water temperatures estimated from 54 cloud-free Landsat ETM+ scenes acquired in the period from 2000 to 2014. The results show that water temperatures downstream of both dams are much cooler than those upstream of both dams in summer, and the water temperature remains stable along the river in winter, showing evident characteristic of the thermal pollution caused by dams. The area affected by the Geheyan Dam reaches beyond 20 km along the downstream river, and that affected by the Gaobazhou Dam extends beyond the point where the Qingjiang River enters the Yangtze River. Considering the long time series and global coverage of Landsat ETM+ imagery, the proposed technique in the current study provides a promising method for globally monitoring the thermal pollution caused by dams in large rivers.

  9. Safety of snake antivenom immunoglobulins: efficacy of viral inactivation in a complete downstream process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricati, C P; Oliveira-Nascimento, L; Yoshida, J T; Caricati, A T P; Raw, I; Stephano, M A

    2013-01-01

    Viral safety remains a challenge when processing a plasma-derived product. A variety of pathogens might be present in the starting material, which requires a downstream process capable of broad viral reduction. In this article, we used a wide panel of viruses to assess viral removal/inactivation of our downstream process for Snake Antivenom Immunoglobulin (SAI). First, we screened and excluded equine plasma that cross-reacted with any model virus, a procedure not published before for antivenoms. In addition, we evaluated for the first time the virucidal capacity of phenol applied to SAI products. Among the steps analyzed in the process, phenol addition was the most effective one, followed by heat, caprylic acid, and pepsin. All viruses were fully inactivated only by phenol treatment; heat, the second most effective step, did not inactivate the rotavirus and the adenovirus used. We therefore present a SAI downstream method that is cost-effective and eliminates viruses to the extent required by WHO for a safe product. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  10. Measurement of pulsatile turbulent flow downstream of polyurethane heart valve prosthesis using particle image velocimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.K.; Sung, J.Y. [Graduate School, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea); Chang, J.K.; Min, B.G.; Yoo, J.Y. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    1998-11-01

    In-vitro flow characteristics downstream of a polyurethane artificial heart valve under a pulsatile flow condition were investigated using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). With a triggering system and a time-delay circuit the velocity field downstream of the valve was evaluated in conjunction with the opening behavior of a flexible valve leaflet during a cardiac cycle.. Reynolds shear stress distribution was calculated from the velocity fields at a peak systolic phase. Direct measurements of the wall shear stress by hot-film anemometry (HFA) were compared with the PIV data. The possibilities of vascular complications, such as the thrombus formation and red blood cell damage, could be estimated from the overall view of the instantaneous velocity and stress fields obtained. A correlation between the flow pattern downstream of the valve and the corresponding opening posture of the polyurethane valve membrane gives useful data necessary for the improved design of the frame structure and leaflet geometry of the valve. (author). 11 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Optimizing withdrawal from drinking water reservoirs to reduce downstream temperature pollution and reservoir hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, M; Rinke, K; Hipsey, M R; Boehrer, B

    2017-07-15

    Sustainable management of drinking water reservoirs requires balancing the demands of water supply whilst minimizing environmental impact. This study numerically simulates the effect of an improved withdrawal scheme designed to alleviate the temperature pollution downstream of a reservoir. The aim was to identify an optimal withdrawal strategy such that water of a desirable discharge temperature can be supplied downstream without leading to unacceptably low oxygen concentrations within the reservoir. First, we calibrated a one-dimensional numerical model for hydrodynamics and oxygen dynamics (GLM-AED2), verifying that the model reproduced water temperatures and hypolimnetic dissolved oxygen concentrations accurately over a 5 year period. Second, the model was extended to include an adaptive withdrawal functionality, allowing for a prescribed withdrawal temperature to be found, with the potential constraint of hypolimnetic oxygen concentration. Scenario simulations on epi-/metalimnetic withdrawal demonstrate that the model is able to autonomously determine the best withdrawal height depending on the thermal structure and the hypolimnetic oxygen concentration thereby optimizing the ability to supply a desirable discharge temperature to the downstream river during summer. This new withdrawal strategy also increased the hypolimnetic raw water volume to be used for drinking water supply, but reduced the dissolved oxygen concentrations in the deep and cold water layers (hypolimnion). Implications of the results for reservoir management are discussed and the numerical model is provided for operators as a simple and efficient tool for optimizing the withdrawal strategy within different reservoir contexts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Environmental hedging: A theory and method for reconciling reservoir operations for downstream ecology and water supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, L. E.; Lund, J. R.; Moyle, P. B.; Quiñones, R. M.; Herman, J. D.; O'Rear, T. A.

    2017-09-01

    Building reservoir release schedules to manage engineered river systems can involve costly trade-offs between storing and releasing water. As a result, the design of release schedules requires metrics that quantify the benefit and damages created by releases to the downstream ecosystem. Such metrics should support making operational decisions under uncertain hydrologic conditions, including drought and flood seasons. This study addresses this need and develops a reservoir operation rule structure and method to maximize downstream environmental benefit while meeting human water demands. The result is a general approach for hedging downstream environmental objectives. A multistage stochastic mixed-integer nonlinear program with Markov Chains, identifies optimal "environmental hedging," releases to maximize environmental benefits subject to probabilistic seasonal hydrologic conditions, current, past, and future environmental demand, human water supply needs, infrastructure limitations, population dynamics, drought storage protection, and the river's carrying capacity. Environmental hedging "hedges bets" for drought by reducing releases for fish, sometimes intentionally killing some fish early to reduce the likelihood of large fish kills and storage crises later. This approach is applied to Folsom reservoir in California to support survival of fall-run Chinook salmon in the lower American River for a range of carryover and initial storage cases. Benefit is measured in terms of fish survival; maintaining self-sustaining native fish populations is a significant indicator of ecosystem function. Environmental hedging meets human demand and outperforms other operating rules, including the current Folsom operating strategy, based on metrics of fish extirpation and water supply reliability.

  13. A ROBUST COMBINATORIAL APPROACH BASED ON P-GRAPH FOR SUPERSTRUCTURE GENERATION IN DOWNSTREAM BIOPROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui Xu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the production of chemicals from fermentation, the cost of downstream purification constitutes the major portion of the total production cost. Since the bioprocess generally contains a large amount of biochemical separation units, its flowsheets are complex. How to generate the rigorous superstructure of the downstream bioprocess is a primary problem and key step. In this work, a robust combined approach based on the P-graph was proposed to generate the rigorous superstructure of the downstream process of fermentation. This method integrates the hierarchical decomposition of the heuristics with P-graph-based algorithm MSG with the advantages including: (1 Different design flowsheets could be evaluated simultaneously; (2 An unique bipartite graph, P-graph, was introduced, which could represent the maximum structure clearly and intuitively; (3 The rigorous superstructure could be automatically generated. The validity of the present method was verified with two practical bioprocesses. Results show that the effective processes and the adequate operation units could be determined in the beginning stage of the design, and the tedious reforming steps during process synthesis could be avoided.

  14. Glycosaminoglycan-Mediated Downstream Signaling of CXCL8 Binding to Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupert Derler

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The recruitment of leukocytes, mediated by endothelium bound chemokine gradients, is a vital process in inflammation. The highly negatively charged, unbranched polysaccharide family of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs, such as heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate mediate chemokine immobilization. Specifically the binding of CXCL8 (interleukin 8 to GAGs on endothelial cell surfaces is known to regulate neutrophil recruitment. Currently, it is not clear if binding of CXCL8 to GAGs leads to endothelial downstream signaling in addition to the typical CXCR1/CXCR2 (C-X-C motif chemokine receptor 1 and 2-mediated signaling which activates neutrophils. Here we have investigated the changes in protein expression of human microvascular endothelial cells induced by CXCL8. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα stimulation was used to mimic an inflammatory state which allowed us to identify syndecan-4 (SDC4 as the potential proteoglycan co-receptor of CXCL8 by gene array, real-time PCR and flow cytometry experiments. Enzymatic GAG depolymerization via heparinase III and chondroitinase ABC was used to emulate the effect of glycocalyx remodeling on CXCL8-induced endothelial downstream signaling. Proteomic analyses showed changes in the expression pattern of a number of endothelial proteins such as Zyxin and Caldesmon involved in cytoskeletal organization, cell adhesion and cell mobility. These results demonstrate for the first time a potential role of GAG-mediated endothelial downstream signaling in addition to the well-known CXCL8-CXCR1/CXCR2 signaling pathways in neutrophils.

  15. Upstream to downstream: stormwater quality in Mayagüez, Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wengrove, Meagan E; Ballestero, Thomas P

    2012-08-01

    The focus of this research was upon consequences of urban stormwater runoff entering two streams in Mayagüez, Puerto Rico. Mayagüez is the largest urban area of the western side of the island of Puerto Rico and provides an excellent point of reference to monitor the affects of urban development on water quality in a tropical climate. The two monitored streams were Quebrada del Oro and Cano Majagual. The research hypothesis asks, "Does stormwater runoff from urban development measurably affect the water quality of downstream receiving water by raising the conductivity, temperature, and flow quantity characteristics during storm events in comparison to upstream water quality?" In essence, the results for Quebrada del Oro agreed with the hypothesis of this project, while Cano Majagual produced results different from the hypothesis primarily due to the absence of non-urbanized land use for both upstream and downstream sections as well as the buffering capacity of a large wetland just upstream of the downstream instrument location of Cano Majagual. Both streams showed signs of stream impairment according to the temperature criteria (32°C or 90°F) set by the Junta de Calidad Ambiental and the US Environmental Protection Agency. Dissolved oxygen levels of the streams were severely affected by water temperature and oxygen-consuming matter within these stream systems, making dissolved oxygen and temperature important water quality parameters for tropical climates.

  16. Zooplankton (Cladocera, Copepoda dynamics in the River Danube upstream and downstream of Budapest, Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadadi-Fülöp, Cs.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The spatial distribution and seasonal dynamics of zooplankton (Cladocera, Copepoda were studied in the River Danube near Budapest, Hungary. The investigated river section was relatively poor in plankton, nauplii dominated. A total of 36 species was recorded of which Acanthocyclops robustus, Thermocyclops crassus, Bosmina longirostris were the most abundant. There was a downstream increase in copepod densities, however, no other remarkable differences could be observed between the profiles upstream and downstream of the capital. Generally, the streamline was characterized by lower densities and lower number of taxa as compared to the river bank; nevertheless, there were differences between the left and the right banks both upstream or downstream as well. Seasonal dynamics was defined by a marked late winter–spring aspect and abundance peaks were found to be characteristic for Danube with high densities in May–June and August–September. Examining the relationship between zooplankton density and the hydrological regime, it can be concluded that zooplankton production in the main channel is of minor importance, rather floodplain areas and adjacent water bodies seem to be important sources of plankton biomass.

  17. Lost in Development’s Shadow: The Downstream Human Consequences of Dams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian D. Richter

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The World Commission on Dams (WCD report documented a number of social and environmental problems observed in dam development projects. The WCD gave particular emphasis to the challenges of properly resettling populations physically displaced by dams, and estimated the total number of people directly displaced at 40-80 million. Less attention has been given, however, to populations living downstream of dams whose livelihoods have been affected by dam-induced alterations of river flows. By substantially changing natural flow patterns and blocking movements of fish and other animals, large dams can severely disrupt natural riverine production systems – especially fisheries, flood-recession agriculture and dry-season grazing. We offer here the first global estimate of the number of river-dependent people potentially affected by dam-induced changes in river flows and other ecosystem conditions. Our conservative estimate of 472 million river-dependent people living downstream of large dams along impacted river reaches lends urgency to the need for more comprehensive assessments of dam costs and benefits, as well as to the social inequities between dam beneficiaries and those potentially disadvantaged by dam projects. We conclude with three key steps in dam development processes that could substantially alleviate the damaging downstream impacts of dams.

  18. An experimental study on the onset of detonation downstream of a perforated plate with staggered orifices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei; Zhou, Jin; Lin, Zhiyong; Liu, Shijie

    2017-09-01

    The present study investigated the onset of detonation (OD) process which takes place downstream of a 0.9-mm-thick perforated plate. The orifice diameter of the plate is 1.6 mm with a blockage of 59%, and it was placed perpendicular to the axial direction of a smooth detonation tube. `Stable' mixture C2H2 + 2.5O2 + 70%Ar and `unstable' mixture C2H2 + 5N2O were tested, respectively. Ionization probes and smoked foils were used to record detonation velocities and corresponding cellular patterns. Excellent agreement of the velocity trends and smoked foil results shows that a critical pressure range exists to identify `go' and `no go' of OD downstream of the perforated plate. However, the OD mechanisms for these two gaseous mixtures are distinct: for the `stable' mixture, OD occurs in the downstream near field (6 tube diameters in this study), whereas, OD in the `unstable' mixture could also observed in the far field via the transition of deflagration to detonation after a long duration of quasi-steady regime. This distance reaches up to tens of tube diameters when close to the critical pressure.

  19. Decabrominated diphenyl ether in river fish and sediment samples collected downstream an industrial park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eljarrat, Ethel; Labandeira, Ana; Marsh, Göran; Raldúa, Demetrio; Barceló, Damià

    2007-10-01

    Fish, sediment and water samples from different places along the Spanish River Vero, a tributary of the Cinca River in the Ebro River basin, were collected in two different sampling campaigns, the first one during November 2004 and the second one in November 2005. The samples were collected up- and downstream from an industrial park. A total of 29 fishes, 6 sediments and 3 water samples were analyzed for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Analytical work included 23 congeners, from tri- to deca-BDEs. The highest values for both sediment and fish samples were found downstream of the industrial park. High BDE-209 contamination was found in these sediment samples, with values up to 12 microg g(-1) dry weight. Moreover, BDE-209 was detected in 14 out of 15 biota samples collected downstream the industrial park, at concentration levels ranging from 20 to 707 ng g(-1) lipid weight, whereas it was not detected in samples collected upstream. These fish concentrations proved the bioavailability of BDE-209 and represented the highest deca-BDE values found in aquatic biota. The analysis of industrial effluents revealed that some industries contribute in some way to the BDE-209 contamination found in this area, but the industry focused on the polyamide polymerization is the main responsible.

  20. Epigenetic silencing of downstream genes mediated by tandem orientation in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiehl, Steffen; Zimmermann, Tobias; Savai, Rajkumar; Pullamsetti, Soni S; Seeger, Werner; Bartkuhn, Marek; Dammann, Reinhard H

    2017-06-20

    Epigenetic deregulation is of importance in tumorigenesis. In particular CpG islands (CGI), are frequently hypermethylated. Here, genome-wide DNA-methylation profiles of 480,000 CpGs in lung cancer cells were generated. It was observed that intra- and intergenic CGI exhibited higher methylation compared to normal cells. The functional annotation of hypermethylated CGI revealed that the hypermethylation was associated with homeobox domain genes and targets marked by repressive histone modifications. The strongest methylation variation was observed in transitional areas of CGI, termed shores. 5'-shores of promoter-associated CGI in lung cancer cell lines were higher methylated than 3'-shores. Within two tandem-oriented genes, a significant hypermethylation of the downstream-located CGI promoters was revealed. Hypermethylation correlates with the length of the intergenic region between such tandem genes. As the RASSF1A tumor suppressor gene represents such a downstream tandem gene, its silencing was analyzed using an inducible system. It was determined that the induction of an upstream gene led to a repression of RASSF1A through a process involving histone deacetylases and CPSF1. A tumor-specific increase in expression of histone deacetylases and CPSF1 was detected in lung cancer. Our results suggest that the downstream gene could be susceptible to epigenetic silencing when organized in a tandem orientation.

  1. Morphology analysis in middle-downstream area of Progo River due to the debris flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitriadin, Ahmad Azmi; Ikhsan, Jaza'ul; Harsanto, Puji

    2017-06-01

    One of the problems that occur in Progo River is the formation of sediment in the downstream section. The sediment material in the upstream becomes the source of sediment at the downstream area. Excess sediment supply from the upstream causes morphological changes in a relatively short time. The morphological changes in riverbed will affect hydraulics conditions. Hydraulic has an important role in the process of aggradation and degradation in the riverbed. Furthermore, the process of erosion and sedimentation will affect the stability of the construction in the water. In Progo River, there are some buildings of infrastructure such as revetment, bridge, irrigation intake, groundsill, and weir. Based on the results of a numerical model of the hydraulic analysis system, there was approximately 87,000,000 m3 of sediment on Progo River in 2015. In fact, aggradation and degradation occurred very intensively in the middle-downstream area of Progo River. Sediment movement simulation also showed that the sediment supply of lava could prevent excessive bed degradation. Nevertheless, the absence of sediment supply will lead to bed degradation process. It indicates that the management of the sediment supply in the upstream area must be managed properly.

  2. The effect of catalyst length and downstream reactor distance on catalytic combustor performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D.

    1980-01-01

    A study was made to determine the effects on catalytic combustor performance which resulted from independently varying the length of a catalytic reactor and the length available for gas-phase reactions downstream of the catalyst. Monolithic combustion catalysts from three manufacturers were tested in a combustion test rig with no. 2 diesel fuel. Catalytic reactor lengths of 2.5 and 5.4 cm, and downstream gas-phase reaction distances of 7.3, 12.4, 17.5, and 22.5 cm were evaluated. Measurements of carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, and pressure drop were made. The catalytic-reactor pressure drop was less than 1 percent of the upstream total pressure for all test configurations and test conditions. Nitrogen oxides and unburned hydrocarbons emissions were less than 0.25 g NO2/kg fuel and 0.6 g HC/kg fuel, respectively. The minimum operating temperature (defined as the adiabatic combustion temperature required to obtain carbon monoxide emissions below a reference level of 13.6 g CO/kg fuel) ranged from 1230 K to 1500 K for the various conditions and configurations tested. The minimum operating temperature decreased with increasing total (catalytic-reactor-plus-downstream-gas-phase-reactor-zone) residence time but was independent of the relative times spent in each region when the catalytic-reactor residence time was greater than or equal to 1.4 ms.

  3. Optimization of Upstream Detention Reservoir Facilities for Downstream Flood Mitigation in Urban Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi Thuy Ngo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A detention reservoir is one of the most effective engineered solutions for flood damage mitigation in urban areas. Detention facilities are constructed to temporarily store storm water and then slowly drain when the peak period has passed. This delayed drainage may coincide with upstream floods and aggravate the flood risk downstream. Optimal operation and design are needed to improve the performance of detention reservoirs for flood reduction. This study couples hydrologic simulation software (EPA-SWMM with an evolutional optimizer (extraordinary particle swarm optimization, EPSO to minimize flood damage downstream while considering the inundation risk at the detention reservoir. The optimum design and operation are applied to an urban case study in Seoul, Korea, for historical severe flooding events and designed rainfall scenarios. The optimal facilities outperform the present facilities in terms of flood damage reduction both downstream and in the detention reservoir area. Specifically, the peak water level at the detention pond under optimal conditions is significantly smaller than that of the current conditions. The comparison of the total flooded volume in the whole watershed shows a dramatic reduction of 79% in a severe flooding event in 2010 and around 20% in 2011 and in 180 min designed rainfall scenarios.

  4. MicroRNA-145 suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma by targeting IRS1 and its downstream Akt signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yelin [Department of Anesthesiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Combined Multi-organ Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Hu, Chen; Cheng, Jun [Department of Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Combined Multi-organ Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Chen, Binquan [Department of Anesthesiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Ke, Qinghong; Lv, Zhen; Wu, Jian [Department of Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Combined Multi-organ Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Zhou, Yanfeng, E-mail: zyfhdj@yahoo.com [Department of Anesthesiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • MiR-145 expression is down-regulated in HCC tissues and inversely related with IRS1 levels. • MiR-145 directly targets IRS1 in HCC cells. • Restored expression of miR-145 suppressed HCC cell proliferation and growth. • MiR-145 induced IRS1 under-expression potentially reduced downstream AKT signaling. - Abstract: Accumulating evidences have proved that dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is involved in cancer initiation and progression. In this study, we showed that miRNA-145 level was significantly decreased in hepatocellular cancer (HCC) tissues and cell lines, and its low expression was inversely associated with the abundance of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1), a key mediator in oncogenic insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling. We verified IRS1 as a direct target of miR-145 using Western blotting and luciferase reporter assay. Further, the restoration of miR-145 in HCC cell lines suppressed cancer cell growth, owing to down-regulated IRS1 expression and its downstream Akt/FOXO1 signaling. Our results demonstrated that miR-145 could inhibit HCC through targeting IRS1 and its downstream signaling, implicating the loss of miR-145 regulation may be a potential molecular mechanism causing aberrant oncogenic signaling in HCC.

  5. Assessing water deprivation at the sub-river basin scale in LCA integrating downstream cascade effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loubet, Philippe; Roux, Philippe; Núñez, Montserrat; Belaud, Gilles; Bellon-Maurel, Véronique

    2013-12-17

    Physical water deprivation at the midpoint level is assessed in water-related LCIA methods using water scarcity indicators (e.g., withdrawal-to-availability and consumption-to-availability) at the river basin scale. Although these indicators represent a great step forward in the assessment of water-use-related impacts in LCA, significant challenges still remain in improving their accuracy and relevance. This paper presents a methodology that can be used to derive midpoint characterization factors for water deprivation taking into account downstream cascade effects within a single river basin. This effect is considered at a finer scale because a river basin must be split into different subunits. The proposed framework is based on a two-step approach. First, water scarcity is defined at the sub-river basin scale with the consumption-to-availability (CTA) ratio, and second, characterization factors for water deprivation (CFWD) are calculated, integrating the effects on downstream sub-river basins. The sub-river basin CTA and CFWD were computed based on runoff data, water consumption data and a water balance for two different river basins. The results show significant differences between the CFWD in a given river basin, depending on the upstream or downstream position. Finally, an illustrative example is presented, in which different land planning scenarios, taking into account additional water consumption in a city, are assessed. Our work demonstrates how crucial it is to localize the withdrawal and release positions within a river basin.

  6. Complex biallelic IGH rearrangements in IgM-expressing Z-138 cell line : Involvement of downstream immunoglobulin class switch recombination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guikema, JEJ; Fenton, JAL; de Boer, C; Kleiverda, K; Brink, AATP; Raap, AK; Estrov, Z; Schuuring, E; Kluin, PM

    Chromosomal translocations involving the immunoglobulin (Ig) receptor loci usually disrupt and silence these loci. On the basis of observations in follicular lymphoma (FL) with downstream Ig heavy chain (IGH) class switch recombination (CSR), we hypothesized that downstream CSR-mediated chromosomal

  7. Occupational and ambient exposure to benzene and total hydrocarbons in the downstream petroleum industries and effectiveness of controls for exposure at distribution networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, D.; Johnson, D.; Shaw, M.L. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    1996-03-01

    Ambient and occupational exposure to benzene and total hydrocarbon in the downstream petroleum industries were evaluated. Benzene is a minor component in gasoline and is considered to be toxic by the Canadian Environmental Protection Act. It has been classified as a human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Data was collected from the following sectors of the downstream petroleum industry: refineries, pipelines, marine, bulk terminal, rail car, trucks, service stations, underground storage tanks and site remediation. A comparison of facilities with and without vapour controls was included in this study. A review of the existing literature and previous studies pertaining to benzene exposure revealed a notable lack of Canadian studies on occupational and environmental benzene levels. Traditional methods of benzene and total hydrocarbons (THC) occupational sampling has been long term, providing only time-weighted-average exposure data. Such data does not provide information as to which task of a particular job contributes most to workers` exposure. This data could lead to the development of control measures to reduce environmental benzene and gasoline vapour load. Data in this study was divided into three sections: (1) personal occupational long term samples, i.e.greater than one hour in duration, (2) personal occupational short term samples, i.e. less than one hour in duration, and (3) area and ambient samples, i.e. samples collected within or near the facility. 133 refs., 59 tabs., 6 figs.

  8. Coarse and fine sediment transportation patterns and causes downstream of the Three Gorges Dam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Songzhe; Yang, Yunping; Zhang, Mingjin; Sun, Zhaohua; Zhu, Lingling; You, Xingying; Li, Kanyu

    2017-11-01

    Reservoir construction within a basin affects the process of water and sediment transport downstream of the dam. The Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) affects the sediment transport downstream of the dam. The impoundment of the TGR reduced total downstream sediment. The sediment group d≤0.125 mm (fine particle) increased along the path, but the average was still below what existed before the reservoir impoundment. The sediments group d>0.125 mm (coarse particle) was recharged in the Yichang to Jianli reach, but showed a deposition trend downstream of Jianli. The coarse sediment in the Yichang to Jianli section in 2003 to 2007 was above the value before the TGR impoundment. However, the increase of both coarse and fine sediments in 2008 to 2014 was less than that in 2003 to 2007. The sediment retained in the dam is the major reason for the sediment reduction downstream. However, the retention in different river reaches is affected by riverbed coarsening, discharge, flow process, and conditions of lake functioning and recharging from the tributaries. The main conclusions derived from our study are as follows: 1) The riverbed in the Yichang to Shashi section was relatively coarse, thereby limiting the supply of fine and coarse sediments. The fine sediment supply was mainly controlled by TGR discharge, whereas the coarse sediment supply was controlled by the duration of high flow and its magnitude. 2) The supply of both coarse and fine sediments in the Shashi to Jianli section was controlled by the amount of total discharge. The sediment supply from the riverbed was higher in flood years than that in the dry years. The coarse sediment tended to deposit, and the deposition in the dry years was larger than that in the flood years. 3) The feeding of the fine sediment in the Luoshan to Hankou section was mainly from the riverbed. The supply in 2008 to 2014 was more than that in 2003 to 2007. Around 2010, the coarse sediments transited from depositing to scouring that was

  9. 25 CFR 700.33 - Act (The Act).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Act (The Act). 700.33 Section 700.33 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.33 Act (The Act). (a) The Act. The Act is Pub. L. 93-531, (88 Stat...

  10. Assessment of radium-226 bioavailability and bioaccumulation downstream of decommissioned uranium operations, using the caged oligochaete (Lumbriculus variegatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiramanaden, Cheryl I E; Orr, Patricia L; Russel, Cynthia K

    2015-03-01

    The present study investigated the integrated effects of several geochemical processes that control radium-226 ((226) Ra) mobility in the aquatic environment and bioaccumulation in in situ caged benthic invertebrates. Radium-226 bioaccumulation from sediment and water was evaluated using caged oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus) deployed for 10 d in 6 areas downstream of decommissioned uranium operations in Ontario and Saskatchewan, Canada. Measured (226) Ra radioactivity levels in the retrieved oligochaetes did not relate directly to water and sediment exposure levels. Other environmental factors that may influence (226) Ra bioavailability in sediment and water were investigated. The strongest mitigating influence on (226) Ra bioaccumulation factors was sediment barium concentration, with elevated barium (Ba) levels being related to use of barium chloride in effluent treatment for removing (226) Ra through barite formation. Observations from the present study also indicated that (226) Ra bioavailability was influenced by dissolved organic carbon in water, and by gypsum, carbonate minerals, and iron oxyhydroxides in sediment, suggestive of sorption processes. Environmental factors that appeared to increase (226) Ra bioaccumulation were the presence of other group (II) ions in water (likely competing for binding sites on organic carbon molecules), and the presence of K-feldspars in sediment, which likely act as a dynamic repository for (226) Ra where weak ion exchange can occur. In addition to influencing bioavailability to sediment biota, secondary minerals such as gypsum, carbonate minerals, and iron oxyhydroxides likely help mitigate (226) Ra release into overlying water after the dissolution of sedimentary barite. Environ Toxicol Chem 2015;34:507-517. © 2014 SETAC. © 2015 SETAC.

  11. The Child Justice Act

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stephan

    1995-06-16

    Jun 16, 1995 ... I want to express my gratitude to them all. 1 In the past a few different categories of young offenders were specifically addressed in our law. For example, s 290 of the Criminal Procedure Act 51 of 1977 (before its repeal by the Child. Justice Act 75 of 2008) had specific provisions for "young offenders" under ...

  12. ACT and College Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleyaert, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    What is the relationship between ACT scores and success in college? For decades, admissions policies in colleges and universities across the country have required applicants to submit scores from a college entrance exam, most typically the ACT (American College Testing) or SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test). This requirement suggests that high school…

  13. Marine Mammal Protection Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA or Act) prohibits, with certain exceptions, the "take" of marine mammals in U.S. waters and by U.S. citizens on the high seas,...

  14. Transitions as Speech Acts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, Alice Ann

    1993-01-01

    Reviews speech act theory to explain the function of writing transitions in terms of the illocutionary and perlocutionary effect of explicit performatives. Identifies explicit performatives in samples of professional writing in technical and academic areas. Suggest ways to revise textbooks to include the findings from speech act theory. (SR)

  15. Acts of kindness and acts of novelty affect life satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Kathryn E; Bardi, Anat

    2010-01-01

    The present experiment was designed to establish the effects of acts of kindness and acts of novelty on life satisfaction. Participants aged 18-60 took part on a voluntary basis. They were randomly assigned to perform either acts of kindness, acts of novelty, or no acts on a daily basis for 10 days. Their life satisfaction was measured before and after the 10-day experiment. As expected, performing acts of kindness or acts of novelty resulted in an increase in life satisfaction.

  16. Stochastic modeling of Cryptosporidium parvum to predict transport, retention, and downstream exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, J. D.; Boano, F.; Atwill, E. R.; Li, X.; Harter, T.; Packman, A. I.

    2016-12-01

    Rivers are a means of rapid and long-distance transmission of pathogenic microorganisms from upstream terrestrial sources. Thus, significant fluxes of pathogen loads from agricultural lands can occur due to transport in surface waters. Pathogens enter streams and rivers in a variety of processes, notably overland flow, shallow groundwater discharge, and direct inputs from host populations such as humans and other vertebrate species. Viruses, bacteria, and parasites can enter a stream and persist in the environment for varying amounts of time. Of particular concern is the protozoal parasite, Cryptosporidium parvum, which can remain infective for weeks to months under cool and moist conditions, with the infectious state (oocysts) largely resistant to chlorination. In order to manage water-borne diseases more effectively we need to better predict how microbes behave in freshwater systems, particularly how they are transported downstream in rivers and in the process interact with the streambed and other solid surfaces. Microbes continuously immobilize and resuspend during downstream transport due to a variety of processes, such as gravitational settling, attachment to in-stream structures such as submerged macrophytes, and hyporheic exchange and filtration within underlying sediments. These various interactions result in a wide range of microbial residence times in the streambed and therefore influence the persistence of pathogenic microbes in the stream environment. We developed a stochastic mobile-immobile model to describe these microbial transport and retention processes in streams and rivers that also accounts for microbial inactivation. We used the model to assess the transport, retention, and inactivation of C. parvum within stream environments, specifically under representative flow conditions of California streams where C. parvum exposure can be at higher risk due to agricultural nonpoint sources. The results demonstrate that the combination of stream reach

  17. On the electron temperature downstream of the solar wind termination shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Chashei

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study the temperatures of electrons convected with the solar wind to large solar distances and finally transported over the solar wind termination shock. Nearly nothing, unless at high energies in the cosmic ray regime, is known about the thermodynamical behaviour of these distant electrons from in~situ plasma observations. Hence it is tacitly assumed these electrons, due to their adiabatic behaviour and vanishing heat conduction or energization processes, have rapidly cooled off to very low temperatures once they eventually arrive at the solar wind termination shock (at about 100 AU. In this paper we show that such electrons, however, at their passage over the termination shock due to the shock–electric field action undergo an over-adiabatic heating and therefore appear on the downstream side as a substantially heated plasma species. Looking quantitatively into this heating process we find that solar wind electrons achieve temperatures of the order of 2–4 × 106 K downstream of the termination shock, depending on the upstream solar wind bulk velocity and the shock compression ratio. Hence these electrons therewith play an important dynamical role in structuring this shock and determining the downstream plasma flow properties. Furthermore, they present an additional ionization source for incoming neutral interstellar hydrogen and excite X-ray emission. They also behave similar to cosmic ray electrons and extend to some limited region upstream of the shock of the order of 0.1 AU by spatial diffusion and thereby also modify the upstream solar wind properties.

  18. Has dyke development in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta shifted flood hazard downstream?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. K. Triet

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the Vietnamese part of the Mekong Delta (VMD the areas with three rice crops per year have been expanded rapidly during the last 15 years. Paddy-rice cultivation during the flood season has been made possible by implementing high-dyke flood defenses and flood control structures. However, there are widespread claims that the high-dyke system has increased water levels in downstream areas. Our study aims at resolving this issue by attributing observed changes in flood characteristics to high-dyke construction and other possible causes. Maximum water levels and duration above the flood alarm level are analysed for gradual trends and step changes at different discharge gauges. Strong and robust increasing trends of peak water levels and duration downstream of the high-dyke areas are found with a step change in 2000/2001, i.e. immediately after the disastrous flood which initiated the high-dyke development. These changes are in contrast to the negative trends detected at stations upstream of the high-dyke areas. This spatially different behaviour of changes in flood characteristics seems to support the public claims. To separate the impact of the high-dyke development from the impact of the other drivers – i.e. changes in the flood hydrograph entering the Mekong Delta, and changes in the tidal dynamics – hydraulic model simulations of the two recent large flood events in 2000 and 2011 are performed. The hydraulic model is run for a set of scenarios whereas the different drivers are interchanged. The simulations reveal that for the central VMD an increase of 9–13 cm in flood peak and 15 days in duration can be attributed to high-dyke development. However, for this area the tidal dynamics have an even larger effect in the range of 19–32 cm. However, the relative contributions of the three drivers of change vary in space across the delta. In summary, our study confirms the claims that the high-dyke development has raised the flood

  19. Has dyke development in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta shifted flood hazard downstream?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Khanh Triet, Nguyen; Viet Dung, Nguyen; Fujii, Hideto; Kummu, Matti; Merz, Bruno; Apel, Heiko

    2017-08-01

    In the Vietnamese part of the Mekong Delta (VMD) the areas with three rice crops per year have been expanded rapidly during the last 15 years. Paddy-rice cultivation during the flood season has been made possible by implementing high-dyke flood defenses and flood control structures. However, there are widespread claims that the high-dyke system has increased water levels in downstream areas. Our study aims at resolving this issue by attributing observed changes in flood characteristics to high-dyke construction and other possible causes. Maximum water levels and duration above the flood alarm level are analysed for gradual trends and step changes at different discharge gauges. Strong and robust increasing trends of peak water levels and duration downstream of the high-dyke areas are found with a step change in 2000/2001, i.e. immediately after the disastrous flood which initiated the high-dyke development. These changes are in contrast to the negative trends detected at stations upstream of the high-dyke areas. This spatially different behaviour of changes in flood characteristics seems to support the public claims. To separate the impact of the high-dyke development from the impact of the other drivers - i.e. changes in the flood hydrograph entering the Mekong Delta, and changes in the tidal dynamics - hydraulic model simulations of the two recent large flood events in 2000 and 2011 are performed. The hydraulic model is run for a set of scenarios whereas the different drivers are interchanged. The simulations reveal that for the central VMD an increase of 9-13 cm in flood peak and 15 days in duration can be attributed to high-dyke development. However, for this area the tidal dynamics have an even larger effect in the range of 19-32 cm. However, the relative contributions of the three drivers of change vary in space across the delta. In summary, our study confirms the claims that the high-dyke development has raised the flood hazard downstream. However, it is not

  20. To what extent can green infrastructure mitigate downstream flooding in a peri-urban catchment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, J. E.; Burns, M.; Sanders, B. F.; Flethcher, T.

    2016-12-01

    In this research, we couple an urban hydrologic model (MUSIC, eWater, AUS) with a fine resolution 2D hydrodynamic model (BreZo, UC Irvine, USA) to test to what extent retrofitting an urban watershed with stormwater control measures (SCMs) can propagate flood management benefits downstream. Our study site is the peri-urban Little Stringybark Creek (LSC) catchment in eastern Melbourne, AUS, with an area of 4.5 km2 and connected impervious area of 9%. Urban development is mainly limited to the upper 2 km2of the catchment. Since 2009 the LSC catchment has been the subject of a large-scale experiment aiming to restore morenatural flow by implementing over 300 SCMs, such as rain tanks and infiltration trenches, resulting in runoff from 50% of connected impervious areas now being intercepted by some form of SCM. For our study we calibrated the hydrologic and hydraulic models based on current catchment conditions, then we developed models representing alternative SCM scenarios including a complete lack of SCMs versus a full implementation of SCMs. Flow in the hydrologic/hydraulic models is forced using a range of synthetic rainfall events with annual exceedance probabilities (AEPs) between 63-1% and durations between 10 min to 24 hr. Metrics of SCM efficacy in changing flood regime include flood depths and extents, flow intensity (m2/s), flood duration, and critical storm duration leading to maximum flood conditions. Results indicate that across the range of AEPs tested and for storm durations equal or less than 3 hours, current SCM conditions reduce downstream flooded area on average by 29%, while a full implementation of SCMs would reduce downstream flooded area on average by 91%. A full implementation of SCMs could also lower maximum flow intensities by 83% on average, reducing damage potential to structures in the flow path and increasing the ability for vehicles to evacuate flooded streets. We also found that for storm durations longer than 3 hours, the SCMs capacity

  1. Advances in downstream processing of biologics - Spectroscopy: An emerging process analytical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüdt, Matthias; Briskot, Till; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2017-03-24

    Process analytical technologies (PAT) for the manufacturing of biologics have drawn increased interest in the last decade. Besides being encouraged by the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) PAT initiative, PAT promises to improve process understanding, reduce overall production costs and help to implement continuous manufacturing. This article focuses on spectroscopic tools for PAT in downstream processing (DSP). Recent advances and future perspectives will be reviewed. In order to exploit the full potential of gathered data, chemometric tools are widely used for the evaluation of complex spectroscopic information. Thus, an introduction into the field will be given. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Modelling landslide-generated tsunami: from landslide propagation to downstream flood in dam context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Martin; Podladchikov, Yury; Humair, Florian; Matasci, Battista; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2015-04-01

    Alpine regions have a high density of dammed lakes, either natural or anthropogenic. Those are frequently surrounded by steep slopes and thus, are potentially affected by mass wasting processes. The penetration of landsliding material in the water body may lead to impulse waves that could overtop the dam and, in the worst case scenario, breach or break the latter. The possible resulting outburst flood is a serious threat for populated places, commonly concentrated downstream in the valleys. In order to assess the risk resulting from the succession of all phenomenon, a numerical model able to handle all of them is required. Although specific models of flooding simulation or wave propagation are efficient, there is currently no fully achieved model capable to integrate all the above-mentioned processes at the same time. In order to address this, we propose a new model capable to handle these difficult combinations and which is suitable for risk assessment in dam contexts. Our model is based on both the shallow water equations and viscous flow equations. The first ones are stabilised by the Lax-Friedrichs scheme and compute the wave propagation and the downstream flow, i.e. the wet state. The viscous flow equations are used for the dry state and to propagate the landslide body. The transition from one state to the other is ruled by a threshold based on the Reynolds number. First, in order to test the capacity of our model to endure critical situations, we conducted numerical sandbox tests such as Riemann problems, dam break, and landslide tsunami-related ones in 2 dimensions. In a second time, the model is applied on a real case study: the Oeschinen Lake (Switzerland). This naturally dammed lake is specifically selected since it is potentially affected by all above-mentioned phenomenon, including landsliding, wave generation, wave propagation in the water body and on the shore as well as the downstream flooding. Results show that the municipality of Kandersteg

  3. Induction of postmitotic neuroretina cell proliferation by distinct Ras downstream signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyssonnaux, C; Provot, S; Felder-Schmittbuhl, M P; Calothy, G; Eychène, A

    2000-10-01

    Ras-induced cell transformation is mediated through distinct downstream signaling pathways, including Raf, Ral-GEFs-, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase)-dependent pathways. In some cell types, strong activation of the Ras-Raf-MEK-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade leads to cell cycle arrest rather than cell division. We previously reported that constitutive activation of this pathway induces sustained proliferation of primary cultures of postmitotic chicken neuroretina (NR) cells. We used this model system to investigate the respective contributions of Ras downstream signaling pathways in Ras-induced cell proliferation. Three RasV12 mutants (S35, G37, and C40) which differ by their ability to bind to Ras effectors (Raf, Ral-GEFs, and the p110 subunit of PI 3-kinase, respectively) were able to induce sustained NR cell proliferation, although none of these mutants was reported to transform NIH 3T3 cells. Furthermore, they all repressed the promoter of QR1, a neuroretina growth arrest-specific gene. Overexpression of B-Raf or activated versions of Ras effectors Rlf-CAAX and p110-CAAX also induced NR cell division. The mitogenic effect of the RasC40-PI 3-kinase pathway appears to involve Rac and RhoA GTPases but not the antiapoptotic Akt (protein kinase B) signaling. Division induced by RasG37-Rlf appears to be independent of Ral GTPase activation and presumably requires an unidentified mechanism. Activation of either Ras downstream pathway resulted in ERK activation, and coexpression of a dominant negative MEK mutant or mKsr-1 kinase domain strongly inhibited proliferation induced by the three Ras mutants or by their effectors. Similar effects were observed with dominant negative mutants of Rac and Rho. Thus, both the Raf-MEK-ERK and Rac-Rho pathways are absolutely required for Ras-induced NR cell division. Activation of these two pathways by the three distinct Ras downstream effectors possibly relies on an autocrine or paracrine loop

  4. Export of Organic Matter and Microbes from the Greenland Ice Sheet: Sources, Composition, and Downstream Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, T. J.; Zarsky, J. D.; Cameron, K.; Lamarche-Gagnon, G.; Hawkings, J.; Telling, J.; Tedstone, A.; Wadham, J.; Jacobsen, C. S.; Yde, J. C.; Stibal, M.

    2016-12-01

    Meltwater runoff from the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) has increased by more than 50% in the last 50 years. While considerable uncertainty revolves around the impact this change may have on downstream ecosystems, previous research has suggested that solute and microbial exports from the GrIS are likely to increase with higher freshwater fluxes. We monitored the Watson River, a glacially fed river in West Greenland, over the 2012 and 2015 summers to evaluate the influence increased fluxes may exert on local microbial communities and downstream biogeochemical cycles. Our objectives were to approximate the number of cells exported, characterize cell assemblages, and determine their origin. In 2012, paired microbiological samples were taken sporadically at the Leverett Glacier meltwater portal (at the head of the Watson River) and the Watson River fjord outlet 30 km downstream, to quantify microbial cells and characterize assemblage structure. We found cell concentrations and microbial assemblages to be very similar between locations, despite their distance apart. This suggests that GrIS outlet rivers are "neutral pipes" connecting microbes between glacial and estuarine habitats. We further identified subtle shifts in assemblage structure over the course of the summer melt season (May to August), and hypothesized that this reflects an expanding subglacial drainage network, with waters draining parts of the GrIS bed progressively further inland as the melt season progressed. Meltwaters from the Leverett Glacier portal were again monitored during the 2015 summer to identify the source of exported microbes by sampling during or near outburst events, which flush long-term stored waters from the ice-sheet bed. Using 14C dating, we found that exported suspended sediment-bound carbon becomes progressively older from June to August. This suggests that different reservoirs are tapped as the melt season progresses, which we interpret as originating from a greater distance into the

  5. Draconian dress act repealed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhone, C

    1994-01-01

    The Dress Act was put into place in Malawi by the government of President Kamuzu Banda after the long period of direct colonialism. The act made it illegal for women in Malawi to be seen publicly wearing dresses which did not completely cover their knees or wearing pants; men had to wear their hair short. Police officers even scrutinized women's attire at private house parties and in homes. The autocratic political structure established by Banda, however, was voted out in a referendum June 14, 1993. Pressure by opposition forces such as the United Democratic Front forced a repeal of the act on November 16 of the same year. The repeal was vigorously attacked by female Parliament members as a move which would result in moral degradation and an increase in the level of sexual harassment against women. Other citizens and tourists have generally detested the act. The act has most certainly kept many potential visitors from vacationing in Malawi. Some expert observers think that repeals of the Dress Act, the Forfeiture Act, and legislation which allowed the government to detain opposition figures without trial were done to garner support from the Paris Club for the resumption of balance of payments support suspended due to the country's poor human rights record.

  6. Sarbanes Oxley Act

    OpenAIRE

    Těšínský, Josef

    2011-01-01

    The diploma thesis is focused on corporate fraud problematic, on The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and on problematics of internal control systems and corporate governance, which relate closely with the Sarbanes-Oxley act. The goal of my diploma thesis is to highlight the significance of corporate fraud problematic and create an integrated summary of requirements placed on companies, which either have to or want to comply with the Sarbanes-Oxley act. The opening part of the diploma thesis is foc...

  7. The Experiment as Act

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten

    to identify and locate the experiments of POEX65 as acts; and to ask the questions: what constitutes those acts as experiments? and how do we possibly archive them? My purpose, then, is to define the methodologies to obtain the contours of a post-phenomenology of experimental artistic production in order...... to be able to analyse the phenomena found at POEX65. Here I will use the notion of the ‘ontological theatre’ (Pickering), which, according to Pickering, is acted out in experimental art productions. The experiment could thus be seen as an ‘agency-realism’ – as an ‘act’ of relations across the aesthetics...

  8. 75 FR 63703 - Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-18

    ... CFR Part 261a Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act Regulation AGENCY: Board of Governors of the Federal...) is issuing a final rule to amend its regulation implementing the Privacy Act of 1974 (Privacy Act..., and applicants for Board employment, for access to their records under the Privacy Act; the amendment...

  9. Resolution of thermal striping issue downstream of a horizontal pipe elbow in stratified pipe flow. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzay, T.M.; Kasza, K.E.

    1985-01-01

    A thermally stratified pipe flow produced by a thermal transient when passing through a horizontal elbow as a result of secondary flow gives rise to large thermal fluctuations on the inner curvature wall of the downstream piping. These fluctuations were measured in a specially instrumented horizontal pipe and elbow system on a test set-up using water in the Mixing Components Technology Facility (MCTF) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). This study is part of a larger program which is studying the influence of thermal buoyancy on general reactor component performance. This paper discusses the influence of pipe flow generated thermal oscillations on the thermal stresses induced in the pipe walls. The instrumentation was concentrated around the exit plane of the 90/sup 0/ sweep elbow, since prior tests had indicated that the largest thermal fluctuations would occur within about one hydraulic diameter downstream of the elbow exit. The thermocouples were located along the inner curvature of the piping and measured the near surface fluid temperature. The test matrix involved thermal downramps under turbulent flow conditions.

  10. Novel Strategies for Upstream and Downstream Processing of Tannin Acyl Hydrolase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Durán, Luis V.; Valdivia-Urdiales, Blanca; Contreras-Esquivel, Juan C.; Rodríguez-Herrera, Raúl; Aguilar, Cristóbal N.

    2011-01-01

    Tannin acyl hydrolase also referred as tannase is an enzyme with important applications in several science and technology fields. Due to its hydrolytic and synthetic properties, tannase could be used to reduce the negative effects of tannins in beverages, food, feed, and tannery effluents, for the production of gallic acid from tannin-rich materials, the elucidation of tannin structure, and the synthesis of gallic acid esters in nonaqueous media. However, industrial applications of tannase are still very limited due to its high production cost. Thus, there is a growing interest in the production, recovery, and purification of this enzyme. Recently, there have been published a number of papers on the improvement of upstream and downstream processing of the enzyme. These papers dealt with the search for new tannase producing microorganisms, the application of novel fermentation systems, optimization of culture conditions, the production of the enzyme by recombinant microorganism, and the design of efficient protocols for tannase recovery and purification. The present work reviews the state of the art of basic and biotechnological aspects of tannin acyl hydrolase, focusing on the recent advances in the upstream and downstream processing of the enzyme. PMID:21941633

  11. Delineation of downstream signalling components during acrosome reaction mediated by heat solubilized human zona pellucida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talwar Pankaj

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human egg is enveloped by a glycoproteinaceous matrix, zona pellucida (ZP, responsible for binding of the human spermatozoa to the egg and induction of acrosomal exocytosis in the spermatozoon bound to ZP. In the present manuscript, attempts have been made to delineate the downstream signalling components employed by human ZP to induce acrosome reaction. Methods Heat-solubilized human ZP (SIZP was used to study the induction of acrosome reaction in capacitated human spermatozoa using tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate conjugated Pisum sativum agglutinin (TRITC-PSA in absence or presence of various pharmacological inhibitors. In addition, intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i levels in sperm using Fluo-3 acetoxymethyl ester as fluorescent probe were also estimated in response to SIZP. Results SIZP induces acrosomal exocytosis in capacitated human sperm in a dose dependent manner accompanied by an increase in [Ca2+]i. Human SIZP mediated induction of acrosome reaction depends on extracellular Ca2+ and involves activation of Gi protein-coupled receptor, tyrosine kinase, protein kinases A & C and phosphoinositide 3 (PI3- kinase. In addition, T-type voltage operated calcium channels and GABA-A receptor associated chloride (Cl- channels play an important role in SIZP mediated induction of acrosome reaction. Conclusions Results described in the present study provide a comprehensive account of the various downstream signalling components associated with human ZP mediated acrosome reaction.

  12. Single pass tangential flow filtration to debottleneck downstream processing for therapeutic antibody production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizon-Maspat, Jemelle; Bourret, Justin; D'Agostini, Anna; Li, Feng

    2012-04-01

    As the therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb) market continues to grow, optimizing production processes is becoming more critical in improving efficiencies and reducing cost-of-goods in large-scale production. With the recent trends of increasing cell culture titers from upstream process improvements, downstream capacity has become the bottleneck in many existing manufacturing facilities. Single Pass Tangential Flow Filtration (SPTFF) is an emerging technology, which is potentially useful in debottlenecking downstream capacity, especially when the pool tank size is a limiting factor. It can be integrated as part of an existing purification process, after a column chromatography step or a filtration step, without introducing a new unit operation. In this study, SPTFF technology was systematically evaluated for reducing process intermediate volumes from 2× to 10× with multiple mAbs and the impact of SPTFF on product quality, and process yield was analyzed. Finally, the potential fit into the typical 3-column industry platform antibody purification process and its implementation in a commercial scale manufacturing facility were also evaluated. Our data indicate that using SPTFF to concentrate protein pools is a simple, flexible, and robust operation, which can be implemented at various scales to improve antibody purification process capacity. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Longitudinal distribution of Chironomidae (Diptera) downstream from a dam in a neotropical river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinha, G D; Aviz, D; Lopes Filho, D R; Petsch, D K; Marchese, M R; Takeda, A M

    2013-08-01

    The damming of a river causes dangerous consequences on structure of the environment downstream of the dam, modifying the sediment composition, which impose major adjustments in longitudinal distribution of benthic community. The construction of Engenheiro Sérgio Motta Dam in the Upper Paraná River has caused impacts on the aquatic communities, which are not yet fully known. This work aimed to provide more information about the effects of this impoundment on the structure of Chironomidae larvae assemblage. The analysis of data of physical and chemical variables in relation to biological data of 8 longitudinal sections in the Upper Paraná River showed that composition of Chironomidae larvae of stations near Engenheiro Sérgio Motta Dam differed of the other stations (farther of the Dam). The predominance of coarse sediments at stations upstream and finer sediments further downstream affected the choice of habitat by different morphotypes of Chironomidae and it caused a change in the structure of this assemblage in the longitudinal stretch.

  14. Evaluating lignocellulosic biomass, its derivatives, and downstream products with Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason S. Lupoi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The creation of fuels, chemicals, and materials from plants can aid in replacing products fabricated from non-renewable energy sources. Before using biomass in downstream applications, it must be characterized to assess chemical traits, such as cellulose, lignin, or lignin monomer content, or the sugars released following an acid or enzymatic hydrolysis. The measurement of these traits allows researchers to gauge the recalcitrance of the plants, and develop efficient deconstruction strategies to maximize yields. Standard methods for assessing biomass phenotypes often have experimental protocols that limit their use for screening sizeable numbers of plant species. Raman spectroscopy, a non-destructive, non-invasive vibrational spectroscopy technique, is capable of providing qualitative, structural information and quantitative measurements. Applications of Raman spectroscopy have aided in alleviating the constraints of standard methods by coupling spectral data with multivariate analysis to construct models capable of predicting analytes. Hydrolysis and fermentation products, such as glucose and ethanol, can be quantified off-, at-, or on-line. Raman imaging has enabled researchers to develop a visual understanding of reactions, such as different pretreatment strategies, in real time, while also providing integral chemical information. This review provides an overview of what Raman spectroscopy is, and how it has been applied to the analysis of whole lignocellulosic biomass, its derivatives, and downstream process monitoring.

  15. A reverse signaling pathway downstream of Sema4A controls cell migration via Scrib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tianliang; Yang, Lida; Kaur, Harmandeep; Pestel, Jenny; Looso, Mario; Nolte, Hendrik; Krasel, Cornelius; Heil, Daniel; Krishnan, Ramesh K; Santoni, Marie-Josée; Borg, Jean-Paul; Bünemann, Moritz; Offermanns, Stefan; Swiercz, Jakub M; Worzfeld, Thomas

    2017-01-02

    Semaphorins comprise a large family of ligands that regulate key cellular functions through their receptors, plexins. In this study, we show that the transmembrane semaphorin 4A (Sema4A) can also function as a receptor, rather than a ligand, and transduce signals triggered by the binding of Plexin-B1 through reverse signaling. Functionally, reverse Sema4A signaling regulates the migration of various cancer cells as well as dendritic cells. By combining mass spectrometry analysis with small interfering RNA screening, we identify the polarity protein Scrib as a downstream effector of Sema4A. We further show that binding of Plexin-B1 to Sema4A promotes the interaction of Sema4A with Scrib, thereby removing Scrib from its complex with the Rac/Cdc42 exchange factor βPIX and decreasing the activity of the small guanosine triphosphatase Rac1 and Cdc42. Our data unravel a role for Plexin-B1 as a ligand and Sema4A as a receptor and characterize a reverse signaling pathway downstream of Sema4A, which controls cell migration. © 2017 Sun et al.

  16. Rhizosecretion improves the production of Cyanovirin-N in Nicotiana tabacum through simplified downstream processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, Luisa M; Szeto, Tim H; Ma, Julian K-C; Drake, Pascal M W

    2016-07-01

    Rhizosecretion has many advantages for the production of recombinant pharmaceuticals, notably facile downstream processing from hydroponic medium. The aim of this study was to increase yields of the HIV microbicide candidate, Cyanovirin-N (CV-N), obtained using this production platform and to develop a simplified methodology for its downstream processing from hydroponic medium. Placing hydroponic cultures on an orbital shaker more than doubled the concentration of CV-N in the hydroponic medium compared to plants which remained stationary, reaching a maximum of approximately 20μg/ml in one week, which is more than 3 times higher than previously reported yields. The protein composition of the hydroponic medium, the rhizosecretome, was characterised in plants cultured with or without the plant growth regulator alpha-napthaleneacetic acid by LC-ESI-MS/MS, and CV-N was the most abundant protein. The issue of large volumes in the rhizosecretion system was addressed by using ion exchange chromatography to concentrate CV-N and partially remove impurities. The semi-purified CV-N was demonstrated to bind to HIV gp120 in an ELISA and to neutralise HIVBa-L with an IC50 of 6nM in a cell-based assay. Rhizosecretion is therefore a practicable and inexpensive method for the production of functional CV-N. Copyright © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Novel Strategies for Upstream and Downstream Processing of Tannin Acyl Hydrolase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis V. Rodríguez-Durán

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tannin acyl hydrolase also referred as tannase is an enzyme with important applications in several science and technology fields. Due to its hydrolytic and synthetic properties, tannase could be used to reduce the negative effects of tannins in beverages, food, feed, and tannery effluents, for the production of gallic acid from tannin-rich materials, the elucidation of tannin structure, and the synthesis of gallic acid esters in nonaqueous media. However, industrial applications of tannase are still very limited due to its high production cost. Thus, there is a growing interest in the production, recovery, and purification of this enzyme. Recently, there have been published a number of papers on the improvement of upstream and downstream processing of the enzyme. These papers dealt with the search for new tannase producing microorganisms, the application of novel fermentation systems, optimization of culture conditions, the production of the enzyme by recombinant microorganism, and the design of efficient protocols for tannase recovery and purification. The present work reviews the state of the art of basic and biotechnological aspects of tannin acyl hydrolase, focusing on the recent advances in the upstream and downstream processing of the enzyme.

  18. Effects of stream-adjacent logging in fishless headwaters on downstream coastal cutthroat trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Douglas S.; Sloat, Matthew R.; Gresswell, Robert E.; Berger, Aaron M.; Hockman-Wert, David; Leer, David W.; Skaugset, Arne E.

    2016-01-01

    To investigate effects of headwater logging on downstream coastal cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii clarkii) populations, we monitored stream habitat and biotic indicators including biomass, abundance, growth, movement, and survival over 8 years using a paired-watershed approach. Reference and logged catchments were located on private industrial forestland on ∼60-year harvest rotation. Five clearcuts (14% of the logged catchment area) were adjacent to fishless portions of the headwater streams, and contemporary regulations did not require riparian forest buffers in the treatment catchment. Logging did not have significant negative effects on downstream coastal cutthroat trout populations for the duration of the sample period. Indeed, the only statistically significant response of fish populations following logging in fishless headwaters was an increase in late-summer biomass (g·m−2) of age-1+ coastal cutthroat trout in tributaries. Ultimately, the ability to make broad generalizations concerning effects of timber harvest is difficult because response to disturbance (anthropogenically influenced or not) in aquatic systems is complex and context-dependent, but our findings provide one example of environmentally compatible commercial logging in a regenerated forest setting.

  19. Highly resolved numerical simulation of combustion downstream of a rocket engine igniter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttay, R.; Gomet, L.; Lehnasch, G.; Mura, A.

    2017-07-01

    We study ignition processes in the turbulent reactive flow established downstream of highly under-expanded coflowing jets. The corresponding configuration is typical of a rocket engine igniter, and to the best knowledge of the authors, this study is the first that documents highly resolved numerical simulations of such a reactive flowfield. Considering the discharge of axisymmetric coaxial under-expanded jets, various morphologies are expected, depending on the value of the nozzle pressure ratio, a key parameter used to classify them. The present computations are conducted with a value of this ratio set to fifteen. The simulations are performed with the massively parallel CREAMS solver on a grid featuring approximately 440,000,000 computational nodes. In the main zone of interest, the level of spatial resolution is D/74, with D the central inlet stream diameter. The computational results reveal the complex topology of the compressible flowfield. The obtained results also bring new and useful insights into the development of ignition processes. In particular, ignition is found to take place rather far downstream of the shock barrel, a conclusion that contrasts with early computational studies conducted within the unsteady RANS computational framework. Consideration of detailed chemistry confirms the essential role of hydroperoxyl radicals, while the analysis of the Takeno index reveals the predominance of a non-premixed combustion mode.

  20. Long-term hypo-osmoregulatory capacity in downstream migrating Atlantic salmon Salmo salar L. smolts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urke, H A; Arnekleiv, J V; Nilsen, T O; Nilssen, K J; Rønning, L; Ulvund, J B; Kristensen, T

    2014-10-01

    The duration of hypo-osmoregulatory capacity in downstream migrating Atlantic salmon Salmo salar L smolts previously stocked as startfed young-of-the year (YOY) parr was tested in the River Dalåa from mid-May to late-June 1999. Hypo-osmoregulatory capacity, measured as plasma osmolality and chloride, was assessed after seawater (SW) challenge tests (168 h, salinity = 35). All S. salar exhibited sufficient hypo-osmoregulatory capacity at the initiation of downstream migration in mid-May. Migrating S. salar smolts caught in mid-May and retained in fresh water displayed no signs of de-smoltification as they maintained hypo-osmoregulatory capacity through June. This indicates a physiological smolt window that lasts a minimum of 6 weeks (330 degree days; D°) for hatchery-produced S. salar smolts stocked as YOY parr. Based on the observed river migration speeds, it can be assumed that the S. salar smolts entered SW 2-4 weeks after initiation of migration in the upper parts of the River Dalåa. Hence, based on smolt migration and SW tolerance, it is suggested that stocking of YOY parr is a viable enhancement strategy in the River Dalåa. © 2014 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  1. The role of wing kinematics of freely flying birds downstream the wake of flapping wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Krishnamoorthy; Gurka, Roi

    2016-11-01

    Avian aerodynamics has been a topic of research for centuries. Avian flight features such as flapping, morphing and maneuvering make bird aerodynamics a complex system to study, analyze and understand. Aerodynamic performance of the flapping wings can be quantified by measuring the vortex structures present in the downstream wake. Still, the direct correlation between the flapping wing kinematics and the evolution of wake features need to be established. In this present study, near wake of three bird species (western sandpiper, European starling and American robin) have been measured experimentally. Long duration, time-resolved, particle image velocimetry technique has been used to capture the wake properties. Simultaneously, the bird kinematics have been captured using high speed camera. Wake structures are reconstructed from the collected PIV images for long chord distances downstream. Wake vorticities and circulation are expressed in the wake composites. Comparison of the wake features of the three birds shows similarities and some key differences are also found. Wing tip motions of the birds are extracted for four continuous wing beat cycle to analyze the wing kinematics. Kinematic parameters of all the three birds are compared to each other and similar trends exhibited by all the birds have been observed. A correlation between the wake evolutions with the wing motion is presented. It was found that the wings' motion generates unique flow patterns at the near wake, especially at the transition phases. At these locations, a drastic change in the circulation was observed.

  2. Flow structure in the downstream of a square cylinder with different angles of incidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Jamshidi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents comparisons between flow fields for turbulent flow over square cylinder with two different angles of incidence in free stream at Reynolds number of Re = 3400. The present numerical results were obtained using a two-dimensional finite-volume code which solves governing equations. The pressure field was obtained with well known SIMPLE algorithm. The central difference scheme was employed for the discretization of convection and diffusion terms. The ν2 f and standard k - ε model were used for simulation of turbulent flow. Time averaged velocity, root mean square velocities and streamlines in the downstream of square cylinders are presented. A number of quantities such as Strouhal number, drag coefficient and the length of the wake are calculated for the case of angle of incidence α = 0°, 45° with two turbulent models. Strouhal number and the length of the wake are larger for the case of α = 45° because of the sharp corners in it which results in more diffusion of turbulence in the downstream of the cylinder. On the other hand, with comparison of results obtained by ν2 f and standard k - ε models with experiment, it is obvious that ν2 f leads to much more accurate results.

  3. Human muscle fibre type-specific regulation of AMPK and downstream targets by exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Dorte Enggaard; Albers, Peter Hjorth; Prats, Clara

    2015-01-01

    are expressed in a fibre type-dependent manner and that fibre type-specific activation of AMPK and downstream targets is dependent on exercise intensity. Pools of type I and II fibres were prepared from biopsies of m. vastus lateralis from healthy men before and after two exercise trials; A) continuous cycling......AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a regulator of energy homeostasis during exercise. Studies suggest muscle fibre type-specific AMPK expression. However, fibre type-specific regulation of AMPK and downstream targets during exercise has not been proven. We hypothesized that AMPK subunits...... (CON) 30 min at 69 ± 1% VO2peak or B) interval cycling (INT) 30 min with 6 × 1.5 min high-intense bouts peaking at 95 ± 2% VO2peak . In type I vs. II fibres a higher β1 AMPK (+215%) and lower γ3 AMPK expression (-71%) was found. α1 , α2 , β2 and γ1 AMPK expression was similar between fibre types...

  4. Distinct roles for sequences upstream of and downstream from Physarum editing sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Amy C; Somerlot, Benjamin H; Parimi, Neeta; Gott, Jonatha M

    2009-09-01

    RNAs in the mitochondria of Physarum polycephalum contain nonencoded nucleotides that are added during RNA synthesis. Essentially all steady-state RNAs are accurately and fully edited, yet the signals guiding these precise nucleotide insertions are presently unknown. To localize the regions of the template that are required for editing, we constructed a series of chimeric templates that substitute varying amounts of DNA either upstream of or downstream from C insertion sites. Remarkably, all sequences necessary for C addition are contained within approximately 9 base pairs on either side of the insertion site. In addition, our data strongly suggest that sequences within this critical region affect different steps in the editing reaction. Template alterations upstream of an editing site influence nucleotide selection and/or insertion, while downstream changes affect editing site recognition and templated extension from the added, unpaired nucleotide. The data presented here provide the first evidence that individual regions of the DNA template play discrete mechanistic roles and represent a crucial initial step toward defining the source of the editing specificity in Physarum mitochondria. In addition, these findings have mechanistic implications regarding the potential involvement of the mitochondrial RNA polymerase in the editing reaction.

  5. Trehalose-6-phosphate synthesis controls yeast gluconeogenesis downstream and independent of SNF1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deroover, Sofie; Ghillebert, Ruben; Broeckx, Tom; Winderickx, Joris; Rolland, Filip

    2016-06-01

    Trehalose-6-P (T6P), an intermediate of trehalose biosynthesis, was identified as an important regulator of yeast sugar metabolism and signaling. tps1Δ mutants, deficient in T6P synthesis (TPS), are unable to grow on rapidly fermentable medium with uncontrolled influx in glycolysis, depletion of ATP and accumulation of sugar phosphates. However, the exact molecular mechanisms involved are not fully understood. We show that SNF1 deletion restores the tps1Δ growth defect on glucose, suggesting that lack of TPS hampers inactivation of SNF1 or SNF1-regulated processes. In addition to alternative, non-fermentable carbon metabolism, SNF1 controls two major processes: respiration and gluconeogenesis. The tps1Δ defect appears to be specifically associated with deficient inhibition of gluconeogenesis, indicating more downstream effects. Consistently, Snf1 dephosphorylation and inactivation on glucose medium are not affected, as confirmed with an in vivo Snf1 activity reporter. Detailed analysis shows that gluconeogenic Pck1 and Fbp1 expression, protein levels and activity are not repressed upon glucose addition to tps1Δ cells, suggesting a link between the metabolic defect and persistent gluconeogenesis. While SNF1 is essential for induction of gluconeogenesis, T6P/TPS is required for inactivation of gluconeogenesis in the presence of glucose, downstream and independent of SNF1 activity and the Cat8 and Sip4 transcription factors. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Comparison of Flow Structures in the Downstream Region of a Cylinder with Flexible Strip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekşin, Süleyman; Yayla, Sedat

    2015-05-01

    The present study investigates the details of flow structure to downstream of a circular cylinder mounted on a flat surface, in successive plan-view plane both in the boundary layer and up level region. The behavior of the flow in the wake of the bare cylinder and attached a flexible strip which has a 1400 N/mm2 modulus of elasticity vinyl PVC transperent film. The length of strip 240 mm (L/D=4) is investigated using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique for Reynolds numbers based on the cylinder diameter of 2500. The flow data downstream of the cylinder are presented using time-averaged velocity vector map, Vavg, streamline patterns, ψavg, vorticity contours, ωavg, and Reynolds stress correlations, u'u' avg, v'v' avg, u'v' avg and rms velocity values. The locations of the peak values of Reynolds stress correlations and other data are also presented in both bare cylinder and attached body in order to determine the regions under high fluctuations. Another L/D ratios will be investigated in other experiments.

  7. Evaluating lignocellulosic biomass, its derivatives, and downstream products with Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupoi, Jason S; Gjersing, Erica; Davis, Mark F

    2015-01-01

    The creation of fuels, chemicals, and materials from plants can aid in replacing products fabricated from non-renewable energy sources. Before using biomass in downstream applications, it must be characterized to assess chemical traits, such as cellulose, lignin, or lignin monomer content, or the sugars released following an acid or enzymatic hydrolysis. The measurement of these traits allows researchers to gage the recalcitrance of the plants and develop efficient deconstruction strategies to maximize yields. Standard methods for assessing biomass phenotypes often have experimental protocols that limit their use for screening sizeable numbers of plant species. Raman spectroscopy, a non-destructive, non-invasive vibrational spectroscopy technique, is capable of providing qualitative, structural information and quantitative measurements. Applications of Raman spectroscopy have aided in alleviating the constraints of standard methods by coupling spectral data with multivariate analysis to construct models capable of predicting analytes. Hydrolysis and fermentation products, such as glucose and ethanol, can be quantified off-, at-, or on-line. Raman imaging has enabled researchers to develop a visual understanding of reactions, such as different pretreatment strategies, in real-time, while also providing integral chemical information. This review provides an overview of what Raman spectroscopy is, and how it has been applied to the analysis of whole lignocellulosic biomass, its derivatives, and downstream process monitoring.

  8. Tryptophan Metabolism Along the Kynurenine Pathway Downstream of Toll-like Receptor Stimulation in Peripheral Monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, F; Bhat, M; Sandberg, K; Ståhl, S; Piehl, F; Svensson, C; Erhardt, S; Schwieler, L

    2016-11-01

    Tryptophan degradation along the kynurenine pathway is of central importance for the immune function. Toll-like receptors (TLRs), representing the first line of immune defence against pathogens, are expressed in various cell types. The most abundant expression is found on monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells. The aim of this study was to investigate whether stimulation with different TLR ligands induces the kynurenine pathway in human peripheral monocytes. Cell supernatants were analysed using a liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry to measure kynurenine, kynurenic acid (KYNA), quinolinic acid (QUIN) and tryptophan. Stimulation of TLR-2, TLR-3, TLR-4, TLR-7/8 and TLR-9 was found to induce the production of kynurenine, but only stimulation of TLR-3 increased levels of further downstream metabolites, such as KYNA and QUIN. Stimulation of TLR-1, TLR-5 and TLR-6 did not induce the kynurenine pathway. Taken together, this study provides novel evidence demonstrating that TLR activation induces a pattern of downstream tryptophan degradation along the kynurenine pathway in monocytes. The results of this study may implicate that TLRs can be used as new drug targets for the regulation of aberrant tryptophan metabolism along this pathway, a potential therapeutic strategy that may be of importance in several disorders. © 2016 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  9. Channel erosion in a rapidly urbanizing region of Tijuana, Mexico: Enlargement downstream of channel hardpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Kristine; Biggs, Trent; Langendoen, Eddy; Castillo, Carlos; Gudiño, Napoleon; Yuan, Yongping; Liden, Douglas

    2016-04-01

    Urban-induced erosion in Tijuana, Mexico, has led to excessive sediment deposition in the Tijuana Estuary in the United States. Urban areas in developing countries, in contrast to developed countries, are characterized by much lower proportions of vegetation and impervious surfaces due to limited access to urban services such as road paving and landscaping, and larger proportions of exposed soils. In developing countries, traditional watershed scale variables such as impervious surfaces may not be good predictors of channel enlargement. In this research, we surveyed the stream channel network of an erodible tributary of the Tijuana River Watershed, Los Laureles Canyon, at 125 locations, including repeat surveys from 2008. Structure from Motion (SfM) and 3D photo-reconstruction techniques were used to create digital terrain models of stream reaches upstream and downstream of channel hardpoints. Channels are unstable downstream of hardpoints, with incision up to 2 meters and widening up to 12 meters. Coordinated channelization is essential to avoid piece-meal approaches that lead to channel degradation. Watershed impervious area is not a good predictor of channel erosion due to the overriding importance of hardpoints and likely to the high sediment supply from the unpaved roads which prevents channel erosion throughout the stream network.

  10. Pharmacological therapeutics targeting the secondary defects and downstream pathology of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinazzola, Janelle M.; Kunkel, Louis M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Since the identification of the dystrophin gene in 1986, a cure for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) has yet to be discovered. Presently, there are a number of genetic-based therapies in development aimed at restoration and/or repair of the primary defect. However, growing understanding of the pathophysiological consequences of dystrophin absence has revealed several promising downstream targets for the development of therapeutics. Areas covered In this review, we discuss various strategies for DMD therapy targeting downstream consequences of dystrophin absence including loss of muscle mass, inflammation, fibrosis, calcium overload, oxidative stress, and ischemia. The rationale of each approach and the efficacy of drugs in preclinical and clinical studies are discussed. Expert opinion For the last 30 years, effective DMD drug therapy has been limited to corticosteroids, which are associated with a number of negative side effects. Our knowledge of the consequences of dystrophin absence that contribute to DMD pathology has revealed several potential therapeutic targets. Some of these approaches may have potential to improve or slow disease progression independently or in combination with genetic-based approaches. The applicability of these pharmacological therapies to DMD patients irrespective of their genetic mutation, as well as the potential benefits even for advanced stage patients warrants their continued investigation. PMID:28670506

  11. Discovery and characterization of novel vascular and hematopoietic genes downstream of etsrp in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo A Gomez

    Full Text Available The transcription factor Etsrp is required for vasculogenesis and primitive myelopoiesis in zebrafish. When ectopically expressed, etsrp is sufficient to induce the expression of many vascular and myeloid genes in zebrafish. The mammalian homolog of etsrp, ER71/Etv2, is also essential for vascular and hematopoietic development. To identify genes downstream of etsrp, gain-of-function experiments were performed for etsrp in zebrafish embryos followed by transcription profile analysis by microarray. Subsequent in vivo expression studies resulted in the identification of fourteen genes with blood and/or vascular expression, six of these being completely novel. Regulation of these genes by etsrp was confirmed by ectopic induction in etsrp overexpressing embryos and decreased expression in etsrp deficient embryos. Additional functional analysis of two newly discovered genes, hapln1b and sh3gl3, demonstrates their importance in embryonic vascular development. The results described here identify a group of genes downstream of etsrp likely to be critical for vascular and/or myeloid development.

  12. Estimating the wake deflection downstream of a wind turbine in different atmospheric stabilities: an LES study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Vollmer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An intentional yaw misalignment of wind turbines is currently discussed as one possibility to increase the overall energy yield of wind farms. The idea behind this control is to decrease wake losses of downstream turbines by altering the wake trajectory of the controlled upwind turbines. For an application of such an operational control, precise knowledge about the inflow wind conditions, the magnitude of wake deflection by a yawed turbine and the propagation of the wake is crucial. The dependency of the wake deflection on the ambient wind conditions as well as the uncertainty of its trajectory are not sufficiently covered in current wind farm control models. In this study we analyze multiple sources that contribute to the uncertainty of the estimation of the wake deflection downstream of yawed wind turbines in different ambient wind conditions. We find that the wake shapes and the magnitude of deflection differ in the three evaluated atmospheric boundary layers of neutral, stable and unstable thermal stability. Uncertainty in the wake deflection estimation increases for smaller temporal averaging intervals. We also consider the choice of the method to define the wake center as a source of uncertainty as it modifies the result. The variance of the wake deflection estimation increases with decreasing atmospheric stability. Control of the wake position in a highly convective environment is therefore not recommended.

  13. Influence of Copper Ore Comminution in HPGR on Downstream Minerallurgical Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saramak D.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Crushing processes taking place in high-pressure grinding rolls devices (HPGR are currently one of the most efficient methods of hard ore size reduction in terms of the energy consumption. The HPGR products are characterized by a fine particle size and the micro-cracks formation in individual particles, which appears in downstream grinding processes, decreasing their energy consumption. The purpose of the paper was to analyze the effectiveness of a ball mill grinding process and flotation operations depending on the changeable conditions of run of the HPGR crushing process. The research programme carried out included crushing tests in the laboratory scale HPGR device at various settings of the operating pressure volume and selected qualitative properties of the feed material (i.e. particle size distribution. On the basis of obtained results the models, defining the grinding process effectiveness as a function of changeable conditions of HPGR process run, were determined. Based on these models the optimal grinding time in a ball mill was specified which is, in turn, the basis for optimization of operation the technological comminution circuits for a given material type. The obtained results proved that the application of HPGR devices in given copper ore comminution circuit may improve the effectiveness of downstream grinding process what leads to improvement of the entire circuit work efficiency through decreasing the process energy consumption and enhancing the product size reduction.

  14. Energy Policy Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Energy Policy Act (EPA) addresses energy production in the United States, including: (1) energy efficiency; (2) renewable energy; (3) oil and gas; (4) coal; (5)...

  15. Clean Water Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Clean Water Act (CWA) establishes the basic structure for regulating discharges of pollutants into U.S. waters and regulating quality standards for surface...

  16. Affordable Care Act (ACA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Affordable Care Act (ACA) is a federal statute enacted with a goal of increasing the quality and affordability of health insurance. Through a web service, CMS...

  17. Endangered Species Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) is to protect and recover imperiled species and the ecosystems upon which they depend. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife...

  18. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CYSTIC FIBROSIS Learn about cystic fibrosis, a genetic lung disorder that affects the pancreas and other organs, ... Clearance Techniques (ACTs) Autogenic Drainage (AD) Basics of Lung Care Chest Physical Therapy Coughing and Huffing High- ...

  19. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... resources you need to continuously build upon this work. Awards and Grants Career Development Awards Research Awards ... The Preserving Employee Wellness Programs Act Our Advocacy Work Advocacy Achievements Advocacy News Briefings, Testimonies, and Regulatory ...

  20. Abandoned Shipwreck Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Abandoned Shipwreck Act of 1987 (ASA) affirms the authority of state governments to claim ownership to, protect, and manage abandoned shipwrecks on state...

  1. Act250 Permits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The dataset includes the geographic location for Act 250 permits issued since the inception of the law in 1970. Base permit numbers only are included; permit...

  2. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Team Your cystic fibrosis care team includes a group of CF health care professionals who partner with ... Airway Clearance Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs) There are different ways to clear your airways. Most are easy ...

  3. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Twitter YouTube Instagram Email DONATE Breadcrumb Navigation Home Life With CF Treatments and Therapies Airway Clearance Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs) There are different ways to clear your airways. Most are easy to ...

  4. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Airway Clearance Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs) There are different ways to clear your airways. Most are easy ... to loosen mucus from airway walls. See how different airway clearance techniques work to help you clear ...

  5. DREAM Act, Part II

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miranda, María Eugenia

    2011-01-01

    .... For nearly a decade Congress has failed to pass a bill - the Development Relief and Education for Alien Minors Act - that would grant AJulema legal residence and free her from a life in the shadows...

  6. Clean Water Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data represent geographic terms used within the Clean Water Act (CWA). The CWA establishes the basic structure for regulating the addition of pollutants...

  7. ACT250 Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The ACT 250 Districts layer is part of a larger dataset that contains administrative boundaries for Vermont's Agency of Natural Resources. The dataset includes...

  8. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What to Consider Regarding a Lung Transplant Medications Antibiotics Bronchodilators Mucus Thinners Nebulizer Care at Home Vascular ... that help thin and move the mucus, and antibiotics. Bronchodilators should be inhaled before you start ACTs. ...

  9. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an eCard Submit Your Artwork Honor a Loved One Create a Tribute Page Find a Tribute Page ... to try. However, the best ACT is the one that you are most likely to perform as ...

  10. Acts of Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelund, Sidsel

    described as knowledge producers and exhibitions and art works as instances of knowledge production. Acts of Research: Knowledge Production in Contemporary Arts between Knowledge Economy and Critical Practices analyses this development. The academic discussion of knowledge production in the arts has taken...... place mostly in seminars and articles, in which knowledge is often discussed as an intrinsic quality of the artwork. Acts of Research, however, is devoted to studying the rise of knowledge production in contemporary art from the perspective of artistic, curatorial and educational research...... with an awareness of larger political, economic, geographical and art-related aspects. The concept of ‘acts of research’ is suggested as a way to understand knowledge production as a creative act in which research carried out in relation to a specific material challenges and resists the protocols of conventional...

  11. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NACFC Carolyn and C. Richard Mattingly Leadership in Mental Health Care Award Mary M. Kontos Award NACFC ... you clear the thick, sticky mucus from your lungs. ACTs are often used with other treatments, including ...

  12. Marine Pollution Prevention Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Pollution Prevention Act of 2008 implements the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, including related Protocols (MARPOL)...

  13. National Environmental Policy Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) was the first major environmental law in the United States and established national environmental policies for the...

  14. The Impact of Impoundment on Mercury Bioaccumulation in Fish Downstream from a Newly Constructed Reservoir, Wujiang River, Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sixin; Zhou, Lianfeng; Chang, Jianbo; Yang, Zhi; Hu, Juxiang; Hongjun, Wang

    2017-11-01

    Mercury concentrations in fish were investigated downstream from a newly impounded subtropical reservoir in August 2008. After 6-7 months of reservoir impoundment, mean mercury concentration in fish from downstream is significantly increased by 1.9 times. Not only carnivorous fish but also benthic fish had significantly higher total mercury concentrations than others. No significant correlation was found between total mercury concentrations and body length or weight of 13 fish species. Compared with the pre-impoundment, total mercury in fish from downstream is significantly increased by reservoir impoundment, but the increased rate is lower than those in subarctic and temperate areas. Fish samples surpassed the Chinese hygienic standard for tolerances of mercury in foods increased by 4.3%. More attention should be given to fish mercury levels from downstream sites to prevent possible adverse effects on the health of local people.

  15. MASH test 3-37 of the TxDOT 31-inch W-beam downstream anchor terminal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a suitable replacement for the downstream turndown : guardrail anchor system. The turndown guardrail anchor system does not meet mandated test requirements : under MASH for upstream anchor applic...

  16. Draft Scientific Report Connectivity of Streams and Wetlands to Downstream Waters: A Review and Synthesis of the Scientific Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synthesizes peer-reviewed scientific literature on the biological, chemical, and hydrologic connectivity of waters and the effects that small streams, wetlands, and open waters have on larger downstream waters such as rivers, lakes, estuaries, and oceans.

  17. Integrated Optimization of Upstream and Downstream Processing in Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing under Uncertainty: A Chance Constrained Programming Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, S.; Farid, S. S.; Papageorgiou, L. G.

    2016-01-01

    This work addresses the integrated optimization of upstream and downstream processing strategies of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) under uncertainty. In the upstream processing (USP), the bioreactor sizing strategies are optimized, while in the downstream processing (DSP), the chromatography sequencing and column sizing strategies, including the resin at each chromatography step, the number of columns, the column diameter and bed height, and the number of cycles per batch, are determined. Meanwh...

  18. Effects of three high-flow experiments on the Colorado River ecosystem downstream from Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Theodore S.

    2011-01-01

    Three high-flow experiments (HFEs) were conducted by the U.S. Department of the Interior at Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona, in March 1996, November 2004, and March 2008. These experiments, also known as artificial or controlled floods, were large-volume, scheduled releases of water from Glen Canyon Dam that were designed to mimic some aspects of pre-dam Colorado River seasonal flooding. The goal of these experiments was to determine whether high flows could be used to benefit important physical and biological resources in Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Grand Canyon National Park that had been affected by the operation of Glen Canyon Dam. Efforts such as HFEs that seek to maintain and restore downstream resources are undertaken by the U.S. Department of the Interior under the auspices of the Grand Canyon Protection Act of 1992 (GCPA; title XVIII, secs. 1801-1809, of Public Law 102-575). Scientists conducted a wide range of monitoring and research activities before, during, and after the experiments. Initially, research efforts focused on whether HFEs could be used to rebuild and maintain Grand Canyon sandbars, which provide camping beaches for hikers and whitewater rafters, create habitats potentially used by native fish and other wildlife, and are the source of windborne sand that may help to protect some archaeological resources from weathering and erosion. As scientists gained a better understanding of how HFEs affect the physical environment, research efforts expanded to include additional investigations about the effects of HFEs on biological resources, such as native fishes, nonnative sports fishes, riverside vegetation, and the aquatic food web. The chapters that follow summarize and synthesize for decisionmakers and the public what has been learned about HFEs to provide a framework for implementing similar future experiments. This report is a product of the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program (GCDAMP), a Federal initiative authorized to ensure

  19. Downstream changes in spring-fed stream invertebrate communities: the effect of increased temperature range?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell G. DEATH

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Reduced thermal amplitude has been highlighted as a limiting factor for aquatic invertebrate diversity in springs. Moving downstream water temperature range increases and invertebrate richness is expected to change accordingly. In the present study temperature patterns were investigated in seven spring-fed streams, between April 2001 and November 2002, and compared to five run-off-fed streams to assess the degree of crenic temperature constancy. Temperature and physico-chemical characteristics of the water, and food resource levels were measured, and the invertebrate fauna collected at 4 distances (0, 100, 500 m and 1 km from seven springs in the North and South Islands of New Zealand. Temperature variability was greater for run-off-fed streams than for springs, and increased in the spring-fed streams with distance from the source. Periphyton and physico-chemical characteristics of the water did not change markedly over the 1 km studied, with the exception of water velocity and organic matter biomass, which increased and decreased, respectively. The rate of increase in temperature amplitude differed greatly for the studied springs, probably being affected by flow, altitude, and the number and type of tributaries (i.e., spring- or run-off-fed joining the spring-fed stream channel. Longitudinal changes in the number and evenness of invertebrate taxa were positively correlated to thermal amplitude (rs = 0.8. Moving downstream, invertebrate communities progressively incorporated taxa with higher mobility and taxa more common in nearby run-off-fed streams. Chironomids and non-insect taxa were denser at the sources. Chironomid larvae also numerically dominated communities 100 and 500 m downstream from the sources, together with Pycnocentria spp. and Zelolessica spp., while taxa such as Hydora sp. and Hydraenidae beetles, the mayflies Deleatidium spp. and Coloburiscus humeralis, and the Trichoptera Pycnocentrodes spp., all had greater abundances 1 km

  20. Overview of the North Atlantic Waveguide and Downstream Impact Experiment (NAWDEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfler, Andreas; Craig, George; Ament, Felix; Arbogast, Philippe; Crewell, Susanne; Doyle, James D.; Hirsch, Lutz; Mayer, Bernhard; McTaggart-Cowan, Ron; Methven, John; Rahm, Stephan; Reitebuch, Oliver; Rivière, Gwendal; Vaughan, Geraint; Wendisch, Manfred; Wernli, Heini; Wirth, Martin; Witschas, Benjamin

    2017-04-01

    The North Atlantic Waveguide and Downstream Impact Experiment (NAWDEX) was a highly successful field campaign conducted from 19 September to 18 October 2016. The main aims of NAWDEX are to increase the physical understanding and to quantify the effects of diabatic processes on jet stream disturbances and their consequences for downstream predictability and high-impact weather in the mid-latitudes. One of the crucial processes for the correct prediction of the mid-latitude circulation is the release of latent heat in clouds that are driven by large-scale motions in extratropical cyclones. A focus will be put on early research highlights with a demonstration of the unique capability of the suite of instruments deployed during NAWDEX to observe mid-latitude cloud systems. We present the favorable general synoptic situation during the campaign period that was characterized by a series of deep low pressure systems that continuously moved towards Iceland. NAWDEX was an international field experiment involving scientists from Europe and North America performing airborne observations onboard four research aircraft (German HALO and Falcon, French Falcon, UK BAE-146) over the North Atlantic and Europe. We will give an overview on the observations of water vapor, temperature, wind, clouds and precipitation in numerous jet stream disturbances featuring active diabatic processes. The research aircraft HALO and Falcon used a state-of-the-art remote sensing payload that was deployed to perform observations for the NAWDEX aims and to support the preparation of the future satellite missions ADM-Aeolus and EarthCARE. The aircraft coordination and the support by ground-based observations allowed a unique data set to be obtained, containing a number of observational highlights. The aircraft operated from Iceland over the air traffic-dense North Atlantic in situations with limited predictability, which required focused forecasting and flight planning strategies. For the first time

  1. Predation on juvenile pacific salmon oncorhynchus spp. in downstream migrant traps in prairie creek, california

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, W.G.; Bjorkstedt, E.P.; Ellings, C.S.

    2011-01-01

    Downstream migrant traps are a widely applied fishery management tool for sampling anadromous Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus spp. and steelhead O. mykiss smolts along theWest Coast of North America and elsewhere, yet predation on juvenile salmonids in traps has not been studied quantitatively.We assessed the frequency of occurrence and abundance of juvenile salmonids in the stomachs of coastal cutthroat trout O. clarkii clarkii, coho salmon O. kisutch, steelhead, and prickly sculpin Cottus asper (>70 mm fork length) captured in traps and in nearby stream habitats. All four predator species took juvenile salmonids with much greater frequency in traps than in stream habitats. Among free-swimming predators, only coastal cutthroat trout were observed with salmonid fry in their stomachs, but they took fewer salmonid prey and appeared to rely more heavily on insect prey than did coastal cutthroat trout captured in traps. Predators consumed up to 25% of the available prey over a broad range of prey abundances. Over the course of the study, predators consumed 2.5% of all salmonid fry captured in traps, but this fraction ranged from less than 1% to more than 10% in any given year. The number of prey taken in traps increased with predator length and with prey abundance in traps, and predation in traps peaked during the period of most intense downstream migration by salmon fry. In contrast, live-box design and trap location had little or no effect on the total number of prey taken by individual predators.We estimated that the predation mortality of juvenile salmon increased by 0.5-1.0% due to in-trap predation (i.e., a 9-10% relative increase over natural predation rates). We found no evidence that predators selected for prey on the basis of species. These results should motivate additional research on methods that reduce or eliminate predation in trap live-boxes and protocols for efficiently measuring predation associated with the trapping of downstream migrants. ?? American

  2. Polar View Snow Service- Operational Snow Cover Mapping for Downstream Runoff Modeling and Hydropower Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Heike; Appel, Florian; Rust, Felix; Mauser, Wolfram

    2010-12-01

    Information on snow cover and snow properties are important for hydrology and runoff modelling. Frequent updates of snow cover observation, especially for areas characterized by short-term snow dynamics, can help to improve water balance and discharge calculations. Within the GMES service element Polar View, VISTA offers a snow mapping service for Central Europe since several years [1, 2]. We outline the use of this near-real- time product for hydrological applications in Alpine environment. In particular we discuss the integration of the Polar View product into a physically based hydrological model (PROMET). This allows not only the provision of snow equivalent values, but also enhances river runoff modelling and its use in hydropower energy yield prediction. The GMES snow products of Polar View are thus used in a downstream service for water resources management, providing information services for renewable energy suppliers and energy traders.

  3. Trends in the biomanufacture of polyhydroxyalkanoates with focus on downstream processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosseva, Maria R; Rusbandi, Edy

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the current review is to analyze trends in development of an efficient technology for polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) biomanufacture highlighting the up-to-date progress on PHA biosynthesis and focusing on the downstream processing. Three main production pathways were identified: through microbial, enzymic, or plant routes. Microbial fermentation processes were predominant, with a wide range of microorganisms, starting materials and culture conditions reported. Largely, two schemes for recovering PHAs from the reaction medium post fermentation were identified: dissolving biomass to separate PHAs granules with strong oxidants, and extracting PHAs directly from the biomass using suitable solvents. For the valuable industrial scale biosynthesis of PHA several technological elements need to be applied such as robust whole-cell microbial catalyst with its optimal culturing conditions, suitable carbon source, proper mode of process operation, as well as economical and ecological purification methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Targeting Protein Kinase C Downstream of Growth Factor and Adhesion Signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catríona M. Dowling

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The signaling outputs of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases, G-protein coupled receptors and integrins converge to mediate key cell process such as cell adhesion, cell migration, cell invasion and cell proliferation. Once activated by their ligands, these cell surface proteins recruit and direct a diverse range of proteins to disseminate the appropriate response downstream of the specific environmental cues. One of the key groups of proteins required to regulate these activities is the family of serine/threonine intracellular kinases called Protein Kinase Cs. The activity and subcellular location of PKCs are mediated by a series of tightly regulated events and is dependent on several posttranslational modifications and the availability of second messengers. Protein Kinase Cs exhibit both pro- and anti-tumorigenic effects making them an interesting target for anti-cancer treatment.

  5. Development of suitable solvent system for downstream processing of biopolymer pullulan using response surface methodology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirban Roy Choudhury

    Full Text Available Downstream processing is an important aspect of all biotechnological processes and has significant implications on quality and yield of the final product. Several solvents were examined for their efficacy on pullulan precipitation from fermentation broth. Interactions among four selected solvents and their effect on pullulan yield were studied using response surface methodology. A polynomial model was developed using D-optimal design and three contour plots were generated by performing 20 different experiments and the model was validated by performing optimization experiments. The results indicated that lower concentration of ethanol in combination with the other three solvents has resulted in higher yield of polymer from fermentation broth and the optimized solvent system was able to recover 1.44 times more pullulan as compared to the conventional ethanolic precipitation method. These observations may help in enhancing efficiency of pullulan recovery from fermentation broth and also result in reduced cost of production for the final product.

  6. Assessing geomorphic change along the Trinity River downstream from Lewiston Dam, California, 1980-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Jennifer A.; Wright, Scott A.; Minear, Justin T.; Flint, Lorraine E.

    2015-01-01

    The Trinity River Restoration Program, one of the nation’s largest adaptively managed river restoration programs, requires periodic assessment to determine the effectiveness of management actions in restoring channel dynamics and habitat features. This study documents riparian and channel changes along an intensively managed 65-kilometer reach of the Trinity River in California, downstream from Lewiston Dam. The two primary periods of interest, from 1980 to 2001 and from 2001 to 2011, are separated by a shift in restoration activities mandated by the U.S. Department of the Interior December 2000 Record of Decision. The post-2001 restoration strategy increased managed-flow releases, gravel augmentation, watershed restoration, and mechanical channel rehabilitation.

  7. Myosin II governs collective cell migration behaviour downstream of guidance receptor signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combedazou, Anne; Choesmel-Cadamuro, Valérie; Gay, Guillaume; Liu, Jiaying; Dupré, Loïc; Ramel, Damien; Wang, Xiaobo

    2017-01-01

    Border cell migration during Drosophila oogenesis is a potent model to study collective cell migration, a process involved in development and metastasis. Border cell clusters adopt two main types of behaviour during migration: linear and rotational. However, the molecular mechanism controlling the switch from one to the other is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that non-muscle Myosin II (NMII, also known as Spaghetti squash) activity controls the linear-to-rotational switch. Furthermore, we show that the regulation of NMII takes place downstream of guidance receptor signalling and is critical to ensure efficient collective migration. This study thus provides new insight into the molecular mechanism coordinating the different cell behaviours in a migrating cluster. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Trading in the downstream European gas market. A successive oligopoly approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boots, M.G. [ECN Policy Studies, Petten (Netherlands); Rijkers, F.A.M. [Office of Energy Regulation DTe, Den Haag (Netherlands); Hobbs, B.F. [Whiting School of Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2005-01-01

    A model of successive oligopoly is applied to the European natural gas market. The model has a two-level structure, in which Cournot producers are also Stackelberg leaders with respect to traders, who may be Cournot oligopolists or price takers. Several conclusions emerge. First, successive oligopoly (''double marginalization'') yields higher prices and lower consumer welfare than if oligopoly exists only on one level. Second, due to the high concentration of traders, prices are distorted more by market power in trading than in production. Third, trader profits depend on whether producers can price discriminate among consuming sectors; if so, producers collect a greater share of the profits. Finally, when traders increase in number, prices approach competitive levels. Thus, it is important to prevent concentration in the downstream gas market. If oligopolistic trading cannot be prevented, vertical integration should not be discouraged, especially if it would increase the number of traders.

  9. Wastewater from the manufacture of rubber vulcanization accelerators: characterization, downstream monitoring and chemical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, A; Ormad, P; Roche, P; Sarasa, J; Gimeno, E; Ovelleiro, J L

    1996-05-10

    The content of wastewater resulting from the manufacture of rubber antioxidants and accelerators by a factory situated in the Ebro basin (Spain) has been determined using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID). The change in the pollutants was studied in the riverbed via two modules which continuously gathered pollutants on various solid supports (activated carbon and XAD-2 resins). These modules were located in Bocal Station, lying a further 100 km downstream from the factory, and from the Zaragoza water supply. Forty-six different compounds were identified at Bocal Station, the majority resulting from the production of rubber additives. Due to the immunity of different waste substances, and to the toxic nature of some, we studied their reaction when subjected to techniques of chemical oxidation using ozone.

  10. Corporate Governance and Human Resource Management in Nigeria’s Downstream Petroleum Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyewunmi Olabode A.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of a ‘new world economy’ makes it imperative for corporate entities to adjust their corporate values, practices and internal processes. This paper explored the interrelatedness of selected corporate governance practices and human resource management outcomes. The paper relied on established corporate management theories as a platform for empirical consideration of selected issues relative to four established players in Nigeria’s downstream petroleum sector. A descriptive method was adopted and data was collected via a survey of 112 respondents. Contextual arguments were captured to achieve a robust appreciation of issues affecting individual participation and operations of corporate entities. The study found that there is a significant relationship between corporate governance practices and human resource management outcomes. Requisite conclusions and recommendations were provided in the light of empirical and theoretical findings.

  11. Targeting Protein Kinase C Downstream of Growth Factor and Adhesion Signalling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowling, Catríona M., E-mail: Catriona.Dowling@ul.ie; Kiely, Patrick A., E-mail: Catriona.Dowling@ul.ie [Department of Life Sciences, Materials and Surface Science Institute and Stokes Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick 78666 (Ireland); Health Research Institute (HRI), University of Limerick, Limerick 78666 (Ireland)

    2015-07-15

    The signaling outputs of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases, G-protein coupled receptors and integrins converge to mediate key cell process such as cell adhesion, cell migration, cell invasion and cell proliferation. Once activated by their ligands, these cell surface proteins recruit and direct a diverse range of proteins to disseminate the appropriate response downstream of the specific environmental cues. One of the key groups of proteins required to regulate these activities is the family of serine/threonine intracellular kinases called Protein Kinase Cs. The activity and subcellular location of PKCs are mediated by a series of tightly regulated events and is dependent on several posttranslational modifications and the availability of second messengers. Protein Kinase Cs exhibit both pro- and anti-tumorigenic effects making them an interesting target for anti-cancer treatment.

  12. Overtesting and the Downstream Consequences of Overtreatment: Implications of "Preventing Overdiagnosis" for Emergency Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Christopher R; Raja, Ali S; Brown, Michael D

    2015-12-01

    Overtesting, the downstream consequences of overdiagnosis, and overtreatment of some patients are topics of growing debate within emergency medicine (EM). The "Preventing Overdiagnosis" conference, hosted by The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, with sponsorship from consumer organizations, medical journals, and academic institutions, is evidence of an expanding interest in this topic. However, EM represents a compellingly unique environment, with increased decision density tied to high stakes for patients and providers with missed or delayed diagnoses in a professional atmosphere that does not tolerate mistakes. This article reviews the relevance of this reductionist paradigm to EM, provides a first-hand synopsis of the first "Preventing Overdiagnosis" conference, and assesses barriers to moving the concept of less test ordering to reality. © 2015 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  13. Downstream and seasonal changes of lithium isotope ratios in the Ganges-Brahmaputra river system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaka, Takuya; Araoka, Daisuke; Yoshimura, Toshihiro; Hossain, H. M. Zakir; Nishio, Yoshiro; Suzuki, Atsushi; Kawahata, Hodaka

    2017-08-01

    The Li isotope ratio (δ7Li) is expected to be a useful tracer of silicate weathering in river and groundwater systems, which is an important contributor to the seawater compositional changes that accompany the evolution of the Earth's surface environment. To obtain accurate estimates of continental Li fluxes to the ocean, we determined δ7Li values of dissolved Li in the lower Ganges-Brahmaputra river system in both the dry and rainy seasons, and in deep groundwater in the Bengal basin. Dissolved Li and δ7Li values in the lower reaches of the rivers (0.04-0.66 µmol kg-1 and +19.1‰ to +34.2‰, respectively) were predominantly derived from silicate weathering, as is the case in the upper parts of these rivers. We observed large changes in δ7Li over a distance of more than 1000 km downstream that were due mainly to Rayleigh-type removal of Li from river water. Extremely high Li concentrations (1.15-1.67 µmol kg-1) and low δ7Li values (+5.1‰ to +11.6‰) in groundwater samples indicate congruent isotope leaching and dissolution of silicate minerals in the deep aquifer, where the water residence time is long. In the rainy season, Li concentrations and δ7Li values were lower than in the dry season, owing to the shorter residence time of river water and the substantial input of local subsurface flow through lowland alluvium. These results suggest that accurate estimation of continental Li fluxes to the ocean should take account of downstream and seasonal changes, as well as aquifer depth variations, in δ7Li values.

  14. Use of bone scan during initial prostate cancer workup, downstream procedures, and associated Medicare costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falchook, Aaron D; Salloum, Ramzi G; Hendrix, Laura H; Chen, Ronald C

    2014-06-01

    For patients with a high likelihood of having metastatic disease (high-risk prostate cancer), bone scan is the standard, guideline-recommended test to look for bony metastasis. We quantified the use of bone scans and downstream procedures, along with associated costs, in patients with high-risk prostate cancer, and their use in low- and intermediate-risk patients for whom these tests are not recommended. Patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database diagnosed with prostate cancer from 2004 to 2007 were included. Prostate specific antigen (PSA), Gleason score, and clinical T stage were used to define D'Amico risk categories. We report use of bone scans from the date of diagnosis to the earlier of treatment or 6 months. In patients who underwent bone scans, we report use of bone-specific x-ray, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, and bone biopsy within 3 months after bone scan. Costs were estimated using 2012 Medicare reimbursement rates. In all, 31% and 48% of patients with apparent low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer underwent a bone scan; of these patients, 21% underwent subsequent x-rays, 7% CT, and 3% MRI scans. Bone biopsies were uncommon. Overall, bone scans and downstream procedures was $11,300,000 for low- and intermediate-risk patients. For patients with apparent high-risk disease, only 62% received a bone scan, of whom 14% were found to have metastasis. There is overuse of bone scans in patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancers, which is unlikely to yield clinically actionable information and results in a potential Medicare waste. However, there is underuse of bone scans in high-risk patients for whom metastasis is likely. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Simple preparation of plant epidermal tissue for laser microdissection and downstream quantitative proteome and carbohydrate analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eFalter

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The outwardly directed cell wall and associated plasma membrane of epidermal cells represent the first layers of plant defense against intruding pathogens. Cell wall modifications and the formation of defense structures at sites of attempted pathogen penetration are decisive for plant defense. A precise isolation of these stress-induced structures would allow a specific analysis of regulatory mechanism and cell wall adaption. However, methods for large-scale epidermal tissue preparation from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, which would allow proteome and cell wall analysis of complete, laser-microdissected epidermal defense structures, have not been provided. We developed the adhesive tape – liquid cover glass technique for simple leaf epidermis preparation from A. thaliana, which is also applicable on grass leaves. This method is compatible with subsequent staining techniques to visualize stress-related cell wall structures, which were precisely isolated from the epidermal tissue layer by laser microdissection coupled to laser pressure catapulting. We successfully demonstrated that these specific epidermal tissue samples could be used for quantitative downstream proteome and cell wall analysis. The development of the adhesive tape – liquid cover glass technique for simple leaf epidermis preparation and the compatibility to laser microdissection and downstream quantitative analysis opens new possibilities in the precise examination of stress- and pathogen-related cell wall structures in epidermal cells. Because the developed tissue processing is also applicable on A. thaliana, well-established, model pathosystems that include the interaction with powdery mildews can be studied to determine principal regulatory mechanisms in plant-microbe interaction with their potential outreach into crop breeding.

  16. A computational fluid dynamics modeling study of guide walls for downstream fish passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Kevin; Towler, Brett; Haro, Alexander J.; Ahlfeld, David P.

    2017-01-01

    A partial-depth, impermeable guidance structure (or guide wall) for downstream fish passage is typically constructed as a series of panels attached to a floating boom and anchored across a water body (e.g. river channel, reservoir, or power canal). The downstream terminus of the wall is generally located nearby to a fish bypass structure. If guidance is successful, the fish will avoid entrainment in a dangerous intake structure (i.e. turbine intakes) while passing from the headpond to the tailwater of a hydroelectric facility through a safer passage route (i.e. the bypass). The goal of this study is to determine the combination of guide wall design parameters that will most likely increase the chance of surface-oriented fish being successfully guided to the bypass. To evaluate the flow field immediately upstream of a guide wall, a parameterized computational fluid dynamics model of an idealized power canal was constructed in © ANSYS Fluent v 14.5 (ANSYS Inc., 2012). The design parameters investigated were the angle and depth of the guide wall and the average approach velocity in the power canal. Results call attention to the importance of the downward to sweeping flow ratio and demonstrate how a change in guide wall depth and angle can affect this important hydraulic cue to out-migrating fish. The key findings indicate that a guide wall set at a small angle (15° is the minimum in this study) and deep enough such that sweeping flow dominant conditions prevail within the expected vertical distribution of fish approaching the structure will produce hydraulic conditions that are more likely to result in effective passage.

  17. Modelling of the impact of biofouling on hydrodynamics downstream of a tidal turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennis, A. C.; Rivier, A.; Dauvin, J. C.

    2016-02-01

    Biological organisms, like barnacles, mussels or bryozoans, colonize rapidly an immersed surface and could form a thickness until several centimeters on it. This biofouling could modify hydrodynamics around tidal turbine by increasing drag and hence resistance and could be detrimental to the performance of turbine (e.g. Orme et al., 2001; Khor and Xiao, 2011). Our work focuses on modifications of vortices downstream of a tidal turbine due to biofouling using CFD. Fixed biological organisms are solved explicitly by the model and are considered by modifying the blade profile. Firstly an airfoil colonized by barnacles is modelled for various fouling height and spacing and results are compared to experimental and simulated data (Orme et al., 2001; Khor and Xiao, 2011) in order to assess the capacity of the model to reproduce the flow around a blade with biofouling. Then a Darrieus vertical axis tidal turbine is modelled using a dynamic mesh. Configuration with smooth clean blades is assessed by comparison with experiments and simulations made by Roa (2011) and Bossard (2012). Biological organisms with various heights, spacing and shapes are fixed on blades and wakes downstream of clean and colonized tidal turbine are compared. Vorticity fields around the tidal turbine are clearly modified when blades are colonized. Samples will be taken from location where farms are planned to be built (Alderney Race/Raz Blanchard) to characterize more precisely the characteristics of species which are liable to fix on tidal turbine.Reference:Bossard (2012). Doctoral dissertation, Université de Grenoble.Khor & Xiao. (2011). Ocean Eng, 38(10), 1065-1079. Orme et al. (2001). Marine Renewable Energy Conference, Newcastle.Roa (2011).Doctoral dissertation, Université de Grenoble.

  18. The Maternal Obesity Management (MOM) Trial Protocol: a lifestyle intervention during pregnancy to minimize downstream obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, Kristi B; Ferraro, Zachary M; Goldfield, Gary; Keely, Erin; Stacey, Dawn; Hadjiyannakis, Stasia; Jean-Philippe, Sonia; Walker, Mark; Barrowman, Nicholas J

    2013-05-01

    Maternal obesity and/or high gestational weight gain (GWG) are associated with downstream child obesity. Pregnancy represents a critical period for prevention as women are highly motivated and more receptive to behavior change. This pilot study was developed to test the feasibility of intervening with the mother, specifically keeping her GWG within the Institute of Medicine (IOM) limits, with the intended target of preventing obesity in her child downstream. We are testing the practicality of delivering a structured physical activity and nutrition intervention to pregnant women during gestation and then following mom and baby to 24 months of age. This study is a two-arm, parallel group, randomized controlled trial being conducted in Ottawa. Pregnant women, with pregravid BMI >18.5, between 12 and 20 weeks gestation are randomized to one of two groups: intervention (n=30) who receive the MOM trial Handbook (guide to healthy gestation) plus a structured physical activity and nutrition program, or a standard clinical care control group (n=30). The intervention lasts 25-28 weeks (6 months) depending on anticipated delivery date, with follow-up assessment on mother and child at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months post-delivery. Pregnancy, a critical time of growth, development and physiological change, provides an opportunity for early lifestyle intervention. The goal of identifying an effective lifestyle program for the gestational period that leads to healthy fetal development and subsequently normal weight offspring, less likely to develop obesity and its co-morbidities, is unique and could possibly attenuate the inter-generational cycle of obesity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Use of Bone Scan During Initial Prostate Cancer Workup, Downstream Procedures, and Associated Medicare Costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falchook, Aaron D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Salloum, Ramzi G. [Department of Health Services Policy and Management, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina (United States); Hendrix, Laura H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Chen, Ronald C., E-mail: ronald_chen@med.unc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: For patients with a high likelihood of having metastatic disease (high-risk prostate cancer), bone scan is the standard, guideline-recommended test to look for bony metastasis. We quantified the use of bone scans and downstream procedures, along with associated costs, in patients with high-risk prostate cancer, and their use in low- and intermediate-risk patients for whom these tests are not recommended. Methods and Materials: Patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database diagnosed with prostate cancer from 2004 to 2007 were included. Prostate specific antigen (PSA), Gleason score, and clinical T stage were used to define D'Amico risk categories. We report use of bone scans from the date of diagnosis to the earlier of treatment or 6 months. In patients who underwent bone scans, we report use of bone-specific x-ray, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, and bone biopsy within 3 months after bone scan. Costs were estimated using 2012 Medicare reimbursement rates. Results: In all, 31% and 48% of patients with apparent low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer underwent a bone scan; of these patients, 21% underwent subsequent x-rays, 7% CT, and 3% MRI scans. Bone biopsies were uncommon. Overall, <1% of low- and intermediate-risk patients were found to have metastatic disease. The annual estimated Medicare cost for bone scans and downstream procedures was $11,300,000 for low- and intermediate-risk patients. For patients with apparent high-risk disease, only 62% received a bone scan, of whom 14% were found to have metastasis. Conclusions: There is overuse of bone scans in patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancers, which is unlikely to yield clinically actionable information and results in a potential Medicare waste. However, there is underuse of bone scans in high-risk patients for whom metastasis is likely.

  20. Planned flooding and Colorado River riparian trade-offs downstream from Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Lawrence E.; Ayers, T.J.; Bennett, J.B.; Christensen, K.; Kearsley, M.J.C.; Meretsky, V.J.; Phillips, A. M.; Parnell, R.A.; Spence, J.; Sogge, M.K.; Springer, A.E.; Wegner, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    Regulated river restoration through planned flooding involves trade-offs between aquatic and terrestrial components, between relict pre-dam and novel post-dam resources and processes, and between management of individual resources and ecosystem characteristics. We review the terrestrial (wetland and riparian) impacts of a 1274 m3/s test flood conducted by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation in March/April 1996, which was designed to improve understanding of sediment transport and management downstream from Glen Canyon Dam in the Colorado River ecosystem. The test flood successfully restored sandbars throughout the river corridor and was timed to prevent direct impacts to species of concern. A total of 1275 endangered Kanab ambersnail (Oxyloma haydeni kanabensis) were translocated above the flood zone at Vaseys Paradise spring, and an estimated 10.7% of the total snail habitat and 7.7% of the total snail population were lost to the flood. The test flood scoured channel margin wetlands, including potential foraging habitats of endangered Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus). It also buried ground-covering riparian vegetation under >1 m of fine sand but only slightly altered woody sandbar vegetation and some return-current channel marshes. Pre-flood control efforts and appropriate flood timing limited recruitment of four common nonnative perennial plant species. Slight impacts on ethnobotanical resources were detected >430 km downstream, but those plant assemblages recovered rapidly. Careful design of planned flood hydrograph shape and seasonal timing is required to mitigate terrestrial impacts during efforts to restore essential fluvial geomorphic and aquatic habitats in regulated river ecosystems.

  1. Assessing the Downstream Impact of the Integrated Use of Socioeconomic and Remote Sensing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R. S.; Downs, R. R.; Schumacher, J.

    2014-12-01

    The interdisciplinary use of data from multiple disciplines to address both research and applied problems has received increasing attention in the sciences, but understanding remains limited on the specific modalities of data use and their impact not only in enabling new research insights but also in facilitating the application of research to societal problems. In our previous work, we used citation analysis to investigate the use of data from the NASA Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center (SEDAC) and identify the extent of interdisciplinary use, based on the subject classifications of citing journals. We also proposed and tested a taxonomy of data integration and use on a selection of peer-reviewed scientific articles that cited both remote sensing data and socioeconomic data from SEDAC. We extend both of these analyses here. We analyze the interdisciplinary use of SEDAC data over a seven-year period including the types and topical areas of application observed. We also explore the degree to which different types of data integration and use are leading to further "downstream" research and applications, and if objective measures can be developed using bibliometric methods to quantify downstream use and impact in meaningful ways. These methods include both traditional citation analysis and searches of the informal literature and online resources. Better understanding of how disparate data and information has been utilized to address new interdisciplinary problems will help the data user and provider communities improve the effectiveness and efficiency of their efforts. It should also provide justification for further investments in linking different data resources and networks across scientific fields, in methods of interdisciplinary data integration, and in application of integrated data to societal problems.

  2. Numerical Simulation of Missouri River Bed Evolution Downstream of Gavins Point Dam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Z. A.; Blum, M. D.; Lephart, G.; Viparelli, E.

    2016-12-01

    The Missouri River originates in the Rocky Mountains in western Montana and joins the Mississippi River near Saint Louis, Missouri. In the 1900s dam construction and river engineering works, such as river alignment, narrowing and bank protections were performed in the Missouri River basin to control the flood flows, ensure navigation and use the water for agricultural, industrial and municipal needs, for the production of hydroelectric power generation and for recreation. These projects altered the flow and the sediment transport regimes in the river and the exchange of sediment between the river and the adjoining floodplain. Here we focus on the long term effect of dam construction and channel narrowing on the 1200 km long reach of the Missouri River between Gavins Point Dam, Nebraska and South Dakota, and the confluence with the Mississippi River. Field observations show that two downstream migrating waves of channel bed degradation formed in this reach in response to the changes in flow regime, sediment load and channel geometry. We implemented a one dimensional morphodynamic model for large, low slope sand bed rivers, we validated the model at field scale by comparing the numerical results with the available field data and we use the model to 1) predict the magnitude and the migration rate of the waves of degradation at engineering time scales ( 150 years into the future), 2) quantify the changes in the sand load delivered to the Mississippi River, where field observations at Thebes, i.e. downstream of Saint Louis, suggest a decline in the mean annual sand load in the past 50 years, and 3) identify the role of the main tributaries - Little Sioux River, Platte River and Kansas River - on the wave migration speed and the annual sand load in the Missouri River main channel.

  3. Targeting the cis-dimerization of LINGO-1 with low MW compounds affects its downstream signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobret, L; De Tauzia, M L; Ferent, J; Traiffort, E; Hénaoui, I; Godin, F; Kellenberger, E; Rognan, D; Pantel, J; Bénédetti, H; Morisset-Lopez, S

    2015-02-01

    The transmembrane protein LINGO-1 is a negative regulator in the nervous system mainly affecting axonal regeneration, neuronal survival, oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating its functions are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the formation and the role of LINGO-1 cis-dimers in the regulation of its biological activity. LINGO-1 homodimers were identified in both HEK293 and SH-SY5Y cells using co-immunoprecipitation experiments and BRET saturation analysis. We performed a hypothesis-driven screen for identification of small-molecule protein-protein interaction modulators of LINGO-1 using a BRET-based assay, adapted for screening. The compound identified was further assessed for effects on LINGO-1 downstream signalling pathways using Western blotting analysis and AlphaScreen technology. LINGO-1 was present as homodimers in primary neuronal cultures. LINGO-1 interacted homotypically in cis-orientation and LINGO-1 cis-dimers were formed early during LINGO-1 biosynthesis. A BRET-based assay allowed us to identify phenoxybenzamine as the first conformational modulator of LINGO-1 dimers. In HEK-293 cells, phenoxybenzamine was a positive modulator of LINGO-1 function, increasing the LINGO-1-mediated inhibition of EGF receptor signalling and Erk phosphorylation. Our data suggest that LINGO-1 forms constitutive cis-dimers at the plasma membrane and that low MW compounds affecting the conformational state of these dimers can regulate LINGO-1 downstream signalling pathways. We propose that targeting the LINGO-1 dimerization interface opens a new pharmacological approach to the modulation of its function and provides a new strategy for drug discovery. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  4. A downstream CpG island controls transcript initiation and elongation and the methylation state of the imprinted Airn macro ncRNA promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha V Koerner

    Full Text Available A CpG island (CGI lies at the 5' end of the Airn macro non-protein-coding (nc RNA that represses the flanking Igf2r promoter in cis on paternally inherited chromosomes. In addition to being modified on maternally inherited chromosomes by a DNA methylation imprint, the Airn CGI shows two unusual organization features: its position immediately downstream of the Airn promoter and transcription start site and a series of tandem direct repeats (TDRs occupying its second half. The physical separation of the Airn promoter from the CGI provides a model to investigate if the CGI plays distinct transcriptional and epigenetic roles. We used homologous recombination to generate embryonic stem cells carrying deletions at the endogenous locus of the entire CGI or just the TDRs. The deleted Airn alleles were analyzed by using an ES cell imprinting model that recapitulates the onset of Igf2r imprinted expression in embryonic development or by using knock-out mice. The results show that the CGI is required for efficient Airn initiation and to maintain the unmethylated state of the Airn promoter, which are both necessary for Igf2r repression on the paternal chromosome. The TDRs occupying the second half of the CGI play a minor role in Airn transcriptional elongation or processivity, but are essential for methylation on the maternal Airn promoter that is necessary for Igf2r to be expressed from this chromosome. Together the data indicate the existence of a class of regulatory CGIs in the mammalian genome that act downstream of the promoter and transcription start.

  5. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ACTIONS Health Care Reform Priorities for the CF Community in Health Care Reform Milestones in Health Care Reform How Tax Reform Could Impact People With CF The Preserving Employee Wellness Programs Act Our Advocacy ... We recognize the value of tapping into the ...

  6. Special Appropriation Act Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is sometimes directed to provide funding to a specific entity for study, purpose, or activity.This information will be of interest to a community or other entity that has been identified in one of EPA's appropriations acts to receive such funding.

  7. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... toddlers will need help from a parent or caregiver. Older kids and adults can choose ACTs that they can do on their ... (clapping) or vibration to loosen mucus from airway walls. See how different airway clearance techniques work to help you clear the thick, sticky mucus ...

  8. [Schema therapy - ACT - mindfulness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousineau, Pierre; Ngô, Thanh-Lan

    2013-01-01

    For schema therapy, significant weight is given to early experiences of social life. They lead to the creation of memories, largely implicit. These memories are reactivated in specific contexts and are often managed through dysfunctional strategies. Schema therapy seeks to modify these memories categorized as patterns. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), meanwhile, aims to transform our reactions linked to our learning history and to develop a greater flexibility taking into account what occurs in the present moment. Several techniques originate from the mindfulness tradition and seek to transform the individual into a witness of his own experience, rather than someone acting out patterns based on his learning history. Despite their different paradigms, it is possible to combine these approaches. As schemas manifest through somatic reactions, thoughts, affects, action tendencies, it becomes possible to try to change the relationship between the individual and these private experiences through the use of mindfulness, philosophical concepts and techniques derived from ACT. This is the aim of this article. Essay presenting the use of a schema mindfulness flash card to help patients tolerate intense affects generated by the activation of schemas and to attain greater adaptive flexibility (Healthy Adult mode). It is possible to integrate ACT techniques and concept to schema therapy in order to facilitate adaptive flexibility.

  9. Arabidopsis class I KNOTTED-like homeobox proteins act downstream in the IDA-HAE/HSL2 floral abscission signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chun-Lin; Stenvik, Grethe-Elisabeth; Vie, Ane Kjersti; Bones, Atle M; Pautot, Véronique; Proveniers, Marcel; Aalen, Reidunn B; Butenko, Melinka A

    2011-07-01

    Floral organ abscission in Arabidopsis thaliana is regulated by the putative ligand-receptor system comprising the signaling peptide INFLORESCENCE DEFICIENT IN ABSCISSION (IDA) and the two receptor-like kinases HAESA and HAESA-LIKE2. The IDA signaling pathway presumably activates a MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE (MAPK) cascade to induce separation between abscission zone (AZ) cells. Misexpression of IDA effectuates precocious floral abscission and ectopic cell separation in latent AZ cell regions, which suggests that negative regulators are in place to prevent unrestricted and untimely AZ cell separation. Through a screen for mutations that restore floral organ abscission in ida mutants, we identified three new mutant alleles of the KNOTTED-LIKE HOMEOBOX gene BREVIPEDICELLUS (BP)/KNOTTED-LIKE FROM ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA1 (KNAT1). Here, we show that bp mutants, in addition to shedding their floral organs prematurely, have phenotypic commonalities with plants misexpressing IDA, such as enlarged AZ cells. We propose that BP/KNAT1 inhibits floral organ cell separation by restricting AZ cell size and number and put forward a model whereby IDA signaling suppresses BP/KNAT1, which in turn allows KNAT2 and KNAT6 to induce floral organ abscission.

  10. Regional distribution of serotonergic receptors: a systems neuroscience perspective on the downstream effects of the multimodal-acting antidepressant vortioxetine on excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehrson, Alan L; Jeyarajah, Theepica; Sanchez, Connie

    2016-04-01

    Previous work from this laboratory hypothesized that the multimodal antidepressant vortioxetine enhances cognitive function through a complex mechanism, using serotonergic (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) receptor actions to modulate gamma-butyric acid (GABA) and glutamate neurotransmission in key brain regions like the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus. However, serotonergic receptors have circumscribed expression patterns, and therefore vortioxetine's effects on GABA and glutamate neurotransmission will probably be regionally selective. In this article, we attempt to develop a conceptual framework in which the effects of 5-HT, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and vortioxetine on GABA and glutamate neurotransmission can be understood in the PFC and striatum-2 regions with roles in cognition and substantially different 5-HT receptor expression patterns. Thus, we review the anatomy of the neuronal microcircuitry in the PFC and striatum, anatomical data on 5-HT receptor expression within these microcircuits, and electrophysiological evidence on the effects of 5-HT on the behavior of each cell type. This analysis suggests that 5-HT and SSRIs will have markedly different effects within the PFC, where they will induce mixed effects on GABA and glutamate neurotransmission, compared to the striatum, where they will enhance GABAergic interneuron activity and drive down the activity of medium spiny neurons. Vortioxetine is expected to reduce GABAergic interneuron activity in the PFC and concomitantly increase cortical pyramidal neuron firing. However in the striatum, vortioxetine is expected to increase activity at GABAergic interneurons and have mixed excitatory and inhibitory effects in medium spiny neurons. Thus the conceptual framework developed here suggests that vortioxetine will have regionally selective effects on GABA and glutamate neurotransmission.

  11. A Study of the Ion Hose Instability in the DARHT-II Downstream Transport Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarrick, J F

    2004-11-11

    is created and accelerated up to 18.4 MeV over a distance of about fifty meters. Then the true downstream transport begins: the beam drifts through a matching section in preparation for the kicker, over some ten meters; the long-pulse beam then travels about four more meters from the kicker to the main dump. In the accelerator, the beam energy is obviously not constant; the transport is emittance-dominated and done through nearly continuous solenoidal focusing. In the downstream section, there are only two discrete solenoids over the entire fourteen meters and the transport is largely ballistic. Since ion hose has been studied in the accelerator [3] and since the lack of continuous focusing is considered a concern with respect to ion hose in the downstream section, the focus of this study is only from the exit of the accelerator to the main dump. A more in-depth description of the baseline (ion-free) DARHT-II downstream transport, including description of the actual transport elements and their use, will not be presented in this document; such details can be found in the documents cited in the References. The study of these effects will be done in stages. In the next section, the nature of the residual gas in the vacuum system will be considered, along with the various assumptions made in characterizing the creation of ions. Then the ion hose instability will be described in its simplest form. In the fourth section, additional features of ion hose will then be presented which attempt to capture some of the key behavior. Then a much more complete model using particle-in-cell (PIC) numerical techniques will be described, followed by details of the specific implementation used here. In section seven, the code will be benchmarked against results published in the literature. Section eight has the most relevant material: the actual study of the effects of ion hose and background gas focusing in the DARHT-II downstream transport region. In section nine, a simple experiment

  12. Impact of pretreatment and downstream processing technologies on economics and energy in cellulosic ethanol production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murthy Ganti S

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While advantages of biofuel have been widely reported, studies also highlight the challenges in large scale production of biofuel. Cost of ethanol and process energy use in cellulosic ethanol plants are dependent on technologies used for conversion of feedstock. Process modeling can aid in identifying techno-economic bottlenecks in a production process. A comprehensive techno-economic analysis was performed for conversion of cellulosic feedstock to ethanol using some of the common pretreatment technologies: dilute acid, dilute alkali, hot water and steam explosion. Detailed process models incorporating feedstock handling, pretreatment, simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation, ethanol recovery and downstream processing were developed using SuperPro Designer. Tall Fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb was used as a model feedstock. Results Projected ethanol yields were 252.62, 255.80, 255.27 and 230.23 L/dry metric ton biomass for conversion process using dilute acid, dilute alkali, hot water and steam explosion pretreatment technologies respectively. Price of feedstock and cellulose enzymes were assumed as $50/metric ton and 0.517/kg broth (10% protein in broth, 600 FPU/g protein respectively. Capital cost of ethanol plants processing 250,000 metric tons of feedstock/year was $1.92, $1.73, $1.72 and $1.70/L ethanol for process using dilute acid, dilute alkali, hot water and steam explosion pretreatment respectively. Ethanol production cost of $0.83, $0.88, $0.81 and $0.85/L ethanol was estimated for production process using dilute acid, dilute alkali, hot water and steam explosion pretreatment respectively. Water use in the production process using dilute acid, dilute alkali, hot water and steam explosion pretreatment was estimated 5.96, 6.07, 5.84 and 4.36 kg/L ethanol respectively. Conclusions Ethanol price and energy use were highly dependent on process conditions used in the ethanol production plant. Potential for

  13. Passage of downstream migrant American eels through an airlift-assisted deep bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haro, Alexander J.; Watten, Barnaby J.; Noreika, John

    2016-01-01

    Traditional downstream guidance and bypass facilities for anadromous fishes (i.e., surface bypasses, surface guidance structures, and behavioral barriers) have frequently been ineffective for anguillid eels. Because eels typically spend the majority of their time near the bottom in the vicinity of intake structures, deep bypass structures with entrances near the bottom hold promise for increased effectiveness, thereby aiding in the recovery of this important species. A new design of a deep bypass system that uses airlift technology (the Conte Airlift Bypass) to induce flow in a bypass pipe was tested in a simulated intake entrance environment under controlled laboratory conditions. Water velocities of 0.9–1.5 m s−1 could be generated at the bypass entrance (opening with 0.073 m2 area), with corresponding flows through the bypass pipe of 0.07–0.11 m3 s−1. Gas saturation and hydrostatic pressure within the bypass pipe did not vary appreciably from a control (no air) condition under tested airflows. Migratory silver-phase American eels (Anguilla rostrata) tested during dark conditions readily located, entered, and passed through the bypass; initial avoidance rates (eels approaching but not entering the bypass entrance) were lower at higher entrance velocities. Eels that investigated the bypass pipe entrance tended to enter headfirst, but those that then exited the pipe upstream did so more frequently at lower entrance velocities. Eels appeared to swim against the flow while being transported downstream through the pipe; median transit times through the bypass for each test velocity ranged from 5.8 to 12.2 s, with transit time decreasing with increasing entrance velocity. Eels did not show strong avoidance of the vertical section of the pipe which contained injected air. No mortality or injury of bypassed eels was observed, and individual eels repeatedly passed through the bypass at rates of up to 40 passes per hour, suggesting that individuals do not

  14. Human muscle fibre type-specific regulation of AMPK and downstream targets by exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Dorte E; Albers, Peter H; Prats, Clara; Baba, Otto; Birk, Jesper B; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F P

    2015-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a regulator of energy homeostasis during exercise. Studies suggest muscle fibre type-specific AMPK expression. However, fibre type-specific regulation of AMPK and downstream targets during exercise has not been demonstrated. We hypothesized that AMPK subunits are expressed in a fibre type-dependent manner and that fibre type-specific activation of AMPK and downstream targets is dependent on exercise intensity. Pools of type I and II fibres were prepared from biopsies of vastus lateralis muscle from healthy men before and after two exercise trials: (1) continuous cycling (CON) for 30 min at 69 ± 1% peak rate of O2 consumption () or (2) interval cycling (INT) for 30 min with 6 × 1.5 min high-intensity bouts peaking at 95 ± 2% . In type I vs. II fibres a higher β1 AMPK (+215%) and lower γ3 AMPK expression (−71%) was found. α1, α2, β2 and γ1 AMPK expression was similar between fibre types. In type I vs. II fibres phosphoregulation after CON was similar (AMPKThr172, ACCSer221, TBC1D1Ser231 and GS2+2a) or lower (TBC1D4Ser704). Following INT, phosphoregulation in type I vs. II fibres was lower (AMPKThr172, TBC1D1Ser231, TBC1D4Ser704 and ACCSer221) or higher (GS2+2a). Exercise-induced glycogen degradation in type I vs. II fibres was similar (CON) or lower (INT). In conclusion, a differentiated response to exercise of metabolic signalling/effector proteins in human type I and II fibres was evident during interval exercise. This could be important for exercise type-specific adaptations, i.e. insulin sensitivity and mitochondrial density, and highlights the potential for new discoveries when investigating fibre type-specific signalling. PMID:25640469

  15. Aberrations and Emittance Growth in the DARHT 2nd Axis Downstream Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, Martin E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-24

    The emittance of the DARHT 2nd Axis has been inferred from solenoid scans performed in the downstream transport (DST) region using a short kicked pulse. The beam spot size is measured by viewing optical transition radiation (OTR) in the near field as a function of the field (current) of a solenoid magnet (S4). The imaging station containing the OTR target is located about 100 cm downstream of the solenoid magnet. The emittance is then inferred using a beam optics code such as LAMDA or XTR by fitting the data to initial conditions upstream of the S4 solenoid magnet. The initial conditions are the beam size, beam convergence and emittance. The beam energy and current are measured. In preparation for a solenoid scan, the magnets upstream of the solenoid are adjusted to produce a round beam with no beam losses due to scraping in the beam tube. This is different from the standard tune in which the beam tune is adjusted to suppress the effects of ions and rf in the septum dump. In this standard tune, approximately 10% of the beam is lost due to scraping as the beam enters the small 3.75” ID beam tube after the septum. The normalized emittance inferred from recent solenoid scans typically ranges from 600 to 800 π(mm-mrad). This larger beam size increases the sensitivity to any non-linear fields in the Collins quadrupoles that are mounted along the small diameter beam tube. The primary magnet used to adjust the beam size in this region is the S3 solenoid magnet. Measurements made of the beam shape as the beam size was decreased showed significant structure consistent with non-linear fields. Using the measured magnetic fields in the Collins quadrupoles including higher order multipoles, the beam transport through the Collins quadrupoles is simulated and compared to the observed OTR images. The simulations are performed using the beam optics codes TRANSPORT [1] and TURTLE [2]. Estimates of the emittance growth and beam losses are made as a function of the S3

  16. GMES and Down-stream Services Following User Requirements: Examples on Regional And Coastal Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noehren, I.; Breitbach, G.; Schroeder, F.

    2012-04-01

    MyOcean as part of the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) services provides information on the state of the oceans on a regular basis. The products are delivered on a global as well as on a regional scale like EU, covering the physical state of the ocean and primary ecosystem parameters. For local or coastal scales these Core Services very often do not meet the requirements of the potential end-user who needs information on e. g. marine safety, oil spills, marine resources and coastal management. For these local information needs Downstream Services derived from GMES Core Services, e.g. MyOcean products, but also directly from observation infrastructure are necessary. With Cosyna (Coastal Observation System for Northern and Arctic Seas) a national project between MyOcean and downstream services is established. The core of the project is an integrated pre-operational observation system which combines in-situ observations and remote sensing procedures with numerical models to obtain synoptic data sets of the southern North Sea and make basic infrastructure and continuous data available to the scientific community. The network provides intermediate products in terms of quality-assured time series and maps with high temporal and spatial resolution; end-users might produce their own end products. Integrated products cover processed information based on a combination of different observations and models, accompanied by instructions of use and optionally by interpretations. To enhance operational services in coastal areas improved forecasts with coupled models and data assimilation are developed in the EC funded FIELD_AC project (Fluxes, Interactions and Environment at the Land-Ocean Boundary. Downscaling, Assimilation and Coupling). The application area of the German partner is the German Bight. By means of a strong interaction with the Cosyna observational network main emphasis is laid on the user needs (e.g. of national agencies, coastal and harbour

  17. Novel downstream molecular targets of SIRT1 in melanoma: a quantitative proteomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Chandra K; George, Jasmine; Nihal, Minakshi; Sabat, Grzegorz; Kumar, Raj; Ahmad, Nihal

    2014-04-15

    Melanoma is one of the most lethal forms of skin cancer and its incidence is continuing to rise in the United States. Therefore, novel mechanism and target-based strategies are needed for the management of this disease. SIRT1, a NAD(+)-dependent class III histone deacetylase, has been implicated in a variety of physiological processes and pathological conditions. We recently demonstrated that SIRT1 is upregulated in melanoma and its inhibition by a small-molecule, tenovin-1, inhibits cell proliferation and clonogenic survival of melanoma cells, possibly via activating p53. Here, we employed a gel free quantitative proteomics approach to identify the downstream effectors and targets of SIRT1 in melanoma. The human malignant melanoma, G361 cells were treated with tenovin-1 followed by protein extraction, in liquid trypsin digestion, and peptide analyses using nanoLC-MS/MS. A total of 1091 proteins were identified, of which 20 proteins showed significant differential expression with 95% confidence interval. These proteins were subjected to gene ontology and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) to obtain the information regarding their biological and molecular functions. Real-Time qRT-PCR validation showed that five of these (PSAP, MYO1B, MOCOS, HIS1H4A and BUB3) were differentially expressed at mRNA levels. Based on their important role in cell cycle regulation, we selected to focus on BUB family proteins (BUB3, as well as BUB1 and BUBR1) for subsequent validation. The qRT-PCR and immunoblot analyses showed that tenovin-1 inhibition of SIRT1 resulted in a downregulation of BUB3, BUB1 and BUBR1 in multiple melanoma cell lines. Since tenovin-1 is an inhibitor of both SIRT1 and SIRT2, we employed lentivirus mediated silencing of SIRT1 and SIRT2 in G361 cells to determine if the observed effects on BUB family proteins are due to SIRT1- or SIRT2- inhibition. We found that only SIRT1 inhibition resulted in a decrease in BUB3, BUB1 and BUBR1. Our study identified the mitotic

  18. Downstream Toll-like receptor signaling mediates adaptor-specific cytokine expression following focal cerebral ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolanle Famakin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deletion of some Toll-like receptors (TLRs affords protection against cerebral ischemia, but disruption of their known major downstream adaptors does not. To determine whether compensation in the production of downstream effectors by one pathway when the other is disrupted can explain these findings, we examined cytokine/chemokine expression and inflammatory infiltrates in wild-type (WT, MyD88−/− and TRIF-mutant mice following permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO. Methods Cytokine/chemokine expression was measured with a 25-plex bead array in the serum and brains of all three groups of mice at baseline (no surgery/naïve and at 3 hours and 24 hours following pMCAO. Brain inflammatory and neutrophil infiltrates were examined 24 hours following pMCAO. Results IL-6, keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF and IL-10 were significantly decreased in MyD88−/− mice compared to WT mice following pMCAO. Significantly, decreased levels of the neutrophil chemoattractants KC and G-CSF corresponded with a trend toward fewer neutrophils in the brains of MyD88−/− mice. IP-10 was significantly decreased when either pathway was disrupted. MIP-1α was significantly decreased in TRIF-mutant mice, consistent with TRIF-dependent production. MyD88−/− mice showed elevations of a number of Th2 cytokines, such as IL-13, at baseline, which became significantly decreased following pMCAO. Conclusions Both MyD88 and TRIF mediate pathway-specific cytokine production following focal cerebral ischemia. Our results also suggest a compensatory Th2-type skew at baseline in MyD88−/− mice and a paradoxical switch to a Th1 phenotype following focal cerebral ischemia. The MyD88 pathway directs the expression of neutrophil chemoattractants following cerebral ischemia.

  19. Impact of pretreatment and downstream processing technologies on economics and energy in cellulosic ethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Murthy, Ganti S

    2011-09-05

    While advantages of biofuel have been widely reported, studies also highlight the challenges in large scale production of biofuel. Cost of ethanol and process energy use in cellulosic ethanol plants are dependent on technologies used for conversion of feedstock. Process modeling can aid in identifying techno-economic bottlenecks in a production process. A comprehensive techno-economic analysis was performed for conversion of cellulosic feedstock to ethanol using some of the common pretreatment technologies: dilute acid, dilute alkali, hot water and steam explosion. Detailed process models incorporating feedstock handling, pretreatment, simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation, ethanol recovery and downstream processing were developed using SuperPro Designer. Tall Fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb) was used as a model feedstock. Projected ethanol yields were 252.62, 255.80, 255.27 and 230.23 L/dry metric ton biomass for conversion process using dilute acid, dilute alkali, hot water and steam explosion pretreatment technologies respectively. Price of feedstock and cellulose enzymes were assumed as $50/metric ton and 0.517/kg broth (10% protein in broth, 600 FPU/g protein) respectively. Capital cost of ethanol plants processing 250,000 metric tons of feedstock/year was $1.92, $1.73, $1.72 and $1.70/L ethanol for process using dilute acid, dilute alkali, hot water and steam explosion pretreatment respectively. Ethanol production cost of $0.83, $0.88, $0.81 and $0.85/L ethanol was estimated for production process using dilute acid, dilute alkali, hot water and steam explosion pretreatment respectively. Water use in the production process using dilute acid, dilute alkali, hot water and steam explosion pretreatment was estimated 5.96, 6.07, 5.84 and 4.36 kg/L ethanol respectively. Ethanol price and energy use were highly dependent on process conditions used in the ethanol production plant. Potential for significant ethanol cost reductions exist in increasing

  20. Downstream and soaring interfaces and vortices in 2-D stratified wakes and their impact on transport of contaminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. D. Chashechkin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The flow of continuously stratified fluids past obstacles was studied analytically, numerically, and experimentally. The obstacles discussed here include a flat strip, aligned with the flow, inclined or transverse to the flow and a horizontal cylinder. In the flow pattern, transient and attached (lee internal waves, downstream wakes with submerged interfaces and vortices, soaring singular interfaces, soaring vortices and vortex systems are distinguished. New components of laminar flow past a horizontally towed strip are presented. Fine transverse streaky structures on the strip in the downstream wake were visualized. Soaring isolated interfaces, which are internal boundary layers forming inside the downstream attached wave field past bluff bodies were observed. With increasing of the body velocity a vortex pair was formed directly at the leading edge of this interface.

  1. Microalgae Oil Production: A Downstream Approach to Energy Requirements for the Minamisoma Pilot Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhani S. Wibawa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the potential of microalgae oil production as an alternative renewable energy source, in a pilot project located at Minamisoma City in the Fukushima Prefecture of Japan. The algal communities used in this research were the locally mixed species, which were mainly composed of Desmodesmus collected from the Minamisoma pilot project. The microalgae oil-production processes in Minamisoma consisted of three stages: cultivation, dewatering, and extraction. The estimated theoretical input-energy requirement for extracting oil was 137.25 MJ to process 50 m3 of microalgae, which was divided into cultivation 15.40 MJ, centrifuge 13.39 MJ, drum filter 14.17 MJ, and hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL 94.29 MJ. The energy profit ratio (EPR was 1.41. The total energy requirement was highest in the HTL process (68% followed by cultivation (11% and the drum filter (10%. The EPR value increased along with the yield in the cultivation process. Using HTL, the microalgae biomass could be converted to bio-crude oil to increase the oil yield in the extraction process. Therefore, in the long run, the HTL process could help lower production costs, due to the lack of chemical additions, for extracting oil in the downstream estimation of the energy requirements for microalgae oil production.

  2. State-and-transition prototype model of riparian vegetation downstream of Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, Barbara E.; Starfield, Anthony M.; Black, Ronald S.; Van Lonkhuyzen, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Facing an altered riparian plant community dominated by nonnative species, resource managers are increasingly interested in understanding how to manage and promote healthy riparian habitats in which native species dominate. For regulated rivers, managing flows is one tool resource managers consider to achieve these goals. Among many factors that can influence riparian community composition, hydrology is a primary forcing variable. Frame-based models, used successfully in grassland systems, provide an opportunity for stakeholders concerned with riparian systems to evaluate potential riparian vegetation responses to alternative flows. Frame-based, state-and-transition models of riparian vegetation for reattachment bars, separation bars, and the channel margin found on the Colorado River downstream of Glen Canyon Dam were constructed using information from the literature. Frame-based models can be simple spreadsheet models (created in Microsoft® Excel) or developed further with programming languages (for example, C-sharp). The models described here include seven community states and five dam operations that cause transitions between states. Each model divides operations into growing (April–September) and non-growing seasons (October–March) and incorporates upper and lower bar models, using stage elevation as a division. The inputs (operations) can be used by stakeholders to evaluate flows that may promote dynamic riparian vegetation states, or identify those flow options that may promote less desirable states (for example, Tamarisk [Tamarix sp.] temporarily flooded shrubland). This prototype model, although simple, can still elicit discussion about operational options and vegetation response.

  3. Protein kinases: mechanisms and downstream targets in inflammation-mediated obesity and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandipati, Kalyana C; Subramanian, Saravanan; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2017-02-01

    Obesity-induced low-grade inflammation (metaflammation) impairs insulin receptor signaling. This has been implicated in the development of insulin resistance. Insulin signaling in the target tissues is mediated by stress kinases such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase, inhibitor of NF-kB kinase complex β (IKKβ), AMP-activated protein kinase, protein kinase C, Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase, and RNA-activated protein kinase. Most of these kinases phosphorylate several key regulators in glucose homeostasis. The phosphorylation of serine residues in the insulin receptor and IRS-1 molecule results in diminished enzymatic activity in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway. This has been one of the key mechanisms observed in the tissues that are implicated in insulin resistance especially in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2-DM). Identifying the specific protein kinases involved in obesity-induced chronic inflammation may help in developing the targeted drug therapies to minimize the insulin resistance. This review is focused on the protein kinases involved in the inflammatory cascade and molecular mechanisms and their downstream targets with special reference to obesity-induced T2-DM.

  4. Lessons learned from accidents in downstream petroleum product processing and handling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramli, Abu Hanipah; Somarin, Samad Doostdar; Ismail, Zubaidah [Univ. of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia). Civil Engineering Dept.

    2012-09-15

    This study examined the facilities involved in the downstream sector of the industry involving processing, pipeline transfer and storage. The distribution of accidents in terms of frequencies, probable causes and casualties associated with them are presented. The study was based on selected published data over the past fifty five years. It was found that over the study period the highest number of facilities involved was plants and refineries with 58.8% and storage representing 29.4%. About 65% involved fatalities. The maximum number of casualties was 500 recorded by the Mexico City liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) fire and explosion, a minimum of zero and a standard deviation of 120 lives.Weak leadership, lack of training and breakdown of systems and procedures were identified as important contributory factors. The recruitment of leadership positions needs to be critically reexamined and training methods have to be improved. Approaches to ensure reduced number of incidents and the right leadership during a real crisis situation are required. (orig.)

  5. AS101 prevents diabetic nephropathy progression and mesangial cell dysfunction: regulation of the AKT downstream pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itay Israel Shemesh

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN is characterized by proliferation of mesangial cells, mesangial expansion, hypertrophy and extracellular matrix accumulation. Previous data have cross-linked PKB (AKT to TGFβ induced matrix modulation. The non-toxic compound AS101 has been previously shown to favorably affect renal pathology in various animal models and inhibits AKT activity in leukemic cells. Here, we studied the pharmacological properties of AS101 against the progression of rat DN and high glucose-induced mesangial dysfunction. In-vivo administration of AS101 to Streptozotocin injected rats didn't decreased blood glucose levels but ameliorated kidney hypotrophy, proteinuria and albuminuria and downregulated cortical kidney phosphorylation of AKT, GSK3β and SMAD3. AS101 treatment of primary rat glomerular mesangial cells treated with high glucose significantly reduced their elevated proliferative ability, as assessed by XTT assay and cell cycle analysis. This reduction was associated with decreased levels of p-AKT, increased levels of PTEN and decreased p-GSK3β and p-FoxO3a expression. Pharmacological inhibition of PI3K, mTORC1 and SMAD3 decreased HG-induced collagen accumulation, while inhibition of GSK3β did not affect its elevated levels. AS101 also prevented HG-induced cell growth correlated to mTOR and (rpS6 de-phosphorylation. Thus, pharmacological inhibition of the AKT downstream pathway by AS101 has clinical potential in alleviating the progression of diabetic nephropathy.

  6. Leopold’s Arboretum Needs Upstream Water Treatment to Restore Wetlands Downstream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy B. Zedler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A case study has broad relevance for urban natural reserves. Aldo Leopold’s far-reaching vision to restore historical ecosystems at the UW-Madison Arboretum has been difficult to achieve despite ~80 years of restoration work. Wetlands (~1/4 of the 485-ha reserve resist restoration, given urban watersheds and inflows of low quality water. Current conditions favor aggressive invasive plants (cattails, reed canary grass, and buckthorn—species that do not fulfill the 1934 vision. Today, urban runoff flows into remnant natural wetlands, degraded wetlands, the iconic Curtis Prairie, and constructed wetlands. Regulations for total maximum daily loads (TMDLs have led local municipalities to expand pre-existing sediment- and nutrient-trapping ponds from 5.67 ha (14 ac of Arboretum land to 9.3 ha (23 ac to protect downstream lakes. Both the runoff and the treatment facilities (with invasive plants limit the Arboretum’s ability to achieve pre-settlement vegetation. Consistent with Leopold’s vision, we endorse Arboretum principles that urban runoff be restored to pre-settlement quality, and we recommend shifting efforts to reduce TMDLs to upstream lands in order to protect the Arboretum. Given that invasive species will persist, Leopold’s Arboretum should be rededicated to research, education, and restoration, plus sustainable management of its waters and wetlands.

  7. Cis-elements required for the demethylation of the mouse M-lysozyme downstream enhancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, A; Short, M; Ammerpohl, O; Asbrand, C; Nickel, J; Renkawitz, R

    1997-08-15

    The mouse lysozyme downstream enhancer was previously colocalized with the DNase I-hypersensitive site in the chromatin of mature macrophages. This hypersensitive site was shown to be macrophage differentiation-dependent. Demethylation of CpG sequences within the enhancer is correlated with lysozyme expression in mature macrophages. Binding of the GABP heterotetrameric transcription factor to the enhancer core element (MLDE), only seen in vivo on the demethylated MLDE element in macrophages, is inhibited by DNA methylation. Here, we analyzed the DNA sequences required for demethylation. In electrophoretic mobility shift experiments we found that in addition to the complete methylated MLDE the hemimethylated form of the lower strand inhibits GABP binding as well. Therefore, GABP is unlikely to be the mediator of demethylation. In addition, we show by stable DNA transfections of methylated mouse lysozyme enhancer sequences that MLDE-flanking sequences are required for demethylation. We narrowed down these DNA elements to two short regions of 163 and 79 base pairs on either side of the MLDE, each of which is sufficient to mediate demethylation of the GABP site.

  8. Methylation of the mouse M-lysozyme downstream enhancer inhibits heterotetrameric GABP binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, J; Short, M L; Schmitz, A; Eggert, M; Renkawitz, R

    1995-12-11

    Expression of the mouse M-lysozyme gene is a specific marker for the differentiation of macrophage/granulocyte cell lineages. Analysis of the mechanisms regulating M-lysozyme gene expression revealed an enhancer element in the 3'-flanking region of the gene, termed the M-lysozyme downstream enhancer (MLDE). Here we demonstrate that the nuclear factors binding to MLDE are present in all tested myeloid and non-myeloid mouse cell lines. Sequence analysis of MLDE identified two different sequences, CAGGAAGT and CCGGAAGT, which match the consensus binding sequences for proteins of the ets gene superfamily. The two sites are oriented palindromicly and separated by 10 bp. DMS/DEPC interference assays revealed different patterns of DNA-protein contacts on the two sites. Mutation of each consensus sequence leads to an individual change in protein binding in vitro. Despite these differences, both sequences are bound by GABP, forming a heterotetrameric complex. Tissue specificity is correlated with demethylation of a single CpG dinucleotide located in one of the two Ets motifs. This site when methylated inhibits GABP binding to both sequences in non-macrophage cell types.

  9. Bed load transport for a mixture of particle sizes: Downstream sorting rather than anomalous diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Niannian; Xie, Yushu; Nie, Ruihua

    2017-10-01

    The stochastic nature of bed load transport induces diffusion of sediment tracers, which is governed by the dynamics of their bulk behavior over time. By deploying both numerical simulations and flume experiments, the emergent particle diffusion regimes for both uniform and mixed tracer particles were studied and compared. For uniform particles, power-law-distributed resting times Tr produced super-, sub- or normal diffusion regimes for certain values of the tail exponent ν . Based on the assumption that heterogeneity in particle size leads to a power-law distribution of Tr , a completely different diffusion regime emerges in mixtures compared with those obtained from uniform particles with the same value of the tail exponent ν . Mixtures exhibited the same ballistic regime (the variance of travel distance grows as time squared) for different values of ν , and ballistic regimes for mixtures also emerged from several other tested models. Furthermore, our experimental results confirmed the ballistic regime; however, the decreasing number of tracked particles may result in apparent but deceptive sub-diffusion. We conclude that ballistic regimes for mixtures result from violations of the independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) assumptions, attributing to downstream sorting processes.

  10. Unravelling pathways downstream Sox6 induction in K562 erythroid cells by proteomic analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Barbarani, Gloria

    2017-10-20

    The Sox6 transcription factor is crucial for terminal maturation of definitive red blood cells. Sox6-null mouse fetuses present misshapen and nucleated erythrocytes, due to impaired actin assembly and cytoskeleton stability. These defects are accompanied with a reduced survival of Sox6-/- red blood cells, resulting in a compensated anemia. Sox6-overexpression in K562 cells and in human primary ex vivo erythroid cultures enhances erythroid differentiation and leads to hemoglobinization, the hallmark of erythroid maturation. To obtain an overview on processes downstream to Sox6 expression, we performed a differential proteomic analysis on human erythroid K562 cells overexpressing Sox6. Sox6-overexpression induces dysregulation of 64 proteins, involved in cytoskeleton remodeling and in protein synthesis, folding and trafficking, key processes for erythroid maturation. Moreover, 43 out of 64 genes encoding for differentially expressed proteins contain within their proximal regulatory regions sites that are bound by SOX6 according to ENCODE ChIP-seq datasets and are possible direct SOX6 targets. SAR1B, one of the most induced proteins upon Sox6 overexpression, shares a conserved regulatory module, composed by a double SOX6 binding site and a GATA1 consensus, with the adjacent SEC24 A gene. Since both genes encode for COPII components, this element could concur to the coordinated expression of these proteins during erythropoiesis.

  11. Parathyroid hormone-related peptide is a downstream target for ras and src activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; Drucker, D J

    1994-03-04

    Neoplastic transformation may be associated with the development of paraneoplastic syndromes that complicate the management of patients with malignant disease. One of these syndromes, humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy, has been shown to be attributable to increased secretion of a parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP). The gene encoding PTHrP is expressed at low levels in a growth factor-dependent manner in normal tissues, and the mechanisms underlying selective tumor-associated induction of PTHrP gene expression remain unclear. Here we show that cellular transformation by the EJ-Ha-ras and v-src oncogenes is associated with a marked increase in PTHrP gene expression. Ha-ras- and v-src-transfected NRK 49F cells and ras-transfected RCB 2.2 cell lines secreted increased amounts of immunoreactive PTHrP. Northern blot analysis also demonstrated increased levels of PTHrP mRNA transcripts in oncogene-transfected stable cell lines. No significant change in the half-life of PTHrP mRNA transcripts was detected in Ha-ras- and v-src-transformed cells. In contrast, nuclear run-on assays demonstrated an increased rate of PTHrP gene transcription in oncogene-transformed cells. These observations demonstrate that the gene encoding PTHrP is a downstream target for ras and src, potentially providing a molecular basis for understanding the activation of PTHrP gene expression in malignancy-associated hypercalcemia.

  12. POD analysis of the turbulent flow downstream a mild and sharp bend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalpakli Vester, Athanasia; Örlü, Ramis; Alfredsson, P. Henrik

    2015-03-01

    Time-resolved stereoscopic particle image velocimetry measurements have been taken of the turbulent flow at the exit plane of a mild and a sharp pipe bend. Cross-sectional flow fields were obtained 1, 2 and 3 pipe diameters downstream the bend in order to capture the flow evolution. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) was applied in order to identify the underlying vortical patterns and revealed the existence of a single cell spanning the whole cross section as the most dominant structure, while the Dean cells appeared in the next most energetic modes. The results from these investigations, which indicate the origin of the oscillatory motion of the Dean vortices, the so-called swirl switching, were found to agree with those presented by Hellström et al. (J Fluid Mech 735:R7, 2013). Furthermore, the effect of a honeycomb, mounted at the bend inlet, on the flow field has been studied by means of statistical and POD analysis in order to test the hypothesis by Sakakibara and Machida (Phys Fluids 24:041702, 2012), viz. whether the unsteady behaviour of the Dean cells is related to large-scale structures existing upstream the bend. As a consequence of the honeycomb, the Dean vortices do not appear in the mean field, nor in the most energetic modes, which opens possibilities to overcome or at least delay the problem of fatigue in piping systems which can be caused by the swirl switching.

  13. Spider mites suppress tomato defenses downstream of jasmonate and salicylate independently of hormonal crosstalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, Juan M; Schimmel, Bernardus C J; Glas, Joris J; Ataide, Livia M S; Pappas, Maria L; Villarroel, Carlos A; Schuurink, Robert C; Sabelis, Maurice W; Kant, Merijn R

    2015-01-01

    Plants respond to herbivory by mounting a defense. Some plant-eating spider mites (Tetranychus spp.) have adapted to plant defenses to maintain a high reproductive performance. From natural populations we selected three spider mite strains from two species, Tetranychus urticae and Tetranychus evansi, that can suppress plant defenses, using a fourth defense-inducing strain as a benchmark, to assess to which extent these strains suppress defenses differently. We characterized timing and magnitude of phytohormone accumulation and defense-gene expression, and determined if mites that cannot suppress defenses benefit from sharing a leaf with suppressors. The nonsuppressor strain induced a mixture of jasmonate- (JA) and salicylate (SA)-dependent defenses. Induced defense genes separated into three groups: ‘early’ (expression peak at 1 d postinfestation (dpi)); ‘intermediate’ (4 dpi); and ‘late’, whose expression increased until the leaf died. The T. evansi strains suppressed genes from all three groups, but the T. urticae strain only suppressed the late ones. Suppression occurred downstream of JA and SA accumulation, independently of the JA–SA antagonism, and was powerful enough to boost the reproductive performance of nonsuppressors up to 45%. Our results show that suppressing defenses not only brings benefits but, within herbivore communities, can also generate a considerable ecological cost when promoting the population growth of a competitor. PMID:25297722

  14. Modulation of RNA polymerase II phosphorylation downstream of pathogen perception orchestrates plant immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fangjun; Cheng, Cheng; Cui, Fuhao; de Oliveira, Marcos V V; Yu, Xiao; Meng, Xiangzong; Intorne, Aline C; Babilonia, Kevin; Li, Maoying; Li, Bo; Chen, Sixue; Ma, Xianfeng; Xiao, Shunyuan; Zheng, Yi; Fei, Zhangjun; Metz, Richard P; Johnson, Charles D; Koiwa, Hisashi; Sun, Wenxian; Li, Zhaohu; de Souza Filho, Gonçalo A; Shan, Libo; He, Ping

    2014-12-10

    Perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) elicits host transcriptional reprogramming as part of the immune response. Although pathogen perception is well studied, the signaling networks orchestrating immune gene expression remain less clear. In a genetic screen for components involved in the early immune gene transcription reprogramming, we identified Arabidopsis RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain (CTD) phosphatase-like 3 (CPL3) as a negative regulator of immune gene expression. MAMP perception induced rapid and transient cyclin-dependent kinase C (CDKC)-mediated phosphorylation of Arabidopsis CTD. The CDKCs, which are in turn phosphorylated and activated by a canonical MAP kinase (MAPK) cascade, represent a point of signaling convergence downstream of multiple immune receptors. CPL3 directly dephosphorylated CTD to counteract MAPK-mediated CDKC regulation. Thus, modulation of the phosphorylation dynamics of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II transcription machinery by MAPKs, CTD kinases, and phosphatases constitutes an essential mechanism for rapid orchestration of host immune gene expression and defense upon pathogen attacks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Activity of methane oxidizing bacteria along the River Elbe downstream to its estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoušu, A.; Šimek, K.; Bussmann, I.

    2012-04-01

    Contribution of rivers and estuarine systems to the global methane (CH4) budget is still not clear yet and for improving the estimations on the CH4 emission it is essential to cover the whole natural system in large-scale studies. In this context we quantified the activity of methane oxidizing bacteria (as a microbial "biofilter") over almost two seasons along a large European river system, the river Elbe, from its source in the Czech Republic towards to its estuary in the North Sea. Determination of methane oxidation rate was measured using a tritiated CH4 radiotracer technique. Methane concentrations in the water column were analyzed by the headspace method. The range of CH4concentrations and related microbial oxidation activities displayed a strong increase from the upper river parts, which includes mainly natural river, to the polluted downstream canalized parts of the river with high CH4concentrations and microbial activities, where anaerobic sediments occur. In the water column of the estuarine zone a sharp decrease of the CH4 concentration- and CH4 oxidation rates is mainly influenced by the increasing salinity. Additional parameters (temperature, dissolved oxygen, amount of suspended particular matter and nutrient content) are possible factors influencing the methanotrophic activity. Further investigations will compare the population structure of MOB at the different sites along the whole transect.

  16. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (Pcna) as a direct downstream target gene of Hoxc8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Hyehyun; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Bok, Jinwoong; Chung, Hyun Joo [Department of Anatomy, Embryology Laboratory, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myoung Hee, E-mail: mhkim1@yuhs.ac [Department of Anatomy, Embryology Laboratory, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-19

    Hoxc8 is a member of Hox family transcription factors that play crucial roles in spatiotemporal body patterning during embryogenesis. Hox proteins contain a conserved 61 amino acid homeodomain, which is responsible for recognition and binding of the proteins onto Hox-specific DNA binding motifs and regulates expression of their target genes. Previously, using proteome analysis, we identified Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (Pcna) as one of the putative target genes of Hoxc8. Here, we asked whether Hoxc8 regulates Pcna expression by directly binding to the regulatory sequence of Pcna. In mouse embryos at embryonic day 11.5, the expression pattern of Pcna was similar to that of Hoxc8 along the anteroposterior body axis. Moreover, Pcna transcript levels as well as cell proliferation rate were increased by overexpression of Hoxc8 in C3H10T1/2 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. Characterization of 2.3 kb genomic sequence upstream of Pcna coding region revealed that the upstream sequence contains several Hox core binding sequences and one Hox-Pbx binding sequence. Direct binding of Hoxc8 proteins to the Pcna regulatory sequence was verified by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Taken together, our data suggest that Pcna is a direct downstream target of Hoxc8.

  17. Eco-hydrology of the Pangani River downstream of Nyumba ya Mungu reservoir, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwamila, Tulinave B.; Kimwaga, Richard J.; Mtalo, Felix W.

    Eco-hydrological studies are highly emphasized worldwide at the moment especially where hydraulic structures such as dams are concerned, mainly focusing on benefiting both humans and existing ecosystem for the present and future generations. The study at Pangani basin was aimed at assessing the sufficiency and the amount of flow reaching the downstream area of the Pangani River for maintenance of ecosystem. Fish species were considered as the indicators for ecosystem health. Flow duration curves (FDC) and hydrographs were developed by using the collected historical daily flow data and used for assessing the flow variation before and after Nyumba ya Mungu (NYM) dam construction. The results showed that there is no seasonality and that for most part of the year the flow is within 20-40 m 3/s. From the comparison it was found that there is 42.7% decrease in Q 5, 2.1% decrease in Q 95, 38.9% increase in Q 75, 23.4% increase in Q 50 and decrease of percentage exceedence of 50 m 3/s by 61.5%. Physical habitat simulation model (PHABSIM) was used for hydraulic simulation incorporating geometric and flow data collected in the field. From the simulations minimum flow for habitat protection is about 15 m 3/s and for flood formation flows should be greater than 50 m 3/s. Thus the required reservoir outflow for sustainable water resources management at the NYM should follow the above specifications.

  18. Identification of possible downstream genes required for the extension of peripheral axons in primary sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Makoto; Segawa, Hiroshi; Naito, Mayumi; Okamoto, Hitoshi

    2014-03-07

    The LIM-homeodomain transcription factor Islet2a establishes neuronal identity in the developing nervous system. Our previous study showed that Islet2a function is crucial for extending peripheral axons of sensory neurons in zebrafish embryo. Overexpressing a dominant-negative form of Islet2a significantly reduced peripheral axon extension in zebrafish sensory neurons, implicating Islet2a in the gene regulation required for neurite formation or proper axon growth in developing sensory neurons. Based on this, we conducted systematic screening to isolate genes regulated by Islet2a and affecting the development of axon growth in embryonic zebrafish sensory neurons. The 26 genes selected included some encoding factors involved in neuronal differentiation, axon growth, cellular signaling, and structural integrity of neurons, as well as genes whose functions are not fully determined. We chose four representative candidates as possible Islet2a downstream functional targets (simplet, tppp, tusc5 and tmem59l) and analyzed their respective mRNA expressions in dominant-negative Islet2a-expressing embryos. They are not reported the involvement of axonal extension or their functions in neural cells. Finally, knockdown of these genes suggested their direct actual involvement in the extension of peripheral axons in sensory neurons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Vacuum calculation of the TBID (Target Beam Instrumentation Downstream) for CNGS

    CERN Document Server

    Chiggiato, P

    2006-01-01

    For the TBID (Target Beam Instrumentation Downstream) monitor of CNGS (CERN Neutrinos to Gran Sasso) a design identical to that of the TBIU (Target Beam Instrumentation Upstream) monitor of the SPS targets has been adopted. However the vacuum solution implemented in the SPS, namely ion pumping, cannot be trivially applied to CNGS; in fact the high radioactivity level expected for the latter could damage the electrical cables in the about 10 years of expected activity and hinder or delay any human intervention. In this note the possibility of NEG pumping, without any electrical feeding, is considered. The getter should ensure the demanded pressure limit of 10-4 Torr in conditions that are very harsh: temperature up to 150°C, 0.1 A electron bombardment and proton bombardment during the 10 years of working of the monitor. It is shown that the beam induced CH4 pumping speed is not enough at the beginning of the operation to ensure the pressure requirements. In addition, in the worst scenario when a uniform ele...

  20. Ca2+ and Mg2+ modulate conformational dynamics and stability of downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Khoa; Dhulipala, Gangadhar; Gonzalez, Walter G; Gerstman, Bernard S; Regmi, Chola; Chapagain, Prem P; Miksovska, Jaroslava

    2015-01-01

    Downstream Regulatory Element Antagonist Modulator (DREAM) belongs to the family of neuronal calcium sensors (NCS) that transduce the intracellular changes in Ca2+ concentration into a variety of responses including gene expression, regulation of Kv channel activity, and calcium homeostasis. Despite the significant sequence and structural similarities with other NCS members, DREAM shows several features unique among NCS such as formation of a tetramer in the apo-state, and interactions with various intracellular biomacromolecules including DNA, presenilin, Kv channels, and calmodulin. Here we use spectroscopic techniques in combination with molecular dynamics simulation to study conformational changes induced by Ca2+/Mg2+ association to DREAM. Our data indicate a minor impact of Ca2+ association on the overall structure of the N- and C-terminal domains, although Ca2+ binding decreases the conformational heterogeneity as evident from the decrease in the fluorescence lifetime distribution in the Ca2+ bound forms of the protein. Time-resolved fluorescence data indicate that Ca2+binding triggers a conformational transition that is characterized by more efficient quenching of Trp residue. The unfolding of DREAM occurs through an partially unfolded intermediate that is stabilized by Ca2+ association to EF-hand 3 and EF-hand 4. The native state is stabilized with respect to the partially unfolded state only in the presence of both Ca2+ and Mg2+ suggesting that, under physiological conditions, Ca2+ free DREAM exhibits a high conformational flexibility that may facilitate its physiological functions. PMID:25627705

  1. Detection and diversity of aeromonads from treated wastewater and fish inhabiting effluent and downstream waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topic Popovic, Natalija; Kazazic, Snjezana P; Strunjak-Perovic, Ivancica; Barisic, Josip; Sauerborn Klobucar, Roberta; Kepec, Slavko; Coz-Rakovac, Rozelinda

    2015-10-01

    A two-season investigation of the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent, of related waters, sludge and fish across a wide area and 11 stations, with emphasis on Aeromonas spp. was conducted. Aeromonas veronii was the prevailing aeromonad isolated by MALDI TOF MS in the summer period. A rise of Aeromonas hydrophila was observed in summer in raw sewage, treated wastewater and effluent-carrying canal. The ratio of aeromonad species retrieved from fish tissues did not correspond with the water and sludge findings, as in spring in the effluent-carrying canal fish carried Aeromonas salmonicida ssp. salmonicida and Aeromonas bestiarum, while in summer mainly A. veronii and Acinetobacter johnsonii were isolated from fish tissues in the same location. No correlation was established between fecal coliforms/enterococci and aeromonad occurrence. All retrieved Aeromonas species demonstrated a distinct spectral pattern, with peaks showing unique mass distribution ranging from 4000 to 10,000Da. Hierarchical clustering separated aeromonads of all isolated species and clustered closely related strains together. Resistance was determined towards amoxicillin, and frequently towards sulfamethoxazole and erythromycin. In summer, a high proportion of water and sludge Aeromonas species demonstrated multiple resistance patterns towards five or more antimicrobials. The quinolone resistance of water aeromonads was mostly related to A. veronii. There are potential health concerns regarding aeromonad exposure amongst recreational fishermen who come into contact with fish inhabiting waters downstream from the WWTP, and WWTP workers who are occupationally exposed to wastewaters and their aerosols. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Spatial and temporal patterns of micropollutants upstream and downstream of 24 WWTPs across Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spycher, Barbara; Deuber, Fabian; Kistler, David; Burdon, Frank; Reyes, Marta; Alder, Alfredo C.; Joss, Adriano; Eggen, Rik; Singer, Heinz; Stamm, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Treated wastewater is an important source of micropollutants in many streams. These chemicals consist of very diverse set of compounds that may vary in space and time. In order to improve our understanding of such spatio-temporal patterns of micropollutants in surface waters, we compared upstream and downstream locations at 24 sites across the Swiss Plateau and Jura (12 sites in the 2013 campaign, 12 sites during the 2014 campaign). Each site represents the most upstream treatment plant in the corresponding catchment. This survey is part of the interdisciplinary, Eawag-wide research project EcoImpact that aims at elucidating the ecological effects of micropollutants on stream ecosystems. In 2013, a broad analytical screening was applied to samples collected during winter (January) and summer conditions (June). Based in these results, the bi-monthly samples obtained in 2014 were analysed for a set of about 60 selected organic micropollutants and 10 heavy metals. The screening results demonstrate that generally pharmaceuticals, artificial sweeteners and corrosion inhibitors make up the largest part of the organic micropollutants. Pesticides including biocides and plant protection products are also regularly found but at lower concentrations. This presentation will analyse the variability of the micropollutant patterns across the different sites and how upstream conditions and the wastewater composition changes with season.

  3. Perturbation biology nominates upstream–downstream drug combinations in RAF inhibitor resistant melanoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkut, Anil; Wang, Weiqing; Demir, Emek; Aksoy, Bülent Arman; Jing, Xiaohong; Molinelli, Evan J; Babur, Özgün; Bemis, Debra L; Onur Sumer, Selcuk; Solit, David B; Pratilas, Christine A; Sander, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to targeted cancer therapies is an important clinical problem. The discovery of anti-resistance drug combinations is challenging as resistance can arise by diverse escape mechanisms. To address this challenge, we improved and applied the experimental-computational perturbation biology method. Using statistical inference, we build network models from high-throughput measurements of molecular and phenotypic responses to combinatorial targeted perturbations. The models are computationally executed to predict the effects of thousands of untested perturbations. In RAF-inhibitor resistant melanoma cells, we measured 143 proteomic/phenotypic entities under 89 perturbation conditions and predicted c-Myc as an effective therapeutic co-target with BRAF or MEK. Experiments using the BET bromodomain inhibitor JQ1 affecting the level of c-Myc protein and protein kinase inhibitors targeting the ERK pathway confirmed the prediction. In conclusion, we propose an anti-cancer strategy of co-targeting a specific upstream alteration and a general downstream point of vulnerability to prevent or overcome resistance to targeted drugs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04640.001 PMID:26284497

  4. Connections between Transcription Downstream of Genes and cis-SAGe Chimeric RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwalenia, Katarzyna; Qin, Fujun; Singh, Sandeep; Tangtrongstittikul, Panjapon; Li, Hui

    2017-11-22

    cis-Splicing between adjacent genes (cis-SAGe) is being recognized as one way to produce chimeric fusion RNAs. However, its detail mechanism is not clear. Recent study revealed induction of transcriptions downstream of genes (DoGs) under osmotic stress. Here, we investigated the influence of osmotic stress on cis-SAGe chimeric RNAs and their connection to DoGs. We found,the absence of induction of at least some cis-SAGe fusions and/or their corresponding DoGs at early time point(s). In fact, these DoGs and their cis-SAGe fusions are inversely correlated. This negative correlation was changed to positive at a later time point. These results suggest a direct competition between the two categories of transcripts when total pool of readthrough transcripts is limited at an early time point. At a later time point, DoGs and corresponding cis-SAGe fusions are both induced, indicating that total readthrough transcripts become more abundant. Finally, we observed overall enhancement of cis-SAGe chimeric RNAs in KCl-treated samples by RNA-Seq analysis.

  5. Spider mites suppress tomato defenses downstream of jasmonate and salicylate independently of hormonal crosstalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, Juan M; Schimmel, Bernardus C J; Glas, Joris J; Ataide, Livia M S; Pappas, Maria L; Villarroel, Carlos A; Schuurink, Robert C; Sabelis, Maurice W; Kant, Merijn R

    2015-01-01

    Plants respond to herbivory by mounting a defense. Some plant-eating spider mites (Tetranychus spp.) have adapted to plant defenses to maintain a high reproductive performance. From natural populations we selected three spider mite strains from two species, Tetranychus urticae and Tetranychus evansi, that can suppress plant defenses, using a fourth defense-inducing strain as a benchmark, to assess to which extent these strains suppress defenses differently. We characterized timing and magnitude of phytohormone accumulation and defense-gene expression, and determined if mites that cannot suppress defenses benefit from sharing a leaf with suppressors. The nonsuppressor strain induced a mixture of jasmonate- (JA) and salicylate (SA)-dependent defenses. Induced defense genes separated into three groups: 'early' (expression peak at 1 d postinfestation (dpi)); 'intermediate' (4 dpi); and 'late', whose expression increased until the leaf died. The T. evansi strains suppressed genes from all three groups, but the T. urticae strain only suppressed the late ones. Suppression occurred downstream of JA and SA accumulation, independently of the JA-SA antagonism, and was powerful enough to boost the reproductive performance of nonsuppressors up to 45%. Our results show that suppressing defenses not only brings benefits but, within herbivore communities, can also generate a considerable ecological cost when promoting the population growth of a competitor. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  6. The North Atlantic Waveguide and Downstream Impact Experiment (NAWDEX): First results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, George; Schäfler, Andreas; Ament, Felix; Arbogast, Philippe; Crewell, Susanne; Doyle, James; Hirsch, Lutz; Mayer, Bernhard; McTaggart-Cowan, Ron; Methven, John; Rahm, Stephan; Rautenhaus, Marc; Reitebuch, Oliver; Rivière, Gwendal; Vaughan, Geraint; Wendisch, Manfred; Wernli, Heini; Wirth, Martin; Witschas, Benjamin

    2017-04-01

    First results will be presented from the NAWDEX experiment, an international field campaign with the overall goal of increasing the physical understanding and quantifying the effects of diabatic processes on disturbances to the jet stream over the North Atlantic, their influence on downstream propagation, and consequences for high-impact weather in Europe. The campaign took place from 19 September to 18 October 2016, and deployed a variety of remote-sensing and in-situ instruments that provided an extraordinarily detailed picture of the interacting dynamics and thermodynamics. Thirteen intensive observation periods took place over the course of the campaign, including moisture inflow and diabatic processes in warm conveyor belts, cloud and dynamical structure in outflow and ridge-building events, as well as other events This presentation will briefly review the weather events that were observed during NAWDEX and give a preliminary evaluation of how the observations contribute to new understanding of midlatitude weather systems. As an example, an analysis of the structure and evolution of ex-Tropical Storm Karl will be presented. This system was observed by a sequence of aircraft flights over a period of six days, as it moved from the subtropics into the midlatitudes off the coast of North America, reintensified explosively as a midlatitude cyclone south of Greenland, and eventually contributed to poor precipitation forecasts for Norway.

  7. Critical interactionism: an upstream-downstream approach to health care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Diane Cocozza; Burbank, Patricia M

    2011-01-01

    Currently, per capita health care expenditures in the United States are more than 20% higher than any other country in the world and more than twice the average expenditure for European countries, yet the United States ranks 37th in life expectancy. Clearly, the health care system is not succeeding in improving the health of the US population with its focus on illness care for individuals. A new theoretical approach, critical interactionism, combines symbolic interactionism and critical social theory to provide a guide for addressing health care problems from both an upstream and downstream approach. Concepts of meaning from symbolic interactionism and emancipation from critical perspective move across system levels to inform and reform health care for individuals, organizations, and societies. This provides a powerful approach for health care reform, moving back and forth between the micro and macro levels. Areas of application to nursing practice with several examples (patients with obesity; patients who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender; workplace bullying and errors), nursing education, and research are also discussed.

  8. Carbon contamination removal in larger chambers with low-power downstream plasma cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, C. G.; Vane, R.

    2012-03-01

    There is a need for pristine vacuum environments free of carbon contamination in many lithography tools. Carbon is a particularly irksome contaminant due to its ubiquity and its reactivity with energetic electron or EUV photon beams. When residual hydrocarbons land on a surface that is being impinged by an energetic beam, they will crack and reform as less mobile deposits. Carbon buildup cause loss in image resolution resulting in line width measurement increases during multiple CD-SEM scans, and on EUV optics it can lead to lower reflectivity and throughput of a lithography system. A new downstream plasma cleaner has been developed to clean larger chambers at lower pressures and higher RF plasma power (50W) and operates efficiently with current turbomolecular pumps. Cleaning rates can be measured by using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) with its surface previously contaminated with hydrocarbons. Rates have been measured at over 1 nm/minute at a distance of over 0.5 m from the plasma source. The cleaner can be used with room air, oxygen gas mixtures, and hydrogen gas. Although it is slightly larger than the currently available Evactron® De-Contaminator, it still has a compact footprint which allows it to be easily installed on lithography tools. This paper will explore the operation of the new plasma cleaner, examining the effect of the cleaning rate due to changes in various conditions including power, pressure and distance from the plasma source.

  9. The Colorado River and its deposits downstream from Grand Canyon in Arizona, California, and Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Ryan S.; Block, Debra L.; Felger, Tracey J.; House, P. Kyle; Pearthree, Philip A.; Gootee, Brian F.; Youberg, Ann M.; Howard, Keith A.; Beard, L. Sue

    2018-02-05

    Understanding the evolution of the Colorado River system has direct implications for (1) the processes and timing of continental-scale river system integration, (2) the formation of iconic landscapes like those in and around Grand Canyon, and (3) the availability of groundwater resources. Spatial patterns in the position and type of Colorado River deposits, only discernible through geologic mapping, can be used to test models related to Colorado River evolution. This is particularly true downstream from Grand Canyon where ancestral Colorado River deposits are well-exposed. We are principally interested in (1) regional patterns in the minimum and maximum elevation of each depositional unit, which are affected by depositional mechanism and postdepositional deformation; and (2) the volume of each unit, which reflects regional changes in erosion, transport efficiency, and accommodation space. The volume of Colorado River deposits below Grand Canyon has implications for groundwater resources, as the primary regional aquifer there is composed of those deposits. To this end, we are presently mapping Colorado River deposits and compiling and updating older mapping. This preliminary data release shows the current status of our mapping and compilation efforts. We plan to update it at regular intervals in conjunction with ongoing mapping.

  10. Model-Based Comparison of Antibody Dimerization in Continuous and Batch-Wise Downstream Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Sellberg

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies are generally produced using a generic platform approach in which several chromatographic separations assure high purity of the product. Dimerization can occur during the fermentation stage and may occur also during the downstream processing. We present here simulations in which a traditional platform approach that consist of protein A capture, followed by cation-exchange and anion-exchange chromatography for polishing is compared to a continuous platform in which dimer removal and virus inactivation are carried out on a size-exclusion column. A dimerization model that takes pH, salt concentration and the concentration of antibodies into account is combined with chromatographic models, to be able to predicted both the separation and the degree to which dimers are formed. Purification of a feed composition that contained 1% by weight of dimer and a total antibody concentration of 1 g/L was modeled using both approaches, and the amount of antibodies in the continuous platform was at least 4 times lower than in the traditional platform. The total processing time was also lower, as the cation-exchange polish could be omitted.

  11. Electrical guidance efficiency of downstream-migrating juvenile Sea Lamprey decreases with increasing water velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miehls, Scott M.; Johnson, Nicholas; Haro, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    We tested the efficacy of a vertically oriented field of pulsed direct current (VEPDC) created by an array of vertical electrodes for guiding downstream-moving juvenile Sea Lampreys Petromyzon marinus to a bypass channel in an artificial flume at water velocities of 10–50 cm/s. Sea Lampreys were more likely to be captured in the bypass channel than in other sections of the flume regardless of electric field status (on or off) or water velocity. Additionally, Sea Lampreys were more likely to be captured in the bypass channel when the VEPDC was active; however, an interaction between the effects of VEPDC and water velocity was observed, as the likelihood of capture decreased with increases in water velocity. The distribution of Sea Lampreys shifted from right to left across the width of the flume toward the bypass channel when the VEPDC was active at water velocities less than 25 cm/s. The VEPDC appeared to have no effect on Sea Lamprey distribution in the flume at water velocities greater than 25 cm/s. We also conducted separate tests to determine the threshold at which Sea Lampreys would become paralyzed. Individuals were paralyzed at a mean power density of 37.0 µW/cm3. Future research should investigate the ability of juvenile Sea Lampreys to detect electric fields and their specific behavioral responses to electric field characteristics so as to optimize the use of this technology as a nonphysical guidance tool across variable water velocities.

  12. The impact of semiconductor, electronics and optoelectronic industries on downstream perfluorinated chemical contamination in Taiwanese rivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Angela Yu-Chen [National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: yuchenlin@ntu.edu.tw; Panchangam, Sri Chandana; Lo, Chao-Chun [National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2009-04-15

    This study provides the first evidence on the influence of the semiconductor and electronics industries on perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) contamination in receiving rivers. We have quantified ten PFCs, including perfluoroalkyl sulfonates (PFASs: PFBS, PFHxS, PFOS) and perfluoroalkyl carboxylates (PFCAs: PFHxA, PFHpA, PFOA, PFNA, PFDA, PFUnA, PFDoA) in semiconductor, electronic, and optoelectronic industrial wastewaters and their receiving water bodies (Taiwan's Keya, Touchien, and Xiaoli rivers). PFOS was found to be the major constituent in semiconductor wastewaters (up to 0.13 mg/L). However, different PFC distributions were found in electronics plant wastewaters; PFOA was the most significant PFC, contributing on average 72% to the effluent water samples, followed by PFOS (16%) and PFDA (9%). The distribution of PFCs in the receiving rivers was greatly impacted by industrial sources. PFOS, PFOA and PFDA were predominant and prevalent in all the river samples, with PFOS detected at the highest concentrations (up to 5.4 {mu}g/L). - The semiconductor, electronics and optoelectronic industries are the primary source of PFC contamination in downstream aqueous environments.

  13. Perturbation biology nominates upstream-downstream drug combinations in RAF inhibitor resistant melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkut, Anil; Wang, Weiqing; Demir, Emek; Aksoy, Bülent Arman; Jing, Xiaohong; Molinelli, Evan J; Babur, Özgün; Bemis, Debra L; Onur Sumer, Selcuk; Solit, David B; Pratilas, Christine A; Sander, Chris

    2015-08-18

    Resistance to targeted cancer therapies is an important clinical problem. The discovery of anti-resistance drug combinations is challenging as resistance can arise by diverse escape mechanisms. To address this challenge, we improved and applied the experimental-computational perturbation biology method. Using statistical inference, we build network models from high-throughput measurements of molecular and phenotypic responses to combinatorial targeted perturbations. The models are computationally executed to predict the effects of thousands of untested perturbations. In RAF-inhibitor resistant melanoma cells, we measured 143 proteomic/phenotypic entities under 89 perturbation conditions and predicted c-Myc as an effective therapeutic co-target with BRAF or MEK. Experiments using the BET bromodomain inhibitor JQ1 affecting the level of c-Myc protein and protein kinase inhibitors targeting the ERK pathway confirmed the prediction. In conclusion, we propose an anti-cancer strategy of co-targeting a specific upstream alteration and a general downstream point of vulnerability to prevent or overcome resistance to targeted drugs.

  14. Dreams and acting out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinberg, L

    1987-01-01

    Dreams can be used as containers that free patients from increased tension. This may be the principal function of certain types of dreams, called "evacuative dreams." They are dreams used for getting rid of unbearable affects and unconscious fantasies, or as a safety valve for partial discharge of instinctual drives. These dreams are observed primarily in borderline and psychotic patients, but can also be seen in the regressive states of neurotic patients during weekends and other periods of separation. Such dreams have to be differentiated from "elaborative dreams," which have a working-through function and stand in an inverse relationship to acting out: the greater the production of elaborative dreams, the less the tendency to act out, and vice versa.

  15. ST–ACTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gidofalvi, Gyozo; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    2006-01-01

    hot issue in the area of spatio–temporal databases [7]. While existing Moving Object Simulators (MOSs) address different physical aspects of mobility, they neglect the important social and geo–demographical aspects of it. This paper presents ST–ACTS, a Spatio–Temporal ACTivity Simulator that, usi......–temporal distributions of activities, which make it essential for the development of adequate spatiotemporal data management and data mining techniques....... various geo–statistical data sources and intuitive principles, models the so far neglected aspects. ST–ACTS considers that (1) objects (representing mobile users) move from one spatio–temporal location to another with the objective of performing a certain activity at the latter location; (2) not all users...

  16. RECOGNISING SPEECH ACTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phyllis Kaburise

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Speech Act Theory (SAT, a theory in pragmatics, is an attempt to describe what happens during linguistic interactions. Inherent within SAT is the idea that language forms and intentions are relatively formulaic and that there is a direct correspondence between sentence forms (for example, in terms of structure and lexicon and the function or meaning of an utterance. The contention offered in this paper is that when such a correspondence does not exist, as in indirect speech utterances, this creates challenges for English second language speakers and may result in miscommunication. This arises because indirect speech acts allow speakers to employ various pragmatic devices such as inference, implicature, presuppositions and context clues to transmit their messages. Such devices, operating within the non-literal level of language competence, may pose challenges for ESL learners.

  17. A Vanishing Act

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Anders; Hecht, Janus; Stilling, Maria Kirstine

    2016-01-01

    The use of information and communication technology (ICT) has played an important role in the reforms that have taken place in Western welfare societies over the past two decades. ICT is regarded as a way to provide transparency and information exchange among providers, users and politicians. Thi...... internal contradictions in the organization of elderly home care services so that key processes have become outright invisible. This trick, the paper argues, is essentially an act of what Bourdieu calls social magic....

  18. Toxic Substances Control Act

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Toxic Substances Control Act and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  19. Williamson Act - The California Land Conservation Act of 1965

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The California Land Conservation Act of 1965 - commonly referred to as the Williamson Act - is the State's primary program for the conservation of private land in...

  20. Expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha and its downstream targets in fibroepithelial tumors of the breast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijper, Arno; Groep, P. van der; Wall, E. van der; Diest, P.J. van

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) alpha and its downstream targets carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are key factors in the survival of proliferating tumor cells in a hypoxic microenvironment. We studied the expression and prognostic relevance

  1. European downstream oil industry safety performance : statistical summary of reported incidents, 1997 and overview 1993 to 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-10-01

    This report is the fourth by CONCAWE reviewing the safety performance of the downstream ol industry in Western Europe. It includes the results of 27 companies which together represent over 90% of the oil refining capacity in the region. Of the 27 com...

  2. Biological Responses in Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) Caged Downstream from Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants in the Credit River, ON, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovarin, Stephen; Sultana, Tamanna; Metcalfe, Chris

    2017-12-11

    To determine whether discharges of contaminants from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) may be contributing to the decline in populations of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) in the watershed of the Credit River in ON, Canada, we caged juvenile brook trout upstream and downstream of the WWTPs of the small communities of Acton and Orangeville. Levels of vitellogenin were significantly elevated in liver tissue of trout caged downstream of both WWTPs, indicating exposure to estrogenic substances. Levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances indicative of oxidation of lipids were elevated in the gill tissue of brook trout caged downstream of the Orangeville WWTP, and levels of total glutathione were significantly lower in the gills of brook trout caged downstream of the Acton WWTP. Both biomarkers are indicative of oxidative stress, although many constituents of wastewater could be responsible for these responses. More work is needed to determine whether discharges of wastewater are contributing to the decline of brook trout in the Credit River and other cold-water streams in the Lake Ontario catchment basin.

  3. p300 and p53 levels determine activation of HIF-1 downstream targets in invasive breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vleugel, M.M.; Shvarts, D.; Wall, E. van der; Diest, P.J. van

    2006-01-01

    In previous studies, we noted that overexpression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)–1a in breast cancer, especially the diffuse form, does not always lead to functional activation of its downstream genes. Transcriptional activity of HIF-1 may be repressed by p53 through competition

  4. Turbulent heat transfer characteristics and pressure drop in swirling flow at upstream and downstream of an abrupt expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohir, A. E.

    2012-03-01

    This investigation is aimed at studying the heat transfer characteristics and pressure drop for turbulent airflow in a sudden expansion pipe equipped with propeller swirl generator. The investigation is performed for the Reynolds number ranging from 10,000 to 41,000 under a uniform heat flux condition. The experiments are conducted for three locations for the propeller fan upstream the sudden expansion and three locations downstream the sudden expansion ( N = 5 blades and blade angle of 45°). The influences of using a freely rotating propeller on heat transfer enhancement and pressure drop are reported. The experimental results indicate that inserting the propeller downstream of the tube provides considerable improvement of the heat transfer rate higher than inserting the propeller upstream the tube. The increase in pressure drop resulting from using the propeller upstream is found to be higher than the downstream swirler. The maximum performance enhancement for the downstream swirler is about 326% while it is about 213% for upstream one. Correlations for relative mean Nusselt number and enhancement performance are presented for different fan locations and different Reynolds numbers.

  5. The Influence of a Eutrophic Lake to the River Downstream : Spatiotemporal Algal Composition Changes and the Driving Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Q.; Chen, Y.; Liu, Z.; Van de Giesen, N.C.; Zhu, D.

    2015-01-01

    Algal blooms have been frequently found at the upper reaches of the Tanglang River, which is downstream from the eutrophic Dianchi Lake. The eutrophic lake upstream is considered to be a potential source of phytoplankton, which contributes to the development of harmful algal blooms in the river

  6. A plant chamber system with downstream reaction chamber to study the effects of pollution on biogenic emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timovsky, J.; Gankema, Paulien; Pierik, Ronald; Holzinger, Rupert

    2014-01-01

    A system of two plant chambers and a downstream reaction chamber has been set up to investigate the emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and possible effects of pollutants such as ozone. The system can be used to compare BVOC emissions from two sets of differently treated plants,

  7. Defective Connective Tissue Remodeling in Smad3 Mice Leads to Accelerated Aneurysmal Growth Through Disturbed Downstream TGF-β Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. van der Pluijm, PhD

    2016-10-01

    Smad3 deficiency leads to imbalanced activation of downstream genes, no activation of MMPs in VSMCs, and immune responses resulting in rapid aortic wall dilatation and rupture. Our findings uncover new possibilities for treatment of SMAD3 patients; instead of targeting TGF-β signaling, immune suppression may be more beneficial.

  8. Groundwater connectivity of prairie-pothole wetlands to downstream waters: The role of water-table mound transience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, B. P.

    2016-12-01

    Wetlands commonly recharge shallow groundwater and contribute baseflow to downstream waters. However, the degree of groundwater connectivity between any given wetland and downstream waters ranges widely. Depressional wetlands, such as prairie potholes, can be particularly difficult to assess. In the prairie pothole region (PPR) of North America, a water-table often rises above the adjacent wetland and creates a barrier to groundwater flow. Hydrologic connectivity is still possible in some geologic settings and in response to water-table transience. Drawing from modeling results from recent study in the North Dakota PPR, this presentation reviews the effect of water-table mounds on groundwater flow and illustrates how anisotropy and geologic heterogeneity can overcome water-table mounds and facilitate connectivity. Following this review, scenarios of water-table transience are considered, drawing from 30 years of shallow groundwater and wetland surface elevation observations at Cottonwood Lake Research Area near Jamestown, North Dakota. Results show water-table mounds can be transient seasonally and over longer periods. Flow paths of groundwater connectivity form when water-table mounds dissipate. However, interpretation of these flow paths as evidence of actual flow of water from a wetland to downstream waters can be misleading. Scenarios where apparent flowpaths of connectivity do, and do not, represent genuine hydrologic connectivity are discussed. These findings demonstrate the complexity of assessing groundwater connectivity between prairie-pothole wetlands and downstream waters and provide insight to the data needs and modeling approaches useful to verify groundwater connectivity.

  9. A sustainability model based on cloud infrastructures for core and downstream Copernicus services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manunta, Michele; Calò, Fabiana; De Luca, Claudio; Elefante, Stefano; Farres, Jordi; Guzzetti, Fausto; Imperatore, Pasquale; Lanari, Riccardo; Lengert, Wolfgang; Zinno, Ivana; Casu, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    The incoming Sentinel missions have been designed to be the first remote sensing satellite system devoted to operational services. In particular, the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Sentinel-1 sensor, dedicated to globally acquire over land in the interferometric mode, guarantees an unprecedented capability to investigate and monitor the Earth surface deformations related to natural and man-made hazards. Thanks to the global coverage strategy and 12-day revisit time, jointly with the free and open access data policy, such a system will allow an extensive application of Differential Interferometric SAR (DInSAR) techniques. In such a framework, European Commission has been funding several projects through the GMES and Copernicus programs, aimed at preparing the user community to the operational and extensive use of Sentinel-1 products for risk mitigation and management purposes. Among them, the FP7-DORIS, an advanced GMES downstream service coordinated by Italian National Council of Research (CNR), is based on the fully exploitation of advanced DInSAR products in landslides and subsidence contexts. In particular, the DORIS project (www.doris-project.eu) has developed innovative scientific techniques and methodologies to support Civil Protection Authorities (CPA) during the pre-event, event, and post-event phases of the risk management cycle. Nonetheless, the huge data stream expected from the Sentinel-1 satellite may jeopardize the effective use of such data in emergency response and security scenarios. This potential bottleneck can be properly overcome through the development of modern infrastructures, able to efficiently provide computing resources as well as advanced services for big data management, processing and dissemination. In this framework, CNR and ESA have tightened up a cooperation to foster the use of GRID and cloud computing platforms for remote sensing data processing, and to make available to a large audience advanced and innovative tools for DIn

  10. Design methodology for integrated downstream separation systems in an ethanol biorefinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh Rohani, Navid

    Energy security and environmental concerns have been the main drivers for a historic shift to biofuel production in transportation fuel industry. Biofuels should not only offer environmental advantages over the petroleum fuels they replace but also should be economically sustainable and viable. The so-called second generation biofuels such as ethanol which is the most produced biofuel are mostly derived from lignocellulosic biomasses. These biofuels are more difficult to produce than the first generation ones mainly due to recalcitrance of the feedstocks in extracting their sugar contents. Costly pre-treatment and fractionation stages are required to break down lignocellulosic feedstocks into their constituent elements. On the other hand the mixture produced in fermentation step in a biorefinery contains very low amount of product which makes the subsequent separation step more difficult and more energy consuming. In an ethanol biorefinery, the dilute fermentation broth requires huge operating cost in downstream separation for recovery of the product in a conventional distillation technique. Moreover, the non-ideal nature of ethanol-water mixture which forms an iseotrope at almost 95 wt%, hinders the attainment of the fuel grade ethanol (99.5 wt%). Therefore, an additional dehydration stage is necessary to purify the ethanol from its azeotropic composition to fuel-grade purity. In order to overcome the constraint pertaining to vapor-liquid equilibrium of ethanol-water separation, several techniques have been investigated and proposed in the industry. These techniques such as membrane-based technologies, extraction and etc. have not only sought to produce a pure fuel-grade ethanol but have also aimed at decreasing the energy consumption of this energy-intensive separation. Decreasing the energy consumption of an ethanol biorefinery is of paramount importance in improving its overall economics and in facilitating the way to displacing petroleum transportation fuel

  11. The role of a dambo in the hydrology of a catchment and the river network downstream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. von der Heyden

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Dambos are shallow, seasonally inundated wetlands and are a widespread landform in Central and Southern Africa. Owing to their importance in local agriculture and as a water resource, the hydrology of dambos is of considerable interest: varied, and sometimes contradictory, hydrological characteristics have been described in the literature. The issues in contention focus on the role of the dambo in (i the catchment evapotranspiration (ET budget, (ii flood flow retardation and attenuation, and (iii sustaining dry season flow to the river down-stream. In addition, both rainfall and groundwater have been identified as the dominant source of water to the dambo and various hydrogeological models have been proposed to describe the hydrological functions of the landform. In this paper, hydrological and geochemical data collected over a full hydrological year are used to investigate and describe the hydrological functions of a dambo in north-western Zambia. The Penman estimate of wetland ET was less than the ET from the miombo-wooded interfluve and the wetland has been shown to have little effect on flood flow retardation or attenuation. Discharge of water stored within the wetland contributed little to the dry season flow from the dambo, which was sustained primarily by groundwater discharge. Flow in a perched aquifer within the catchment soils contributed a large portion of baseflow during the rains and early dry season. This source ceased by the mid dry season, implying that the sustained middle to late dry season streamflow from the wetland is through discharge of a deeper aquifer within the underlying regolith or bedrock. This hypothesis is tested through an analysis of groundwater and wetland geochemistry. Various physical parameters, PHREEQC model results and end member mixing analysis (EMMA suggest strongly that the deep Upper Roan dolomite aquifer is the source of sustained discharge from the wetland. Keywords: dambo, hydrology, hydrogeology

  12. N-myc Downstream Regulated Gene 1 (NDRG1 Is Fused to ERG in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothee Pflueger

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A step toward the molecular classification of prostate cancer was the discovery of recurrent erythroblast transformation. specific rearrangements, most commonly fusing the androgen-regulated TMPRSS2 promoter to ERG. The TMPRSS2-ERG fusion is observed in around 90% of tumors that overexpress the oncogene ERG. The goal of the current study was to complete the characterization of these ERG-overexpressing prostate cancers. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse transcription.polymerase chain reaction assays, we screened 101 prostate cancers, identifying 34 cases (34% with the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion. Seven cases demonstrated ERG rearrangement by fluorescence in situ hybridization without the presence of TMPRSS2-ERG fusion messenger RNA transcripts. Screening for known 5' partners, we determined that three cases harbored the SLC45A3-ERG fusion. To discover novel 5' partners in these ERG-overexpressing and ERG-rearranged cases, we used paired-end RNA sequencing. We first confirmed the utility of this approach by identifying the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion in a known positive prostate cancer case and then discovered a novel fusion involving the androgen-inducible tumor suppressor, NDRG1 (N-myc downstream regulated gene 1, and ERG in two cases. Unlike TMPRSS2-ERG and SCL45A3-ERG fusions, the NDRG1-ERG fusion is predicted to encode a chimeric protein. Like TMPRSS2, SCL45A3 and NDRG1 are inducible not only by androgen but also by estrogen. This study demonstrates that most ERG-overexpressing prostate cancers harbor hormonally regulated TMPRSS2-ERG, SLC45A3-ERG, or NDRG1-ERG fusions. Broader implications of this study support the use of RNA sequencing to discover novel cancer translocations.

  13. Autophagic-lysosomal dysregulation downstream of cathepsin B inactivation in human skin fibroblasts exposed to UVA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamore, Sarah D; Wondrak, Georg T

    2012-01-01

    Recently, using 2D-DIGE proteomics we have identified cathepsin B as a novel target of UVA in human Hs27 skin fibroblasts. In response to chronic exposure to noncytotoxic doses of UVA (9.9 J cm(-2), twice a week, 3 weeks), photooxidative impairment of cathepsin B enzymatic activity occurred with accumulation of autofluorescent aggregates colocalizing with lysosomes, an effect mimicked by pharmacological antagonism of cathepsin B using the selective inhibitor CA074Me. Here, we have further explored the mechanistic involvement of cathepsin B inactivation in UVA-induced autophagic-lysosomal alterations using autophagy-directed PCR expression array analysis as a discovery tool. Consistent with lysosomal expansion, UVA upregulated cellular protein levels of the lysosomal marker glycoprotein Lamp-1, and increased levels of the lipidated autophagosomal membrane constituent LC3-II were detected. UVA did not alter expression of beclin 1 (BECN1), an essential factor for initiation of autophagy, but upregulation of p62 (sequestosome 1, SQSTM1), a selective autophagy substrate, and α-synuclein (SNCA), an autophagic protein substrate and aggresome component, was observed at the mRNA and protein level. Moreover, UVA downregulated transglutaminase-2 (TGM2), an essential enzyme involved in autophagolysosome maturation. Strikingly, UVA effects on Lamp-1, LC3-II, beclin 1, p62, α-synuclein, and transglutaminase-2 were mimicked by CA074Me treatment. Taken together, our data suggest that UVA-induced autophagic-lysosomal alterations occur as a consequence of impaired autophagic flux downstream of cathepsin B inactivation, a novel molecular mechanism potentially involved in UVA-induced skin photodamage. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry and Owner Societies 2012

  14. DUSP19, a downstream effector of leptin, inhibits chondrocyte apoptosis via dephosphorylating JNK during osteoarthritis pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Xu, Zhengli; Wang, Jialin; Xu, Shuogui

    2016-03-01

    Increased mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity has been found in human osteoarthritis (OA). Dual specificity protein phosphatase 19 (DUSP19), a member of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatases (MKPs), controls the activity of various MAPKs. This study was aimed to explore the function of DUSP19 during OA pathogenesis. Here, OA and healthy control data were downloaded from the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus database (GSE57218). Forty-five patients with OA and 25 healthy donors were enrolled in this study. A rat OA model was induced by anterior cruciate ligament transection. Primary cultured chondrocytes were treated with leptin (10 ng mL(-1)). Cell survival, cell apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were identified by CCK-8 and flow cytometry, respectively. In the cartilage of OA patients, DUSP19 was expressed in a lower level than in the cartilage of healthy control. The DUSP19 level was negatively correlated with leptin, which was confirmed by experiments in the rat OA model. Moreover, cell apoptosis and JNK activation in the rat cartilage were increased with the increasing of leptin levels and the decreasing of DUSP19 mRNA levels. In primary culture chondrocytes, exogenous leptin suppressed DUSP19 expression. The ectopic expression of DUSP19 significantly ameliorated leptin-induced apoptosis in damaged chondrocytes, accompanied by the reduced production of ROS. Moreover, the activity of JNK stimulated by leptin was suppressed by DUSP19 overexpression. The present study indicated that DUSP19, a downstream of leptin, inhibited apoptosis of chondrocytes through dephosphorylating JNK.

  15. HPAEC-PAD quantification of Haemophilus influenzae type b polysaccharide in upstream and downstream samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Put, Robert M F; de Haan, Alex; van den IJssel, Jan G M; Hamidi, Ahd; Beurret, Michel

    2015-11-27

    Due to the rapidly increasing introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and other conjugate vaccines worldwide during the last decade, reliable and robust analytical methods are needed for the quantitative monitoring of intermediate samples generated during fermentation (upstream processing, USP) and purification (downstream processing, DSP) of polysaccharide vaccine components. This study describes the quantitative characterization of in-process control (IPC) samples generated during the fermentation and purification of the capsular polysaccharide (CPS), polyribosyl-ribitol-phosphate (PRP), derived from Hib. Reliable quantitative methods are necessary for all stages of production; otherwise accurate process monitoring and validation is not possible. Prior to the availability of high performance anion exchange chromatography methods, this polysaccharide was predominantly quantified either with immunochemical methods, or with the colorimetric orcinol method, which shows interference from fermentation medium components and reagents used during purification. Next to an improved high performance anion exchange chromatography-pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD) method, using a modified gradient elution, both the orcinol assay and high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) analyses were evaluated. For DSP samples, it was found that the correlation between the results obtained by HPAEC-PAD specific quantification of the PRP monomeric repeat unit released by alkaline hydrolysis, and those from the orcinol method was high (R(2)=0.8762), and that it was lower between HPAEC-PAD and HPSEC results. Additionally, HPSEC analysis of USP samples yielded surprisingly comparable results to those obtained by HPAEC-PAD. In the early part of the fermentation, medium components interfered with the different types of analysis, but quantitative HPSEC data could still be obtained, although lacking the specificity of the HPAEC-PAD method. Thus, the HPAEC

  16. Reduced expression of N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 2 in human thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Jianjun

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NDRG2 (N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 2 was initially cloned in our laboratory. Previous results have shown that NDRG2 expressed differentially in normal and cancer tissues. Specifically, NDRG2 mRNA was down-regulated or undetectable in several human cancers, and over-expression of NDRG2 inhibited the proliferation of cancer cells. NDRG2 also exerts important functions in cell differentiation and tumor suppression. However, it remains unclear whether NDRG2 participates in carcinogenesis of the thyroid. Methods In this study, we investigated the expression profile of human NDRG2 in thyroid adenomas and carcinomas, by examining tissues from individuals with thyroid adenomas (n = 40 and carcinomas (n = 35, along with corresponding normal tissues. Immunohistochemistry, quantitative RT-PCR and western blot methods were utilized to determine both the protein and mRNA expression status of Ndrg2 and c-Myc. Results The immunostaining analysis revealed a decrease of Ndrg2 expression in thyroid carcinomas. When comparing adenomas or carcinomas with adjacent normal tissue from the same individual, the mRNA expression level of NDRG2 was significantly decreased in thyroid carcinoma tissues, while there was little difference in adenoma tissues. This differential expression was confirmed at the protein level by western blotting. However, there were no significant correlations of NDRG2 expression with gender, age, different histotypes of thyroid cancers or distant metastases. Conclusion Our data indicates that NDRG2 may participate in thyroid carcinogenesis. This finding provides novel insight into the important role of NDRG2 in the development of thyroid carcinomas. Future studies are needed to address whether the down-regulation of NDRG2 is a cause or a consequence of the progression from a normal thyroid to a carcinoma.

  17. A tale of three islands: Downstream natural iron fertilization in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J.; Popova, E. E.; Srokosz, M. A.; Yool, A.

    2016-05-01

    Iron limitation of primary productivity prevails across much of the Southern Ocean but there are exceptions; in particular, the phytoplankton blooms associated with the Kerguelen Plateau, Crozet Islands, and South Georgia. These blooms occur annually, fertilized by iron and nutrient-rich shelf waters that are transported downstream from the islands. Here we use a high-resolution (1/12°) ocean general circulation model and Lagrangian particle tracking to investigate whether inter-annual variability in the potential lateral advection of iron could explain the inter-annual variability in the spatial extent of the blooms. Comparison with ocean color data, 1998-2007, suggests that iron fertilization via advection can explain the extent of each island's annual bloom, but only the inter-annual variability of the Crozet bloom. The area that could potentially be fertilized by iron from Kerguelen was much larger than the bloom, suggesting that there is another primary limiting factor, potentially silicate, that controls the inter-annual variability of bloom spatial extent. For South Georgia, there are differences in the year-to-year timing of advection and consequently fertilization, but no clear explanation of the inter-annual variability observed in the bloom's spatial extent has been identified. The model results suggest that the Kerguelen and Crozet blooms are terminated by nutrient exhaustion, probably iron and or silicate, whereas the deepening of the mixed layer in winter terminates the South Georgia bloom. Therefore, iron fertilization via lateral advection alone can explain the annual variability of the Crozet bloom, but not fully that of the Kerguelen and South Georgia blooms.

  18. Pesticides in blood from spectacled caiman (Caiman crocodilus) downstream of banana plantations in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Paul B C; Woudneh, Million B; Ross, Peter S

    2013-11-01

    Spectacled caiman (Caiman crocodilus) are fish-eating crocodilians that inhabit freshwater habitat in tropical regions of the Americas. To assess the exposure of caiman to pesticides from banana plantations, the authors collected whole blood samples (30 mL) from 14 adult caiman that were captured in the North Atlantic region of Costa Rica. Blood samples were analyzed for 70 legacy- and current-use pesticides and breakdown products using newly developed ultra-trace, high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). Caiman accumulated pesticides ranked by concentration as dieldrin > permethrin > mirex > 4,4'-DDE > alpha-endosulfan > heptachlor epoxide > oxychlordane > heptachlor > cypermethrin. Caiman within the high-intensity banana crop watershed of Rio Suerte had higher pesticide burdens relative to other more remote locations (F = 12.79; p = 0.00). Pesticide concentration decreased with distance from upstream banana plantations in this river system (F = 20.76; p = 0.00). Caiman body condition was negatively correlated with total pesticide concentrations (F = 6.23; p = 0.02) and with proximity to banana plantations (F = 5.05; p = 0.04). This suggests that either pesticides elicited toxic effects in caiman, resulting in diminished overall health, or that the quantity or quality of their prey was reduced by pesticides downstream of plantation waterways. The authors' results indicate that pesticide use in banana plantations is impacting a high trophic level species inhabiting one of the most important wilderness areas in Costa Rica (Tortuguero National Park). © 2013 SETAC.

  19. Vector averaging occurs downstream from learning in smooth pursuit eye movements of monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlon, M; Lisberger, S G

    1999-10-15

    How are sensory-motor transformations organized in a cortical motor system? In general, sensory information is transformed through a variety of signal processing operations in the context of distinct coordinate frameworks. We studied the interaction of two distinct operations in pursuit eye movements, learning and vector-averaging, to gain insight into their underlying coordinate frameworks and their sequence in sensory-motor processing. Learning was induced in the initiation of pursuit eye movements by targets that moved initially at one speed for 100 msec and then increased or decreased to a sustained final speed. Vector averaging was studied by comparing the initial eye acceleration evoked by the simultaneous motion of two targets with that evoked by each target singly. Learning caused specific effects on the direction of the vector-averaged responses to two-target stimuli that included one target moving in the direction used to induce learning. Learned increases or decreases in eye acceleration caused the direction of the responses to two-targets to rotate toward or away from the learning direction. Learning also caused nonspecific changes in the responses to two-target stimuli. After any learning protocol, two-target responses usually became smaller, and their directions rotated away from the axis of the target motion used for learning. Quantitative analysis showed that the specific effects of learning were predicted most closely by a model in which vector averaging occurs downstream from the site(s) of learning. We suggest that the pursuit system creates parallel commands for potential movements to each of the targets in two-target stimuli, and that learning occurs in the coordinates of the potential movements.

  20. A large novel deletion downstream of PAX6 gene in a Chinese family with ocular coloboma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Guo

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The paired box gene 6 (PAX6 is an essential transcription factor for eye formation. Genetic alterations in PAX6 can lead to various ocular malformations including aniridia. The purpose of this study was to identify genetic defects as the underlying cause of familial ocular coloboma in a large Chinese family. METHODS: After linkage analysis was carried out in this family, all exons of PAX6 in the proband were sequenced by the Sanger sequencing technique. Then the genome of the proband was evaluated by a microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH. Quantitative real-time PCR was applied to verify the abnormal aCGH findings. RESULTS: All patients presented bilateral partial coloboma of iris, severe congenital nystagmus, hyperpresbyopia and congenital posterior polar cataracts. Two-point linkage analysis in the autosomal dominant family showed loss of heterozygosity at the D11S914 locus. There was no pathogenic mutation in the exons of PAX6. The aCGH analysis revealed a 681 kb heterozygous deletion on chromosome 11p13. Quantitative real-time PCR verified the deletion in the patients and further confirmed this deletion cosegregation with the ocular coloboma phenotype in the family. CONCLUSIONS: The 681 kb large deletion of chromosome 11p13 downstream of PAX6 is the genetic cause of the familial ocular coloboma in this large Chinese family. aCGH should be applied if there is a negative result for the mutation detection of PAX6 in patients with ocular coloboma.

  1. Characterization of the efficiency of sedimentation basins downstream of harvested peat bogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson-Do, Myriam; St-Hilaire, André

    2015-04-01

    Peat harvesting is a very lucrative industry in the provinces of Quebec and New-Brunswick (Canada). Peat enters in many potting mix used for horticulture. However, harvesting this resource has some impacts on the environment. First, industries need to drain the peat bog to dry the superficial layer. Then, it is harvested with industrial vacuums and the underlying layer is allowed to dry. The drained water is laden with suspended sediments (mostly organic peat fibers) that may affect biota of the stream where it is discharged. To counter the problem, this water does not go directly on the stream but first flows through a sedimentation basin, built to reduce suspended sediment loads. This work focuses on characterizing and eventually modeling the efficiency of those sedimentation basins. Seven basins were studied in Rivière-du-Loup, St-Valère and Escoumins (Quebec, Canada). They each have a different ratio basin area/drained area (4.7 10-4 to 20.3 10-4). To continuously monitor the sediment loads (calculated from sediment concentrations and discharge) entering and leaving basins, a nephelometer and a level logger were installed in the water column upstream and downstream of sedimentation basins. Their trapping efficiency was measured during the ice-free period (May to October) and for each significant rain event, since it is known that the rain and subsequent runoff induce most of the peat transport in and out of the basin. Results show that the event efficiency decreases as the basin is filled up with trapped sediments. For one basin, the efficiency was 85August. Trapping efficiency can be used as a tool to estimate basin dimensions. This has been done for municipal sedimentation ponds that trap minerals and will be adapted to the current context, where the dominant sediment is organic.

  2. Long-term impacts on macroinvertebrates downstream of reclaimed mountaintop mining valley fills in Central Appalachia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pond, Gregory J; Passmore, Margaret E; Pointon, Nancy D; Felbinger, John K; Walker, Craig A; Krock, Kelly J G; Fulton, Jennifer B; Nash, Whitney L

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies have documented adverse effects to biological communities downstream of mountaintop coal mining and valley fills (VF), but few data exist on the longevity of these impacts. We sampled 15 headwater streams with VFs reclaimed 11-33 years prior to 2011 and sampled seven local reference sites that had no VFs. We collected chemical, habitat, and benthic macroinvertebrate data in April 2011; additional chemical samples were collected in September 2011. To assess ecological condition, we compared VF and reference abiotic and biotic data using: (1) ordination to detect multivariate differences, (2) benthic indices (a multimetric index and an observed/expected predictive model) calibrated to state reference conditions to detect impairment, and (3) correlation and regression analysis to detect relationships between biotic and abiotic data. Although VF sites had good instream habitat, nearly 90 % of these streams exhibited biological impairment. VF sites with higher index scores were co-located near unaffected tributaries; we suggest that these tributaries were sources of sensitive taxa as drifting colonists. There were clear losses of expected taxa across most VF sites and two functional feeding groups (% scrapers and %shredders) were significantly altered. Percent VF and forested area were related to biological quality but varied more than individual ions and specific conductance. Within the subset of VF sites, other descriptors (e.g., VF age, site distance from VF, the presence of impoundments, % forest) had no detectable relationships with biological condition. Although these VFs were constructed pursuant to permits and regulatory programs that have as their stated goals that (1) mined land be reclaimed and restored to its original use or a use of higher value, and (2) mining does not cause or contribute to violations of water quality standards, we found sustained ecological damage in headwaters streams draining VFs long after reclamation was completed.

  3. Environmental change in a modified catchment downstream of a gold mine, Solomon Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Simon; Kvennefors, Charlotte; Jacob, Krista; Kera, Joshua; Grinham, Alistair

    2017-12-01

    Solomon Islands is rapidly developing its natural resource exploitation sector, but data needed to assess consequent environmental impacts are scarce. We assessed catchments surrounding the Gold Ridge gold mine (Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands) and found that extensive changes in river course, and water and sediment quality have occurred downstream of the gold mine since its development. Sediment run-off from exposed areas associated with the mine pit has increased, elevating turbidity (up to 2450 NTU) and metal and arsenic levels, with levels of the latter being up to 0.141 mg/L in surface waters and 265 mg/kg in sediments. An overfull, inoperative tailings storage facility associated with the currently inactive gold mine with fluctuating arsenic levels (up to 0.087 mg/L in the water; 377 mg/kg in the sediment) presents an ongoing threat to the environment. Arsenic, due to its toxicity, appears to be the greatest threat, with sediment and water guideline levels in rivers exceeded 10-fold and exceeded nearly 20-fold in the tailings dam sediments. Despite elevated metal and arsenic content in the area, no toxic inorganic arsenic was found to have bioaccumulated in locally harvested food. In summary, the natural environment surrounding the Gold Ridge mine has been modified substantially and requires an ongoing monitoring program to ensure the ecosystem services of food and water for the local communities continue to be safe. This study informs not only the local area but also provides a microcosm of the broader global challenges facing the regulation of extractive industries in proximity to subsistence communities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The impact of Indonesian peatland degradation on downstream marine ecosystems and the global carbon cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Jesse F; Hohn, Sönke; Rixen, Tim; Baum, Antje; Merico, Agostino

    2016-01-01

    Tropical peatlands are among the most space-efficient stores of carbon on Earth containing approximately 89 Gt C. Of this, 57 Gt (65%) are stored in Indonesian peatlands. Large-scale exploitation of land, including deforestation and drainage for the establishment of oil palm plantations, is changing the carbon balance of Indonesian peatlands, turning them from a natural sink to a source via outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere and leakage of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) into the coastal ocean. The impacts of this perturbation to the coastal environment and at the global scale are largely unknown. Here, we evaluate the downstream effects of released Indonesian peat carbon on coastal ecosystems and on the global carbon cycle. We use a biogeochemical box model in combination with novel and literature observations to investigate the impact of different carbon emission scenarios on the combined ocean-atmosphere system. The release of all carbon stored in the Indonesian peat pool, considered as a worst-case scenario, will increase atmospheric pCO2 by 8 ppm to 15 ppm within the next 200 years. The expected impact on the Java Sea ecosystems is most significant on the short term (over a few hundred years) and is characterized by an increase of 3.3% in phytoplankton, 32% in seagrass biomass, and 5% decrease in coral biomass. On the long term, however, the coastal ecosystems will recover to reach near pre-excursion conditions. Our results suggest that the ultimate fate of the peat carbon is in the deep ocean with 69% of it landing in the deep DIC pool after 1000 years, but the effects on the global ocean carbonate chemistry will be marginal. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Pharmacologic treatment of downstream of tyrosine kinase 7 congenital myasthenic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witting, Nanna; Vissing, John

    2014-03-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs) are increasingly recognized as causes of muscle fatigue and weakness. However, treatment of individual syndromes has been described only in small case series. To analyze the information published thus far concerning the effect of pharmacologic treatment of one of the most common subtypes of CMS, downstream of tyrosine kinase 7 (DOK7) CMS. In a search of the PubMed database, we found 16 publications describing the response to medication in 122 individuals with DOK7 deficiency. The last search was performed August 15, 2013. If more than 1 article had been published by the same group, a comparison of the participants in the studies was made, and data appearing more than once were excluded. Positive effects were observed in 6 of 66 patients who received an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, 65 of 69 patients who received ephedrine or salbutamol, 18 of 29 who were given 3,4-diaminopyridine, and 13 of 16 individuals who received a combination of these drugs. Our analysis found no evidence that age at disease onset, age at treatment start, drug dosage, or mutation type influenced treatment results. The magnitude of treatment effect with ephedrine or salbutamol seems to increase gradually, peaking after approximately 6 to 8 months. Treatment with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors resulted in worsened conditions for most patients. This analysis suggests that (1) ephedrine or salbutamol is the first choice of treatment in DOK7 CMS; (2) 3,4-diaminopyridine may provide additional benefi; (3) it is never too late to initiate treatment; and (4) in contrast to acquired myasthenia gravis, treatment with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors should be avoided in DOK7 CMS.

  6. Approach of fuzzy logic in the preliminary risk analysis of the upstream and downstream lines of an offshore petroleum production unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Claudio B. [PETROBRAS Transporte S.A. (TRANSPETRO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pinho, Edson [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Seropedica, RJ (Brazil); Maia Neto, Luiz

    2009-07-01

    This work consists of the application of a model of qualitative risk assessment based in fuzzy logic for the judgment of criticality of the scenarios of accident identified through the technique of preliminary hazard analysis in the upstream and downstream of an offshore oil production unit already in operation. The model based on fuzzy logic acts as substitute to the traditional Risks Matrix that uses subjective concepts for the categories of expected severity and frequency of the accidents. The structure of the employed model consists of 7 input variables, an internal variable and an output variable, all linked in accordance with the modules of analysis for each type of accident. The developed base of knowledge, that complete the expert system consists of membership functions developed for each one of the variables and a set of 219 distributed inference rules in the 7 different modules. The developed knowledge base, which incorporates the mechanisms of logical reasoning of specialists, assists and guides, with efficiency, the teams that carry through the preliminary hazard analyses with the use of a computer program having previously inserted routines. The employed model incorporates in the knowledge base of the program the existing concepts in the categories of frequency and severity, under the form of membership functions of the linguistic variable and the set of rules. With this, scales subdivided in ranges, defined on the basis of the existing direction present in the risks matrices are used to define the actions to be taken for the analyzed accident scenarios. (author)

  7. Teaching Speech Acts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teaching Speech Acts

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I argue that pragmatic ability must become part of what we teach in the classroom if we are to realize the goals of communicative competence for our students. I review the research on pragmatics, especially those articles that point to the effectiveness of teaching pragmatics in an explicit manner, and those that posit methods for teaching. I also note two areas of scholarship that address classroom needs—the use of authentic data and appropriate assessment tools. The essay concludes with a summary of my own experience teaching speech acts in an advanced-level Portuguese class.

  8. The Act of Walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Maria Quvang Harck; Olesen, Mette; Helmer, Pernille Falborg

    2014-01-01

    perception of ‘walkability’ is based upon a subjective judgement of different physical factors, such as sidewalk width, traffic volumes and building height (Ewing and Handy 2009:67). And iIn order to understand the act of walking it is therefore necessary to create a vocabulary to understand how and why...... internalize the common norms and values of pedestrian culture and are influenced by their physical environment when walking. In conclusion the chapter questions and discusses how this knowledge could be used in future planning practices....

  9. Population structure and dynamics of Gammarus fossarum (Amphipoda) upstream and downstream from effluents of sewage treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladewig, V; Jungmann, D; Köhler, H-R; Schirling, M; Triebskorn, R; Nagel, R

    2006-04-01

    Two streams in Germany (Körsch and Lockwitzbach), each with two sampling sites above and below a sewage treatment plant (STP) discharging effluent, were investigated. Sampling sites were characterized, and exposure monitoring for chemicals with known or assumed endocrine disrupting potential was carried out. Both the population structure and the population dynamics of Gammarus fossarum were examined. The physicochemical parameters measured at the sampling sites of the Lockwitzbach and Körsch streams were found not to reach levels having an acute toxic impact on the development of gammarids. The calculated estrogenic potential in the stream water was 22- to 35-fold higher at the downstream site of the Körsch compared with the other sampling sites, mainly because of the concentrations of 17alpha-ethinylestradiol on two sampling dates. At both streams, an influence of the respective STP effluent on the sex ratio of G. fossarum was not observed. Moreover, intersexuality was not induced by these effluents. Differences in the structure and dynamics of G. fossarum populations were more pronounced at the Körsch than at the Lockwitzbach. At the downstream sampling site at the Körsch, gammarids reached their highest abundances. Particularly at the downstream sampling site of the Körsch, the proportion of breeding female gammarids and the proportion of juvenile gammarids in the smallest body length class were decreased compared with upstream. Adult gammarids were larger from the Lockwitzbach downstream site, but they were smaller from the Körsch downstream site compared with the respective upstream site. At the Körsch, the earlier onset of the autumnal reproductive resting period could be caused by the influence of the STP effluent.

  10. 76 FR 59073 - Privacy Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-23

    ... 32 CFR Part 1901 Privacy Act AGENCY: Central Intelligence Agency. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: Consistent with the Privacy Act (PA), the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) has undertaken and completed a... Act (PA), the CIA has undertaken and completed a review of its public PA regulations. As a result of...

  11. 78 FR 73466 - Privacy Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-06

    ... CORPORATION 22 CFR Part 707 Privacy Act AGENCY: Overseas Private Investment Corporation. ACTION: Notice of... (``OPIC'') Privacy Act (``PA'') regulations by making substantive and administrative changes. These... confidential or inappropriate for public disclosure. Regulatory Flexibility Act (5 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) Pursuant...

  12. Speech Acts and Rhetorical Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, Martin, Jr.

    Some authorities wish to persuasively define rhetoric as formal or public speeches, while others hold to a more traditional and broader definition pointing to the relevance of speech-act theory to support them. Central to speech-act theory is the illocutionary act (uttering at least one sentence of some language under certain conditions). Two…

  13. Speech Acts and Conversational Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geis, Michael L.

    This book unites speech act theory and conversation analysis to advance a theory of conversational competence, called the Dynamic Speech Act Theory (DSAT). In contrast to traditional speech act theory that focuses almost exclusively on intuitive assessments of isolated, constructed examples, this theory is predicated on the assumption that speech…

  14. Surface water - groundwater relationship in the downstream part of the Komadougou Yobe River (Eastern Sahelian Niger)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hector, B.; Genthon, P.; Luxereau, A.; Descloîtres, M.; Moumouni Moussa, A.; Abdou, H.

    2012-04-01

    The Komadougou Yobe (KY) is a temporary river meandering on nearly 100 km along the Niger/Nigeria border in its lower part, before reaching the endoreic Lake Chad. There, seasonal flow from July to January is related to rainfall amount on the upstream Jos Plateau, Nigeria. In the semi-arid downstream area (350 mm annual rainfall in Diffa, Niger) the KY is the main source of recharge for the sandy quaternary aquifer which is used both for irrigation and for drinking water supply. The borders of the KY in Niger are subjected to an agricultural development involving intensive irrigated cropping of sweet pepper mainly produced for sale in Nigeria. Irrigation waters are mainly extracted from the KY, and therefore irrigation must stop when the River runs dry, but irrigation from wells is now developing with an increased risk of soil salinization. The flow rate of the KY has been impacted both by the 80s and 90s droughts, also underwent by the entire Sahel, and by the building up of a series of dams starting from the 70s in Nigeria. Therefore the KY and its relations with the underlying groundwaters should be carefully monitored to provide guidelines for policy makers in charge of the development of this area. However, in this remote area, data are scarce and often discontinuous : there are for example no continuous groundwater level data from before the drought. As part of the Lake Chad French IRD project, series of campaigns involving water level, exploration geophysics, gravity, soil sampling and social studies have been carried out between 2008 and 2011. They allowed to build a numerical model for groundwater-river interactions which in some instances has been compared with previously recorded data. This model is then forced with theoretical climatic senarii based on humid 60s data and data from the drought period. This allows discussing the relationships between the river and groundwaters in a changing climate. Our results militate for the setting up of a limited

  15. RFX2 is a candidate downstream amplifier of A-MYB regulation in mouse spermatogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kistler Malathi K

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian spermatogenesis involves formation of haploid cells from the male germline and then a complex morphological transformation to generate motile sperm. Focusing on meiotic prophase, some tissue-specific transcription factors are known (A-MYB or suspected (RFX2 to play important roles in modulating gene expression in pachytene spermatocytes. The current work was initiated to identify both downstream and upstream regulatory connections for Rfx2. Results Searches of pachytene up-regulated genes identified high affinity RFX binding sites (X boxes in promoter regions of several new genes: Adam5, Pdcl2, and Spag6. We confirmed a strong promoter-region X-box for Alf, a germ cell-specific variant of general transcription factor TFIIA. Using Alf as an example of a target gene, we showed that its promoter is stimulated by RFX2 in transfected cells and used ChIP analysis to show that the promoter is occupied by RFX2 in vivo. Turning to upstream regulation of the Rfx2 promoter, we identified a cluster of three binding sites (MBS for the MYB family of transcription factors. Because testis is one of the few sites of A-myb expression, and because spermatogenesis arrests in pachytene in A-myb knockout mice, the MBS cluster implicates Rfx2 as an A-myb target. Electrophoretic gel-shift, ChIP, and co-transfection assays all support a role for these MYB sites in Rfx2 expression. Further, Rfx2 expression was virtually eliminated in A-myb knockout testes. Immunohistology on testis sections showed that A-MYB expression is up-regulated only after pachytene spermatocytes have clearly moved away from the tubule wall, which correlates with onset of RFX2 expression, whereas B-MYB expression, by contrast, is prevalent only in earlier spermatocytes and spermatogonia. Conclusion With an expanding list of likely target genes, RFX2 is potentially an important transcriptional regulator in pachytene spermatocytes. Rfx2 itself is a good candidate to be

  16. Activated Ras alters lens and corneal development through induction of distinct downstream targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reneker Lixing

    2010-01-01

    results suggest that Ras activation a induces distinct sets of downstream targets in the lens and cornea resulting in distinct cellular responses and b is sufficient for initiation but not completion of lens fiber differentiation.

  17. DORIS downstream service: a support to civil defence autorithies in landslides and subsidence risk management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciampalini, A.; Del Ventisette, C.; Moretti, S.; Manunta, M.; Calò, F.; Paglia, L.; Ardizzone, F.; Guzzetti, F.; Rossi, M.; Bellotti, F.; Colombo, D.; Strozzi, T.; Wegmuller, U.; Mora, O.; Sanches, F.

    2012-04-01

    DORIS is an advanced FP7-EU project for the design of a pre-operational advanced downstream service aimed at detecting, mapping, monitoring and forecasting surface deformations, including landslides and ground subsidence, by exploiting multiple Earth Observation (EO) and ground-based (non-EO) data technologies. Ground deformations are the result of a variety of natural and human-induced causes and triggers. These phenomena are frequent and widespread in Europe, causing extensive economic damage to private properties and public assets and their social impact is relevant. In Europe, the large number of areas affected by ground deformations, the frequency and extent of the triggering events, the extent of the impact and the magnitude of the damage, make it mandatory a multiscale, systemic approach. Further, the complexity and extent of the problem is such that it cannot be tackled (and solved) at an individual, site-specific scale, or using a single technique or methodology. The problem can be approached only through the integration of data and information taken at different scales, and with the collaborative efforts of multiple expertise. With this respect, the several satellite sensors now available, including about forty passive - optical - sensors and nine active - synthetic aperture radar (SAR) - sensors, provide valuable technological alternatives to traditional methods and tools to detect, map, monitor and forecast ground deformations over large areas and with the required accuracy. The temporal continuity and the geometric compatibility among time series of ERS-1, ERS-2 and ENVISAT data represents an unprecedented opportunity to generate very long time series of ground deformations. This provides exclusive information for an improved understanding of the long term behavior of slow and very-slow ground deformation phenomena. In this context, DORIS intends to exploit the extensive catalogues of multiple C-band SAR sensors to provide, via a joint analysis

  18. Conversation, speech acts, and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtgraves, Thomas

    2008-03-01

    Speakers frequently have specific intentions that they want others to recognize (Grice, 1957). These specific intentions can be viewed as speech acts (Searle, 1969), and I argue that they play a role in long-term memory for conversation utterances. Five experiments were conducted to examine this idea. Participants in all experiments read scenarios ending with either a target utterance that performed a specific speech act (brag, beg, etc.) or a carefully matched control. Participants were more likely to falsely recall and recognize speech act verbs after having read the speech act version than after having read the control version, and the speech act verbs served as better recall cues for the speech act utterances than for the controls. Experiment 5 documented individual differences in the encoding of speech act verbs. The results suggest that people recognize and retain the actions that people perform with their utterances and that this is one of the organizing principles of conversation memory.

  19. Triple acting radial seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Todd A [West Palm Beach, FL; Carella, John A [Jupiter, FL

    2012-03-13

    A triple acting radial seal used as an interstage seal assembly in a gas turbine engine, where the seal assembly includes an interstage seal support extending from a stationary inner shroud of a vane ring, the interstage seal support includes a larger annular radial inward facing groove in which an outer annular floating seal assembly is secured for radial displacement, and the outer annular floating seal assembly includes a smaller annular radial inward facing groove in which an inner annular floating seal assembly is secured also for radial displacement. A compliant seal is secured to the inner annular floating seal assembly. The outer annular floating seal assembly encapsulates the inner annular floating seal assembly which is made from a very low alpha material in order to reduce thermal stress.

  20. Normative acts management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Ardeleanu

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of the normative act amongst the formal law sources system is the result of the constructive activity of specialized bodies, designated by the Constitution, by laws or by regulations of normative power (having the right of drafting norms of generally mandatory power. Such bodies are named lawgiving bodies (also referred to as the "lawgiver" or "lawmaker" and they are first of all the bodies of the lawgiving power, entitled to issue on a primary and originator level the fundamental social relations in a society, to organize the juridical order of a nation or of a community of nations. The activity of these bodies is carried out under rules of juridical technique and in accordance with the general purposes imposed by the proper functioning of the social mechanism regarding the coexistence of social freedoms.

  1. Virtual Acts of Balance!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anders Koed

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of official documents and white papers pertaining to the two web-portals The Policy Grid Project and FEED that are launched by the UK and the EU respectively. The aim of the portals is to filter and synthesize information relevant for policy discussions and thereby...... Construction of Technology' and it shows how the framing of the portals and the concrete digital choices taken in relation to the infrastructure are influenced by the social intentions of relevant social groups as well as by the technical limitations on computers abilities to process semantic data....... It is especially emphasized how technical web-ontologies implicitly carries with them deeper philosophical ontologies about phanomena such as 'politic', 'scientific intentionality' and 'freedom'. The compromise between these technical influences and the social intentions is described as a 'virtual act of balance...

  2. Identification of ligand-selective peptidic ActRIIB-antagonists using phage display technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Kotaro; Kanematsu-Yamaki, Yoko; Kamada, Yusuke; Oka, Masahiro; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Miwa, Masanori; Asami, Taiji; Inooka, Hiroshi

    2017-09-01

    ActRIIB (activin receptor type-2B) is an activin receptor subtype constitutively expressed in the whole body, playing a role in cellular proliferation, differentiation, and metabolism. For its various physiological activities, ActRIIB interacts with activin and multiple other ligands including myostatin (MSTN), growth differentiation factor 11 (GDF11), and bone morphogenetic protein 9 (BMP9). Notably, the protein-protein interaction (PPI) between ActRIIB and MSTN negatively controls muscular development. Therefore, this PPI has been targeted for effective treatment of muscle degenerative diseases such as muscular dystrophy and sarcopenia. Here, we report the identification of ligand-selective peptidic ActRIIB-antagonists by phage display technology. Our peptides bound to the extracellular domain of ActRIIB, inhibited PPIs between ActRIIB expressed on the cell surface and its ligands, and subsequently suppressed activation of Smad that serves as the downstream signal of the ActRIIB pathway. Interestingly, these peptidic antagonists displayed different ligand selectivities; the AR2mini peptide inhibited multiple ligands (activin A, MSTN, GDF11, and BMP9), AR9 inhibited MSTN and GDF11, while AR8 selectively inhibited MSTN. This is the first report of artificial peptidic ActRIIB-antagonists possessing ligand-selectivity.

  3. Genome-wide identification of GLABRA3 downstream genes for anthocyanin biosynthesis and trichome formation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chenhao; Li, Dong; Jin, Changyu; Duan, Shaowei; Qi, Shuanghui; Liu, Kaige; Wang, Hanchen; Ma, Haoli; Hai, Jiangbo; Chen, Mingxun

    2017-04-01

    GLABRA3 (GL3), a bHLH transcription factor, has previously proved to be involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis and trichome formation in Arabidopsis, however, its downstream targeted genes are still largely unknown. Here, we found that GL3 was widely present in Arabidopsis vegetative and reproductive organs. New downstream targeted genes of GL3 for anthocyanin biosynthesis and trichome formation were identified in young shoots and expanding true leaves by RNA sequencing. GL3-mediated gene expression was tissue specific in the two biological processes. This study provides new clues to further understand the GL3-mediated regulatory network of anthocyanin biosynthesis and trichome formation in Arabidopsis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. An experimental study on the flow stabilization in the downstream region of a butterfly-type valve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.W. [Kumoh National University of Technology Graduate School, Kumi (Korea); Lee, S.W. [Kumoh National University, Kumi (Korea)

    2000-11-01

    A flow stabilizer, which is made of a honeycomb and three different mesh screens, is located downstream of a butterfly-type valve, for the reduction of flow disturbances behind the valve. Mean flow and turbulence measurements as well as flow visualizations are conducted in the downstream region of the flow stabilizer. The result shows that the honeycomb reduces the secondary flow significantly, but deepens the non-uniformity of the streamwise velocity component and turbulence. The mesh screens considerably reduce the turbulence and enhance the uniformity of mean velocities. The combination of the honeycomb and three mesh screens results in an efficient reduction in the flow disturbances. In addition, the flow stabilizer proves to have a good performance in the suppression of turbulence at a short distance. (author). 20 refs., 9 figs.

  5. Behavior, passage, and downstream migration of juvenile Chinook salmon from Detroit Reservoir to Portland, Oregon, 2014–15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Tobias J.; Beeman, John W.; Hansen, Amy C.; Hansel, Hal C.; Hansen, Gabriel S.; Hatton, Tyson W.; Kofoot, Eric E.; Sholtis, Matthew D.; Sprando, Jamie M.

    2015-11-16

    An evaluation was conducted to estimate dam passage survival of juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) at Detroit Dam during a period of spill. To estimate dam passage survival, we used a paired-release recapture study design and released groups of tagged fish upstream (997 fish) and downstream (625 fish) of Detroit Dam. A total of 43 fish (6.8 percent) passed Detroit Dam from the upstream release group and passage occurred through regulating outlets (54.8 percent), spill bays (31.0 percent), and turbines (14.3 percent). We do not present dam passage survival estimates from 2014 because these estimates would have been highly uncertain due to the low number of fish that passed Detroit Dam during the study. Secondary objectives were addressed using data collected from tagged fish that were released at the downstream release site.

  6. The NAC domain-containing protein, GmNAC6, is a downstream component of the ER stress- and osmotic stress-induced NRP-mediated cell-death signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinheiro Guilherme L

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is a major signaling organelle, which integrates a variety of responses against physiological stresses. In plants, one such stress-integrating response is the N-rich protein (NRP-mediated cell death signaling pathway, which is synergistically activated by combined ER stress and osmotic stress signals. Despite the potential of this integrated signaling to protect plant cells against different stress conditions, mechanistic knowledge of the pathway is lacking, and downstream components have yet to be identified. Results In the present investigation, we discovered an NAC domain-containing protein from soybean, GmNAC6 (Glycine max NAC6, to be a downstream component of the integrated pathway. Similar to NRP-A and NRP-B, GmNAC6 is induced by ER stress and osmotic stress individually, but requires both signals for full activation. Transient expression of GmNAC6 promoted cell death and hypersensitive-like responses in planta. GmNAC6 and NRPs also share overlapping responses to biotic signals, but the induction of NRPs peaked before the increased accumulation of GmNAC6 transcripts. Consistent with the delayed kinetics of GmNAC6 induction, increased levels of NRP-A and NRP-B transcripts induced promoter activation and the expression of the GmNAC6 gene. Conclusions Collectively, our results biochemically link GmNAC6 to the ER stress- and osmotic stress-integrating cell death response and show that GmNAC6 may act downstream of the NRPs.

  7. Bitter, sweet and umami taste receptors and downstream signaling effectors: Expression in embryonic and growing chicken gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheled-Shoval, Shira L; Druyan, Shelly; Uni, Zehava

    2015-08-01

    Taste perception is a crucial biological mechanism affecting food and water choices and consumption in the animal kingdom. Bitter taste perception is mediated by a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family-the taste 2 receptors (T2R)-and their downstream proteins, whereas sweet and umami tastes are mediated by the GPCR family -taste 1 receptors (T1R) and their downstream proteins. Taste receptors and their downstream proteins have been identified in extra-gustatory tissues in mammals, such as the lungs and gastrointestinal tract (GIT), and their GIT activation has been linked with different metabolic and endocrinic pathways in the GIT. The chicken genome contains three bitter taste receptors termed ggTas2r1, ggTas2r2, and ggTas2r7, and the sweet/umami receptors ggTas1r1 and ggTas1r3, but it lacks the sweet receptor ggTas1r2. The aim of this study was to identify and determine the expression of genes related to taste perception in the chicken GIT, both at the embryonic stage and in growing chickens. The results of this study demonstrate for the first time, using real-time PCR, expression of the chicken taste receptor genes ggTas2r1, ggTas2r2, ggTas2r7, ggTas1r1, and ggTas1r3 and of their downstream protein-encoding genes TRPM5, α-gustducin, and PLCβ2 in both gustatory tissues-the palate and tongue, and extra-gustatory tissues-the proventriculus, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, and colon of embryonic day 19 (E19) and growing (21 d old) chickens. Expression of these genes suggests the involvement of taste pathways for sensing carbohydrates, amino acids and bitter compounds in the chicken GIT. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  8. Use of multispectral satellite remote sensing to assess mixing of suspended sediment downstream of large river confluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, M.; Rhoads, Bruce L.; Greenberg, Jonathan A.

    2018-01-01

    Although past work has noted that contrasts in turbidity often are detectable on remotely sensed images of rivers downstream from confluences, no systematic methodology has been developed for assessing mixing over distance of confluent flows with differing surficial suspended sediment concentrations (SSSC). In contrast to field measurements of mixing below confluences, satellite remote-sensing can provide detailed information on spatial distributions of SSSC over long distances. This paper presents a methodology that uses remote-sensing data to estimate spatial patterns of SSSC downstream of confluences along large rivers and to determine changes in the amount of mixing over distance from confluences. The method develops a calibrated Random Forest (RF) model by relating training SSSC data from river gaging stations to derived spectral indices for the pixels corresponding to gaging-station locations. The calibrated model is then used to predict SSSC values for every river pixel in a remotely sensed image, which provides the basis for mapping of spatial variability in SSSCs along the river. The pixel data are used to estimate average surficial values of SSSC at cross sections spaced uniformly along the river. Based on the cross-section data, a mixing metric is computed for each cross section. The spatial pattern of change in this metric over distance can be used to define rates and length scales of surficial mixing of suspended sediment downstream of a confluence. This type of information is useful for exploring the potential influence of various controlling factors on mixing downstream of confluences, for evaluating how mixing in a river system varies over time and space, and for determining how these variations influence water quality and ecological conditions along the river.

  9. Assessment of Downstream Cycling of Point Source Ammonium Input to the Sacramento River, California Using Stable Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, S. R.; Kendall, C.; Young, M. B.; Parker, A. E.

    2010-12-01

    Ammonium input from Sacramento Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant (SRWTP) is of concern because of its potential to alter the aquatic food chain by favoring a different mix of aquatic primary producers and/or by reducing phytoplankton abundance through inhibition of nitrate assimilation. Samples were collected from 23 sites along a transect from the upper Sacramento River out to Suisun Bay in March and April of 2009. The samples were analyzed for isotopes of ammonium, nitrate, particulate organic matter (POM), dissolved organic matter, d2H and d18O of water and conventional water solute chemistry. Ammonium concentrations were between 40 and 50 uM downstream of the SRWTP as compared to upstream values of less than 1 uM. Decreasing NH4 concentrations and increasing d15N-NH4 values and NO3 concentrations below the SRWTP reflect progressive nitrification downstream of the SRWTP and provide a distinct isotopic signature for SRWTP derived ammonium. In addition, the d15N of the POM (composed mostly of algae) shows distinct downstream changes due to uptake of NH4. The isotopic and concentration data from both the March and April transects indicate a change from NO3 to NH4 assimilation as phytoplankton enter the zone of elevated NH4 concentration below SRWTP. Between 30 and 60 miles (April and March data respectively) below SRWTP where NH4 concentrations have decreased, the data suggest a switch back to nitrate assimilation. The isotopic trends and water chemistry record the extent and progress of both nitrification and nutrient assimilation downstream of SRWTP.

  10. Hourly Water Quality Dynamics in Rivers Downstream of Urban Areas: Quantifying Seasonal Variation and Modelling Impacts of Urban Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, M.; McGrane, S. J.; Miller, J. D.; Hitt, O.; Bowes, M.

    2016-12-01

    Continuous monitoring of water flows and quality is invaluable in improving understanding of the influence of urban areas on river health. When used to inform predictive modelling, insights can be gained as to how urban growth may affect the chemical and biological quality of rivers as they flow downstream into larger waterbodies. Water flow and quality monitoring in two urbanising sub-catchments (pollutant first flushes was particularly apparent in urban streams but this was followed by a rapid recovery. Chronic effects lasting for three to four weeks were only seen downstream of a sewage treatment works (STW). In this respect temperature- and respiration-driven DO sags in summer were at least if not more severe than those driven by the winter storms. Likewise, although winter storm NH4 concentrations violated EU legislation downstream of the STW, they were lower than summer concentrations in pollutant flushes following dry spells. In contrast the predominant phenomenon affecting water quality in the Cut during the storms was dilution. Here, a river water quality model was calibrated and applied over the course of a year to capture the importance of periphyton photosynthesis and respiration cycles in determining water quality and to predict the influence of hypothetical urban growth on downstream river health. The periods monitored intensively, dry spells followed by prolonged rainfall, represent: (i) marked changes in conditions likely to become more prevalent in future, (ii) situations under which water quality in urban areas is likely to be particularly vulnerable, being influenced for example by first flush effects followed by capacity exceedance at STW. Despite this, whilst being somewhat long lasting in places, impacts on DO were not severe.

  11. Anthropogenic phosphorus (P) inputs to a river basin and their impacts on P fluxes along its upstream-downstream continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wangshou; Swaney, Dennis; Hong, Bongghi; Howarth, Robert

    2017-04-01

    Phosphorus (P) originating from anthropogenic sources as a pollutant of surface waters has been an environmental issue for decades because of the well-known role of P in eutrophication. Human activities, such as food production and rapid urbanization, have been linked to increased P inputs which are often accompanied by corresponding increases in riverine P export. However, uneven distributions of anthropogenic P inputs along watersheds from the headwaters to downstream reaches can result in significantly different contributions to the riverine P fluxes of a receiving water body. So far, there is still very little scientific understanding of anthropogenic P inputs and their impacts on riverine flux in river reaches along the upstream to downstream continuum. Here, we investigated P budgets in a series of nested watersheds draining into Hongze Lake of China, and developed a simple empirical function to describe the relationship between anthropogenic inputs and riverine TP fluxes. The results indicated that an average of 1.1% of anthropogenic P inputs are exported into rivers, with most of the remainder retained in the watershed landscape over the period studied. Fertilizer application was the main contributor of P loading to the lake (55% of total loads), followed by legacy P stock (30%), food and feed P inputs (12%) and non-food P inputs (4%). From 60% to 89% of the riverine TP loads generated from various locations within this basin were ultimately transported into the receiving lake of the downstream, with an average rate of 1.86 tons P km-1 retaining in the main stem of the inflowing river annually. Our results highlight that in-stream processes can significantly buffer the riverine P loading to the downstream receiving lake. An integrated P management strategy considering the influence of anthropogenic inputs and hydrological interactions is required to assess and optimize P management for protecting fresh waters.

  12. Strategy fortify the engineering activities in the downstream sector; Estrategia para o fortalecimento das atividades de engenharia no refino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafraia, Joao Ricardo Barusso; Meniconi, Vitor Marcio de Marco; Campos, Michel Fabianski [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Almeida, Antonio Humberto Pereira de [Federacao das Industria do Estado de Minas Gerais (FIEMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Burman, Michel Jaques; Freire, Luiz Gustavo de Melo [Accenture, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The strategy to fortify the engineering activities in the downstream sector consists in the creation of the Center of Excellence in Engineering. The main objectives of the Center are the following: promote the knowledge transfer between experienced and junior professionals and retain the knowledge generated in specific engineering project. Hence the union of all those factors above will result in a valuable asset which is the development of engineering capabilities among the project team ('learn by doing methodology'). (author)

  13. Comparison of hinge microflow fields of bileaflet mechanical heart valves implanted in different sinus shape and downstream geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Yee Han; Kabinejadian, Foad; Nguyen, Vinh-Tan; Su, Boyang; Yoganathan, Ajit P; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of the bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs) hinge microflow fields is a crucial step in heart valve engineering. Earlier in vitro studies of BMHV hinge flow at the aorta position in idealized straight pipes have shown that the aortic sinus shapes and sizes may have a direct impact on hinge microflow fields. In this paper, we used a numerical study to look at how different aortic sinus shapes, the downstream aortic arch geometry, and the location of the hinge recess can influence the flow fields in the hinge regions. Two geometric models for sinus were investigated: a simplified axisymmetric sinus and an idealized three-sinus aortic root model, with two different downstream geometries: a straight pipe and a simplified curved aortic arch. The flow fields of a 29-mm St Jude Medical BMHV with its four hinges were investigated. The simulations were performed throughout the entire cardiac cycle. At peak systole, recirculating flows were observed in curved downsteam aortic arch unlike in straight downstream pipe. Highly complex three-dimensional leakage flow through the hinge gap was observed in the simulation results during early diastole with the highest velocity at 4.7 m/s, whose intensity decreased toward late diastole. Also, elevated wall shear stresses were observed in the ventricular regions of the hinge recess with the highest recorded at 1.65 kPa. Different flow patterns were observed between the hinge regions in straight pipe and curved aortic arch models. We compared the four hinge regions at peak systole in an aortic arch downstream model and found that each individual hinge did not vary much in terms of the leakage flow rate through the valves.

  14. How polluted is the Yangtze river? Water quality downstream from the Three Gorges Dam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Beat; Berg, Michael; Yao, Zhi Ping; Zhang, Xian Feng; Wang, Ding; Pfluger, August

    2008-09-01

    The concentrations of major anions and cations, nitrogen and phosphorus, dissolved and particulate trace elements, and organic pollutants were determined for the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River (Changjiang) from below the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) to the mouth at Shanghai in November 2006. The concentration of dissolved inorganic phosphate (DIP) was constant at a low level of 6-8 microgP/L, but the concentration of nitrate (NO(3)(-)) approximately doubled downstream and was closely correlated with K(+). This translated to a daily load of well over 1000 t of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) at Datong. The average concentrations of dissolved Pb (0.078+/-0.023 microg/L), Cd (0.024+/-0.009 microg/L), Cr (0.57+/-0.09 microg/L), Cu (1.9+/-0.7 microg/L), and Ni (0.50+/-0.49 microg/L) were comparable with those in other major world rivers, while As (3.3+/-1.3 microg/L) and Zn (1.5+/-0.6 microg/L) were higher by factors of 5.5 and 2.5, respectively. The trace element contents of suspended particles of As (31+/-28 microg/g), Pb (83+/-34 microg/g), and Ni (52+/-16 microg/g) were close to maximum concentrations recommended for rivers by the European Community (EC). The average concentrations of Cd (2.6+/-1.6 microg/g), Cr (185+/-102 microg/g), Cu (115+/-106 microg/g), and Zn (500+/-300 microg/g) exceeded the EC standards by a factor of two, and Hg (4.4+/-4.7 microg/g) by a factor of 4 to 5. Locally occurring peak concentrations exceed these values up to fourfold, among them the notorious elements As, Hg, and Tl. All dissolved and particulate trace element concentrations were higher than estimates made twenty years ago [Zhang, J., Geochemistry of trace metals from Chinese river/estuary systems: an overview. Estuar Coast Shelf Sci 1995; 41: 631-658.]. The enormous loads of anthropogenic pollutants disposed to the river were diluted by the large water discharge of the Yangtze even during the lowest flow resulting in the relatively low concentration levels of trace

  15. Influences of body size and environmental factors on autumn downstream migration of bull trout in the Boise River, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnot, L.; Dunham, J.B.; Hoem, T.; Koetsier, P.

    2008-01-01

    Many fishes migrate extensively through stream networks, yet patterns are commonly described only in terms of the origin and destination of migration (e.g., between natal and feeding habitats). To better understand patterns of migration in bull trout,Salvelinus confluentus we studied the influences of body size (total length [TL]) and environmental factors (stream temperature and discharge) on migrations in the Boise River basin, Idaho. During the autumns of 2001-2003, we tracked the downstream migrations of 174 radio-tagged bull trout ranging in size from 21 to 73 cm TL. The results indicated that large bull trout (>30 cm) were more likely than small fish to migrate rapidly downstream after spawning in headwater streams in early autumn. Large bull trout also had a higher probability of arriving at the current terminus of migration in the system, Arrowrock Reservoir. The rate of migration by small bull trout was more variable and individuals were less likely to move into Arrowrock Reservoir. The rate of downstream migration by all fish was slower when stream discharge was greater. Temperature was not associated with the rate of migration. These findings indicate that fish size and environmentally related changes in behavior have important influences on patterns of migration. In a broader context, these results and other recent work suggest, at least in some cases, that commonly used classifications of migratory behavior may not accurately reflect the full range of behaviors and variability among individuals (or life stages) and environmental conditions. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  16. Error Sign Feedback as an Alternative to Pilots for the Tracking of FEXT Transfer Functions in Downstream VDSL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louveaux J

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available With increasing bandwidths and decreasing loop lengths, crosstalk becomes the main impairment in VDSL systems. For downstream communication, crosstalk precompensation techniques have been designed to cope with this issue by using the collocation of the transmitters. These techniques naturally need an accurate estimation of the crosstalk channel impulse responses. We investigate the issue of tracking these channels. Due to the lack of coordination between the receivers, and because the amplitude levels of the remaining interference from crosstalk after precompensation are very low, blind estimation schemes are inefficient in this case. So some part of the upstream or downstream bit rate needs to be used to help the estimation. In this paper, we design a new algorithm to try to limit the bandwidth used for the estimation purpose by exploiting the collocation at the transmitter side. The principle is to use feedback from the receiver to the transmitter instead of using pilots in the downstream signal. It is justified by computing the Cramer-Rao lower bound on the estimation error variance and showing that, for the levels of power in consideration, and for a given bit rate used to help the estimation, this bound is effectively lower for the proposed scheme. A simple algorithm based on the maximum likelihood is proposed. Its performance is analyzed in detail and is compared to a classical scheme using pilot symbols. Finally, an improved but more complex version is proposed to approach the performance bound.

  17. Occurrence and removal of antibiotics and the corresponding resistance genes in wastewater treatment plants: effluents' influence to downstream water environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianan; Cheng, Weixiao; Xu, Like; Jiao, Yanan; Baig, Shams Ali; Chen, Hong

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the occurrence of 8 antibiotics [3 tetracyclines (TCs), 4 sulfonamides, and 1 trimethoprim (TMP)], 12 antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) (10 tet, 2 sul), 4 types of bacteria [no antibiotics, anti-TC, anti-sulfamethoxazole (SMX), and anti-double], and intI1 in two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) were assessed and their influences in downstream lake were investigated. Both WWTPs' effluent demonstrated some similarities, but the abundance and removal rate varied significantly. Results revealed that biological treatment mainly removed antibiotics and ARGs, whereas physical techniques were found to eliminate antibiotic resistance bacteria (ARBs) abundance (about 1 log for each one). UV disinfection did not significantly enhance the removal efficiency, and the release of the abundantly available target contaminants from the excess sludge may pose threats to human and the environment. Different antibiotics showed diverse influences on the downstream lake, and the concentrations of sulfamethazine (SM2) and SMX were observed to increase enormously. The total ARG abundance ascended about 0.1 log and some ARGs (e.g., tetC, intI1, tetA) increased due to the high input of the effluent. In addition, the abundance of ARB variation in the lake also changed, but the abundance of four types of bacteria remained stable in the downstream sampling sites.

  18. Effect of Flow Characteristics in the Downstream of Butterfly Valve on the Flow Rate Measurement using Venturi Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seok Ho; Lee, Jungho; Yu, Cheong Hwan; Park, San-Jin; Chung, Chang-Hwan

    2010-06-01

    For testing large-capacity pump, the accurate flow rate measurement is needed in the test loop. As a measuring method of flow rate, venturi tube is recommended due to its low pressure loss. However, upstream disturbance of loop component such as valve has an effect upon the accuracy of flow rate measurement. For controlling flow rate in case of high flow rate and large-scale piping system, butterfly-type valve is generally used due to its compactness. However, butterfly valve disturbs downstream flow by generating turbulence, cavities, or abrupt pressure change. In this study, the effect of downstream disturbance of butterfly valve on the flow rate measurement using venturi tube is investigated. Test loop consists of circulation pump, reservoir, butterfly valve, venturi tube, and reference flow meter. The test is conducted with regard to a different valve opening angle of butterfly valve. PIV system is used to visualize and analyze flow in the downstream region of butterfly valve. According to valve opening angle, the flow characteristics and the accuracy of flow rate measurement are investigated.

  19. Relative importance of Microcystis abundance and diversity in determining microcystin dynamics in Lake Erie coastal wetland and downstream beach water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, C; Rea, C; Yu, Z; Lee, J

    2016-01-01

    Microcystis population and microcystin (MC) dynamics were investigated in western Lake Erie coastal wetlands and downstream beach water. A three-dimensional (3-D) model was developed to quantify how Microcystis population size and structure affect MCs. Real-time PCR, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA) were used. A moderate-low level of Microcystis abundance and MCs were detected with a significant increase along the wetland flow and the spatiotemporal homogeneity of Microcystis populations. The proportion of toxigenic and nontoxgenic genotypes appeared to be more affected by the variation in two major Microcystis PC-IGS genotypes. MC dynamics was associated with the changing Microcystis population size and structure. The 3-D model showed that Microcystis population with greater Microcystis PC-IGS abundance (and simultaneously higher diversity) had more MCs. Microcystin variation was significantly affected by Microcystis population size and structure. The 3-D model also revealed the relative importance of Microcystis population size and structure in determining MCs in the Lake Erie costal wetland and downstream beach water. This study enriches our understanding of Microcystis population and microcystin ecology in a western Lake Erie coastal wetland and downstream beach water. Our illustrative model brings a new perspective for understanding the ecological relationship between Microcystis population size and structure and MCs. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. The impacts of wind power integration on sub-daily variation in river flows downstream of hydroelectric dams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Jordan D; Patino-Echeverri, Dalia; Characklis, Gregory W

    2014-08-19

    Due to their operational flexibility, hydroelectric dams are ideal candidates to compensate for the intermittency and unpredictability of wind energy production. However, more coordinated use of wind and hydropower resources may exacerbate the impacts dams have on downstream environmental flows, that is, the timing and magnitude of water flows needed to sustain river ecosystems. In this paper, we examine the effects of increased (i.e., 5%, 15%, and 25%) wind market penetration on prices for electricity and reserves, and assess the potential for altered price dynamics to disrupt reservoir release schedules at a hydroelectric dam and cause more variable and unpredictable hourly flow patterns (measured in terms of the Richards-Baker Flashiness (RBF) index). Results show that the greatest potential for wind energy to impact downstream flows occurs at high (∼25%) wind market penetration, when the dam sells more reserves in order to exploit spikes in real-time electricity prices caused by negative wind forecast errors. Nonetheless, compared to the initial impacts of dam construction (and the dam's subsequent operation as a peaking resource under baseline conditions) the marginal effects of any increased wind market penetration on downstream flows are found to be relatively minor.

  1. The essential and downstream common proteins of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: A protein-protein interaction network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yimin; Kuo, Su-Wei; Chen, Le; Heckman, C J; Jiang, M C

    2017-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a devastative neurodegenerative disease characterized by selective loss of motoneurons. While several breakthroughs have been made in identifying ALS genetic defects, the detailed molecular mechanisms are still unclear. These genetic defects involve in numerous biological processes, which converge to a common destiny: motoneuron degeneration. In addition, the common comorbid Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD) further complicates the investigation of ALS etiology. In this study, we aimed to explore the protein-protein interaction network built on known ALS-causative genes to identify essential proteins and common downstream proteins between classical ALS and ALS+FTD (classical ALS + ALS/FTD) groups. The results suggest that classical ALS and ALS+FTD share similar essential protein set (VCP, FUS, TDP-43 and hnRNPA1) but have distinctive functional enrichment profiles. Thus, disruptions to these essential proteins might cause motoneuron susceptible to cellular stresses and eventually vulnerable to proteinopathies. Moreover, we identified a common downstream protein, ubiquitin-C, extensively interconnected with ALS-causative proteins (22 out of 24) which was not linked to ALS previously. Our in silico approach provides the computational background for identifying ALS therapeutic targets, and points out the potential downstream common ground of ALS-causative mutations.

  2. The electron distribution function downstream of the solar-wind termination shock: Where are the hot electrons?

    CERN Document Server

    Fahr, Hans J; Verscharen, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    In the majority of the literature on plasma shock waves until now, electrons have played the role of "ghost particles," since they contribute to mass- and momentum flows only negligibly and have been treated as taking care of the electric plasma neutrality. In some more recent papers, however, electrons play a new important role in the shock dynamics and thermodynamics, especially at the solar-wind termination shock. They react on the shock electric field in a very specific way, leading to suprathermal non-equilibrium distributions of the downstream electrons that can be represented by a kappa distribution function. In this article, we discuss why these anticipated hot electron population has not been seen by the plasma detectors of the Voyager spacecraft downstream of the solar-wind termination shock. We show that hot non-equilibrium electrons induce a strong negative electric charge-up of any spacecraft cruising through this downstream plasma environment. This charge reduces electron fluxes at the spacecraf...

  3. The essential and downstream common proteins of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: A protein-protein interaction network analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yimin Mao

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS is a devastative neurodegenerative disease characterized by selective loss of motoneurons. While several breakthroughs have been made in identifying ALS genetic defects, the detailed molecular mechanisms are still unclear. These genetic defects involve in numerous biological processes, which converge to a common destiny: motoneuron degeneration. In addition, the common comorbid Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD further complicates the investigation of ALS etiology. In this study, we aimed to explore the protein-protein interaction network built on known ALS-causative genes to identify essential proteins and common downstream proteins between classical ALS and ALS+FTD (classical ALS + ALS/FTD groups. The results suggest that classical ALS and ALS+FTD share similar essential protein set (VCP, FUS, TDP-43 and hnRNPA1 but have distinctive functional enrichment profiles. Thus, disruptions to these essential proteins might cause motoneuron susceptible to cellular stresses and eventually vulnerable to proteinopathies. Moreover, we identified a common downstream protein, ubiquitin-C, extensively interconnected with ALS-causative proteins (22 out of 24 which was not linked to ALS previously. Our in silico approach provides the computational background for identifying ALS therapeutic targets, and points out the potential downstream common ground of ALS-causative mutations.

  4. Simulating potential structural and operational changes for Detroit Dam on the North Santiam River, Oregon, for downstream temperature management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccola, Norman L.; Rounds, Stewart A.; Sullivan, Annett B.; Risley, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Detroit Dam was constructed in 1953 on the North Santiam River in western Oregon and resulted in the formation of Detroit Lake. With a full-pool storage volume of 455,100 acre-feet and a dam height of 463 feet, Detroit Lake is one of the largest and most important reservoirs in the Willamette River basin in terms of power generation, recreation, and water storage and releases. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers operates Detroit Dam as part of a system of 13 reservoirs in the Willamette Project to meet multiple goals, which include flood-damage protection, power generation, downstream navigation, recreation, and irrigation. A distinct cycle in water temperature occurs in Detroit Lake as spring and summer heating through solar radiation creates a warm layer of water near the surface and isolates cold water below. Controlling the temperature of releases from Detroit Dam, therefore, is highly dependent on the location, characteristics, and usage of the dam's outlet structures. Prior to operational changes in 2007, Detroit Dam had a well-documented effect on downstream water temperature that was problematic for endangered salmonid fish species, releasing water that was too cold in midsummer and too warm in autumn. This unnatural seasonal temperature pattern caused problems in the timing of fish migration, spawning, and emergence. In this study, an existing calibrated 2-dimensional hydrodynamic water-quality model [CE-QUAL-W2] of Detroit Lake was used to determine how changes in dam operation or changes to the structural release points of Detroit Dam might affect downstream water temperatures under a range of historical hydrologic and meteorological conditions. The results from a subset of the Detroit Lake model scenarios then were used as forcing conditions for downstream CE-QUAL-W2 models of Big Cliff Reservoir (the small reregulating reservoir just downstream of Detroit Dam) and the North Santiam and Santiam Rivers. Many combinations of environmental, operational, and

  5. Impact on Water Quality of Nandoni Water Reservoir Downstream of Municipal Sewage Plants in Vhembe District, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabulani Ray Gumbo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The deterioration of water quality in our freshwater sources is on the increase worldwide and, in South Africa, mostly due to the discharge of municipal sewage effluent. Here we report on the use of principal component analysis, coupled with factor and cluster analysis, to study the similarities and differences between upstream and downstream sampling sites that are downstream of municipal sewage plants. The contribution of climatic variables, air temperature, humidity, and rainfall were also evaluated with respect to variations in water quality at the sampling sites. The physicochemical and microbial values were higher than the Department of Water Affairs and Forestry (DWAF and World Health Organization (WHO guidelines. The cluster analysis showed the presence of two clusters for each of the Mvudi, Dzindi, and Luvuvhu Rivers and Nandoni reservoir sampling sites. The principal component analysis (PCA accounted for 40% of the water quality variation and was associated strongly with pH, electrical conductivity, calcium, magnesium, chloride, bromide, nitrate, and total coliform, and negatively with rainfall, which represented Mvudi downstream and was attributed to the Thohoyandou sewage plant. The PCA accounted for 54% of the variation and was associated strongly with electrical conductivity, sulfate; total dissolved solids, fluoride, turbidity, nitrate, manganese, alkalinity, magnesium, and total coliform represented Dzindi downstream, with inflows from the Vuwani sewage plant and agriculture. The PCA accounted for 30% of the variation and was associated strongly with total dissolved solids, electrical conductivity, magnesium, fluoride, nitrate, sulfate, total coliform average air temperature, and total rainfall, and negatively associated with manganese and bromide represented Luvuvhu upstream and was associated with commercial agriculture. The PCA accounted for 21% of the variation and was associated strongly with turbidity, alkalinity, magnesium

  6. TBX3, a downstream target of TGF-β1, inhibits mesangial cell apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wensing, Lislaine A. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Av. Albert Einstein, 627, Morumbi, 2SS/Bloco A., São Paulo, São Paulo CEP 05651-901 (Brazil); Departamento de Fisiologia e Biofísica, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Campos, Alexandre H., E-mail: alexandre.campos@einstein.br [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Av. Albert Einstein, 627, Morumbi, 2SS/Bloco A., São Paulo, São Paulo CEP 05651-901 (Brazil)

    2014-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an increasingly common condition characterized by progressive loss of functional nephrons leading to renal failure. TGF-β1-induced mesangial cell (MC) phenotype alterations have been linked to the genesis of CKD. Here we show that TGF-β1 regulates TBX3 gene expression in MC. This gene encodes for two main isoforms, TBX3.1 and TBX3+2α. TBX3.1 has been implicated in cell immortalization, proliferation and apoptosis by inhibiting p14{sup ARF}-Mdm2-p53 pathway, while TBX3+2α role has not been defined. We demonstrated that TBX3 overexpression abrogated MC apoptosis induced by serum deprivation. Moreover, we observed an enhancement in TBX3 protein expression both in glomerular and tubular regions in the model of 5/6 nephrectomy, temporally related to increased expression of TGF-β1, type IV collagen and fibronectin. Our results indicate that TBX3 acts as an anti-apoptotic factor in MC in vitro and may be involved in the mechanism by which TGF-β1 induces glomerulosclerosis and tubular fibrosis during the progression of nephropathies. - Highlights: • TBX3 isoforms are upregulated by TGF-b1 in mesangial cells. • TBX3 isoforms have different subcellular distribution profile in mesangial cells. • TBX3 isoforms exhibit antiapoptotic action in mesangial cells. • TBX3 protein is overexpressed in a model of nephropathy (5/6 nephrectomy)

  7. [Euthanasia and medical act].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Right to life -as the prohibition of intentionally and arbitrarily taking life, even with authorization of the concerned one- is an internationally recognized right. In many countries, debate regarding euthanasia is more centered in its convenience, social acceptability and how it is regulated, than in its substantial legitimacy. Some argue that euthanasia should be included as part of clinical practice of health professionals, grounded on individual's autonomy claims-everyone having the liberty to choose how to live and how to die. Against this, others sustain that life has a higher value than autonomy, exercising autonomy without respecting the right to life would become a serious moral and social problem. Likewise, euthanasia supporters some-times claim a 'right to live with dignity', which must be understood as a personal obligation, referred more to the ethical than to the strictly legal sphere. In countries where it is already legalized, euthanasia practice has extended to cases where it is not the patient who requests this but the family or some healthcare professional, or even the legal system-when they think that the patient is living in a condition which is not worthy to live. Generalization of euthanasia possibly will end in affecting those who need more care, such as elder, chronically ill or dying people, damaging severely personal basic rights. Nature, purpose and tradition of medicine rule out the practice of euthanasia, which ought not be considered a medical act or legitimately compulsory for physicians. Today's medicine counts with effective treatments for pain and suffering, such as palliative care, including sedative therapy, which best preserves persons dignity and keeps safe the ethos of the medical profession.

  8. Chemotherapy resistance of mouse WAP-SVT/t breast cancer cells is mediated by osteopontin, inhibiting apoptosis downstream of caspase-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graessmann, M; Berg, B; Fuchs, B; Klein, A; Graessmann, A

    2007-05-03

    Impairment of the complex regulatory network of cell death and survival is frequently the reason for therapy resistance of breast cancer cells and a major cause of tumor progression. We established two independent cell lines from a fast growing mouse breast tumor (WAP-SVT/t transgenic animal). Cells from one line (ME-A cells) are sensitive to apoptotic stimuli such as growth factor depletion or treatment with antitumor agents (e.g. doxorubicin). Cells from the second line (ME-C cells), which carry a missense mutation at the p53 codon 242, are very insensitive to apoptotic stimuli. Co-cultivation experiments revealed that the ME-C cells mediate cell death resistance to the ME-A cells. Microarray and Western blot analysis showed that osteopontin (OPN) is selectively overexpressed by the ME-C cells. This glycoprotein is the most abundant protein secreted by the ME-C cells and we obtained strong indications that OPN is the main antiapoptotic factor. However, the OPN containing ME-C cell medium does not alter the expression level of pro- or antiapoptotic genes or known inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs). Its signaling involves mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase (MEK)1/2 as the kinase inhibitor PD98059 restores apoptosis but not the Akt inhibitor. In the ME-A cells, mitochondrial cytochrome c release occurs with and without external apoptotic stimuli. OPN containing ME-C cell medium does not prevent the mitochondrial cytochrome c release and caspase-9 processing. In serum starved ME-A cells, the OPN containing ME-C cell medium prevents caspase-3 activation. However, in doxorubicin-treated cells, although apoptosis is blocked, it does not inhibit caspase-3. This indicates that the ME-A cells distinguish between the initial apoptotic stimuli and that the cells possess a further uncharacterized control element acting downstream from caspase-3.

  9. Protection of LDL from oxidation by olive oil polyphenols is associated with a downregulation of CD40-ligand expression and its downstream products in vivo in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañer, Olga; Covas, María-Isabel; Khymenets, Olha; Nyyssonen, Kristiina; Konstantinidou, Valentini; Zunft, Hans-Franz; de la Torre, Rafael; Muñoz-Aguayo, Daniel; Vila, Joan; Fitó, Montserrat

    2012-05-01

    Recently, the European Food Safety Authority approved a claim concerning the benefits of olive oil polyphenols for the protection of LDL from oxidation. Polyphenols could exert health benefits not only by scavenging free radicals but also by modulating gene expression. We assessed whether olive oil polyphenols could modulate the human in vivo expressions of atherosclerosis-related genes in which LDL oxidation is involved. In a randomized, crossover, controlled trial, 18 healthy European volunteers daily received 25 mL olive oil with a low polyphenol content (LPC: 2.7 mg/kg) or a high polyphenol content (HPC: 366 mg/kg) in intervention periods of 3 wk separated by 2-wk washout periods. Systemic LDL oxidation and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 and the expression of proatherogenic genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells [ie, CD40 ligand (CD40L), IL-23α subunit p19 (IL23A), adrenergic β-2 receptor (ADRB2), oxidized LDL (lectin-like) receptor 1 (OLR1), and IL-8 receptor-α (IL8RA)] decreased after the HPC intervention compared with after the LPC intervention. Random-effects linear regression analyses showed 1) a significant decrease in CD40, ADRB2, and IL8RA gene expression with the decrease of LDL oxidation and 2) a significant decrease in intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and OLR1 gene expression with increasing concentrations of tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol in urine. In addition to reducing LDL oxidation, the intake of polyphenol-rich olive oil reduces CD40L gene expression, its downstream products, and related genes involved in atherogenic and inflammatory processes in vivo in humans. These findings provide evidence that polyphenol-rich olive oil can act through molecular mechanisms to provide cardiovascular health benefits. This trial was registered at www.controlled-trials.com as ISRCTN09220811.

  10. CCAAT-enhancer-binding Protein β (C/EBPβ) and Downstream Human Placental Growth Hormone Genes Are Targets for Dysregulation in Pregnancies Complicated by Maternal Obesity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakili, Hana; Jin, Yan; Menticoglou, Savas; Cattini, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Human chorionic somatomammotropin (CS) and placental growth hormone variant (GH-V) act as metabolic adaptors in response to maternal insulin resistance, which occurs in “normal” pregnancy. Maternal obesity can exacerbate this “resistance,” suggesting that CS, GH-V, or transcription factors that regulate their production might be targets. The human CS genes, hCS-A and hCS-B, flank the GH-V gene. A significant decrease in pre-term placental CS/GH-V RNA levels was observed in transgenic mice containing the CS/GH-V genes in a model of high fat diet (HFD)-induced maternal obesity. Similarly, a decrease in CS/GH-V RNA levels was detected in term placentas from obese (body mass index (BMI) ≥ 35 kg/m2) versus lean (BMI 20–25 kg/m2) women. A specific decrease in transcription factor CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) RNA levels was also seen with obesity; C/EBPβ is required for mouse placenta development and is expressed, like CS and GH-V, in syncytiotrophoblasts. Binding of C/EBPβ to the CS gene downstream enhancer regions, which by virtue of their position distally flank the GH-V gene, was reduced in placenta chromatin from mice on a HFD and in obese women; a corresponding decrease in RNA polymerase II associated with CS/GH-V promoters was also observed. Detection of decreased endogenous CS/GH-V RNA levels in human placental tumor cells treated with C/EBPβ siRNA is consistent with a direct effect. These data provide evidence for CS/GH-V dysregulation in acute HFD-induced obesity in mouse pregnancy and chronic obesity in human pregnancy and implicate C/EBPβ, a factor associated with CS regulation and placental development. PMID:23782703

  11. CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) and downstream human placental growth hormone genes are targets for dysregulation in pregnancies complicated by maternal obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakili, Hana; Jin, Yan; Menticoglou, Savas; Cattini, Peter A

    2013-08-02

    Human chorionic somatomammotropin (CS) and placental growth hormone variant (GH-V) act as metabolic adaptors in response to maternal insulin resistance, which occurs in "normal" pregnancy. Maternal obesity can exacerbate this "resistance," suggesting that CS, GH-V, or transcription factors that regulate their production might be targets. The human CS genes, hCS-A and hCS-B, flank the GH-V gene. A significant decrease in pre-term placental CS/GH-V RNA levels was observed in transgenic mice containing the CS/GH-V genes in a model of high fat diet (HFD)-induced maternal obesity. Similarly, a decrease in CS/GH-V RNA levels was detected in term placentas from obese (body mass index (BMI) ≥ 35 kg/m(2)) versus lean (BMI 20-25 kg/m(2)) women. A specific decrease in transcription factor CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) RNA levels was also seen with obesity; C/EBPβ is required for mouse placenta development and is expressed, like CS and GH-V, in syncytiotrophoblasts. Binding of C/EBPβ to the CS gene downstream enhancer regions, which by virtue of their position distally flank the GH-V gene, was reduced in placenta chromatin from mice on a HFD and in obese women; a corresponding decrease in RNA polymerase II associated with CS/GH-V promoters was also observed. Detection of decreased endogenous CS/GH-V RNA levels in human placental tumor cells treated with C/EBPβ siRNA is consistent with a direct effect. These data provide evidence for CS/GH-V dysregulation in acute HFD-induced obesity in mouse pregnancy and chronic obesity in human pregnancy and implicate C/EBPβ, a factor associated with CS regulation and placental development.

  12. 7 CFR 65.100 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 65.100 Section 65.100 Agriculture Regulations of... MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) COUNTRY OF ORIGIN LABELING OF BEEF..., AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.100 Act. Act means the Agricultural Marketing Act of...

  13. Patents and Downstream Innovation Suppression - Facts or Fiction?:A Critique of the Use of Historical Sources in Support of the Thesis that Broad Patent Scope Enables the Suppression or Hindrance of Downstream Useful-Technology Development

    OpenAIRE

    Howells, John

    2008-01-01

    Merges and Nelson have proposed that pioneer patents have enabled their owners to 'block' or 'hold-up' downstream innovation in cases as important as the car, radio, aircraft and electric lighting (Merges and Nelson 1990, ; Merges and Nelson 1994). Merges and Nelson use their work to question the value of Kitch's prospect theory of patents, a theory that the social value of patents is that they enable the efficient coordination of technological development.    I re-examine history and legal s...

  14. 78 FR 46256 - Privacy Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION 11 CFR Part 1 Privacy Act CFR Correction In Title 11 of the Code of Federal Regulations, revised as... 1954.'' are added at the end of the definition of Act. BILLING CODE 1505-01-D ...

  15. Parainfluenza Virus 3 Blocks Antiviral Mediators Downstream of the Interferon Lambda Receptor by Modulating Stat1 Phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Kirsten C; McGill, Jodi L; Reinhardt, Timothy A; Sacco, Randy E

    2015-12-30

    Parainfluenza viruses are known to inhibit type I interferon (IFN) production; however, there is a lack of information regarding the type III IFN response during infection. Type III IFNs signal through a unique heterodimeric receptor, IFN-λR1/interleukin-10R2 (IL-10R2), which is primarily expressed by epithelial cells. Parainfluenza virus 3 (PIV-3) infection is highly restricted to the airway epithelium. We therefore sought to examine type III IFN signaling pathways during PIV-3 infection of epithelial cells. We used three strains of PIV-3: human PIV-3 (HPIV-3), bovine PIV-3 (BPIV-3), and dolphin PIV-1 (Tursiops truncatus PIV-1, or TtPIV-1). Here, we show that message levels of IL-29 are significantly increased during PIV-3 infection, yet downstream antiviral signaling molecules are not upregulated to levels similar to those of the positive control. Furthermore, in Vero cells infected with PIV-3, stimulation with recombinant IL-29/-28A/-28B does not cause upregulation of downstream antiviral molecules, suggesting that PIV-3 interferes with the JAK/STAT pathway downstream of the IFN-λR1/IL-10R2 receptor. We used Western blotting to examine the phosphorylation of Stat1 and Stat2 in Vero cells and the bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B. In Vero cells, we observed reduced phosphorylation of the serine 727 (S727) site on Stat1, while in BEAS-2B cells Stat1 phosphorylation was decreased at the tyrosine 701 (Y701) site during PIV-3 infection. PIV-3 therefore interferes with the phosphorylation of Stat1 downstream of the type III IFN receptor. These data provide new evidence regarding strategies employed by parainfluenza viruses to effectively circumvent respiratory epithelial cell-specific antiviral immunity. Parainfluenza virus (PIV) in humans is associated with bronchiolitis and pneumonia and can be especially problematic in infants and the elderly. Also seen in cattle, bovine PIV-3 causes respiratory infections in young calves. In addition, PIV-3 is one of a

  16. A large-area, spatially continuous assessment of land cover map error and its impact on downstream analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Lyndon; Chen, Peng; Debats, Stephanie; Evans, Tom; Ferreira, Stefanus; Kuemmerle, Tobias; Ragazzo, Gabrielle; Sheffield, Justin; Wolf, Adam; Wood, Eric; Caylor, Kelly

    2018-01-01

    Land cover maps increasingly underlie research into socioeconomic and environmental patterns and processes, including global change. It is known that map errors impact our understanding of these phenomena, but quantifying these impacts is difficult because many areas lack adequate reference data. We used a highly accurate, high-resolution map of South African cropland to assess (1) the magnitude of error in several current generation land cover maps, and (2) how these errors propagate in downstream studies. We first quantified pixel-wise errors in the cropland classes of four widely used land cover maps at resolutions ranging from 1 to 100 km, and then calculated errors in several representative "downstream" (map-based) analyses, including assessments of vegetative carbon stocks, evapotranspiration, crop production, and household food security. We also evaluated maps' spatial accuracy based on how precisely they could be used to locate specific landscape features. We found that cropland maps can have substantial biases and poor accuracy at all resolutions (e.g., at 1 km resolution, up to ∼45% underestimates of cropland (bias) and nearly 50% mean absolute error (MAE, describing accuracy); at 100 km, up to 15% underestimates and nearly 20% MAE). National-scale maps derived from higher-resolution imagery were most accurate, followed by multi-map fusion products. Constraining mapped values to match survey statistics may be effective at minimizing bias (provided the statistics are accurate). Errors in downstream analyses could be substantially amplified or muted, depending on the values ascribed to cropland-adjacent covers (e.g., with forest as adjacent cover, carbon map error was 200%-500% greater than in input cropland maps, but ∼40% less for sparse cover types). The average locational error was 6 km (600%). These findings provide deeper insight into the causes and potential consequences of land cover map error, and suggest several recommendations for land

  17. Freeze-responsive regulation of MEF2 proteins and downstream gene networks in muscles of the wood frog, Rana sylvatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Oscar A; Hadj-Moussa, Hanane; Storey, Kenneth B

    2017-07-01

    The wood frog survives frigid North American winters by retreating into a state of suspended animation characterized by the freezing of up to 65% of total body water as extracellular ice and displaying no heartbeat, breathing, brain activity, or movement. Physiological and biochemical adaptations are in place to facilitate global metabolic depression and protect against the consequences of whole body freezing. This study examined the myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) transcription factor family, proteins responsible for coordinating selective gene expression of a myriad of cellular functions from muscle development and remodelling to various stress responses. Immunoblotting, subcellular localization, and RT-PCR were used to analyze the regulation of MEF2A and MEF2C transcription factors and selected downstream targets under their control at transcriptional, translational, and post-translational levels in skeletal and cardiac muscles from control, frozen and thawed frogs. Both MEF2A/C proteins were freeze-responsive in skeletal muscle, displaying increases of 1.7-2 fold for phosphorylated MEF2A Thr312 and MEF2C Thr300 during freezing with an enrichment of nuclear phosphorylated MEF2 proteins (by 1.7-2.1 fold) observed as early as 4h post-freezing. Despite the reduced response of total and phosphorylated MEF2A/C protein levels observed in cardiac muscle, the MEF2 downstream gene targets (glucose transporter-4, calreticulin, and creatine kinase brain and muscle isozymes) displayed similar increases in transcript levels (1.7-4.8 fold) after 24h freezing in both muscle types. This study describes a novel freeze-responsive function for MEF2 transcription factors and further elaborates our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying natural freeze tolerance. This novel freeze-responsive regulation suggests a role for MEF2s and downstream genes in cryoprotectant glucose distribution, calcium homeostasis, and maintenance of energy reserves vital for successful

  18. Essential roles of the Kar2/BiP molecular chaperone downstream of the UPR pathway in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Woo Jung

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is a central hub where secreted or membrane-bound proteins are maturated and folded properly in eukaryotes. Maintenance of ER homeostasis is particularly important for human fungal pathogens, such as Cryptococcus neoformans, which encounter a plethora of host-mediated stresses during infection. Our previous study demonstrated that the unfolded protein response (UPR pathway, composed of the evolutionarily conserved Ire1 kinase and the unique Hxl1 transcription factor, has pleiotropic roles in ER stress response, thermotolerance, antifungal drug resistance, and virulence in C. neoformans. Here, we functionally characterized an ER-resident molecular chaperone, Kar2/BiP, in C. neoformans. Conditional expression of KAR2 by the copper-regulated promoter revealed that Kar2 is essential for the viability of C. neoformans. Constitutive expression of KAR2 by the strong histone H3 promoter partially restores resistance to ER stress, cell wall stress, thermotolerance, and genotoxic stress in ire1Δ and hxl1Δ mutants, suggesting that Kar2 mainly functions downstream of the UPR pathway. Furthermore, Kar2 appears to control azole resistance in C. neoformans downstream of the UPR pathway without regulation of ERG11 or ERG3. Interestingly, we discovered that azole treatment is sensed as ER-stress and subsequently activates the Ire1-dependent Hxl1 splicing event and induction of KAR2 by the UPR pathway. In contrast, the constitutive expression of Kar2 is not sufficient to restore the Ire1-mediated regulation of capsule production in C. neoformans UPR mutants. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that Kar2 is not only essential for vegetative growth but also required for response and adaptation to the environmental stresses and antifungal drugs downstream of the UPR pathway in C. neoformans.

  19. Impact of a large tropical reservoir on riverine transport of sediment, carbon, and nutrients to downstream wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Manuel J.; Wüest, Alfred; Wehrli, Bernhard; Landert, Jan; Senn, David B.

    2011-12-01

    Large dams can have major ecological and biogeochemical impacts on downstream ecosystems such as wetlands and riparian habitats. We examined sediment removal and carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) cycling in Itezhi-Tezhi Reservoir (ITT; area = 364 km2, hydraulic residence time = 0.7 yr), which is located directly upstream of a high ecological value floodplain ecosystem (Kafue Flats) in the Zambezi River Basin. Field investigations (sediment cores, sediment traps, water column samples), mass balance estimates, and a numerical biogeochemical reservoir model were combined to estimate N, P, C, and sediment removal, organic C mineralization, primary production, and N fixation. Since dam completion in 1978, 330 × 103 tons (t) of sediment and 16 × 103, 1.5 × 103, 200 t of C, N, and P, respectively, have accumulated annually in ITT sediments. Approximately 50% of N inputs and 60% of P inputs are removed by the reservoir, illustrating its potential in decreasing nutrients to the downstream Kafue Flats floodplain. The biogeochemical model predicted substantial primary production in ITT (˜280 g C m-2 yr-1), and significant N-fixation (˜30% for the total primary production) was required to support primary production due to marginal inputs of inorganic N. Model simulations indicate that future hydropower development in the reservoir, involving the installation of turbines driven by hypolimnetic water, will likely result in the delivery of low-oxygen waters to downstream ecosystems and increased outputs of dissolved inorganic N and P by a factor of ˜4 and ˜2 compared to current dam management, respectively.

  20. The electron distribution function downstream of the solar-wind termination shock: Where are the hot electrons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahr, Hans J.; Richardson, John D.; Verscharen, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    In the majority of the literature on plasma shock waves, electrons play the role of "ghost particles", since their contribution to mass and momentum flows is negligible, and they have been treated as only taking care of the electric plasma neutrality. In some more recent papers, however, electrons play a new important role in the shock dynamics and thermodynamics, especially at the solar-wind termination shock. They react on the shock electric field in a very specific way, leading to suprathermal nonequilibrium distributions of the downstream electrons, which can be represented by a kappa distribution function. In this paper, we discuss why this anticipated hot electron population has not been seen by the plasma detectors of the Voyager spacecraft downstream of the solar-wind termination shock. We show that hot nonequilibrium electrons induce a strong negative electric charge-up of any spacecraft cruising through this downstream plasma environment. This charge reduces electron fluxes at the spacecraft detectors to nondetectable intensities. Furthermore, we show that the Debye length λDκ grows to values of about λDκ/λD ≃ 106 compared to the classical value λD in this hot-electron environment. This unusual condition allows for the propagation of a certain type of electrostatic plasma waves that, at very large wavelengths, allow us to determine the effective temperature of the suprathermal electrons directly by means of the phase velocity of these waves. At moderate wavelengths, the electron-acoustic dispersion relation leads to nonpropagating oscillations with the ion-plasma frequency ωp, instead of the traditional electron plasma frequency.

  1. Mechanisms of stabilization and blowoff of a premixed flame downstream of a heat-conducting perforated plate

    KAUST Repository

    Kedia, Kushal S.

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate the flame stabilization mechanism and the conditions leading to the blowoff of a laminar premixed flame anchored downstream of a heat-conducting perforated-plate/multi-hole burner, with overall nearly adiabatic conditions. We use unsteady, fully resolved, two-dimensional simulations with detailed chemical kinetics and species transport for methane-air combustion. Results show a bell-shaped flame stabilizing above the burner plate hole, with a U-shaped section anchored between neighboring holes. The base of the positively curved U-shaped section of the flame is positioned near the stagnation point, at a location where the flame displacement speed is equal to the flow speed. This location is determined by the combined effect of heat loss and flame stretch on the flame displacement speed. As the mass flow rate of the reactants is increased, the flame displacement speed at this location varies non-monotonically. As the inlet velocity is increased, the recirculation zone grows slowly, the flame moves downstream, and the heat loss to the burner decreases, strengthening the flame and increasing its displacement speed. As the inlet velocity is raised, the stagnation point moves downstream, and the flame length grows to accommodate the reactants mass flow. Concomitantly, the radius of curvature of the flame base decreases until it reaches an almost constant value, comparable to the flame thickness. While the heat loss decreases, the higher flame curvature dominates thereby reducing the displacement speed of the flame base. For a stable flame, the gradient of the flame base displacement speed normal to the flame is higher than the gradient of the flow speed along the same direction, leading to dynamic stability. As inlet velocity is raised further, the former decreases while the latter increases until the stability condition is violated, leading to blowoff. The flame speed during blow off is determined by the feedback between the

  2. Lahars at Cotopaxi and Tungurahua Volcanoes, Ecuador: Highlights from stratigraphy and observational records and related downstream hazards: Chapter 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothes, Patricia A; Vallance, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Lahars are volcanic debris flows that are dubbed primary when triggered by eruptive activity or secondary when triggered by other factors such as heavy rainfall after eruptive activity has waned. Variation in time and space of the proportion of sediment to water within a lahar dictates lahar flow phase and the resultant sedimentary character of deposits. Characteristics of source material and of debris eroded and incorporated during flow downstream may strongly affect the grain-size composition of flowing lahars and their deposits. Lahars borne on the flanks of two steep-sided stratocones in Ecuador exemplify two important lahar types. Glacier-clad Cotopaxi volcano has been a producer of primary lahars that flow great distances downstream. Such primary lahars include those of both clast-rich and matrix-rich composition—some of which have flowed as far as 325 km to the Pacific Ocean. Cotopaxi's last important eruption in 1877 generated formidable syneruptive lahars comparable in size to those that buried Armero, Colombia, following the 1985 eruption of Nevado del Ruiz volcano. In contrast, ash-producing eruptive activity during the past 15 years at Tungurahua volcano has generated a continual supply of fresh volcaniclastic debris that is regularly remobilized by precipitation. Between 2000 and 2011, 886 rain-generated lahars were registered at Tungurahua. These two volcanoes pose dramatically different hazards to nearby populations. At Tungurahua, the frequency and small sizes of lahars have resulted in effective mitigation measures. At Cotopaxi 137 years have passed since the last important lahar-producing eruption, and there is now a high-risk situation for more than 100,000 people living in downstream valleys.

  3. Review of samples of tailings, soils and stream sediment adjacent to and downstream from the Ruth Mine, Inyo County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rytuba, James J.; Kim, Christopher S.; Goldstein, Daniel N.

    2011-01-01

    The Ruth Mine and mill are located in the western Mojave Desert in Inyo County, California (fig. 1). The mill processed gold-silver (Au-Ag) ores mined from the Ruth Au-Ag deposit, which is adjacent to the mill site. The Ruth Au-Ag deposit is hosted in Mesozoic intrusive rocks and is similar to other Au-Ag deposits in the western Mojave Desert that are associated with Miocene volcanic centers that formed on a basement of Mesozoic granitic rocks (Bateman, 1907; Gardner, 1954; Rytuba, 1996). The volcanic rocks consist of silicic domes and associated flows, pyroclastic rocks, and subvolcanic intrusions (fig. 2) that were emplaced into Mesozoic silicic intrusive rocks (Troxel and Morton, 1962). The Ruth Mine is on Federal land managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Tailings from the mine have been eroded and transported downstream into Homewood Canyon and then into Searles Valley (figs. 3, 4, 5, and 6). The BLM provided recreational facilities at the mine site for day-use hikers and restored and maintained the original mine buildings in collaboration with local citizen groups for use by visitors (fig. 7). The BLM requested that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in collaboration with Chapman University, measure arsenic (As) and other geochemical constituents in soils and tailings at the mine site and in stream sediments downstream from the mine in Homewood Canyon and in Searles Valley (fig. 3). The request was made because initial sampling of the site by BLM staff indicated high concentrations of As in tailings and soils adjacent to the Ruth Mine. This report summarizes data obtained from field sampling of mine tailings and soils adjacent to the Ruth Mine and stream sediments downstream from the mine on June 7, 2009. Our results permit a preliminary assessment of the sources of As and associated chemical constituents that could potentially impact humans and biota.

  4. 17-Beta estradiol and 4-nonylphenol delay smolt development and downstream migration in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Steffen S; Skovbølling, Søren; Nielsen, Christian

    2004-01-01

    . Serum vitellogenin levels increased several-fold in both male and female E2- and 4-NP-treated fish. Overall, E2- and 4-NP-treatment impaired smolting as judged by elevated condition factor, reduced gill Na+, K+ -ATPase activity and alpha-subunit Na+, K+ -ATPase mRNA level, reduced muscle water content......The effect of 17-beta estradiol (E2) and 4-nonylphenol (4-NP) on smoltification and downstream migration of Atlantic salmon was studied in an integrated laboratory and field study. In a stock of hatchery-raised 1-year-old salmon, smoltification progressed from February until late May as judged...

  5. Freezing fecal samples prior to DNA extraction affects the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio determined by downstream quantitative PCR analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, Martin Iain; Bergström, Anders; Licht, Tine Rask

    Freezing stool samples prior to DNA extraction and downstream analysis is widely used in metagenomic studies of the human microbiota but may affect the inferred community composition. In this study DNA was extracted either directly or following freeze storage of three homogenized human fecal...... samples using three different extraction methods. No consistent differences were observed in DNA yields between extractions on fresh and frozen samples, however differences were observed between extraction methods. Quantitative PCR analysis was subsequently performed on all DNA samples using six different...

  6. Freezing fecal samples prior to DNA extraction affects the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio determined by downstream quantitative PCR analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, Martin Iain; Bergström, Anders; Licht, Tine Rask

    2012-01-01

    Freezing stool samples prior to DNA extraction and downstream analysis is widely used in metagenomic studies of the human microbiota but may affect the inferred community composition. In this study, DNA was extracted either directly or following freeze storage of three homogenized human fecal...... samples using three different extraction methods. No consistent differences were observed in DNA yields between extractions on fresh and frozen samples; however, differences were observed between extraction methods. Quantitative PCR analysis was subsequently performed on all DNA samples using six...

  7. Fresh tar (from biomass gasification) destruction with downstream catalysts: comparison of their intrinsic activity with a realistic kinetic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corella, J.; Narvaez, I.; Orio, A. [Complutense Univ. of Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1996-12-31

    A model for fresh tar destruction over catalysts placed downstream a biomass gasifier is presented. It includes the stoichio-metry and the calculation of the kinetic constants for the tar destruction. Catalysts studied include commercial Ni steam reforming catalysts and calcinated dolomites. Kinetic constants for tar destruction are calculated for several particle sizes, times- on-stream and temperatures of the catalyst and equivalence ratios in the gasifier. Such intrinsic kinetic constants allow a rigorous or scientific comparison of solids and conditions to be used in an advanced gasification process. (orig.) 4 refs.

  8. In situ wave phenomena in the upstream and downstream regions of interplanetary shocks: Implications for type 2 burst theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.; Vinas, A. F.

    1997-01-01

    The results are presented of in situ waves observed by the Ulyssess unified radio and plasma wave experiment (URAP) in the upstream and downstream regions of a large number of interplanetary shocks. The Langmuir waves which are the most essential ingredients for the type 2 radio emission are observed only in the upstream regions of a limited number of shocks. On the other hand, the ion-acoustic-like waves (0.5 to 5 kHz) are observed near most of the interplanetary shocks. Implications of observations made for the electron acceleration mechanisms at the collisionless shocks and for type 2 burst theories are presented.

  9. Principal stress analysis in LDA measurement of the flow field downstream of 19-mm Sorin Bicarbon heart valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, V; Grigioni, M; Daniele, C; D'Avenio, G

    1998-11-01

    Heart valve replacement has become, since many years, a common surgical practice. Along with the improvement that the patients' health has derived from it, however, a certain amount of risk could not be avoided, bound to the inevitable hemodynamic disturbances that an artificial device generates. A major shortcoming, often reported, is the formation of thrombus on the edge of the prosthetic valve, with a possible obstruction of the orifices through which blood should normally flow undisturbed. Hemolysis is another possible consequence of the implantation of a mechanical heart valve, generally correlated to turbulence downstream of prosthetic heart valves (PHV). As it is agreed upon by many researchers, the risk of thrombogenicity or hemolysis is higher in those valves that are more subject to promote turbulence and flow separation in the flow through them. In the following paper, we present a study of the turbulence-related shear stress downstream of a bileaflet valve of minimum size (19 mm external diameter) Sorin Bicarbon. This size was chosen, accordingly to the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) draft guidance suggestion to investigate the worst case in turbulence promoted by PHVs, in order to have the highest velocity gradients and shear stresses for the FDA-stated cardiac output (6 1/min), related to maximum Reynolds number conditions. Velocity data were collected with the two-dimensional laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) technique; whereas this approach does not investigate directly all three components of the flow field, in the present case (bileaflet valves) it is not a limitation to the assessment of the maximum turbulence shear stress (TSS), thanks to the two-dimensional flow nature downstream of bileaflet models. Data taken in coincident mode were elaborated in order to determine the maximum shear stress in the measured points in the flow field, using the 2D Principal Stress Analysis (PSA). The consequences of a variable principal normal stress direction all

  10. Modeling the potential effects of climate change on water temperature downstream of a shallow reservoir, lower Madison River, MT [USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gooseff, M.N. [Department of Geology and Geological Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO, 80401 (United States); Strzepek, K. [Department of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Chapra, S.C. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Tufts University, Medford, MA (United States)

    2005-02-01

    A numerical stream temperature model that accounts for kinematic wave flow routing, and heat exchange fluxes between stream water and the atmosphere, and stream water and the stream bed is developed and calibrated to a data-set from the Lower Madison River, Montana, USA. Future climate scenarios were applied to the model through changes to the atmospheric input data based on air temperature and solar radiation output from four General Circulation Models (GCM) for the region under atmospheric CO2 concentration doubling. The purpose of this study was to quantify potential climate change impacts on water temperature for the Lower Madison River, and to assess possible impacts to aquatic ecosystems. Because water temperature is a critical component of fish habitat, this information could be of use in future planning operations of current reservoirs. We applied air temperature changes to diurnal temperatures, daytime temperatures only, and nighttime temperatures only, to assess the impacts of variable potential warming trends. The results suggest that, given the potential climatic changes, the aquatic ecosystem downstream of Ennis Lake will experience higher water temperatures, possibly leading to increased stress on fish populations.Daytime warming produced the largest increases in downstream water temperature.

  11. Evolutionary divergence of the plant elicitor peptides (Peps) and their receptors: interfamily incompatibility of perception but compatibility of downstream signalling

    KAUST Repository

    Lori, M.

    2015-05-22

    Plant elicitor peptides (Peps) are potent inducers of pattern-triggered immunity and amplify the immune response against diverse pathogens. Peps have been discovered and studied extensively in Arabidopsis and only recently orthologs in maize were also identified and characterized in more detail. Here, the presence of PROPEPs, the Pep precursors, and PEPRs, the Pep receptors, was investigated within the plant kingdom. PROPEPs and PEPRs were identified in most sequenced species of the angiosperms. The conservation and compatibility of the Pep-PEPR-system was analysed by using plants of two distantly related dicot families, Brassicaceae and Solanaceae, and a representative family of monocot plants, the Poaceae. All three plant families contain important crop plants, including maize, rice, tomato, potato, and canola. Peps were not recognized by species outside of their plant family of origin, apparently because of a divergence of the Pep sequences. Three family-specific Pep motifs were defined and the integration of such a motif into the Pep sequence of an unrelated Pep enabled its perception. Transient transformation of Nicotiana benthamiana with the coding sequences of the AtPEPR1 and ZmPEPR1a led to the recognition of Pep peptides of Brassicaceae or Poaceae origin, respectively, and to the proper activation of downstream signalling. It was concluded that signalling machinery downstream of the PEPRs is highly conserved whereas the leucine-rich repeat domains of the PEPRs co-evolved with the Peps, leading to distinct motifs and, with it, interfamily incompatibility.

  12. Tissue microarray analysis of eIF4E and its downstream effector proteins in human breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clifford John

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E is elevated in many cancers and is a prognostic indicator in breast cancer. Many pro-tumorigenic proteins are selectively translated via eIF4E, including c-Myc, cyclin D1, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and Tousled-like kinase 1B (TLK1B. However, western blot analysis of these factors in human breast cancer has been limited by the availability of fresh frozen tissue and the labor-intensive nature of the multiple assays required. Our goal was to validate whether formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues arranged in a tissue microarray (TMA format would be more efficient than the use of fresh-frozen tissue and western blot to test multiple downstream gene products. Results Breast tumor TMAs were stained immunohistochemically and quantitated using the ARIOL imaging system. In the TMAs, eIF4E levels correlated strongly with c-Myc, cyclin D1, TLK1B, VEGF, and ODC. Western blot comparisons of eIF4E vs. TLK1B were consistent with the immunohistochemical results. Consistent with our previous western blot results, eIF4E did not correlate with node status, ER, PR, or HER-2/neu. Conclusion We conclude that the TMA technique yields similar results as the western blot technique and can be more efficient and thorough in the evaluation of several products downstream of eIF4E.

  13. Mercury concentrations in fish from a Sierra Nevada foothill reservoir located downstream from historic gold-mining operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Michael K.; Martin, Barbara A.; May, Thomas W.; Alpers, Charles N.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined mercury concentrations in whole fish from Camp Far West Reservoir, an 830-ha reservoir in northern California, USA, located downstream from lands mined for gold during and following the Gold Rush of 1848–1864. Total mercury (reported as dry weight concentrations) was highest in spotted bass (mean, 0.93 μg/g; range, 0.16–4.41 μg/g) and lower in bluegill (mean, 0.45 μg/g; range, 0.22–1.96 μg/g) and threadfin shad (0.44 μg/g; range, 0.21–1.34 μg/g). Spatial patterns for mercury in fish indicated high concentrations upstream in the Bear River arm and generally lower concentrations elsewhere, including downstream near the dam. These findings coincided with patterns exhibited by methylmercury in water and sediment, and suggested that mercury-laden inflows from the Bear River were largely responsible for contaminating the reservoir ecosystem. Maximum concentrations of mercury in all three fish species, but especially bass, were high enough to warrant concern about toxic effects in fish and consumers of fish.

  14. Water Scarcity Hotspots Travel Downstream Due to Human Interventions in the 20th and 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldkamp, T. I. E.; Wada, Y.; Aerts, J. C. J. H.; Doell, P.; Gosling, S. N.; Liu, J.; Masaki, Y.; Oki, T.; Ostberg, S.; Pokhrel, Y.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Water scarcity is rapidly increasing in many regions. In a novel, multi-model assessment, we examine how human interventions (HI: land use and land cover change, man-made reservoirs and human water use) affected monthly river water availability and water scarcity over the period 1971 - 2010. Here we show that HI drastically change the critical dimensions of water scarcity, aggravating water scarcity for 8.8%(7.4 - 16.5 %) ) of the global population but alleviating it for another 8.3 % (6.4 -15.8 %). Positive impacts of HI mostly occur upstream, whereas HI aggravate water scarcity downstream; HI cause water scarcity to travel downstream. Attribution of water scarcity changes to HI components is complex and varies among the hydrological models. Seasonal variation in impacts and dominant HI components is also substantial. A thorough consideration of the spatially and temporally varying interactions among HI components and of uncertainties is therefore crucial for the success of water scarcity adaptation by HI.

  15. Empirical investigation on the dependence of TCP downstream throughput on SNR in an IEEE802.11b WLAN system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikponmwosa Oghogho

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of TCP downstream throughput (TCPdownT on signal to noise ratio (SNR in an IEEE802.11b WLAN system was investigated in various environments and varieties of QoS traffic. TCPdownT was measured for various SNR observed. An Infrastructure based IEEE802.11b WLAN system having networked computers on which measurement software were installed, was set up consecutively in various environments (open corridor, small offices with block walls and plaster boards and free space. Empirical models describing TCPdownT against SNR for different signal ranges (all ranges of signals, strong signals only, grey signals only and weak signals only were statistically generated and validated. As the SNR values changed from high (strong signals through low (grey signals to very low (weak signals, our results show a strong dependence of TCPdownT on the received SNR. Our models showed lower RMS errors when compared with other similar models. We observed RMS errors of 0.6734791 Mbps, 0.472209 Mbps, 0.9111563 Mbps and 0.5764460 Mbps for general (all SNR model, strong signals model, grey signals model and Weak signals model respectively. Our models will provide researchers and WLAN systems users with a tool to estimate the TCP downstream throughput in a real network in various environments by monitoring the received SNR.

  16. Robust and rapid algorithms facilitate large-scale whole genome sequencing downstream analysis in an integrative framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Miaoxin; Li, Jiang; Li, Mulin Jun; Pan, Zhicheng; Hsu, Jacob Shujui; Liu, Dajiang J; Zhan, Xiaowei; Wang, Junwen; Song, Youqiang; Sham, Pak Chung

    2017-05-19

    Whole genome sequencing (WGS) is a promising strategy to unravel variants or genes responsible for human diseases and traits. However, there is a lack of robust platforms for a comprehensive downstream analysis. In the present study, we first proposed three novel algorithms, sequence gap-filled gene feature annotation, bit-block encoded genotypes and sectional fast access to text lines to address three fundamental problems. The three algorithms then formed the infrastructure of a robust parallel computing framework, KGGSeq, for integrating downstream analysis functions for whole genome sequencing data. KGGSeq has been equipped with a comprehensive set of analysis functions for quality control, filtration, annotation, pathogenic prediction and statistical tests. In the tests with whole genome sequencing data from 1000 Genomes Project, KGGSeq annotated several thousand more reliable non-synonymous variants than other widely used tools (e.g. ANNOVAR and SNPEff). It took only around half an hour on a small server with 10 CPUs to access genotypes of ∼60 million variants of 2504 subjects, while a popular alternative tool required around one day. KGGSeq's bit-block genotype format used 1.5% or less space to flexibly represent phased or unphased genotypes with multiple alleles and achieved a speed of over 1000 times faster to calculate genotypic correlation. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Accumulation of trace elements and growth responses in Corbicula fluminea downstream of a coal-fired power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, Gretchen Loeffler; Wright, Meredith S; Hopkins, William A; Meyer, Judy L

    2009-07-01

    Lentic organisms exposed to coal-fired power plant (CFPP) discharges can have elevated trace element concentrations in their tissues, but this relationship and its potential consequences are unclear for lotic organisms. To explore these patterns in a lotic environment, we transplanted Corbicula fluminea from a reference stream to a stream receiving CFPP discharge. We assessed trace element accumulation and glutathione concentration in clam tissue, shell growth, and condition index at five sites along a contamination gradient. Clams at the most upstream and contaminated site had the highest growth rate, condition index, glutathione concentrations, and concentrations of arsenic (7.85+/-0.25 microg/g [dry mass]), selenium (17.75+/-0.80 microg/g), and cadmium (7.28+/-0.34 microg/g). Mercury concentrations declined from 4.33+/-0.83 to 0.81+/-0.11 microg/g [dry mass] in clams transplanted into the selenium-rich environment nearest the power plant, but this effect was not as evident at less impacted, downstream sites. Even though dilution of trace elements within modest distances from the power plant reduced bioaccumulation potential in clams, long-term loading of trace elements to downstream depositional regions (e.g., slow moving, silty areas) is likely significant.

  18. Accumulation of trace elements and growth responses in Corbicula fluminea downstream of a coal-fired power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltier, G.L.; Wright, M.S.; Hopkins, W.A.; Meyer, J.L. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    2009-07-15

    Lentic organisms exposed to coal-fired power plant (CFPP) discharges can have elevated trace element concentrations in their tissues, but this relationship and its potential consequences are unclear for lotic organisms. To explore these patterns in a lotic environment, we transplanted Corbicula fluminea from a reference stream to a stream receiving CFPP discharge. We assessed trace element accumulation and glutathione concentration in clam tissue, shell growth, and condition index at five sites along a contamination gradient. Clams at the most upstream and contaminated site had the highest growth rate, condition index, glutathione concentrations, and concentrations of arsenic (7.85 {+-} 0.25 {mu} g/g (dry mass)), selenium (17.75 {+-} 0.80 {mu} g/g), and cadmium (7.28 {+-} 0.34 {mu} g/g). Mercury concentrations declined from 4.33 {+-} 0.83 to 0.81 {+-} 0.11 {mu} g/g (dry mass) in clams transplanted into the selenium-rich environment nearest the power plant, but this effect was not as evident at less impacted, downstream sites. Even though dilution of trace elements within modest distances from the power plant reduced bioaccumulation potential in clams, long-term loading of trace elements to downstream depositional regions (e.g., slow moving, silty areas) is likely significant.

  19. Water scarcity hotspots travel downstream due to human interventions in the 20th and 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldkamp, T. I. E.; Wada, Y.; Aerts, J. C. J. H.; Döll, P.; Gosling, S. N.; Liu, J.; Masaki, Y.; Oki, T.; Ostberg, S.; Pokhrel, Y.; Satoh, Y.; Kim, H.; Ward, P. J.

    2017-06-01

    Water scarcity is rapidly increasing in many regions. In a novel, multi-model assessment, we examine how human interventions (HI: land use and land cover change, man-made reservoirs and human water use) affected monthly river water availability and water scarcity over the period 1971-2010. Here we show that HI drastically change the critical dimensions of water scarcity, aggravating water scarcity for 8.8% (7.4-16.5%) of the global population but alleviating it for another 8.3% (6.4-15.8%). Positive impacts of HI mostly occur upstream, whereas HI aggravate water scarcity downstream; HI cause water scarcity to travel downstream. Attribution of water scarcity changes to HI components is complex and varies among the hydrological models. Seasonal variation in impacts and dominant HI components is also substantial. A thorough consideration of the spatially and temporally varying interactions among HI components and of uncertainties is therefore crucial for the success of water scarcity adaptation by HI.

  20. Mercury concentrations in fish from a Sierra Nevada foothill reservoir located downstream from historic gold-mining operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Michael K; Martin, Barbara A; May, Thomas W; Alpers, Charles N

    2010-04-01

    This study examined mercury concentrations in whole fish from Camp Far West Reservoir, an 830-ha reservoir in northern California, USA, located downstream from lands mined for gold during and following the Gold Rush of 1848-1864. Total mercury (reported as dry weight concentrations) was highest in spotted bass (mean, 0.93 microg/g; range, 0.16-4.41 microg/g) and lower in bluegill (mean, 0.45 microg/g; range, 0.22-1.96 microg/g) and threadfin shad (0.44 microg/g; range, 0.21-1.34 microg/g). Spatial patterns for mercury in fish indicated high concentrations upstream in the Bear River arm and generally lower concentrations elsewhere, including downstream near the dam. These findings coincided with patterns exhibited by methylmercury in water and sediment, and suggested that mercury-laden inflows from the Bear River were largely responsible for contaminating the reservoir ecosystem. Maximum concentrations of mercury in all three fish species, but especially bass, were high enough to warrant concern about toxic effects in fish and consumers of fish.

  1. The Influence of a Eutrophic Lake to the River Downstream: Spatiotemporal Algal Composition Changes and the Driving Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Yu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Algal blooms have been frequently found at the upper reaches of the Tanglang River, which is downstream from the eutrophic Dianchi Lake. The eutrophic lake upstream is considered to be a potential source of phytoplankton, which contributes to the development of harmful algal blooms in the river downstream and can cause many serious problems for the river ecology. However, few studies focused on these kinds of rivers. Therefore, a field observation and laboratory analysis were conducted in this study. The results showed that the Tanglang River was obviously spatially heterogeneous due to the eutrophic Dianchi Lake upstream. The toxic Microcystis from the Dianchi Lake dominated the phytoplankton at the upper reaches, but these were gradually, rather than immediately, replaced by centric diatoms and chlorococalean green algae in the middle and lower reaches. The results of correlation analysis indicated that the changes in hydrodynamic conditions and underwater light intensity accounted for the spatial variations. The differences in the adaptability of different algae to changing aquatic environments explained the spatial variations of phytoplankton abundance. The dominant algae, most of which was from the Dianchi Lake upstream, determined the characteristics of the total abundance at the Tanglang River.

  2. Mercury in Fish Collected Upstream and Downstream of Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico: 1991--2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P.R. Fresquez

    2004-10-15

    Small amounts of mercury (Hg) may exist in some canyon drainage systems within Los Alamos National Laboratory lands as a result of past discharges of untreated effluents. This paper reports on the concentrations of Hg in muscle (fillets) of various types of fish species collected downstream of LANL's influence from 1991 through 2004. The mean Hg concentration in fish from Cochiti reservoir (0.22 {micro}g/g wet weight), which is located downstream of LANL, was similar to fish collected from a reservoir upstream of LANL (Abiquiu) (0.26 {micro}g/g wet weight). Mercury concentrations in fish collected from both reservoirs exhibited significantly (Abiquiu = p < 0.05 and Cochiti = p < 0.10) decreasing trends over time. Predator fish like the northern pike (Esox lucius) contained significantly higher concentrations of Hg (0.39 {micro}g/g wet weight) than bottom-feeding fish like the white sucker (Catostomus commersoni) (0.10 {micro}g/g wet weight).

  3. VT Act 174 Wind Potential

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The statewide wind potential layer used in the Act 174 effort represents three combined wind resource layers: Potential Residential and Small and...

  4. Endangered Species Act Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Critical habitat (CH) is designated for the survival and recovery of species listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Critical...

  5. The Iran Sanctions Act (ISA)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Katzman, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    ... (the Iran Freedom Support Act, P.L. 109-293) extended it until December 31, 2011, terminated application to Libya, and added provisions, although with substantial Administration flexibility in implementation...

  6. Model for the Study of Automating a System of Pumping Water from Upstream to Downstream Hydropower Plant Using Siemens S7-200 PLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugen Raduca

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the realization of an experimental model for studying didactic use automation system pumping water from upstream to downstream hydropower. As command and control unit was used PLC Siemens S7-200.

  7. 7 CFR 35.1 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 35.1 Section 35.1 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices... Definitions § 35.1 Act. Act or Export Grape and Plum Act means “An Act to promote the foreign trade of the...

  8. 7 CFR 922.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 922.2 Section 922.2 Agriculture Regulations of... WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 922.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress (May 12, 1933), as amended and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of...

  9. 7 CFR 948.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 948.2 Section 948.2 Agriculture Regulations of... Regulating Handling Definitions § 948.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10 73d Congress, as amended and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (sections 1-19, 48...

  10. 7 CFR 987.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 987.2 Section 987.2 Agriculture Regulations of... RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 987.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress, as amended and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of...

  11. 7 CFR 981.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 981.2 Section 981.2 Agriculture Regulations of... Handling Definitions § 981.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress, as amended and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (48 Stat. 31, as amended...

  12. 7 CFR 984.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 984.2 Section 984.2 Agriculture Regulations of... Handling Definitions § 984.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress, as amended and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (7 U.S.C. 601 et seq.). ...

  13. 7 CFR 915.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 915.2 Section 915.2 Agriculture Regulations of... Regulating Handling Definitions § 915.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress (May 12, 1933), as amended and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (48...

  14. 7 CFR 993.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 993.2 Section 993.2 Agriculture Regulations of... Regulating Handling Definitions § 993.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress, as amended and reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (7 U.S.C. 601 et seq.). ...

  15. 7 CFR 932.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 932.2 Section 932.2 Agriculture Regulations of... Handling Definitions § 932.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress (May 12, 1933) as amended and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (48 Stat. 31...

  16. 7 CFR 925.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 925.2 Section 925.2 Agriculture Regulations of... SOUTHEASTERN CALIFORNIA Definitions § 925.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress (May 12, 1933), as amended and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (48...

  17. 7 CFR 1260.128 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 1260.128 Section 1260.128 Agriculture... Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1260.128 Act. Act means the Beef Promotion and Research Act of 1985, Title XVI, Subtitle A of the Food Security Act of 1985, Pub. L. 99-198 and any amendments thereto. ...

  18. 7 CFR 916.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 916.2 Section 916.2 Agriculture Regulations of... Regulating Handling Definitions § 916.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress (May 12, 1933), as amended and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (48...

  19. 7 CFR 927.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 927.2 Section 927.2 Agriculture Regulations of... Regulating Handling Definitions § 927.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress (May 12, 1933), as amended and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (48...

  20. 7 CFR 983.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 983.2 Section 983.2 Agriculture Regulations of... NEW MEXICO Definitions § 983.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73rd Congress (May 12, 1933), as amended and as re-enacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Order Act of 1937, as amended (48 Stat...

  1. 7 CFR 906.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 906.2 Section 906.2 Agriculture Regulations of... GRANDE VALLEY IN TEXAS Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 906.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress, as amended and as re-enacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of...

  2. 7 CFR 917.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 917.2 Section 917.2 Agriculture Regulations of... Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 917.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress (May 12, 1933), as amended, and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as...

  3. 7 CFR 956.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 956.2 Section 956.2 Agriculture Regulations of... OF SOUTHEAST WASHINGTON AND NORTHEAST OREGON Definitions § 956.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10... Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (Sec. 1-19, 48 Stat. 31, as amended; 7 U.S.C. 601 et seq.). ...

  4. 7 CFR 923.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 923.2 Section 923.2 Agriculture Regulations of... IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 923.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d... Act of 1937, as amended (48 Stat. 31, as amended; 7 U.S.C. 601 et seq.; 68 Stat. 906, 1047). ...

  5. 7 CFR 959.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 959.2 Section 959.2 Agriculture Regulations of... Handling Definitions § 959.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress, as amended and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (sections 1-19, 48 Stat...

  6. 7 CFR 966.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 966.2 Section 966.2 Agriculture Regulations of... Handling Definitions § 966.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress, as amended and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (48 Stat. 31, as amended...

  7. 7 CFR 930.1 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 930.1 Section 930.1 Agriculture Regulations of... Definitions § 930.1 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress (May 12, 1933), as amended, and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (48 Stat. 31, as...

  8. 7 CFR 982.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 982.2 Section 982.2 Agriculture Regulations of... Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 982.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress, as amended and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (7 U.S.C...

  9. 7 CFR 989.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 989.2 Section 989.2 Agriculture Regulations of... CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 989.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress, as amended, and as re-enacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended...

  10. 7 CFR 1170.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Act. 1170.2 Section 1170.2 Agriculture Regulations of... Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DAIRY PRODUCT MANDATORY REPORTING § 1170.2 Act. Act means the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946, 7 U.S.C. 1621 et seq., as amended by the Dairy Market Enhancement Act of...

  11. 7 CFR 946.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 946.2 Section 946.2 Agriculture Regulations of... Regulating Handling Definitions § 946.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress, as amended and reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (48 Stat. 31, as...

  12. Status and Habitat Requirements of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam, 1989-1990 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigro, Anthony A. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

    1990-09-01

    We report on our progress from April 1989 through March 1990 on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF), US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). Study objectives addressed by each agency are to describe the life history and population dynamics of subadults and adults between Bonneville and McNary dams and evaluate the need and identify potential methods for protecting, mitigating and enhancing populations downstream from McNary Dam, to describe the white sturgeon recreational fishery between Bonneville and McNary dams, describe reproductive and early life history characteristics downstream from Bonneville Dam and describe life history and population dynamics of subadults and adults downstream from Bonneville Dam, to describe reproduction and early life history characteristics, define habitat requirements for spawning and rearing and quantify extent of habitat available between Bonneville and McNary dams, and to describe reproduction and early life history characteristics, define habitat requirements for spawning and rearing and quantify extent of habitat available downstream from Bonneville Dam. Our approach is to work concurrently downstream and upstream from Bonneville Dam. Upstream from Bonneville Dam we began work in the Dalles Reservoir in 1987 and expanded efforts to Bonneville Reservoir in 1988 and John Day Reservoir in 1989. Highlights from this work is also included. 47 refs., 33 figs., 66 tabs.

  13. River flow availability for environmental flow allocation downstream of hydropower facilities in the Kafue Basin of Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalumba, Mulenga; Nyirenda, Edwin

    2017-12-01

    The Government of the Republic Zambia (GRZ) will install a new hydropower station Kafue Gorge Lower downstream of the existing Kafue Gorge Station (KGS) and plans to start operating the Itezhi-Tezhi (ITT) hydropower facility in the Kafue Basin. The Basin has significant biodiversity hot spots such as the Luangwa National park and Kafue Flats. It is described as a Man-Biosphere reserve and the National Park is a designated World Heritage Site hosting a variety of wildlife species. All these natural reserves demand special protection, and environmental flow requirements (e-flows) have been identified as a necessary need to preserve these ecosystems. Implementation of e-flows is therefore a priority as Zambia considers to install more hydropower facilities. However before allocation of e-flows, it is necessary to first assess the river flow available for allocation at existing hydropower stations in the Kafue Basin. The river flow availability in the basin was checked by assessing the variability in low and high flows since the timing, frequency and duration of extreme droughts and floods (caused by low and high flows) are all important hydrological characteristics of a flow regime that affects e-flows. The river flows for a 41 year monthly time series data (1973-2014) were used to extract independent low and high flows using the Water Engineering Time Series Processing Tool (WETSPRO). The low and high flows were used to construct cumulative frequency distribution curves that were compared and analysed to show their variation over a long period. A water balance of each hydropower station was used to check the river flow allocation aspect by comparing the calculated water balance outflow (river flow) with the observed river flow, the hydropower and consumptive water rights downstream of each hydropower station. In drought periods about 50-100 m3/s of riverflow is available or discharged at both ITT and KGS stations while as in extreme flood events about 1300-1500 m3/s

  14. Changes in the Mountain Cryosphere and Potential Risks to Downstream Communities: Insights from the Indian Himalayan Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Simon; Ballesteros, Juan Antonio; Huggel, Christian; Linsbauer, Andreas; Mal, Suraj; Singh Rana, Ranbir; Singh Randhawa, Surjeet; Ruiz-Villanueva, Virginia; Salzmann, Nadine; Singh Samant, Sher; Stoffel, Markus

    2017-04-01

    Mountain environments around the world are often considered to be amongst the most sensitive to the impacts of climate change. For people living in mountain communities, there are clear challenges to be faced as their livelihoods and subsistence are directly dependent on their surrounding natural environment. But what of the wider implications for societies and large urban settlements living downstream - why should they care about the climate-driven changes occurring potentially hundreds of kilometers away in the snow and ice capped mountains? In this contribution we address this question, drawing on studies and experiences gained within joint Indo-Swiss research collaborations focused on the Indian Himalayan states of Himachal Pradesh and Uttarakhand. With the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change currently embarking on the scoping of their 6th Assessment Cycle, which includes a planned Special Report on Oceans and the Cryosphere, this contribution provides a timely reminder of the importance of mountain regions, and potential far-reaching consequences of changes in the mountain cryosphere. Our studies highlight several key themes which link the mountain environment to the lowland populated areas, including the role of the mountain cryosphere as a water source, far-reaching hazards and disasters that can originate from mountain regions, the role of mountains in providing essential ecosystem services, the economic importance of tourism in mountain regions, and the importance of transportation routes which pass through mountain environments. These themes are intricately linked, as for example demonstrated during the 2013 Uttarakhand flood disaster where many of the approximately 6000 fatalities were tourists visiting high mountain pilgrimage sites. As a consequence of the disaster, tourists stayed away during subsequent seasons with significant economic impacts felt across the State. In Himachal Pradesh, a key national transportation corridor is the Rohtang pass

  15. 7 CFR 33.1 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 33.1 Section 33.1 Agriculture Regulations of the... AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Definitions § 33.1 Act. Act and Export Apple Act are synonymous and mean “An act to promote the foreign trade of the United States in apples to protect the reputation of...

  16. Assembly-driven activation of the AIM2 foreign-dsDNA sensor provides a polymerization template for downstream ASC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrone, Seamus R.; Matyszewski, Mariusz; Yu, Xiong; Delannoy, Michael; Egelman, Edward H.; Sohn, Jungsan

    2015-07-01

    AIM2 recognizes foreign dsDNA and assembles into the inflammasome, a filamentous supramolecular signalling platform required to launch innate immune responses. We show here that the pyrin domain of AIM2 (AIM2PYD) drives both filament formation and dsDNA binding. In addition, the dsDNA-binding domain of AIM2 also oligomerizes and assists in filament formation. The ability to oligomerize is critical for binding dsDNA, and in turn permits the size of dsDNA to regulate the assembly of the AIM2 polymers. The AIM2PYD oligomers define the filamentous structure, and the helical symmetry of the AIM2PYD filament is consistent with the filament assembled by the PYD of the downstream adaptor ASC. Our results suggest that the role of AIM2PYD is not autoinhibitory, but generating a structural template by coupling ligand binding and oligomerization is a key signal transduction mechanism in the AIM2 inflammasome.

  17. Technical note: Measurement of mammary plasma flow in sows by downstream dilution of mammary vein infused para-aminohippuric acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Uffe Krogh; Storm, Adam Christian; Theil, Peter Kappel

    2016-01-01

    catheter was surgically implanted in the femoral artery, and another 2 were inserted in the right cranial mammary vein of 8 second- and third-parity sows on d 76 ± 2 SEM of gestation. On the 3rd and 17th days in milk, arterial and venous blood samples were drawn in hourly intervals from 0.5 h before until...... 6.5 h after feeding. The MPF in the right cranial mammary vein was measured by downstream dilution of infused pAH (3.0 mmol/h). Total MPF-pAH was calculated assuming that the measured flow constituted the flow from 5 out of 14 suckled glands on the basis of the anatomical structure of the mammary...

  18. Reg-2, a downstream signaling protein in the ciliary neurotrophic factor survival pathway, alleviates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong eJiang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF, originally described as a neurocytokine that could support the survival of neurons, has been recently found to alleviate demyelination, prevent axon loss, and improve functional recovery in a rat model of acute experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. However, poor penetration into the brain parenchyma and unfavorable side effects limit the utility of CNTF. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of a protein downstream of CNTF, regeneration gene protein 2 (Reg-2. Using multiple morphological, molecular biology, and electrophysiological methods to assess neuroinflammation, axonal loss, demyelination, and functional impairment, we observed that Reg-2 and CNTF exert similar effects in the acute phase of EAE. Both treatments attenuated axonal loss and demyelination, improved neuronal survival, and produced functional improvement. With a smaller molecular weight and improved penetration into the brain parenchyma, Reg-2 may be a useful substitute for CNTF therapy in EAE and multiple sclerosis.

  19. Towards Protein Crystallization as a Process Step in Downstream Processing of Therapeutic Antibodies: Screening and Optimization at Microbatch Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Yuguo; Kammerer, Bernd; Eisenkolb, Maike; Lohr, Katrin; Kiefer, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Crystallization conditions of an intact monoclonal IgG4 (immunoglobulin G, subclass 4) antibody were established in vapor diffusion mode by sparse matrix screening and subsequent optimization. The procedure was transferred to microbatch conditions and a phase diagram was built showing surprisingly low solubility of the antibody at equilibrium. With up-scaling to process scale in mind, purification efficiency of the crystallization step was investigated. Added model protein contaminants were excluded from the crystals to more than 95%. No measurable loss of Fc-binding activity was observed in the crystallized and redissolved antibody. Conditions could be adapted to crystallize the antibody directly from concentrated and diafiltrated cell culture supernatant, showing purification efficiency similar to that of Protein A chromatography. We conclude that crystallization has the potential to be included in downstream processing as a low-cost purification or formulation step. PMID:21966480

  20. Effects of a surface oriented travelling screen and water abstraction practices on downstream migrating Salmonidae smolts in a lowland stream

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Jon Christian; Aarestrup, Kim; Deacon, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    of the water abstraction site. There was no evidence that the surface oriented travelling screen had any influence on the probability of fish passing the water abstraction site. However, for both species, the probability of successful migration past the water abstraction site correlated negatively...... hydroelectric reservoirs. The present study tested the use of a surface orientated travelling screen to guide Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) and brown trout (Salmo trutta L.) smolts past a water abstraction site in a shallow lowland stream. The percentage of total discharge abstracted from the stream...... was included in the analyses. Indigenous migrating smolts were trapped, PIT tagged and subsequently released upstream of the water abstraction site. Releases shifted between a present or absent travelling screen. The migration success of the released smolts was evaluated using a trap situated downstream...

  1. MARK/Par1 Kinase Is Activated Downstream of NMDA Receptors through a PKA-Dependent Mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura P Bernard

    Full Text Available The Par1 kinases, also known as microtubule affinity-regulating kinases (MARKs, are important for the establishment of cell polarity from worms to mammals. Dysregulation of these kinases has been implicated in autism, Alzheimer's disease and cancer. Despite their important function in health and disease, it has been unclear how the activity of MARK/Par1 is regulated by signals from cell surface receptors. Here we show that MARK/Par1 is activated downstream of NMDA receptors in primary hippocampal neurons. Further, we show that this activation is dependent on protein kinase A (PKA, through the phosphorylation of Ser431 of Par4/LKB1, the major upstream kinase of MARK/Par1. Together, our data reveal a novel mechanism by which MARK/Par1 is activated at the neuronal synapse.

  2. Mobilization and attenuation of metals downstream from a base-metal mining site in the Matra Mountains, northeastern Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odor, L.; Wanty, R.B.; Horvath, I.; Fugedi, U.; ,

    1999-01-01

    Regional geochemical baseline values have been established for Hungary by the use of low-density stream-sediment surveys of flood-plain deposits of large drainage basins and of the fine fraction of stream sediments. The baseline values and anomaly thresholds thus produced helped to evaluate the importance of high toxic element concentrations found in soils in a valley downstream of a polymetallic vein-type base-metal mine. Erosion of the mine dumps and flotation dump, losses of metals during filtering, storage and transportation, human neglects, and operational breakdowns, have all contributed to the contamination of a small catchment basin in a procession of releases of solid waste. The sulfide-rich waste material weathers to a yellow color; this layer of 'yellow sand' blankets a narrow strip of the floodplain of Toka Creek in the valley near the town of Gyongyosoroszi. Contamination was spread out in the valley by floods. Metals present in the yellow sand include Pb, As, Cd, Cu, Zn, and Sb. Exposure of the local population to these metals may occur through inhalation of airborne particulates or by ingestion of these metals that are taken up by crops grown in the valley. To evaluate the areal extent and depth of the contamination, active stream sediment, flood-plain deposits, lake or reservoir sediments, soils, and surface water were sampled along the erosion pathways downstream of the mine and dumps. The flood-plain profile was sampled in detail to see the vertical distribution of elements and to relate the metal concentrations to the sedimentation and contamination histories of the flood plain. Downward migration of mobile Zn and Cd from the contaminated upper layers under supergene conditions is observed, while vertical migration of Pb, As, Hg and Sb appears to be insignificant. Soil profiles of 137Cs which originated from above-ground atomic bomb tests and the Chernobyl accident, provide good evidence that the upper 30-40 cm of the flood-plain sections, which

  3. Characterizing the transport of natural uranium and its decay product {sup 226}Ra, downstream from former mines in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phrommavanh, Vannapha; Boissezon, Helene de; Nos, Jeremy; Koko, Marie-Benedicte; Descostes, Michael [AREVA Mines - Business Group Mines, DEXP/DR et D, Tour AREVA,1 Place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Defense (France); Leermakers, Martine [Vrije Universiteit Brussel VUB, Departement Analytische en Milieuchemie ANCH, Brussels (Belgium)

    2013-07-01

    Surface waters downstream from former uranium mines have been studied in order to characterize U and {sup 226}Ra transport and to assess their bioavailability. Filtrations and ultra-filtrations (UF) have been performed (0.45 μm / 0.2 μm / 500 kDa / 100 kDa / 10 kDa) and compared to the in situ technique, diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT). One of the study sites, a stream passing through a peat bog located in the vicinity of a former U mine, shows an increase in total U and a slight increase in {sup 226}Ra concentrations. While {sup 226}Ra is completely dissolved, U is mainly present as particles and colloids, the dissolved fraction reaching only about 5-20%. (authors)

  4. Development of a Competent and Trouble Free DNA Isolation Protocol for Downstream Genetic Analyses in Glycine Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Amjad Nawaz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Extraction of deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA from plants is preliminary step in molecular biology. Fast and cost effective genomic DNA isolation from Glycine species for downstream application is a major bottleneck. Here we report a high throughput and trouble free method for genomic DNA extraction from leaf and seeds of Glycine species with high quality and quantity. Protocol reports the optimization by employing different concentrations of CTAB and PVP in extraction buffer. Efficiency of optimized protocol was compared with frequently used DNA extraction methods. Wide adoptability and utility of this protocol was confirmed by DNA extraction from leaves as well as seeds of G. max, G. soja, G. tomentella and G. latifolia. Extracted DNA was successfully subjected to PCR amplification of five microsatellite markers and four putative glycosyltransferase genes. DNA extraction protocol is reproducible, trouble free, rapid and can be adopted for plant molecular biology applications.

  5. Nitric oxide, as a downstream signal, plays vital role in auxin induced cucumber tolerance to sodic alkaline stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Biao; Miao, Li; Kong, Wenjie; Bai, Ji-Gang; Wang, Xiufeng; Wei, Min; Shi, Qinghua

    2014-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and auxin (indole-3-acetic acid; IAA) play vital roles in regulating plants tolerance to abiotic stresses. This study showed that both NO and IAA could induce cucumber plants tolerance to sodic alkaline stress, which depended on their roles in regulating reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging, antioxidative enzymes activities, Na(+) accumulation and protecting photosystems II (PSII) from damage. In addition, IAA has significant effect on NO accumulation in cucumber root, which could be responsible for IAA-induced sodic alkaline stress tolerance. Further investigation indicated that the function of IAA could be abolished by NO scavenger (cPTIO). On the contrary, IAA transport inhibitor (NPA) showed no significant effects on abolishing the function of NO. Based on these results, it could be concluded that NO is an essential downstream signal for IAA-induced cucumber tolerance to sodic alkaline stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Effectiveness factors for a commercial steam reforming (Ni) catalyst and for a calcined dolomite used downstream biomass gasifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corella, J.; Narvaez, I.; Orio, A. [Madrid Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Chem. Eng.

    1996-12-31

    A commercial steam reforming catalyst from BASF, the G1-25 S one, and a calcined dolomite, Norte-1, from Cantabria-Spain, have been used, once crushed and sieved to different particle fractions between 1.0 and 4.0 mm. The materials have been tested downstream small pilot biomass gasifiers, bubbling fluidized bed type, gasifying with air and with steam. The Thiele modulus and the effectiveness factor have been calculated at temperatures of 750-850 deg C. It is experimentally shown that diffusion control plays an important part when particle size is larger than ca. 0.5 mm. This has to be taken into account when comparing the quality of the solids for tar elimination. (author) (5 refs.)

  7. The down-stream effects of mannan-induced lectin complement pathway activation depend quantitatively on alternative pathway amplification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Morten; Garred, Peter; Karlstrøm, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    was not observed even at high mannan concentrations since addition of the inhibiting anti-MBL mAb 3F8 completely abolished generation of the terminal C5b-9 complex (TCC). However, selective blockade of AP by anti-factor D inhibited more than 80% of TCC release into the fluid phase after LP activation showing...... that AP amplification is quantitatively responsible for the final effect of initial specific LP activation. TCC generation on the solid phase was distinctly but less inhibited by anti-fD. C2 bypass of the LP pathway could be demonstrated, and AP amplification was also essential during C2 bypass in LP...... as shown by complete inhibition of TCC generation in C2-deficient serum by anti-fD and anti-properdin antibodies. In conclusion, the down-stream effect of LP activation depends strongly on AP amplification in normal human serum and in the C2 bypass pathway....

  8. Focal Adhesion Kinase Is Required for Intestinal Regeneration and Tumorigenesis Downstream of Wnt/c-Myc Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Gabrielle H.; Morton, Jennifer P.; Myant, Kevin; Phesse, Toby J.; Ridgway, Rachel A.; Marsh, Victoria; Wilkins, Julie A.; Athineos, Dimitris; Muncan, Vanesa; Kemp, Richard; Neufeld, Kristi; Clevers, Hans; Brunton, Valerie; Winton, Douglas J.; Wang, Xiaoyan; Sears, Rosalie C.; Clarke, Alan R.; Frame, Margaret C.; Sansom, Owen J.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The intestinal epithelium has a remarkable capacity to regenerate after injury and DNA damage. Here, we show that the integrin effector protein Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) is dispensable for normal intestinal homeostasis and DNA damage signaling, but is essential for intestinal regeneration following DNA damage. Given Wnt/c-Myc signaling is activated following intestinal regeneration, we investigated the functional importance of FAK following deletion of the Apc tumor suppressor protein within the intestinal epithelium. Following Apc loss, FAK expression increased in a c-Myc-dependent manner. Codeletion of Apc and Fak strongly reduced proliferation normally induced following Apc loss, and this was associated with reduced levels of phospho-Akt and suppression of intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc heterozygous mice. Thus, FAK is required downstream of Wnt Signaling, for Akt/mTOR activation, intestinal regeneration, and tumorigenesis. Importantly, this work suggests that FAK inhibitors may suppress tumorigenesis in patients at high risk of developing colorectal cancer. PMID:20708588

  9. Towards protein crystallization as a process step in downstream processing of therapeutic antibodies: screening and optimization at microbatch scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuguo Zang

    Full Text Available Crystallization conditions of an intact monoclonal IgG4 (immunoglobulin G, subclass 4 antibody were established in vapor diffusion mode by sparse matrix screening and subsequent optimization. The procedure was transferred to microbatch conditions and a phase diagram was built showing surprisingly low solubility of the antibody at equilibrium. With up-scaling to process scale in mind, purification efficiency of the crystallization step was investigated. Added model protein contaminants were excluded from the crystals to more than 95%. No measurable loss of Fc-binding activity was observed in the crystallized and redissolved antibody. Conditions could be adapted to crystallize the antibody directly from concentrated and diafiltrated cell culture supernatant, showing purification efficiency similar to that of Protein A chromatography. We conclude that crystallization has the potential to be included in downstream processing as a low-cost purification or formulation step.

  10. Flow Structure Downstream of a Mechanical Heart Valve during Systole: Investigation Using High-Speed Particle Image Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshkai, Peter; Haji-Esmaeili, Farida

    2007-11-01

    High speed digital particle image velocimetry is employed to study turbulent flow through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve during systolic and diastolic phases of a cardiac cycle. Unsteady vortex shedding from the valve's leaflets displays distinct characteristic frequencies, depending on the opening angle of each leaflet. Small- and large-scale transverse oscillations of the separated shear layers are studied using global quantitative flow imaging approach. Implementation of high-speed digital particle image velocimetry technique yields quantitative information about vortex shedding frequencies and trajectories of the shed vortices downstream of the valve. Turbulent flow structures including jet-like regions and shed vortices are characterized in terms of patterns of instantaneous and time-averaged velocity, vorticity, and streamline topology.

  11. Kisspeptin-10 Induces β-Casein Synthesis via GPR54 and Its Downstream Signaling Pathways in Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianhua; Liu, Juxiong; Huang, Bingxu; Kan, Xingchi; Chen, Guangxin; Wang, Wei; Fu, Shoupeng

    2017-12-05

    Kisspeptins (Kps) play a key role in the regulation of GnRH axis and as an anti-metastasis agent by binding with GPR54. Recently, we observed that the expression of GPR54 was higher in the lactating mammary tissues of dairy cows with high-quality milk (0.81 ± 0.13 kg/day of milk protein yield; 1.07 ± 0.18 kg/day of milk fat yield) than in those with low-quality milk (0.51 ± 0.14 kg/day of milk protein yield; 0.67 ± 0.22 kg/day of milk fat yield). We hypothesized that Kp-10 might regulate the milk protein, β-casein (CSN2) synthesis via GPR54 and its downstream signaling. First, we isolated the bovine mammary epithelial cells (bMECs) from lactating Holstein dairy cows, and treated them with different concentrations of Kp-10. Compared with the control cells, the synthesis of CSN2 is significantly increased at a concentration of 100 nM of Kp-10. In addition, the increased effect of CSN2 synthesis was blocked when the cells were pre-treated with the selective inhibitor of GPR54 Peptide-234 (P-234). Mechanistic study revealed that Kp-10 activated ERK1/2, AKT, mTOR and STAT5 in bMECs. Moreover, inhibiting ERK1/2, AKT, mTOR and STAT5 with U0126, MK2206, Rapamycin and AG490 could block the effects of Kp-10. Together, these results demonstrate that Kp-10 facilitates the synthesis of CSN2 via GPR54 and its downstream signaling pathways mTOR, ERK1/2, STAT5 and AKT.

  12. Kisspeptin-10 Induces β-Casein Synthesis via GPR54 and Its Downstream Signaling Pathways in Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Sun

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Kisspeptins (Kps play a key role in the regulation of GnRH axis and as an anti-metastasis agent by binding with GPR54. Recently, we observed that the expression of GPR54 was higher in the lactating mammary tissues of dairy cows with high-quality milk (0.81 ± 0.13 kg/day of milk protein yield; 1.07 ± 0.18 kg/day of milk fat yield than in those with low-quality milk (0.51 ± 0.14 kg/day of milk protein yield; 0.67 ± 0.22 kg/day of milk fat yield. We hypothesized that Kp-10 might regulate the milk protein, β-casein (CSN2 synthesis via GPR54 and its downstream signaling. First, we isolated the bovine mammary epithelial cells (bMECs from lactating Holstein dairy cows, and treated them with different concentrations of Kp-10. Compared with the control cells, the synthesis of CSN2 is significantly increased at a concentration of 100 nM of Kp-10. In addition, the increased effect of CSN2 synthesis was blocked when the cells were pre-treated with the selective inhibitor of GPR54 Peptide-234 (P-234. Mechanistic study revealed that Kp-10 activated ERK1/2, AKT, mTOR and STAT5 in bMECs. Moreover, inhibiting ERK1/2, AKT, mTOR and STAT5 with U0126, MK2206, Rapamycin and AG490 could block the effects of Kp-10. Together, these results demonstrate that Kp-10 facilitates the synthesis of CSN2 via GPR54 and its downstream signaling pathways mTOR, ERK1/2, STAT5 and AKT.

  13. Effect of buried plates on scour profiles downstream of hydraulic jump in open channels with horizontal and reverse bed slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Abbaspour

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Local scour downstream of sluice gates in erosive beds is one of the main concerns of hydraulic engineers because it can cause considerable damage to structures. Many researchers have conducted various studies to predict the maximum depth and length of scour holes and to develop new methods to control this phenomenon. In the methods that have recently been examined, embedded buried plates are used to control the scour in the erosive beds. In this study, using a physical model, the effect of buried plates in erosive beds on the depth of scour downstream of a hydraulic jump was studied. Several experiments were performed in which plates were buried at 50° and 90° angles at different distances from the apron in open channels with horizontal and reverse bed slopes. The results of experiments in which the scour profiles were drawn in dimensionless forms show that the angle and position of the plates are important to controlling and reducing scour depth. In fact, by reducing the angle of buried plates, the maximum depth of scour is also reduced. Also, comparison of the results of a single buried plate and double buried plates shows that using two buried plates at the distances of 30 and 45 cm from the non-erodible bed is more effective in reducing the scour depth. The best distances of the buried plates with angles of 90° and 50° from the non-erodible bed are 45 cm and 30 cm, respectively, in the condition with a single buried plate.

  14. Reservoir impacts downstream in highly regulated river basins: the Ebro delta and the Guadalquivir estuary in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, María J.; Rovira, Albert; García-Contreras, Darío; Contreras, Eva; Millares, Agustín; Aguilar, Cristina; Losada, Miguel A.

    2016-05-01

    Regulation by reservoirs affects both the freshwater regime and the sediment delivery at the area downstream, and may have a significant impact on water quality in the final transitional water bodies. Spain is one the countries with more water storage capacity by reservoirs in the world. Dense reservoir networks can be found in most of the hydrographic basins, especially in the central and southern regions. The spatial redistribution of the seasonal and annual water storage in reservoirs for irrigation and urban supply, mainly, has resulted in significant changes of water flow and sediment load regimes, together with a fostered development of soil and water uses, with environmental impacts downstream and higher vulnerability of these areas to the sea level rise and drought occurrence. This work shows these effects in the Guadalquivir and the Ebro River basins, two of the largest regulated areas in Spain. The results show a 71 % decrease of the annual freshwater input to the Guadalquivir River estuary during 1930-2014, an increase of 420 % of the irrigated area upstream the estuary, and suspended sediment loads up to 1000 % the initial levels. In the Ebro River delta, the annual water yield has decreased over a 30 % but, on the contrary, the big reservoirs are located in the main stream, and the sediment load has decreased a 99 %, resulting in a delta coastal regression up to 10 m per year and the massive presence of macrophytes in the lower river. Adaptive actions proposed to face these impacts in a sea level rise scenario are also analyzed.

  15. Membrane actions of progestins at dopamine type 1-like and GABAA receptors involve downstream signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Cheryl A; Walf, Alicia A

    2008-10-01

    In the ventral tegmental area (VTA), progestins facilitate lordosis via rapid actions at membrane dopamine Type 1-like (D(1)) and/or GABA(A) receptors (GBRs), rather than via cognate, intracellular progestin receptors (PRs). Downstream signal transduction pathways involved in these effects were investigated using lordosis as a bioassay. If progestins' actions at D(1) and/or GBRs in the VTA require activation of G-proteins, adenylyl cyclase, cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), phospholipase C (PLC), and/or PKC, then pharmacologically blocking these pathways would be expected to attenuate progestin-facilitated lordosis and its enhancement by D(1) and GBR activity. Ovariectomized, estradiol-primed rats were infused first with vehicle or signal transduction inhibitor, and second with vehicle, a D(1) or GBR agonist, and then with vehicle or progestins to the VTA. Rats were tested for lordosis following infusions. Results indicated that initiation of G-proteins, adenylyl cyclase, PKA, PLC, or PKC in the VTA is required for rapid effects of progestins through D(1) and/or GBRs to facilitate lordosis. As well, progestins' actions at n-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) may modulate activity at D(1) and/or GBRs and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) may be a common signaling pathway. Findings from a microarray study demonstrated that there was upregulation of genes associated with steroid metabolism, GBRs, D(1), NMDARs and signal transduction factors in the midbrain VTA of naturally receptive mated compared to non-mated rats. Thus, in the VTA, progestins have rapid membrane-mediated actions via D(1), GBRs, NMDARs and their downstream signal transduction pathways.

  16. FVII, FVIIa and downstream markers of extrinsic pathway activation differ by EPCR Ser219Gly variant in healthy men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Helen A; Cooper, Jackie A; Drenos, Fotios; Acharya, Jayshree; Mitchell, Jacqueline P.; Bauer, Kenneth A; Morrissey, James H; Esnouf, M Peter; Humphries, Stephen E

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of a variant in EPCR (Ser219Gly), previously shown to affect EPCR shedding, upon plasma FVII, FVIIa and downstream markers of activated coagulation. Methods: Statistical analysis was undertaken in ~2000 healthy middle aged men (NPHSII) Results: Higher soluble EPCR levels were confirmed for Gly allele carriers (p<0.0001). Significantly higher levels of FVII, FVIIa and downstream markers of activated coagulation in the extrinsic pathway (FIX activation pep {FIXpep}; FX activation pep {FXpep}), and prothrombin F1+2 (F1+2) were identified in baseline samples, in Gly carriers compared to Ser/Ser (p<=0.04 for trend). In repeat samples collected for up to five years, levels of FVII and F1+2 were higher in Gly allele carriers compared to Ser/Ser by (FVII: 6.9% CI 5.5-8.4 in Ser/Gly; and 23.4% CI 16.3-30.8 in Gly/Gly, p<0.0001), (F1+2: 8.1% CI 5.2-11.1 in Ser/Gly; 25.2% CI 11.8-40.3 in Gly/Gly, p<0.04), confirming reproducibility of findings at baseline. Molar ratios for FIXpep, FXpep and F1+2 to FVIIa were constant in Ser/Ser and Ser/Gly but tended to be higher in Gly/Gly, reaching statistical significance for FIXpep:FVIIa (p=0.04). Conclusions: These data suggest that higher levels of FVII and FVIIa circulate when EPCR shedding is greatest. Furthermore, these results suggest consequences for activation of extrinsic coagulation. PMID:19696402

  17. Integrative Genomics Implicates EGFR as a Downstream Mediator in NKX2-1 Amplified Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Clarke

    Full Text Available NKX2-1, encoding a homeobox transcription factor, is amplified in approximately 15% of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC, where it is thought to drive cancer cell proliferation and survival. However, its mechanism of action remains largely unknown. To identify relevant downstream transcriptional targets, here we carried out a combined NKX2-1 transcriptome (NKX2-1 knockdown followed by RNAseq and cistrome (NKX2-1 binding sites by ChIPseq analysis in four NKX2-1-amplified human NSCLC cell lines. While NKX2-1 regulated genes differed among the four cell lines assayed, cell proliferation emerged as a common theme. Moreover, in 3 of the 4 cell lines, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR was among the top NKX2-1 upregulated targets, which we confirmed at the protein level by western blot. Interestingly, EGFR knockdown led to upregulation of NKX2-1, suggesting a negative feedback loop. Consistent with this finding, combined knockdown of NKX2-1 and EGFR in NCI-H1819 lung cancer cells reduced cell proliferation (as well as MAP-kinase and PI3-kinase signaling more than knockdown of either alone. Likewise, NKX2-1 knockdown enhanced the growth-inhibitory effect of the EGFR-inhibitor erlotinib. Taken together, our findings implicate EGFR as a downstream effector of NKX2-1 in NKX2-1 amplified NSCLC, with possible clinical implications, and provide a rich dataset for investigating additional mediators of NKX2-1 driven oncogenesis.

  18. Regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells by ccp1, a FGF2 downstream gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inman Gareth J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coiled-coil domain containing 115 (Ccdc115 or coiled coil protein-1 (ccp1 was previously identified as a downstream gene of Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 (FGF2 highly expressed in embryonic and adult brain. However, its function has not been characterised to date. Here we hypothesized that ccp1 may be a downstream effecter of FGF2, promoting cell proliferation and protecting from apoptosis. Methods Forced ccp1 expression in mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF and neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cell line, as well as down-regulation of ccp1 expression by siRNA in NIH3T3, was used to characterize the role of ccp1. Results Ccp1 over-expression increased cell proliferation, whereas down-regulation of ccp1 expression reduced it. Ccp1 was able to increase cell proliferation in the absence of serum. Furthermore, ccp1 reduced apoptosis upon withdrawal of serum in SK-N-SH. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK or ERK Kinase (MEK inhibitor, U0126, only partially inhibited the ccp1-dependent BrdU incorporation, indicating that other signaling pathway may be involved in ccp1-induced cell proliferation. Induction of Sprouty (SPRY upon FGF2 treatment was accelerated in ccp1 over-expressing cells. Conclusions All together, the results showed that ccp1 regulates cell number by promoting proliferation and suppressing cell death. FGF2 was shown to enhance the effects of ccp1, however, it is likely that other mitogenic factors present in the serum can also enhance the effects. Whether these effects are mediated by FGF2 influencing the ccp1 function or by increasing the ccp1 expression level is still unclear. At least some of the proliferative regulation by ccp1 is mediated by MAPK, however other signaling pathways are likely to be involved.

  19. Nuclear cereblon modulates transcriptional activity of Ikaros and regulates its downstream target, enkephalin, in human neuroblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Takeyoshi [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, TWIns, 2-2 Wakamatsu, Shinjuku, Tokyo, 162-8480 (Japan); Asahi, Toru [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, TWIns, 2-2 Wakamatsu, Shinjuku, Tokyo, 162-8480 (Japan); Research Organization for Nano & Life Innovation, Waseda University #03C309, TWIns, 2-2 Wakamatsu, Shinjuku, Tokyo, 162-8480 (Japan); Sawamura, Naoya, E-mail: naoya.sawamura@gmail.com [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, TWIns, 2-2 Wakamatsu, Shinjuku, Tokyo, 162-8480 (Japan); Research Organization for Nano & Life Innovation, Waseda University #03C309, TWIns, 2-2 Wakamatsu, Shinjuku, Tokyo, 162-8480 (Japan)

    2016-08-26

    The gene coding cereblon (CRBN) was originally identified in genetic linkage analysis of mild autosomal recessive nonsyndromic intellectual disability. CRBN has broad localization in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. However, the significance of nuclear CRBN remains unknown. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the role of CRBN in the nucleus. First, we generated a series of CRBN deletion mutants and determined the regions responsible for the nuclear localization. Only CRBN protein lacking the N-terminal region was localized outside of the nucleus, suggesting that the N-terminal region is important for its nuclear localization. CRBN was also identified as a thalidomide-binding protein and component of the cullin-4-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Thalidomide has been reported to be involved in the regulation of the transcription factor Ikaros by CRBN-mediated degradation. To investigate the nuclear functions of CRBN, we performed co-immunoprecipitation experiments and evaluated the binding of CRBN to Ikaros. As a result, we found that CRBN was associated with Ikaros protein, and the N-terminal region of CRBN was required for Ikaros binding. In luciferase reporter gene experiments, CRBN modulated transcriptional activity of Ikaros. Furthermore, we found that CRBN modulated Ikaros-mediated transcriptional repression of the proenkephalin gene by binding to its promoter region. These results suggest that CRBN binds to Ikaros via its N-terminal region and regulates transcriptional activities of Ikaros and its downstream target, enkephalin. - Highlights: • We found that CRBN is a nucleocytoplasmic shutting protein and identified the key domain for nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. • CRBN associates with the transcription factor Ikaros via the N-terminal domain. • CRBN modulates Ikaros-mediated transcriptional regulation and its downstream target, enkephalin.

  20. Three-dimensional flow field around and downstream of a subscale model rotating vertical axis wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Kevin J.; Coletti, Filippo; Elkins, Christopher J.; Dabiri, John O.; Eaton, John K.

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional, three-component mean velocity fields have been measured around and downstream of a scale model vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) operated at tip speed ratios (TSRs) of 1.25 and 2.5, in addition to a non-rotating case. The five-bladed turbine model has an aspect ratio (height/diameter) of 1 and is operated in a water tunnel at a Reynolds number based on turbine diameter of 11,600. Velocity fields are acquired using magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) at an isotropic resolution of 1/50 of the turbine diameter. Mean flow reversal is observed immediately behind the turbine for cases with rotation. The turbine wake is highly three-dimensional and asymmetric throughout the investigated region, which extends up to 7 diameters downstream. A vortex pair, generated at the upwind-turning side of the turbine, plays a dominant role in wake dynamics by entraining faster fluid from the freestream and aiding in wake recovery. The higher TSR case shows a larger region of reverse flow and greater asymmetry in the near wake of the turbine, but faster wake recovery due to the increase in vortex pair strength with increasing TSR. The present measurement technique also provides detailed information about flow in the vicinity of the turbine blades and within the turbine rotor. The details of the flow field around VAWTs and in their wakes can inform the design of high-density VAWT wind farms, where wake interaction between turbines is a principal consideration.