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Sample records for hox cofactors meis1

  1. Meis1 Is Required for Adult Mouse Erythropoiesis, Megakaryopoiesis and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Expansion.

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    Michelle Erin Miller

    Full Text Available Meis1 is recognized as an important transcriptional regulator in hematopoietic development and is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of leukemia, both as a Hox transcription factor co-factor and independently. Despite the emerging recognition of Meis1's importance in the context of both normal and leukemic hematopoiesis, there is not yet a full understanding of Meis1's functions and the relevant pathways and genes mediating its functions. Recently, several conditional mouse models for Meis1 have been established. These models highlight a critical role for Meis1 in adult mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs and implicate reactive oxygen species (ROS as a mediator of Meis1 function in this compartment. There are, however, several reported differences between these studies in terms of downstream progenitor populations impacted and effectors of function. In this study, we describe further characterization of a conditional knockout model based on mice carrying a loxP-flanked exon 8 of Meis1 which we crossed onto the inducible Cre localization/expression strains, B6;129-Gt(ROSA26Sor(tm1(Cre/ERTNat/J or B6.Cg-Tg(Mx1-Cre1Cgn/J. Findings obtained from these two inducible Meis1 knockout models confirm and extend previous reports of the essential role of Meis1 in adult HSC maintenance and expansion and provide new evidence that highlights key roles of Meis1 in both megakaryopoiesis and erythropoiesis. Gene expression analyses point to a number of candidate genes involved in Meis1's role in hematopoiesis. Our data additionally support recent evidence of a role of Meis1 in ROS regulation.

  2. Dual role for Hox genes and Hox co-factors in conferring leg motoneuron survival and identity in Drosophila.

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    Baek, Myungin; Enriquez, Jonathan; Mann, Richard S

    2013-05-01

    Adult Drosophila walk using six multi-jointed legs, each controlled by ∼50 leg motoneurons (MNs). Although MNs have stereotyped morphologies, little is known about how they are specified. Here, we describe the function of Hox genes and homothorax (hth), which encodes a Hox co-factor, in Drosophila leg MN development. Removing either Hox or Hth function from a single neuroblast (NB) lineage results in MN apoptosis. A single Hox gene, Antennapedia (Antp), is primarily responsible for MN survival in all three thoracic segments. When cell death is blocked, partially penetrant axon branching errors are observed in Hox mutant MNs. When single MNs are mutant, errors in both dendritic and axon arborizations are observed. Our data also suggest that Antp levels in post-mitotic MNs are important for specifying their identities. Thus, in addition to being essential for survival, Hox and hth are required to specify accurate MN morphologies in a level-dependent manner.

  3. Genome-wide tissue-specific occupancy of the Hox protein Ultrabithorax and Hox cofactor Homothorax in Drosophila.

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    Matthew Slattery

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The Hox genes are responsible for generating morphological diversity along the anterior-posterior axis during animal development. The Drosophila Hox gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx, for example, is required for specifying the identity of the third thoracic (T3 segment of the adult, which includes the dorsal haltere, an appendage required for flight, and the ventral T3 leg. Ubx mutants show homeotic transformations of the T3 leg towards the identity of the T2 leg and the haltere towards the wing. All Hox genes, including Ubx, encode homeodomain containing transcription factors, raising the question of what target genes Ubx regulates to generate these adult structures. To address this question, we carried out whole genome ChIP-chip studies to identify all of the Ubx bound regions in the haltere and T3 leg imaginal discs, which are the precursors to these adult structures. In addition, we used ChIP-chip to identify the sites bound by the Hox cofactor, Homothorax (Hth. In contrast to previous ChIP-chip studies carried out in Drosophila embryos, these binding studies reveal that there is a remarkable amount of tissue- and transcription factor-specific binding. Analyses of the putative target genes bound and regulated by these factors suggest that Ubx regulates many downstream transcription factors and developmental pathways in the haltere and T3 leg. Finally, we discovered additional DNA sequence motifs that in some cases are specific for individual data sets, arguing that Ubx and/or Hth work together with many regionally expressed transcription factors to execute their functions. Together, these data provide the first whole-genome analysis of the binding sites and target genes regulated by Ubx to specify the morphologies of the adult T3 segment of the fly.

  4. DNMT3A mutations mediate the epigenetic reactivation of the leukemogenic factor MEIS1 in acute myeloid leukemia.

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    Ferreira, H J; Heyn, H; Vizoso, M; Moutinho, C; Vidal, E; Gomez, A; Martínez-Cardús, A; Simó-Riudalbas, L; Moran, S; Jost, E; Esteller, M

    2016-06-09

    Close to half of de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases do not exhibit any cytogenetic aberrations. In this regard, distortion of the DNA methylation setting and the presence of mutations in epigenetic modifier genes can also be molecular drivers of the disease. In recent years, somatic missense mutations of the DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A) have been reported in ~20% of AML patients; however, no obvious critical downstream gene has been identified that could explain the role of DNMT3A in the natural history of AML. Herein, using whole-genome bisulfite sequencing and DNA methylation microarrays, we have identified a key gene undergoing promoter hypomethylation-associated transcriptional reactivation in DNMT3 mutant patients, the leukemogenic HOX cofactor MEIS1. Our results indicate that, in the absence of mixed lineage leukemia fusions, an alternative pathway for engaging an oncogenic MEIS1-dependent transcriptional program can be mediated by DNMT3A mutations.

  5. The pancreatic and duodenal homeobox protein PDX-1 regulates the ductal specific keratin 19 through the degradation of MEIS1 and DNA binding.

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    Johannes von Burstin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pancreas organogenesis is the result of well-orchestrated and balanced activities of transcription factors. The homeobox transcription factor PDX-1 plays a crucial role in the development and function of the pancreas, both in the maintenance of progenitor cells and in determination and maintenance of differentiated endocrine cells. However, the activity of homeobox transcription factors requires coordination with co-factors, such as PBX and MEIS proteins. PBX and MEIS proteins belong to the family of three amino acid loop extension (TALE homeodomain proteins. In a previous study we found that PDX-1 negatively regulates the transcriptional activity of the ductal specific keratin 19 (Krt19. In this study, we investigate the role of different domains of PDX-1 and elucidate the functional interplay of PDX-1 and MEIS1 necessary for Krt19 regulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we demonstrate that PDX-1 exerts a dual manner of regulation of Krt19 transcriptional activity. Deletion studies highlight that the NH(2-terminus of PDX-1 is functionally relevant for the down-regulation of Krt19, as it is required for DNA binding of PDX-1 to the Krt19 promoter. Moreover, this effect occurs independently of PBX. Second, we provide insight on how PDX-1 regulates the Hox co-factor MEIS1 post-transcriptionally. We find specific binding of MEIS1 and MEIS2 to the Krt19 promoter using IP-EMSA, and siRNA mediated silencing of Meis1, but not Meis2, reduces transcriptional activation of Krt19 in primary pancreatic ductal cells. Over-expression of PDX-1 leads to a decreased level of MEIS1 protein, and this decrease is prevented by inhibition of the proteasome. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our data provide evidence for a dual mechanism of how PDX-1 negatively regulates Krt19 ductal specific gene expression. These findings imply that transcription factors may efficiently regulate target gene expression through diverse, non

  6. Analysis list: Meis1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Meis1 Blood,Embryo,Embryonic fibroblast,Neural,Pluripotent stem cell + mm9 http://d...barchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Meis1.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Meis...1.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Meis1.10.tsv http://dbarchive.bioscien...cedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Meis1.Blood.tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Meis...1.Embryo.tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Meis1.Embryonic_fibroblas

  7. MEIS1 functions as a potential AR negative regulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Liang [Department of Urology, Chinese PLA Medical School/Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China); Department of Urology, Civil Aviation General Hospital/Civil Aviation Medical College of Peking University, Beijing 100123 (China); Li, Mingyang [Department of Gastroenterology, Nan Lou Division, Chinese PLA Medical School/Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China); Feng, Fan [Department of Pharmacy, General Hospital of Shenyang Military Command, Shenyang 110016 (China); Yang, Yutao [Beijing Institute for Neuroscience, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100069 (China); Hang, Xingyi [National Scientific Data Sharing Platform for Population and Health, Beijing 100730 (China); Cui, Jiajun, E-mail: cuijn@ucmail.uc.edu [Department of Cancer and Cell Biology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States); Gao, Jiangping, E-mail: jpgao@163.com [Department of Urology, Chinese PLA Medical School/Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China)

    2014-10-15

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays critical roles in human prostate carcinoma progression and transformation. However, the activation of AR is regulated by co-regulators. MEIS1 protein, the homeodomain transcription factor, exhibited a decreased level in poor-prognosis prostate tumors. In this study, we investigated a potential interaction between MEIS1 and AR. We found that overexpression of MEIS1 inhibited the AR transcriptional activity and reduced the expression of AR target gene. A potential protein–protein interaction between AR and MEIS1 was identified by the immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assays. Furthermore, MEIS1 modulated AR cytoplasm/nucleus translocation and the recruitment to androgen response element in prostate specific antigen (PSA) gene promoter sequences. In addition, MEIS1 promoted the recruitment of NCoR and SMRT in the presence of R1881. Finally, MEIS1 inhibited the proliferation and anchor-independent growth of LNCaP cells. Taken together, our data suggests that MEIS1 functions as a novel AR co-repressor. - Highlights: • A potential interaction was identified between MEIS1 and AR signaling. • Overexpression of MEIS1 reduced the expression of AR target gene. • MEIS1 modulated AR cytoplasm/nucleus translocation. • MEIS1 inhibited the proliferation and anchor-independent growth of LNCaP cells.

  8. Analysis list: MEIS1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MEIS1 Blood + hg19 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/MEIS1.1.t...sv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/MEIS1.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/MEIS...1.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/MEIS1.Blood.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/Blood.gml ...

  9. File list: Oth.Bld.20.MEIS1.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.20.MEIS1.AllCell hg19 TFs and others MEIS1 Blood SRX150751,SRX150753,SRX038...914,SRX038916,SRX038915 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bld.20.MEIS1.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.Bld.50.MEIS1.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.50.MEIS1.AllCell hg19 TFs and others MEIS1 Blood SRX150751,SRX150753,SRX038...914,SRX038916,SRX038915 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bld.50.MEIS1.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Oth.Bld.05.MEIS1.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.05.MEIS1.AllCell hg19 TFs and others MEIS1 Blood SRX038915,SRX038914,SRX150...751,SRX038916,SRX150753 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bld.05.MEIS1.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.Bld.10.MEIS1.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.10.MEIS1.AllCell hg19 TFs and others MEIS1 Blood SRX038915,SRX150751,SRX150...753,SRX038916,SRX038914 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bld.10.MEIS1.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Oth.ALL.50.MEIS1.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.50.MEIS1.AllCell hg19 TFs and others MEIS1 All cell types SRX150751,SRX1507...53,SRX038914,SRX038916,SRX038915 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.ALL.50.MEIS1.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Oth.ALL.05.MEIS1.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.05.MEIS1.AllCell hg19 TFs and others MEIS1 All cell types SRX038915,SRX0389...14,SRX150751,SRX038916,SRX150753 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.ALL.05.MEIS1.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.EmF.10.Meis1.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.EmF.10.Meis1.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Meis1 Embryonic fibroblast SRX442882,SR...X442881,SRX442883 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.EmF.10.Meis1.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.ALL.20.MEIS1.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.20.MEIS1.AllCell hg19 TFs and others MEIS1 All cell types SRX150751,SRX1507...53,SRX038914,SRX038916,SRX038915 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.ALL.20.MEIS1.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.EmF.50.Meis1.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.EmF.50.Meis1.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Meis1 Embryonic fibroblast SRX442882,SR...X442881,SRX442883 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.EmF.50.Meis1.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.ALL.10.MEIS1.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.10.MEIS1.AllCell hg19 TFs and others MEIS1 All cell types SRX038915,SRX1507...51,SRX150753,SRX038916,SRX038914 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.ALL.10.MEIS1.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.Bld.05.Meis1.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.05.Meis1.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Meis1 Blood SRX475273,SRX475275,SRX4752...74,SRX475272,SRX310204 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Bld.05.Meis1.AllCell.bed ...

  20. Meis1 regulates epidermal stem cells and is required for skin tumorigenesis.

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    Kazuhiro Okumura

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that Meis1 plays an important role in blood development and vascular homeostasis, and can induce blood cancers, such as leukemia. However, its role in epithelia remains largely unknown. Here, we uncover two roles for Meis1 in the epidermis: as a critical regulator of epidermal homeostasis in normal tissues and as a proto-oncogenic factor in neoplastic tissues. In normal epidermis, we show that Meis1 is predominantly expressed in the bulge region of the hair follicles where multipotent adult stem cells reside, and that the number of these stem cells is reduced when Meis1 is deleted in the epidermal tissue of mice. Mice with epidermal deletion of Meis1 developed significantly fewer DMBA/TPA-induced benign and malignant tumors compared with wild-type mice, suggesting that Meis1 plays a role in both tumor development and malignant progression. This is consistent with the observation that Meis1 expression increases as tumors progress from benign papillomas to malignant carcinomas. Interestingly, we found that Meis1 localization was altered to neoplasia development. Instead of being localized to the stem cell region, Meis1 is localized to more differentiated cells in tumor tissues. These findings suggest that, during the transformation from normal to neoplastic tissues, a functional switch occurs in Meis1.

  1. Meis1: effects on motor phenotypes and the sensorimotor system in mice

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    Aaro V. Salminen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available MEIS1 encodes a developmental transcription factor and has been linked to restless legs syndrome (RLS in genome-wide association studies. RLS is a movement disorder leading to severe sleep reduction and has a substantial impact on the quality of life of patients. In genome-wide association studies, MEIS1 has consistently been the gene with the highest effect size and functional studies suggest a disease-relevant downregulation. Therefore, haploinsufficiency of Meis1 could be the system with the most potential for modeling RLS in animals. We used heterozygous Meis1-knockout mice to study the effects of Meis1 haploinsufficiency on mouse behavioral and neurological phenotypes, and to relate the findings to human RLS. We exposed the Meis1-deficient mice to assays of motor, sensorimotor and cognitive ability, and assessed the effect of a dopaminergic receptor 2/3 agonist commonly used in the treatment of RLS. The mutant mice showed a pattern of circadian hyperactivity, which is compatible with human RLS. Moreover, we discovered a replicable prepulse inhibition (PPI deficit in the Meis1-deficient animals. In addition, these mice were hyposensitive to the PPI-reducing effect of the dopaminergic receptor agonist, highlighting a role of Meis1 in the dopaminergic system. Other reported phenotypes include enhanced social recognition at an older age that was not related to alterations in adult olfactory bulb neurogenesis previously shown to be implicated in this behavior. In conclusion, the Meis1-deficient mice fulfill some of the hallmarks of an RLS animal model, and revealed the role of Meis1 in sensorimotor gating and in the dopaminergic systems modulating it.

  2. Meis1: effects on motor phenotypes and the sensorimotor system in mice

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    Schormair, Barbara; Niedermeier, Kristina M.; Rathkolb, Birgit; Rácz, Ildikó; Klopstock, Thomas; Wolf, Eckhard; Zimmer, Andreas; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Fuchs, Helmut; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Wurst, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT MEIS1 encodes a developmental transcription factor and has been linked to restless legs syndrome (RLS) in genome-wide association studies. RLS is a movement disorder leading to severe sleep reduction and has a substantial impact on the quality of life of patients. In genome-wide association studies, MEIS1 has consistently been the gene with the highest effect size and functional studies suggest a disease-relevant downregulation. Therefore, haploinsufficiency of Meis1 could be the system with the most potential for modeling RLS in animals. We used heterozygous Meis1-knockout mice to study the effects of Meis1 haploinsufficiency on mouse behavioral and neurological phenotypes, and to relate the findings to human RLS. We exposed the Meis1-deficient mice to assays of motor, sensorimotor and cognitive ability, and assessed the effect of a dopaminergic receptor 2/3 agonist commonly used in the treatment of RLS. The mutant mice showed a pattern of circadian hyperactivity, which is compatible with human RLS. Moreover, we discovered a replicable prepulse inhibition (PPI) deficit in the Meis1-deficient animals. In addition, these mice were hyposensitive to the PPI-reducing effect of the dopaminergic receptor agonist, highlighting a role of Meis1 in the dopaminergic system. Other reported phenotypes include enhanced social recognition at an older age that was not related to alterations in adult olfactory bulb neurogenesis previously shown to be implicated in this behavior. In conclusion, the Meis1-deficient mice fulfill some of the hallmarks of an RLS animal model, and revealed the role of Meis1 in sensorimotor gating and in the dopaminergic systems modulating it. PMID:28645892

  3. MEIS1 inhibits clear cell renal cell carcinoma cells proliferation and in vitro invasion or migration.

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    Zhu, Jie; Cui, Liang; Xu, Axiang; Yin, Xiaotao; Li, Fanglong; Gao, Jiangping

    2017-03-07

    Myeloid ecotropic viral integration site 1 (MEIS1) protein plays a synergistic causative role in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, MEIS1 has also shown to be a potential tumor suppressor in some other cancers, such as non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and prostate cancer. Although multiple roles of MEIS1 in cancer development and progression have been identified, there is an urgent demand to discover more functions of this molecule for further therapeutic design. MEIS1 was overexpressed via adenovirus vector in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) cells. Western blot and real-time qPCR (quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction) was performed to examine the protein and mRNA levels of MEIS1. Cell proliferation, survival, in vitro migration and invasion were tested by MTT, colony formation, soft-agar, transwell (in vitro invasion/migration) assays, and tumor in vivo growthwas measured on nude mice model. In addition, flow-cytometry analysis was used to detect cell cycle arrest or non-apoptotic cell death of ccRCC cells induced by MEIS1. MEIS1 exhibits a decreased expression in ccRCC cell lines than that in non-tumor cell lines. MEIS1 overexpression inhibits ccRCC cells proliferation and induces G1/S arrest concomitant with marked reduction of G1/S transition regulators, Cyclin D1 and Cyclin A. Moreover, MEIS1-1 overexpression also induces non-apoptotic cell death of ccRCC cells via decreasing the levels of pro-survival regulators Survivin and BCL-2. Transwell migration assay (TMA) shows that MEIS1 attenuates in vitro invasion and migration of ccRCC cells with down-regulated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process. Further, in nude mice model, MEIS1 inhibits the in vivo growth of Caki-1 cells. By investigating the role of MEIS1 in ccRCC cells' survival, proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, cell cycle progress, apoptosis and metastasis, in the present work, we propose that MEIS1 may play an important role in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (cc

  4. Involvement of crosstalk between Oct4 and Meis1a in neural cell fate decision.

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    Takeyuki Yamada

    Full Text Available Oct4 plays a critical role both in maintaining pluripotency and the cell fate decision of embryonic stem (ES cells. Nonetheless, in the determination of the neuroectoderm (NE from ES cells, the detailed regulation mechanism of the Oct4 gene expression is poorly understood. Here, we report that crosstalk between Oct4 and Meis1a, a Pbx-related homeobox protein, is required for neural differentiation of mouse P19 embryonic carcinoma (EC cells induced by retinoic acid (RA. During neural differentiation, Oct4 expression was transiently enhanced during 6-12 h of RA addition and subsequently disappeared within 48 h. Coinciding with up-regulation of Oct4 expression, the induction of Meis1a expression was initiated and reached a plateau at 48 h, suggesting that transiently induced Oct4 activates Meis1a expression and the up-regulated Meis1a then suppresses Oct4 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP and luciferase reporter analysis showed that Oct4 enhanced Meis1a expression via direct binding to the Meis1 promoter accompanying histone H3 acetylation and appearance of 5-hydoxymethylcytosine (5hmC, while Meis1a suppressed Oct4 expression via direct association with the Oct4 promoter together with histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1. Furthermore, ectopic Meis1a expression promoted neural differentiation via formation of large neurospheres that expressed Nestin, GLAST, BLBP and Sox1 as neural stem cell (NSC/neural progenitor markers, whereas its down-regulation generated small neurospheres and repressed neural differentiation. Thus, these results imply that crosstalk between Oct4 and Meis1a on mutual gene expressions is essential for the determination of NE from EC cells.

  5. Predicting the molecular role of MEIS1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rad, Abolfazl; Farshchian, Moein; Forghanifard, Mohammad Mahdi; Matin, Maryam M.; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza; Geerts, Dirk; A'rabi, Azadeh; Memar, Bahram; Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    The three amino acid loop extension (TALE) class myeloid ecotropic viral integration site 1 (MEIS1) homeobox gene is known to play a crucial role in normal and tumor development. In contrast with its well-described cancer stemness properties in hematopoietic cancers, little is known about its role

  6. Regulation of the MEI-1/MEI-2 Microtubule-Severing Katanin Complex in Early Caenorhabditis elegans Development

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    Sarah M. Beard

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available After fertilization, rapid changes of the Caenorhabditis elegans cytoskeleton occur in the transition from meiosis to mitosis, requiring precise regulation. The MEI-1/MEI-2 katanin microtubule-severing complex is essential for meiotic spindle formation but must be quickly inactivated to allow for proper formation of the mitotic spindle. MEI-1/MEI-2 inactivation is dependent on multiple redundant pathways. The primary pathway employs the MEL-26 substrate adaptor for the CUL-3/cullin-based E3 ubiquitin ligase, which targets MEI-1 for proteosomal degradation. Here, we used quantitative antibody staining to measure MEI-1 levels to determine how other genes implicated in MEI-1 regulation act relative to CUL-3/MEL-26. The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome, APC/C, the DYRK (Dual-specificity tyrosine-regulated kinase, MBK-2, and the CUL-2-based E3 ubiquitin ligase act together to degrade MEI-1, in parallel to MEL-26/CUL-3. CUL-2 is known to keep MEL-26 low during meiosis, so CUL-2 apparently changes its target from MEL-26 in meiosis to MEI-1 in mitosis. RFL-1, an activator of cullin E3 ubiquitin ligases, activates CUL-2 but not CUL-3 for MEI-1 elimination. HECD-1 (HECT/Homologous to the E6AP carboxyl terminus domain E3 ligase acts as a MEI-1 activator in meiosis but functions as an inhibitor during mitosis, without affecting levels of MEI-1 or MEI-2. Our results highlight the multiple layers of MEI-1 regulation that are required during the switch from the meiotic to mitotic modes of cell division.

  7. MEIS1 and BTBD9: genetic association with restless leg syndrome in end stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schormair, Barbara; Plag, Jens; Kaffe, Maria; Gross, Nadine; Czamara, Darina; Samtleben, Walter; Lichtner, Peter; Ströhle, Andreas; Stefanidis, Ioannis; Vainas, Andreas; Dardiotis, Efthimios; Sakkas, George K; Gieger, Christian; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Meitinger, Thomas; Heemann, Uwe; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M; Oexle, Konrad; Winkelmann, Juliane

    2011-07-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a sleep related movement disorder that occurs both in an idiopathic form and in symptomatic varieties. RLS is a frequent and distressing comorbidity in end stage renal disease (ESRD). For idiopathic RLS (iRLS), genetic risk factors have been identified, but their role in RLS in ESRD has not been investigated yet. Therefore, a case-control association study of these variants in ESRD patients was performed. The study genotyped 10 iRLS associated variants at four loci encompassing the genes MEIS1, BTBD9, MAP2K5/SKOR1, and PTPRD, in two independent case-control samples from Germany and Greece using multiplex PCR and MALDI-TOF (matrix assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight) mass spectrometry. Statistical analysis was performed as logistic regression with age and gender as covariates. For the combined analysis a Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test was applied. The study included 200 RLS-positive and 443 RLS-negative ESRD patients in the German sample, and 141 and 393 patients, respectively, in the Greek sample. In the German sample, variants in MEIS1 and BTBD9 were associated with RLS in ESRD (P(nom)≤0.004, ORs 1.52 and 1.55), whereas, in the Greek sample, there was a trend for association to MAP2K5/SKOR1 and BTBD9 (P(nom)≤0.08, ORs 1.41 and 1.33). In the combined analysis including all samples, BTBD9 was associated after correction for multiple testing (P(corrected)=0.0013, OR 1.47). This is the first demonstration of a genetic influence on RLS in ESRD patients with BTBD9 being significantly associated. The extent of the genetic predisposition could vary between different subgroups of RLS in ESRD.

  8. Sequential Binding of MEIS1 and NKX2-5 on the Popdc2 Gene: A Mechanism for Spatiotemporal Regulation of Enhancers during Cardiogenesis

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    Laurent Dupays

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The homeobox transcription factors NKX2-5 and MEIS1 are essential for vertebrate heart development and normal physiology of the adult heart. We show that, during cardiac differentiation, the two transcription factors have partially overlapping expression patterns, with the result that as cardiac progenitors from the anterior heart field differentiate and migrate into the cardiac outflow tract, they sequentially experience high levels of MEIS1 and then increasing levels of NKX2-5. Using the Popdc2 gene as an example, we also show that a significant proportion of target genes for NKX2-5 contain a binding motif recognized by NKX2-5, which overlaps with a binding site for MEIS1. Binding of the two factors to such overlapping sites is mutually exclusive, and this provides a simple regulatory mechanism for spatial and temporal synchronization of a common pool of targets between NKX2-5 and MEIS1.

  9. Novel interactions between vertebrate Hox genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooiveld, MHW; Morgan, R; Rieden, PID; Houtzager, E; Pannese, M; Damen, K; Boncinelli, E; Durston, AJ

    1999-01-01

    Understanding why metazoan Hox/HOM-C genes are expressed in spatiotemporal sequences showing colinearity with their genomic sequence is a central challenge in developmental biology. Here, we studied the consequences of ectopically expressing Hox genes to investigate whether Hox-Hox interactions

  10. Stepwise isotope editing of [FeFe]-hydrogenases exposes cofactor dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senger, Moritz; Mebs, Stefan; Duan, Jifu; Wittkamp, Florian; Apfel, Ulf-Peter; Heberle, Joachim; Haumann, Michael; Stripp, Sven Timo

    2016-07-26

    The six-iron cofactor of [FeFe]-hydrogenases (H-cluster) is the most efficient H2-forming catalyst in nature. It comprises a diiron active site with three carbon monoxide (CO) and two cyanide (CN(-)) ligands in the active oxidized state (Hox) and one additional CO ligand in the inhibited state (Hox-CO). The diatomic ligands are sensitive reporter groups for structural changes of the cofactor. Their vibrational dynamics were monitored by real-time attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Combination of (13)CO gas exposure, blue or red light irradiation, and controlled hydration of three different [FeFe]-hydrogenase proteins produced 8 Hox and 16 Hox-CO species with all possible isotopic exchange patterns. Extensive density functional theory calculations revealed the vibrational mode couplings of the carbonyl ligands and uniquely assigned each infrared spectrum to a specific labeling pattern. For Hox-CO, agreement between experimental and calculated infrared frequencies improved by up to one order of magnitude for an apical CN(-) at the distal iron ion of the cofactor as opposed to an apical CO. For Hox, two equally probable isomers with partially rotated ligands were suggested. Interconversion between these structures implies dynamic ligand reorientation at the H-cluster. Our experimental protocol for site-selective (13)CO isotope editing combined with computational species assignment opens new perspectives for characterization of functional intermediates in the catalytic cycle.

  11. Targeted resequencing and systematic in vivo functional testing identifies rare variants in MEIS1 as significant contributors to restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Eva C; Kousi, Maria; Tan, Perciliz L; Tilch, Erik; Knauf, Franziska; Lichtner, Peter; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Högl, Birgit; Frauscher, Birgit; Berger, Klaus; Fietze, Ingo; Hornyak, Magdolna; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Bachmann, Cornelius G; Zimprich, Alexander; Peters, Annette; Gieger, Christian; Meitinger, Thomas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Katsanis, Nicholas; Winkelmann, Juliane

    2014-07-03

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurologic condition characterized by nocturnal dysesthesias and an urge to move, affecting the legs. RLS is a complex trait, for which genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified common susceptibility alleles of modest (OR 1.2-1.7) risk at six genomic loci. Among these, variants in MEIS1 have emerged as the largest risk factors for RLS, suggesting that perturbations in this transcription factor might be causally related to RLS susceptibility. To establish this causality, direction of effect, and total genetic burden of MEIS1, we interrogated 188 case subjects and 182 control subjects for rare alleles not captured by previous GWASs, followed by genotyping of ∼3,000 case subjects and 3,000 control subjects, and concluded with systematic functionalization of all discovered variants using a previously established in vivo model of neurogenesis. We observed a significant excess of rare MEIS1 variants in individuals with RLS. Subsequent assessment of all nonsynonymous variants by in vivo complementation revealed an excess of loss-of-function alleles in individuals with RLS. Strikingly, these alleles compromised the function of the canonical MEIS1 splice isoform but were irrelevant to an isoform known to utilize an alternative 3' sequence. Our data link MEIS1 loss of function to the etiopathology of RLS, highlight how combined sequencing and systematic functional annotation of rare variation at GWAS loci can detect risk burden, and offer a plausible explanation for the specificity of phenotypic expressivity of loss-of-function alleles at a locus broadly necessary for neurogenesis and neurodevelopment. Copyright © 2014 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Combinatorial action of Grainyhead, Extradenticle and Notch in regulating Hox mediated apoptosis in Drosophila larval CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Risha; Sipani, Rashmi; Govinda Rajan, Sriivatsan; Kumar, Raviranjan; Joshi, Rohit

    2017-10-01

    Hox mediated neuroblast apoptosis is a prevalent way to pattern larval central nervous system (CNS) by different Hox genes, but the mechanism of this apoptosis is not understood. Our studies with Abdominal-A (Abd-A) mediated larval neuroblast (pNB) apoptosis suggests that AbdA, its cofactor Extradenticle (Exd), a helix-loop-helix transcription factor Grainyhead (Grh), and Notch signaling transcriptionally contribute to expression of RHG family of apoptotic genes. We find that Grh, AbdA, and Exd function together at multiple motifs on the apoptotic enhancer. In vivo mutagenesis of these motifs suggest that they are important for the maintenance of the activity of the enhancer rather than its initiation. We also find that Exd function is independent of its known partner homothorax in this apoptosis. We extend some of our findings to Deformed expressing region of sub-esophageal ganglia where pNBs undergo a similar Hox dependent apoptosis. We propose a mechanism where common players like Exd-Grh-Notch work with different Hox genes through region specific enhancers to pattern respective segments of larval central nervous system.

  13. Collinear Hox-Hox interactions are involved in patterning the vertebrate anteroposterior (A-P axis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kongju Zhu

    Full Text Available Investigating regulation and function of the Hox genes, key regulators of positional identity in the embryo, opened a new vista in developmental biology. One of their most striking features is collinearity: the temporal and spatial orders of expression of these clustered genes each match their 3' to 5' order on the chromosome. Despite recent progress, the mechanisms underlying collinearity are not understood. Here we show that ectopic expression of 4 different single Hox genes predictably induces and represses expression of others, leading to development of different predictable specific sections of the body axis. We use ectopic expression in wild-type and noggin-dorsalised (Hox-free Xenopus embryos, to show that two Hox-Hox interactions are important. Posterior induction (induction of posterior Hox genes by anterior ones: PI, drives Hox temporal collinearity (Hox timer, which itself drives anteroposterior (A-P patterning. Posterior prevalence (repression of anterior Hox genes by posterior ones: PP is important in translating temporal to spatial collinearity. We thus demonstrate for the first time that two collinear Hox interactions are important for vertebrate axial patterning. These findings considerably extend and clarify earlier work suggesting the existence and importance of PP and PI, and provide a major new insight into genesis of the body axis.

  14. Hox and ParaHox gene expression in early body plan patterning of polyplacophoran mollusks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Martin; Wollesen, Tim; Wanninger, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Molecular developmental studies of various bilaterians have shown that the identity of the anteroposterior body axis is controlled by Hox and ParaHox genes. Detailed Hox and ParaHox gene expression data are available for conchiferan mollusks, such as gastropods (snails and slugs) and cephalopods (squids and octopuses), whereas information on the putative conchiferan sister group, Aculifera, is still scarce (but see Fritsch et al., 2015 on Hox gene expression in the polyplacophoran Acanthochitona crinita). In contrast to gastropods and cephalopods, the Hox genes in polyplacophorans are expressed in an anteroposterior sequence similar to the condition in annelids and other bilaterians. Here, we present the expression patterns of the Hox genes Lox5, Lox4, and Lox2, together with the ParaHox gene caudal (Cdx) in the polyplacophoran A. crinita. To localize Hox and ParaHox gene transcription products, we also investigated the expression patterns of the genes FMRF and Elav, and the development of the nervous system. Similar to the other Hox genes, all three Acr-Lox genes are expressed in an anteroposterior sequence. Transcripts of Acr-Cdx are seemingly present in the forming hindgut at the posterior end. The expression patterns of both the central class Acr-Lox genes and the Acr-Cdx gene are strikingly similar to those in annelids and nemerteans. In Polyplacophora, the expression patterns of the Hox and ParaHox genes seem to be evolutionarily highly conserved, while in conchiferan mollusks these genes are co-opted into novel functions that might have led to evolutionary novelties, at least in gastropods and cephalopods. © 2016 The Authors. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The significance of Hox gene collinearity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunt, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Arthropods and vertebrates inherited their Hox clusters from an ancestral cluster of at least six genes already present in their last common ancestor, Urbilateria. Clustering and a common transcriptional direction are both likely features of the way that the gene complex first arose in a process of tandem gene duplication. Spatial collinearity (correspondence between ordering of Hox genes along the chromosome and their expression patterns along the head-tail axis) has been conserved in many animal groups and is likely to have been already present in Urbilateria. It is not known why the Hox cluster evolved with spatial collinearity. Four models are discussed. These vary in the significance they place upon Hox chromatin structure, and also on whether they propose that collinearity is primarily concerned with establishment or maintenance of Hox expression. Published proposals to explain spatial collinearity, which invoke enhancer sharing, chromatin closing or chromatin opening, are either problematic or can offer only partial explanations. In an alternative proposal it is suggested here that spatial collinearity evolved principally to maximise physical segregation, and thereby minimise incidence of boundaries, between active and inactive genes within the Hox cluster. This is to minimise erroneous transfer of transcriptional activity, or inactivity, between adjacent Hox genes.

  16. Composition and genomic organization of arthropod Hox clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Pace, Ryan M.; Grbi?, Miodrag; Nagy, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The ancestral arthropod is believed to have had a clustered arrangement of ten Hox genes. Within arthropods, Hox gene mutations result in transformation of segment identities. Despite the fact that variation in segment number/character was common in the diversification of arthropods, few examples of Hox gene gains/losses have been correlated with morphological evolution. Furthermore, a full appreciation of the variation in the genomic arrangement of Hox genes in extant arthropods h...

  17. Composition and genomic organization of arthropod Hox clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Pace, Ryan M.; Miodrag Grbić; Nagy, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The ancestral arthropod is believed to have had a clustered arrangement of ten Hox genes. Within arthropods, Hox gene mutations result in transformation of segment identities. Despite the fact that variation in segment number/character was common in the diversification of arthropods, few examples of Hox gene gains/losses have been correlated with morphological evolution. Furthermore, a full appreciation of the variation in the genomic arrangement of Hox genes in extant art...

  18. "Self-regulation," a new facet of Hox genes' function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Rushikesh; Bastida, Maria Félix; Kmita, Marie; Ros, Marian

    2014-01-01

    Precise temporal and spatial expression of the clustered Hox genes is essential for patterning the developing embryo. Temporal activation of Hox genes was shown to be cluster-autonomous. However, gene clustering appears dispensable for spatial colinear expression. Generally, a set of Hox genes expressed in a group of cells instructs these cells about their fate such that the differential expression of Hox genes results in morphological diversity. The spatial colinearity is considered to rely both on local and long-range cis regulation. Here, we report on the global deregulation of HoxA and HoxD expression patterns upon inactivation of a subset of HOXA and HOXD proteins. Our data suggest the existence of a "self-regulation" mechanism, a process by which HOX proteins establish and/or maintain the spatial domains of the Hox gene family and we propose that the functionally dominant HOX proteins could contribute to generating the spatial parameters of Hox expression in a given tissue, i.e., HOX controlling the establishment of the ultimate HOX code. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Evolution of Hox-like genes in Cnidaria: Study of Hydra Hox repertoire reveals tailor-made Hox-code for Cnidarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Puli Chandramouli; Unni, Manu K; Gungi, Akhila; Agarwal, Pallavi; Galande, Sanjeev

    2015-11-01

    Hox and ParaHox genes play decisive roles in patterning the anterior-posterior body axis in Bilateria. Evolutionary origin of Hox genes and primary body axis predate the divergence of Bilateria and Cnidaria. However, function of Cnidarian Hox-like genes and their regulation in axis determination is obscure due to studies limited to a few representative model systems. Present investigation is conducted using Hydra, a Hydrozoan member of phylum Cnidaria, to gain insights into the roles of Cnidarian Hox-like genes in primary axis formation. Here, we report identification of six Hox-like genes from our in-house transcriptome data. Phylogenetic analysis of these genes shows bilaterian counterparts of Hox1, Gsx and Mox. Additionally, we report CnoxB_HVUL, CnoxC2_HVUL and CnoxC3_HVUL belonging to two Cnidarian specific groups. In situ hybridization analysis of Hydra homologues provided important clues about their possible roles in pattern formation of polyps and bud development. Specifically, Hox1_HVUL is regulated by Wnt signaling and plays critical role in head formation. Collating information about expression patterns of different Hox-like genes from previous reports and this study reveals no conformity within Cnidaria. Indicating that unlike in Bilateria, there is no consolidated Hox-code determining primary body axis in Cnidaria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Composition and genomic organization of arthropod Hox clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M. Pace

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ancestral arthropod is believed to have had a clustered arrangement of ten Hox genes. Within arthropods, Hox gene mutations result in transformation of segment identities. Despite the fact that variation in segment number/character was common in the diversification of arthropods, few examples of Hox gene gains/losses have been correlated with morphological evolution. Furthermore, a full appreciation of the variation in the genomic arrangement of Hox genes in extant arthropods has not been recognized, as genome sequences from each major arthropod clade have not been reported until recently. Initial genomic analysis of the chelicerate Tetranychus urticae suggested that loss of Hox genes and Hox gene clustering might be more common than previously assumed. To further characterize the genomic evolution of arthropod Hox genes, we compared the genomic arrangement and general characteristics of Hox genes from representative taxa from each arthropod subphylum. Results In agreement with others, we find arthropods generally contain ten Hox genes arranged in a common orientation in the genome, with an increasing number of sampled species missing either Hox3 or abdominal-A orthologs. The genomic clustering of Hox genes in species we surveyed varies significantly, ranging from 0.3 to 13.6 Mb. In all species sampled, arthropod Hox genes are dispersed in the genome relative to the vertebrate Mus musculus. Differences in Hox cluster size arise from variation in the number of intervening genes, intergenic spacing, and the size of introns and UTRs. In the arthropods surveyed, Hox gene duplications are rare and four microRNAs are, in general, conserved in similar genomic positions relative to the Hox genes. Conclusions The tightly clustered Hox complexes found in the vertebrates are not evident within arthropods, and differential patterns of Hox gene dispersion are found throughout the arthropods. The comparative genomic data continue to

  1. Composition and genomic organization of arthropod Hox clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Ryan M; Grbić, Miodrag; Nagy, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    The ancestral arthropod is believed to have had a clustered arrangement of ten Hox genes. Within arthropods, Hox gene mutations result in transformation of segment identities. Despite the fact that variation in segment number/character was common in the diversification of arthropods, few examples of Hox gene gains/losses have been correlated with morphological evolution. Furthermore, a full appreciation of the variation in the genomic arrangement of Hox genes in extant arthropods has not been recognized, as genome sequences from each major arthropod clade have not been reported until recently. Initial genomic analysis of the chelicerate Tetranychus urticae suggested that loss of Hox genes and Hox gene clustering might be more common than previously assumed. To further characterize the genomic evolution of arthropod Hox genes, we compared the genomic arrangement and general characteristics of Hox genes from representative taxa from each arthropod subphylum. In agreement with others, we find arthropods generally contain ten Hox genes arranged in a common orientation in the genome, with an increasing number of sampled species missing either Hox3 or abdominal-A orthologs. The genomic clustering of Hox genes in species we surveyed varies significantly, ranging from 0.3 to 13.6 Mb. In all species sampled, arthropod Hox genes are dispersed in the genome relative to the vertebrate Mus musculus. Differences in Hox cluster size arise from variation in the number of intervening genes, intergenic spacing, and the size of introns and UTRs. In the arthropods surveyed, Hox gene duplications are rare and four microRNAs are, in general, conserved in similar genomic positions relative to the Hox genes. The tightly clustered Hox complexes found in the vertebrates are not evident within arthropods, and differential patterns of Hox gene dispersion are found throughout the arthropods. The comparative genomic data continue to support an ancestral arthropod Hox cluster of ten genes with

  2. Possible rules for the ancestral origin of Hox gene collinearity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunt, Stephen J; Gaunt, Alexander L

    2016-12-07

    The Hox gene cluster is believed to have formed from a single ProtoHox gene by repeated cycles of the following events: tandem gene duplication, mutation to generate a new expression boundary along the embryonic axis, and acquisition of a new Hox patterning function. The Hox cluster in Bilateria evolved in compliance with the so-called collinearity rule. That is, the order of the genes along the chromosome corresponds with the order of their embryonic expression domains along the head-tail axis. Gaunt (2015) suggested that collinearity may have arisen as a mechanism to minimise the incidence of boundaries between active and inactive genes within the Hox cluster. We now attempt to clarify the model by presenting it in the form of three rules: 1) no two Hox genes may persist in the same cluster with the same anterior boundary of activity in the same tissue; 2) an inactive Hox gene must not be flanked by two active Hox genes; 3) an active Hox gene must not be flanked by two inactive genes. We provide evidence and illustrative computer simulations to show that these rules, which can apply only to partially overlapping patterns of Hox activity, may account for the ancestral origin of Hox gene collinearity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. NUP98-HOXA9 bearing therapy-related myeloid neoplasm involves myeloid-committed cell and induces HOXA5, EVI1, FLT3, and MEIS1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burillo-Sanz, S; Morales-Camacho, R M; Caballero-Velázquez, T; Vargas, M T; García-Lozano, J R; Falantes, J F; Prats-Martín, C; Bernal, R; Pérez-Simón, J A

    2016-02-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements involving NUP98 gene have been associated with human leukemias such as de novo AML, therapy-related AML (t-AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Genetic fusion NUP98-HOXA9, caused by t(7;11)(p15;p15), is a recurrent cytogenetic alteration in de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) usually found in young Asian patients and its description in therapy-related myeloid neoplasms (t-MN) is rare. Only one Asian case with molecular demonstration of the NUP98-HOXA9 fusion has been reported in therapy-related leukemia. NUP98-HOXA9 leukemogenic mechanism is derived from the transcription factor activity of the chimeric protein, which enhances the expression of genes related to cellular differentiation arrest and proliferation. We studied a Caucasian woman with a therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia after Ewing's sarcoma. Molecular demonstration of the genetic fusion NUP98-HOXA9 was performed by RT-PCR, and gene expression was analyzed by real-time PCR, including four AML patients with MLL rearrangements for comparative analysis. Cytologic and flow cytometric analysis was also carried out. After cytologic and flow cytometric analysis diagnostics was therapy-related myeloid neoplasm (t-MN). The major component of blasts in the acute leukemia was with neutrophilic differentiation, but 13% erythroid lineage blasts were also found. Cytogenetic and FISH analysis revealed t(7;11)(p15;p15) and NUP98-HOXA9 fusion gene was demonstrated. Gene expression analysis showed upregulation of EVI1 and MEIS1 in the index patient, both of them previously related to a worst outcome. In this work, we include a detailed molecular, clinical, cytological, and cytometric study of the second t-AML bearing NUP98-HOXA9 genetic fusion. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Extensive polycistronism and antisense transcription in the mammalian Hox clusters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëll Mainguy

    Full Text Available The Hox clusters play a crucial role in body patterning during animal development. They encode both Hox transcription factor and micro-RNA genes that are activated in a precise temporal and spatial sequence that follows their chromosomal order. These remarkable collinear properties confer functional unit status for Hox clusters. We developed the TranscriptView platform to establish high resolution transcriptional profiling and report here that transcription in the Hox clusters is far more complex than previously described in both human and mouse. Unannotated transcripts can represent up to 60% of the total transcriptional output of a cluster. In particular, we identified 14 non-coding Transcriptional Units antisense to Hox genes, 10 of which (70% have a detectable mouse homolog. Most of these Transcriptional Units in both human and mouse present conserved sizeable sequences (>40 bp overlapping Hox transcripts, suggesting that these Hox antisense transcripts are functional. Hox clusters also display at least seven polycistronic clusters, i.e., different genes being co-transcribed on long isoforms (up to 30 kb. This work provides a reevaluated framework for understanding Hox gene function and dys-function. Such extensive transcriptions may provide a structural explanation for Hox clustering.

  5. Hox Genes in Cardiovascular Development and Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine Roux

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart defects (CHD are the leading cause of death in the first year of life. Over the past 20 years, much effort has been focused on unraveling the genetic bases of CHD. In particular, studies in human genetics coupled with those of model organisms have provided valuable insights into the gene regulatory networks underlying CHD pathogenesis. Hox genes encode transcription factors that are required for the patterning of the anterior–posterior axis in the embryo. In this review, we focus on the emerging role of anteriorly expressed Hox genes (Hoxa1, Hoxb1, and Hoxa3 in cardiac development, specifically their contribution to patterning of cardiac progenitor cells and formation of the great arteries. Recent evidence regarding the cooperative regulation of heart development by Hox proteins with members of the TALE-class of homeodomain proteins such as Pbx and Meis transcription factors is also discussed. These findings are highly relevant to human pathologies as they pinpoint new genes that increase susceptibility to cardiac anomalies and provide novel mechanistic insights into CHD.

  6. Improving Hox protein classification across the major model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueber, Stefanie D; Weiller, Georg F; Djordjevic, Michael A; Frickey, Tancred

    2010-05-25

    The family of Hox-proteins has been a major focus of research for over 30 years. Hox-proteins are crucial to the correct development of bilateral organisms, however, some uncertainty remains as to which Hox-proteins are functionally equivalent across different species. Initial classification of Hox-proteins was based on phylogenetic analysis of the 60 amino acid homeodomain. This approach was successful in classifying Hox-proteins with differing homeodomains, but the relationships of Hox-proteins with nearly identical homeodomains, yet distinct biological functions, could not be resolved. Correspondingly, these 'problematic' proteins were classified into one large unresolved group. Other classifications used the relative location of the Hox-protein coding genes on the chromosome (synteny) to further resolve this group. Although widely used, this synteny-based classification is inconsistent with experimental evidence from functional equivalence studies. These inconsistencies led us to re-examine and derive a new classification for the Hox-protein family using all Hox-protein sequences available in the GenBank non-redundant protein database (NCBI-nr). We compare the use of the homeodomain, the homeodomain with conserved flanking regions (the YPWM and linker region), and full length Hox-protein sequences as a basis for classification of Hox-proteins. In contrast to previous attempts, our approach is able to resolve the relationships for the 'problematic' as well as ABD-B-like Hox-proteins. We highlight differences to previous classifications and clarify the relationships of Hox-proteins across the five major model organisms, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Branchiostoma floridae, Mus musculus and Danio rerio. Comparative and functional analysis of Hox-proteins, two fields crucial to understanding the development of bilateral organisms, have been hampered by difficulties in predicting functionally equivalent Hox-proteins across species. Our

  7. Breaking Colinearity in the Mouse HoxD Complex

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kondo, Takashi; Duboule, Denis

    1999-01-01

    .... Previous work suggested that Hox genes were made progressively available for transcription in the course of gastrulation, implying the existence of an element capable of initiating a repressive...

  8. Hox genes require homothorax and extradenticle for body wall identity specification but not for appendage identity specification during metamorphosis of Tribolium castaneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Frank W; Jockusch, Elizabeth L

    2014-11-01

    The establishment of segment identity is a key developmental process that allows for divergence along the anteroposterior body axis in arthropods. In Drosophila, the identity of a segment is determined by the complement of Hox genes it expresses. In many contexts, Hox transcription factors require the protein products of extradenticle (exd) and homothorax (hth) as cofactors to perform their identity specification functions. In holometabolous insects, segment identity may be specified twice, during embryogenesis and metamorphosis. To glean insight into the relationship between embryonic and metamorphic segmental identity specification, we have compared these processes in the flour beetle Tribolium castaneum, which develops ventral appendages during embryogenesis that later metamorphose into adult appendages with distinct morphologies. At metamorphosis, comparisons of RNAi phenotypes indicate that Hox genes function jointly with Tc-hth and Tc-exd to specify several region-specific aspects of the adult body wall. On the other hand, Hox genes specify appendage identities along the anteroposterior axis independently of Tc-hth/Tc-exd and Tc-hth/Tc-exd specify proximal vs. distal identity within appendages independently of Hox genes during this stage. During embryogenesis, Tc-hth and Tc-exd play a broad role in the segmentation process and are required for specification of body wall identities in the thorax; however, contrasting with results from other species, we did not obtain homeotic transformations of embryonic appendages in response to Tc-hth or Tc-exd RNAi. In general, the homeotic effects of interference with the function of Hox genes and Tc-hth/Tc-exd during metamorphosis did not match predictions based on embryonic roles of these genes. Comparing metamorphic patterning in T. castaneum to embryonic and post-embryonic development in hemimetabolous insects suggests that holometabolous metamorphosis combines patterning processes of both late embryogenesis and

  9. Increased HOX C13 expression in metastatic melanoma progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cantile Monica

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The process of malignant transformation, progression and metastasis of melanoma is not completely understood. Recently, the microarray technology has been used to survey transcriptional differences that might provide insight into the metastatic process, but the validation of changing gene expression during metastatic transition period is poorly investigated. A large body of literature has been produced on the role of the HOX genes network in tumour evolution, suggesting the involvement of HOX genes in several types of human cancers. Deregulated paralogous group 13 HOX genes expression has been detected in melanoma, cervical cancer and odonthogenic tumors. Among these, Hox C13 is also involved in the expression control of the human keratin genes hHa5 and hHa2, and recently it was identified as a member of human DNA replication complexes. Methods In this study, to investigate HOX C13 expression in melanoma progression, we have compared its expression pattern between naevi, primary melanoma and metastasis. In addition HOXC13 profile pattern of expression has been evaluated in melanoma cell lines. Results Our results show the strong and progressive HOX C13 overexpression in metastatic melanoma tissues and cytological samples compared to nevi and primary melanoma tissues and cells. Conclusions The data presentated in the paper suggest a possible role of HOX C13 in metastatic melanoma switch.

  10. SNPs and Hox gene mapping in Ciona intestinalis

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    Biffali Elio

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tunicate Ciona intestinalis (Enterogona, Ascidiacea, a major model system for evolutionary and developmental genetics of chordates, harbours two cryptic species. To assess the degree of intra- and inter-specific genetic variability, we report the identification and analysis of C. intestinalis SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism markers. A SNP subset was used to determine the genetic distance between Hox-5 and -10 genes. Results DNA fragments were amplified from 12 regions of C. intestinalis sp. A. In total, 128 SNPs and 32 one bp indels have been identified within 8 Kb DNA. SNPs in coding regions cause 4 synonymous and 12 non-synonymous substitutions. The highest SNP frequency was detected in the Hox5 and Hox10 intragenic regions. In C. intestinalis, these two genes have lost their archetypal topology within the cluster, such that Hox10 is located between Hox4 and Hox5. A subset of the above primers was used to perform successful amplification in C. intestinalis sp. B. In this cryptic species, 62 SNPs were identified within 3614 bp: 41 in non-coding and 21 in coding regions. The genetic distance of the Hox-5 and -10 loci, computed combining a classical backcross approach with the application of SNP markers, was found to be 8.4 cM (Haldane's function. Based on the physical distance, 1 cM corresponds to 39.5 Kb. Linkage disequilibrium between the aforementioned loci was calculated in the backcross generation. Conclusion SNPs here described allow analysis and comparisons within and between C. intestinalis cryptic species. We provide the first reliable computation of genetic distance in this important model chordate. This latter result represents an important platform for future studies on Hox genes showing deviations from the archetypal topology.

  11. Dynamic nucleosome organization at hox promoters during zebrafish embryogenesis.

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    Steven E Weicksel

    Full Text Available Nucleosome organization at promoter regions plays an important role in regulating gene activity. Genome-wide studies in yeast, flies, worms, mammalian embryonic stem cells and transformed cell lines have found well-positioned nucleosomes flanking a nucleosome depleted region (NDR at transcription start sites. This nucleosome arrangement depends on DNA sequence (cis-elements as well as DNA binding factors and ATP-dependent chromatin modifiers (trans-factors. However, little is understood about how the nascent embryonic genome positions nucleosomes during development. This is particularly intriguing since the embryonic genome must undergo a broad reprogramming event upon fusion of sperm and oocyte. Using four stages of early embryonic zebrafish development, we map nucleosome positions at the promoter region of 37 zebrafish hox genes. We find that nucleosome arrangement at the hox promoters is a progressive process that takes place over several stages. At stages immediately after fertilization, nucleosomes appear to be largely disordered at hox promoter regions. At stages after activation of the embryonic genome, nucleosomes are detectable at hox promoters, with positions becoming more uniform and more highly occupied. Since the genomic sequence is invariant during embryogenesis, this progressive change in nucleosome arrangement suggests that trans-factors play an important role in organizing nucleosomes during embryogenesis. Separating hox genes into expressed and non-expressed groups shows that expressed promoters have better positioned and occupied nucleosomes, as well as distinct NDRs, than non-expressed promoters. Finally, by blocking the retinoic acid-signaling pathway, we disrupt early hox gene transcription, but observe no effect on nucleosome positions, suggesting that active hox transcription is not a driving force behind the arrangement of nucleosomes at the promoters of hox genes during early development.

  12. HOX gene complement and expression in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko W. Currie

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Freshwater planarians are well known for their regenerative abilities. Less well known is how planarians maintain spatial patterning in long-lived adult animals or how they re-pattern tissues during regeneration. HOX genes are good candidates to regulate planarian spatial patterning, yet the full complement or genomic clustering of planarian HOX genes has not yet been described, primarily because only a few have been detectable by in situ hybridization, and none have given morphological phenotypes when knocked down by RNAi. Results Because the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea (S. mediterranea is unsegmented, appendage less, and morphologically simple, it has been proposed that it may have a simplified HOX gene complement. Here, we argue against this hypothesis and show that S. mediterranea has a total of 13 HOX genes, which represent homologs to all major axial categories, and can be detected by whole-mount in situ hybridization using a highly sensitive method. In addition, we show that planarian HOX genes do not cluster in the genome, yet 5/13 have retained aspects of axially restricted expression. Finally, we confirm HOX gene axial expression by RNA deep-sequencing 6 anterior–posterior “zones” of the animal, which we provide as a dataset to the community to discover other axially restricted transcripts. Conclusions Freshwater planarians have an unappreciated HOX gene complexity, with all major axial categories represented. However, we conclude based on adult expression patterns that planarians have a derived body plan and their asexual lifestyle may have allowed for large changes in HOX expression from the last common ancestor between arthropods, flatworms, and vertebrates. Using our in situ method and axial zone RNAseq data, it should be possible to further understand the pathways that pattern the anterior–posterior axis of adult planarians.

  13. HOX gene complement and expression in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Ko W; Brown, David D R; Zhu, Shujun; Xu, ChangJiang; Voisin, Veronique; Bader, Gary D; Pearson, Bret J

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater planarians are well known for their regenerative abilities. Less well known is how planarians maintain spatial patterning in long-lived adult animals or how they re-pattern tissues during regeneration. HOX genes are good candidates to regulate planarian spatial patterning, yet the full complement or genomic clustering of planarian HOX genes has not yet been described, primarily because only a few have been detectable by in situ hybridization, and none have given morphological phenotypes when knocked down by RNAi. Because the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea (S. mediterranea) is unsegmented, appendage less, and morphologically simple, it has been proposed that it may have a simplified HOX gene complement. Here, we argue against this hypothesis and show that S. mediterranea has a total of 13 HOX genes, which represent homologs to all major axial categories, and can be detected by whole-mount in situ hybridization using a highly sensitive method. In addition, we show that planarian HOX genes do not cluster in the genome, yet 5/13 have retained aspects of axially restricted expression. Finally, we confirm HOX gene axial expression by RNA deep-sequencing 6 anterior-posterior "zones" of the animal, which we provide as a dataset to the community to discover other axially restricted transcripts. Freshwater planarians have an unappreciated HOX gene complexity, with all major axial categories represented. However, we conclude based on adult expression patterns that planarians have a derived body plan and their asexual lifestyle may have allowed for large changes in HOX expression from the last common ancestor between arthropods, flatworms, and vertebrates. Using our in situ method and axial zone RNAseq data, it should be possible to further understand the pathways that pattern the anterior-posterior axis of adult planarians.

  14. Over-expression of HOX-8, the human homologue of the mouse Hox-8 homeobox gene, in human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, M; Tanaka, M; Iwase, T; Naito, Y; Sugimura, H; Kino, I

    1993-07-15

    A human ovarian yolk sac tumor cDNA library was screened for homeobox genes with an oligonucleotide probe under low stringent condition. Three homeobox genes were isolated, two of which were identified as HHO.c1 and HB24. The third was highly homologous with the mouse Hox-8 gene and was designated as HOX-8. Studies on RNAs from 25 human tumor tissues and cell lines showed that the profile of HOX-8 expression was different from those of HHO.c1 and HB24. The expression of HOX-8 was not detected in hematopoietic tumor cells, in which HHO.c1 and HB24 were highly expressed. HOX-8 was expressed at higher levels in a variety of tumors of epithelial origin than in their corresponding normal tissues more frequently than HHO.c1 and HB24. All three homeobox genes were highly expressed in a yolk sac tumor, an immature tumor of gonadal origin. These results suggest that HOX-8 plays a more important role in human tumors of epithelial origin than those of hematopoietic origin.

  15. The role of HoxA11 and HoxA13 in the evolution of novel fin morphologies in a representative batoid (Leucoraja erinacea

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    Shannon N. Barry

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Batoids exhibit unique body plans with derived fin morphologies, such as the anteriorly expanded pectoral fins that fuse to the head, or distally extended anterior pelvic fin lobes used for a modified swimming technique utilized by skates (Rajidae. The little skate (Leucoraja erinacea, exhibits both of these unique fin morphologies. These fin modifications are not present in a typical shark body plan, and little is known regarding the mechanisms underlying their development. A recent study identified a novel apical ectodermal ridge (AER associated with the development of the anterior pectoral fin in the little skate, but the role of the posterior HoxA genes was not featured during skate fin development. Results We present the first evidence for HoxA expression (HoxA11 and HoxA13 in novel AER domains associated with the development of three novel fin morphologies in a representative batoid, L. erinacea. We found HoxA13 expression associated with the recently described novel AER in the anterior pectoral fin, and HoxA11 expression in a novel AER domain in the anterior pelvic fin that we describe here. We find that both HoxA11 and HoxA13 are expressed in claspers, and while HoxA11 is expressed in pelvic fins and claspers, HoxA13 is expressed exclusively in developing claspers of males. Finally, HoxA11 expression is associated with the developing fin rays in paired fins. Conclusion Overall, these results indicate that the posterior HoxA genes play an important role in the morphological evolution of paired fins in a representative batoid. These data suggest that the batoids utilize a unique Hox code, where the posterior HoxA genes exhibit distinct expression patterns that are likely associated with specification of novel fin morphologies.

  16. Cofactor engineering for advancing chemical biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yipeng; San, Ka-Yiu; Bennett, George N

    2013-12-01

    Cofactors provide redox carriers for biosynthetic reactions, catabolic reactions and act as important agents in transfer of energy for the cell. Recent advances in manipulating cofactors include culture conditions or additive alterations, genetic modification of host pathways for increased availability of desired cofactor, changes in enzyme cofactor specificity, and introduction of novel redox partners to form effective circuits for biochemical processes and biocatalysts. Genetic strategies to employ ferredoxin, NADH and NADPH most effectively in natural or novel pathways have improved yield and efficiency of large-scale processes for fuels and chemicals and have been demonstrated with a variety of microbial organisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Are Hox genes ancestrally involved in axial patterning? Evidence from the hydrozoan Clytia hemisphaerica (Cnidaria.

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    Roxane Chiori

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The early evolution and diversification of Hox-related genes in eumetazoans has been the subject of conflicting hypotheses concerning the evolutionary conservation of their role in axial patterning and the pre-bilaterian origin of the Hox and ParaHox clusters. The diversification of Hox/ParaHox genes clearly predates the origin of bilaterians. However, the existence of a "Hox code" predating the cnidarian-bilaterian ancestor and supporting the deep homology of axes is more controversial. This assumption was mainly based on the interpretation of Hox expression data from the sea anemone, but growing evidence from other cnidarian taxa puts into question this hypothesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Hox, ParaHox and Hox-related genes have been investigated here by phylogenetic analysis and in situ hybridisation in Clytia hemisphaerica, an hydrozoan species with medusa and polyp stages alternating in the life cycle. Our phylogenetic analyses do not support an origin of ParaHox and Hox genes by duplication of an ancestral ProtoHox cluster, and reveal a diversification of the cnidarian HOX9-14 genes into three groups called A, B, C. Among the 7 examined genes, only those belonging to the HOX9-14 and the CDX groups exhibit a restricted expression along the oral-aboral axis during development and in the planula larva, while the others are expressed in very specialised areas at the medusa stage. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Cross species comparison reveals a strong variability of gene expression along the oral-aboral axis and during the life cycle among cnidarian lineages. The most parsimonious interpretation is that the Hox code, collinearity and conservative role along the antero-posterior axis are bilaterian innovations.

  18. Hox genes: choreographers in neural development, architects of circuit organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippidou, Polyxeni; Dasen, Jeremy S

    2013-10-02

    The neural circuits governing vital behaviors, such as respiration and locomotion, are comprised of discrete neuronal populations residing within the brainstem and spinal cord. Work over the past decade has provided a fairly comprehensive understanding of the developmental pathways that determine the identity of major neuronal classes within the neural tube. However, the steps through which neurons acquire the subtype diversities necessary for their incorporation into a particular circuit are still poorly defined. Studies on the specification of motor neurons indicate that the large family of Hox transcription factors has a key role in generating the subtypes required for selective muscle innervation. There is also emerging evidence that Hox genes function in multiple neuronal classes to shape synaptic specificity during development, suggesting a broader role in circuit assembly. This Review highlights the functions and mechanisms of Hox gene networks and their multifaceted roles during neuronal specification and connectivity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Engineering redox balance through cofactor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiulai; Li, Shubo; Liu, Liming

    2014-06-01

    Redox balance plays an important role in the production of enzymes, pharmaceuticals, and chemicals. To meet the demands of industrial production, it is desirable that microbes maintain a maximal carbon flux towards target metabolites with no fluctuations in redox. This requires functional cofactor systems that support dynamic homeostasis between different redox states or functional stability in a given redox state. Redox balance can be achieved by improving the self-balance of a cofactor system, regulating the substrate balance of a cofactor system, and engineering the synthetic balance of a cofactor system. This review summarizes how cofactor systems can be manipulated to improve redox balance in microbes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Protonation/reduction dynamics at the [4Fe-4S] cluster of the hydrogen-forming cofactor in [FeFe]-hydrogenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senger, Moritz; Mebs, Stefan; Duan, Jifu; Shulenina, Olga; Laun, Konstantin; Kertess, Leonie; Wittkamp, Florian; Apfel, Ulf-Peter; Happe, Thomas; Winkler, Martin; Haumann, Michael; Stripp, Sven T

    2018-01-31

    The [FeFe]-hydrogenases of bacteria and algae are the most efficient hydrogen conversion catalysts in nature. Their active-site cofactor (H-cluster) comprises a [4Fe-4S] cluster linked to a unique diiron site that binds three carbon monoxide (CO) and two cyanide (CN - ) ligands. Understanding microbial hydrogen conversion requires elucidation of the interplay of proton and electron transfer events at the H-cluster. We performed real-time spectroscopy on [FeFe]-hydrogenase protein films under controlled variation of atmospheric gas composition, sample pH, and reductant concentration. Attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy was used to monitor shifts of the CO/CN - vibrational bands in response to redox and protonation changes. Three different [FeFe]-hydrogenases and several protein and cofactor variants were compared, including element and isotopic exchange studies. A protonated equivalent (HoxH) of the oxidized state (Hox) was found, which preferentially accumulated at acidic pH and under reducing conditions. We show that the one-electron reduced state Hred' represents an intrinsically protonated species. Interestingly, the formation of HoxH and Hred' was independent of the established proton pathway to the diiron site. Quantum chemical calculations of the respective CO/CN - infrared band patterns favored a cysteine ligand of the [4Fe-4S] cluster as the protonation site in HoxH and Hred'. We propose that proton-coupled electron transfer facilitates reduction of the [4Fe-4S] cluster and prevents premature formation of a hydride at the catalytic diiron site. Our findings imply that protonation events both at the [4Fe-4S] cluster and at the diiron site of the H-cluster are important in the hydrogen conversion reaction of [FeFe]-hydrogenases.

  1. A Simple Model of Hox Genes: Bone Morphology Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmaefsky, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Visual demonstrations of abstract scientific concepts are effective strategies for enhancing content retention (Shmaefsky 2004). The concepts associated with gene regulation of growth and development are particularly complex and are well suited for teaching with visual models. This demonstration provides a simple and accurate model of Hox gene…

  2. Anterior Hox Genes in Cardiac Development and Great Artery Patterning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Laforest

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available During early development, the heart tube grows by progressive addition of progenitor cells to the arterial and venous poles. These cardiac progenitor cells, originally identified in 2001, are located in the splanchnic mesoderm in a region termed the second heart field (SHF. Since its discovery, our view of heart development has been refined and it is well established that perturbation in the addition of SHF cells results in a spectrum of congenital heart defects. We have previously shown that anterior Hox genes, including Hoxb1, Hoxa1 and Hoxa3, are expressed in distinct subdomains of the SHF that contribute to atrial and subpulmonary myocardium. It is well known that Hox proteins exert their function through interaction with members of the TALE family, including Pbx and Meis factors. The expression profile of Pbx and Meis factors overlaps with that of anterior Hox factors in the embryonic heart, and recent data suggest that they may interact together during cardiac development. This review aims to bring together recent findings in vertebrates that strongly suggest an important function for Hox, Pbx and Meis factors in heart development and disease.

  3. Hox protein mutation and macroevolution of the insect body plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronshaugen, Matthew; McGinnis, Nadine; McGinnis, William

    2002-02-21

    A fascinating question in biology is how molecular changes in developmental pathways lead to macroevolutionary changes in morphology. Mutations in homeotic (Hox) genes have long been suggested as potential causes of morphological evolution, and there is abundant evidence that some changes in Hox expression patterns correlate with transitions in animal axial pattern. A major morphological transition in metazoans occurred about 400 million years ago, when six-legged insects diverged from crustacean-like arthropod ancestors with multiple limbs. In Drosophila melanogaster and other insects, the Ultrabithorax (Ubx) and abdominal A (AbdA, also abd-A) Hox proteins are expressed largely in the abdominal segments, where they can suppress thoracic leg development during embryogenesis. In a branchiopod crustacean, Ubx/AbdA proteins are expressed in both thorax and abdomen, including the limb primordia, but do not repress limbs. Previous studies led us to propose that gain and loss of transcriptional activation and repression functions in Hox proteins was a plausible mechanism to diversify morphology during animal evolution. Here we show that naturally selected alteration of the Ubx protein is linked to the evolutionary transition to hexapod limb pattern.

  4. Primitive duplicate Hox clusters in the European eel's genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiaan V Henkel

    Full Text Available The enigmatic life cycle and elongated body of the European eel (Anguilla anguilla L., 1758 have long motivated scientific enquiry. Recently, eel research has gained in urgency, as the population has dwindled to the point of critical endangerment. We have assembled a draft genome in order to facilitate advances in all provinces of eel biology. Here, we use the genome to investigate the eel's complement of the Hox developmental transcription factors. We show that unlike any other teleost fish, the eel retains fully populated, duplicate Hox clusters, which originated at the teleost-specific genome duplication. Using mRNA-sequencing and in situ hybridizations, we demonstrate that all copies are expressed in early embryos. Theories of vertebrate evolution predict that the retention of functional, duplicate Hox genes can give rise to additional developmental complexity, which is not immediately apparent in the adult. However, the key morphological innovation elsewhere in the eel's life history coincides with the evolutionary origin of its Hox repertoire.

  5. A general scenario of Hox gene inventory variation among major sarcopterygian lineages

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    Wang Chaolin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hox genes are known to play a key role in shaping the body plan of metazoans. Evolutionary dynamics of these genes is therefore essential in explaining patterns of evolutionary diversity. Among extant sarcopterygians comprising both lobe-finned fishes and tetrapods, our knowledge of the Hox genes and clusters has largely been restricted in several model organisms such as frogs, birds and mammals. Some evolutionary gaps still exist, especially for those groups with derived body morphology or occupying key positions on the tree of life, hindering our understanding of how Hox gene inventory varied along the sarcopterygian lineage. Results We determined the Hox gene inventory for six sarcopterygian groups: lungfishes, caecilians, salamanders, snakes, turtles and crocodiles by comprehensive PCR survey and genome walking. Variable Hox genes in each of the six sarcopterygian group representatives, compared to the human Hox gene inventory, were further validated for their presence/absence by PCR survey in a number of related species representing a broad evolutionary coverage of the group. Turtles, crocodiles, birds and placental mammals possess the same 39 Hox genes. HoxD12 is absent in snakes, amphibians and probably lungfishes. HoxB13 is lost in frogs and caecilians. Lobe-finned fishes, amphibians and squamate reptiles possess HoxC3. HoxC1 is only present in caecilians and lobe-finned fishes. Similar to coelacanths, lungfishes also possess HoxA14, which is only found in lobe-finned fishes to date. Our Hox gene variation data favor the lungfish-tetrapod, turtle-archosaur and frog-salamander relationships and imply that the loss of HoxD12 is not directly related to digit reduction. Conclusions Our newly determined Hox inventory data provide a more complete scenario for evolutionary dynamics of Hox genes along the sarcopterygian lineage. Limbless, worm-like caecilians and snakes possess similar Hox gene inventories to animals with

  6. Evolution of echinoderms may not have required modification of the ancestral deuterostome HOX gene cluster: first report of PG4 and PG5 Hox orthologues in echinoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Suzanne; Martinez, Pedro; Chen, Wei-Chung; Thorndyke, Michael; Byrne, Maria

    2003-11-01

    Is the extreme derivation of the echinoderm body plan reflected in a derived echinoderm Hox genotype? Building on previous work, we exploited the sequence conservation of the homeobox to isolate putative orthologues of several Hox genes from two asteroid echinoderms. The 5-peptide motif (LPNTK) diagnostic of PG4 Hox genes was identified immediately downstream of one of the partial homeodomains from Patiriella exigua. This constitutes the first unequivocal report of a PG4 Hox gene orthologue from an echinoderm. Subsequent screenings identified genes of both PG4 and PG4/5 in Asterias rubens. Although in echinoids only a single gene (PG4/5) occupies these two contiguous cluster positions, we conclude that the ancestral echinoderm must have had the complete deuterostome suite of medial Hox genes, including orthologues of both PG4 and PG4/5 (=PG5). The reported absence of PG4 in the HOX cluster of echinoids is therefore a derived state, and the ancestral echinoderm probably had a HOX cluster not dissimilar to that of other deuterostomes. Modification of the ancestral deuterostome Hox genotype may not have been required for evolution of the highly derived echinoderm body plan.

  7. Salamander Hox clusters contain repetitive DNA and expanded non-coding regions: a typical Hox structure for non-mammalian tetrapod vertebrates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Stephen Randal; Putta, Srikrishna; Walker, John A; Smith, Jeramiah J; Maki, Nobuyasu; Tsonis, Panagiotis A

    2013-04-05

    Hox genes encode transcription factors that regulate embryonic and post-embryonic developmental processes. The expression of Hox genes is regulated in part by the tight, spatial arrangement of conserved coding and non-coding sequences. The potential for evolutionary changes in Hox cluster structure is thought to be low among vertebrates; however, recent studies of a few non-mammalian taxa suggest greater variation than originally thought. Using next generation sequencing of large genomic fragments (>100 kb) from the red spotted newt (Notophthalamus viridescens), we found that the arrangement of Hox cluster genes was conserved relative to orthologous regions from other vertebrates, but the length of introns and intergenic regions varied. In particular, the distance between hoxd13 and hoxd11 is longer in newt than orthologous regions from vertebrate species with expanded Hox clusters and is predicted to exceed the length of the entire HoxD clusters (hoxd13-hoxd4) of humans, mice, and frogs. Many repetitive DNA sequences were identified for newt Hox clusters, including an enrichment of DNA transposon-like sequences relative to non-coding genomic fragments. Our results suggest that Hox cluster expansion and transposon accumulation are common features of non-mammalian tetrapod vertebrates.

  8. Deterministic HOX Patterning in Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neuroectoderm

    OpenAIRE

    Lippmann, Ethan S.; Williams, Clay E.; Ruhl, David A.; Estevez-Silva, Maria C.; Chapman, Edwin R.; Coon, Joshua J.; Ashton, Randolph S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Colinear HOX expression during hindbrain and spinal cord development diversifies and assigns regional neural phenotypes to discrete rhombomeric and vertebral domains. Despite the precision of HOX patterning in?vivo, in?vitro approaches for differentiating human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) to posterior neural fates coarsely pattern HOX expression thereby generating cultures broadly specified to hindbrain or spinal cord regions. Here, we demonstrate that successive activation of fibr...

  9. Prenatal brain disruption in molybdenum cofactor deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmi-Nawi, Nirit; Malinger, Gustavo; Mandel, Hanna; Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Lev, Dorit

    2011-04-01

    Molybdenum cofactor deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that may present during the neonatal period with intractable seizures and be mistaken for ischemic encephalopathy. We describe a patient whose prenatal sonography at 35 weeks' gestation revealed diffuse brain damage with multiple subcortical cavities, ventriculomegaly, dysgenesis of the corpus callosum, and a hypoplastic cerebellum with an enlarged cisterna magna. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) later revealed brain atrophy, and multicystic encephalomalacia with hypoplastic vermis and cerebellum. Neurological examination at 10 months showed microcephaly, profound mental retardation, and spasticity. Uric acid was low, and taurine and xanthine were increased in the urine. A sulfite test was positive. The diagnosis of molybdenum cofactor deficiency was made. Sulfite oxidase activity in fibroblasts was undetectable. The patient was found to be homozygous for the 251-418del in the MOCS1 gene. This is the first description of the prenatal development of severe brain disruption in molybdenum cofactor deficiency.

  10. Evolutionary conservation of regulatory elements in vertebrate HOX gene clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santini, Simona; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Meyer, Axel

    2003-12-31

    Due to their high degree of conservation, comparisons of DNA sequences among evolutionarily distantly-related genomes permit to identify functional regions in noncoding DNA. Hox genes are optimal candidate sequences for comparative genome analyses, because they are extremely conserved in vertebrates and occur in clusters. We aligned (Pipmaker) the nucleotide sequences of HoxA clusters of tilapia, pufferfish, striped bass, zebrafish, horn shark, human and mouse (over 500 million years of evolutionary distance). We identified several highly conserved intergenic sequences, likely to be important in gene regulation. Only a few of these putative regulatory elements have been previously described as being involved in the regulation of Hox genes, while several others are new elements that might have regulatory functions. The majority of these newly identified putative regulatory elements contain short fragments that are almost completely conserved and are identical to known binding sites for regulatory proteins (Transfac). The conserved intergenic regions located between the most rostrally expressed genes in the developing embryo are longer and better retained through evolution. We document that presumed regulatory sequences are retained differentially in either A or A clusters resulting from a genome duplication in the fish lineage. This observation supports both the hypothesis that the conserved elements are involved in gene regulation and the Duplication-Deletion-Complementation model.

  11. Hox expression in the direct-type developing sand dollar Peronella japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchimoto, Jun; Yamaguchi, Masaaki

    2014-08-01

    Echinoderms are a curious group of deuterostomes that forms a clade with hemichordates but has a pentameral body plan. Hox complex plays a pivotal role in axial patterning in bilaterians and often occurs in a cluster on the chromosome. In contrast to hemichordates with an organized Hox cluster, the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus has a Hox cluster with an atypical organization. However, the current data on hox expression in sea urchin rudiments are fragmentary. We report a comprehensive examination of hox expression in a sand dollar echinoid. Nine hox genes are expressed in the adult rudiment, which are classified into two groups, but hox11/13b belongs to both: one with linear expression in the coelomic mesoderm and another with radial expression around the adult mouth. The linear genes may endow the coelom/mesentery with axial information to direct postmetamorphic transformation of the digestive tract, whereas the radial genes developmentally correlate with the morphological novelties of echinoderms and/or sea urchins. Recruitment of the radial genes except hox11/13b appears to be accompanied by the loss of ancestral/axial roles. This in toto co-option of the hox genes provides insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the evolution of echinoderms from a bilateral ancestor. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. All the three ParaHox genes are present in Nuttallochiton mirandus (Mollusca: polyplacophora): evolutionary considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barucca, Marco; Biscotti, Maria A; Olmo, Ettore; Canapa, Adriana

    2006-03-15

    The ParaHox gene cluster contains three homeobox genes, Gsx, Xlox and Cdx and has been demonstrated to be an evolutionary sister of the Hox gene cluster. Among deuterostomes the three genes are found in the majority of taxa, whereas among protostomes they have so far been isolated only in the phylum Sipuncula. We report the partial sequences of all three ParaHox genes in the polyplacophoran Nuttallochiton mirandus, the first species of the phylum Mollusca where all ParaHox genes have been isolated. This finding has phylogenetic implications for the phylum Mollusca and for its relationships with the other lophotrochozoan taxa. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. HoxA Genes and the Fin-to-Limb Transition in Vertebrates

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    João Leite-Castro

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available HoxA genes encode for important DNA-binding transcription factors that act during limb development, regulating primarily gene expression and, consequently, morphogenesis and skeletal differentiation. Within these genes, HoxA11 and HoxA13 were proposed to have played an essential role in the enigmatic evolutionary transition from fish fins to tetrapod limbs. Indeed, comparative gene expression analyses led to the suggestion that changes in their regulation might have been essential for the diversification of vertebrates’ appendages. In this review, we highlight three potential modifications in the regulation and function of these genes that may have boosted appendage evolution: (1 the expansion of polyalanine repeats in the HoxA11 and HoxA13 proteins; (2 the origin of +a novel long-non-coding RNA with a possible inhibitory function on HoxA11; and (3 the acquisition of cis-regulatory elements modulating 5’ HoxA transcription. We discuss the relevance of these mechanisms for appendage diversification reviewing the current state of the art and performing additional comparative analyses to characterize, in a phylogenetic framework, HoxA11 and HoxA13 expression, alanine composition within the encoded proteins, long-non-coding RNAs and cis-regulatory elements.

  14. Hox gene cluster of the ascidian, Halocynthia roretzi, reveals multiple ancient steps of cluster disintegration during ascidian evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekigami, Yuka; Kobayashi, Takuya; Omi, Ai; Nishitsuji, Koki; Ikuta, Tetsuro; Fujiyama, Asao; Satoh, Noriyuki; Saiga, Hidetoshi

    2017-01-01

    Hox gene clusters with at least 13 paralog group (PG) members are common in vertebrate genomes and in that of amphioxus. Ascidians, which belong to the subphylum Tunicata (Urochordata), are phylogenetically positioned between vertebrates and amphioxus, and traditionally divided into two groups: the Pleurogona and the Enterogona. An enterogonan ascidian, Ciona intestinalis (Ci), possesses nine Hox genes localized on two chromosomes; thus, the Hox gene cluster is disintegrated. We investigated the Hox gene cluster of a pleurogonan ascidian, Halocynthia roretzi (Hr) to investigate whether Hox gene cluster disintegration is common among ascidians, and if so, how such disintegration occurred during ascidian or tunicate evolution. Our phylogenetic analysis reveals that the Hr Hox gene complement comprises nine members, including one with a relatively divergent Hox homeodomain sequence. Eight of nine Hr Hox genes were orthologous to Ci-Hox1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 12 and 13. Following the phylogenetic classification into 13 PGs, we designated Hr Hox genes as Hox1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 11/12/13.a, 11/12/13.b and HoxX. To address the chromosomal arrangement of the nine Hox genes, we performed two-color chromosomal fluorescent in situ hybridization, which revealed that the nine Hox genes are localized on a single chromosome in Hr, distinct from their arrangement in Ci. We further examined the order of the nine Hox genes on the chromosome by chromosome/scaffold walking. This analysis suggested a gene order of Hox1, 11/12/13.b, 11/12/13.a, 10, 5, X, followed by either Hox4, 3, 2 or Hox2, 3, 4 on the chromosome. Based on the present results and those previously reported in Ci, we discuss the establishment of the Hox gene complement and disintegration of Hox gene clusters during the course of ascidian or tunicate evolution. The Hox gene cluster and the genome must have experienced extensive reorganization during the course of evolution from the ancestral tunicate to Hr and Ci. Nevertheless

  15. Cofactors Influencing Prevalence and Intensity of Schistosoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An epidemiological study of sedentary Fulani settlements in Dumbi, Igabi Local Government Area of Kaduna State was undertaken to determine cofactors of Schistosoma haematobium prevalence and intensity of infection. Consenting individuals were recruited after sensitization from six settlements and administered a ...

  16. Effect of increased HoxB4 on human megakaryocytic development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Yiming [Department of Pathology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Program in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Sullenbarger, Brent [Department of Pathology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Lasky, Larry C., E-mail: Lasky.4@osu.edu [Department of Pathology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Program in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} HoxB4 overexpression in human TF1 cells increased the expression of CD61 and CD41a. {yields} HoxB4 fusion protein enhanced megakaryocytic development of CD34{sup +} cord blood cells. {yields} Ectopic HoxB4 increased Tpo receptor expression and decreased c-Myb expression. {yields} HoxB4 RNA silencing increased c-Myb expression and decreased Fli-1 expression. -- Abstract: In order to produce clinically useful quantities of platelets ex vivo we may need to firstly enhance early self-renewal of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and/or megakaryocyte (Mk) progenitors. The homeodomain transcription factor HoxB4 has been shown to be an important regulator of stem cell renewal and hematopoiesis; however, its effect on megakaryopoiesis is unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of HoxB4 overexpression or RNA silencing on megakaryocytic development in the human TF1 progenitor cell line; we then used recombinant tPTD-HoxB4 fusion protein to study the effect of exogenous HoxB4 on megakaryocytic development of human CD34 positively-selected cord blood cells. We found that ectopic HoxB4 in TF1 cells increased the antigen expression of CD61and CD41a, increased the gene expression of thrombopoietin receptor (TpoR), Scl-1, Cyclin D1, Fog-1 and Fli-1 while it decreased c-Myb expression. HoxB4 RNA silencing in TF1 cells decreased the expression of CD61 and CD41a and decreased Fli-1 expression while it increased the expression of c-Myb. Recombinant tPTD-HoxB4 fusion protein increased the percentages and absolute numbers of CD41a and CD61 positive cells during megakaryocytic differentiation of CD34 positively-selected cord blood cells and increased the numbers of colony-forming unit-megakaryocyte (CFU-Mk). Adding tPTD-HoxB4 fusion protein increased the gene expression of TpoR, Cyclin D1, Fog-1 and Fli-1 while it inhibited c-Myb expression. Our data suggest that increased HoxB4 enhanced early megakaryocytic development in human TF1 cells and CD34

  17. Evidence for at least six Hox clusters in the Japanese lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Tarang K.; Ravi, Vydianathan; Yamasaki, Shinichi; Lee, Alison P.; Lian, Michelle M.; Tay, Boon-Hui; Tohari, Sumanty; Yanai, Seiji; Tay, Alice; Brenner, Sydney; Venkatesh, Byrappa

    2013-01-01

    Cyclostomes, comprising jawless vertebrates such as lampreys and hagfishes, are the sister group of living jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes) and hence an important group for understanding the origin and diversity of vertebrates. In vertebrates and other metazoans, Hox genes determine cell fate along the anteroposterior axis of embryos and are implicated in driving morphological diversity. Invertebrates contain a single Hox cluster (either intact or fragmented), whereas elephant shark, coelacanth, and tetrapods contain four Hox clusters owing to two rounds of whole-genome duplication (“1R” and “2R”) during early vertebrate evolution. By contrast, most teleost fishes contain up to eight Hox clusters because of an additional “teleost-specific” genome duplication event. By sequencing bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones and the whole genome, here we provide evidence for at least six Hox clusters in the Japanese lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum). This suggests that the lamprey lineage has experienced an additional genome duplication after 1R and 2R. The relative age of lamprey and human paralogs supports this hypothesis. Compared with gnathostome Hox clusters, lamprey Hox clusters are unusually large. Several conserved noncoding elements (CNEs) were predicted in the Hox clusters of lamprey, elephant shark, and human. Transgenic zebrafish assay indicated the potential of CNEs to function as enhancers. Interestingly, CNEs in individual lamprey Hox clusters are frequently conserved in multiple Hox clusters in elephant shark and human, implying a many-to-many orthology relationship between lamprey and gnathostome Hox clusters. Such a relationship suggests that the first two rounds of genome duplication may have occurred independently in the lamprey and gnathostome lineages. PMID:24043829

  18. HoxB8 in noradrenergic specification and differentiation of the autonomic nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Leslie; Ferdin, Marius; Holzmann, Julia; Stubbusch, Jutta; Rohrer, Hermann

    2012-03-01

    Different prespecification of mesencephalic and trunk neural crest cells determines their response to environmental differentiation signals and contributes to the generation of different autonomic neuron subtypes, parasympathetic ciliary neurons in the head and trunk noradrenergic sympathetic neurons. The differentiation of ciliary and sympathetic neurons shares many features, including the initial BMP-induced expression of noradrenergic characteristics that is, however, subsequently lost in ciliary but maintained in sympathetic neurons. The molecular basis of specific prespecification and differentiation patterns has remained unclear. We show here that HoxB gene expression in trunk neural crest is maintained in sympathetic neurons. Ectopic expression of a single HoxB gene, HoxB8, in mesencephalic neural crest results in a strongly increased expression of sympathetic neuron characteristics like the transcription factor Hand2, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH) in ciliary neurons. Other subtype-specific properties like RGS4 and RCad are not induced. HoxB8 has only minor effects in postmitotic ciliary neurons and is unable to induce TH and DBH in the enteric nervous system. Thus, we conclude that HoxB8 acts by maintaining noradrenergic properties transiently expressed in ciliary neuron progenitors during normal development. HoxC8, HoxB9, HoxB1 and HoxD10 elicit either small and transient or no effects on noradrenergic differentiation, suggesting a selective effect of HoxB8. These results implicate that Hox genes contribute to the differential development of autonomic neuron precursors by maintaining noradrenergic properties in the trunk sympathetic neuron lineage. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Replacing Electron Transport Cofactors with Hydrogenases

    KAUST Repository

    Laamarti, Rkia

    2016-12-01

    Enzymes have found applications in a broad range of industrial production processes. While high catalytic activity, selectivity and mild reaction conditions are attractive advantages of the biocatalysts, particularly costs arising from required cofactors pose a sever limitation. While cofactor-recycling systems are available, their use implies constraints for process set-up and conditions, which are a particular problem e.g. for solid-gas-phase reactions. Several oxidoreductases are able to directly exchange electrons with electrodes. Hence, the co-immobilization of both, an electron-utilizing and an electron-generating oxidoreductase on conductive nanoparticles should facilitate the direct electron flow from an enzymatic oxidation to a reduction reaction circumventing redox-cofactors requirements. In such a set-up, hydrogenases could generate and provide electrons directly form gaseous hydrogen. This thesis describes the co-immobilization of the oxygen tolerant hydrogenases from C. eutropha or C. metallidurans and cytochrome P450BM3 as test system. Conductive material in the form of carbon nanotubes (CNT) serves as a suitable support. A combination of the hydrogenase and the catalytic domain of P450BM3 immobilized on carbon nanotubes were tested for the oxidation of lauric acid in the presence of hydrogen instead of an electron-transport cofactor. The GC-MS analysis reveals the conversion of 4% of lauric acid (LA) into three products, which correspond to the hydroxylated lauric acid in three different positions with a total turnover (TON) of 34. The product distribution is similar to that obtained when using the wildtype P450BM3 with the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) cofactor. Such electronic coupling couldn’t be achieved for the conversion of other substrates such as propane and cyclohexane, probably due to the high uncoupling rate within the heme-domain of cytochrome P450BM3 when unnatural substrates are introduced.

  20. Unusual Gene Order and Organization of the Sea Urchin Hox Cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, R A; Rowen, L; Nesbitt, R; Bloom, S; Rast, J P; Berney, K; Arenas-Mena, C; Martinez, P; Lucas, S; Richardson, P M; Davidson, E H; Peterson, K J; Hood, L

    2005-10-11

    The highly consistent gene order and axial colinear expression patterns found in vertebrate hox gene clusters are less well conserved across the rest of bilaterians. We report the first deuterostome instance of an intact hox cluster with a unique gene order where the paralog groups are not expressed in a sequential manner. The finished sequence from BAC clones from the genome of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, reveals a gene order wherein the anterior genes (Hox1, Hox2 and Hox3) lie nearest the posterior genes in the cluster such that the most 3 gene is Hox5. (The gene order is : 5-Hox1, 2, 3, 11/13c, 11/13b, 11/13a, 9/10, 8, 7, 6, 5 - 3). The finished sequence result is corroborated by restriction mapping evidence and BAC-end scaffold analyses. Comparisons with a putative ancestral deuterostome Hox gene cluster suggest that the rearrangements leading to the sea urchin gene order were many and complex.

  1. Multiple structure-intrinsic disorder interactions regulate and coordinate Hox protein function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondos, Sarah

    During animal development, Hox transcription factors determine fate of developing tissues to generate diverse organs and appendages. Hox proteins are famous for their bizarre mutant phenotypes, such as replacing antennae with legs. Clearly, the functions of individual Hox proteins must be distinct and reliable in vivo, or the organism risks malformation or death. However, within the Hox protein family, the DNA-binding homeodomains are highly conserved and the amino acids that contact DNA are nearly invariant. These observations raise the question: How do different Hox proteins correctly identify their distinct target genes using a common DNA binding domain? One possible means to modulate DNA binding is through the influence of the non-homeodomain protein regions, which differ significantly among Hox proteins. However genetic approaches never detected intra-protein interactions, and early biochemical attempts were hindered because the special features of ``intrinsically disordered'' sequences were not appreciated. We propose the first-ever structural model of a Hox protein to explain how specific contacts between distant, intrinsically disordered regions of the protein and the homeodomain regulate DNA binding and coordinate this activity with other Hox molecular functions.

  2. Early mesodermal expression of Hox genes in the polychaete Alitta virens (Annelida, Lophotrochozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulakova, Milana A; Bakalenko, Nadezhda I; Novikova, Elena L

    2017-01-01

    Hox genes are the key regulators of axial regionalization of bilaterian animals. However, their main function is fulfilled differently in the development of animals from different evolutionary branches. Early patterning of the developing embryos by Hox gene expression in the representatives of protostomes (arthropods, mollusks) starts in the ectodermal cells. On the contrary, the instructive role of the mesoderm in the axial patterning was demonstrated for vertebrates. This makes it difficult to understand if during the axial regionalization of ancestral bilaterians Hox genes first expressed in the developing mesoderm or the ectoderm. To resolve this question, it is necessary to expand the number of models for investigation of the early axial patterning. Here, we show that three Hox genes of the polychaete Alitta virens (formerly Nereis virens, Annelida, Lophotrochozoa)-Hox2, Hox4, and Lox5-are expressed in the mesodermal anlagen of the three future larval chaetigerous segments in spatially colinear manner before the initiation of Hox expression in the larval ectoderm. This is the first evidence of sequential Hox gene expression in the mesoderm of protostomes to date.

  3. Spatial expression of Hox cluster genes in the ontogeny of a sea urchin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas-Mena, C.; Cameron, A. R.; Davidson, E. H.

    2000-01-01

    The Hox cluster of the sea urchin Strongylocentrous purpuratus contains ten genes in a 500 kb span of the genome. Only two of these genes are expressed during embryogenesis, while all of eight genes tested are expressed during development of the adult body plan in the larval stage. We report the spatial expression during larval development of the five 'posterior' genes of the cluster: SpHox7, SpHox8, SpHox9/10, SpHox11/13a and SpHox11/13b. The five genes exhibit a dynamic, largely mesodermal program of expression. Only SpHox7 displays extensive expression within the pentameral rudiment itself. A spatially sequential and colinear arrangement of expression domains is found in the somatocoels, the paired posterior mesodermal structures that will become the adult perivisceral coeloms. No such sequential expression pattern is observed in endodermal, epidermal or neural tissues of either the larva or the presumptive juvenile sea urchin. The spatial expression patterns of the Hox genes illuminate the evolutionary process by which the pentameral echinoderm body plan emerged from a bilateral ancestor.

  4. Unusual Gene Order and Organization of the Sea Urchin HoxCluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, Paul M.; Lucas, Susan; Cameron, R. Andrew; Rowen,Lee; Nesbitt, Ryan; Bloom, Scott; Rast, Jonathan P.; Berney, Kevin; Arenas-Mena, Cesar; Martinez, Pedro; Davidson, Eric H.; Peterson, KevinJ.; Hood, Leroy

    2005-05-10

    The highly consistent gene order and axial colinear expression patterns found in vertebrate hox gene clusters are less well conserved across the rest of bilaterians. We report the first deuterostome instance of an intact hox cluster with a unique gene order where the paralog groups are not expressed in a sequential manner. The finished sequence from BAC clones from the genome of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, reveals a gene order wherein the anterior genes (Hox1, Hox2 and Hox3) lie nearest the posterior genes in the cluster such that the most 3' gene is Hox5. (The gene order is : 5'-Hox1,2, 3, 11/13c, 11/13b, '11/13a, 9/10, 8, 7, 6, 5 - 3)'. The finished sequence result is corroborated by restriction mapping evidence and BAC-end scaffold analyses. Comparisons with a putative ancestral deuterostome Hox gene cluster suggest that the rearrangements leading to the sea urchin gene order were many and complex.

  5. Quantitative assessment of Hox complex expression in the indirect development of the polychaete annelid Chaetopterus sp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, K. J.; Irvine, S. Q.; Cameron, R. A.; Davidson, E. H.

    2000-01-01

    A prediction from the set-aside theory of bilaterian origins is that pattern formation processes such as those controlled by the Hox cluster genes are required specifically for adult body plan formation. This prediction can be tested in animals that use maximal indirect development, in which the embryonic formation of the larva and the postembryonic formation of the adult body plan are temporally and spatially distinct. To this end, we quantitatively measured the amount of transcripts for five Hox genes in embryos of a lophotrochozoan, the polychaete annelid Chaetopterus sp. The polychaete Hox complex is shown not to be expressed during embryogenesis, but transcripts of all measured Hox complex genes are detected at significant levels during the initial stages of adult body plan formation. Temporal colinearity in the sequence of their activation is observed, so that activation follows the 3'-5' arrangement of the genes. Moreover, Hox gene expression is spatially localized to the region of teloblastic set-aside cells of the later-stage embryos. This study shows that an indirectly developing lophotrochozoan shares with an indirectly developing deuterostome, the sea urchin, a common mode of Hox complex utilization: construction of the larva, whether a trochophore or dipleurula, does not involve Hox cluster expression, but in both forms the complex is expressed in the set-aside cells from which the adult body plan derives.

  6. Systematic expression analysis of Hox genes at adulthood reveals novel patterns in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutlet, Bertrand; Theys, Nicolas; Coste, Cécile; Ahn, Marie-Thérèse; Doshishti-Agolli, Konstantin; Lizen, Benoît; Gofflot, Françoise

    2016-04-01

    Hox proteins are key regulators of animal development, providing positional identity and patterning information to cells along the rostrocaudal axis of the embryo. Although their embryonic expression and function are well characterized, their presence and biological importance in adulthood remains poorly investigated. We provide here the first detailed quantitative and neuroanatomical characterization of the expression of the 39 Hox genes in the adult mouse brain. Using RT-qPCR we determined the expression of 24 Hox genes mainly in the brainstem of the adult brain, with low expression of a few genes in the cerebellum and the forebrain. Using in situ hybridization (ISH) we have demonstrated that expression of Hox genes is maintained in territories derived from the early segmental Hox expression domains in the hindbrain. Indeed, we show that expression of genes belonging to paralogy groups PG2-8 is maintained in the hindbrain derivatives at adulthood. The spatial colinearity, which characterizes the early embryonic expression of Hox genes, is still observed in sequential antero-posterior boundaries of expression. Moreover, the main mossy and climbing fibres precerebellar nuclei express PG2-8 Hox genes according to their migration origins. Second, ISH confirms the presence of Hox gene transcripts in territories where they are not detected during development, suggesting neo-expression in these territories in adulthood. Within the forebrain, we have mapped Hoxb1, Hoxb3, Hoxb4, Hoxd3 and Hoxa5 expression in restricted areas of the sensory cerebral cortices as well as in specific thalamic relay nuclei. Our data thus suggest a requirement of Hox genes beyond their role of patterning genes, providing a new dimension to their functional relevance in the central nervous system.

  7. The Evolution of HoxD-11 Expression in the Bird Wing: Insights from Alligator mississippiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Alexander O.; Kohlsdorf, Tiana; Fallon, John F.; VandenBrooks, John; Wagner, Günter P.

    2008-01-01

    Background Comparative morphology identifies the digits of the wing of birds as 1,2 and 3, but they develop at embryological positions that become digits 2, 3 and 4 in other amniotes. A hypothesis to explain this is that a homeotic frame shift of digital identity occurred in the evolution of the bird wing, such that digits 1,2 and 3 are developing from embryological positions 2, 3 and 4. Digit 1 of the mouse is the only digit that shows no late expression of HoxD-11. This is also true for the anterior digit of the bird wing, suggesting this digit is actually a digit 1. If this is the case, we can expect closer relatives of birds to show no HoxD-11 expression only in digit 1. To test this prediction we investigate HoxD-11 expression in crocodilians, the closest living relatives of birds. Methodology/Principal Findings Using degenerate primers we cloned a 606 nucleotide fragment of exon 1 of the alligator HoxD-11 gene and used it for whole-mount in-situ detection in alligator embryos. We found that in the pentadactyl forelimbs of alligator, as in the mouse, late expression of HoxD-11 is absent only in digit 1. Conclusions/Significance The ancestral condition for amniotes is that late-phase HoxD-11 expression is absent only in digit 1. The biphalangeal morphology and lack of HoxD-11 expression of the anterior digit of the wing is like digit 1 of alligator and mouse, but its embryological position as digit 2 is derived. HoxD-11 expression in alligator is consistent with the hypothesis that both digit morphology as well as HoxD-11 expression are shifted towards posterior in the bird wing. PMID:18833328

  8. A saturation screen for cis-acting regulatory DNA in the Hox genes of Ciona intestinalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keys, David N.; Lee, Byung-in; Di Gregorio, Anna; Harafuji, Naoe; Detter, Chris; Wang, Mei; Kahsai, Orsalem; Ahn, Sylvia; Arellano, Andre; Zhang, Quin; Trong, Stephan; Doyle, Sharon A.; Satoh, Noriyuki; Satou, Yutaka; Saiga, Hidetoshi; Christian, Allen; Rokhsar, Dan; Hawkins, Trevor L.; Levine, Mike; Richardson, Paul

    2005-01-05

    A screen for the systematic identification of cis-regulatory elements within large (>100 kb) genomic domains containing Hox genes was performed by using the basal chordate Ciona intestinalis. Randomly generated DNA fragments from bacterial artificial chromosomes containing two clusters of Hox genes were inserted into a vector upstream of a minimal promoter and lacZ reporter gene. A total of 222 resultant fusion genes were separately electroporated into fertilized eggs, and their regulatory activities were monitored in larvae. In sum, 21 separable cis-regulatory elements were found. These include eight Hox linked domains that drive expression in nested anterior-posterior domains of ectodermally derived tissues. In addition to vertebrate-like CNS regulation, the discovery of cis-regulatory domains that drive epidermal transcription suggests that C. intestinalis has arthropod-like Hox patterning in the epidermis.

  9. Evolution of the snake body form reveals homoplasy in amniote Hox gene function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Jason J; Polly, P David

    2015-04-02

    Hox genes regulate regionalization of the axial skeleton in vertebrates, and changes in their expression have been proposed to be a fundamental mechanism driving the evolution of new body forms. The origin of the snake-like body form, with its deregionalized pre-cloacal axial skeleton, has been explained as either homogenization of Hox gene expression domains, or retention of standard vertebrate Hox domains with alteration of downstream expression that suppresses development of distinct regions. Both models assume a highly regionalized ancestor, but the extent of deregionalization of the primaxial domain (vertebrae, dorsal ribs) of the skeleton in snake-like body forms has never been analysed. Here we combine geometric morphometrics and maximum-likelihood analysis to show that the pre-cloacal primaxial domain of elongate, limb-reduced lizards and snakes is not deregionalized compared with limbed taxa, and that the phylogenetic structure of primaxial morphology in reptiles does not support a loss of regionalization in the evolution of snakes. We demonstrate that morphometric regional boundaries correspond to mapped gene expression domains in snakes, suggesting that their primaxial domain is patterned by a normally functional Hox code. Comparison of primaxial osteology in fossil and modern amniotes with Hox gene distributions within Amniota indicates that a functional, sequentially expressed Hox code patterned a subtle morphological gradient along the anterior-posterior axis in stem members of amniote clades and extant lizards, including snakes. The highly regionalized skeletons of extant archosaurs and mammals result from independent evolution in the Hox code and do not represent ancestral conditions for clades with snake-like body forms. The developmental origin of snakes is best explained by decoupling of the primaxial and abaxial domains and by increases in somite number, not by changes in the function of primaxial Hox genes.

  10. Rotiferan Hox genes give new insights into the evolution of metazoan bodyplans

    OpenAIRE

    Andreas C Fröbius; Funch, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The phylum Rotifera consists of minuscule, nonsegmented animals with a unique body plan and an unresolved phylogenetic position. The presence of pharyngeal articulated jaws supports an inclusion in Gnathifera nested in the Spiralia. Comparison of Hox genes, involved in animal body plan patterning, can be used to infer phylogenetic relationships. Here, we report the expression of five Hox genes during embryogenesis of the rotifer Brachionus manjavacas and show how these genes define different ...

  11. Multiple chromosomal rearrangements structured the ancestral vertebrate Hox-bearing protochromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent J Lynch

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available While the proposal that large-scale genome expansions occurred early in vertebrate evolution is widely accepted, the exact mechanisms of the expansion--such as a single or multiple rounds of whole genome duplication, bloc chromosome duplications, large-scale individual gene duplications, or some combination of these--is unclear. Gene families with a single invertebrate member but four vertebrate members, such as the Hox clusters, provided early support for Ohno's hypothesis that two rounds of genome duplication (the 2R-model occurred in the stem lineage of extant vertebrates. However, despite extensive study, the duplication history of the Hox clusters has remained unclear, calling into question its usefulness in resolving the role of large-scale gene or genome duplications in early vertebrates. Here, we present a phylogenetic analysis of the vertebrate Hox clusters and several linked genes (the Hox "paralogon" and show that different phylogenies are obtained for Dlx and Col genes than for Hox and ErbB genes. We show that these results are robust to errors in phylogenetic inference and suggest that these competing phylogenies can be resolved if two chromosomal crossover events occurred in the ancestral vertebrate. These results resolve conflicting data on the order of Hox gene duplications and the role of genome duplication in vertebrate evolution and suggest that a period of genome reorganization occurred after genome duplications in early vertebrates.

  12. Control of cotton fibre elongation by a homeodomain transcription factor GhHOX3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Chun-Min; Shangguan, Xiao-Xia; Zhao, Bo; Zhang, Xiu-Fang; Chao, Lu-Men; Yang, Chang-Qing; Wang, Ling-Jian; Zhu, Hua-Yu; Zeng, Yan-Da; Guo, Wang-Zhen; Zhou, Bao-Liang; Hu, Guan-Jing; Guan, Xue-Ying; Chen, Z Jeffrey; Wendel, Jonathan F; Zhang, Tian-Zhen; Chen, Xiao-Ya

    2014-11-21

    Cotton fibres are unusually long, single-celled epidermal seed trichomes and a model for plant cell growth, but little is known about the regulation of fibre cell elongation. Here we report that a homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-ZIP) transcription factor, GhHOX3, controls cotton fibre elongation. GhHOX3 genes are localized to the 12th homoeologous chromosome set of allotetraploid cotton cultivars, associated with quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for fibre length. Silencing of GhHOX3 greatly reduces (>80%) fibre length, whereas its overexpression leads to longer fibre. Combined transcriptomic and biochemical analyses identify target genes of GhHOX3 that also contain the L1-box cis-element, including two cell wall loosening protein genes GhRDL1 and GhEXPA1. GhHOX3 interacts with GhHD1, another homeodomain protein, resulting in enhanced transcriptional activity, and with cotton DELLA, GhSLR1, repressor of the growth hormone gibberellin (GA). GhSLR1 interferes with the GhHOX3-GhHD1 interaction and represses target gene transcription. Our results uncover a novel mechanism whereby a homeodomain protein transduces GA signal to promote fibre cell elongation.

  13. MicroRNA filters Hox temporal transcription noise to confer boundary formation in the spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chung-Jung; Hong, Tian; Tung, Ying-Tsen; Yen, Ya-Ping; Hsu, Ho-Chiang; Lu, Ya-Lin; Chang, Mien; Nie, Qing; Chen, Jun-An

    2017-03-01

    The initial rostrocaudal patterning of the neural tube leads to differential expression of Hox genes that contribute to the specification of motor neuron (MN) subtype identity. Although several 3' Hox mRNAs are expressed in progenitors in a noisy manner, these Hox proteins are not expressed in the progenitors and only become detectable in postmitotic MNs. MicroRNA biogenesis impairment leads to precocious expression and propagates the noise of Hoxa5 at the protein level, resulting in an imprecise Hoxa5-Hoxc8 boundary. Here we uncover, using in silico simulation, two feed-forward Hox-miRNA loops accounting for the precocious and noisy Hoxa5 expression, as well as an ill-defined boundary phenotype in Dicer mutants. Finally, we identify mir-27 as a major regulator coordinating the temporal delay and spatial boundary of Hox protein expression. Our results provide a novel trans Hox-miRNA circuit filtering transcription noise and controlling the timing of protein expression to confer robust individual MN identity.

  14. A single three-dimensional chromatin compartment in amphioxus indicates a stepwise evolution of vertebrate Hox bimodal regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acemel, Rafael D; Tena, Juan J; Irastorza-Azcarate, Ibai; Marlétaz, Ferdinand; Gómez-Marín, Carlos; de la Calle-Mustienes, Elisa; Bertrand, Stéphanie; Diaz, Sergio G; Aldea, Daniel; Aury, Jean-Marc; Mangenot, Sophie; Holland, Peter W H; Devos, Damien P; Maeso, Ignacio; Escrivá, Hector; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis

    2016-03-01

    The HoxA and HoxD gene clusters of jawed vertebrates are organized into bipartite three-dimensional chromatin structures that separate long-range regulatory inputs coming from the anterior and posterior Hox-neighboring regions. This architecture is instrumental in allowing vertebrate Hox genes to pattern disparate parts of the body, including limbs. Almost nothing is known about how these three-dimensional topologies originated. Here we perform extensive 4C-seq profiling of the Hox cluster in embryos of amphioxus, an invertebrate chordate. We find that, in contrast to the architecture in vertebrates, the amphioxus Hox cluster is organized into a single chromatin interaction domain that includes long-range contacts mostly from the anterior side, bringing distant cis-regulatory elements into contact with Hox genes. We infer that the vertebrate Hox bipartite regulatory system is an evolutionary novelty generated by combining ancient long-range regulatory contacts from DNA in the anterior Hox neighborhood with new regulatory inputs from the posterior side.

  15. Extraction and purification of molybdenum cofactor from milk xanthine oxidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Spanning, R J; Wansell-Bettenhaussen, C W; Oltmann, L F; Stouthamer, A.H.

    1987-01-01

    Molybdenum cofactor (mocofactor) is extracted efficiently, free of impurities and in high concentrations, by acid treatment of xanthine oxidase and subsequent incubation of the precipitate with phosphate buffer containing EDTA, molybdate and oxygen. It is suggested that cofactor is bound to the

  16. Metabolic impact of redox cofactor perturbations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Jin; Lages, Nuno; Oldiges, M.

    2009-01-01

    to induce widespread changes in metabolism. We present a detailed analysis of the impact of perturbations in redox cofactors in the cytosol or mitochondria on glucose and energy metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to aid metabolic engineering decisions that involve cofactor engineering. We enhanced NADH...

  17. Observation and modelling of HOx radicals in a boreal forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hens

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of OH and HO2 radicals were conducted in a pine-dominated forest in southern Finland during the HUMPPA-COPEC-2010 (Hyytiälä United Measurements of Photochemistry and Particles in Air – Comprehensive Organic Precursor Emission and Concentration study field campaign in summer 2010. Simultaneous side-by-side measurements of hydroxyl radicals were conducted with two instruments using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF, indicating small systematic disagreement, OHLIF / OHCIMS = (1.31 ± 0.14. Subsequently, the LIF instrument was moved to the top of a 20 m tower, just above the canopy, to investigate the radical chemistry at the ecosystem–atmosphere interface. Comprehensive measurements including observations of many volatile organic compounds (VOCs and the total OH reactivity were conducted and analysed using steady-state calculations as well as an observationally constrained box model. Production rates of OH calculated from measured OH precursors are consistent with those derived from the steady-state assumption and measured total OH loss under conditions of moderate OH reactivity. The primary photolytic sources of OH contribute up to one-third to the total OH production. OH recycling, which occurs mainly by HO2 reacting with NO and O3, dominates the total hydroxyl radical production in this boreal forest. Box model simulations agree with measurements for hydroxyl radicals (OHmod. / OHobs. = 1.00 ± 0.16, while HO2 mixing ratios are significantly under-predicted (HO2mod. / HO2obs. = 0.3 ± 0.2, and simulated OH reactivity does not match the observed OH reactivity. The simultaneous under-prediction of HO2 and OH reactivity in periods in which OH concentrations were simulated realistically suggests that the missing OH reactivity is an unaccounted-for source of HO2. Detailed analysis of the HOx production, loss, and recycling pathways suggests that in periods of high total OH reactivity

  18. Phosphorylation of HOX11/TLX1 on Threonine-247 during mitosis modulates expression of cyclin B1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chesney Alden

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HOX11/TLX1 (hereafter referred to as HOX11 homeobox gene was originally identified at a t(10;14(q24;q11 translocation breakpoint, a chromosomal abnormality observed in 5-7% of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALLs. We previously reported a predisposition to aberrant spindle assembly checkpoint arrest and heightened incidences of chromosome missegregation in HOX11-overexpressing B lymphocytes following exposure to spindle poisons. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate cell cycle specific expression of HOX11. Results Cell cycle specific expression studies revealed a phosphorylated form of HOX11 detectable only in the mitotic fraction of cells after treatment with inhibitors to arrest cells at different stages of the cell cycle. Mutational analyses revealed phosphorylation on threonine-247 (Thr247, a conserved amino acid that defines the HOX11 gene family and is integral for the association with DNA binding elements. The effect of HOX11 phosphorylation on its ability to modulate expression of the downstream target, cyclin B1, was tested. A HOX11 mutant in which Thr247 was substituted with glutamic acid (HOX11 T247E, thereby mimicking a constitutively phosphorylated HOX11 isoform, was unable to bind the cyclin B1 promoter or enhance levels of the cyclin B1 protein. Expression of the wildtype HOX11 was associated with accelerated progression through the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, impaired synchronization in prometaphase and reduced apoptosis whereas expression of the HOX11 T247E mutant restored cell cycle kinetics, the spindle checkpoint and apoptosis. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the transcriptional activity of HOX11 is regulated by phosphorylation of Thr247 in a cell cycle-specific manner and that this phosphorylation modulates the expression of the target gene, cyclin B1. Since it is likely that Thr247 phosphorylation regulates DNA binding activity to multiple HOX11 target sequences, it is

  19. Functional dissection of the Hox protein Abdominal-B in Drosophila cell culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Zongzhao [Key Laboratory of the Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beichen West Road, Chaoyang, Beijing 100101 (China); CellNetworks - Cluster of Excellence, Centre for Organismal Studies (COS) Heidelberg, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Yang, Xingke, E-mail: yangxk@ioz.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of the Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beichen West Road, Chaoyang, Beijing 100101 (China); Lohmann, Ingrid, E-mail: ilohmann@flydev.org [CellNetworks - Cluster of Excellence, Centre for Organismal Studies (COS) Heidelberg, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ct340 CRM was identified to be the posterior spiracle enhancer of gene cut. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ct340 is under the direct transcriptional control of Hox protein Abd-B. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An efficient cloning system was developed to assay protein-DNA interaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New features of Abd-B dependent target gene regulation were detected. -- Abstract: Hox transcription factors regulate the morphogenesis along the anterior-posterior (A/P) body axis through the interaction with small cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) of their target gene, however so far very few Hox CRMs are known and have been analyzed in detail. In this study we have identified a new Hox CRM, ct340, which guides the expression of the cell type specification gene cut (ct) in the posterior spiracle under the direct control of the Hox protein Abdominal-B (Abd-B). Using the ct340 enhancer activity as readout, an efficient cloning system to generate VP16 activation domain fusion protein was developed to unambiguously test protein-DNA interaction in Drosophila cell culture. By functionally dissecting the Abd-B protein, new features of Abd-B dependent target gene regulation were detected. Due to its easy adaptability, this system can be generally used to map functional domains within sequence-specific transcriptional factors in Drosophila cell culture, and thus provide preliminary knowledge of the protein functional domain structure for further in vivo analysis.

  20. Sequencing and genomic annotation of the chicken (Gallus gallus) hox clusters and mapping of evolutionarily conserved regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richardson, M.K.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Groenen, M.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Hox genes encode transcription factors that are involved in the regulation of normal development and are mutated in some diseases and malformations. Chicken HOX genes have been extensively studied in the chick limb and other developmental models. To date while the chicken HOXA cluster has been

  1. Role of a polymorphism in a Hox/Pax-responsive enhancer in the evolution of the vertebrate spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, Isabel; Nunes, Andreia; Woltering, Joost M.; Casaca, Ana; Nóvoa, Ana; Vinagre, Tânia; Hunter, Margaret E.; Duboule, Denis; Mallo, Moisés

    2013-01-01

    Patterning of the vertebrate skeleton requires the coordinated activity of Hox genes. In particular, Hox10 proteins are essential to set the transition from thoracic to lumbar vertebrae because of their rib-repressing activity. In snakes, however, the thoracic region extends well into Hox10-expressing areas of the embryo, suggesting that these proteins are unable to block rib formation. Here, we show that this is not a result of the loss of rib-repressing properties by the snake proteins, but rather to a single base pair change in a Hox/Paired box (Pax)-responsive enhancer, which prevents the binding of Hox proteins. This polymorphism is also found in Paenungulata, such as elephants and manatees, which have extended rib cages. In vivo, this modified enhancer failed to respond to Hox10 activity, supporting its role in the extension of rib cages. In contrast, the enhancer could still interact with Hoxb6 and Pax3 to promote rib formation. These results suggest that a polymorphism in the Hox/Pax-responsive enhancer may have played a role in the evolution of the vertebrate spine by differently modulating its response to rib-suppressing and rib-promoting Hox proteins.

  2. Regulation of endometrial receptivity by the highly expressed HOXA9, HOXA11 and HOXD10 HOX-class homeobox genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Bei; Geerts, Dirk; Bu, Zhiqin; Ai, Jihui; Jin, Lei; Li, Yufeng; Zhang, Hanwang; Zhu, Guijin

    2014-01-01

    Are other HOX genes, in addition to HOXA10, involved in endometrial receptivity? The highly expressed HOXA9, HOXA11 and HOXD10 genes also appear to be involved in endometrial receptivity. Within the HOX family of homeobox transcription factor genes are the leading candidates for the regulation of

  3. Conservation and variation in Hox genes: how insect models pioneered the evo-devo field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffer, Alison; Pick, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary developmental biology, or evo-devo, broadly investigates how body plan diversity and morphological novelties have arisen and persisted in nature. The discovery of Hox genes in Drosophila, and their subsequent identification in most other metazoans, led biologists to try to understand how embryonic genes crucial for proper development have changed to promote the vast morphological variation seen in nature. Insects are ideal model systems for studying this diversity and the mechanisms underlying it because phylogenetic relationships are well established, powerful genetic tools have been developed, and there are many examples of evolutionary specializations that have arisen in nature in different insect lineages, such as the jumping leg of orthopterans and the helmet structures of treehoppers. Here, we briefly introduce the field of evo-devo and Hox genes, discuss functional tools available to study early developmental genes in insects, and provide examples in which changes in Hox genes have contributed to changes in body plan or morphology.

  4. How Hox genes can shed light on the place of echinoderms among the deuterostomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Bruno; Mooi, Rich

    2014-01-01

    The Hox gene cluster ranks among the greatest of biological discoveries of the past 30 years. Morphogenetic patterning genes are remarkable for the systems they regulate during major ontogenetic events, and for their expressions of molecular, temporal, and spatial colinearity. Recent descriptions of exceptions to these colinearities are suggesting deep phylogenetic signal that can be used to explore origins of entire deuterostome phyla. Among the most enigmatic of these deuterostomes in terms of unique body patterning are the echinoderms. However, there remains no overall synthesis of the correlation between this signal and the variations observable in the presence/absence and expression patterns of Hox genes. Recent data from Hox cluster analyses shed light on how the bizarre shift from bilateral larvae to radial adults during echinoderm ontogeny can be accomplished by equally radical modifications within the Hox cluster. In order to explore this more fully, a compilation of observations on the genetic patterns among deuterostomes is integrated with the body patterning trajectories seen across the deuterostome clade. Synthesis of available data helps to explain morphogenesis along the anterior/posterior axis of echinoderms, delineating the origins and fate of that axis during ontogeny. From this, it is easy to distinguish between 'seriality' along echinoderm rays and true A/P axis phenomena such as colinearity within the somatocoels, and the ontogenetic outcomes of the unique translocation and inversion of the anterior Hox class found within the Echinodermata. An up-to-date summary and integration of the disparate lines of research so far produced on the relationship between Hox genes and pattern formation for all deuterostomes allows for development of a phylogeny and scenario for the evolution of deuterostomes in general, and the Echinodermata in particular.

  5. A Stable Thoracic Hox Code and Epimorphosis Characterize Posterior Regeneration in Capitella teleta

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Danielle M.; Seaver, Elaine C.

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration, the ability to replace lost tissues and body parts following traumatic injury, occurs widely throughout the animal tree of life. Regeneration occurs either by remodeling of pre-existing tissues, through addition of new cells by cell division, or a combination of both. We describe a staging system for posterior regeneration in the annelid, Capitella teleta, and use the C. teleta Hox gene code as markers of regional identity for regenerating tissue along the anterior-posterior axis. Following amputation of different posterior regions of the animal, a blastema forms and by two days, proliferating cells are detected by EdU incorporation, demonstrating that epimorphosis occurs during posterior regeneration of C. teleta. Neurites rapidly extend into the blastema, and gradually become organized into discrete nerves before new ganglia appear approximately seven days after amputation. In situ hybridization shows that seven of the ten Hox genes examined are expressed in the blastema, suggesting roles in patterning the newly forming tissue, although neither spatial nor temporal co-linearity was detected. We hypothesized that following amputation, Hox gene expression in pre-existing segments would be re-organized to scale, and the remaining fragment would express the complete suite of Hox genes. Surprisingly, most Hox genes display stable expression patterns in the ganglia of pre-existing tissue following amputation at multiple axial positions, indicating general stability of segmental identity. However, the three Hox genes, CapI-lox4, CapI-lox2 and CapI-Post2, each shift its anterior expression boundary by one segment, and each shift includes a subset of cells in the ganglia. This expression shift depends upon the axial position of the amputation. In C. teleta, thoracic segments exhibit stable positional identity with limited morphallaxis, in contrast with the extensive body remodeling that occurs during regeneration of some other annelids, planarians and acoel

  6. Adaptive evolution of the Hox gene family for development in bats and dolphins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Liang

    Full Text Available Bats and cetaceans (i.e., whales, dolphins, porpoises are two kinds of mammals with unique locomotive styles and occupy novel niches. Bats are the only mammals capable of sustained flight in the sky, while cetaceans have returned to the aquatic environment and are specialized for swimming. Associated with these novel adaptations to their environment, various development changes have occurred to their body plans and associated structures. Given the importance of Hox genes in many aspects of embryonic development, we conducted an analysis of the coding regions of all Hox gene family members from bats (represented by Pteropus vampyrus, Pteropus alecto, Myotis lucifugus and Myotis davidii and cetaceans (represented by Tursiops truncatus for adaptive evolution using the available draft genome sequences. Differences in the selective pressures acting on many Hox genes in bats and cetaceans were found compared to other mammals. Positive selection, however, was not found to act on any of the Hox genes in the common ancestor of bats and only upon Hoxb9 in cetaceans. PCR amplification data from additional bat and cetacean species, and application of the branch-site test 2, showed that the Hoxb2 gene within bats had significant evidence of positive selection. Thus, our study, with genomic and newly sequenced Hox genes, identifies two candidate Hox genes that may be closely linked with developmental changes in bats and cetaceans, such as those associated with the pancreatic, neuronal, thymus shape and forelimb. In addition, the difference in our results from the genome-wide scan and newly sequenced data reveals that great care must be taken in interpreting results from draft genome data from a limited number of species, and deep genetic sampling of a particular clade is a powerful tool for generating complementary data to address this limitation.

  7. Adaptive evolution of the Hox gene family for development in bats and dolphins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lu; Shen, Yong-Yi; Pan, Xiao-Wei; Zhou, Tai-Cheng; Yang, Chao; Irwin, David M; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Bats and cetaceans (i.e., whales, dolphins, porpoises) are two kinds of mammals with unique locomotive styles and occupy novel niches. Bats are the only mammals capable of sustained flight in the sky, while cetaceans have returned to the aquatic environment and are specialized for swimming. Associated with these novel adaptations to their environment, various development changes have occurred to their body plans and associated structures. Given the importance of Hox genes in many aspects of embryonic development, we conducted an analysis of the coding regions of all Hox gene family members from bats (represented by Pteropus vampyrus, Pteropus alecto, Myotis lucifugus and Myotis davidii) and cetaceans (represented by Tursiops truncatus) for adaptive evolution using the available draft genome sequences. Differences in the selective pressures acting on many Hox genes in bats and cetaceans were found compared to other mammals. Positive selection, however, was not found to act on any of the Hox genes in the common ancestor of bats and only upon Hoxb9 in cetaceans. PCR amplification data from additional bat and cetacean species, and application of the branch-site test 2, showed that the Hoxb2 gene within bats had significant evidence of positive selection. Thus, our study, with genomic and newly sequenced Hox genes, identifies two candidate Hox genes that may be closely linked with developmental changes in bats and cetaceans, such as those associated with the pancreatic, neuronal, thymus shape and forelimb. In addition, the difference in our results from the genome-wide scan and newly sequenced data reveals that great care must be taken in interpreting results from draft genome data from a limited number of species, and deep genetic sampling of a particular clade is a powerful tool for generating complementary data to address this limitation.

  8. Enzyme cofactors: Double-edged sword for catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Ivaylo

    2013-01-01

    The metal cofactors responsible for the activity of CDK2 -- a representative member of the kinase superfamily of enzymes -- have now been shown to also have inhibitory effects during the catalytic cycle.

  9. Rotiferan Hox genes give new insights into the evolution of metazoan bodyplans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreas, Fröbius C.; Funch, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The phylum Rotifera consists of minuscule, nonsegmented animals with a unique body plan and an unresolved phylogenetic position. The presence of pharyngeal articulated jaws supports an inclusion in Gnathifera nested in the Spiralia. Comparison of Hox genes, involved in animal body plan patterning...... the anteroposterior axis.Sequence analysis revealed that the lox5 parapeptide, a key signature in lophotrochozoan and platyhelminthean Hox6/lox5 genes, is absent and replaced by different signatures in Rotifera and Chaetognatha, and that the MedPost gene, until now unique to Chaetognatha, is also present in rotifers...

  10. Rotiferan Hox genes give new insights into the evolution of metazoan bodyplans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreas, Fröbius C.; Funch, Peter

    2017-01-01

    , can be used to infer phylogenetic relationships. Here, we report the expression of five Hox genes during embryogenesis of the rotifer Brachionus manjavacas and show how these genes define different functional components of the nervous system and not the usual bilaterian staggered expression along...... the anteroposterior axis.Sequence analysis revealed that the lox5 parapeptide, a key signature in lophotrochozoan and platyhelminthean Hox6/lox5 genes, is absent and replaced by different signatures in Rotifera and Chaetognatha, and that the MedPost gene, until now unique to Chaetognatha, is also present in rotifers...

  11. Intact cluster and chordate-like expression of ParaHox genes in a sea star.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annunziata, Rossella; Martinez, Pedro; Arnone, Maria Ina

    2013-06-27

    The ParaHox genes are thought to be major players in patterning the gut of several bilaterian taxa. Though this is a fundamental role that these transcription factors play, their activities are not limited to the endoderm and extend to both ectodermal and mesodermal tissues. Three genes compose the ParaHox group: Gsx, Xlox and Cdx. In some taxa (mostly chordates but to some degree also in protostomes) the three genes are arranged into a genomic cluster, in a similar fashion to what has been shown for the better-known Hox genes. Sea urchins possess the full complement of ParaHox genes but they are all dispersed throughout the genome, an arrangement that, perhaps, represented the primitive condition for all echinoderms. In order to understand the evolutionary history of this group of genes we cloned and characterized all ParaHox genes, studied their expression patterns and identified their genomic loci in a member of an earlier branching group of echinoderms, the asteroid Patiria miniata. We identified the three ParaHox orthologs in the genome of P. miniata. While one of them, PmGsx is provided as maternal message, with no zygotic activation afterwards, the other two, PmLox and PmCdx are expressed during embryogenesis, within restricted domains of both endoderm and ectoderm. Screening of a Patiria bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library led to the identification of a clone containing the three genes. The transcriptional directions of PmGsx and PmLox are opposed to that of the PmCdx gene within the cluster. The identification of P. miniata ParaHox genes has revealed the fact that these genes are clustered in the genome, in contrast to what has been reported for echinoids. Since the presence of an intact cluster, or at least a partial cluster, has been reported in chordates and polychaetes respectively, it becomes clear that within echinoderms, sea urchins have modified the original bilaterian arrangement. Moreover, the sea star ParaHox domains of expression show

  12. Metabolic and Transcriptional Response to Cofactor Perturbations in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anders Koefoed; Blank, L.M.; Oldiges, M.

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic cofactors such as NADH and ATP play important roles in a large number of cellular reactions, and it is of great interest to dissect the role of these cofactors in different aspects of metabolism. Toward this goal, we overexpressed NADH oxidase and the soluble F1-ATPase in Escherichia coli...... of redox and energy metabolism and should help in developing metabolic engineering strategies in E. coli....

  13. What's in a covalent bond? On the role and formation of covalently bound flavin cofactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuts, Dominic P. H. M.; Scrutton, Nigel S.; McIntire, William S.; Fraaije, Marco W.

    Many enzymes use one or more cofactors, such as biotin, heme, or flavin. These cofactors may be bound to the enzyme in a noncovalent or covalent manner. Although most flavoproteins contain a noncovalently bound flavin cofactor (FMN or FAD), a large number have these cofactors covalently linked to

  14. Polycomb-dependent regulatory contacts between distant Hox loci in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bantignies, Frédéric; Roure, Virginie; Comet, Itys

    2011-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, Hox genes are organized in an anterior and a posterior cluster, called Antennapedia complex and bithorax complex, located on the same chromosome arm and separated by 10 Mb of DNA. Both clusters are repressed by Polycomb group (PcG) proteins. Here, we show that genes of...

  15. Role of Cdx and Hox genes in posterior axial extension in the mouse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304081302

    2009-01-01

    Hox and Cdx genes are phylogenetically related transcription factor-encoding genes that control positional tissue identity during embryonic develop- ment. In addition, mutations impairing Cdx activity in mice elicit poste- rior body truncations, affecting the axial skeleton, the neuraxis and cau-

  16. Rotiferan Hox genes give new insights into the evolution of metazoan bodyplans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröbius, Andreas C; Funch, Peter

    2017-04-04

    The phylum Rotifera consists of minuscule, nonsegmented animals with a unique body plan and an unresolved phylogenetic position. The presence of pharyngeal articulated jaws supports an inclusion in Gnathifera nested in the Spiralia. Comparison of Hox genes, involved in animal body plan patterning, can be used to infer phylogenetic relationships. Here, we report the expression of five Hox genes during embryogenesis of the rotifer Brachionus manjavacas and show how these genes define different functional components of the nervous system and not the usual bilaterian staggered expression along the anteroposterior axis. Sequence analysis revealed that the lox5-parapeptide, a key signature in lophotrochozoan and platyhelminthean Hox6/lox5 genes, is absent and replaced by different signatures in Rotifera and Chaetognatha, and that the MedPost gene, until now unique to Chaetognatha, is also present in rotifers. Collectively, our results support an inclusion of chaetognaths in gnathiferans and Gnathifera as sister group to the remaining spiralians.Rotifers are microscopic animals with an unusual, nonsegmented body plan consisting of a head, trunk and foot. Here, Fröbius and Funch investigate the role of Hox genes-which are widely used in animal body plan patterning-in rotifer embryogenesis and find non-canonical expression in the nervous system.

  17. Emerging roles for tubulin folding cofactors at the centrosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanarraga, Mónica López; Carranza, Gerardo; Castaño, Raquel; Jiménez, Victoria; Villegas, Juan Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Despite its fundamental role in centrosome biology, procentriole formation, both in the canonical and in the de novo replication pathways, remains poorly understood, and the molecular components that are involved in human cells are not well established. We found that one of the tubulin cofactors, TBCD, is localized at centrosomes and the midbody, and is required for spindle organization, cell abscission, centriole formation and ciliogenesis. Our studies have established a molecular link between the centriole and the midbody, demonstrating that this cofactor is also necessary for microtubule retraction during cell abscission. TBCD is the first centriolar protein identified that plays a role in the assembly of both “centriolar rosettes” during early ciliogenesis, and at the procentriole budding site by S/G2, a discovery that directly implicates tubulin cofactors in the cell division, cell migration and cell signaling research fields. PMID:20798813

  18. Molybdenum cofactor deficiency mimics cerebral palsy: differentiating factors for diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Kenjiro; Hamano, Shin-ichiro; Mochizuki, Hiroshi; Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Ida, Hiroyuki

    2012-08-01

    We describe an infant with molybdenum cofactor deficiency, initially diagnosed as cerebral palsy. Clinical features of molybdenum cofactor deficiency, e.g., neonatal seizures, hypertonus/hypotonus, and feeding and respiratory difficulties, resemble those of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Our patient, a 2-year-old boy, presented with spastic quadriplegia and mental retardation. He manifested intractable neonatal seizures and diffuse cerebral atrophy. When admitted with bronchitis at age 18 months, his uric acid levels in blood and urine were undetectable. A urinary sulfite test revealed positive results. Further tests revealed elevated urinary levels of xanthine, hypoxanthine, and S-sulfocystein. Sequencing of the MOCS2A gene revealed heterozygosity for c.[265T>C] + [266A>G], diagnosed as molybdenum cofactor deficiency type B. Neonatal seizures, progressive cerebral atrophy, and low serum levels of uric acid may provide diagnostic clues in patients with cerebral palsy of undetermined cause. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The HD-Zip IV gene GaHOX1 from cotton is a functional homologue of the Arabidopsis GLABRA2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xue-Ying; Li, Qian-Jin; Shan, Chun-Min; Wang, Shui; Mao, Ying-Bo; Wang, Ling-Jian; Chen, Xiao-Ya

    2008-09-01

    Most of the plant homeodomain-containing proteins play important roles in organ patterning and development, and Arabidopsis GLABRA2 (GL2), a member of the class IV homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-ZIP) proteins, is a trichome and non-root hair cell regulator. Here we report the analysis of two cotton homeodomain-containing proteins, GaHOX1 and GaHOX2, isolated from the diploid cotton Gossypium arboreum. Both GaHOX1 and GaHOX2 belong to the class IV HD-ZIP family. When expressed under the control of the GL2 promoter, GaHOX1 rescued trichome development of an Arabidopsis glabrous mutant of gl2-2 (SALK_130213), whereas GaHOX2 did not. On the other hand, expression of GaHOX1 with a Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter in the wild-type Arabidopsis plants suppressed the trichome development just as the GL2 ectopic expression. Expression analysis by Northern, RT-PCR and in situ hybridization indicated that GaHOX1 is predominantly expressed in cotton fiber cells at early developmental stages, consistent with its putative role in regulating cotton fiber development, while GaHOX2 is expressed in both fiber and other ovular tissues, including outer and inner integuments. Our results suggest that GaHOX1 is a functional homolog of GL2 in plant trichome development.

  20. [Xanthine oxidase deficiency (hereditary xanthinuria), molybdenum cofactor deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumi, S; Wada, Y

    1996-12-01

    Hereditary xanthinuria is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, with xanthine oxidase deficiency. Patients often display renal symptoms because they excrete a large amounts of xanthine in urine. An high-fluid-intake, alow-purine-food, and alkalinization of urine are effective in the patients. Molybdenum cofactor is essential for xanthine oxidase, sulfite oxidase and aldehyde oxidase. Patients with molybdenum cofactor deficiency display severe neurological symptoms, such as severe convulsions. The patients increase urinary excretions of xanthine and sulfite. Treatments are ineffective for neurological symptoms.

  1. Evidence for independent Hox gene duplications in the hagfish lineage: a PCR-based gene inventory of Eptatretus stoutii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Peter F; Fried, Claudia; Prohaska, Sonja J; Bailey, Wendy J; Misof, Bernhard Y; Ruddle, Frank H; Wagner, Günter P

    2004-09-01

    Hox genes code for transcription factors that play a major role in the development of all animal phyla. In invertebrates these genes usually occur as tightly linked cluster, with a few exceptions where the clusters have been dissolved. Only in vertebrates multiple clusters have been demonstrated which arose by duplication from a single ancestral cluster. This history of Hox cluster duplications, in particular during the early elaboration of the vertebrate body plan, is still poorly understood. In this paper we report the results of a PCR survey on genomic DNA of the pacific hagfish Eptatretus stoutii. Hagfishes are one of two clades of recent jawless fishes that are an offshoot of the early radiation of jawless vertebrates. Our data provide evidence for at least 33 distinct Hox genes in the hagfish genome, which is most compatible with the hypothesis of multiple Hox clusters. The largest number, seven, of distinct homeobox fragments could be assigned to paralog group 9, which could imply that the hagfish has more than four clusters. Quartet mapping reveals that within each paralog group the hagfish sequences are statistically more closely related to gnathostome Hox genes than with either amphioxus or lamprey genes. These results support two assumptions about the history of Hox genes: (1) The association of hagfish homeobox sequences with gnathostome sequences suggests that at least one Hox cluster duplication event happened in the stem of vertebrates, i.e., prior to the most recent common ancestor of jawed and jawless vertebrates. (2) The high number of paralog group 9 sequences in hagfish and the phylogenetic position of hagfish suggests that the hagfish lineage underwent additional independent Hox cluster/-gene duplication events.

  2. Anterior Hox Genes Interact with Components of the Neural Crest Specification Network to Induce Neural Crest Fates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouti, Mina; Briscoe, James; Gavalas, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Hox genes play a central role in neural crest (NC) patterning particularly in the cranial region of the body. Despite evidence that simultaneous loss of Hoxa1 and Hoxb1 function resulted in NC specification defects, the role of Hox genes in NC specification has remained unclear due to extended genetic redundancy among Hox genes. To circumvent this problem, we expressed anterior Hox genes in the trunk neural tube of the developing chick embryo. This demonstrated that anterior Hox genes play a central role in NC cell specification by rapidly inducing the key transcription factors Snail2 and Msx1/2 and a neural progenitor to NC cell fate switch characterized by cell adhesion changes and an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Cells delaminated from dorsal and medial neural tube levels and generated ectopic neurons, glia progenitors, and melanocytes. The mobilization of the NC genetic cascade was dependent upon bone morphogenetic protein signaling and optimal levels of Notch signaling. Therefore, anterior Hox patterning genes participate in NC specification and EMT by interacting with NC-inducing signaling pathways and regulating the expression of key genes involved in these processes. Stem Cells 2011;29:858–870 PMID:21433221

  3. The oxidation product of molybdenum cofactor from milk xanthine oxidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Spanning, R J; Wansell-Bettenhaussen, C W; Oltmann, L F; Stouthamer, A.H.

    In extracts of acid treated molybdenum cofactor containing xanthine oxidase, fluorescence is maximally developed upon a three hours incubation. Analysis by means of reversed phase HPLC revealed the presence of several fluorescent compounds, the main one being a blue fluorescent compound with an

  4. Structure-Based Redesign of Cofactor Binding in Putrescine Oxidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopacz, Malgorzata M.; Rovida, Stefano; van Duijn, Esther; Fraaije, Marco W.; Mattevi, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Putrescine oxidase (PuO) from Rhodococcus erythropolis is a soluble homodimeric Flavoprotein, which oxidizes small aliphatic diamines. In this study, we report the crystal structures and cofactor binding properties of wild-type and mutant enzymes. From a structural viewpoint, PuO closely resembles

  5. Insight into cofactor recognition in arylamine N-acetyltransferase enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Ximing; Li de la Sierra-Gallay, Inés; Kubiak, Xavier Jean Philippe

    2015-01-01

    for Bacillus anthracis NAT1 and Homo sapiens NAT2. Therefore, in contrast to previous data, this study shows that different orthologous NATs can bind their cofactors in a similar way, suggesting that the mode of binding CoA in this family of enzymes is less diverse than previously thought. Moreover...

  6. Polycomb and Hox Genes Control JNK-Induced Remodeling of the Segment Boundary during Drosophila Morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Roumengous

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In segmented tissues, anterior and posterior compartments represent independent morphogenetic domains, which are made of distinct lineages separated by boundaries. During dorsal closure of the Drosophila embryo, specific “mixer cells” (MCs are reprogrammed in a JNK-dependent manner to express the posterior determinant engrailed (en and cross the segment boundary. Here, we show that JNK signaling induces de novo expression of en in the MCs through repression of Polycomb (Pc and release of the en locus from the silencing PcG bodies. Whereas reprogramming occurs in MCs from all thoracic and abdominal segments, cell mixing is restricted to the central abdominal region. We demonstrate that this spatial control of MC remodeling depends on the antagonist activity of the Hox genes abdominal-A and Abdominal-B. Together, these results reveal an essential JNK/en/Pc/Hox gene regulatory network important in controlling both the plasticity of segment boundaries and developmental reprogramming.

  7. Hox Function Is Required for the Development and Maintenance of the Drosophila Feeding Motor Unit

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    Jana Friedrich

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Feeding is an evolutionarily conserved and integral behavior that depends on the rhythmic activity of feeding muscles stimulated by specific motoneurons. However, critical molecular determinants underlying the development of the neuromuscular feeding unit are largely unknown. Here, we identify the Hox transcription factor Deformed (Dfd as essential for feeding unit formation, from initial specification to the establishment of active synapses, by controlling stage-specific sets of target genes. Importantly, we found Dfd to control the expression of functional components of synapses, such as Ankyrin2-XL, a protein known to be critical for synaptic stability and connectivity. Furthermore, we uncovered Dfd as a potential regulator of synaptic specificity, as it represses expression of the synaptic cell adhesion molecule Connectin (Con. These results demonstrate that Dfd is critical for the establishment and maintenance of the neuromuscular unit required for feeding behavior, which might be shared by other group 4 Hox genes.

  8. Trimethylation of Histone 3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) ChIP-PCR and transcriptional expression data of Ef1-alpha, cyp26A, HoxC10, HoxD10 and HoxD11 in the Xenopus XTC cell line.

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    Vieira, Warren; Sahin, Hande; Wells, Kaylee; McCusker, Catherine

    2017-12-01

    Trimethylation of Histone 3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) is a chromatin modification that is associated with transcriptional repression (Cao et al., 2002; Sarma et al., 2008; Pengelly et al., 2013) [1], [2], [3]. In this article we performed anti-H3K27me3 Chromosomal Immunoprecipitation (ChIP-PCR), to detect the abundance of H3K27me3 marks on Ef1-alpha, cyp26A, HoxC10, HoxD10 and HoxD11 in the Xenopus XTC cell line. We also performed RT-PCR for these genes to determine whether their expression is detectable in the XTC cell culture. The data we present here are the fold enrichment of Ef1-alpha, cyp26A, HoxC10, HoxD10 and HoxD11 on anti-H3K27me3 ChIP compared to no antibody controls. We also present RT-PCR data on the above listed genes.

  9. HoxA-11 and FOXO1A cooperate to regulate decidual prolactin expression: towards inferring the core transcriptional regulators of decidual genes.

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    Vincent J Lynch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During the menstrual cycle, the ovarian steroid hormones estrogen and progesterone control a dramatic transcriptional reprogramming of endometrial stromal cells (ESCs leading to a receptive state for blastocyst implantation and the establishment of pregnancy. A key marker gene of this decidualization process is the prolactin gene. Several transcriptional regulators have been identified that are essential for decidualization of ESCs, including the Hox genes HoxA-10 and HoxA-11, and the forkhead box gene FOXO1A. While previous studies have identified downstream target genes for HoxA-10 and FOXO1A, the role of HoxA-11 in decidualization has not been investigated. Here, we show that HoxA-11 is required for prolactin expression in decidualized ESC. While HoxA-11 alone is a repressor on the decidual prolactin promoter, it turns into an activator when combined with FOXO1A. Conversely, HoxA-10, which has been previously shown to associate with FOXO1A to upregulate decidual IGFBP-1 expression, is unable to upregulate PRL expression when co-expressed with FOXO1A. By co-immunoprecipitation and chromatin immunoprecipitation, we demonstrate physical association of HoxA-11 and FOXO1A, and binding of both factors to an enhancer region (-395 to -148 relative to the PRL transcriptional start site of the decidual prolactin promoter. Because FOXO1A is induced upon decidualization, it serves to assemble a decidual-specific transcriptional complex including HoxA-11. These data highlight cooperativity between numerous transcription factors to upregulate PRL in differentiating ESC, and suggest that this core set of transcription factors physically and functionally interact to drive the expression of a gene battery upregulated in differentiated ESC. In addition, the functional non-equivalence of HoxA-11 and HoxA-10 with respect to PRL regulation suggests that these transcription factors regulate distinct sets of target genes during decidualization.

  10. Coupling of HOx, NOx and halogen chemistry in the antarctic boundary layer

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    R. A. Salmon

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A modelling study of radical chemistry in the coastal Antarctic boundary layer, based upon observations performed in the course of the CHABLIS (Chemistry of the Antarctic Boundary Layer and the Interface with Snow campaign at Halley Research Station in coastal Antarctica during the austral summer 2004/2005, is described: a detailed zero-dimensional photochemical box model was used, employing inorganic and organic reaction schemes drawn from the Master Chemical Mechanism, with additional halogen (iodine and bromine reactions added. The model was constrained to observations of long-lived chemical species, measured photolysis frequencies and meteorological parameters, and the simulated levels of HOx, NOx and XO compared with those observed. The model was able to replicate the mean levels and diurnal variation in the halogen oxides IO and BrO, and to reproduce NOx levels and speciation very well. The NOx source term implemented compared well with that directly measured in the course of the CHABLIS experiments. The model systematically overestimated OH and HO2 levels, likely a consequence of the combined effects of (a estimated physical parameters and (b uncertainties within the halogen, particularly iodine, chemical scheme. The principal sources of HOx radicals were the photolysis and bromine-initiated oxidation of HCHO, together with O(1D + H2O. The main sinks for HOx were peroxy radical self- and cross-reactions, with the sum of all halogen-mediated HOx loss processes accounting for 40% of the total sink. Reactions with the halogen monoxides dominated CH3O2-HO2-OH interconversion, with associated local chemical ozone destruction in place of the ozone production which is associated with radical cycling driven by the analogous NO reactions. The analysis highlights the need for observations of physical parameters such as aerosol surface area and boundary layer structure to constrain such calculations, and the dependence of simulated radical levels

  11. Atmospheric Processing of European Air Masses: Evidences from the Modelling of HOx Measurements over Cyprus

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    Mallik, C.; Martinez, M.; Novelli, A.; Reiffs, A.; Derstroff, B.; Sauvage, C.; Bourtsoukidis, E.; Phillips, G. J.; Fischer, H.; Meusel, H.; Su, H.; Crowley, J.; Schuladen, J.; Williams, J.; Tomsche, L.; Hafermann, S.; Javed, M. U.; Lelieveld, J.; Harder, H.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of the hydroxyl radical (OH) and the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2), were measured in Cyprus along with a suite of other trace gases during the CYPHEX (CYprus PHotochemistry EXperiment) field campaign, in the summer of 2014. Cyprus is a remote island in the Eastern Mediterranean located downwind of the mainland Europe emissions. The lowest HOx production was observed in aged air masses with the lowest O3 and CO levels and processed for an extended period in the marine boundary layer. To study the contributions of various photochemical precursors to the HOx budget, OH and HO2 were simulated with a photochemical box model (CAABA) constrained with measurements. The model could simulate the observed HOx levels reasonably well, but it failed to reproduce the HOx partitioning, and OH levels were overestimated by about 50% when biogenic hydrocarbons were not included. When isoprene, emitted from the local vegetation, was included in the model, the gap between modelled and measured OH reduced, with the modelled OH being only about 20% too high. The remaining discrepancy vanished by including measured pinene (α and β) reactivity (concentration x rate constant w.r.t. OH) into the model. However, pinene chemistry caused the model to underestimate HO2 by about 20%. Since biogenic emissions account for a major fraction of the global hydrocarbon budget, we tested the performance of a global model EMAC, with the same chemical scheme as CAABA, in simulating the measured OH and HO2 in Cyprus. We found that EMAC is able to simulate the HO2 concentrations, but severely overestimated OH (as well as NO levels), which influences the lifetime of many gaseous species in the atmosphere.

  12. The Homeobox BcHOX8 Gene in Botrytis Cinerea Regulates Vegetative Growth and Morphology

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    Antal, Zsuzsanna; Rascle, Christine; Cimerman, Agnès; Viaud, Muriel; Billon-Grand, Geneviève; Choquer, Mathias; Bruel, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Filamentous growth and the capacity at producing conidia are two critical aspects of most fungal life cycles, including that of many plant or animal pathogens. Here, we report on the identification of a homeobox transcription factor encoding gene that plays a role in these two particular aspects of the development of the phytopathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea. Deletion of the BcHOX8 gene in both the B. cinerea B05-10 and T4 strains causes similar phenotypes, among which a curved, arabesque-like, hyphal growth on hydrophobic surfaces; the mutants were hence named Arabesque. Expression of the BcHOX8 gene is higher in conidia and infection cushions than in developing appressorium or mycelium. In the Arabesque mutants, colony growth rate is reduced and abnormal infection cushions are produced. Asexual reproduction is also affected with abnormal conidiophore being formed, strongly reduced conidia production and dramatic changes in conidial morphology. Finally, the mutation affects the fungus ability to efficiently colonize different host plants. Analysis of the B. cinerea genome shows that BcHOX8 is one member of a nine putative homeobox genes family. Available gene expression data suggest that these genes are functional and sequence comparisons indicate that two of them would be specific to B. cinerea and its close relative Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. PMID:23133556

  13. The homeobox BcHOX8 gene in Botrytis cinerea regulates vegetative growth and morphology.

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    Zsuzsanna Antal

    Full Text Available Filamentous growth and the capacity at producing conidia are two critical aspects of most fungal life cycles, including that of many plant or animal pathogens. Here, we report on the identification of a homeobox transcription factor encoding gene that plays a role in these two particular aspects of the development of the phytopathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea. Deletion of the BcHOX8 gene in both the B. cinerea B05-10 and T4 strains causes similar phenotypes, among which a curved, arabesque-like, hyphal growth on hydrophobic surfaces; the mutants were hence named Arabesque. Expression of the BcHOX8 gene is higher in conidia and infection cushions than in developing appressorium or mycelium. In the Arabesque mutants, colony growth rate is reduced and abnormal infection cushions are produced. Asexual reproduction is also affected with abnormal conidiophore being formed, strongly reduced conidia production and dramatic changes in conidial morphology. Finally, the mutation affects the fungus ability to efficiently colonize different host plants. Analysis of the B. cinerea genome shows that BcHOX8 is one member of a nine putative homeobox genes family. Available gene expression data suggest that these genes are functional and sequence comparisons indicate that two of them would be specific to B. cinerea and its close relative Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

  14. Hairy transcriptional repression targets and cofactor recruitment in Drosophila.

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    Daniella Bianchi-Frias

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Members of the widely conserved Hairy/Enhancer of split family of basic Helix-Loop-Helix repressors are essential for proper Drosophila and vertebrate development and are misregulated in many cancers. While a major step forward in understanding the molecular mechanism(s surrounding Hairy-mediated repression was made with the identification of Groucho, Drosophila C-terminal binding protein (dCtBP, and Drosophila silent information regulator 2 (dSir2 as Hairy transcriptional cofactors, the identity of Hairy target genes and the rules governing cofactor recruitment are relatively unknown. We have used the chromatin profiling method DamID to perform a global and systematic search for direct transcriptional targets for Drosophila Hairy and the genomic recruitment sites for three of its cofactors: Groucho, dCtBP, and dSir2. Each of the proteins was tethered to Escherichia coli DNA adenine methyltransferase, permitting methylation proximal to in vivo binding sites in both Drosophila Kc cells and early embryos. This approach identified 40 novel genomic targets for Hairy in Kc cells, as well as 155 loci recruiting Groucho, 107 loci recruiting dSir2, and wide genomic binding of dCtBP to 496 loci. We also adapted DamID profiling such that we could use tightly gated collections of embryos (2-6 h and found 20 Hairy targets related to early embryogenesis. As expected of direct targets, all of the putative Hairy target genes tested show Hairy-dependent expression and have conserved consensus C-box-containing sequences that are directly bound by Hairy in vitro. The distribution of Hairy targets in both the Kc cell and embryo DamID experiments corresponds to Hairy binding sites in vivo on polytene chromosomes. Similarly, the distributions of loci recruiting each of Hairy's cofactors are detected as cofactor binding sites in vivo on polytene chromosomes. We have identified 59 putative transcriptional targets of Hairy. In addition to finding putative targets for

  15. Remaining challenges in cellular flavin cofactor homeostasis and flavoprotein biogenesis

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    Teresa Anna eGiancaspero

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The primary role of the water-soluble vitamin B2 (riboflavin in cell biology is connected with its conversion into FMN and FAD, the cofactors of a large number of dehydrogenases, oxidases and reductases involved in energetic metabolism, epigenetics, protein folding, as well as in a number of diverse regulatory processes. The problem of localisation of flavin cofactor synthesis events and in particular of the FAD synthase (EC 2.7.7.2 in HepG2 cells is addressed here by confocal microscopy in the frame of its relationships with kinetics of FAD synthesis and delivery to client apo-flavoproteins. FAD synthesis catalysed by recombinant isoform 2 of FADS occurs via an ordered bi-bi mechanism in which ATP binds prior to FMN, and pyrophosphate is released before FAD. Spectrophotometric continuous assays of the reconstitution rate of apo-D-aminoacid oxidase with its cofactor, allowed us to propose that besides its FAD synthesising activity, hFADS is able to operate as a FAD chaperone.The physical interaction between FAD forming enzyme and its clients was further confirmed by dot blot and immunoprecipitation experiments carried out testing as a client either a nuclear or a mitochondrial enzyme that is lysine specific demethylase 1 (LSD1, EC 1.-.-.- and dimethylglycine dehydrogenase (Me2GlyDH, EC 1.5.8.4, respectively which carry out similar reactions of oxidative demethylation, assisted by tetrahydrofolate used to form 5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate. A direct transfer of the cofactor from hFADS2 to apo-dimethyl glycine dehydrogenase was also demonstrated. Thus, FAD synthesis and delivery to these enzymes are crucial processes for bioenergetics and nutri-epigenetics of liver cells.

  16. Comparative analyses of vertebrate posterior HoxD clusters reveal atypical cluster architecture in the caecilian Typhlonectes natans

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    Amemiya Chris T

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The posterior genes of the HoxD cluster play a crucial role in the patterning of the tetrapod limb. This region is under the control of a global, long-range enhancer that is present in all vertebrates. Variation in limb types, as is the case in amphibians, can probably not only be attributed to variation in Hox genes, but is likely to be the product of differences in gene regulation. With a collection of vertebrate genome sequences available today, we used a comparative genomics approach to study the posterior HoxD cluster of amphibians. A frog and a caecilian were included in the study to compare coding sequences as well as to determine the gain and loss of putative regulatory sequences. Results We sequenced the posterior end of the HoxD cluster of a caecilian and performed comparative analyses of this region using HoxD clusters of other vertebrates. We determined the presence of conserved non-coding sequences and traced gains and losses of these footprints during vertebrate evolution, with particular focus on amphibians. We found that the caecilian HoxD cluster is almost three times larger than its mammalian counterpart. This enlargement is accompanied with the loss of one gene and the accumulation of repeats in that area. A similar phenomenon was observed in the coelacanth, where a different gene was lost and expansion of the area where the gene was lost has occurred. At least one phylogenetic footprint present in all vertebrates was lost in amphibians. This conserved region is a known regulatory element and functions as a boundary element in neural tissue to prevent expression of Hoxd genes. Conclusion The posterior part of the HoxD cluster of Typhlonectes natans is among the largest known today. The loss of Hoxd-12 and the expansion of the intergenic region may exert an influence on the limb enhancer, by having to bypass a distance seven times that of regular HoxD clusters. Whether or not there is a correlation with the

  17. Clustering of tissue-specific sub-TADs accompanies the regulation of HoxA genes in developing limbs.

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    Soizik Berlivet

    Full Text Available HoxA genes exhibit central roles during development and causal mutations have been found in several human syndromes including limb malformation. Despite their importance, information on how these genes are regulated is lacking. Here, we report on the first identification of bona fide transcriptional enhancers controlling HoxA genes in developing limbs and show that these enhancers are grouped into distinct topological domains at the sub-megabase scale (sub-TADs. We provide evidence that target genes and regulatory elements physically interact with each other through contacts between sub-TADs rather than by the formation of discreet "DNA loops". Interestingly, there is no obvious relationship between the functional domains of the enhancers within the limb and how they are partitioned among the topological domains, suggesting that sub-TAD formation does not rely on enhancer activity. Moreover, we show that suppressing the transcriptional activity of enhancers does not abrogate their contacts with HoxA genes. Based on these data, we propose a model whereby chromatin architecture defines the functional landscapes of enhancers. From an evolutionary standpoint, our data points to the convergent evolution of HoxA and HoxD regulation in the fin-to-limb transition, one of the major morphological innovations in vertebrates.

  18. Molecular evolution of HoxA13 and the multiple origins of limbless morphologies in amphibians and reptiles

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    Marina E. Singarete

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Developmental processes and their results, morphological characters, are inherited through transmission of genes regulating development. While there is ample evidence that cis-regulatory elements tend to be modular, with sequence segments dedicated to different roles, the situation for proteins is less clear, being particularly complex for transcription factors with multiple functions. Some motifs mediating protein-protein interactions may be exclusive to particular developmental roles, but it is also possible that motifs are mostly shared among different processes. Here we focus on HoxA13, a protein essential for limb development. We asked whether the HoxA13 amino acid sequence evolved similarly in three limbless clades: Gymnophiona, Amphisbaenia and Serpentes. We explored variation in ω (dN/dS using a maximum-likelihood framework and HoxA13sequences from 47 species. Comparisons of evolutionary models provided low ω global values and no evidence that HoxA13 experienced relaxed selection in limbless clades. Branch-site models failed to detect evidence for positive selection acting on any site along branches of Amphisbaena and Gymnophiona, while three sites were identified in Serpentes. Examination of alignments did not reveal consistent sequence differences between limbed and limbless species. We conclude that HoxA13 has no modules exclusive to limb development, which may be explained by its involvement in multiple developmental processes.

  19. Molecular evolution of HoxA13 and the multiple origins of limbless morphologies in amphibians and reptiles

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    Singarete, Marina E.; Grizante, Mariana B.; Milograna, Sarah R.; Nery, Mariana F.; Kin, Koryu; Wagner, Günter P.; Kohlsdorf, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Developmental processes and their results, morphological characters, are inherited through transmission of genes regulating development. While there is ample evidence that cis-regulatory elements tend to be modular, with sequence segments dedicated to different roles, the situation for proteins is less clear, being particularly complex for transcription factors with multiple functions. Some motifs mediating protein-protein interactions may be exclusive to particular developmental roles, but it is also possible that motifs are mostly shared among different processes. Here we focus on HoxA13, a protein essential for limb development. We asked whether the HoxA13 amino acid sequence evolved similarly in three limbless clades: Gymnophiona, Amphisbaenia and Serpentes. We explored variation in ω (dN/dS) using a maximum-likelihood framework and HoxA13sequences from 47 species. Comparisons of evolutionary models provided low ω global values and no evidence that HoxA13 experienced relaxed selection in limbless clades. Branch-site models failed to detect evidence for positive selection acting on any site along branches of Amphisbaena and Gymnophiona, while three sites were identified in Serpentes. Examination of alignments did not reveal consistent sequence differences between limbed and limbless species. We conclude that HoxA13 has no modules exclusive to limb development, which may be explained by its involvement in multiple developmental processes. PMID:26500429

  20. Genomic loss of EZH2 leads to epigenetic modifications and overexpression of the HOX gene clusters in myelodysplastic syndrome

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    Chang, Chun-Kang; He, Qi; Wu, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Zheng; Shi, Wen-Hui; Guo, Juan; Zhu, Yang; Zhao, You-Shan; Gu, Shu-Cheng; Fei, Cheng-Ming; Li, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    The role of EZH2 in cancer is complex and may vary depending on cancer type or stage. We examined the effect of altered EZH2 levels on H3K27 methylation, HOX gene expression, and malignant phenotype in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) cell lines and an in vivo xenograft model. We also studied links between EZH2 expression and prognosis in MDS patients. Patients with high-grade MDS exhibited lower levels of EZH2 expression than those with low-grade MDS. Low EZH2 expression was associated with high percentages of blasts, shorter survival, and increased transformation of MDS into acute myeloid leukemia (AML). MDS patients frequently had reductions in EZH2 copy number. EZH2 knockdown increased tumor growth capacity and reduced H3K27me3 levels in both MDS-derived leukemia cells and in a xenograft model. H3K27me3 levels were reduced and HOX gene cluster expression was increased in MDS patients. EZH2 knockdown also increased HOX gene cluster expression by reducing H3K27me3, and H3K27 demethylating agents increased HOX gene cluster expression in MDS-derived cell lines. These findings suggest genomic loss of EZH2 contributes to overexpression of the HOX gene clusters in MDS through epigenetic modifications. PMID:26812882

  1. The C. elegans hox gene lin-39 controls cell cycle progression during vulval development.

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    Roiz, Daniel; Escobar-Restrepo, Juan Miguel; Leu, Philipp; Hajnal, Alex

    2016-10-01

    Cell fate specification during organogenesis is usually followed by a phase of cell proliferation to produce the required number of differentiated cells. The Caenorhabditis elegans vulva is an excellent model to study how cell fate specification and cell proliferation are coordinated. The six vulval precursor cells (VPCs) are born at the first larval stage, but they arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle until the beginning of the third larval stage, when their fates are specified and the three proximal VPCs proliferate to generate 22 vulval cells. An epidermal growth factor (EGF) signal from the gonadal anchor cell combined with lateral DELTA/NOTCH signaling between the VPCs determine the primary (1°) and secondary (2°) fates, respectively. The hox gene lin-39 plays a key role in integrating these spatial patterning signals and in maintaining the VPCs as polarized epithelial cells. Using a fusion-defective eff-1(lf) mutation to keep the VPCs polarized, we find that VPCs lacking lin-39 can neither activate lateral NOTCH signaling nor proliferate. LIN-39 promotes cell cycle progression through two distinct mechanisms. First, LIN-39 maintains the VPCs competent to proliferate by inducing cdk-4 cdk and cye-1 cyclinE expression via a non-canonical HOX binding motif. Second, LIN-39 activates in the adjacent VPCs the NOTCH signaling pathway, which promotes VPC proliferation independently of LIN-39. The hox gene lin-39 is therefore a central node in a regulatory network coordinating VPC differentiation and proliferation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Wavelength-Resolved Photon Fluxes of Indoor Light Sources: Implications for HOx Production.

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    Kowal, Shawn F; Allen, Seth R; Kahan, Tara F

    2017-09-19

    Photochemistry is a largely unconsidered potential source of reactive species such as hydroxyl and peroxy radicals (OH and HO2, "HOx") indoors. We present measured wavelength-resolved photon fluxes and distance dependences of indoor light sources including halogen, incandescent, and compact fluorescent lights (CFL) commonly used in residential buildings; fluorescent tubes common in industrial and commercial settings; and sunlight entering buildings through windows. We use these measurements to predict indoor HOx production rates from the photolysis of nitrous acid (HONO), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), ozone (O3), formaldehyde (HCHO), and acetaldehyde (CH3CHO). Our results suggest that while most lamps can photolyze these molecules, only sunlight and fluorescent tubes will be important to room-averaged indoor HOx levels due to the strong distance dependence of the fluxes from compact bulbs. Under ambient conditions, we predict that sunlight and fluorescent lights will photolyze HONO to form OH at rates of 106-107 molecules cm-3 s-1, and that fluorescent lights will photolyze HCHO to form HO2 at rates of ∼106 molecules cm-3 s-1; rates could be 2 orders of magnitude higher under high precursor concentrations. Ozone and H2O2 will not be important photochemical OH sources under most conditions, and CH3CHO will generally increase HO2 production rates only slightly. We also calculated photolysis rate constants for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and nitrate radicals (NO3) in the presence of the different light sources. Photolysis is not likely an important fate for NO3 indoors, but NO2 photolysis could be an important source of indoor O3.

  3. CRISPR/Cas9 Mutagenesis Reveals Versatile Roles of Hox Genes in Crustacean Limb Specification and Evolution.

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    Martin, Arnaud; Serano, Julia M; Jarvis, Erin; Bruce, Heather S; Wang, Jennifer; Ray, Shagnik; Barker, Carryn A; O'Connell, Liam C; Patel, Nipam H

    2016-01-11

    Crustaceans possess a diverse array of specialized limbs. Although shifts in Hox gene expression domains have been postulated to play a role in generating this limb diversity, little functional data have been provided to understand the precise roles of Hox genes during crustacean development. We used a combination of CRISPR/Cas9-targeted mutagenesis and RNAi knockdown to decipher the function of the six Hox genes expressed in the developing mouth and trunk of the amphipod Parhyale hawaiensis. These experimentally manipulated animals display specific and striking homeotic transformations. We found that abdominal-A (abd-A) and Abdominal-B (Abd-B) are required for proper posterior patterning, with knockout of Abd-B resulting in an animal with thoracic type legs along what would have been an abdomen, and abd-A disruption generating a simplified body plan characterized by a loss of specialization in both abdominal and thoracic appendages. In the thorax, Ubx is necessary for gill development and for repression of gnathal fate, and Antp dictates claw morphology. In the mouth, Scr and Antp confer the part-gnathal, part-thoracic hybrid identity of the maxilliped, and Scr and Dfd prevent antennal identity in posterior head segments. Our results allow us to define the role Hox genes play in specifying each appendage type in Parhyale, including the modular nature by which some appendages are patterned by Hox gene inputs. In addition, we define how changes in Hox gene expression have generated morphological differences between crustacean species. Finally, we also highlight the utility of CRISPR/Cas9-based somatic mutagenesis in emerging model organisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. EGL-20/Wnt and MAB-5/Hox Act Sequentially to Inhibit Anterior Migration of Neuroblasts in C. elegans.

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    Matthew P Josephson

    Full Text Available Directed neuroblast and neuronal migration is important in the proper development of nervous systems. In C. elegans the bilateral Q neuroblasts QR (on the right and QL (on the left undergo an identical pattern of cell division and differentiation but migrate in opposite directions (QR and descendants anteriorly and QL and descendants posteriorly. EGL-20/Wnt, via canonical Wnt signaling, drives the expression of MAB-5/Hox in QL but not QR. MAB-5 acts as a determinant of posterior migration, and mab-5 and egl-20 mutants display anterior QL descendant migrations. Here we analyze the behaviors of QR and QL descendants as they begin their anterior and posterior migrations, and the effects of EGL-20 and MAB-5 on these behaviors. The anterior and posterior daughters of QR (QR.a/p after the first division immediately polarize and begin anterior migration, whereas QL.a/p remain rounded and non-migratory. After ~1 hour, QL.a migrates posteriorly over QL.p. We find that in egl-20/Wnt, bar-1/β-catenin, and mab-5/Hox mutants, QL.a/p polarize and migrate anteriorly, indicating that these molecules normally inhibit anterior migration of QL.a/p. In egl-20/Wnt mutants, QL.a/p immediately polarize and begin migration, whereas in bar-1/β-catenin and mab-5/Hox, the cells transiently retain a rounded, non-migratory morphology before anterior migration. Thus, EGL-20/Wnt mediates an acute inhibition of anterior migration independently of BAR-1/β-catenin and MAB-5/Hox, and a later, possible transcriptional response mediated by BAR-1/β-catenin and MAB-5/Hox. In addition to inhibiting anterior migration, MAB-5/Hox also cell-autonomously promotes posterior migration of QL.a (and QR.a in a mab-5 gain-of-function.

  5. Rational drug repurposing using sscMap analysis in a HOX-TALE model of leukemia.

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    Kettyle, Laura M J; Liberante, Fabio G; Thompson, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Drug discovery and development are often hampered by lack of target identification and clinical tractability. Repurposing of approved drugs to life-threatening diseases such as leukemia is emerging as a promising alternative approach. Connectivity mapping systems link approved drugs with disease-related gene signatures. Relevant preclinical models provide essential tools for system validation and proof-of-concept studies. Herein we describe procedures aimed at generating disease-based gene signatures and applying them to established cross-referencing databases of potential candidate drugs. As a proof of principle, we present the identification of Entinostat as a candidate drug for the treatment of HOX-TALE-related leukemia.

  6. Low oxygen tension reveals distinct HOX codes in human cord blood-derived stromal cells associated with specific endochondral ossification capacities in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedtke, Stefanie; Sacchetti, Benedetto; Laitinen, Anita; Donsante, Samantha; Klöckers, Robert; Laitinen, Saara; Riminucci, Mara; Kogler, Gesine

    2017-10-01

    Effects of oxygen tension on the generation, expansion, proliferation and differentiation of stromal cell types is widely described in the literature. However, data on the internal heterogeneity of applied cell populations at different O 2 levels and possible impacts on differentiation potentials are controversial. Here, the expression of 39 human HOX genes was determined in neonatal cord blood stromal cells and linked to differentiation-associated signatures. In cord blood, unrestricted somatic stromal cells (USSCs), lacking HOX gene expression, and cord blood-derived multipotent stromal cells (CB-MSCs), expressing about 20 HOX genes, are distinguished by their specific HOX code. Interestingly, 74% of the clones generated at 21% O 2 were HOX-negative USSCs, whereas 73% of upcoming clones at 3% O 2 were HOX-positive CB-MSCs. In order to better categorize distinct cell lines generated at 3% O 2 , the expression of all 39 HOX genes within HOX clusters A, B, C and D were tested and new subtypes defined: cells negative in all four HOX clusters (USSCs); cells positive in all four clusters (CB-MSCs ABCD ); and subpopulations missing a single cluster (CB-MSCs ACD and CB-MSCs BCD ). Comprehensive qPCR analyses of established chondro-osteomarkers revealed subtype-specific signatures verifiably associated with in vitro and in vivo differentiation capacity. The data presented here underline the necessity of better characterizing distinct cell populations at a clonal level, taking advantage of the inherent specific HOX code as a distinguishing feature between individual subtypes. Moreover, the correlation of subtype-specific molecular signatures with in vitro and in vivo bone formation is discussed. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Insights into hydrocarbon formation by nitrogenase cofactor homologs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi Chung; Hu, Yilin; Ribbe, Markus W

    2015-04-14

    The L-cluster is an all-iron homolog of nitrogenase cofactors. Driven by europium(II) diethylenetriaminepentaacetate [Eu(II)-DTPA], the isolated L-cluster is capable of ATP-independent reduction of CO and CN(-) to C1 to C4 and C1 to C6 hydrocarbons, respectively. Compared to its cofactor homologs, the L-cluster generates considerably more CH4 from the reduction of CO and CN(-), which could be explained by the presence of a "free" Fe atom that is "unmasked" by homocitrate as an additional site for methanation. Moreover, the elevated CH4 formation is accompanied by a decrease in the amount of longer hydrocarbons and/or the lengths of the hydrocarbon products, illustrating a competition between CH4 formation/release and C-C coupling/chain extension. These observations suggest the possibility of designing simpler synthetic clusters for hydrocarbon formation while establishing the L-cluster as a platform for mechanistic investigations of CO and CN(-) reduction without complications originating from the heterometal and homocitrate components. Nitrogenase is a metalloenzyme that is highly complex in structure and uniquely versatile in function. It catalyzes two reactions that parallel two important industrial processes: the reduction of nitrogen to ammonia, which parallels the Haber-Bosch process in ammonia production, and the reduction of carbon monoxide to hydrocarbons, which parallels the Fischer-Tropsch process in fuel production. Thus, the significance of nitrogenase can be appreciated from the perspective of the useful products it generates: (i) ammonia, the "fixed" nitrogen that is essential for the existence of the entire human population; and (ii) hydrocarbons, the "recycled" carbon fuel that could be used to directly address the worldwide energy shortage. This article provides initial insights into the catalytic characteristics of various nitrogenase cofactors in hydrocarbon formation. The reported assay system provides a useful tool for mechanistic

  8. Domain analysis of the tubulin cofactor system: a model for tubulin folding and dimerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroszewski Lukasz

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The correct folding and dimerization of tubulins, before their addition to the microtubular structure, needs a group of conserved proteins called cofactors A to E. The biochemical analysis of cofactors gave an insight to their general functions, however not much is known about the domain structure and detailed, molecular function of these proteins. Results Combining modelling and fold prediction tools, we present 3D models of all cofactors, including several previously unannotated domains of cofactors B-E. Apart from the new HEAT and Armadillo domains in cofactor D and an unusual spectrin-like domain in cofactor C, we have identified a new subfamily of ubiquitin-like domains in cofactors B and E. Together, these observations provide a reliable, molecular level model of cofactor complex. Conclusion Distant homology searches allowed the identification of unknown regions of cofactors as self-reliant domains and allow us to present a detailed hypothesis of how a cofactor complex performs its function.

  9. Insights into Hox protein function from a large scale combinatorial analysis of protein domains.

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    Samir Merabet

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Protein function is encoded within protein sequence and protein domains. However, how protein domains cooperate within a protein to modulate overall activity and how this impacts functional diversification at the molecular and organism levels remains largely unaddressed. Focusing on three domains of the central class Drosophila Hox transcription factor AbdominalA (AbdA, we used combinatorial domain mutations and most known AbdA developmental functions as biological readouts to investigate how protein domains collectively shape protein activity. The results uncover redundancy, interactivity, and multifunctionality of protein domains as salient features underlying overall AbdA protein activity, providing means to apprehend functional diversity and accounting for the robustness of Hox-controlled developmental programs. Importantly, the results highlight context-dependency in protein domain usage and interaction, allowing major modifications in domains to be tolerated without general functional loss. The non-pleoitropic effect of domain mutation suggests that protein modification may contribute more broadly to molecular changes underlying morphological diversification during evolution, so far thought to rely largely on modification in gene cis-regulatory sequences.

  10. Insights into Hox protein function from a large scale combinatorial analysis of protein domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merabet, Samir; Litim-Mecheri, Isma; Karlsson, Daniel; Dixit, Richa; Saadaoui, Mehdi; Monier, Bruno; Brun, Christine; Thor, Stefan; Vijayraghavan, K; Perrin, Laurent; Pradel, Jacques; Graba, Yacine

    2011-10-01

    Protein function is encoded within protein sequence and protein domains. However, how protein domains cooperate within a protein to modulate overall activity and how this impacts functional diversification at the molecular and organism levels remains largely unaddressed. Focusing on three domains of the central class Drosophila Hox transcription factor AbdominalA (AbdA), we used combinatorial domain mutations and most known AbdA developmental functions as biological readouts to investigate how protein domains collectively shape protein activity. The results uncover redundancy, interactivity, and multifunctionality of protein domains as salient features underlying overall AbdA protein activity, providing means to apprehend functional diversity and accounting for the robustness of Hox-controlled developmental programs. Importantly, the results highlight context-dependency in protein domain usage and interaction, allowing major modifications in domains to be tolerated without general functional loss. The non-pleoitropic effect of domain mutation suggests that protein modification may contribute more broadly to molecular changes underlying morphological diversification during evolution, so far thought to rely largely on modification in gene cis-regulatory sequences.

  11. Hox genes define distinct progenitor sub-domains within the second heart field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Nicolas; Roux, Marine; Ryckebüsch, Lucile; Niederreither, Karen; Dollé, Pascal; Moon, Anne; Capecchi, Mario; Zaffran, Stéphane

    2011-05-15

    Much of the heart, including the atria, right ventricle and outflow tract (OFT) is derived from a progenitor cell population termed the second heart field (SHF) that contributes progressively to the embryonic heart during cardiac looping. Several studies have revealed anterior-posterior patterning of the SHF, since the anterior region (anterior heart field) contributes to right ventricular and OFT myocardium whereas the posterior region gives rise to the atria. We have previously shown that Retinoic Acid (RA) signal participates to this patterning. We now show that Hoxb1, Hoxa1, and Hoxa3, as downstream RA targets, are expressed in distinct sub-domains within the SHF. Our genetic lineage tracing analysis revealed that Hoxb1, Hoxa1 and Hoxa3-expressing cardiac progenitor cells contribute to both atria and the inferior wall of the OFT, which subsequently gives rise to myocardium at the base of pulmonary trunk. By contrast to Hoxb1(Cre), the contribution of Hoxa1-enhIII-Cre and Hoxa3(Cre)-labeled cells is restricted to the distal regions of the OFT suggesting that proximo-distal patterning of the OFT is related to SHF sub-domains characterized by combinatorial Hox genes expression. Manipulation of RA signaling pathways showed that RA is required for the correct deployment of Hox-expressing SHF cells. This report provides new insights into the regulatory gene network in SHF cells contributing to the atria and sub-pulmonary myocardium. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Bat Accelerated Regions Identify a Bat Forelimb Specific Enhancer in the HoxD Locus.

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    Betty M Booker

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The molecular events leading to the development of the bat wing remain largely unknown, and are thought to be caused, in part, by changes in gene expression during limb development. These expression changes could be instigated by variations in gene regulatory enhancers. Here, we used a comparative genomics approach to identify regions that evolved rapidly in the bat ancestor, but are highly conserved in other vertebrates. We discovered 166 bat accelerated regions (BARs that overlap H3K27ac and p300 ChIP-seq peaks in developing mouse limbs. Using a mouse enhancer assay, we show that five Myotis lucifugus BARs drive gene expression in the developing mouse limb, with the majority showing differential enhancer activity compared to the mouse orthologous BAR sequences. These include BAR116, which is located telomeric to the HoxD cluster and had robust forelimb expression for the M. lucifugus sequence and no activity for the mouse sequence at embryonic day 12.5. Developing limb expression analysis of Hoxd10-Hoxd13 in Miniopterus natalensis bats showed a high-forelimb weak-hindlimb expression for Hoxd10-Hoxd11, similar to the expression trend observed for M. lucifugus BAR116 in mice, suggesting that it could be involved in the regulation of the bat HoxD complex. Combined, our results highlight novel regulatory regions that could be instrumental for the morphological differences leading to the development of the bat wing.

  13. Sulphur shuttling across a chaperone during molybdenum cofactor maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoux, Pascal; Ruppelt, Christian; Oudouhou, Flore; Lavergne, Jérôme; Siponen, Marina I; Toci, René; Mendel, Ralf R; Bittner, Florian; Pignol, David; Magalon, Axel; Walburger, Anne

    2015-02-04

    Formate dehydrogenases (FDHs) are of interest as they are natural catalysts that sequester atmospheric CO2, generating reduced carbon compounds with possible uses as fuel. FDHs activity in Escherichia coli strictly requires the sulphurtransferase EcFdhD, which likely transfers sulphur from IscS to the molybdenum cofactor (Mo-bisPGD) of FDHs. Here we show that EcFdhD binds Mo-bisPGD in vivo and has submicromolar affinity for GDP-used as a surrogate of the molybdenum cofactor's nucleotide moieties. The crystal structure of EcFdhD in complex with GDP shows two symmetrical binding sites located on the same face of the dimer. These binding sites are connected via a tunnel-like cavity to the opposite face of the dimer where two dynamic loops, each harbouring two functionally important cysteine residues, are present. On the basis of structure-guided mutagenesis, we propose a model for the sulphuration mechanism of Mo-bisPGD where the sulphur atom shuttles across the chaperone dimer.

  14. Exercise–induced Anaphylaxis: the Role of Cofactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zogaj, Dukagjin; Ibranji, Alkerta; Hoxha, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Anaphylaxis is a dramatic clinical emergency. It is a very severe, life-threatening generalized or systemic hypersensitivity reaction. Based on immunologic mechanism the anaphylaxis is divided in IgE, IgG, complement, or immune complexes-mediated vs non allergic anaphylaxis. There are a lot of etiologic factors of anaphylaxis, but the three principal immunologic triggers are drugs, insect stings, and foods. Regarding the clinical severity there are several proposed grading systems. The diagnosis of anaphylaxis is mainly clinical. Discussion: The anaphylaxis markers measured in clinical laboratories are total tryptase and histamine. There are some conditions that modulate the onset of anaphylaxis, acting as co- or augmentation factors, which significantly lower the allergen dose necessary for triggering anaphylaxis. The well-documented cofactors of anaphylaxis are physical exercise, alcohol consumption, some foods, co-administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), and concomitant infectious diseases. Development of anaphylaxis depends on the sensitization pattern, the proportion of the involved immunoglobulin classes, characteristics of the allergen, the proportion of the involved immunoglobulin classes, the avidity and affinity of immunoglobulins to bind an allergen, the route of allergen application, and, last but not least, the presence of cofactors of anaphylaxis. Conclusion: Anaphylaxis remains a continuous challenge for the diagnosis and treatment. The adequate management of anaphylaxis requires rapid diagnosis, implementation of primary and secondary prevention measures, and immediate administration of subcutaneous epinephrine. PMID:25685088

  15. Manual control of catalytic reactions: Reactions by an apoenzyme gel and a cofactor gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yuichiro; Takashima, Yoshinori; Hashidzume, Akihito; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Harada, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes play a vital role in catalysing almost all chemical reactions that occur in biological systems. Some enzymes must form complexes with non-protein molecules called cofactors to express catalytic activities. Although the control of catalytic reactions via apoenzyme–cofactor complexes has attracted significant attention, the reports have been limited to the microscale. Here, we report a system to express catalytic activity by adhesion of an apoenzyme gel and a cofactor gel. The apoenzyme and cofactor gels act as catalysts when they form a gel assembly, but they lose catalytic ability upon manual dissociation. We successfully construct a system with switchable catalytic activity via adhesion and separation of the apoenzyme gel with the cofactor gel. We expect that this methodology can be applied to regulate the functional activities of enzymes that bear cofactors in their active sites, such as the oxygen transport of haemoglobin or myoglobin and the electron transport of cytochromes. PMID:26537172

  16. Global substitution of hemeproteins with noncanonical amino acids in Escherichia coli with intact cofactor maturation machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völler, Jan-Stefan; Thi To, Tuyet Mai; Biava, Hernan; Koksch, Beate; Budisa, Nediljko

    2017-11-01

    Global substitution of canonical amino acids (cAAs) with noncanonical (ncAAs) counterparts in proteins whose function is dependent on post-translational events such as cofactor binding is still a methodically challenging and difficult task as ncAA insertion generally interferes with the cofactor biosynthesis machinery. Here, we report a technology for the expression of fully substituted and functionally active cofactor-containing hemeproteins. The maturation process which yields an intact cofactor is timely separated from cAA→ncAA substitutions. This is achieved by an optimised expression and fermentation procedure which includes pre-induction of the heme cofactor biosynthesis followed by an incorporation experiment at multiple positions in the protein sequence. This simple strategy can be potentially applied for engineering of other cofactor-containing enzymes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cofactory: Sequence-based prediction of cofactor specificity of Rossmann folds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertz-Hansen, Henrik Marcus; Blom, Nikolaj; Feist, Adam

    2014-01-01

    cofactor specificity using only primary amino acid sequence information. The algorithm identifies potential cofactor binding Rossinann folds and predicts the specificity for the cofactors FAD(H2), NAD(H), and NADP(H) The Rossmann fold sequence search is carried out using hidden Markov models whereas......Obtaining optimal cofactor balance to drive production is a challenge metabolically engineered microbial strains. To facilitate identification of heterologous enzymes with desirable altered cofactor requirements from native content, we have developed Cofactory, a method for prediction of enzyme...... artificial neural networks are used for specificity prediction. Training was carried out using experimental data from protein cofactor structure complexes. The overall performance was benchmarked against an independent evaluation set obtaining Matthews correlation coefficients of 0.94, 0.79, and 0.65 for FAD...

  18. Hox gene expression in the embryonic genital system of the sea turtle Lepidochelys olivacea (Eschscholt, 1829), a species with temperature-dependent sex determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifuentes-Romero, Itzel; Merchant-Larios, Horacio; García-Gasca, Alejandra

    2010-09-01

    Hox genes are conserved transcription factors which regulate embryonic morphogenesis and differentiation. For the first time, we examined the quantitative and spatial expression of two Hox 5' genes, HoxD11 and HoxA13, in the developing genital system of the olive ridley Lepidochelys olivacea, a species with temperature-dependent sex determination. Quantitative and spatial expression patterns of both genes suggest a role in the female pathway rather than the male pathway. For instance, both genes, especially HoxA13, were expressed in the undifferentiated gonad during the thermosensitive period at a female promoting temperature, and downregulated in the differentiated gonad. By contrast, expression of both genes was low in gonads incubated at a male promoting temperature and did not change significantly in the differentiated gonad. Furthermore, we found high expression levels of HoxA13 in the paramesonephric duct at the male promoting temperature but not at the female promoting temperature, suggesting a role for this Hox gene in the partial regression of the Müllerian duct in males. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Modeling the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere of the south coast air basin of California. 2. HOx radical production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Robert J

    2004-02-01

    The production of HOx radicals in the South Coast Air Basin of California is investigated during the smog episode of September 9, 1993 using the California Institute of Technology (CIT) air-quality model. Sources of HOx(hydroxyl, hydroperoxy, and organic peroxy radicals) incorporated into the associated gas-phase chemical mechanism include the combination of excited-state singlet oxygen (formed from ozone (O3) photolysis (hv)) with water, the photolysis of nitrous acid, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and carbonyl compounds (formaldehyde (HCHO) or higher aldehydes and ketones), the consumption of aldehydes and alkenes (ALK) by the nitrate radical, and the consumption of alkenes by O3 and the oxygen atom (O). At a given time or location for surface cells and vertical averages, each route of HOx formation may be the greatest contributor to overall formation except HCHO-hv, H2O2-hv, and ALK-O, the latter two of which are insignificant pathways in general. The contribution of the ALK-O3 pathway is dependent on the stoichiometric yield of OH, but this pathway, at least for the studied smog episode, may not be as generally significant as previous research suggests. Future emissions scenarios yield lower total HOx production rates and a shift in the relative importance of individual pathways.

  20. Conservation of ParaHox genes' function in patterning of the digestive tract of the marine gastropod Gibbula varia

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    Steiner Gerhard

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Presence of all three ParaHox genes has been described in deuterostomes and lophotrochozoans, but to date one of these three genes, Xlox has not been reported from any ecdysozoan taxa and both Xlox and Gsx are absent in nematodes. There is evidence that the ParaHox genes were ancestrally a single chromosomal cluster. Colinear expression of the ParaHox genes in anterior, middle, and posterior tissues of several species studied so far suggest that these genes may be responsible for axial patterning of the digestive tract. So far, there are no data on expression of these genes in molluscs. Results We isolated the complete coding sequences of the three Gibbula varia ParaHox genes, and then tested their expression in larval and postlarval development. In Gibbula varia, the ParaHox genes participate in patterning of the digestive tract and are expressed in some cells of the neuroectoderm. The expression of these genes coincides with the gradual formation of the gut in the larva. Gva-Gsx patterns potential neural precursors of cerebral ganglia as well as of the apical sensory organ. During larval development this gene is involved in the formation of the mouth and during postlarval development it is expressed in the precursor cells involved in secretion of the radula, the odontoblasts. Gva-Xolx and Gva-Cdx are involved in gut patterning in the middle and posterior parts of digestive tract, respectively. Both genes are expressed in some ventral neuroectodermal cells; however the expression of Gva-Cdx fades in later larval stages while the expression of Gva-Xolx in these cells persists. Conclusions In Gibbula varia the ParaHox genes are expressed during anterior-posterior patterning of the digestive system. This colinearity is not easy to spot during early larval stages because the differentiated endothelial cells within the yolk permanently migrate to their destinations in the gut. After torsion, Gsx patterns the mouth and foregut

  1. Neutral polyethylene oxide with a cofactor recommended for particle flocculation

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    M. R Abdallah/Qasaimeh

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Conventional and neutral high molecular weight polyethylene oxide (PEO adsorbs on some colloids and fines, flocculating them into flocs. Addition of a cofactor (CF makes PEO adsorb on all types of colloids and fines, flocculating them into larger flocs. Homoflocculation of fines with PEO alone and with CF added prior to PEO were investigated in this work at low and high effective shear rates. CF role was investigated: it enhanced flocculation amplitude and rate by several magnitudes relative to PEO used alone, and was ascribed to the CF action to stiffen and extend PEO coils. Considering CF-PEO abilities in homoflocculation and in heteroflocculation as recorded in the literature, combination of homo - and heteroflocculation can now be applied to processes. Formed flocs and individual particles will simultaneously deposit onto fibers and, when filtered, particles will be retained in the fiber cake. This technique can be applied in industry processes and water treatment.

  2. Interplay between structure and magnetism in HoxPr1-x alloys. 1. Neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goff, J.P.; Bryn-Jacobsen, C.; McMorrow, D.F.

    1998-01-01

    The structural and the magnetic ordering in thin-film HoxPr1-x alloys have been studied using neutron-and x-ray-diffraction techniques. As the concentration of Ho decreases the alloys adopt hexagonal-close-packed (hcp), Sm, and double hexagonal-close-packed (dhcp) crystal structures. The results...... show enhanced occupation of the cubic sites by Pr in the Sm and dhcp phases. The magnetic behavior is found to be very different in the three crystalline phases. The hcp samples form basal-plane spirals and the alloys with the Sm structure form a commensurate magnetic structure with the same...... periodicity as the magnetic order on the hexagonal sites in Sm metal, but the moments are confined to the basal plane. At low temperatures both Ho and Pr are found to adopt their full saturation moments in these phases. A Pr thin film is found to order with a similar magnetic structure to bulk Pr. However...

  3. Ancient Pbx-Hox signatures define hundreds of vertebrate developmental enhancers

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    Parker Hugo J

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene regulation through cis-regulatory elements plays a crucial role in development and disease. A major aim of the post-genomic era is to be able to read the function of cis-regulatory elements through scrutiny of their DNA sequence. Whilst comparative genomics approaches have identified thousands of putative regulatory elements, our knowledge of their mechanism of action is poor and very little progress has been made in systematically de-coding them. Results Here, we identify ancient functional signatures within vertebrate conserved non-coding elements (CNEs through a combination of phylogenetic footprinting and functional assay, using genomic sequence from the sea lamprey as a reference. We uncover a striking enrichment within vertebrate CNEs for conserved binding-site motifs of the Pbx-Hox hetero-dimer. We further show that these predict reporter gene expression in a segment specific manner in the hindbrain and pharyngeal arches during zebrafish development. Conclusions These findings evoke an evolutionary scenario in which many CNEs evolved early in the vertebrate lineage to co-ordinate Hox-dependent gene-regulatory interactions that pattern the vertebrate head. In a broader context, our evolutionary analyses reveal that CNEs are composed of tightly linked transcription-factor binding-sites (TFBSs, which can be systematically identified through phylogenetic footprinting approaches. By placing a large number of ancient vertebrate CNEs into a developmental context, our findings promise to have a significant impact on efforts toward de-coding gene-regulatory elements that underlie vertebrate development, and will facilitate building general models of regulatory element evolution.

  4. The non-enzymatic reduction of azo dyes by flavin and nicotinamide cofactors under varying conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Jessica M; John, Gilbert H

    2013-10-01

    Azo dyes are ubiquitous in products and often become environmental pollutants due to their anthropogenic nature. Azoreductases are enzymes which are present within many bacteria and are capable of breaking down the azo dyes via reduction of the azo bond. Often, though, carcinogenic aromatic amines are formed as metabolites and are of concern to humans. Azoreductases function via an oxidation-reduction reaction and require cofactors (a nicotinamide cofactor and sometimes a flavin cofactor) to perform their function. Non-enzymatic reduction of azo dyes in the absence of an azoreductase enzyme has been suggested in previous studies, but has never been studied in detail in terms of varying cofactor combinations, different oxygen states or pHs, nor has the enzymatic reduction been compared to azoreduction in terms of dye reduction or metabolites produced, which was the aim of this study. Reduction of azo dyes by different cofactor combinations was found to occur under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions and under physiologically-relevant pHs to produce the same metabolites as an azoreductase. Our results show that, in some cases, the non-enzymatic reduction by the cofactors was found to be equal to that seen with the azoreductase, suggesting that all dye reduction in these cases is due to the cofactors themselves. This study details the importance of the use of a cofactor-only control when studying azoreductase enzymes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Application of NAD(P)H oxidase for cofactor regeneration in dehydrogenase catalyzed oxidations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehn, Gustav; Pedersen, Asbjørn Toftgaard; Woodley, John

    2016-01-01

    alcohol dehydrogenases. However, their effective use requires an effective regeneration of the oxidized nicotinamide cofactor (NAD(P)+), which is critical for the economic feasibility of the process. NAD(P)H oxidase is an enzyme class of particular interest for this cofactor regeneration since it enables...

  6. Stalled flavodoxin binds its cofactor while fully exposed outside the ribosome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwman, J.A.; Westphal, A.H.; Berkel, van W.J.H.; Mierlo, van C.P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Correct folding of proteins is crucial for cellular homeostasis. More than thirty percent of proteins contain one or more cofactors, but the impact of these cofactors on co-translational folding remains largely unknown. Here, we address the binding of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) to nascent

  7. Nuclear Receptor Cofactors in PPARγ-Mediated Adipogenesis and Adipocyte Energy Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Powell

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional cofactors are integral to the proper function and regulation of nuclear receptors. Members of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR family of nuclear receptors are involved in the regulation of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. They modulate gene transcription in response to a wide variety of ligands, a process that is mediated by transcriptional coactivators and corepressors. The mechanisms by which these cofactors mediate transcriptional regulation of nuclear receptor function are still being elucidated. The rapidly increasing array of cofactors has brought into focus the need for a clear understanding of how these cofactors interact in ligand- and cell-specific manners. This review highlights the differential effects of the assorted cofactors regulating the transcriptional action of PPARγ and summarizes the recent advances in understanding the physiological functions of corepressors and coactivators.

  8. On the chain lenth in Ox, HOx, NOx, ClOx and BrOx cycles in the middle atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larin, Igor; Kuskov, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Analysis of chain mechanisms of ozone depletion in Ox, HOx, NOx, ClOx and BrOx cycles has been performed. The carried out analysis has allowed to get analytical expression for calculation of the rate of limiting stage of chain prolongation, as well as chain breaking and chain length in cycles specified. It has been shown, that the correct estimation of ozone depletion in the chain processes is possible only through definition of the rate of limiting stage with taking into account of all reactions of chain prolongation, instead of the unique reaction possessing the least rate as it usually became earlier. It has been shown also, that choice of one reaction means ignoring a chain character of the process and leads to overestimate of real rate of ozone destruction. The role of null chain processes in the cycles specified above has been considered. It has been shown, that these processes play defining role in formation of families of odd oxygen, nitrogen, chlorine and bromine. By means of methods developed, data of IPCC scenario RCP 4.5, and two-dimensional model Socrates the rate of ozone destruction and chain length in Ox, HOx, NOx, ClOx and BrOx cycles for modeling conditions of April 2013 at 50 N and height diapason 15-120 km has been calculated. It has been shown, that in the middle stratosphere ozone destruction is due mainly to NOx cycle, whereas in the mesosphere and low thermosphere it is due mainly HOx one. It has been also shown that ClOx and BrOx have the greatest chain length in the upper stratosphere which exceeds 106 and HOx cycle in the low thermosphere has a chain length exceeding 1011.

  9. HO_x chemistry during INTEX-A 2004: Observation, model calculation, and comparison with previous studies

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Xinrong; Olson, Jennifer R; Crawford, James H.; Brune, William H.; Mao, Jingqiu; Long, Robert B.; Chen, Zhong; Chen, Gao; Avery, Melody A.; Sachse, Glen W.; Barrick, John D; Diskin, Glenn S.; Huey, L. Greg; Fried, Alan; Cohen, Ronald C

    2008-01-01

    OH and HO_2 were measured with the Airborne Tropospheric Hydrogen Oxides Sensor (ATHOS) as part of a large measurement suite from the NASA DC-8 aircraft during the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment-A (INTEX-A). This mission, which was conducted mainly over North America and the western Atlantic Ocean in summer 2004, was an excellent test of atmospheric oxidation chemistry. The HOx results from INTEX-A are compared to those from previous campaigns and to results for other related ...

  10. Physical forces may cause Hox gene collinearity in the primary and secondary axes of the developing vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, Spyros

    2011-01-01

    The features of spatial and temporal Hox gene collinearity along the anteroposterior and secondary axes of vertebrate development have been extensively studied. However, the understanding of these features remains problematic. Some genetic engineering experiments were performed and the consequent modifications of the Hoxd gene expressions in the vertebrate limb and trunk were presented. A two-phases model was proposed to describe the above results but still many data cannot be explained. In the present work a different mechanism is put forward in order to deal with the above experiments. This alternative mechanism (coined biophysical model), is based on the hypothesis that physical forces decondense and 'loop out' the chromatin fiber causing the observed Hox gene collinearity phenomena at the early stages of axonal development. The two models are compared in detail. The biophysical model adequately explains the data even in cases where the results are characterized as unexpected. Furthermore, the biophysical model predicts that the Hox gene expressions are entangled in space and time and this coupling is compatible with the data of the early developmental stages. Additional experiments are proposed for a direct test of this model. © 2011 The Author. Journal compilation © 2011 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  11. Technical Note: Formal blind intercomparison of OH measurements: results from the international campaign HOxComp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Schlosser

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyl radicals (OH are the major oxidizing species in the troposphere. Because of their central importance, absolute measurements of their concentrations are needed to validate chemical mechanisms of atmospheric models. The extremely low and highly variable concentrations in the troposphere, however, make measurements of OH difficult. Three techniques are currently used worldwide for tropospheric observations of OH after about 30~years of technical developments: Differential Optical Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS, Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (LIF, and Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (CIMS. Even though many measurement campaigns with OH data were published, the question of accuracy and precision is still under discussion.

    Here, we report results of the first formal, blind intercomparison of these techniques. Six OH instruments (4~LIF, 1~CIMS, 1~DOAS participated successfully in the ground-based, international HOxComp campaign carried out in Jülich, Germany, in summer 2005. Comparisons were performed for three days in ambient air (3~LIF, 1 CIMS and for six days in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR (3~LIF, 1~DOAS. All instruments were found to measure tropospheric OH concentrations with high sensitivity and good time resolution. The pairwise correlations between different data sets were linear and yielded high correlation coefficients (r2=0.75−0.96. Excellent absolute agreement was observed for the instruments at the SAPHIR chamber, yielding slopes between 1.01 and 1.13 in the linear regressions. In ambient air, the slopes deviated from unity by factors of 1.06 to 1.69, which can partly be explained by the stated instrumental accuracies. In addition, sampling inhomogeneities and calibration problems have apparently contributed to the discrepancies. The absolute intercepts of the linear regressions did not exceed 0.6×106 cm−3, mostly being insignificant and of

  12. HIV-1 evades innate immune recognition through specific cofactor recruitment

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    Rasaiyaah, Jane; Tan, Choon Ping; Fletcher, Adam J.; Price, Amanda J.; Blondeau, Caroline; Hilditch, Laura; Jacques, David A.; Selwood, David L.; James, Leo C.; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Towers, Greg J.

    2013-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 is able to replicate in primary human macrophages without stimulating innate immunity despite reverse transcription of genomic RNA into double-stranded DNA, an activity that might be expected to trigger innate pattern recognition receptors. We reasoned that if correctly orchestrated HIV-1 uncoating and nuclear entry is important for evasion of innate sensors then manipulation of specific interactions between HIV-1 capsid and host factors that putatively regulate these processes should trigger pattern recognition receptors and stimulate type 1 interferon (IFN) secretion. Here we show that HIV-1 capsid mutants N74D and P90A, which are impaired for interaction with cofactors cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor subunit 6 (CPSF6) and cyclophilins (Nup358 and CypA), respectively, cannot replicate in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages because they trigger innate sensors leading to nuclear translocation of NF-κB and IRF3, the production of soluble type 1 IFN and induction of an antiviral state. Depletion of CPSF6 with short hairpin RNA expression allows wild-type virus to trigger innate sensors and IFN production. In each case, suppressed replication is rescued by IFN-receptor blockade, demonstrating a role for IFN in restriction. IFN production is dependent on viral reverse transcription but not integration, indicating that a viral reverse transcription product comprises the HIV-1 pathogen-associated molecular pattern. Finally, we show that we can pharmacologically induce wild-type HIV-1 infection to stimulate IFN secretion and an antiviral state using a non-immunosuppressive cyclosporine analogue. We conclude that HIV-1 has evolved to use CPSF6 and cyclophilins to cloak its replication, allowing evasion of innate immune sensors and induction of a cell-autonomous innate immune response in primary human macrophages.

  13. Cofactor requirement of HpyAV restriction endonuclease.

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    Siu-Hong Chan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori is the etiologic agent of common gastritis and a risk factor for gastric cancer. It is also one of the richest sources of Type II restriction-modification (R-M systems in microorganisms. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have cloned, expressed and purified a new restriction endonuclease HpyAV from H. pylori strain 26695. We determined the HpyAV DNA recognition sequence and cleavage site as CCTTC 6/5. In addition, we found that HpyAV has a unique metal ion requirement: its cleavage activity is higher with transition metal ions than in Mg(++. The special metal ion requirement of HpyAV can be attributed to the presence of a HNH catalytic site similar to ColE9 nuclease instead of the canonical PD-X-D/EXK catalytic site found in many other REases. Site-directed mutagenesis was carried out to verify the catalytic residues of HpyAV. Mutation of the conserved metal-binding Asn311 and His320 to alanine eliminated cleavage activity. HpyAV variant H295A displayed approximately 1% of wt activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Some HNH-type endonucleases have unique metal ion cofactor requirement for optimal activities. Homology modeling and site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that HpyAV is a member of the HNH nuclease family. The identification of catalytic residues in HpyAV paved the way for further engineering of the metal binding site. A survey of sequenced microbial genomes uncovered 10 putative R-M systems that show high sequence similarity to the HpyAV system, suggesting lateral transfer of a prototypic HpyAV-like R-M system among these microorganisms.

  14. Cofactor requirement of HpyAV restriction endonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Siu-Hong; Opitz, Lars; Higgins, Lauren; O'loane, Diana; Xu, Shuang-Yong

    2010-02-05

    Helicobacter pylori is the etiologic agent of common gastritis and a risk factor for gastric cancer. It is also one of the richest sources of Type II restriction-modification (R-M) systems in microorganisms. We have cloned, expressed and purified a new restriction endonuclease HpyAV from H. pylori strain 26695. We determined the HpyAV DNA recognition sequence and cleavage site as CCTTC 6/5. In addition, we found that HpyAV has a unique metal ion requirement: its cleavage activity is higher with transition metal ions than in Mg(++). The special metal ion requirement of HpyAV can be attributed to the presence of a HNH catalytic site similar to ColE9 nuclease instead of the canonical PD-X-D/EXK catalytic site found in many other REases. Site-directed mutagenesis was carried out to verify the catalytic residues of HpyAV. Mutation of the conserved metal-binding Asn311 and His320 to alanine eliminated cleavage activity. HpyAV variant H295A displayed approximately 1% of wt activity. Some HNH-type endonucleases have unique metal ion cofactor requirement for optimal activities. Homology modeling and site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that HpyAV is a member of the HNH nuclease family. The identification of catalytic residues in HpyAV paved the way for further engineering of the metal binding site. A survey of sequenced microbial genomes uncovered 10 putative R-M systems that show high sequence similarity to the HpyAV system, suggesting lateral transfer of a prototypic HpyAV-like R-M system among these microorganisms.

  15. CDX2 hox gene product in a rat model of esophageal cancer

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    Rizzetto Christian

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Barrett's mucosa is the precursor of esophageal adenocarcinoma. The molecular mechanisms behind Barrett's carcinogenesis are largely unknown. Experimental models of longstanding esophageal reflux of duodenal-gastric contents may provide important information on the biological sequence of the Barrett's oncogenesis. Methods The expression of CDX2 hox-gene product was assessed in a rat model of Barrett's carcinogenesis. Seventy-four rats underwent esophago-jejunostomy with gastric preservation. Excluding perisurgical deaths, the animals were sacrificed at various times after the surgical treatment (Group A: 30 weeks. Results No Cdx2 expression was detected in either squamous epithelia of the proximal esophagus or squamous cell carcinomas. De novo Cdx2 expression was consistently documented in the proliferative zone of the squamous epithelium close to reflux ulcers (Group A: 68%; Group B: 64%; Group C: 80%, multilayered epithelium and intestinal metaplasia (Group A: 9%; Group B: 41%; Group C: 60%, and esophageal adenocarcinomas (Group B: 36%; Group C: 35%. A trend for increasing overall Cdx2 expression was documented during the course of the experiment (p = 0.001. Conclusion De novo expression of Cdx2 is an early event in the spectrum of the lesions induced by experimental gastro-esophageal reflux and should be considered as a key step in the morphogenesis of esophageal adenocarcinoma.

  16. CDX2 hox gene product in a rat model of esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingravallo, Giuseppe; Dall'Olmo, Luigi; Segat, Daniela; Fassan, Matteo; Mescoli, Claudia; Dazzo, Emanuela; Castoro, Carlo; Polimeno, Lorenzo; Rizzetto, Christian; Baroni, Maurizio David; Zaninotto, Giovanni; Ancona, Ermanno; Rugge, Massimo

    2009-08-07

    Barrett's mucosa is the precursor of esophageal adenocarcinoma. The molecular mechanisms behind Barrett's carcinogenesis are largely unknown. Experimental models of longstanding esophageal reflux of duodenal-gastric contents may provide important information on the biological sequence of the Barrett's oncogenesis. The expression of CDX2 hox-gene product was assessed in a rat model of Barrett's carcinogenesis. Seventy-four rats underwent esophago-jejunostomy with gastric preservation. Excluding perisurgical deaths, the animals were sacrificed at various times after the surgical treatment (Group A: 30 weeks). No Cdx2 expression was detected in either squamous epithelia of the proximal esophagus or squamous cell carcinomas. De novo Cdx2 expression was consistently documented in the proliferative zone of the squamous epithelium close to reflux ulcers (Group A: 68%; Group B: 64%; Group C: 80%), multilayered epithelium and intestinal metaplasia (Group A: 9%; Group B: 41%; Group C: 60%), and esophageal adenocarcinomas (Group B: 36%; Group C: 35%). A trend for increasing overall Cdx2 expression was documented during the course of the experiment (p = 0.001). De novo expression of Cdx2 is an early event in the spectrum of the lesions induced by experimental gastro-esophageal reflux and should be considered as a key step in the morphogenesis of esophageal adenocarcinoma.

  17. The anterior determinant bicoid of Drosophila is a derived Hox class 3 gene

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    Stauber, Michael; Jäckle, Herbert; Schmidt-Ott, Urs

    1999-01-01

    The Drosophila gene bicoid functions as the anterior body pattern organizer of Drosophila. Embryos lacking maternally expressed bicoid fail to develop anterior segments including head and thorax. In wild-type eggs, bicoid mRNA is localized in the anterior pole region and the bicoid protein forms an anterior-to-posterior concentration gradient. bicoid activity is required for transcriptional activation of zygotic segmentation genes and the translational suppression of uniformly distributed maternal caudal mRNA in the anterior region of the embryo. caudal genes as well as other homeobox genes or members of the Drosophila segmentation gene cascade have been found to be conserved in animal evolution. In contrast, bicoid homologs have been identified only in close relatives of the schizophoran fly Drosophila. This poses the question of how the bicoid gene evolved and adopted its unique function in organizing anterior–posterior polarity. We have cloned bicoid from a basal cyclorrhaphan fly, Megaselia abdita (Phoridae, Aschiza), and show that the gene originated from a recent duplication of the direct homolog of the vertebrate gene Hox3, termed zerknüllt, which specifies extraembryonic tissues in insects. PMID:10097115

  18. Resenha da obra "Libros en galego de onte e hoxe para a nenez e a mocidade"

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    Sharlene Davantel Valarini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A obra “Libros en galego de onte e hoxe para a nenez e a mocidade” constitui-se como o volume 26 da coleção “Materiais didácticos”, do Instituto de Ciências da Educação, da Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, organizada pelas professoras e pesquisadoras Isabel Mociño González e Blanca-Ana Roig Rechou. Em sua essência, reúne resenhas e outros textos sobre obras infantis e juvenis traduzidas ou por traduzir para a língua galega publicados no período de 2010 a 2015 no jornal “El correo galego”, de Santiago de Compostela. O objetivo da obra é apresentar livros estrangeiros que tragam avanços para o sistema literário da Galícia, principalmente, na formação do jovem leitor. É indicada para mediadores de leitura, professores, bibliotecários e pais, constituindo-se em uma contribuição para a divulgação da Literatura Infantil e Juvenil, visto que tanto as obras revisitadas (tidas como clássicas quanto as mais atuais se encontram apresentadas e discutidas ao longo dos textos que compõem a obra, formando um panorama das publicações mais contundentes.

  19. The efficiency of mapping of quantitative trait loci using cofactor analysis in half-sib design

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    Lund Mogens

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This simulation study was designed to study the power and type I error rate in QTL mapping using cofactor analysis in half-sib designs. A number of scenarios were simulated with different power to identify QTL by varying family size, heritability, QTL effect and map density, and three threshold levels for cofactor were considered. Generally cofactor analysis did not increase the power of QTL mapping in a half-sib design, but increased the type I error rate. The exception was with small family size where the number of correctly identified QTL increased by 13% when heritability was high and 21% when heritability was low. However, in the same scenarios the number of false positives increased by 49% and 45% respectively. With a liberal threshold level of 10% for cofactor combined with a low heritability, the number of correctly identified QTL increased by 14% but there was a 41% increase in the number of false positives. Also, the power of QTL mapping did not increase with cofactor analysis in scenarios with unequal QTL effect, sparse marker density and large QTL effect (25% of the genetic variance, but the type I error rate tended to increase. A priori, cofactor analysis was expected to have higher power than individual chromosome analysis especially in experiments with lower power to detect QTL. Our study shows that cofactor analysis increased the number of false positives in all scenarios with low heritability and the increase was up to 50% in low power experiments and with lower thresholds for cofactors.

  20. Molecular simulation to investigate the cofactor specificity for pichia stipitis Xylose reductase.

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    Xia, Xiao-Le; Cong, Shan; Weng, Xiao-Rong; Chen, Jin-Hua; Wang, Jing-Fang; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-11-01

    Xylose is one of the most abundant carbohydrates in nature, and widely used to produce bioethanol via fermentation in industry. Xylulose can produce two key enzymes: xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase. Owing to the disparate cofactor specificities of xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase, intracellular redox imbalance is detected during the xylose fermentation, resulting in low ethanol yields. To overcome this barrier, a common strategy is applied to artificially modify the cofactor specificity of xylose reductase. In this study, we utilized molecular simulation approaches to construct a 3D (three-dimensional) structural model for the NADP-dependent Pichia stipitis xylose reductase (PsXR). Based on the 3D model, the favourable binding modes for both cofactors NAD and NADP were obtained using the flexible docking procedure and molecular dynamics simulation. Structural analysis of the favourable binding modes showed that the cofactor binding site of PsXR was composed of 3 major components: a hydrophilic pocket, a hydrophobic pocket as well as a linker channel between the aforementioned two pockets. The hydrophilic pocket could recognize the nicotinamide moiety of the cofactors by hydrogen bonding networks, while the hydrophobic pocket functioned to position the adenine moiety of the cofactors by hydrophobic and Π-Π stacking interactions. The linker channel contained some key residues for ligand-binding; their mutation could have impact to the specificity of PsXR. Finally, it was found that any of the two single mutations, K21A and K270N, might reverse the cofactor specificity of PsXR from major NADP- to NADdependent, which was further confirmed by the additional experiments. Our findings may provide useful insights into the cofactor specificity of PsXR, stimulating new strategies for better designing xylose reductase and improving ethanol production in industry.

  1. The glmS Ribozyme Cofactor is a General Acid-Base Catalyst

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    Viladoms, Julia; Fedor, Martha J.

    2012-01-01

    The glmS ribozyme is the first natural self-cleaving ribozyme known to require a cofactor. The D-glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN6P) cofactor has been proposed to serve as a general acid, but its role in the catalytic mechanism has not been established conclusively. We surveyed GlcN6P-like molecules for their ability to support self-cleavage of the glmS ribozyme and found a strong correlation between the pH dependence of the cleavage reaction and the intrinsic acidity of the cofactors. For cofactors with low binding affinities the contribution to rate enhancement was proportional to their intrinsic acidity. This linear free-energy relationship between cofactor efficiency and acid dissociation constants is consistent with a mechanism in which the cofactors participate directly in the reaction as general acid-base catalysts. A high value for the Brønsted coefficient (β ~ 0.7) indicates that a significant amount of proton transfer has already occurred in the transition state. The glmS ribozyme is the first self-cleaving RNA to use an exogenous acid-base catalyst. PMID:23113700

  2. Effects of the cofactor binding sites on the activities of secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (SADH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Chen, Xiangjun; Han, Jun; Ma, Sichun; Wang, Jianmei; Li, Xufeng; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Zhibin; Yang, Yi

    2016-07-01

    SADHs from Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus are enzymes that, together with various cofactors, catalyze the reversible reduction of carbonyl compounds to their corresponding alcohols. To explore how cofactors bind to SADH, TeSADH was cloned in this study, and Ser(199) and Arg(200) were replaced by Tyr and Asp, respectively. Both sites were expected to be inside or adjacent to the cofactor-binding domain according to computational a prediction. Analysis of TeSADH activities revealed that the enzymatic efficiency (kcat/Km) of the S199Y mutant was noticeably enhanced using by NADH, NADPH as cofactors, and similar with that of wild-type using by NADP(+), NAD(+). Conversely, the activity of the R200D mutant significantly decreased with all cofactors. Furthermore, in yeast, the S199Y mutant substantially elevated the ethanol concentration compared with the wild type. Molecular dynamics simulation results indicated the H-bonding network between TeSADH and the cofactors was stronger for the S199Y mutant and the binding energy was simultaneously increased. Moreover, the fluorescence results indicated the S199Y mutant exhibited an increased preference for NAD(P)H, binding with NAD(P)H more compactly compared with wild type. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Genome-scale consequences of cofactor balancing in engineered pentose utilization pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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    Amit Ghosh

    Full Text Available Biofuels derived from lignocellulosic biomass offer promising alternative renewable energy sources for transportation fuels. Significant effort has been made to engineer Saccharomyces cerevisiae to efficiently ferment pentose sugars such as D-xylose and L-arabinose into biofuels such as ethanol through heterologous expression of the fungal D-xylose and L-arabinose pathways. However, one of the major bottlenecks in these fungal pathways is that the cofactors are not balanced, which contributes to inefficient utilization of pentose sugars. We utilized a genome-scale model of S. cerevisiae to predict the maximal achievable growth rate for cofactor balanced and imbalanced D-xylose and L-arabinose utilization pathways. Dynamic flux balance analysis (DFBA was used to simulate batch fermentation of glucose, D-xylose, and L-arabinose. The dynamic models and experimental results are in good agreement for the wild type and for the engineered D-xylose utilization pathway. Cofactor balancing the engineered D-xylose and L-arabinose utilization pathways simulated an increase in ethanol batch production of 24.7% while simultaneously reducing the predicted substrate utilization time by 70%. Furthermore, the effects of cofactor balancing the engineered pentose utilization pathways were evaluated throughout the genome-scale metabolic network. This work not only provides new insights to the global network effects of cofactor balancing but also provides useful guidelines for engineering a recombinant yeast strain with cofactor balanced engineered pathways that efficiently co-utilizes pentose and hexose sugars for biofuels production. Experimental switching of cofactor usage in enzymes has been demonstrated, but is a time-consuming effort. Therefore, systems biology models that can predict the likely outcome of such strain engineering efforts are highly useful for motivating which efforts are likely to be worth the significant time investment.

  4. A Hox Gene, Antennapedia, Regulates Expression of Multiple Major Silk Protein Genes in the Silkworm Bombyx mori*

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    Tsubota, Takuya; Tomita, Shuichiro; Uchino, Keiro; Kimoto, Mai; Takiya, Shigeharu; Kajiwara, Hideyuki; Yamazaki, Toshimasa; Sezutsu, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Hox genes play a pivotal role in the determination of anteroposterior axis specificity during bilaterian animal development. They do so by acting as a master control and regulating the expression of genes important for development. Recently, however, we showed that Hox genes can also function in terminally differentiated tissue of the lepidopteran Bombyx mori. In this species, Antennapedia (Antp) regulates expression of sericin-1, a major silk protein gene, in the silk gland. Here, we investigated whether Antp can regulate expression of multiple genes in this tissue. By means of proteomic, RT-PCR, and in situ hybridization analyses, we demonstrate that misexpression of Antp in the posterior silk gland induced ectopic expression of major silk protein genes such as sericin-3, fhxh4, and fhxh5. These genes are normally expressed specifically in the middle silk gland as is Antp. Therefore, the evidence strongly suggests that Antp activates these silk protein genes in the middle silk gland. The putative sericin-1 activator complex (middle silk gland-intermolt-specific complex) can bind to the upstream regions of these genes, suggesting that Antp directly activates their expression. We also found that the pattern of gene expression was well conserved between B. mori and the wild species Bombyx mandarina, indicating that the gene regulation mechanism identified here is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism and not an artifact of the domestication of B. mori. We suggest that Hox genes have a role as a master control in terminally differentiated tissues, possibly acting as a primary regulator for a range of physiological processes. PMID:26814126

  5. Overexpression of HOX genes is prevalent in Ewing sarcoma and is associated with altered epigenetic regulation of developmental transcription programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svoboda, Laurie K; Harris, Ashley; Bailey, Natashay J; Schwentner, Raphaela; Tomazou, Eleni; von Levetzow, Cornelia; Magnuson, Brian; Ljungman, Mats; Kovar, Heinrich; Lawlor, Elizabeth R

    2014-12-01

    The polycomb proteins BMI-1 and EZH2 are highly overexpressed by Ewing sarcoma (ES), a tumor of stem cell origin that is driven by EWS-ETS fusion oncogenes, most commonly EWS-FLI1. In the current study we analyzed expression of transcription programs that are controlled by polycomb proteins during embryonic development to determine if they are abnormal in ES. Our results show that polycomb target gene expression in ES deviates from normal tissues and stem cells and that, as expected, most targets are relatively repressed. However, we also discovered a paradoxical up regulation of numerous polycomb targets and these were highly enriched for homeobox (HOX) genes. Comparison of HOX profiles between malignant and non-malignant tissues revealed a distinctive HOX profile in ES, which was characterized by overexpression of posterior HOXD genes. In addition, ectopic expression of EWS-FLI1 during stem cell differentiation led to aberrant up regulation of posterior HOXD genes. Mechanistically, this up regulation was associated with altered epigenetic regulation. Specifically, ES and EWS-FLI1+ stem cells displayed a relative loss of polycomb-dependent H3K27me3 and gain of trithorax-dependent H3K4me3 at the promoters of posterior HOXD genes and also at the HOXD11.12 polycomb response element. In addition, a striking correlation was evident between HOXD13 and other genes whose regulation is coordinately regulated during embryonic development by distal enhancer elements. Together, these studies demonstrate that epigenetic regulation of polycomb target genes, in particular HOXD genes, is altered in ES and that these changes are mediated downstream of EWS-FLI1.

  6. Transcriptional Repression of Hox Genes by C. elegans HP1/HPL and H1/HIS-24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studencka, Maja; Wesołowski, Radosław; Opitz, Lennart; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Wisniewski, Jacek R.; Jedrusik-Bode, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Elucidation of the biological role of linker histone (H1) and heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) in mammals has been difficult owing to the existence of a least 11 distinct H1 and three HP1 subtypes in mice. Caenorhabditis elegans possesses two HP1 homologues (HPL-1 and HPL-2) and eight H1 variants. Remarkably, one of eight H1 variants, HIS-24, is important for C. elegans development. Therefore we decided to analyse in parallel the transcriptional profiles of HIS-24, HPL-1/-2 deficient animals, and their phenotype, since hpl-1, hpl-2, and his-24 deficient nematodes are viable. Global transcriptional analysis of the double and triple mutants revealed that HPL proteins and HIS-24 play gene-specific roles, rather than a general repressive function. We showed that HIS-24 acts synergistically with HPL to allow normal reproduction, somatic gonad development, and vulval cell fate decision. Furthermore, the hpl-2; his-24 double mutant animals displayed abnormal development of the male tail and ectopic expression of C. elegans HOM-C/Hox genes (egl-5 and mab-5), which are involved in the developmental patterning of male mating structures. We found that HPL-2 and the methylated form of HIS-24 specifically interact with the histone H3 K27 region in the trimethylated state, and HIS-24 associates with the egl-5 and mab-5 genes. Our results establish the interplay between HPL-1/-2 and HIS-24 proteins in the regulation of positional identity in C. elegans males. PMID:23028351

  7. Evolution of sex-specific traits through changes in HOX-dependent doublesex expression.

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    Kohtaro Tanaka

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Almost every animal lineage is characterized by unique sex-specific traits, implying that such traits are gained and lost frequently in evolution. However, the genetic mechanisms responsible for these changes are not understood. In Drosophila, the activity of the sex determination pathway is restricted to sexually dimorphic tissues, suggesting that spatial regulation of this pathway may contribute to the evolution of sex-specific traits. We examine the regulation and function of doublesex (dsx, the main transcriptional effector of the sex determination pathway, in the development and evolution of Drosophila sex combs. Sex combs are a recent evolutionary innovation and show dramatic diversity in the relatively few Drosophila species that have them. We show that dsx expression in the presumptive sex comb region is activated by the HOX gene Sex combs reduced (Scr, and that the male isoform of dsx up-regulates Scr so that both genes become expressed at high levels in this region in males but not in females. Precise spatial regulation of dsx is essential for defining sex comb position and morphology. Comparative analysis of Scr and dsx expression reveals a tight correlation between sex comb morphology and the expression patterns of both genes. In species that primitively lack sex combs, no dsx expression is observed in the homologous region, suggesting that the origin and diversification of this structure were linked to the gain of a new dsx expression domain. Two other, distantly related fly lineages that independently evolved novel male-specific structures show evolutionary gains of dsx expression in the corresponding tissues, where dsx may also be controlled by Scr. These findings suggest that changes in the spatial regulation of sex-determining genes are a key mechanism that enables the evolution of new sex-specific traits, contributing to some of the most dramatic examples of phenotypic diversification in nature.

  8. Hox gene expression leads to differential hind leg development between honeybee castes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomtorin, Ana Durvalina; Barchuk, Angel Roberto; Moda, Livia Maria; Simoes, Zila Luz Paulino

    2012-01-01

    Beyond the physiological and behavioural, differences in appendage morphology between the workers and queens of Apis mellifera are pre-eminent. The hind legs of workers, which are highly specialized pollinators, deserve special attention. The hind tibia of worker has an expanded bristle-free region used for carrying pollen and propolis, the corbicula. In queens this structure is absent. Although the morphological differences are well characterized, the genetic inputs driving the development of this alternative morphology remain unknown. Leg phenotype determination takes place between the fourth and fifth larval instar and herein we show that the morphogenesis is completed at brown-eyed pupa. Using results from the hybridization of whole genome-based oligonucleotide arrays with RNA samples from hind leg imaginal discs of pre-pupal honeybees of both castes we present a list of 200 differentially expressed genes. Notably, there are castes preferentially expressed cuticular protein genes and members of the P450 family. We also provide results of qPCR analyses determining the developmental transcription profiles of eight selected genes, including abdominal-A, distal-less and ultrabithorax (Ubx), whose roles in leg development have been previously demonstrated in other insect models. Ubx expression in workers hind leg is approximately 25 times higher than in queens. Finally, immunohistochemistry assays show that Ubx localization during hind leg development resembles the bristles localization in the tibia/basitarsus of the adult legs in both castes. Our data strongly indicate that the development of the hind legs diphenism characteristic of this corbiculate species is driven by a set of caste-preferentially expressed genes, such as those encoding cuticular protein genes, P450 and Hox proteins, in response to the naturally different diets offered to honeybees during the larval period.

  9. Hox Gene Expression Leads to Differential Hind Leg Development between Honeybee Castes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomtorin, Ana Durvalina; Barchuk, Angel Roberto; Moda, Livia Maria; Simoes, Zila Luz Paulino

    2012-01-01

    Beyond the physiological and behavioural, differences in appendage morphology between the workers and queens of Apis mellifera are pre-eminent. The hind legs of workers, which are highly specialized pollinators, deserve special attention. The hind tibia of worker has an expanded bristle-free region used for carrying pollen and propolis, the corbicula. In queens this structure is absent. Although the morphological differences are well characterized, the genetic inputs driving the development of this alternative morphology remain unknown. Leg phenotype determination takes place between the fourth and fifth larval instar and herein we show that the morphogenesis is completed at brown-eyed pupa. Using results from the hybridization of whole genome-based oligonucleotide arrays with RNA samples from hind leg imaginal discs of pre-pupal honeybees of both castes we present a list of 200 differentially expressed genes. Notably, there are castes preferentially expressed cuticular protein genes and members of the P450 family. We also provide results of qPCR analyses determining the developmental transcription profiles of eight selected genes, including abdominal-A, distal-less and ultrabithorax (Ubx), whose roles in leg development have been previously demonstrated in other insect models. Ubx expression in workers hind leg is approximately 25 times higher than in queens. Finally, immunohistochemistry assays show that Ubx localization during hind leg development resembles the bristles localization in the tibia/basitarsus of the adult legs in both castes. Our data strongly indicate that the development of the hind legs diphenism characteristic of this corbiculate species is driven by a set of caste-preferentially expressed genes, such as those encoding cuticular protein genes, P450 and Hox proteins, in response to the naturally different diets offered to honeybees during the larval period. PMID:22848371

  10. Hox gene expression leads to differential hind leg development between honeybee castes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Durvalina Bomtorin

    Full Text Available Beyond the physiological and behavioural, differences in appendage morphology between the workers and queens of Apis mellifera are pre-eminent. The hind legs of workers, which are highly specialized pollinators, deserve special attention. The hind tibia of worker has an expanded bristle-free region used for carrying pollen and propolis, the corbicula. In queens this structure is absent. Although the morphological differences are well characterized, the genetic inputs driving the development of this alternative morphology remain unknown. Leg phenotype determination takes place between the fourth and fifth larval instar and herein we show that the morphogenesis is completed at brown-eyed pupa. Using results from the hybridization of whole genome-based oligonucleotide arrays with RNA samples from hind leg imaginal discs of pre-pupal honeybees of both castes we present a list of 200 differentially expressed genes. Notably, there are castes preferentially expressed cuticular protein genes and members of the P450 family. We also provide results of qPCR analyses determining the developmental transcription profiles of eight selected genes, including abdominal-A, distal-less and ultrabithorax (Ubx, whose roles in leg development have been previously demonstrated in other insect models. Ubx expression in workers hind leg is approximately 25 times higher than in queens. Finally, immunohistochemistry assays show that Ubx localization during hind leg development resembles the bristles localization in the tibia/basitarsus of the adult legs in both castes. Our data strongly indicate that the development of the hind legs diphenism characteristic of this corbiculate species is driven by a set of caste-preferentially expressed genes, such as those encoding cuticular protein genes, P450 and Hox proteins, in response to the naturally different diets offered to honeybees during the larval period.

  11. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume I - gas phase reactions of Ox, HOx, NOx and SOx species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Atkinson

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This article, the first in the series, presents kinetic and photochemical data evaluated by the IUPAC Subcommittee on GasKinetic Data Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry. It covers the gas phase and photochemical reactions of Ox, HOx, NOx and SOx species, which were last published in 1997, and were updated on the IUPAC website in late 2001. The article consists of a summary sheet, containing the recommended kinetic parameters for the evaluated reactions, and five appendices containing the data sheets, which provide information upon which the recommendations are made.

  12. The expression of HoxB5 and SPC in neonatal rat lung at exposure to fluoxetine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taghizadeh R

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Razieh Taghizadeh,1 Zahra Taghipour,2 Akbar Karimi,1 Ali Shamsizadeh,3 Mohammad Mohsen Taghavi,2 Mahdi Shariati,2 Ahmad Shabanizadeh,2 Hamid Reza Jafari Naveh,2 Reza Bidaki,4 Fariba Aminzadeh51Department of Biology, Payame Noor University, Isfahan, Iran; 2Department of Anatomy, Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Rafsanjan, Iran; 3Department of Physiology, Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Rafsanjan, Iran; 4Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran; 5Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Rafsanjan, IranObjective: Approximately 10% of pregnant women suffer from pregnancy-associated depression. Fluoxetine, as a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is being employed as a therapy for depressive disorders. The present study aimed to determine the effects of fluoxetine on neonatal lung development.Methods: Thirty pregnant Wistar rats (weighing 200–250 g were treated daily with 7 mg/kg fluoxetine from gestation day 0 to gestation day 21, via gavage. The control group received a similar volume of distilled water only. Following delivery, the newborns and their lungs were immediately weighed in both of the groups. The right lung was fixed for histological assessments while the left lung was used for evaluation of the expression of SPC and HoxB5 by the real-time polymerase chain reaction method.Results: Results have indicated that even though the body weight and the number of neonatal rats in both groups were the same, the lung weight of neonates exposed to fluoxetine was significantly different compared to the control group (P<0.05. Expression of both genes was increased, nonetheless, only elevation of HoxB5 was significant (P<0.05. Histological studies demonstrated that lung tissue in the fluoxetine treatment group morphologically appears to be similar to the pseudoglandular phase, whereas the control group lungs experienced more development.Conclusion: According to the upregulated expression of HoxB5 concerning

  13. Cytosolic iron chaperones: Proteins delivering iron cofactors in the cytosol of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, Caroline C; Ryu, Moon-Suhn; Frey, Avery; Patel, Sarju

    2017-08-04

    Eukaryotic cells contain hundreds of metalloproteins that are supported by intracellular systems coordinating the uptake and distribution of metal cofactors. Iron cofactors include heme, iron-sulfur clusters, and simple iron ions. Poly(rC)-binding proteins are multifunctional adaptors that serve as iron ion chaperones in the cytosolic/nuclear compartment, binding iron at import and delivering it to enzymes, for storage (ferritin) and export (ferroportin). Ferritin iron is mobilized by autophagy through the cargo receptor, nuclear co-activator 4. The monothiol glutaredoxin Glrx3 and BolA2 function as a [2Fe-2S] chaperone complex. These proteins form a core system of cytosolic iron cofactor chaperones in mammalian cells. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Chemomimetic biocatalysis: exploiting the synthetic potential of cofactor-dependent enzymes to create new catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prier, Christopher K; Arnold, Frances H

    2015-11-11

    Despite the astonishing breadth of enzymes in nature, no enzymes are known for many of the valuable catalytic transformations discovered by chemists. Recent work in enzyme design and evolution, however, gives us good reason to think that this will change. We describe a chemomimetic biocatalysis approach that draws from small-molecule catalysis and synthetic chemistry, enzymology, and molecular evolution to discover or create enzymes with non-natural reactivities. We illustrate how cofactor-dependent enzymes can be exploited to promote reactions first established with related chemical catalysts. The cofactors can be biological, or they can be non-biological to further expand catalytic possibilities. The ability of enzymes to amplify and precisely control the reactivity of their cofactors together with the ability to optimize non-natural reactivity by directed evolution promises to yield exceptional catalysts for challenging transformations that have no biological counterparts.

  15. The Drosophila Hox gene Ultrabithorax acts in both muscles and motoneurons to orchestrate formation of specific neuromuscular connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessinger, Christian; Technau, Gerhard M; Rogulja-Ortmann, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Hox genes are known to specify motoneuron pools in the developing vertebrate spinal cord and to control motoneuronal targeting in several species. However, the mechanisms controlling axial diversification of muscle innervation patterns are still largely unknown. We present data showing that the Drosophila Hox gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx) acts in the late embryo to establish target specificity of ventrally projecting RP motoneurons. In abdominal segments A2 to A7, RP motoneurons innervate the ventrolateral muscles VL1-4, with VL1 and VL2 being innervated in a Wnt4-dependent manner. In Ubx mutants, these motoneurons fail to make correct contacts with muscle VL1, a phenotype partially resembling that of the Wnt4 mutant. We show that Ubx regulates expression of Wnt4 in muscle VL2 and that it interacts with the Wnt4 response pathway in the respective motoneurons. Ubx thus orchestrates the interaction between two cell types, muscles and motoneurons, to regulate establishment of the ventrolateral neuromuscular network. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. TRA-1/GLI controls the expression of the Hox gene lin-39 during C. elegans vulval development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Emese; Hargitai, Balázs; Regos, Agnes; Tihanyi, Borbála; Barna, János; Borsos, Eva; Takács-Vellai, Krisztina; Vellai, Tibor

    2009-06-15

    The vulva of the Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodite develops from a subset of six vulval precursor cells (VPCs) by the combined effect of the Ras, Wingless and Notch signaling cascades, and of three redundant synMuv (synthetic Multivulva) pathways grouped into classes A, B and C. Here we show that signaling via the GLI- (Glioma-associated protein) like transcription factor TRA-1, which is the terminal regulator of the C. elegans sex determination cascade, is a newly discovered pathway specifying vulval cell fates. We found that TRA-1 accumulates in, and regulates the fusion process of, cells (including the VPCs and hypodermal cells) involved in vulval patterning. TRA-1 also influenced the expression of the Hox gene lin-39, a central regulator of vulval development. Furthermore, inactivation of tra-1, which transforms animals with hermaphrodite-specific karyotype into males, promoted vulval induction in synMuv A, but not in synMuv B, mutant background. This implies that TRA-1 interacts with the class B synMuv genes, many of which are involved in chromatin-mediated transcriptional repression of cell proliferation. These results may help to understand how compromised GLI activity in humans leads to cancer. Together, we suggest that the GLI protein family involved in several key developmental processes in both invertebrates and vertebrates regulates somatic cell fates through influencing, at least in part, the expression of specific Hox genes.

  17. Identification of a bis-molybdopterin intermediate in molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschke, Stefan; Sigfridsson, Kajsa G V; Kaufmann, Paul; Leidel, Nils; Horn, Sebastian; Gast, Klaus; Schulzke, Carola; Haumann, Michael; Leimkühler, Silke

    2013-10-11

    The molybdenum cofactor is an important cofactor, and its biosynthesis is essential for many organisms, including humans. Its basic form comprises a single molybdopterin (MPT) unit, which binds a molybdenum ion bearing three oxygen ligands via a dithiolene function, thus forming Mo-MPT. In bacteria, this form is modified to form the bis-MPT guanine dinucleotide cofactor with two MPT units coordinated at one molybdenum atom, which additionally contains GMPs bound to the terminal phosphate group of the MPTs (bis-MGD). The MobA protein catalyzes the nucleotide addition to MPT, but the mechanism of the biosynthesis of the bis-MGD cofactor has remained enigmatic. We have established an in vitro system for studying bis-MGD assembly using purified compounds. Quantification of the MPT/molybdenum and molybdenum/phosphorus ratios, time-dependent assays for MPT and MGD detection, and determination of the numbers and lengths of Mo-S and Mo-O bonds by X-ray absorption spectroscopy enabled identification of a novel bis-Mo-MPT intermediate on MobA prior to nucleotide attachment. The addition of Mg-GTP to MobA loaded with bis-Mo-MPT resulted in formation and release of the final bis-MGD product. This cofactor was fully functional and reconstituted the catalytic activity of apo-TMAO reductase (TorA). We propose a reaction sequence for bis-MGD formation, which involves 1) the formation of bis-Mo-MPT, 2) the addition of two GMP units to form bis-MGD on MobA, and 3) the release and transfer of the mature cofactor to the target protein TorA, in a reaction that is supported by the specific chaperone TorD, resulting in an active molybdoenzyme.

  18. Identification of a Bis-molybdopterin Intermediate in Molybdenum Cofactor Biosynthesis in Escherichia coli*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschke, Stefan; Sigfridsson, Kajsa G. V.; Kaufmann, Paul; Leidel, Nils; Horn, Sebastian; Gast, Klaus; Schulzke, Carola; Haumann, Michael; Leimkühler, Silke

    2013-01-01

    The molybdenum cofactor is an important cofactor, and its biosynthesis is essential for many organisms, including humans. Its basic form comprises a single molybdopterin (MPT) unit, which binds a molybdenum ion bearing three oxygen ligands via a dithiolene function, thus forming Mo-MPT. In bacteria, this form is modified to form the bis-MPT guanine dinucleotide cofactor with two MPT units coordinated at one molybdenum atom, which additionally contains GMPs bound to the terminal phosphate group of the MPTs (bis-MGD). The MobA protein catalyzes the nucleotide addition to MPT, but the mechanism of the biosynthesis of the bis-MGD cofactor has remained enigmatic. We have established an in vitro system for studying bis-MGD assembly using purified compounds. Quantification of the MPT/molybdenum and molybdenum/phosphorus ratios, time-dependent assays for MPT and MGD detection, and determination of the numbers and lengths of Mo–S and Mo–O bonds by X-ray absorption spectroscopy enabled identification of a novel bis-Mo-MPT intermediate on MobA prior to nucleotide attachment. The addition of Mg-GTP to MobA loaded with bis-Mo-MPT resulted in formation and release of the final bis-MGD product. This cofactor was fully functional and reconstituted the catalytic activity of apo-TMAO reductase (TorA). We propose a reaction sequence for bis-MGD formation, which involves 1) the formation of bis-Mo-MPT, 2) the addition of two GMP units to form bis-MGD on MobA, and 3) the release and transfer of the mature cofactor to the target protein TorA, in a reaction that is supported by the specific chaperone TorD, resulting in an active molybdoenzyme. PMID:24003231

  19. Life habits, hox genes, and affinities of a 311 million-year-old holometabolan larva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Joachim T; Labandeira, Conrad C; Santiago-Blay, Jorge A; Haug, Carolin; Brown, Susan

    2015-09-29

    series on successive abdominal segments - in addition to comparable features on a second taxon eight million-years-younger - that indicates Hox-gene regulation of segmental and appendage patterning among earliest Holometabola. Srokalarva berthei body features suggest a caterpillar-like body plan and head structures indicating herbivory consistent with known, contemporaneous insect feeding damage on seed plants. Taxonomic resolution places Srokalarva berthei as an extinct lineage, apparently possessing features closer to neuropteroid than other holometabolous lineages.

  20. Phase diagram with an enhanced spin-glass region of the mixed Ising-XY magnet LiHoxEr1-xF4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piatek, J. O.; Dalla Piazza, B.; Nikseresht, N.

    2013-01-01

    We present the experimental phase diagram of LiHoxEr1-xF4, a dilution series of dipolar-coupled model magnets. The phase diagram was determined using a combination of ac susceptibility and neutron scattering. Three unique phases in addition to the Ising ferromagnet LiHoF4 and the XY antiferromagnet...

  1. Concerted involvement of Cdx/Hox genes and Wnt signaling in morphogenesis of the caudal neural tube and cloacal derivatives from the posterior growth zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Ven, C.; Bialecka, M.; Neijts, R.; Young, T.; Rowland, J.E.; Stringer, E.J.; van Rooijen, C.R.; Meijlink, F.; Novoa, A.; Freund, J.N.; Mallo, M.; Beck, F.; Deschamps, J.

    2011-01-01

    Decrease in Cdx dosage in an allelic series of mouse Cdx mutants leads to progressively more severe posterior vertebral defects. These defects are corrected by posterior gain of function of the Wnt effector Lef1. Precocious expression of Hox paralogous 13 genes also induces vertebral axis truncation

  2. Response of H{sub 2} production and Hox-hydrogenase activity to external factors in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baebprasert, Wipawee [Program of Biotechnology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Laboratory of Cyanobacterial Biotechnology, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Lindblad, Peter [Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science, The Aangstroem Laboratories, Uppsala University, Box 523, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Incharoensakdi, Aran [Laboratory of Cyanobacterial Biotechnology, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)

    2010-07-15

    The effects of external factors on both H{sub 2} production and bidirectional Hox-hydrogenase activity were examined in the non-N{sub 2}-fixing cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803. Exogenous glucose and increased osmolality both enhanced H{sub 2} production with optimal production observed at 0.4% and 20 mosmol kg{sup -1}, respectively. Anaerobic condition for 24 h induced significant higher H{sub 2}ase activity with cells in BG11{sub 0} showing highest activities. Increasing the pH resulted in an increased Hox-hydrogenase activity with an optimum at pH 7.5. The Hox-hydrogenase activity gradually increased with increasing temperature from 30 {sup circle} C to 60 {sup circle} C with the highest activity observed at 70 {sup circle} C. A low concentration at 100 {mu}M of either DTT or {beta}-mercaptoethanol resulted in a minor stimulation of H{sub 2} production. {beta}-Mercaptoethanol added to nitrogen- and sulfur-deprived cells stimulated H{sub 2} production significantly. The highest Hox-hydrogenase activity was observed in cells in BG11{sub 0}-S-deprived condition and 750 {mu}M {beta}-mercaptoethanol measured at a temperature of 70 C; 14.32 {mu}mol H{sub 2} mg chl a{sup -1} min{sup -1}. (author)

  3. DEFECTS IN CERVICAL VERTEBRAE IN BORIC ACID-EXPOSED RAT EMBRYOS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH ANTERIOR SHIFTS OF HOX GENE EXPRESSION DOMAINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defects in cervical vertebrae in boric acid-exposed rat embryos are associated with anterior shifts of hox gene expression domainsNathalie Wery,1 Michael G. Narotsky,2 Nathalie Pacico,1 Robert J. Kavlock,2 Jacques J. Picard,1 AND Francoise Gofflot,1*1Unit of Developme...

  4. Identification and Characterization of the Novel p97 co-factors, Rep8 and ASPL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Louise Kjær

    The highly conserved and ubiquitin-specific AAA ATPase p97 acts on ubiquitylated substrates in diverse cellular mechanisms such as chromatin-associated degradation, fusion of homotypic membranes and ER-associated degradation. Different p97 cofactors associate with the ATPase, thereby constituting...

  5. Biochemical and genetic characterization of three molybdenum cofactor hydroxylases in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoff, Tine; Frandsen, Gitte Inselmann; Rocher, Anne

    1998-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidases and xanthine dehydrogenases/oxidases belong to the molybdenum cofactor dependent hydroxylase class of enzymes. Zymograms show that Arabidopsis thaliana has at least three different aldehyde oxidases and one xanthine oxidase. Three different cDNA clones encoding putative aldehyde...

  6. Time-resolved fluorescence analysis of the mobile flavin cofactor in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    and facilitates efficient flavin reduction. It has been suggested that mobility of the flavin ring also plays an important role in the catalysis of the related en- zyme phenol hydroxylase. 45. Optimal regulation of catalysis in these redox enzymes requires strict regu- lation of the cofactor mobility. Specific (transient) interactions with ...

  7. Time-resolved fluorescence analysis of the mobile flavin cofactor in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Conformational heterogeneity of the FAD cofactor in -hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase (PHBH) was investigated with time-resolved polarized flavin fluorescence. For binary enzyme/substrate (analogue) complexes of wild-type PHBH and Tyr222 mutants, crystallographic studies have revealed two distinct flavin conformations ...

  8. Proline dehydrogenase from Thermus thermophilus does not discriminate between FAD and FMN as cofactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijbers, Mieke M.E.; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta; Westphal, Adrie H.; Delgado-Arciniega, Estela; Medina, Milagros; Berkel, Van Willem J.H.

    2017-01-01

    Flavoenzymes are versatile biocatalysts containing either FAD or FMN as cofactor. FAD often binds to a Rossmann fold, while FMN prefers a TIM-barrel or flavodoxin-like fold. Proline dehydrogenase is denoted as an exception: it possesses a TIM barrel-like fold while binding FAD. Using a riboflavin

  9. Cellular Cofactors of Lentiviral Integrase: From Target Validation to Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Taltynov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To accomplish their life cycle, lentiviruses make use of host proteins, the so-called cellular cofactors. Interactions between host cell and viral proteins during early stages of lentiviral infection provide attractive new antiviral targets. The insertion of lentiviral cDNA in a host cell chromosome is a step of no return in the replication cycle, after which the host cell becomes a permanent carrier of the viral genome and a producer of lentiviral progeny. Integration is carried out by integrase (IN, an enzyme playing also an important role during nuclear import. Plenty of cellular cofactors of HIV-1 IN have been proposed. To date, the lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75 is the best studied cofactor of HIV-1 IN. Moreover, small molecules that block the LEDGF/p75-IN interaction have recently been developed for the treatment of HIV infection. The nuclear import factor transportin-SR2 (TRN-SR2 has been proposed as another interactor of HIV IN-mediating nuclear import of the virus. Using both proteins as examples, we will describe approaches to be taken to identify and validate novel cofactors as new antiviral targets. Finally, we will highlight recent advances in the design and the development of small-molecule inhibitors binding to the LEDGF/p75-binding pocket in IN (LEDGINs.

  10. Role of XDHC in Molybdenum Cofactor Insertion into Xanthine Dehydrogenase of Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leimkühler, Silke; Klipp, Werner

    1999-01-01

    Rhodobacter capsulatus xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) is composed of two subunits, XDHA and XDHB. Immediately downstream of xdhB, a third gene was identified, designated xdhC, which is cotranscribed with xdhAB. Interposon mutagenesis revealed that the xdhC gene product is required for XDH activity. However, XDHC is not a subunit of active XDH, which forms an α2β2 heterotetramer in R. capsulatus. It was shown that XDHC neither is a transcriptional regulator for xdh gene expression nor influences XDH stability. To analyze the function of XDHC for XDH in R. capsulatus, inactive XDH was purified from an xdhC mutant strain. Analysis of the molybdenum cofactor content of this enzyme demonstrated that in the absence of XDHC, no molybdopterin cofactor MPT is present in the XDHAB tetramer. In contrast, absorption spectra of inactive XDH isolated from the xdhC mutant revealed the presence of iron-sulfur clusters and flavin adenine dinucleotide, demonstrating that XDHC is not required for the insertion of these cofactors. The absence of MPT from XDH isolated from an xdhC mutant indicates that XDHC either acts as a specific MPT insertase or might be a specific chaperone facilitating the insertion of MPT and/or folding of XDH during or after cofactor insertion. PMID:10217763

  11. The methanogenic redox cofactor F420is widely synthesized by aerobic soil bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ney, Blair; Ahmed, F Hafna; Carere, Carlo R; Biswas, Ambarish; Warden, Andrew C; Morales, Sergio E; Pandey, Gunjan; Watt, Stephen J; Oakeshott, John G; Taylor, Matthew C; Stott, Matthew B; Jackson, Colin J; Greening, Chris

    2017-01-01

    F 420 is a low-potential redox cofactor that mediates the transformations of a wide range of complex organic compounds. Considered one of the rarest cofactors in biology, F 420 is best known for its role in methanogenesis and has only been chemically identified in two phyla to date, the Euryarchaeota and Actinobacteria. In this work, we show that this cofactor is more widely distributed than previously reported. We detected the genes encoding all five known F 420 biosynthesis enzymes (cofC, cofD, cofE, cofG and cofH) in at least 653 bacterial and 173 archaeal species, including members of the dominant soil phyla Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi and Firmicutes. Metagenome datamining validated that these genes were disproportionately abundant in aerated soils compared with other ecosystems. We confirmed through high-performance liquid chromatography analysis that aerobically grown stationary-phase cultures of three bacterial species, Paracoccus denitrificans, Oligotropha carboxidovorans and Thermomicrobium roseum, synthesized F 420 , with oligoglutamate sidechains of different lengths. To understand the evolution of F 420 biosynthesis, we also analyzed the distribution, phylogeny and genetic organization of the cof genes. Our data suggest that although the F o precursor to F 420 originated in methanogens, F 420 itself was first synthesized in an ancestral actinobacterium. F 420 biosynthesis genes were then disseminated horizontally to archaea and other bacteria. Together, our findings suggest that the cofactor is more significant in aerobic bacterial metabolism and soil ecosystem composition than previously thought. The cofactor may confer several competitive advantages for aerobic soil bacteria by mediating their central metabolic processes and broadening the range of organic compounds they can synthesize, detoxify and mineralize.

  12. Determination of cofactors in marine sediments; Bestimmung von Kofaktoren im marinen Sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huschek, G.; Kayser, A.

    2002-12-01

    In respect to a sieving study of sediments in three different sediment locations (Wadden Sea (A), river Elbe-Aestuar (B), Baltic Sea (C)) a determination of selected organic compounds were carried out to study the influence of the sieving process on the variance of cofactors and analytical results. The organic pollutants PCB, Organochlorpesticides (OCP) and PAH were investigated in three fine sediment fractions <2 mm, > and < 63 {mu}m of the locations by accredited and standardised methods. At the same time the cofactor Organic Carbon (TOC) as well as Total Carbon (TC) and Total Nitrogen (TN) were determined in the fine sediment fractions. The endocrine disruptor Bisphenol A could be detected in the sediment locations B and C. The comparison of TOC, TC and TN average values by t-test showed significant differences between the fine fractions of location B and C. Because of low TOC values no signification was detectable in sediment A. The results show that the TOC values in fine sediments are affected by sieving. An enrichment of carbon was detected in the <63 {mu}m fraction in consideration of variance. A correlation between the cofactor TOC and the organic pollutant values could only be detected in the fine fractions of location B. The enrichment of pollutant values in the fine fractions was here analogue of TOC. For a comprehensive evaluation of the cofactor TOC no sufficient sieving sample materials were available in this study for location A and C. So a final statement regarding TOC in fine sediment fractions as a cofactor was not possible. The results show that a determination of organic contaminants in the fine sediment fraction <63 {mu}m make sense because of their enrichment in fine fractions in respect to the TOC values. (orig.)

  13. Impacts of mechanistic changes on HOx formation and recycling in the oxidation of isoprene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Derwent

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently reported model-measurement discrepancies for the concentrations of the HOx radical species (OH and HO2 in locations characterized by high emission rates of isoprene have indicated possible deficiencies in the representation of OH recycling and formation in isoprene mechanisms currently employed in numerical models; particularly at low levels of NOx. Using version 3.1 of the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM v3.1 as a base mechanism, the sensitivity of the system to a number of detailed mechanistic changes is examined for a wide range of NOx levels, using a simple box model. The studies consider sensitivity tests in relation to three general areas for which experimental and/or theoretical evidence has been reported in the peer-reviewed literature, as follows: (1 implementation of propagating channels for the reactions of HO2 with acyl and β-oxo peroxy radicals with HO2, with support from a number of studies; (2 implementation of the OH-catalysed conversion of isoprene-derived hydroperoxides to isomeric epoxydiols, as characterised by Paulot et al.~(2009a; and (3 implementation of a mechanism involving respective 1,5 and 1,6 H atom shift isomerisation reactions of the β-hydroxyalkenyl and cis-δ-hydroxyalkenyl peroxy radical isomers, formed from the sequential addition of OH and O2 to isoprene, based on the theoretical study of Peeters et al. (2009. All the considered mechanistic changes lead to simulated increases in the concentrations of OH, with (1 and (2 resulting in respective increases of up to about 7% and 16%, depending on the level of NOx. (3 is found to have potentially much greater impacts, with enhancements in OH concentrations of up to a factor of about 3.3, depending on the level of NOx, provided the (crucial rapid photolysis of the hydroperoxy-methyl-butenal products of the cis-δ-hydroxyalkenyl peroxy radical isomerisation reactions is represented, as also postulated by Peeters et al.~(2009. Additional tests suggest that

  14. Nighttime observation and chemistry of HOx in the Pearl River Delta and Beijing in summer 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, K. D.; Rohrer, F.; Holland, F.; Fuchs, H.; Brauers, T.; Oebel, A.; Dlugi, R.; Hu, M.; Li, X.; Lou, S. R.; Shao, M.; Zhu, T.; Wahner, A.; Zhang, Y. H.; Hofzumahaus, A.

    2014-05-01

    Nighttime HOx chemistry was investigated in two ground-based field campaigns (PRIDE-PRD2006 and CAREBEIJING2006) in summer 2006 in China by comparison of measured and modeled concentration data of OH and HO2. The measurement sites were located in a rural environment in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) under urban influence and in a suburban area close to Beijing, respectively. In both locations, significant nighttime concentrations of radicals were observed under conditions with high total OH reactivities of about 40-50 s-1 in PRD and 25 s-1 near Beijing. For OH, the nocturnal concentrations were within the range of (0.5-3) × 106 cm-3, implying a significant nighttime oxidation rate of pollutants on the order of several ppb per hour. The measured nighttime concentration of HO2 was about (0.2-5) × 108 cm-3, containing a significant, model-estimated contribution from RO2 as an interference. A chemical box model based on an established chemical mechanism is capable of reproducing the measured nighttime values of the measured peroxy radicals and kOH, but underestimates in both field campaigns the observed OH by about 1 order of magnitude. Sensitivity studies with the box model demonstrate that the OH discrepancy between measured and modeled nighttime OH can be resolved, if an additional ROx production process (about 1 ppb h-1) and additional recycling (RO2 → HO2 → OH) with an efficiency equivalent to 1 ppb NO is assumed. The additional recycling mechanism was also needed to reproduce the OH observations at the same locations during daytime for conditions with NO mixing ratios below 1 ppb. This could be an indication that the same missing process operates at day and night. In principle, the required primary ROx source can be explained by ozonolysis of terpenoids, which react faster with ozone than with OH in the nighttime atmosphere. However, the amount of these highly reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) would require a strong local source, for which

  15. Interplay between structure and magnetism in HoxPr1-x alloys. 2. Resonant x-ray magnetic scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigliante, A.; Christensen, M.J.; Hill, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    X-ray-scattering techniques have been used to study the crystal and magnetic structures of HoxPr1-x alloys in the form of thin films. Three distinct crystal structures are found as a function of concentration x, each of which has a characteristic magnetic structure. For x greater than or equal to 0.......6 a hexagonal-close-packed phase is found with the magnetic moments ordered in a basal-plane helix, whereas for 0.4 less than or equal to x... hexagonal-close-packed and remain nonmagnetic down to the lowest temperatures studied. Using x-ray magnetic resonance scattering techniques, we demonstrate that a small, static spin-density wave is induced within the alloy 5d band at both the Pr and Ho sites in both of the magnetically ordered phases...

  16. Hox Gene Deformed is likely involved in mandibular regression during presoldier differentiation in the nasute termite Nasutitermes takasagoensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toga, Kouhei; Saiki, Ryota; Maekawa, Kiyoto

    2013-09-01

    Division of labor is a distinguishing characteristic of eusocial insects. To understand the proximate factors underlying caste determination, it is essential to clarify the developmental mechanisms during the differentiation of each caste. Termite soldiers have species-specific and diverse morphologies that are specialized for colony defense. Soldiers of the subfamily Nasutitermitinae (Termitidae), one of the most derived termite groups, possess a long, horn-like frontal projection (nasus), an invaginated glandular structure in the head (frontal gland), and regressed mandibles. These morphological changes occur prior to the molt into presoldiers (the preceding stage of soldiers). In Drosophila and other insects, Hox genes determine segment identities; thus they might be involved in such body-part-specific modifications during soldier differentiation. Deformed (Dfd) functions not only in the formation of the mandible and maxilla but also in other head parts (e.g., eye-antennal disc) in other insects. In this study, we examined Dfd functions in nasus/frontal gland formation and mandibular regression in Nasutitermes takasagoensis. Relative expression analyses showed that Dfd expression levels in the mouthparts were significantly higher than those in any other body parts of workers before presoldier molt. Dfd RNA interference resulted in the inhibition of mandibular regression during presoldier differentiation, but nasus and frontal gland formation were not affected. These results suggest that Dfd is involved in the determination of mandibular positional information and specific modification during presoldier differentiation in N. takasagoensis. This is the first work to show the effects of Hox genes on caste-specific morphogenesis in social insects. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Adaptive evolution of 5'HoxD genes in the origin and diversification of the cetacean flipper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Yuan, Lihong; Rossiter, Stephen J; Zuo, Xueguo; Ru, Binghua; Zhong, Hui; Han, Naijian; Jones, Gareth; Jepson, Paul D; Zhang, Shuyi

    2009-03-01

    The homeobox (Hox) genes Hoxd12 and Hoxd13 control digit patterning and limb formation in tetrapods. Both show strong expression in the limb bud during embryonic development, are highly conserved across vertebrates, and show mutations that are associated with carpal, metacarpal, and phalangeal deformities. The most dramatic evolutionary reorganization of the mammalian limb has occurred in cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises), in which the hind limbs have been lost and the forelimbs have evolved into paddle-shaped flippers. We reconstructed the phylogeny of digit patterning in mammals and inferred that digit number has changed twice in the evolution of the cetacean forelimb. First, the divergence of the early cetaceans from their even-toed relatives coincided with the reacquisition of the pentadactyl forelimb, whereas the ancestors of tetradactyl baleen whales (Mysticeti) later lost a digit again. To test whether the evolution of the cetacean forelimb is associated with positive selection or relaxation of Hoxd12 and Hoxd13, we sequenced these genes in a wide range of mammals. In Hoxd12, we found evidence of Darwinian selection associated with both episodes of cetacean forelimb reorganization. In Hoxd13, we found a novel expansion of a polyalanine tract in cetaceans compared with other mammals (17/18 residues vs. 14/15 residues, respectively), lengthening of which has previously been shown to be linked to synpolydactyly in humans and mice. Both genes also show much greater sequence variation among cetaceans than across other mammalian lineages. Our results strongly implicate 5'HoxD genes in the modulation of digit number, web forming, and the high morphological diversity of the cetacean manus.

  18. Overview of the 2007 and 2008 campaigns conducted as part of the Greenland Summit Halogen-HOx Experiment (GSHOX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Brooks

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available From 10 May through 17 June 2007 and 6 June through 9 July 2008 intensive sampling campaigns at Summit, Greenland confirmed that active bromine chemistry is occurring in and above the snow pack at the highest part of the Greenland ice sheet (72°36´ N, 38°25´ W and 3.2 km above sea level. Direct measurements found BrO and soluble gas phase Br− mixing ratios in the low pptv range on many days (maxima −3 of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM to reactive gaseous mercury (RGM and enhanced OH relative to HO2 plus RO2 confirm that active bromine chemistry is impacting chemical cycles even at such low abundances of reactive bromine species. However, it does not appear that Bry chemistry can fully account for observed perturbations to HOx partitioning, suggesting unknown additional chemical processes may be important in this unique environment, or that our understanding of coupled NOx-HOx-Bry chemistry above sunlit polar snow is incomplete. Rapid transport from the north Atlantic marine boundary layer occasionally caused enhanced BrO at Summit (just two such events observed during the 12 weeks of sampling over the two seasons. In general observed reactive bromine was linked to activation of bromide (Br− in, and release of reactive bromine from, the snowpack. A coupled snow-atmosphere model simulated observed NO and BrO at Summit during a three day interval when winds were weak. The source of Br− in surface and near surface snow at Summit is not entirely clear, but concentrations were observed to increase when stronger vertical mixing brought free tropospheric air to the surface. Reactive Bry mixing ratios above the snow often increased in the day or two following increases in snow concentration, but this response was not consistent. On seasonal time scales concentrations of Br− in snow and reactive bromine in the air were directly related.

  19. The molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis protein MobA from Rhodobacter capsulatus is required for the activity of molybdenum enzymes containing MGD, but not for xanthine dehydrogenase harboring the MPT cofactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leimkühler, S; Klipp, W

    1999-05-15

    The requirement of MobA for molybdoenzymes with different molybdenum cofactors was analyzed in Rhodobacter capsulatus. MobA is essential for DMSO reductase and nitrate reductase activity, both enzymes containing the molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide cofactor (MGD), but not for active xanthine dehydrogenase, harboring the molybdopterin cofactor. In contrast to the mob locus of Escherichia coli and R. sphaeroides, the mobB gene is not located downstream of mobA in R. capsulatus. The mobA gene is expressed constitutively at low levels and no increase in mobA expression could be observed even under conditions of high MGD demand.

  20. Structure of a bacterial microcompartment shell protein bound to a cobalamin cofactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael C; Crowley, Christopher S; Kopstein, Jeffrey; Bobik, Thomas A; Yeates, Todd O

    2014-12-01

    The EutL shell protein is a key component of the ethanolamine-utilization microcompartment, which serves to compartmentalize ethanolamine degradation in diverse bacteria. The apparent function of this shell protein is to facilitate the selective diffusion of large cofactor molecules between the cytoplasm and the lumen of the microcompartment. While EutL is implicated in molecular-transport phenomena, the details of its function, including the identity of its transport substrate, remain unknown. Here, the 2.1 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of a EutL shell protein bound to cobalamin (vitamin B12) is presented and the potential relevance of the observed protein-ligand interaction is briefly discussed. This work represents the first structure of a bacterial microcompartment shell protein bound to a potentially relevant cofactor molecule.

  1. DEAH-RHA helicase•Znf cofactor systems in kinetoplastid RNA editing and evolutionarily distant RNA processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Reyes, Jorge; Mooers, Blaine H M; Abu-Adas, Zakaria; Kumar, Vikas; Gulati, Shelly

    Multi-zinc finger proteins are an emerging class of cofactors in DEAH-RHA RNA helicases across highly divergent eukaryotic lineages. DEAH-RHA helicase•zinc finger cofactor partnerships predate the split of kinetoplastid protozoa, which include several human pathogens, from other eukaryotic lineages 100-400 Ma. Despite a long evolutionary history, the prototypical DEAH-RHA domains remain highly conserved. This short review focuses on a recently identified DEAH-RHA helicase•zinc finger cofactor system in kinetoplastid RNA editing, and its potential functional parallels with analogous systems in embryogenesis control in nematodes and antivirus protection in humans.

  2. Kinetics based reaction optimization of enzyme catalyzed reduction of formaldehyde to methanol with synchronous cofactor regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marpani, Fauziah; Sárossy, Zsuzsa; Pinelo, Manuel; Meyer, Anne S

    2017-12-01

    Enzymatic reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2 ) to methanol (CH3 OH) can be accomplished using a designed set-up of three oxidoreductases utilizing reduced pyridine nucleotide (NADH) as cofactor for the reducing equivalents electron supply. For this enzyme system to function efficiently a balanced regeneration of the reducing equivalents during reaction is required. Herein, we report the optimization of the enzymatic conversion of formaldehyde (CHOH) to CH3 OH by alcohol dehydrogenase, the final step of the enzymatic redox reaction of CO2 to CH3 OH, with kinetically synchronous enzymatic cofactor regeneration using either glucose dehydrogenase (System I) or xylose dehydrogenase (System II). A mathematical model of the enzyme kinetics was employed to identify the best reaction set-up for attaining optimal cofactor recycling rate and enzyme utilization efficiency. Targeted process optimization experiments were conducted to verify the kinetically modeled results. Repetitive reaction cycles were shown to enhance the yield of CH3 OH, increase the total turnover number (TTN) and the biocatalytic productivity rate (BPR) value for both system I and II whilst minimizing the exposure of the enzymes to high concentrations of CHOH. System II was found to be superior to System I with a yield of 8 mM CH3 OH, a TTN of 160 and BPR of 24 μmol CH3 OH/U · h during 6 hr of reaction. The study demonstrates that an optimal reaction set-up could be designed from rational kinetics modeling to maximize the yield of CH3 OH, whilst simultaneously optimizing cofactor recycling and enzyme utilization efficiency. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. CD/MCD/VTVH-MCD Studies of Escherichia coli Bacterioferritin Support a Binuclear Iron Cofactor Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Yeonju; Schwartz, Jennifer K; Huang, Victor W; Boice, Emily; Kurtz, Donald M; Solomon, Edward I

    2015-12-01

    Ferritins and bacterioferritins (Bfrs) utilize a binuclear non-heme iron binding site to catalyze oxidation of Fe(II), leading to formation of an iron mineral core within a protein shell. Unlike ferritins, in which the diiron site binds Fe(II) as a substrate, which then autoxidizes and migrates to the mineral core, the diiron site in Bfr has a 2-His/4-carboxylate ligand set that is commonly found in diiron cofactor enzymes. Bfrs could, therefore, utilize the diiron site as a cofactor rather than for substrate iron binding. In this study, we applied circular dichroism (CD), magnetic CD (MCD), and variable-temperature, variable-field MCD (VTVH-MCD) spectroscopies to define the geometric and electronic structures of the biferrous active site in Escherichia coli Bfr. For these studies, we used an engineered M52L variant, which is known to eliminate binding of a heme cofactor but to have very minor effects on either iron oxidation or mineral core formation. We also examined an H46A/D50A/M52L Bfr variant, which additionally disrupts a previously observed mononuclear non-heme iron binding site inside the protein shell. The spectral analyses define a binuclear and an additional mononuclear ferrous site. The biferrous site shows two different five-coordinate centers. After O2 oxidation and re-reduction, only the mononuclear ferrous signal is eliminated. The retention of the biferrous but not the mononuclear ferrous site upon O2 cycling supports a mechanism in which the binuclear site acts as a cofactor for the O2 reaction, while the mononuclear site binds the substrate Fe(II) that, after its oxidation to Fe(III), migrates to the mineral core.

  4. Potential role of Arabidopsis PHP as an accessory subunit of the PAF1 transcriptional cofactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sunchung; Ek-Ramos, Maria Julissa; Oh, Sookyung; van Nocker, Steven

    2011-08-01

    Paf1C is a transcriptional cofactor that has been implicated in various transcription-associated mechanisms spanning initiation, elongation and RNA processing, and is important for multiple aspects of development in Arabidopsis. Our recent studies suggest Arabidopsis Paf1C is crucial for proper regulation of genes within H3K27me3-enriched chromatin, and that a protein named PHP may act as an accessory subunit of Paf1C that promotes this function.

  5. CoFactor: Folate Requirement for Optimization of 5-Fluouracil Activity in Anticancer Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular reduced folate exists as a “pool” of more than 6 interconvertable forms. One of these forms, 5,10 methylenetetrahydrofolic acid (CH2THF, is the key one-carbon donor and reduced folate substrate for thymidylate synthase (TS. This pathway has been an important target for chemotherapy as it provides one of the necessary nucleotide substrates for DNA synthesis. The fluoropyrimidine 5-fluorouracil (5-FU exerts its main cytotoxic activity through TS inhibition. Leucovorin (5-formyltetrahydrofolate; LV has been used to increase the intracellular reduced folate pools and enhance TS inhibition. However, it must be metabolized within the cell through multiple intracellular enzymatic steps to form CH2THF. CoFactor (USAN fotrexorin calcium, (dl-5,10,-methylenepteroyl-monoglutamate calcium salt is a reduced folate that potentiates 5-FU cytotoxicity. According to early clinical trials, when 5-FU is modulated by CoFactor instead of LV, there is greater anti-tumor activity and less toxicity. This review presents the emerging role of CoFactor in colorectal and nongastrointestinal malignancies.

  6. A network analysis of cofactor-protein interactions for analyzing associations between human nutrition and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Boyer, Marie Pier; Lacroix, Sébastien; Scotti, Marco; Morine, Melissa J; Kaput, Jim; Priami, Corrado

    2016-01-18

    The involvement of vitamins and other micronutrients in intermediary metabolism was elucidated in the mid 1900's at the level of individual biochemical reactions. Biochemical pathways remain the foundational knowledgebase for understanding how micronutrient adequacy modulates health in all life stages. Current daily recommended intakes were usually established on the basis of the association of a single nutrient to a single, most sensitive adverse effect and thus neglect interdependent and pleiotropic effects of micronutrients on biological systems. Hence, the understanding of the impact of overt or sub-clinical nutrient deficiencies on biological processes remains incomplete. Developing a more complete view of the role of micronutrients and their metabolic products in protein-mediated reactions is of importance. We thus integrated and represented cofactor-protein interaction data from multiple and diverse sources into a multi-layer network representation that links cofactors, cofactor-interacting proteins, biological processes, and diseases. Network representation of this information is a key feature of the present analysis and enables the integration of data from individual biochemical reactions and protein-protein interactions into a systems view, which may guide strategies for targeted nutritional interventions aimed at improving health and preventing diseases.

  7. Live Cell Discovery of Microbial Vitamin Transport and Enzyme-Cofactor Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lindsey N; Koech, Phillip K; Plymale, Andrew E; Landorf, Elizabeth V; Konopka, Allan; Collart, Frank R; Lipton, Mary S; Romine, Margaret F; Wright, Aaron T

    2016-02-19

    The rapid completion of microbial genomes is inducing a conundrum in functional gene discovery. Novel methods are needed to shorten the gap between characterizing a microbial genome and experimentally validating bioinformatically predicted functions. Of particular importance are transport mechanisms, which shuttle nutrients such as B vitamins and metabolites across cell membranes and are required for the survival of microbes ranging from members of environmental microbial communities to pathogens. Methods to accurately assign function and specificity for a wide range of experimentally unidentified and/or predicted membrane-embedded transport proteins, along with characterization of intracellular enzyme-cofactor associations, are needed to enable a significantly improved understanding of microbial biochemistry and physiology, microbial interactions, and microbial responses to perturbations. Chemical probes derived from B vitamins B1, B2, and B7 have allowed us to experimentally address the aforementioned needs by identifying B vitamin transporters and intracellular enzyme-cofactor associations through live cell labeling of the filamentous anoxygenic photoheterotroph, Chloroflexus aurantiacus J-10-fl, known to employ mechanisms for both B vitamin biosynthesis and environmental salvage. Our probes provide a unique opportunity to directly link cellular activity and protein function back to ecosystem and/or host dynamics by identifying B vitamin transport and cofactor-dependent interactions required for survival.

  8. Substrate Recognition and Catalysis by the Cofactor-Independent Dioxygenase DpgC+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fielding,E.; Widboom, P.; Bruner, S.

    2007-01-01

    The enzyme DpgC belongs to a small class of oxygenases not dependent on accessory cofactors for activity. DpgC is in the biosynthetic pathway for the nonproteinogenic amino acid 3, 5-dihydroxyphenylglycine in actinomycetes bacteria responsible for the production of the vancomycin/teicoplanin family of antibiotic natural products. The X-ray structure of DpgC confirmed the absence of cofactors and defined a novel hydrophobic dioxygen binding pocket adjacent to a bound substrate analogue. In this paper, the role specific amino acids play in substrate recognition and catalysis is examined through biochemical and structural characterization of site-specific enzyme mutations and alternate substrates. The results establish the importance of three amino acids, Arg254, Glu299, and Glu189, in the chemistry of DpgC. Arg254 and Glu189 join to form a specific contact with one of the phenolic hydroxyls of the substrate, and this interaction plays a key role in both substrate recognition and catalysis. The X-ray crystal structure of Arg254Lys was determined to address the role this residue plays in the chemistry. In addition, characterization of alternate substrate analogues demonstrates the presence and position of phenol groups are necessary for both enzyme recognition and downstream oxidation chemistry. Overall, this work defines the mechanism of substrate recognition and specificity by the cofactor-independent dioxygenase DpgC.

  9. Stalled flavodoxin binds its cofactor while fully exposed outside the ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houwman, Joseline A; Westphal, Adrie H; van Berkel, Willem J H; van Mierlo, Carlo P M

    2015-10-01

    Correct folding of proteins is crucial for cellular homeostasis. More than thirty percent of proteins contain one or more cofactors, but the impact of these cofactors on co-translational folding remains largely unknown. Here, we address the binding of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) to nascent flavodoxin, by generating ribosome-arrested nascent chains that expose either the entire protein or C-terminally truncated segments thereof. The native α/β parallel fold of flavodoxin is among the most ancestral and widely distributed folds in nature and exploring its co-translational folding is thus highly relevant. In Escherichia coli (strain BL21(DE3) Δtig::kan) FMN turns out to be limiting for saturation of this flavoprotein on time-scales vastly exceeding those of flavodoxin synthesis. Because the ribosome affects protein folding, apoflavodoxin cannot bind FMN during its translation. As a result, binding of cofactor to released protein is the last step in production of this flavoprotein in the cell. We show that once apoflavodoxin is entirely synthesized and exposed outside the ribosome to which it is stalled by an artificial linker containing the SecM sequence, the protein is natively folded and capable of binding FMN. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Proline dehydrogenase from Thermus thermophilus does not discriminate between FAD and FMN as cofactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huijbers, Mieke M E; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta; Westphal, Adrie H; Delgado-Arciniega, Estela; Medina, Milagros; van Berkel, Willem J H

    2017-03-03

    Flavoenzymes are versatile biocatalysts containing either FAD or FMN as cofactor. FAD often binds to a Rossmann fold, while FMN prefers a TIM-barrel or flavodoxin-like fold. Proline dehydrogenase is denoted as an exception: it possesses a TIM barrel-like fold while binding FAD. Using a riboflavin auxotrophic Escherichia coli strain and maltose-binding protein as solubility tag, we produced the apoprotein of Thermus thermophilus ProDH (MBP-TtProDH). Remarkably, reconstitution with FAD or FMN revealed that MBP-TtProDH has no preference for either of the two prosthetic groups. Kinetic parameters of both holo forms are similar, as are the dissociation constants for FAD and FMN release. Furthermore, we show that the holo form of MBP-TtProDH, as produced in E. coli TOP10 cells, contains about three times more FMN than FAD. In line with this flavin content, the crystal structure of TtProDH variant ΔABC, which lacks helices αA, αB and αC, shows no electron density for an AMP moiety of the cofactor. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of a flavoenzyme that does not discriminate between FAD and FMN as cofactor. Therefore, classification of TtProDH as an FAD-binding enzyme should be reconsidered.

  11. The mechanism of assembly and cofactor insertion into Rhodobacter capsulatus xanthine dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Silvia; Saggu, Miguel; Möller, Nadine; Anker, Stefan D; Lendzian, Friedhelm; Hildebrandt, Peter; Leimkühler, Silke

    2008-06-13

    Rhodobacter capsulatus xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) is a molybdo-flavoprotein that is highly homologous to the homodimeric mammalian xanthine oxidoreductase. However, the bacterial enzyme has an (alphabeta)(2) heterotetrameric structure, and the cofactors were identified to be located on two different polypeptides. We have analyzed the mechanism of cofactor insertion and subunit assembly of R. capsulatus XDH, using engineered subunits with appropriate substitutions in the interfaces. In an (alphabeta) heterodimeric XDH containing the XdhA and XdhB subunits, the molybdenum cofactor (Moco) was shown to be absent, indicating that dimerization of the (alphabeta) subunits has to precede Moco insertion. In an (alphabeta)(2) XDH heterotetramer variant, including only one active Moco-center, the active (alphabeta) site of the chimeric enzyme was shown to be fully active, revealing that the two subunits act independent without cooperativity. Amino acid substitutions at two cysteine residues coordinating FeSI of the two [2Fe-2S] clusters of the enzyme demonstrate that an incomplete assembly of FeSI impairs the formation of the XDH (alphabeta)(2) heterotetramer and, thus, insertion of Moco into the enzyme. The results reveal that the insertion of the different redox centers into R. capsulatus XDH takes place sequentially. Dimerization of two (alphabeta) dimers is necessary for insertion of sulfurated Moco into apo-XDH, the last step of XDH maturation.

  12. Mutation of human molybdenum cofactor sulfurase gene is responsible for classical xanthinuria type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichida, K; Matsumura, T; Sakuma, R; Hosoya, T; Nishino, T

    2001-04-20

    Drosophila ma-l gene was suggested to encode an enzyme for sulfuration of the desulfo molybdenum cofactor for xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) and aldehyde oxidase (AO). The human molybdenum cofactor sulfurase (HMCS) gene, the human ma-l homologue, is therefore a candidate gene responsible for classical xanthinuria type II, which involves both XDH and AO deficiencies. However, HMCS has not been identified as yet. In this study, we cloned the HMCS gene from a cDNA library prepared from liver. In two independent patients with classical xanthinuria type II, we identified a C to T base substitution at nucleotide 1255 in the HMCS gene that should cause a CGA (Arg) to TGA (Ter) nonsense substitution at codon 419. A classical xanthinuria type I patient and healthy volunteers lacked this mutation. These results indicate that a functional defect of the HMCS gene is responsible for classical xanthinuria type II, and that HMCS protein functions to provide a sulfur atom for the molybdenum cofactor of XDH and AO. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  13. Systematic discovery of cofactor motifs from ChIP-seq data by SIOMICS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jun; Dhillon, Vikram; Li, Xiaoman; Hu, Haiyan

    2015-06-01

    Understanding transcriptional regulatory elements and particularly the transcription factor binding sites represents a significant challenge in computational biology. The chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by massive parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq) experiments provide an unprecedented opportunity to study transcription factor binding sites on the genome-wide scale. Here we describe a recently developed tool, SIOMICS, to systematically discover motifs and binding sites of transcription factors and their cofactors from ChIP-seq data. Unlike other tools, SIOMICS explores the co-binding properties of multiple transcription factors in short regions to predict motifs and binding sites. We have previously shown that the original SIOMICS method predicts motifs and binding sites of more cofactors in more accurate and time-effective ways than two popular methods. In this paper, we present the extended SIOMICS method, SIOMICS_Extension, and demonstrate its usage for systematic discovery of cofactor motifs and binding sites. The SIOMICS tool, including SIOMICS and SIOMICS_Extension, are available at http://hulab.ucf.edu/research/projects/SIOMICS/SIOMICS.html. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. CpG island clusters and pro-epigenetic selection for CpGs in protein-coding exons of HOX and other transcription factors

    OpenAIRE

    Branciamore, Sergio; Chen, Zhao-Xia; Riggs, Arthur D.; Rodin, Sergei N.

    2010-01-01

    CpG dinucleotides contribute to epigenetic mechanisms by being the only site for DNA methylation in mammalian somatic cells. They are also mutation hotspots and ∼5-fold depleted genome-wide. We report here a study focused on CpG sites in the coding regions of Hox and other transcription factor genes, comparing methylated genomes of Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, and Danio rerio with nonmethylated genomes of Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. We analyzed 4-fold degenerate, synony...

  15. Host co-factors of the retrovirus-like transposon Ty1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risler Jenni K

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long-terminal repeat (LTR retrotransposons have complex modes of mobility involving reverse transcription of their RNA genomes in cytoplasmic virus-like particles (VLPs and integration of the cDNA copies into the host genome. The limited coding capacity of retrotransposons necessitates an extensive reliance on host co-factors; however, it has been challenging to identify co-factors that are required for endogenous retrotransposon mobility because retrotransposition is such a rare event. Results To circumvent the low frequency of Ty1 LTR-retrotransposon mobility in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we used iterative synthetic genetic array (SGA analysis to isolate host mutations that reduce retrotransposition. Query strains that harbor a chromosomal Ty1his3AI reporter element and either the rtt101Δ or med1Δ mutation, both of which confer a hypertransposition phenotype, were mated to 4,847 haploid ORF deletion strains. Retrotransposition was measured in the double mutant progeny, and a set of 275 ORF deletions that suppress the hypertransposition phenotypes of both rtt101Δ and med1Δ were identified. The corresponding set of 275 retrotransposition host factors (RHFs includes 45 previously identified Ty1 or Ty3 co-factors. More than half of the RHF genes have statistically robust human homologs (E -10. The level of unintegrated Ty1 cDNA in 181 rhfΔ single mutants was altered RHF genes, including specific ribosomal protein and ribosome biogenesis genes and RNA degradation, modification and transport genes resulted in low Ty1 cDNA levels. The level of Ty1 Gag but not RNA was reduced in ribosome biogenesis mutants bud21Δ, hcr1Δ, loc1Δ, and puf6Δ. Conclusion Ty1 retrotransposition is dependent on multiple co-factors acting at different steps in the replication cycle. Human orthologs of these RHFs are potential, or in a few cases, presumptive HIV-1 co-factors in human cells. RHF genes whose absence results in decreased Ty1 c

  16. Host co-factors of the retrovirus-like transposon Ty1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Long-terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons have complex modes of mobility involving reverse transcription of their RNA genomes in cytoplasmic virus-like particles (VLPs) and integration of the cDNA copies into the host genome. The limited coding capacity of retrotransposons necessitates an extensive reliance on host co-factors; however, it has been challenging to identify co-factors that are required for endogenous retrotransposon mobility because retrotransposition is such a rare event. Results To circumvent the low frequency of Ty1 LTR-retrotransposon mobility in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we used iterative synthetic genetic array (SGA) analysis to isolate host mutations that reduce retrotransposition. Query strains that harbor a chromosomal Ty1his3AI reporter element and either the rtt101Δ or med1Δ mutation, both of which confer a hypertransposition phenotype, were mated to 4,847 haploid ORF deletion strains. Retrotransposition was measured in the double mutant progeny, and a set of 275 ORF deletions that suppress the hypertransposition phenotypes of both rtt101Δ and med1Δ were identified. The corresponding set of 275 retrotransposition host factors (RHFs) includes 45 previously identified Ty1 or Ty3 co-factors. More than half of the RHF genes have statistically robust human homologs (E RHF genes, including specific ribosomal protein and ribosome biogenesis genes and RNA degradation, modification and transport genes resulted in low Ty1 cDNA levels. The level of Ty1 Gag but not RNA was reduced in ribosome biogenesis mutants bud21Δ, hcr1Δ, loc1Δ, and puf6Δ. Conclusion Ty1 retrotransposition is dependent on multiple co-factors acting at different steps in the replication cycle. Human orthologs of these RHFs are potential, or in a few cases, presumptive HIV-1 co-factors in human cells. RHF genes whose absence results in decreased Ty1 cDNA include characterized RNA metabolism and modification genes, consistent with their having roles in early

  17. Combined metabolic engineering of precursor and co-factor supply to increase α-santalene production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scalcinati, Gionata; Partow, Siavash; Siewers, Verena; Schalk, Michel; Daviet, Laurent; Nielsen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    ...-santalene production. A multistep metabolic engineering strategy targeted to increase precursor and cofactor supply was employed to manipulate the yeast metabolic network in order to redirect carbon toward the desired product...

  18. Airborne intercomparison of HOx measurements using laser-induced fluorescence and chemical ionization mass spectrometry during ARCTAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Crawford

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The hydroxyl (OH and hydroperoxyl (HO2 radicals, collectively called HOx, play central roles in tropospheric chemistry. Accurate measurements of OH and HO2 are critical to examine our understanding of atmospheric chemistry. Intercomparisons of different techniques for detecting OH and HO2 are vital to evaluate their measurement capabilities. Three instruments that measured OH and/or HO2 radicals were deployed on the NASA DC-8 aircraft throughout Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS in the spring and summer of 2008. One instrument was the Penn State Airborne Tropospheric Hydrogen Oxides Sensor (ATHOS for OH and HO2 measurements based on Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF spectroscopy. A second instrument was the NCAR Selected-Ion Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (SI-CIMS for OH measurement. A third instrument was the NCAR Peroxy Radical Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (PeRCIMS for HO2 measurement. Formal intercomparison of LIF and CIMS was conducted for the first time on a same aircraft platform. The three instruments were calibrated by quantitative photolysis of water vapor by ultraviolet (UV light at 184.9 nm with three different calibration systems. The absolute accuracies were ±32% (2σ for the LIF instrument, ±65% (2σ for the SI-CIMS instrument, and ±50% (2σ for the PeRCIMS instrument. In general, good agreement was obtained between the CIMS and LIF measurements of both OH and HO2 measurements. Linear regression of the entire data set yields [OH]CIMS = 0.89 × [OH]LIF + 2.8 × 104 cm−3 with a correlation coefficient r2 = 0.72 for OH, and [HO2]CIMS = 0.86 × [HO2]LIF + 3.9 parts per trillion by volume (pptv, equivalent to pmol mol−1 with a correlation coefficient r2 = 0.72 for HO2. In general, the difference between CIMS and LIF instruments for OH and HO2 measurements can be explained by their combined measurement uncertainties. Comparison with box model results shows some

  19. A water-forming NADH oxidase from Lactobacillus pentosus and its potential application in the regeneration of synthetic biomimetic cofactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia eNowak

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The cell-free biocatalytic production of fine chemicals by oxidoreductases has continuously grown over the past years. Since especially dehydrogenases depend on the stoichiometric use of nicotinamide pyridine cofactors, an integrated efficient recycling system is crucial to allow process operation under economic conditions. Lately, the variety of cofactors for biocatalysis was broadened by the utilization of totally synthetic and cheap biomimetics. Though, to date the regeneration has been limited to chemical or electrochemical methods. Here, we report an enzymatic recycling by the flavoprotein NADH-oxidase from Lactobacillus pentosus (LpNox. Since this enzyme has not been described before, we first characterized it in regard to its optimal reaction parameters. We found that the heterologously overexpressed enzyme only contained 13 % FAD. In vitro loading of the enzyme with FAD, resulted in a higher specific activity towards its natural cofactor NADH as well as different nicotinamide derived biomimetics. Apart from the enzymatic recycling, which gives water as a by-product by transferring four electrons onto oxygen, unbound FAD can also catalyse the oxidation of biomimetic cofactors. Here a two electron process takes place yielding H2O2 instead. The enzymatic and chemical recycling was compared in regard to reaction kinetics for the natural and biomimetic cofactors. With LpNox and FAD, two recycling strategies for biomimetic cofactors are described with either water or hydrogen peroxide as a by-product.

  20. Gene expression suggests conserved aspects of Hox gene regulation in arthropods and provides additional support for monophyletic Myriapoda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Ralf; Budd, Graham E

    2010-07-05

    Antisense transcripts of Ultrabithorax (aUbx) in the millipede Glomeris and the centipede Lithobius are expressed in patterns complementary to that of the Ubx sense transcripts. A similar complementary expression pattern has been described for non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) of the bithoraxoid (bxd) locus in Drosophila, in which the transcription of bxd ncRNAs represses Ubx via transcriptional interference. We discuss our findings in the context of possibly conserved mechanisms of Ubx regulation in myriapods and the fly.Bicistronic transcription of Ubx and Antennapedia (Antp) has been reported previously for a myriapod and a number of crustaceans. In this paper, we show that Ubx/Antp bicistronic transcripts also occur in Glomeris and an onychophoran, suggesting further conserved mechanisms of Hox gene regulation in arthropods.Myriapod monophyly is supported by the expression of aUbx in all investigated myriapods, whereas in other arthropod classes, including the Onychophora, aUbx is not expressed. Of the two splice variants of Ubx/Antp only one could be isolated from myriapods, representing a possible further synapomorphy of the Myriapoda.

  1. Gene expression suggests conserved aspects of Hox gene regulation in arthropods and provides additional support for monophyletic Myriapoda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janssen Ralf

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Antisense transcripts of Ultrabithorax (aUbx in the millipede Glomeris and the centipede Lithobius are expressed in patterns complementary to that of the Ubx sense transcripts. A similar complementary expression pattern has been described for non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs of the bithoraxoid (bxd locus in Drosophila, in which the transcription of bxd ncRNAs represses Ubx via transcriptional interference. We discuss our findings in the context of possibly conserved mechanisms of Ubx regulation in myriapods and the fly. Bicistronic transcription of Ubx and Antennapedia (Antp has been reported previously for a myriapod and a number of crustaceans. In this paper, we show that Ubx/Antp bicistronic transcripts also occur in Glomeris and an onychophoran, suggesting further conserved mechanisms of Hox gene regulation in arthropods. Myriapod monophyly is supported by the expression of aUbx in all investigated myriapods, whereas in other arthropod classes, including the Onychophora, aUbx is not expressed. Of the two splice variants of Ubx/Antp only one could be isolated from myriapods, representing a possible further synapomorphy of the Myriapoda.

  2. UTX and JMJD3 are histone H3K27 demethylases involved in HOX gene regulation and development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Karl; Cloos, Paul A C; Christensen, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    -methylation of Lys 27 on histone H3 (H3K27me2/me3). Owing to the essential role of the PRC2 complex in repressing a large number of genes involved in somatic processes, the H3K27me3 mark is associated with the unique epigenetic state of stem cells. The rapid decrease of the H3K27me3 mark during specific stages...... of embryogenesis and stem-cell differentiation indicates that histone demethylases specific for H3K27me3 may exist. Here we show that the human JmjC-domain-containing proteins UTX and JMJD3 demethylate tri-methylated Lys 27 on histone H3. Furthermore, we demonstrate that ectopic expression of JMJD3 leads...... to a strong decrease of H3K27me3 levels and causes delocalization of polycomb proteins in vivo. Consistent with the strong decrease in H3K27me3 levels associated with HOX genes during differentiation, we show that UTX directly binds to the HOXB1 locus and is required for its activation. Finally mutation of F...

  3. Hox, Wnt, and the evolution of the primary body axis: insights from the early-divergent phyla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Joseph F; Baxevanis, Andreas D

    2007-01-01

    The subkingdom Bilateria encompasses the overwhelming majority of animals, including all but four early-branching phyla: Porifera, Ctenophora, Placozoa, and Cnidaria. On average, these early-branching phyla have fewer cell types, tissues, and organs, and are considered to be significantly less specialized along their primary body axis. As such, they present an attractive outgroup from which to investigate how evolutionary changes in the genetic toolkit may have contributed to the emergence of the complex animal body plans of the Bilateria. This review offers an up-to-date glimpse of genome-scale comparisons between bilaterians and these early-diverging taxa. Specifically, we examine these data in the context of how they may explain the evolutionary development of primary body axes and axial symmetry across the Metazoa. Next, we re-evaluate the validity and evolutionary genomic relevance of the zootype hypothesis, which defines an animal by a specific spatial pattern of gene expression. Finally, we extend the hypothesis that Wnt genes may be the earliest primary body axis patterning mechanism by suggesting that Hox genes were co-opted into this patterning network prior to the last common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians. Reviewed by Pierre Pontarotti, Gáspár Jékely, and L Aravind. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers' comments section. PMID:18078518

  4. Hox, Wnt, and the evolution of the primary body axis: insights from the early-divergent phyla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baxevanis Andreas D

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The subkingdom Bilateria encompasses the overwhelming majority of animals, including all but four early-branching phyla: Porifera, Ctenophora, Placozoa, and Cnidaria. On average, these early-branching phyla have fewer cell types, tissues, and organs, and are considered to be significantly less specialized along their primary body axis. As such, they present an attractive outgroup from which to investigate how evolutionary changes in the genetic toolkit may have contributed to the emergence of the complex animal body plans of the Bilateria. This review offers an up-to-date glimpse of genome-scale comparisons between bilaterians and these early-diverging taxa. Specifically, we examine these data in the context of how they may explain the evolutionary development of primary body axes and axial symmetry across the Metazoa. Next, we re-evaluate the validity and evolutionary genomic relevance of the zootype hypothesis, which defines an animal by a specific spatial pattern of gene expression. Finally, we extend the hypothesis that Wnt genes may be the earliest primary body axis patterning mechanism by suggesting that Hox genes were co-opted into this patterning network prior to the last common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians. Open peer review Reviewed by Pierre Pontarotti, Gáspár Jékely, and L Aravind. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers' comments section.

  5. Dissociation of activated protein C functions by elimination of protein S cofactor enhancement.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harmon, Shona

    2008-11-07

    Activated protein C (APC) plays a critical anticoagulant role in vivo by inactivating procoagulant factor Va and factor VIIIa and thus down-regulating thrombin generation. In addition, APC bound to the endothelial cell protein C receptor can initiate protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1)-mediated cytoprotective signaling. Protein S constitutes a critical cofactor for the anticoagulant function of APC but is not known to be involved in regulating APC-mediated protective PAR-1 signaling. In this study we utilized a site-directed mutagenesis strategy to characterize a putative protein S binding region within the APC Gla domain. Three single amino acid substitutions within the APC Gla domain (D35T, D36A, and A39V) were found to mildly impair protein S-dependent anticoagulant activity (<2-fold) but retained entirely normal cytoprotective activity. However, a single amino acid substitution (L38D) ablated the ability of protein S to function as a cofactor for this APC variant. Consequently, in assays of protein S-dependent factor Va proteolysis using purified proteins or in the plasma milieu, APC-L38D variant exhibited minimal residual anticoagulant activity compared with wild type APC. Despite the location of Leu-38 in the Gla domain, APC-L38D interacted normally with endothelial cell protein C receptor and retained its ability to trigger PAR-1 mediated cytoprotective signaling in a manner indistinguishable from that of wild type APC. Consequently, elimination of protein S cofactor enhancement of APC anticoagulant function represents a novel and effective strategy by which to separate the anticoagulant and cytoprotective functions of APC for potential therapeutic gain.

  6. A membrane-, mediator-, cofactor-less glucose/oxygen biofuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coman, Vasile; Vaz-Domínguez, Cristina; Ludwig, Roland; Harreither, Wolfgang; Haltrich, Dietmar; De Lacey, Antonio L; Ruzgas, Tautgirdas; Gorton, Lo; Shleev, Sergey

    2008-10-28

    We report the fabrication and characterisation of a non-compartmentalised, mediator and cofactor free glucose-oxygen biofuel cell based on adsorbed enzymes exhibiting direct bioelectrocatalysis, viz. cellobiose dehydrogenase from Dichomera saubinetii and laccase from Trametes hirsuta as the anodic and cathodic bioelements, respectively, with the following characteristics: an open-circuit voltage of 0.73 V; a maximum power density of 5 microW cm(-2) at 0.5 V of the cell voltage and an estimated half-life of > 38 h in air-saturated 0.1 M citrate-phosphate buffer, pH 4.5 containing 5 mM glucose.

  7. Kinetics based reaction optimization of enzyme catalysed reduction of formaldehyde to methanol with synchronous cofactor regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marpani, Fauziah Binti; Sárossy, Zsuzsa; Pinelo, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Enzymatic reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2 ) to methanol (CH3 OH) can be accomplished using a designed set-up of three oxidoreductases utilizing reduced pyridine nucleotide (NADH) as cofactor for the reducing equivalents electron supply. For this enzyme system to function efficiently a balanced...... experiments were conducted to verify the kinetically modelled results. Repetitive reaction cycles were shown to enhance the yield of CH3 OH, increase the total turnover number (TTN) and the biocatalytic productivity rate (BPR) value for both system I and II whilst minimizing the exposure of the enzymes...

  8. Characterization of a "TRAMP-like" co-factor of the human RNA exosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Marianne Skovgaard; Kristiansen, Maiken Søndergaard; Lubas, Michal Szymon

    exosome, the major 3’-5’ exonuclease complex in human cells. PROMPTs have a lot in common with the yeast Cryptic Unstable Transcripts (CUTs), which are degraded by the concerted effort of the exosome, and its co-factor complex TRAMP (Trf4p/Air1p/Mtr4p). We have identified human proteins with functional...... similarities to components of the yeast TRAMP complex, and show that these are involved in the degradation of PROMPTs. While, these proteins form transient complexes with the exosome, our preliminary results also indicate that complex formation can occur directly with catalytic components of the exosome...

  9. Diversity and Functional Analysis of the FeMo-Cofactor Maturase NifB

    OpenAIRE

    Simon Arragain; Emilio Jiménez-Vicente; Scandurra, Alessandro A.; Stefan Burén; Rubio, Luis M.; Carlos Echavarri-Erasun

    2017-01-01

    One of the main hurdles to engineer nitrogenase in a non-diazotrophic host is achieving NifB activity. NifB is an extremely unstable and oxygen sensitive protein that catalyzes a low-potential SAM-radical dependent reaction. The product of NifB activity is called NifB-co, a complex [8Fe-9S-C] cluster that serves as obligate intermediate in the biosyntheses of the active-site cofactors of all known nitrogenases. Here we study the diversity and phylogeny of naturally occurring NifB proteins, th...

  10. Purification and In Vitro Activity of Mitochondria Targeted Nitrogenase Cofactor Maturase NifB

    OpenAIRE

    Stefan Burén; Xi Jiang; Gema López-Torrejón; Carlos Echavarri-Erasun; Rubio, Luis M.

    2017-01-01

    Active NifB is a milestone in the process of engineering nitrogen fixing plants. NifB is an extremely O2-sensitive S-adenosyl methionine (SAM)–radical enzyme that provides the key metal cluster intermediate (NifB-co) for the biosyntheses of the active-site cofactors of all three types of nitrogenases. NifB and NifB-co are unique to diazotrophic organisms. In this work, we have expressed synthetic codon-optimized versions of NifB from the γ-proteobacterium Azotobacter vinelandii and the thermo...

  11. Cofactor of BRCA1: A new genetic marker for common malignant liver cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Editorial Office

    2016-01-01

    A new study has identified a vital gene in the pathogenesis and progression of liver cancer hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), according to a team of biotechnology researchers at The American University in Cairo, Egypt, in a scientific paper published recently by AMOR. The study on human gene ‘Cofactor of BRCA1’ (dubbed COBRA1) and its potential role as a reliable cancer predictor for HCC is especially important due to the disease’s grim outlook. HCC is “ranked as the second most common cause of...

  12. The Interplay of Cofactor Interactions and Post-translational Modifications in the Regulation of the AAA+ ATPase p97

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänzelmann, Petra; Schindelin, Hermann

    2017-01-01

    The hexameric type II AAA ATPase (ATPase associated with various activities) p97 (also referred to as VCP, Cdc48, and Ter94) is critically involved in a variety of cellular activities including pathways such as DNA replication and repair which both involve chromatin remodeling, and is a key player in various protein quality control pathways mediated by the ubiquitin proteasome system as well as autophagy. Correspondingly, p97 has been linked to various pathophysiological states including cancer, neurodegeneration, and premature aging. p97 encompasses an N-terminal domain, two highly conserved ATPase domains and an unstructured C-terminal tail. This enzyme hydrolyzes ATP and utilizes the resulting energy to extract or disassemble protein targets modified with ubiquitin from stable protein assemblies, chromatin and membranes. p97 participates in highly diverse cellular processes and hence its activity is tightly controlled. This is achieved by multiple regulatory cofactors, which either associate with the N-terminal domain or interact with the extreme C-terminus via distinct binding elements and target p97 to specific cellular pathways, sometimes requiring the simultaneous association with more than one cofactor. Most cofactors are recruited to p97 through conserved binding motifs/domains and assist in substrate recognition or processing by providing additional molecular properties. A tight control of p97 cofactor specificity and diversity as well as the assembly of higher-order p97-cofactor complexes is accomplished by various regulatory mechanisms, which include bipartite binding, binding site competition, changes in oligomeric assemblies, and nucleotide-induced conformational changes. Furthermore, post-translational modifications (PTMs) like acetylation, palmitoylation, phosphorylation, SUMOylation, and ubiquitylation of p97 have been reported which further modulate its diverse molecular activities. In this review, we will describe the molecular basis of p97

  13. Cofactor-binding sites in proteins of deviating sequence: comparative analysis and clustering in torsion angle, cavity, and fold space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegemann, Björn; Klebe, Gerhard

    2012-02-01

    Small molecules are recognized in protein-binding pockets through surface-exposed physicochemical properties. To optimize binding, they have to adopt a conformation corresponding to a local energy minimum within the formed protein-ligand complex. However, their conformational flexibility makes them competent to bind not only to homologous proteins of the same family but also to proteins of remote similarity with respect to the shape of the binding pockets and folding pattern. Considering drug action, such observations can give rise to unexpected and undesired cross reactivity. In this study, datasets of six different cofactors (ADP, ATP, NAD(P)(H), FAD, and acetyl CoA, sharing an adenosine diphosphate moiety as common substructure), observed in multiple crystal structures of protein-cofactor complexes exhibiting sequence identity below 25%, have been analyzed for the conformational properties of the bound ligands, the distribution of physicochemical properties in the accommodating protein-binding pockets, and the local folding patterns next to the cofactor-binding site. State-of-the-art clustering techniques have been applied to group the different protein-cofactor complexes in the different spaces. Interestingly, clustering in cavity (Cavbase) and fold space (DALI) reveals virtually the same data structuring. Remarkable relationships can be found among the different spaces. They provide information on how conformations are conserved across the host proteins and which distinct local cavity and fold motifs recognize the different portions of the cofactors. In those cases, where different cofactors are found to be accommodated in a similar fashion to the same fold motifs, only a commonly shared substructure of the cofactors is used for the recognition process. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Effects of Cofactors on Conformation Transition of Random Peptides Consisting of a Reduced Amino Acid Alphabet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming-Feng; Xie, Ying; Zhang, Yue-Jie; Xing, Xue-Yan

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to explore the structure characteristic of random polypeptides constructed by origin early amino acid alphabet, as well as the effects of cofactors on conformation transition of random peptides. DNA library R8-4 encoding VNM random peptides were constructed by small cassette strategy. Subsequently, a random polypeptide library was constructed using in vitro translation. Expression and purification of VNM random peptides were also performed by a conventional method of recombinant. CD spectrum analysis indicated that VNM random polypeptides have a secondary structure characteristic of protein, such as the content of α-helix is greater than 60%, random coil is about 20% β sheet, and β turn is less than 10%. CD spectrum changed with the addition of 10-40 µM ATP and NADP, but slightly changed by NAD; no influence was observed with MgSO4. Bis-ANS binding assay indicated that fluorescent intensity of bis-ANS was strengthened slightly by 10 VNM random peptides. Fluorescent intensity was strengthened fourfold by adding 10-40 µM ATP, NAD, and NADH, whereas the inducing effect of NADPH and MgSO4 were negligible. VNM random peptides have a classic secondary structure and hydrophobic domain in water solution. Moreover, conformation transition and hydrophobic domain could be induced by cofactor, indicating the preliminary evidence for the hypothesis that "the origin of primitive protein was induced by small molecule."

  15. Effect of mitochondrial cofactors and antioxidants supplementation on cognition in the aged canine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snigdha, Shikha; de Rivera, Christina; Milgram, Norton W; Cotman, Carl W

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of research has focused on modifiable risk factors for prevention and attenuation of cognitive decline in aging. This has led to an unprecedented interest in the relationship between diet and cognitive function. Several preclinical and epidemiologic studies suggest that dietary intervention can be used to improve cognitive function but randomized controlled trials are increasingly failing to replicate these findings. Here, we use a canine model of aging to evaluate the effects of specific components of diet supplementation which contain both antioxidants and a combination of mitochondrial cofactors (lipoic acid [LA] and acetyl-l-carnitine) on a battery of cognitive functions. Our data suggest that supplementation with mitochondrial cofactors, but not LA or antioxidant alone, selectively improve long-term recall in aged canines. Furthermore, we found evidence that LA alone could have cognitive impairing effects. These results contrast to those of a previous longitudinal study in aged canine. Our data demonstrate that one reason for this difference may be the nutritional status of animals at baseline for the 2 studies. Overall, this study suggests that social, cognitive, and physical activity together with optimal dietary intake (rather than diet alone) promotes successful brain aging. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. In Search of Novel Targets for Heart Disease: Myocardin and Myocardin-Related Transcriptional Cofactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander T. Mikhailov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidence suggests that gene-regulatory networks, which are responsible for directing cardiovascular development, are altered under stress conditions in the adult heart. The cardiac gene regulatory network is controlled by cardioenriched transcription factors and multiple-cell-signaling inputs. Transcriptional coactivators also participate in gene-regulatory circuits as the primary targets of both physiological and pathological signals. Here, we focus on the recently discovered myocardin-(MYOCD related family of transcriptional cofactors (MRTF-A and MRTF-B which associate with the serum response transcription factor and activate the expression of a variety of target genes involved in cardiac growth and adaptation to stress via overlapping but distinct mechanisms. We discuss the involvement of MYOCD, MRTF-A, and MRTF-B in the development of cardiac dysfunction and to what extent modulation of the expression of these factors in vivo can correlate with cardiac disease outcomes. A close examination of the findings identifies the MYOCD-related transcriptional cofactors as putative therapeutic targets to improve cardiac function in heart failure conditions through distinct context-dependent mechanisms. Nevertheless, we are in support of further research to better understand the precise role of individual MYOCD-related factors in cardiac function and disease, before any therapeutic intervention is to be entertained in preclinical trials.

  17. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of molybdenum-cofactor biosynthesis protein C from Thermus thermophilus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanaujia, Shankar Prasad; Ranjani, Chellamuthu Vasuki; Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman; Baba, Seiki; Chen, Lirong; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Nishida, Masami; Ebihara, Akio; Shinkai, Akeo; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Sekar, Kanagaraj; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki (IIS); (SP8); (Georgia)

    2010-12-03

    The Gram-negative aerobic eubacterium Thermus thermophilus is an extremely important thermophilic microorganism that was originally isolated from a thermal vent environment in Japan. The molybdenum cofactor in this organism is considered to be an essential component required by enzymes that catalyze diverse key reactions in the global metabolism of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur. The molybdenum-cofactor biosynthesis protein C derived from T. thermophilus was crystallized in two different space groups. Crystals obtained using the first crystallization condition belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 64.81, b = 109.84, c = 115.19 {angstrom}, {beta} = 104.9{sup o}; the crystal diffracted to a resolution of 1.9 {angstrom}. The other crystal form belonged to space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 106.57, c = 59.25 {angstrom}, and diffracted to 1.75 {angstrom} resolution. Preliminary calculations reveal that the asymmetric unit contains 12 monomers and one monomer for the crystals belonging to space group P2{sub 1} and R32, respectively.

  18. Polyphosphate is a cofactor for the activation of factor XI by thrombin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sharon H.; Smith, Stephanie A.

    2011-01-01

    Factor XI deficiency is associated with a bleeding diathesis, but factor XII deficiency is not, indicating that, in normal hemostasis, factor XI must be activated in vivo by a protease other than factor XIIa. Several groups have identified thrombin as the most likely activator of factor XI, although this reaction is slow in solution. Although certain nonphysiologic anionic polymers and surfaces have been shown to enhance factor XI activation by thrombin, the physiologic cofactor for this reaction is uncertain. Activated platelets secrete the highly anionic polymer polyphosphate, and our previous studies have shown that polyphosphate has potent procoagulant activity. We now report that polyphosphate potently accelerates factor XI activation by α-thrombin, β-thrombin, and factor XIa and that these reactions are supported by polyphosphate polymers of the size secreted by activated human platelets. We therefore propose that polyphosphate is a natural cofactor for factor XI activation in plasma that may help explain the role of factor XI in hemostasis and thrombosis. PMID:21976677

  19. Live Cell Discovery of Microbial Vitamin Transport and Enzyme-Cofactor Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Lindsey N.; Koech, Phillip K.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Landorf, Elizabeth V.; Konopka, Allan; Collart, Frank; Lipton, Mary S.; Romine, Margaret F.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2016-02-02

    The rapid completion of microbial genomes is inducing a conundrum in functional gene discovery. Novel methods are critically needed to shorten the gap between characterizing a microbial genome and experimentally validating bioinformatically-predicted functions. Of particular importance are transport mechanisms, used to shuttle nutrients and metabolites across cell mem-branes, such as B vitamins, which are indispensable to metabolic reactions crucial to the survival of diverse microbes ranging from members of environmental microbial communities to human pathogens. Methods to accurately assign function and specificity for a wide range of experimentally unidentified and/or predicted membrane-embedded transport proteins, and characterization of intra-cellular enzyme-cofactor/nutrient associations are needed to enable a significantly improved understanding of microbial biochemis-try and physiology, how microbes associate with others, and how they sense and respond to environmental perturbations. Chemical probes derived from B vitamins B1, B2, and B7 have allowed us to experimentally address the aforementioned needs by identifying B vitamin transporters and intracellular protein-cofactor associations through live cell labeling of the filamentous anoxygenic pho-toheterotroph, Chloroflexus aurantiacus J-10-fl, known for both B vitamin biosynthesis and environmental salvage. Our probes provide a unique opportunity to directly link cellular activity and protein function back to ecosystem and/or host dynamics by iden-tifying B vitamin transport and disposition mechanisms required for survival.

  20. Biochemical and structural analysis of the molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis protein MobA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guse, Annika; Stevenson, Clare E M; Kuper, Jochen; Buchanan, Grant; Schwarz, Gunter; Giordano, Gerard; Magalon, Axel; Mendel, Ralf R; Lawson, David M; Palmer, Tracy

    2003-07-11

    Molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide (MGD) is the form of the molybdenum cofactor that is required for the activity of most bacterial molybdoenzymes. MGD is synthesized from molybdopterin (MPT) and GTP in a reaction catalyzed by the MobA protein. Here we report that wild type MobA can be copurified along with bound MPT and MGD, demonstrating a tight binding of both its substrate and product. To study structure-function relationships, we have constructed a number of site-specific mutations of the most highly conserved amino acid residues of the MobA protein family. Variant MobA proteins were characterized for their ability to support the synthesis of active molybdenum enzymes, to bind MPT and MGD, to interact with the molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis proteins MobB and MoeA. They were also characterized by x-ray structural analysis. Our results suggest an essential role for glycine 15 of MobA, either for GTP binding and/or catalysis, and an involvement of glycine 82 in the stabilization of the product-bound form of the enzyme. Surprisingly, the individual and double substitution of asparagines 180 and 182 to aspartate did not affect MPT binding, catalysis, and product stabilization.

  1. NarJ chaperone binds on two distinct sites of the aponitrate reductase of Escherichia coli to coordinate molybdenum cofactor insertion and assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergnes, Alexandra; Pommier, Janine; Toci, René; Blasco, Francis; Giordano, Gérard; Magalon, Axel

    2006-01-27

    Understanding when and how metal cofactor insertion occurs into a multisubunit metalloenzyme is of fundamental importance. Molybdenum cofactor insertion is a tightly controlled process that involves specific interactions between the proteins that promote cofactor delivery, enzyme-specific chaperones, and the apoenzyme. In the assembly pathway of the multisubunit molybdoenzyme, membrane-bound nitrate reductase A from Escherichia coli, a NarJ-assisted molybdenum cofactor (Moco) insertion step, must precede membrane anchoring of the apoenzyme. Here, we have shown that the NarJ chaperone interacts at two distinct binding sites of the apoenzyme, one interfering with its membrane anchoring and another one being involved in molybdenum cofactor insertion. The presence of the two NarJ-binding sites within NarG is required to ensure productive formation of active nitrate reductase. Our findings supported the view that enzyme-specific chaperones play a central role in the biogenesis of multisubunit molybdoenzymes by coordinating subunits assembly and molybdenum cofactor insertion.

  2. Hox paralog group 2 genes control the migration of mouse pontine neurons through slit-robo signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc J Geisen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The pontine neurons (PN represent a major source of mossy fiber projections to the cerebellum. During mouse hindbrain development, PN migrate tangentially and sequentially along both the anteroposterior (AP and dorsoventral (DV axes. Unlike DV migration, which is controlled by the Netrin-1/Dcc attractive pathway, little is known about the molecular mechanisms guiding PN migration along the AP axis. Here, we show that Hoxa2 and Hoxb2 are required both intrinsically and extrinsically to maintain normal AP migration of subsets of PN, by preventing their premature ventral attraction towards the midline. Moreover, the migration defects observed in Hoxa2 and Hoxb2 mutant mice were phenocopied in compound Robo1;Robo2, Slit1;Slit2, and Robo2;Slit2 knockout animals, indicating that these guidance molecules act downstream of Hox genes to control PN migration. Indeed, using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we further demonstrated that Robo2 is a direct target of Hoxa2 in vivo and that maintenance of high Robo and Slit expression levels was impaired in Hoxa2 mutant mice. Lastly, the analysis of Phox2b-deficient mice indicated that the facial motor nucleus is a major Slit signaling source required to prevent premature ventral migration of PN. These findings provide novel insights into the molecular control of neuronal migration from transcription factor to regulation of guidance receptor and ligand expression. Specifically, they address the question of how exposure to multiple guidance cues along the AP and DV axes is regulated at the transcriptional level and in turn translated into stereotyped migratory responses during tangential migration of neurons in the developing mammalian brain.

  3. Chaperonin cofactors, Cpn10 and Cpn20, of green algae and plants function as hetero-oligomeric ring complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yi-Chin C; Mueller-Cajar, Oliver; Saschenbrecker, Sandra; Hartl, F Ulrich; Hayer-Hartl, Manajit

    2012-06-08

    The chloroplast chaperonin system of plants and green algae is a curiosity as both the chaperonin cage and its lid are encoded by multiple genes, in contrast to the single genes encoding the two components of the bacterial and mitochondrial systems. In the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Cr), three genes encode chaperonin cofactors, with cpn10 encoding a single ∼10-kDa domain and cpn20 and cpn23 encoding tandem cpn10 domains. Here, we characterized the functional interaction of these proteins with the Escherichia coli chaperonin, GroEL, which normally cooperates with GroES, a heptamer of ∼10-kDa subunits. The C. reinhardtii cofactor proteins alone were all unable to assist GroEL-mediated refolding of bacterial ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase but gained this ability when CrCpn20 and/or CrCpn23 was combined with CrCpn10. Native mass spectrometry indicated the formation of hetero-oligomeric species, consisting of seven ∼10-kDa domains. The cofactor "heptamers" interacted with GroEL and encapsulated substrate protein in a nucleotide-dependent manner. Different hetero-oligomer arrangements, generated by constructing cofactor concatamers, indicated a preferential heptamer configuration for the functional CrCpn10-CrCpn23 complex. Formation of heptamer Cpn10/Cpn20 hetero-oligomers was also observed with the Arabidopsis thaliana (At) cofactors, which functioned with the chloroplast chaperonin, AtCpn60α(7)β(7). It appears that hetero-oligomer formation occurs more generally for chloroplast chaperonin cofactors, perhaps adapting the chaperonin system for the folding of specific client proteins.

  4. An active dimanganese(III)-tyrosyl radical cofactor in Escherichia coli class Ib ribonucleotide reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotruvo, Joseph A; Stubbe, Joanne

    2010-02-16

    Escherichia coli class Ib ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) converts nucleoside 5'-diphosphates to deoxynucleoside 5'-diphosphates and is expressed under iron-limited and oxidative stress conditions. This RNR is composed of two homodimeric subunits: alpha2 (NrdE), where nucleotide reduction occurs, and beta2 (NrdF), which contains an unidentified metallocofactor that initiates nucleotide reduction. nrdE and nrdF are found in an operon with nrdI, which encodes an unusual flavodoxin proposed to be involved in metallocofactor biosynthesis and/or maintenance. Ni affinity chromatography of a mixture of E. coli (His)(6)-NrdI and NrdF demonstrated tight association between these proteins. To explore the function of NrdI and identify the metallocofactor, apoNrdF was loaded with Mn(II) and incubated with fully reduced NrdI (NrdI(hq)) and O(2). Active RNR was rapidly produced with 0.25 +/- 0.03 tyrosyl radical (Y*) per beta2 and a specific activity of 600 units/mg. EPR and biochemical studies of the reconstituted cofactor suggest it is Mn(III)(2)-Y*, which we propose is generated by Mn(II)(2)-NrdF reacting with two equivalents of HO(2)(-), produced by reduction of O(2) by NrdF-bound NrdI(hq). In the absence of NrdI(hq), with a variety of oxidants, no active RNR was generated. By contrast, a similar experiment with apoNrdF loaded with Fe(II) and incubated with O(2) in the presence or absence of NrdI(hq) gave 0.2 and 0.7 Y*/beta2 with specific activities of 80 and 300 units/mg, respectively. Thus NrdI(hq) hinders Fe(III)(2)-Y* cofactor assembly in vitro. We propose that NrdI is an essential player in E. coli class Ib RNR cluster assembly and that the Mn(III)(2)-Y* cofactor, not the diferric-Y* one, is the active metallocofactor in vivo.

  5. Electron transfer between the heme bound oxygen and the tetrahydrobiopterin cofactor of nitric oxide synthase: a DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menyhárd, Dóra K.

    2004-07-01

    Nitric oxide is synthesized from L-Arg by nitric oxide synthases (NOSs). DFT calculations carried out in the present study demonstrate that there is direct coupling between the heme bound oxygen and the tetrahydrobiopterin (H 4B) cofactor in the activated state of NOS. Results indicate that radicalization of H 4B causes the coupled reduction of heme bound oxygen. In our model system H 3B rad radical formation is prompted by proton dissociation from the N5 site of the cofactor; spin density is transferred to the heme bound oxygen, which we found in an orientation preconditioned for H abstraction from the substrate.

  6. Substrate- and Cofactor-independent Inhibition of Histone Demethylase KDM4C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leurs, Ulrike; Lohse, Brian; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of histone demethylases has within recent years advanced into a new strategy for treating cancer and other diseases. Targeting specific histone demethylases can be challenging as the active sites of KDM1A-B and KDM-4A-D histone demethylases, respectively, are highly conserved. Most...... inhibitors developed up-to-date target either the cofactor- or substrate-binding sites of these enzymes, resulting in a lack of selectivity and off-target effects. This study describes the discovery of the first peptide-based inhibitors of KDM4 histone demethylases that do not share the histone peptide...... sequence, or inhibit through substrate competition. Through screening of DNA-encoded peptide libraries against KDM1 and -4 histone demethylases by phage display, two cyclic peptides targeting the histone demethylase KDM4C were identified and developed as inhibitors by amino acid replacement, truncation...

  7. Co-factors necessary for PPAR mediated transactivation of endogenous target genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Lars; Nielsen, Ronni; Stunnenberg, Henk

    physiological scenarios. PPARa and PPARd are transcriptional regulators of fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis, whereas PPAR? controls genes involved in lipid storage. Consequently, there must be PPAR subtype specific molecular determinants that secure PPAR selective recognition and activation of target...... promoters in a given cell type. In vitro experiments suggest that the different PPAR subtypes might have dissimilar binding preference for some PPAR target sites and may also have different affinity for some transcriptional co-factors. However the molecular mechanisms behind PPAR subtype specific activation...... of endogenous target gene in different cell types are elusive. To mutually compare the ability of the PPAR subtypes to activate endogenous target genes in a given cell, PPARa, PPARb/d and PPARg2 were HA tagged and rapidly, equally and synchronously expressed using adenoviral delivery. Within a few hours after...

  8. Optimizing Cofactor Specificity of Oxidoreductase Enzymes for the Generation of Microbial Production Strains—OptSwap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    King, Zachary A.; Feist, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Central oxidoreductase enzymes (eg, dehydrogenases, reductases) in microbial metabolism often have preferential binding specificity for one of the two major currency metabolites NAD(H) and NADP(H). These enzyme specificities result in a division of the metabolic functionality of the currency...... metabolites: enzymes reducing NAD+ to NADH drive oxidative phosphorylation, and enzymes reducing NADP+ to NADPH drive anabolic reactions. In this work, we introduce the computational method OptSwap, which predicts bioprocessing strain designs by identifying optimal modifications of the cofactor binding...... specificities of oxidoreductase enzyme and complementary reaction knockouts. Using the Escherichia coli genome-scale metabolic model iJO1366, OptSwap predicted eight growth-coupled production designs with significantly greater product yields or substrate-specific productivities than designs predicted with gene...

  9. Regulatory Enhancer-Core-Promoter Communication via Transcription Factors and Cofactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabidi, Muhammad A; Stark, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Gene expression is regulated by genomic enhancers that recruit transcription factors and cofactors to activate transcription from target core promoters. Over the past years, thousands of enhancers and core promoters in animal genomes have been annotated, and we have learned much about the domain structure in which regulatory genomes are organized in animals. Enhancer-core-promoter targeting occurs at several levels, including regulatory domains, DNA accessibility, and sequence-encoded core-promoter specificities that are likely mediated by different regulatory proteins. We review here current knowledge about enhancer-core-promoter targeting, regulatory communication between enhancers and core promoters, and the protein factors involved. We conclude with an outlook on open questions that we find particularly interesting and that will likely lead to additional insights in the upcoming years. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Income poverty, poverty co-factors, and the adjustment of children in elementary school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Brian P; Brown, Eleanor D

    2006-01-01

    Since 1990, there have been great advances in how developmental researchers construct poverty. These advances are important because they may help inform social policy at many levels and help frame how American culture constructs poverty for children, both symbolically and in the opportunities children and families get to escape from poverty. Historically, developmental perspectives have embodied social address and main effects models, snapshot views of poverty effects at single points in time, and a rather narrow focus on income as the symbolic marker of the ecology of disadvantage. More recent views, in contrast, emphasize the diverse circumstances of disadvantaged families and diverse outcomes of disadvantaged children, the multiple sources of risk and the multiple determinants of poor outcomes for these children, dynamic aspects of that ecology, and change as well as continuity in outcome trajectories. The advances also consist of more powerful frames for understanding the ecology of disadvantage and the risk it poses for child outcomes. Most developmental researchers still tend to frame causal variables ultimately in terms of the dichotomy between social causation and social selection views, with a primary emphasis on the former. In part, this framing has reflected limitations of sample size and design, because the theoretical and empirical power of reciprocal selection models is clear (Kim et al., 2003). The conceptual advances that prompt such models include widespread acknowledgement of third variable problems in interpreting effects, of the clear need for multivariate approaches, and the need to pursue mechanisms and moderators of the relations between causal candidates and child outcomes. In the context of these advances, one of the core goals of our research program has been to construct robust representations of environmental adversity for disadvantaged families. Most of our research focuses on contextual co-factors at a family level (e.g., maternal

  11. CD63 is an essential cofactor to leukocyte recruitment by endothelial P-selectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Emily L; Ridger, Victoria; Ferraro, Francesco; Turmaine, Mark; Saftig, Paul; Cutler, Daniel F

    2011-10-13

    The activation of endothelial cells is critical to initiating an inflammatory response. Activation induces the fusion of Weibel-Palade Bodies (WPB) with the plasma membrane, thus transferring P-selectin and VWF to the cell surface, where they act in the recruitment of leukocytes and platelets, respectively. CD63 has long been an established component of WPB, but the functional significance of its presence within an organelle that acts in inflammation and hemostasis was unknown. We find that ablating CD63 expression leads to a loss of P-selectin-dependent function: CD63-deficient HUVECs fail to recruit leukocytes, CD63-deficient mice exhibit a significant reduction in both leukocyte rolling and recruitment and we show a failure of leukocyte extravasation in a peritonitis model. Loss of CD63 has a similar phenotype to loss of P-selectin itself, thus CD63 is an essential cofactor to P-selectin.

  12. Characterization of water-forming NADH oxidases for co-factor regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehn, Gustav; Pedersen, Asbjørn Toftgaard; J. Charnock, Simon

    an environmentaland economic perspective [1]. Alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH) offer one such alternative. However, the reaction requires the oxidized nicotinamide co-factor (NAD+) that must be recycled due to its high cost contribution. One regeneration method that offers certain advantages is the oxidation of NADH......Traditional chemical methods for alcohol oxidation are often associated with issues such as high consumption of expensive oxidizing agents, generation of metal waste and the use of environmentally undesirable organic solvents. Developing green, selective catalysts is therefore important from...... using water forming NADH oxidases (NOX-2). The implementation of the ADH/NOX system for alcohol oxidation, however, requires consideration of several different issues. Enzyme activity and stability at relevant pH and temperature conditions, but also the tolerance to the substrates and products present...

  13. Constrained spin-density dynamics of an iron-sulfur complex: ferredoxin cofactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Md Ehesan; Nair, Nisanth N; Staemmler, Volker; Marx, Dominik

    2012-06-14

    The computation of antiferromagnetic exchange coupling constants J by means of efficient density-based approaches requires in practice to take care of both spin projection to approximate the low spin ground state and proper localization of the magnetic orbitals at the transition metal centers. This is demonstrated here by a combined approach where the extended broken-symmetry (EBS) technique is employed to include the former aspect, while spin density constraints are applied to ensure the latter. This constrained EBS (CEBS) approach allows us to carry out ab initio molecular dynamics on a spin-projected low spin potential energy surface that is generated on-the-fly by propagating two coupled determinants and thereby accessing the antiferromagnetic coupling along the trajectory. When applied to the prototypical model of the oxidized [2Fe-2S] cofactor in Ferredoxins, [Fe(2)S(2)(SH)(4)](2-), at room temperature, CEBS leads to remarkably good results for geometrical structures and coupling constants J.

  14. Esmond E. Snell--the pathfinder of B vitamins and cofactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Hideyuki; Tanase, Sumio; Yagi, Toshiharu

    2010-04-01

    Esmond E. Snell (1914-2003) was a giant of B-vitamin and enzyme research. His early research in bacterial nutrition had lead to the discovery of vitamins such as lipoic acid and folic acid, and an anti-vitamin avidin. He developed microbiological assay methods for riboflavin and other vitamins and amino acids, which are still used today. He also investigated the metabolism of vitamins, discovered pyridoxal and pyridoxamine as the active forms of vitamin B(6) and revealed the mechanism of transamination and other reactions catalysed by vitamin B(6) enzymes. His research in later years on pyruvoyl-dependent histidine decarboxylase unveiled the biogenesis mechanism of this first built-in cofactor. Throughout his career, he was a great mentor of many people, all of whom are inspired by his philosophy of science.

  15. Structure and stability of an azoreductase with an FAD cofactor from the strict anaerobe Clostridium perfringens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Jessica; Dai, Shuo; Ren, Jie; Taylor, Amanda; Wilkerson, Mitchell; John, Gilbert; Xie, Aihua

    2014-06-01

    Azoreductase enzymes present in many microorganisms exhibit the ability to reduce azo dyes, an abundant industrial pollutant, to produce carcinogenic metabolites that threaten human health. All biochemically-characterized azoreductases, around 30 to date, have been isolated from aerobic bacteria, except for AzoC, the azoreductase of Clostridium perfringens, which is from a strictly anaerobic bacterium. AzoC is a recently biochemically-characterized azoreductase. The lack of structural information on AzoC hinders the mechanistic understanding of this enzyme. In this paper, we report on the biophysical characterization of the structure and thermal stability of AzoC by using a wide range of biophysical tools: Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS), Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy, Fourier-transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy, SDS-PAGE, Size Exclusion Chromatography, MALDI-TOF and UV-visible spectroscopy. We found that the flavin cofactor of AzoC is FAD, while all other structurally-known azoreductases employ FMN as a cofactor. The secondary structure of AzoC has 16% less α-helix structures, 5% more β-sheet structures and 11% more turn and unordered than the average of structurally-known azoreductase that have 10-14% sequence similarities with AzoC. We also found that oxidized AzoC is trimeric, which is unique amongst structurally known azoreductases. In contrast, reduced AzoC is monomeric, despite similarities in catalytic activity and thermal stability of oxidized and reduced AzoC. Our results show that the use of FTIR spectroscopy is crucial for characterization of the β-sheet content in AzoC, illustrating the need for complementary biophysical tools for secondary structural characterization of proteins.

  16. Molybdenum cofactor and isolated sulphite oxidase deficiencies: Clinical and molecular spectrum among Egyptian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Maha S; Selim, Laila; El-Bassyouni, Hala T; Issa, Mahmoud Y; Mahmoud, Iman; Ismail, Samira; Girgis, Mariane; Sadek, Abdelrahim A; Gleeson, Joseph G; Abdel Hamid, Mohamed S

    2016-09-01

    Molybdenum cofactor deficiency (MoCD) and Sulfite oxidase deficiency (SOD) are rare autosomal recessive conditions of sulfur-containing amino acid metabolism with overlapping clinical features and emerging therapies. The clinical phenotype is indistinguishable and they can only be differentiated biochemically. MOCS1, MOCS2, MOCS3, and GPRN genes contribute to the synthesis of molybdenum cofactor, and SUOX gene encodes sulfite oxidase. The aim of this study was to elucidate the clinical, radiological, biochemical and molecular findings in patients with SOD and MoCD. Detailed clinical and radiological assessment of 9 cases referred for neonatal encephalopathy with hypotonia, microcephaly, and epilepsy led to a consideration of disorders of sulfur-containing amino acid metabolism. The diagnosis of six with MoCD and three with SOD was confirmed by biochemical tests, targeted sequencing, and whole exome sequencing where suspicion of disease was lower. Novel SUOX mutations were detected in 3 SOD cases and a novel MOCS2 mutation in 1 MoCD case. Most patients presented in the first 3 months of life with intractable tonic-clonic seizures, axial hypotonia, limb hypertonia, exaggerated startle response, feeding difficulties, and progressive cystic encephalomalacia on brain imaging. A single patient with MoCD had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, hitherto unreported with these diseases. Our results emphasize that intractable neonatal seizures, spasticity, and feeding difficulties can be important early signs for these disorders. Progressive microcephaly, intellectual disability and specific brain imaging findings in the first year were additional diagnostic aids. These clinical cues can be used to minimize delays in diagnosis, especially since promising treatments are emerging for MoCD type A. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Increased isobutanol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by eliminating competing pathways and resolving cofactor imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Fumio; Ishii, Jun; Kondo, Takashi; Ida, Kengo; Tezuka, Hironori; Kondo, Akihiko

    2013-12-05

    Isobutanol is an important target for biorefinery research as a next-generation biofuel and a building block for commodity chemical production. Metabolically engineered microbial strains to produce isobutanol have been successfully developed by introducing the Ehrlich pathway into bacterial hosts. Isobutanol-producing baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) strains have been developed following the strategy with respect to its advantageous characteristics for cost-effective isobutanol production. However, the isobutanol yields and titers attained by the developed strains need to be further improved through engineering of S. cerevisiae metabolism. Two strategies including eliminating competing pathways and resolving the cofactor imbalance were applied to improve isobutanol production in S. cerevisiae. Isobutanol production levels were increased in strains lacking genes encoding members of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex such as LPD1, indicating that the pyruvate supply for isobutanol biosynthesis is competing with acetyl-CoA biosynthesis in mitochondria. Isobutanol production was increased by overexpression of enzymes responsible for transhydrogenase-like shunts such as pyruvate carboxylase, malate dehydrogenase, and malic enzyme. The integration of a single gene deletion lpd1Δ and the activation of the transhydrogenase-like shunt further increased isobutanol levels. In a batch fermentation test at the 50-mL scale from 100 g/L glucose using the two integrated strains, the isobutanol titer reached 1.62 ± 0.11 g/L and 1.61 ± 0.03 g/L at 24 h after the start of fermentation, which corresponds to the yield at 0.016 ± 0.001 g/g glucose consumed and 0.016 ± 0.0003 g/g glucose consumed, respectively. These results demonstrate that downregulation of competing pathways and metabolic functions for resolving the cofactor imbalance are promising strategies to construct S. cerevisiae strains that effectively produce isobutanol.

  18. Dissecting Torsin/cofactor function at the nuclear envelope: a genetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudermilch, Ethan; Tsai, Pei-Ling; Graham, Morven; Turner, Elizabeth; Zhao, Chenguang; Schlieker, Christian

    2016-12-15

    The human genome encodes four Torsin ATPases, the functions of which are poorly understood. In this study, we use CRISPR/Cas9 engineering to delete all four Torsin ATPases individually and in combination. Using nuclear envelope (NE) blebbing as a phenotypic measure, we establish a direct correlation between the number of inactivated Torsin alleles and the occurrence of omega-shaped herniations within the lumen of the NE. A similar, although not identical, redundancy is observed for LAP1 and LULL1, which serve as regulatory cofactors for a subset of Torsin ATPases. Unexpectedly, deletion of Tor2A in a TorA/B/3A-deficient background results in a stark increase of bleb formation, even though Tor2A does not respond to LAP1/LULL1 stimulation. The robustness of the observed phenotype in Torsin-deficient cells enables a structural analysis via electron microscopy tomography and a compositional analysis via immunogold labeling. Ubiquitin and nucleoporins were identified as distinctively localizing components of the omega-shaped bleb structure. These findings suggest a functional link between the Torsin/cofactor system and NE/nuclear pore complex biogenesis or homeostasis and establish a Torsin-deficient cell line as a valuable experimental platform with which to decipher Torsin function. © 2016 Laudermilch et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  19. The intersection of the extrinsic hedgehog and WNT/wingless signals with the intrinsic Hox code underpins branching pattern and tube shape diversity in the drosophila airways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Matsuda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The tubular networks of the Drosophila respiratory system and our vasculature show distinct branching patterns and tube shapes in different body regions. These local variations are crucial for organ function and organismal fitness. Organotypic patterns and tube geometries in branched networks are typically controlled by variations of extrinsic signaling but the impact of intrinsic factors on branch patterns and shapes is not well explored. Here, we show that the intersection of extrinsic hedgehog(hh and WNT/wingless (wg signaling with the tube-intrinsic Hox code of distinct segments specifies the tube pattern and shape of the Drosophila airways. In the cephalic part of the airways, hh signaling induces expression of the transcription factor (TF knirps (kni in the anterior dorsal trunk (DTa1. kni represses the expression of another TF spalt major (salm, making DTa1 a narrow and long tube. In DTa branches of more posterior metameres, Bithorax Complex (BX-C Hox genes autonomously divert hh signaling from inducing kni, thereby allowing DTa branches to develop as salm-dependent thick and short tubes. Moreover, the differential expression of BX-C genes is partly responsible for the anterior-to-posterior gradual increase of the DT tube diameter through regulating the expression level of Salm, a transcriptional target of WNT/wg signaling. Thus, our results highlight how tube intrinsic differential competence can diversify tube morphology without changing availabilities of extrinsic factors.

  20. Separation of xylose and glucose using an integrated membrane system for enzymatic cofactor regeneration and downstream purification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morthensen, Sofie Thage; Sigurdardóttir, Sigyn Björk; Meyer, Anne S.

    2017-01-01

    Mixtures of xylose, glucose and pyruvate were fed to a membrane bioreactor equipped with a charged NF membrane (NTR 7450). Value-added products were obtained in the reactor via enzymatic cofactor-dependent catalysis of glucose to gluconic acid and pyruvate to lactic acid, respectively. The initial...

  1. COFACTOR SPECIFICITY ENGINEERING OF STREPTOCOCCUS MUTANS NADH OXIDASE 2 FOR NAD(P+ REGENERATION IN BIOCATALYTIC OXIDATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Petschacher

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Soluble water-forming NAD(PH oxidases constitute a promising NAD(P+ regeneration method as they only need oxygen as cosubstrate and produce water as sole byproduct. Moreover, the thermodynamic equilibrium of O2 reduction is a valuable driving force for mostly energetically unfavorable biocatalytic oxidations. Here, we present the generation of an NAD(PH oxidase with high activity for both cofactors, NADH and NADPH. Starting from the strictly NADH specific water-forming Streptococcus mutans NADH oxidase 2 several rationally designed cofactor binding site mutants were created and kinetic values for NADH and NADPH conversion were determined. Double mutant 93R94H showed comparable high rates and low Km values for NADPH (kcat 20 s−1, Km 6 μM and NADH (kcat 25 s−1, Km 9 μM with retention of 70 % of wild type activity towards NADH. Moreover, by screening of a SeSaM library S. mutans NADH oxidase 2 variants showing predominantly NADPH activity were found, giving further insight into cofactor binding site architecture. Applicability for cofactor regeneration is shown for coupling with alcohol dehydrogenase from Sphyngobium yanoikuyae for 2-heptanone production.

  2. Determinants of Cofactor Specificity for the Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli: Simulation, Kinetics and Evolutionary Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentealba, Matias; Muñoz, Rodrigo; Maturana, Pablo; Krapp, Adriana; Cabrera, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenases (G6PDHs) from different sources show varying specificities towards NAD+ and NADP+ as cofactors. However, it is not known to what extent structural determinants of cofactor preference are conserved in the G6PDH family. In this work, molecular simulations, kinetic characterization of site-directed mutants and phylogenetic analyses were used to study the structural basis for the strong preference towards NADP+ shown by the G6PDH from Escherichia coli. Molecular Dynamics trajectories of homology models showed a highly favorable binding energy for residues K18 and R50 when interacting with the 2'-phosphate of NADP+, but the same residues formed no observable interactions in the case of NAD+. Alanine mutants of both residues were kinetically characterized and analyzed with respect to the binding energy of the transition state, according to the kcat/KM value determined for each cofactor. Whereas both residues contribute to the binding energy of NADP+, only R50 makes a contribution (about -1 kcal/mol) to NAD+ binding. In the absence of both positive charges the enzyme was unable to discriminate NADP+ from NAD+. Although kinetic data is sparse, the observed distribution of cofactor preferences within the phylogenetic tree is sufficient to rule out the possibility that the known NADP+-specific G6PDHs form a monophyletic group. While the β1-α1 loop shows no strict conservation of K18, (rather, S and T seem to be more frequent), in the case of the β2-α2 loop, different degrees of conservation are observed for R50. Noteworthy is the fact that a K18T mutant is indistinguishable from K18A in terms of cofactor preference. We conclude that the structural determinants for the strict discrimination against NAD+ in the case of the NADP+-specific enzymes have evolved independently through different means during the evolution of the G6PDH family. We further suggest that other regions in the cofactor binding pocket, besides the β1-α1 and β2-α2

  3. Heterogeneous production and loss of HOx by airborne TiO2 particles and implications for climate change mitigation strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, D. R.; Heard, D. E.; Ingham, T.; Chipperfield, M.; Seakins, P. W.; Baeza Romero, M. T. T.; Taverna, G. S.

    2016-12-01

    It is suggested that injection of TiO2 particles into the stratosphere to back-scatter solar radiation maybe an effective measure to mitigate the effects of global warming. TiO2 particles are well suited to this application because of their high refractive index.1 However, the effect of such a measure on stratospheric chemistry is not fully understood. HO2 is a key atmospheric species in both the troposphere and the stratosphere and is responsible for 40% of ozone destruction in the lower stratosphere.2 In addition to this, application of TiO2 coatings to surfaces within the urban environment are used to abate ambient levels of NO2 and for their self-cleaning properties. This study investigates the heterogeneous reaction between airborne sub-micron TiO2 particles and HO2 radicals using an aerosol flow tube and the FAGE (fluorescence assay by gas expansion) technique to monitor HO2 uptake. The dependence of the uptake coefficient (γHO2) to relative humidity (RH) has been determined. Experiments performed in dark conditions at the most stratospherically relevant RH (11.1%) determined γHO2 = (2.08 ± 0.11) × 10-2. A positive dependence of γHO2 with RH was observed which showed a correlation between γHO2 and the number of monolayers of water adsorbed on the particle surface. Experiments illuminated with near-UV light (365 nm) were performed and showed significant production of HO2 from the aerosols into the gas phase. The concentrations were dependent on light flux, RH and total particle surface area. While the production of HOx in the gas phase has been observed close to TiO2 surfaces in the presence of H2O23,4 it is believed that this phenomena has not been observed from airborne TiO2 particles and parameterized in this way before. Emissions of HO2 from the surface of TiO2 particles in the stratosphere could rule out the application of TiO2 particles for use within solar-radiation management schemes. The TOMCAT 3-D chemical transport model was used to predict

  4. Nighttime HOx chemistry in the Pearl River Delta and Beijing in summer 2006: intense oxidation without sunlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, K. D.; Rohrer, F.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Fuchs, H.; Brauers, T.; Dlugi, R.; Li, X.; Lou, S. R.; Shao, M.; Zhu, T.; Wahner, A.; Zhang, Y. H.

    2012-04-01

    Due to the absence of sunlight, unexpected high nighttime OH concentrations reported in previous field studies are of high interest for in-depth understanding of trace gas removal and reaction kinetics. In summer 2006, within the framework of PRIDE-PRD2006 and CAREBEIJING2006, we performed intensive in-situ measurements for HOx radicals and ancillary parameters at two non-urban sites in Pearl River Delta and Beijing, respectively. During nighttime, quite similar features for both campaigns were observed. Measured nighttime OH and HO2 concentrations were about 0.5 - 3-106cm-3 and 0.2 - 5-108cm-3, respectively. A box model with the established chemical mechanism (RACM-MIM-GK) underestimated these observed OH concentrations by an order of magnitude while reproduced the observed HO2 taking into account the known interference from ambient RO2 radicals (Fuchs et al. 2011). By testing the recently proposed recycling mechanisms applied for daytime chemistry, we found both a small primary source and a secondary source of OH radicals, the last one comparable to daytime observations (Lu et al., 2011, Hofzumahaus et al., 2009). Interestingly, the widely applied LIM0 and MIM2+ showed marginal impacts on the modeled nighttime OH concentrations under high isoprene concentrations. With the help of a simple 1 d simulation, we found that direct input of ROx radicals by vertical transport was negligible while the input of PAN and MPAN could be of significance. Averaged nighttime pollutant turnover rates by OH were as high as 8 ppb/h and 4 ppb/h for PRD and Beijing, respectively, dominating nighttime oxidation processes. Fuchs, H., et al. Detection of HO2 by laser-induced fluorescence: calibration and interferences from RO2 radicals, Atmos. Meas. Tech., 4, 1209-1225, 2011. Hofzumahaus, A. et al. Amplified Trace Gas Removal in the Troposphere, Science, 324, 1702-1704, 2009. Lu, K. D. et al. Observation and modelling of OH and HO2 concentrations in the Pearl River Delta 2006: a missing

  5. Global analysis of induced transcription factors and cofactors identifies Tfdp2 as an essential coregulator during terminal erythropoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cynthia; Lodish, Harvey F

    2014-06-01

    Key transcriptional regulators of terminal erythropoiesis, such as GATA-binding factor 1 (GATA1) and T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia protein 1 (TAL1), have been well characterized, but transcription factors and cofactors and their expression modulations have not yet been explored on a global scale. Here, we use global gene expression analysis to identify 28 transcription factors and 19 transcriptional cofactors induced during terminal erythroid differentiation whose promoters are enriched for binding by GATA1 and TAL1. Utilizing protein-protein interaction databases to identify cofactors for each transcription factor, we pinpoint several co-induced pairs, of which E2f2 and its cofactor transcription factor Dp-2 (Tfdp2) were the most highly induced. TFDP2 is a critical cofactor required for proper cell cycle control and gene expression. GATA1 and TAL1 are bound to the regulatory regions of Tfdp2 and upregulate its expression and knockdown of Tfdp2 results in significantly reduced rates of proliferation as well as reduced upregulation of many erythroid-important genes. Loss of Tfdp2 also globally inhibits the normal downregulation of many E2F2 target genes, including those that regulate the cell cycle, causing cells to accumulate in S phase and resulting in increased erythrocyte size. Our findings highlight the importance of TFDP2 in coupling the erythroid cell cycle with terminal differentiation and validate this study as a resource for future work on elucidating the role of diverse transcription factors and coregulators in erythropoiesis. Copyright © 2014 ISEH - Society for Hematology and Stem Cells. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. HOx radical chemistry in oxidation flow reactors with low-pressure mercury lamps systematically examined by modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Z.; Day, D. A.; Stark, H.; Li, R.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Palm, B. B.; Brune, W. H.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-11-01

    model are within ±25 % for OH exposure and within ±60 % for other parameters. These uncertainties are small relative to the dynamic range of outputs. Uncertainty analysis shows that most of the uncertainty is contributed by photolysis rates of O3, O2, and H2O and reactions of OH and HO2 with themselves or with some abundant species, i.e., O3 and H2O2. OHexp calculated from direct integration and estimated from SO2 decay in the model with laminar and measured residence time distributions (RTDs) are generally within a factor of 2 from the plug-flow OHexp. However, in the models with RTDs, OHexp estimated from SO2 is systematically lower than directly integrated OHexp in the case of significant SO2 consumption. We thus recommended using OHexp estimated from the decay of the species under study when possible, to obtain the most appropriate information on photochemical aging in the OFR. Using HOx-recycling vs. destructive external OH reactivity only leads to small changes in OHexp under most conditions. Changing the identity (rate constant) of external OH reactants can result in substantial changes in OHexp due to different reductions in OH suppression as the reactant is consumed. We also report two equations for estimating OH exposure in OFR254. We find that the equation estimating OHexp from measured O3 consumption performs better than an alternative equation that does not use it, and thus recommend measuring both input and output O3 concentrations in OFR254 experiments. This study contributes to establishing a firm and systematic understanding of the gas-phase HOx and Ox chemistry in these reactors, and enables better experiment planning and interpretation as well as improved design of future reactors.

  7. Corto and DSP1 interact and bind to a maintenance element of the Scr Hox gene: understanding the role of Enhancers of trithorax and Polycomb

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    Boldyreva Lidiya

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polycomb-group genes (PcG encode proteins that maintain homeotic (Hox gene repression throughout development. Conversely, trithorax-group (trxG genes encode positive factors required for maintenance of long term Hox gene activation. Both kinds of factors bind chromatin regions called maintenance elements (ME. Our previous work has shown that corto, which codes for a chromodomain protein, and dsp1, which codes for an HMGB protein, belong to a class of genes called the Enhancers of trithorax and Polycomb (ETP that interact with both PcG and trxG. Moreover, dsp1 interacts with the Hox gene Scr, the DSP1 protein is present on a Scr ME in S2 cells but not in embryos. To understand better the role of ETP, we addressed genetic and molecular interactions between corto and dsp1. Results We show that Corto and DSP1 proteins co-localize at 91 sites on polytene chromosomes and co-immunoprecipitate in embryos. They interact directly through the DSP1 HMG-boxes and the amino-part of Corto, which contains a chromodomain. In order to search for a common target, we performed a genetic interaction analysis. We observed that corto mutants suppressed dsp11 sex comb phenotypes and enhanced AntpScx phenotypes, suggesting that corto and dsp1 are simultaneously involved in the regulation of Scr. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation of the Scr ME, we found that Corto was present on this ME both in Drosophila S2 cells and in embryos, whereas DSP1 was present only in S2 cells. Conclusion Our results reveal that the proteins Corto and DSP1 are differently recruited to a Scr ME depending on whether the ME is active, as seen in S2 cells, or inactive, as in most embryonic cells. The presence of a given combination of ETPs on an ME would control the recruitment of either PcG or TrxG complexes, propagating the silenced or active state.

  8. The geochemical record of the ancient nitrogen cycle, nitrogen isotopes, and metal cofactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Linda V; Glass, Jennifer B

    2011-01-01

    The nitrogen (N) cycle is the only global biogeochemical cycle that is driven by biological functions involving the interaction of many microorganisms. The N cycle has evolved over geological time and its interaction with the oxygen cycle has had profound effects on the evolution and timing of Earth's atmosphere oxygenation (Falkowski and Godfrey, 2008). Almost every enzyme that microorganisms use to manipulate N contains redox-sensitive metals. Bioavailability of these metals has changed through time as a function of varying redox conditions, and likely influenced the biological underpinnings of the N cycle. It is possible to construct a record through geological time using N isotopes and metal concentrations in sediments to determine when the different stages of the N cycle evolved and the role metal availability played in the development of key enzymes. The same techniques are applicable to understanding the operation and changes in the N cycle through geological time. However, N and many of the redox-sensitive metals in some of their oxidation states are mobile and the isotopic composition or distribution can be altered by subsequent processes leading to erroneous conclusions. This chapter reviews the enzymology and metal cofactors of the N cycle and describes proper utilization of methods used to reconstruct evolution of the N cycle through time. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and its cofactor vitronectin stabilize arterial thrombi after vascular injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinides, S; Schäfer, K; Thinnes, T; Loskutoff, D J

    2001-01-30

    The origin and contribution of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and its cofactor vitronectin (VN) to arterial thrombosis/thrombolysis in vivo is controversial. Ferric chloride was used to induce carotid artery injury in 97 wild-type (WT), 84 PAI-1-/-, and 84 VN-/- mice. Complete thrombotic occlusion was observed in 70% of PAI-1-/- mice versus 92% of WT (P:thrombi were unstable and frequently embolized. As a result, the patency rate of carotid vessels 30 minutes after injury was as high in VN-/- mice (36%) as in PAI-1-/- mice (which demonstrate progressive thrombolysis) and significantly higher than that of WT mice (12%; P:=0.013). Histochemical and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction studies revealed an early upregulation of PAI-1 mRNA and protein expression in the thrombus and the vessel wall, which persisted for >/=1 week. VN protein also accumulated after injury, but VN mRNA levels remained low at all times. PAI-1 and VN participate in the thrombotic response to arterial injury by preventing premature thrombus dissolution and embolization. The accumulation of PAI-1 in the thrombus/vessel wall after injury may result, at least in part, from local synthesis, whereas the VN protein appears to be derived from plasma.

  10. Purification and characterization of iron-cofactored superoxide dismutase from Enteromorpha linza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Mingsheng; Cai, Ruanhong; Wang, Shujun; Liu, Zhaopu; Jiao, Yuliang; Fang, Yaowei; Zhang, Xiaoxin

    2013-11-01

    A superoxide dismutase was purified from Enteromorpha linza using a simple and safe procedure, which comprised phosphate buffer extraction, ammonium sulphate precipitation, ion exchange chromatography on Q-sepharose column, and gel filtration chromatography on Superdex 200 10/300GL. The E. linza superoxide dismutase ( ElSOD) was purified 103.6-fold, and a yield of 19.1% and a specific activity of 1 750 U/mg protein were obtained. The SDS-PAGE exhibited ElSOD a single band near 23 kDa and the gel filtration study showed ElSOD's molecular weight is near 46 kDa in nondenatured condition, indicating it's a homodimeric protein. El SOD is an iron-cofactored superoxide dismutase (Fe-SOD) because it was inhibited by hydrogen peroxide, insensitive to potassium cyanide. The optimal temperature for its maximal enzyme activity was 35°C, and it still had 29.8% relative activity at 0°C, then ElSOD can be classified as a cold-adapted enzyme. ElSOD was stable when temperature was below 40°C or the pH was within the range of 5-10. The first 11 N-terminal amino acids of ElSOD were ALELKAPPYEL, comparison of its N-terminal sequence with other Fe-SOD N-terminal sequences at the same position suggests it is possibly a chloroplastic Fe-SOD.

  11. Influence of the molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis on anaerobic respiration, biofilm formation and motility in Burkholderia thailandensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreae, Clio A; Titball, Richard W; Butler, Clive S

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia thailandensis is closely related to Burkholderia pseudomallei, a bacterial pathogen and the causative agent of melioidosis. B. pseudomallei can survive and persist within a hypoxic environment for up to one year and has been shown to grow anaerobically in the presence of nitrate. Currently, little is known about the role of anaerobic respiration in pathogenesis of melioidosis. Using B. thailandensis as a model, a library of 1344 transposon mutants was created to identify genes required for anaerobic nitrate respiration. One transposon mutant (CA01) was identified with an insertion in BTH_I1704 (moeA), a gene required for the molybdopterin biosynthetic pathway. This pathway is involved in the synthesis of a molybdopterin cofactor required for a variety of molybdoenzymes, including nitrate reductase. Disruption of molybdopterin biosynthesis prevented growth under anaerobic conditions, when using nitrate as the sole terminal electron acceptor. Defects in anaerobic respiration, nitrate reduction, motility and biofilm formation were observed for CA01. Mutant complementation with pDA-17:BTH_I1704 was able to restore anaerobic growth on nitrate, nitrate reductase activity and biofilm formation, but did not restore motility. This study highlights the potential importance of molybdoenzyme-dependent anaerobic respiration in the survival and virulence of B. thailandensis. Copyright © 2013 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Overexpression of Arabidopsis molybdenum cofactor sulfurase gene confers drought tolerance in maize (Zea mays L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yao; Li, Yajun; Zhang, Jiachang; Xiao, Yitao; Yue, Yuesen; Duan, Liusheng; Zhang, Mingcai; Li, Zhaohu

    2013-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a key component of the signaling system that integrates plant adaptive responses to abiotic stress. Overexpression of Arabidopsis molybdenum cofactor sulfurase gene (LOS5) in maize markedly enhanced the expression of ZmAO and aldehyde oxidase (AO) activity, leading to ABA accumulation and increased drought tolerance. Transgenic maize (Zea mays L.) exhibited the expected reductions in stomatal aperture, which led to decreased water loss and maintenance of higher relative water content (RWC) and leaf water potential. Also, transgenic maize subjected to drought treatment exhibited lower leaf wilting, electrolyte leakage, malondialdehyde (MDA) and H(2)O(2) content, and higher activities of antioxidative enzymes and proline content compared to wild-type (WT) maize. Moreover, overexpression of LOS5 enhanced the expression of stress-regulated genes such as Rad 17, NCED1, CAT1, and ZmP5CS1 under drought stress conditions, and increased root system development and biomass yield after re-watering. The increased drought tolerance in transgenic plants was associated with ABA accumulation via activated AO and expression of stress-related gene via ABA induction, which sequentially induced a set of favorable stress-related physiological and biochemical responses.

  13. Overexpression of Arabidopsis molybdenum cofactor sulfurase gene confers drought tolerance in maize (Zea mays L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Lu

    Full Text Available Abscisic acid (ABA is a key component of the signaling system that integrates plant adaptive responses to abiotic stress. Overexpression of Arabidopsis molybdenum cofactor sulfurase gene (LOS5 in maize markedly enhanced the expression of ZmAO and aldehyde oxidase (AO activity, leading to ABA accumulation and increased drought tolerance. Transgenic maize (Zea mays L. exhibited the expected reductions in stomatal aperture, which led to decreased water loss and maintenance of higher relative water content (RWC and leaf water potential. Also, transgenic maize subjected to drought treatment exhibited lower leaf wilting, electrolyte leakage, malondialdehyde (MDA and H(2O(2 content, and higher activities of antioxidative enzymes and proline content compared to wild-type (WT maize. Moreover, overexpression of LOS5 enhanced the expression of stress-regulated genes such as Rad 17, NCED1, CAT1, and ZmP5CS1 under drought stress conditions, and increased root system development and biomass yield after re-watering. The increased drought tolerance in transgenic plants was associated with ABA accumulation via activated AO and expression of stress-related gene via ABA induction, which sequentially induced a set of favorable stress-related physiological and biochemical responses.

  14. Structural basis for activation of an archaeal ribonuclease P RNA by protein cofactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Makoto

    2017-09-01

    Ribonuclease P (RNase P) is an endoribonuclease that catalyzes the processing of the 5'-leader sequence of precursor tRNA (pre-tRNA) in all phylogenetic domains. We have found that RNase P in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 consists of RNase P RNA (PhopRNA) and five protein cofactors designated PhoPop5, PhoRpp21, PhoRpp29, PhoRpp30, and PhoRpp38. Biochemical characterizations over the past 10 years have revealed that PhoPop5 and PhoRpp30 fold into a heterotetramer and cooperate to activate a catalytic domain (C-domain) in PhopRNA, whereas PhoRpp21 and PhoRpp29 form a heterodimer and function together to activate a specificity domain (S-domain) in PhopRNA. PhoRpp38 plays a role in elevation of the optimum temperature of RNase P activity, binding to kink-turn (K-turn) motifs in two stem-loops in PhopRNA. This review describes the structural and functional information on P. horikoshii RNase P, focusing on the structural basis for the PhopRNA activation by the five RNase P proteins.

  15. [Heparin cofactor II, a thrombin inhibitor with a still not clarified physiologic role].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, E B; Duboscq, C L; Kordich, L C

    1999-01-01

    Heparin Cofactor II (HCII) is a glycoprotein in human plasma which inactivates thrombin rapidly in the presence of dermatan sulfate. Inhibition occurs by formation of a stable equimolar complex between HCII and thrombin. HCII association with thrombotic events has not always been observed, thus decreased HCII does not appear to be a strong risk factor for thromboembolic events. Reduced HCII levels have been detected in different clinical conditions, such as hepatic failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation, thalasemina, sickle cell anemia. Increased physiological levels have been found in pregnant women and oral contraception. In our laboratory, we measured HCII plasmatic levels in the normal Buenos Aires city population and in patients under different clinical conditions, such as sepsis, diabetis, burns, oral anticoagulation and in patients treated with heparin, hyperhomcysteinemia in whom septic and diabetic patients showed decreased values. HCII thrombin inhibition possibly takes place in extravascular sites where dermatan sulfate is present. HCII activity would be important in the regulation of wound healing, inflammation, or neuronal development.

  16. Molecular strategies of microbial iron assimilation: from high-affinity complexes to cofactor assembly systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miethke, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms have to cope with restricted iron bioavailability in most environmental habitats as well as during host colonization. The continuous struggle for iron has brought forth a plethora of acquisition and assimilation strategies that share several functional and mechanistic principles. One common theme is the utilization of high-affinity chelators for extracellular iron mobilization, generally known as siderophore-dependent iron acquisition. This basic strategy is related with another central aspect of microbial iron acquisition, which is the release of the mobilized iron from extracellular sources to allow its transfer and incorporation into metabolically active proteins. A variety of mechanisms which are often coupled with high-affinity uptake have evolved to facilitate the removal of iron from siderophore ligands; however, they differ in many key aspects including substrate specificities and release efficiencies. The most sophisticated iron release pathways comprise processes of specific hydrolysis and reduction of ferric siderophores, especially in the case of high-affinity iron complexes with greatly negative redox potentials that often represent crucial factors for virulence development in bacterial and fungal pathogens. During the following steps of iron utilization, the acquired metal is transferred through intracellular trafficking pathways which may include diverse storage compartments in order to be directed to cofactor assembly systems and to final protein targeting. Several of these iron channeling routes have been described recently and provide first insights into the later steps of iron assimilation that characterize an essential part of the cellular iron homeostasis network.

  17. A Regulatory Role of NAD Redox Status on Flavin Cofactor Homeostasis in S. cerevisiae Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Anna Giancaspero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD are two redox cofactors of pivotal importance for mitochondrial functionality and cellular redox balance. Despite their relevance, the mechanism by which intramitochondrial NAD(H and FAD levels are maintained remains quite unclear in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We investigated here the ability of isolated mitochondria to degrade externally added FAD and NAD (in both its reduced and oxidized forms. A set of kinetic experiments demonstrated that mitochondrial FAD and NAD(H destroying enzymes are different from each other and from the already characterized NUDIX hydrolases. We studied here, in some detail, FAD pyrophosphatase (EC 3.6.1.18, which is inhibited by NAD+ and NADH according to a noncompetitive inhibition, with Ki values that differ from each other by an order of magnitude. These findings, together with the ability of mitochondrial FAD pyrophosphatase to metabolize endogenous FAD, presumably deriving from mitochondrial holoflavoproteins destined to degradation, allow for proposing a novel possible role of mitochondrial NAD redox status in regulating FAD homeostasis and/or flavoprotein degradation in S. cerevisiae.

  18. The potential involvement of the cofactor of BRCA1 in hepatocellular carcinoma pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Youssef

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The cofactor of BRCA1 (COBRA1, which also refers to negative elongation factor polypeptide B (NELF-B, is a negative elongation factor (NELF subunit that has been implicated in the development and progression of several cancers. While reduced COBRA1 expression has been associated with metastatic breast cancer, COBRA1 negatively regulates the activator protein-1 (AP-1 complex, leading to the down-regulation of trefoil factor-1 (TFF1 expression in gastric cancer cell lines. The involvement of COBRA1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC tumor formation and progression is not known. Here, we investigated the expression of COBRA1, the AP-1 complex, and TFF1 in several HCC cell lines; ranging from low- to high-grade HCC cell lines generated from patients with different stages of the disease. Our results showed that the COBRA1 protein was highly expressed in the low-grade HCC cell line, while significantly down-regulated in high-grade HCC cell lines. TFF1, previously regarded as a COBRA1 target gene, was only expressed in the low-grade HCC cell line and the control cells. Our results suggest that COBRA1 may play a role in HCC pathogenesis and progression. The TFF1 mRNA expression profile was uncorrelated to that of the AP-1 complex subunit proteins, which suggests the involvement of other regulatory pathways in TFF1 expression; however, this requires further study.

  19. Co-immobilization of enoate reductase with a cofactor-recycling partner enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Han; Xiao, Wenhua; Xie, Panpan; Zheng, Liangyu

    2018-02-01

    Herein we established co-immobilized methods for enoate reductases (ERs) and glucose dehydrogenase (GDH), forming a cofactor regeneration system. In cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs), ammonium sulfate and oxidized dextran were selected as a precipitant and a cross-linker, respectively. In biomimetic immobilization (BI), ER-GDH-silica particles (ER-GDH-SPs) were rapidly formed through a one-step approach by using a silicic acid precursor. Under the optimal conditions, the ER activity recovery in ER-GDH-CLEAs and ER-GDH-SPs were 44.9±1.8% and 44.5±2.1%, and the immobilization efficiency was 93.5±1.2% and 92.4±1.2%, respectively. ER-GDH-CLEAs and ER-GDH-SPs exhibit excellent thermal and pH stability, and superior reusability. The activity of ER-GDH-SPs toward the substrate is also better than that of free ER and GDH in reduction of 4-(4-Methoxyphenyl)-3-buten-2-one. This study introduces simple and inexpensive co-immobilization strategies to construct novel and efficient ER-GDH-CLEAs and ER-GDH-SPs with high activity and stability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Engineering of the glycerol decomposition pathway and cofactor regulation in an industrial yeast improves ethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Tang, Yan; Guo, Zhongpeng; Shi, Guiyang

    2013-10-01

    Glycerol is a major by-product of industrial ethanol production and its formation consumes up to 4 % of the sugar substrate. This study modified the glycerol decomposition pathway of an industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to optimize the consumption of substrate and yield of ethanol. This study is the first to couple glycerol degradation with ethanol formation, to the best of our knowledge. The recombinant strain overexpressing GCY1 and DAK1, encoding glycerol dehydrogenase and dihydroxyacetone kinase, respectively, in glycerol degradation pathway, exhibited a moderate increase in ethanol yield (2.9 %) and decrease in glycerol yield (24.9 %) compared to the wild type with the initial glucose concentration of 15 % under anaerobic conditions. However, when the mhpF gene, encoding acetylating NAD⁺-dependent acetaldehyde dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli, was co-expressed in the aforementioned recombinant strain, a further increase in ethanol yield by 5.5 % and decrease in glycerol yield by 48 % were observed for the resultant recombinant strain GDMS1 when acetic acid was added into the medium prior to inoculation compared to the wild type. The process outlined in this study which enhances glycerol consumption and cofactor regulation in an industrial yeast is a promising metabolic engineering strategy to increase ethanol production by reducing the formation of glycerol.

  1. Deoxyribozymes that catalyze photochemistry: cofactor-dependent and -independent photorepair of thymine dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Dipankar; Chinnapen, Daniel J F

    2003-01-01

    Experimental strategies involving in vitro selection, designed to test the validity of the "RNA World Hypothesis", have demonstrated a significantly broader catalytic range for RNA (and, nucleic acids in general) than found in naturally occurring ribozymes. We wished to explore whether photochemical reactions could be catalyzed by nucleic acid enzymes. In vitro selection experiments were carried out to obtain "photolyase" deoxyribozymes, capable of photoreversing thymine cyclobutane dimers in the presence of a cofactor, serotonin. During in vitro selection from a thymine-dimer containing random DNA library, irradiated with light >300 nm, two pools of catalytic nucleic molecules emerged--one that required serotonin for activity, and another pool that, surprisingly, did not. Characterization of the serotonin-independent clones indicated the optimal wavelength for its repair activity (approximately 1,400-fold) to be approximately 300 nm, notably red-shifted from the absorption maximum of the DNA itself. The folded enzyme may contain a G-quadruplex (whose spectra have red-shifted tails relative to duplex absorbance), and our hypothesis has the folded enzyme as an antenna for the efficient channelling of light or electrons to the thymine dimer, much in the manner of protein photolyases.

  2. The HOONO/HONO2 branching ratio in the OH + NO2 + M reaction: how effective is this reaction as a sink for HOx and NOX?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, M.; Bean, B. D.; Mollner, A. K.; Nizkorodov, S.; Nair, G.; Sander, S. P.; Peterson, K. A.; Francisco, J. S.

    2003-04-01

    The termolecular association reaction OH + NO_2 + M rightarrow HONO_2 + M is a critical process in the lower atmosphere, because it sequesters HO_x and NO_x radicals as nitric acid. However, a minor channel leading to formation of an isomer of nitric acid, HOONO or peroxynitrous acid, can diminish the yield of HONO_2. HOONO is less stable than nitric acid and would rapidly decompose to reactants in the atmosphere. We report a laboratory study in which one isomer, cis-cis HOONO is detected in direct absorption by IR cavity ringdown spectroscopy. The HOONO/HONO_2 branching ratios from the OH + NO_2 reaction are measured at low pressures, and implications for the atmosphere are discussed.

  3. An ab initio investigation of the significance of the HOOF intermediate in coupling reactions involving FOO(x) and HO(x) species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, J. S.

    1993-02-01

    Ab initio calculations are used to investigate the stability and role of HOOF in the reaction of FO with HO radicals. The heat of formation for HOOF is estimated as 0.4 +/- 2 kcal/mol using an isodesmic reaction scheme. Spectroscopic properties of the HOOF intermediate is also provided in order to facilitate its identification. Decomposition pathways of the intermediate are examined. The lowest energy pathway is the formation of F atoms and HO2 radicals and requires 27.2 kcal/mol to proceed. Reactions leading to the formation of the HOOF intermediate are examined in regard to their importance in understanding stratospheric chemistry involving the coupling of fluorine and fluorine oxide with HO(x) species in catalytic cycles.

  4. A New Standard for Crustacean Genomes: The Highly Contiguous, Annotated Genome Assembly of the Clam Shrimp Eulimnadia texana Reveals HOX Gene Order and Identifies the Sex Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Stephen C; Long, Anthony D

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Vernal pool clam shrimp (Eulimnadia texana) are a promising model system due to their ease of lab culture, short generation time, modest sized genome, a somewhat rare stable androdioecious sex determination system, and a requirement to reproduce via desiccated diapaused eggs. We generated a highly contiguous genome assembly using 46× of PacBio long read data and 216× of Illumina short reads, and annotated using Illumina RNAseq obtained from adult males or hermaphrodites. Of the 120 Mb genome 85% is contained in the largest eight contigs, the smallest of which is 4.6 Mb. The assembly contains 98% of transcripts predicted via RNAseq. This assembly is qualitatively different from scaffolded Illumina assemblies: It is produced from long reads that contain sequence data along their entire length, and is thus gap free. The contiguity of the assembly allows us to order the HOX genes within the genome, identifying two loci that contain HOX gene orthologs, and which approximately maintain the order observed in other arthropods. We identified a partial duplication of the Antennapedia complex adjacent to the few genes homologous to the Bithorax locus. Because the sex chromosome of an androdioecious species is of special interest, we used existing allozyme and microsatellite markers to identify the E. texana sex chromosome, and find that it comprises nearly half of the genome of this species. Linkage patterns indicate that recombination is extremely rare and perhaps absent in hermaphrodites, and as a result the location of the sex determining locus will be difficult to refine using recombination mapping. PMID:29294012

  5. CpG island clusters and pro-epigenetic selection for CpGs in protein-coding exons of HOX and other transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branciamore, Sergio; Chen, Zhao-Xia; Riggs, Arthur D; Rodin, Sergei N

    2010-08-31

    CpG dinucleotides contribute to epigenetic mechanisms by being the only site for DNA methylation in mammalian somatic cells. They are also mutation hotspots and approximately 5-fold depleted genome-wide. We report here a study focused on CpG sites in the coding regions of Hox and other transcription factor genes, comparing methylated genomes of Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, and Danio rerio with nonmethylated genomes of Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. We analyzed 4-fold degenerate, synonymous codons with the potential for CpG. That is, we studied "silent" changes that do not affect protein products but could damage epigenetic marking. We find that DNA-binding transcription factors and other developmentally relevant genes show, only in methylated genomes, a bimodal distribution of CpG usage. Several genetic code-based tests indicate, again for methylated genomes only, that the frequency of silent CpGs in Hox genes is much greater than expectation. Also informative are NCG-GNN and NCC-GNN codon doublets, for which an unusually high rate of G to C and C to G transversions was observed at the third (silent) position of the first codon. Together these results are interpreted as evidence for strong "pro-epigenetic" selection acting to preserve CpG sites in coding regions of many genes controlling development. We also report that DNA-binding transcription factors and developmentally important genes are dramatically overrepresented in or near clusters of three or more CpG islands, suggesting a possible relationship between evolutionary preservation of CpG dinucleotides in both coding regions and CpG islands.

  6. Biocatalytic hydroxylation of n-butane with in situ cofactor regeneration at low temperature and under normal pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svenja Staudt

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The hydroxylation of n-alkanes, which proceeds in the presence of a P450-monooxygenase advantageously at temperatures significantly below room temperature, is described. In addition, an enzymatic hydroxylation of the “liquid gas” n-butane with in situ cofactor regeneration, which does not require high-pressure conditions, was developed. The resulting 2-butanol was obtained as the only regioisomer, at a product concentration of 0.16 g/L.

  7. In silico model-driven cofactor engineering strategies for improving the overall NADP(H) turnover in microbial cell factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmanan, Meiyappan; Yu, Kai; Koduru, Lokanand; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2015-10-01

    Optimizing the overall NADPH turnover is one of the key challenges in various value-added biochemical syntheses. In this work, we first analyzed the NADPH regeneration potentials of common cell factories, including Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Bacillus subtilis, and Pichia pastoris across multiple environmental conditions and determined E. coli and glycerol as the best microbial chassis and most suitable carbon source, respectively. In addition, we identified optimal cofactor specificity engineering (CSE) enzyme targets, whose cofactors when switched from NAD(H) to NADP(H) improve the overall NADP(H) turnover. Among several enzyme targets, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase was recognized as a global candidate since its CSE improved the NADP(H) regeneration under most of the conditions examined. Finally, by analyzing the protein structures of all CSE enzyme targets via homology modeling, we established that the replacement of conserved glutamate or aspartate with serine in the loop region could change the cofactor dependence from NAD(H) to NADP(H).

  8. Elucidation of new condition-dependent roles for fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase linked to cofactor balances.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Toit W P Schabort

    Full Text Available The cofactor balances in metabolism is of paramount importance in the design of a metabolic engineering strategy and understanding the regulation of metabolism in general. ATP, NAD+ and NADP+ balances are central players linking the various fluxes in central metabolism as well as biomass formation. NADP+ is especially important in the metabolic engineering of yeasts for xylose fermentation, since NADPH is required by most yeasts in the initial step of xylose utilisation, including the fast-growing Kluyveromyces marxianus. In this simulation study of yeast metabolism, the complex interplay between these cofactors was investigated; in particular, how they may affect the possible roles of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, the pentose phosphate pathway, glycerol production and the pyruvate dehydrogenase bypass. Using flux balance analysis, it was found that the potential role of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase was highly dependent on the cofactor specificity of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and on the carbon source. Additionally, the excessive production of ATP under certain conditions might be involved in some of the phenomena observed, which may have been overlooked to date. Based on these findings, a strategy is proposed for the metabolic engineering of a future xylose-fermenting yeast for biofuel production.

  9. Diversity and Functional Analysis of the FeMo-Cofactor Maturase NifB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Arragain

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the main hurdles to engineer nitrogenase in a non-diazotrophic host is achieving NifB activity. NifB is an extremely unstable and oxygen sensitive protein that catalyzes a low-potential SAM-radical dependent reaction. The product of NifB activity is called NifB-co, a complex [8Fe-9S-C] cluster that serves as obligate intermediate in the biosyntheses of the active-site cofactors of all known nitrogenases. Here we study the diversity and phylogeny of naturally occurring NifB proteins, their protein architecture and the functions of the distinct NifB domains in order to understand what defines a catalytically active NifB. Focus is on NifB from the thermophile Chlorobium tepidum (two-domain architecture, the hyperthermophile Methanocaldococcus infernus (single-domain architecture and the mesophile Klebsiella oxytoca (two-domain architecture, showing in silico characterization of their nitrogen fixation (nif gene clusters, conserved NifB motifs, and functionality. C. tepidum and M. infernus NifB were able to complement an Azotobacter vinelandii (ΔnifB mutant restoring the Nif+ phenotype and thus demonstrating their functionality in vivo. In addition, purified C. tepidum NifB exhibited activity in the in vitro NifB-dependent nitrogenase reconstitution assay. Intriguingly, changing the two-domain K. oxytoca NifB to single-domain by removal of the C-terminal NifX-like extension resulted in higher in vivo nitrogenase activity, demonstrating that this domain is not required for nitrogen fixation in mesophiles.

  10. Bacterial Thymidylate Synthase Binds Two Molecules of Substrate and Cofactor without Cooperativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapienza, Paul J; Falk, Bradley T; Lee, Andrew L

    2015-11-18

    Thymidylate synthase (TSase) is a clinically important enzyme because it catalyzes synthesis of the sole de novo source of deoxy-thymidylate. Without this enzyme, cells die a "thymineless death" since they are starved of a crucial DNA synthesis precursor. As a drug target, TSase is well studied in terms of its structure and reaction mechanism. An interesting mechanistic feature of dimeric TSase is that it is "half-the-sites reactive", which is a form of negative cooperativity. Yet, the basis for this is not well-understood. Some experiments point to cooperativity at the binding steps of the reaction cycle as being responsible for the phenomenon, but the literature contains conflicting reports. Here we use ITC and NMR to resolve these inconsistencies. This first detailed thermodynamic dissection of multisite binding of dUMP to E. coli TSase shows the nucleotide binds to the free and singly bound forms of the enzyme with nearly equal affinity over a broad range of temperatures and in multiple buffers. While small but significant differences in ΔC°P for the two binding events show that the active sites are not formally equivalent, there is little-to-no allostery at the level of ΔG°bind. In addition NMR titration data reveal that there is minor intersubunit cooperativity in formation of a ternary complex with the mechanism based inhibitor, 5F-dUMP, and cofactor. Taken together, the data show that functional communication between subunits is minimal for both binding steps of the reaction coordinate.

  11. Contrasting Effects of Two Lipid Cofactors of Prion Replication on the Conformation of the Prion Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Srivastava

    Full Text Available Recent studies introduced two experimental protocols for converting full-length recombinant prion protein (rPrP purified from E.coli into the infectious prion state (PrPSc with high infectivity titers. Both protocols employed protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA for generating PrPSc de novo, but used two different lipids, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleolyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho(1'-rac-glycerol (POPG or phosphatidylethanolamine (PE, as conversion cofactors. The current study compares the effect of POPG and PE on the physical properties of native, α-helical full-length mouse rPrP under the solvent conditions used for converting rPrP into PrPSc. Surprisingly, the effects of POPG and PE on rPrP physical properties, including its conformation, thermodynamic stability, aggregation state and interaction with a lipid, were found to be remarkably different. PE was shown to have minimal, if any, effects on rPrP thermodynamic stability, cooperativity of unfolding, immediate solvent environment or aggregation state. In fact, little evidence indicates that PE interacts with rPrP directly. In contrast, POPG was found to bind to and induce dramatic changes in rPrP structure, including a loss of α-helical conformation and formation of large lipid-protein aggregates that were resistant to partially denaturing conditions. These results suggest that the mechanisms by which lipids assist conversion of rPrP into PrPSc might be fundamentally different for POPG and PE.

  12. Horizontal acquisition of a hypoxia-responsive molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis pathway contributed to Mycobacterium tuberculosis pathoadaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levillain, Florence; Poquet, Yannick; Mallet, Ludovic; Mazères, Serge; Marceau, Michael; Brosch, Roland; Bange, Franz-Christoph; Supply, Philip; Magalon, Axel; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2017-11-01

    The unique ability of the tuberculosis (TB) bacillus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, to persist for long periods of time in lung hypoxic lesions chiefly contributes to the global burden of latent TB. We and others previously reported that the M. tuberculosis ancestor underwent massive episodes of horizontal gene transfer (HGT), mostly from environmental species. Here, we sought to explore whether such ancient HGT played a part in M. tuberculosis evolution towards pathogenicity. We were interested by a HGT-acquired M. tuberculosis-specific gene set, namely moaA1-D1, which is involved in the biosynthesis of the molybdenum cofactor. Horizontal acquisition of this gene set was striking because homologues of these moa genes are present all across the Mycobacterium genus, including in M. tuberculosis. Here, we discovered that, unlike their paralogues, the moaA1-D1 genes are strongly induced under hypoxia. In vitro, a M. tuberculosis moaA1-D1-null mutant has an impaired ability to respire nitrate, to enter dormancy and to survive in oxygen-limiting conditions. Conversely, heterologous expression of moaA1-D1 in the phylogenetically closest non-TB mycobacterium, Mycobacterium kansasii, which lacks these genes, improves its capacity to respire nitrate and grants it with a marked ability to survive oxygen depletion. In vivo, the M. tuberculosis moaA1-D1-null mutant shows impaired survival in hypoxic granulomas in C3HeB/FeJ mice, but not in normoxic lesions in C57BL/6 animals. Collectively, our results identify a novel pathway required for M. tuberculosis resistance to host-imposed stress, namely hypoxia, and provide evidence that ancient HGT bolstered M. tuberculosis evolution from an environmental species towards a pervasive human-adapted pathogen.

  13. Taspase1 processing alters TFIIA cofactor properties in the regulation of TFIID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malecová, Barbora; Caputo, Valentina S; Lee, Diane F; Hsieh, James J; Oelgeschläger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    TFIIA is an important positive regulator of TFIID, the primary promoter recognition factor of the basal RNA polymerase II transcription machinery. TFIIA antagonises negative TFIID regulators such as negative cofactor 2 (NC2), promotes specific binding of the TBP subunit of TFIID to TATA core promoter sequence elements and stimulates the interaction of TBP-associated factors (TAFs) in the TFIID complex with core promoter elements located downstream of TATA, such as the initiator element (INR). Metazoan TFIIA consists of 3 subunits, TFIIAα (35 kDa), β (19 kDa) and γ (12 kDa). TFIIAα and β subunits are encoded by a single gene and result from site-specific cleavage of a 55 kDa TFIIA(α/β) precursor protein by the protease Taspase1. Metazoan cells have been shown to contain variable amounts of TFIIA (55/12 kDa) and Taspase1-processed TFIIA (35/19/12 kDa) depending on cell type, suggesting distinct gene-specific roles of unprocessed and Taspase1-processed TFIIA. How precisely Taspase1 processing affects TFIIA functions is not understood. Here we report that Taspase1 processing alters TFIIA interactions with TFIID and the conformation of TFIID/TFIIA promoter complexes. We further show that Taspase1 processing induces increased sensitivity of TFIID/TFIIA complexes to the repressor NC2, which is counteracted by the presence of an INR core promoter element. Our results provide first evidence that Taspase1 processing affects TFIIA regulation of TFIID and suggest that Taspase1 processing of TFIIA is required to establish INR-selective core promoter activity in the presence of NC2.

  14. Molybdate uptake by Agrobacterium tumefaciens correlates with the cellular molybdenum cofactor status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Marie-Christine; Ali, Koral; Sonnenschein, Marleen; Robrahn, Laura; Strauss, Daria; Narberhaus, Franz; Masepohl, Bernd

    2016-09-01

    Many enzymes require the molybdenum cofactor, Moco. Under Mo-limiting conditions, the high-affinity ABC transporter ModABC permits molybdate uptake and Moco biosynthesis in bacteria. Under Mo-replete conditions, Escherichia coli represses modABC transcription by the one-component regulator, ModE, consisting of a DNA-binding and a molybdate-sensing domain. Instead of a full-length ModE protein, many bacteria have a shorter ModE protein, ModE(S) , consisting of a DNA-binding domain only. Here, we asked how such proteins sense the intracellular molybdenum status. We show that the Agrobacterium tumefaciens ModE(S) protein Atu2564 is essential for modABC repression. ModE(S) binds two Mo-boxes in the modA promoter as shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Northern analysis revealed cotranscription of modE(S) with the upstream gene, atu2565, which was dispensable for ModE(S) activity. To identify genes controlling ModE(S) function, we performed transposon mutagenesis. Tn5 insertions resulting in derepressed modA transcription mapped to the atu2565-modE(S) operon and several Moco biosynthesis genes. We conclude that A. tumefaciens ModE(S) activity responds to Moco availability rather than to molybdate concentration directly, as is the case for E. coli ModE. Similar results in Sinorhizobium meliloti suggest that Moco dependence is a common feature of ModE(S) regulators. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The Antioxidant Cofactor Alpha-Lipoic Acid May Control Endogenous Formaldehyde Metabolism in Mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia V. Shindyapina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The healthy human body contains small amounts of metabolic formaldehyde (FA that mainly results from methanol oxidation by pectin methylesterase, which is active in a vegetable diet and in the gastrointestinal microbiome. With age, the ability to maintain a low level of FA decreases, which increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease and dementia. It has been shown that 1,2-dithiolane-3-pentanoic acid or alpha lipoic acid (ALA, a naturally occurring dithiol and antioxidant cofactor of mitochondrial α-ketoacid dehydrogenases, increases glutathione (GSH content and FA metabolism by mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2 thus manifests a therapeutic potential beyond its antioxidant property. We suggested that ALA can contribute to a decrease in the FA content of mammals by acting on ALDH2 expression. To test this assumption, we administered ALA in mice in order to examine the effect on FA metabolism and collected blood samples for the measurement of FA. Our data revealed that ALA efficiently eliminated FA in mice. Without affecting the specific activity of FA-metabolizing enzymes (ADH1, ALDH2, and ADH5, ALA increased the GSH content in the brain and up-regulated the expression of the FA-metabolizing ALDH2 gene in the brain, particularly in the hippocampus, but did not impact its expression in the liver in vivo or in rat liver isolated from the rest of the body. After ALA administration in mice and in accordance with the increased content of brain ALDH2 mRNA, we detected increased ALDH2 activity in brain homogenates. We hypothesized that the beneficial effects of ALA on patients with Alzheimer's disease may be associated with accelerated ALDH2-mediated FA detoxification and clearance.

  16. Serotype-Specific Structural Differences in the Protease-Cofactor Complexes of the Dengue Virus Family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandramouli, Sumana; Joseph, Jeremiah S.; Daudenarde, Sophie; Gatchalian, Jovylyn; Cornillez-Ty, Cromwell; Kuhn, Peter (Scripps)

    2010-03-04

    With an estimated 40% of the world population at risk, dengue poses a significant threat to human health, especially in tropical and subtropical regions. Preventative and curative efforts, such as vaccine development and drug discovery, face additional challenges due to the occurrence of four antigenically distinct serotypes of the causative dengue virus (DEN1 to -4). Complex immune responses resulting from repeat assaults by the different serotypes necessitate simultaneous targeting of all forms of the virus. One of the promising targets for drug development is the highly conserved two-component viral protease NS2B-NS3, which plays an essential role in viral replication by processing the viral precursor polyprotein into functional proteins. In this paper, we report the 2.1-{angstrom} crystal structure of the DEN1 NS2B hydrophilic core (residues 49 to 95) in complex with the NS3 protease domain (residues 1 to 186) carrying an internal deletion in the N terminus (residues 11 to 20). While the overall folds within the protease core are similar to those of DEN2 and DEN4 proteases, the conformation of the cofactor NS2B is dramatically different from those of other flaviviral apoprotease structures. The differences are especially apparent within its C-terminal region, implicated in substrate binding. The structure reveals for the first time serotype-specific structural elements in the dengue virus family, with the reported alternate conformation resulting from a unique metal-binding site within the DEN1 sequence. We also report the identification of a 10-residue stretch within NS3pro that separates the substrate-binding function from the catalytic turnover rate of the enzyme. Implications for broad-spectrum drug discovery are discussed.

  17. Purification and In Vitro Activity of Mitochondria Targeted Nitrogenase Cofactor Maturase NifB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Burén

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Active NifB is a milestone in the process of engineering nitrogen fixing plants. NifB is an extremely O2-sensitive S-adenosyl methionine (SAM–radical enzyme that provides the key metal cluster intermediate (NifB-co for the biosyntheses of the active-site cofactors of all three types of nitrogenases. NifB and NifB-co are unique to diazotrophic organisms. In this work, we have expressed synthetic codon-optimized versions of NifB from the γ-proteobacterium Azotobacter vinelandii and the thermophilic methanogen Methanocaldococcus infernus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in Nicotiana benthamiana. NifB proteins were targeted to the mitochondria, where O2 consumption is high and bacterial-like [Fe-S] cluster assembly operates. In yeast, NifB proteins were co-expressed with NifU, NifS, and FdxN proteins that are involved in NifB [Fe–S] cluster assembly and activity. The synthetic version of thermophilic NifB accumulated in soluble form within the yeast cell, while the A. vinelandii version appeared to form aggregates. Similarly, NifB from M. infernus was expressed at higher levels in leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana and accumulated as a soluble protein while A. vinelandii NifB was mainly associated with the non-soluble cell fraction. Soluble M. infernus NifB was purified from aerobically grown yeast and biochemically characterized. The purified protein was functional in the in vitro FeMo-co synthesis assay. This work presents the first active NifB protein purified from a eukaryotic cell, and highlights the importance of screening nif genes from different organisms in order to sort the best candidates to assemble a functional plant nitrogenase.

  18. Aspergillus fumigatus SidA is a highly specific ornithine hydroxylase with bound flavin cofactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chocklett, Samuel W; Sobrado, Pablo

    2010-08-10

    Ferrichrome is a hydroxamate-containing siderophore produced by the pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus under iron-limiting conditions. This siderophore contains N(5)-hydroxylated l-ornithines essential for iron binding. A. fumigatus siderophore A (Af SidA) catalyzes the flavin- and NADPH-dependent hydroxylation of l-ornithine in ferrichrome biosynthesis. Af SidA was recombinantly expressed and purified as a soluble tetramer and is the first member of this class of flavin monooxygenases to be isolated with a bound flavin cofactor. The enzyme showed typical saturation kinetics with respect to l-ornithine while substrate inhibition was observed at high concentrations of NADPH and NADH. Increasing amounts of hydrogen peroxide were measured as a function of reduced nicotinamide coenzyme concentration, indicating that inhibition was caused by increased uncoupling. Af SidA is highly specific for its amino acid substrate, only hydroxylating l-ornithine. An 8-fold preference in the catalytic efficiency was determined for NADPH compared to NADH. In the absence of substrate, Af SidA can be reduced by NADPH, and a C4a-(hydro)peroxyflavin intermediate is observed. The decay of this intermediate is accelerated by l-ornithine binding. This intermediate was only stabilized by NADPH and not by NADH, suggesting a role for NADP(+) in the stabilization of intermediates in the reaction of Af SidA. NADP(+) is a competitive inhibitor with respect to NADPH, demonstrating that Af SidA forms a ternary complex with NADP(+) and l-ornithine during catalysis. The data suggest that Af SidA likely proceeds by a sequential kinetic mechanism.

  19. Immobilisation and characterisation of biocatalytic co-factor recycling enzymes, glucose dehydrogenase and NADH oxidase, on aldehyde functional ReSynTM polymer microspheres

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Twala, BV

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available the immobilisation of two biocatalytically relevant co-factor recycling enzymes, glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and NADH oxidase (NOD) on aldehyde functional ReSynTM polymer microspheres with varying functional group densities. The successful immobilisation...

  20. Transforming growth factor-beta isoforms regulate the surface expression of membrane cofactor protein (CD46) and CD59 on human keratinocytes [corrected

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasch, M. C.; Bos, J. D.; Daha, M. R.; Asghar, S. S.

    1999-01-01

    We studied the regulation of the expression of complement regulatory proteins, membrane cofactor protein (MCP), decay accelerating factor (DAF) and CD59, on human keratinocytes by supernatant of activated mononuclear cells and by some individual cytokines present therein. Cultured keratinocytes

  1. Production of shikimic acid from Escherichia coli through chemically inducible chromosomal evolution and cofactor metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yan-Yan; Ling, Chen; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Huang, Jian; Liu, Jian-Zhong

    2014-02-10

    Shikimic acid (SA) produced from the seeds of Chinese star anise (Illicium verum) is a key intermediate for the synthesis of neuraminidase inhibitors such as oseltamivir (Tamiflu®), an anti-influenza drug. However, plants cannot deliver a stable supply of SA. To avoid the resulting shortages and price fluctuations, a stable source of affordable SA is required. Although recent achievements in metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli strains have significantly increased SA productivity, commonly-used plasmid-based expression systems are prone to genetic instability and require constant selective pressure to ensure plasmid maintenance. Cofactors also play an important role in the biosynthesis of different fermentation products. In this study, we first constructed an E. coli SA production strain that carries no plasmid or antibiotic marker. We then investigated the effect of endogenous NADPH availability on SA production. The pps and csrB genes were first overexpressed by replacing their native promoter and integrating an additional copy of the genes in a double gene knockout (aroK and aroL) of E. coli. The aroG(fbr), aroB, aroE and tktA gene cluster was integrated into the above E. coli chromosome by direct transformation. The gene copy number was then evolved to the desired value by triclosan induction. The resulting strain, E. coli SA110, produced 8.9-fold more SA than did the parental strain E. coli (ΔaroKΔaroL). Following qRT-PCR analysis, another copy of the tktA gene under the control of the 5P(tac) promoter was inserted into the chromosome of E. coli SA110 to obtain the more productive strain E. coli SA110. Next, the NADPH availability was increased by overexpressing the pntAB or nadK genes, which further enhanced SA production. The final strain, E. coli SA116, produced 3.12 g/L of SA with a yield on glucose substrate of 0.33 mol/mol. An SA-producing E. coli strain that carries neither a plasmid nor an antibiotic marker was constructed by triclosan

  2. Escherichia coli primase zinc is sensitive to substrate and cofactor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, L; Griep, M A

    1999-06-08

    The ligation state of the single zinc site in primase from Escherichia coli changes when various substrates and cofactors are added alone or in combination as determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) provides information about the local structure (approximately 5 A) of atoms surrounding the metal and has been widely used to characterize metalloproteins. The zinc site in native primase and in primase bound to low (30 mM) magnesium acetate was found to be tetrahedrally ligated by three sulfurs at an average distance of 2.36 +/- 0.02 A and one histidine nitrogen located at a distance of 2.15 +/- 0.03 A. When ATP, ATP and (dT)17, or ATP, low magnesium acetate and (dT)17 was added to primase, one (or two) additional nitrogen/oxygen ligands were coordinated to the zinc together with the histidine nitrogen at an average distance of 2.15 +/- 0.03 A. These additional ligands are likely from adjacent phosphates from ATP. Another structure was observed for the primase-(dT)17 complex in which an additional nitrogen/oxygen ligand likely from the phosphate backbone together with the histidine nitrogen was located at a significantly shorter average distance of 2.05 +/- 0.03 A. High magnesium acetate (300 mM) completely inactivates primase in a reversible manner such that the region near the zinc ligands becomes accessible to proteolytic digestion [Urlacher, T. M., and Griep, M. A. (1995) Biochemistry 34, 16708-16714]. In this inactive complex, additional oxygen/nitrogen ligands from acetate as well as the histidine nitrogen are located at a distance of 2.20 +/- 0.03 A from the zinc site. To test whether the catalytic magnesium was binding within approximately 5 A of the zinc, we incubated primase with high (300 mM) manganese acetate. The functional properties of magnesium and manganese are similar, but the larger atomic number of manganese enhances the X-ray backscattering, making it possible to identify. Since no significant difference was

  3. Iron Sulfur and Molybdenum Cofactor Enzymes Regulate the Drosophila Life Cycle by Controlling Cell Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvonimir Marelja

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Iron sulfur (Fe-S clusters and the molybdenum cofactor (Moco are present at enzyme sites, where the active metal facilitates electron transfer. Such enzyme systems are soluble in the mitochondrial matrix, cytosol and nucleus, or embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane, but virtually absent from the cell secretory pathway. They are of ancient evolutionary origin supporting respiration, DNA replication, transcription, translation, the biosynthesis of steroids, heme, catabolism of purines, hydroxylation of xenobiotics, and cellular sulfur metabolism. Here, Fe-S cluster and Moco biosynthesis in Drosophila melanogaster is reviewed and the multiple biochemical and physiological functions of known Fe-S and Moco enzymes are described. We show that RNA interference of Mocs3 disrupts Moco biosynthesis and the circadian clock. Fe-S-dependent mitochondrial respiration is discussed in the context of germ line and somatic development, stem cell differentiation and aging. The subcellular compartmentalization of the Fe-S and Moco assembly machinery components and their connections to iron sensing mechanisms and intermediary metabolism are emphasized. A biochemically active Fe-S core complex of heterologously expressed fly Nfs1, Isd11, IscU, and human frataxin is presented. Based on the recent demonstration that copper displaces the Fe-S cluster of yeast and human ferredoxin, an explanation for why high dietary copper leads to cytoplasmic iron deficiency in flies is proposed. Another proposal that exosomes contribute to the transport of xanthine dehydrogenase from peripheral tissues to the eye pigment cells is put forward, where the Vps16a subunit of the HOPS complex may have a specialized role in concentrating this enzyme within pigment granules. Finally, we formulate a hypothesis that (i mitochondrial superoxide mobilizes iron from the Fe-S clusters in aconitase and succinate dehydrogenase; (ii increased iron transiently displaces manganese on superoxide

  4. Vibrational Probes of Molybdenum Cofactor-Protein Interactions in Xanthine Dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chao; Yang, Jing; Reschke, Stefan; Leimkühler, Silke; Kirk, Martin L

    2017-06-19

    The pyranopterin dithiolene (PDT) ligand is an integral component of the molybdenum cofactor (Moco) found in all molybdoenzymes with the sole exception of nitrogenase. However, the roles of the PDT in catalysis are still unknown. The PDT is believed to be bound to the proteins by an extensive hydrogen-bonding network, and it has been suggested that these interactions may function to fine-tune Moco for electron- and atom-transfer reactivity in catalysis. Here, we use resonance Raman (rR) spectroscopy to probe Moco-protein interactions using heavy-atom congeners of lumazine, molecules that bind tightly to both wild-type xanthine dehydrogenase (wt-XDH) and its Q102G and Q197A variants following enzymatic hydroxylation to the corresponding violapterin product molecules. The resulting enzyme-product complexes possess intense near-IR absorption, allowing high-quality rR spectra to be collected on wt-XDH and the Q102G and Q197A variants. Small negative frequency shifts relative to wt-XDH are observed for the low-frequency Moco vibrations. These results are interpreted in the context of weak hydrogen-bonding and/or electrostatic interactions between Q102 and the -NH 2 terminus of the PDT, and between Q197 and the terminal oxo of the Mo≡O group. The Q102A, Q102G, Q197A, and Q197E variants do not appreciably affect the kinetic parameters k red and k red /K D , indicating that a primary role for these glutamine residues is to stabilize and coordinate Moco in the active site of XO family enzymes but to not directly affect the catalytic throughput. Raman frequency shifts between wt-XDH and its Q102G variant suggest that the changes in the electron density at the Mo ion that accompany Mo oxidation during electron-transfer regeneration of the catalytically competent active site are manifest in distortions at the distant PDT amino terminus. This implies a primary role for the PDT as a conduit for facilitating enzymatic electron-transfer reactivity in xanthine oxidase family

  5. The endothelial nitric oxide synthase cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin shields the remote myocardium from apoptosis after experimental myocardial infarction in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidrich, Felix M; Jercke, Marcel C; Ritzkat, Anna; Ebner, Annette; Poitz, David M; Pfluecke, Christian; Quick, Silvio; Speiser, Uwe; Simonis, Gregor; Wäßnig, Nadine K; Strasser, Ruth H; Wiedemann, Stephan

    2017-08-23

    Following myocardial infarction (MI), apoptosis occurs early in the remote myocardium and contributes to the processes of myocardial remodeling. Increased nitrosative stress is a well-known and potent inductor of myocardial apoptosis. Excess activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) increases its uncoupling potential and results in nitrosative stress via formation of peroxynitrite. However, the pathophysiologic role of eNOS signaling in the remote myocardium after MI is as yet undefined. The impact of eNOS activation on pro- and anti-apoptotic signaling in the remote myocardium and the influence of pretreatment with the eNOS cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) on eNOS activation, nitrosative stress level and apoptosis induction and execution were studied in a rat myocardial infarction model in vivo. 24 hours after anterior MI, eNOS activity in animals treated with left anterior descending coronary artery ligation (LIG) significantly increased in the posterior left ventricular myocardium as did protein nitrosylation when compared to sham treatment. This was paralleled by induction of apoptosis via both, the extrinsic and intrinsic pathways. Moreover, anti-apoptotic signaling via protein kinase B/Akt and glycogen synthase-kinase 3 beta was suppressed. Notably, pretreatment with the eNOS cofactor BH4 reduced eNOS activation, prevented excess protein nitrosylation, blunted apoptosis induction, facilitated anti-apoptotic signaling and eventually prevented apoptosis execution. Here we showed that 24 hours after experimental MI in rats in vivo, apoptosis was induced in the posterior non-infarcted LV wall. Evidence is presented that pretreatment with the eNOS cofactor BH4 resulted in less nitrosative stress and weakened apoptotic processes, although stabilizers contained did participate in this phenomenon. Because apoptosis is a crucial component of myocardial remodeling, influencing eNOS signaling might be an interesting pharmacological target for the

  6. HIV-1 Entry Cofactor: Functional cDNA Cloning of a Seven-Transmembrane, G Protein–Coupled Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Yu; Broder, Christopher C.; Kennedy, Paul E.; Berger, Edward A.

    2011-01-01

    A cofactor for HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus-type 1) fusion and entry was identified with the use of a novel functional complementary DNA (cDNA) cloning strategy. This protein, designated “fusin,” is a putative G protein–coupled receptor with seven transmembrane segments. Recombinant fusin enabled CD4-expressing nonhuman cell types to support HIV-1 Env-mediated cell fusion and HIV-1 infection. Antibodies to fusin blocked cell fusion and infection with normal CD4-positive human target ce...

  7. Deletion mutation in Drosophila ma-l homologous, putative molybdopterin cofactor sulfurase gene is associated with bovine xanthinuria type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, T; Ihara, N; Itoh, T; Fujita, T; Sugimoto, Y

    2000-07-21

    Defective xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) activity in humans results in xanthinuria and xanthine calculus accumulation in kidneys. Bovine xanthinuria was demonstrated in a local herd and characterized as xanthinuria type II, similar to the Drosophila ma-l mutations, which lose activities of molybdoenzymes, XDH, and aldehyde oxidase, although sulfite oxidase activity is preserved. Linkage analysis located the disease locus at the centromeric region of bovine chromosome 24, where a ma-l homologous, putative molybdopterin cofactor sulfurase gene (MCSU) has been physically mapped. We found that a deletion mutation at tyrosine 257 in MCSU is tightly associated with bovine xanthinuria type II.

  8. Characterization of recombinant biosynthetic precursors of the cysteine tryptophylquinone cofactors of l-lysine-epsilon-oxidase and glycine oxidase from Marinomonas mediterranea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón-Verdú, María Dolores; Campillo-Brocal, Jonatan C; Lucas-Elío, Patricia; Davidson, Victor L; Sánchez-Amat, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    The lysine-ε-oxidase, LodA, and glycine oxidase, GoxA, from Marinomonas mediteranea each possesses a cysteine tryptophylquinone (CTQ) cofactor. This cofactor is derived from posttranslational modifications which are covalent crosslinking of tryptophan and cysteine residues and incorporation of two oxygen atoms into the indole ring of Trp. In this manuscript, it is shown that the recombinant synthesis of LodA and GoxA containing a fully synthesized CTQ cofactor requires coexpression of a partner flavoprotein, LodB for LodA and GoxB for GoxA, which are not interchangeable. An inactive precursor of LodA or GoxA which contained a monohydroxylated Trp residue and no crosslink to the Cys was isolated from the soluble fraction when they were expressed alone. The structure of LodA revealed an Asp residue close to the cofactor which is conserved in quinohemoprotein amine dehydrogenase (QHNDH), containing CTQ, and methylamine dehydrogenase (MADH) containing tryptophan tryptophylquinone (TTQ) as cofactor. To study the role of this residue in the synthesis of the LodA precursor, Asp-512 was mutated to Ala. When the mutant protein was coexpressed with LodB an inactive protein was isolated which was soluble and contained no modifications at all, suggesting a role for this Asp in the initial LodB-independent hydroxylation of Trp. A similar role had been proposed for this conserved Asp residue in MADH. It is noteworthy that the formation of TTQ in MADH from the precursor also requires an accessory enzyme for its biosynthesis but it is a diheme enzyme MauG and not a flavoprotein. The results presented reveal novel mechanisms of post-translational modification involved in the generation of protein-derived cofactors. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cofactor-dependent proteins: evolution, chemical diversity and bio-applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Structural evidence for the partially oxidized dipyrromethene and dipyrromethanone forms of the cofactor of porphobilinogen deaminase: structures of the Bacillus megaterium enzyme at near-atomic resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azim, N. [University of Punjab, New Campus, Lahore-54590 (Pakistan); Deery, E.; Warren, M. J. [University of Kent, Stacey Building, Canterbury CT2 7NJ (United Kingdom); Wolfenden, B. A. A.; Erskine, P.; Cooper, J. B., E-mail: jon.cooper@ucl.ac.uk; Coker, A.; Wood, S. P. [UCL Division of Medicine (Royal Free Campus), Rowland Hill Street, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); Akhtar, M. [University of Punjab, New Campus, Lahore-54590 (Pakistan)

    2014-03-01

    The enzyme porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD; hydroxymethylbilane synthase; EC 2.5.1.61) catalyses a key early step in the biosynthesis of tetrapyrroles in which four molecules of the monopyrrole porphobilinogen are condensed to form a linear tetrapyrrole. Two near-atomic resolution structures of PBGD from B. megaterium are reported that demonstrate the time-dependent accumulation of partially oxidized forms of the cofactor, including one that possesses a tetrahedral C atom in the terminal pyrrole ring. The enzyme porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD; hydroxymethylbilane synthase; EC 2.5.1.61) catalyses an early step of the tetrapyrrole-biosynthesis pathway in which four molecules of the monopyrrole porphobilinogen are condensed to form a linear tetrapyrrole. The enzyme possesses a dipyrromethane cofactor, which is covalently linked by a thioether bridge to an invariant cysteine residue (Cys241 in the Bacillus megaterium enzyme). The cofactor is extended during the reaction by the sequential addition of the four substrate molecules, which are released as a linear tetrapyrrole product. Expression in Escherichia coli of a His-tagged form of B. megaterium PBGD has permitted the X-ray analysis of the enzyme from this species at high resolution, showing that the cofactor becomes progressively oxidized to the dipyrromethene and dipyrromethanone forms. In previously solved PBGD structures, the oxidized cofactor is in the dipyromethenone form, in which both pyrrole rings are approximately coplanar. In contrast, the oxidized cofactor in the B. megaterium enzyme appears to be in the dipyrromethanone form, in which the C atom at the bridging α-position of the outer pyrrole ring is very clearly in a tetrahedral configuration. It is suggested that the pink colour of the freshly purified protein is owing to the presence of the dipyrromethene form of the cofactor which, in the structure reported here, adopts the same conformation as the fully reduced dipyrromethane form.

  10. Refining the reaction mechanism of O2 towards its co-substrate in cofactor-free dioxygenases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro J. Silva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cofactor-less oxygenases perform challenging catalytic reactions between singlet co-substrates and triplet oxygen, in spite of apparently violating the spin-conservation rule. In 1-H-3-hydroxy-4-oxoquinaldine-2,4-dioxygenase, the active site has been suggested by quantum chemical computations to fine tune triplet oxygen reactivity, allowing it to interact rapidly with its singlet substrate without the need for spin inversion, and in urate oxidase the reaction is thought to proceed through electron transfer from the deprotonated substrate to an aminoacid sidechain, which then feeds the electron to the oxygen molecule. In this work, we perform additional quantum chemical computations on these two systems to elucidate several intriguing features unaddressed by previous workers. These computations establish that in both enzymes the reaction proceeds through direct electron transfer from co-substrate to O2 followed by radical recombination, instead of minimum-energy crossing points between singlet and triplet potential energy surfaces without formal electron transfer. The active site does not affect the reactivity of oxygen directly but is crucial for the generation of the deprotonated form of the co-substrates, which have redox potentials far below those of their protonated forms and therefore may transfer electrons to oxygen without sizeable thermodynamic barriers. This mechanism seems to be shared by most cofactor-less oxidases studied so far.

  11. Host cofactors and pharmacologic ligands share an essential interface in HIV-1 capsid that is lost upon disassembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda J Price

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 capsid is involved in all infectious steps from reverse transcription to integration site selection, and is the target of multiple host cell and pharmacologic ligands. However, structural studies have been limited to capsid monomers (CA, and the mechanistic basis for how these ligands influence infection is not well understood. Here we show that a multi-subunit interface formed exclusively within CA hexamers mediates binding to linear epitopes within cellular cofactors NUP153 and CPSF6, and is competed for by the antiretroviral compounds PF74 and BI-2. Each ligand is anchored via a shared phenylalanine-glycine (FG motif to a pocket within the N-terminal domain of one monomer, and all but BI-2 also make essential interactions across the N-terminal domain: C-terminal domain (NTD:CTD interface to a second monomer. Dissociation of hexamer into CA monomers prevents high affinity interaction with CPSF6 and PF74, and abolishes binding to NUP153. The second interface is conformationally dynamic, but binding of NUP153 or CPSF6 peptides is accommodated by only one conformation. NUP153 and CPSF6 have overlapping binding sites, but each makes unique CA interactions that, when mutated selectively, perturb cofactor dependency. These results reveal that multiple ligands share an overlapping interface in HIV-1 capsid that is lost upon viral disassembly.

  12. Role of halogen and hydrogen bonds for stabilization of antithyroid drugs with hypohalous acids (HOX, X = I, Br, and Cl) adducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sheshtawy, Hamdy S.; El-Mehasseb, Ibrahim

    2017-11-01

    The mechanism for the inhibition of thyroid hormones by the thioamide-like antithyroid drug is a key process in the thyroid gland function. Therefore, in this study theoretical investigation of the molecular interaction between two antithyroid drugs, namely methimazol (MMI) and thiazoline-2-thione (T2T), with the hypohalous acids (HOX, X = I, Br, and Cl), which act as heme-linked halogenated species to tyrosine residue was discussed. The calculations were performed by M06-2X and MP2 using aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory. In addition, wB97xd/6-31G* level of theory was used in order to account for the dispersion forces. The results show the possible formation of three adducts, which is stabilized by halogen bond (I), both halogen and hydrogen bonds (II), two hydrogen bonds (III). The binding energies of the complexes reveals stabilization in the order III > II > I. The binding energies of the complexes was increased with increasing the electron affinity and polarizability of halogen atom, the dipole moment of the complexes (I and II), the electrostatic potential on halogen atom (Vmax:i.e σ-hole), and the charge-transfer process through the halogen bond in I. On the other hand, the binding energies of the complexes decreased with increasing the halogen atom electronegativity and the dipole moment of complex III. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis was used to investigate the molecular orbital interactions and the charge transfer process upon complexation.

  13. About Contribution of Ox-, HOx-, NOx-, ClOx- and BrOx-cycle in the Stratospheric Ozone Depletion in the XXIst Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larin, Igor

    2017-04-01

    Based on the previously proposed algorithm of calculation of limiting stages of the reaction prolongations in stratospheric ozone depletion cycles* a contribution of Ox-, HOx-, NOx-, ClOx- and BrOx-cycle in ozone destruction at the end of the XXIst century at the latitude of 50° N for different seasons have been calculated. Calculations have been performed using a two-dimensional interactive model SOCRATES, and data on the concentrations of the main greenhouse gases listed in the scenarios of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) RCP 4.5, according to which the stabilization of radiative forcing to occur by the end of the XXIst century. The work presents data on the absolute rates of ozone destruction in the cycles and their relative contribution to the destruction of ozone in 1995 and 2100 respectively in the altitude range 15-55 km for March, June, September, and December at 50° N. * Igor Larin. On the Chain Length and Rate of Ozone Depletion in the Main Stratospheric Cycles//Atmospheric and Climate Sciences (2013) №8. P. 141-149. http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/acs.2013.31016

  14. TLX1/HOX11-mediated disruption of primary thymocyte differentiation prior to the CD4+CD8+ double-positive stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Bronwyn M.; Hawley, Teresa S.; Spain, Lisa M.; Kerkel, Kristi A.; Hawley, Robert G.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The TLX1/HOX11 homeobox gene is frequently activated in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) by the t(10;14)(q24;q11) and t(7;10)(q35;q24) chromosomal translocations or by as yet unknown transcriptional mechanisms in the absence of 10q24 cytogenetic abnormalities. Almost all TLX1+ T-ALLs exhibit a CD4+CD8+ double-positive (DP) phenotype. To investigate the role of TLX1 as an initiating oncogene in T-ALL pathogenesis, we assessed the consequences of retroviral vector-directed TLX1 expression during the differentiation of murine and human thymocytes in fetal thymic organ cultures. Interestingly, enforced expression of TLX1 disrupted the differentiation of murine fetal liver precursors and human cord blood CD34+ stem/progenitor cells prior to the DP thymocyte stage. Although differentiation arrest was associated with an increased percentage of apoptotic thymocytes, it could only be partially bypassed by coexpression of transgenic BCL2. Mutation of the invariant asparagine residue at position 51 of the homeodomain – which is required for efficient DNA binding – released the block, consistent with the notion that TLX1 inhibits thymocyte differentiation and promotes T-cell oncogenesis by functioning as a transcription factor. The relevance of these findings is discussed in the context of activating NOTCH1 mutations and the other genetic lesions implicated in the multistep transformation process of TLX1+ T-ALL. PMID:16398656

  15. Comparative Analysis of Chromatin Binding by Sex Comb on Midleg (SCM) and Other Polycomb Group Repressors at a Drosophila Hox Gene▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liangjun; Jahren, Neal; Miller, Ellen L.; Ketel, Carrie S.; Mallin, Daniel R.; Simon, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    Sex Comb on Midleg (SCM) is a transcriptional repressor in the Polycomb group (PcG), but its molecular role in PcG silencing is not known. Although SCM can interact with Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) in vitro, biochemical studies have indicated that SCM is not a core constituent of PRC1 or PRC2. Nevertheless, SCM is just as critical for Drosophila Hox gene silencing as canonical subunits of these well-characterized PcG complexes. To address functional relationships between SCM and other PcG components, we have performed chromatin immunoprecipitation studies using cultured Drosophila Schneider line 2 (S2) cells and larval imaginal discs. We find that SCM associates with a Polycomb response element (PRE) upstream of the Ubx gene which also binds PRC1, PRC2, and the DNA-binding PcG protein Pleiohomeotic (PHO). However, SCM is retained at this Ubx PRE despite genetic disruption or knockdown of PHO, PRC1, or PRC2, suggesting that SCM chromatin targeting does not require prior association of these other PcG components. Chromatin immunoprecipitations (IPs) to test the consequences of SCM genetic disruption or knockdown revealed that PHO association is unaffected, but reduced levels of PRE-bound PRC2 and PRC1 were observed. We discuss these results in light of current models for recruitment of PcG complexes to chromatin targets. PMID:20351181

  16. Comparative analysis of chromatin binding by Sex Comb on Midleg (SCM) and other polycomb group repressors at a Drosophila Hox gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liangjun; Jahren, Neal; Miller, Ellen L; Ketel, Carrie S; Mallin, Daniel R; Simon, Jeffrey A

    2010-06-01

    Sex Comb on Midleg (SCM) is a transcriptional repressor in the Polycomb group (PcG), but its molecular role in PcG silencing is not known. Although SCM can interact with Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) in vitro, biochemical studies have indicated that SCM is not a core constituent of PRC1 or PRC2. Nevertheless, SCM is just as critical for Drosophila Hox gene silencing as canonical subunits of these well-characterized PcG complexes. To address functional relationships between SCM and other PcG components, we have performed chromatin immunoprecipitation studies using cultured Drosophila Schneider line 2 (S2) cells and larval imaginal discs. We find that SCM associates with a Polycomb response element (PRE) upstream of the Ubx gene which also binds PRC1, PRC2, and the DNA-binding PcG protein Pleiohomeotic (PHO). However, SCM is retained at this Ubx PRE despite genetic disruption or knockdown of PHO, PRC1, or PRC2, suggesting that SCM chromatin targeting does not require prior association of these other PcG components. Chromatin immunoprecipitations (IPs) to test the consequences of SCM genetic disruption or knockdown revealed that PHO association is unaffected, but reduced levels of PRE-bound PRC2 and PRC1 were observed. We discuss these results in light of current models for recruitment of PcG complexes to chromatin targets.

  17. Co-expression of an alcohol dehydrogenase and a cyclohexanone monooxygenase for cascade reactions facilitates the regeneration of the NADPH cofactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Anna; Srinivasamurthy, Vishnu; Böttcher, Dominique; Kabisch, Johannes; Bornscheuer, Uwe T

    2018-01-01

    The introduction of a three-enzyme cascade (comprising a cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO), an alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and a lipase (CAL-A)) for the production of oligo-ε-caprolactone provided self-sufficiency with respect to NADPH-cofactor regeneration and reduced inhibiting effects on the central CHMO enzyme. For further optimization of cofactor regeneration, now a co-expression of CHMO and ADH in E. coli using a Duet™ vector was performed. This led to higher conversion values of the substrate cyclohexanol in whole-cell biocatalysis compared to an expression of both enzymes from two separate plasmids. Furthermore, a more advantageous balance of expression levels between the partial cascade enzymes was achieved via engineering of the ribosome binding site. This contributed to an even faster cofactor regeneration rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. One pathway can incorporate either adenine or dimethylbenzimidazole as an alpha-axial ligand of B12 cofactors in Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Peter J; Lango, Jozsef; Carkeet, Colleen; Britten, Audrey; Kräutler, Bernhard; Hammock, Bruce D; Roth, John R

    2008-02-01

    Corrinoid (vitamin B12-like) cofactors contain various alpha-axial ligands, including 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB) or adenine. The bacterium Salmonella enterica produces the corrin ring only under anaerobic conditions, but it can form "complete" corrinoids aerobically by importing an "incomplete" corrinoid, such as cobinamide (Cbi), and adding appropriate alpha- and beta-axial ligands. Under aerobic conditions, S. enterica performs the corrinoid-dependent degradation of ethanolamine if given vitamin B12, but it can make B12 from exogenous Cbi only if DMB is also provided. Mutants isolated for their ability to degrade ethanolamine without added DMB converted Cbi to pseudo-B12 cofactors (having adenine as an alpha-axial ligand). The mutations cause an increase in the level of free adenine and install adenine (instead of DMB) as an alpha-ligand. When DMB is provided to these mutants, synthesis of pseudo-B12 cofactors ceases and B12 cofactors are produced, suggesting that DMB regulates production or incorporation of free adenine as an alpha-ligand. Wild-type cells make pseudo-B12 cofactors during aerobic growth on propanediol plus Cbi and can use pseudo-vitamin B12 for all of their corrinoid-dependent enzymes. Synthesis of coenzyme pseudo-B12 cofactors requires the same enzymes (CobT, CobU, CobS, and CobC) that install DMB in the formation of coenzyme B12. Models are described for the mechanism and control of alpha-axial ligand installation.

  19. Site-Specific Bioconjugation of an Organometallic Electron Mediator to an Enzyme with Retained Photocatalytic Cofactor Regenerating Capacity and Enzymatic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung In Lim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthesis consists of a series of reactions catalyzed by redox enzymes to synthesize carbohydrates using solar energy. In order to take the advantage of solar energy, many researchers have investigated artificial photosynthesis systems mimicking the natural photosynthetic enzymatic redox reactions. These redox reactions usually require cofactors, which due to their high cost become a key issue when constructing an artificial photosynthesis system. Combining a photosensitizer and an Rh-based electron mediator (RhM has been shown to photocatalytically regenerate cofactors. However, maintaining the high concentration of cofactors available for efficient enzymatic reactions requires a high concentration of the expensive RhM; making this process cost prohibitive. We hypothesized that conjugation of an electron mediator to a redox enzyme will reduce the amount of electron mediators necessary for efficient enzymatic reactions. This is due to photocatalytically regenerated NAD(PH being readily available to a redox enzyme, when the local NAD(PH concentration near the enzyme becomes higher. However, conventional random conjugation of RhM to a redox enzyme will likely lead to a substantial loss of cofactor regenerating capacity and enzymatic activity. In order to avoid this issue, we investigated whether bioconjugation of RhM to a permissive site of a redox enzyme retains cofactor regenerating capacity and enzymatic activity. As a model system, a RhM was conjugated to a redox enzyme, formate dehydrogenase obtained from Thiobacillus sp. KNK65MA (TsFDH. A RhM-containing azide group was site-specifically conjugated to p-azidophenylalanine introduced to a permissive site of TsFDH via a bioorthogonal strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition and an appropriate linker. The TsFDH-RhM conjugate exhibited retained cofactor regenerating capacity and enzymatic activity.

  20. In situ chemichromic studies of interactions between a lutetium bis-octaalkyl-substituted phthalocyanine and selected biological cofactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, C.; Cammidge, A. N.; Cook, M. J.; Sosa-Sanchez, J. L.; Sharma, A. K.; Ray, A. K.

    2012-01-01

    Spin-coated films, approximately 100 nm thick, of a newly synthesized bis[octakis(octyl)phthalocyaninato] lutetium(III) complex on ultrasonically cleaned glass substrates exhibit pronounced chemichromic behaviour with potential application in healthcare. In situ kinetic optical absorption spectroscopic measurements show that the phthalocyanine Q-band is red shifted by 60 nm upon oxidation arising from exposure to bromine vapour. Recovery to the original state is achieved by the treatment of the oxidized films with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and l-ascorbic acid (vitamin C) in an aqueous solution containing 1.5 M lithium perchlorate. The neutralization process is found to be governed by first-order kinetics. The linear increase of the reduction rate with increasing concentration of cofactors provides a basis for calibration of analyte concentrations ranging from 3.5 mM down to 0.03 mM. PMID:21676969

  1. Transcription cofactors TRIM24, TRIM28, and TRIM33 associate to form regulatory complexes that suppress murine hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herquel, Benjamin; Ouararhni, Khalid; Khetchoumian, Konstantin; Ignat, Mihaela; Teletin, Marius; Mark, Manuel; Béchade, Guillaume; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Sanglier-Cianférani, Sarah; Hamiche, Ali; Cammas, Florence; Davidson, Irwin; Losson, Régine

    2011-05-17

    TRIM24 (TIF1α), TRIM28 (TIF1β), and TRIM33 (TIF1γ) are three related cofactors belonging to the tripartite motif superfamily that interact with distinct transcription factors. TRIM24 interacts with the liganded retinoic acid (RA) receptor to repress its transcriptional activity. Germ line inactivation of TRIM24 in mice deregulates RA-signaling in hepatocytes leading to the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here we show that TRIM24 can be purified as at least two macromolecular complexes comprising either TRIM33 or TRIM33 and TRIM28. Somatic hepatocyte-specific inactivation of TRIM24, TRIM28, or TRIM33 all promote HCC in a cell-autonomous manner in mice. Moreover, HCC formation upon TRIM24 inactivation is strongly potentiated by further loss of TRIM33. These results demonstrate that the TIF1-related subfamily of TRIM proteins interact both physically and functionally to modulate HCC formation in mice.

  2. Chameau HAT and DRpd3 HDAC function as antagonistic cofactors of JNK/AP-1-dependent transcription during Drosophila metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miotto, Benoit; Sagnier, Thierry; Berenger, Hélène; Bohmann, Dirk; Pradel, Jacques; Graba, Yacine

    2006-01-01

    Gene regulation by AP-1 transcription factors in response to Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling controls essential cellular processes during development and in pathological situations. Here, we report genetic and molecular evidence that the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) Chameau and the histone deacetylase DRpd3 act as antagonistic cofactors of DJun and DFos to modulate JNK-dependent transcription during thorax metamorphosis and JNK-induced apoptosis in Drosophila. We demonstrate in cultured cells that DFos phosphorylation mediated by JNK signaling plays a central role in coordinating the dynamics of Chameau and DRpd3 recruitment and function at AP-1-responsive promoters. Activating the pathway stimulates the HAT function of Chameau, promoting histone H4 acetylation and target gene transcription. Conversely, in response to JNK signaling inactivation, DRpd3 is recruited and suppresses histone acetylation and transcription. This study establishes a direct link among JNK signaling, DFos phosphorylation, chromatin modification, and AP-1-dependent transcription and its importance in a developing organism.

  3. The Ubx2 and Ubx3 cofactors direct Cdc48 activity to proteolytic and nonproteolytic ubiquitin-dependent processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Wallace, Mairi; Hofmann, Kay

    2004-01-01

    Valosin-containing protein, VCP/p97 or Cdc48, is a eukaryotic ATPase involved in membrane fusion, protein transport, and protein degradation. We describe two proteins, Ubx2 and Ubx3, which interact with Cdc48 in fission yeast. Ubx3 is the ortholog of p47/Shp1, a previously described Cdc48 cofactor...... involved in membrane fusion, whereas Ubx2 is a novel protein. Cdc48 binds the UBX domains present in both Ubx2 and Ubx3, indicating that this domain is a general Cdc48-interacting module. Ubx2 and Ubx3 also interact with ubiquitin chains. Disruption of the ubx3(+)-gene causes both temperature...... parallels a substrate receptor of the 26S proteasome, Pus1/Rpn10, indicating that the Cdc48-Ubx3 complex is involved in delivering substrates to the 26S proteasome....

  4. Intestinal stem cell overproliferation resulting from inactivation of the APC tumor suppressor requires the transcription cofactors Earthbound and Erect wing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ai; Benchabane, Hassina; Wang, Zhenghan; Zimmerman, Chloe; Xin, Nan; Perochon, Jessica; Kalna, Gabriela; Sansom, Owen J; Cheng, Chao; Cordero, Julia B; Ahmed, Yashi

    2017-07-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction directs intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation during homeostasis. Hyperactivation of Wnt signaling initiates colorectal cancer, which most frequently results from truncation of the tumor suppressor Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC). The β-catenin-TCF transcription complex activates both the physiological expression of Wnt target genes in the normal intestinal epithelium and their aberrantly increased expression in colorectal tumors. Whether mechanistic differences in the Wnt transcription machinery drive these distinct levels of target gene activation in physiological versus pathological states remains uncertain, but is relevant for the design of new therapeutic strategies. Here, using a Drosophila model, we demonstrate that two evolutionarily conserved transcription cofactors, Earthbound (Ebd) and Erect wing (Ewg), are essential for all major consequences of Apc1 inactivation in the intestine: the hyperactivation of Wnt target gene expression, excess number of ISCs, and hyperplasia of the epithelium. In contrast, only Ebd, but not Ewg, mediates the Wnt-dependent regulation of ISC proliferation during homeostasis. Therefore, in the adult intestine, Ebd acts independently of Ewg in physiological Wnt signaling, but cooperates with Ewg to induce the hyperactivation of Wnt target gene expression following Apc1 loss. These findings have relevance for human tumorigenesis, as Jerky (JRK/JH8), the human Ebd homolog, promotes Wnt pathway hyperactivation and is overexpressed in colorectal, breast, and ovarian cancers. Together, our findings reveal distinct requirements for Ebd and Ewg in physiological Wnt pathway activation versus oncogenic Wnt pathway hyperactivation following Apc1 loss. Such differentially utilized transcription cofactors may offer new opportunities for the selective targeting of Wnt-driven cancers.

  5. TcoF-DB: dragon database for human transcription co-factors and transcription factor interacting proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Ulf; Schmeier, Sebastian; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2011-01-01

    The initiation and regulation of transcription in eukaryotes is complex and involves a large number of transcription factors (TFs), which are known to bind to the regulatory regions of eukaryotic DNA. Apart from TF-DNA binding, protein-protein interaction involving TFs is an essential component of the machinery facilitating transcriptional regulation. Proteins that interact with TFs in the context of transcription regulation but do not bind to the DNA themselves, we consider transcription co-factors (TcoFs). The influence of TcoFs on transcriptional regulation and initiation, although indirect, has been shown to be significant with the functionality of TFs strongly influenced by the presence of TcoFs. While the role of TFs and their interaction with regulatory DNA regions has been well-studied, the association between TFs and TcoFs has so far been given less attention. Here, we present a resource that is comprised of a collection of human TFs and the TcoFs with which they interact. Other proteins that have a proven interaction with a TF, but are not considered TcoFs are also included. Our database contains 157 high-confidence TcoFs and additionally 379 hypothetical TcoFs. These have been identified and classified according to the type of available evidence for their involvement in transcriptional regulation and their presence in the cell nucleus. We have divided TcoFs into four groups, one of which contains high-confidence TcoFs and three others contain TcoFs which are hypothetical to different extents. We have developed the Dragon Database for Human Transcription Co-Factors and Transcription Factor Interacting Proteins (TcoF-DB). A web-based interface for this resource can be freely accessed at http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/tcof/ and http://apps.sanbi.ac.za/tcof/.

  6. Cofactor-Mediated Conformational Dynamics Promote Product Release From Escherichia coli Dihydrofolate Reductase via an Allosteric Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyen, David; Fenwick, R Bryn; Stanfield, Robyn L; Dyson, H Jane; Wright, Peter E

    2015-07-29

    The enzyme dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR, E) from Escherichia coli is a paradigm for the role of protein dynamics in enzyme catalysis. Previous studies have shown that the enzyme progresses through the kinetic cycle by modulating the dynamic conformational landscape in the presence of substrate dihydrofolate (DHF), product tetrahydrofolate (THF), and cofactor (NADPH or NADP(+)). This study focuses on the quantitative description of the relationship between protein fluctuations and product release, the rate-limiting step of DHFR catalysis. NMR relaxation dispersion measurements of millisecond time scale motions for the E:THF:NADP(+) and E:THF:NADPH complexes of wild-type and the Leu28Phe (L28F) point mutant reveal conformational exchange between an occluded ground state and a low population of a closed state. The backbone structures of the occluded ground states of the wild-type and mutant proteins are very similar, but the rates of exchange with the closed excited states are very different. Integrated analysis of relaxation dispersion data and THF dissociation rates measured by stopped-flow spectroscopy shows that product release can occur by two pathways. The intrinsic pathway consists of spontaneous product dissociation and occurs for all THF-bound complexes of DHFR. The allosteric pathway features cofactor-assisted product release from the closed excited state and is utilized only in the E:THF:NADPH complexes. The L28F mutation alters the partitioning between the pathways and results in increased flux through the intrinsic pathway relative to the wild-type enzyme. This repartitioning could represent a general mechanism to explain changes in product release rates in other E. coli DHFR mutants.

  7. Putative endogenous filovirus VP35-like protein potentially functions as an IFN antagonist but not a polymerase cofactor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsunari Kondoh

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that some non-retroviral RNA virus genes are integrated into vertebrate genomes. Endogenous filovirus-like elements (EFLs have been discovered in some mammalian genomes. However, their potential roles in ebolavirus infection are unclear. A filovirus VP35-like element (mlEFL35 is found in the little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus genome. Putative mlEFL35-derived protein (mlEFL35p contains nearly full-length amino acid sequences corresponding to ebolavirus VP35. Ebola virus VP35 has been shown to bind double-stranded RNA, leading to inhibition of type I interferon (IFN production, and is also known as a viral polymerase cofactor that is essential for viral RNA transcription/replication. In this study, we transiently expressed mlEFL35p in human kidney cells and investigated its biological functions. We first found that mlEFL35p was coimmunoprecipitated with itself and ebolavirus VP35s but not with the viral nucleoprotein. Then the biological functions of mlEFL35p were analyzed by comparing it to ebolavirus VP35s. We found that the expression of mlEFL35p significantly inhibited human IFN-β promoter activity as well as VP35s. By contrast, expression of mlEFL35p did not support viral RNA transcription/replication and indeed slightly decrease the reporter gene expression in a minigenome assay. These results suggest that mlEFL35p potentially acts as an IFN antagonist but not a polymerase cofactor.

  8. Late-gestation maternal dietary methyl donor and cofactor supplementation in sheep partially reverses protection against allergic sensitization by IUGR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooldridge, Amy L; Bischof, Robert J; Liu, Hong; Heinemann, Gary K; Hunter, Damien S; Giles, Lynne C; Simmons, Rebecca A; Lien, Yu-Chin; Lu, Wenyun; Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Kind, Karen L; Owens, Julie A; Clifton, Vicki L; Gatford, Kathryn L

    2018-01-01

    Perinatal exposures are associated with altered risks of childhood allergy. Human studies and our previous work suggest that restricted growth in utero (IUGR) is protective against allergic disease. The mechanisms are not clearly defined, but reduced fetal abundance and altered metabolism of methyl donors are hypothesized as possible underlying mechanisms. Therefore, we examined whether late-gestation maternal dietary methyl donor and cofactor supplementation of the placentally restricted (PR) sheep pregnancy would reverse allergic protection in progeny. Allergic outcomes were compared between progeny from control pregnancies (CON; n = 49), from PR pregnancies without intervention (PR; n = 28), and from PR pregnancies where the dam was fed a methyl donor plus cofactor supplement from day 120 of pregnancy until delivery (PR + Methyl; n = 25). Both PR and PR + Methyl progeny were smaller than CON; supplementation did not alter birth size. PR was protective against cutaneous hypersensitivity responses to ovalbumin (OVA; P < 0.01 in singletons). Cutaneous hypersensitivity responses to OVA in PR + Methyl progeny were intermediate to and not different from the responses of CON and PR sheep. Cutaneous hypersensitivity responses to house dust mites did not differ between treatments. In singleton progeny, upper dermal mast cell density was greater in PR + Methyl than in PR or CON (each P < 0.05). The differences in the cutaneous allergic response were not explained by treatment effects on circulating immune cells or antibodies. Our results suggest that mechanisms underlying in utero programming of allergic susceptibility by IUGR and methyl donor availability may differ and imply that late-gestation methyl donor supplementation may increase allergy risk.

  9. Structural studies of the molybdenum site in the MoFe protein and it FeMo cofactor by EXAFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conradson, S.D.; Burgess, B.K.; Newton, W.E.; Mortenson, L.E.; Hodgson, K.O.

    1987-11-25

    Nitrogenase is a complex bacterial enzyme system that is responsible for the conversion of atmospheric N/sub 2/ to ammonia. The structure and function of molybdenum in the MoFe protein of this system has been the subject of a number of investigations, including the use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy. This paper reports the results of the authors recent studies on several states of the MoFe protein and its FeMo cofactor (which is extruded by treatment with N-methylformamide). Mo K-edge (XANES) and extended fine structure (EXAFS) spectra have been recorded to high energies above the absorption edge with excellent signal-to-nose on the semireduced form of the MoFe protein from both Clostridium pasteurianum and Azotobacter vinelandii and on the as isolated FeMo-co and FeMo-co treated with benzenethiol and with benzeneselenol. In all of the states studied, EXAFS results reveal that the Mo is in an environment that contains two or three oxygen (or nitrogen) atoms at 2.10-2.12 A, three to five S atoms at 2.37 A, and three to four Fe atoms at 2.68-2.70 A. The numbers of these ligands change upon removal of the cofactor from the protein as discussed in the paper. For FeMo-co, comparisons also show that thil/selenol is not binding directly to the Mo site. The results of these EXAFS (and their XANES published earlier) definitely show the presence of several low-Z ligands and are not compatible with a tetrahedral arrangement of only nearest S neighbors at the Mo site.

  10. Specificity of anti-phospholipid antibodies in infectious mononucleosis: a role for anti-cofactor protein antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorice, M; Pittoni, V; Griggi, T; Losardo, A; Leri, O; Magno, M S; Misasi, R; Valesini, G

    2000-01-01

    The antigen specificity of anti-phospholipid antibodies in infectious mononucleosis (IM) was studied using ELISA for the detection of anti-β2-glycoprotein I (β2-GPI), anti-annexin V, anti-protein S and anti-prothrombin antibodies and TLC immunostaining for the detection of anti-phospholipid antibodies. This technique enabled us to look at antibodies reacting to ‘pure’ phospholipid antigens in the absence of protein contamination. Sera from 46 patients with IM, 18 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 21 with primary anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome (PAPS), 50 with Helicobacter pylori infection and 30 healthy blood donors were tested. This study highlights anti-phospholipid antibodies in patients with IM as specific ‘pure’ anti-cardiolipin antibodies, while in PAPS and SLE patients anti-phosphatidylserine and anti-phosphatidylethanolamine antibodies were also found. This investigation also shows that the anti-cardiolipin antibodies found in IM can be present with anti-cofactor protein antibodies. The higher prevalence of anti-cofactor antibodies found in IM sera than in Helicobacter pylori sera may be due to the immunostimulatory effect and/or the polyclonal activation often observed in course of Epstein–Barr virus infection. However, anti-β2-GPI and, to a lesser extent, anti-prothrombin antibodies occur with a significantly lower prevalence in IM than in PAPS patients. This finding suggests that these antibodies should be regarded as the expression of the broad autoimmune syndrome involving the phospholipid-binding plasma proteins. PMID:10792380

  11. Structural basis of thermal stability of the tungsten cofactor synthesis protein MoaB from Pyrococcus furiosus.

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    Nastassia Havarushka

    Full Text Available Molybdenum and tungsten cofactors share a similar pterin-based scaffold, which hosts an ene-dithiolate function being essential for the coordination of either molybdenum or tungsten. The biosynthesis of both cofactors involves a multistep pathway, which ends with the activation of the metal binding pterin (MPT by adenylylation before the respective metal is incorporated. In the hyperthermophilic organism Pyrococcus furiosus, the hexameric protein MoaB (PfuMoaB has been shown to catalyse MPT-adenylylation. Here we determined the crystal structure of PfuMoaB at 2.5 Å resolution and identified key residues of α3-helix mediating hexamer formation. Given that PfuMoaB homologues from mesophilic organisms form trimers, we investigated the impact on PfuMoaB hexamerization on thermal stability and activity. Using structure-guided mutagenesis, we successfully disrupted the hexamer interface in PfuMoaB. The resulting PfuMoaB-H3 variant formed monomers, dimers and trimers as determined by size exclusion chromatography. Circular dichroism spectroscopy as well as chemical cross-linking coupled to mass spectrometry confirmed a wild-type-like fold of the protomers as well as inter-subunits contacts. The melting temperature of PfuMoaB-H3 was found to be reduced by more than 15 °C as determined by differential scanning calorimetry, thus demonstrating hexamerization as key determinant for PfuMoaB thermal stability. Remarkably, while a loss of activity at temperatures higher than 50 °C was observed in the PfuMoaB-H3 variant, at lower temperatures, we determined a significantly increased catalytic activity. The latter suggests a gain in conformational flexibility caused by the disruption of the hexamerization interface.

  12. p53 transactivation and the impact of mutations, cofactors and small molecules using a simplified yeast-based screening system.

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    Virginia Andreotti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The p53 tumor suppressor, which is altered in most cancers, is a sequence-specific transcription factor that is able to modulate the expression of many target genes and influence a variety of cellular pathways. Inactivation of the p53 pathway in cancer frequently occurs through the expression of mutant p53 protein. In tumors that retain wild type p53, the pathway can be altered by upstream modulators, particularly the p53 negative regulators MDM2 and MDM4. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Given the many factors that might influence p53 function, including expression levels, mutations, cofactor proteins and small molecules, we expanded our previously described yeast-based system to provide the opportunity for efficient investigation of their individual and combined impacts in a miniaturized format. The system integrates i variable expression of p53 proteins under the finely tunable GAL1,10 promoter, ii single copy, chromosomally located p53-responsive and control luminescence reporters, iii enhanced chemical uptake using modified ABC-transporters, iv small-volume formats for treatment and dual-luciferase assays, and v opportunities to co-express p53 with other cofactor proteins. This robust system can distinguish different levels of expression of WT and mutant p53 as well as interactions with MDM2 or 53BP1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We found that the small molecules Nutlin and RITA could both relieve the MDM2-dependent inhibition of WT p53 transactivation function, while only RITA could impact p53/53BP1 functional interactions. PRIMA-1 was ineffective in modifying the transactivation capacity of WT p53 and missense p53 mutations. This dual-luciferase assay can, therefore, provide a high-throughput assessment tool for investigating a matrix of factors that can influence the p53 network, including the effectiveness of newly developed small molecules, on WT and tumor-associated p53 mutants as well as interacting proteins.

  13. TcoF-DB: dragon database for human transcription co-factors and transcription factor interacting proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Schaefer, Ulf

    2010-10-21

    The initiation and regulation of transcription in eukaryotes is complex and involves a large number of transcription factors (TFs), which are known to bind to the regulatory regions of eukaryotic DNA. Apart from TF-DNA binding, protein-protein interaction involving TFs is an essential component of the machinery facilitating transcriptional regulation. Proteins that interact with TFs in the context of transcription regulation but do not bind to the DNA themselves, we consider transcription co-factors (TcoFs). The influence of TcoFs on transcriptional regulation and initiation, although indirect, has been shown to be significant with the functionality of TFs strongly influenced by the presence of TcoFs. While the role of TFs and their interaction with regulatory DNA regions has been well-studied, the association between TFs and TcoFs has so far been given less attention. Here, we present a resource that is comprised of a collection of human TFs and the TcoFs with which they interact. Other proteins that have a proven interaction with a TF, but are not considered TcoFs are also included. Our database contains 157 high-confidence TcoFs and additionally 379 hypothetical TcoFs. These have been identified and classified according to the type of available evidence for their involvement in transcriptional regulation and their presence in the cell nucleus. We have divided TcoFs into four groups, one of which contains high-confidence TcoFs and three others contain TcoFs which are hypothetical to different extents. We have developed the Dragon Database for Human Transcription Co-Factors and Transcription Factor Interacting Proteins (TcoF-DB). A web-based interface for this resource can be freely accessed at http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/tcof/ and http://apps.sanbi.ac.za/tcof/. © The Author(s) 2010.

  14. Molybdenum cofactor deficiency causes translucent integument, male-biased lethality, and flaccid paralysis in the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Tsuguru; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Banno, Yutaka

    2016-06-01

    Uric acid accumulates in the epidermis of Bombyx mori larvae and renders the larval integument opaque and white. Yamamoto translucent (oya) is a novel spontaneous mutant with a translucent larval integument and unique phenotypic characteristics, such as male-biased lethality and flaccid larval paralysis. Xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) that requires a molybdenum cofactor (MoCo) for its activity is a key enzyme for uric acid synthesis. It has been observed that injection of a bovine xanthine oxidase, which corresponds functionally to XDH and contains its own MoCo activity, changes the integuments of oya mutants from translucent to opaque and white. This finding suggests that XDH/MoCo activity might be defective in oya mutants. Our linkage analysis identified an association between the oya locus and chromosome 23. Because XDH is not linked to chromosome 23 in B. mori, MoCo appears to be defective in oya mutants. In eukaryotes, MoCo is synthesized by a conserved biosynthesis pathway governed by four loci (MOCS1, MOCS2, MOCS3, and GEPH). Through a candidate gene approach followed by sequence analysis, a 6-bp deletion was detected in an exon of the B. mori molybdenum cofactor synthesis-step 1 gene (BmMOCS1) in the oya strain. Moreover, recombination was not observed between the oya and BmMOCS1 loci. These results indicate that the BmMOCS1 locus is responsible for the oya locus. Finally, we discuss the potential cause of male-biased lethality and flaccid paralysis observed in the oya mutants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. TILLING in the two-rowed barley cultivar 'Barke' reveals preferred sites of functional diversity in the gene HvHox1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komatsuda Takao

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The economic importance of cereals such as barley, and the demand for improved yield and quality require a better understanding of the genetic components that modulate biologically and commercially relevant traits. While Arabidopsis thaliana is the premiere model plant system, the spectrum of its traits cannot address all of the fundamental questions of crop plant development. Unlike Arabidopsis, barley is both a crop and a model system for scientific research, and it is increasingly being used for genetic and molecular investigations into the conserved biological processes of cereals. A common challenge in genetic studies in plants with large genomes arises from the very time-consuming work of associating mutant phenotypes with gene sequence information, especially if insertion mutagenesis is not routine, as in barley. Reverse genetics based on chemical mutagenesis represents the best solution to this obstacle. Findings In barley, we generated a new TILLING (Targeting Local Lesions IN Genomes resource comprising 10,279 M2 mutants in the two-rowed malting cultivar 'Barke,' which has been used in the generation of other genomic resources in barley (~150,000 ESTs, DH mapping population. The value of this new resource was tested using selected candidate genes. An average frequency of approximately one mutation per 0.5 Mb was determined by screening ten fragments of six different genes. The ethyl methanesulphonate (EMSmutagenesis efficiency was studied by recording and relating the mutagenesis-dependent effects found in the three mutant generations (M1-M3. A detailed analysis was performed for the homeodomain-leucine-zipper (HD-ZIP gene HvHox1. Thirty-one mutations were identified by screening a 1,270-bp fragment in 7,348 M2 lines. Three of the newly identified mutants exhibited either a six-rowed or an intermedium-spike phenotype, and one mutant displayed a significantly altered spikelet morphology compared to that of the 'Barke

  16. Technical Note: Formal blind intercomparison of HO2 measurements in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR during the HOxComp campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Schlosser

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydroperoxy radical (HO2 concentrations were measured during the formal blind intercomparison campaign HOxComp carried out in Jülich, Germany, in 2005. Three instruments detected HO2 via chemical conversion to hydroxyl radicals (OH and subsequent detection of the sum of OH and HO2 by laser induced fluorescence (LIF. All instruments were based on the same detection and calibration scheme. Because measurements by a MIESR instrument failed during the campaign, no absolute reference measurement was available, so that the accuracy of individual instruments could not be addressed. Instruments sampled ambient air for three days and were attached to the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR during the second part of the campaign. Six experiments of one day each were conducted in SAPHIR, where air masses are homogeneously mixed, in order to investigate the performance of instruments and to determine potential interferences of measurements under well-controlled conditions. Linear correlation coefficients (R2 between measurements of the LIF instruments are generally high and range from 0.82 to 0.98. However, the agreement between measurements is variable. The regression analysis of the entire data set of measurements in SAPHIR yields slopes between 0.69 to 1.26 and intercepts are smaller than typical atmospheric daytime concentrations (less than 1 pptv. The quality of fit parameters improves significantly, when data are grouped into data subsets of similar water vapor concentrations. Because measurements of LIF instruments were corrected for a well-characterized water dependence of their sensitivities, this indicates that an unknown factor related to water vapor affected measurements in SAPHIR. Measurements in ambient air are also well-correlated, but regression parameters differ from results obtained from SAPHIR experiments. This could have been caused by differences in HO2 concentrations in the sampled air at the slightly different locations of

  17. ATRA and As₂O₃ regulate differentiation of human hematopoietic stem cells into granulocyte progenitor via alteration of HoxB8 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W-J; Jiang, N-J; Guo, Q-L; Xu, Q

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and/or arsenic trioxide (As2O3) on homeobox B8 (HOXB8) mRNA and protein expressions during the differentiation and proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to colony forming unit-granulocyte (CFU-G) in order to explore the pathogenesis of leukemia mediated by HOXB8 at mRNA and protein level. Twelve cord blood samples were collected from the fetal placenta umbilical vein and cultured in vitro. The proliferation and differentiation of cord blood HSCs into CFU-G was continuously disrupted with 10 nmol/l of ATRA and/or 10 nmol/l of As2O3. The expression of HOXB8 mRNA and protein were detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western-blot, respectively. HOXB8 mRNA/protein expression was detected in control, ATRA, As2O3 and ATRA +As2O3 groups on days 3, 7, and 12 of culture. HOXB8 mRNA/protein expression was detectable on day 3, reached its highest level on day 7 and decreased on day 12. HOXB8 mRNA/protein expression in ATRA, As2O3 and ATRA+As2O3 was upregulated compared with control group (p ATRA/As2O3 up-regulate the expression of HOXB8 mRNA/protein, and treatment of leukemia with ATRA/As2O3 may regulate HOX gene expression.

  18. Multiple transcription factors directly regulate Hox gene lin-39 expression in ventral hypodermal cells of the C. elegans embryo and larva, including the hypodermal fate regulators LIN-26 and ELT-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wan-Ju; Reece-Hoyes, John S; Walhout, Albertha J M; Eisenmann, David M

    2014-05-13

    Hox genes encode master regulators of regional fate specification during early metazoan development. Much is known about the initiation and regulation of Hox gene expression in Drosophila and vertebrates, but less is known in the non-arthropod invertebrate model system, C. elegans. The C. elegans Hox gene lin-39 is required for correct fate specification in the midbody region, including the Vulval Precursor Cells (VPCs). To better understand lin-39 regulation and function, we aimed to identify transcription factors necessary for lin-39 expression in the VPCs, and in particular sought factors that initiate lin-39 expression in the embryo. We used the yeast one-hybrid (Y1H) method to screen for factors that bound to 13 fragments from the lin-39 region: twelve fragments contained sequences conserved between C. elegans and two other nematode species, while one fragment was known to drive reporter gene expression in the early embryo in cells that generate the VPCs. Sixteen transcription factors that bind to eight lin-39 genomic fragments were identified in yeast, and we characterized several factors by verifying their physical interactions in vitro, and showing that reduction of their function leads to alterations in lin-39 levels and lin-39::GFP reporter expression in vivo. Three factors, the orphan nuclear hormone receptor NHR-43, the hypodermal fate regulator LIN-26, and the GATA factor ELT-6 positively regulate lin-39 expression in the embryonic precursors to the VPCs. In particular, ELT-6 interacts with an enhancer that drives GFP expression in the early embryo, and the ELT-6 site we identified is necessary for proper embryonic expression. These three factors, along with the factors ZTF-17, BED-3 and TBX-9, also positively regulate lin-39 expression in the larval VPCs. These results significantly expand the number of factors known to directly bind and regulate lin-39 expression, identify the first factors required for lin-39 expression in the embryo, and hint at a

  19. Iron mediates catalysis of nucleic acid processing enzymes: support for Fe(II) as a cofactor before the great oxidation event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okafor, C Denise; Lanier, Kathryn A; Petrov, Anton S; Athavale, Shreyas S; Bowman, Jessica C; Hud, Nicholas V; Williams, Loren Dean

    2017-04-20

    Life originated in an anoxic, Fe2+-rich environment. We hypothesize that on early Earth, Fe2+ was a ubiquitous cofactor for nucleic acids, with roles in RNA folding and catalysis as well as in processing of nucleic acids by protein enzymes. In this model, Mg2+ replaced Fe2+ as the primary cofactor for nucleic acids in parallel with known metal substitutions of metalloproteins, driven by the Great Oxidation Event. To test predictions of this model, we assay the ability of nucleic acid processing enzymes, including a DNA polymerase, an RNA polymerase and a DNA ligase, to use Fe2+ in place of Mg2+ as a cofactor during catalysis. Results show that Fe2+ can indeed substitute for Mg2+ in catalytic function of these enzymes. Additionally, we use calculations to unravel differences in energetics, structures and reactivities of relevant Mg2+ and Fe2+ complexes. Computation explains why Fe2+ can be a more potent cofactor than Mg2+ in a variety of folding and catalytic functions. We propose that the rise of O2 on Earth drove a Fe2+ to Mg2+ substitution in proteins and nucleic acids, a hypothesis consistent with a general model in which some modern biochemical systems retain latent abilities to revert to primordial Fe2+-based states when exposed to pre-GOE conditions. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Co-factor regeneration in the production of 1,2-epoxypropane by Mycobacterium strain E3: the role of storage material.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, de A.; Smit, M.R.; Voorhorst, W.G.B.; Bont, de J.A.M.

    1993-01-01

    When grown on ethene Mycobacterium strain E3 produces epoxyalkanes from alkenes in an oxygen- and NADH-dependent reaction. The process of co-factor regeneration was studied by analysing the intracellular pools of NADH and storage material during the production of 1,2-epoxypropane from propene. With

  1. A functional mobA gene for molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide cofactor biosynthesis is required for activity and holoenzyme assembly of the heterotrimeric nicotine dehydrogenases of Arthrobacter nicotinovorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachelaru, Paula; Schiltz, Emile; Brandsch, Roderich

    2006-07-01

    Two Arthrobacter nicotinovorans molybdenum enzymes hydroxylate the pyridine ring of nicotine. Molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide (MCD) was determined to be a cofactor of these enzymes. A mobA gene responsible for the formation of MCD could be identified and its function shown to be required for assembly of the heterotrimeric molybdenum enzymes.

  2. C4b-binding protein inhibits the factor V-dependent but not the factor V-independent cofactor activity of protein S in the activated protein C-mediated inactivation of factor VIIIa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Poel, R. H.; Meijers, J. C.; Bouma, B. N.

    2001-01-01

    Activated protein C (APC) is an important inactivator of coagulation factors Va and VIIIa. In the inactivation of factors Va and VIIIa, protein S serves as a cofactor to APC. Protein S can bind to C4b-binding protein (C4BP), and thereby loses its cofactor activity to APC. By modulating free protein

  3. A 7-Deazaadenosylaziridine Cofactor for Sequence-Specific Labeling of DNA by the DNA Cytosine-C5 Methyltransferase M.HhaI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falk Kunkel

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available DNA methyltransferases (MTases catalyze the transfer of the activated methyl group of the cofactor S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet or SAM to the exocyclic amino groups of adenine or cytosine or the C5 ring atom of cytosine within specific DNA sequences. The DNA adenine-N6 MTase from Thermus aquaticus (M.TaqI is also capable of coupling synthetic N-adenosylaziridine cofactor analogues to its target adenine within the double-stranded 5′-TCGA-3′ sequence. This M.TaqI-mediated coupling reaction was exploited to sequence-specifically deliver fluorophores and biotin to DNA using N-adenosylaziridine derivatives carrying reporter groups at the 8-position of the adenine ring. However, these 8-modified aziridine cofactors were poor substrates for the DNA cytosine-C5 MTase from Haemophilus haemolyticus (M.HhaI. Based on the crystal structure of M.HhaI in complex with a duplex oligodeoxynucleotide and the cofactor product, we synthesized a stable 7-deazaadenosylaziridine derivative with a biotin group attached to the 7-position via a flexible linker. This 7-modified aziridine cofactor can be efficiently used by M.HhaI for the direct, quantitative and sequence-specific delivery of biotin to the second cytosine within 5′-GCGC-3′ sequences in short duplex oligodeoxynucleotides and plasmid DNA. In addition, we demonstrate that biotinylation by M.HhaI depends on the methylation status of the target cytosine and, thus, could provide a method for cytosine-C5 DNA methylation detection in mammalian DNA.

  4. X-ray absorption spectroscopy on the calcium cofactor to the manganese cluster in photosynthetic oxygen evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cinco, Roehl M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-12-01

    Along with Mn, calcium and chloride ions are necessary cofactors for oxygen evolution in Photosystem II (PS II). To further test and verify whether Ca is close to the Mn cluster, the authors substituted strontium for Ca and probed from the Sr point of view for any nearby Mn. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of Sr-reactivated PS II indicates major differences between the intact and NH2OH-treated samples. In intact samples, the Fourier transform of the Sr EXAFS shows a Fourier peak that is missing in inactive samples. This peak II is best simulated by two Mn neighbors at a distance of 3.5 Angstrom, confirming the proximity of Ca (Sr) cofactor to the Mn cluster. In addition, polarized Sr EXAFS on oriented Sr-reactivated samples shows this peak II is dichroic: large magnitude at 10 degrees (angle between the PS II membrane normal and the x-ray electric field vector) and small at 80 degrees. Analysis of the dichroism yields the relative angle between the Sr-Mn vector and membrane normal (23 degrees ± 4 degrees), and the isotropic coordination number for these layered samples. X-ray absorption spectroscopy has also been employed to assess the degree of similarity between the manganese cluster in PS II and a family of synthetic manganese complexes containing the distorted cubane [Mn4O3X] core (X = benzoate, acetate, methoxide, hydroxide, azide, fluoride, chloride or bromide). In addition, Mn4O3Cl complexes containing three or six terminal Cl ligands at three of the Mn were included in this study. The EXAFS method detects the small changes in the core structures as X is varied in this series, and serves to exclude these distorted cubanes of C3v symmetry as a topological model for the Mn catalytic cluster. The sulfur K-edge x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra for the amino acids cysteine, methionine, their corresponding oxidized forms cystine and methionine sulfoxide, and

  5. Comparisons of observed and modeled OH and HO2 concentrations during the ambient measurement period of the HOxComp field campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Elste

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A photochemical box model constrained by ancillary observations was used to simulate OH and HO2 concentrations for three days of ambient observations during the HOxComp field campaign held in Jülich, Germany in July 2005. Daytime OH levels observed by four instruments were fairly well reproduced to within 33% by a base model run (Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism with updated isoprene chemistry adapted from Master Chemical Mechanism ver. 3.1 with high R2 values (0.72–0.97 over a range of isoprene (0.3–2 ppb and NO (0.1–10 ppb mixing ratios. Daytime HO2(* levels, reconstructed from the base model results taking into account the sensitivity toward speciated RO2 (organic peroxy radicals, as recently reported from one of the participating instruments in the HO2 measurement mode, were 93% higher than the observations made by the single instrument. This also indicates an overprediction of the HO2 to OH recycling. Together with the good model-measurement agreement for OH, it implies a missing OH source in the model. Modeled OH and HO2(* could only be matched to the observations by addition of a strong unknown loss process for HO2(* that recycles OH at a high yield. Adding to the base model, instead, the recently proposed isomerization mechanism of isoprene peroxy radicals (Peeters and Müller, 2010 increased OH and HO2(* by 28% and 13% on average. Although these were still only 4% higher than the OH observations made by one of the instruments, larger overestimations (42–70% occurred with respect to the OH observations made by the other three instruments. The overestimation in OH could be diminished only when reactive alkanes (HC8 were solely introduced to the model to explain the missing fraction of observed OH reactivity. Moreover, the overprediction of HO2(* became even larger than in the base case. These analyses imply that the rates of the isomerization are not readily supported by the ensemble of radical observations. One of the

  6. The ParaHox gene Gsx patterns the apical organ and central nervous system but not the foregut in scaphopod and cephalopod mollusks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollesen, Tim; Rodríguez Monje, Sonia Victoria; McDougall, Carmel; Degnan, Bernard M; Wanninger, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the ParaHox gene Gsx patterned the foregut of the last common bilaterian ancestor. This notion was corroborated by Gsx expression in three out of four lophotrochozoan species, several ecdysozoans, and some deuterostomes. Remarkably, Gsx is also expressed in the bilaterian anterior-most central nervous system (CNS) and the gastropod and annelid apical organ. To infer whether these findings are consistent with other mollusks or even lophotrochozoans, we investigated Gsx expression in developmental stages of representatives of two other molluscan classes, the scaphopod Antalis entalis and the cephalopod Idiosepius notoides. Gsx is not expressed in the developing digestive tract of Antalis entalis and Idiosepius notoides. Instead, it is expressed in cells of the apical organ in the scaphopod trochophore and in two cells adjacent to this organ. Late-stage trochophores express Aen-Gsx in cells of the developing cerebral and pedal ganglia and in cells close to the pavilion, mantle, and foot. In postmetamorphic specimens, Aen-Gsx is expressed in the cerebral and pedal ganglia, the foot, and the nascent captacula. In early squid embryos, Ino-Gsx is expressed in the cerebral, palliovisceral, and optic ganglia. In late-stage embryos, Ino-Gsx is additionally expressed close to the eyes and in the supraesophageal and posterior subesophageal masses and optic lobes. Developmental stages close to hatching express Ino-Gsx only close to the eyes. Our results suggest that Gsx expression in the foregut might not be a plesiomorphic trait of the Lophotrochozoa as insinuated previously. Since neither ecdysozoans nor deuterostomes express Gsx in their gut, a role in gut formation in the last common bilaterian ancestor appears unlikely. Gsx is consistently expressed in the bilaterian anterior-most CNS and the apical organ of lophotrochozoan larvae, suggesting a recruitment of Gsx into the formation of this organ in the Lophotrochozoa. The cephalopod posterior

  7. RNA helicase DEAD box protein 5 regulates Polycomb repressive complex 2/Hox transcript antisense intergenic RNA function in hepatitis B virus infection and hepatocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Xing, Zheng; Mani, Saravana Kumar Kailasam; Bancel, Brigitte; Durantel, David; Zoulim, Fabien; Tran, Elizabeth J; Merle, Philippe; Andrisani, Ourania

    2016-10-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major factor in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) pathogenesis by a mechanism not yet understood. Elucidating mechanisms of HBV-mediated hepatocarcinogenesis is needed to gain insights into classification and treatment of HCC. In HBV replicating cells, including virus-associated HCCs, suppressor of zeste 12 homolog (SUZ12), a core subunit of Polycomb repressive complex2 (PRC2), undergoes proteasomal degradation. This process requires the long noncoding RNA, Hox transcript antisense intergenic RNA (HOTAIR). Intriguingly, HOTAIR interacts with PRC2 and also binds RNA-binding E3 ligases, serving as a ubiquitination scaffold. Herein, we identified the RNA helicase, DEAD box protein 5 (DDX5), as a regulator of SUZ12 stability and PRC2-mediated gene repression, acting by regulating RNA-protein complexes formed with HOTAIR. Specifically, knockdown of DDX5 and/or HOTAIR enabled reexpression of PRC2-repressed genes epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) and pluripotency genes. Also, knockdown of DDX5 enhanced transcription from the HBV minichromosome. The helicase activity of DDX5 stabilized SUZ12- and PRC2-mediated gene silencing, by displacing the RNA-binding E3 ligase, Mex-3 RNA-binding family member B (Mex3b), from HOTAIR. Conversely, ectopic expression of Mex3b ubiquitinated SUZ12, displaced DDX5 from HOTAIR, and induced SUZ12 down-regulation. In G2 phase of cells expressing the HBV X protein (HBx), SUZ12 preferentially associated with Mex3b, but not DDX5, resulting in de-repression of PRC2 targets, including EpCAM and pluripotency genes. Significantly, liver tumors from HBx/c-myc bitransgenic mice and chronically HBV-infected patients exhibited a strong negative correlation between DDX5 messenger RNA levels, pluripotency gene expression, and liver tumor differentiation. Notably, chronically infected HBV patients with HCC expressing reduced DDX5 exhibited poor prognosis after tumor resection, identifying DDX5 as an

  8. The Roles of β-Oxidation and Cofactor Homeostasis in Peroxisome Distribution and Function in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Mauro A; Patel, Ashish B; Park, Jaeseok; Lee, Koeun; Strader, Lucia C; Bartel, Bonnie

    2016-11-01

    Key steps of essential metabolic pathways are housed in plant peroxisomes. We conducted a microscopy-based screen for anomalous distribution of peroxisomally targeted fluorescence in Arabidopsis thaliana This screen uncovered 34 novel alleles in 15 genes affecting oil body mobilization, fatty acid β-oxidation, the glyoxylate cycle, peroxisome fission, and pexophagy. Partial loss-of-function of lipid-mobilization enzymes conferred peroxisomes clustered around retained oil bodies without other notable defects, suggesting that this microscopy-based approach was sensitive to minor perturbations, and that fatty acid β-oxidation rates in wild type are higher than required for normal growth. We recovered three mutants defective in PECTIN METHYLESTERASE31, revealing an unanticipated role in lipid mobilization for this cytosolic enzyme. Whereas mutations reducing fatty acid import had peroxisomes of wild-type size, mutations impairing fatty acid β-oxidation displayed enlarged peroxisomes, possibly caused by excess fatty acid β-oxidation intermediates in the peroxisome. Several fatty acid β-oxidation mutants also displayed defects in peroxisomal matrix protein import. Impairing fatty acid import reduced the large size of peroxisomes in a mutant defective in the PEROXISOMAL NAD(+) TRANSPORTER (PXN), supporting the hypothesis that fatty acid accumulation causes pxn peroxisome enlargement. The diverse mutants isolated in this screen will aid future investigations of the roles of β-oxidation and peroxisomal cofactor homeostasis in plant development. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  9. An Arabidopsis F-box protein acts as a transcriptional co-factor to regulate floral development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Eunyoung; Tan, Queenie K-G; Hill, Theresa A; Irish, Vivian F

    2008-04-01

    Plants flower in response to both environmental and endogenous signals. The Arabidopsis LEAFY (LFY) transcription factor is crucial in integrating these signals, and acts in part by activating the expression of multiple floral homeotic genes. LFY-dependent activation of the homeotic APETALA3 (AP3) gene requires the activity of UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO), an F-box component of an SCF ubiquitin ligase, yet how this regulation is effected has remained unclear. Here, we show that UFO physically interacts with LFY both in vitro and in vivo, and this interaction is necessary to recruit UFO to the AP3 promoter. Furthermore, a transcriptional repressor domain fused to UFO reduces endogenous LFY activity in plants, supporting the idea that UFO acts as part of a transcriptional complex at the AP3 promoter. Moreover, chemical or genetic disruption of proteasome activity compromises LFY-dependent AP3 activation, indicating that protein degradation is required to promote LFY activity. These results define an unexpected role for an F-box protein in functioning as a DNA-associated transcriptional co-factor in regulating floral homeotic gene expression. These results suggest a novel mechanism for promoting flower development via protein degradation and concomitant activation of the LFY transcription factor. This mechanism may be widely conserved, as homologs of UFO and LFY have been identified in a wide array of plant species.

  10. Cofactor balance by nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT) coordinates reductive carboxylation and glucose catabolism in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gameiro, Paulo A; Laviolette, Laura A; Kelleher, Joanne K; Iliopoulos, Othon; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2013-05-03

    Cancer and proliferating cells exhibit an increased demand for glutamine-derived carbons to support anabolic processes. In addition, reductive carboxylation of α-ketoglutarate by isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and 2 (IDH2) was recently shown to be a major source of citrate synthesis from glutamine. The role of NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) cofactors in coordinating glucose and glutamine utilization in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is not well understood, with the source(s) of NADPH for the reductive carboxylation reaction remaining unexplored. Nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT) is a mitochondrial enzyme that transfers reducing equivalents from NADH to NADPH. Here, we show that knockdown of NNT inhibits the contribution of glutamine to the TCA cycle and activates glucose catabolism in SkMel5 melanoma cells. The increase in glucose oxidation partially occurred through pyruvate carboxylase and rendered NNT knockdown cells more sensitive to glucose deprivation. Importantly, knocking down NNT inhibits reductive carboxylation in SkMel5 and 786-O renal carcinoma cells. Overexpression of NNT is sufficient to stimulate glutamine oxidation and reductive carboxylation, whereas it inhibits glucose catabolism in the TCA cycle. These observations are supported by an impairment of the NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) ratios. Our findings underscore the role of NNT in regulating central carbon metabolism via redox balance, calling for other mechanisms that coordinate substrate preference to maintain a functional TCA cycle.

  11. A Bicarbonate Cofactor Modulates 1,4-Dihydroxy-2-naphthoyl-Coenzyme A Synthase in Menaquinone Biosynthesis of Escherichia coli*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ming; Chen, Minjiao; Guo, Zu-Feng; Guo, Zhihong

    2010-01-01

    1,4-Dihydroxy-2-naphthoyl coenzyme A (DHNA-CoA) synthase is a typical crotonase-fold protein catalyzing an intramolecular Claisen condensation in the menaquinone biosynthetic pathway. We have characterized this enzyme from Escherichia coli and found that it is activated by bicarbonate in a concentration-dependent manner. The bicarbonate binding site has been identified in the crystal structure of a virtually identical ortholog (96.8% sequence identity) from Salmonella typhimurium through comparison with a bicarbonate-insensitive orthologue. Kinetic properties of the enzyme and its site-directed mutants of the bicarbonate binding site indicate that the exogenous bicarbonate anion is essential to the enzyme activity. With this essential catalytic role, the simple bicarbonate anion is an enzyme cofactor, which is usually a small organic molecule derived from vitamins, a metal ion, or a metal-containing polyatomic anionic complex. This finding leads to classification of the DHNA-CoA synthases into two evolutionarily conserved subfamilies: type I enzymes that are bicarbonate-dependent and contain a conserved glycine at the bicarbonate binding site; and type II enzymes that are bicarbonate-independent and contain a conserved aspartate at the position similar to the enzyme-bound bicarbonate. In addition, the unique location of the enzyme-bound bicarbonate allows it to be proposed as a catalytic base responsible for abstraction of the α-proton of the thioester substrate in the enzymatic reaction, suggesting a unified catalytic mechanism for all DHNA-CoA synthases. PMID:20643650

  12. Cofactor recycling for co-production of 1,3-propanediol and glutamate by metabolically engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinhai; Wu, Yao; Wu, Wenjun; Zhang, Ye; Liu, Dehua; Chen, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    Production of 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PDO) from glycerol is a promising route toward glycerol biorefinery. However, the yield of 1,3-PDO is limited due to the requirement of NADH regeneration via glycerol oxidation process, which generates large amounts of undesired byproducts. Glutamate fermentation by Corynebacterium glutamicum is an important oxidation process generating excess NADH. In this study, we proposed a novel strategy to couple the process of 1,3-PDO synthesis with glutamate production for cofactor regeneration. With the optimization of 1,3-PDO synthesis route, C. glutamicum can efficiently convert glycerol into 1,3-PDO with the yield of ~ 1.0 mol/mol glycerol. Co-production of 1,3-PDO and glutamate was also achieved which increased the yield of glutamate by 18% as compared to the control. Since 1,3-PDO and glutamate can be easily separated in downstream process, this study provides a potential green route for coupled production of 1,3-PDO and glutamate to enhance the economic viability of biorefinery process. PMID:28176878

  13. Iron is a specific cofactor for distinct oxidation- and aggregation-dependent Aβ toxicity mechanisms in a Drosophila model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Stanislav; Dziadulewicz, Nikolas; Crowther, Damian C

    2015-07-01

    Metals, including iron, are present at high concentrations in amyloid plaques in individuals with Alzheimer's disease, where they are also thought to be cofactors in generating oxidative stress and modulating amyloid formation. In this study, we present data from several Drosophila models of neurodegenerative proteinopathies indicating that the interaction between iron and amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) is specific and is not seen for other aggregation-prone polypeptides. The interaction with iron is likely to be important in the dimerisation of Aβ and is mediated by three N-terminal histidines. Transgenic fly lines systematically expressing all combinations of His>Ala substitutions in Aβ were generated and used to study the pathological role of these residues. Developmental eye phenotypes, longevity and histological examinations indicate that the N-terminal histidines have distinct position-dependent and -independent mechanisms. The former mediate the toxic effects of metals and Aβ aggregation under non-oxidising conditions and the latter are relevant under oxidising conditions. Understanding how Aβ mediates neurotoxic effects in vivo will help to better target pathological pathways using aggregation blockers and metal-modifying agents. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Nickel(II) Inhibits Tet-Mediated 5-Methylcytosine Oxidation by High Affinity Displacement of the Cofactor Iron(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ruichuan; Mo, Jiezhen; Dai, Jiayin; Wang, Hailin

    2017-06-16

    Ten-eleven translocation (Tet) family proteins are Fe(II)- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases that regulate the dynamics of DNA methylation by catalyzing the oxidation of DNA 5-methylcytosine (5mC). To exert physiologically important functions, redox-active iron chelated in the catalytic center of Tet proteins directly involves the oxidation of the multiple substrates. To understand the function and interaction network of Tet dioxygenases, it is interesting to obtain high affinity and a specific inhibitor. Surprisingly, here we found that natural Ni(II) ion can bind to the Fe(II)-chelating motif (HXD) with an affinity of 7.5-fold as high as Fe(II). Consistently, we further found that Ni(II) ion can displace the cofactor Fe(II) of Tet dioxygenases and inhibit Tet-mediated 5mC oxidation activity with an estimated IC50 of 1.2 μM. Essentially, Ni(II) can be used as a high affinity and selective inhibitor to explore the function and dynamics of Tet proteins.

  15. Exosome Cofactors Connect Transcription Termination to RNA Processing by Guiding Terminated Transcripts to the Appropriate Exonuclease within the Nuclear Exosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyumin; Heo, Dong-Hyuk; Kim, Iktae; Suh, Jeong-Yong; Kim, Minkyu

    2016-06-17

    The yeast Nrd1 interacts with the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNApII) through its CTD-interacting domain (CID) and also associates with the nuclear exosome, thereby acting as both a transcription termination and RNA processing factor. Previously, we found that the Nrd1 CID is required to recruit the nuclear exosome to the Nrd1 complex, but it was not clear which exosome subunits were contacted. Here, we show that two nuclear exosome cofactors, Mpp6 and Trf4, directly and competitively interact with the Nrd1 CID and differentially regulate the association of Nrd1 with two catalytic subunits of the exosome. Importantly, Mpp6 promotes the processing of Nrd1-terminated transcripts preferentially by Dis3, whereas Trf4 leads to Rrp6-dependent processing. This suggests that Mpp6 and Trf4 may play a role in choosing a particular RNA processing route for Nrd1-terminated transcripts within the exosome by guiding the transcripts to the appropriate exonuclease. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Vascular immunotargeting to endothelial determinant ICAM-1 enables optimal partnering of recombinant scFv-thrombomodulin fusion with endogenous cofactor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin F Greineder

    Full Text Available The use of targeted therapeutics to replenish pathologically deficient proteins on the luminal endothelial membrane has the potential to revolutionize emergency and cardiovascular medicine. Untargeted recombinant proteins, like activated protein C (APC and thrombomodulin (TM, have demonstrated beneficial effects in acute vascular disorders, but have failed to have a major impact on clinical care. We recently reported that TM fused with an scFv antibody fragment to platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1 exerts therapeutic effects superior to untargeted TM. PECAM-1 is localized to cell-cell junctions, however, whereas the endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR, the key co-factor of TM/APC, is exposed in the apical membrane. Here we tested whether anchoring TM to the intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1 favors scFv/TM collaboration with EPCR. Indeed: i endothelial targeting scFv/TM to ICAM-1 provides ~15-fold greater activation of protein C than its PECAM-targeted counterpart; ii blocking EPCR reduces protein C activation by scFv/TM anchored to endothelial ICAM-1, but not PECAM-1; and iii anti-ICAM scFv/TM fusion provides more profound anti-inflammatory effects than anti-PECAM scFv/TM in a mouse model of acute lung injury. These findings, obtained using new translational constructs, emphasize the importance of targeting protein therapeutics to the proper surface determinant, in order to optimize their microenvironment and beneficial effects.

  17. Shared Sulfur Mobilization Routes for tRNA Thiolation and Molybdenum Cofactor Biosynthesis in Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Leimkühler

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Modifications of transfer RNA (tRNA have been shown to play critical roles in the biogenesis, metabolism, structural stability and function of RNA molecules, and the specific modifications of nucleobases with sulfur atoms in tRNA are present in pro- and eukaryotes. Here, especially the thiomodifications xm5s2U at the wobble position 34 in tRNAs for Lys, Gln and Glu, were suggested to have an important role during the translation process by ensuring accurate deciphering of the genetic code and by stabilization of the tRNA structure. The trafficking and delivery of sulfur nucleosides is a complex process carried out by sulfur relay systems involving numerous proteins, which not only deliver sulfur to the specific tRNAs but also to other sulfur-containing molecules including iron–sulfur clusters, thiamin, biotin, lipoic acid and molybdopterin (MPT. Among the biosynthesis of these sulfur-containing molecules, the biosynthesis of the molybdenum cofactor (Moco and the synthesis of thio-modified tRNAs in particular show a surprising link by sharing protein components for sulfur mobilization in pro- and eukaryotes.

  18. Codon-Optimized NADH Oxidase Gene Expression and Gene Fusion with Glycerol Dehydrogenase for Bienzyme System with Cofactor Regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baishan Fang

    Full Text Available NADH oxidases (NOXs play an important role in maintaining balance of NAD+/NADH by catalyzing cofactors regeneration. The expression of nox gene from Lactobacillus brevis in Escherichia coli BL21 (BL21 (DE3 was studied. Two strategies, the high AT-content in the region adjacent to the initiation codon and codon usage of the whole gene sequence consistent with the host, obtained the NOX activity of 59.9 U/mg and 73.3 U/mg (crude enzyme, with enhanced expression level of 2.0 and 2.5-folds, respectively. Purified NOX activity was 213.8 U/mg. Gene fusion of glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH and NOX formed bifuctional multi-enzymes for bioconversion of glycerol coupled with coenzyme regeneration. Kinetic parameters of the GDH-NOX for each substrate, glycerol and NADH, were calculated as Vmax(Glycerol 20 μM/min, Km(Glycerol 19.4 mM, Vmax (NADH 12.5 μM/min and Km (NADH 51.3 μM, respectively, which indicated the potential application of GDH-NOX for quick glycerol analysis and dioxyacetone biosynthesis.

  19. Regulation of an in vivo metal-exchangeable superoxide dismutase from Propionibacterium shermanii exhibiting activity with different metal cofactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehn, A P; Meier, B

    1994-12-15

    The anaerobic, but aerotolerant Propionibacterium freudenreichii sp. shermanii contains a single superoxide dismutase [EC 1.15.1.1.] exhibiting comparable activity with iron or manganese as metal cofactor. The formation of superoxide dismutase is not depending on the supplementation of iron or manganese to the culture medium. Even in the absence of these metals the protein is built in comparable amounts. Bacteria grown in the absence of iron and manganese synthesize a superoxide dismutase with very low activity which had incorporated copper. If the medium was also depleted of copper, cobalt was incorporated, leading to an enzymically inactive form. In the absence of cobalt an enzymically inactive superoxide dismutase was built with unknown metal contents. Upon aeration the amount of superoxide dismutase activity increased continuously up to 9 h, due to a de novo synthesis of the protein. This superoxide dismutase had incorporated iron into the active centre. The superoxide dismutase of Propionibacterium shermanii is able to form a much wider variety of complexes with trace metal ions in vivo than previously recognized, leading to the hypothesis that the original function of these proteins was the binding of cytoplasmic trace metals present in excess.

  20. Chemoselective, Enzymatic C-H Bond Amination Catalyzed by a Cytochrome P450 Containing an Ir(Me)-PIX Cofactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dydio, Paweł; Key, Hanna M; Hayashi, Hiroki; Clark, Douglas S; Hartwig, John F

    2017-02-08

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes have been engineered to catalyze abiological C-H bond amination reactions, but the yields of these reactions have been limited by low chemoselectivity for the amination of C-H bonds over competing reduction of the azide substrate to a sulfonamide. Here we report that P450s derived from a thermophilic organism and containing an iridium porphyrin cofactor (Ir(Me)-PIX) in place of the heme catalyze enantioselective intramolecular C-H bond amination reactions of sulfonyl azides. These reactions occur with chemoselectivity for insertion of the nitrene units into C-H bonds over reduction of the azides to the sulfonamides that is higher and with substrate scope that is broader than those of enzymes containing iron porphyrins. The products from C-H amination are formed in up to 98% yield and ∼300 TON. In one case, the enantiomeric excess reaches 95:5 er, and the reactions can occur with divergent site selectivity. The chemoselectivity for C-H bond amination is greater than 20:1 in all cases. Variants of the Ir(Me)-PIX CYP119 displaying these properties were identified rapidly by evaluating CYP119 mutants containing Ir(Me)-PIX in cell lysates, rather than as purified enzymes. This study sets the stage to discover suitable enzymes to catalyze challenging C-H amination reactions.

  1. Development of CHARMM-compatible force-field parameters for cobalamin and related cofactors from quantum mechanical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Anna; Parks, Jerry M; Gumbart, James C

    2018-01-15

    Corrinoid cofactors such as cobalamin are used by many enzymes and are essential for most living organisms. Therefore, there is broad interest in investigating cobalamin-protein interactions with molecular dynamics simulations. Previously developed parameters for cobalamins are based mainly on crystal structure data. Here, we report CHARMM-compatible force field parameters for several corrinoids developed from quantum mechanical calculations. We provide parameters for corrinoids in three oxidation states, Co3+, Co2+ and Co1+, and with various axial ligands. Lennard-Jones parameters for the cobalt center in the Co(II) and Co(I) states were optimized using a helium atom probe, and partial atomic charges were obtained with a combination of natural population analysis (NPA) and restrained electrostatic potential (RESP) fitting approaches. The Force Field Toolkit was used to optimize all bonded terms. The resulting parameters, determined solely from calculations of cobalamin alone or in water, were then validated by assessing their agreement with DFT geometries and by analyzing molecular dynamics simulation trajectories of several corrinoid proteins for which X-ray crystal structures are available. In each case, we obtained excellent agreement with the reference data. In comparison to previous CHARMM-compatible parameters for cobalamin we observe a better agreement for the fold angle and lower RMSD in the cobalamin binding site. The approach described here is readily adaptable for developing CHARMM-compatible force-field parameters of other corrinoids or large biomolecules.

  2. A disulfide-stabilized conformer of methionine synthase reveals an unexpected role for the histidine ligand of the cobalamin cofactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, Supratim; Koutmos, Markos; Pattridge, Katherine A.; Ludwig, Martha L.; Matthews, Rowena G. (Michigan)

    2008-07-08

    B{sub 12}-dependent methionine synthase (MetH) from Escherichia coli is a large modular protein that is alternately methylated by methyltetrahydrofolate to form methylcobalamin and demethylated by homocysteine to form cob(I)alamin. Major domain rearrangements are required to allow cobalamin to react with three different substrates: homocysteine, methyltetrahydrofolate, and S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet). These same rearrangements appear to preclude crystallization of the wild-type enzyme. Disulfide cross-linking was used to lock a C-terminal fragment of the enzyme into a unique conformation. Cysteine point mutations were introduced at Ile-690 and Gly-743. These cysteine residues span the cap and the cobalamin-binding module and form a cross-link that reduces the conformational space accessed by the enzyme, facilitating protein crystallization. Here, we describe an x-ray structure of the mutant fragment in the reactivation conformation; this conformation enables the transfer of a methyl group from AdoMet to the cobalamin cofactor. In the structure, the axial ligand to the cobalamin, His-759, dissociates from the cobalamin and forms intermodular contacts with residues in the AdoMet-binding module. This unanticipated intermodular interaction is expected to play a major role in controlling the distribution of conformers required for the catalytic and the reactivation cycles of the enzyme.

  3. Genetic analysis of membrane cofactor protein (CD46) of the complement system in women with and without preeclamptic pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokki, A Inkeri; Aalto-Viljakainen, Tia; Meri, Seppo; Laivuori, Hannele

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a common disorder of pregnancy characterized by endothelial dysfunction. It may be life-threatening for the mother and fetus in severe cases. Dysregulation of the complement system has been suggested to predispose women to preeclampsia. Complement is part of the innate and adaptive immune systems and potentially capable of causing inflammation and tissue damage. Membrane cofactor protein MCP (CD46) is among the potent complement regulators that have recently been linked to a severe form of preeclampsia with or without an underlying autoimmune phenotype. Mutations in CD46 predispose to thrombotic microangiopathy with endothelial cell dysfunction. The exome of CD46 were sequenced in 95 Finnish women with severe preeclampsia. Genetic variations discovered in the full exome were compared to those observed in 95 control women who did not develop preeclampsia. Because A304V (rs35366573) was associated with preeclampsia in one previous study, we sequenced the transmembrane region including the A304V variant and part of the cytoplasmic tail in 95 additional controls. We did not discover any association between A304V or other CD46 SNPs and preeclampsia. This study describes a carefully characterized cohort of severely preeclamptic Finnish women and found no potentially predisposing variants in CD46. However, it is possible that other genetic components of the complement system may affect the pathogenesis of severe preeclampsia and related diseases.

  4. Cofactors-loaded quaternary structure of lysine-specific demethylase 5C (KDM5C) protein: Computational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yunhui; Alexov, Emil

    2016-12-01

    The KDM5C gene (also known as JARID1C and SMCX) is located on the X chromosome and encodes a ubiquitously expressed 1560-aa protein, which plays an important role in lysine methylation (specifically reverses tri- and di-methylation of Lys4 of histone H3). Currently, 13 missense mutations in KDM5C have been linked to X-linked mental retardation. However, the molecular mechanism of disease is currently unknown due to the experimental difficulties in expressing such large protein and the lack of experimental 3D structure. In this work, we utilize homology modeling, docking, and experimental data to predict 3D structures of KDM5C domains and their mutual arrangement. The resulting quaternary structure includes KDM5C JmjN, ARID, PHD1, JmjC, ZF domains, substrate histone peptide, enzymatic cofactors, and DNA. The predicted quaternary structure was investigated with molecular dynamic simulation for its stability, and further analysis was carried out to identify features measured experimentally. The predicted structure of KDM5C was used to investigate the effects of disease-causing mutations and it was shown that the mutations alter domain stability and inter-domain interactions. The structural model reported in this work could prompt experimental investigations of KDM5C domain-domain interaction and exploration of undiscovered functionalities. Proteins 2016; 84:1797-1809. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Crystal structure of the molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis protein MobA from Escherichia coli at near-atomic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, C E; Sargent, F; Buchanan, G; Palmer, T; Lawson, D M

    2000-11-15

    All mononuclear molybdoenzymes bind molybdenum in a complex with an organic cofactor termed molybdopterin (MPT). In many bacteria, including Escherichia coli, molybdopterin can be further modified by attachment of a GMP group to the terminal phosphate of molybdopterin to form molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide (MGD). This modification reaction is required for the functioning of many bacterial molybdoenzymes, including the nitrate reductases, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) reductases, and formate dehydrogenases. The GMP attachment step is catalyzed by the cellular enzyme MobA. The crystal structure of the 21.6 kDa E. coli MobA has been determined by MAD phasing with selenomethionine-substituted protein and subsequently refined at 1. 35 A resolution against native data. The structure consists of a central, predominantly parallel beta sheet sandwiched between two layers of alpha helices and resembles the dinucleotide binding Rossmann fold. One face of the molecule bears a wide depression that is lined by a number of strictly conserved residues, and this feature suggests that this is where substrate binding and catalysis take place. Through comparisons with a number of structural homologs, we have assigned plausible functions to several of the residues that line the substrate binding pocket. The enzymatic mechanism probably proceeds via a nucleophilic attack by MPT on the GMP donor, most likely GTP, to produce MGD and pyrophosphate. By analogy with related enzymes, this process is likely to require magnesium ions.

  6. Identification of a new point mutation in the human molybdenum cofactor sulferase gene that is responsible for xanthinuria type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Moriwaki, Yuji; Takahashi, Sumio; Tsutsumi, Zenta; Tuneyoshi, Ka; Matsui, Kiyoshi; Cheng, Jidong; Hada, Toshikazu

    2003-11-01

    A 43-year-old xanthinuric female was referred to our department because of hypouricemia. Routine laboratory data showed hypouricemia, a high level of plasma oxypurines, decreased urinary uric acid excretion, and increased urinary oxypurine excretion, with xanthine dehydrogenase activity in the duodenal mucosa below the limits of detection. In addition, allopurinol was not metabolized. From these findings, the patient was diagnosed with xanthinuria type II. To investigate the properties of xanthine dehydrogenase/xanthine oxidase (XDH/XO) deficiency, a cDNA sequence encoding XDH/XO, aldehyde oxidase (AO), and molybdenum cofactor sulferase (MCS), as well as immunoblotting analysis for XDH/XO protein, obtained from duodenal mucosa samples were performed. The XDH/XO cDNA and AO cDNA sequences of the xanthinuric patient were consistent with previously reported ones, whereas the MCS cDNA sequence revealed a point mutation of G to C in nucleotide 466, which changed codon 156 from GCC (Ala) to CCC (Pro). In addition, the MCS genomic DNA sequence including the site of the mutation revealed the same, suggesting that the xanthinuric patient was homozygous for this mutation. Such findings have not been previously reported for patients with xanthinuria type II.

  7. Characterization of the HIV-1 RNA associated proteome identifies Matrin 3 as a nuclear cofactor of Rev function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myers Michael P

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central to the fully competent replication cycle of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 is the nuclear export of unspliced and partially spliced RNAs mediated by the Rev posttranscriptional activator and the Rev response element (RRE. Results Here, we introduce a novel method to explore the proteome associated with the nuclear HIV-1 RNAs. At the core of the method is the generation of cell lines harboring an integrated provirus carrying RNA binding sites for the MS2 bacteriophage protein. Flag-tagged MS2 is then used for affinity purification of the viral RNA. By this approach we found that the viral RNA is associated with the host nuclear matrix component MATR3 (Matrin 3 and that its modulation affected Rev activity. Knockdown of MATR3 suppressed Rev/RRE function in the export of unspliced HIV-1 RNAs. However, MATR3 was able to associate with Rev only through the presence of RRE-containing viral RNA. Conclusions In this work, we exploited a novel proteomic method to identify MATR3 as a cellular cofactor of Rev activity. MATR3 binds viral RNA and is required for the Rev/RRE mediated nuclear export of unspliced HIV-1 RNAs.

  8. A comparative study of amyloid-beta (1-42) as a cofactor for plasminogen activation by vampire bat plasminogen activator and recombinant human tissue-type plasminogen activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruithof, Egbert K O; Schleuning, Wolf-Dieter

    2004-09-01

    The activity of both human tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and the PA from the saliva of the vampire bat, Desmodus rotundus, (DSPA) is critically dependent on the presence of a cofactor. The most efficient cofactor for both PAs is fibrin, but fibrinogen and amyloid beta peptides also have cofactor activities for human t-PA. Compared to t-PA, DSPA has a more stringent requirement for fibrin as a cofactor. The present study was undertaken to compare cofactor activities of amyloid beta 1-42 (Abeta1-42) for plasminogen activation by DSPA-alpha1 or by t-PA. The two PAs were incubated with different concentrations of glu-plasminogen, a chromogenic substrate for plasmin and 100 micro g mL (-1) of Abeta1-42, fibrinogen or fibrin as cofactor. Using the kinetic parameters directly determined from the chromogenic substrate conversion curves, we derived the relative efficacies of DSPA or t-PA in the presence of cofactor at the physiological plasminogen concentration of 2 micro M. In the presence of fibrin, the activity of DSPA was comparable to that of t-PA and 23,270-fold higher than its activity without cofactor, whereas fibrin induced only a 248-fold increase in t-PA activity. The activity of DSPA with Abeta1-42 or fibrinogen as cofactor was 485-fold lower than its activity in the presence of fibrin, while for t-PA this difference was only 26-fold. The much lower activity of DSPA as compared to t-PA with Abeta1-42 or fibrinogen might lead to fewer side effects when used for the thrombolytic therapy of stroke.

  9. The structure of tubulin-binding cofactor A from Leishmania major infers a mode of association during the early stages of microtubule assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrack, Keri L.; Fyfe, Paul K.; Hunter, William N., E-mail: w.n.hunter@dundee.ac.uk [University of Dundee, Dow Street, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-21

    The structure of a tubulin-binding cofactor from L. major is reported and compared with yeast, plant and human orthologues. Tubulin-binding cofactor A (TBCA) participates in microtubule formation, a key process in eukaryotic biology to create the cytoskeleton. There is little information on how TBCA might interact with β-tubulin en route to microtubule biogenesis. To address this, the protozoan Leishmania major was targeted as a model system. The crystal structure of TBCA and comparisons with three orthologous proteins are presented. The presence of conserved features infers that electrostatic interactions that are likely to involve the C-terminal tail of β-tubulin are key to association. This study provides a reagent and template to support further work in this area.

  10. Acute TNF-induced repression of cell identity genes is mediated by NFκB-directed redistribution of cofactors from super-enhancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Søren Fisker; Larsen, Bjørk Ditlev; Loft, Anne

    2015-01-01

    for the acute activation of the inflammatory gene program. Here, we show that the major transactivating subunit of NFκB, v-rel avian reticuloendotheliosis viral oncogene homolog A (RELA), is also required for acute TNF-induced suppression of adipocyte genes. Notably, this repression does not involve RELA...... binding to the associated enhancers but rather loss of cofactors and enhancer RNA (eRNA) selectively from high-occupancy sites within super-enhancers. Based on these data, we have developed models that, with high accuracy, predict which enhancers and genes are repressed by TNF in adipocytes. We show...... that these models are applicable to other cell types where TNF represses genes associated with super-enhancers in a highly cell-type-specific manner. Our results propose a novel paradigm for NFκB-mediated repression, whereby NFκB selectively redistributes cofactors from high-occupancy enhancers, thereby...

  11. Molybdenum cofactor-dependent resistance to N-hydroxylated base analogs in Escherichia coli is independent of MobA function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozmin, Stanislav G. [Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Department of Genetics, Saint-Petersburg State University, Saint-Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Schaaper, Roel M. [Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)]. E-mail: schaaper@niehs.nih.gov

    2007-06-01

    Lack of molybdenum cofactor (MoCo) in Escherichia coli and related microorganisms was found to cause hypersensitivity to certain N-hydroxylated base analogs, such as HAP (6-N-hydroxylaminopurine). This observation has lead to a previous proposal that E. coli contains a molybdoenzyme capable of detoxifying such N-hydroxylated analogs. Here, we show that, unexpectedly, deletion of all known or putative molybdoenzymes in E. coli failed to reveal any base-analog sensitivity, suggesting that a novel type of MoCo-dependent activity is involved. Further, we establish that protection against the analogs does not require the common molybdopterin guanine-dinucleotide (MGD) form of the cofactor, but instead the guanosine monophosphate (GMP)-free version of MoCo (MPT) is sufficient.

  12. Molybdenum cofactor-dependent resistance to N-hydroxylated base analogs in Escherichia coli is independent of MobA function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozmin, Stanislav G; Schaaper, Roel M

    2007-06-01

    Lack of molybdenum cofactor (MoCo) in Escherichia coli and related microorganisms was found to cause hypersensitivity to certain N-hydroxylated base analogs, such as HAP (6-N-hydroxylaminopurine). This observation has lead to a previous proposal that E. coli contains a molybdoenzyme capable of detoxifying such N-hydroxylated analogs. Here, we show that, unexpectedly, deletion of all known or putative molybdoenzymes in E. coli failed to reveal any base-analog sensitivity, suggesting that a novel type of MoCo-dependent activity is involved. Further, we establish that protection against the analogs does not require the common molybdopterin guanine-dinucleotide (MGD) form of the cofactor, but instead the guanosine monophosphate (GMP)-free version of MoCo (MPT) is sufficient.

  13. Altered cofactor binding affects stability and activity of human UDP-galactose 4′-epimerase: implications for type III galactosemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCorvie, Thomas J.; Liu, Ying; Frazer, Andrew; Gleason, Tyler J.; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L.; Timson, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Deficiency of UDP-galactose 4′-epimerase is implicated in type III galactosemia. Two variants, p.K161N-hGALE and p.D175N-hGALE, have been previously found in combination with other alleles in patients with a mild form of the disease. Both variants were studied in vivo and in vitro and showed different levels of impairment. p.K161N-hGALE was severely impaired with substantially reduced enzymatic activity, increased thermal stability, reduced cofactor binding and inability to rescue the galactose-sensitivity of gal10-null yeast. Interestingly p.K161N-hGALE showed less impairment of activity with UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine in comparison to UDP-galactose. Differential scanning fluorimetry revealed that p.K161N-hGALE was more stable than the wild-type protein and only changed stability in the presence of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine and NAD+. p.D175N-hGALE essentially rescued the galactose-sensitivity of gal10-null yeast, was less stable than the wild-type protein but showed increased stability in the presence of substrates and cofactor. We postulate that p.K161N-hGALE causes its effects by abolishing an important interaction between the protein and the cofactor, whereas p.D175N-hGALE is predicted to remove a stabilizing salt bridge between the ends of two α-helices that contain residues that interact with NAD+. These results suggest that the cofactor binding is dynamic and that its loss results in significant structural changes that may be important in disease causation. PMID:22613355

  14. Crystal Structure of the Thermus thermophilus 16 S rRNA Methyltransferase RsmC in Complex with Cofactor and Substrate Guanosine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirci, H.; Gregory, S; Dahlberg, A; Jogl, G

    2008-01-01

    Post-transcriptional modification is a ubiquitous feature of ribosomal RNA in all kingdoms of life. Modified nucleotides are generally clustered in functionally important regions of the ribosome, but the functional contribution to protein synthesis is not well understood. Here we describe high resolution crystal structures for the N{sup 2}-guanine methyltransferase RsmC that modifies residue G1207 in 16 S rRNA near the decoding site of the 30 S ribosomal subunit. RsmC is a class I S-adenosyl-l-methionine-dependent methyltransferase composed of two methyltransferase domains. However, only one S-adenosyl-l-methionine molecule and one substrate molecule, guanosine, bind in the ternary complex. The N-terminal domain does not bind any cofactor. Two structures with bound S-adenosyl-l-methionine and S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine confirm that the cofactor binding mode is highly similar to other class I methyltransferases. Secondary structure elements of the N-terminal domain contribute to cofactor-binding interactions and restrict access to the cofactor-binding site. The orientation of guanosine in the active site reveals that G1207 has to disengage from its Watson-Crick base pairing interaction with C1051 in the 16 S rRNA and flip out into the active site prior to its modification. Inspection of the 30 S crystal structure indicates that access to G1207 by RsmC is incompatible with the native subunit structure, consistent with previous suggestions that this enzyme recognizes a subunit assembly intermediate.

  15. Bioorganometallic chemistry: biocatalytic oxidation reactions with biomimetic nad+/nadh co-factors and [cp*rh(bpy)h]+ for selective organic synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, Jochen; Hollman, Frank; Ho, The Vinh; Schnyder, Adrian; Fish, Richard H.; Schmid, Andreas

    2004-03-09

    The biocatalytic, regioselective hydroxylation of 2-hydroxybiphenyl to the corresponding catechol was accomplished utilizing the monooxygenase 2-hydroxybiphenyl 3-monooxygenase (HbpA). The necessary natural nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) co-factor for this biocatalytic process was replaced by a biomimetic co-factor, N-benzylnicotinamide bromide, 1a. The interaction between the flavin (FAD) containing HbpA enzyme and the corresponding biomimetic NADH compound, N-benzyl-1,4-dihdronicotinamide, 1b, for hydride transfers, was shown to readily occur. The in situ recycling of the reduced NADH biomimic 1b from 1a was accomplished with [Cp*Rh(bpy)H](Cl); however, productive coupling of this regeneration reaction to the enzymatic hydroxylation reaction was not totally successful, due to a deactivation process concerning the HbpA enzyme peripheral groups; i.e., -SH or -NH{sub 2} possibly reacting with the precatalyst, [Cp*Rh(bpy)(H{sub 2}O)](Cl){sub 2}, and thus inhibiting the co-factor regeneration process. The deactivation mechanism was studied, and a promising strategy of derivatizing these peripheral -SH or -NH{sub 2} groups with a polymer containing epoxide was successful in circumventing the undesired interaction between HbpA and the precatalyst. This latter strategy allowed tandem co-factor regeneration using 1a or 2a, [Cp*Rh(bpy)(H2O)](Cl){sub 2}, and formate ion, in conjunction with the polymer bound, FAD containing HbpA enzyme to provide the catechol product.

  16. Fluorinated Vitamin B12 Analogs Are Cofactors of Corrinoid-Dependent Enzymes: a 19F-Labeled Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Probe for Identifying Corrinoid-Protein Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupperich, Erhard; Eisinger, Hans-Jürgen; Kerssebaum, Rainer; Nexø, Ebba

    1993-01-01

    The homoacetogenic bacterium Sporomusa ovata synthesized the vitamin B12 analog phenolyl cobamide or 4-fluorophenolyl cobamide when the methanol medium of growing cells was supplemented with 10 mM phenol or 5 mM 4-fluorophenol. Phenol and, presumably, 4-fluorophenol were specifically incorporated into these cobamides, since phenol was not metabolized significantly into amino acids or into acetic acid, the product of the catabolism. The phenol-containing cobamides contributed up to 90% of the protein-bound cobamides of the 1,300 to 1,900 nmol of corrinoid per g of dry cell material formed. Fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of 4-fluorophenolyl cobamide exhibited a resonance near 30 ppm. An additional signal emerged at 25 ppm when 4-fluorophenolyl cobamide was investigated as the cofactor of a corrinoid-dependent protein. The two resonances indicated distinct cofactor arrangements within the protein's active site. A 5-ppm high-field shift change suggested van der Waal's interactions between the fluorinated nucleotide of the cofactor and adjacent amino acid residues of the enzyme. Similarly, Propionibacterium freudenreichii and Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum synthesized 5-fluorobenzimidazolyl cobamide. The human corrinoid binders intrinsic factor, transcobalamin, and haptocorrin recognized this corrinoid like vitamin B12. Hence, it is possible to use 19F-labeled nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for analyses of protein-bound cobamides. PMID:16348877

  17. Acquisition of complement inhibitor serine protease factor I and its cofactors C4b-binding protein and factor H by Prevotella intermedia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Malm

    Full Text Available Infection with the Gram-negative pathogen Prevotella intermedia gives rise to periodontitis and a growing number of studies implies an association of P. intermedia with rheumatoid arthritis. The serine protease Factor I (FI is the central inhibitor of complement degrading complement components C3b and C4b in the presence of cofactors such as C4b-binding protein (C4BP and Factor H (FH. Yet, the significance of complement inhibitor acquisition in P. intermedia infection and FI binding by Gram-negative pathogens has not been addressed. Here we show that P. intermedia isolates bound purified FI as well as FI directly from heat-inactivated human serum. FI bound to bacteria retained its serine protease activity as shown in degradation experiments with (125I-labeled C4b. Since FI requires cofactors for its activity we also investigated the binding of purified cofactors C4BP and FH and found acquisition of both proteins, which retained their activity in FI mediated degradation of C3b and C4b. We propose that FI binding by P. intermedia represents a new mechanism contributing to complement evasion by a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen associated with chronic diseases.

  18. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics studies on the mechanism of action of cofactor pyridoxal 5'-phosphate in ornithine 4,5-aminomutase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Jiayun; Scrutton, Nigel S; Sutcliffe, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    A computational study was performed on the experimentally elusive cyclisation step in the cofactor pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent D-ornithine 4,5-aminomutase (OAM)-catalysed reaction. Calculations using both model systems and a combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approach suggest that regulation of the cyclic radical intermediate is achieved through the synergy of the intrinsic catalytic power of cofactor PLP and the active site of the enzyme. The captodative effect of PLP is balanced by an enzyme active site that controls the deprotonation of both the pyridine nitrogen atom (N1) and the Schiff-base nitrogen atom (N2). Furthermore, electrostatic interactions between the terminal carboxylate and amino groups of the substrate and Arg297 and Glu81 impose substantial "strain" energy on the orientation of the cyclic intermediate to control its trajectory. In addition the "strain" energy, which appears to be sensitive to both the number of carbon atoms in the substrate/analogue and the position of the radical intermediates, may play a key role in controlling the transition of the enzyme from the closed to the open state. Our results provide new insights into several aspects of the radical mechanism in aminomutase catalysis and broaden our understanding of cofactor PLP-dependent reactions. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Identification of an Isothiocyanate on the HypEF Complex Suggests a Route for Efficient Cyanyl-Group Channeling during [NiFe]-Hydrogenase Cofactor Generation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven T Stripp

    Full Text Available [NiFe]-hydrogenases catalyze uptake and evolution of H2 in a wide range of microorganisms. The enzyme is characterized by an inorganic nickel/ iron cofactor, the latter of which carries carbon monoxide and cyanide ligands. In vivo generation of these ligands requires a number of auxiliary proteins, the so-called Hyp family. Initially, HypF binds and activates the precursor metabolite carbamoyl phosphate. HypF catalyzes removal of phosphate and transfers the carbamate group to HypE. In an ATP-dependent condensation reaction, the C-terminal cysteinyl residue of HypE is modified to what has been interpreted as thiocyanate. This group is the direct precursor of the cyanide ligands of the [NiFe]-hydrogenase active site cofactor. We present a FT-IR analysis of HypE and HypF as isolated from E. coli. We follow the HypF-catalyzed cyanation of HypE in vitro and screen for the influence of carbamoyl phosphate and ATP. To elucidate on the differences between HypE and the HypEF complex, spectro-electrochemistry was used to map the vibrational Stark effect of naturally cyanated HypE. The IR signature of HypE could ultimately be assigned to isothiocyanate (-N=C=S rather than thiocyanate (-S-C≡N. This has important implications for cyanyl-group channeling during [NiFe]-hydrogenase cofactor generation.

  20. Distribution in Different Organisms of Amino Acid Oxidases with FAD or a Quinone As Cofactor and Their Role as Antimicrobial Proteins in Marine Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonatan C. Campillo-Brocal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Amino acid oxidases (AAOs catalyze the oxidative deamination of amino acids releasing ammonium and hydrogen peroxide. Several kinds of these enzymes have been reported. Depending on the amino acid isomer used as a substrate, it is possible to differentiate between l-amino acid oxidases and d-amino acid oxidases. Both use FAD as cofactor and oxidize the amino acid in the alpha position releasing the corresponding keto acid. Recently, a novel class of AAOs has been described that does not contain FAD as cofactor, but a quinone generated by post-translational modification of residues in the same protein. These proteins are named as LodA-like proteins, after the first member of this group described, LodA, a lysine epsilon oxidase synthesized by the marine bacterium Marinomonas mediterranea. In this review, a phylogenetic analysis of all the enzymes described with AAO activity has been performed. It is shown that it is possible to recognize different groups of these enzymes and those containing the quinone cofactor are clearly differentiated. In marine bacteria, particularly in the genus Pseudoalteromonas, most of the proteins described as antimicrobial because of their capacity to generate hydrogen peroxide belong to the group of LodA-like proteins.

  1. A tyrosyl-dimanganese coupled spin system is the native metalloradical cofactor of the R2F subunit of the ribonucleotide reductase of Corynebacterium ammoniagenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Nicholas; Ogata, Hideaki; Stolle, Patrick; Reijerse, Edward; Auling, Georg; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2010-08-18

    The X-ray crystallographic structure of the native R2F subunit of the ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) of Corynebacterium ammoniagenes ATCC 6872 is reported, with a resolution of 1.36 A. The metal site contains an oxo/hydroxo-bridged manganese dimer, located near a tyrosine residue (Y115). The coordination of the manganese dimer and its distance to a nearby tyrosine residue resemble the di-iron metalloradical cofactor of class I RNR from Escherichia coli . Multifrequency EPR measurements of the highly active C. ammoniagenes R2F subunit show that the metal site contains a ferromagnetically exchange-coupled Mn(III)Mn(III) dimer weakly coupled to a tyrosyl radical. A mechanism for the metalloradical cofactor (Mn(III)Mn(III)Y(*)) generation is proposed. H(2)O(2) (HO(2)(-)) instead of O(2) is hypothesized as physiological oxidant for the Mn dimer which in turn oxidizes the tyrosine Y115. Changes in the ligand sphere of both manganese ions during metalloradical generation direct the complex formation of this cofactor, disfavoring alternate reaction pathways such as H(2)O(2) dismutation, as observed for manganese catalase, a structural analogue of the R2F metal site. The presented results demonstrate the importance of manganese for radical formation in this RNR and confirm the assignment of this enzyme to class Ib.

  2. Engineering Cofactor Preference of Ketone Reducing Biocatalysts: A Mutagenesis Study on a γ-Diketone Reductase from the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Serving as an Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Katzberg

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of pharmaceuticals and catalysts more and more relies on enantiopure chiral building blocks. These can be produced in an environmentally benign and efficient way via bioreduction of prochiral ketones catalyzed by dehydrogenases. A productive source of these biocatalysts is the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, whose genome also encodes a reductase catalyzing the sequential reduction of the γ-diketone 2,5-hexanedione furnishing the diol (2S,5S-hexanediol and the γ-hydroxyketone (5S-hydroxy-2-hexanone in high enantio- as well as diastereoselectivity (ee and de >99.5%. This enzyme prefers NADPH as the hydrogen donating cofactor. As NADH is more stable and cheaper than NADPH it would be more effective if NADH could be used in cell-free bioreduction systems. To achieve this, the cofactor binding site of the dehydrogenase was altered by site-directed mutagenesis. The results show that the rational approach based on a homology model of the enzyme allowed us to generate a mutant enzyme having a relaxed cofactor preference and thus is able to use both NADPH and NADH. Results obtained from other mutants are discussed and point towards the limits of rationally designed mutants.

  3. A rapid, automated VWF ristocetin cofactor activity assay improves reliability in the diagnosis of Von Willebrand disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, Annette E; Shepherd, Fiona; Kitchen, Stephen; Makris, Michael

    2011-04-01

    The effective diagnosis and monitoring of Von Willebrand Disease (VWD) requires an accurate assessment of ristocetin co-factor activity (VWF:RCo). Current methodologies include automated platelet aggregometry and manual visual agglutination both of which are laborious to perform and notoriously subject to a high degree of inter and intra assay variation. We have evaluated an automated VWF:RCo assay (BC Von Willebrand Reagent, Siemens, Marberg, Germany) for use on the Sysmex CS2100i analyser (Milton Keynes, UK) and retrospectively compared the results with an in-house manual visual agglutination assay and VWF antigen (Siemens) in normal subjects and in 53 patients with various types of VWD and 23 patients following VWF therapeutic treatment. The intra and interassay CV was improved with the automated assay (2.3% and 3.8% respectively) compared to 7% with the manual VWF:RCo assay. Good correlation was found between the two assays (r=0.91) in 53 patients with VWD. The mean manual VWF:RCo was 0.25IU/ml and mean automated VWF:RCo was 0.27IU/ml. A comparable increase in VWF:RCo following treatment, mostly with Desmopressin, was found in 13 patients with type 1 VWD (mean 3.9 fold increase with manual VWF:RCo and 3.1 fold with the automated VWF:RCo). In 13 patients with type 2 or 3 VWD following treatment mostly with concentrate , a higher increase was found with the automated VWF:RCo assay than the manual assay (mean 11.9 fold manually and mean 20.3 automated). The automated VWF:RCo assay shows enhanced precision and analysis time in this difficult and time consuming laboratory test and its introduction should greatly improve the reliability of VWF testing. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Selenol binds to iron in nitrogenase iron-molybdenum cofactor: An extended x-ray absorption fine structure study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conradson, S.D.; Hodgson, K.O.; Hedman, B. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Burgess, B.K. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Newton, W.E. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States); Cicco, A.Di [Universita degli Studi di Camerino, Camerino (Italy); Filipponi, A. [Universita degli Studi dell`Aquila (Italy); Wu, Z.Y.; Natoli, C.R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati (Italy)

    1994-02-15

    The biological N{sub 2}-fixation reaction is catalyzed by the enzyme nitrogenase. The metal cluster active site of this enzyme, the iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMoco), can be studied either while bound within the MoFe protein component of nitrogenase or after it has ben extracted into N-methylformamide. The two species are similar but not identical. For example, the addition of thiophenol or selenophenol to isolated FeMoco causes its rather broad S = 3/2 electron paramagnetic resonance signal to sharpen and more closely approach the signal exhibited by protein-bound FeMoco. The nature of this thiol/selenol binding site has been investigated by using Se-K edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) to study selenophenol ligated to FeMoco, and the results are reported here. EXAFS data analysis at the ligand Se-K edge was performed with a set of software, GNXAS, that provides for direct calculation of the theoretical EXAFS signals and least-squares fits to the experimental data. Data analysis results show definitively that the selenol (and by inference thiol) binds to Fe at a distance of 2.4 {angstrom}. In contrast, unacceptable fits are obtained with either Mo or S as the liganded atom (instead of Fe). These results provide quantitative details about an exchangeable thio/selenol binding site on FeMoco in its isolated, solution state and establish an Fe atom as the site of this reaction. Furthermore, the utility of ligand-based EXAFS as a probe of coordination in polynuclear metal clusters is demonstrated.

  5. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity phenotype in mice lacking the cyclin-dependent kinase 5 cofactor p35.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drerup, Justin M; Hayashi, Kanehiro; Cui, Huxing; Mettlach, Gabriel L; Long, Michael A; Marvin, Marian; Sun, Xiankai; Goldberg, Matthew S; Lutter, Michael; Bibb, James A

    2010-12-15

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may result from delayed establishment of corticolimbic circuitry or perturbed dopamine (DA) neurotransmission. Despite the widespread use of stimulants to treat ADHD, little is known regarding their long-term effects on neurotransmitter levels and metabolism. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) regulates DA signaling through control of synthesis, postsynaptic responses, and vesicle release. Mice lacking the Cdk5-activating cofactor p35 are deficient in cortical lamination, suggesting altered motor/reward circuitry. We employed mice lacking p35 to study the effect of altered circuitry in vivo. Positron emission tomography measured glucose metabolism in the cerebral cortex using 2-deoxy-2-[¹⁸F] fluoro-d-glucose as the radiotracer. Retrograde dye tracing and tyrosine hydroxylase immunostains assessed the effect of p35 knockout on the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC), especially in relation to mesolimbic circuit formation. We defined the influence of Cdk5/p35 activity on catecholaminergic neurotransmission and motor activity via examination of locomotor responses to psychostimulants, monoamine neurotransmitter levels, and DA signal transduction. Here, we report that mice deficient in p35 display increased glucose uptake in the cerebral cortex, basal hyperactivity, and paradoxical decreased locomotion in response to chronic injection of cocaine or methylphenidate. Knockout mice also exhibited an increased susceptibility to changes in PFC neurotransmitter content after chronic methylphenidate exposure and altered basal DAergic activity in acute striatal and PFC slices. Our findings suggest that dysregulation of Cdk5/p35 activity during development may contribute to ADHD pathology, as indicated by the behavioral phenotype, improperly established mesolimbic circuitry, and aberrations in striatal and PFC catecholaminergic signaling in p35 knockout mice. Copyright © 2010 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier

  6. Transfer of the molybdenum cofactor synthesized by Rhodobacter capsulatus MoeA to XdhC and MobA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Meina; Stöcklein, Walter; Leimkühler, Silke

    2007-09-28

    The molybdenum cofactor (Moco) exists in different variants in the cell and can be directly inserted into molybdoenzymes utilizing the molybdopterin (MPT) form of Moco. In bacteria such as Rhodobacter capsulatus and Escherichia coli, MPT is further modified by attachment of a GMP nucleotide, forming MPT guanine dinucleotide (MGD). In this work, we analyzed the distribution and targeting of different forms of Moco to their respective user enzymes by proteins that bind Moco and are involved in its further modification. The R. capsulatus proteins MogA, MoeA, MobA, and XdhC were purified, and their specific interactions were analyzed. Interactions between the protein pairs MogA-MoeA, MoeA-XdhC, MoeA-MobA, and XdhC-MobA were identified by surface plasmon resonance measurements. In addition, the transfer of Moco produced by the MogA-MoeA complex to XdhC was investigated. A direct competition of MobA and XdhC for Moco binding was determined. In vitro analyses showed that XdhC bound to MobA, prevented the binding of Moco to MobA, and thereby inhibited MGD biosynthesis. The data were confirmed by in vivo studies in R. capsulatus cells showing that overproduction of XdhC resulted in a 50% decrease in the activity of bis-MGD-containing Me(2)SO reductase. We propose that, in bacteria, the distribution of Moco in the cell and targeting to the respective user enzymes are accomplished by specific proteins involved in Moco binding and modification.

  7. HypD is the scaffold protein for Fe-(CN)2CO cofactor assembly in [NiFe]-hydrogenase maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stripp, Sven T; Soboh, Basem; Lindenstrauss, Ute; Braussemann, Mario; Herzberg, Martin; Nies, Dietrich H; Sawers, R Gary; Heberle, Joachim

    2013-05-14

    [NiFe]-hydrogenases bind a NiFe-(CN)2CO cofactor in their catalytic large subunit. The iron-sulfur protein HypD and the small accessory protein HypC play a central role in the generation of the CO and CN(-) ligands. Infrared spectroscopy identified signatures on an anaerobically isolated HypCD complex that are reminiscent of those in the hydrogenase active site, suggesting that this complex is the assembly site of the Fe-(CN)2CO moiety of the cofactor prior to its transfer to the hydrogenase large subunit. Here, we report that HypD isolated in the absence of HypC shows infrared bands at 1956 cm(-1), 2072 cm(-1), and 2092 cm(-1) that can be assigned to CO, CN(1), and CN(2), respectively, and which are indistinguishable from those observed for the HypCD complex. HypC could not be isolated with CO or CN(-) ligand contribution. Treatment of HypD with EDTA led to the concomitant loss of Fe and the CO and CN(-) signatures, while oxidation by H2O2 resulted in a positive shift of the CO and CN(-) bands by 35 cm(-1) and 20 cm(-1), respectively, indicative of the ferrous iron as an immediate ligation site for the diatomic ligands. Analysis of HypD amino acid variants identified cysteines 41, 69, and 72 to be essential for maturation of the cofactor. We propose a refined model for the ligation of Fe-(CN)2CO to HypD and the role of HypC in [NiFe]-hydrogenase maturation.

  8. A Novel Nonsense Variant in Nav1.5 Cofactor MOG1 Eliminates Its Sodium Current Increasing Effect and May Increase the Risk of Arrhythmias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Morten S; Jensen, Niels F; Holst, Anders G

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The protein MOG1 is a cofactor of the cardiac sodium channel, Nav1.5. Overexpression of MOG1 in Nav1.5-expressing cells increases sodium current markedly. Mutations in the genes encoding Nav1.5 and its accessory proteins have been associated with cardiac arrhythmias of significant...... clinical impact. We sought to investigate whether MOG1 is implicated in cardiac arrhythmias. METHODS: We performed a genetic screening of the MOG1-encoding gene (gene symbol RANGRF, alias MOG1) in 220 Danish patients with cardiac arrhythmia. Of the 220, 197 were young patients with lone atrial fibrillation...

  9. A manganese(IV)/iron(IV) intermediate in assembly of the manganese(IV)/iron(III) cofactor of Chlamydia trachomatis ribonucleotide reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Hoffart, Lee M; Krebs, Carsten; Bollinger, J Martin

    2007-07-31

    We recently showed that the class Ic ribonucleotide reductase from the human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis uses a Mn(IV)/Fe(III) cofactor to generate protein and substrate radicals in its catalytic mechanism [Jiang, W., Yun, D., Saleh, L., Barr, E. W., Xing, G., Hoffart, L. M., Maslak, M.-A., Krebs, C., and Bollinger, J. M., Jr. (2007) Science 316, 1188-1191]. Here, we have dissected the mechanism of formation of this novel heterobinuclear redox cofactor from the Mn(II)/Fe(II) cluster and O2. An intermediate with a g = 2 EPR signal that shows hyperfine coupling to both 55Mn and 57Fe accumulates almost quantitatively in a second-order reaction between O2 and the reduced R2 complex. The otherwise slow decay of the intermediate to the active Mn(IV)/Fe(III)-R2 complex is accelerated by the presence of the one-electron reductant, ascorbate, implying that the intermediate is more oxidized than Mn(IV)/Fe(III). Mössbauer spectra show that the intermediate contains a high-spin Fe(IV) center. Its chemical and spectroscopic properties establish that the intermediate is a Mn(IV)/Fe(IV)-R2 complex with an S = 1/2 electronic ground state arising from antiferromagnetic coupling between the Mn(IV) (S(Mn) = 3/2) and high-spin Fe(IV) (S(Fe) = 2) sites.

  10. Acute TNF-induced repression of cell identity genes is mediated by NFκB-directed redistribution of cofactors from super-enhancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Søren Fisker; Larsen, Bjørk Ditlev; Loft, Anne; Nielsen, Ronni; Madsen, Jesper Grud Skat; Mandrup, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) plays a central role in low-grade adipose tissue inflammation and development of insulin resistance during obesity. In this context, nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) is directly involved and required for the acute activation of the inflammatory gene program. Here, we show that the major transactivating subunit of NFκB, v-rel avian reticuloendotheliosis viral oncogene homolog A (RELA), is also required for acute TNF-induced suppression of adipocyte genes. Notably, this repression does not involve RELA binding to the associated enhancers but rather loss of cofactors and enhancer RNA (eRNA) selectively from high-occupancy sites within super-enhancers. Based on these data, we have developed models that, with high accuracy, predict which enhancers and genes are repressed by TNF in adipocytes. We show that these models are applicable to other cell types where TNF represses genes associated with super-enhancers in a highly cell-type–specific manner. Our results propose a novel paradigm for NFκB-mediated repression, whereby NFκB selectively redistributes cofactors from high-occupancy enhancers, thereby specifically repressing super-enhancer-associated cell identity genes. PMID:26113076

  11. RNA helicase MOV10 functions as a co-factor of HIV-1 Rev to facilitate Rev/RRE-dependent nuclear export of viral mRNAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Feng; Zhang, Junsong; Zhang, Yijun; Geng, Guannan; Liang, Juanran; Li, Yingniang; Chen, Jingliang [Institute of Human Virology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control of Ministry of Education, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Liu, Chao, E-mail: liuchao9@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Institute of Human Virology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control of Ministry of Education, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Zhang, Hui [Institute of Human Virology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control of Ministry of Education, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) exploits multiple host factors during its replication. The REV/RRE-dependent nuclear export of unspliced/partially spliced viral transcripts needs the assistance of host proteins. Recent studies have shown that MOV10 overexpression inhibited HIV-1 replication at various steps. However, the endogenous MOV10 was required in certain step(s) of HIV-1 replication. In this report, we found that MOV10 potently enhances the nuclear export of viral mRNAs and subsequently increases the expression of Gag protein and other late products through affecting the Rev/RRE axis. The co-immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that MOV10 interacts with Rev in an RNA-independent manner. The DEAG-box of MOV10 was required for the enhancement of Rev/RRE-dependent nuclear export and the DEAG-box mutant showed a dominant-negative activity. Our data propose that HIV-1 utilizes the anti-viral factor MOV10 to function as a co-factor of Rev and demonstrate the complicated effects of MOV10 on HIV-1 life cycle. - Highlights: • MOV10 can function as a co-factor of HIV-1 Rev. • MOV10 facilitates Rev/RRE-dependent transport of viral mRNAs. • MOV10 interacts with Rev in an RNA-independent manner. • The DEAG-box of MOV10 is required for the enhancement of Rev/RRE-dependent export.

  12. S-layer proteins as a source of carotenoids: Isolation of the carotenoid cofactor deinoxanthin from its S-layer protein DR_2577.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farci, Domenica; Esposito, Francesca; El Alaoui, Sabah; Piano, Dario

    2017-09-01

    S-layers are regular paracrystalline arrays of proteins or glycoproteins that characterize the outer envelope of several bacteria and archaea. The auto-assembling properties of these proteins make them suitable for application in nanotechnologies. However, the bacterial cell wall and its S-layer are also an important binding sites for carotenoids and they may represent a potential source of these precious molecules for industrial purposes. The S-layer structure and its components were extensively studied in the radio-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, which for long time represented one of the model organisms in this respect. The protein DR_2577 has been shown to be one of the naturally over-expressed S-layer components in this bacterium. The present report describes a high scale purification procedure of this protein in solution. The purity of the samples, assayed by native and denaturing electrophoresis, showed how this method leads to a selective and high efficient recovery of the pure DR_2577. Recently, we have found that the deinoxanthin, a carotenoid typical of D. radiodurans, is a cofactor non covalently bound to the protein DR_2577. The pure DR_2577 samples may be precipitated or lyophilized and used as a source of the carotenoid cofactor deinoxanthin by an efficient extraction using organic solvents. The procedure described in this work may represent a general approach for the isolation of S-layer proteins and their carotenoids with potentials for industrial applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cofactor Specificity of the Bifunctional Alcohol and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (AdhE) in Wild-Type and Mutant Clostridium thermocellum and Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Tianyong; Olson, Daniel G.; Tian, Liang; Bomble, Yannick J.; Himmel, Michael E.; Lo, Jonathan; Hon, Shuen; Shaw, A. Joe; van Dijken, Johannes P.; Lynd, Lee R.; Metcalf, W. W.

    2015-05-26

    Clostridium thermocellum and Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticumare thermophilic bacteria that have been engineered to produce ethanol from the cellulose and hemicellulose fractions of biomass, respectively. Although engineered strains of T. saccharolyticumproduce ethanol with a yield of 90% of the theoretical maximum, engineered strains ofC. thermocellumproduce ethanol at lower yields (~50% of the theoretical maximum). In the course of engineering these strains, a number of mutations have been discovered in theiradhEgenes, which encode both alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymes. To understand the effects of these mutations, theadhEgenes from six strains ofC. thermocellumandT. saccharolyticumwere cloned and expressed inEscherichia coli, the enzymes produced were purified by affinity chromatography, and enzyme activity was measured. In wild-type strains of both organisms, NADH was the preferred cofactor for both ALDH and ADH activities. In high-ethanol-producing (ethanologen) strains ofT. saccharolyticum, both ALDH and ADH activities showed increased NADPH-linked activity. Interestingly, the AdhE protein of the ethanologenic strain ofC. thermocellumhas acquired high NADPH-linked ADH activity while maintaining NADH-linked ALDH and ADH activities at wild-type levels

  14. Applications of vitamin B6 cofactor pyridoxal 5‧-phosphate and pyridoxal 5‧-phosphate crowned gold nanoparticles for optical sensing of metal ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothra, Shilpa; Upadhyay, Yachana; Kumar, Rajender; Sahoo, Suban K.

    2017-03-01

    Vitamin B6 cofactor pyridoxal 5‧-phosphate (PLP) and PLP crowned gold nanoparticles (PLP-AuNPs) was applied for the optical chemosensing of metal ions in aqueous medium. PLP showed a visually detectable colour change from colourless to yellow and 'turn-off' fluorescence in the presence of Fe3 +. The fluorescence intensity of PLP at 433 nm was also blue-shifted and enhanced at 395 nm upon addition of Al3 +. When the PLP was functionalized over AuNPs surface, the wine red colour of PLP-AuNPs was turned to purplish-blue and the SPR band at 525 nm was red-shifted upon addition of Al3 +, Cd2 + and Pb2 + due to the complexation-induced aggregation of nanoparticles. The developed sensing systems exhibited good selectivity and specificity for the detected analytes (Fe3 +, Al3 +, Cd2 + and Pb2 +).

  15. X-ray crystallographic evidence for the presence of the cysteine tryptophylquinone cofactor in L-lysine ε-oxidase from Marinomonas mediterranea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Seiji; Nakano, Shogo; Matsui, Daisuke; Akaji, Shusaku; Inagaki, Kenji; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2013-09-01

    We have determined the x-ray crystal structure of L-lysine ε-oxidase from Marinomonas mediterranea in its native and L-lysine-complex forms at 1.94- and 1.99-Å resolution, respectively. In the native enzyme, electron densities clearly indicate the presence of cysteine tryptophylquinone (CTQ) previously identified in quinohemoprotein amine dehydrogenase. In the L-lysine-complex, an electron density corresponding to the bound L-lysine shows that its ε-amino group is attached to the C6 carbonyl group of CTQ, suggesting the formation of a Schiff-base intermediate. Collectively, the present crystal structure provides the first example of an enzyme employing a tryptophylquinone cofactor in an amine oxidase.

  16. Co-factors for abnormal lactate levels among persons with HIV disease at a tertiary HIV care setting in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Muthu; Srinivas, Chakravarthy Narasimhachar; Shankar, Esaki Muthu; Deepak, Manohar; Murugavel, Kailapuri G; Balakrishnan, Pachamuthu; Solomon, Suniti; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran

    2008-08-01

    The co-factors underlying abnormal lactate level remains to be determined in resource-limited settings. In a cross-sectional study conducted between January 2004 and July 2006, we determined the proportion of HIV-infected persons with abnormal lactate levels and correlated the association of certain co-factors of abnormal lactate levels at a tertiary HIV care centre in Chennai, Southern India. Lactate was estimated by the enzymatic method using an Olympus AU 400 autoanalyzer. Absolute CD4+T lymphocyte count was determined by the Guava personal cell analyser (Guava Technologies Inc., Hayward, CA, USA). Subjects were classified to have normal or abnormal values of lactate based on the reference interval (0.3-2.2 mmol/L). A p value 0.05 was considered statistically significant. A total of 225 HIV-infected individuals (HAART experienced 213 (95%) and HAART naïve (5%)) were included in the analysis. Mean age was 34+/-8 and 36+/-9 years for the individuals with normal and abnormal lactate levels respectively. Of these 185 (82%) had normal (0.3-2.2 mmol/L) and 40 (18%) had abnormal (>2.2 mmol/L) lactate levels. Significant difference in relation to female gender was observed between the normal and abnormal groups (p=0.03). Among the abnormal group, 39 (97.5%) subjects were HAART experienced compared to 174 (94.1%) normal group. Among the abnormal group, 24 (60%) individuals had a CD4 count of <200 cells/microL as compared to 76 (41.1%) normal subjects. Female gender should be carefully monitored with respect to their clinical, laboratory and biological data to diminish the occurrence of lactic acidosis.

  17. Molecular cloning and chromosomal localization of human membrane cofactor protein (MCP). Evidence for inclusion in the multigene family of complement-regulatory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lublin, D M; Liszewski, M K; Post, T W; Arce, M A; Le Beau, M M; Rebentisch, M B; Lemons, L S; Seya, T; Atkinson, J P

    1988-07-01

    Membrane cofactor protein (MCP), a regulatory molecular of the complement system with cofactor activity for the factor I-mediated inactivation of C3b and C4b, is widely distributed, being present on leukocytes, platelets, endothelial cells, epithelial cells, and fibroblasts. MCP was purified from a human T cell line (HSB2) and the NH2-terminal 24-amino acid sequence obtained by Edman degradation. An oligonucleotide probe based on this sequence was used to identify a clone from a human monocytic (U937) cDNA library. Nucleotide sequencing showed a 43-bp 5'-untranslated region, an open reading frame of 1,152 bp, and a 335-bp 3'-untranslated region followed by a 16-bp poly(A) track. The deduced full-length MCP protein consists of a 34-amino acid signal peptide and a 350-amino acid mature protein. The protein has, beginning at the NH2 terminus, four approximately 60-amino acid repeat units that match the consensus sequence found in a multigene family of complement regulatory proteins (C3b-receptor or CR1, C3d-receptor or CR2, decay-accelerating factor, C4-binding protein, and factor H), as well as several other complement and non-complement proteins. The remainder of the MCP protein consists of 25 amino acids that are rich in serine and threonine (probable site of heavy O-linked glycosylation of MCP), 17 amino acids of unknown significance, and a 23-amino acid transmembrane hydrophobic region followed by a 33-amino acid cytoplasmic tail. The MCP gene was localized to human chromosome 1, bands 1q31-41, by analysis of human x rodent somatic cell hybrid clones and by in situ hybridization. This same genetic region contains the multigene family of complement-regulatory proteins, which is thereby enlarged to include the functionally and structurally related MCP.

  18. Mutational analysis of Kaposica reveals that bridging of MG2 and CUB domains of target protein is crucial for the cofactor activity of RCA proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Avneesh Kumar; Panse, Yogesh; Ghosh, Payel; Reza, Malik Johid; Mullick, Jayati; Sahu, Arvind

    2015-10-13

    The complement system has evolved to annul pathogens, but its improper regulation is linked with diseases. Efficient regulation of the system is primarily provided by a family of proteins termed regulators of complement activation (RCA). The knowledge of precise structural determinants of RCA proteins critical for imparting the regulatory activities and the molecular events underlying the regulatory processes, nonetheless, is still limited. Here, we have dissected the structural requirements of RCA proteins that are crucial for one of their two regulatory activities, the cofactor activity (CFA), by using the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus RCA homolog Kaposica as a model protein. We have scanned the entire Kaposica molecule by sequential mutagenesis using swapping and site-directed mutagenesis, which identified residues critical for its interaction with C3b and factor I. Mapping of these residues onto the modeled structure of C3b-Kaposica-factor I complex supported the mutagenesis data. Furthermore, the model suggested that the C3b-interacting residues bridge the CUB (complement C1r-C1s, Uegf, Bmp1) and MG2 (macroglobulin-2) domains of C3b. Thus, it seems that stabilization of the CUB domain with respect to the core of the C3b molecule is central for its CFA. Identification of CFA-critical regions in Kaposica guided experiments in which the equivalent regions of membrane cofactor protein were swapped into decay-accelerating factor. This strategy allowed CFA to be introduced into decay-accelerating factor, suggesting that viral and human regulators use a common mechanism for CFA.

  19. Highly efficient bioreduction of 2-hydroxyacetophenone to (S)- and (R)-1-phenyl-1,2-ethanediol by two substrate tolerance carbonyl reductases with cofactor regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhi-Mei; Zhang, Jian-Dong; Fan, Xiao-Jun; Zheng, Gao-Wei; Chang, Hong-Hong; Wei, Wen-Long

    2017-02-10

    Optically pure 1-phenyl-1,2-ethanediol is a very important chiral building block and intermediate in fine chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Reduction of 2-hydroxyacetophenone provides a straightforward approach to access these important compounds. In this study, two enantiocomplementary carbonyl reductases, BDHA (2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase from Bacillus subtilis) and GoSCR (polyol dehydrogenase from Gluconobacter oxydans) were discovered for the first time to convert 2-hydroxyacetophenone (2-HAP) to (R)-1-phenyl-1,2-ethanediol ((R)-PED) and (S)-1-phenyl-1,2-ethanediol ((S)-PED) with excellent stereochemical selectivity, respectively. The two enzymes were purified and characterized. In vitro bioreduction of 2-HAP catalyzed by BDHA and GoSCR coupled with glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) from Bacillus subtilis for cofactor regeneration were demonstrated, affording both (R)-PED and (S)-PED in>99% ee and 99% conversion. Recombinant Escherichia coli whole cells co-expressing both GDH and BDHA or GoSCR genes were used to asymmetric reduction of 2-HAP to (R)-PED or (S)-PED. Under the optimized conditions, the bioreduction of 400mM (54g/L) substrate was proceeded smoothly without the external addition of cofactor, and the product (R)-PED and (S)-PED were obtained with 99% yield, >99% ee and 18.0g/L/h volumetric productivity. These results offer a practical biocatalytic method for the preparation of both (R)-PED and (S)-PED with high volumetric productivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Evidence That the [beta] Subunit of Chlamydia trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase Is Active with the Manganese Ion of Its Manganese(IV)/Iron(III) Cofactor in Site 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dassama, Laura M.K.; Boal, Amie K.; Krebs, Carsten; Rosenzweig, Amy C.; Bollinger, Jr., J. Martin (NWU); (Penn)

    2014-10-02

    The reaction of a class I ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) begins when a cofactor in the {beta} subunit oxidizes a cysteine residue {approx}35 {angstrom} away in the {alpha} subunit, generating a thiyl radical. In the class Ic enzyme from Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct), the cysteine oxidant is the Mn{sup IV} ion of a Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} cluster, which assembles in a reaction between O{sub 2} and the Mn{sup II}/Fe{sup II} complex of {beta}. The heterodinuclear nature of the cofactor raises the question of which site, 1 or 2, contains the Mn{sup IV} ion. Because site 1 is closer to the conserved location of the cysteine-oxidizing tyrosyl radical of class Ia and Ib RNRs, we suggested that the Mn{sup IV} ion most likely resides in this site (i.e., {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}), but a subsequent computational study favored its occupation of site 2 ({sup 1}Fe{sup III}/{sup 2}Mn{sup IV}). In this work, we have sought to resolve the location of the Mn{sup IV} ion in Ct RNR-{beta} by correlating X-ray crystallographic anomalous scattering intensities with catalytic activity for samples of the protein reconstituted in vitro by two different procedures. In samples containing primarily Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} clusters, Mn preferentially occupies site 1, but some anomalous scattering from site 2 is observed, implying that both {sup 1}Mn{sup II}/{sup 2}Fe{sup II} and {sup 1}Fe{sup II}/{sup 2}Mn{sup II} complexes are competent to react with O{sub 2} to produce the corresponding oxidized states. However, with diminished Mn{sup II} loading in the reconstitution, there is no evidence for Mn occupancy of site 2, and the greater activity of these 'low-Mn' samples on a per-Mn basis implies that the {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}-{beta} is at least the more active of the two oxidized forms and may be the only active form.

  1. Casein is an essential cofactor in autoantibody reactivity directed against the C-terminal SmD1 peptide AA 83-119 in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemekasten, Gabriela; Marell, Jeannette; Hentschel, Christian; Klein, Rolf; Burmester, Gerd-R; Schoessler, Werner; Hiepe, Falk

    2002-12-01

    The C-terminal peptide SmD1(83-119) has been identified as an important autoantigen in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). ELISA studies have shown that roughly 70% of all sera from patients with SLE react with this peptide. Previous findings revealed that the addition of blocking agents and sample dilution buffers influences the discrimination between positive and negative anti-SmD1(83-119) sera in SLE. The aim of the present study was to identify possible cofactors in the anti-SmD1(83-119) reactivity. We therefore tested SLE sera (n=6) for anti-SmD1(83-119) reactivity by ELISA and analysed the effects of different blocking agents (1% skim milk, 1% gelatin, and 1% BSA). In our investigation, lipids were extracted from skim milk using dichlomethane, and the putative fraction was tested to assess the assay's ability to discriminate between positive and negative sera. The effects of enzymatic digestion by casein were analyzed, and different concentrations of casein were used to determine the role of this protein in the detection of anti-SmD1(83-119) antibodies by ELISA. Furthermore, rabbits were immunized with SmD1(83-119) adsorbed to casein and control proteins. One percent skim milk was the most effective blocking agent and sample dilution buffer for the discrimination between positive and negative sera. As demonstrated by SDS electrophoresis, the discriminative capacity was influenced by enzymatic digestion of skim milk proteins, but not by lipid extraction. Differences in anti-SmD1(83-119) reactivity upon variation of the casein concentration suggest that the protein plays a significant role in the detection of anti-SmD1(83-119) antibodies. However, our immunisation studies did not show any effect of casein on anti-SmD1(83-119) reactivity, suggesting that it has no immunogenic effect on the anti-SmD1(83-119) response. In conclusion, casein seems to be an important cofactor in autoantibody reactivity directed against the C-terminal SmD1(83-119) peptide and

  2. TcoF-DB v2: update of the database of human and mouse transcription co-factors and transcription factor interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Schmeier, Sebastian

    2016-10-17

    Transcription factors (TFs) play a pivotal role in transcriptional regulation, making them crucial for cell survival and important biological functions. For the regulation of transcription, interactions of different regulatory proteins known as transcription co-factors (TcoFs) and TFs are essential in forming necessary protein complexes. Although TcoFs themselves do not bind DNA directly, their influence on transcriptional regulation and initiation, although indirect, has been shown to be significant, with the functionality of TFs strongly influenced by the presence of TcoFs. In the TcoF-DB v2 database, we collect information on TcoFs. In this article, we describe updates and improvements implemented in TcoF-DB v2. TcoF-DB v2 provides several new features that enables exploration of the roles of TcoFs. The content of the database has significantly expanded, and is enriched with information from Gene Ontology, biological pathways, diseases and molecular signatures. TcoF-DB v2 now includes many more TFs; has substantially increased the number of human TcoFs to 958, and now includes information on mouse (418 new TcoFs). TcoF-DB v2 enables the exploration of information on TcoFs and allows investigations into their influence on transcriptional regulation in humans and mice. TcoF-DB v2 can be accessed at http://tcofdb.org/.

  3. Cofactor Balance by Nicotinamide Nucleotide Transhydrogenase (NNT) Coordinates Reductive Carboxylation and Glucose Catabolism in the Tricarboxylic Acid (TCA) Cycle*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gameiro, Paulo A.; Laviolette, Laura A.; Kelleher, Joanne K.; Iliopoulos, Othon; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Cancer and proliferating cells exhibit an increased demand for glutamine-derived carbons to support anabolic processes. In addition, reductive carboxylation of α-ketoglutarate by isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and 2 (IDH2) was recently shown to be a major source of citrate synthesis from glutamine. The role of NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ cofactors in coordinating glucose and glutamine utilization in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is not well understood, with the source(s) of NADPH for the reductive carboxylation reaction remaining unexplored. Nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT) is a mitochondrial enzyme that transfers reducing equivalents from NADH to NADPH. Here, we show that knockdown of NNT inhibits the contribution of glutamine to the TCA cycle and activates glucose catabolism in SkMel5 melanoma cells. The increase in glucose oxidation partially occurred through pyruvate carboxylase and rendered NNT knockdown cells more sensitive to glucose deprivation. Importantly, knocking down NNT inhibits reductive carboxylation in SkMel5 and 786-O renal carcinoma cells. Overexpression of NNT is sufficient to stimulate glutamine oxidation and reductive carboxylation, whereas it inhibits glucose catabolism in the TCA cycle. These observations are supported by an impairment of the NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ ratios. Our findings underscore the role of NNT in regulating central carbon metabolism via redox balance, calling for other mechanisms that coordinate substrate preference to maintain a functional TCA cycle. PMID:23504317

  4. Estimating HIV Incidence during Pregnancy and Knowledge of Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission with an Ad Hoc Analysis of Potential Cofactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Obinchemti Egbe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We determined the incidence of HIV seroconversion during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy and ad hoc potential cofactors associated with HIV seroconversion after having an HIV-negative result antenatally. We also studied knowledge of PMTCT among pregnant women in seven health facilities in Fako Division, South West Region, Cameroon. Method. During the period between September 12 and December 4, 2011, we recruited a cohort of 477 HIV-negative pregnant women by cluster sampling. Data collection was with a pretested interviewer-administered questionnaire. Sociodemographic information, knowledge of PMTCT, and methods of HIV prevention were obtained from the study population and we did Voluntary Counselling and Testing (VCT for HIV. Results. The incidence rate of HIV seroconversion during pregnancy was 6.8/100 woman-years. Ninety percent of the participants did not use condoms throughout pregnancy but had a good knowledge of PMTCT of HIV. Only 31.9% of participants knew their HIV status before the booking visit and 33% did not know the HIV status of their partners. Conclusion. The incidence rate of HIV seroconversion in the Fako Division, Cameroon, was 6.8/100 woman-years. No risk factors associated with HIV seroconversion were identified among the study participants because of lack of power to do so.

  5. Estimating HIV Incidence during Pregnancy and Knowledge of Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission with an Ad Hoc Analysis of Potential Cofactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbe, Thomas Obinchemti; Tazinya, Rose-Mary Asong; Halle-Ekane, Gregory Edie; Egbe, Eta-Nkongho; Achidi, Eric Akum

    2016-01-01

    We determined the incidence of HIV seroconversion during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy and ad hoc potential cofactors associated with HIV seroconversion after having an HIV-negative result antenatally. We also studied knowledge of PMTCT among pregnant women in seven health facilities in Fako Division, South West Region, Cameroon. During the period between September 12 and December 4, 2011, we recruited a cohort of 477 HIV-negative pregnant women by cluster sampling. Data collection was with a pretested interviewer-administered questionnaire. Sociodemographic information, knowledge of PMTCT, and methods of HIV prevention were obtained from the study population and we did Voluntary Counselling and Testing (VCT) for HIV. The incidence rate of HIV seroconversion during pregnancy was 6.8/100 woman-years. Ninety percent of the participants did not use condoms throughout pregnancy but had a good knowledge of PMTCT of HIV. Only 31.9% of participants knew their HIV status before the booking visit and 33% did not know the HIV status of their partners. The incidence rate of HIV seroconversion in the Fako Division, Cameroon, was 6.8/100 woman-years. No risk factors associated with HIV seroconversion were identified among the study participants because of lack of power to do so.

  6. High-Resolution Mapping and Dynamics of the Transcriptome, Transcription Factors, and Transcription Co-Factor Networks in Classically and Alternatively Activated Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitabh Das

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are the prime innate immune cells of the inflammatory response, and the combination of multiple signaling inputs derived from the recognition of host factors [e.g., interferon-g (IFN-γ] and invading pathogen products (e.g., toll-like receptors (TLRs agonists are required to maintain essential macrophage function. The profound effects on biological outcomes of inflammation associated with IFN-γ pretreatment (“priming” and TLR4 ligand bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced macrophage activation (M1 or classical activation have long been recognized, but the underlying mechanisms are not well defined. Therefore, we analyzed gene expression profiles of macrophages and identified genes, transcription factors (TFs, and transcription co-factors (TcoFs that are uniquely or highly expressed in IFN-γ-mediated TLR4 ligand LPS-inducible versus only TLR4 ligand LPS-inducible primary macrophages. This macrophage gene expression has not been observed in macrophage cell lines. We also showed that interleukin (IL-4 and IL-13 (M2 or alternative activation elicited the induction of a distinct subset of genes related to M2 macrophage polarization. Importantly, this macrophage gene expression was also associated with promoter conservation. In particular, our approach revealed novel roles for the TFs and TcoFs in response to inflammation. We believe that the systematic approach presented herein is an important framework to better understand the transcriptional machinery of different macrophage subtypes.

  7. Identification of a Rhodobacter capsulatus L-cysteine desulfurase that sulfurates the molybdenum cofactor when bound to XdhC and before its insertion into xanthine dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Meina; Stöcklein, Walter; Walburger, Anne; Magalon, Axel; Leimkühler, Silke

    2007-08-21

    The molybdenum cofactor (Moco) containing enzymes aldehyde oxidase and xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) require for activity a sulfuration step that inserts a terminal sulfur ligand into Moco. XdhC was shown to be essential for the production of active XDH in Rhodobacter capsulatus but is itself not a subunit of the purified enzyme. XdhC binds stoichiometric amounts of Moco and is further able to transfer its bound Moco to XDH. Previous work suggested that XdhC particularly stabilizes the sulfurated form of Moco before the insertion into XDH. In this work, we identify an R. capsulatus l-cysteine desulfurase, NifS4, which is involved in the formation of the Mo=S ligand of Moco. We show that NifS4 interacts with XdhC and not with XDH. NifS4 mobilizes sulfur from l-cysteine by formation of a protein-bound persulfide intermediate and transfers this sulfur further to Moco. This reaction was shown to be more effective than the chemical sulfuration of Moco using sulfide as sulfur source. Further studies clearly showed that Moco is sulfurated before the insertion into XDH, while it is bound to XdhC. Conclusively, XdhC has a versatile role in R. capsulatus: binding of Moco, interaction with NifS4 for the sulfuration of Moco, protection of sulfurated Moco from oxidation, and further transfer to XDH.

  8. La mitocondria como fábrica de cofactores: biosíntesis de grupo hemo, centros Fe-S y nucleótidos de flavina (FMN/FAD)

    OpenAIRE

    Alexa Villavicencio-Queijeiro

    2012-01-01

    Los cofactores hemo, centros Fe-S y los nucleótidos de flavina (FMN y FAD) son esenciales para muchos organismos, existen un gran número de proteínas que dependen de ellos para llevar a cabo sus funciones biológicas. Estos cofactores han sido reconocidos como esenciales para las reacciones de óxido-reducción, pero también están involucrados en otros procesos celulares como la catálisis química, la regulación, la señalización y la detección de señales intra y extra celulares. Diversos grupos d...

  9. NMR analysis of the dynamic exchange of the NS2B cofactor between open and closed conformations of the West Nile virus NS2B-NS3 protease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun-Cheng Su

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The two-component NS2B-NS3 proteases of West Nile and dengue viruses are essential for viral replication and established targets for drug development. In all crystal structures of the proteases to date, the NS2B cofactor is located far from the substrate binding site (open conformation in the absence of inhibitor and lining the substrate binding site (closed conformation in the presence of an inhibitor. METHODS: In this work, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy of isotope and spin-labeled samples of the West Nile virus protease was used to investigate the occurrence of equilibria between open and closed conformations in solution. FINDINGS: In solution, the closed form of the West Nile virus protease is the predominant conformation irrespective of the presence or absence of inhibitors. Nonetheless, dissociation of the C-terminal part of the NS2B cofactor from the NS3 protease (open conformation occurs in both the presence and the absence of inhibitors. Low-molecular-weight inhibitors can shift the conformational exchange equilibria so that over 90% of the West Nile virus protease molecules assume the closed conformation. The West Nile virus protease differs from the dengue virus protease, where the open conformation is the predominant form in the absence of inhibitors. CONCLUSION: Partial dissociation of NS2B from NS3 has implications for the way in which the NS3 protease can be positioned with respect to the host cell membrane when NS2B is membrane associated via N- and C-terminal segments present in the polyprotein. In the case of the West Nile virus protease, discovery of low-molecular-weight inhibitors that act by breaking the association of the NS2B cofactor with the NS3 protease is impeded by the natural affinity of the cofactor to the NS3 protease. The same strategy can be more successful in the case of the dengue virus NS2B-NS3 protease.

  10. Structural Analysis of the Mn(IV)/Fe(III) Cofactor of Chlamydia Trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase By Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy And Density Functional Theory Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younker, J.M.; Krest, C.M.; Jiang, W.; Krebs, C.; Bollinger, J.M.Jr.; Green, M.T.

    2009-05-28

    The class Ic ribonucleotide reductase from Chlamydia trachomatis (C{bar A}) uses a stable Mn(lV)/ Fe(lll) cofactor to initiate nucleotide reduction by a free-radical mechanism. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations are used to postulate a structure for this cofactor. Fe and Mn K-edge EXAFS data yield an intermetallic distance of -2.92 {angstrom}. The Mn data also suggest the presence of a short 1.74 {angstrom} Mn-O bond. These metrics are compared to the results of DFT calculations on 12 cofactor models derived from the crystal structure of the inactive Fe2(lll/ III) form of the protein. Models are differentiated by the protonation states of their bridging and terminal OH{sub x} ligands as well as the location of the Mn(lV) ion (site 1 or 2). The models that agree best with experimental observation feature a{mu}-1, 3-carboxylate bridge (E120), terminal solvent (H{sub 2}O/OH) to site 1, one {mu}-O bridge, and one {mu}-OH bridge. The site-placement of the metal ions cannot be discerned from the available data.

  11. La mitocondria como fábrica de cofactores: biosíntesis de grupo hemo, centros Fe-S y nucleótidos de flavina (FMN/FAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexa Villavicencio-Queijeiro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Los cofactores hemo, centros Fe-S y los nucleótidos de flavina (FMN y FAD son esenciales para muchos organismos, existen un gran número de proteínas que dependen de ellos para llevar a cabo sus funciones biológicas. Estos cofactores han sido reconocidos como esenciales para las reacciones de óxido-reducción, pero también están involucrados en otros procesos celulares como la catálisis química, la regulación, la señalización y la detección de señales intra y extra celulares. Diversos grupos de investigación han contribuido al establecimiento de las rutas bioquímicas por las que se sintetizan estos cofactores, así como a la forma en que se transportan y regulan en los diferentes organismos. Todo este conocimiento ha permitido asociar algunas enfermedades con defectos metabólicos en estas rutas de biosíntesis, así como plantear nuevas estrategias terapéuticas y algunas aplicaciones biotecnológicas.

  12. Minor head injury as cause and co-factor in the aetiology of stroke in childhood: a report of eight cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieslich, M; Fiedler, A; Heller, C; Kreuz, W; Jacobi, G

    2002-07-01

    Traumatic stroke usually occurs after dissection of large extracranial or intracranial vessels, leading to disseminated cerebral embolism. Stretching and distorting forces in cerebral intraparenchymal end arteries can cause intimal lesions followed by an occluding thrombus. To investigate the importance of traumatic endothelial lesions in intraparenchymal end arteries after minor head injuries. The cases of eight children are reported. They were aged between two and seven years (mean 6.2 years), and they developed significant neurological deficits at 15 minutes to 72 hours (mean 16.3 hours) after minor head injuries. The the patients all had hemiparesis combined with other signs, including central facial paralysis, dysphasia, dysphagia, and extrapyramidal signs. Computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging showed cerebral infarctions affecting branches of the middle cerebral artery (n = 3), anterior cerebral artery (n = 1), posterior cerebral artery (n = 1), and basilar artery (n = 3). These lesions affected the basal ganglia, the internal capsule, and the brain stem. Neither heart disease nor dissections of large vessels were present. Two children had prothrombotic risk factors (an increase in lipoprotein (a) and a factor V Leiden mutation). The follow up period was between three months and 13 years (mean 3.9 years). Outcome was classified according to the Glasgow outcome scale as moderate disability (n = 4), severe disability (n = 2), non-disabling sequelae (n = 1), and total recovery (n = 1). Minor head injuries can be cause and co-factor in the aetiology of stroke. The frequency of this may be underestimated, and detailed medical history of the days before stroke manifestation may identify more traumatic events, especially in the group of so called "idiopathic" strokes.

  13. Photoinduced Reductive Elimination of H 2 from the Nitrogenase Dihydride (Janus) State Involves a FeMo-cofactor-H 2 Intermediate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukoyanov, Dmitriy; Khadka, Nimesh; Dean, Dennis R.; Raugei, Simone; Seefeldt, Lance C.; Hoffman, Brian M.

    2017-02-08

    N2 reduction by nitrogenase involves the accumulation of four reducing equivalents at the active site FeMo-cofactor to form a state with two [Fe-H-Fe] bridging hydrides (denoted E4(4H), the Janus intermediate), and we recently demonstrated that the enzyme is activated to cleave the N≡N triple bond by the reductive elimination (re) of H2 from this state. We are exploring a photochemical approach to obtaining atomic-level details of the re activation process. We have shown that when E4(4H) at cryogenic temperatures is subjected to 450 nm irradiation in an EPR cavity, it cleanly undergoes photoinduced re of H2 to give a reactive doubly-reduced intermediate, denoted E4(2H)*, which corresponds to the intermediate that would form if thermal dissociative re loss of H2 preceded N2 binding. Experiments reported here establish that photoinduced re occurs in two steps. Photolysis of E4(4H) generates an intermediate state that undergoes subsequent photoinduced conversion to [E4(2H)* + H2]. The experiments, supported by DFT calculation, indicate that the trapped intermediate is an H2 complex on the ground adiabatic potential energy suface that connects E4(4H) with [E4(2H)* + H2]. We suggest this complex, denoted E4(H2; 2H), is a thermally populated intermediate in the catalytically central re of H2 by E4(4H), and that N2 reacts with this complex to complete the activated conversion of [E4(4H) + N2] into [E4(2N2H) + H2].

  14. Crystal structures of human sulfotransferases SULT1B1 and SULT1C1 complexed with the cofactor product adenosine-3'- 5'-diphosphate (PAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dombrovski, Luidmila; Dong, Aiping; Bochkarev, Alexey; Plotnikov, Alexander N. (Toronto)

    2008-09-17

    Cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULTs), often referred as Phase II enzymes of chemical defense, are a superfamily of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a sulfonate group from 3{prime}-phosphoadenosine 5{prime}-phosphosulfate (PAPS) to an acceptor group of substrates. This reaction modulates the activities of a large array of small endogenous and foreign chemicals including drugs, toxic compounds, steroid hormones, and neurotransmitters. In some cases, however, SULTs activate certain food and environmental compounds to mutagenenic and carcinogenic metabolites. Twelve human SULTs have been identified, which are partitioned into three families: SULT1, SULT2 and SULT4. The SULT1 family is further divided in four subfamilies, A, B, C, and E, and comprises eight members (1A1, 1A2, 1A3, 1B1, 1C1, 1C2, 1C3, and 1E1). Despite sequence and structural similarity among the SULTs, the family and subfamily members appear to have different biological function. SULT1 family shows substrate-binding specificity for simple phenols, estradiol, and thyroid hormones, as well as environmental xenobiotics and drugs. Human SULT1B1 is expressed in liver, colon, small intestine, and blood leukocytes, and shows substrate-binding specificity to thyroid hormones and benzylic alcohols. Human SULT1C1 is expressed in the adult stomach, kidney, and thyroid, as well as in fetal kidney and liver. SULT1C1 catalyzes the sulfonation of p-nitrophenol and N-hydroxy-2-acetylaminofluorene in vitro. However, the in vivo function of the enzyme remains unknown. We intend to solve the structures for all of the SULTs for which structural information is not yet available, and compare the structural and functional features of the entire SULT superfamily. Here we report the structures of two members of SULT1 family, SULT1B1 and SULT1C1, both in complex with the product of the PAPS cofactor, adenosine-3{prime}-5{prime}-diphosphate (PAP).

  15. Cdc48 and cofactors Npl4-Ufd1 are important for G1 progression during heat stress by maintaining cell wall integrity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Ti Hsieh

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin-selective chaperone Cdc48, a member of the AAA (ATPase Associated with various cellular Activities ATPase superfamily, is involved in many processes, including endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD, ubiquitin- and proteasome-mediated protein degradation, and mitosis. Although Cdc48 was originally isolated as a cell cycle mutant in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, its cell cycle functions have not been well appreciated. We found that temperature-sensitive cdc48-3 mutant is largely arrested at mitosis at 37°C, whereas the mutant is also delayed in G1 progression at 38.5°C. Reporter assays show that the promoter activity of G1 cyclin CLN1, but not CLN2, is reduced in cdc48-3 at 38.5°C. The cofactor npl4-1 and ufd1-2 mutants also exhibit G1 delay and reduced CLN1 promoter activity at 38.5°C, suggesting that Npl4-Ufd1 complex mediates the function of Cdc48 at G1. The G1 delay of cdc48-3 at 38.5°C is a consequence of cell wall defect that over-activates Mpk1, a MAPK family member important for cell wall integrity in response to stress conditions including heat shock. cdc48-3 is hypersensitive to cell wall perturbing agents and is synthetic-sick with mutations in the cell wall integrity signaling pathway. Our results suggest that the cell wall defect in cdc48-3 is exacerbated by heat shock, which sustains Mpk1 activity to block G1 progression. Thus, Cdc48-Npl4-Ufd1 is important for the maintenance of cell wall integrity in order for normal cell growth and division.

  16. The Transcription Cofactor Swi6 of the Fusarium graminearum Is Involved in Fusarium Graminearum Virus 1 Infection-Induced Phenotypic Alterations

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    Moonil Son

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The transcription cofactor Swi6 plays important roles in regulating vegetative growth and meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Functions of Swi6 ortholog were also characterized in Fusarium graminearum which is one of the devastating plant pathogenic fungi. Here, we report possible role of FgSwi6 in the interaction between F. graminearum and Fusarium graminearum virus 1 (FgV1 strain DK21. FgV1 perturbs biological characteristics of host fungi such as vegetative growth, sporulation, pigmentation, and reduction of the virulence (hypovirulence of its fungal host. To characterize function(s of FgSWI6 gene during FgV1 infection, targeted deletion, over-expression, and complementation mutants were generated and further infected successfully with FgV1. Deletion of FgSwi6 led to severe reduction of vegetative growth even aerial mycelia while over-expression did not affect any remarkable alteration of phenotype in virus-free isolates. Virus-infected (VI FgSWI6 deletion isolate exhibited completely delayed vegetative growth. However, VI FgSWI6 over-expression mutant grew faster than any other VI isolates. To verify whether these different growth patterns in VI isolates, viral RNA quantification was carried out using qRT-PCR. Surprisingly, viral RNA accumulations in VI isolates were similar regardless of introduced mutations. These results provide evidence that FgSWI6 might play important role(s in FgV1 induced phenotype alteration such as delayed vegetative growth.

  17. S-Adenosyl-S-carboxymethyl-l-homocysteine: a novel cofactor found in the putative tRNA-modifying enzyme CmoA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrne, Robert T.; Whelan, Fiona [University of York, Heslington YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Aller, Pierre [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Diamond House, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Bird, Louise E. [OPPF-UK, Research Complex at Harwell, R92 Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Oxford University, Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Dowle, Adam [University of York, Heslington YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Lobley, Carina M. C. [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Diamond House, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Reddivari, Yamini; Nettleship, Joanne E.; Owens, Raymond J. [OPPF-UK, Research Complex at Harwell, R92 Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Oxford University, Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Antson, Alfred A. [University of York, Heslington YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Waterman, David G., E-mail: david.waterman@stfc.ac.uk [STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); University of York, Heslington YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-01

    The putative methyltransferase CmoA is involved in the nucleoside modification of transfer RNA. X-ray crystallography and mass spectrometry are used to show that it contains a novel SAM derivative, S-adenosyl-S-carboxymethyl-l-homocysteine, in which the donor methyl group is replaced by a carboxymethyl group. Uridine at position 34 of bacterial transfer RNAs is commonly modified to uridine-5-oxyacetic acid (cmo{sup 5}U) to increase the decoding capacity. The protein CmoA is involved in the formation of cmo{sup 5}U and was annotated as an S-adenosyl-l-methionine-dependent (SAM-dependent) methyltransferase on the basis of its sequence homology to other SAM-containing enzymes. However, both the crystal structure of Escherichia coli CmoA at 1.73 Å resolution and mass spectrometry demonstrate that it contains a novel cofactor, S-adenosyl-S-carboxymethyl-l-homocysteine (SCM-SAH), in which the donor methyl group is substituted by a carboxymethyl group. The carboxyl moiety forms a salt-bridge interaction with Arg199 that is conserved in a large group of CmoA-related proteins but is not conserved in other SAM-containing enzymes. This raises the possibility that a number of enzymes that have previously been annotated as SAM-dependent are in fact SCM-SAH-dependent. Indeed, inspection of electron density for one such enzyme with known X-ray structure, PDB entry http://scripts.iucr.org/cgi-bin/cr.cgi?rm, suggests that the active site contains SCM-SAH and not SAM.

  18. Decrease in the red cell cofactor 2,3-diphosphoglycerate increases hemoglobin oxygen affinity in the hibernating brown bear Ursus arctos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revsbech, Inge G; Malte, Hans; Fröbert, Ole; Evans, Alina; Blanc, Stéphane; Josefsson, Johan; Fago, Angela

    2013-01-01

    During winter hibernation, brown bears (Ursus arctos) reduce basal O(2) consumption rate to ∼25% compared with the active state, while body temperature decreases moderately (to ∼30°C), suggesting a temperature-independent component in their metabolic depression. To establish whether changes in O(2) consumption during hibernation correlate with changes in blood O(2) affinity, we took blood samples from the same six individuals of hibernating and nonhibernating free-ranging brown bears during winter and summer, respectively. A single hemoglobin (Hb) component was detected in all samples, indicating no switch in Hb synthesis. O(2) binding curves measured on red blood cell lysates at 30°C and 37°C showed a less temperature-sensitive O(2) affinity than in other vertebrates. Furthermore, hemolysates from hibernating bears consistently showed lower cooperativity and higher O(2) affinity than their summer counterparts, regardless of the temperature. We found that this increase in O(2) affinity was associated with a significant decrease in the red cell Hb-cofactor 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG) during hibernation to approximately half of the summer value. Experiments performed on purified Hb, to which DPG had been added to match summer and winter levels, confirmed that the low DPG content was the cause of the left shift in the Hb-O(2) equilibrium curve during hibernation. Levels of plasma lactate indicated that glycolysis is not upregulated during hibernation and that metabolism is essentially aerobic. Calculations show that the increase in Hb-O(2) affinity and decrease in cooperativity resulting from decreased red cell DPG may be crucial in maintaining a fairly constant tissue oxygen tension during hibernation in vivo.

  19. Protonation and Sulfido versus Oxo Ligation Changes at the Molybdenum Cofactor in Xanthine Dehydrogenase (XDH) Variants Studied by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschke, Stefan; Mebs, Stefan; Sigfridsson-Clauss, Kajsa G V; Kositzki, Ramona; Leimkühler, Silke; Haumann, Michael

    2017-02-20

    Enzymes of the xanthine oxidase family are among the best characterized mononuclear molybdenum enzymes. Open questions about their mechanism of transfer of an oxygen atom to the substrate remain. The enzymes share a molybdenum cofactor (Moco) with the metal ion binding a molybdopterin (MPT) molecule via its dithiolene function and terminal sulfur and oxygen groups. For xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) from the bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus, we used X-ray absorption spectroscopy to determine the Mo site structure, its changes in a pH range of 5-10, and the influence of amino acids (Glu730 and Gln179) close to Moco in wild-type (WT), Q179A, and E730A variants, complemented by enzyme kinetics and quantum chemical studies. Oxidized WT and Q179A revealed a similar Mo(VI) ion with each one MPT, Mo═O, Mo-O - , and Mo═S ligand, and a weak Mo-O(E730) bond at alkaline pH. Protonation of an oxo to a hydroxo (OH) ligand (pK ∼ 6.8) causes inhibition of XDH at acidic pH, whereas deprotonated xanthine (pK ∼ 8.8) is an inhibitor at alkaline pH. A similar acidic pK for the WT and Q179A variants, as well as the metrical parameters of the Mo site and density functional theory calculations, suggested protonation at the equatorial oxo group. The sulfido was replaced with an oxo ligand in the inactive E730A variant, further showing another oxo and one Mo-OH ligand at Mo, which are independent of pH. Our findings suggest a reaction mechanism for XDH in which an initial oxo rather than a hydroxo group and the sulfido ligand are essential for xanthine oxidation.

  20. Mechanism of assembly of the dimanganese-tyrosyl radical cofactor of class Ib ribonucleotide reductase: enzymatic generation of superoxide is required for tyrosine oxidation via a Mn(III)Mn(IV) intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotruvo, Joseph A; Stich, Troy A; Britt, R David; Stubbe, JoAnne

    2013-03-13

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) utilize radical chemistry to reduce nucleotides to deoxynucleotides in all organisms. In the class Ia and Ib RNRs, this reaction requires a stable tyrosyl radical (Y(•)) generated by oxidation of a reduced dinuclear metal cluster. The Fe(III)2-Y(•) cofactor in the NrdB subunit of the class Ia RNRs can be generated by self-assembly from Fe(II)2-NrdB, O2, and a reducing equivalent. By contrast, the structurally homologous class Ib enzymes require a Mn(III)2-Y(•) cofactor in their NrdF subunit. Mn(II)2-NrdF does not react with O2, but it binds the reduced form of a conserved flavodoxin-like protein, NrdIhq, which, in the presence of O2, reacts to form the Mn(III)2-Y(•) cofactor. Here we investigate the mechanism of assembly of the Mn(III)2-Y(•) cofactor in Bacillus subtilis NrdF. Cluster assembly from Mn(II)2-NrdF, NrdI(hq), and O2 has been studied by stopped flow absorption and rapid freeze quench EPR spectroscopies. The results support a mechanism in which NrdI(hq) reduces O2 to O2(•-) (40-48 s(-1), 0.6 mM O2), the O2(•-) channels to and reacts with Mn(II)2-NrdF to form a Mn(III)Mn(IV) intermediate (2.2 ± 0.4 s(-1)), and the Mn(III)Mn(IV) species oxidizes tyrosine to Y(•) (0.08-0.15 s(-1)). Controlled production of O2(•-) by NrdIhq during class Ib RNR cofactor assembly both circumvents the unreactivity of the Mn(II)2 cluster with O2 and satisfies the requirement for an "extra" reducing equivalent in Y(•) generation.

  1. Cofactors in the RNA World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditzler, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    RNA world theories figure prominently in many scenarios for the origin and early evolution of life. These theories posit that RNA molecules played a much larger role in ancient biology than they do now, acting both as the dominant biocatalysts and as the repository of genetic information. Many features of modern RNA biology are potential examples of molecular fossils from an RNA world, such as the pervasive involvement of nucleotides in coenzymes, the existence of natural aptamers that bind these coenzymes, the existence of natural ribozymes, a biosynthetic pathway in which deoxynucleotides are produced from ribonucleotides, and the central role of ribosomal RNA in protein synthesis in the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome. Here, we uses both a top-down approach that evaluates RNA function in modern biology and a bottom-up approach that examines the capacities of RNA independent of modern biology. These complementary approaches exploit multiple in vitro evolution techniques coupled with high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics analysis. Together these complementary approaches advance our understanding of the most primitive organisms, their early evolution, and their eventual transition to modern biochemistry.

  2. Influence of the Li···π Interaction on the H/X···π Interactions in HOLi···C6H6···HOX/XOH (X=F, Cl, Br, I) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yanli; Wu, Wenjie; Li, Xiaoyan; Zheng, Shijun; Meng, Lingpeng

    2013-06-03

    The influences of the Li···π interaction of C6H6···LiOH on the H···π interaction of C6H6···HOX (X=F, Cl, Br, I) and the X···π interaction of C6H6···XOH (X=Cl, Br, I) are investigated by means of full electronic second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory calculations and "quantum theory of atoms in molecules" (QTAIM) studies. The binding energies, binding distances, infrared vibrational frequencies, and electron densities at the bond critical points (BCPs) of the hydrogen bonds and halogen bonds prove that the addition of the Li···π interaction to benzene weakens the H···π and X···π interactions. The influences of the Li···π interaction on H···π interactions are greater than those on X···π interactions; the influences of the H···π interactions on the Li···π interaction are greater than X···π interactions on Li···π interaction. The greater the influence of Li···π interaction on H/X···π interactions, the greater the influences of H/X···π interactions on Li···π interaction. QTAIM studies show that the intermolecular interactions of C6H6···HOX and C6H6···XOH are mainly of the π type. The electron densities at the BCPs of hydrogen bonds and halogen bonds decrease on going from bimolecular complexes to termolecular complexes, and the π-electron densities at the BCPs show the same pattern. Natural bond orbital analyses show that the Li···π interaction reduces electron transfer from C6 H6 to HOX and XOH. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Induction of chondro-, osteo- and adipogenesis in embryonic stem cells by bone morphogenetic protein-2: Effect of cofactors on differentiating lineages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    zur Nieden Nicole I

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, tissue engineering has merged with stem cell technology with interest to develop new sources of transplantable material for injury or disease treatment. Eminently interesting, are bone and joint injuries/disorders because of the low self-regenerating capacity of the matrix secreting cells, particularly chondrocytes. ES cells have the unlimited capacity to self-renew and maintain their pluripotency in culture. Upon induction of various signals they will then differentiate into distinctive cell types such as neurons, cardiomyocytes and osteoblasts. Results We present here that BMP-2 can drive ES cells to the cartilage, osteoblast or adipogenic fate depending on supplementary co-factors. TGFβ1, insulin and ascorbic acid were identified as signals that together with BMP-2 induce a chondrocytic phenotype that is characterized by increased expression of cartilage marker genes in a timely co-ordinated fashion. Expression of collagen type IIB and aggrecan, indicative of a fully mature state, continuously ascend until reaching a peak at day 32 of culture to approximately 80-fold over control values. Sox9 and scleraxis, cartilage specific transcription factors, are highly expressed at very early stages and show decreased expression over the time course of EB differentiation. Some smaller proteoglycans, such as decorin and biglycan, are expressed at earlier stages. Overall, proteoglycan biosynthesis is up-regulated 7-fold in response to the supplements added. BMP-2 induced chondrocytes undergo hypertrophy and begin to alter their expression profile towards osteoblasts. Supplying mineralization factors such as β-glycerophosphate and vitamin D3 with the culture medium can facilitate this process. Moreover, gene expression studies show that adipocytes can also differentiate from BMP-2 treated ES cells. Conclusions Ultimately, we have found that ES cells can be successfully triggered to differentiate into chondrocyte-like cells

  4. Improving ethanol yield in acetate-reducing Saccharomyces cerevisiae by cofactor engineering of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and deletion of ALD6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papapetridis, Ioannis; van Dijk, Marlous; Dobbe, Arthur P A; Metz, Benjamin; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2016-04-26

    Acetic acid, an inhibitor of sugar fermentation by yeast, is invariably present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates which are used or considered as feedstocks for yeast-based bioethanol production. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains have been constructed, in which anaerobic reduction of acetic acid to ethanol replaces glycerol formation as a mechanism for reoxidizing NADH formed in biosynthesis. An increase in the amount of acetate that can be reduced to ethanol should further decrease acetic acid concentrations and enable higher ethanol yields in industrial processes based on lignocellulosic feedstocks. The stoichiometric requirement of acetate reduction for NADH implies that increased generation of NADH in cytosolic biosynthetic reactions should enhance acetate consumption. Replacement of the native NADP(+)-dependent 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase in S. cerevisiae by a prokaryotic NAD(+)-dependent enzyme resulted in increased cytosolic NADH formation, as demonstrated by a ca. 15% increase in the glycerol yield on glucose in anaerobic cultures. Additional deletion of ALD6, which encodes an NADP(+)-dependent acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, led to a 39% increase in the glycerol yield compared to a non-engineered strain. Subsequent replacement of glycerol formation by an acetate reduction pathway resulted in a 44% increase of acetate consumption per amount of biomass formed, as compared to an engineered, acetate-reducing strain that expressed the native 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and ALD6. Compared to a non-acetate reducing reference strain under the same conditions, this resulted in a ca. 13% increase in the ethanol yield on glucose. The combination of NAD(+)-dependent 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase expression and deletion of ALD6 resulted in a marked increase in the amount of acetate that was consumed in these proof-of-principle experiments, and this concept is ready for further testing in industrial strains as well as in hydrolysates. Altering the cofactor

  5. compartment-specific interactions of Hox proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    was on understanding gene sequences and function. These studies showed that important regulatory proteins are highly conserved in sequence and, often, in function, in organisms as diverse as mice and worms. Thus, novel genes alone do not make one organism different from another. Instead, many findings have made ...

  6. Establishment of canine hemangiosarcoma xenograft models expressing endothelial growth factors, their receptors, and angiogenesis-associated homeobox genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maruo Kouji

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human hemangiosarcoma (HSA tends to have a poor prognosis; its tumorigenesis has not been elucidated, as there is a dearth of HSA clinical specimens and no experimental model for HSA. However, the incidence of spontaneous HSA is relatively high in canines; therefore, canine HSA has been useful in the study of human HSA. Recently, the production of angiogenic growth factors and their receptors in human and canine HSA has been reported. Moreover, the growth-factor environment of HSA is very similar to that of pathophysiological angiogenesis, which some homeobox genes regulate in the transcription of angiogenic molecules. In the present study, we established 6 xenograft canine HSA tumors and detected the expression of growth factors, their receptors, and angiogenic homeobox genes. Methods Six primary canine HSAs were xenografted to nude mice subcutaneously and serially transplanted. Subsequently, the expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A, basic fibroblast growth factors (bFGF, flt-1 and flk-1 (receptors of VEGF-A, FGFR-1, and angiogenic homeobox genes HoxA9, HoxB3, HoxB7, HoxD3, Pbx1, and Meis1 were investigated in original and xenograft tumors by histopathology, immunostaining, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, using canine-specific primer sets. Results Histopathologically, xenograft tumors comprised a proliferation of neoplastic cells that were varied in shape, from spindle-shaped and polygonal to ovoid; some vascular-like structures and vascular clefts of channels were observed, similar to those in the original tumors. The expression of endothelial markers (CD31 and vWF was detected in xenograft tumors by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Moreover, the expression of VEGF-A, bFGF, flt-1, flk-1, FGFR-1, HoxA9, HoxB3, HoxB7, HoxD3, Pbx1, and Meis1 was detected in xenograft tumors. Interestingly, expressions of bFGF tended to be higher in 3 of the xenograft HSA tumors than in the

  7. Establishment of canine hemangiosarcoma xenograft models expressing endothelial growth factors, their receptors, and angiogenesis-associated homeobox genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Human hemangiosarcoma (HSA) tends to have a poor prognosis; its tumorigenesis has not been elucidated, as there is a dearth of HSA clinical specimens and no experimental model for HSA. However, the incidence of spontaneous HSA is relatively high in canines; therefore, canine HSA has been useful in the study of human HSA. Recently, the production of angiogenic growth factors and their receptors in human and canine HSA has been reported. Moreover, the growth-factor environment of HSA is very similar to that of pathophysiological angiogenesis, which some homeobox genes regulate in the transcription of angiogenic molecules. In the present study, we established 6 xenograft canine HSA tumors and detected the expression of growth factors, their receptors, and angiogenic homeobox genes. Methods Six primary canine HSAs were xenografted to nude mice subcutaneously and serially transplanted. Subsequently, the expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, basic fibroblast growth factors (bFGF), flt-1 and flk-1 (receptors of VEGF-A), FGFR-1, and angiogenic homeobox genes HoxA9, HoxB3, HoxB7, HoxD3, Pbx1, and Meis1 were investigated in original and xenograft tumors by histopathology, immunostaining, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), using canine-specific primer sets. Results Histopathologically, xenograft tumors comprised a proliferation of neoplastic cells that were varied in shape, from spindle-shaped and polygonal to ovoid; some vascular-like structures and vascular clefts of channels were observed, similar to those in the original tumors. The expression of endothelial markers (CD31 and vWF) was detected in xenograft tumors by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Moreover, the expression of VEGF-A, bFGF, flt-1, flk-1, FGFR-1, HoxA9, HoxB3, HoxB7, HoxD3, Pbx1, and Meis1 was detected in xenograft tumors. Interestingly, expressions of bFGF tended to be higher in 3 of the xenograft HSA tumors than in the other tumors. Conclusion We

  8. Crystal Structure of the Redox-Active Cofactor Dibromothymoquinone Bound to Circadian Clock Protein KaiA and Structural Basis for Dibromothymoquinone's Ability to Prevent Stimulation of KaiC Phosphorylation by KaiA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pattanayek, Rekha; Sidiqi, Said K.; Egli, Martin [Vanderbilt-MED

    2013-09-19

    KaiA protein that stimulates KaiC phosphorylation in the cyanobacterial circadian clock was recently shown to be destabilized by dibromothymoquinone (DBMIB), thus revealing KaiA as a sensor of the plastoquinone (PQ) redox state and suggesting an indirect control of the clock by light through PQ redox changes. Here we show using X-ray crystallography that several DBMIBs are bound to KaiA dimer. Some binding modes are consistent with oligomerization of N-terminal KaiA pseudoreceiver domains and/or reduced interdomain flexibility. DBMIB bound to the C-terminal KaiA (C-KaiA) domain and limited stimulation of KaiC kinase activity by C-KaiA in the presence of DBMIB demonstrate that the cofactor may weakly inhibit KaiA-KaiC binding.

  9. Identification and characterization of the first mutation (Arg776Cys) in the C-terminal domain of the Human Molybdenum Cofactor Sulfurase (HMCS) associated with type II classical xanthinuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, Hava; Naamati, Meirav Shtauber; Levartovsky, David; Lagziel, Ayala; Shani, Esther; Horn, Ivona; Shalev, Hanna; Landau, Daniel

    2007-05-01

    Classical xanthinuria type II is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by deficiency of xanthine dehydrogenase and aldehyde oxidase activities due to lack of a common sulfido-olybdenum cofactor (MoCo). Two mutations, both in the N-terminal domain of the Human Molybdenum Cofactor Sulfurase (HMCS), were reported in patients with type II xanthinuria. Whereas the N-terminal domain of HMCS was demonstrated to have cysteine desulfurase activity, the C-terminal domain hypothetically transfers the sulfur to the MoCo. We describe the first mutation in the C-terminal domain of HMCS identified in a Bedouin-Arab child presenting with urolithiasis and in an asymptomatic Jewish female. Patients were diagnosed with type II xanthinuria by homozygosity mapping and/or allopurinol loading test. The Bedouin-Arab child was homozygous for a c.2326C>T (p.Arg776Cys) mutation, while the female patient was compound heterozygous for this and a novel c.1034insA (p.Gln347fsStop379) mutation in the N-terminal domain of HMCS. Cosegregation of the homozygous mutant genotype with hypouricemia and hypouricosuria was demonstrated in the Bedouin family. Haplotype analysis indicated that p.Arg776Cys is a recurrent mutation. Arg776 together with six surrounding amino acid residues were found fully conserved and predicted to be buried in homologous eukaryotic MoCo sulfurases. Moreover, Arg776 is conserved in a diversity of eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteins that posses a domain homologous to the C-terminal domain of HMCS. Our findings suggest that Arg776 is essential for a core structure of the C-terminal domain of the HMCS and identification of a mutation at this site may contribute clarifying the mechanism of MoCo sulfuration.

  10. Infección del virus del papiloma humano y cáncer de cuello uterino: distribución de genotipos en mujeres conizadas por lesión escamosa intraepitelial de alto grado (CIN 2-3) y análisis de los cofactores de cáncer de cérvix en Málaga

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez Sánchez, Eva María

    2012-01-01

    Estudio observacional retrospectivo en mujeres conizadas por lesión intraepitelial cervical de alto grado, estudio de la distribución de los genotipos del HPV y los cofactores estudiados durante un año en el Hospital Regional Carlos Haya de Málaga

  11. Article Commentary: Kynurenine Pathway Pathologies: Do Nicotinamide and Other Pathway Co-Factors have a Therapeutic Role in Reduction of Symptom Severity, Including Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS and Fibromyalgia (FM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele Blankfield

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS and fibromyalgia (FM appear to meet the criteria of a tryptophan-kynurenine pathway disorder with potential neuroimmunological sequelae. Aspects of some of the putative precipitating factors have been previously outlined. 2 , 3 An analysis of the areas of metabolic dysfunction will focus on future directions for research and management. The definition of dual tryptophan pathways has increased the understanding of the mind-body, body-mind dichotomy. The serotonergic pathway highlights the primary (endogenous psychiatric disorders. The up-regulation of the kynurenine pathway by physical illnesses can cause neuropathic and immunological disorders 1 associated with secondary neuropsychiatric symptoms. Tryptophan and nicotinamide deficiencies fall within the protein energy malnutrition (PEM spectrum. They can arise if the kynurenine pathway is stressed by primary or secondary inflammatory conditions and the consequent imbalance of available catabolic/anabolic substrates may adversely influence convalescent phase efficiency. The replacement of depleted or reduced NAD+ levels and other cofactors can perhaps improve the clinical management of these disorders.

  12. Liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the analysis of plant samples: a method for simultaneous screening of common cofactors or nucleotides and application to an engineered plant line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérard, Florence; Pétriacq, Pierre; Gakière, Bertrand; Tcherkez, Guillaume

    2011-10-01

    Intense efforts are currently devoted to improve plant metabolomic analyses so as to describe more accurately the whole picture of metabolic pathways. Analyses based on liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-TOF) are now widely distributed among plant science laboratories. However, the use of reliable, sensitive LC-TOF methods to identify and quantify micromolar or inframicromolar key metabolites is often impeded by the sensitivity of the technique to sample preparation or chromatographic conditions. Typically, the sample matrix has a substantial influence on ionization efficiency and therefore, on the detectability of such compounds. Here, we describe a new method to analyze simultaneously 23 nucleotides and cofactors from plant extracts, taking advantage of solid-phase extraction (SPE) prior to injection. The influence of common m/z fragments in several metabolites and adducts is considered. We applied this method to characterise metabolic intermediates of NAD biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana, using a wild-type and an engineered transgenic plant line that produces bacterial quinolinate phosphoribosyl transferase (nadc). We show that sample pre-purification with SPE is strictly required not only for compound quantification and identification but also to allow ionization of matrix-sensitive compounds (e.g. nicotinamide) or alleviate fragmentation of others (e.g. NAD). When exogenous substrate quinolinate was infiltrated into Arabidopsis leaves to increase the natural content in downstream metabolites, a clear correlation between intermediates of NAD biosynthesis was seen, showing the accuracy of our method for quantification in biological samples. Nadc plants only showed very modest changes in NAD-related metabolites and furthermore, they were associated with slightly lower photosynthetic performance and ATP production. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Transcriptional inhibition of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} gene (CDKN1) expression by survivin is at least partially p53-dependent: Evidence for survivin acting as a transcription factor or co-factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Lei [Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); Pre-Doctoral Chinese Fellowship Student, Second West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Sichuan (China); Ling, Xiang; Liu, Wensheng; Das, Gokul M. [Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); Li, Fengzhi, E-mail: fengzhi.li@roswellpark.org [Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Survivin inhibits the expression of p21 protein, mRNA and promoter activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Survivin neutralizes p53-induced p21 expression and promoter activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Survivin physically interacts with p53 in cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Genetic silencing of endogenous survivin upregulates p21 in p53 wild type cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both p53 and survivin interacts on the two p53-binding sites in the p21 promoter. -- Abstract: Growing evidence suggests a role for the antiapoptotic protein survivin in promotion of cancer cell G1/S transition and proliferation. However, the underlying mechanism is unclear. Further, although upregulation of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} by p53 plays an important role in p53-mediated cell G1 arrests in response to various distresses, it is unknown whether survivin plays a role in the regulation of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} expression. Here, we report that exogenous expression of survivin in p53-wild type MCF-7 breast cancer cells inhibits the expression of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} protein, mRNA and promoter activity, while the survivin C84A mutant and antisense failed to do so. Cotransfection experiments in the p53 mutant H1650 lung cancer cell line showed that survivin neutralizes p53-induced p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} expression and promoter activity. Importantly, genetically silencing of endogenous survivin using lentiviral survivin shRNA also enhances endogenous p21 in p53 wild type cancer cells, suggesting the physiological relevance of the fining. We further demonstrated that both p53 and survivin interacts on the two p53-binding sites in the p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} promoter (-2313 to -2212; -1452 to -1310), and survivin physically interacts with p53 in cancer cells. Together, we propose that survivin may act as a transcription factor or cofactor to interact with p53 on the p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} promoter leading to the inhibition of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1

  14. Dermatan sulfate in tunicate phylogeny: Order-specific sulfation pattern and the effect of [→4IdoA(2-Sulfateβ-1→3GalNAc(4-Sulfateβ-1→] motifs in dermatan sulfate on heparin cofactor II activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugahara Kazuyuki

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously, we have reported the presence of highly sulfated dermatans in solitary ascidians from the orders Phlebobranchia (Phallusia nigra and Stolidobranchia (Halocynthia pyriformis and Styela plicata. Despite the identical disaccharide backbone, consisting of [→4IdoA(2Sβ-1→3GalNAcβ-1→], those polymers differ in the position of sulfation on the N-Acetyl galactosamine, which can occur at carbon 4 or 6. We have shown that position rather than degree of sulfation is important for heparin cofactor II activity. As a consequence, 2,4- and 2,6-sulfated dermatans have high and low heparin cofactor II activities, respectively. In the present study we extended the disaccharide analysis of ascidian dermatan sulfates to additional species of the orders Stolidobranchia (Herdmania pallida, Halocynthia roretzi and Phlebobranchia (Ciona intestinalis, aiming to investigate how sulfation evolved within Tunicata. In addition, we analysed how heparin cofactor II activity responds to dermatan sulfates containing different proportions of 2,6- or 2,4-disulfated units. Results Disaccharide analyses indicated a high content of disulfated disaccharide units in the dermatan sulfates from both orders. However, the degree of sulfation decreased from Stolidobranchia to Phlebobranchia. While 76% of the disaccharide units in dermatan sulfates from stolidobranch ascidians are disulfated, 53% of disulfated disaccharides are found in dermatan sulfates from phlebobranch ascidians. Besides this notable difference in the sulfation degree, dermatan sulfates from phlebobranch ascidians contain mainly 2,6-sulfated disaccharides whereas dermatan sulfate from the stolidobranch ascidians contain mostly 2,4-sulfated disaccharides, suggesting that the biosynthesis of dermatan sulfates might be differently regulated during tunicates evolution. Changes in the position of sulfation on N-acetylgalactosamine in the disaccharide [→4IdoA(2-Sulfateβ-1→3GalNAcβ-1

  15. Cotranscriptional recruitment of RNA exosome cofactors Rrp47p and Mpp6p and two distinct Trf-Air-Mtr4 polyadenylation (TRAMP) complexes assists the exonuclease Rrp6p in the targeting and degradation of an aberrant messenger ribonucleoprotein particle (mRNP) in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuparevic, Igor; Mosrin-Huaman, Christine; Hervouet-Coste, Nadège; Remenaric, Mateja; Rahmouni, A Rachid

    2013-11-01

    The cotranscriptional mRNA processing and packaging reactions that lead to the formation of export-competent messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) are under the surveillance of quality control steps. Aberrant mRNPs resulting from faulty events are retained in the nucleus with ensuing elimination of their mRNA component. The molecular mechanisms by which the surveillance system recognizes defective mRNPs and stimulates their destruction by the RNA degradation machinery are still not completely elucidated. Using an experimental approach in which mRNP formation in yeast is disturbed by the action of the bacterial Rho helicase, we have shown previously that the targeting of Rho-induced aberrant mRNPs is mediated by Rrp6p, which is recruited cotranscriptionally in association with Nrd1p following Rho action. Here we investigated the specific involvement in this quality control process of different cofactors associated with the nuclear RNA degradation machinery. We show that, in addition to the main hydrolytic action of the exonuclease Rrp6p, the cofactors Rrp47p, Mpp6p as well as the Trf-Air-Mtr4 polyadenylation (TRAMP) components Trf4p, Trf5p, and Air2p contribute significantly by stimulating the degradation process upon their cotranscriptional recruitment. Trf4p and Trf5p are apparently recruited in two distinct TRAMP complexes that both contain Air2p as component. Surprisingly, Rrp47p appears to play an important role in mutual protein stabilization with Rrp6p, which highlights a close association between the two partners. Together, our results provide an integrated view of how different cofactors of the RNA degradation machinery cooperate to target and eliminate aberrant mRNPs.

  16. Cotranscriptional Recruitment of RNA Exosome Cofactors Rrp47p and Mpp6p and Two Distinct Trf-Air-Mtr4 Polyadenylation (TRAMP) Complexes Assists the Exonuclease Rrp6p in the Targeting and Degradation of an Aberrant Messenger Ribonucleoprotein Particle (mRNP) in Yeast*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuparevic, Igor; Mosrin-Huaman, Christine; Hervouet-Coste, Nadège; Remenaric, Mateja; Rahmouni, A. Rachid

    2013-01-01

    The cotranscriptional mRNA processing and packaging reactions that lead to the formation of export-competent messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) are under the surveillance of quality control steps. Aberrant mRNPs resulting from faulty events are retained in the nucleus with ensuing elimination of their mRNA component. The molecular mechanisms by which the surveillance system recognizes defective mRNPs and stimulates their destruction by the RNA degradation machinery are still not completely elucidated. Using an experimental approach in which mRNP formation in yeast is disturbed by the action of the bacterial Rho helicase, we have shown previously that the targeting of Rho-induced aberrant mRNPs is mediated by Rrp6p, which is recruited cotranscriptionally in association with Nrd1p following Rho action. Here we investigated the specific involvement in this quality control process of different cofactors associated with the nuclear RNA degradation machinery. We show that, in addition to the main hydrolytic action of the exonuclease Rrp6p, the cofactors Rrp47p, Mpp6p as well as the Trf-Air-Mtr4 polyadenylation (TRAMP) components Trf4p, Trf5p, and Air2p contribute significantly by stimulating the degradation process upon their cotranscriptional recruitment. Trf4p and Trf5p are apparently recruited in two distinct TRAMP complexes that both contain Air2p as component. Surprisingly, Rrp47p appears to play an important role in mutual protein stabilization with Rrp6p, which highlights a close association between the two partners. Together, our results provide an integrated view of how different cofactors of the RNA degradation machinery cooperate to target and eliminate aberrant mRNPs. PMID:24047896

  17. Correction: Dermatan sulfate in tunicate phylogeny: Order-specific sulfation pattern and the effect of [→4IdoA(2-Sulfateβ-1→3GalNAc(4-Sulfateβ-1→] motifs in dermatan sulfate on heparin cofactor II activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugahara Kazuyuki

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract After the publication of the work entitled "Dermatan sulfate in tunicate phylogeny: Order-specific sulfation pattern and the effect of [→4IdoA(2-Sulfateβ-1→3GalNAc(4-Sulfateβ-1→] motifs in dermatan sulfate on heparin cofactor II activity", by Kozlowski et al., BMC Biochemistry 2011, 12:29, we found that the legends to Figures 2 to 5 contain serious mistakes that compromise the comprehension of the work. This correction article contains the correct text of the legends to Figures 2 to 5.

  18. Magnetic phase diagram of HoxTm1-x alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarthour, R.S.; Cowley, R.A.; Ward, R.C.C.

    2000-01-01

    The magnetic phase diagram of the competing anisotropy system, Ho/Tm, has been determined by neutron-scattering techniques and the results compared with calculations based on a mean-field model. The crystal-field interactions in Ho favor alignment of the magnetic moments in the basal plane whereas......, with long-range order, were identified and the magnetic phase diagram, including a pentacritical point, determined. A mean-field model was used to explain the results and the results are in good agreement with the experimental results....... in Tm they favor alignment along the c axis. Single-crystal alloys were grown with molecular-beam epitaxy techniques in Oxford. The components of the magnetic moment alone the c direction and in the basal plane were determined from the neutron-scattering measurements. Five distinct magnetic phases...

  19. The homeodomain transcription factor Hoxa2 interacts with and promotes the proteasomal degradation of the E3 ubiquitin protein ligase RCHY1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Bergiers

    Full Text Available Hox proteins are conserved homeodomain transcription factors known to be crucial regulators of animal development. As transcription factors, the functions and modes of action (co-factors, target genes of Hox proteins have been very well studied in a multitude of animal models. However, a handful of reports established that Hox proteins may display molecular activities distinct from gene transcription regulation. Here, we reveal that Hoxa2 interacts with 20S proteasome subunits and RCHY1 (also known as PIRH2, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets p53 for degradation. We further show that Hoxa2 promotes proteasome-dependent degradation of RCHY1 in an ubiquitin-independent manner. Correlatively, Hoxa2 alters the RCHY1-mediated ubiquitination of p53 and promotes p53 stabilization. Together, our data establish that Hoxa2 can regulate the proteasomal degradation of RCHY1 and stabilization of p53.

  20. Cell Fusion as a Cofactor in Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    vesicular stomatitis virus ( VSV ), to be reversibly activated by a brief incubation in mildly acidic medium. The advantages of this method are that it is not...fusion. However, our findings indicated a different and unexpected to us mechanism. We found that PC-3 released one or more infectious viruses that...transferred the retroviral vectors that encoded RFP and EGFP in PC-3 cells. Since these vectors were based on mouse leukemia virus (MLV), we

  1. Plasminogen: A cellular protein cofactor for PrPSc propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Mays, Charles E; Ryou, Chongsuk

    2011-01-01

    The biochemical essence of prion replication is the molecular multiplication of the disease-associated misfolded isoform of prion protein (PrP), termed PrPSc, in a nucleic acid-free manner. PrPSc is generated by the protein misfolding process facilitated by conformational conversion of the host-encoded cellular PrP to PrPSc. Evidence suggests that an auxiliary factor may play a role in PrPSc propagation. We and others previously discovered that plasminogen interacts with PrP, while its functi...

  2. Plasminogen: A cellular protein cofactor for PrPSc propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Charles E; Ryou, Chongsuk

    2011-01-01

    The biochemical essence of prion replication is the molecular multiplication of the disease-associated misfolded isoform of prion protein (PrP), termed PrPSc, in a nucleic acid-free manner. PrP(Sc) is generated by the protein misfolding process facilitated by conformational conversion of the host-encoded cellular PrP to PrP(Sc). Evidence suggests that an auxiliary factor may play a role in PrP(Sc) propagation. We and others previously discovered that plasminogen interacts with PrP, while its functional role for PrPSc propagation remained undetermined. In our recent in vitro PrP conversion study, we showed that plasminogen substantially stimulates PrP(Sc) propagation in a concentration-dependent manner by accelerating the rate of PrP(Sc) generation, while depletion of plasminogen, destabilization of its structure, and interference with the PrP-plasminogen interaction hinder PrP(Sc) propagation. Further investigation in cell culture models confirmed an increase of PrP(Sc) formation by plasminogen. Although molecular basis of the observed activity for plasminogen remain to be addressed, our results demonstrate that plasminogen is the first cellular protein auxiliary factor proven to stimulate PrP(Sc) propagation.

  3. Photoactivation of NAD Kinase through Phytochrome: Phosphate Donors and Cofactors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Takafumi Tezuka; Yukio Yamamoto

    1975-01-01

    .... In the presence of exogenous Mg , which is required for NAD kinase activity, α-nitroso-β-naphthol, cyanide, and dimethylglyoxime, strongly inhibited the activation by red light without affecting the level of NAD kinase in the dark...

  4. System wide cofactor turnovers can propagate metabolic stability between pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Y.; Guan, Y.H.; Villadsen, John

    2016-01-01

    the metabolic networks studied were invariably associated with living cells. Nowadays, there are needs to reconstruct metabolic networks, and so metabolic homeostasis cannot be taken for granted. For metabolic steady state, enzyme feedback control has been known to explain why metabolites in metabolic pathways......Metabolic homeostasis, or low-level metabolic steady state, has long been taken for granted in metabolic engineering, and research priority has always been given to understand metabolic flux control and regulation of the reaction network. In the past, this has not caused concerns because....... Furthermore, we elaborated the criteria to tell if a multi-enzyme over-all reaction path is of in vivo nature or not at the metabolic level. As new findings, we discovered that there are interactions between the enzyme feedback inhibition and the CI turnover, and such interactions may well lead to metabolic...

  5. Contaminants as viral cofactors: assessing indirect population effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springman, Katherine R.; Kurath, Gael; Anderson, James J.; Emlen, John M.

    2005-01-01

    Current toxicological methods often miss contaminant effects, particularly when immune suppression is involved. The failure to recognize and evaluate indirect and sublethal effects severely limits the applicability of those methods at the population level. In this study, the Vitality model is used to evaluate the population level effects of a contaminant exerting only indirect, sublethal effects at the individual level. Juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were injected with 2.5 or 10.0 mg/kg doses of the model CYP1A inducer, β-naphthoflavone (BNF) as a pre-stressor, then exposed to a challenge dose of 102 or 104 pfu/fish of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), an important viral pathogen of salmonids in North America. At the end of the 28-d challenge, the mortality data were processed according to the Vitality model which indicated that the correlation between the average rate of vitality loss and the pre-stressor dose was strong:R2 = 0.9944. Average time to death and cumulative mortality were dependent on the BNF dose, while no significant difference between the two viral dosages was shown, implying that the history of the organism at the time of stressor exposure is an important factor in determining the virulence or toxicity of the stressor. The conceptual framework of this model permits a smoother transfer of results to a more complex stratum, namely the population level, which allows the immunosuppressive results generated by doses of a CYP1A inducer that more accurately represent the effects elicited by environmentally-relevant contaminant concentrations to be extrapolated to target populations. The indirect effects of other environmental contaminants with similar biotransformation pathways, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), could be assessed and quantified with this model and the results applied to a more complex biological hierarchy.

  6. Cofactor engineering of Lactobacillus brevis alcohol dehydrogenase by computational design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machielsen, M.P.; Looger, L.L.; Raedts, J.G.J.; Dijkhuizen, S.; Hummel, W.; Henneman, H.G.; Daussmann, T.; Oost, van der J.

    2009-01-01

    The R-specific alcohol dehydrogenase from Lactobacillus brevis (Lb-ADH) catalyzes the enantioselective reduction of prochiral ketones to the corresponding secondary alcohols. It is stable and has broad substrate specificity. These features make this enzyme an attractive candidate for

  7. Progression of Hepatitis to Hcc: Immunological Cofactors and Genetic Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonaguro, Franco M.

    2014-07-01

    Globally, an estimated 130-170 million persons (2%-3% of the world's population) are living with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. About 80% of individuals exposed to HCV develop chronic infection and 3-11% of people with chronic HCV infection will develop liver cirrhosis within 20 years with associated risks of liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma. Region-specific estimates range from 2.9% in Northern Africa. The lowest prevalence (0.01%-0.1%) has been reported from countries in the United Kingdom and Scandinavia; the highest prevalence (15%-20%) has been reported from Egypt. Germany and France show in the general population a low (50 years old account for most infections, with a HCV-prevalence peak >30% in subject over 65 years of age (Figure 1), suggesting a cohort effect in which the risk for HCV infection was higher in the distant past, i.e., 40-60 years previously. In the same areas, in fact, the HCV prevalence drops to <10% in the 30-35 years age group. All these data would support the role of specific events (including public-health related iatrogenic transmission) in circulation of the pathogen in each population. However a further issue is frequency and rate of chronic HCV infection as well as progression to HCC...

  8. Uranium Exerts Acute Toxicity by Binding to Pyrroloquinoline Quinone Cofactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael R. VanEngelen; Robert I. Szilagyi; Robin Gerlach; Brady E. Lee; William A. Apel; Brent M. Peyton

    2011-02-01

    Uranium as an environmental contaminant has been shown to be toxic to eukaryotes and prokaryotes; however, no specific mechanisms of uranium toxicity have been proposed so far. Here a combination of in vivo, in vitro, and in silico studies are presented describing direct inhibition of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent growth and metabolism by uranyl cations. Electrospray-ionization mass spectroscopy, UV-vis optical spectroscopy, competitive Ca2+/uranyl binding studies, relevant crystal structures, and molecular modeling unequivocally indicate the preferred binding of uranyl simultaneously to the carboxyl oxygen, pyridine nitrogen, and quinone oxygen of the PQQ molecule. The observed toxicity patterns are consistent with the biotic ligand model of acute metal toxicity. In addition to the environmental implications, this work represents the first proposed molecular mechanism of uranium toxicity in bacteria, and has relevance for uranium toxicity in many living systems.

  9. Promoter and Cofactor Requirements for SERM-ER Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not...OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON USAMRMC a. REPORT U b. ABSTRACT U c. THIS PAGE U UU 41 19b...Santos Silva, E., Blin , N., and Gott, P. Kapranov, P., Cawley, S.E., Drenkow, J., Bekiranov, S., Strausberg,(1999). Hepatocyte nuclear factor 3

  10. Investigation of glycerol assimilation and cofactor metabolism in Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anders Koefoed

    supplementation. The positive effects were observed from cultivation of L. lactis IL1403 with trehalose as a substrate under aerated conditions. Under these conditions, the supplementation of glycerol would cause an increase in biomass production of over night cultures. The growth rate of the cultures......The production of biodiesel has been steadily increasing during the last decade, and with it crude glycerol as a byproduct. Despite being rich in glycerol, the increased supply has saturated the demand for glycerol, making purification a non-viable option. The background for this project...... was to investigate the suitability of lactic acid bacteria as production organisms for the production of biofuels and biochemicals. Specifically, the goal was to adapt the model organism Lactococcus lactis to convert crude glycerol, to value-added fuels or chemicals. Work was divided between four main areas: life...

  11. Trichomoniasis--an important cofactor of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serwin, Agnieszka Beata; Koper, Marta

    2013-01-01

    Trichomonas (T.) vaginalis is the most common non-viral sexually transmitted infection worldwide. The estimated number of new T. vaginalis infections accounts for 276.4 million cases globally. The pathogen induces local inflammation of the lower genitourinary tract, can be involved in premature labour, low birth weight and facilitates HIV-1 transmission via sexual intercourse. In the paper, we present basic epidemiological data on T. vaginalis infection, biologic mechanisms by which the pathogen enhances HIV-1 acquisition, principles of modern diagnosis and treatment of the infection.

  12. Myeloid ecotropic viral integration site 1 inhibits cell proliferation, invasion or migration in human gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Fei; Wang, Hong; Wang, Yingying

    2017-10-27

    Myeloid ecotropic viral integration site 1 (MEIS1) has been identified to be a potential tumor suppressor in some cancers. However, the mechanisms underlying MEIS1-induced cancer development and progression were not clear. Here, we investigated the expression and role of MEIS1 in gastric cancer. In vivo , we analyzed tumor growth using nude mice model. In the present study, MEIS1 expression was obviously decreased in GC cell lines compared with that in normal gastric cell lines (all pmigration assay revealed that MEIS1 affects cell invasion and migration, and inhibited epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Finally, MEIS1 inhibits MKN28 cell growth in nude mice model. In conclusion, our study suggested that MEIS1 plays an important role in regulating cell survival, proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, cell cycle, apoptosis and metastasis. Thus, MEIS1 might be recommended as an effective target for GC patients.

  13. Experiment list: SRX442882 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available essing cells (hM); Mus musculus; ChIP-Seq source_name=Embryonic fibroblast || cell type=Meis1 overexpressing...last|Lineage=primaryCells|Description=Mouse Embryonic Fibroblast 37198561,94.5,18.4,18033 GSM1310408: Meis1/2 ChIPSeq, Meis1 overexpr

  14. Haematopoietic malignancies caused by dysregulation of a chromatin-binding PHD finger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Gang G.; Song, Jikui; Wang, Zhanxin; Dormann, Holger L.; Casadio, Fabio; Li, Haitao; Luo, Jun-Li; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Allis, C. David; (MSKCC); (Scripps); (Rockefeller)

    2009-07-21

    Histone H3 lysine4 methylation (H3K4me) has been proposed as a critical component in regulating gene expression, epigenetic states, and cellular identities. The biological meaning of H3K4me is interpreted by conserved modules including plant homeodomain (PHD) fingers that recognize varied H3K4me states. The dysregulation of PHD fingers has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancers and immune or neurological disorders. Here we report that fusing an H3K4-trimethylation (H3K4me3)-binding PHD finger, such as the carboxy-terminal PHD finger of PHF23 or JARID1A (also known as KDM5A or RBBP2), to a common fusion partner nucleoporin-98 (NUP98) as identified in human leukaemias, generated potent oncoproteins that arrested haematopoietic differentiation and induced acute myeloid leukaemia in murine models. In these processes, a PHD finger that specifically recognizes H3K4me3/2 marks was essential for leukaemogenesis. Mutations in PHD fingers that abrogated H3K4me3 binding also abolished leukaemic transformation. NUP98-PHD fusion prevented the differentiation-associated removal of H3K4me3 at many loci encoding lineage-specific transcription factors (Hox(s), Gata3, Meis1, Eya1 and Pbx1), and enforced their active gene transcription in murine haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Mechanistically, NUP98-PHD fusions act as 'chromatin boundary factors', dominating over polycomb-mediated gene silencing to 'lock' developmentally critical loci into an active chromatin state (H3K4me3 with induced histone acetylation), a state that defined leukaemia stem cells. Collectively, our studies represent, to our knowledge, the first report that deregulation of the PHD finger, an 'effector' of specific histone modification, perturbs the epigenetic dynamics on developmentally critical loci, catastrophizes cellular fate decision-making, and even causes oncogenesis during mammalian development.

  15. The role of HO_x in super- and subsonic aircraft exhaust plumes

    OpenAIRE

    Hanisco, T. F.; Wennberg, P. O.; R. C. Cohen; J. G. Anderson; D. W. Fahey; Keim, E. R; Gao, R. S.; Wamsley, R. C.; Donnelly, S. G.; Del Negro, L. A.; R. J. Salawitch; Kelly, K. K.; Proffitt, M.H.

    1997-01-01

    The generation of sulfuric acid aerosols in aircraft exhaust has emerged as a critical issue in determining the impact of supersonic aircraft on stratospheric ozone. It has long been held that the first step in the mechanism of aerosol formation is the oxidation of SO_(2) emitted from the engine by OH in the exhaust plume. We report in situ measurements of OH and HO_(2) in the exhaust plumes of a supersonic (Air France Concorde) and a subsonic (NASA ER-2) aircraft in the lower stratosphere. T...

  16. The Role of HO(x) in Super- and Subsonic Aircraft Exhaust Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanisco, T. F.; Wennberg, P. O.; Cohen, R. C.; Anderson, J. G.; Fahey, D. W.; Keim, E. R.; Gao, R. S.; Wamsley, R. C.; Donnelly, S. G.; DelNegro, L. A.; hide

    1997-01-01

    The generation of sulfuric acid aerosols in aircraft exhaust has emerged as a critical issue in determining the impact of supersonic aircraft on stratospheric ozone. It has long been held that the first step in the mechanism of aerosol formation is the oxidation of SO2 emitted from the engine by OH in the exhaust plume. We report in situ measurements of OH and HO2 in the exhaust plumes of a supersonic (Air France Concorde) and a subsonic (NASA ER-2) aircraft in the lower stratosphere. These measurements imply that reactions with OH are responsible for oxidizing only a small fraction of SO2 (2%), and thus cannot explain the large number of particles observed in the exhaust wake of the Concorde.

  17. The role of HOx in super- and subsonic aircraft exhaust plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanisco, T. F.; Wennberg, P. O.; Cohen, R. C.; Anderson, J. G.; Fahey, D. W.; Keim, E. R.; Gao, R. S.; Wamsley, R. C.; Donnelly, S. G.; Del Negro, L. A.; Salawitch, R. J.; Kelly, K. K.; Proffitt, M. H.

    The generation of sulfuric acid aerosols in aircraft exhaust has emerged as a critical issue in determining the impact of supersonic aircraft on stratospheric ozone. It has long been held that the first step in the mechanism of aerosol formation is the oxidation of SO2 emitted from the engine by OH in the exhaust plume. We report in situ measurements of OH and HO2 in the exhaust plumes of a supersonic (Air France Concorde) and a subsonic (NASA ER-2) aircraft in the lower stratosphere. These measurements imply that reactions with OH are responsible for oxidizing only a small fraction of SO2 (2%), and thus cannot explain the large number of particles observed in the exhaust wake of the Concorde.

  18. HOX genes in the sepiolid squid Euprymna scolopes: Implications for the evolution of complex body plans

    OpenAIRE

    Callaerts, Patrick; Lee, Patricia N.; Hartmann, Britta; Farfan, Claudia; Choy, Darrett W. Y.; Ikeo, Kazuho; Fischbach, Karl-Friedrich; Gehring, Walter J.; de Couet, H. Gert

    2002-01-01

    Molluscs display a rich diversity of body plans ranging from the wormlike appearance of aplacophorans to the complex body plan of the cephalopods with highly developed sensory organs, a complex central nervous system, and cognitive abilities unrivaled among the invertebrates. The aim of the current stu