WorldWideScience

Sample records for hotspot identification methods

  1. Identification of Hotspots of Genetic Risk for Type 2 Diabetes Using GIS Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Having the ability to scan the entire country for potential "hotspots" with increased risk of developing chronic diseases due to various environmental, demographic, and genetic susceptibility factors may inform risk management decisions and enable better env...

  2. Identification of chromosomal translocation hotspots via scan statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Israel T; Rosales, Rafael A; Holanda, Adriano J; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Jankovic, Mila

    2014-09-15

    The detection of genomic regions unusually rich in a given pattern is an important undertaking in the analysis of next-generation sequencing data. Recent studies of chromosomal translocations in activated B lymphocytes have identified regions that are frequently translocated to c-myc oncogene. A quantitative method for the identification of translocation hotspots was crucial to this study. Here we improve this analysis by using a simple probabilistic model and the framework provided by scan statistics to define the number and location of translocation breakpoint hotspots. A key feature of our method is that it provides a global chromosome-wide nominal control level to clustering, as opposed to previous methods based on local criteria. While being motivated by a specific application, the detection of unusual clusters is a widespread problem in bioinformatics. We expect our method to be useful in the analysis of data from other experimental approaches such as of ChIP-seq and 4C-seq. The analysis of translocations from B lymphocytes with the method described here reveals the presence of longer hotspots when compared with those defined previously. Further, we show that the hotspot size changes substantially in the absence of DNA repair protein 53BP1. When 53BP1 deficiency is combined with overexpression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase, the hotspot length increases even further. These changes are not detected by previous methods that use local significance criteria for clustering. Our method is also able to identify several exclusive translocation hotspots located in genes of known tumor supressors. The detection of translocation hotspots is done with hot_scan, a program implemented in R and Perl. Source code and documentation are freely available for download at https://github.com/itojal/hot_scan. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Biogeographic methods identify gymnosperm biodiversity hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Medina, R; Morrone, J J; Lunz Vega, I

    2001-10-01

    A remarkable congruence among areas of endemism, panbiogeographic nodes, and refugia in western North America, Japan, south-western China, Tasmania, and New Caledonia indicates that these areas deserve special status for conservation. Here we propose that areas identified by different biogeographic methods are significant candidates for designation as hotspots.

  4. Recombination Hotspot/Coldspot Identification Combining Three Different Pseudocomponents via an Ensemble Learning Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingquan Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recombination presents a nonuniform distribution across the genome. Genomic regions that present relatively higher frequencies of recombination are called hotspots while those with relatively lower frequencies of recombination are recombination coldspots. Therefore, the identification of hotspots/coldspots could provide useful information for the study of the mechanism of recombination. In this study, a new computational predictor called SVM-EL was proposed to identify hotspots/coldspots across the yeast genome. It combined Support Vector Machines (SVMs and Ensemble Learning (EL based on three features including basic kmer (Kmer, dinucleotide-based auto-cross covariance (DACC, and pseudo dinucleotide composition (PseDNC. These features are able to incorporate the nucleic acid composition and their order information into the predictor. The proposed SVM-EL achieves an accuracy of 82.89% on a widely used benchmark dataset, which outperforms some related methods.

  5. Sampling effects on the identification of roadkill hotspots: Implications for survey design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sara M; Marques, J Tiago; Lourenço, André; Medinas, Denis; Barbosa, A Márcia; Beja, Pedro; Mira, António

    2015-10-01

    Although locating wildlife roadkill hotspots is essential to mitigate road impacts, the influence of study design on hotspot identification remains uncertain. We evaluated how sampling frequency affects the accuracy of hotspot identification, using a dataset of vertebrate roadkills (n = 4427) recorded over a year of daily surveys along 37 km of roads. "True" hotspots were identified using this baseline dataset, as the 500-m segments where the number of road-killed vertebrates exceeded the upper 95% confidence limit of the mean, assuming a Poisson distribution of road-kills per segment. "Estimated" hotspots were identified likewise, using datasets representing progressively lower sampling frequencies, which were produced by extracting data from the baseline dataset at appropriate time intervals (1-30 days). Overall, 24.3% of segments were "true" hotspots, concentrating 40.4% of roadkills. For different groups, "true" hotspots accounted from 6.8% (bats) to 29.7% (small birds) of road segments, concentrating from 60% (lizards, lagomorphs, carnivores) of roadkills. Spatial congruence between "true" and "estimated" hotspots declined rapidly with increasing time interval between surveys, due primarily to increasing false negatives (i.e., missing "true" hotspots). There were also false positives (i.e., wrong "estimated" hotspots), particularly at low sampling frequencies. Spatial accuracy decay with increasing time interval between surveys was higher for smaller-bodied (amphibians, reptiles, small birds, small mammals) than for larger-bodied species (birds of prey, hedgehogs, lagomorphs, carnivores). Results suggest that widely used surveys at weekly or longer intervals may produce poor estimates of roadkill hotspots, particularly for small-bodied species. Surveying daily or at two-day intervals may be required to achieve high accuracy in hotspot identification for multiple species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. HotSpot Wizard: a web server for identification of hot spots in protein engineering

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pavelka, Antonin; Chovancova, Eva; Damborsky, Jiri

    2009-01-01

    HotSpot Wizard is a web server for automatic identification of 'hot spots' for engineering of substrate specificity, activity or enantioselectivity of enzymes and for annotation of protein structures...

  7. Five-way smoking status classification using text hot-spot identification and error-correcting output codes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cohen, Aaron M

    2008-01-01

    .... Our submission included several techniques that we compared and studied, including hot-spot identification, zero-vector filtering, inverse class frequency weighting, error-correcting output codes...

  8. Farm nitrogen balances in six European agricultural landscapes – a method for farming system assessment, emission hotspot identification, and mitigation measure evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Tommy; Bienkowski, J.; Bleeker, A.

    2012-01-01

    Six agricultural landscapes in Poland (PL), the Netherlands (NL), France (FR), Italy (IT), Scotland (UK) and Denmark (DK) were studied, and a common method was developed for undertaking farm inventories and the derivation of farm nitrogen (N) balances and N surplus from the in total 222 farms...... average was similar to those of PL and DK (122 ± 20 and 146 ± 55 kg N ha−1yr−1, respectively) when landless poultry were included. However, the challenge remains how to account for indirect N surpluses and emissions from such farms with a large export of manure out of the landscape. We conclude that farm...

  9. Identification of a Hawaiian-Emperor Style Bend in the Tuvalu Segment of the Rurutu Hotspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlayson, V.; Konter, J. G.; Konrad, K.; Price, A. A.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Jackson, M. G.

    2016-12-01

    Absolute plate motion (APM) models continue to improve with better characterization of drift of the two primary hotspots: Hawaii and Louisville. While APM models are more reliable from 50 Ma to modern times, uncertainty is introduced prior to 50 Ma due to hotspot track mismatch, uncertain location of the Louisville hotspot, and inter-hotspot drift as deduced from paleolatitude data [1,2]. Hawaiian hotspot drift contributed to a sharp 50 Ma Hawaiian-Emperor Bend (HEB) not reflected by the Louisville track. Adding a third HEB to the known long-lived hotspot tracks allows evaluation of APM uncertainty and hotspot drift. We present Pb-Sr-Nd-Hf isotopes and 40Ar/39Ar ages that complement existing Rurutu data [3], and for the first time trace the hotspot through its HEB back to 100 Ma. Our results reveal that the Tuvalu chain and some western Samoa seamounts define an age-progressive 63-42 Ma segment of the Rurutu track. The segment displays various mixtures between extreme endmember HIMU (206Pb/204Pb ≥ 20) and compositionally common FOZO [4,5] typical of Rurutu volcanism [3,6]. Other compositions also occur, differing in age and origin. In addition to the Rurutu-related seamounts, three seamounts were also sampled that have depleted mid-ocean ridge basalt compositions and ages that coincide with the opening of the underlying ocean basin. While distinct from the Rurutu hotspot, Samoan volcanoes overlapping 50-42 Ma Rurutu seamounts prevent straightforward identification of the HEB. Using age, composition, and location data, we project the Rurutu track with a moving hotspot APM model [7] from each age-dated seamount, defining the likeliest location with a cluster of projected HEBs. We find the Rurutu HEB occurs near the intersection of Tuvalu and western Samoa, providing a key constraint required to evaluate APM and inter-hotspot drift. 1. Koppers et al., (2012) doi:10.1038/ngeo1638 2. Tarduno et al., (2003) doi:10.1126/science.1086442 3. Konter et al., (2008) doi:10

  10. Analysis of Traffic Crashes Involving Pedestrians Using Big Data: Investigation of Contributing Factors and Identification of Hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kun; Ozbay, Kaan; Kurkcu, Abdullah; Yang, Hong

    2017-08-01

    This study aims to explore the potential of using big data in advancing the pedestrian risk analysis including the investigation of contributing factors and the hotspot identification. Massive amounts of data of Manhattan from a variety of sources were collected, integrated, and processed, including taxi trips, subway turnstile counts, traffic volumes, road network, land use, sociodemographic, and social media data. The whole study area was uniformly split into grid cells as the basic geographical units of analysis. The cell-structured framework makes it easy to incorporate rich and diversified data into risk analysis. The cost of each crash, weighted by injury severity, was assigned to the cells based on the relative distance to the crash site using a kernel density function. A tobit model was developed to relate grid-cell-specific contributing factors to crash costs that are left-censored at zero. The potential for safety improvement (PSI) that could be obtained by using the actual crash cost minus the cost of "similar" sites estimated by the tobit model was used as a measure to identify and rank pedestrian crash hotspots. The proposed hotspot identification method takes into account two important factors that are generally ignored, i.e., injury severity and effects of exposure indicators. Big data, on the one hand, enable more precise estimation of the effects of risk factors by providing richer data for modeling, and on the other hand, enable large-scale hotspot identification with higher resolution than conventional methods based on census tracts or traffic analysis zones. © 2017 Society for Risk Analysis.

  11. Isotopic identification of nitrogen hotspots across natural terrestrial ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Bai

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N influences local biological processes, ecosystem productivity, the composition of the atmospheric-climate system, and the human endeavour as a whole. Here we use natural variations in N isotopes, coupled with two models, to trace global pathways of N loss from the land to the water and atmosphere. We show that denitrification accounts for approximately 35 % of total N losses from the natural soil, with NO, N2O, and N2 fluxes equal to 15.7 ± 4.7 Tg N yr−1, 10.2 ± 3.0 Tg N yr−1, and 21.0 ± 6.1 Tg N yr−1, respectively. Our analysis points to tropical regions as the major "hotspot" of nitrogen export from the terrestrial biosphere, accounting for 71 % of global N losses from the natural land surface. The poorly studied Congo Basin is further identified as one of the major natural sources of atmospheric N2O. Extra-tropical areas, by contrast, lose a greater fraction of N via leaching pathways (~77 % of total N losses than do tropical biomes, likely contributing to N limitations of CO2 uptake at higher latitudes. Our results provide an independent constraint on global models of the N cycle among different regions of the unfertilized biosphere.

  12. Applying Hotspot Detection Methods in Forestry: A Case Study of Chestnut Oak Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songlin Fei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hotspot detection has been widely adopted in health sciences for disease surveillance, but rarely in natural resource disciplines. In this paper, two spatial scan statistics (SaTScan and ClusterSeer and a nonspatial classification and regression trees method were evaluated as techniques for identifying chestnut oak (Quercus Montana regeneration hotspots among 50 mixed-oak stands in the central Appalachian region of the eastern United States. Hotspots defined by the three methods had a moderate level of conformity and revealed similar chestnut oak regeneration site affinity. Chestnut oak regeneration hotspots were positively associated with the abundance of chestnut oak trees in the overstory and a moderate cover of heather species (Vaccinium and Gaylussacia spp. but were negatively associated with the abundance of hayscented fern (Dennstaedtia punctilobula and mountain laurel (Kalmia latiforia. In general, hotspot detection is a viable tool for assisting natural resource managers with identifying areas possessing significantly high or low tree regeneration.

  13. Finite mixture modeling for vehicle crash data with application to hotspot identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byung-Jung; Lord, Dominique; Lee, Chungwon

    2014-10-01

    The application of finite mixture regression models has recently gained an interest from highway safety researchers because of its considerable potential for addressing unobserved heterogeneity. Finite mixture models assume that the observations of a sample arise from two or more unobserved components with unknown proportions. Both fixed and varying weight parameter models have been shown to be useful for explaining the heterogeneity and the nature of the dispersion in crash data. Given the superior performance of the finite mixture model, this study, using observed and simulated data, investigated the relative performance of the finite mixture model and the traditional negative binomial (NB) model in terms of hotspot identification. For the observed data, rural multilane segment crash data for divided highways in California and Texas were used. The results showed that the difference measured by the percentage deviation in ranking orders was relatively small for this dataset. Nevertheless, the ranking results from the finite mixture model were considered more reliable than the NB model because of the better model specification. This finding was also supported by the simulation study which produced a high number of false positives and negatives when a mis-specified model was used for hotspot identification. Regarding an optimal threshold value for identifying hotspots, another simulation analysis indicated that there is a discrepancy between false discovery (increasing) and false negative rates (decreasing). Since the costs associated with false positives and false negatives are different, it is suggested that the selected optimal threshold value should be decided by considering the trade-offs between these two costs so that unnecessary expenses are minimized. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Rapid experimental SAD phasing and hot-spot identification with halogenated fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph D. Bauman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Through X-ray crystallographic fragment screening, 4-bromopyrazole was discovered to be a `magic bullet' that is capable of binding at many of the ligand `hot spots' found in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT. The binding locations can be in pockets that are `hidden' in the unliganded crystal form, allowing rapid identification of these sites for in silico screening. In addition to hot-spot identification, this ubiquitous yet specific binding provides an avenue for X-ray crystallographic phase determination, which can be a significant bottleneck in the determination of the structures of novel proteins. The anomalous signal from 4-bromopyrazole or 4-iodopyrazole was sufficient to determine the structures of three proteins (HIV-1 RT, influenza A endonuclease and proteinase K by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD from single crystals. Both compounds are inexpensive, readily available, safe and very soluble in DMSO or water, allowing efficient soaking into crystals.

  15. Structure-selective hot-spot Raman enhancement for direct identification and detection of trace penicilloic acid allergen in penicillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liying; Jin, Yang; Mao, Hui; Zheng, Lei; Zhao, Jiawei; Peng, Yan; Du, Shuhu; Zhang, Zhongping

    2014-08-15

    Trace penicilloic acid allergen frequently leads to various fatal immune responses to many patients, but it is still a challenge to directly discriminate and detect its residue in penicillin by a chemosensing way. Here, we report that silver-coated gold nanoparticles (Au@Ag NPs) exhibit a structure-selective hot-spot Raman enhancement capability for direct identification and detection of trace penicilloic acid in penicillin. It has been demonstrated that penicilloic acid can very easily link Au@Ag NPs together by its two carboxyl groups, locating itself spontaneously at the interparticle of Au@Ag NPs to form strong Raman hot-spot. At the critical concentration inducing the nanoparticle aggregation, Raman-enhanced effect of penicilloic acid is ~60,000 folds higher than that of penicillin. In particular, the selective Raman enhancement to the two carboxyl groups makes the peak of carboxyl group at C6 of penicilloic acid appear as a new Raman signal due to the opening of β-lactam ring of penicillin. The surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticle sensor reaches a sensitive limit lower than the prescribed 1.0‰ penicilloic acid residue in penicillin. The novel strategy to examine allergen is more rapid, convenient and inexpensive than the conventional separation-based assay methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Rapid experimental SAD phasing and hot-spot identification with halogenated fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauman, Joseph D.; Harrison, Jerry Joe E. K.; Arnold, Eddy

    2016-01-01

    Through X-ray crystallographic fragment screening, 4-bromopyrazole was discovered to be a `magic bullet' that is capable of binding at many of the ligand `hot spots' found in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). The binding locations can be in pockets that are `hidden' in the unliganded crystal form, allowing rapid identification of these sites forin silicoscreening. In addition to hot-spot identification, this ubiquitous yet specific binding provides an avenue for X-ray crystallographic phase determination, which can be a significant bottleneck in the determination of the structures of novel proteins. The anomalous signal from 4-bromopyrazole or 4-iodopyrazole was sufficient to determine the structures of three proteins (HIV-1 RT, influenza A endonuclease and proteinase K) by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) from single crystals. Both compounds are inexpensive, readily available, safe and very soluble in DMSO or water, allowing efficient soaking into crystals.

  17. Multicriteria identification sets method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenev, G. K.

    2016-11-01

    A multicriteria identification and prediction method for mathematical models of simulation type in the case of several identification criteria (error functions) is proposed. The necessity of the multicriteria formulation arises, for example, when one needs to take into account errors of completely different origins (not reducible to a single characteristic) or when there is no information on the class of noise in the data to be analyzed. An identification sets method is described based on the approximation and visualization of the multidimensional graph of the identification error function and sets of suboptimal parameters. This method allows for additional advantages of the multicriteria approach, namely, the construction and visual analysis of the frontier and the effective identification set (frontier and the Pareto set for identification criteria), various representations of the sets of Pareto effective and subeffective parameter combinations, and the corresponding predictive trajectory tubes. The approximation is based on the deep holes method, which yields metric ɛ-coverings with nearly optimal properties, and on multiphase approximation methods for the Edgeworth-Pareto hull. The visualization relies on the approach of interactive decision maps. With the use of the multicriteria method, multiple-choice solutions of identification and prediction problems can be produced and justified by analyzing the stability of the optimal solution not only with respect to the parameters (robustness with respect to data) but also with respect to the chosen set of identification criteria (robustness with respect to the given collection of functionals).

  18. Climate Change Hotspots Identification in China through the CMIP5 Global Climate Model Ensemble

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanghe Gu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available China is one of the countries vulnerable to adverse climate changes. The potential climate change hotspots in China throughout the 21st century are identified in this study by using a multimodel, multiscenario climate model ensemble that includes Phase Five of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5 atmosphere-ocean general circulation models. Both high (RCP8.5 and low (RCP4.5 greenhouse gas emission trajectories are tested, and both the mean and extreme seasonal temperature and precipitation are considered in identifying regional climate change hotspots. Tarim basin and Tibetan Plateau in West China are identified as persistent regional climate change hotspots in both the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 scenarios. The aggregate impacts of climate change increase throughout the 21st century and are more significant in RCP8.5 than in RCP4.5. Extreme hot event and mean temperature are two climate variables that greatly contribute to the hotspots calculation in all regions. The contribution of other climate variables exhibits a notable subregional variability. South China is identified as another hotspot based on the change of extreme dry event, especially in SON and DJF, which indicates that such event will frequently occur in the future. Our results can contribute to the designing of national and cross-national adaptation and mitigation policies.

  19. Identification of burden hotspots and risk factors for cholera in India: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohammad; Sen Gupta, Sanjukta; Arora, Nisha; Khasnobis, Pradeep; Venkatesh, Srinivas; Sur, Dipika; Nair, Gopinath B; Sack, David A; Ganguly, Nirmal K

    2017-01-01

    Even though cholera has existed for centuries and many parts of the country have sporadic, endemic and epidemic cholera, it is still an under-recognized health problem in India. A Cholera Expert Group in the country was established to gather evidence and to prepare a road map for control of cholera in India. This paper identifies cholera burden hotspots and factors associated with an increased risk of the disease. We acquired district level data on cholera case reports of 2010-2015 from the Integrated Disease Surveillance Program. Socioeconomic characteristics and coverage of water and sanitation was obtained from the 2011 census. Spatial analysis was performed to identify cholera hotspots, and a zero-inflated Poisson regression was employed to identify the factors associated with cholera and predicted case count in the district. 27,615 cholera cases were reported during the 6-year period. Twenty-four of 36 states of India reported cholera during these years, and 13 states were classified as endemic. Of 641 districts, 78 districts in 15 states were identified as "hotspots" based on the reported cases. On the other hand, 111 districts in nine states were identified as "hotspots" from model-based predicted number of cases. The risk for cholera in a district was negatively associated with the coverage of literate persons, households using treated water source and owning mobile telephone, and positively associated with the coverage of poor sanitation and drainage conditions and urbanization level in the district. The study reaffirms that cholera continues to occur throughout a large part of India and identifies the burden hotspots and risk factors. Policymakers may use the findings of the article to develop a roadmap for prevention and control of cholera in India.

  20. Identification and analysis of mutational hotspots in oncogenes and tumour suppressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeissa, Hanadi; Benstead-Hume, Graeme; Richardson, Christopher J; Pearl, Frances M G

    2017-03-28

    The key to interpreting the contribution of a disease-associated mutation in the development and progression of cancer is an understanding of the consequences of that mutation both on the function of the affected protein and on the pathways in which that protein is involved. Protein domains encapsulate function and position-specific domain based analysis of mutations have been shown to help elucidate their phenotypes. In this paper we examine the domain biases in oncogenes and tumour suppressors, and find that their domain compositions substantially differ. Using data from over 30 different cancers from whole-exome sequencing cancer genomic projects we mapped over one million mutations to their respective Pfam domains to identify which domains are enriched in any of three different classes of mutation; missense, indels or truncations. Next, we identified the mutational hotspots within domain families by mapping small mutations to equivalent positions in multiple sequence alignments of protein domainsWe find that gain of function mutations from oncogenes and loss of function mutations from tumour suppressors are normally found in different domain families and when observed in the same domain families, hotspot mutations are located at different positions within the multiple sequence alignment of the domain. By considering hotspots in tumour suppressors and oncogenes independently, we find that there are different specific positions within domain families that are particularly suited to accommodate either a loss or a gain of function mutation. The position is also dependent on the class of mutation.We find rare mutations co-located with well-known functional mutation hotspots, in members of homologous domain superfamilies, and we detect novel mutation hotspots in domain families previously unconnected with cancer. The results of this analysis can be accessed through the MOKCa database (http://strubiol.icr.ac.uk/extra/MOKCa).

  1. Hazard identification methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna ORYMOWSKA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the main hazards that occur in the context of inland navigation and their impact on the vessel. First, characteristics are extracted from the following methods with regard to identifying threats: involving steering gear damage to an inland vessel moving on a straight waterway. Next, a hazard identification model is presented, which is appropriate to a situation involving steering gear damage to an inland vessel moving on a straight fairway.

  2. Evaluating Temporal Consistency in Marine Biodiversity Hotspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barner, Allison K.; Benkwitt, Cassandra E.; Boersma, Kate S.; Cerny-Chipman, Elizabeth B.; Ingeman, Kurt E.; Kindinger, Tye L.; Lindsley, Amy J.; Nelson, Jake; Reimer, Jessica N.; Rowe, Jennifer C.; Shen, Chenchen; Thompson, Kevin A.; Heppell, Selina S.

    2015-01-01

    With the ongoing crisis of biodiversity loss and limited resources for conservation, the concept of biodiversity hotspots has been useful in determining conservation priority areas. However, there has been limited research into how temporal variability in biodiversity may influence conservation area prioritization. To address this information gap, we present an approach to evaluate the temporal consistency of biodiversity hotspots in large marine ecosystems. Using a large scale, public monitoring dataset collected over an eight year period off the US Pacific Coast, we developed a methodological approach for avoiding biases associated with hotspot delineation. We aggregated benthic fish species data from research trawls and calculated mean hotspot thresholds for fish species richness and Shannon’s diversity indices over the eight year dataset. We used a spatial frequency distribution method to assign hotspot designations to the grid cells annually. We found no areas containing consistently high biodiversity through the entire study period based on the mean thresholds, and no grid cell was designated as a hotspot for greater than 50% of the time-series. To test if our approach was sensitive to sampling effort and the geographic extent of the survey, we followed a similar routine for the northern region of the survey area. Our finding of low consistency in benthic fish biodiversity hotspots over time was upheld, regardless of biodiversity metric used, whether thresholds were calculated per year or across all years, or the spatial extent for which we calculated thresholds and identified hotspots. Our results suggest that static measures of benthic fish biodiversity off the US West Coast are insufficient for identification of hotspots and that long-term data are required to appropriately identify patterns of high temporal variability in biodiversity for these highly mobile taxa. Given that ecological communities are responding to a changing climate and other

  3. Evaluating Temporal Consistency in Marine Biodiversity Hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacenza, Susan E; Thurman, Lindsey L; Barner, Allison K; Benkwitt, Cassandra E; Boersma, Kate S; Cerny-Chipman, Elizabeth B; Ingeman, Kurt E; Kindinger, Tye L; Lindsley, Amy J; Nelson, Jake; Reimer, Jessica N; Rowe, Jennifer C; Shen, Chenchen; Thompson, Kevin A; Heppell, Selina S

    2015-01-01

    With the ongoing crisis of biodiversity loss and limited resources for conservation, the concept of biodiversity hotspots has been useful in determining conservation priority areas. However, there has been limited research into how temporal variability in biodiversity may influence conservation area prioritization. To address this information gap, we present an approach to evaluate the temporal consistency of biodiversity hotspots in large marine ecosystems. Using a large scale, public monitoring dataset collected over an eight year period off the US Pacific Coast, we developed a methodological approach for avoiding biases associated with hotspot delineation. We aggregated benthic fish species data from research trawls and calculated mean hotspot thresholds for fish species richness and Shannon's diversity indices over the eight year dataset. We used a spatial frequency distribution method to assign hotspot designations to the grid cells annually. We found no areas containing consistently high biodiversity through the entire study period based on the mean thresholds, and no grid cell was designated as a hotspot for greater than 50% of the time-series. To test if our approach was sensitive to sampling effort and the geographic extent of the survey, we followed a similar routine for the northern region of the survey area. Our finding of low consistency in benthic fish biodiversity hotspots over time was upheld, regardless of biodiversity metric used, whether thresholds were calculated per year or across all years, or the spatial extent for which we calculated thresholds and identified hotspots. Our results suggest that static measures of benthic fish biodiversity off the US West Coast are insufficient for identification of hotspots and that long-term data are required to appropriately identify patterns of high temporal variability in biodiversity for these highly mobile taxa. Given that ecological communities are responding to a changing climate and other

  4. Identification of water quality degradation hotspots in developing countries by applying large scale water quality modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malsy, Marcus; Reder, Klara; Flörke, Martina

    2014-05-01

    Decreasing water quality is one of the main global issues which poses risks to food security, economy, and public health and is consequently crucial for ensuring environmental sustainability. During the last decades access to clean drinking water increased, but 2.5 billion people still do not have access to basic sanitation, especially in Africa and parts of Asia. In this context not only connection to sewage system is of high importance, but also treatment, as an increasing connection rate will lead to higher loadings and therefore higher pressure on water resources. Furthermore, poor people in developing countries use local surface waters for daily activities, e.g. bathing and washing. It is thus clear that water utilization and water sewerage are indispensable connected. In this study, large scale water quality modelling is used to point out hotspots of water pollution to get an insight on potential environmental impacts, in particular, in regions with a low observation density and data gaps in measured water quality parameters. We applied the global water quality model WorldQual to calculate biological oxygen demand (BOD) loadings from point and diffuse sources, as well as in-stream concentrations. Regional focus in this study is on developing countries i.e. Africa, Asia, and South America, as they are most affected by water pollution. Hereby, model runs were conducted for the year 2010 to draw a picture of recent status of surface waters quality and to figure out hotspots and main causes of pollution. First results show that hotspots mainly occur in highly agglomerated regions where population density is high. Large urban areas are initially loading hotspots and pollution prevention and control become increasingly important as point sources are subject to connection rates and treatment levels. Furthermore, river discharge plays a crucial role due to dilution potential, especially in terms of seasonal variability. Highly varying shares of BOD sources across

  5. Coastal Risk Assessment Framework tool for the identification of hotspots along the Emilia-Romagna coastline (northern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armaroli, Clara; Duo, Enrico; Ciavola, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    The Emilia-Romagna coastline is located in northern Italy, facing the Adriatic sea. The area is especially exposed to the flooding hazard because of its low lying nature, high urbanisation and the large exploitation of beach resources for tourism. The identification of hotspots where marine flooding can cause significant damages is, therefore, a key issue. The methodology implemented to identify hotspots is based on the Coastal Risk Assessment Framework tool that was developed in the RISC-KIT project (www.risckit.eu). The tool combines the hazard component with different exposure indicators and is applied along predefined coastal sectors of almost 1 Km alongshore length. The coastline was divided into 106 sectors in which each component was analysed. The hazard part was evaluated through the computation of maximum water levels, obtained as the sum of wave set-up, storm surge and tide, calculated along representative beach profiles, one per sector, and for two return periods (10 and 100 years). The data for the computation of the maximum water level were extracted from the literature. The landward extension of flood-prone areas in each sector was the extension of the flood maps produced by the regional authorities for the EU Flood Directive and for the same return periods. The exposure indicators were evaluated taking into account the location and type of different assets in each sector and in flood-prone areas. Specifically, the assets that were taken into account are: the transport network, the utilities (water, gas and electricity) networks, the land use typologies, the social vulnerability status of the population and the business sector. Each component was then ranked from 1 to 5, considering a scale based on their computed value (hazard), importance and location (exposure indicators). A final coastal index (CI) was computed as the root mean square of the geometrical mean of the exposure indicators multiplied by the hazard indicator. Land use typologies were

  6. Identification of hotspots and trends of fecal surface water pollution in developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reder, Klara; Flörke, Martina; Alcamo, Joseph

    2015-04-01

    Water is the essential resource ensuring human life on earth, which can only prosper when water is available and accessible. But of importance is not only the quantity of accessible water but also its quality, which in case of pollution may pose a risk to human health. The pollutants which pose a risk to human health are manifold, covering several groups such as pathogens, nutrients, human pharmaceuticals, heavy metals, and others. With regards to human health, pathogen contamination is of major interest as 4% of all death and 5.7% of disability or ill health in the world can be attributed to poor water supply, sanitation and personal and domestic hygiene. In developing countries, 2.6 billion people lacked access to improved sanitation in 2011. The lack of sanitation poses a risk to surface water pollution which is a threat to human health. A typical indicator for pathogen pollution is fecal coliform bacteria. The objective our study is to assess fecal pollution in the developing regions Africa, Asia and Latin America using the large-scale water quality model WorldQual. Model runs were carried-out to calculate in-stream concentrations and the respective loadings reaching rivers for the time period 1990 to 2010. We identified hotspots of fecal coliform loadings and in-stream concentrations which were further analyzed and ranked in terms of fecal surface water pollution. Main findings are that loadings mainly originate from the domestic sector, thus loadings are high in highly populated areas. In general, domestic loadings can be attributed to the two subsectors domestic sewered and domestic non sewered. The spatial distribution of both sectors varies across catchments. Hotspot pattern of in-stream concentrations are similar to the loadings pattern although they are different in seasonality. As the dilution varies with climate its dilution capacity is high during seasons with high precipitation, which in turn decreases the in-stream concentrations. The fecal

  7. A framework for the identification of hotspots of climate change risk for mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifici, Michela; Visconti, Piero; Rondinini, Carlo

    2017-10-14

    As rates of global warming increase rapidly, identifying species at risk of decline due to climate impacts and the factors affecting this risk have become key challenges in ecology and conservation biology. Here, we present a framework for assessing three components of climate-related risk for species: vulnerability, exposure and hazard. We used the relationship between the observed response of species to climate change and a set of intrinsic traits (e.g. weaning age) and extrinsic factors (e.g. precipitation seasonality within a species geographic range) to predict, respectively, the vulnerability and exposure of all data-sufficient terrestrial non-volant mammals (3,953 species). Combining this information with hazard (the magnitude of projected climate change within a species geographic range), we identified global hotspots of species at risk from climate change that includes the western Amazon basin, south-western Kenya, north-eastern Tanzania, north-eastern South Africa, Yunnan province in China, and mountain chains in Papua-New Guinea. Our framework identifies priority areas for monitoring climate change effects on species and directing climate mitigation actions for biodiversity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Routine use of the Ion Torrent AmpliSeq™ Cancer Hotspot Panel for identification of clinically actionable somatic mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsongalis, Gregory J; Peterson, Jason D; de Abreu, Francine B; Tunkey, Christopher D; Gallagher, Torrey L; Strausbaugh, Linda D; Wells, Wendy A; Amos, Christopher I

    2014-05-01

    Somatic mutation analysis is standard of practice for solid tumors in order to identify therapeutic sensitizing and resistance mutations. Our laboratory routinely performed standalone PCR-based methods for mutations in several genes. Rapid discovery and introduction of new therapeutics has demanded additional genomic information for adequate management of the cancer patient. We evaluated a next generation sequencing assay, the Ion Torrent AmpliSeq Cancer Hotspot Panelv2 (CHPv2), capable of identifying multiple somatic mutations in 50 genes in a single assay. Accuracy, precision, limit of detection, and specificity were evaluated using DNA from well-characterized cell lines, genetically engineered cell lines fixed and embedded in paraffin, and previously tested mutation positive or negative, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. Normal kidney, tonsil and colon FFPE tissues were used as controls. Accuracy studies showed 100% concordance in each patient sample between previous PCR results and the corresponding variants identified using the Ion Torrent panel. Precision studies gave consistent results when libraries were prepared from the same original DNA and were run on multiple 316 chips. The limit of detection was determined to be 5% for single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and 20% for insertions and deletions (indels). Specificity studies using normal FFPE tissue previously tested by PCR methods were also 100%. We have evaluated the performance of the AmpliSeq Cancer Panel Hotspotv2 and show that it is suitable for clinical testing. This next generation sequencing panel has allowed the laboratory to consolidate a broader range of molecular oncology testing to a single platform and single assay.

  9. Hotspot identification of trans-boundary water conflict due to anthropogenic water use and climate change in the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, A.; Yoshikawa, S.; Kanae, S.

    2014-12-01

    A significant fraction of world population is projected to experience increased water stress in response to the combined effects of population growth and climate change. Some previous studies have suggested that high water stress had significant causality for civil war, and militarized conflict and trans-boundary water conflict in international river basin. On the other hand, some previous empirical analyses have found that institutionalization (e.g., specific provisions in trans-boundary freshwater treaties) in international river basin was associated with a lower risk of water conflicts during water scarcity. The purpose of this study is to identify these water conflict "hotspots", integrating institutional and governance mechanisms of adaptations to impact of water stress. These adaptations is classified to 4 abilities and skills and then used to calculate the adaptive capacity. The adaptive capacity includes the way to manage water conflict effectively, plan to deal with uncertainty in the future, alter current situation and create institutionalization with common perspective throughout the whole activities. This study identifies water conflict "hotspots" by combining high water stress areas projected by a global water resource model and a lower degree of the adaptive capacity. This study finds that 9 water conflict "hotspots" in Africa, Asia and South America.

  10. The identification of 'hotspots' of heavy metal pollution in soil-rice systems at a regional scale in eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wanlu; Xu, Binbin; Song, Qiujin; Liu, Xingmei; Xu, Jianming; Brookes, Philip C

    2014-02-15

    Chinese agricultural soils and crops are suffering from increasing damage from heavy metals, which are introduced from various pollution sources including agriculture, traffic, mining and especially the flourishing private metal recycling industry. In this study, 219 pairs of rice grain and corresponding soil samples were collected from Wenling in Zhejiang Province to identify the spatial relationship and pollution hotspots of Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn in the soil-rice system. The mean soil concentrations of heavy metals were 0.316 mg kg(-1) for Cd, 47.3 mg kg(-1) for Cu, 31.7 mg kg(-1) for Ni and 131 mg kg(-1) for Zn, and the metal concentrations in rice grain were 0.132 mg kg(-1) for Cd, 2.46 mg kg(-1) for Cu, 0.223 mg kg(-1) for Ni and 17.4 mg kg(-1) for Zn. The coefficient of variability (CV) of soil Cd, Cu and rice Cd were 147%, 146% and 180%, respectively, indicating an extensive variability. While the CVs of other metals ranged from 23.4% to 84.3% with a moderate variability. Kriging interpolation procedure and the Local Moran's I index detected the locations of pollution hotspots of these four metals. Cd and Cu had a very similar spatial pattern, with contamination hotspots located simultaneously in the northwestern part of the study area, and there were obvious hotspots for soil Zn in the north area, while in the northeast for soil Ni. The existence of hotspots may be due to industrialization and other anthropogenic activities. An Enrichment Index (EI) was employed to measure the uptake of heavy metals by rice. The results indicated that the accumulation and availability of heavy metals in the soil-rice system may be influenced by both soil heavy metal concentrations and soil physico-chemical properties. Cross-correlograms quantitatively illustrated that EIs were significantly correlated with soil properties. Soil pH and organic matter were the most important factors controlling the uptake of heavy metals by rice. As results, positive measures should be taken into

  11. Hotspot advance speed - hotspot size/core-hotspot distance relation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We examined the evolution of extragalactic radio sources using the observed corehotspot distance and hotspot size. Analysis indicates a fairly strong positive correlation in the ratio of core-hotspot distance to hotspot size between that of the approaching arm and the receding arm with a correlation coefficient of r ~ 0.7.

  12. Structural Analysis of PTM Hotspots (SAPH-ire) – A Quantitative Informatics Method Enabling the Discovery of Novel Regulatory Elements in Protein Families*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhurst, Henry M.; Choudhury, Shilpa; Torres, Matthew P.

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the biological function potential of post-translational modifications (PTMs) is becoming increasingly important in light of the exponential increase in available PTM data from high-throughput proteomics. We developed structural analysis of PTM hotspots (SAPH-ire)—a quantitative PTM ranking method that integrates experimental PTM observations, sequence conservation, protein structure, and interaction data to allow rank order comparisons within or between protein families. Here, we applied SAPH-ire to the study of PTMs in diverse G protein families, a conserved and ubiquitous class of proteins essential for maintenance of intracellular structure (tubulins) and signal transduction (large and small Ras-like G proteins). A total of 1728 experimentally verified PTMs from eight unique G protein families were clustered into 451 unique hotspots, 51 of which have a known and cited biological function or response. Using customized software, the hotspots were analyzed in the context of 598 unique protein structures. By comparing distributions of hotspots with known versus unknown function, we show that SAPH-ire analysis is predictive for PTM biological function. Notably, SAPH-ire revealed high-ranking hotspots for which a functional impact has not yet been determined, including phosphorylation hotspots in the N-terminal tails of G protein gamma subunits—conserved protein structures never before reported as regulators of G protein coupled receptor signaling. To validate this prediction we used the yeast model system for G protein coupled receptor signaling, revealing that gamma subunit–N-terminal tail phosphorylation is activated in response to G protein coupled receptor stimulation and regulates protein stability in vivo. These results demonstrate the utility of integrating protein structural and sequence features into PTM prioritization schemes that can improve the analysis and functional power of modification-specific proteomics data. PMID:26070665

  13. Structural Analysis of PTM Hotspots (SAPH-ire)--A Quantitative Informatics Method Enabling the Discovery of Novel Regulatory Elements in Protein Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhurst, Henry M; Choudhury, Shilpa; Torres, Matthew P

    2015-08-01

    Predicting the biological function potential of post-translational modifications (PTMs) is becoming increasingly important in light of the exponential increase in available PTM data from high-throughput proteomics. We developed structural analysis of PTM hotspots (SAPH-ire)--a quantitative PTM ranking method that integrates experimental PTM observations, sequence conservation, protein structure, and interaction data to allow rank order comparisons within or between protein families. Here, we applied SAPH-ire to the study of PTMs in diverse G protein families, a conserved and ubiquitous class of proteins essential for maintenance of intracellular structure (tubulins) and signal transduction (large and small Ras-like G proteins). A total of 1728 experimentally verified PTMs from eight unique G protein families were clustered into 451 unique hotspots, 51 of which have a known and cited biological function or response. Using customized software, the hotspots were analyzed in the context of 598 unique protein structures. By comparing distributions of hotspots with known versus unknown function, we show that SAPH-ire analysis is predictive for PTM biological function. Notably, SAPH-ire revealed high-ranking hotspots for which a functional impact has not yet been determined, including phosphorylation hotspots in the N-terminal tails of G protein gamma subunits--conserved protein structures never before reported as regulators of G protein coupled receptor signaling. To validate this prediction we used the yeast model system for G protein coupled receptor signaling, revealing that gamma subunit-N-terminal tail phosphorylation is activated in response to G protein coupled receptor stimulation and regulates protein stability in vivo. These results demonstrate the utility of integrating protein structural and sequence features into PTM prioritization schemes that can improve the analysis and functional power of modification-specific proteomics data. © 2015 by The American

  14. Identification of soil contamination hotspots with veterinary antibiotics using heavy metal concentrations and leaching data--a field study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermann, Anne; Gao, Jing; Welp, Gerhard; Siemens, Jan; Roelcke, Marco; Heimann, Lisa; Nieder, Rolf; Xue, Qiaoyun; Lin, Xianyong; Sandhage-Hofmann, Alexandra; Amelung, Wulf

    2014-11-01

    In regions with high livestock densities, the usage of antibiotics and metals for veterinary purposes or as growth promoters poses a risk in manured soils. We investigated to which degree the concentrations and depth distributions of Cu, Zn, Cr and As could be used as a tracer to discover contaminations with sulfonamides, tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones. Besides, we estimated the potential vertical translocation of antibiotics and compared the results to measured data. In the peri-urban region of Beijing, China, soil was sampled from agricultural fields and a dry riverbed contaminated by organic waste disposal. The antibiotic concentrations reached 110 μg kg(-1) sulfamethazine, 111 μg kg(-1) chlortetracycline and 62 μg kg(-1) enrofloxacin in the topsoil of agricultural fields. Intriguingly, total concentrations of Cu, Zn, Cr and As were smaller than 65, 130, 36 and 10 mg kg(-1) in surface soil, respectively, therewith fulfilling Chinese quality standards. Correlations between sulfamethazine concentrations and Cu or Zn suggest that in regions with high manure applications, one might use the frequently existing monitoring data for metals to identify potential pollution hotspots for antibiotics in topsoils. In the subsoils, we found sulfamethazine down to ≥2 m depth on agricultural sites and down to ≥4 m depth in the riverbed. As no translocation of metals was observed, subsoil antibiotic contamination could not be predicted from metal data. Nevertheless, sulfonamide stocks in the subsoil could be estimated with an accuracy of 35-200 % from fertilisation data and potential leaching rates. While this may not be sufficient for precise prediction of antibiotic exposure, it may very well be useful for the pre-identification of risk hotspots for subsequent in-depth assessment studies.

  15. Star identification methods, techniques and algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Guangjun

    2017-01-01

    This book summarizes the research advances in star identification that the author’s team has made over the past 10 years, systematically introducing the principles of star identification, general methods, key techniques and practicable algorithms. It also offers examples of hardware implementation and performance evaluation for the star identification algorithms. Star identification is the key step for celestial navigation and greatly improves the performance of star sensors, and as such the book include the fundamentals of star sensors and celestial navigation, the processing of the star catalog and star images, star identification using modified triangle algorithms, star identification using star patterns and using neural networks, rapid star tracking using star matching between adjacent frames, as well as implementation hardware and using performance tests for star identification. It is not only valuable as a reference book for star sensor designers and researchers working in pattern recognition and othe...

  16. Adaptive geostatistical sampling enables efficient identification of malaria hotspots in repeated cross-sectional surveys in rural Malawi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alinune N Kabaghe

    Full Text Available In the context of malaria elimination, interventions will need to target high burden areas to further reduce transmission. Current tools to monitor and report disease burden lack the capacity to continuously detect fine-scale spatial and temporal variations of disease distribution exhibited by malaria. These tools use random sampling techniques that are inefficient for capturing underlying heterogeneity while health facility data in resource-limited settings are inaccurate. Continuous community surveys of malaria burden provide real-time results of local spatio-temporal variation. Adaptive geostatistical design (AGD improves prediction of outcome of interest compared to current random sampling techniques. We present findings of continuous malaria prevalence surveys using an adaptive sampling design.We conducted repeated cross sectional surveys guided by an adaptive sampling design to monitor the prevalence of malaria parasitaemia and anaemia in children below five years old in the communities living around Majete Wildlife Reserve in Chikwawa district, Southern Malawi. AGD sampling uses previously collected data to sample new locations of high prediction variance or, where prediction exceeds a set threshold. We fitted a geostatistical model to predict malaria prevalence in the area.We conducted five rounds of sampling, and tested 876 children aged 6-59 months from 1377 households over a 12-month period. Malaria prevalence prediction maps showed spatial heterogeneity and presence of hotspots-where predicted malaria prevalence was above 30%; predictors of malaria included age, socio-economic status and ownership of insecticide-treated mosquito nets.Continuous malaria prevalence surveys using adaptive sampling increased malaria prevalence prediction accuracy. Results from the surveys were readily available after data collection. The tool can assist local managers to target malaria control interventions in areas with the greatest health impact and is

  17. Identification of hotspots in the European union for the introduction of four zoonotic arboviroses by live animal trade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Durand

    Full Text Available Live animal trade is considered a major mode of introduction of viruses from enzootic foci into disease-free areas. Due to societal and behavioural changes, some wild animal species may nowadays be considered as pet species. The species diversity of animals involved in international trade is thus increasing. This could benefit pathogens that have a broad host range such as arboviruses. The objective of this study was to analyze the risk posed by live animal imports for the introduction, in the European Union (EU, of four arboviruses that affect human and horses: Eastern and Western equine encephalomyelitis, Venezuelan equine encephalitis and Japanese encephalitis. Importation data for a five-years period (2005-2009, extracted from the EU TRACES database, environmental data (used as a proxy for the presence of vectors and horses and human population density data (impacting the occurrence of clinical cases were combined to derive spatially explicit risk indicators for virus introduction and for the potential consequences of such introductions. Results showed the existence of hotspots where the introduction risk was the highest in Belgium, in the Netherlands and in the north of Italy. This risk was higher for Eastern equine encephalomyelitis (EEE than for the three other diseases. It was mainly attributed to exotic pet species such as rodents, reptiles or cage birds, imported in small-sized containments from a wide variety of geographic origins. The increasing species and origin diversity of these animals may have in the future a strong impact on the risk of introduction of arboviruses in the EU.

  18. Identification of Hotspots in the European Union for the Introduction of Four Zoonotic Arboviroses by Live Animal Trade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Benoit; Lecollinet, Sylvie; Beck, Cécile; Martínez-López, Beatriz; Balenghien, Thomas; Chevalier, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    Live animal trade is considered a major mode of introduction of viruses from enzootic foci into disease-free areas. Due to societal and behavioural changes, some wild animal species may nowadays be considered as pet species. The species diversity of animals involved in international trade is thus increasing. This could benefit pathogens that have a broad host range such as arboviruses. The objective of this study was to analyze the risk posed by live animal imports for the introduction, in the European Union (EU), of four arboviruses that affect human and horses: Eastern and Western equine encephalomyelitis, Venezuelan equine encephalitis and Japanese encephalitis. Importation data for a five-years period (2005-2009, extracted from the EU TRACES database), environmental data (used as a proxy for the presence of vectors) and horses and human population density data (impacting the occurrence of clinical cases) were combined to derive spatially explicit risk indicators for virus introduction and for the potential consequences of such introductions. Results showed the existence of hotspots where the introduction risk was the highest in Belgium, in the Netherlands and in the north of Italy. This risk was higher for Eastern equine encephalomyelitis (EEE) than for the three other diseases. It was mainly attributed to exotic pet species such as rodents, reptiles or cage birds, imported in small-sized containments from a wide variety of geographic origins. The increasing species and origin diversity of these animals may have in the future a strong impact on the risk of introduction of arboviruses in the EU. PMID:23894573

  19. Satellite-derived methane hotspot emission estimates using a fast data-driven method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwitz, Michael; Schneising, Oliver; Reuter, Maximilian; Heymann, Jens; Krautwurst, Sven; Bovensmann, Heinrich; Burrows, John P.; Boesch, Hartmut; Parker, Robert J.; Somkuti, Peter; Detmers, Rob G.; Hasekamp, Otto P.; Aben, Ilse; Butz, André; Frankenberg, Christian; Turner, Alexander J.

    2017-05-01

    Methane is an important atmospheric greenhouse gas and an adequate understanding of its emission sources is needed for climate change assessments, predictions, and the development and verification of emission mitigation strategies. Satellite retrievals of near-surface-sensitive column-averaged dry-air mole fractions of atmospheric methane, i.e. XCH4, can be used to quantify methane emissions. Maps of time-averaged satellite-derived XCH4 show regionally elevated methane over several methane source regions. In order to obtain methane emissions of these source regions we use a simple and fast data-driven method to estimate annual methane emissions and corresponding 1σ uncertainties directly from maps of annually averaged satellite XCH4. From theoretical considerations we expect that our method tends to underestimate emissions. When applying our method to high-resolution atmospheric methane simulations, we typically find agreement within the uncertainty range of our method (often 100 %) but also find that our method tends to underestimate emissions by typically about 40 %. To what extent these findings are model dependent needs to be assessed. We apply our method to an ensemble of satellite XCH4 data products consisting of two products from SCIAMACHY/ENVISAT and two products from TANSO-FTS/GOSAT covering the time period 2003-2014. We obtain annual emissions of four source areas: Four Corners in the south-western USA, the southern part of Central Valley, California, Azerbaijan, and Turkmenistan. We find that our estimated emissions are in good agreement with independently derived estimates for Four Corners and Azerbaijan. For the Central Valley and Turkmenistan our estimated annual emissions are higher compared to the EDGAR v4.2 anthropogenic emission inventory. For Turkmenistan we find on average about 50 % higher emissions with our annual emission uncertainty estimates overlapping with the EDGAR emissions. For the region around Bakersfield in the Central Valley we

  20. Identification of the hot-spot areas for sickle cell disease using cord blood screening at a district hospital: an Indian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Sujata; Sahu, Pushpansu; Kar, Shantanu Kumar; Negi, Sapna

    2015-10-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD), a genetic disorder often reported late, can be identified early in life, and hot-spot areas may be identified to conduct genetic epidemiology studies. This study was undertaken to estimate prevalence and to identify hot spot area for SCD in Kalahandi district, by screening cord blood of neonates delivered at the district hospital as first-hand information. Kalahandi District Hospital selected for the study is predominated by tribal population with higher prevalence of SCD as compared to other parts of Odisha. Cord blood screening of SCD was carried out on 761 newborn samples of which 13 were screened to be homozygous for SCD. Information on area of parent's residence was also collected. Madanpur Rampur area was found to be with the highest prevalence of SCD (10.52 %) and the gene distribution did not follow Hardy-Weinberg Equation indicating un-natural selection. The approach of conducting neonatal screening in a district hospital for identification of SCD is feasible and appropriate for prioritizing area for the implementation of large-scale screening and planning control measures thereof.

  1. Identification of evolutionary hotspots based on genetic data from multiple terrestrial and aquatic taxa and gap analysis of hotspots in protected lands encompassed by the South Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J.; Snider, M.; Duke, J.; Moyer, G.R.

    2014-01-01

     The southeastern United States is a recognized hotspot of biodiversity for a variety of aquatic taxa, including fish, amphibians, and mollusks. Unfortunately, the great diversity of the area is accompanied by a large proportion of species at risk of extinction . Gap analysis was employed to assess the representation of evolutionary hotspots in protected lands w h ere an evolutionary hotspot was defined as an area with high evolutionary potential and measured by atypical patterns of genetic divergence, genetic diversity, and to a lesser extent genetic similarity across multiple terrestrial or aquatic taxa. A survey of the primary literature produced 16 terrestrial and 14 aquatic genetic datasets for estimation of genetic divergence and diversity. Relative genetic diversity and divergence values for each terrestrial and aquatic dataset were used for interpolation of multispecies genetic surfaces and subsequent visualization using ArcGIS. The multispecies surfaces interpolated from relative divergences and diversity data identified numerous evolutionary hotspots for both terrestrial and aquatic taxa , many of which were afforded some current protection. For instance, 14% of the cells identified as hotspots of aquatic diversity were encompassed by currently protected areas. Additionally, 25% of the highest 1% of terrestrial diversity cells were afforded some level of protection. In contrast, areas of high and low divergence among species, and areas of high variance in diversity were poorly represented in the protected lands. Of particular interest were two areas that were consistently identified by several different measures as important from a conservation perspective. These included an area encompassing the panhandle of Florida and southern Georgia near the Apalachicola National Forest (displaying varying levels of genetic divergence and greater than average levels of genetic diversity) and a large portion of the coastal regions of North and South Carolina

  2. Identification methods for structural health monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Papadimitriou, Costas

    2016-01-01

    The papers in this volume provide an introduction to well known and established system identification methods for structural health monitoring and to more advanced, state-of-the-art tools, able to tackle the challenges associated with actual implementation. Starting with an overview on fundamental methods, introductory concepts are provided on the general framework of time and frequency domain, parametric and non-parametric methods, input-output or output only techniques. Cutting edge tools are introduced including, nonlinear system identification methods; Bayesian tools; and advanced modal identification techniques (such as the Kalman and particle filters, the fast Bayesian FFT method). Advanced computational tools for uncertainty quantification are discussed to provide a link between monitoring and structural integrity assessment. In addition, full scale applications and field deployments that illustrate the workings and effectiveness of the introduced monitoring schemes are demonstrated.

  3. Multivariate Methods for Muon Identification at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Assis-Jesus, A C S; Polycarpo, E; Landim, F

    2001-01-01

    The best possible identification of a muon by LHCb will be obtained by combining the available information from all the relevant subdetectors. We present a comparison among three multivariate methods, applying them to the muon identification. A neural network method and two parametric statistical approaches (one Bayesian and one classical) were studied in the context of separating muons from other particles using a simulation of eventswith the maximum background hit rate in the muon chambers. For a muon efficiency of 90% the pion misidentification is ~1%. The Bayesian and the neural network methods gave the best performance.

  4. Hot-spot analysis applied to the identification of potential high and low regulating, providing and cultural ecosystem services in Vilnius Region (Lithuania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Daniel, Depellegrin; Egarter-Vigl, Lukas; Cerda, Artemi; Estebaranz, Ferran; Misiune, Ieva

    2017-04-01

    Ecosystem services (ES) potential assessment is crucial for a correct territorial planning at different scales of analysis (Depellegrin et al., 2016). In urban and peri-urban areas, sprawl, grazing and unsustainable agriculture practices contributed to land degradation and de decrease of the quality and quantity of the services provided by these areas (Eldridge and Delgado-Baquerizo, 2017; Favretto et al., 2017). In order to understand the spatial pattern of these impacts, mapping ES potential is key to understand the areas that need to be restored and protected for an unsustainable use (Brevik et al., 2016; Egarter-Vigl et al., 2017; Pereira et al., 2017). Hot-spot analysis is a good method to identify clusters of areas with high and low capacity for ES capacity. This analysis is very useful to detect homogeneous areas, where ES have high or low quality. The objective of this work is to apply a hot-spot analysis to detect areas with high/low capacity for Regulating, Provision, Cultural and Total ES in Vilnius region. ES potential was carried out based on the matrix developed by Burkhard et al. (2009), which ranks ES capacity from 0= no capacity to 5=very high relevant capacity to a different land use type. The results showed that regulating, providing and cultural and total ES have a significant dispersed (low-clustered) pattern: Regulating (Z-score=-19.28, pJournal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology, 23, 441-455. Egarter-Vigl, L., Depellegrin, D., Pereira, P., De Groot, D., Tappeiner, U. (2017) Mapping the ecosystem service delivery chain: Capacity, flow, and demand pertaining to aesthetic experiences in mountain landscapes, Science of the Total Environment, 574, 442-436. Eldridge, D.J., Delgado-Baquerizo, M. (2017) Continental-scale impacts of livestock grazing on ecosystem supporting and regulating services. Land Degradation and Development. DOI: 10.1002/ldr.2668 Favretto, N., Lueding, E., Stringer, L., Dougill, A.J. (2017) Valuing ecosystem services

  5. Method for genetic identification of unknown organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colston, Jr., Billy W.; Fitch, Joseph P.; Hindson, Benjamin J.; Carter, Chance J.; Beer, Neil Reginald

    2016-08-23

    A method of rapid, genome and proteome based identification of unknown pathogenic or non-pathogenic organisms in a complex sample. The entire sample is analyzed by creating millions of emulsion encapsulated microdroplets, each containing a single pathogenic or non-pathogenic organism sized particle and appropriate reagents for amplification. Following amplification, the amplified product is analyzed.

  6. Methods for identification of irradiated food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bögl, K. W.

    The current position regarding identification of irradiated food is described. Attempts have been made to apply physical, chemical and biological forms of measurement. Up to know, the most appropriate methods, very close to practical routine application, seem to be: the electron spin resonance technique, the luminescence techniques and the analysis of volatiles (originated mainly from the lipid fraction) and o-tyrosine.

  7. Particle identification methods in High Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Va' Vra, J.

    2000-01-27

    This paper deals with two major particle identification methods: dE/dx and Cherenkov detection. In the first method, the authors systematically compare existing dE/dx data with various predictions available in the literature, such as the Particle Data group recommendation, and judge the overall consistency. To my knowledge, such comparison was not done yet in a published form for the gaseous detectors used in High-Energy physics. As far as the second method, there are two major Cherenkov light detection techniques: the threshold and the Ring imaging methods. The authors discuss the recent trend in these techniques.

  8. Computational botany methods for automated species identification

    CERN Document Server

    Remagnino, Paolo; Wilkin, Paul; Cope, James; Kirkup, Don

    2017-01-01

    This book discusses innovative methods for mining information from images of plants, especially leaves, and highlights the diagnostic features that can be implemented in fully automatic systems for identifying plant species. Adopting a multidisciplinary approach, it explores the problem of plant species identification, covering both the concepts of taxonomy and morphology. It then provides an overview of morphometrics, including the historical background and the main steps in the morphometric analysis of leaves together with a number of applications. The core of the book focuses on novel diagnostic methods for plant species identification developed from a computer scientist’s perspective. It then concludes with a chapter on the characterization of botanists' visions, which highlights important cognitive aspects that can be implemented in a computer system to more accurately replicate the human expert’s fixation process. The book not only represents an authoritative guide to advanced computational tools fo...

  9. New Waste Beverage Cans Identification Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firmansyah Burlian

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The primary emphasis of this work is on the development of a new waste beverage cans identification method for automated beverage cans sorting systems known as the SVS system. The method described involved window-based subdivision of the image into X-cells, construction of X-candidate template for N-cells, calculation of matching scores of reference templates for the N-cells image, and application of matching score to identify the grade of the object. The SVS system performance for correct beverage cans grade identification is 95.17% with estimated throughput of 21,600 objects per hour with a conveyor belt width of 18˝. The weight of the throughput depends on the size and type of the objects.

  10. Simplified method of odontograms for individual identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa Vigil, M A; Arenal, A A; Rodriguez Gonzalez, M A; Llompart, R C; Gonzalez Menendez, J M; Diez, F R

    1990-12-01

    A computerized method of codifying dental lesions and treatment is presented to enable faster identification of victims of catastrophes. Each tooth is assigned a bidigital value. The first digit refers to the root and designates whether it is found to be perfect, damaged and/or treated, or absent. The second digit refers to the crown and is assigned according to the number of surfaces showing lesions or treatment. For the identification of corpses, missing individuals whose record reveals values less than or equal to those of the subject in every tooth (or of each quadrant in cases of doubt) are selected for consideration from the data base. Individuals who have even one tooth with a value greater than that of the subject are eliminated.

  11. Combining Methods to Describe Important Marine Habitats for Top Predators: Application to Identify Biological Hotspots in Tropical Waters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie Thiers

    Full Text Available In tropical waters resources are usually scarce and patchy, and predatory species generally show specific adaptations for foraging. Tropical seabirds often forage in association with sub-surface predators that create feeding opportunities by bringing prey close to the surface, and the birds often aggregate in large multispecific flocks. Here we hypothesize that frigatebirds, a tropical seabird adapted to foraging with low energetic costs, could be a good predictor of the distribution of their associated predatory species, including other seabirds (e.g. boobies, terns and subsurface predators (e.g., dolphins, tunas. To test this hypothesis, we compared distribution patterns of marine predators in the Mozambique Channel based on a long-term dataset of both vessel- and aerial surveys, as well as tracking data of frigatebirds. By developing species distribution models (SDMs, we identified key marine areas for tropical predators in relation to contemporaneous oceanographic features to investigate multi-species spatial overlap areas and identify predator hotspots in the Mozambique Channel. SDMs reasonably matched observed patterns and both static (e.g. bathymetry and dynamic (e.g. Chlorophyll a concentration and sea surface temperature factors were important explaining predator distribution patterns. We found that the distribution of frigatebirds included the distributions of the associated species. The central part of the channel appeared to be the best habitat for the four groups of species considered in this study (frigatebirds, brown terns, boobies and sub-surface predators.

  12. Identification of the hot-spot areas for sickle cell disease using cord blood screening at a district hospital: an Indian perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Dixit, Sujata; Sahu, Pushpansu; Kar, Shantanu Kumar; Negi, Sapna

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD), a genetic disorder often reported late, can be identified early in life, and hot-spot areas may be identified to conduct genetic epidemiology studies. This study was undertaken to estimate prevalence and to identify hot spot area for SCD in Kalahandi district, by screening cord blood of neonates delivered at the district hospital as first-hand information. Kalahandi District Hospital selected for the study is predominated by tribal population with higher prevalence ...

  13. Identifying ecosystem service hotspots for environmental management in Durban, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashieda Davids

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite considerable research into the importance of ecosystem services, little has been achieved in translating such research into management action. In an urban context where numerous pressures on ecosystem services exist, the identification and management of priority ecosystem services areas are vital to ensure the ongoing provision of these services.Method: To identify opportunities for securing a sustainable supply of ecosystem services for the city of Durban, this paper identifies ecosystem service priority areas, called hotspots, and assesses their spatial congruence with critical biodiversity areas (CBAs, conservation areas, the Durban Metropolitan Open Space System (D’MOSS and land ownership categories, using spatial overlap and correlation analyses. Hotspots for 13 ecosystem services were identified and analysed, including carbon storage, nutrient retention, sediment retention, water supply and flood attenuation.Results: The study found generally weak correlations between ecosystem service hotspots and CBAs and conservation areas. On average, 30% of the 13 ecosystem services hotspots were located within terrestrial CBAs, 51% within the D’MOSS, with nominal overlaps of 0.3%, 3.9% and 5.07% within estuaries and freshwater CBAs and conservation areas, respectively. The majority of ecosystem service hotspots were located within communally (41% or privately owned (27% lands.Conclusion: The results indicated that substantial portions of hotspot areas lie outside of formally regulated and managed conservation areas and remain vulnerable to human impact and habitat degradation. The study identified management areas and options that could yield maximum benefits; including the need for the development of an ecosystem services management and protection strategy, the selection of areas for co-management of ecosystem service hotspots and CBAs and the need for collaborative management.

  14. Hotspots of species richness, threat and endemism for terrestrial vertebrates in SW Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, López-López; Luigi, Maiorano; Alessandra, Falcucci; Emilio, Barba; Luigi, Boitani

    2011-09-01

    The Mediterranean basin, and the Iberian Peninsula in particular, represent an outstanding "hotspot" of biological diversity with a long history of integration between natural ecosystems and human activities. Using deductive distribution models, and considering both Spain and Portugal, we downscaled traditional range maps for terrestrial vertebrates (amphibians, breeding birds, mammals and reptiles) to the finest possible resolution with the data at hand, and we identified hotspots based on three criteria: i) species richness; ii) vulnerability, and iii) endemism. We also provided a first evaluation of the conservation status of biodiversity hotspots based on these three criteria considering both existing and proposed protected areas (i.e., Natura 2000). For the identification of hotspots, we used a method based on the cumulative distribution functions of species richness values. We found no clear surrogacy among the different types of hotspots in the Iberian Peninsula. The most important hotspots (considering all criteria) are located in the western and southwestern portions of the study area, in the Mediterranean biogeographical region. Existing protected areas are not specifically concentrated in areas of high species richness, with only 5.2% of the hotspots of total richness being currently protected. The Natura 2000 network can potentially constitute an important baseline for protecting vertebrate diversity in the Iberian Peninsula although further improvements are needed. We suggest taking a step forward in conservation planning in the Mediterranean basin, explicitly considering the history of the region as well as its present environmental context. This would allow moving from traditional reserve networks (conservation focused on "patterns") to considerations about the "processes" that generated present biodiversity.

  15. Use of local statistics to reveal hidden information of pollution hotspots in urban soil geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chaosheng

    2017-04-01

    The identification of pollution hotspots is an important approach for a better understanding of spatial distribution patterns and the exploration for their influencing factors in environmental studies. One of the most often asked questions in an environmental investigation is: Where are the pollution hotspots? This presentation explains one of the popularly used methodologies called local index of spatial association (LISA) and its applications in urban geochemical studies in Galway, Ireland and London of the UK. The LISA is a useful tool for identifying pollution hotspots and classifying them into spatial clusters and spatial outliers. The results were affected by the definition of weight function, data transformation and existence of extreme values, and it is suggested that all these influencing factors should be considered until reasonable and reliable results are obtained. This method has been applied to identify Pb pollution in Galway, polluted areas in bonfires sites, elevated P and REE concentrations in London. Hotspots in identified in urban soils are related to locations of high road density, traditional festival bonfires, industries and other human activities. The results of hotspots analysis provide useful information for the management of urban soils.

  16. Water quality in riparian boreal forest: a multi-method approach to scale biogeochemical drivers from groundwater hotspots to catchment outlets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploum, Stefan; Kuglerová, Lenka; Leach, Jason; Laudon, Hjalmar

    2017-04-01

    Stream chemistry in boreal regions is for a large degree defined by the riparian zone. Within the riparian zone, groundwater hotspots represent a very small area, but likely play a major role in controlling stream water quality. Hotspots have shown to be unique in their plant species richness, soil texture and biogeochemistry. Also in terms of stream metabolism, hotspots show different responses, either due to local biotic or abiotic conditions. Readily available hydrological mapping tools, combined with biogeochemical data (stream temperature and stable water isotopes) show that there is great potential in predicting groundwater hotspots using terrain-based approaches. However, the role of individual hotspots varies in time. Presumably their hydrological regime is highly dependent on landscape properties of the upstream area. To improve the predictability of hotspots in space and time, a mechanistic understanding is needed. We achieve this by a combined approach including a damming experiment, high resolution optic fiber stream temperature measurements (DTS), a dense groundwater well network, stream and groundwater trace element analysis, frost monitoring and infrared (IR) imagery. This field-based strategy sheds light on the underlying drivers of groundwater hotspots and links them to landscape characteristics. This allows to move away from highly monitored reaches, and evaluate the relation between upland landscape features and the temporal variability of groundwater exfiltration rates on a catchment scale.

  17. 9 CFR 2.50 - Time and method of identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Time and method of identification. 2... AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Identification of Animals § 2.50 Time and method of identification. (a... , or shall be identified by a distinctive and legible tattoo marking acceptable to and approved by the...

  18. [A accurate identification method for Chinese materia medica--systematic identification of Chinese materia medica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue-Yong; Liao, Cai-Li; Liu, Si-Qi; Liu, Chun-Sheng; Shao, Ai-Juan; Huang, Lu-Qi

    2013-05-01

    This paper put forward a more accurate identification method for identification of Chinese materia medica (CMM), the systematic identification of Chinese materia medica (SICMM) , which might solve difficulties in CMM identification used the ordinary traditional ways. Concepts, mechanisms and methods of SICMM were systematically introduced and possibility was proved by experiments. The establishment of SICMM will solve problems in identification of Chinese materia medica not only in phenotypic characters like the mnorphous, microstructure, chemical constituents, but also further discovery evolution and classification of species, subspecies and population in medical plants. The establishment of SICMM will improve the development of identification of CMM and create a more extensive study space.

  19. Defining persistent hotspots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kittur, Nupur; Binder, Sue; Campbell, Carl H.

    2017-01-01

    , investigators and neglected tropical disease (NTD) program managers need to define them based on changes in prevalence and/or intensity. But how should the data be analyzed to define a persistent hotspot? We have analyzed a dataset from an operational research study in western Tanzania after three annual MDAs...... and contrast the outcomes of these analyses. Our intent is to showhowthe samedataset yields different numbers of persistent hotspots depending on the approach used to define them. We suggest that investigators and NTD program managers use the approach most suited for their study or program, but whichever...... using four different approaches to define persistent hotspots. The four approaches are 1) absolute percent change in prevalence; 2) percent change in prevalence; 3) change in World Health Organization guideline categories; 4) change (absolute or percent) in both prevalence and intensity. We compare...

  20. Observed climate change hotspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, M.; Palazzi, E.; Hardenberg, J.; Provenzale, A.

    2015-05-01

    We quantify climate change hotspots from observations, taking into account the differences in precipitation and temperature statistics (mean, variability, and extremes) between 1981-2010 and 1951-1980. Areas in the Amazon, the Sahel, tropical West Africa, Indonesia, and central eastern Asia emerge as primary observed hotspots. The main contributing factors are the global increase in mean temperatures, the intensification of extreme hot-season occurrence in low-latitude regions and the decrease of precipitation over central Africa. Temperature and precipitation variability have been substantially stable over the past decades, with only a few areas showing significant changes against the background climate variability. The regions identified from the observations are remarkably similar to those defined from projections of global climate models under a "business-as-usual" scenario, indicating that climate change hotspots are robust and persistent over time. These results provide a useful background to develop global policy decisions on adaptation and mitigation priorities over near-time horizons.

  1. [Bacterial identification methods in the microbiology laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou, Germán; Fernández-Olmos, Ana; García, Celia; Sáez-Nieto, Juan Antonio; Valdezate, Sylvia

    2011-10-01

    In order to identify the agent responsible of the infectious process and understanding the pathogenic/pathological implications, clinical course, and to implement an effective antimicrobial therapy, a mainstay in the practice of clinical microbiology is the allocation of species to a microbial isolation. In daily routine practice microbiology laboratory phenotypic techniques are applied to achieve this goal. However, they have some limitations that are seen more clearly for some kinds of microorganism. Molecular methods can circumvent some of these limitations, although its implementation is not universal. This is due to higher costs and the level of expertise required for thei implementation, so molecular methods are often centralized in reference laboratories and centers. Recently, proteomics-based methods made an important breakthrough in the field of diagnostic microbiology and will undoubtedly have a major impact on the future organization of the microbiology services. This paper is a short review of the most noteworthy aspects of the three bacterial identification methods described above used in microbiology laboratories. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  2. Methods for peptide identification by spectral comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrillo Brian

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tandem mass spectrometry followed by database search is currently the predominant technology for peptide sequencing in shotgun proteomics experiments. Most methods compare experimentally observed spectra to the theoretical spectra predicted from the sequences in protein databases. There is a growing interest, however, in comparing unknown experimental spectra to a library of previously identified spectra. This approach has the advantage of taking into account instrument-dependent factors and peptide-specific differences in fragmentation probabilities. It is also computationally more efficient for high-throughput proteomics studies. Results This paper investigates computational issues related to this spectral comparison approach. Different methods have been empirically evaluated over several large sets of spectra. First, we illustrate that the peak intensities follow a Poisson distribution. This implies that applying a square root transform will optimally stabilize the peak intensity variance. Our results show that the square root did indeed outperform other transforms, resulting in improved accuracy of spectral matching. Second, different measures of spectral similarity were compared, and the results illustrated that the correlation coefficient was most robust. Finally, we examine how to assemble multiple spectra associated with the same peptide to generate a synthetic reference spectrum. Ensemble averaging is shown to provide the best combination of accuracy and efficiency. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that when combined, these methods can boost the sensitivity and specificity of spectral comparison. Therefore they are capable of enhancing and complementing existing tools for consistent and accurate peptide identification.

  3. Identification of 'carbon hot-spots' and quantification of GHG intensities in the biodiesel supply chain using hybrid LCA and structural path analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquaye, Adolf A; Wiedmann, Thomas; Feng, Kuishang; Crawford, Robert H; Barrett, John; Kuylenstierna, Johan; Duffy, Aidan P; Koh, S C Lenny; McQueen-Mason, Simon

    2011-03-15

    It is expected that biodiesel production in the EU will remain the dominant contributor as part of a 10% minimum binding target for biofuel in transportation fuel by 2020 within the 20% renewable energy target in the overall EU energy mix. Life cycle assessments (LCA) of biodiesel to evaluate its environmental impacts have, however, remained questionable, mainly because of the adoption of a traditional process analysis approach resulting in system boundary truncation and because of issues regarding the impacts of land use change and N(2)O emissions from fertilizer application. In this study, a hybrid LCA methodology is used to evaluate the life cycle CO(2) equivalent emissions of rape methyl ester (RME) biodiesel. The methodology uses input-output analysis to estimate upstream indirect emissions in order to complement traditional process LCA in a hybrid framework. It was estimated that traditional LCA accounted for 2.7 kg CO(2)-eq per kg of RME or 36.6% of total life cycle emissions of the RME supply chin. Further to the inclusion of upstream indirect impacts in the LCA system (which accounted for 23% of the total life cycle emissions), emissions due to direct land use change (6%) and indirect land use change (16.5%) and N(2)O emissions from fertilizer applications (17.9%) were also calculated. Structural path analysis is used to decompose upstream indirect emissions paths of the biodiesel supply chain in order to identify, quantify, and rank high carbon emissions paths or 'hot-spots' in the biodiesel supply chain. It was shown, for instance, that inputs from the 'Other Chemical Products' sector (identified as phosphoric acid, H(3)PO(4)) into the biodiesel production process represented the highest carbon emission path (or hot-spot) with 5.35% of total upstream indirect emissions of the RME biodiesel supply chain.

  4. Rescuing Perishable Neuroanatomical Information from a Threatened Biodiversity Hotspot: Remote Field Methods for Brain Tissue Preservation Validated by Cytoarchitectonic Analysis, Immunohistochemistry, and X-Ray Microcomputed Tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F Hughes

    Full Text Available Biodiversity hotspots, which harbor more endemic species than elsewhere on Earth, are increasingly threatened. There is a need to accelerate collection efforts in these regions before threatened or endangered species become extinct. The diverse geographical, ecological, genetic, morphological, and behavioral data generated from the on-site collection of an individual specimen are useful for many scientific purposes. However, traditional methods for specimen preparation in the field do not permit researchers to retrieve neuroanatomical data, disregarding potentially useful data for increasing our understanding of brain diversity. These data have helped clarify brain evolution, deciphered relationships between structure and function, and revealed constraints and selective pressures that provide context about the evolution of complex behavior. Here, we report our field-testing of two commonly used laboratory-based techniques for brain preservation while on a collecting expedition in the Congo Basin and Albertine Rift, two poorly known regions associated with the Eastern Afromontane biodiversity hotspot. First, we found that transcardial perfusion fixation and long-term brain storage, conducted in remote field conditions with no access to cold storage laboratory equipment, had no observable impact on cytoarchitectural features of lizard brain tissue when compared to lizard brain tissue processed under laboratory conditions. Second, field-perfused brain tissue subjected to prolonged post-fixation remained readily compatible with subsequent immunohistochemical detection of neural antigens, with immunostaining that was comparable to that of laboratory-perfused brain tissue. Third, immersion-fixation of lizard brains, prepared under identical environmental conditions, was readily compatible with subsequent iodine-enhanced X-ray microcomputed tomography, which facilitated the non-destructive imaging of the intact brain within its skull. In summary, we

  5. Detecting Biosphere anomalies hotspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guanche-Garcia, Yanira; Mahecha, Miguel; Flach, Milan; Denzler, Joachim

    2017-04-01

    The current amount of satellite remote sensing measurements available allow for applying data-driven methods to investigate environmental processes. The detection of anomalies or abnormal events is crucial to monitor the Earth system and to analyze their impacts on ecosystems and society. By means of a combination of statistical methods, this study proposes an intuitive and efficient methodology to detect those areas that present hotspots of anomalies, i.e. higher levels of abnormal or extreme events or more severe phases during our historical records. Biosphere variables from a preliminary version of the Earth System Data Cube developed within the CAB-LAB project (http://earthsystemdatacube.net/) have been used in this study. This database comprises several atmosphere and biosphere variables expanding 11 years (2001-2011) with 8-day of temporal resolution and 0.25° of global spatial resolution. In this study, we have used 10 variables that measure the biosphere. The methodology applied to detect abnormal events follows the intuitive idea that anomalies are assumed to be time steps that are not well represented by a previously estimated statistical model [1].We combine the use of Autoregressive Moving Average (ARMA) models with a distance metric like Mahalanobis distance to detect abnormal events in multiple biosphere variables. In a first step we pre-treat the variables by removing the seasonality and normalizing them locally (μ=0,σ=1). Additionally we have regionalized the area of study into subregions of similar climate conditions, by using the Köppen climate classification. For each climate region and variable we have selected the best ARMA parameters by means of a Bayesian Criteria. Then we have obtained the residuals by comparing the fitted models with the original data. To detect the extreme residuals from the 10 variables, we have computed the Mahalanobis distance to the data's mean (Hotelling's T^2), which considers the covariance matrix of the joint

  6. Portraits of Benvenuto Cellini and Anthropological Methods of Their Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasobin, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    Modern methods of biometric identification are increasingly applied in order to attribute works of art. They are based on developments in the 19th century anthropological methods. So, this article describes how the successional anthropological methods were applied for the identification of Benvenuto Cellini's portraits. Objective comparison of…

  7. Communications device identification methods, communications methods, wireless communications readers, wireless communications systems, and articles of manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Kerry D [Kennewick, WA; Anderson, Gordon A [Benton City, WA; Gilbert, Ronald W [Morgan Hill, CA

    2011-02-01

    Communications device identification methods, communications methods, wireless communications readers, wireless communications systems, and articles of manufacture are described. In one aspect, a communications device identification method includes providing identification information regarding a group of wireless identification devices within a wireless communications range of a reader, using the provided identification information, selecting one of a plurality of different search procedures for identifying unidentified ones of the wireless identification devices within the wireless communications range, and identifying at least some of the unidentified ones of the wireless identification devices using the selected one of the search procedures.

  8. Methods for Aircraft State and Parameter Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-05-01

    IFIP Conference on Optimization Techniques. Rome, Italy, May 1973. 3. Mehra, Raman K., and Stepner, David E.: "Maximm Likelihood Identification and...Aircraft. Rept. 1356, Res.. Dept., Cessan Aircraft Co., Key 1957. 10. Stepner, David E., and Mehra, Raman K.: ?Kaximum Likelihood Identification and...the position input signal ass mostly dus to talmtry noise. which mae metly 1 percent of full scale. The eccelerometer signal noias , mialy due to

  9. Multi-Scale Multi-physics Methods Development for the Calculation of Hot-Spots in the NGNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downar, Thomas [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Seker, Volkan [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2013-04-30

    Radioactive gaseous fission products are released out of the fuel element at a significantly higher rate when the fuel temperature exceeds 1600°C in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). Therefore, it is of paramount importance to accurately predict the peak fuel temperature during all operational and design-basis accident conditions. The current methods used to predict the peak fuel temperature in HTGRs, such as the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), estimate the average fuel temperature in a computational mesh modeling hundreds of fuel pebbles or a fuel assembly in a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) or prismatic block type reactor (PMR), respectively. Experiments conducted in operating HTGRs indicate considerable uncertainty in the current methods and correlations used to predict actual temperatures. The objective of this project is to improve the accuracy in the prediction of local "hot" spots by developing multi-scale, multi-physics methods and implementing them within the framework of established codes used for NGNP analysis.The multi-scale approach which this project will implement begins with defining suitable scales for a physical and mathematical model and then deriving and applying the appropriate boundary conditions between scales. The macro scale is the greatest length that describes the entire reactor, whereas the meso scale models only a fuel block in a prismatic reactor and ten to hundreds of pebbles in a pebble bed reactor. The smallest scale is the micro scale--the level of a fuel kernel of the pebble in a PBR and fuel compact in a PMR--which needs to be resolved in order to calculate the peak temperature in a fuel kernel.

  10. Comparison of System Identification Methods using Ambient Bridge Test Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P.; Brincker, Rune; Peeters, B.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper the performance of four different system identification methods is compared using operational data obtained from an ambient vibration test of the Swiss Z24 highway bridge. The four methods are the frequency domain based peak-picking methods, the polyreference LSCE method, the stocha......In this paper the performance of four different system identification methods is compared using operational data obtained from an ambient vibration test of the Swiss Z24 highway bridge. The four methods are the frequency domain based peak-picking methods, the polyreference LSCE method...

  11. An overview on biometric identification methods and implementations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroica, Petre; Vladescu, Marian

    2010-11-01

    The paper presents the three most efficient methods of biometric identification: fingerprint recognition, face recognition and iris recognition. The authors evaluated the performance of each method, based on the concept of error rates. The paper also presents an overview of the biometric identification implementations, highlighting the advantages and disadvantages from a practical point of view, based on a balance between reliability and invasiveness of each method.

  12. Imbalance aware lithography hotspot detection: a deep learning approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haoyu; Luo, Luyang; Su, Jing; Lin, Chenxi; Yu, Bei

    2017-07-01

    With the advancement of very large scale integrated circuits (VLSI) technology nodes, lithographic hotspots become a serious problem that affects manufacture yield. Lithography hotspot detection at the post-OPC stage is imperative to check potential circuit failures when transferring designed patterns onto silicon wafers. Although conventional lithography hotspot detection methods, such as machine learning, have gained satisfactory performance, with the extreme scaling of transistor feature size and layout patterns growing in complexity, conventional methodologies may suffer from performance degradation. For example, manual or ad hoc feature extraction in a machine learning framework may lose important information when predicting potential errors in ultra-large-scale integrated circuit masks. We present a deep convolutional neural network (CNN) that targets representative feature learning in lithography hotspot detection. We carefully analyze the impact and effectiveness of different CNN hyperparameters, through which a hotspot-detection-oriented neural network model is established. Because hotspot patterns are always in the minority in VLSI mask design, the training dataset is highly imbalanced. In this situation, a neural network is no longer reliable, because a trained model with high classification accuracy may still suffer from a high number of false negative results (missing hotspots), which is fatal in hotspot detection problems. To address the imbalance problem, we further apply hotspot upsampling and random-mirror flipping before training the network. Experimental results show that our proposed neural network model achieves comparable or better performance on the ICCAD 2012 contest benchmark compared to state-of-the-art hotspot detectors based on deep or representative machine leaning.

  13. Sensors and Methods for Electromagnetic Pulse Identification

    OpenAIRE

    Pavel FIALA; Drexler, Petr

    2006-01-01

    There are some suitable methods for the measurement of ultra-short solitary electromagnetic pulses that can be generated by high power pulsed generators. The measurement methods properties have to correspond to the fact whether we want to measure pulses of voltage, current or free-space electromagnetic wave. The need for specific measurement methods occurred by the development of high power microwave pulse generator. Applicable methods are presented in this paper. The method utilizing Faraday...

  14. Comparison of System Identification Methods using Ambient Bridge Test Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P.; Peeters, B.; Hermans, L.

    In this paper the performance of four different system identification methods is compared using operational data obtained from an ambient vibration test of the Swiss Z24 highway bridge. The four methods are the frequency domain based peak-picking methods, the polyreference LSCE method, the stocha......In this paper the performance of four different system identification methods is compared using operational data obtained from an ambient vibration test of the Swiss Z24 highway bridge. The four methods are the frequency domain based peak-picking methods, the polyreference LSCE method......, the stochastic subspace method for estimation of state space systems and the prediction error method for estimation of Auto-Regressive Moving Average Vector models. It is not the entention to elect a winner among the four methods, but more to emphasize the different advantages of each of the methods....

  15. Comparison of System Identification Methods using Ambient Bridge Test Data

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, P; Brincker, Rune; Peeters, B; De Roeck, G.; Hermans, L.; Krämer, C.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper the performance of four different system identification methods is compared using operational data obtained from an ambient vibration test of the Swiss Z24 highway bridge. The four methods are the frequency domain based peak-picking methods, the polyreference LSCE method, the stochastic subspace method for estimation of state space systems and the prediction error method for estimation of Auto-Regressive Moving Average Vector models. It is not the entention to elect a winner amo...

  16. Identifying multidrug resistant tuberculosis transmission hotspots using routinely collected data12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjourides, Justin; Lin, Hsien-Ho; Shin, Sonya; Jeffery, Caroline; Contreras, Carmen; Cruz, Janeth Santa; Jave, Oswaldo; Yagui, Martin; Asencios, Luis; Pagano, Marcello; Cohen, Ted

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY In most countries with large drug resistant tuberculosis epidemics, only those cases that are at highest risk of having MDRTB receive a drug sensitivity test (DST) at the time of diagnosis. Because of this prioritized testing, identification of MDRTB transmission hotspots in communities where TB cases do not receive DST is challenging, as any observed aggregation of MDRTB may reflect systematic differences in how testing is distributed in communities. We introduce a new disease mapping method, which estimates this missing information through probability–weighted locations, to identify geographic areas of increased risk of MDRTB transmission. We apply this method to routinely collected data from two districts in Lima, Peru over three consecutive years. This method identifies an area in the eastern part of Lima where previously untreated cases have increased risk of MDRTB. This may indicate an area of increased transmission of drug resistant disease, a finding that may otherwise have been missed by routine analysis of programmatic data. The risk of MDR among retreatment cases is also highest in these probable transmission hotspots, though a high level of MDR among retreatment cases is present throughout the study area. Identifying potential multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB) transmission hotspots may allow for targeted investigation and deployment of resources. PMID:22401962

  17. Efficient Parametric Identification Method for High Voltage Pulse Transformers

    CERN Document Server

    Aguglia, D; Viarouge, P; Cros, J

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new identification method for a pulse transformer equivalent circuit. It is based on an analytical approximation of the frequency-domain impedance data derived from a no-load test with open-circuited secondary winding and only requires measurements of primary current and voltage without phase data. Compared with time consuming and complex methods based on off-line non-linear identification procedures, this simple method also gives an estimation of the error on the identified parameters. The method is validated on an existing pulse transformer.

  18. Regional differences in recombination hotspots between two chicken populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, M.G.; As, van P.; Veenendaal, A.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Groenen, M.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Although several genetic linkage maps of the chicken genome have been published, the resolution of these maps is limited and does not allow the precise identification of recombination hotspots. The availability of more than 3.2 million SNPs in the chicken genome and the recent advances in

  19. Investigating methods of stream planform identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohberg, M. M.; Lusk, K.; Miller, D.; Stonedahl, F.; Stonedahl, S. H.

    2013-12-01

    Stream planforms are used to map scientific measurements, estimate volumetric discharge, and model stream flow. Changes in these planforms can be used to quantify erosion and water level fluctuations. This research investigated five cost-effective methods of identifying stream planforms: (1) consumer-grade digital camera GPS (2) multi-view stereo 3D scene reconstruction (using Microsoft Photosynth (TM)) (3) a cross-sectional measurement approach (4) a triangulation-based measurement approach and (5) the 'square method' - a novel photogrammetric procedure which involved floating a large wooden square in the stream, photographing the square and banks from numerous angles and then using the square to correct for perspective and extract the outline (using custom post-processing software). Data for each of the five methods was collected at Blackhawk Creek in Davenport, Iowa. Additionally we placed 30 control points near the banks of the stream and measured 88 lengths between these control points. We measured or calculated the locations of these control points with each of our five methods and calculated the average percent error associated with each method using the predicted control point locations. The effectiveness of each method was evaluated in terms of accuracy, affordability, environmental intrusiveness, and ease of use. The camera equipped with GPS proved to be a very ineffective method due to an extremely high level of error, 289%. The 3D point cloud extracted from Photosynth was missing markers for many of the control points, so the error calculation (which yielded 11.7%) could only be based on five of the 88 lengths and is thus highly uncertain. The two non-camera methods (cross-sectional and triangulation measurements) resulted in low percent error (2.04% and 1.31% respectively) relative to the control point lengths, but these methods were very time consuming, exhausting, and only provided low resolution outlines. High resolution data collection would

  20. Development of DNA-based Identification methods to track the ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability to track the identity and abundance of larval fish, which are ubiquitous during spawning season, may lead to a greater understanding of fish species distributions in Great Lakes nearshore areas including early-detection of invasive fish species before they become established. However, larval fish are notoriously hard to identify using traditional morphological techniques. While DNA-based identification methods could increase the ability of aquatic resource managers to determine larval fish composition, use of these methods in aquatic surveys is still uncommon and presents many challenges. In response to this need, we have been working with the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service to develop field and laboratory methods to facilitate the identification of larval fish using DNA-meta-barcoding. In 2012, we initiated a pilot-project to develop a workflow for conducting DNA-based identification, and compared the species composition at sites within the St. Louis River Estuary of Lake Superior using traditional identification versus DNA meta-barcoding. In 2013, we extended this research to conduct DNA-identification of fish larvae collected from multiple nearshore areas of the Great Lakes by the USFWS. The species composition of larval fish generally mirrored that of fish species known from the same areas, but was influenced by the timing and intensity of sampling. Results indicate that DNA-based identification needs only very low levels of biomass to detect pre

  1. Imbalance aware lithography hotspot detection: a deep learning approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haoyu; Luo, Luyang; Su, Jing; Lin, Chenxi; Yu, Bei

    2017-03-01

    With the advancement of VLSI technology nodes, light diffraction caused lithographic hotspots have become a serious problem affecting manufacture yield. Lithography hotspot detection at the post-OPC stage is imperative to check potential circuit failures when transferring designed patterns onto silicon wafers. Although conventional lithography hotspot detection methods, such as machine learning, have gained satisfactory performance, with extreme scaling of transistor feature size and more and more complicated layout patterns, conventional methodologies may suffer from performance degradation. For example, manual or ad hoc feature extraction in a machine learning framework may lose important information when predicting potential errors in ultra-large-scale integrated circuit masks. In this paper, we present a deep convolutional neural network (CNN) targeting representative feature learning in lithography hotspot detection. We carefully analyze impact and effectiveness of different CNN hyper-parameters, through which a hotspot-detection-oriented neural network model is established. Because hotspot patterns are always minorities in VLSI mask design, the training data set is highly imbalanced. In this situation, a neural network is no longer reliable, because a trained model with high classification accuracy may still suffer from high false negative results (missing hotspots), which is fatal in hotspot detection problems. To address the imbalance problem, we further apply minority upsampling and random-mirror flipping before training the network. Experimental results show that our proposed neural network model achieves highly comparable or better performance on the ICCAD 2012 contest benchmark compared to state-of-the-art hotspot detectors based on deep or representative machine leaning.

  2. Methodes for identification of specific language impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toktam Maleki Shahmahmood

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Specific language impiarment (SLI is one of the most prevalent developmental language disorders its diagnosis is a problematic issue among researchers and clinicians because of the heterogeneity of language profiles in the affected population and overlapping with other developmental language disorders. The aim of this study was to review the suggested diagnostic criteria for this disorder, controversies about these criteria and identify the most accurate diagnostic methods.Methods: Published article from 1980 to 2012 in bibliographic and publisher databases including Pubmed, Google scholar, Cochran library, Web of Science, ProQuest, Springer, Oxford, Science direct, Ovid, Iran Medex and Magiran about the diagnostic methods for discriminating preschoool children with specific language impiarment from normal developing children were reviewd in this article. These keywords were used for research: “specific language impairment”, “SLI”, “diagnosis or identification”, “standardized tests”, and “tests for language development”.Conclusion: The results of this study show inspite of agreement of researchers and clinicians about exclusionary criteria as one basic part of the diagnosis of specific language impiarment , there is no consensus about the other part, inclusionary criteria. Different studies used different inclusionary criteria which can be divided to categories of clincal judgment, discrepancy-based criteria, standardized testing, clinical markers and markers from spontaneous speech samples. Advantages, disadvantages, and clinical applicability of each diagnostic method are discussed in this article.

  3. Exploring spatial patterns and hotspots of diarrhea in Chiang Mai, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathi Nitin K

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diarrhea is a major public health problem in Thailand. The Ministry of Public Health, Thailand, has been trying to monitor and control this disease for many years. The methodology and the results from this study could be useful for public health officers to develop a system to monitor and prevent diarrhea outbreaks. Methods The objective of this study was to analyse the epidemic outbreak patterns of diarrhea in Chiang Mai province, Northern Thailand, in terms of their geographical distributions and hotspot identification. The data of patients with diarrhea at village level and the 2001–2006 population censuses were collected to achieve the objective. Spatial analysis, using geographic information systems (GIS and other methods, was used to uncover the hidden phenomena from the data. In the data analysis section, spatial statistics such as quadrant analysis (QA, nearest neighbour analysis (NNA, and spatial autocorrelation analysis (SAA, were used to identify the spatial patterns of diarrhea in Chiang Mai province. In addition, local indicators of spatial association (LISA and kernel density (KD estimation were used to detect diarrhea hotspots using data at village level. Results The hotspot maps produced by the LISA and KD techniques showed spatial trend patterns of diarrhea diffusion. Villages in the middle and northern regions revealed higher incidences. Also, the spatial patterns of diarrhea during the years 2001 and 2006 were found to represent spatially clustered patterns, both at global and local scales. Conclusion Spatial analysis methods in GIS revealed the spatial patterns and hotspots of diarrhea in Chiang Mai province from the year 2001 to 2006. To implement specific and geographically appropriate public health risk-reduction programs, the use of such spatial analysis tools may become an integral component in the epidemiologic description, analysis, and risk assessment of diarrhea.

  4. Optic Disc Identification Methods for Retinal Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin Rotaru

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Presented are the methods proposed by authors to identify and model the optic disc in colour retinal images. The first three our approaches localized the optic disc in two steps: a in the green component of RGB image the optic disc area is detected based on texture indicators and pixel intensity variance analysis; b on the segmented area the optic disc edges are extracted and the resulted boundary is approximated by a Hough transform. The last implemented method identifies the optic disc area by analysis of blood vessels network extracted in the green channel of the original image. In the segmented area the optic disc edges are obtained by an iterative Canny algorithm and are approximated by a circle Hough transform.

  5. VT Biodiversity Project - Biological Hotspots

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This dataset is the result of an effort to map biological "hotspots" in Vermont based on the "element occurrences" in the Nongame and Natural...

  6. A correlation based bullet identification method using empirical mode decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigdeli, Saeed; Danandeh, Hamed; Ebrahimi Moghaddam, Mohsen

    2017-09-01

    The striations on bullet surface are 3D micro structures formed when a bullet is forcing its way out of barrel. Each barrel leaves individual striation patterns on bullets. Hence, the striation information of bullets is helpful for firearm identification. Common automatic identification methods process these images using linear time invariant (LTI) filters based on correlation. These methods do not consider the sensitivity of correlation based comparisons to nonlinear baseline drifts. The striations are undeniably random unique micro structures caused by random non-model-based imperfections in the tools used in rifling process, therefore any characteristic profile that is extracted from a bullet image is statistically non-stationary. Due to limitations of LTI filters, using them in smoothing bullet images and profiles may cause information loss and impact the process of identification. To address these problems, in this article, we consider bullet images as nonlinear non-stationary processes and propose a novel method which uses ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) as a preprocessing algorithm for smoothing and feature extraction. The features extracted by EEMD algorithm not only contain less noise, but also have no nonlinear baseline drifts. These improvements help the correlation based comparison methods to perform more robustly and efficiently. The experiments showed that our proposed method attained better results compared with two common methods in the field of automatic bullet identification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Methods of Identification of Nonlinear Mechanical Vibrating Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakhtienko, N. P.

    2000-12-01

    Methods for determination of the dynamic characteristics and parameters of mechanical vibrating systems by processing experimental data on controlled vibrations are presented. These methods are intended for construction of mathematical models of objects to be identified and classed as parametric and nonparametric methods. The quadrature formulas of the nonparametric-identification method are derived by inverting the integral parameters of approximate analytical solutions of nonlinear differential equations. The parametric-identification method involves setting up and solving systems of linear algebraic equations in the sought-for inertia, stiffness, and dissipation parameters by integrating experimental processes using special weighting functions. Depending on the type of the nonlinearity of the vibrating system and the method of representing experimental processes, the weighting functions can be oriented toward displacement, velocity, or acceleration gauges. The results of studies made mainly at the Institute of Mechanics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine are presented

  8. Methods of Identification and Evaluation of Brownfield Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safet Kurtović

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The basic objective of this paper was to determine the importance and potential restoration of brownfield sites in terms of economic prosperity of a particular region or country. In addition, in a theoretical sense, this paper presents the methods used in the identification of brownfield sites such as Smart Growth Network model and Thomas GIS model, and methods for evaluation of brownfield sites or the indexing method, cost-benefit and multivariate analysis.

  9. Methods of Identification and Evaluation of Brownfield Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safet Kurtovic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic objective of this paper was to determine the importance and potential restoration of brownfield sites in terms of economic prosperity of a particular region or country. In addition, in a theoretical sense, this paper presents the methods used in the identification of brownfield sites such as Smart Growth Network model and Thomas GIS model, and methods for evaluation of brownfield sites or the indexing method, cost-benefit and multivariate analysis.

  10. Impact of identity theft on methods of identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLemore, Jerri; Hodges, Walker; Wyman, Amy

    2011-06-01

    Responsibility for confirming a decedent's identity commonly falls on the shoulders of the coroner or medical examiner. Misidentification of bodies results in emotional turmoil for the next-of-kin and can negatively impact the coroner's or medical examiner's career. To avoid such mishaps, the use of scientific methods to establish a positive identification is advocated. The use of scientific methods of identification may not be reliable in cases where the decedent had assumed the identity of another person. Case studies of erroneously identified bodies due to identity theft from the state medical examiner offices in Iowa and New Mexico are presented. This article discusses the scope and major concepts of identity theft and how identity theft prevents the guarantee of a positive identification.

  11. Comparison of automatic atherosclerosis identification methods on MR imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carman, Charles S.; Merickel, Michael B.

    1990-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides excellent soft tissue contrast enabling the non-invasive visualization of soft lissue diseases. The quantification of tissues distinguishable in MR images significantly increases the diagnostic information available to physicians. New 3-D display workstations are available that can also make use of the tissue characteristics to generate clinically useful views of a patient. While simple tissue selection methods work with computed tomography (CT) images these same methods usually do not work with MR images. Several feasibility studies of tissue classification methods have been performed on MR images but few comparative studies of these methods have been published and little work is available on the best statistical model of tissues in MIRI. We have developed a novel method for the identification and quantification of soft tissues from MRI atherosclerosis in particular. This project is part of our work on the development of tissue characterization and identification tools to facilitate soft tissue disease diagnosis and evaluation utilizing MR imagery. Several supervised pattern recognition methods were investigated for tissue identification in MR images such as a Fisher linear discriminant and a minimum distance to the means classifier. For tissue in vivo adequate histology can be difficult to collect. We used cluster analysis methods to generate the necessary training information. ISODATA was modified to use hierarchical stopping rules to determine the true number of tissues in the images. This new method was

  12. General Anisotropy Identification of Paperboard with Virtual Fields Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.M. Considine; F. Pierron; K.T. Turner; D.W. Vahey

    2014-01-01

    This work extends previous efforts in plate bending of Virtual Fields Method (VFM) parameter identification to include a general 2-D anisotropicmaterial. Such an extension was needed for instances in which material principal directions are unknown or when specimen orientation is not aligned with material principal directions. A new fixture with a multiaxial force...

  13. CULTURE-INDEPENDENT MOLECULAR METHODS FOR FECAL SOURCE IDENTIFICATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecal contamination is widespread in the waterways of the United States. Both to correct the problem, and to estimate public health risk, it is necessary to identify the source of the contamination. Several culture-independent molecular methods for fecal source identification hav...

  14. Image portion identification methods, image parsing methods, image parsing systems, and articles of manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassahn, Gordon D.; Lancaster, Gregory D.; Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2013-01-08

    Image portion identification methods, image parsing methods, image parsing systems, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an image portion identification method includes accessing data regarding an image depicting a plurality of biological substrates corresponding to at least one biological sample and indicating presence of at least one biological indicator within the biological sample and, using processing circuitry, automatically identifying a portion of the image depicting one of the biological substrates but not others of the biological substrates.

  15. Probability of identification (POI): a statistical model for the validation of qualitative botanical identification methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    A qualitative botanical identification method (BIM) is an analytical procedure which returns a binary result (1 = Identified, 0 = Not Identified). A BIM may be used by a buyer, manufacturer, or regulator to determine whether a botanical material being tested is the same as the target (desired) mate...

  16. Absence of the TAP2 human recombination hotspot in chimpanzees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan E Ptak

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent experiments using sperm typing have demonstrated that, in several regions of the human genome, recombination does not occur uniformly but instead is concentrated in "hotspots" of 1-2 kb. Moreover, the crossover asymmetry observed in a subset of these has led to the suggestion that hotspots may be short-lived on an evolutionary time scale. To test this possibility, we focused on a region known to contain a recombination hotspot in humans, TAP2, and asked whether chimpanzees, the closest living evolutionary relatives of humans, harbor a hotspot in a similar location. Specifically, we used a new statistical approach to estimate recombination rate variation from patterns of linkage disequilibrium in a sample of 24 western chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus. This method has been shown to produce reliable results on simulated data and on human data from the TAP2 region. Strikingly, however, it finds very little support for recombination rate variation at TAP2 in the western chimpanzee data. Moreover, simulations suggest that there should be stronger support if there were a hotspot similar to the one characterized in humans. Thus, it appears that the human TAP2 recombination hotspot is not shared by western chimpanzees. These findings demonstrate that fine-scale recombination rates can change between very closely related species and raise the possibility that rates differ among human populations, with important implications for linkage-disequilibrium based association studies.

  17. Optimum Identification Method of Sorting Green Household Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daud Mohd Hisam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This project is related to design of sorting facility for reducing, reusing, recycling green waste material, and in particular to invent an automatic system to distinguish household waste in order to separate them from the main waste stream. The project focuses on thorough analysis of the properties of green household waste. The method of identification is using capacitive sensor where the characteristic data taken on three different sensor drive frequency. Three types of material have been chosen as a medium of this research, to be separated using the selected method. Based on capacitance characteristics and its ability to penetrate green object, optimum identification method is expected to be recognized in this project. The output capacitance sensor is in analogue value. The results demonstrate that the information from the sensor is enough to recognize the materials that have been selected.

  18. Comparison of three methods for identification of pathogenic Neisseria species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appelbaum, P.C.; Lawrence, R.B.

    1979-05-01

    A radiometric procedure was compared with the Minitek and Cystine Trypticase Agar sugar degradation methods for identification of 113 Neisseria species (58 Neisseria meningitidis, 51 Neisseria gonorrhoeae, 2 Neisseria lactamica, 2 Neisseria sicca). Identification of meningococci and gonoccoi was confirmed by agglutination and fluorescent antibody techniques, respectively. The Minitek method identified 97% of meningococci, 92% of gonococci, and 100% of other Neisseria after 4 h of incubation. The radiometric (Bactec) procedure identified 100% of gonococci and 100% of miscellaneous Neisseria after 3 h, but problems were encountered with meningococci: 45% of the later strains yielded index values for fructose between 20 and 28 (recommended negative cut-off point, less than 20), with strongly positive (greater than 100) glucose and maltose and negative o-nitrophenyl-beta-0-galactopyranoside reactions in all 58 strains. The Cystine Trypticase Agar method identified 91% of meningococci, ases.

  19. Method for Rapid Protein Identification in a Large Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenli Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein identification is an integral part of proteomics research. The available tools to identify proteins in tandem mass spectrometry experiments are not optimized to face current challenges in terms of identification scale and speed owing to the exponential growth of the protein database and the accelerated generation of mass spectrometry data, as well as the demand for nonspecific digestion and post-modifications in complex-sample identification. As a result, a rapid method is required to mitigate such complexity and computation challenges. This paper thus aims to present an open method to prevent enzyme and modification specificity on a large database. This paper designed and developed a distributed program to facilitate application to computer resources. With this optimization, nearly linear speedup and real-time support are achieved on a large database with nonspecific digestion, thus enabling testing with two classical large protein databases in a 20-blade cluster. This work aids in the discovery of more significant biological results, such as modification sites, and enables the identification of more complex samples, such as metaproteomics samples.

  20. Identification Method of Mud Shale Fractures Base on Wavelet Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Weixu; Lai, Fuqiang; Luo, Han

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, inspired by seismic analysis technology, a new method for analysing mud shale fractures oil and gas reservoirs by logging properties has emerged. By extracting the high frequency attribute of the wavelet transform in the logging attribute, the formation information hidden in the logging signal is extracted, identified the fractures that are not recognized by conventional logging and in the identified fracture segment to show the “cycle jump”, “high value”, “spike” and other response effect is more obvious. Finally formed a complete wavelet denoising method and wavelet high frequency identification fracture method.

  1. Probability of Identification: A Statistical Model for the Validation of Qualitative Botanical Identification Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBudde, Robert A.; Harnly, James M.

    2013-01-01

    A qualitative botanical identification method (BIM) is an analytical procedure that returns a binary result (1 = Identified, 0 = Not Identified). A BIM may be used by a buyer, manufacturer or regulator to determine whether a botanical material being tested is the same as the target (desired) material, or whether it contains excessive non-target (undesirable) material. The report describes the development and validation of studies for a BIM based on the proportion of replicates identified, or probability of identification (POI), as the basic observed statistic. The statistical procedures proposed for data analysis follow closely those of the probability of detection, and harmonize the statistical concepts and parameters between quantitative and qualitative method validation. Use of POI statistics also harmonizes statistical concepts for botanical, microbiological, toxin, and other analyte identification methods that produce binary results. The POI statistical model provides a tool for graphical representation of response curves for qualitative methods, reporting of descriptive statistics, and application of performance requirements. Single collaborator and multicollaborative study examples are given. PMID:22468371

  2. Hot-spots in tapwaterleidingen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolferen, J. van; Sluis, S.M. van der

    2002-01-01

    ln opdracht van de VNI is een aantal berekeningen uitgevoerd voor het vaststellen van aanvullende richtlijnen in verband met hot-spots in tapwaterleidingen. Hierbij is deels voortgebouwd op berekeningen die reeds eerder in opdracht van Novem zijn uitgevoerd t.b.v. ISSO publicatie 55.1, Handleiding

  3. Vortex Tube Modeling Using the System Identification Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jaeyoung; Jeong, Jiwoong; Yu, Sangseok [Chungnam Nat’l Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Im, Seokyeon [Tongmyong Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    In this study, vortex tube system model is developed to predict the temperature of the hot and the cold sides. The vortex tube model is developed based on the system identification method, and the model utilized in this work to design the vortex tube is ARX type (Auto-Regressive with eXtra inputs). The derived polynomial model is validated against experimental data to verify the overall model accuracy. It is also shown that the derived model passes the stability test. It is confirmed that the derived model closely mimics the physical behavior of the vortex tube from both the static and dynamic numerical experiments by changing the angles of the low-temperature side throttle valve, clearly showing temperature separation. These results imply that the system identification based modeling can be a promising approach for the prediction of complex physical systems, including the vortex tube.

  4. Rapid identification of cytokinins by an immunological method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, R.O.; Jameson, P.E.; Morris, J.W. (Univ. of Missouri-Columbia (USA)); Laloue, M. (Centre Nationale de la Recherche Scientifique, Gif-sur-Yvette (France))

    1991-04-01

    A method for rapid identification of bacterial cytokinins has been developed in which cultures are fed ({sup 3}H)adenine, the cytokinins (including, {sup 3}H-labeled cytokinins) are isolated by immunoaffinity chromatography, and analyzed by HPLC with on-line scintillation counting. Analysis of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains showed that some produced primarily trans-zeatin, whereas others produced primarily trans-zeatin riboside. Pseudomonas syringae pv savastanoi produced mixtures of transzeatin, dihydrozeatin, 1{double prime}-methyl-trans-zeatin riboside, and other unknown cytokinin-like substances. Corynebacterium fascians, produced cis-zeatin, isopentenyladenine and isopentenyladenosine. The technique is designed for qualitative rather than quantitative studies and allows ready identification of bacterial cytokinins. It may also have utility in the study of plant cytokinins if adequate incorporation of label into cytokinin precursor pools can be achieved.

  5. METHODS FOR FISH SPECIES IDENTIFICATION IN FOOD PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľubica Mrázová

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The need for identification of fishery products in food is currently ongoing issue for both consumers and producers of food. Consumer interest is driven in one the healthy diet, which prefers fish products, as an indispensable ingredient food and on the other hand, is a potential allergen causing health problems in humans allergic to fish protein. Allergy is a phenomenon that significantly affects human health, as well as overall life expectancy of an individual. The large number of fish species are known to trigger allergic reactions directly food intake or inhalation of fumes only, depending on the sensitivity orgamizmu. Large quantity of fish allergens are proteins from the stock protein to enzymes. Methods used for species identifications of fish in food products are PCR sequencing, multiplex PCR, PCR-RFLP, PCR-SSCP, RAPD, real-time PCR. doi:10.5219/25

  6. Normalized modularity optimization method for community identification with degree adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuqin; Zhao, Hongyu

    2013-11-01

    As a fundamental problem in network study, community identification has attracted much attention from different fields. Representing a seminal work in this area, the modularity optimization method has been widely applied and studied. However, this method has issues in resolution limit and extreme degeneracy and may not perform well for networks with unbalanced structures. Although several methods have been proposed to overcome these limitations, they are all based on the original idea of defining modularity through comparing the total number of edges within the putative communities in the observed network with that in an equivalent randomly generated network. In this paper, we show that this modularity definition is not suitable to analyze some networks such as those with unbalanced structures. Instead, we propose to define modularity through the average degree within the communities and formulate modularity as comparing the sum of average degree within communities of the observed network to that of an equivalent randomly generated network. In addition, we also propose a degree-adjusted approach for further improvement when there are unbalanced structures. We analyze the theoretical properties of our degree adjusted method. Numerical experiments for both artificial networks and real networks demonstrate that average degree plays an important role in network community identification, and our proposed methods have better performance than existing ones.

  7. Testing the Efficacy of Global Biodiversity Hotspots for Insect Conservation: The Case of South African Katydids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazelet, Corinna S; Thompson, Aileen C; Naskrecki, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    The use of endemism and vascular plants only for biodiversity hotspot delineation has long been contested. Few studies have focused on the efficacy of global biodiversity hotspots for the conservation of insects, an important, abundant, and often ignored component of biodiversity. We aimed to test five alternative diversity measures for hotspot delineation and examine the efficacy of biodiversity hotspots for conserving a non-typical target organism, South African katydids. Using a 1° fishnet grid, we delineated katydid hotspots in two ways: (1) count-based: grid cells in the top 10% of total, endemic, threatened and/or sensitive species richness; vs. (2) score-based: grid cells with a mean value in the top 10% on a scoring system which scored each species on the basis of its IUCN Red List threat status, distribution, mobility and trophic level. We then compared katydid hotspots with each other and with recognized biodiversity hotspots. Grid cells within biodiversity hotspots had significantly higher count-based and score-based diversity than non-hotspot grid cells. There was a significant association between the three types of hotspots. Of the count-based measures, endemic species richness was the best surrogate for the others. However, the score-based measure out-performed all count-based diversity measures. Species richness was the least successful surrogate of all. The strong performance of the score-based method for hotspot prediction emphasizes the importance of including species' natural history information for conservation decision-making, and is easily adaptable to other organisms. Furthermore, these results add empirical support for the efficacy of biodiversity hotspots in conserving non-target organisms.

  8. Human Fecal Source Identification: Real-Time Quantitative PCR Method Standardization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Method standardization or the formal development of a protocol that establishes uniform performance benchmarks and practices is necessary for widespread adoption of a fecal source identification approach. Standardization of a human-associated fecal identification method has been...

  9. HUMAN FECAL SOURCE IDENTIFICATION: REAL-TIME QUANTITATIVE PCR METHOD STANDARDIZATION - abstract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Method standardization or the formal development of a protocol that establishes uniform performance benchmarks and practices is necessary for widespread adoption of a fecal source identification approach. Standardization of a human-associated fecal identification method has been...

  10. An identification method for damping ratio in rotor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weimin; Li, Qihang; Gao, Jinji; Yao, Jianfei; Allaire, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Centrifugal compressor testing with magnetic bearing excitations is the last step to assure the compressor rotordynamic stability in the designed operating conditions. To meet the challenges of stability evaluation, a new method combining the rational polynomials method (RPM) with the weighted instrumental variables (WIV) estimator to fit the directional frequency response function (dFRF) is presented. Numerical simulation results show that the method suggested in this paper can identify the damping ratio of the first forward and backward modes with high accuracy, even in a severe noise environment. Experimental tests were conducted to study the effect of different bearing configurations on the stability of rotor. Furthermore, two example centrifugal compressors (a nine-stage straight-through and a six-stage back-to-back) were employed to verify the feasibility of identification method in industrial configurations as well.

  11. Auxanographic Carbohydrate Assimilation Method for Large Scale Yeast Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devadas, Suganthi Martena; Ballal, Mamatha; Prakash, Peralam Yegneswaran; Hande, Manjunath H; Bhat, Geetha V; Mohandas, Vinitha

    2017-04-01

    The auxanographic carbohydrate assimilation had been an important method for differentiation of yeasts. Prevailing methods described in the literature for carbohydrate assimilation has limited scope for use in large scale yeast identification. To optimize the large scale auxanographic carbohydrate assimilation method for yeast identification. A modified auxanographic carbohydrate assimilation method was developed and a total of 35 isolates of Candida species comprising of four ATCC (American Type Culture Collection) Candida strains ( Candida albicans ATCC 90028, Candida tropicalis ATCC 90018, Candida parapsilosis ATCC 750, Candida krusei ATCC 6258) and 31 clinical isolates of Candida tropicalis (n=13), Candida krusei (n=7), Candida glabrata (n=3), Candida kefyr (n=3), Candida albicans (n=5) were validated. The carbohydrates tested were Glucose, Sucrose, Maltose, Lactose, Cellubiose, Raffinose, Trehalose, Xylose, Galactose and Dulcitol. A total of 35 Candida species were tested for their carbohydrate assimilative property and the results were consistent with the existing standard protocols. A well circumscribed opaque yeast growth indicated assimilation of the test carbohydrate and translucent to opalescent growth with the outline of initial inoculum alone indicated lack of assimilation. The control plate indicated no growth of the Candida species. The carbohydrate assimilation tests finds utility for yeast diversity studies exploring novel ecological niches. The technique described here facilitates testing of an extended range of carbohydrates and yeasts in a cost effective manner.

  12. Identification of fractional order systems using modulating functions method

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Dayan

    2013-06-01

    The modulating functions method has been used for the identification of linear and nonlinear systems. In this paper, we generalize this method to the on-line identification of fractional order systems based on the Riemann-Liouville fractional derivatives. First, a new fractional integration by parts formula involving the fractional derivative of a modulating function is given. Then, we apply this formula to a fractional order system, for which the fractional derivatives of the input and the output can be transferred into the ones of the modulating functions. By choosing a set of modulating functions, a linear system of algebraic equations is obtained. Hence, the unknown parameters of a fractional order system can be estimated by solving a linear system. Using this method, we do not need any initial values which are usually unknown and not equal to zero. Also we do not need to estimate the fractional derivatives of noisy output. Moreover, it is shown that the proposed estimators are robust against high frequency sinusoidal noises and the ones due to a class of stochastic processes. Finally, the efficiency and the stability of the proposed method is confirmed by some numerical simulations.

  13. HotSpot Wizard 2.0: automated design of site-specific mutations and smart libraries in protein engineering

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bendl, Jaroslav; Stourac, Jan; Sebestova, Eva; Vavra, Ondrej; Musil, Milos; Brezovsky, Jan; Damborsky, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    HotSpot Wizard 2.0 is a web server for automated identification of hot spots and design of smart libraries for engineering proteins' stability, catalytic activity, substrate specificity and enantioselectivity...

  14. Using a distribution and conservation status weighted hotspot approach to identify areas in need of conservation action to benefit Idaho bird species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Aaron M.; Leu, Matthias; Svancara, Leona K.; Wilson, Gina; Scott, J. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Identification of biodiversity hotspots (hereafter, hotspots) has become a common strategy to delineate important areas for wildlife conservation. However, the use of hotspots has not often incorporated important habitat types, ecosystem services, anthropogenic activity, or consistency in identifying important conservation areas. The purpose of this study was to identify hotspots to improve avian conservation efforts for Species of Greatest Conservation Need (SGCN) in the state of Idaho, United States. We evaluated multiple approaches to define hotspots and used a unique approach based on weighting species by their distribution size and conservation status to identify hotspot areas. All hotspot approaches identified bodies of water (Bear Lake, Grays Lake, and American Falls Reservoir) as important hotspots for Idaho avian SGCN, but we found that the weighted approach produced more congruent hotspot areas when compared to other hotspot approaches. To incorporate anthropogenic activity into hotspot analysis, we grouped species based on their sensitivity to specific human threats (i.e., urban development, agriculture, fire suppression, grazing, roads, and logging) and identified ecological sections within Idaho that may require specific conservation actions to address these human threats using the weighted approach. The Snake River Basalts and Overthrust Mountains ecological sections were important areas for potential implementation of conservation actions to conserve biodiversity. Our approach to identifying hotspots may be useful as part of a larger conservation strategy to aid land managers or local governments in applying conservation actions on the ground.

  15. Damping identification in frequency domain using integral method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhiwei; Sheng, Meiping; Ma, Jiangang; Zhang, Wulin

    2015-03-01

    A new method for damping identification of linear system in frequency domain is presented, by using frequency response function (FRF) with integral method. The FRF curve is firstly transformed to other type of frequency-related curve by changing the representations of horizontal and vertical axes. For the newly constructed frequency-related curve, integral is conducted and the area forming from the new curve is used to determine the damping. Three different methods based on integral are proposed in this paper, which are called FDI-1, FDI-2 and FDI-3 method, respectively. For a single degree of freedom (Sdof) system, the formulated relation of each method between integrated area and loss factor is derived theoretically. The numeral simulation and experiment results show that, the proposed integral methods have high precision, strong noise resistance and are very stable in repeated measurements. Among the three integral methods, FDI-3 method is the most recommended because of its higher accuracy and simpler algorithm. The new methods are limited to linear system in which modes are well separated, and for closely spaced mode system, mode decomposition process should be conducted firstly.

  16. Methods, Systems and Apparatuses for Radio Frequency Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Chu, Andrew W. (Inventor); Lin, Gregory Y. (Inventor); Kennedy, Timothy F. (Inventor); Ngo, Phong H. (Inventor); Brown, Dewey T. (Inventor); Byerly, Diane (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A system for radio frequency identification (RFID) includes an enclosure defining an interior region interior to the enclosure, and a feed for generating an electromagnetic field in the interior region in response to a signal received from an RFID reader via a radio frequency (RF) transmission line and, in response to the electromagnetic field, receiving a signal from an RFID sensor attached to an item in the interior region. The structure of the enclosure may be conductive and may include a metamaterial portion, an electromagnetically absorbing portion, or a wall extending in the interior region. Related apparatuses and methods for performing RFID are provided.

  17. Comparison Study of Subspace Identification Methods Applied to Flexible Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelghani, M.; Verhaegen, M.; Van Overschee, P.; De Moor, B.

    1998-09-01

    In the past few years, various time domain methods for identifying dynamic models of mechanical structures from modal experimental data have appeared. Much attention has been given recently to so-called subspace methods for identifying state space models. This paper presents a detailed comparison study of these subspace identification methods: the eigensystem realisation algorithm with observer/Kalman filter Markov parameters computed from input/output data (ERA/OM), the robust version of the numerical algorithm for subspace system identification (N4SID), and a refined version of the past outputs scheme of the multiple-output error state space (MOESP) family of algorithms. The comparison is performed by simulating experimental data using the five mode reduced model of the NASA Mini-Mast structure. The general conclusion is that for the case of white noise excitations as well as coloured noise excitations, the N4SID/MOESP algorithms perform equally well but give better results (improved transfer function estimates, improved estimates of the output) compared to the ERA/OM algorithm. The key computational step in the three algorithms is the approximation of the extended observability matrix of the system to be identified, for N4SID/MOESP, or of the observer for the system to be identified, for the ERA/OM. Furthermore, the three algorithms only require the specification of one dimensioning parameter.

  18. On the orthogonalised reverse path method for nonlinear system identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhamad, P.; Sims, N. D.; Worden, K.

    2012-09-01

    The problem of obtaining the underlying linear dynamic compliance matrix in the presence of nonlinearities in a general multi-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) system can be solved using the conditioned reverse path (CRP) method introduced by Richards and Singh (1998 Journal of Sound and Vibration, 213(4): pp. 673-708). The CRP method also provides a means of identifying the coefficients of any nonlinear terms which can be specified a priori in the candidate equations of motion. Although the CRP has proved extremely useful in the context of nonlinear system identification, it has a number of small issues associated with it. One of these issues is the fact that the nonlinear coefficients are actually returned in the form of spectra which need to be averaged over frequency in order to generate parameter estimates. The parameter spectra are typically polluted by artefacts from the identification of the underlying linear system which manifest themselves at the resonance and anti-resonance frequencies. A further problem is associated with the fact that the parameter estimates are extracted in a recursive fashion which leads to an accumulation of errors. The first minor objective of this paper is to suggest ways to alleviate these problems without major modification to the algorithm. The results are demonstrated on numerically-simulated responses from MDOF systems. In the second part of the paper, a more radical suggestion is made, to replace the conditioned spectral analysis (which is the basis of the CRP method) with an alternative time domain decorrelation method. The suggested approach - the orthogonalised reverse path (ORP) method - is illustrated here using data from simulated single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) and MDOF systems.

  19. Variable identification in group method of data handling methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Iraci Martinez, E-mail: martinez@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Bueno, Elaine Inacio [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia, Guarulhos, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The Group Method of Data Handling - GMDH is a combinatorial multi-layer algorithm in which a network of layers and nodes is generated using a number of inputs from the data stream being evaluated. The GMDH network topology has been traditionally determined using a layer by layer pruning process based on a preselected criterion of what constitutes the best nodes at each level. The traditional GMDH method is based on an underlying assumption that the data can be modeled by using an approximation of the Volterra Series or Kolmorgorov-Gabor polynomial. A Monitoring and Diagnosis System was developed based on GMDH and Artificial Neural Network - ANN methodologies, and applied to the IPEN research Reactor IEA-R1. The GMDH was used to study the best set of variables to be used to train an ANN, resulting in a best monitoring variable estimative. The system performs the monitoring by comparing these estimative calculated values with measured ones. The IPEN Reactor Data Acquisition System is composed of 58 variables (process and nuclear variables). As the GMDH is a self-organizing methodology, the input variables choice is made automatically, and the real input variables used in the Monitoring and Diagnosis System were not showed in the final result. This work presents a study of variable identification of GMDH methodology by means of an algorithm that works in parallel with the GMDH algorithm and traces the initial variables paths, resulting in an identification of the variables that composes the best Monitoring and Diagnosis Model. (author)

  20. Methodology and software to detect viral integration site hot-spots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Namshin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modern gene therapy methods have limited control over where a therapeutic viral vector inserts into the host genome. Vector integration can activate local gene expression, which can cause cancer if the vector inserts near an oncogene. Viral integration hot-spots or 'common insertion sites' (CIS are scrutinized to evaluate and predict patient safety. CIS are typically defined by a minimum density of insertions (such as 2-4 within a 30-100 kb region, which unfortunately depends on the total number of observed VIS. This is problematic for comparing hot-spot distributions across data sets and patients, where the VIS numbers may vary. Results We develop two new methods for defining hot-spots that are relatively independent of data set size. Both methods operate on distributions of VIS across consecutive 1 Mb 'bins' of the genome. The first method 'z-threshold' tallies the number of VIS per bin, converts these counts to z-scores, and applies a threshold to define high density bins. The second method 'BCP' applies a Bayesian change-point model to the z-scores to define hot-spots. The novel hot-spot methods are compared with a conventional CIS method using simulated data sets and data sets from five published human studies, including the X-linked ALD (adrenoleukodystrophy, CGD (chronic granulomatous disease and SCID-X1 (X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency trials. The BCP analysis of the human X-linked ALD data for two patients separately (774 and 1627 VIS and combined (2401 VIS resulted in 5-6 hot-spots covering 0.17-0.251% of the genome and containing 5.56-7.74% of the total VIS. In comparison, the CIS analysis resulted in 12-110 hot-spots covering 0.018-0.246% of the genome and containing 5.81-22.7% of the VIS, corresponding to a greater number of hot-spots as the data set size increased. Our hot-spot methods enable one to evaluate the extent of VIS clustering, and formally compare data sets in terms of hot-spot overlap

  1. Efficient Assessment of Social Hotspots in the Supply Chains of 100 Product Categories Using the Social Hotspots Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Benoît Norris

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Data collection, or the inventory step, is often the most labor-intensive phase of any Life Cycle Assessment (LCA study. The S-LCA Guidelines and numerous authors have recommended generic assessment in this first phase of an S-LCA. In an effort to identify the social hotspots in the supply chains of 100 product categories during just a few months’ time, adopting a streamlined approach was essential. The Social Hotspots Database system was developed by New Earth over 5 years. It includes a Global Input Output (IO model derived from the Global Trade Analysis Project, a Worker Hours Model constructed using annual wage payments and wage rates by country and sector, and Social Theme Tables covering 22 themes within five Social Impact Categories—Labor Rights and Decent Work, Health and Safety, Human Rights, Governance and Community Impacts. The data tables identify social risks for over 100 indicators. Both the ranking of worker hour intensity and the risk levels across multiple social themes for the Country Specific Sectors (CSS within a product category supply chain are used to calculate Social Hotspots Indexes (SHI using an additive weighting method. The CSS with the highest SHI are highlighted as social hotspots within the supply chain of the product in question. This system was tested in seven case studies in 2011. In order to further limit the number of hotspots, a set of prioritization rules was applied. This paper will review the method implemented to study the social hotspots of the 100 product categories and provide one detailed example. Limitations of the approach and recommended research avenues will be outlined.

  2. Bayesian Methods for Nonlinear System Identification of Civil Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conte Joel P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new framework for the identification of mechanics-based nonlinear finite element (FE models of civil structures using Bayesian methods. In this approach, recursive Bayesian estimation methods are utilized to update an advanced nonlinear FE model of the structure using the input-output dynamic data recorded during an earthquake event. Capable of capturing the complex damage mechanisms and failure modes of the structural system, the updated nonlinear FE model can be used to evaluate the state of health of the structure after a damage-inducing event. To update the unknown time-invariant parameters of the FE model, three alternative stochastic filtering methods are used: the extended Kalman filter (EKF, the unscented Kalman filter (UKF, and the iterated extended Kalman filter (IEKF. For those estimation methods that require the computation of structural FE response sensitivities with respect to the unknown modeling parameters (EKF and IEKF, the accurate and computationally efficient direct differentiation method (DDM is used. A three-dimensional five-story two-by-one bay reinforced concrete (RC frame is used to illustrate the performance of the framework and compare the performance of the different filters in terms of convergence, accuracy, and robustness. Excellent estimation results are obtained with the UKF, EKF, and IEKF. Because of the analytical linearization used in the EKF and IEKF, abrupt and large jumps in the estimates of the modeling parameters are observed when using these filters. The UKF slightly outperforms the EKF and IEKF.

  3. Primary Identification Methods and their Effectiveness in Mass Disaster Situations: A Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Naiara M. Gaglietti; Ricardo H. A. Silva

    2017-01-01

    Mass disasters generally result in an elevated number of casualties that need identification. The primary identification methods listed by INTERPOL (DNA, fingerprint and forensic dentistry) have a very important role in helping and speeding up the victim identification process. The present study sought to report mass destruction cases found in the literature published from 2005 to 2015 that have used the primary human identification methods. This study has been done as a literature review usi...

  4. System Identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keesman, K.J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary System Identification Introduction.- Part I: Data-based Identification.- System Response Methods.- Frequency Response Methods.- Correlation Methods.- Part II: Time-invariant Systems Identification.- Static Systems Identification.- Dynamic Systems Identification.- Part III: Time-varying

  5. Assessment of tuberculosis spatial hotspot areas in Antananarivo, Madagascar, by combining spatial analysis and genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratovonirina, Noël Harijaona; Rakotosamimanana, Niaina; Razafimahatratra, Solohery Lalaina; Raherison, Mamy Serge; Refrégier, Guislaine; Sola, Christophe; Rakotomanana, Fanjasoa; Rasolofo Razanamparany, Voahangy

    2017-08-14

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a public health problem in Madagascar. A crucial element of TB control is the development of an easy and rapid method for the orientation of TB control strategies in the country. Our main objective was to develop a TB spatial hotspot identification method by combining spatial analysis and TB genotyping method in Antananarivo. Sputa of new pulmonary TB cases from 20 TB diagnosis and treatment centers (DTCs) in Antananarivo were collected from August 2013 to May 2014 for culture. Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) clinical isolates were typed by spoligotyping on a Luminex® 200 platform. All TB patients were respectively localized according to their neighborhood residence and the spatial distribution of all pulmonary TB patients and patients with genotypic clustered isolates were scanned respectively by the Kulldorff spatial scanning method for identification of significant spatial clustering. Areas exhibiting spatial clustering of patients with genotypic clustered isolates were considered as hotspot TB areas for transmission. Overall, 467 new cases were included in the study, and 394 spoligotypes were obtained (84.4%). New TB cases were distributed in 133 of the 192 Fokontany (administrative neighborhoods) of Antananarivo (1 to 15 clinical patients per Fokontany) and patients with genotypic clustered isolates were distributed in 127 of the 192 Fokontany (1 to 13 per Fokontany). A single spatial focal point of epidemics was detected when ignoring genotypic data (p = 0.039). One Fokontany of this focal point and three additional ones were detected to be spatially clustered when taking genotypes into account (p Madagascar and will allow better TB control strategies by public health authorities.

  6. Study of Biometric Identification Method Based on Naked Footprint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raji Rafiu King

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The scale of deployment of biometric identity-verification systems has recently seen an enormous increase owing to the need for more secure and reliable way of identifying people. Footprint identification which can be defined as the measurement of footprint features for recognizing the identity of a user has surfaced recently. This study is based on a biometric personal identification method using static footprint features viz. friction ridge / texture and foot shape / silhouette. To begin with, naked footprints of users are captured; images then undergo pre processing followed by the extraction of two features; shape using Gradient Vector Flow (GVF) snake model and minutiae extraction respectively. Matching is then effected based on these two features followed by a fusion of these two results for either a reject or accept decision. Our shape matching feature is based on cosine similarity while the texture one is based on miniature score matching. The results from our research establish that the naked footprint is a credible biometric feature as two barefoot impressions of an individual match perfectly while that of two different persons shows a great deal of dissimilarity. Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Doi: 10.12777/ijse.5.2.29-35 How to cite this article: King

  7. [Use of THP-1 for allergens identification method validation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuezheng; Jia, Qiang; Zhang, Jun; Li, Xue; Zhang, Yanshu; Dai, Yufei

    2014-05-01

    Look for an in vitro test method to evaluate sensitization using THP-1 cells by the changes of the expression of cytokines to provide more reliable markers of the identification of sensitization. The monocyte-like THP-1 cells were induced and differentiated into THP-1-macrophages with PMA (0.1 microg/ml). The changes of expression of cytokines at different time points after the cells being treated with five known allergens, 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB), nickel sulfate (NiSO4), phenylene diamine (PPDA) potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7) and toluene diisocyanate (TDI) and two non-allergens sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and isopropanol (IPA) at various concentrations were evaluated. The IL-6 and TNF-alpha production was measured by ELISA. The secretion of IL-1beta and IL-8 was analyzed by Cytometric Bead Array (CBA). The section of the IL-6, TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and IL-8 were the highest when THP-1 cells were exposed to NiSO4, DNCB and K2Cr2O7 for 6h, PPDA and TDI for 12h. The production of IL-6 were approximately 40, 25, 20, 50 and 50 times for five kinds chemical allergens NiSO4, DNCB, K2Cr2O7, PPDA and TDI respectively at the optimum time points and the optimal concentration compared to the control group. The expression of TNF-alpha were 20, 12, 20, 8 and 5 times more than the control group respectively. IL-1beta secretion were 30, 60, 25, 30 and 45 times respectively compared to the control group. The production of IL-8 were approximately 15, 12, 15, 12 and 7 times respectively compared to the control group. Both non-allergens SDS and IPA significantly induced IL-6 secretion in a dose-dependent manner however SDS cause a higher production levels, approximately 20 times of the control. Therefore IL-6 may not be a reliable marker for identification of allergens. TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and IL-8 expressions did not change significantly after exposed to the two non-allergens. The test method using THP-1 cells by detecting the productions of cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and

  8. A comparison of microscopic and spectroscopic identification methods for analysis of microplastics in environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young Kyoung; Hong, Sang Hee; Jang, Mi; Han, Gi Myung; Rani, Manviri; Lee, Jongmyoung; Shim, Won Joon

    2015-04-15

    The analysis of microplastics in various environmental samples requires the identification of microplastics from natural materials. The identification technique lacks a standardized protocol. Herein, stereomicroscope and Fourier transform infrared spectroscope (FT-IR) identification methods for microplastics (microplastics were significantly (p0.05) different. Depending on the number of samples and the microplastic size range of interest, the appropriate identification method should be determined; selecting a suitable identification method for microplastics is crucial for evaluating microplastic pollution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Methodical algorithm of harmonized identification of plant varieties morphological characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Н. В. Павлюк

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The article performs the requirements to the preparation and Table characteristics content of the holding Test guidelines examination of new varieties to identify the difference, uniformity and stability. It is pointed that the identification of varieties is carried by the morphological characteristics description as presented in the table. Being standard these characteristics comply with ones requirements. An characteristics explanation with an asterisk (* is given, their importance for the international harmonization of variety descriptions by States UPOV Members is indicated. The article presents an explanation of the grouping characteristics with documented revealing conditions. As it is commonly determined any characteristic begins with the plants or plants parts identification, which after a colon is followed by the body or its part nomination or by observed peculiarity. The requirements to the formulation of characteristics nomination are performed. It should be clear enough for understanding and without conditions determining. The degree of every characteristic nomination manifestation for its defining and making harmonizing descriptions is set. The corresponding numeric code, which facilitates the entry of data, drafting descriptions and their exchanging is given to each revealing degree. The morphological code configuration of variety phenotype is formed by the codes. It is emphasized that the features are divided into qualitative, quantitative and pseudo qualitative. The presentation order of the features in the table corresponds to the botanical or chronological order. It is noted that the Test guidelines should contain all the features suitable for holding examination at BOC and that there should not be any restrictions on their being included into Methods. Every feature can be used from a complete features list.

  10. PIPI: PTM-Invariant Peptide Identification Using Coding Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fengchao; Li, Ning; Yu, Weichuan

    2016-12-02

    In computational proteomics, the identification of peptides with an unlimited number of post-translational modification (PTM) types is a challenging task. The computational cost associated with database search increases exponentially with respect to the number of modified amino acids and linearly with respect to the number of potential PTM types at each amino acid. The problem becomes intractable very quickly if we want to enumerate all possible PTM patterns. To address this issue, one group of methods named restricted tools (including Mascot, Comet, and MS-GF+) only allow a small number of PTM types in database search process. Alternatively, the other group of methods named unrestricted tools (including MS-Alignment, ProteinProspector, and MODa) avoids enumerating PTM patterns with an alignment-based approach to localizing and characterizing modified amino acids. However, because of the large search space and PTM localization issue, the sensitivity of these unrestricted tools is low. This paper proposes a novel method named PIPI to achieve PTM-invariant peptide identification. PIPI belongs to the category of unrestricted tools. It first codes peptide sequences into Boolean vectors and codes experimental spectra into real-valued vectors. For each coded spectrum, it then searches the coded sequence database to find the top scored peptide sequences as candidates. After that, PIPI uses dynamic programming to localize and characterize modified amino acids in each candidate. We used simulation experiments and real data experiments to evaluate the performance in comparison with restricted tools (i.e., Mascot, Comet, and MS-GF+) and unrestricted tools (i.e., Mascot with error tolerant search, MS-Alignment, ProteinProspector, and MODa). Comparison with restricted tools shows that PIPI has a close sensitivity and running speed. Comparison with unrestricted tools shows that PIPI has the highest sensitivity except for Mascot with error tolerant search and Protein

  11. Vinegar identification by ultraviolet spectrum technology and pattern recognition method

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huali, Zhao; Zhixi, Li; Xuemei, Yang; Baoan, Chen

    2009-01-01

    Some kinds of vinegars are studied for identification. First, their ultraviolet spectrum curves are obtained by evaporation and ultraviolet spectrum scanning under the conditions of wavelength at 245...

  12. The Red Queen theory of recombination hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubeda, F; Wilkins, J F

    2011-03-01

    Recombination hotspots are small chromosomal regions, where meiotic crossover events happen with high frequency. Recombination is initiated by a double-strand break (DSB) that requires the intervention of the molecular repair mechanism. The DSB repair mechanism may result in the exchange of homologous chromosomes (crossover) and the conversion of the allelic sequence that breaks into the one that does not break (biased gene conversion). Biased gene conversion results in a transmission advantage for the allele that does not break, thus preventing recombination and rendering recombination hotspots transient. How is it possible that recombination hotspots persist over evolutionary time (maintaining the average chromosomal crossover rate) when they are self-destructive? This fundamental question is known as the recombination hotspot paradox and has attracted much attention in recent years. Yet, that attention has not translated into a fully satisfactory answer. No existing model adequately explains all aspects of the recombination hotspot paradox. Here, we formulate an intragenomic conflict model resulting in Red Queen dynamics that fully accounts for all empirical observations regarding the molecular mechanisms of recombination hotspots, the nonrandom targeting of the recombination machinery to hotspots and the evolutionary dynamics of hotspot turnover. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2010 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  13. Capturing Hotspots For Constrained Indoor Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Tanvir; Pedersen, Torben Bach; Lu, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Finding the hotspots in large indoor spaces is very important for getting overloaded locations, security, crowd management, indoor navigation and guidance. The tracking data coming from indoor tracking are huge in volume and not readily available for finding hotspots. This paper presents a graph...

  14. Prediction of Protein Hotspots from Whole Protein Sequences by a Random Projection Ensemble System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinjian Jiang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Hotspot residues are important in the determination of protein-protein interactions, and they always perform specific functions in biological processes. The determination of hotspot residues is by the commonly-used method of alanine scanning mutagenesis experiments, which is always costly and time consuming. To address this issue, computational methods have been developed. Most of them are structure based, i.e., using the information of solved protein structures. However, the number of solved protein structures is extremely less than that of sequences. Moreover, almost all of the predictors identified hotspots from the interfaces of protein complexes, seldom from the whole protein sequences. Therefore, determining hotspots from whole protein sequences by sequence information alone is urgent. To address the issue of hotspot predictions from the whole sequences of proteins, we proposed an ensemble system with random projections using statistical physicochemical properties of amino acids. First, an encoding scheme involving sequence profiles of residues and physicochemical properties from the AAindex1 dataset is developed. Then, the random projection technique was adopted to project the encoding instances into a reduced space. Then, several better random projections were obtained by training an IBk classifier based on the training dataset, which were thus applied to the test dataset. The ensemble of random projection classifiers is therefore obtained. Experimental results showed that although the performance of our method is not good enough for real applications of hotspots, it is very promising in the determination of hotspot residues from whole sequences.

  15. Prediction of Protein Hotspots from Whole Protein Sequences by a Random Projection Ensemble System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jinjian; Wang, Nian; Chen, Peng; Zheng, Chunhou; Wang, Bing

    2017-01-01

    Hotspot residues are important in the determination of protein-protein interactions, and they always perform specific functions in biological processes. The determination of hotspot residues is by the commonly-used method of alanine scanning mutagenesis experiments, which is always costly and time consuming. To address this issue, computational methods have been developed. Most of them are structure based, i.e., using the information of solved protein structures. However, the number of solved protein structures is extremely less than that of sequences. Moreover, almost all of the predictors identified hotspots from the interfaces of protein complexes, seldom from the whole protein sequences. Therefore, determining hotspots from whole protein sequences by sequence information alone is urgent. To address the issue of hotspot predictions from the whole sequences of proteins, we proposed an ensemble system with random projections using statistical physicochemical properties of amino acids. First, an encoding scheme involving sequence profiles of residues and physicochemical properties from the AAindex1 dataset is developed. Then, the random projection technique was adopted to project the encoding instances into a reduced space. Then, several better random projections were obtained by training an IBk classifier based on the training dataset, which were thus applied to the test dataset. The ensemble of random projection classifiers is therefore obtained. Experimental results showed that although the performance of our method is not good enough for real applications of hotspots, it is very promising in the determination of hotspot residues from whole sequences. PMID:28718782

  16. A Parameter Identification Method for Helicopter Noise Source Identification and Physics-Based Semi-Empirical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Eric, II; Schmitz, Fredric H.

    2010-01-01

    A new physics-based parameter identification method for rotor harmonic noise sources is developed using an acoustic inverse simulation technique. This new method allows for the identification of individual rotor harmonic noise sources and allows them to be characterized in terms of their individual non-dimensional governing parameters. This new method is applied to both wind tunnel measurements and ground noise measurements of two-bladed rotors. The method is shown to match the parametric trends of main rotor Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) noise, allowing accurate estimates of BVI noise to be made for operating conditions based on a small number of measurements taken at different operating conditions.

  17. Primary Identification Methods and their Effectiveness in Mass Disaster Situations: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naiara M. Gaglietti

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mass disasters generally result in an elevated number of casualties that need identification. The primary identification methods listed by INTERPOL (DNA, fingerprint and forensic dentistry have a very important role in helping and speeding up the victim identification process. The present study sought to report mass destruction cases found in the literature published from 2005 to 2015 that have used the primary human identification methods. This study has been done as a literature review using the keywords: disasters, natural disasters, disaster victims, and human identification in a total of 16 selected papers and 13 listed disasters. It has been concluded that the primary identification methods are capable and efficient to perform a safe and satisfactory identification of mass disasters victims, used both separately or in combination.

  18. THEORETICAL ASPECTS AND METHODS OF PARAMETERS IDENTIFICATION OF ELECTRIC TRACTION SYSTEM DEVICES. METHOD OF WEIGHT FUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Mishchenko

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Development and substantiation of a new method of structural identification of electrical devices of electric traction systems for both DC and AC current. Methodology. To solve this problem the following methods are used: the methods and techniques of the linear electrical engineering, in particular, the Laplace operator method; the numerical method for solving the integral equation, which is based on the representation of the Wiener-Hopf linear equations system (this allows forming the solutions of the problem in a mathematical form of the correlation and weight functions; the factorization method, which provides certain partition of the correlation functions of the stochastic processes. Findings. It was developed the method of weight function of the electrical devices identification, which can be fully used in the systems of electric traction. As the use example of the developed method it was considered a feeder section of DC electric traction with the single power supply. On this section move two electric locomotives of the type DE 1, they have been identified by the weighting functions. The required currents and voltages of electric locomotives are also formulated in the electric traction network in probabilistic and statistical form, that is, the functions of mathematical expectation and the correlation functions are determined. At this, it is taken into account that the correlation function of the sum of random functions is equal to the sum of the correlation functions of additives, and the correlation function of the integral of a random function is defined as the double integral of the correlation function of the output of a random function. Originality. Firstly, originality consists of the adaption of the developed method of structural identification for the devices of electric traction system. Secondly, it lies in the proper development of the new method of weight function. And finally, it lies in the solution of the Wiener

  19. Enhanced detection method for corneal protein identification using shotgun proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlager John J

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cornea is a specialized transparent connective tissue responsible for the majority of light refraction and image focus for the retina. There are three main layers of the cornea: the epithelium that is exposed and acts as a protective barrier for the eye, the center stroma consisting of parallel collagen fibrils that refract light, and the endothelium that is responsible for hydration of the cornea from the aqueous humor. Normal cornea is an immunologically privileged tissue devoid of blood vessels, but injury can produce a loss of these conditions causing invasion of other processes that degrade the homeostatic properties resulting in a decrease in the amount of light refracted onto the retina. Determining a measure and drift of phenotypic cornea state from normal to an injured or diseased state requires knowledge of the existing protein signature within the tissue. In the study of corneal proteins, proteomics procedures have typically involved the pulverization of the entire cornea prior to analysis. Separation of the epithelium and endothelium from the core stroma and performing separate shotgun proteomics using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry results in identification of many more proteins than previously employed methods using complete pulverized cornea. Results Rabbit corneas were purchased, the epithelium and endothelium regions were removed, proteins processed and separately analyzed using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Proteins identified from separate layers were compared against results from complete corneal samples. Protein digests were separated using a six hour liquid chromatographic gradient and ion-trap mass spectrometry used for detection of eluted peptide fractions. The SEQUEST database search results were filtered to allow only proteins with match probabilities of equal or better than 10-3 and peptides with a probability of 10-2 or less with at least two unique peptides isolated within

  20. Hotspots Detection from Trajectory Data Based on Spatiotemporal Data Field Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, K.; Zhou, Q.; Wu, T.; Xu, Y. Q.

    2017-09-01

    City hotspots refer to the areas where residents visit frequently, and large traffic flow exist, which reflect the people travel patterns and distribution of urban function area. Taxi trajectory data contain abundant information about urban functions and citizen activities, and extracting interesting city hotspots from them can be of importance in urban planning, traffic command, public travel services etc. To detect city hotspots and discover a variety of changing patterns among them, we introduce a data field-based cluster analysis technique to the pick-up and drop-off points of taxi trajectory data and improve the method by introducing the time weight, which has been normalized to estimate the potential value in data field. Thus, in the light of the new potential function in data field, short distance and short time difference play a powerful role. So the region full of trajectory points, which is regarded as hotspots area, has a higher potential value, while the region with thin trajectory points has a lower potential value. The taxi trajectory data of Wuhan city in China on May 1, 6 and 9, 2015, are taken as the experimental data. From the result, we find the sustaining hotspots area and inconstant hotspots area in Wuhan city based on the spatiotemporal data field method. Further study will focus on optimizing parameter and the interaction among hotspots area.

  1. HOTSPOTS DETECTION FROM TRAJECTORY DATA BASED ON SPATIOTEMPORAL DATA FIELD CLUSTERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Qin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available City hotspots refer to the areas where residents visit frequently, and large traffic flow exist, which reflect the people travel patterns and distribution of urban function area. Taxi trajectory data contain abundant information about urban functions and citizen activities, and extracting interesting city hotspots from them can be of importance in urban planning, traffic command, public travel services etc. To detect city hotspots and discover a variety of changing patterns among them, we introduce a data field-based cluster analysis technique to the pick-up and drop-off points of taxi trajectory data and improve the method by introducing the time weight, which has been normalized to estimate the potential value in data field. Thus, in the light of the new potential function in data field, short distance and short time difference play a powerful role. So the region full of trajectory points, which is regarded as hotspots area, has a higher potential value, while the region with thin trajectory points has a lower potential value. The taxi trajectory data of Wuhan city in China on May 1, 6 and 9, 2015, are taken as the experimental data. From the result, we find the sustaining hotspots area and inconstant hotspots area in Wuhan city based on the spatiotemporal data field method. Further study will focus on optimizing parameter and the interaction among hotspots area.

  2. Use of local Moran's I and GIS to identify pollution hotspots of Pb in urban soils of Galway, Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chaosheng; Luo, Lin; Xu, Weilin; Ledwith, Valerie

    2008-07-15

    Pollution hotspots in urban soils need to be identified for better environmental management. It is important to know if there are hotspots and if the hotspots are statistically significant. In this study identification of pollution hotspots was investigated using Pb concentrations in urban soils of Galway City in Ireland as an example, and the influencing factors on results of hotspot identification were investigated. The index of local Moran's I is a useful tool for identifying pollution hotspots of Pb pollution in urban soils, and for classifying them into spatial clusters and spatial outliers. The results were affected by the definition of weight function, data transformation and existence of extreme values. Compared with the results for the positively skewed raw data, the transformed data and data with extreme values excluded revealed a larger area for the high value spatial clusters in the city centre. While it is hard to decide the best way of using this index, it is suggested that all these influencing factors should be considered until reasonable and reliable results are obtained. GIS mapping can be applied to help evaluate the results via visualization of the spatial patterns. Meanwhile, selected pollution hotspots (extreme values) in this study were confirmed by re-analyses and re-sampling.

  3. Identifying infection hotspots early on.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabha, Ghasson

    2012-04-01

    According to many published studies, 'ducting in ventilation and air-conditioning are largely overlooked and ignored, as they are out of sight and out of mind', despite mounting evidence indicating a higher risk in spreading airborne infections'. So says Ghasson Shabha BSc (Arch) MSc, PhD (Arch), MBIFM, Associate CIBSE, PG Cert Ed, of the Faculty of Technology, Engineering and the Environment (TEE), at the Birmingham School of the Built Environment (BSBE) at Birmingham City University, who adds that CIBSE estimates that fewer than 5% of buildings with air-conditioning systems above 12 kW have been inspected so far. Here he argues that incorporating 3D building information modelling software into existing computer-aided facilities management software systems will enable hospitals' 'infection hotspots' to be far more quickly identified, and subsequently monitored, to prevent future problems.

  4. Overview of identification methods of mechanical parameters based on full-field measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Avril, Stéphane; Bonnet, Marc; Bretelle, Anne Sophie; Grediac, Michel; Hild, François; Ienny, Patrick; Latourte, Felix; Lemosse, Didier; Pagano, Stéphane; Pagnacco, Emmanuel; Pierron, Fabrice

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews recently developed methods for constitutive parameter identification based on kinematic full-field measurements, namely the finite element model updating method (FEMU), the constitutive equation gap method (CEGM), the virtual fields method (VFM), the equilibrium gap method (EGM) and the reciprocity gap method (RGM). Their formulation and underlying principles are presented and discussed. These identification techniques are then applied to full-field experimental data obta...

  5. Rapid method for identification of transgenic fish zygosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    . Alimuddin

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Identification of zygosity in transgenik fish is normally achieved by PCR analysis with genomic DNA template extracted from the tissue of progenies which are derived by mating the transgenic fish and wild-type counterpart.  This method needs relatively large amounts of fish material and is time- and labor-intensive. New approaches addressing this problem could be of great help for fish biotechnologists.  In this experiment, we applied a quantitative real-time PCR (qr-PCR method to analyze zygosity in a stable line of transgenic zebrafish (Danio rerio carrying masu salmon, Oncorhynchus masou D6-desaturase-like gene. The qr-PCR was performed using iQ SYBR Green Supermix in the iCycler iQ Real-time PCR Detection System (Bio-Rad Laboratories, USA.  Data were analyzed using the comparative cycle threshold method.  The results demonstrated a clear-cut identification of all transgenic fish (n=20 classified as a homozygous or heterozygous.  Mating of those fish with wild-type had revealed transgene transmission to the offspring following expected Mendelian laws. Thus, we found that the qTR-PCR to be effective for a rapid and precise determination of zygosity in transgenic fish. This technique could be useful in the establishment of breeding programs for mass transgenic fish production and in experiments in which zygosity effect could have a functional impact. Keywords: quantitative real-time PCR; zygosity; transgenic fish; mass production   ABSTRAK Identifikasi sigositas ikan transgenik biasanya dilakukan menggunakan analisa PCR dengan cetakan DNA genomik yang diekstraksi dari jaringan ikan hasil persilangan antara ikan transgenik dan ikan normal.   Metode ini memerlukan ikan dalam jumlah yang banyak, dan juga waktu serta tenaga.  Pendekatan baru untuk mengatasi masalah tersebut akan memberikan manfaat besar kepada peneliti bioteknologi perikanan.  Pada penelitian ini, kami menggunakan metode PCR real-time kuantitatif (krt-PCR untuk

  6. A Smart phone Identification Method Based on Gesture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Di

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to promote the practicality of smart phone identification based on gesture, we introduce weighted morphological characteristics and early termination of authentication into dynamic time warping (DTW algorithm, which based on characteristic moving data captured by in-built accelerometer and gyroscopes, and put forward an effective identification algorithm (ME-DTW for smartphone. The algorithm controls the contribution made by the difference between the latitudes to the total Euclidean distance by smartphone morphological characteristics. It also introduces restricted areas touch trigger gesture acquisition scheme and authentication gesture length selection scheme based on normal distribution, which effectively improve the identification accuracy and efficiency. Experimental results show that: when others imitate gestures attack false acceptance rate tends to 0%, the personal identification false rejection rate remained at 3.29%, which can meet most practical security needs

  7. Schematic Method for Effective Identification of Anaerobes from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Further tests revealed Bacteroides fragilis, Fusobacterium nucleatium, Porphyromonas assacharolytica, Prevotella intermedia, and Peptosterptococcus magnus as most frequently isolated. The developed scheme interlinked the various identification steps: 1st level; inoculation and growth, 2nd level; Gram differentiation and ...

  8. Denture identification using individual national identification number of Saudi Arabia: An innovative inclusion method of casted metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Atul; Priya, M. S.; Kannan, S. Karthiga; Singh, Smita; Ahmed Shaikh, Saquib B.; Fadaleh, Mousa Abu

    2017-01-01

    Context: Forensic odontology is one of the branches of dentistry, which played a very important role in identification of individuals in accident, natural and mass disaster, and civil unrest and in genocide crimes. In the absence of natural teeth, marking or labeling of denture plays a vital role in the personal identification. Background: Various types of marking or labeling methods are reported. However, many are not according to the criteria put forth by American Dental Association or other professional association. Majority of these techniques may be time consuming and expansive, may not be standardized, long lasting and do not permit the incorporation of a large amount of information. Aim: The aim of this study is to find out a denture identification technique that should be easy, less expensive, long lasting, and standardized. Materials and Methods: This article illustrates an inclusion denture casted metal technique of the individual national identification number printed in the patient's residence number or iquama or national identity card issued by the ministry of interior, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is used as a denture marker in the lingual surface of mandibular denture. Results: The label in this method is durable and can withstand high temperature, less chances of deterioration, visible radiographically, and provide all important information about individual that is standardized, reliable, and also accessible from any remote location. Conclusion: Hence, the proposed technique is an easy, less expensive, long lasting, radiographically visible, and standardized method of identification. PMID:28584470

  9. Detecting and confirming residual hotspots of lymphatic filariasis transmission in American Samoa 8 years after stopping mass drug administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Sarah; Ryan, Stephanie; Roineau, Maureen; Andreosso, Athena; Fuimaono, Saipale; Tufa, Joseph; Graves, Patricia M.

    2017-01-01

    The Global Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (LF) aims to eliminate the disease as a public health problem by 2020 by conducting mass drug administration (MDA) and controlling morbidity. Once elimination targets have been reached, surveillance is critical for ensuring that programmatic gains are sustained, and challenges include timely identification of residual areas of transmission. WHO guidelines encourage cost-efficient surveillance, such as integration with other population-based surveys. In American Samoa, where LF is caused by Wuchereria bancrofti, and Aedes polynesiensis is the main vector, the LF elimination program has made significant progress. Seven rounds of MDA (albendazole and diethycarbamazine) were completed from 2000 to 2006, and Transmission Assessment Surveys were passed in 2010/2011 and 2015. However, a seroprevalence study using an adult serum bank collected in 2010 detected two potential residual foci of transmission, with Og4C3 antigen (Ag) prevalence of 30.8% and 15.6%. We conducted a follow up study in 2014 to verify if transmission was truly occurring by comparing seroprevalence between residents of suspected hotspots and residents of other villages. In adults from non-hotspot villages (N = 602), seroprevalence of Ag (ICT or Og4C3), Bm14 antibody (Ab) and Wb123 Ab were 1.2% (95% CI 0.6–2.6%), 9.6% (95% CI 7.5%-12.3%), and 10.5% (95% CI 7.6–14.3%), respectively. Comparatively, adult residents of Fagali’i (N = 38) had significantly higher seroprevalence of Ag (26.9%, 95% CI 17.3–39.4%), Bm14 Ab (43.4%, 95% CI 32.4–55.0%), and Wb123 Ab 55.2% (95% CI 39.6–69.8%). Adult residents of Ili’ili/Vaitogi/Futiga (N = 113) also had higher prevalence of Ag and Ab, but differences were not statistically significant. The presence of transmission was demonstrated by 1.1% Ag prevalence (95% CI 0.2% to 3.1%) in 283 children aged 7–13 years who lived in one of the suspected hotspots; and microfilaraemia in four individuals, all of

  10. Denture identification using individual national identification number of Saudi Arabia: An innovative inclusion method of casted metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Atul; Priya, M S; Kannan, S Karthiga; Singh, Smita; Ahmed Shaikh, Saquib B; Fadaleh, Mousa Abu

    2017-01-01

    Forensic odontology is one of the branches of dentistry, which played a very important role in identification of individuals in accident, natural and mass disaster, and civil unrest and in genocide crimes. In the absence of natural teeth, marking or labeling of denture plays a vital role in the personal identification. Various types of marking or labeling methods are reported. However, many are not according to the criteria put forth by American Dental Association or other professional association. Majority of these techniques may be time consuming and expansive, may not be standardized, long lasting and do not permit the incorporation of a large amount of information. The aim of this study is to find out a denture identification technique that should be easy, less expensive, long lasting, and standardized. This article illustrates an inclusion denture casted metal technique of the individual national identification number printed in the patient's residence number or iquama or national identity card issued by the ministry of interior, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is used as a denture marker in the lingual surface of mandibular denture. The label in this method is durable and can withstand high temperature, less chances of deterioration, visible radiographically, and provide all important information about individual that is standardized, reliable, and also accessible from any remote location. Hence, the proposed technique is an easy, less expensive, long lasting, radiographically visible, and standardized method of identification.

  11. Application of GIS to predict malaria hotspots based on Anopheles arabiensis habitat suitability in Southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwitira, Isaiah; Murwira, Amon; Zengeya, Fadzai M.; Shekede, Munyaradzi Davis

    2018-02-01

    Malaria remains a major public health problem and a principal cause of morbidity and mortality in most developing countries. Although malaria still presents health problems, significant successes have been recorded in reducing deaths resulting from the disease. As malaria transmission continues to decline, control interventions will increasingly depend on the ability to define high-risk areas known as malaria hotspots. Therefore, there is urgent need to use geospatial tools such as geographic information system to detect spatial patterns of malaria and delineate disease hot spots for better planning and management. Thus, accurate mapping and prediction of seasonality of malaria hotspots is an important step towards developing strategies for effective malaria control. In this study, we modelled seasonal malaria hotspots as a function of habitat suitability of Anopheles arabiensis (A. Arabiensis) as a first step towards predicting likely seasonal malaria hotspots that could provide guidance in targeted malaria control. We used Geographical information system (GIS) and spatial statistic methods to identify seasonal hotspots of malaria cases at the country level. In order to achieve this, we first determined the spatial distribution of seasonal malaria hotspots using the Getis Ord Gi* statistic based on confirmed positive malaria cases recorded at health facilities in Zimbabwe over four years (1996-1999). We then used MAXENT technique to model habitat suitability of A. arabiensis from presence data collected from 1990 to 2002 based on bioclimatic variables and altitude. Finally, we used autologistic regression to test the extent to which malaria hotspots can be predicted using A. arabiensis habitat suitability. Our results show that A. arabiensis habitat suitability consistently and significantly (p malaria hotspots from 1996 to 1999. Overall, our results show that malaria hotspots can be predicted using A. arabiensis habitat suitability, suggesting the possibility of

  12. Hotspot detection using space-time scan statistics on children under five years of age in Depok

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdiana, Miranti; Widyaningsih, Yekti

    2017-03-01

    Some problems that affect the health level in Depok is the high malnutrition rates from year to year and the more spread infectious and non-communicable diseases in some areas. Children under five years old is a vulnerable part of population to get the malnutrition and diseases. Based on this reason, it is important to observe the location and time, where and when, malnutrition in Depok happened in high intensity. To obtain the location and time of the hotspots of malnutrition and diseases that attack children under five years old, space-time scan statistics method can be used. Space-time scan statistic is a hotspot detection method, where the area and time of information and time are taken into account simultaneously in detecting the hotspots. This method detects a hotspot with a cylindrical scanning window: the cylindrical pedestal describes the area, and the height of cylinder describe the time. Cylinders formed is a hotspot candidate that may occur, which require testing of hypotheses, whether a cylinder can be summed up as a hotspot. Hotspot detection in this study carried out by forming a combination of several variables. Some combination of variables provides hotspot detection results that tend to be the same, so as to form groups (clusters). In the case of infant health level in Depok city, Beji health care center region in 2011-2012 is a hotspot. According to the combination of the variables used in the detection of hotspots, Beji health care center is most frequently as a hotspot. Hopefully the local government can take the right policy to improve the health level of children under five in the city of Depok.

  13. Comparison of methods for the identification of coagulase-negative staphylococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes RS Cunha

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS species identification is still difficult for most clinical laboratories. The scheme proposed by Kloos and Schleifer and modified by Bannerman is the reference method used for the identification of staphylococcal species and subspecies; however, this method is relatively laborious for routine use since it requires the utilization of a large number of biochemical tests. The objective of the present study was to compare four methods, i.e., the reference method, the API Staph system (bioMérieux and two methods modified from the reference method in our laboratory (simplified method and disk method, in the identification of 100 CNS strains. Compared to the reference method, the simplified method and disk method correctly identified 100 and 99% of the CNS species, respectively, while this rate was 84% for the API Staph system. Inaccurate identification by the API Staph method was observed for Staphylococcus epidermidis (2.2%, S. hominis (25%, S. haemolyticus (37.5%, and S. warneri (47.1%. The simplified method using the simple identification scheme proposed in the present study was found to be efficient for all strains tested, with 100% sensitivity and specificity and proved to be available alternative for the identification of staphylococci, offering, higher reliability and lower cost than the currently available commercial systems. This method would be very useful in clinical microbiology laboratory, especially in places with limited resources.

  14. Application of the Empirical Bayes Method with the Finite Mixture Model for Identifying Accident-Prone Spots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajie Zou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hotspot identification (HSID is an important component of the highway safety management process. A number of methods have been proposed to identify hotspots. Among these methods, previous studies have indicated that the empirical Bayes (EB method can outperform other methods for identifying hotspots, since the EB method combines the historical crash records of the site and expected number of crashes obtained from a safety performance function (SPF for similar sites. However, the SPFs are usually developed based on a large number of sites, which may contain heterogeneity in traffic characteristic. As a result, the hotspot identification accuracy of EB methods can possibly be affected by SPFs, when heterogeneity is present in crash data. Thus, it is necessary to consider the heterogeneity and homogeneity of roadway segments when using EB methods. To address this problem, this paper proposed three different classification-based EB methods to identify hotspots. Rural highway crash data collected in Texas were analyzed and classified into different groups using the proposed methods. Based on the modeling results for Texas crash dataset, it is found that one proposed classification-based EB method performs better than the standard EB method as well as other HSID methods.

  15. Coral Reef Watch, Hotspots, 50 km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Coral Reef Watch provides Coral Bleaching hotspot maps derived from NOAA's Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES). This data provides global area...

  16. Mycobacteria mobility shift assay: a method for the rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Muraro Wildner

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The identification of mycobacteria is essential because tuberculosis (TB and mycobacteriosis are clinically indistinguishable and require different therapeutic regimens. The traditional phenotypic method is time consuming and may last up to 60 days. Indeed, rapid, affordable, specific and easy-to-perform identification methods are needed. We have previously described a polymerase chain reaction-based method called a mycobacteria mobility shift assay (MMSA that was designed for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC and nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM species identification. The aim of this study was to assess the MMSA for the identification of MTC and NTM clinical isolates and to compare its performance with that of the PRA-hsp65 method. A total of 204 clinical isolates (102 NTM and 102 MTC were identified by the MMSA and PRA-hsp65. For isolates for which these methods gave discordant results, definitive species identification was obtained by sequencing fragments of the 16S rRNA and hsp65 genes. Both methods correctly identified all MTC isolates. Among the NTM isolates, the MMSA alone assigned 94 (92.2% to a complex or species, whereas the PRA-hsp65 method assigned 100% to a species. A 91.5% agreement was observed for the 94 NTM isolates identified by both methods. The MMSA provided correct identification for 96.8% of the NTM isolates compared with 94.7% for PRA-hsp65. The MMSA is a suitable auxiliary method for routine use for the rapid identification of mycobacteria.

  17. Mycobacteria mobility shift assay: a method for the rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildner, Letícia Muraro; Bazzo, Maria Luiza; Liedke, Susie Coutinho; Nogueira, Christiane Lourenço; Segat, Gabriela; Senna, Simone Gonçalves; Schlindwein, Aline Daiane; Oliveira, Jaquelline Germano de; Rovaris, Darcita B; Bonjardim, Claudio A; Kroon, Erna G; Ferreira, Paulo C P

    2014-06-01

    The identification of mycobacteria is essential because tuberculosis (TB) and mycobacteriosis are clinically indistinguishable and require different therapeutic regimens. The traditional phenotypic method is time consuming and may last up to 60 days. Indeed, rapid, affordable, specific and easy-to-perform identification methods are needed. We have previously described a polymerase chain reaction-based method called a mycobacteria mobility shift assay (MMSA) that was designed for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) and nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) species identification. The aim of this study was to assess the MMSA for the identification of MTC and NTM clinical isolates and to compare its performance with that of the PRA-hsp65 method. A total of 204 clinical isolates (102 NTM and 102 MTC) were identified by the MMSA and PRA-hsp65. For isolates for which these methods gave discordant results, definitive species identification was obtained by sequencing fragments of the 16S rRNA and hsp65 genes. Both methods correctly identified all MTC isolates. Among the NTM isolates, the MMSA alone assigned 94 (92.2%) to a complex or species, whereas the PRA-hsp65 method assigned 100% to a species. A 91.5% agreement was observed for the 94 NTM isolates identified by both methods. The MMSA provided correct identification for 96.8% of the NTM isolates compared with 94.7% for PRA-hsp65. The MMSA is a suitable auxiliary method for routine use for the rapid identification of mycobacteria.

  18. Single-sheet identification method of heavy charged particles using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An attempt has been made to examine the suitability of the single-sheet particle identification technique in CR-39 and CN-85 polycarbonate by plotting track cone length vs. residual range for different heavy ions in these detectors. So, the maximum etchable ranges of heavy ions such as 93Nb, 86Kr and 4He in CR-39 and ...

  19. Identification methods for Campylobacters, Helicobacters, and related organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    On, Stephen L.W.

    1996-01-01

    The organisms which are referred to as campylobacteria are associated with a diverse range of diseases and habitats and are important from both clinical and economic perspectives. Accurate identification of these organisms is desirable for deciding upon appropriate therapeutic measures, and also...

  20. Hotspot temperature calculation and quench analysis on ITER busbar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, J., E-mail: jianrong@mail.ustc.edu.cn [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230027 (China); Huang, X.Y.; Song, Y.T.; Wu, S.T. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • The hotspot temperature is calculated in the case of different extra copper in this paper. • The MQE (minimum quench energy) is carried out as the external heating to trigger a quench in busbar. • The temperature changes after quench is analyzed by Gandalf code in the case of different extra copper and no helium. • The normal length is carried out in the case of different extra copper by Gandalf code. - Abstract: This paper describes the analysis of ITER feeder busbar, the hotspot temperature of busbar is calculated by classical method in the case of 0%, 50%, 75% and 100% extra copper (copper strands). The quench behavior of busbar is simulated by 1-D Gandalf code, and the MQE (minimum quench energy) is estimated in classical method as initial external heat in Gandalf input file. The temperature and the normal length of conductor are analyzed in the case of 0%, 50% and 100% extra copper and no helium. By hotspot temperature, conductor temperature and normal length are contrasted in different extra copper cases, it is shown that the extra copper play an important role in quench protecting.

  1. Where the wild things are: Predicting hotspots of seabird aggregations in the California Current System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, N.; Jahncke, J.; Herzog, M.P.; Howar, J.; Hyrenbach, K.D.; Zamon, J.E.; Ainley, D.G.; Wiens, J.A.; Morgan, K.; Balance, L.T.; Stralberg, D.

    2011-01-01

    Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) provide an important tool for conservation of marine ecosystems. To be most effective, these areas should be strategically located in a manner that supports ecosystem function. To inform marine spatial planning and support strategic establishment of MPAs within the California Current System, we identified areas predicted to support multispecies aggregations of seabirds ("hotspot????). We developed habitat-association models for 16 species using information from at-sea observations collected over an 11-year period (1997-2008), bathymetric data, and remotely sensed oceanographic data for an area from north of Vancouver Island, Canada, to the USA/Mexico border and seaward 600 km from the coast. This approach enabled us to predict distribution and abundance of seabirds even in areas of few or no surveys. We developed single-species predictive models using a machine-learning algorithm: bagged decision trees. Single-species predictions were then combined to identify potential hotspots of seabird aggregation, using three criteria: (1) overall abundance among species, (2) importance of specific areas ("core area????) to individual species, and (3) predicted persistence of hotspots across years. Model predictions were applied to the entire California Current for four seasons (represented by February, May, July, and October) in each of 11 years. Overall, bathymetric variables were often important predictive variables, whereas oceanographic variables derived from remotely sensed data were generally less important. Predicted hotspots often aligned with currently protected areas (e.g., National Marine Sanctuaries), but we also identified potential hotspots in Northern California/Southern Oregon (from Cape Mendocino to Heceta Bank), Southern California (adjacent to the Channel Islands), and adjacent to Vancouver Island, British Columbia, that are not currently included in protected areas. Prioritization and identification of multispecies hotspots

  2. Parameter identification methods for improving structural dynamic models. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Charles

    1988-01-01

    There is an increasing need to develop Parameter Identification methods for improving structural dynamic models, based on the inability of engineers to produce mathematical models which correlate with experimental data. This research explores the efficiency of combining Component Mode Synthesis (substructuring) methods with Parameter Identification procedures in order to improve analytical modeling of structural components and their connections. Improvements are computed in terms of physical stiffness and damping parameters in order that the physical characteristics of the model can be better understood. Connections involving both viscous and friction damping are investigated. Substructuring methods are utilized to reduce the complexity of the identification problem. Component and inter-component structural connection properties are evaluated and identified independently, thus simplifying the identification problem. It is shown that modal test data is effective for identifying modeling problems associated with structural components, and for determining the stiffness and damping properties of intercomponent connections. In general, Parameter Identification is improved when greater quantities of experimental data are available.

  3. The structural identification method of the dynamic plant by experimental data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Л.М. Блохін

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available  The common method, task and algorithm of structural identification of multidimensional stabilizable plant dynamic models under the action of controlling, controlled and uncontrolled during the experiments stochastic disturbances are offered. The common and main special cases of identification task are set and the mathematical algorithms of their solving are given.

  4. Identification method for helicopter flight dynamics modeling with rotor degrees of freedom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Wei

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive method based on system identification theory for helicopter flight dynamics modeling with rotor degrees of freedom is developed. A fully parameterized rotor flapping equation for identification purpose is derived without using any theoretical model, so the confidence of the identified model is increased, and then the 6 degrees of freedom rigid body model is extended to 9 degrees of freedom high-order model. Bode sensitivity function is derived to increase the accuracy of frequency spectra calculation which influences the accuracy of model parameter identification. Then a frequency domain identification algorithm is established. Acceleration technique is developed furthermore to increase calculation efficiency, and the total identification time is reduced by more than 50% using this technique. A comprehensive two-step method is established for helicopter high-order flight dynamics model identification which increases the numerical stability of model identification compared with single step algorithm. Application of the developed method to identify the flight dynamics model of BO 105 helicopter based on flight test data is implemented. A comparative study between the high-order model and rigid body model is performed at last. The results show that the developed method can be used for helicopter high-order flight dynamics model identification with high accuracy as well as efficiency, and the advantage of identified high-order model is very obvious compared with low-order model.

  5. Exploring Dual Identification among Muslim-American Emerging Adults: A Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirin, Selcuk R.; Bikmen, Nida; Mir, Madeeha; Fine, Michelle; Zaal, Mayida; Katsiaficas, Dalal

    2008-01-01

    This mixed methods study explored dual identification among Muslim-American emerging adults of immigrant origin. A closer look was taken at the relationship between American and Muslim identifications and how this relationship was influenced by experiences of discrimination, acculturative and religious practices, and whether it varied by gender.…

  6. Thruster Modelling for Underwater Vehicle Using System Identification Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Shahrieel Mohd Aras

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper describes a study of thruster modelling for a remotely operated underwater vehicle (ROV by system identification using Microbox 2000/2000C. Microbox 2000/2000C is an XPC target machine device to interface between an ROV thruster with the MATLAB 2009 software. In this project, a model of the thruster will be developed first so that the system identification toolbox in MATLAB can be used. This project also presents a comparison of mathematical and empirical modelling. The experiments were carried out by using a mini compressor as a dummy depth pressure applied to a pressure sensor. The thruster model will thrust and submerge until it reaches a set point and maintain the set point depth. The depth was based on pressure sensor measurement. A conventional proportional controller was used in this project and the results gathered justified its selection.

  7. A Practical Approach to Screening Potential Environmental Hotspots of Different Impact Categories in Supply Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Nakatani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Identification of environmental hotspots becomes a pressing issue for companies pursuing sustainable supply chain management. In particular, excessive dependence on water resources outside the country may put the supply chain at unanticipated risk of water shortage. This article presents a practical approach to screening potential environmental hotspots of different impact categories that occur in the supply chain using environmental input-output analysis. First, the amounts of domestic and foreign potential impacts of global warming, terrestrial acidification, and water resource consumption, induced through supply chains were calculated for 403 sectors of Japanese products. Thereafter, with a focus on potential impacts induced through the import of raw materials, a framework for screening foreign potential hotspots was presented. The results showed that the sectoral potential impacts of water resource consumption had high rates of foreign impacts at deeper tiers of the supply chains for some sectors, which indicated that there exist hidden water hotspots outside the country. In the case study of fiber yarns, impacts on water resource consumption induced as a result of the import of crops, as well as that induced in silviculture as a result of the import of wood chips, were found to be the foreign potential hotspots.

  8. Characterizing local biological hotspots in the Gulf of Maine using remote sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribera, Marta M.

    Researchers increasingly advocate the use of ecosystem-based management (EBM) for managing complex marine ecosystems. This approach requires managers to focus on processes and cross-scale interactions, rather than individual components. However, they often lack appropriate tools and data sources to pursue this change in management approach. One method that has been proposed to understand the ecological complexity inherent in marine ecosystems is the study of biological hotspots. Biological hotspots are locations where organisms from different trophic levels aggregate to feed on abundant supplies, and they are considered a first step toward understanding the processes driving spatial and temporal heterogeneity in marine systems. Biological hotspots are supported by phytoplankton aggregations, which are characterized by high spatial and temporal variability. As a result, methods developed to locate biological hotspots in relatively stable terrestrial systems are not well suited for more dynamic marine ecosystems. The main objective of this thesis is thus to identify and characterize local-scale biological hotspots in the western side of the Gulf of Maine. The first chapter describes a new methodological framework with the steps needed to locate these types of hotspots in marine ecosystems using remote sensing datasets. Then, in the second chapter these hotspots are characterized using a novel metric that uses time series information and spatial statistics to account for both the temporal variability and spatial structure of these marine aggregations. This metric redefines biological hotspots as areas with a high probability of exhibiting positive anomalies of productivity compared to the expected regional seasonal pattern. Finally, the third chapter compares the resulting biological hotspots to fishery-dependent abundance indices of surface and benthic predators to determine the effect of the location and magnitude of phytoplankton aggregations on the rest of the

  9. Activating K-Ras mutations outwith ‘hotspot' codons in sporadic colorectal tumours – implications for personalised cancer medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G; Bounds, R; Wolf, H; Steele, R J C; Carey, F A; Wolf, C R

    2010-01-01

    Background: Response to EGFR-targeted therapies in colorectal cancer patients has been convincingly associated with Kirsten-Ras (K-Ras) mutation status. Current mandatory mutation testing for patient selection is limited to the K-Ras ‘hotspot' codons 12 and 13. Methods: Colorectal tumours (n=106) were screened for additional K-Ras mutations, phenotypes compared in transformation and Ras GTPase activating assays and gene and pathway changes induced by individual K-Ras mutants identified by microarray analysis. Taqman-based gene copy number and FISH analyses were used to investigate K-Ras gene amplification. Results: Four additional K-Ras mutations (Leu19Phe (1 out of 106 tumours), Lys117Asn (1 out of 106), Ala146Thr (7 out of 106) and Arg164Gln (1 out of 106)) were identified. Lys117Asn and Ala146Thr had phenotypes similar to the hotspot mutations, whereas Leu19Phe had an attenuated phenotype and the Arg164Gln mutation was phenotypically equivalent to wt K-Ras. We additionally identified a new K-Ras gene amplification event, present in approximately 2% of tumours. Conclusions: The identification of mutations outwith previously described hotspot codons increases the K-Ras mutation burden in colorectal tumours by one-third. Future mutation screening to facilitate optimal patient selection for treatment with EGFR-targeted therapies should therefore be extended to codon 146, and in addition should consider the unique molecular signatures associated with individual K-Ras mutations. PMID:20147967

  10. On localised hotspots of an urban crime model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, David J. B.; O'Farrell, Hayley

    2013-06-01

    We investigate stationary, spatially localised crime hotspots on the real line and the plane of an urban crime model of Short et al. [M. Short, M. DÓrsogna, A statistical model of criminal behavior, Mathematical Models and Methods in Applied Sciences 18 (2008) 1249-1267]. Extending the weakly nonlinear analysis of Short et al., we show in one-dimension that localised hotspots should bifurcate off the background spatially homogeneous state at a Turing instability provided the bifurcation is subcritical. Using path-following techniques, we continue these hotspots and show that the bifurcating pulses can undergo the process of homoclinic snaking near the singular limit. We analyse the singular limit to explain the existence of spike solutions and compare the analytical results with the numerical computations. In two-dimensions, we show that localised radial spots should also bifurcate off the spatially homogeneous background state. Localised planar hexagon fronts and hexagon patches are found and depending on the proximity to the singular limit these solutions either undergo homoclinic snaking or act like “multi-spot” solutions. Finally, we discuss applications of these localised patterns in the urban crime context and the full agent-based model.

  11. A new identification method for energetic ion {delta}E-E telescopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Cesar [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Alcala, 28871 Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Institut fuer Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Christian-Albrechts, Universitaet zu Kiel, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Bronchalo, Enrique [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Alcala, 28871 Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Fisica y Arquitectura de Computadores, Universidad Miguel Hernandez, Avda. Universidad s/n, 03202 Elche, Alicante (Spain)], E-mail: ebronchalo@umh.es; Medina, Jose [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Alcala, 28871 Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain)

    2007-11-21

    A new ion identification method for {delta}E-E telescopes is presented. The method works by counting data points under {delta}E(E) curves on {delta}E-E diagrams. These curves are obtained by simulating the telescope response to a flux of energetic ions. The method is checked against three published methods applied to several experimental data sets.

  12. Predator diversity hotspots in the blue ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worm, Boris; Lotze, Heike K; Myers, Ransom A

    2003-08-19

    Concentrations of biodiversity, or hotspots, represent conservation priorities in terrestrial ecosystems but remain largely unexplored in marine habitats. In the open ocean, many large predators such as tunas, sharks, billfishes, and sea turtles are of current conservation concern because of their vulnerability to overfishing and ecosystem role. Here we use scientific-observer records from pelagic longline fisheries in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans to show that oceanic predators concentrate in distinct diversity hotspots. Predator diversity consistently peaks at intermediate latitudes (20-30 degrees N and S), where tropical and temperate species ranges overlap. Individual hotspots are found close to prominent habitat features such as reefs, shelf breaks, or seamounts and often coincide with zooplankton and coral reef hotspots. Closed-area models in the northwest Atlantic predict that protection of hotspots outperforms other area closures in safeguarding threatened pelagic predators from ecological extinction. We conclude that the seemingly monotonous landscape of the open ocean shows rich structure in species diversity and that these features should be used to focus future conservation efforts.

  13. The impact of parameter identification methods on drug therapy control in an intensive care unit

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hann, CE; Chase, JG; Ypma, MF; Elfring, J Jos; Nor, NHM; Lawrence, P; Shaw, GM

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of fast parameter identification methods, which do not require any forward simulations, on model-based glucose control, using retrospective data in the Christchurch...

  14. High-resolution characterization of CPD hotspot formation in human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala, Anamaria G; Morris, Robert T; Wyrick, John J; Smerdon, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Repair of DNA lesions must occur within the chromatin landscape and is associated with alterations in histone modifications and nucleosome rearrangement. To directly associate these chromatin features with DNA damage and repair, it is necessary to be able to map DNA adducts. We have developed a cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD)-specific immunoprecipitation method and mapped ultraviolet damage hotspots across human chromosomes 1 and 6. CPD hotspots occur almost equally in genic and intergenic regions. However, these hotspots are significantly more prevalent adjacent to repeat elements, especially Alu repeats. Nucleosome mapping studies indicate that nucleosomes are consistently positioned at Alu elements where CPD hotspots form, but by 2 h post-irradiation, these same regions are significantly depleted of nucleosomes. These results indicate that nucleosomes associated with hotspots of CPD formation are readily rearranged, potentially making them accessible to DNA repair machinery. Our results represent the first chromosome scale map of ultraviolet-induced DNA lesions in the human genome, and reveal the sequence features and dynamic chromatin changes associated with CPD hotspots.

  15. Fingerprint: A Unique and Reliable Method for Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palash Kumar Bose

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fingerprints have been the gold standard for personal identification within the forensic community for more than one hundred years. It is still universal in spite of discovery of DNA fingerprint. The science of fingerprint identification has evolved over time from the early use of finger prints to mark business transactions in ancient Babylonia to their use today as core technology in biometric security devices and as scientific evidence in courts of law throughout the world. The science of fingerprints, dactylography or dermatoglyphics, had long been widely accepted, and well acclaimed and reputed as panacea for individualization, particularly in forensic investigations. Human fingerprints are detailed, unique, difficult to alter, and durable over the life of an individual, making them suitable as lifelong markers of human identity. Fingerprints can be readily used by police or other authorities to identify individuals who wish to conceal their identity, or to identify people who are incapacitated or deceased, as in the aftermath of a natural disaster

  16. Development of methods for identification of phenolic compounds in tansy flowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Маргарита Юріївна Золотайкіна

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tanacetum vulgare L. is widespread herb in Ukraine, having a substantial resource base. The absence of national normative documentation for this type of herbal material points to the relevance of research in this area and development of modern methods for identification of phenolic compounds as a main group of biologically active substances.Aim. Development of harmonized with European Pharmacopoeia (PhEur requirements method for identification of phenolic compounds in Tansy flowers.Methods. For the purpose mentioned above, a standardized TLC-method described in the State Pharmacopoeia of Ukraine (SPhU monographs for identification of phenolic compounds in different types of herbal material was used. Validation parameters of the method for the studied herb were determined.Results. A TLC method for identification of phenolic compounds in Tansy flowers considering modern PhEur approaches to standardization of herbs was developed. Validation of the identification method was carried out for the following validation parameters: specificity, robustness, and precision. This method was offered for implementation to the SPhU monograph «Tansy flowers».Conclusion. TLC method for identification of phenolic compounds in Tansy flowers was developed for the first time. As a result of validation of the given method for identification of phenolic compounds, by validation parameters (specificity, robustness, and precision, following chromatography conditions were selected: Silica gel coated Aluminum-backed TLC plates, application volume for both test samples and reference samples was 10 μl, mobile phase: formic acid concentrated – water – methyl ethyl ketone – ethyl acetate (10:10:30:50 V/V/V/V, detection – spraying with solutions of aminoethyl diphenylborinate in methanol and macrogol in methanol and view under 365 nm UV. The method for quantitative determination of phenolic compounds in Tansy flowers was offered for implementation in «Tansy flowers

  17. Plate tectonics and hotspots: the third dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D L; Tanimoto, T; Zhang, Y S

    1992-06-19

    High-resolution seismic tomographic models of the upper mantle provide powerful new constraints on theories of plate tectonics and hotspots. Midocean ridges have extremely low seismic velocities to a depth of 100 kilometers. These low velocities imply partial melting. At greater depths, low-velocity and high-velocity anomalies record, respectively, previous positions of migrating ridges and trenches. Extensional, rifting, and hotspot regions have deep (> 200 kilometers) low-velocity anomalies. The upper mantle is characterized by vast domains of high temperature rather than small regions surrounding hotspots; the asthenosphere is not homogeneous or isothermal. Extensive magmatism requires a combination of hot upper mantle and suitable lithospheric conditions. High-velocity regions of the upper 200 kilometers of the mantle correlate with Archean cratons.

  18. Are hot-spots occluded from water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Irina Sousa; Ramos, Rui Miguel; Martins, Joao Miguel; Fernandes, Pedro Alexandrino; Ramos, Maria João

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are the basis of many biological processes and are governed by focused regions with high binding affinities, the warm- and hot-spots. It was proposed that these regions are surrounded by areas with higher packing density leading to solvent exclusion around them - "the O-ring theory." This important inference still lacks sufficient demonstration. We have used Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the validity of the O-ring theory in the context of the conformational flexibility of the proteins, which is critical for function, in general, and for interaction with water, in particular. The MD results were analyzed for a variety of solvent-accessible surface area (SASA) features, radial distribution functions (RDFs), protein-water distances, and water residence times. The measurement of the average solvent-accessible surface area features for the warm- and hot-spots and the null-spots, as well as data for corresponding RDFs, identify distinct properties for these two sets of residues. Warm- and hot-spots are found to be occluded from the solvent. However, it has to be borne in mind that water-mediated interactions have significant power to construct an extensive and strongly bonded interface. We observed that warm- and hot-spots tend to form hydrogen bond (H-bond) networks with water molecules that have an occupancy around 90%. This study provides strong evidence in support of the O-ring theory and the results show that hot-spots are indeed protected from the bulk solvent. Nevertheless, the warm- and hot-spots still make water-mediated contacts, which are also important for protein-protein binding.

  19. A Globally Self-Consistent Model of Plate Motions Relative to the Hotspots for the Past 48 Million Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, E.; Gordon, R. G.

    2012-04-01

    Hotspots are volcanic anomalies, either in an intraplate setting or in the form of excessive volcanism along the plate boundaries, not explained by classic plate tectonics. In the early 70's, along with a deep mantle origin, hotspots were proposed to move so slowly relative to one another such that they could be used as a reference frame fixed in the deep mantle for describing plate motions in an "absolute" sense. Ever since the idea was first introduced, however, the rates of relative hotspot motion, and thus the limits of the hotspot frame of reference, have remained a source of heated debate with suggestions ranging from apparent fixity to rapid motion between the hotspots. The question of inter-hotspot motion is closely related to the estimation of true polar wander—rotation of the whole solid earth relative to the spin axis. A fundamental problem of global tectonics and paleomagnetism is determining which part of apparent polar wander—the apparent movement of age-progressive paleomagnetic poles relative to the continent in question—is due to plate motion, and which part is due to true polar wander. One approach for separating these is available if the hotspots are indeed tracking the motion of the mantle beneath the asthenosphere and are moving slowly relative to one another. In this case, a model of plate motion relative to the hotspots can be used to predict the positions of past paleomagnetic poles relative to the spin axis and thus estimate the amount of true polar wander. Cumulative improvements in the age progression along the hotspot tracks, the geomagnetic reversal time scale, and relative plate reconstructions lead to significant changes in earlier results. In this study, we build on a new method for objectively estimating plate-hotspot rotations and their uncertainties, and on our recent results that have demonstrated no significant motion between the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hotspots since 48 Ma, and present a globally self-consistent model

  20. ECG Identification Based on Non-Fiducial Feature Extraction Using Window Removal Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo-Hyuk Jung

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes electrocardiogram (ECG identification based on non-fiducial feature extraction using window removal method, nearest neighbor (NN, support vector machine (SVM, and linear discriminant analysis (LDA. In the pre-processing stage, Daubechies 4 is used to remove the baseline wander and noise of the original signal. In the feature extraction and selection stage, windows are set at a time interval of 5 s in the preprocessed signal, while autocorrelation, scaling, and discrete cosine transform (DCT are applied to extract and select features. Thereafter, the window removal method is applied to all of the generated windows to remove those that are unrecognizable. Lastly, in the classification stage, the NN, SVM, and LDA classifiers are used to perform individual identification. As a result, when the NN is used in the Normal Sinus Rhythm (NSR, PTB diagnostic, and QT database, the results indicate that the subject identification rates are 100%, 99.40% and 100%, while the window identification rates are 99.02%, 97.13% and 98.91%. When the SVM is used, all of the subject identification rates are 100%, while the window identification rates are 96.92%, 95.82% and 98.32%. When the LDA is used, all of the subject identification rates are 100%, while the window identification rates are 98.67%, 98.65% and 99.23%. The proposed method demonstrates good results with regard to data that not only includes normal signals, but also abnormal signals. In addition, the window removal method improves the individual identification accuracy by removing windows that cannot be recognized.

  1. Energy Method for Identification of Electromechanical Devices and Systems

    OpenAIRE

    D. I. Rodkin; Y. V. Romashihin

    2011-01-01

    The paper considers a method for determination of induction motor electromagnetic parameters while using complete instant power equations. The methods for AC motor electromagnetic parameters are proposed in the paper. The paper reveals the method efficiency while determining induction motor electromagnetic parameters. 

  2. Energy Method for Identification of Electromechanical Devices and Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Rodkin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a method for determination of induction motor electromagnetic parameters while using complete instant power equations. The methods for AC motor electromagnetic parameters are proposed in the paper. The paper reveals the method efficiency while determining induction motor electromagnetic parameters. 

  3. [Old and new ways of personal and victim identification by dental methods. Review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dézsi, Csilla; Mágori, Krisztina Ágnes; Szili, Károly

    2015-05-10

    The aim of this paper was to create a comprehensive literature review on forensic dental methods. This literature review is based on historical and the latest results of the forensic odontology. Thus, this comparative study deals with various methods including certain dental identification methods which are easy to use and do not require advanced technological background. Nowadays, the main reasons for the use of forensic odontology methods are natural disasters, however, their sensitivity depends on the availability of proper dental documentation of the subject/victim. Custom made prostheses offer the most accurate dental identification, which can allow an identification rate of 99.9%. Combination of different methods can also exhibit a high sensitivity (40-99.9%). It seems important that separation of old and novel methods is not recommended. Also, it is important to maintain and upgrade present methods which are capable of identifying one or more subjects/victims in practice. The authors propose several methods which could serve as a base of the new national policy in forensic dental identification and could be used by teams dealing with the identification of disaster victims.

  4. Revue bibliographique: les methodes chimiques d'identification et de classification des champignons.

    OpenAIRE

    Verscheure, M.; Lognay, Georges; Marlier, M.

    2002-01-01

    For few years, advancements of molecular methods and analytical techniques enabled scientists to realise a classification of microorganisms based on biochemical characteristics. This classification, called chemotaxonomy, includes molecular methods and chemical methods which provide additional data and lead to a better identification and/or classification. Peer reviewed

  5. Hybridization hotspots at bat swarming sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiesław Bogdanowicz

    Full Text Available During late summer and early autumn in temperate zones of the Northern Hemisphere, thousands of bats gather at caves, mainly for the purpose of mating. We demonstrated that this swarming behavior most probably leads not only to breeding among bats of the same species but also interbreeding between different species. Using 14 nuclear microsatellites and three different methods (the Bayesian assignment approaches of STRUCTURE and NEWHYBRIDS and a principal coordinate analysis of pairwise genetic distances, we analyzed 375 individuals belonging to three species of whiskered bats (genus Myotis at swarming sites across their sympatric range in southern Poland. The overall hybridization rate varied from 3.2 to 7.2%. At the species level, depending on the method used, these values ranged from 2.1-4.6% in M. mystacinus and 3.0-3.7% in M. brandtii to 6.5-30.4% in M. alcathoe. Hybrids occurred in about half of the caves we studied. In all three species, the sex ratio of hybrids was biased towards males but the observed differences did not differ statistically from those noted at the population level. In our opinion, factors leading to the formation of these admixed individuals and their relatively high frequency are: i swarming behaviour at swarming sites, where high numbers of bats belonging to several species meet; ii male-biased sex ratio during the swarming period; iii the fact that all these bats are generally polygynous. The highly different population sizes of different species at swarming sites may also play some role. Swarming sites may represent unique hybrid hotspots, which, as there are at least 2,000 caves in the Polish Carpathians alone, may occur on a massive scale not previously observed for any group of mammal species in the wild. Evidently, these sites should be treated as focal points for the conservation of biodiversity and evolutionary processes.

  6. A State Space Method for Modal Identification of Mechanical Systems from Time Domain Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobo Liu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A new state space method is presented for modal identification of a mechanical system from its time domain impulse or initial condition responses. A key step in this method is the identification of the characteristic polynomial coefficients of an adjoint system. Once these coefficients are determined, a canonical state space realization of the adjoint system and the system's modal parameters are formulated straightforwardly. This method is conceptually and mathematically simple and is easy to be implemented. Detailed mathematical treatments are demonstrated and numerical examples are provided to illustrate the use and effectiveness of the method.

  7. A feature point identification method for positron emission particle tracking with multiple tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiggins, Cody, E-mail: cwiggin2@vols.utk.edu [University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 1408 Circle Drive, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Santos, Roque [University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Department of Nuclear Engineering (United States); Escuela Politécnica Nacional, Departamento de Ciencias Nucleares (Ecuador); Ruggles, Arthur [University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Department of Nuclear Engineering (United States)

    2017-01-21

    A novel detection algorithm for Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) with multiple tracers based on optical feature point identification (FPI) methods is presented. This new method, the FPI method, is compared to a previous multiple PEPT method via analyses of experimental and simulated data. The FPI method outperforms the older method in cases of large particle numbers and fine time resolution. Simulated data show the FPI method to be capable of identifying 100 particles at 0.5 mm average spatial error. Detection error is seen to vary with the inverse square root of the number of lines of response (LORs) used for detection and increases as particle separation decreases. - Highlights: • A new approach to positron emission particle tracking is presented. • Using optical feature point identification analogs, multiple particle tracking is achieved. • Method is compared to previous multiple particle method. • Accuracy and applicability of method is explored.

  8. An Automatic Parameter Identification Method for a PMSM Drive with LC-Filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Michael Møller; Christensen, Jeppe Haals; Weber, Magnus L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a method for stand-still identification of parameters in a permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) fed from an inverter equipped with an three-phase LC-type output filter. Using a special random modulation strategy, the method uses the inverter for broad-band excitation...... the parameters in an analytical reference model that minimize the model error. To demonstrate the practical feasibility of the method, a fully functional drive including an embedded real-time controller has been built. In addition to modulation, data acquisition and control the whole parameter identification...... method is also implemented on the real-time controller. Based on laboratory experiments on a 22 kW drive, it is concluded that the embedded identification method can estimate the five parameters in less than ten seconds....

  9. Identification of the parameters of an elastic material model using the constitutive equation gap method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florentin, Eric; Lubineau, Gilles

    2010-09-01

    Today, the identification of material model parameters is based more and more on full-field measurements. This article explains how an appropriate use of the constitutive equation gap method (CEGM) can help in this context. The CEGM is a well-known concept which, until now, has been used mainly for the verification of finite element simulations. This has led to many developments, especially concerning the techniques for constructing statically admissible stress fields. The originality of the present study resides in the application of these recent developments to the identification problem. The proposed CEGM is described in detail, then evaluated through the identification of heterogeneous isotropic elastic properties. The results obtained are systematically compared with those of the equilibrium gap method, which is a well-known technique for the resolution of such identification problems. We prove that the use of the enhanced CEGM significantly improves the quality of the results.

  10. Identification of the parameters of an elastic material model using the constitutive equation gap method

    KAUST Repository

    Florentin, Éric

    2010-04-23

    Today, the identification ofmaterialmodel parameters is based more and more on full-field measurements. This article explains how an appropriate use of the constitutive equation gap method (CEGM) can help in this context. The CEGM is a well-known concept which, until now, has been used mainly for the verification of finite element simulations. This has led to many developments, especially concerning the techniques for constructing statically admissible stress fields. The originality of the present study resides in the application of these recent developments to the identification problem. The proposed CEGM is described in detail, then evaluated through the identification of heterogeneous isotropic elastic properties. The results obtained are systematically compared with those of the equilibrium gap method, which is a well-known technique for the resolution of such identification problems. We prove that the use of the enhanced CEGM significantly improves the quality of the results. © Springer-Verlag 2010.

  11. Continuous representation of tumor microvessel density and detection of angiogenic hotspots in histological whole-slide images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kather, Jakob Nikolas; Marx, Alexander; Reyes-Aldasoro, Constantino Carlos; Schad, Lothar R.; Zöllner, Frank Gerrit; Weis, Cleo-Aron

    2015-01-01

    Blood vessels in solid tumors are not randomly distributed, but are clustered in angiogenic hotspots. Tumor microvessel density (MVD) within these hotspots correlates with patient survival and is widely used both in diagnostic routine and in clinical trials. Still, these hotspots are usually subjectively defined. There is no unbiased, continuous and explicit representation of tumor vessel distribution in histological whole slide images. This shortcoming distorts angiogenesis measurements and may account for ambiguous results in the literature. In the present study, we describe and evaluate a new method that eliminates this bias and makes angiogenesis quantification more objective and more efficient. Our approach involves automatic slide scanning, automatic image analysis and spatial statistical analysis. By comparing a continuous MVD function of the actual sample to random point patterns, we introduce an objective criterion for hotspot detection: An angiogenic hotspot is defined as a clustering of blood vessels that is very unlikely to occur randomly. We evaluate the proposed method in N=11 images of human colorectal carcinoma samples and compare the results to a blinded human observer. For the first time, we demonstrate the existence of statistically significant hotspots in tumor images and provide a tool to accurately detect these hotspots. PMID:26061817

  12. Hotspot Mainport Schiphol : midterm review report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Döpp, S.; Brink, van den P.; Hartogensis, O.K.; Jacobs, A.; Homan, C.; Sondij, J.

    2012-01-01

    The focus of Knowledge for Climate (KfC) research in Hotspot Schiphol Mainport is to optimize the contribution of meteorological services to a sustainable operation and reliable operation of Schiphol airport. Three research projects have been carried out in the first tranche of the Knowledge for

  13. Eliminating "Hotspots" in Digital Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, P. M.

    1984-01-01

    Signals from defective picture elements rejected. Image processing program for use with charge-coupled device (CCD) or other mosaic imager augmented with algorithm that compensates for common type of electronic defect. Algorithm prevents false interpretation of "hotspots". Used for robotics, image enhancement, image analysis and digital television.

  14. The unusual Samoan hotspot: A "hotspot highway" juxtaposed with a trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, M. G.; Konter, J. G.; Koppers, A. A.

    2011-12-01

    Oceanic hotspots are fed by (relatively) stationary, upwelling mantle plumes that melt beneath mobile tectonic plates. This mechanism results in the generation of a linear chain of volcanoes exhibiting a clear age progression: the islands and seamounts should be increasingly older with increasing distance from the inferred location of the mantle plume. Located in the southwest Pacific, the Cook-Austral volcanic islands and seamounts were long thought to lack a clear age progression, and it has been argued that the Cook-Austral volcanic chain is an example of a hotspot not fed by a mantle plume. However, work by Chauvel et al (1997) showed that the Cook-Austral volcanoes have been generated by three distinct, co-linear mantle plumes spaced by ~1000 km, resulting in 3 overlapping hotspot tracks. Critically, the volcanoes generated by each hotspot exhibit a clear age progression that emerges from its respective plume. Using plate motion models, the reconstructed tracks of the three Cook-Austral hotspots backtrack through the region of the Pacific plate now occupied by the Samoan hotspot between 10 and 40 Ma (Konter et al., 2008). Owing to the unusual number of hotspots (Samoa is the fourth) that have been hosted in the region, we refer to this corridor of the Pacific plate as the "hotspot highway." The Samoan hotspot is burning through and thus crosscutting the trails of the older Cook-Austral hotspots. Consistent with this hypothesis, Jackson et al. (2010) reported volcanic features from the Cook-Austral hotspots in the Samoan region, including three seamounts and one atoll with geochemical affinities to the Cook-Austral hotspot. The Pacific lithosphere was likely "preconditioned" (metasomatized) by the three Cook-Australs hotspots before the arrival of the Samoan plume into the region, yet geochemical signatures associated with the Cook-Austral hotspot pedigrees are not evident in Samoan shield lavas. However, Samoan rejuvenated lavas exhibit a clear EMI (enriched

  15. A simple and rapid molecular method for Leptospira species identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, Ahmed; Anthony, Richard M.; Hartskeerl, Rudy A.

    2010-01-01

    Serological and DNA-based classification systems only have little correlation. Currently serological and molecular methods for characterizing Leptospira are complex and costly restricting their world-wide distribution and use. Ligation mediated amplification combined with microarray analysis

  16. Identification of Employee Performance Appraisal Methods in Agricultural Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Venclova Katerina; Salkova Andrea; Kolackova Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    A formal employee performance appraisal is regarded as one of the tools of human resources performance management. People, their knowledge and skills are currently considered to be the most valuable resource a company has. The article focuses on methods of employee performance appraisal in agricultural organizations in the Czech Republic. The first part of the article deals with the theoretical background of the term “formal appraisal” and employee performance appraisal methods as defined by ...

  17. Hotspots within hotspots? Hammerhead shark movements around Wolf Island, Galapagos Marine Reserve

    OpenAIRE

    Hearn, Alex; Ketchum, James; Klimley, A. Peter; Espinoza, Eduardo; Peñaherrera, Cesar

    2010-01-01

    Are pelagic species such as sharks and tuna distributed homogenously or heterogeneously in the oceans? Large assemblages of these species have been observed at seamounts and offshore islands in the eastern tropical Pacific, which are considered hotspots of pelagic biodiversity. Is the species distribution uniform at these hotspots or do species aggregate at a finer spatial scale at these sites? We employed three techniques to demonstrate that the aggregations of scalloped hammerhead sharks, S...

  18. Note: Model-based identification method of a cable-driven wearable device for arm rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiang; Chen, Weihai; Zhang, Jianbin; Wang, Jianhua

    2015-09-01

    Cable-driven exoskeletons have used active cables to actuate the system and are worn on subjects to provide motion assistance. However, this kind of wearable devices usually contains uncertain kinematic parameters. In this paper, a model-based identification method has been proposed for a cable-driven arm exoskeleton to estimate its uncertainties. The identification method is based on the linearized error model derived from the kinematics of the exoskeleton. Experiment has been conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed model-based method in practical application.

  19. HOTSPOT Health Physics codes for the PC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homann, S.G.

    1994-03-01

    The HOTSPOT Health Physics codes were created to provide Health Physics personnel with a fast, field-portable calculation tool for evaluating accidents involving radioactive materials. HOTSPOT codes are a first-order approximation of the radiation effects associated with the atmospheric release of radioactive materials. HOTSPOT programs are reasonably accurate for a timely initial assessment. More importantly, HOTSPOT codes produce a consistent output for the same input assumptions and minimize the probability of errors associated with reading a graph incorrectly or scaling a universal nomogram during an emergency. The HOTSPOT codes are designed for short-term (less than 24 hours) release durations. Users requiring radiological release consequences for release scenarios over a longer time period, e.g., annual windrose data, are directed to such long-term models as CAPP88-PC (Parks, 1992). Users requiring more sophisticated modeling capabilities, e.g., complex terrain; multi-location real-time wind field data; etc., are directed to such capabilities as the Department of Energy`s ARAC computer codes (Sullivan, 1993). Four general programs -- Plume, Explosion, Fire, and Resuspension -- calculate a downwind assessment following the release of radioactive material resulting from a continuous or puff release, explosive release, fuel fire, or an area contamination event. Other programs deal with the release of plutonium, uranium, and tritium to expedite an initial assessment of accidents involving nuclear weapons. Additional programs estimate the dose commitment from the inhalation of any one of the radionuclides listed in the database of radionuclides; calibrate a radiation survey instrument for ground-survey measurements; and screen plutonium uptake in the lung (see FIDLER Calibration and LUNG Screening sections).

  20. Identification of Employee Performance Appraisal Methods in Agricultural Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venclova Katerina

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A formal employee performance appraisal is regarded as one of the tools of human resources performance management. People, their knowledge and skills are currently considered to be the most valuable resource a company has. The article focuses on methods of employee performance appraisal in agricultural organizations in the Czech Republic. The first part of the article deals with the theoretical background of the term “formal appraisal” and employee performance appraisal methods as defined by Czech and foreign specialists. Further, the article describes, based on a questionnaire survey, employee performance appraisal methods that are considered importantfor the agricultural organizations in the Czech Republic. The aim of the article is to identify the current state of formal employee appraisal in a sample group of agricultural organizationsand to test dependencies between selected qualitative characteristics. The outcomes show that the most commonly used methods of employee performance appraisal in agricultural organizations include predefined goal-based performance appraisal, predefined standard outcome-based performance appraisal and appraisal interviews. Agricultural organizations apply these methodsin particular due to the fact that their findings are further utilized in other areas of human resource management, such as reward system and personnel planning. In statistical terms, dependencybetween the method of employee performance appraisal according to predefined goals applied by agricultural organizations and personnel planning (an area of human resources managementhas been proven (p-value: 0.032, Phi coefficient: 4.578.

  1. Methods for identification and verification using vacuum XRF system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Fred (Inventor); Kaiser, Bruce (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Apparatus and methods in which one or more elemental taggants that are intrinsically located in an object are detected by x-ray fluorescence analysis under vacuum conditions to identify or verify the object's elemental content for elements with lower atomic numbers. By using x-ray fluorescence analysis, the apparatus and methods of the invention are simple and easy to use, as well as provide detection by a non line-of-sight method to establish the origin of objects, as well as their point of manufacture, authenticity, verification, security, and the presence of impurities. The invention is extremely advantageous because it provides the capability to measure lower atomic number elements in the field with a portable instrument.

  2. Fatigue crack identification method based on strain amplitude changing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tiancai; Gao, Jun; Wang, Yonghong; Xu, Youliang

    2017-09-01

    Aiming at the difficulties in identifying the location and time of crack initiation in the castings of helicopter transmission system during fatigue tests, by introducing the classification diagnostic criteria of similar failure mode to find out the similarity of fatigue crack initiation among castings, an engineering method and quantitative criterion for detecting fatigue cracks based on strain amplitude changing is proposed. This method is applied on the fatigue test of a gearbox housing, whose results indicates: during the fatigue test, the system alarms when SC strain meter reaches the quantitative criterion. The afterwards check shows that a fatigue crack less than 5mm is found at the corresponding location of SC strain meter. The test result proves that the method can provide accurate test data for strength life analysis.

  3. Classification Model for Forest Fire Hotspot Occurrences Prediction Using ANFIS Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijayanto, A. K.; Sani, O.; Kartika, N. D.; Herdiyeni, Y.

    2017-01-01

    This study proposed the application of data mining technique namely Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) on forest fires hotspot data to develop classification models for hotspots occurrence in Central Kalimantan. Hotspot is a point that is indicated as the location of fires. In this study, hotspot distribution is categorized as true alarm and false alarm. ANFIS is a soft computing method in which a given inputoutput data set is expressed in a fuzzy inference system (FIS). The FIS implements a nonlinear mapping from its input space to the output space. The method of this study classified hotspots as target objects by correlating spatial attributes data using three folds in ANFIS algorithm to obtain the best model. The best result obtained from the 3rd fold provided low error for training (error = 0.0093676) and also low error testing result (error = 0.0093676). Attribute of distance to road is the most determining factor that influences the probability of true and false alarm where the level of human activities in this attribute is higher. This classification model can be used to develop early warning system of forest fire.

  4. Identification of buried victims in natural disaster with GPR method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewi, Rianty Kusuma; Kurniawan, Adityo; Taqwantara, Reyhan Fariz; Iskandar, Farras M.; Naufal, Taufiq Ziyan; Widodo

    2017-07-01

    Indonesian is one of the most seismically active regions in the world and has very complicated plate convergence because there is meeting point of several tectonic plates. The complexity of tectonic features causes a lot of natural disasters such as landslides, tsunamis, earth quakes, volcanoes eruption, etc. Sometimes, the disasters occurs in high populated area and causing thousands to millions of victim been buried under the rumble. Unfortunately, the evacuation still uses the conventional method such using rescue dogs whereas the sensitivity of smell is decrease when the victims buried under the level of the ground. The purpose of this study is to detect buried bodies using GPR method, so it can enhance the effectiveness and the efficiency in looking for the disaster victims. GPR method is used because it can investigate things under the ground. A detailed GPR research has been done in Cikutra Graveyard, Bandung, with corpse buried two week until two years before the research. The radar profiles from this research showed amplitude contras anomaly between the new corpse and the old ones. We obtained the amplitude contras at 1.2-1.4 meters under the surface. This method proved to be effective but still need more attention on undulated surface and non-soil areas.

  5. Identification of root filling interfaces by microscopy and tomography methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaslansky, P.; Fratzl, P.; Rack, A.; Wu, M.K.; Wesselink, P.R.; Shemesh, H.

    2011-01-01

    Aim  To assess differences in observed cross-sectional areas of root canals and filling materials, as imaged by three microscopy and two tomography methods. Methodology  Six roots filled with laterally compacted Gutta-percha and AH26 were scanned with phase-contrast enhanced microtomography in a

  6. Identification of alternative method of teaching and learning the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examines alternative method of teaching and learning of the concept of diffusion. An improvised U-shape glass tube called ionic mobility tube was used to observed and measure the rate of movement of divalent metal ions in an aqueous medium in the absence of an electric current. The study revealed that the ...

  7. Sponge cell culture? A molecular identification method for sponge cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sipkema, D.; Heilig, G.H.J.; Akkermans, A.D.L.; Osinga, R.; Tramper, J.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2003-01-01

    Dissociated sponge cells are easily confused with unicellular organisms. This has been an obstacle in the development of sponge-cell lines. We developed a molecular detection method to identify cells of the sponge Dysidea avara in dissociated cell cultures. The 18S ribosomal RNA gene from a Dysidea

  8. identification of alternative method of teaching and learning the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DJFLEX

    This study examines alternative method of teaching and learning of the concept of diffusion. An improvised U-shape glass tube called ionic mobility tube was used to observed and measure the rate of movement of divalent metal ions in an aqueous medium in the absence of an electric current. The study revealed that the ...

  9. Comparison of methods for the identification of microorganisms isolated from blood cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Aydir Cecília Marinho; Fortaleza, Carlos Magno Castelo Branco; Ferreira, Adriano Martison; Cavalcante, Ricardo de Souza; Mondelli, Alessandro Lia; Bagagli, Eduardo; da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza

    2016-08-05

    Bloodstream infections are responsible for thousands of deaths each year. The rapid identification of the microorganisms causing these infections permits correct therapeutic management that will improve the prognosis of the patient. In an attempt to reduce the time spent on this step, microorganism identification devices have been developed, including the VITEK(®) 2 system, which is currently used in routine clinical microbiology laboratories. This study evaluated the accuracy of the VITEK(®) 2 system in the identification of 400 microorganisms isolated from blood cultures and compared the results to those obtained with conventional phenotypic and genotypic methods. In parallel to the phenotypic identification methods, the DNA of these microorganisms was extracted directly from the blood culture bottles for genotypic identification by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. The automated VITEK(®) 2 system correctly identified 94.7 % (379/400) of the isolates. The YST and GN cards resulted in 100 % correct identifications of yeasts (15/15) and Gram-negative bacilli (165/165), respectively. The GP card correctly identified 92.6 % (199/215) of Gram-positive cocci, while the ANC card was unable to correctly identify any Gram-positive bacilli (0/5). The performance of the VITEK(®) 2 system was considered acceptable and statistical analysis showed that the system is a suitable option for routine clinical microbiology laboratories to identify different microorganisms.

  10. A system boundary identification method for life cycle assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Tao; Zhang, Hongchao; Liu, Zhichao

    2014-01-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a useful tool for quantifying the overall environmental impacts of a product, process, or service. The scientific scope and boundary definition are important to ensure the accuracy of LCA results. Defining the boundary in LCA is difficult and there are no commonly...... of processes considered, and the gradient of the fitting curve trends to zero gradually. According to the threshold rules, a relatively accurate system boundary could be obtained.It is found from this research that the system boundary curve describes the growth of life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) results...... accepted scientific methods yet. The objective of this research is to present a comprehensive discussion of system boundaries in LCA and to develop an appropriate boundary delimitation method.A product system is partitioned into the primary system and interrelated subsystems. The hierarchical relationship...

  11. Inferring Rationales from Choice : Identification for Rational Shortlist Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Rohan Dutta; Sean Horan

    2013-01-01

    A wide variety of choice behavior inconsistent with preference maximization can be explained by Manzini and Mariotti's Rational Shortlist Methods. Choices are made by sequentially applying a pair of asymmetric binary relations (rationales) to eliminate inferior alternatives. Manzini and Mariotti's axiomatic treatment elegantly describes which behavior can be explained by this model. However, it leaves unanswered what can be inferred, from observed behavior, about the underlying rationales. Es...

  12. DNA barcoding of Rhododendron (Ericaceae), the largest Chinese plant genus in biodiversity hotspots of the Himalaya-Hengduan Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Li-Jun; Liu, Jie; Möller, Michael; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Xue-Mei; Li, De-Zhu; Gao, Lian-Ming

    2015-07-01

    The Himalaya-Hengduan Mountains encompass two global biodiversity hotspots with high levels of biodiversity and endemism. This area is one of the diversification centres of the genus Rhododendron, which is recognized as one of the most taxonomically challenging plant taxa due to recent adaptive radiations and rampant hybridization. In this study, four DNA barcodes were evaluated on 531 samples representing 173 species of seven sections of four subgenera in Rhododendron, with a high sampling density from the Himalaya-Hengduan Mountains employing three analytical methods. The varied approaches (nj, pwg and blast) had different species identification powers with blast performing best. With the pwg analysis, the discrimination rates for single barcodes varied from 12.21% to 25.19% with ITS barcodes showed the highest discrimination ability (both 41.98%) among all possible combinations. As a single barcode, psbA-trnH performed best with a relatively high performance (25.19%). Overall, the three-marker combination of ITS + psbA-trnH + matK was found to be the best DNA barcode for identifying Rhododendron species. The relatively low discriminative efficiency of DNA barcoding in this genus (~42%) may possibly be attributable to too low sequence divergences as a result of a long generation time of Rhododendron and complex speciation patterns involving recent radiations and hybridizations. Taking the morphology, distribution range and habitat of the species into account, DNA barcoding provided additional information for species identification and delivered a preliminary assessment of biodiversity for the large genus Rhododendron in the biodiversity hotspots of the Himalaya-Hengduan Mountains. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Identification of metabolic system parameters using global optimization methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gatzke Edward P

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The problem of estimating the parameters of dynamic models of complex biological systems from time series data is becoming increasingly important. Methods and results Particular consideration is given to metabolic systems that are formulated as Generalized Mass Action (GMA models. The estimation problem is posed as a global optimization task, for which novel techniques can be applied to determine the best set of parameter values given the measured responses of the biological system. The challenge is that this task is nonconvex. Nonetheless, deterministic optimization techniques can be used to find a global solution that best reconciles the model parameters and measurements. Specifically, the paper employs branch-and-bound principles to identify the best set of model parameters from observed time course data and illustrates this method with an existing model of the fermentation pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This is a relatively simple yet representative system with five dependent states and a total of 19 unknown parameters of which the values are to be determined. Conclusion The efficacy of the branch-and-reduce algorithm is illustrated by the S. cerevisiae example. The method described in this paper is likely to be widely applicable in the dynamic modeling of metabolic networks.

  14. A graphic method for identification of novel glioma related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu-Fei; Shu, Yang; Yang, Lei; He, Yi-Chun; Li, Li-Peng; Huang, GuaHua; Li, Hai-Peng; Jiang, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Glioma, as the most common and lethal intracranial tumor, is a serious disease that causes many deaths every year. Good comprehension of the mechanism underlying this disease is very helpful to design effective treatments. However, up to now, the knowledge of this disease is still limited. It is an important step to understand the mechanism underlying this disease by uncovering its related genes. In this study, a graphic method was proposed to identify novel glioma related genes based on known glioma related genes. A weighted graph was constructed according to the protein-protein interaction information retrieved from STRING and the well-known shortest path algorithm was employed to discover novel genes. The following analysis suggests that some of them are related to the biological process of glioma, proving that our method was effective in identifying novel glioma related genes. We hope that the proposed method would be applied to study other diseases and provide useful information to medical workers, thereby designing effective treatments of different diseases.

  15. Research on Hotspot Discovery in Internet Public Opinions Based on Improved -Means

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gensheng Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available How to discover hotspot in the Internet public opinions effectively is a hot research field for the researchers related which plays a key role for governments and corporations to find useful information from mass data in the Internet. An improved -means algorithm for hotspot discovery in internet public opinions is presented based on the analysis of existing defects and calculation principle of original -means algorithm. First, some new methods are designed to preprocess website texts, select and express the characteristics of website texts, and define the similarity between two website texts, respectively. Second, clustering principle and the method of initial classification centers selection are analyzed and improved in order to overcome the limitations of original -means algorithm. Finally, the experimental results verify that the improved algorithm can improve the clustering stability and classification accuracy of hotspot discovery in internet public opinions when used in practice.

  16. Application of Story-wise Shear Building Identification Method to Actual Ambient Vibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei eFujita

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A sophisticated and smart story stiffness System Identification (SI method for a shear building model is applied to a full-scale building frame subjected to micro-tremors. The advantageous and novel feature is that not only the modal parameters, such as natural frequencies and damping ratios, but also the physical model parameters, such as story stiffnesses and damping coefficients, can be identified using micro-tremors. While the building responses to earthquake ground motions are necessary in the previous SI method, it is shown in this paper that the micro-tremor measurements in a full-scale 5 story building frame can be used for identification within the same framework. The SI using micro-tremor measurements leads to the enhanced usability of the previously proposed story-wise shear building identification method. The degree of ARX models and cut-off frequencies of band-pass filter are determined to derive reliable results.

  17. Spatial heterogeneity in the Mediterranean Biodiversity Hotspot affects barcoding accuracy of its freshwater fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, M F; Herder, F; Monaghan, M T; Almada, V; Barbieri, R; Bariche, M; Berrebi, P; Bohlen, J; Casal-Lopez, M; Delmastro, G B; Denys, G P J; Dettai, A; Doadrio, I; Kalogianni, E; Kärst, H; Kottelat, M; Kovačić, M; Laporte, M; Lorenzoni, M; Marčić, Z; Özuluğ, M; Perdices, A; Perea, S; Persat, H; Porcelotti, S; Puzzi, C; Robalo, J; Šanda, R; Schneider, M; Šlechtová, V; Stoumboudi, M; Walter, S; Freyhof, J

    2014-11-01

    Incomplete knowledge of biodiversity remains a stumbling block for conservation planning and even occurs within globally important Biodiversity Hotspots (BH). Although technical advances have boosted the power of molecular biodiversity assessments, the link between DNA sequences and species and the analytics to discriminate entities remain crucial. Here, we present an analysis of the first DNA barcode library for the freshwater fish fauna of the Mediterranean BH (526 spp.), with virtually complete species coverage (498 spp., 98% extant species). In order to build an identification system supporting conservation, we compared species determination by taxonomists to multiple clustering analyses of DNA barcodes for 3165 specimens. The congruence of barcode clusters with morphological determination was strongly dependent on the method of cluster delineation, but was highest with the general mixed Yule-coalescent (GMYC) model-based approach (83% of all species recovered as GMYC entity). Overall, genetic morphological discontinuities suggest the existence of up to 64 previously unrecognized candidate species. We found reduced identification accuracy when using the entire DNA-barcode database, compared with analyses on databases for individual river catchments. This scale effect has important implications for barcoding assessments and suggests that fairly simple identification pipelines provide sufficient resolution in local applications. We calculated Evolutionarily Distinct and Globally Endangered scores in order to identify candidate species for conservation priority and argue that the evolutionary content of barcode data can be used to detect priority species for future IUCN assessments. We show that large-scale barcoding inventories of complex biotas are feasible and contribute directly to the evaluation of conservation priorities. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Melting Temperature Mapping Method: A Novel Method for Rapid Identification of Unknown Pathogenic Microorganisms within Three Hours of Sample Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimi, Hideki; Ueno, Tomohiro; Hayashi, Shirou; Abe, Akihito; Tsurue, Takahiro; Mori, Masashi; Tabata, Homare; Minami, Hiroshi; Goto, Michihiko; Akiyama, Makoto; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Saito, Shigeru; Kitajima, Isao

    2015-07-28

    Acquiring the earliest possible identification of pathogenic microorganisms is critical for selecting the appropriate antimicrobial therapy in infected patients. We herein report the novel "melting temperature (Tm) mapping method" for rapidly identifying the dominant bacteria in a clinical sample from sterile sites. Employing only seven primer sets, more than 100 bacterial species can be identified. In particular, using the Difference Value, it is possible to identify samples suitable for Tm mapping identification. Moreover, this method can be used to rapidly diagnose the absence of bacteria in clinical samples. We tested the Tm mapping method using 200 whole blood samples obtained from patients with suspected sepsis, 85% (171/200) of which matched the culture results based on the detection level. A total of 130 samples were negative according to the Tm mapping method, 98% (128/130) of which were also negative based on the culture method. Meanwhile, 70 samples were positive according to the Tm mapping method, and of the 59 suitable for identification, 100% (59/59) exhibited a "match" or "broad match" with the culture or sequencing results. These findings were obtained within three hours of whole blood collection. The Tm mapping method is therefore useful for identifying infectious diseases requiring prompt treatment.

  19. General Practice Clinical Data Help Identify Dementia Hotspots: A Novel Geospatial Analysis Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Nasser; Wangdi, Kinley; Cherbuin, Nicolas; Anstey, Kaarin J

    2018-01-01

    We have a poor understanding of whether dementia clusters geographically, how this occurs, and how dementia may relate to socio-demographic factors. To shed light on these important questions, this study aimed to compute a dementia risk score for individuals to assess spatial variation of dementia risk, identify significant clusters (hotspots), and explore their association with socioeconomic status. We used clinical records from 16 general practices (468 Statistical Area level 1 s, N = 14,746) from the city of west Adelaide, Australia for the duration of 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2014. Dementia risk was estimated using The Australian National University-Alzheimer's Disease Risk Index. Hotspot analyses were applied to examine potential clusters in dementia risk at small area level. Significant hotspots were observed in eastern and southern areas while coldspots were observed in the western area within the study perimeter. Additionally, significant hotspots were observed in low socio-economic communities. We found dementia risk scores increased with age, sex (female), high cholesterol, no physical activity, living alone (widow, divorced, separated, or never married), and co-morbidities such as diabetes and depression. Similarly, smoking was associated with a lower dementia risk score. The identification of dementia risk clusters may provide insight into possible geographical variations in risk factors for dementia and quantify these risks at the community level. As such, this research may enable policy makers to tailor early prevention strategies to the correct individuals within their precise locations.

  20. Particle identification method in the CsI(Tl) scintillator used for the CHIMERA 4 pi detector

    CERN Document Server

    Alderighi, M; Basssini, R; Berceanu, I; Blicharska, J; Boiano, C; Borderie, B; Bougault, R; Bruno, M; Cali, C; Cardella, G; Cavallaro, S; D'Agostino, M; D'andrea, M; Dayras, R; De Filippo, E; Fichera, F; Geraci, E; Giustolisi, F; Grzeszczuk, A; Guardone, N; Guazzoni, P; Guinet, D; Iacono-Manno, M; Kowalski, S; La Guidara, E; Lanchais, A L; Lanzalone, G; Lanzanò, G; Le Neindre, N; Li, S; Maiolino, C; Majka, Z; Manfredi, G; Nicotra, D; Paduszynski, T; Pagano, A; Papa, M; Petrovici, C M; Piasecki, E; Pirrone, S; Politi, G; Pop, A; Porto, F; Rivet, M F; Rosato, E; Sacca, G; Sechi, G; Simion, V; Sperduto, M L; Steckmeyer, J C; Trifiró, A; Trimarchi, M; Urso, S; Vannini, G; Vigilante, M; Wilczynski, J; Wu, H; Xiao, Z; Zetta, L; Zipper, W

    2002-01-01

    The charged particle identification obtained by the analysis of signals coming from the CsI(Tl) detectors of the CHIMERA 4 pi heavy-ion detector is presented. A simple double-gate integration method, with the use of the cyclotron radiofrequency as reference time, results in low thresholds for isotopic particle identification. The dependence of the identification quality on the gate generation timing is discussed. Isotopic identification of light ions up to Beryllium is clearly seen. For the first time also the identification of Z=5 particles is observed. The identification of neutrons interacting with CsI(Tl) by (n,alpha) and (n,gamma) reactions is also discussed.

  1. Digital grid method for fingerprint identification and objective report writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Kumar Thakar

    2016-06-01

    In the present study an attempt has been made to develop a modified grid method for comparison of finger print. The step by step procedure to use this grid for comparison of inked fingerprints present on questioned or standard documents like property wills affidavits, bank documents and passports etc along with the Adobe Photoshop CS5 has been discussed in detail. The modified grid enables the expert not only to perform a box by box comparison of the fingerprints but also a new way of write a report, which can be demonstrated well to the judiciary in the court room trials.

  2. Methods for identification of images acquired with digital cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geradts, Zeno J.; Bijhold, Jurrien; Kieft, Martijn; Kurosawa, Kenji; Kuroki, Kenro; Saitoh, Naoki

    2001-02-01

    From the court we were asked whether it is possible to determine if an image has been made with a specific digital camera. This question has to be answered in child pornography cases, where evidence is needed that a certain picture has been made with a specific camera. We have looked into different methods of examining the cameras to determine if a specific image has been made with a camera: defects in CCDs, file formats that are used, noise introduced by the pixel arrays and watermarking in images used by the camera manufacturer.

  3. Photogrammetric Method and Software for Stream Planform Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonedahl, S. H.; Stonedahl, F.; Lohberg, M. M.; Lusk, K.; Miller, D.

    2013-12-01

    Accurately characterizing the planform of a stream is important for many purposes, including recording measurement and sampling locations, monitoring change due to erosion or volumetric discharge, and spatial modeling of stream processes. While expensive surveying equipment or high resolution aerial photography can be used to obtain planform data, our research focused on developing a close-range photogrammetric method (and accompanying free/open-source software) to serve as a cost-effective alternative. This method involves securing and floating a wooden square frame on the stream surface at several locations, taking photographs from numerous angles at each location, and then post-processing and merging data from these photos using the corners of the square for reference points, unit scale, and perspective correction. For our test field site we chose a ~35m reach along Black Hawk Creek in Sunderbruch Park (Davenport, IA), a small, slow-moving stream with overhanging trees. To quantify error we measured 88 distances between 30 marked control points along the reach. We calculated error by comparing these 'ground truth' distances to the corresponding distances extracted from our photogrammetric method. We placed the square at three locations along our reach and photographed it from multiple angles. The square corners, visible control points, and visible stream outline were hand-marked in these photos using the GIMP (open-source image editor). We wrote an open-source GUI in Java (hosted on GitHub), which allows the user to load marked-up photos, designate square corners and label control points. The GUI also extracts the marked pixel coordinates from the images. We also wrote several scripts (currently in MATLAB) that correct the pixel coordinates for radial distortion using Brown's lens distortion model, correct for perspective by forcing the four square corner pixels to form a parallelogram in 3-space, and rotate the points in order to correctly orient all photos of

  4. Emotion identification method using RGB information of human face

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Shinya; Mita, Akira

    2015-03-01

    Recently, the number of single households is drastically increased due to the growth of the aging society and the diversity of lifestyle. Therefore, the evolution of building spaces is demanded. Biofied Building we propose can help to avoid this situation. It helps interaction between the building and residents' conscious and unconscious information using robots. The unconscious information includes emotion, condition, and behavior. One of the important information is thermal comfort. We assume we can estimate it from human face. There are many researchs about face color analysis, but a few of them are conducted in real situations. In other words, the existing methods were not used with disturbance such as room lumps. In this study, Kinect was used with face-tracking. Room lumps and task lumps were used to verify that our method could be applicable to real situation. In this research, two rooms at 22 and 28 degrees C were prepared. We showed that the transition of thermal comfort by changing temperature can be observed from human face. Thus, distinction between the data of 22 and 28 degrees C condition from face color was proved to be possible.

  5. A Real-Time Scintillation Crystal Identification Method and Its FPGA Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafa, A. A.; Saleh, H. I.

    2014-10-01

    At the expense of increasing the complexity, Zernike Moment (ZM) was used in Crystal Identification (CI) to solve the parallax error with the highest identification performance among recent methods that are based on Digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms. In Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanners, the CI method must fulfill the real-time event rate processing that requires low complexity and fast algorithms. The main idea of this paper is the complexity reduction of the ZM-based CI method and using a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier to comply with the rate of real-time PET scanners. To achieve this goal, 1-D form of ZM and fast computations of cascaded ZM and SVM stages are proposed to minimize the complexity while preserving the highest performance among compared methods. The proposed fast ZM-SVM CI method is implemented using both MATLAB and FPGA and verified by identification of 100 000 pulses of LSO-LuYAP scintillation crystals. The FPGA realization of the fast ZM-SVM CI method offers an identification rate of 90.6% at a rate of 6.2 Mevents/s using 16 samples per event which is sufficient for real time small animal PET scanners.

  6. Gender Identification of the Speaker Using VQ Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasif V. Nabiyev

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Speaking is the easiest and natural form of communication between people. Intensive studies are made in order to provide this communication via computers between people. The systems using voice biometric technology are attracting attention especially in the angle of cost and usage. When compared with the other biometic systems the application is much more practical. For example by using a microphone placed in the environment voice record can be obtained even without notifying the user and the system can be applied. Moreover the remote access facility is one of the other advantages of voice biometry. In this study, it is aimed to automatically determine the gender of the speaker through the speech waves which include personal information. If the speaker gender can be determined while composing models according to the gender information, the success of voice recognition systems can be increased in an important degree. Generally all the speaker recognition systems are composed of two parts which are feature extraction and matching. Feature extraction is the procedure in which the least information presenting the speech and the speaker is determined through voice signal. There are different features used in voice applications such as LPC, MFCC and PLP. In this study as a feature vector MFCC is used. Feature mathcing is the procedure in which the features derived from unknown speakers and known speaker group are compared. According to the text used in comparison the system is devided to two parts that are text dependent and text independent. While the same text is used in text dependent systems, different texts are used in indepentent text systems. Nowadays, DTW and HMM are text dependent, VQ and GMM are text indepentent matching methods. In this study due to the high success ratio and simple application features VQ approach is used.In this study a system which determines the speaker gender automatically and text independent is proposed. The proposed

  7. The impact of hotspot-targeted interventions on malaria transmission: study protocol for a cluster-randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bousema Teun

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria transmission is highly heterogeneous in most settings, resulting in the formation of recognizable malaria hotspots. Targeting these hotspots might represent a highly efficacious way of controlling or eliminating malaria if the hotspots fuel malaria transmission to the wider community. Methods/design Hotspots of malaria will be determined based on spatial patterns in age-adjusted prevalence and density of antibodies against malaria antigens apical membrane antigen-1 and merozoite surface protein-1. The community effect of interventions targeted at these hotspots will be determined. The intervention will comprise larviciding, focal screening and treatment of the human population, distribution of long-lasting insecticide-treated nets and indoor residual spraying. The impact of the intervention will be determined inside and up to 500 m outside the targeted hotspots by PCR-based parasite prevalence in cross-sectional surveys, malaria morbidity by passive case detection in selected facilities and entomological monitoring of larval and adult Anopheles populations. Discussion This study aims to provide direct evidence for a community effect of hotspot-targeted interventions. The trial is powered to detect large effects on malaria transmission in the context of ongoing malaria interventions. Follow-up studies will be needed to determine the effect of individual components of the interventions and the cost-effectiveness of a hotspot-targeted approach, where savings made by reducing the number of compounds that need to receive interventions should outweigh the costs of hotspot-detection. Trial registration NCT01575613. The protocol was registered online on 20 March 2012; the first community was randomized on 26 March 2012.

  8. Research on Palmprint Identification Method Based on Quantum Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum image recognition is a technology by using quantum algorithm to process the image information. It can obtain better effect than classical algorithm. In this paper, four different quantum algorithms are used in the three stages of palmprint recognition. First, quantum adaptive median filtering algorithm is presented in palmprint filtering processing. Quantum filtering algorithm can get a better filtering result than classical algorithm through the comparison. Next, quantum Fourier transform (QFT is used to extract pattern features by only one operation due to quantum parallelism. The proposed algorithm exhibits an exponential speed-up compared with discrete Fourier transform in the feature extraction. Finally, quantum set operations and Grover algorithm are used in palmprint matching. According to the experimental results, quantum algorithm only needs to apply square of N operations to find out the target palmprint, but the traditional method needs N times of calculation. At the same time, the matching accuracy of quantum algorithm is almost 100%.

  9. Research on Palmprint Identification Method Based on Quantum Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhanzhan

    2014-01-01

    Quantum image recognition is a technology by using quantum algorithm to process the image information. It can obtain better effect than classical algorithm. In this paper, four different quantum algorithms are used in the three stages of palmprint recognition. First, quantum adaptive median filtering algorithm is presented in palmprint filtering processing. Quantum filtering algorithm can get a better filtering result than classical algorithm through the comparison. Next, quantum Fourier transform (QFT) is used to extract pattern features by only one operation due to quantum parallelism. The proposed algorithm exhibits an exponential speed-up compared with discrete Fourier transform in the feature extraction. Finally, quantum set operations and Grover algorithm are used in palmprint matching. According to the experimental results, quantum algorithm only needs to apply square of N operations to find out the target palmprint, but the traditional method needs N times of calculation. At the same time, the matching accuracy of quantum algorithm is almost 100%. PMID:25105165

  10. Benchmarking of methods for identification of antimicrobial resistance genes in bacterial whole genome data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Philip T. L. C.; Zankari, Ea; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2016-01-01

    to two different methods in current use for identification of antibiotic resistance genes in bacterial WGS data. A novel method, KmerResistance, which examines the co-occurrence of k-mers between the WGS data and a database of resistance genes, was developed. The performance of this method was compared...... with two previously described methods; ResFinder and SRST2, which use an assembly/BLAST method and BWA, respectively, using two datasets with a total of 339 isolates, covering five species, originating from the Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust and Danish pig farms. The predicted resistance...... was compared with the observed phenotypes for all isolates. To challenge further the sensitivity of the in silico methods, the datasets were also down-sampled to 1% of the reads and reanalysed. The best results were obtained by identification of resistance genes by mapping directly against the raw reads...

  11. Analisa Kecepatan Transfer Data Pada Perancangan Hotspot Sederhana Dengan System Single Sign On Di Perkantoran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bela Neziah Arum Pangesti

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The problems office in the utilization of wireless technology has widely used but sometimes without take into the number of users, so it is not mangkus. The networking system for small office can be use wireless simple system. Most of the office has applied hotspot but that is old system, one account for all people using internet access. Single sign-on is a system services of hotspot, this system verifying an account for each user so people have different and username dan a password. The methodology used is literature review, analysis, design, implementation, testing and analysis of the data transfer rate. The hotspot with a single sign-on system using mikrotik, and access point, the connected with networking devices in the office. Winbox tools is used to configuration. Testing with the user had been connected to the hotspot system single sign on. Methods of test to user login on the system single sign-on is the black box texting. Testing the speed of data transfer is used staff user and guest user who uploaded three types of files to the drive with diffrent bandwidth. Then the network sniffing is used tools wireshark. The results from this study is simple hotspot service with single sign-on system for office and from the analysis of the data transfer rate was known the data transfer rate on the staff user and guest user to the three types of file is a type of word files greater than PDF and PPT.

  12. Isolation and identification methods of Rothia species in oral cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzukibashi, Osamu; Uchibori, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Taira; Umezawa, Koji; Mashimo, Chiho; Nambu, Takayuki; Saito, Masanori; Hashizume-Takizawa, Tomomi; Ochiai, Tomoko

    2017-03-01

    Rothia dentocariosa and Rothia mucilaginosa which are Gram-positive bacteria are part of the normal flora in the human oral cavity and pharynx. Furthermore, Rothia aeria, which was first isolated from air samples in the Russian space station Mir, is predicted to be an oral inhabitant. Immunocompromised patients are often infected by these organisms, leading to various systemic diseases. The involvement of these organisms in oral infections has attracted little attention, and their distribution in the oral cavity has not been fully clarified because of difficulties in accurately identifying these organisms. A suitable selective medium for oral Rothia species, including R. aeria, is necessary to assess the veritable prevalence of these organisms in the oral cavity. To examine the bacterial population in the oral cavity, a novel selective medium (ORSM) was developed for isolating oral Rothia species in this study. ORSM consists of tryptone, sodium gluconate, Lab-Lemco powder, sodium fluoride, neutral acriflavin, lincomycin, colistin, and agar. The average growth recovery of oral Rothia species on ORSM was 96.7% compared with that on BHI-Y agar. Growth of other representative oral bacteria, i.e. genera Streptococcus, Actinomyces, Neisseria, and Corynebacterium, was remarkably inhibited on the selective medium. PCR primers were designed based on partial sequences of the 16S rDNA genes of oral Rothia species. These primers reacted to each organism and did not react to other non-oral Rothia species or representative oral bacteria. These results indicated that these primers are useful for identifying oral Rothia species. A simple multiplex PCR procedure using these primers was a reliable method of identifying oral Rothia species. The proportion of oral Rothia species in saliva samples collected from 20 subjects was examined by culture method using ORSM. Rothia dentocariosa, Rothia mucilaginosa, and R. aeria accounted for 1.3%, 5.9%, and 0.8% of the total cultivable

  13. Some Numerical Methods for Exponential Analysis with Connection to a General Identification Scheme for Linear Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-01

    identify by block number) System- identification, Prony , exponential analysis, Singularity Expansion Method, transient 20 BTAT(Continue o...produces a "best fit " to the wave- form under analysis in the mean-square 3ense, that is, it minimizes the mean-square error. Some other methods that have...herein to describe the Prony procedure (24], the so-called least squares Prony procedure [9], and the pencil-of-functions method of Jain [191. The

  14. A simple method for identification of irradiated spices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behere, A.; Desai, S.R.P.; Nair, P.M. (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Food Technology and Enzyme Engineering Div.); Rao, S.M.D. (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Technical Physics and Prototype Engineering Div.)

    1992-07-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) properties of curry powder, a salt containing spice mixture, and three different ground spices, viz, chilli, turmeric and pepper, were compared with TL of table salt. The spices other than curry powder, did not exhibit characteristic TL in the absence of salt. Therefore studies were initiated to develop a simple and reliable method using common salt for distinguishing irradiated spices (10 kGy) from unirradiated ones under normal conditions of storage. Common salt exhibited a characteristic TL glow at 170{sup o}C. However, when present in curry powder, the TL glow of salt showed a shift to 208{sup o}C. It was further observed that upon storage up to 6 months, the TL of irradiated curry powder retained about 10% of the original intensity and still could be distinguished from the untreated samples. From our results it is evident that common salt could be used as an indicator either internally or externally in small sachets for incorporating into prepacked spices. (author).

  15. Identification of rural landscape classes through a GIS clustering method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Diti

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a methodology aimed at supporting the rural planning process. The analysis of the state of the art of local and regional policies focused on rural and suburban areas, and the study of the scientific literature in the field of spatial analysis methodologies, have allowed the definition of the basic concept of the research. The proposed method, developed in a GIS, is based on spatial metrics selected and defined to cover various agricultural, environmental, and socio-economic components. The specific goal of the proposed methodology is to identify homogeneous extra-urban areas through their objective characterization at different scales. Once areas with intermediate urban-rural characters have been identified, the analysis is then focused on the more detailed definition of periurban agricultural areas. The synthesis of the results of the analysis of the various landscape components is achieved through an original interpretative key which aims to quantify the potential impacts of rural areas on the urban system. This paper presents the general framework of the methodology and some of the main results of its first implementation through an Italian case study.

  16. Industrial Process Identification and Control Design Step-test and Relay-experiment-based Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Tao

    2012-01-01

      Industrial Process Identification and Control Design is devoted to advanced identification and control methods for the operation of continuous-time processes both with and without time delay, in industrial and chemical engineering practice.   The simple and practical step- or relay-feedback test is employed when applying the proposed identification techniques, which are classified in terms of common industrial process type: open-loop stable; integrating; and unstable, respectively. Correspondingly, control system design and tuning models that follow are presented for single-input-single-output processes.   Furthermore, new two-degree-of-freedom control strategies and cascade control system design methods are explored with reference to independently-improving, set-point tracking and load disturbance rejection. Decoupling, multi-loop, and decentralized control techniques for the operation of multiple-input-multiple-output processes are also detailed. Perfect tracking of a desire output trajectory is realiz...

  17. A De-identification method for bilingual clinical texts of various note types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Soo-Yong; Park, Yu Rang; Shin, Yongdon; Choi, Hyo Joung; Park, Jihyun; Lyu, Yongman; Lee, Moo-Song; Choi, Chang-Min; Kim, Woo-Sung; Lee, Jae Ho

    2015-01-01

    De-identification of personal health information is essential in order not to require written patient informed consent. Previous de-identification methods were proposed using natural language processing technology in order to remove the identifiers in clinical narrative text, although these methods only focused on narrative text written in English. In this study, we propose a regular expression-based de-identification method used to address bilingual clinical records written in Korean and English. To develop and validate regular expression rules, we obtained training and validation datasets composed of 6,039 clinical notes of 20 types and 5,000 notes of 33 types, respectively. Fifteen regular expression rules were constructed using the development dataset and those rules achieved 99.87% precision and 96.25% recall for the validation dataset. Our de-identification method successfully removed the identifiers in diverse types of bilingual clinical narrative texts. This method will thus assist physicians to more easily perform retrospective research.

  18. A simplified fractional order impedance model and parameter identification method for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qingxia; Xu, Jun; Cao, Binggang; Li, Xiuqing

    2017-01-01

    Identification of internal parameters of lithium-ion batteries is a useful tool to evaluate battery performance, and requires an effective model and algorithm. Based on the least square genetic algorithm, a simplified fractional order impedance model for lithium-ion batteries and the corresponding parameter identification method were developed. The simplified model was derived from the analysis of the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy data and the transient response of lithium-ion batteries with different states of charge. In order to identify the parameters of the model, an equivalent tracking system was established, and the method of least square genetic algorithm was applied using the time-domain test data. Experiments and computer simulations were carried out to verify the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed model and parameter identification method. Compared with a second-order resistance-capacitance (2-RC) model and recursive least squares method, small tracing voltage fluctuations were observed. The maximum battery voltage tracing error for the proposed model and parameter identification method is within 0.5%; this demonstrates the good performance of the model and the efficiency of the least square genetic algorithm to estimate the internal parameters of lithium-ion batteries. PMID:28212405

  19. Magnetic and electric hotspots with silicon nanodimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Reuben M; Permyakov, Dmitry; Yu, Ye Feng; Markovich, Dmitry; Paniagua-Domínguez, Ramón; Gonzaga, Leonard; Samusev, Anton; Kivshar, Yuri; Luk'yanchuk, Boris; Kuznetsov, Arseniy I

    2015-03-11

    The study of the resonant behavior of silicon nanostructures provides a new route for achieving efficient control of both electric and magnetic components of light. We demonstrate experimentally and numerically that enhancement of localized electric and magnetic fields can be achieved in a silicon nanodimer. For the first time, we experimentally observe hotspots of the magnetic field at visible wavelengths for light polarized across the nanodimer's primary axis, using near-field scanning optical microscopy.

  20. Parameter Identification of Ship Maneuvering Models Using Recursive Least Square Method Based on Support Vector Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Zhu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Determination of ship maneuvering models is a tough task of ship maneuverability prediction. Among several prime approaches of estimating ship maneuvering models, system identification combined with the full-scale or free- running model test is preferred. In this contribution, real-time system identification programs using recursive identification method, such as the recursive least square method (RLS, are exerted for on-line identification of ship maneuvering models. However, this method seriously depends on the objects of study and initial values of identified parameters. To overcome this, an intelligent technology, i.e., support vector machines (SVM, is firstly used to estimate initial values of the identified parameters with finite samples. As real measured motion data of the Mariner class ship always involve noise from sensors and external disturbances, the zigzag simulation test data include a substantial quantity of Gaussian white noise. Wavelet method and empirical mode decomposition (EMD are used to filter the data corrupted by noise, respectively. The choice of the sample number for SVM to decide initial values of identified parameters is extensively discussed and analyzed. With de-noised motion data as input-output training samples, parameters of ship maneuvering models are estimated using RLS and SVM-RLS, respectively. The comparison between identification results and true values of parameters demonstrates that both the identified ship maneuvering models from RLS and SVM-RLS have reasonable agreements with simulated motions of the ship, and the increment of the sample for SVM positively affects the identification results. Furthermore, SVM-RLS using data de-noised by EMD shows the highest accuracy and best convergence.

  1. An Identification Method for the Unbalance Parameters of a Rotor-Bearing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wengui Mao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is to be submitting an identification method for the unbalance parameters of a rotor-bearing system. In the method, the unbalance parameters identification problem is formulated as the unbalance force reconstruction which belongs to solving deconvolution problem, in which the unbalance force is expressed in the time domain. The unbalance response is expressed by the convolution integral of Green’s function and the unbalance force. In order to avoid the unstable solution arising from the noisy responses and the deconvolution, a regularization method is adopted to stabilize the solution. Meanwhile, a searching of the sensitive measured point has also been carried out to confirm the robustness of the method. Numerical example and a test rig have been used to illustrate the proposed method.

  2. Dynamic load identification for stochastic structures based on Gegenbauer polynomial approximation and regularization method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Sun, Xingsheng; Han, Xu; Jiang, Chao; Yu, Dejie

    2015-05-01

    Based on the Gegenbauer polynomial expansion theory and regularization method, an analytical method is proposed to identify dynamic loads acting on stochastic structures. Dynamic loads are expressed as functions of time and random parameters in time domain and the forward model of dynamic load identification is established through the discretized convolution integral of loads and the corresponding unit-pulse response functions of system. Random parameters are approximated through the random variables with λ-probability density function (PDFs) or their derivative PDFs. For this kind of random variables, Gegenbauer polynomial expansion is the unique correct choice to transform the problem of load identification for a stochastic structure into its equivalent deterministic system. Just via its equivalent deterministic system, the load identification problem of a stochastic structure can be solved by any available deterministic methods. With measured responses containing noise, the improved regularization operator is adopted to overcome the ill-posedness of load reconstruction and to obtain the stable and approximate solutions of certain inverse problems and the valid assessments of the statistics of identified loads. Numerical simulations demonstrate that with regard to stochastic structures, the identification and assessment of dynamic loads are achieved steadily and effectively by the presented method.

  3. A Universal Microarray Detection Method for Identification of Multiple Phytophthora spp. Using Padlock Probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sikora, K.; Verstappen, E.C.P.; Mendes, O.; Schoen, C.D.; Ristaino, J.; Bonants, P.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The genus Phytophthora consists of many species that cause important diseases in ornamental, agronomic, and forest ecosystems worldwide. Molecular methods have been developed for detection and identification of one or several species of Phytophthora in single or multiplex reactions. In this article,

  4. Comparative phylogeography reveals deep lineages and regional evolutionary hotspots in the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Dustin A.; Vandergast, Amy G.; Barr, Kelly R.; Inman, Richard D.; Esque, Todd C.; Nussear, Kenneth E.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: We explored lineage diversification within desert-dwelling fauna. Our goals were (1) to determine whether phylogenetic lineages and population expansions were consistent with younger Pleistocene climate fluctuation hypotheses or much older events predicted by pre-Pleistocene vicariance hypotheses, (2) to assess concordance in spatial patterns of genetic divergence and diversity among species and (3) to identify regional evolutionary hotspots of divergence and diversity and assess their conservation status. Location: Mojave, Colorado, and Sonoran Deserts, USA. Methods: We analysed previously published gene sequence data for twelve species. We used Bayesian gene tree methods to estimate lineages and divergence times. Within each lineage, we tested for population expansion and age of expansion using coalescent approaches. We mapped interpopulation genetic divergence and intra-population genetic diversity in a GIS to identify hotspots of highest genetic divergence and diversity and to assess whether protected lands overlapped with evolutionary hotspots. Results: In seven of the 12 species, lineage divergence substantially predated the Pleistocene. Historical population expansion was found in eight species, but expansion events postdated the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in only four. For all species assessed, six hotspots of high genetic divergence and diversity were concentrated in the Colorado Desert, along the Colorado River and in the Mojave/Sonoran ecotone. At least some proportion of the land within each recovered hotspot was categorized as protected, yet four of the six also overlapped with major areas of human development. Main conclusions: Most of the species studied here diversified into distinct Mojave and Sonoran lineages prior to the LGM – supporting older diversification hypotheses. Several evolutionary hotspots were recovered but are not strategically paired with areas of protected land. Long-term preservation of species-level biodiversity would

  5. Overlooked mountain rock pools in deserts are critical local hotspots of biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Cândida Gomes; Pimm, Stuart L; Brito, José Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The world is undergoing exceptional biodiversity loss. Most conservation efforts target biodiversity hotspots at large scales. Such approach overlooks small-sized local hotspots, which may be rich in endemic and highly threatened species. We explore the importance of mountain rock pools (gueltas) as local biodiversity hotspots in the Sahara-Sahel. Specifically, we considered how many vertebrates (total and endemics) use gueltas, what factors predict species richness, and which gueltas are of most priority for conservation. We expected to provide management recommendations, improve local biodiversity conservation, and simultaneously contribute with a framework for future enhancement of local communities' economy. The identification of local hotspots of biodiversity is important for revaluating global conservation priorities. We quantified the number of vertebrate species from each taxonomic group and endemics present in 69 gueltas in Mauritania, then compared these with species present in a surrounding area and recorded in the country. We evaluated the predictors of species number's present in each guelta through a multiple regression model. We ranked gueltas by their priority for conservation taking into account the percentage of endemics and threats to each guelta. Within a mere aggregate extent of 43 ha, gueltas hold about 32% and 78% of the total taxa analysed and endemics of Mauritania, respectively. The number of species present in each guelta increased with the primary productivity and area of gueltas and occurrence of permanent water. Droughts and human activities threaten gueltas, while 64% of them are currently unprotected. Gueltas are crucial for local biodiversity conservation and human activities. They require urgent management plans in Mauritania's mountains. They could provide refugia under climate change being important for long-term conservation of Sahara-Sahel biodiversity. Given their disproportional importance in relation to their size, they are

  6. Overlooked mountain rock pools in deserts are critical local hotspots of biodiversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cândida Gomes Vale

    Full Text Available The world is undergoing exceptional biodiversity loss. Most conservation efforts target biodiversity hotspots at large scales. Such approach overlooks small-sized local hotspots, which may be rich in endemic and highly threatened species. We explore the importance of mountain rock pools (gueltas as local biodiversity hotspots in the Sahara-Sahel. Specifically, we considered how many vertebrates (total and endemics use gueltas, what factors predict species richness, and which gueltas are of most priority for conservation. We expected to provide management recommendations, improve local biodiversity conservation, and simultaneously contribute with a framework for future enhancement of local communities' economy. The identification of local hotspots of biodiversity is important for revaluating global conservation priorities.We quantified the number of vertebrate species from each taxonomic group and endemics present in 69 gueltas in Mauritania, then compared these with species present in a surrounding area and recorded in the country. We evaluated the predictors of species number's present in each guelta through a multiple regression model. We ranked gueltas by their priority for conservation taking into account the percentage of endemics and threats to each guelta. Within a mere aggregate extent of 43 ha, gueltas hold about 32% and 78% of the total taxa analysed and endemics of Mauritania, respectively. The number of species present in each guelta increased with the primary productivity and area of gueltas and occurrence of permanent water. Droughts and human activities threaten gueltas, while 64% of them are currently unprotected.Gueltas are crucial for local biodiversity conservation and human activities. They require urgent management plans in Mauritania's mountains. They could provide refugia under climate change being important for long-term conservation of Sahara-Sahel biodiversity. Given their disproportional importance in relation to their

  7. Climate change hotspots in the CMIP5 global climate model ensemble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffenbaugh, Noah S; Giorgi, Filippo

    2012-01-10

    We use a statistical metric of multi-dimensional climate change to quantify the emergence of global climate change hotspots in the CMIP5 climate model ensemble. Our hotspot metric extends previous work through the inclusion of extreme seasonal temperature and precipitation, which exert critical influence on climate change impacts. The results identify areas of the Amazon, the Sahel and tropical West Africa, Indonesia, and the Tibetan Plateau as persistent regional climate change hotspots throughout the 21 st century of the RCP8.5 and RCP4.5 forcing pathways. In addition, areas of southern Africa, the Mediterranean, the Arctic, and Central America/western North America also emerge as prominent regional climate change hotspots in response to intermediate and high levels of forcing. Comparisons of different periods of the two forcing pathways suggest that the pattern of aggregate change is fairly robust to the level of global warming below approximately 2°C of global warming (relative to the late-20 th -century baseline), but not at the higher levels of global warming that occur in the late-21 st -century period of the RCP8.5 pathway, with areas of southern Africa, the Mediterranean, and the Arctic exhibiting particular intensification of relative aggregate climate change in response to high levels of forcing. Although specific impacts will clearly be shaped by the interaction of climate change with human and biological vulnerabilities, our identification of climate change hotspots can help to inform mitigation and adaptation decisions by quantifying the rate, magnitude and causes of the aggregate climate response in different parts of the world.

  8. New logarithmic technique of diffusivity identification using the flash method; Nouvelle technique logarithmique d`identification de la diffusivite par la methode flash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thermitus, M.A.; Laurent, M. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    1997-12-31

    Using a logarithmic transformation, the thermogram of a flash experiment can be interpreted as the sum of the adiabatic model solution with a term representative of the losses. Two methods based on this transformation are proposed in this study. They are based on the identification of a parameter that depends on the thickness of the sample and on its diffusivity and not on the experimental conditions. They allow to identify the diffusivity with a high precision even for materials with a low conductivity at high temperatures. (J.S.) 12 refs.

  9. HOTSPOT: The Snake River Scientifi c Drilling Project— Tracking the Yellowstone Hotspot Through Space and Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas F. Williams

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The project “HOTSPOT: Scientifi c Drilling of the Snake River Plain” held its inaugural workshop in Twin Falls, Idaho, U.S.A. on 18–21 May 2006. This inter-disciplinary workshop, sponsored by the International Continental Scientifi c Drilling Program (ICDP, explored the major scientifi c and logistical issues central to a transect of boreholes along the hotspot track and addressing the geochemical evolution of continental lithosphere in response to interaction with deepseated mantle hotspots or plumes. A series of four to six bore holes is envisioned, each about 1.5–2.0 km deep and located along the axis of the Snake River Plain. The holes will specific ally target the origin and evolution of hotspot-related volcanism in space and time. To accomplish scientific and logistical planning, sixty scientists from six countries attended the workshop.

  10. Applications of system identification methods to the prediction of helicopter stability, control and handling characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padfield, G. D.; Duval, R. K.

    1982-01-01

    A set of results on rotorcraft system identification is described. Flight measurements collected on an experimental Puma helicopter are reviewed and some notable characteristics highlighted. Following a brief review of previous work in rotorcraft system identification, the results of state estimation and model structure estimation processes applied to the Puma data are presented. The results, which were obtained using NASA developed software, are compared with theoretical predictions of roll, yaw and pitching moment derivatives for a 6 degree of freedom model structure. Anomalies are reported. The theoretical methods used are described. A framework for reduced order modelling is outlined.

  11. Effective methods of parameter identification for creep models with account of III stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grishchenko Alexey I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The account of tertiary (third stage of creep is important for the failure analysis of structures. The correct description of third stage of creep is based on taking into account of damage accumulation process. An identification of the parameters of coupled creep-damage model leads to the optimization problem of finding the global minimum of a functional, having a complex, non-linear structure and a large number of local minimums. The Nelder–Mead method is applied to the solution to the multiparameter identification problem. The effectiveness and robustness of the applied approach are illustrated on examples of mechanical and civil engineering.

  12. Identification of the corporate values of an enterprise: theory, approaches, methodic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozlov Vladimir Aleksandrovich

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on research and composition of the instrument to identify the corporate values of the enterprise and practical activities to support them. The first part based on theoretical evidence of essence and correlation between notions of ‘Corporate culture’ and ‘Corporate values’. The method of corporate values identification, based on indirect approach, is proposed and the examples are provided. The results of implemented project for corporate values identification at industrial enterprise are presented. For further support the tasks and activities for corporate values management are proposed.

  13. Application of Advanced Numerical Methods in the Identification of Selected Parameters of Synchronous Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    UHRIK Milan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper are analyzed the impacts of change of basic electrical parameters on input/output characteristics of synchronous machine. Some of these impacts can be considered as single-valued functionsand they can be used for identification of missing unknown parameters of the respective synchronous machine. The identification can be performed by comparing the input/output characteristics betweenthe computer model of the machine and characteristics of real machine. For optimizing the error both numeric al methods and genetic algorithms were used.

  14. Methodical Approach to Identification of the Financial and Economic State of an Enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matyushenko Olga I.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The article identifies urgency of the enterprise life cycle theory in the system of managing financial and economic activity of an enterprise, identifies problems and insufficiently developed theoretical issues, namely, identification of the main indicator of the state of an organisation on the life cycle curve, which thoroughly characterises its financial and economic activity. It develops and offers a methodical approach to identification of the financial and economic state of an enterprise. The article analyses, generalises and identifies main sub-systems of an enterprise within the proposed methods. On the basis of analysis of works of scientists the article identifies main indicators that characterise each subsystem of an enterprise and identifies the entropy method, having analysed the existing methods of calculation of an integral indicator, as the most justified approach to calculation of the enterprise life cycle integral indicator.

  15. CRAF Phase 1, a framework to identify coastal hotspots to storm impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-frequency high-impact storms can cause flood and erosion over large coastal areas, which in turn can lead to a significant risk to coastal occupation, producing devastation and immobilising cities and even countries. It is therefore paramount to evaluate risk along the coast at a regional scale through the identification of storm impact hotspots. The Coastal Risk Assessment Framework Phase 1 (CRAF1 is a screening process based on a coastal-index approach that assesses the potential exposure of every kilometre along the coast to previously identified hazards. CRAF1 integrates both hazard (e.g. overwash, erosion and exposure indicators to create a final Coastal Index (CI. The application of CRAF1 at two contrasting case studies (Ria Formosa, Portugal and the Belgian coast, validated against existing information, demonstrates the utility and reliability of this framework on the identification of hotspots. CRAF1 represents a powerful and useful instrument for coastal managers and/or end-users to identify and rank potential hotspot areas in order to define priorities and support disaster reduction plans.

  16. Integrated ecological hotspot identification of organic egg production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, S.E.M.; Boer, de I.J.M.; Aarnink, A.J.A.; Groot Koerkamp, P.W.G.

    2009-01-01

    Ecological sustainability in agriculture is a concept that contains various environmental problems, which are caused by emission of compounds during different processes along the food chain. A precise ecological analysis of farming systems and food chains is needed in order to suggest and implement

  17. Worldwide Sustainability Hotspots in Potato Cultivation. 1. Identification and Mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkort, A.J.; Ruijter, de F.J.; Evert, van F.K.; Conijn, J.G.; Rutgers, B.

    2013-01-01

    Potato and its derivatives increasingly become globally traded products. Commercial companies more and more want to quantify the environmental footprints such as the efficiency of the use of land and water, greenhouse gas emissions, and the risks of eutrophication and contamination of the

  18. Optimized genotyping method for identification of bacterial contaminants in pharmaceutical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatoski, Borche; Ilievska, Miroslava; Babunovska, Hristina; Sekulovski, Nikola; Panov, Sasho

    2016-06-01

    Microbiological control is of crucial importance in the pharmaceutical industry regarding the possible bacterial contamination of the environment, water, raw materials and finished products. Molecular identification of bacterial contaminants based on DNA sequencing of the hypervariable 16SrRNA gene has been introduced recently. The aim of this study is to investigate the suitability of gene sequencing using our selection of PCR primers and conditions for rapid and accurate bacterial identification in pharmaceutical industry quality control. DNA was extracted from overnight incubated colonies from 10 bacterial ATCC strains, which are common contaminants in the pharmaceutical industry. A region of bacterial 16SrRNA gene was analyzed by bidirectional DNA sequencing. Bacterial identification based on partial sequencing of the 16SrRNA gene is the appropriate method that could be used in the pharmaceutical industry after adequate validations. We have successfully identified all tested bacteria with more than 99 % similarity to the already published sequences.

  19. Evaluating current automatic de-identification methods with Veteran’s health administration clinical documents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrández Oscar

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increased use and adoption of Electronic Health Records (EHR causes a tremendous growth in digital information useful for clinicians, researchers and many other operational purposes. However, this information is rich in Protected Health Information (PHI, which severely restricts its access and possible uses. A number of investigators have developed methods for automatically de-identifying EHR documents by removing PHI, as specified in the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act “Safe Harbor” method. This study focuses on the evaluation of existing automated text de-identification methods and tools, as applied to Veterans Health Administration (VHA clinical documents, to assess which methods perform better with each category of PHI found in our clinical notes; and when new methods are needed to improve performance. Methods We installed and evaluated five text de-identification systems “out-of-the-box” using a corpus of VHA clinical documents. The systems based on machine learning methods were trained with the 2006 i2b2 de-identification corpora and evaluated with our VHA corpus, and also evaluated with a ten-fold cross-validation experiment using our VHA corpus. We counted exact, partial, and fully contained matches with reference annotations, considering each PHI type separately, or only one unique ‘PHI’ category. Performance of the systems was assessed using recall (equivalent to sensitivity and precision (equivalent to positive predictive value metrics, as well as the F2-measure. Results Overall, systems based on rules and pattern matching achieved better recall, and precision was always better with systems based on machine learning approaches. The highest “out-of-the-box” F2-measure was 67% for partial matches; the best precision and recall were 95% and 78%, respectively. Finally, the ten-fold cross validation experiment allowed for an increase of the F2-measure to 79% with partial matches

  20. A review of output-only structural mode identification literature employing blind source separation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhu, A.; Narasimhan, S.; Antoni, J.

    2017-09-01

    Output-only modal identification has seen significant activity in recent years, especially in large-scale structures where controlled input force generation is often difficult to achieve. This has led to the development of new system identification methods which do not require controlled input. They often work satisfactorily if they satisfy some general assumptions - not overly restrictive - regarding the stochasticity of the input. Hundreds of papers covering a wide range of applications appear every year related to the extraction of modal properties from output measurement data in more than two dozen mechanical, aerospace and civil engineering journals. In little more than a decade, concepts of blind source separation (BSS) from the field of acoustic signal processing have been adopted by several researchers and shown that they can be attractive tools to undertake output-only modal identification. Originally intended to separate distinct audio sources from a mixture of recordings, mathematical equivalence to problems in linear structural dynamics have since been firmly established. This has enabled many of the developments in the field of BSS to be modified and applied to output-only modal identification problems. This paper reviews over hundred articles related to the application of BSS and their variants to output-only modal identification. The main contribution of the paper is to present a literature review of the papers which have appeared on the subject. While a brief treatment of the basic ideas are presented where relevant, a comprehensive and critical explanation of their contents is not attempted. Specific issues related to output-only modal identification and the relative advantages and limitations of BSS methods both from theoretical and application standpoints are discussed. Gap areas requiring additional work are also summarized and the paper concludes with possible future trends in this area.

  1. An improved method for the molecular identification of single dinoflagellate cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangchun Gao

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Dinoflagellate cysts (i.e., dinocysts are biologically and ecologically important as they can help dinoflagellate species survive harsh environments, facilitate their dispersal and serve as seeds for harmful algal blooms. In addition, dinocysts derived from some species can produce more toxins than vegetative forms, largely affecting species through their food webs and even human health. Consequently, accurate identification of dinocysts represents the first crucial step in many ecological studies. As dinocysts have limited or even no available taxonomic keys, molecular methods have become the first priority for dinocyst identification. However, molecular identification of dinocysts, particularly when using single cells, poses technical challenges. The most serious is the low success rate of PCR, especially for heterotrophic species. Methods In this study, we aim to improve the success rate of single dinocyst identification for the chosen dinocyst species (Gonyaulax spinifera, Polykrikos kofoidii, Lingulodinium polyedrum, Pyrophacus steinii, Protoperidinium leonis and Protoperidinium oblongum distributed in the South China Sea. We worked on two major technical issues: cleaning possible PCR inhibitors attached on the cyst surface and designing new dinoflagellate-specific PCR primers to improve the success of PCR amplification. Results For the cleaning of single dinocysts separated from marine sediments, we used ultrasonic wave-based cleaning and optimized cleaning parameters. Our results showed that the optimized ultrasonic wave-based cleaning method largely improved the identification success rate and accuracy of both molecular and morphological identifications. For the molecular identification with the newly designed dinoflagellate-specific primers (18S634F-18S634R, the success ratio was as high as 86.7% for single dinocysts across multiple taxa when using the optimized ultrasonic wave-based cleaning method, and much higher than that

  2. Use of molecular methods in identification of Candida Species and evaluation of fluconazole resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meltem Yalinay Cirak

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of one of the molecular typing methods such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction following by RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis in the identification of Candida species and then to differentiate the identified azole susceptible and resistant Candida albicans strains by using AP-PCR (arbitrarily primed-polymerase chain reaction. The identification of Candida species by PCR and RFLP analysis was based on the size and primary structural variation of rDNA intergenic spacer regions (ITS. Forty-four clinical Candida isolates comprising 5 species were included to the study. The amplification products were digested individually with 3 different restriction enzymes: HaeIII, DdeI, and BfaI. All the isolates tested yielded the expected band patterns by PCR and RFLP analysis. The results obtained from this study demonstrate that Candida species can be differentiated as C. albicans and non-C. albicans strains only by using HaeIII restriction enzyme and BfaI maintains the differentiation of these non-C. albicans species. After identification Candida species with RFLP analysis, C. albicans strains were included to the AP-PCR test. By using AP-PCR, fluconazole susceptible and resistant strains were differentiated. Nine fluconazole susceptible and 24 fluconazole resistant C. albicans were included to the study. Fluconazole resistant strains had more bands when evaluating with the agarose gel electrophoresis but there were no specific discriminatory band patterns to warrant the differentiation of the resistance. The identification of Candida species with the amplification of intergenic spacer region and RFLP analysis is a practical, short, and a reliable method when comparing to the conventional time-consuming Candida species identification methods. The fluconazole susceptibility testing with AP-PCR seems to be a promising method but further studies must be performed for more specific results.

  3. Threatened Plants in China’s Sanjiang Plain: Hotspot Distributions and Gap Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baojia Du

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Global biodiversity is markedly decreasing in response to climate change and human disturbance. Sanjiang Plain is recognized as a biodiversity hotspot in China due to its high forest and wetland coverage, but species are being lost at an unprecedented rate, induced by anthropogenic activities. Identifying hotspot distributions and conservation gaps of threatened species is of particular significance for enhancing the conservation of biodiversity. Specifically, we integrated the principles and methods of spatial hotspot inspection, geographic information system (GIS technology and spatial autocorrelation analysis along with fieldwork to determine the spatial distribution patterns and unprotected hotspots of vulnerable and endangered plants in Sanjiang Plain. A gap analysis of the conservation status of vulnerable and endangered plants was conducted. Our results indicate that six nationally-protected plants were not observed in nature reserves or were without any protection, while the protection rates were <10% for 10 other nationally-protected plants. Protected areas (PAs cover <5% of the distribution areas for 31 threatened plant species, while only five species are covered by national nature reserves (NNRs within >50% of the distribution areas. We found 30 hotspots with vulnerable and endangered plants in the study area, but the area covered by NNRs is very limited. Most of the hotspots were located in areas with a high-high aggregation of plant species. Therefore, it is necessary to expand the area of existing nature reserves, establish miniature protection plots and create new PAs and ecological corridors to link the existing PAs. Our findings can contribute to the design of a PA network for botanical conservation.

  4. Seed oil polyphenols: rapid and sensitive extraction method and high resolution-mass spectrometry identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koubaa, Mohamed; Mhemdi, Houcine; Vorobiev, Eugène

    2015-05-01

    Phenolic content is a primary parameter for vegetables oil quality evaluation, and directly involved in the prevention of oxidation and oil preservation. Several methods have been reported in the literature for polyphenols extraction from seed oil but the approaches commonly used remain manually handled. In this work, we propose a rapid and sensitive method for seed oil polyphenols extraction and identification. For this purpose, polyphenols were extracted from Opuntia stricta Haw seed oil, using high frequency agitation, separated, and then identified using a liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry method. Our results showed good sensitivity and reproducibility of the developed methods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluating current automatic de-identification methods with Veteran's health administration clinical documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrández, Oscar; South, Brett R; Shen, Shuying; Friedlin, F Jeffrey; Samore, Matthew H; Meystre, Stéphane M

    2012-07-27

    The increased use and adoption of Electronic Health Records (EHR) causes a tremendous growth in digital information useful for clinicians, researchers and many other operational purposes. However, this information is rich in Protected Health Information (PHI), which severely restricts its access and possible uses. A number of investigators have developed methods for automatically de-identifying EHR documents by removing PHI, as specified in the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act "Safe Harbor" method.This study focuses on the evaluation of existing automated text de-identification methods and tools, as applied to Veterans Health Administration (VHA) clinical documents, to assess which methods perform better with each category of PHI found in our clinical notes; and when new methods are needed to improve performance. We installed and evaluated five text de-identification systems "out-of-the-box" using a corpus of VHA clinical documents. The systems based on machine learning methods were trained with the 2006 i2b2 de-identification corpora and evaluated with our VHA corpus, and also evaluated with a ten-fold cross-validation experiment using our VHA corpus. We counted exact, partial, and fully contained matches with reference annotations, considering each PHI type separately, or only one unique 'PHI' category. Performance of the systems was assessed using recall (equivalent to sensitivity) and precision (equivalent to positive predictive value) metrics, as well as the F(2)-measure. Overall, systems based on rules and pattern matching achieved better recall, and precision was always better with systems based on machine learning approaches. The highest "out-of-the-box" F(2)-measure was 67% for partial matches; the best precision and recall were 95% and 78%, respectively. Finally, the ten-fold cross validation experiment allowed for an increase of the F(2)-measure to 79% with partial matches. The "out-of-the-box" evaluation of text de-identification

  6. A comparison of the empirical performance of methods for a risk identification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Patrick B; Stang, Paul E; Overhage, J Marc; Suchard, Marc A; Hartzema, Abraham G; DuMouchel, William; Reich, Christian G; Schuemie, Martijn J; Madigan, David

    2013-10-01

    Observational healthcare data offer the potential to enable identification of risks of medical products, and the medical literature is replete with analyses that aim to accomplish this objective. A number of established analytic methods dominate the literature but their operating characteristics in real-world settings remain unknown. To compare the performance of seven methods (new user cohort, case control, self-controlled case series, self-controlled cohort, disproportionality analysis, temporal pattern discovery, and longitudinal gamma poisson shrinker) as tools for risk identification in observational healthcare data. The experiment applied each method to 399 drug-outcome scenarios (165 positive controls and 234 negative controls across 4 health outcomes of interest) in 5 real observational databases (4 administrative claims and 1 electronic health record). Method performance was evaluated through Area Under the receiver operator characteristics Curve (AUC), bias, mean square error, and confidence interval coverage probability. Multiple methods offer strong predictive accuracy, with AUC > 0.70 achievable for all outcomes and databases with more than one analytical approach. Self-controlled methods (self-controlled case series, temporal pattern discovery, self-controlled cohort) had higher predictive accuracy than cohort and case-control methods across all databases and outcomes. Methods differed in the expected value and variance of the error distribution. All methods had lower coverage probability than the expected nominal properties. Observational healthcare data can inform risk identification of medical product effects on acute liver injury, acute myocardial infarction, acute renal failure and gastrointestinal bleeding. However, effect estimates from all methods require calibration to address inconsistency in method operating characteristics. Further empirical evaluation is required to gauge the generalizability of these findings to other databases and

  7. Extraction, enumeration and identification methods for monitoring microplastics in the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Qiongxuan; Tan, Zhi; Wang, Jundong; Peng, Jinping; Li, Meimin; Zhan, Zhiwei

    2016-07-01

    There is much research on the occurrence, pollution characteristics and impacts of microplastics in the marine environment but this omits factors which play important roles in the analysis of microplastics. This review summarizes the methods and techniques in the extraction from sediment, seawater and organisms, and assesses their advantages and limitations according to different experimental conditions, such as salt solution and reagents added to remove organic matter. Similarly, this overview includes the enumeration methods of microplastics by many kinds of microscopes (e.g. stereomicroscope, fluorescent microscope, scanning electron microscope). Advantages and challenges of using micro-FTIR, ART-FTIR, FPA-FTIR, Pry-GC/MS, and Raman spectroscopy in the identification methods are also discussed. This review suggests that monitoring microplastics needs standardized protocols for extraction, identification and quantification and that further research on the effects of microplastics to human health is needed.

  8. Current Global Absolute Plate Velocities Inferred from the Trends of Hotspot Tracks: Implications for Motion between Groups of Hotspots and Comparison and Combination with Absolute Velocities Inferred from the Orientation of Seismic Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C.; Gordon, R. G.; Zheng, L.

    2016-12-01

    Hotspot tracks are widely used to estimate the absolute velocities of plates, i.e., relative to the lower mantle. Knowledge of current motion between hotspots is important for both plate kinematics and mantle dynamics and informs the discussion on the origin of the Hawaiian-Emperor Bend. Following Morgan & Morgan (2007), we focus only on the trends of young hotspot tracks and omit volcanic propagation rates. The dispersion of the trends can be partitioned into between-plate and within-plate dispersion. Applying the method of Gripp & Gordon (2002) to the hotspot trend data set of Morgan & Morgan (2007) constrained to the MORVEL relative plate angular velocities (DeMets et al., 2010) results in a standard deviation of the 56 hotspot trends of 22°. The largest angular misfits tend to occur on the slowest moving plates. Alternatively, estimation of best-fitting poles to hotspot tracks on the nine individual plates, results in a standard deviation of trends of only 13°, a statistically significant reduction from the introduction of 15 additional adjustable parameters. If all of the between-plate misfit is due to motion of groups of hotspots (beneath different plates), nominal velocities relative to the mean hotspot reference frame range from 1 to 4 mm/yr with the lower bounds ranging from 1 to 3 mm/yr and the greatest upper bound being 8 mm/yr. These are consistent with bounds on motion between Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hotspots over the past ≈50 Ma, which range from zero (lower bound) to 8 to 13 mm/yr (upper bounds) (Koivisto et al., 2014). We also determine HS4-MORVEL, a new global set of plate angular velocities relative to the hotspots constrained to consistency with the MORVEL relative plate angular velocities, using a two-tier analysis similar to that used by Zheng et al. (2014) to estimate the SKS-MORVEL global set of absolute plate velocities fit to the orientation of seismic anisotropy. We find that the 95% confidence limits of HS4-MORVEL and SKS

  9. IDENTIFICATION METHOD FOR PENDULUM SYSTEM MOMENT OF INERTIA WITH VISCOUS DAMPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Alyshev

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a method for identification of axial moment of inertia of the mechanical system called reaction wheel pendulum with a viscous friction in the bearings of the suspension. The method is based on the reversible symmetric motions. Pendulum system motion includes a free measured motion and reverse symmetrical motion at the same angular interval. The pendulum includes a rod with a low-power DC motor with a flywheel attached to the end of the rod. The angle of rotation and velocity of the rod and the flywheel are measured by encoders. The paper introduces a new method,presents a design formula,a mathematical model of the pendulum system and a robust motor control law for it. The method is based on energy algorithm and control residing in electric motor operational changes by means of a flywheel. The mechanical system moves symmetrically that is provided by nonuniform controlled flywheel rotation. As a result, the influence of dissipative factors on identification results is eliminated. Dynamic modeling is carried out for the pendulum system and proves high accuracy of the method. The research results can be used for identification of complex mechanical systems under the action of resistance, dissipative and other forces.

  10. Analyses of Dynamics in Dairy Products and Identification of Lactic Acid Bacteria Population by Molecular Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aytül Sofu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB with different ecological niches are widely seen in fermented meat, vegetables, dairy products and cereals as well as in fermented beverages. Lactic acid bacteria are the most important group of bacteria in dairy industry due to their probiotic characteristics and fermentation agents as starter culture. In the taxonomy of the lactic acid bacteria; by means of rep-PCR, which is the analysis of repetitive sequences that are based on 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA gene sequence, it is possible to conduct structural microbial community analyses such as Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP analysis of DNA fragments of different sizes cut with enzymes, Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD polymorphic DNA amplified randomly at low temperatures and Amplified Fragment-Length Polymorphism (AFLP-PCR of cut genomic DNA. Besides, in the recent years, non-culture-based molecular methods such as Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE, Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE, Thermal Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (TGGE, and Fluorescence In-situ Hybridization (FISH have replaced classical methods once used for the identification of LAB. Identification of lactic acid bacteria culture independent regardless of the method will be one of the most important methods used in the future pyrosequencing as a Next Generation Sequencing (NGS techniques. This paper reviews molecular-method based studies conducted on the identification of LAB species in dairy products.

  11. Simulation of LD Identification Accuracy Using a Pattern of Processing Strengths and Weaknesses Method with Multiple Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miciak, Jeremy; Taylor, W. Pat; Stuebing, Karla K.; Fletcher, Jack M.

    2018-01-01

    We investigated the classification accuracy of learning disability (LD) identification methods premised on the identification of an intraindividual pattern of processing strengths and weaknesses (PSW) method using multiple indicators for all latent constructs. Known LD status was derived from latent scores; values at the observed level identified…

  12. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF METHODS FOR IDENTIFICATION OF NONTUBERCULOUS MYCOBACTERIA ISOLATED FROM CLINICAL MATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Lyamin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently there has been a significant increase in the incidence of mycobacteriosis, which is due to an increase in the proportion of immunosuppressed patients, the presence of these various comorbid conditions, as well as the improvement of diagnostic methods. Selecting the most accurate method of identification is extremely important in determining treatment strategy of patients. The aim of the study was to conduct a comparative analysis of modern methods of identification NTMB isolated from clinical specimens in 2015 in the Samara region. The work was carried out identification of 78 strains of microorganisms. Laboratory diagnosis was carried out using the DNA hybridization method and MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry. When microbial identification using MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry was isolated 16 strains (20.5% M. kansasii; 11 strains (14.1% M. avium and M. fortuitum; 9 strains (11.5% M. gordonae; strain 3 (3.8% M. peregrinum, M. szulgai, M. chimera intracellulare group, strain 2 (2.6% M. abscessus, M. septicum, M. paragordonae, M. senegalence, 1 strain (1.3% M. chelonae, M. frederiksbergense, M. monacense, M. lentiflavum. By using mass spectrometry, it was identified 15 types NTMB compared with 9 types — by DNA hybridization. Full match identification results was observed only in 45 (57.7% strains of divergent strains were found in 16 (20.5%. Most often when using the DNA hybridization method, discrepancy was detected in slow-growing cultures (9 strains with a predominance of microorganisms identified as M. gordonae. Among the representatives of fast-growing NTMB, seven investigations were identified in the identification, more often among representatives of the M. fortuitum and M. peregrinum groups. Particular attention should be paid to the identification of the M. kansasii strain by a molecular genetic method, which mass spectrometry was defined as M. bovis. Both cultures of M. tuberculosis complex, which were identified by MALDI

  13. Molecular architecture of transcription factor hotspots in early adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Baek, Songjoon; Rabiee, Atefeh

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factors have recently been shown to colocalize in hotspot regions of the genome, which are further clustered into super-enhancers. However, the detailed molecular organization of transcription factors at hotspot regions is poorly defined. Here, we have used digital genomic footprint......Transcription factors have recently been shown to colocalize in hotspot regions of the genome, which are further clustered into super-enhancers. However, the detailed molecular organization of transcription factors at hotspot regions is poorly defined. Here, we have used digital genomic...

  14. Identification of Burkholderia spp. in the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory: Comparison of Conventional and Molecular Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Pelt, Cindy; Verduin, Cees M.; Goessens, Wil H. F.; Vos, Margreet C.; Tümmler, Burkhard; Segonds, Christine; Reubsaet, Frans; Verbrugh, Henri; van Belkum, Alex

    1999-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) predisposes patients to bacterial colonization and infection of the lower airways. Several species belonging to the genus Burkholderia are potential CF-related pathogens, but microbiological identification may be complicated. This situation is not in the least due to the poorly defined taxonomic status of these bacteria, and further validation of the available diagnostic assays is required. A total of 114 geographically diverse bacterial isolates, previously identified in reference laboratories as Burkholderia cepacia (n = 51), B. gladioli (n = 14), Ralstonia pickettii (n = 6), B. multivorans (n = 2), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (n = 3), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 11), were collected from environmental, clinical, and reference sources. In addition, 27 clinical isolates putatively identified as Burkholderia spp. were recovered from the sputum of Dutch CF patients. All isolates were used to evaluate the accuracy of two selective growth media, four systems for biochemical identification (API 20NE, Vitek GNI, Vitek NFC, and MicroScan), and three different PCR-based assays. The PCR assays amplify different parts of the ribosomal DNA operon, either alone or in combination with cleavage by various restriction enzymes (PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism [RFLP] analysis). The best system for the biochemical identification of B. cepacia appeared to be the API 20NE test. None of the biochemical assays successfully grouped the B. gladioli strains. The PCR-RFLP method appeared to be the optimal method for accurate nucleic acid-mediated identification of the different Burkholderia spp. With this method, B. gladioli was also reliably classified in a separate group. For the laboratory diagnosis of B. cepacia, we recommend parallel cultures on blood agar medium and selective agar plates. Further identification of colonies with a Burkholderia phenotype should be performed with the API 20NE test. For final confirmation of species identities, PCR

  15. SLR-induced temporal and spatial changes in hotspots to storms along the Catalan coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Jose A.; Sanuy, Marc; Valdemoro, Herminia

    2017-04-01

    Coastal hotspots to storms can be simply defined as locations where the magnitude of the storm-induced risk is significantly higher than neighbouring areas for a given probability of occurrence. Their distribution along the coast depends on the magnitude of storm-induced hazards and on the coastal resilient capacity. Increasing damages observed in our coasts during the last decades have driven the need to include specific chapters on risk management in ICZM plans. In this context, the identification of hotspots is one of the first points to be considered. This permits to better allocate resources for risk management by concentrating efforts in specific locations. Within this context, we have identified hotspots along the Catalan coast (Spanish Mediterranean) to storm-induced erosion and inundation hazards. This has been done by using the methodology developed within the RISCKIT EU project where storm-induced hazards (erosion and inundation) are characterised in probabilistic terms by using simple inundation and erosion models as a function of water level and wave climates and local coastal morphology. The final result was a set of inundation and erosion hotspots along the coast under current conditions for selected probabilities of occurrences, P. For low return periods, Tr, few hotspots appear and they represent coastal locations frequently affected by the corresponding hazard. On the other, for high Tr, a larger number (and of larger extension) of hotspots appear, that although less frequently affected, they are subjected to a larger impact. Although this is valuable information for coastal managers, it is only valid for making decisions for a short time horizon or under steady conditions. However, since the proper time scale for coastal planning is in the order of several decades, it is not likely that conditions will remain steady. Thus, although most of existing predictions of climate-induce changes in storminess in the Mediterranean indicate the absence of

  16. Pedestrian injury and the built environment: an environmental scan of hotspots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crooks Valorie A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pedestrian injury frequently results in devastating and costly injuries and accounts for 11% of all road user fatalities. In the United States in 2006 there were 4,784 fatalities and 61,000 injuries from pedestrian injury, and in 2007 there were 4,654 fatalities and 70,000 injuries. In Canada, injury is the leading cause of death for those under 45 years of age and the fourth most common cause of death for all ages Traumatic pedestrian injury results in nearly 4000 hospitalizations in Canada annually. These injuries result from the interplay of modifiable environmental factors. The objective of this study was to determine links between the built environment and pedestrian injury hotspots in Vancouver. Methods Data were obtained from the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia (ICBC for the 6 year period from 2000 to 2005 and combined with pedestrian injury data extracted from the British Columbia Trauma Registry (BCTR for the same period. High incident locations (hotspots for pedestrian injury in the City of Vancouver were identified and mapped using geographic information systems (GIS, and the characteristics of the built environment at each of the hotspot locations were examined by a team of researchers. Results The analysis highlighted 32 pedestrian injury hotspot locations in Vancouver. 31 of 32 hotspots were situated on major roads. Likewise, the majority of hotspots were located on downtown streets. The 'downtown eastside' was identified as an area with multiple high-incident locations, including the 2 highest ranked pedestrian injury hotspots. Bars were present at 21 of the hotspot locations, with 11 of these locations being judged to have high alcohol establishment density. Conclusion This study highlighted the disproportionate burden of pedestrian injury centred on the downtown eastside area of Vancouver. The environmental scan revealed that important passive pedestrian safety countermeasures were only present at a

  17. The emergence of motives in liminal hotspots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Morten; Sørensen, Kathrine Solgaard

    2017-01-01

    as part of an ongoing collaboration with counselors who experiment with different ways of helping young drug users without taking motivation as premise, in the sense of a prerequisite, for interventions. Data from recorded counseling sessions are analyzed and rearticulated, first in terms of the classical...... motivation–resistance contradiction; then through pragmatic approaches in counseling, i.e., the prevalent cognitive-client-centered form and the “solution-focused brief therapy” approach—and finally as motives emergent in liminal hotspots....

  18. The emergence of motives in liminal hotspots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Morten; Sørensen, Kathrine Solgaard

    2017-01-01

    The concept of “motivation” commonly constructs as a psychological essence what is really the paradoxical imposition of a required desire. While the resulting impasse blocked theoretical development for around four decades, pragmatic motivational techniques evolved regardless. These could...... be (probably to no avail) dismissed for not taking account of the deep theoretical problems. This article suggests instead to rearticulate them with the conceptual repertoire of liminal hotspots, which directs attention to the emergent nature of activities and collectives, and thus motives. This is done...

  19. [Study on TLC identification and UPLC determination method of atractylenolide in Atractylodes macrocephala].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu-Jiao; Xu, Wen-Hui; Shen, Xiao-Li; Tian, Jun-Sheng; Qin, Xue-Mei

    2017-02-01

    This research is to establish TLC and UPLC methods for simultaneous determination of 3 atractylenolides in Atractylodes macrocephala. Silica gel GF254 plate was used for identification of A. macrocephala, and UPLC-PDA gradient elution method was used to simultaneously determine atractylenolide Ⅰ, Ⅱ and Ⅲ. The Waters BEH C₁₈ column(2.1 mm×100 mm,1.7 μm)with acetonitrile-water as mobile phase and the wavelength of UV detector of 235 nm were performed. The quality control study showed that the characteristic for identification by TLC was distinct and highly specific. The method of content determination was in accordance with the regulations. The quantitative evaluation of atractylenolide Ⅰ,Ⅱ and Ⅲ was in good linear range(r>0.999 9), and the average recovery was 93.48%(RSD 1.4%),94.97%(RSD 1.6%),92.71%(RSD 1.2%),respectively. TLC identification was in good specificity and repeatability, and the UPLC-PDA method for the simultaneous determination of 3 atractylenolides was simple and reliable for the quality control of A.macrocephala. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  20. Identification and differentiation of Trichophyton rubrum clinical isolates using PCR-RFLP and RAPD methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hryncewicz-Gwóźdź, A; Jagielski, T; Dobrowolska, A; Szepietowski, J C; Baran, E

    2011-06-01

    Trichophyton rubrum represents the most frequently isolated causative agent of superficial dermatophyte infections. Several genotyping methods have recently been introduced to improve the delineation between pathogenic fungi at both the species and the strain levels. The purpose of this study was to apply selected DNA fingerprinting methods to the identification and strain discrimination of T. rubrum clinical isolates. Fifty-seven isolates from as many tinea patients were subjected to species identification by polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis and strain differentiation using a randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method, with two primers designated 1 and 6. Using PCR-RFLP, 55 of the isolates studied were confirmed to be T. rubrum. Among those, a total of 40 and five distinct profiles were obtained by RAPD with primers 1 and 6, respectively. The combination of profiles from both RAPD assays resulted in 47 genotypes and an overall genotypic diversity rate of 85.4%. A dendrogram analysis performed on the profiles generated by RAPD with primer 1 showed most of the isolates (87.3%) to be genetically related. PCR-RFLP serves as a rapid and reliable method for the identification of T. rubrum species, while the RAPD analysis is rather a disadvantageous tool for T. rubrum strain typing.

  1. Rapid intrinsic fluorescence method for direct identification of pathogens in blood cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, John D; Hyman, Jay M; Borzhemskaya, Larisa; Bowen, Ann; McKellar, Caroline; Ullery, Michael; Mathias, Erin; Ronsick, Christopher; Link, John; Wilson, Mark; Clay, Bradford; Robinson, Ron; Thorpe, Thurman; van Belkum, Alex; Dunne, W Michael

    2013-11-19

    A positive blood culture is a critical result that requires prompt identification of the causative agent. This article describes a simple method to identify microorganisms from positive blood culture broth within the time taken to perform a Gram stain (identification of the etiologic agent may benefit the clinical management of sepsis. Further evaluation is now warranted to determine the performance of the method using clinical blood culture specimens. Physicians often require the identity of the infective agent in order to make life-saving adjustments to empirical therapy or to switch to less expensive and/or more targeted antimicrobials. However, standard identification procedures take up to 2 days after a blood culture is signaled positive, and even most rapid molecular techniques take several hours to provide a result. Other techniques are faster (e.g., matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight [MALDI-TOF] mass spectrometry) but require time-consuming manual processing steps and expensive equipment. There remains a clear need for a simple, inexpensive method to rapidly identify microorganisms directly from positive blood cultures. The promising new method described in this research article can identify microorganisms in minutes by optical spectroscopy, thus permitting the lab to simultaneously report the presence of a positive blood culture and the organism's identity.

  2. The review of identification and assay methods of β-blockers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ольга Олександрівна Віслоус

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Every year the number of β-blockers on the pharmaceutical market is increasing, requiring systematization of their standardization methods.Aim of research. The aim of our research is to study literature data about identification and assay methods of β-blockers with different direction of action – selective (praktolol, metoprolol, atenolol, acebutolol, betaxolol, bevantolol, bisoprolol, celiprolol, esmolol, epanolol, esatenolol, nebivolol, Talinolol, non-selective (alprenolol, Oxprenololum, pindolol, propranolol, timolol, sotalol, nadolol, mepindolol, karteol, tertatolol, bopindolol, bupranolol, penbutolol, kloranolol and combined (labetalol, carvedilol.Methods. The analytical review of literature sources about β-blockers analysis by physical, chemical, and physicochemical methods.Results. After literature sources’ analyzing it was found that physical and physicochemical constants are basically used for β-blockers pharmacopoeial analysis; both physicochemical values and chemical reactions are used in forensic analysis, resulting in the article.It was founded that titration methods, mostly acid-base titration method, are used for β-blockers assay in the analysis of substances. For β-blockers detection in biological fluids and dosage forms, active pharmaceutical ingredients and metabolites mixture separation one should prefer physicochemical methods, such as gas chromatography and liquid chromatography, absorption UV-Visible spectroscopy, fluorometry, etc.Conclusion. The results have shown can be used for the further search of the identification and assay optimal methods of β-blockers both pure and mixed with other active substances and excipients

  3. The detection of thermophilous forest hotspots in Poland using geostatistical interpolation of plant richness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Kiedrzyński

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Attempts to study biodiversity hotspots on a regional scale should combine compositional and functionalist criteria. The detection of hotspots in this study uses one ecologically similar group of high conservation value species as hotspot indicators, as well as focal habitat indicators, to detect the distribution of suitable environmental conditions. The method is assessed with reference to thermophilous forests in Poland – key habitats for many rare and relict species. Twenty-six high conservation priority species were used as hotspot indicators, and ten plant taxa characteristic of the Quercetalia pubescenti-petraeae phytosociological order were used as focal habitat indicators. Species distribution data was based on a 10 × 10 km grid. The number of species per grid square was interpolated by the ordinary kriging geostatistical method. Our analysis largely determined the distribution of areas with concentration of thermophilous forest flora, but also regional disjunctions and geographical barriers. Indicator species richness can be interpreted as a reflection of the actual state of habitat conditions. It can also be used to determine the location of potential species refugia and possible past and future migration routes.

  4. Method for identification of rigid domains and hinge residues in proteins based on exhaustive enumeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Jaehyun; Sim, Jun; Park, Eunsung; Lee, Julian

    2015-06-01

    Many proteins undergo large-scale motions where relatively rigid domains move against each other. The identification of rigid domains, as well as the hinge residues important for their relative movements, is important for various applications including flexible docking simulations. In this work, we develop a method for protein rigid domain identification based on an exhaustive enumeration of maximal rigid domains, the rigid domains not fully contained within other domains. The computation is performed by mapping the problem to that of finding maximal cliques in a graph. A minimal set of rigid domains are then selected, which cover most of the protein with minimal overlap. In contrast to the results of existing methods that partition a protein into non-overlapping domains using approximate algorithms, the rigid domains obtained from exact enumeration naturally contain overlapping regions, which correspond to the hinges of the inter-domain bending motion. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated on several proteins. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Crack identification for transient heat operator by using domain decomposition method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anis Bel Hadj Hassin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with cracks identification from over-determined boundary data. The consideration physical phenomena corresponds to the transient heat equation. we give a theoretical result of identifiability for the inverse problem under consideration. Then, we consider a recovering process based on coupling domain decomposition method and minimizing an energy-type error functional. The efficiency of the proposed approach is illustrated by several numerical results.

  6. Application of PCR-DGGE method for identification of nematode communities in pepper growing soil

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Thi Phuong; Ha, Duy Ngo; Nguyen, Huu Hung; Duong, Duc Hieu

    2017-01-01

    Soil nematodes play an important role in indication for assessing soil environments and ecosystems. Previous studies of nematode community analyses based on molecular identification have shown to be useful for assessing soil environments. Here we applied PCR-DGGE method for molecular analysis of five soil nematode communities (designed as S1 to S5) collected from four provinces in Southeastern Vietnam (Binh Duong, Ba Ria Vung Tau, Binh Phuoc and Dong Nai) based on SSU gene. By sequencing DNA ...

  7. Identification of Histamine H3 Receptor Ligands Using a New Crystal Structure Fragment-based Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Ida Osborn; Boesgaard, Michael W; Fidom, Kimberley

    2017-01-01

    Virtual screening offers an efficient alternative to high-throughput screening in the identification of pharmacological tools and lead compounds. Virtual screening is typically based on the matching of target structures or ligand pharmacophores to commercial or in-house compound catalogues....... The complete pharmacophore fragment library is freely available through the GPCR database, GPCRdb, allowing the successful application herein to be repeated for most of the 285 class A GPCR targets. The method could also easily be adapted to other protein families....

  8. Personal Identification of Deceased Persons: An Overview of the Current Methods Based on Physical Appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplova, Zuzana; Obertova, Zuzana; Gibelli, Daniele M; De Angelis, Danilo; Mazzarelli, Debora; Sforza, Chiarella; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2017-10-03

    The use of the physical appearance of the deceased has become more important because the available antemortem information for comparisons may consist only of a physical description and photographs. Twenty-one articles dealing with the identification based on the physiognomic features of the human body were selected for review and were divided into four sections: (i) visual recognition, (ii) specific facial/body areas, (iii) biometrics, and (iv) dental superimposition. While opinions about the reliability of the visual recognition differ, the search showed that it has been used in mass disasters, even without testing its objectivity and reliability. Specific facial areas being explored for the identification of dead; however, their practical use is questioned, similarly to soft biometrics. The emerging dental superimposition seems to be the only standardized and successfully applied method for identification so far. More research is needed into a potential use of the individualizing features, considering that postmortem changes and technical difficulties may affect the identification. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  9. Polymerase chain reaction in the identification of periodontopathogens: A reliable and satisfactory method?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić-Jakoba Nataša

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is considered one of the bacterial species of etiological importance in periodontitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the serotype of A. actinomycetemcomitans in the subgingival biofilm in subjects with periodontal health and disease. Pooled samples of subgingival plaque were taken for culture-based identification of microorganisms. Colonies suspected to be A. actinomycetemcomitans were selected for molecular identification using either multiplex or conventional PCR in serotype-specific genotyping and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. In silico analysis showed that most selected colonies belong to the genus Campylobacter, although positive signals for serotypes of A. actinomycetemcomitans were obtained with these samples. Identification of A. actinomycetemcomitans by conventional PCR for 16S rRNA with one species-specific and one universal primer was inconclusive because an almost identical signal with Campylobacter gracilis was obtained. Although PCR-based methods for the identification of A. actinomycetemcomitans are more rapid, sequencing should not be omitted. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 41008 and br. 173048

  10. Geographic Hotspots of Critical National Infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, Scott; Barr, Stuart; Pant, Raghav; Hall, Jim W; Alderson, David

    2017-06-12

    Failure of critical national infrastructures can result in major disruptions to society and the economy. Understanding the criticality of individual assets and the geographic areas in which they are located is essential for targeting investments to reduce risks and enhance system resilience. Within this study we provide new insights into the criticality of real-life critical infrastructure networks by integrating high-resolution data on infrastructure location, connectivity, interdependence, and usage. We propose a metric of infrastructure criticality in terms of the number of users who may be directly or indirectly disrupted by the failure of physically interdependent infrastructures. Kernel density estimation is used to integrate spatially discrete criticality values associated with individual infrastructure assets, producing a continuous surface from which statistically significant infrastructure criticality hotspots are identified. We develop a comprehensive and unique national-scale demonstration for England and Wales that utilizes previously unavailable data from the energy, transport, water, waste, and digital communications sectors. The testing of 200,000 failure scenarios identifies that hotspots are typically located around the periphery of urban areas where there are large facilities upon which many users depend or where several critical infrastructures are concentrated in one location. © 2017 Society for Risk Analysis.

  11. [Research on TLC identification and anti-coagulant activity quantitatively methods of Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Tan, Xiao-mei; Long, Qun; Chen, Fei-long

    2012-05-01

    To improve the quality standard of Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans by researching the methods of the TLC identification and anti-coagulant activity quantitatively. Identified the free arginine (Arg) and serine (Ser) in scolopendra by TLC, screened the samples preparation process and developed solvent systems; Determined the anti-coagulant activity by method of titration with thrombin and screened the pretreatment methods. When medicinal materials was extracted by formic acid and 95% ethanol (1:1) with ultrasonic method and developed by n-butanol-acetic acid-water (12:5:4), the spots of Arg and Ser were well separated. Ultrasonic method was suitable for preparation of the anti-coagulant components in Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans and their anti-coagulant activity was determined by method of titration with thrombin could get a well reproducibility, the anti-thrombin activity of testing sample was (14.00 +/- 1.53) U/g and those of three different batch were (13.00 +/- 0.58) U/g, (17.00 +/- 1.15) U/g, (15.67 +/- 1.53) U/g respectively. The methods of TLC identification and anti-coagulant activity quantitatively could be used as a basis for improving the quality standard of Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans.

  12. Research on identification method of heavy vehicle rollover based on hidden Markov model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhiguo; Wang, Yeqin; Hu, Xiaoming; Tao, Yukai; Wang, Jinsheng

    2017-07-01

    Aiming at the problem of early warning credibility degradation as the heavy vehicle load and its center of gravity change greatly; the heavy vehicle rollover state identification method based on the Hidden Markov Model (HMM, is introduced to identify heavy vehicle lateral conditions dynamically in this paper. In this method, the lateral acceleration and roll angle are taken as the observation values of the model base. The Viterbi algorithm is used to predict the state sequence with the highest probability in the observed sequence, and the Markov prediction algorithm is adopted to calculate the state transition law and to predict the state of the vehicle in a certain period of time in the future. According to combination conditions of Double lane change and steering, applying Trucksim and Matlab trained hidden Markov model, the model is applied to the online identification of heavy vehicle rollover states. The identification results show that the model can accurately and efficiently identify the vehicle rollover state, and has good applicability. This study provides a novel method and a general strategy for active safety early warning and control of vehicles, which has reference significance for the application of the Hidden Markov theory in collision, rear-end and lane departure warning system.

  13. Research on identification method of heavy vehicle rollover based on hidden Markov model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Zhiguo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at the problem of early warning credibility degradation as the heavy vehicle load and its center of gravity change greatly; the heavy vehicle rollover state identification method based on the Hidden Markov Model (HMM, is introduced to identify heavy vehicle lateral conditions dynamically in this paper. In this method, the lateral acceleration and roll angle are taken as the observation values of the model base. The Viterbi algorithm is used to predict the state sequence with the highest probability in the observed sequence, and the Markov prediction algorithm is adopted to calculate the state transition law and to predict the state of the vehicle in a certain period of time in the future. According to combination conditions of Double lane change and steering, applying Trucksim and Matlab trained hidden Markov model, the model is applied to the online identification of heavy vehicle rollover states. The identification results show that the model can accurately and efficiently identify the vehicle rollover state, and has good applicability. This study provides a novel method and a general strategy for active safety early warning and control of vehicles, which has reference significance for the application of the Hidden Markov theory in collision, rear-end and lane departure warning system.

  14. Noncontact blood species identification method based on spatially resolved near-infrared transmission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linna; Sun, Meixiu; Wang, Zhennan; Li, Hongxiao; Li, Yingxin; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling

    2017-09-01

    The inspection and identification of whole blood are crucially significant for import-export ports and inspection and quarantine departments. In our previous research, we proved Near-Infrared diffuse transmitted spectroscopy method was potential for noninvasively identifying three blood species, including macaque, human and mouse, with samples measured in the cuvettes. However, in open sampling cases, inspectors may be endangered by virulence factors in blood samples. In this paper, we explored the noncontact measurement for classification, with blood samples measured in the vacuum blood vessels. Spatially resolved near-infrared spectroscopy was used to improve the prediction accuracy. Results showed that the prediction accuracy of the model built with nine detection points was more than 90% in identification between all five species, including chicken, goat, macaque, pig and rat, far better than the performance of the model built with single-point spectra. The results fully supported the idea that spatially resolved near-infrared spectroscopy method can improve the prediction ability, and demonstrated the feasibility of this method for noncontact blood species identification in practical applications.

  15. Species Identification and Phylogenetic Analysis of Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato Using Molecular Biological Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margos, Gabriele; Notter, Isabell; Fingerle, Volker

    2018-01-01

    Bacterial species identification is required in different disciplines and-depending on the purpose-levels of specificity or resolution of typing may vary. Nowadays, molecular methods are the mainstay for bacterial identification and sequence-based analyses are of ever-growing importance. For diagnostics, immediate results are needed and often real-time PCR of one or two loci is the method of choice while for epidemiological or evolutionary studies sequence data of several loci improve phylogenetic resolution to required levels. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and multilocus sequence analyses (MLSA) utilize sequences information of several housekeeping loci (eight for Borrelia) to distinguish between species. This method has been widely used for bacterial species and strain identification and will be described in this chapter.As more and more diversity is being detected in the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato species complex, the importance of accurate species and strain typing has come to the fore. This is particularly significant with a view of differentiating human pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains or species and understanding the epidemiology, ecology, population structure, and evolution of species.

  16. An unusual method of forensic human identification: use of selfie photographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Geraldo Elias; Freitas, Sílvia Guzella de; Maia, Luiza Valéria de Abreu; Melani, Rodolfo Francisco Haltenhoff

    2016-06-01

    As with other methods of identification, in forensic odontology, antemortem data are compared with postmortem findings. In the absence of dental documentation, photographs of the smile play an important role in this comparison. As yet, there are no reports of the use of the selfie photograph for identification purposes. Owing to advancements in technology, electronic devices, and social networks, this type of photograph has become increasingly common. This paper describes a case in which selfie photographs were used to identify a carbonized body, by using the smile line and image superimposition. This low-cost, rapid, and easy to analyze technique provides highly reliable results. Nevertheless, there are disadvantages, such as the limited number of teeth that are visible in a photograph, low image quality, possibility of morphological changes in the teeth after the antemortem image was taken, and difficulty of making comparisons depending on the orientation of the photo. In forensic odontology, new methods of identification must be sought to accompany technological evolution, particularly when no traditional methods of comparison, such as clinical record charts or radiographs, are available. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. An integrated method for the identification of novel genes related to oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Yang, Jing; Xing, Zhihao; Yuan, Fei; Shu, Yang; Zhang, YunHua; Kong, XiangYin; Huang, Tao; Li, HaiPeng; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is a significant public health problem worldwide. Complete identification of genes related to one type of cancer facilitates earlier diagnosis and effective treatments. In this study, two widely used algorithms, the random walk with restart algorithm and the shortest path algorithm, were adopted to construct two parameterized computational methods, namely, an RWR-based method and an SP-based method; based on these methods, an integrated method was constructed for identifying novel disease genes. To validate the utility of the integrated method, data for oral cancer were used, on which the RWR-based and SP-based methods were trained, thereby building two optimal methods. The integrated method combining these optimal methods was further adopted to identify the novel genes of oral cancer. As a result, 85 novel genes were inferred, among which eleven genes (e.g., MYD88, FGFR2, NF-κBIA) were identified by both the RWR-based and SP-based methods, 70 genes (e.g., BMP4, IFNG, KITLG) were discovered only by the RWR-based method and four genes (L1R1, MCM6, NOG and CXCR3) were predicted only by the SP-based method. Extensive analyses indicate that several novel genes have strong associations with cancers, indicating the effectiveness of the integrated method for identifying disease genes.

  18. Scaling issues in local productivity hotspots in marine ecosystems using remote sensing data: A case study in the Gulf of Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribera, M.; Gopal, S.

    2014-12-01

    Productivity hotspots are traditionally defined as concentrations of relatively high biomass compared to global reference values. These hotspots often signal atypical processes occurring in a location, and identifying them is a great first step at understanding the complexity inherent in the system. However, identifying local hotspots can be difficult when an overarching global pattern (i.e. spatial autocorrelation) already exists. This problem is particularly apparent in marine ecosystems because values of productivity in near-shore areas are consistently higher than those of the open ocean due to oceanographic processes such as upwelling. In such cases, if the global reference layer used to detect hotspots is too wide, hotspots may be only identified near the coast while missing known concentrations of organisms in offshore waters. On the other hand, if the global reference layer is too small, every single location may be considered a hotspot. We applied spatial and traditional statistics to remote sensing data to determine the optimal reference global spatial scale for identifying marine productivity hotspots in the Gulf of Maine. Our iterative process measured Getis and Ord's local G* statistic at different global scales until the variance of each hotspot was maximized. We tested this process with different full resolution MERIS chlorophyll layers (300m spatial resolution) for the whole Gulf of Maine. We concluded that the optimal global scale depends on the time of the year the remote sensing data was collected, particularly when coinciding with known seasonal phytoplankton blooms. The hotspots found through this process were also spatially heterogeneous in size, with bigger hotspots in areas offshore than in locations inshore. These results may be instructive for both managers and fisheries researchers as they adapt their fisheries management policies and methods to an ecosystem based approach (EBM).

  19. A measurement fusion method for nonlinear system identification using a cooperative learning algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Youshen; Kamel, Mohamed S

    2007-06-01

    Identification of a general nonlinear noisy system viewed as an estimation of a predictor function is studied in this article. A measurement fusion method for the predictor function estimate is proposed. In the proposed scheme, observed data are first fused by using an optimal fusion technique, and then the optimal fused data are incorporated in a nonlinear function estimator based on a robust least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM). A cooperative learning algorithm is proposed to implement the proposed measurement fusion method. Compared with related identification methods, the proposed method can minimize both the approximation error and the noise error. The performance analysis shows that the proposed optimal measurement fusion function estimate has a smaller mean square error than the LS-SVM function estimate. Moreover, the proposed cooperative learning algorithm can converge globally to the optimal measurement fusion function estimate. Finally, the proposed measurement fusion method is applied to ARMA signal and spatial temporal signal modeling. Experimental results show that the proposed measurement fusion method can provide a more accurate model.

  20. Technical efficiency and economic viability of different cattle identification methods allowed by the Brazilian traceability system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Aurelio Lopes

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to evaluate the technical efficiency and economic viability of the implementation and use of four cattle identification methods allowed by the Brazilian traceability system. The study was conducted in a beef cattle production system located in the State of Mato Grosso, from January to June 2012. Four identification methods (treatments were compared: T1: ear tag in one ear and ear button in the other ear (eabu; T2: ear tag and iron brand on the right leg (eaib; T3: ear tag in one ear and tattoo on the other ear (eata; and T4: ear tag in one ear and electronic ear tag (eael on the other. Each treatment was applied to 60 Nelore animals, totaling 240 animals, divided equally into three life stages (calves, young cattle, adult cattle. The study had two phases: implementation (phase 1 and reading and transfer of identification numbers to an electronic database (phase 2. All operating expenses related to the two phases of the study were determined. The database was constructed, and the statistical analyses were performed using SPSS® 17.0 software. Regarding the time spent on implementation (phase 1, conventional ear tags and electronic ear tags produced similar results, which were lower than those of hot iron and tattoo methods, which differed from each other. Regarding the time required for reading the numbers on animals and their transcription into a database (phase 2, electronic ear-tagging was the fastest method, followed by conventional ear tag, hot iron and tattoo. Among the methods analyzed, the electronic ear tag had the highest technical efficiency because it required less time to implement identifiers and to complete the process of reading and transcription to an electronic database and because it did not exhibit any errors. However, the cost of using the electronic ear-tagging method was higher primarily due to the cost of the device.

  1. Full-waveform associated identification method of ATEM 3D anomalies based on multiple linear regression analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yanju; Huang, Wanyu; Yu, Mingmei; Guan, Shanshan; Wang, Yuan; Zhu, Yu

    2017-01-01

    This article studies full-waveform associated identification method of airborne time-domain electromagnetic method (ATEM) 3-d anomalies based on multiple linear regression analysis method. By using convolution algorithm, full-waveform theoretical responses are computed to derive sample library including switch-off-time period responses and off-time period responses. Extract full-waveform attributes from theoretical responses to derive linear regression equations which are used to identify the geological parameters. In order to improve the precision ulteriorly, we optimize the identification method by separating the sample library into different groups and identify the parameter respectively. Performance of full-waveform associated identification method with field data of wire-loop test experiments with ATEM system in Daedao of Changchun proves that the full-waveform associated identification method is feasible practically.

  2. A Comfort-Aware Energy Efficient HVAC System Based on the Subspace Identification Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Tsakiridis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A proactive heating method is presented aiming at reducing the energy consumption in a HVAC system while maintaining the thermal comfort of the occupants. The proposed technique fuses time predictions for the zones’ temperatures, based on a deterministic subspace identification method, and zones’ occupancy predictions, based on a mobility model, in a decision scheme that is capable of regulating the balance between the total energy consumed and the total discomfort cost. Simulation results for various occupation-mobility models demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed technique.

  3. Comparing culture and molecular methods for the identification of microorganisms involved in necrotizing soft tissue infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudkjøbing, Vibeke Børsholt; Thomsen, Trine Rolighed; Xu, Yijuan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTIs) are a group of infections affecting all soft tissues. NSTI involves necrosis of the afflicted tissue and is potentially life threatening due to major and rapid destruction of tissue, which often leads to septic shock and organ failure. The gold...... that clinicians should be prepared to diagnose and treat any combination of microbial pathogens. Some of the tested molecular methods offer a faster turnaround time combined with a high specificity, which makes supplemental use of such methods attractive for identification of microorganisms, especially...

  4. A New Identification Method of Both Magnetization Characteristic and Parameters of an Unloaded Transformer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Orsag

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a new method of identification of both the magnetization characteristic and the instantaneous parameters G(t and K(t of a single-phase transformer under a sinusoidal supply voltage is proposed. The instantaneous conductance G(t and inverse inductance K(t of the transformer cross section are determined by the scalar product of time functions. The magnetization characteristic is derived by means of the inverse inductance K(t. The method is practically applied to an isolating transformer.

  5. Studies on the methods of identification of irradiated food: Pt. 1; Seedling growth test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Qiongying; Kuang Yanhua; Zheng Yuemei (South China Agricultural Univ., Guangzhou (China))

    A seedling growth test for the identification of gamma irradiated edible vegetable seeds was described. The identification of gamma irradiated grape and the other seeds has been investigated. The purpose of this study was to develop an easy, rapid and practical technique for the identification of irradiated edible vegetable seeds. Seven different irradiated edible vegetable seeds: rice (Oryza sativa), peanut (Arachis hypogaea), maize (Zeamays), soybean (Glycine max), red bean (Phaseolus angularis), mung bean (Phaseolus aureus) and catjang cowpea (Vigna cylindrica) were tested by using the method of seedling growth. All of the edible vegetable seeds were exposed to gamma radiation on different doses, O(CK), 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, 5.0 kGy. After treatment with above 1.0 kGy dose to the seeds, the seedling rate was less than 50% compared with the control. Although the seedling rate of rice seeds reached 58%, the seedling growth was not normal and the seedling leaves appeared deformed. The results by this method were helpful to identify gamma treatment of the edible vegetable seeds with above 1.0 kGy dose. (author).

  6. General methods of identification of narcotic substances in cadaveric urine and biochemical indices in blood at positive identification of drug substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bychkov E.N.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the present paper was to find effective biochemical markers of chronic narcotization. Materials and methods. The results of biochemical research of biological liquids in human organism and chromatographic methods of drug substances identification in cadaveric urine were analyzed. Research of 197 samples of different biologic liquids of 10 persons was carried out. Control was fulfilled on the basis of 135 samples of biological liquids took of 12 persons. Methods of identification of drug substances are presented, chromatographic and spectral characteristics of drug substances are described. Interrelations of biochemical indices at positive study of drug substances identification were conducted. The increased urea metabolic concentration in cadaveric blood of drug addicts was revealed in comparison with control specimens. Results. (Numeral results are given in Table 3. Correct correlation of biochemical markers was not established. Conclusion. The present results suppose continued study of informative reliable biochemical markers of chronic drug intoxication

  7. A rapid and direct real time PCR-based method for identification of Salmonella spp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez-Lazaro, D.; Hernández, Marta; Esteve, T.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work was the validation of a rapid, real-time PCR assay based on TaqMan((R)) technology for the unequivocal identification of Salmonella spp. to be used directly on an agar-grown colony. A real-time PCR system targeting at the Salmonella spp. invA gene was optimized and validated...... to be especially convenient because the pre-mix containing all PCR reagents except for the bacterial cells could be kept at -20 degreesC for at least I month before its use. The optimized TaqMan((R)) real-time PCR assay is a useful, simple and rapid method for routine identification of Salmonella spp...

  8. Identification of campylobacter species isolates with phenotypic methods and polymerase chain reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miljković-Selimović Biljana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni and Campylobacter coli (C. coli are the most common bacterial causes of enterocolitis in humans. However, identification of the species level is not always possible using standard biochemical tests. Objective. Therefore, the goal of this study was to identify these microorganisms by both phenotyping and polymerase chain reaction (PCR technique. Methods. A total of 153 species of thermophilic campylobacters were examined with standard biochemical tests and PCR technique to prove hipO genes of C. jejuni and asp genes of C. coli. Results Standard biochemical tests enabled the speciation of 121 strains of C. jejuni, while application of PCR detected 126 C. jejuni strains. Conclusion. PCR technique allowed not only identification of hippurate-positive C. jejuni, but also hipuratnegative strains of C. jejuni which otherwise would be detected as C. coli if only biochemical tests were applied.

  9. Rotor Resistance Identification and Stability Control Method in Bearingless Induction Motor Drives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, Daigo; Orita, Shuichi; Chiba, Akira; Fukao, Tadashi

    Generally, vector controllers in induction motors tend to suffer from the influence of rotor resistance variation caused by temperature and load torque conditions. Several rotor resistance identification methods have been proposed in the literature. In this paper, a novel rotor resistance identification technique is proposed based on variables in the magnetic suspension control loops. When static force, for example, a shaft weight is applied, force commands are automatically generated in the opposite direction to satisfy the force equilibrium. However, the amplitude and direction of the force command vary in accordance with the rotor resistance variation. Thus, the rotor resistance can be identified from the suspension force command. In addition, influence of temperature drift in gap sensors is investigated. The effectiveness is confirmed experimentally.

  10. Using constitutive equation gap method for identification of elastic material parameters: Technical insights and illustrations

    KAUST Repository

    Florentin, Éric

    2011-08-09

    The constitutive equation gap method (CEGM) is a well-known concept which, until now, has been used mainly for the verification of finite element simulations. Recently, CEGM-based functional has been proposed to identify local elastic parameters based on experimental full-field measurement. From a technical point of view, this approach requires to quickly describe a space of statically admissible stress fields. We present here the technical insights, inspired from previous works in verification, that leads to the construction of such a space. Then, the identification strategy is implemented and the obtained results are compared with the actual material parameters for numerically generated benchmarks. The quality of the identification technique is demonstrated that makes it a valuable tool for interactive design as a way to validate local material properties. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  11. A model selection method for nonlinear system identification based FMRI effective connectivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingfeng; Coyle, Damien; Maguire, Liam; McGinnity, Thomas M; Benali, Habib

    2011-07-01

    In this paper a model selection algorithm for a nonlinear system identification method is proposed to study functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) effective connectivity. Unlike most other methods, this method does not need a pre-defined structure/model for effective connectivity analysis. Instead, it relies on selecting significant nonlinear or linear covariates for the differential equations to describe the mapping relationship between brain output (fMRI response) and input (experiment design). These covariates, as well as their coefficients, are estimated based on a least angle regression (LARS) method. In the implementation of the LARS method, Akaike's information criterion corrected (AICc) algorithm and the leave-one-out (LOO) cross-validation method were employed and compared for model selection. Simulation comparison between the dynamic causal model (DCM), nonlinear identification method, and model selection method for modelling the single-input-single-output (SISO) and multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems were conducted. Results show that the LARS model selection method is faster than DCM and achieves a compact and economic nonlinear model simultaneously. To verify the efficacy of the proposed approach, an analysis of the dorsal and ventral visual pathway networks was carried out based on three real datasets. The results show that LARS can be used for model selection in an fMRI effective connectivity study with phase-encoded, standard block, and random block designs. It is also shown that the LOO cross-validation method for nonlinear model selection has less residual sum squares than the AICc algorithm for the study.

  12. Identification and Frequency of Candida Patient Isolates by CHROMagar Candida Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mirhendi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Candida species can cause opportunistic infections in human. Although Candida albicans is major pathogenic species, non-albicans species of Candida such as C. glabrata , C. tropicalis and C. krusei have been increasingly reported. Identification of Candida species is essential for effective antifungal therapy and for infection control purposes. In the present study the commercial medium CHROMagar Candida was used as a differential method for identification of the yeasts isolated from patients.Materials & Methods: Sixteen standard strains of Candida and non?Candida yeasts were used as the reference cultures. 280 yeasts isolated from the patients referred to two Medical Mycology Laboratories in Tehran were cultured on the chromogenic medium CHROMagar Candida. The cultures incubated for 48 h at 35ºC and were differentiated based on the color of colonies in comparison with the standard strains. For colonies with unspecific color, a PCR-RFLP method was performed.Results: The most frequent species were Candida albicans(66.5% followed by C. parapsilosis (8.6%, C. tropicalis (8.2%, C. glabrata (6.1%, C. krusei (4.6%, C. kefyr (2.5%, C. guilliermondii (0.7%, C. lusitania (0.35% and Cryptococcus neoformans (0.35%.Conclusion: CHROMagar Candida can be a simple and straight-forward method for specific differentiation of medically important Candida species including C. albicans, C. krusei, C. tropicalis and C. glabrata, but not for all Candida isolates. More phenotypic or genotypic methods are necessary for exact identification of other Candida species.

  13. [Method of Remote Sensing Identification for Mineral Types Based on Multiple Spectral Characteristic Parameters Matching].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jing; Ming, Yan-fang; Han, Liu-sheng; Ren, Zhong-liang; Guo, Ya-min

    2015-10-01

    The traditional mineral mapping methods with remote sensing data, based on spectral reflectance matching techniques, shows low accuracy, for obviously being affected by the image quality, atmospheric and other factors. A new mineral mapping method based on multiple types of spectral characteristic parameters is presented in this paper. Various spectral characteristic parameters are used together to enhanced the stability in the situation of atmosphere and environment background affecting. AVIRIS (Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer) data of Nevada Cuprite are selected to determine the mineral types with this method. Typical mineral spectral data are also obtained from USGS (United States Geological Survey) spectral library to calculate the spectral characteristic parameters. A mineral identification model based on multiple spectral characteristic parameters is built by analyzing the various characteristic parameters, and is applied in the mineral mapping experiment in Cuprite area. The mineral mapping result produced by Clark et al. in 1995 is used to evaluate the effect of this method, results show, that mineral mapping results with this method can obtain a high precision, the overall mineral identification accuracy is 78.96%.

  14. Detecting hotspots of atmosphere–vegetation interaction via slowing down – Part 2: Application to a global climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bathiany

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Early warning signals (EWS have become a popular statistical tool to infer stability properties of the climate system. In Part 1 of this two-part paper we have presented a diagnostic method to find the hotspot of a sudden transition as opposed to regions that experience an externally induced tipping as a mere response. Here, we apply our method to the atmosphere–vegetation model PlanetSimulator (PlaSim – VECODE using a regression model. For each of two vegetation collapses in PlaSim-VECODE, we identify a hotspot of one particular grid cell. We demonstrate with additional experiments that the detected hotspots are indeed a particularly sensitive region in the model and give a physical explanation for these results. The method can thus provide information on the causality of sudden transitions and may help to improve the knowledge on the vulnerability of certain subsystems in climate models.

  15. KAOS: a new automated computational method for the identification of overexpressed genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzo, Angelo; Carapezza, Giovanni; Di Bella, Sebastiano; Pulvirenti, Alfredo; Isacchi, Antonella; Bosotti, Roberta

    2016-11-08

    Kinase over-expression and activation as a consequence of gene amplification or gene fusion events is a well-known mechanism of tumorigenesis. The search for novel rearrangements of kinases or other druggable genes may contribute to understanding the biology of cancerogenesis, as well as lead to the identification of new candidate targets for drug discovery. However this requires the ability to query large datasets to identify rare events occurring in very small fractions (1-3 %) of different tumor subtypes. This task is different from what is normally done by conventional tools that are able to find genes differentially expressed between two experimental conditions. We propose a computational method aimed at the automatic identification of genes which are selectively over-expressed in a very small fraction of samples within a specific tissue. The method does not require a healthy counterpart or a reference sample for the analysis and can be therefore applied also to transcriptional data generated from cell lines. In our implementation the tool can use gene-expression data from microarray experiments, as well as data generated by RNASeq technologies. The method was implemented as a publicly available, user-friendly tool called KAOS (Kinase Automatic Outliers Search). The tool enables the automatic execution of iterative searches for the identification of extreme outliers and for the graphical visualization of the results. Filters can be applied to select the most significant outliers. The performance of the tool was evaluated using a synthetic dataset and compared to state-of-the-art tools. KAOS performs particularly well in detecting genes that are overexpressed in few samples or when an extreme outlier stands out on a high variable expression background. To validate the method on real case studies, we used publicly available tumor cell line microarray data, and we were able to identify genes which are known to be overexpressed in specific samples, as well as

  16. Future hotspots of terrestrial mammal loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visconti, Piero; Pressey, Robert L.; Giorgini, Daniele; Maiorano, Luigi; Bakkenes, Michel; Boitani, Luigi; Alkemade, Rob; Falcucci, Alessandra; Chiozza, Federica; Rondinini, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Current levels of endangerment and historical trends of species and habitats are the main criteria used to direct conservation efforts globally. Estimates of future declines, which might indicate different priorities than past declines, have been limited by the lack of appropriate data and models. Given that much of conservation is about anticipating and responding to future threats, our inability to look forward at a global scale has been a major constraint on effective action. Here, we assess the geography and extent of projected future changes in suitable habitat for terrestrial mammals within their present ranges. We used a global earth-system model, IMAGE, coupled with fine-scale habitat suitability models and parametrized according to four global scenarios of human development. We identified the most affected countries by 2050 for each scenario, assuming that no additional conservation actions other than those described in the scenarios take place. We found that, with some exceptions, most of the countries with the largest predicted losses of suitable habitat for mammals are in Africa and the Americas. African and North American countries were also predicted to host the most species with large proportional global declines. Most of the countries we identified as future hotspots of terrestrial mammal loss have little or no overlap with the present global conservation priorities, thus confirming the need for forward-looking analyses in conservation priority setting. The expected growth in human populations and consumption in hotspots of future mammal loss mean that local conservation actions such as protected areas might not be sufficient to mitigate losses. Other policies, directed towards the root causes of biodiversity loss, are required, both in Africa and other parts of the world. PMID:21844048

  17. Methane Hotspots in the Los Angeles Megacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, F. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Bush, S.; Ehleringer, J. R.; Lai, C.; Kort, E. A.; Blake, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Airborne observations show that Los Angeles (LA) is a large source of methane to the atmosphere, yet the sources of excess methane from the urban area are poorly constrained. We used a mobile laboratory, a Ford Transit van equipped with cavity ring down spectrometers (Picarro, Inc.), to measure greenhouse gases (CH4, CO2, and CO) mole fractions in LA. On-road surveys across the LA Basin were conducted seasonally to determine patterns of CH4 enrichment in space and over time, with a focus on quantifying methane leaks from known sources. We found fugitive leaks and elevated CH4 concentrations throughout the LA Basin. Some were associated with known sources, such as landfills, wastewater treatment, and oil and gas infrastructure, while others had an unknown origin. Urban CH4 enrichment varied over the course of the year, largely due to seasonal changes in meteorological conditions. Nevertheless, our mobile surveys revealed CH4 hotspots (>200 ppb elevated with respect to background levels) that persisted among seasons. High CH4 concentrations were most easily predicted by proximity to methane sources, particularly near the coast, while elevated CH4 levels were more evenly dispersed in inland areas. CH4 hotspots had a disproportionate impact on excess methane relative to the area they accounted for, typically providing more than a quarter of excess methane measured on a transect. These data improve estimates of the relative roles of specific leaks and emission sectors to LA's excess methane. Depending on the cost of reducing these CH4 leaks, a focus on CH4 emissions may prove an effective way to reduce LA's greenhouse gas emissions in the near term.

  18. RecRWR: A Recursive Random Walk Method for Improved Identification of Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Perdiz Arrais

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High-throughput methods such as next-generation sequencing or DNA microarrays lack precision, as they return hundreds of genes for a single disease profile. Several computational methods applied to physical interaction of protein networks have been successfully used in identification of the best disease candidates for each expression profile. An open problem for these methods is the ability to combine and take advantage of the wealth of biomedical data publicly available. We propose an enhanced method to improve selection of the best disease targets for a multilayer biomedical network that integrates PPI data annotated with stable knowledge from OMIM diseases and GO biological processes. We present a comprehensive validation that demonstrates the advantage of the proposed approach, Recursive Random Walk with Restarts (RecRWR. The obtained results outline the superiority of the proposed approach, RecRWR, in identifying disease candidates, especially with high levels of biological noise and benefiting from all data available.

  19. A data recipient centered de-identification method to retain statistical attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Tamas S; Tucker, Thomas C; Gangopadhyay, Aryya; Chen, Zhiyuan

    2014-08-01

    Privacy has always been a great concern of patients and medical service providers. As a result of the recent advances in information technology and the government's push for the use of Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems, a large amount of medical data is collected and stored electronically. This data needs to be made available for analysis but at the same time patient privacy has to be protected through de-identification. Although biomedical researchers often describe their research plans when they request anonymized data, most existing anonymization methods do not use this information when de-identifying the data. As a result, the anonymized data may not be useful for the planned research project. This paper proposes a data recipient centered approach to tailor the de-identification method based on input from the recipient of the data. We demonstrate our approach through an anonymization project for biomedical researchers with specific goals to improve the utility of the anonymized data for statistical models used for their research project. The selected algorithm improves a privacy protection method called Condensation by Aggarwal et al. Our methods were tested and validated on real cancer surveillance data provided by the Kentucky Cancer Registry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A Novel Coupled State/Input/Parameter Identification Method for Linear Structural Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhimin Wan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In many engineering applications, unknown states, inputs, and parameters exist in the structures. However, most methods require one or two of these variables to be known in order to identify the other(s. Recently, the authors have proposed a method called EGDF for coupled state/input/parameter identification for nonlinear system in state space. However, the EGDF method based solely on acceleration measurements is found to be unstable, which can cause the drift of the identified inputs and displacements. Although some regularization methods can be adopted for solving the problem, they are not suitable for joint input-state identification in real time. In this paper, a strategy of data fusion of displacement and acceleration measurements is used to avoid the low-frequency drift in the identified inputs and structural displacements for linear structural systems. Two numerical examples about a plane truss and a single-stage isolation system are conducted to verify the effectiveness of the proposed modified EGDF algorithm.

  1. An efficient method to reduce ill-posedness for structural dynamic load identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Meng, Xianghua; Zhang, Dequan; Jiang, Chao; Han, Xu

    2017-10-01

    For the inverse problem of structural dynamic load identification, high system ill-posedness is a main cause leading to instability and low accuracy. In this study, an efficient interpolation-based method is proposed to reduce ill-posedness availably and identify dynamic load stably. The load history is discretized into a series of time elements, and the load profile in each time element is approximated through interpolation functions. Then, in the whole time domain, the dynamic responses under interpolation function loads are calculated through a few finite element analysis and then assembled together to form a global kernel function matrix for load identification. Using singular value decomposition (SVD), the ill-posed degree of the global kernel function matrix can be analyzed. Compared with the conventional Green kernel function method (GKFM), the ill-posedness of global kernel function matrix in the proposed method is significantly reduced. Especially, when the length of time element is selected appropriately, the global kernel function matrix is entirely well-posed and the corresponding dynamic load can be stably identified without any regularization operation. Numerical examples demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method and the correctness of identified load.

  2. Hotspots within hotspots? Hammerhead shark movements around Wolf Island, Galapagos Marine Reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, Alex; Ketchum, James; Klimley, A Peter; Espinoza, Eduardo; Peñaherrera, Cesar

    2010-01-01

    Are pelagic species such as sharks and tuna distributed homogenously or heterogeneously in the oceans? Large assemblages of these species have been observed at seamounts and offshore islands in the eastern tropical Pacific, which are considered hotspots of pelagic biodiversity. Is the species distribution uniform at these hotspots or do species aggregate at a finer spatial scale at these sites? We employed three techniques to demonstrate that the aggregations of scalloped hammerhead sharks, Sphyrna lewini, and other pelagic species were confined to the southeastern corner of Wolf Island in the Galapagos Marine Reserve. Coded ultrasonic transmitters were placed on individuals at this site and at another aggregation site at Darwin Island, separated from Wolf by 40 km, and they were detected by monitors moored at the southeastern corner of Wolf Island and rarely by monitors deployed at other sites around the island. Hammerhead sharks, carrying depth-sensing continual transmitters, were tracked for two-day periods in a vessel and shown to reside a disproportionately large fraction of their time at the southeastern corner. Visual censuses were carried out seasonally at the eight monitor sites at Wolf Island, recording the abundance of one species of tuna, four species of jacks, and a number of other species. The highest diversity and abundance of these species occurred in the southeastern corner of the island. Our results support the use of hammerhead sharks as indicator and umbrella species for pelagic hotspots on a fine scale.

  3. A Maximum Power Transfer Tracking Method for WPT Systems with Coupling Coefficient Identification Considering Two-Value Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Dai

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Maximum power transfer tracking (MPTT is meant to track the maximum power point during the system operation of wireless power transfer (WPT systems. Traditionally, MPTT is achieved by impedance matching at the secondary side when the load resistance is varied. However, due to a loosely coupling characteristic, the variation of coupling coefficient will certainly affect the performance of impedance matching, therefore MPTT will fail accordingly. This paper presents an identification method of coupling coefficient for MPTT in WPT systems. Especially, the two-value issue during the identification is considered. The identification approach is easy to implement because it does not require additional circuit. Furthermore, MPTT is easy to realize because only two easily measured DC parameters are needed. The detailed identification procedure corresponding to the two-value issue and the maximum power transfer tracking process are presented, and both the simulation analysis and experimental results verified the identification method and MPTT.

  4. Identification Methods of Radial Force Parameters for Salient-pole Permanent Magnet Synchronous Bearingless Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooshima, Masahide; Miyazawa, Satoru; Chiba, Akira; Nakamura, Fukuzo; Fukao, Tadashi

    In the permanent magnet (PM) synchronous bearingless motors, radial suspension force components in two-perpendicular axes are mutually interfered by the armature reaction. Then, the magnetic force suspension system has less damping, and it causes unstable rotor suspension with large displacements. In order to eliminate the suspension force interference, some decoupling control methods of the PM bearingless motors have been already proposed. In the decoupling controllers, it is necessary that the radial force parameters are justly identified. The parameters may be varied with the armature reaction or the magnetic saturation in the stator teeth. In this paper, the salient-pole type PM bearingless motors are focused. At first, the parameters are calculated by FEM. However, some problems are found in the FEM parameter identification from a view point of suspension performances of three prototype machines with different structures. Then, a new on-line parameter identification strategy is proposed, and the new strategy is found to be suitable in identification of the parameters considering the armature reaction and the magnetic saturation.

  5. Comparing culture and molecular methods for the identification of microorganisms involved in necrotizing soft tissue infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudkjøbing, Vibeke Børsholt; Thomsen, Trine Rolighed; Xu, Yijuan; Melton-Kreft, Rachael; Ahmed, Azad; Eickhardt, Steffen; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Earl, Joshua P; Ehrlich, Garth D; Moser, Claus

    2016-11-08

    Necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTIs) are a group of infections affecting all soft tissues. NSTI involves necrosis of the afflicted tissue and is potentially life threatening due to major and rapid destruction of tissue, which often leads to septic shock and organ failure. The gold standard for identification of pathogens is culture; however molecular methods for identification of microorganisms may provide a more rapid result and may be able to identify additional microorganisms that are not detected by culture. In this study, tissue samples (n = 20) obtained after debridement of 10 patients with NSTI were analyzed by standard culture, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and multiple molecular methods. The molecular methods included analysis of microbial diversity by 1) direct 16S and D2LSU rRNA gene Microseq 2) construction of near full-length 16S rRNA gene clone libraries with subsequent Sanger sequencing for most samples, 3) the Ibis T5000 biosensor and 4) 454-based pyrosequencing. Furthermore, quantitative PCR (qPCR) was used to verify and determine the relative abundance of Streptococcus pyogenes in samples. For 70 % of the surgical samples it was possible to identify microorganisms by culture. Some samples did not result in growth (presumably due to administration of antimicrobial therapy prior to sampling). The molecular methods identified microorganisms in 90 % of the samples, and frequently detected additional microorganisms when compared to culture. Although the molecular methods generally gave concordant results, our results indicate that Microseq may misidentify or overlook microorganisms that can be detected by other molecular methods. Half of the patients were found to be infected with S. pyogenes, but several atypical findings were also made including infection by a) Acinetobacter baumannii, b) Streptococcus pneumoniae, and c) fungi, mycoplasma and Fusobacterium necrophorum. The study emphasizes that many pathogens can be involved

  6. Power System Oscillation Modes Identifications: Guidelines for Applying TLS-ESPRIT Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajjar, Gopal R.; Soman, Shreevardhan

    2013-05-01

    Fast measurements of power system quantities available through wide-area measurement systems enables direct observations for power system electromechanical oscillations. But the raw observations data need to be processed to obtain the quantitative measures required to make any inference regarding the power system state. A detailed discussion is presented for the theory behind the general problem of oscillatory mode indentification. This paper presents some results on oscillation mode identification applied to a wide-area frequency measurements system. Guidelines for selection of parametes for obtaining most reliable results from the applied method are provided. Finally, some results on real measurements are presented with our inference on them.

  7. Damage identification in plate and shell structures by trilateration method using Lamb waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun P., Durai; C. N., Sathyanarayana; Raja, S.; V. P. S., Naidu

    2017-04-01

    A two-stage algorithm that detects and locates damages in thin walled structures using Lamb wave signals is proposed. Isotropic plate and shell structures with adhesively bonded piezoelectric transducers in circular and rectangular array patterns are considered. Lamb waves are generated and sensed by these transducers in pitch-catch mode, before and after making damages in the structure-under-test for baseline subtraction. In the damage identification process, first the correlation coefficient is determined using current and baseline signals. Further, the Trilateration method is adopted to locate the damage using parameters like Time-of-Flight and Group velocity from the damage-scattered Lamb wave signals.

  8. Investigation of the stochastic subspace identification method for on-line wind turbine tower monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Kaoshan; Wang, Ying; Lu, Wensheng; Ren, Xiaosong; Huang, Zhenhua

    2017-04-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) of wind turbines has been applied in the wind energy industry to obtain their real-time vibration parameters and to ensure their optimum performance. For SHM, the accuracy of its results and the efficiency of its measurement methodology and data processing algorithm are the two major concerns. Selection of proper measurement parameters could improve such accuracy and efficiency. The Stochastic Subspace Identification (SSI) is a widely used data processing algorithm for SHM. This research discussed the accuracy and efficiency of SHM using SSI method to identify vibration parameters of on-line wind turbine towers. Proper measurement parameters, such as optimum measurement duration, are recommended.

  9. A touch probe method of operating an implantable RFID tag for orthopedic implant identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Berger, J Lee; Ogirala, Ajay; Mickle, Marlin H

    2013-06-01

    The major problem in operating an implantable radio-frequency identification (RFID) tag embedded on an orthopedic implant is low efficiency because of metallic interference. To improve the efficiency, this paper proposes a method of operating an implantable passive RFID tag using a touch probe at 13.56 MHz. This technology relies on the electric field interaction between two pairs of electrodes, one being a part of the touch probe placed on the surface of tissue and the other being a part of the tag installed under the tissue. Compared with using a conventional RFID antenna such as a loop antenna, this method has a better performance in the near field operation range to reduce interference with the orthopedic implant. Properly matching the touch probe and the tag to the tissue and the implant reduces signal attenuation and increases the overall system efficiency. The experiments have shown that this method has a great performance in the near field transcutaneous operation and can be used for orthopedic implant identification.

  10. EHPS Handling Stability Analysis of Electric Bus Based on System Identification Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ni; Liu, Hai-mei; Bei, Shao-yi; Li, Bo; Zhao, Jing-bo

    2017-09-01

    Electric hydraulic assist force steering system (EHPS system) is the steering system of electric bus, this paper presents a method of EHPS handling stability analysis based on system identification method according to the handling stability of EHPS system for electric bus. The simulation model of electro-hydraulic assist force steering system EHPS is established by using the software AMESim, and making a quantitative analysis on the characteristics of the electric assist force assisted steering system, the assist force response and stability. At the same time, we study the stability of vehicle, including hunting, transient response, return experiment, the results show that the HPS and EHPS by comparing the simulation: It improves the portability, road sense, transient response and return performance after loading the system, which verifiy the effectiveness of the control strategy that improves vehicle steering performance, and it provides the basis for the optimization of control methods in the future.

  11. Development of a novel hexa-plex PCR method for identification and serotyping of Salmonella species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruichao; Wang, Yang; Shen, Jianzhong; Wu, Congming

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella is one of the most important foodborne pathogens, which causes a huge economic burden worldwide. To detect Salmonella rapidly is very meaningful in preventing salmonellosis and decreasing economic losses. Currently, isolation of Salmonella is confirmed by biochemical and serobased serotyping methods, which are time consuming, labor intensive, and complicated. To solve this problem, a hexa-plex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was developed using comparative genomics analysis and multiplex PCR technology to detect Salmonella and Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Agona, Salmonella Choleraesuis, and Salmonella Pullorum simultaneously. The accuracy of this method was tested by a collection of 142 Salmonella. Furthermore, the strategy described in this article to mine serovar-specific fragments for Salmonella could be used to find specific fragments for other Salmonella serotypes and bacteria. The combination of this strategy and multiplex PCR is promising in the rapid identification of foodborne pathogens.

  12. Identification of some Fusarium species from selected crop seeds using traditional method and BIO-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Kulik

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We identified a species level of the fungal cultures isolated from selected crop seeds using traditional method and BIO-PCR. The use of BIO-PCR did not correspond completely to the morphological analyses. Both methods showed increased infection with F. poae in winter wheat seed sample originated from north Poland. Fungal culture No 40 (isolated from faba bean and identified with traditional method as mixed culture with F. culmorum and F. graminearum did not produce expected product after PCR reaction with species specific primers OPT18F470, OPT18R470. However, the use of additional primers Fc01F, Fc01R allowed for reliable identification of F. culmorum in the culture.

  13. SFM: A novel sequence-based fusion method for disease genes identification and prioritization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Abdulaziz; Moghadam Charkari, Nasrollah

    2015-10-21

    The identification of disease genes from human genome is of great importance to improve diagnosis and treatment of disease. Several machine learning methods have been introduced to identify disease genes. However, these methods mostly differ in the prior knowledge used to construct the feature vector for each instance (gene), the ways of selecting negative data (non-disease genes) where there is no investigational approach to find them and the classification methods used to make the final decision. In this work, a novel Sequence-based fusion method (SFM) is proposed to identify disease genes. In this regard, unlike existing methods, instead of using a noisy and incomplete prior-knowledge, the amino acid sequence of the proteins which is universal data has been carried out to present the genes (proteins) into four different feature vectors. To select more likely negative data from candidate genes, the intersection set of four negative sets which are generated using distance approach is considered. Then, Decision Tree (C4.5) has been applied as a fusion method to combine the results of four independent state-of the-art predictors based on support vector machine (SVM) algorithm, and to make the final decision. The experimental results of the proposed method have been evaluated by some standard measures. The results indicate the precision, recall and F-measure of 82.6%, 85.6% and 84, respectively. These results confirm the efficiency and validity of the proposed method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. THE USE OF THE EXPERIMENT PLANNING METHOD TO EVALUATE THE ACCURACY OF FLEXIBLE UNITS IDENTIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Y. Yehorov

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The identification of rolling stock on the railroads is an integral part of many automation systems as trains in general and cars separately. Various information management systems at sorting yards require the operational information about the object while performing the manufacturing operations. The improvement of the determination accuracy of different parameters characterizing the rolling stock, leads to the immediate quality progress in the traffic volumes management. The aim of the paper is to develop a method to estimate the errors of determination the interaxle distance of the flexible units in the control section using the point path-control transducer for future identification of cars and locomotives. Methodology. To achieve this goal the simulation method and experiment planning were used. The simulation model allowing determining the time intervals between the collisions of wheelset of movable units in point path-control transducer on the control section with variable characteristics of identification devices was developed. The values of the time intervals obtained with using the simulation mode were applied in the method of experiment planning to the final target. Findings. The calculated analytical values of the errors of the interaxle distances do not have the significant differences from values obtained using the simulation model. It makes possible to use the received functional dependence to estimate the possible errors in the identification of rolling stock. The results of this work can be used to identify separate flexible units, and trains in general. Originality. The functional dependence of the error of the interaxle distance error from the fixing point of the wheel path-control transducer, the distance between the sensors and the measured distance was derived using a previously conducted research of the factors influencing the error in determining the interaxle distance of the movable units, and developed

  15. Comparative analyses reveal discrepancies among results of commonly used methods for Anopheles gambiaemolecular form identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinto João

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anopheles gambiae M and S molecular forms, the major malaria vectors in the Afro-tropical region, are ongoing a process of ecological diversification and adaptive lineage splitting, which is affecting malaria transmission and vector control strategies in West Africa. These two incipient species are defined on the basis of single nucleotide differences in the IGS and ITS regions of multicopy rDNA located on the X-chromosome. A number of PCR and PCR-RFLP approaches based on form-specific SNPs in the IGS region are used for M and S identification. Moreover, a PCR-method to detect the M-specific insertion of a short interspersed transposable element (SINE200 has recently been introduced as an alternative identification approach. However, a large-scale comparative analysis of four widely used PCR or PCR-RFLP genotyping methods for M and S identification was never carried out to evaluate whether they could be used interchangeably, as commonly assumed. Results The genotyping of more than 400 A. gambiae specimens from nine African countries, and the sequencing of the IGS-amplicon of 115 of them, highlighted discrepancies among results obtained by the different approaches due to different kinds of biases, which may result in an overestimation of MS putative hybrids, as follows: i incorrect match of M and S specific primers used in the allele specific-PCR approach; ii presence of polymorphisms in the recognition sequence of restriction enzymes used in the PCR-RFLP approaches; iii incomplete cleavage during the restriction reactions; iv presence of different copy numbers of M and S-specific IGS-arrays in single individuals in areas of secondary contact between the two forms. Conclusions The results reveal that the PCR and PCR-RFLP approaches most commonly utilized to identify A. gambiae M and S forms are not fully interchangeable as usually assumed, and highlight limits of the actual definition of the two molecular forms, which might

  16. Human and non-human primate genomes share hotspots of positive selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Enard

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Among primates, genome-wide analysis of recent positive selection is currently limited to the human species because it requires extensive sampling of genotypic data from many individuals. The extent to which genes positively selected in human also present adaptive changes in other primates therefore remains unknown. This question is important because a gene that has been positively selected independently in the human and in other primate lineages may be less likely to be involved in human specific phenotypic changes such as dietary habits or cognitive abilities. To answer this question, we analysed heterozygous Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs in the genomes of single human, chimpanzee, orangutan, and macaque individuals using a new method aiming to identify selective sweeps genome-wide. We found an unexpectedly high number of orthologous genes exhibiting signatures of a selective sweep simultaneously in several primate species, suggesting the presence of hotspots of positive selection. A similar significant excess is evident when comparing genes positively selected during recent human evolution with genes subjected to positive selection in their coding sequence in other primate lineages and identified using a different test. These findings are further supported by comparing several published human genome scans for positive selection with our findings in non-human primate genomes. We thus provide extensive evidence that the co-occurrence of positive selection in humans and in other primates at the same genetic loci can be measured with only four species, an indication that it may be a widespread phenomenon. The identification of positive selection in humans alongside other primates is a powerful tool to outline those genes that were selected uniquely during recent human evolution.

  17. A Rapid Identification Method for Calamine Using Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Based on Multi-Reference Correlation Coefficient Method and Back Propagation Artificial Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yangbo; Chen, Long; Huang, Bisheng; Chen, Keli

    2017-07-01

    As a mineral, the traditional Chinese medicine calamine has a similar shape to many other minerals. Investigations of commercially available calamine samples have shown that there are many fake and inferior calamine goods sold on the market. The conventional identification method for calamine is complicated, therefore as a result of the large scale of calamine samples, a rapid identification method is needed. To establish a qualitative model using near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy for rapid identification of various calamine samples, large quantities of calamine samples including crude products, counterfeits and processed products were collected and correctly identified using the physicochemical and powder X-ray diffraction method. The NIR spectroscopy method was used to analyze these samples by combining the multi-reference correlation coefficient (MRCC) method and the error back propagation artificial neural network algorithm (BP-ANN), so as to realize the qualitative identification of calamine samples. The accuracy rate of the model based on NIR and MRCC methods was 85%; in addition, the model, which took comprehensive multiple factors into consideration, can be used to identify crude calamine products, its counterfeits and processed products. Furthermore, by in-putting the correlation coefficients of multiple references as the spectral feature data of samples into BP-ANN, a BP-ANN model of qualitative identification was established, of which the accuracy rate was increased to 95%. The MRCC method can be used as a NIR-based method in the process of BP-ANN modeling.

  18. From the patient to the clinical mycology laboratory: how can we optimise microscopy and culture methods for mould identification?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyzantiadis, Timoleon-Achilleas A; Johnson, Elizabeth M; Kibbler, Christopher C

    2012-06-01

    The identification of fungi relies mainly on morphological criteria. However, there is a need for robust and definitive phenotypic identification procedures in order to evaluate continuously evolving molecular methods. For the future, there is an emerging consensus that a combined (phenotypic and molecular) approach is more powerful for fungal identification, especially for moulds. Most of the procedures used for phenotypic identification are based on experience rather than comparative studies of effectiveness or performance and there is a need for standardisation among mycology laboratories. This review summarises and evaluates the evidence for the major existing phenotypic identification procedures for the predominant causes of opportunistic mould infection. We have concentrated mainly on Aspergillus, Fusarium and mucoraceous mould species, as these are the most important clinically and the ones for which there are the most molecular taxonomic data.

  19. A universal microarray detection method for identification of multiple Phytophthora spp. using padlock probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Katarzyna; Verstappen, Els; Mendes, Odette; Schoen, Cor; Ristaino, Jean; Bonants, Peter

    2012-06-01

    The genus Phytophthora consists of many species that cause important diseases in ornamental, agronomic, and forest ecosystems worldwide. Molecular methods have been developed for detection and identification of one or several species of Phytophthora in single or multiplex reactions. In this article, we describe a padlock probe (PLP)-based multiplex method of detection and identification for many Phytophthora spp. simultaneously. A generic TaqMan polymerase chain reaction assay, which detects all known Phytophthora spp., is conducted first, followed by a species-specific PLP ligation. A 96-well-based microarray platform with colorimetric readout is used to detect and identify the different Phytophthora spp. PLPs are long oligonucleotides containing target complementary sequence regions at both their 5' and 3' ends which can be ligated on the target into a circular molecule. The ligation is point mutation specific; therefore, closely related sequences can be differentiated. This circular molecule can then be detected on a microarray. We developed 23 PLPs to economically important Phytophthora spp. based upon internal transcribed spacer-1 sequence differences between individual Phytophthora spp. Tests on genomic DNA of many Phytophthora isolates and DNA from environmental samples showed the specificity and utility of PLPs for Phytophthora diagnostics.

  20. Identification of Lonicera japonica and its related species using the DNA barcoding method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhiying; Gao, Ting; Yao, Hui; Shi, Linchun; Zhu, Yingjie; Chen, Shilin

    2011-02-01

    To choose a suitable DNA marker to authenticate the botanical origins of Flos Lonicerae Japonicae and Flos Lonicerae, seven candidate DNA bar codes (i.e., RBCL, MATK, PSBA-TRNH, ITS2, ITS, TRNL intron, and TRNL-F intergenic spacer) were tested on forty-four samples of LONICERA JAPONICA and its closely related species using the DNA barcoding method. We found that all seven candidate bar codes yielded 100 % PCR amplification efficiency and that the sequencing efficiency of the five other candidate bar codes was 100%, with the exception of ITS and ITS2. The highest interspecific divergence was provided by the PSBA-TRNH intergenic spacer, followed by the TRNL-F intergenic spacer based on six parameters and Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Through the inspection of the histograms of the barcoding gap, the distribution of the PSBA-TRNH intergenic spacer was well separated; and only this candidate DNA bar code possessed the highest species identification efficiency at 100 % by BLAST1 method. In conclusion, using the PSBA-TRNH intergenic spacer as a DNA bar code is suitable for the identification of the botanical origins of Flos Lonicerae Japonicae and Flos Lonicerae. This study may provide an important example for the authentication of the botanical origin of medicinal herbs listed in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. A method for identification and analysis of non-overlapping myeloid immunophenotypes in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Gustafson

    Full Text Available The development of flow cytometric biomarkers in human studies and clinical trials has been slowed by inconsistent sample processing, use of cell surface markers, and reporting of immunophenotypes. Additionally, the function(s of distinct cell types as biomarkers cannot be accurately defined without the proper identification of homogeneous populations. As such, we developed a method for the identification and analysis of human leukocyte populations by the use of eight 10-color flow cytometric protocols in combination with novel software analyses. This method utilizes un-manipulated biological sample preparation that allows for the direct quantitation of leukocytes and non-overlapping immunophenotypes. We specifically designed myeloid protocols that enable us to define distinct phenotypes that include mature monocytes, granulocytes, circulating dendritic cells, immature myeloid cells, and myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs. We also identified CD123 as an additional distinguishing marker for the phenotypic characterization of immature LIN-CD33+HLA-DR- MDSCs. Our approach permits the comprehensive analysis of all peripheral blood leukocytes and yields data that is highly amenable for standardization across inter-laboratory comparisons for human studies.

  2. A study on clinical nursing research trends and hotspots based on bibliometric analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Shi-Fan Han; Rui-Fang Zhu; Ting-Ting Qin

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This study was conducted to understand the trends and research hotspots of clinical nursing in China and abroad, thereby to provide guidance for nursing practice and studies. Methods: We retrieved clinical nursing literature (excluding literature related to psychological nursing and traditional Chinese medicine nursing) cited in Wanfang Data (www.wanfangdata.com.cn) and PubMed between 2007 and 2015 and subsequently performed bibliometric analyses on article volume, journal, cluster...

  3. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP)-based method for rapid mushroom species identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaagt, Franziska; Haase, Ilka; Fischer, Markus

    2013-02-27

    Toxic mushroom species, such as the death cap ( Amanita phalloides ), are responsible for most mushroom poisonings. In the present work, novel loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assays were used for the differentiation of even closely related edible and toxic mushroom species. The applicability of these methods was tested by cross-reaction studies and analysis of spiked mushroom samples (raw and fried material). Contaminations at the level of 2% (w/w) could be detected in different mushroom blends. Three detection methods were used: agarose gel analysis, fluorimetric real-time detection, and visual detection by lateral flow dipsticks (LFD). The LAMP assay combined with LFD detection allows the identification of A. phalloides in about 2 h (including DNA extraction) at a very low level of technical equipment (micropestle, water bath, and mobile centrifuge), which makes this technique perfectly suited for on-site applications.

  4. Dynamic Force Identification for Beamlike Structures Using an Improved Dynamic Stiffness Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L. Chen

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study a procedure of dynamic force identification for beamlike structures is developed based on an improved dynamic stiffness method. In this procedure, the entire structure is first divided into substructures according to the excitation locations and the measured response sites. Each substructure is then represented by an equivalent element. The resulting model only retains the degree of freedom (DOF associated with the excitations and the measured responses and the DOF corresponding to the boundaries of the structures. Because the technique partly bypasses the processes of modal parameter extraction, global matrix inversion, and model reduction, it can eliminate many of the approximations and errors that may be introduced during these processes. The principle of the method is described in detail and its efficiency is demonstrated via numerical simulations of three different structures. The sensitivity of the estimated force to random noise is discussed and the limitation of the technique is pointed out.

  5. A Semismooth Newton Method for Nonlinear Parameter Identification Problems with Impulsive Noise

    KAUST Repository

    Clason, Christian

    2012-01-01

    This work is concerned with nonlinear parameter identification in partial differential equations subject to impulsive noise. To cope with the non-Gaussian nature of the noise, we consider a model with L 1 fitting. However, the nonsmoothness of the problem makes its efficient numerical solution challenging. By approximating this problem using a family of smoothed functionals, a semismooth Newton method becomes applicable. In particular, its superlinear convergence is proved under a second-order condition. The convergence of the solution to the approximating problem as the smoothing parameter goes to zero is shown. A strategy for adaptively selecting the regularization parameter based on a balancing principle is suggested. The efficiency of the method is illustrated on several benchmark inverse problems of recovering coefficients in elliptic differential equations, for which one- and two-dimensional numerical examples are presented. © by SIAM.

  6. Automated method for identification and artery-venous classification of vessel trees in retinal vessel networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinayak S Joshi

    Full Text Available The separation of the retinal vessel network into distinct arterial and venous vessel trees is of high interest. We propose an automated method for identification and separation of retinal vessel trees in a retinal color image by converting a vessel segmentation image into a vessel segment map and identifying the individual vessel trees by graph search. Orientation, width, and intensity of each vessel segment are utilized to find the optimal graph of vessel segments. The separated vessel trees are labeled as primary vessel or branches. We utilize the separated vessel trees for arterial-venous (AV classification, based on the color properties of the vessels in each tree graph. We applied our approach to a dataset of 50 fundus images from 50 subjects. The proposed method resulted in an accuracy of 91.44% correctly classified vessel pixels as either artery or vein. The accuracy of correctly classified major vessel segments was 96.42%.

  7. Indirect scaling methods applied to the identification and quantification of auditory attributes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wickelmaier, Florian

    Auditory attributes, like for example loudness, pitch, sharpness, or tonal prominence, reflect how human listeners perceive their acoustical environment. The identification and of relevant auditory attributes and their quantification are therefore of major concern for different applications...... of sound quality research: be it in product-sound design or in the assessment of sound reproduction systems. In this Ph.D. thesis, so-called indirect scaling methods were developed and analyzed for their usefulness in sound quality evaluation. Such methods are characterized by requiring only simple...... qualitative judgments from listeners (as opposed to complex, often numerical judgments in direct scaling procedures), and by providing built-in tests of the validity of the underlying theoretical construct (as opposed to assuming its validity). In indirect scaling procedures, the numerical scale...

  8. Stability predicts genetic diversity in the Brazilian Atlantic forest hotspot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnaval, Ana Carolina; Hickerson, Michael J; Haddad, Célio F B; Rodrigues, Miguel T; Moritz, Craig

    2009-02-06

    Biodiversity hotspots, representing regions with high species endemism and conservation threat, have been mapped globally. Yet, biodiversity distribution data from within hotspots are too sparse for effective conservation in the face of rapid environmental change. Using frogs as indicators, ecological niche models under paleoclimates, and simultaneous Bayesian analyses of multispecies molecular data, we compare alternative hypotheses of assemblage-scale response to late Quaternary climate change. This reveals a hotspot within the Brazilian Atlantic forest hotspot. We show that the southern Atlantic forest was climatically unstable relative to the central region, which served as a large climatic refugium for neotropical species in the late Pleistocene. This sets new priorities for conservation in Brazil and establishes a validated approach to biodiversity prediction in other understudied, species-rich regions.

  9. HD-CNV: hotspot detector for copy number variants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Butler, Jenna L; Osborne Locke, Marjorie Elizabeth; Hill, Kathleen A; Daley, Mark

    2013-01-01

    ... (hotspot detector for copy number variants) is a tool for downstream analysis of previously identified CNV regions from multiple samples, and it detects recurrent regions by finding cliques in an interval graph generated from the input...

  10. Pervasive defaunation of forest remnants in a tropical biodiversity hotspot

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Canale, Gustavo R; Peres, Carlos A; Guidorizzi, Carlos E; Gatto, Cassiano A Ferreira; Kierulff, Maria Cecília M

    2012-01-01

    ... in unprotected forest remnants remain poorly explained. Here, we report unprecedented rates of local extinctions of medium to large-bodied mammals in one of the world's most important tropical biodiversity hotspot...

  11. Transportation conformity particulate matter hot-spot air quality modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    In light of the new development in particulate matter (PM) hot-spot regulations and Illinois Department : of Transportation (IDOT)s National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation requirements, : this project is intended to (1) perform and ...

  12. Methods for the isolation and identification of Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasanov, Uta; Hughes, Denise; Hansbro, Philip M

    2005-11-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important food-borne pathogen and is widely tested for in food, environmental and clinical samples. Identification traditionally involved culture methods based on selective enrichment and plating followed by the characterization of Listeria spp. based on colony morphology, sugar fermentation and haemolytic properties. These methods are the gold standard; but they are lengthy and may not be suitable for testing of foods with short shelf lives. As a result more rapid tests were developed based on antibodies (ELISA) or molecular techniques (PCR or DNA hybridization). While these tests possess equal sensitivity, they are rapid and allow testing to be completed within 48 h. More recently, molecular methods were developed that target RNA rather than DNA, such as RT-PCR, real time PCR or nucleic acid based sequence amplification (NASBA). These tests not only provide a measure of cell viability but they can also be used for quantitative analysis. In addition, a variety of tests are available for sub-species characterization, which are particularly useful in epidemiological investigations. Early typing methods differentiated isolates based on phenotypic markers, such as multilocus enzyme electrophoresis, phage typing and serotyping. These phenotypic typing methods are being replaced by molecular tests, which reflect genetic relationships between isolates and are more accurate. These new methods are currently mainly used in research but their considerable potential for routine testing in the future cannot be overlooked.

  13. An equivalent unbalance identification method for the balancing of nonlinear squeeze-film damped rotordynamic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Cedillo, Sergio G.; Bonello, Philip

    2016-01-01

    The high pressure (HP) rotor in an aero-engine assembly cannot be accessed under operational conditions because of the restricted space for instrumentation and high temperatures. This motivates the development of a non-invasive inverse problem approach for unbalance identification and balancing, requiring prior knowledge of the structure. Most such methods in the literature necessitate linear bearing models, making them unsuitable for aero-engine applications which use nonlinear squeeze-film damper (SFD) bearings. A previously proposed inverse method for nonlinear rotating systems was highly limited in its application (e.g. assumed circular centered SFD orbits). The methodology proposed in this paper overcomes such limitations. It uses the Receptance Harmonic Balance Method (RHBM) to generate the backward operator using measurements of the vibration at the engine casing, provided there is at least one linear connection between rotor and casing, apart from the nonlinear connections. A least-squares solution yields the equivalent unbalance distribution in prescribed planes of the rotor, which is consequently used to balance it. The method is validated on distinct rotordynamic systems using simulated casing vibration readings. The method is shown to provide effective balancing under hitherto unconsidered practical conditions. The repeatability of the method, as well as its robustness to noise, model uncertainty and balancing errors, are satisfactorily demonstrated and the limitations of the process discussed.

  14. Identification of Village Building via Google Earth Images and Supervised Machine Learning Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiling Guo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a method based on supervised machine learning is proposed to identify village buildings from open high-resolution remote sensing images. We select Google Earth (GE RGB images to perform the classification in order to examine its suitability for village mapping, and investigate the feasibility of using machine learning methods to provide automatic classification in such fields. By analyzing the characteristics of GE images, we design different features on the basis of two kinds of supervised machine learning methods for classification: adaptive boosting (AdaBoost and convolutional neural networks (CNN. To recognize village buildings via their color and texture information, the RGB color features and a large number of Haar-like features in a local window are utilized in the AdaBoost method; with multilayer trained networks based on gradient descent algorithms and back propagation, CNN perform the identification by mining deeper information from buildings and their neighborhood. Experimental results from the testing area at Savannakhet province in Laos show that our proposed AdaBoost method achieves an overall accuracy of 96.22% and the CNN method is also competitive with an overall accuracy of 96.30%.

  15. Background heatflow on hotspot planets - Io and Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, David J.; Mcnamara, Sean C.

    1988-01-01

    It is suggested that there is no simple relationship between lithospheric thickness and heatflow on planets where volcanism dominates the heatflow. This applies locally and globally, even away from regions of volcanic activity. This indicates that there is no basis for the assumption that the Io heatflow is as low as (or lower than) the hotspot component alone would suggest. A model is presented to describe the heatflow on hotspot planets. The model is applied to Io and Venus.

  16. Visualization of spatial decision tree for predicting hotspot occurrence in land and forest in Rokan Hilir District Riau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primajaya, Aji; Sukaesih Sitanggang, Imas; Syaufina, Lailan

    2017-01-01

    Visualization is an important issue in datamining to easy understand patterns extracted from dataset. This research applied the Bottom-Up Approach method to develop a visualization module for a spatial decision tree in a geographic information system. Spatial data used in this work consists of nine explanatory layers and one target layers. Explanatory layers include maximum daily temperature, daily precipitation, wind of speed, distance of nearest river, distance of nearest road, land cover, peatland type, peatland depth, income source. The target layer contains hotspot and non-hotspot points that occurred in 2008. The result is the visualization module of spatial decision tree that has three main features including mapping window, interactive window, tree node and tabular visualization for predicting hotspot occurrence.

  17. A NOVEL WRAPPING CURVELET TRANSFORMATION BASED ANGULAR TEXTURE PATTERN (WCTATP EXTRACTION METHOD FOR WEED IDENTIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Ashok Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Apparently weed is a major menace in crop production as it competes with crop for nutrients, moisture, space and light which resulting in poor growth and development of the crop and finally yield. Yield loss accounts for even more than 70% when crops are frown under unweeded condition with severe weed infestation. Weed management is the most significant process in the agricultural applications to improve the crop productivity rate and reduce the herbicide application cost. Existing weed detection techniques does not yield better performance due to the complex background, illumination variation and crop and weed overlapping in the agricultural field image. Hence, there arises a need for the development of effective weed identification technique. To overcome this drawback, this paper proposes a novel Wrapping Curvelet Transformation Based Angular Texture Pattern Extraction Method (WCTATP for weed identification. In our proposed work, Global Histogram Equalization (GHE is used improve the quality of the image and Adaptive Median Filter (AMF is used for filtering the impulse noise from the image. Plant image identification is performed using green pixel extraction and k-means clustering. Wrapping Curvelet transform is applied to the plant image. Feature extraction is performed to extract the angular texture pattern of the plant image. Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO based Differential Evolution Feature Selection (DEFS approach is applied to select the optimal features. Then, the selected features are learned and passed through an RVM based classifier to find out the weed. Edge detection and contouring is performed to identify the weed in the plant image. The Fuzzy rule-based approach is applied to detect the low, medium and high levels of the weed patchiness. From the experimental results, it is clearly observed that the accuracy of the proposed approach is higher than the existing Support Vector Machine (SVM based approaches. The proposed approach

  18. Development of objective flow regime identification method using self-organizing neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Young; Kim, Nam Seok; Kwak, Nam Yee [Handong Global Univ., Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Two-phase flow shows various flow patterns according to the amount of the void and its relative velocity to the liquid flow. This variation directly affect the interfacial transfer which is the key factor for the design or analysis of the phase change systems. Especially the safety analysis of the nuclear power plant has been performed based on the numerical code furnished with the proper constitutive relations depending highly upon the flow regimes. Heavy efforts have been focused to identify the flow regime and at this moment we stand on relative very stable engineering background compare to the other research field. However, the issues related to objectiveness and transient flow regime are still open to study. Lee et al. and Ishii developed the method for the objective and instantaneous flow regime identification based on the neural network and new index of probability distribution of the flow regime which allows just one second observation for the flow regime identification. In the present paper, we developed the self-organized neural network for more objective approach to this problem. Kohonen's Self-Organizing Map (SOM) has been used for clustering, visualization, and abstraction. The SOM is trained through unsupervised competitive learning using a 'winner takes it all' policy. Therefore, its unsupervised training character delete the possible interference of the regime developer to the neural network training. After developing the computer code, we evaluate the performance of the code with the vertically upward two-phase flow in the pipes of 25.4 and 50.4 cmm I.D. Also, the sensitivity of the number of the clusters to the flow regime identification was made.

  19. An overview of methods using 13C for improved compound identification in metabolomics and natural products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clendinen, Chaevien S.; Stupp, Gregory S.; Ajredini, Ramadan; Lee-McMullen, Brittany; Beecher, Chris; Edison, Arthur S.

    2015-01-01

    Compound identification is a major bottleneck in metabolomics studies. In nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) investigations, resonance overlap often hinders unambiguous database matching or de novo compound identification. In liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), discriminating between biological signals and background artifacts and reliable determination of molecular formulae are not always straightforward. We have designed and implemented several NMR and LC-MS approaches that utilize 13C, either enriched or at natural abundance, in metabolomics applications. For LC-MS applications, we describe a technique called isotopic ratio outlier analysis (IROA), which utilizes samples that are isotopically labeled with 5% (test) and 95% (control) 13C. This labeling strategy leads to characteristic isotopic patterns that allow the differentiation of biological signals from artifacts and yield the exact number of carbons, significantly reducing possible molecular formulae. The relative abundance between the test and control samples for every IROA feature can be determined simply by integrating the peaks that arise from the 5 and 95% channels. For NMR applications, we describe two 13C-based approaches. For samples at natural abundance, we have developed a workflow to obtain 13C–13C and 13C–1H statistical correlations using 1D 13C and 1H NMR spectra. For samples that can be isotopically labeled, we describe another NMR approach to obtain direct 13C–13C spectroscopic correlations. These methods both provide extensive information about the carbon framework of compounds in the mixture for either database matching or de novo compound identification. We also discuss strategies in which 13C NMR can be used to identify unknown compounds from IROA experiments. By combining technologies with the same samples, we can identify important biomarkers and corresponding metabolites of interest. PMID:26379677

  20. Dynamic Friction Parameter Identification Method with LuGre Model for Direct-Drive Rotary Torque Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingjian Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Attainment of high-performance motion/velocity control objectives for the Direct-Drive Rotary (DDR torque motor should fully consider practical nonlinearities in controller design, such as dynamic friction. The LuGre model has been widely utilized to describe nonlinear friction behavior; however, parameter identification for the LuGre model remains a challenge. A new dynamic friction parameter identification method for LuGre model is proposed in this study. Static parameters are identified through a series of constant velocity experiments, while dynamic parameters are obtained through a presliding process. Novel evolutionary algorithm (NEA is utilized to increase identification accuracy. Experimental results gathered from the identification experiments conducted in the study for a practical DDR torque motor control system validate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  1. Hotspots Detection in Photovoltaic Modules Using Infrared Thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salazar April M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An increased interest on generating power from renewable sources has led to an increase in solar photovoltaic (PV system installations worldwide. Power generation of such systems is affected by factors that can be identified early on through efficient monitoring techniques. This study developed a non-invasive technique that can detect localized heating and quantify the area of the hotspots, a potential cause of degradation in photovoltaic systems. This is done by the use of infrared thermography, a well-accepted non-destructive evaluation technique that allows contactless, real-time inspection. In this approach, thermal images or thermograms of an operating PV module were taken using an infrared camera. These thermograms were analyzed by a Hotspot Detection algorithm implemented in MATLAB. Prior to image processing, images were converted to CIE L*a*b color space making k-means clustering implementation computationally efficient. K-means clustering is an iterative technique that segments data into k clusters which was used to isolate hotspots. The devised algorithm detected hotspots in the modules being observed. In addition, average temperature and relative area is provided to quantify the hotspot. Various features and conditions leading to hotspots such as crack, junction box and shading were investigated in this study.

  2. Identification of influential spreaders in online social networks using interaction weighted K-core decomposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-garadi, Mohammed Ali; Varathan, Kasturi Dewi; Ravana, Sri Devi

    2017-02-01

    Online social networks (OSNs) have become a vital part of everyday living. OSNs provide researchers and scientists with unique prospects to comprehend individuals on a scale and to analyze human behavioral patterns. Influential spreaders identification is an important subject in understanding the dynamics of information diffusion in OSNs. Targeting these influential spreaders is significant in planning the techniques for accelerating the propagation of information that is useful for various applications, such as viral marketing applications or blocking the diffusion of annoying information (spreading of viruses, rumors, online negative behaviors, and cyberbullying). Existing K-core decomposition methods consider links equally when calculating the influential spreaders for unweighted networks. Alternatively, the proposed link weights are based only on the degree of nodes. Thus, if a node is linked to high-degree nodes, then this node will receive high weight and is treated as an important node. Conversely, the degree of nodes in OSN context does not always provide accurate influence of users. In the present study, we improve the K-core method for OSNs by proposing a novel link-weighting method based on the interaction among users. The proposed method is based on the observation that the interaction of users is a significant factor in quantifying the spreading capability of user in OSNs. The tracking of diffusion links in the real spreading dynamics of information verifies the effectiveness of our proposed method for identifying influential spreaders in OSNs as compared with degree centrality, PageRank, and original K-core.

  3. A novel method for identification and quantification of consistently differentially methylated regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Lin Hsiao

    Full Text Available Advances in biotechnology have resulted in large-scale studies of DNA methylation. A differentially methylated region (DMR is a genomic region with multiple adjacent CpG sites that exhibit different methylation statuses among multiple samples. Many so-called "supervised" methods have been established to identify DMRs between two or more comparison groups. Methods for the identification of DMRs without reference to phenotypic information are, however, less well studied. An alternative "unsupervised" approach was proposed, in which DMRs in studied samples were identified with consideration of nature dependence structure of methylation measurements between neighboring probes from tiling arrays. Through simulation study, we investigated effects of dependencies between neighboring probes on determining DMRs where a lot of spurious signals would be produced if the methylation data were analyzed independently of the probe. In contrast, our newly proposed method could successfully correct for this effect with a well-controlled false positive rate and a comparable sensitivity. By applying to two real datasets, we demonstrated that our method could provide a global picture of methylation variation in studied samples. R source codes to implement the proposed method were freely available at http://www.csjfann.ibms.sinica.edu.tw/eag/programlist/ICDMR/ICDMR.html.

  4. Improved Radio Frequency Identification Indoor Localization Method via Radial Basis Function Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongliang Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Indoor localization technique has received much attention in recent years. Many techniques have been developed to solve the problem. Among the recent proposed methods, radio frequency identification (RFID indoor localization technology has the advantages of low-cost, noncontact, non-line-of-sight, and high precision. This paper proposed two radial basis function (RBF neural network based indoor localization methods. The RBF neural networks are trained to learn the mapping relationship between received signal strength indication values and position of objects. Traditional method used the received signal strength directly as the input of neural network; we added another input channel by taking the difference of the received signal strength, thus improving the reliability and precision of positioning. Fuzzy clustering is used to determine the center of radial basis function. In order to reduce the impact of signal fading due to non-line-of-sight and multipath transmission in indoor environment, we improved the Gaussian filter to process received signal strength values. The experimental results show that the proposed method outperforms the existing methods as well as improves the reliability and precision of the RFID indoor positioning system.

  5. A 2D-View Depth Image- and CNN-Based 3D Model Identification Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiyu Hong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of three-dimensional (3D technology and an increase in the number of available models, issues with copyright protection of 3D models are inevitable. In this paper, we propose a 2D-view depth image- and convolutional neural network (CNN-based 3D model identification method. To identify a 3D model, we first need an adequate number of the modified versions that could be made by copyright infringers. Then, they can be represented by a number of 2D-view depth images that are captured from evenly distributed vertices on a regular convex polyhedron. Finally, a CNN is trained by these depth images to acquire the capability of identifying the 3D model. The experiment carried out with the dataset of Shape Retrieval Contest 2015 (SHREC’15: Non-Rigid 3D Shape Retrieval shows the practicability of our method, which yields 93.5% accuracy. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated via evaluation in the latest standard benchmark SHREC’17 Deformable Shape Retrieval with Missing Parts. It clearly shows superior or comparable performance to state-of-the-art methods, shown by the fact that it is in the top three of the 11 participating methods (without counting different runs.

  6. [Comparison of chosen methods for identification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarek, Agnieszka; Budzyńska, Anna; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate effectiveness of methicillin-resistant S. aureus identification using screening method with oxacillin (6 microg/ml), latex agglutination test--Slidex MRSA Detection and a chromogenic agar medium--MRSA ID. The investigation were carried out on 120 S. aureus strains isolated from clinical materials of patients hospitalized in the University Hospital at the L. Rydygier Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, University of Nicolaus Copernicus in Torún. Consistency of results between chromogenic medium and latex agglutination test amounted 97.5%, chromogenic medium and screening method--96.7%. Identical correspondence of results took a stand in case screening method and latex agglutination test. Results consistency of detecting methicillin resistance in S. aureus strains between this three methods concerned 95.8% strains. Our investigation demonstrated 96.7% sensitivity and 100% specificity for MRSA ID medium for the detection of methicillin resistance. The sensitivity of MRSA-Screen was 95.0% and its specificity reached 100%. The sensitivity and specificity of screening method amounted 96.7%.

  7. Dynamic Friction Parameter Identification Method with LuGre Model for Direct-Drive Rotary Torque Motor

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xingjian; Lin, Siru; Wang, Shaoping

    2016-01-01

    Attainment of high-performance motion/velocity control objectives for the Direct-Drive Rotary (DDR) torque motor should fully consider practical nonlinearities in controller design, such as dynamic friction. The LuGre model has been widely utilized to describe nonlinear friction behavior; however, parameter identification for the LuGre model remains a challenge. A new dynamic friction parameter identification method for LuGre model is proposed in this study. Static parameters are identified t...

  8. Model Optimization Identification Method Based on Closed-loop Operation Data and Process Characteristics Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqiang GENG

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Output noise is strongly related to input in closed-loop control system, which makes model identification of closed-loop difficult, even unidentified in practice. The forward channel model is chosen to isolate disturbance from the output noise to input, and identified by optimization the dynamic characteristics of the process based on closed-loop operation data. The characteristics parameters of the process, such as dead time and time constant, are calculated and estimated based on the PI/PID controller parameters and closed-loop process input/output data. And those characteristics parameters are adopted to define the search space of the optimization identification algorithm. PSO-SQP optimization algorithm is applied to integrate the global search ability of PSO with the local search ability of SQP to identify the model parameters of forward channel. The validity of proposed method has been verified by the simulation. The practicability is checked with the PI/PID controller parameter turning based on identified forward channel model.

  9. Failure envelope modelling of glass/epoxy composite pipes using system identification method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ang Jia; Majid, M. S. Abdul; Nor, Azuwir Mohd; Yaacob, Sazali; Ridzuan, M. J. M.

    2017-11-01

    The paper aims to model the performance of the Glass Fibre Reinforced Epoxy (GRE) composite pipe under multiaxial loading via system identification approach. System identification modelling depends on the input and output data of the experimental result. In this study, the experimental data used are obtained from a pressurised test rig. The model is based on pure hydrostatic (2H: 1A) loading using GRE pipes with three different winding angles (±45 °, ±55 °, ±63 °). Several models based on different model structures are derived for comparison to obtain the best modelling accuracy. The result shows that the transfer function method could model and has the highest efficiency compared with the experimental result. The ±45 ° pipe model have achieved 92.41% and 85.13% for both its hoop and axial model. The ±55 ° pipe model has achieved 96.64% and 86.1%. Follow by the ±63° which the best fit is 92.41% and 94.26%. At the last part of this research, the ±55° pipe model and experimental data has been use to identified when the damage occur and found that the axial strain of 78 bar can damage the experimental pipe in this research.

  10. Redox proteomics: Methods for the identification and enrichment of redox-modified proteins and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennicke, Claudia; Rahn, Jette; Heimer, Nadine; Lichtenfels, Rudolf; Wessjohann, Ludger A; Seliger, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    PTMs are defined as covalent additions to functional groups of amino acid residues in proteins like phosphorylation, glycosylation, S-nitrosylation, acetylation, methylation, lipidation, SUMOylation as well as oxidation. Oxidation of proteins has been characterized as a double-edged sword. While oxidative modifications, in particular of cysteine residues, are widely involved in the regulation of cellular homeostasis, oxidative stress resulting in the oxidation of biomolecules along with the disruption of their biological functions can be associated with the development of diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases, respectively. This is also the case for advanced glycation end products, which result from chemical reactions of keto compounds such as oxidized sugars with proteins. The role of oxidative modifications under physiological and pathophysiological conditions remains largely unknown. Recently, novel technologies have been established that allow the enrichment, identification, and characterization of specific oxidative PTMs (oxPTMs). This is essential to develop strategies to prevent and treat diseases that are associated with oxidative stress. Therefore this review will focus on (i) the methods and technologies, which are currently applied for the detection, identification, and quantification of oxPTMs including the design of high throughput approaches and (ii) the analyses of oxPTMs related to physiological and pathological conditions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Paleocene on-spreading-axis hotspot volcanism along the Ninetyeast Ridge: An interaction between the Kerguelen hotspot and the Wharton spreading center

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishna, K.S.; Gopala Rao, D.; SubbaRaju, L.V.; Chaubey, A.K.; Shcherbakov, V.S.; Pilipenko, A.I.; Murthy, I.V.R.

    Investigations of three plausible tectonic settings of the Kerguelen hotspot relative to the Wharton spreading center evoke the on-spreading-axis hotspot volcanism of Paleocene (60-54 Ma) age along the Ninetyeast Ridge. The hypothesis is consistent...

  12. Nutrient supply, surface currents, and plankton dynamics predict zooplankton hotspots in coastal upwelling systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messié, Monique; Chavez, Francisco P.

    2017-09-01

    A simple combination of wind-driven nutrient upwelling, surface currents, and plankton growth/grazing equations generates zooplankton patchiness and hotspots in coastal upwelling regions. Starting with an initial input of nitrate from coastal upwelling, growth and grazing equations evolve phytoplankton and zooplankton over time and space following surface currents. The model simulates the transition from coastal (large phytoplankton, e.g., diatoms) to offshore (picophytoplankton and microzooplankton) communities, and in between generates a large zooplankton maximum. The method was applied to four major upwelling systems (California, Peru, Northwest Africa, and Benguela) using latitudinal estimates of wind-driven nitrate supply and satellite-based surface currents. The resulting zooplankton simulations are patchy in nature; areas of high concentrations coincide with previously documented copepod and krill hotspots. The exercise highlights the importance of the upwelling process and surface currents in shaping plankton communities.

  13. A New Prediction Model for Transformer Winding Hotspot Temperature Fluctuation Based on Fuzzy Information Granulation and an Optimized Wavelet Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Winding hotspot temperature is the key factor affecting the load capacity and service life of transformers. For the early detection of transformer winding hotspot temperature anomalies, a new prediction model for the hotspot temperature fluctuation range based on fuzzy information granulation (FIG and the chaotic particle swarm optimized wavelet neural network (CPSO-WNN is proposed in this paper. The raw data are firstly processed by FIG to extract useful information from each time window. The extracted information is then used to construct a wavelet neural network (WNN prediction model. Furthermore, the structural parameters of WNN are optimized by chaotic particle swarm optimization (CPSO before it is used to predict the fluctuation range of the hotspot temperature. By analyzing the experimental data with four different prediction models, we find that the proposed method is more effective and is of guiding significance for the operation and maintenance of transformers.

  14. Study of on-machine error identification and compensation methods for micro machine tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shih-Ming; Yu, Han-Jen; Lee, Chun-Yi; Chiu, Hung-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    Micro machining plays an important role in the manufacturing of miniature products which are made of various materials with complex 3D shapes and tight machining tolerance. To further improve the accuracy of a micro machining process without increasing the manufacturing cost of a micro machine tool, an effective machining error measurement method and a software-based compensation method are essential. To avoid introducing additional errors caused by the re-installment of the workpiece, the measurement and compensation method should be on-machine conducted. In addition, because the contour of a miniature workpiece machined with a micro machining process is very tiny, the measurement method should be non-contact. By integrating the image re-constructive method, camera pixel correction, coordinate transformation, the error identification algorithm, and trajectory auto-correction method, a vision-based error measurement and compensation method that can on-machine inspect the micro machining errors and automatically generate an error-corrected numerical control (NC) program for error compensation was developed in this study. With the use of the Canny edge detection algorithm and camera pixel calibration, the edges of the contour of a machined workpiece were identified and used to re-construct the actual contour of the work piece. The actual contour was then mapped to the theoretical contour to identify the actual cutting points and compute the machining errors. With the use of a moving matching window and calculation of the similarity between the actual and theoretical contour, the errors between the actual cutting points and theoretical cutting points were calculated and used to correct the NC program. With the use of the error-corrected NC program, the accuracy of a micro machining process can be effectively improved. To prove the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed methods, micro-milling experiments on a micro machine tool were conducted, and the results

  15. A Time-Space Domain Information Fusion Method for Specific Emitter Identification Based on Dempster-Shafer Evidence Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wen; Cao, Ying; Yang, Lin; He, Zichang

    2017-08-28

    Specific emitter identification plays an important role in contemporary military affairs. However, most of the existing specific emitter identification methods haven't taken into account the processing of uncertain information. Therefore, this paper proposes a time-space domain information fusion method based on Dempster-Shafer evidence theory, which has the ability to deal with uncertain information in the process of specific emitter identification. In this paper, radars will generate a group of evidence respectively based on the information they obtained, and our main task is to fuse the multiple groups of evidence to get a reasonable result. Within the framework of recursive centralized fusion model, the proposed method incorporates a correlation coefficient, which measures the relevance between evidence and a quantum mechanical approach, which is based on the parameters of radar itself. The simulation results of an illustrative example demonstrate that the proposed method can effectively deal with uncertain information and get a reasonable recognition result.

  16. A state-of-the-art hotspot recognition system for full chip verification with lithographic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Mark C.; Kang, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Youngkeun; Park, Joung Il; Paek, Seung weon; Kim, Kee-sup

    2011-04-01

    In today's semiconductor industry, prior to wafer fabrication, it has become a desirable practice to scan layout designs for lithography-induced defects using advanced process window simulations in conjunction with corresponding manufacturing checks. This methodology has been proven to provide the highest level of accuracy when correlating systematic defects found on the wafer with those identified through simulation. To date, when directly applying this methodology at the full chip level, there has been unfavorable expenses incurred that are associated with simulation which are currently overshadowing its primary benefit of accuracy - namely, long runtimes and the requirement for an abundance of cpus. Considering the aforementioned, the industry has begun to lean towards a more practical application for hotspot identification that revolves around topological pattern recognition in an attempt to sidestep the simulation runtime. This solution can be much less costly when weighing against the negative runtime overhead of simulation. The apparent benefits of pattern matching are, however, counterbalanced with a fundamental concern regarding detection accuracy; topological pattern identification can only detect polygonal configurations, or some derivative of a configuration, which have been previously identified. It is evident that both systems have their strengths and their weaknesses, and that one system's strength is the other's weakness, and vice-versa. A novel hotspot detection methodology that utilizes pattern matching combined with lithographic simulation will be introduced. This system will attempt to minimize the negative aspects of both pattern matching and simulation. The proposed methodology has a high potential to decrease the amount of processing time spent during simulation, to relax the high cpu count requirement, and to maximize pattern matching accuracy by incorporating a multi-staged pattern matching flow prior to performing simulation on a reduced

  17. Identification of Non-Stationary Magnetic Field Sources Using the Matching Pursuit Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Palczynska

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The measurements of electromagnetic field emissions, performed on board a vessel have showed that, in this specific environment, a high level of non-stationary magnetic fields (MFs is observed. The adaptive time-frequency method can be used successfully to analyze this type of measured signal. It allows one to specify the time interval in which the individual frequency components of the signal occur. In this paper, the method of identification of non-stationary MF sources based on the matching pursuit (MP algorithm is presented. It consists of the decomposition of an examined time-waveform into the linear expansion of chirplet atoms and the analysis of the matrix of their parameters. The main feature of the proposed method is the modification of the chirplet’s matrix in a way that atoms, whose normalized energies are lower than a certain threshold, will be rejected. On the time-frequency planes of the spectrograms, obtained separately for each remaining chirlpet, it can clearly identify the time-frequency structures appearing in the examined signal. The choice of a threshold defines the computing speed and precision of the performed analysis. The method was implemented in the virtual application and used for processing real data, obtained from measurements of time-vary MF emissions onboard a ship.

  18. Transferability of Object-Oriented Image Analysis Methods for Slum Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Stein

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Updated spatial information on the dynamics of slums can be helpful to measure and evaluate progress of policies. Earlier studies have shown that semi-automatic detection of slums using remote sensing can be challenging considering the large variability in definition and appearance. In this study, we explored the potential of an object-oriented image analysis (OOA method to detect slums, using very high resolution (VHR imagery. This method integrated expert knowledge in the form of a local slum ontology. A set of image-based parameters was identified that was used for differentiating slums from non-slum areas in an OOA environment. The method was implemented on three subsets of the city of Ahmedabad, India. Results show that textural features such as entropy and contrast derived from a grey level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM and the size of image segments are stable parameters for classification of built-up areas and the identification of slums. Relation with classified slum objects, in terms of enclosed by slums and relative border with slums was used to refine classification. The analysis on three different subsets showed final accuracies ranging from 47% to 68%. We conclude that our method produces useful results as it allows including location specific adaptation, whereas generically applicable rulesets for slums are still to be developed.

  19. A new strategy for protein interface identification using manifold learning method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Huang, De-Shuang; Jiang, Changjun

    2014-06-01

    Protein interactions play vital roles in biological processes. The study for protein interface will allow people to elucidate the mechanism of protein interaction. However, a large portion of protein interface data is incorrectly collected in current studies. In this paper, a novel strategy of dataset reconstruction using manifold learning method has been proposed for dealing with the noises in the interaction interface data whose definition is based on the residue distances among the different chains within protein complexes. Three support vector machine-based predictors are constructed using different protein features to identify the functional sites involved in the formation of protein interface. The experimental results achieved in this work demonstrate that our strategy can remove noises, and therefore improve the ability for identification of protein interfaces with 77.8% accuracy.

  20. Dataset for Testing Contamination Source Identification Methods for Water Distribution Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    This dataset includes the results of a simulation study using the source inversion techniques available in the Water Security Toolkit. The data was created to test the different techniques for accuracy, specificity, false positive rate, and false negative rate. The tests examined different parameters including measurement error, modeling error, injection characteristics, time horizon, network size, and sensor placement. The water distribution system network models that were used in the study are also included in the dataset. This dataset is associated with the following publication:Seth, A., K. Klise, J. Siirola, T. Haxton , and C. Laird. Testing Contamination Source Identification Methods for Water Distribution Networks. Journal of Environmental Division, Proceedings of American Society of Civil Engineers. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), Reston, VA, USA, ., (2016).

  1. Identification and Evaluation of Strategic Decisions in Gas Industry Using DEMATEL Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Mehregan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Given the fluctuations of oil price in international markets and its effect on global economy, it is expected that gas industry and use of gas as an alternative energy, have become more important. Therefore, identification of strategic decisions in this industry has attracted increasing attention of managers and researchers. This study aims to identify and evaluate strategic decisions in the National Iranian Gas Company, using DEMATEL method for the first time. For data collection, paired comparison questionnaire have been used. The results of the research show that expanding operations to enter a new market, opening and starting up a new plant or facility, expansion of capacity and restructuring are respectively the most important strategic decisions in the industry.

  2. Molecular Methods Used for the Identification of Potentially Probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Weiss

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Forty potentially probiotic Lactobacillus strains as well as reference strains of different genera were grown under standardised conditions. Cell masses were harvested and DNA was isolated. For identification, all strains were subjected to genus-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR, and the affiliation with the genus Lactobacillus was confirmed for all isolates. Using two species-specific primer-pairs for Lactobacillus reuteri, specific amplicons were observed for eight of the forty investigated strains. For differentiation, these eight strains as well as the reference strains of the species L. reuteri and closely related species were subjected to randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD-PCR using fourteen arbitrary primers. Two selected strains as well as probiotic and common reference strains were further investigated applying pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. With the latter two methods, individual profiles were found for most strains, but no difference between probiotic and common strains could be made out.

  3. A new method for muscle fatigue assessment: Online model identification techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaiordanidou, Maria; Hayashibe, Mitsuhiro; Varray, Alain; Fattal, Charles; Guiraud, David

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to propose a method that allows extraction of the current muscle state under electrically induced fatigue. The triceps surae muscle of 5 subjects paralyzed by spinal cord injury was fatigued by intermittent electrical stimulation (5 × 5 trains at 30 Hz). Classical fatigue indices representing muscle contractile properties [peak twitch (Pt) and half-relaxation time (HRT)] were assessed before and after each 5-train series and were used to identify 2 relevant parameters (Fm , Ur ) of a previously developed mathematical model using the Sigma-Point Kalman Filter. Pt declined significantly during the protocol, whereas HRT remained unchanged. Identification of the model parameters with experimental data yielded a model-based fatigue assessment that gave a more stable evaluation of fatigue than classical parameters. This work reinforces clinical research by providing a tool that clinicians can use to monitor fatigue development during stimulation. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Development of method for identification of compounds emitted during thermal degradation of binders used in foundry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bobrowski

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to develop a method for identification of compounds emitted during thermal degradation of binders used in foundry. Research were performed with the use of Certified Reference Materials mixtures of semi-volatiles compounds with furfuryl alcohol and aldehyde. Furfuryl-urea resin samples were also used. Station for thermal degradation of materials used in foundry was designed and made. Thermal degradation process conditions and gas chromatograph coupled with high resolution mass spectrometry operating conditions were established. Organic compounds emitted during degradation were identified. The paper briefly represents the range of study and the results obtained for furfuryl-urea resin thermal degradation. Significant information about volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds emitted in different temperatures is also discussed.

  5. Method of and system for identification or estimation of a refractive index of a liquid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    This invention relates to a method of and a system (100) for identification or estimation of a refractive index of a liquid (120) comprising a light receiving part (111) adapted to receive polarised or non-polarised light (125; 135), a light emitting part (112) adapted, during use, to transmit...... light (130), an optical structure (110) being adapted to receive, during use, polarised light (125) via or from the light receiving part (111), and being adapted to receive, during use, a liquid (120) having a predetermined refractive index to be identified or estimated, and a first polariser (115......); is adapted, during use, to pass the received light (135) through the optical path so that a narrow wavelength range of the transmitted light (130) is influenced by the predetermined refractive index of the received liquid (120) and that the influenced narrow wavelength range, when observed by a user and...

  6. Computational methods for the identification of spatially varying stiffness and damping in beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, H. T.; Rosen, I. G.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical approximation scheme for the estimation of functional parameters in Euler-Bernoulli models for the transverse vibration of flexible beams with tip bodies is developed. The method permits the identification of spatially varying flexural stiffness and Voigt-Kelvin viscoelastic damping coefficients which appear in the hybrid system of ordinary and partial differential equations and boundary conditions describing the dynamics of such structures. An inverse problem is formulated as a least squares fit to data subject to constraints in the form of a vector system of abstract first order evolution equations. Spline-based finite element approximations are used to finite dimensionalize the problem. Theoretical convergence results are given and numerical studies carried out on both conventional (serial) and vector computers are discussed.

  7. pMD-Membrane: A Method for Ligand Binding Site Identification in Membrane-Bound Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Prakash

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Probe-based or mixed solvent molecular dynamics simulation is a useful approach for the identification and characterization of druggable sites in drug targets. However, thus far the method has been applied only to soluble proteins. A major reason for this is the potential effect of the probe molecules on membrane structure. We have developed a technique to overcome this limitation that entails modification of force field parameters to reduce a few pairwise non-bonded interactions between selected atoms of the probe molecules and bilayer lipids. We used the resulting technique, termed pMD-membrane, to identify allosteric ligand binding sites on the G12D and G13D oncogenic mutants of the K-Ras protein bound to a negatively charged lipid bilayer. In addition, we show that differences in probe occupancy can be used to quantify changes in the accessibility of druggable sites due to conformational changes induced by membrane binding or mutation.

  8. [Research on the identification method of LTE condition in the laser-induced plasma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Juan-juan; Huang, Dan; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Lei; Ma, Wei-guang; Dong, Lei; Yin, Wang-bao; Jia, Suo-tang

    2014-12-01

    Because of the poor accuracy of the commonly used Boltzmann plot method and double-line method, the Boltzmann-Maxwell distribution combined with the Saha-Eggert formula is proposed to improve the measurement accuracy of the plasma temperature; the simple algorithm for determining the linewidth of the emission line was established according to the relationship between the area and the peak value of the Gaussian formula, and the plasma electron density was calculated through the Stark broadening of the spectral lines; the method for identifying the plasma local thermal equilibrium (LTE) condition was established based on the McWhirter criterion. The experimental results show that with the increase in laser energy, the plasma temperature and electron density increase linearly; when the laser energy changes within 127~510 mJ, the plasma electron density changes in the range of 1.30532X10(17)~1.87322X10(17) cm(-3), the plasma temperature changes in the range of 12586~12957 K, and all the plasma generated in this experiment meets the LTE condition threshold according to the McWhirter criterion. For element Al, there exist relatively few observable lines at the same ionization state in the spectral region of the spectrometer, thus it is unable to use the Boltzmann plane method to calculate temperature. One hundred sets of Al plasma spectra were used for temperature measurement by employing the Saha-Boltzmann method and the relative standard deviation (RSD) value is 0.4%, and compared with 1.3% of the double line method, the accuracy has been substantially increased. The methods proposed can be used for rapid plasma temperature and electron density calculation, the LTE condition identification, and are valuable in studies such as free calibration, spectral effectiveness analysis, spectral temperature correction, the best collection location determination, LTE condition distribution in plasma, and so on.

  9. Interaction between Rivers and Aquifers: a method for rapid Identification of Transience in Streambed Conductance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianni, Guillaume; Perrochet, Pierre; Vogel, Alexandre; Brunner, Philip

    2016-04-01

    Streambed hydraulic conductance controls the interactions between surface water and groundwater. In order to quantify river-aquifer dynamics, quantifying conductance is indispensable. However, the streambed conductance is often subject to transience, as a result of the erosion and deposition processes in rivers. This transience has to be quantified and considered for any approach (i.e. numerical or analytical models) aimed at quantifying exchange fluxes. Directly measuring hydraulic properties in a river yields only point values, is time-consuming and therefore not suited to detect transience of the physical properties. We present a method to continuously and rapidly monitor transience of streambed conductance. Input data are time series of stream stage and hydraulic head variations in the aquifer. The method is based on the inversion of a floodwave response. The analytical model consists of only 3 parameters: x, the distance between streambank and an observation well, α, the aquifer diffusivity and a, the retardation coefficient that is inversely proportional to the streambed conductance. Estimation of a is carried out over successive time steps in order to identify transience in streambed conductance. The method is tested on synthetic data and is applied to field data from the Rhône River and its alluvial aquifer (Switzerland). The synthetic method demonstrated the robustness of the proposed methodology. Application of the method to the field site allowed identifying transience in streambed properties, following flood events in the Rhône. This method requires transience in the surface water, and the river should not change its width significantly with a rising water level. If these conditions are fulfilled, this method allows for a rapid and effective identification of transience of streambed conductance.

  10. Feasibility Study on Tension Estimation Technique for Hanger Cables Using the FE Model-Based System Identification Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu-Sik Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hanger cables in suspension bridges are partly constrained by horizontal clamps. So, existing tension estimation methods based on a single cable model are prone to higher errors as the cable gets shorter, making it more sensitive to flexural rigidity. Therefore, inverse analysis and system identification methods based on finite element models are suggested recently. In this paper, the applicability of system identification methods is investigated using the hanger cables of Gwang-An bridge. The test results show that the inverse analysis and systemic identification methods based on finite element models are more reliable than the existing string theory and linear regression method for calculating the tension in terms of natural frequency errors. However, the estimation error of tension can be varied according to the accuracy of finite element model in model based methods. In particular, the boundary conditions affect the results more profoundly when the cable gets shorter. Therefore, it is important to identify the boundary conditions through experiment if it is possible. The FE model-based tension estimation method using system identification method can take various boundary conditions into account. Also, since it is not sensitive to the number of natural frequency inputs, the availability of this system is high.

  11. Raman fiber-optical method for colon cancer detection: Cross-validation and outlier identification approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, D.; Naveed, P.; Ragheb, A.; Niedieker, D.; El-Mashtoly, S. F.; Brechmann, T.; Kötting, C.; Schmiegel, W. H.; Freier, E.; Pox, C.; Gerwert, K.

    2017-06-01

    Endoscopy plays a major role in early recognition of cancer which is not externally accessible and therewith in increasing the survival rate. Raman spectroscopic fiber-optical approaches can help to decrease the impact on the patient, increase objectivity in tissue characterization, reduce expenses and provide a significant time advantage in endoscopy. In gastroenterology an early recognition of malign and precursor lesions is relevant. Instantaneous and precise differentiation between adenomas as precursor lesions for cancer and hyperplastic polyps on the one hand and between high and low-risk alterations on the other hand is important. Raman fiber-optical measurements of colon biopsy samples taken during colonoscopy were carried out during a clinical study, and samples of adenocarcinoma (22), tubular adenomas (141), hyperplastic polyps (79) and normal tissue (101) from 151 patients were analyzed. This allows us to focus on the bioinformatic analysis and to set stage for Raman endoscopic measurements. Since spectral differences between normal and cancerous biopsy samples are small, special care has to be taken in data analysis. Using a leave-one-patient-out cross-validation scheme, three different outlier identification methods were investigated to decrease the influence of systematic errors, like a residual risk in misplacement of the sample and spectral dilution of marker bands (esp. cancerous tissue) and therewith optimize the experimental design. Furthermore other validations methods like leave-one-sample-out and leave-one-spectrum-out cross-validation schemes were compared with leave-one-patient-out cross-validation. High-risk lesions were differentiated from low-risk lesions with a sensitivity of 79%, specificity of 74% and an accuracy of 77%, cancer and normal tissue with a sensitivity of 79%, specificity of 83% and an accuracy of 81%. Additionally applied outlier identification enabled us to improve the recognition of neoplastic biopsy samples.

  12. Raman fiber-optical method for colon cancer detection: Cross-validation and outlier identification approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, D; Naveed, P; Ragheb, A; Niedieker, D; El-Mashtoly, S F; Brechmann, T; Kötting, C; Schmiegel, W H; Freier, E; Pox, C; Gerwert, K

    2017-06-15

    Endoscopy plays a major role in early recognition of cancer which is not externally accessible and therewith in increasing the survival rate. Raman spectroscopic fiber-optical approaches can help to decrease the impact on the patient, increase objectivity in tissue characterization, reduce expenses and provide a significant time advantage in endoscopy. In gastroenterology an early recognition of malign and precursor lesions is relevant. Instantaneous and precise differentiation between adenomas as precursor lesions for cancer and hyperplastic polyps on the one hand and between high and low-risk alterations on the other hand is important. Raman fiber-optical measurements of colon biopsy samples taken during colonoscopy were carried out during a clinical study, and samples of adenocarcinoma (22), tubular adenomas (141), hyperplastic polyps (79) and normal tissue (101) from 151 patients were analyzed. This allows us to focus on the bioinformatic analysis and to set stage for Raman endoscopic measurements. Since spectral differences between normal and cancerous biopsy samples are small, special care has to be taken in data analysis. Using a leave-one-patient-out cross-validation scheme, three different outlier identification methods were investigated to decrease the influence of systematic errors, like a residual risk in misplacement of the sample and spectral dilution of marker bands (esp. cancerous tissue) and therewith optimize the experimental design. Furthermore other validations methods like leave-one-sample-out and leave-one-spectrum-out cross-validation schemes were compared with leave-one-patient-out cross-validation. High-risk lesions were differentiated from low-risk lesions with a sensitivity of 79%, specificity of 74% and an accuracy of 77%, cancer and normal tissue with a sensitivity of 79%, specificity of 83% and an accuracy of 81%. Additionally applied outlier identification enabled us to improve the recognition of neoplastic biopsy samples. Copyright

  13. SEC-TID: A Label-Free Method for Small-Molecule Target Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcius, Michael; Bauer, Andras J; Hao, Qin; Li, Shu; Tutter, Antonin; Raphael, Jacob; Jahnke, Wolfgang; Rondeau, Jean-Michel; Bourgier, Emmanuelle; Tallarico, John; Michaud, Gregory A

    2014-07-01

    Bioactive small molecules are an invaluable source of therapeutics and chemical probes for exploring biological pathways. Yet, significant hurdles in drug discovery often come from lacking a comprehensive view of the target(s) for both early tool molecules and even late-stage drugs. To address this challenge, a method is provided that allows for assessing the interactions of small molecules with thousands of targets without any need to modify the small molecule of interest or attach any component to a surface. We describe size-exclusion chromatography for target identification (SEC-TID), a method for accurately and reproducibly detecting ligand-macromolecular interactions for small molecules targeting nucleic acid and several protein classes. We report the use of SEC-TID, with a library consisting of approximately 1000 purified proteins derived from the protein databank (PDB), to identify the efficacy targets tankyrase 1 and 2 for the Wnt inhibitor XAV939. In addition, we report novel interactions for the tumor-vascular disrupting agent vadimezan/ASA404 (interacting with farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase) and the diuretic mefruside (interacting with carbonic anhydrase XIII). We believe this method can dramatically enhance our understanding of the mechanism of action and potential liabilities for small molecules in drug discovery pipelines through comprehensive profiling of candidate druggable targets. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  14. Development of a real-time PCR method for the identification of Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Amaya; Sánchez, Ana; Martínez, Icíar; Santaclara, Francisco J; Pérez-Martín, Ricardo I; Sotelo, Carmen G

    2013-12-01

    A Real Time-PCR method based on TaqMan technology for the identification of Scomber scombrus has been developed. A system of specific primers and a Minor Groove Binding (MGB) TaqMan probe based on sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome b region was designed. The method was successfully tested in 81 specimens of S. scombrus and related species and validated in 26 different commercial samples. An average Threshold Cycle (Ct) value of 15.3 was obtained with S. scombrus DNA. With the other species tested fluorescence signal was not detected or Ct was significantly higher (P<0.001). The efficiency of the assay was estimated to be 92.41%, with 100% specificity, and no cross reactivity was detected with any other species. These results reveal that the developed method is a rapid and efficient tool to unequivocally identify S. scombrus and may aid in the prevention of fraud or mislabelling in mackerel products. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of phenotypic and genotypic methods for the species identification of coagulase-negative staphylococcal isolates from bovine intramammary infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joo Youn; Fox, Lawrence K; Seo, Keun Seok; McGuire, Mark A; Park, Yong Ho; Rurangirwa, Fred R; Sischo, William M; Bohach, Gregory A

    2011-01-10

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are the most frequently isolated pathogens from cows with intramammary infection (IMI). Although API STAPH ID 20, a commercially available identification system, and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) of the gap gene (gap PCR-RFLP) have been successfully applied for the identification of CNS isolates from human specimens, their accuracy in the identification of veterinary isolates has not been fully established. In this study, we identified 263 CNS isolates from bovine IMI at species level by partial 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis as the definitive test. Species identification obtained using partial 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis was compared to results from the API STAPH ID 20 and gap PCR-RFLP analysis. Eleven different CNS species were identified by partial 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Only 76.0% (200/263) of the species identification results obtained by API STAPH ID 20 matched those obtained by partial 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, whereas 97.0% (255/263) of the species identification results obtained by the gap PCR-RFLP analysis matched those obtained by partial 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The gap PCR-RFLP analysis could be a useful and reliable alternative method for the species identification of CNS isolates from bovine IMI and appears to be a more accurate method of species identification than the API STAPH ID 20 system. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Kitobo Forest of Kenya, a unique hotspot of herpetofaunal diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick K. Malonza

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Herpetologically, the remoteness of Kitobo forest in south-eastern Kenya has partly contributed to it remaining virtually un-explored until 2007. Three surveys were conducted in December 2007, December 2009 and April 2010 aimed at generating a comprehensive list of the forest amphibians and reptiles. Using largely timed-species count method, 13 species of amphibians representing eight families and 32 reptiles belonging to 11 families were recorded. Overall species diversity was highest during the 2007 sampling. The richness and abundance of amphibians was highest during the April 2010 sampling period when the amount of rainfall was also highest. The results of species accumulation curves of the three sampling periods did not plateau demonstrating that more species occur in this forest. Pressure on this forest fragment from the adjacent local people is high which in addition to the annual floods threatens its long-term survival. For example the distribution and abundance of some forest associated species such as the tree frogs Leptopelis flavomaculatus and Hyperolius puncticulatus appear to fluctuate with flood events and may decline in future. Considering the forest associated herpetofanua recorded, Kitobo forest is zoogeographically assignable to the East African coastal forest biodiversity hotspot. The documentation of high species richness and diversity in this small forest fragment strongly highlight its biodiversity importance and place it among the most important sites for the conservation of reptiles and amphibians in Kenya.

  17. Spatio-Temporal Distribution and Hotspots of Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease (HFMD in Northern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratchaphon Samphutthanon

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease (HFMD is an emerging viral disease, and at present, there are no antiviral drugs or vaccines available to control it. Outbreaks have persisted for the past 10 years, particularly in northern Thailand. This study aimed to elucidate the phenomenon of HFMD outbreaks from 2003 to 2012 using general statistics and spatial-temporal analysis employing a GIS-based method. The spatial analysis examined data at the village level to create a map representing the distribution pattern, mean center, standard deviation ellipse and hotspots for each outbreak. A temporal analysis was used to analyze the correlation between monthly case data and meteorological factors. The results indicate that the disease can occur at any time of the year, but appears to peak in the rainy and cold seasons. The distribution of outbreaks exhibited a clustered pattern. Most mean centers and standard deviation ellipses occurred in similar areas. The linear directional mean values of the outbreaks were oriented toward the south. When separated by season, it was found that there was a significant correlation with the direction of the southwest monsoon at the same time. An autocorrelation analysis revealed that hotspots tended to increase even when patient cases subsided. In particular, a new hotspot was found in the recent year in Mae Hong Son province.

  18. Rainfall-induced landslides in Europe: hotspots and thresholds (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepeda, J.; Jaedicke, C.; Nadim, F.; Kalsnes, B.

    2010-12-01

    This contribution presents preliminary results of the European project SafeLand. SafeLand is a large-scale integrating collaborative research project on landslide risks in Europe, funded by the Seventh Framework Programme for research and technological development (FP7) of the European Commission. SafeLand was launched in May 2009 and will run for three years. The project team, which comprises 27 institutions from 12 European countries, is coordinated by the International Centre for Geohazards (ICG) in Norway. SafeLand aims to develop and implement an integrated and comprehensive approach to help and guide decision-making in connection with mitigation of landslide risks. Quantifying the effects of global change (changes in demography and climate change) on evolution of landslide risk in Europe is one of the main goals of SafeLand. The methodologies are tested in selected hazard and risk "hotspots” in Europe, in turn improving knowledge, methodologies and integration strategies for the management of landslide risk. The present contribution is focused on two components of SafeLand: (1) the identification of landslide hazard and risk hotspots and (2) the estimation and assessment of rainfall thresholds for triggering of landslides. Hotspots of landslide hazard and risk were identified by an objective GIS-based analysis. The results show clearly where landslide pose the largest hazard in Europe and the objective approach allows a ranking of the countries by exposed area and population. In absolute numbers, Italy is the country with the highest amount of area and population exposed. Relative to absolute number of inhabitants and area, small alpine countries such as Lichtenstein and Montenegro score highest where as much as 40% of the population could be exposed. It is obvious that the type and quality of the input data are decisive for the quality of the results. Especially the estimation of extreme precipitation events needs improvement. These preliminary results are

  19. DRCPlus in a router: automatic elimination of lithography hotspots using 2D pattern detection and correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Rodriguez, Norma; Omedes, Olivier; Gennari, Frank; Lai, Ya-Chieh; Mankad, Viral

    2010-03-01

    As technology processes continue to shrink, standard design rule checking (DRC) has become insufficient to guarantee design manufacturability. DRCPlus is a powerful technique for capturing yield detractors related to complex 2D situations1,2. DRCPlus is a pattern-based 2D design rule check beyond traditional width and space DRC that can identify problematic 2D configurations which are difficult to manufacture. This paper describes a new approach for applying DRCPlus in a router, enabling an automated approach to detecting and fixing known lithography hotspots using an integrated fast 2D pattern matching engine. A simple pass/no-pass criterion associated with each pattern offers designers guidance on how to fix these problematic patterns. Since it does not rely on compute intensive simulations, DRCPlus can be applied on fairly large design blocks and enforced in conjunction with standard DRC in the early stages of the design flow. By embedding this capability into the router, 2D yield detractors can be identified and fixed by designers in a push-button manner without losing design connectivity. More robust designs can be achieved and the impact on parasitics can be easily assessed. This paper will describe a flow using a fast 2D pattern matching engine integrated into the router in order to enforce DRCPlus rules. An integrated approach allows for rapid identification of hotspot patterns and, more importantly, allows for rapid fixing and verification of these hotspots by a tool that understands design intent and constraints. The overall flow is illustrated in Figure 1. An inexact search pattern is passed to the integrated pattern matcher. The match locations are filtered by the router through application of a DRC constraint (typically a recommended rule). Matches that fail this constraint are automatically fixed by the router, with the modified regions incrementally re-checked to ensure no additional DRCPlus violations are introduced.

  20. Thermally-Driven Mantle Plumes Reconcile Hot-spot Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, D.; Davies, J.

    2008-12-01

    Hot-spots are anomalous regions of magmatism that cannot be directly associated with plate tectonic processes (e.g. Morgan, 1972). They are widely regarded as the surface expression of upwelling mantle plumes. Hot-spots exhibit variable life-spans, magmatic productivity and fixity (e.g. Ito and van Keken, 2007). This suggests that a wide-range of upwelling structures coexist within Earth's mantle, a view supported by geochemical and seismic evidence, but, thus far, not reproduced by numerical models. Here, results from a new, global, 3-D spherical, mantle convection model are presented, which better reconcile hot-spot observations, the key modification from previous models being increased convective vigor. Model upwellings show broad-ranging dynamics; some drift slowly, while others are more mobile, displaying variable life-spans, intensities and migration velocities. Such behavior is consistent with hot-spot observations, indicating that the mantle must be simulated at the correct vigor and in the appropriate geometry to reproduce Earth-like dynamics. Thermally-driven mantle plumes can explain the principal features of hot-spot volcanism on Earth.

  1. HIV protein sequence hotspots for crosstalk with host hub proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Sarmady

    Full Text Available HIV proteins target host hub proteins for transient binding interactions. The presence of viral proteins in the infected cell results in out-competition of host proteins in their interaction with hub proteins, drastically affecting cell physiology. Functional genomics and interactome datasets can be used to quantify the sequence hotspots on the HIV proteome mediating interactions with host hub proteins. In this study, we used the HIV and human interactome databases to identify HIV targeted host hub proteins and their host binding partners (H2. We developed a high throughput computational procedure utilizing motif discovery algorithms on sets of protein sequences, including sequences of HIV and H2 proteins. We identified as HIV sequence hotspots those linear motifs that are highly conserved on HIV sequences and at the same time have a statistically enriched presence on the sequences of H2 proteins. The HIV protein motifs discovered in this study are expressed by subsets of H2 host proteins potentially outcompeted by HIV proteins. A large subset of these motifs is involved in cleavage, nuclear localization, phosphorylation, and transcription factor binding events. Many such motifs are clustered on an HIV sequence in the form of hotspots. The sequential positions of these hotspots are consistent with the curated literature on phenotype altering residue mutations, as well as with existing binding site data. The hotspot map produced in this study is the first global portrayal of HIV motifs involved in altering the host protein network at highly connected hub nodes.

  2. Chemocoding as an identification tool where morphological- and DNA-based methods fall short: Inga as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endara, María-José; Coley, Phyllis D; Wiggins, Natasha L; Forrister, Dale L; Younkin, Gordon C; Nicholls, James A; Pennington, R Toby; Dexter, Kyle G; Kidner, Catherine A; Stone, Graham N; Kursar, Thomas A

    2018-02-13

    The need for species identification and taxonomic discovery has led to the development of innovative technologies for large-scale plant identification. DNA barcoding has been useful, but fails to distinguish among many species in species-rich plant genera, particularly in tropical regions. Here, we show that chemical fingerprinting, or 'chemocoding', has great potential for plant identification in challenging tropical biomes. Using untargeted metabolomics in combination with multivariate analysis, we constructed species-level fingerprints, which we define as chemocoding. We evaluated the utility of chemocoding with species that were defined morphologically and subject to next-generation DNA sequencing in the diverse and recently radiated neotropical genus Inga (Leguminosae), both at single study sites and across broad geographic scales. Our results show that chemocoding is a robust method for distinguishing morphologically similar species at a single site and for identifying widespread species across continental-scale ranges. Given that species are the fundamental unit of analysis for conservation and biodiversity research, the development of accurate identification methods is essential. We suggest that chemocoding will be a valuable additional source of data for a quick identification of plants, especially for groups where other methods fall short. © 2018 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2018 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. An Interoperable Similarity-based Cohort Identification Method Using the OMOP Common Data Model version 5.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Shreya; Sen, Anando; Huser, Vojtech; Hruby, Gregory W; Rusanov, Alexander; Albers, David J; Weng, Chunhua

    2017-06-01

    Cohort identification for clinical studies tends to be laborious, time-consuming, and expensive. Developing automated or semi-automated methods for cohort identification is one of the "holy grails" in the field of biomedical informatics. We propose a high-throughput similarity-based cohort identification algorithm by applying numerical abstractions on Electronic Health Records (EHR) data. We implement this algorithm using the Observational Medical Outcomes Partnership (OMOP) Common Data Model (CDM), which enables sites using this standardized EHR data representation to avail this algorithm with minimum effort for local implementation. We validate its performance for a retrospective cohort identification task on six clinical trials conducted at the Columbia University Medical Center. Our algorithm achieves an average Area Under the Curve (AUC) of 0.966 and an average Precision at 5 of 0.983. This interoperable method promises to achieve efficient cohort identification in EHR databases. We discuss suitable applications of our method and its limitations and propose warranted future work.

  4. [Full Sibling Identification by IBS Scoring Method and Establishment of the Query Table of Its Critical Value].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, R; Li, C T; Zhao, S M; Li, H X; Li, L; Wu, R G; Zhang, C C; Sun, H Y

    2017-04-01

    To establish a query table of IBS critical value and identification power for the detection systems with different numbers of STR loci under different false judgment standards. Samples of 267 pairs of full siblings and 360 pairs of unrelated individuals were collected and 19 autosomal STR loci were genotyped by Golden e ye™ 20A system. The full siblings were determined using IBS scoring method according to the 'Regulation for biological full sibling testing'. The critical values and identification power for the detection systems with different numbers of STR loci under different false judgment standards were calculated by theoretical methods. According to the formal IBS scoring criteria, the identification power of full siblings and unrelated individuals was 0.764 0 and the rate of false judgment was 0. The results of theoretical calculation were consistent with that of sample observation. The query table of IBS critical value for identification of full sibling detection systems with different numbers of STR loci was successfully established. The IBS scoring method defined by the regulation has high detection efficiency and low false judgment rate, which provides a relatively conservative result. The query table of IBS critical value for identification of full sibling detection systems with different numbers of STR loci provides an important reference data for the result judgment of full sibling testing and owns a considerable practical value.

  5. A Dissipation Gap Method for full-field measurement-based identification of elasto-plastic material parameters

    KAUST Repository

    Blaysat, Benoît

    2012-05-18

    Using enriched data such as displacement fields obtained from digital image correlation is a pathway to the local identification of material parameters. Up to now, most of the identification techniques for nonlinear models are based on Finite Element Updating Methods. This article explains how an appropriate use of the Dissipation Gap Method can help in this context and be an interesting alternative to these classical techniques. The Dissipation Gap Methods rely on the concept of error in dissipation that has been used mainly for the verification of finite element simulations. We provide here an original application of these founding developments to the identification of material parameters for nonlinear behaviors. The proposed technique and especially the main technical keypoint of building the admissible fields are described in detail. The approach is then illustrated through the identification of heterogeneous isotropic elasto-plastic properties. The basic numerical features highlighted through these simple examples demonstrate this approach to be a promising tool for nonlinear identification. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Measuring similarity and improving stability in biomarker identification methods applied to Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Júlio; Park, Juhyun; Angelov, Plamen P; Ahmadzai, Abdullah A; Gajjar, Ketan; Scott, Andrew D; Carmichael, Paul L; Martin, Francis L

    2014-04-01

    FTIR spectroscopy is a powerful diagnostic tool that can also derive biochemical signatures of a wide range of cellular materials, such as cytology, histology, live cells, and biofluids. However, while classification is a well-established subject, biomarker identification lacks standards and validation of its methods. Validation of biomarker identification methods is difficult because, unlike classification, there is usually no reference biomarker against which to test the biomarkers extracted by a method. In this paper, we propose a framework to assess and improve the stability of biomarkers derived by a method, and to compare biomarkers derived by different method set-ups and between different methods by means of a proposed "biomarkers similarity index". Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Identification of a Manipulator Model Using the Input Error Method in the Mathematica Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leszek CEDRO

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of parameter identification for a four-degree-of-freedom robot was solved using the Mathematica program. The identification was performed by means of specially developed differential filters [1]. Using the example of a manipulator, we analyze the capabilities of the Mathematica program that can be applied to solve problems related to the modeling, control, simulation and identification of a system [2]. The responses of the identification process for the variables and the values of the quality function are included.

  8. A network-based method for the identification of putative genes related to infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, ShaoPeng; Huang, GuoHua; Hu, Qinghua; Zou, Quan

    2016-11-01

    Infertility has become one of the major health problems worldwide, with its incidence having risen markedly in recent decades. There is an urgent need to investigate the pathological mechanisms behind infertility and to design effective treatments. However, this is made difficult by the fact that various biological factors have been identified to be related to infertility, including genetic factors. A network-based method was established to identify new genes potentially related to infertility. A network constructed using human protein-protein interactions based on previously validated infertility-related genes enabled the identification of some novel candidate genes. These genes were then filtered by a permutation test and their functional and structural associations with infertility-related genes. Our method identified 23 novel genes, which have strong functional and structural associations with previously validated infertility-related genes. Substantial evidence indicates that the identified genes are strongly related to dysfunction of the four main biological processes of fertility: reproductive development and physiology, gametogenesis, meiosis and recombination, and hormone regulation. The newly discovered genes may provide new directions for investigating infertility. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "System Genetics" Guest Editor: Dr. Yudong Cai and Dr. Tao Huang. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. An Objective Prototype-Based Method for Dual-Polarization Radar Clutter Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Wen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A prototype-based method is developed to discriminate different types of clutter (ground clutter, sea clutter, and insects from weather echoes using polarimetric measurements and their textures. This method employs a clustering algorithm to generate data groups from the training dataset, each of which is modeled as a weighted Gaussian distribution called a “prototype.” Two classification algorithms are proposed based on the prototypes, namely maximum prototype likelihood classifier (MPLC and Bayesian classifier (BC. In the MPLC, the probability of a data point with respect to each prototype is estimated to retrieve the final class label under the maximum likelihood criterion. The BC models the probability density function as a Gaussian mixture composed by the prototypes. The class label is obtained under the maximum a posterior criterion. The two algorithms are applied to S-band dual-polarization CP-2 weather radar data in Southeast Queensland, Australia. The classification results for the test dataset are compared with the NCAR fuzzy-logic particle identification algorithm. Generally good agreement is found for weather echo and ground clutter; however, the confusion matrix indicates that the techniques tend to differ from each other on the recognition of insects.

  10. Study of characteristic point identification and preprocessing method for pulse wave signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Tang, Ning; Jiang, Guiping

    2015-02-01

    Characteristics in pulse wave signals (PWSs) include the information of physiology and pathology of human cardiovascular system. Therefore, identification of characteristic points in PWSs plays a significant role in analyzing human cardiovascular system. Particularly, the characteristic points show personal dependent features and are easy to be affected. Acquiring a signal with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and integrity is fundamentally important to precisely identify the characteristic points. Based on the mathematical morphology theory, we design a combined filter, which can effectively suppress the baseline drift and remove the high-frequency noise simultaneously, to preprocess the PWSs. Furthermore, the characteristic points of the preprocessed signal are extracted according to its position relations with the zero-crossing points of wavelet coefficients of the signal. In addition, the differential method is adopted to calibrate the position offset of characteristic points caused by the wavelet transform. We investigated four typical PWSs reconstructed by three Gaussian functions with tunable parameters. The numerical results suggested that the proposed method could identify the characteristic points of PWSs accurately.

  11. Identification of Leishmania isolates from Varzaneh city, Isfahan province, Iran using nested polymerase chain reaction method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Arjmand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leishmaniasis, a parasitic disease, is caused by the Leishmania genus, a protozoan parasite transmitted by sand fly arthropods. Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL in old world is usually caused by L. major, L. tropica, and L. aethiopica complexes. One of the most important hyper endemic areas of CL in Iran is Isfahan province. Varzaneh is a city in the eastern part of Isfahan province. Due to different biological patterns of parasite strains which are distributed in the region, this study was design to identify Leishmania species from human victims using Kinetoplastid DNA as templates in a molecular PCR method. Materials and Methods: Among 186 suspected cases, 50 cases were confirmed positive by direct microscopy after Giemsa staining. Species characterization of the isolates was done using Nested- PCR as a very effective and sensitive tool to reproduce mini circle strands. Results: After Nested-PCR from all 50 cases, 560 bp bands were produced which according to products of reference strains indicate that the infection etiologic agent has been L. major. 22 (44% of patients were females and 28 (56% of them were males. Their age ranges were between 7 months and 60 years. Conclusion: According to the results of the study and the particular pattern of infection prevalent in the region, genetic studies and identification of Leishmania parasites are very important in the disease control and improvement of regional strategy of therapy protocols.

  12. Beef Quality Identification Using Thresholding Method and Decision Tree Classification Based on Android Smartphone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusworo Adi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Beef is one of the animal food products that have high nutrition because it contains carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, and minerals. Therefore, the quality of beef should be maintained so that consumers get good beef quality. Determination of beef quality is commonly conducted visually by comparing the actual beef and reference pictures of each beef class. This process presents weaknesses, as it is subjective in nature and takes a considerable amount of time. Therefore, an automated system based on image processing that is capable of determining beef quality is required. This research aims to develop an image segmentation method by processing digital images. The system designed consists of image acquisition processes with varied distance, resolution, and angle. Image segmentation is done to separate the images of fat and meat using the Otsu thresholding method. Classification was carried out using the decision tree algorithm and the best accuracies were obtained at 90% for training and 84% for testing. Once developed, this system is then embedded into the android programming. Results show that the image processing technique is capable of proper marbling score identification.

  13. Ion mobility spectrometer, spectrometer analyte detection and identification verification system, and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, David A.

    2002-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for ion mobility spectrometry and analyte detection and identification verification system are disclosed. The apparatus is configured to be used in an ion mobility spectrometer and includes a plurality of reactant reservoirs configured to contain a plurality of reactants which can be reacted with the sample to form adducts having varying ion mobilities. A carrier fluid, such as air or nitrogen, is used to carry the sample into the spectrometer. The plurality of reactants are configured to be selectively added to the carrier stream by use inlet and outlet manifolds in communication with the reagent reservoirs, the reservoirs being selectively isolatable by valves. The invention further includes a spectrometer having the reagent system described. In the method, a first reactant is used with the sample. Following a positive result, a second reactant is used to determine whether a predicted response occurs. The occurrence of the second predicted response tends to verify the existence of a component of interest within the sample. A third reactant can also be used to provide further verification of the existence of a component of interest. A library can be established of known responses of compounds of interest with various reactants and the results of a specific multi-reactant survey of a sample can be compared against the library to determine whether a component detected in the sample is likely to be a specific component of interest.

  14. Identification of crotamine in the venom of Crotalus durissus collilineatus by three different methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Sayonara Ay More; Magalhães, Marta Regina; Salazar, Vania Cristina Rodríguez; Valadares, Marize Campos; da Cunha, Luiz Carlos

    2015-03-01

    The use of mice for the identification of crotamine has been the motive of discussions of bioethical character and technical (efficiency), so that a reassessment of the use of animals in experiments is global trend the search for alternative tests. The objective of this study was to standardize a method for HPLC-PDA to identify the presence of crotamine in the venom of rattlesnakes, aiming to propose an alternative methodology to reduce or replace the use of animals. The Cdc was evaluated as to the presence of crotamine by 3 methods: traditional test lethality in mice (Mus musculus) swiss albino male, 18-22 g (i.p.), polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and HPLC-PDA. The venoms of 50 specimens of Crotalus durissus collilineatus, held in the serpentarium CEPB/PUC Goiás, were obtained by manual massage of the gland, making the collection individually. To identify the band corresponding to crotamine, the venoms of specimens, analysis was performed on SDS-PAGE and references. Procedure in mice with 20% of the samples tested positive for crotamine, 24% negative and 56% uncertain outcome. With the SDS-PAGE was identified crotamine in 26% of samples, 26% negative and 48% continued with uncertain outcome. By HPLC method showed the presence myotoxin in 86% of samples, with 14% negative. The tests conducted in this study indicated that methodology which utilizes animals for identifying the presence of crotamine the venom of C. durissus can safely be replaced by the test SDS-PAGE and HPLC, since the methods are reproducible, and do not undergo any interference biological animal and mainly contribute to reducing the number of animals used for laboratory tests. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. An optimised method for material identification using a photon counting detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beldjoudi, Guillaume, E-mail: guillaume.beldjoudi@cea.fr [LETI MINATEC Campus, CEA Grenoble, 17, rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Rebuffel, Veronique; Verger, Loieck [LETI MINATEC Campus, CEA Grenoble, 17, rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France); Kaftandjian, Valerie [CNDRI - INSA Lyon, 20, Avenue Albert Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne, Cedex (France); Rinkel, Jean [LETI MINATEC Campus, CEA Grenoble, 17, rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France)

    2012-01-21

    X-ray photon counting detectors have become a competitive alternative to energy integrating systems in certain domains. However, processing methods currently used in radiography for investigating the composition of an object are an extension of dual energy methods and have started to show their limits with an increasing number of counting windows (bins). Thus, in a context of material recognition for homeland security, this study aims to introduce a new data processing method suitable for any type of detector, in integrating or counting mode, regardless of the number of bins. Additionally, a criterion to quantify the influence of the number of counting windows as well as the influence of their threshold position has been developed. The optimisation process is conducted in simulation by considering ideal detectors, and the results, for detectors with m=2, 3, 4 and 5 counting windows, are compared to those obtained with an analytical criterion developed in the literature and adapted to our study context. Both methods give identical results. In the final part, the performances of a spectrometric detector (energy windows width of 1 keV) and of optimised systems with m=2, 3, 4 and 5 bins are analysed for homogeneous plastic identification. The results show an increase in performance with increase in bin number until the performance level of the spectrometric detector is reached. Moreover, a discussion on the optimisation robustness as a function of material thickness to be identified is presented. The spectrometric detector, which does not require any optimisation of the bins thresholds, appears then to be a candidate of choice for material recognition when using X-ray photon counting detectors.

  16. The smart cluster method. Adaptive earthquake cluster identification and analysis in strong seismic regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Andreas M.; Daniell, James E.; Wenzel, Friedemann

    2017-07-01

    Earthquake clustering is an essential part of almost any statistical analysis of spatial and temporal properties of seismic activity. The nature of earthquake clusters and subsequent declustering of earthquake catalogues plays a crucial role in determining the magnitude-dependent earthquake return period and its respective spatial variation for probabilistic seismic hazard assessment. This study introduces the Smart Cluster Method (SCM), a new methodology to identify earthquake clusters, which uses an adaptive point process for spatio-temporal cluster identification. It utilises the magnitude-dependent spatio-temporal earthquake density to adjust the search properties, subsequently analyses the identified clusters to determine directional variation and adjusts its search space with respect to directional properties. In the case of rapid subsequent ruptures like the 1992 Landers sequence or the 2010-2011 Darfield-Christchurch sequence, a reclassification procedure is applied to disassemble subsequent ruptures using near-field searches, nearest neighbour classification and temporal splitting. The method is capable of identifying and classifying earthquake clusters in space and time. It has been tested and validated using earthquake data from California and New Zealand. A total of more than 1500 clusters have been found in both regions since 1980 with M m i n = 2.0. Utilising the knowledge of cluster classification, the method has been adjusted to provide an earthquake declustering algorithm, which has been compared to existing methods. Its performance is comparable to established methodologies. The analysis of earthquake clustering statistics lead to various new and updated correlation functions, e.g. for ratios between mainshock and strongest aftershock and general aftershock activity metrics.

  17. An inertial parameter identification method of eliminating system damping effect for a six-degree-of-freedom parallel manipulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Tixian

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A new simple and effective inertial parameter identification method based on sinusoidal vibrations of a six-degree-of-freedom parallel manipulator is proposed. Compared with previously known identification algorithms, the advantages of the new approach are there is no need to design the excitation trajectory to consider the condition number of the observation matrix and the inertial matrix can be accurately defined regardless of the effect of viscous friction. In addition, the use of a sinusoidal exciting trajectory allows calculation of the velocities and accelerations from the measured position response. Simulations show that the new approach has acceptable tolerance of dry friction when using a simple coupling parameter modified formula. The experimental application to the hydraulically driven Stewart platform demonstrates the capability and efficiency of the proposed identification method.

  18. Candida colonization and species identification by two methods in NICU newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Sadat Taherzadeh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the last two decades invasive candidiasis has become an increasing problem in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs. Colonization of skin and mucous membranes with Candida spp. is important factor in the pathogenesis of neonatal infection and several colonized sites are major risk factors evoking higher frequencies of progression to invasive candidiasis. The aim of this study was to detect Candida colonization in NICU patients. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 93 neonates in NICUs at Imam Khomeini and Children Medical Center Hospitals in Tehran. Cutaneous and mucous membrane samples obtained at first, third, and seventh days of patients’ stay in NICUs during nine months from August 2013 to May 2014. The samples were primarily cultured on CHROMagar Candida medium. The cultured media were incubated at 35°C for 48h and evaluated based on colony color produced on CHROMagar Candida. In addition, isolated colonies were cultured on Corn Meal Agar medium supplemented with tween 80 for identification of Candida spp. based on their morphology. Finally, polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP method was performed for definite identification of isolated species. Results: Colonization by Candida spp. was occurred in 20.43% of neonates. Fifteen and four patients colonized with one and two different Candida spp., respectively. Isolated Candida spp. identified as; C. parapsilosis (n: 10, C. albicans (n: 7, C. tropicalis (n: 3, C. guilliermondii (n: 2, and C. krusei (n: 1. In present study non-albicans Candia species were dominant (69.56% and C. parapsilosis was the most frequent isolate (43.47%. Using Fisher's exact test, the correlation between fungal colonization with low birth weight, low gestational age, and duration of hospital stay was found to be statistically significant (P=0.003. Conclusion: The results of this study imply to the candida species colonization of neonates

  19. Spatiotemporal detection and analysis of exocytosis reveal fusion "hotspots" organized by the cytoskeleton in endocrine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Tianyi; Lu, Jingze; Zhang, Jinzhong; Zhang, Yongdeng; Chen, Liangyi

    2015-01-20

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscope has often been used to study the molecular mechanisms underlying vesicle exocytosis. However, the spatial occurrence of the fusion events within a single cell is not frequently explored due to the lack of sensitive and accurate computer-assisted programs to analyze large image data sets. Here, we have developed an image analysis platform for the nonbiased identification of different types of vesicle fusion events with high accuracy in different cell types. By performing spatiotemporal analysis of stimulus-evoked exocytosis in insulin-secreting INS-1 cells, we statistically prove that individual vesicle fusion events are clustered at hotspots. This spatial pattern disappears upon the disruption of either the actin or the microtubule network; this disruption also severely inhibits evoked exocytosis. By demonstrating that newcomer vesicles are delivered from the cell interior to the surface membrane for exocytosis, we highlight a previously unappreciated mechanism in which the cytoskeleton-dependent transportation of secretory vesicles organizes exocytosis hotspots in endocrine cells. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Improved method for rapid and accurate isolation and identification of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus from human plaque samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villhauer, Alissa L; Lynch, David J; Drake, David R

    2017-08-01

    Mutans streptococci (MS), specifically Streptococcus mutans (SM) and Streptococcus sobrinus (SS), are bacterial species frequently targeted for investigation due to their role in the etiology of dental caries. Differentiation of S. mutans and S. sobrinus is an essential part of exploring the role of these organisms in disease progression and the impact of the presence of either/both on a subject's caries experience. Of vital importance to the study of these organisms is an identification protocol that allows us to distinguish between the two species in an easy, accurate, and timely manner. While conducting a 5-year birth cohort study in a Northern Plains American Indian tribe, the need for a more rapid procedure for isolating and identifying high volumes of MS was recognized. We report here on the development of an accurate and rapid method for MS identification. Accuracy, ease of use, and material and time requirements for morphological differentiation on selective agar, biochemical tests, and various combinations of PCR primers were compared. The final protocol included preliminary identification based on colony morphology followed by PCR confirmation of species identification using primers targeting regions of the glucosyltransferase (gtf) genes of SM and SS. This method of isolation and identification was found to be highly accurate, more rapid than the previous methodology used, and easily learned. It resulted in more efficient use of both time and material resources. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Image De-Identification Methods for Clinical Research in the XDS Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aryanto, K. Y. E.; van Kernebeek, G.; Berendsen, B.; Oudkerk, M.; van Ooijen, P. M. A.

    To investigate possible de-identification methodologies within the Cross-Enterprise Document Sharing for imaging (XDS-I) environment in order to provide strengthened support for image data exchange as part of clinical research projects. De-identification, using anonymization or pseudonymization, is

  2. Load power device, system and method of load control and management employing load identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yi; Luebke, Charles John; Schoepf, Thomas J.

    2018-01-09

    A load power device includes a power input, at least one power output for at least one load, a plurality of sensors structured to sense voltage and current at the at least one power output, and a processor. The processor provides: (a) load identification based upon the sensed voltage and current, and (b) load control and management based upon the load identification.

  3. A framework for identifying carbon hotspots and forest management drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timilsina, Nilesh; Escobedo, Francisco J; Cropper, Wendell P; Abd-Elrahman, Amr; Brandeis, Thomas J; Delphin, Sonia; Lambert, Samuel

    2013-01-15

    Spatial analyses of ecosystem system services that are directly relevant to both forest management decision making and conservation in the subtropics are rare. Also, frameworks that identify and map carbon stocks and corresponding forest management drivers using available regional, national, and international-level forest inventory datasets could provide insights into key forest structural characteristics and management practices that are optimal for carbon storage. To address this need we used publicly available USDA Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis data and spatial analyses to develop a framework for mapping "carbon hotspots" (i.e. areas of significantly high tree and understory aboveground carbon stocks) across a range of forest types using the state of Florida, USA as an example. We also analyzed influential forest management variables (e.g. forest types, fire, hurricanes, tenure, management activities) using generalized linear mixed modeling to identify drivers associated with these hotspots. Most of the hotspots were located in the northern third of the state some in peri-urban areas, and there were no identifiable hotspots in South Florida. Forest silvicultural treatments (e.g. site preparation, thinning, logging, etc) were not significant predictors of hotspots. Forest types, site quality, and stand age were however significant predictors. Higher site quality and stand age increased the probability of forests being classified as a hotspot. Disturbance type and time since disturbance were not significant predictors in our analyses. This framework can use globally available forest inventory datasets to analyze and map ecosystems service provision areas and bioenergy supplies and identify forest management practices that optimize these services in forests. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A simple identification method for vaginal secretions using relative quantification of Lactobacillus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Masanori; Gamo, Shinsuke; Okiura, Tatsuyuki; Nishimukai, Hiroaki; Asano, Migiwa

    2014-09-01

    In criminal investigations there are some cases in which identifying the presence of vaginal secretions provides crucial evidence in proving sexual assault. However, there are no methods for definitively identifying vaginal secretions. In the present study, we focused on Lactobacillus levels in vaginal secretions and developed a novel identification method for vaginal secretions by relative quantification based on real time PCR. We designed a Lactobacillus conserved region primer pair (LCP) by aligning 16S rRNA gene sequences from major vaginal Lactobacillus species (Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus gasseri, Lactobacillus iners and Lactobacillus jensenii), and selected the human specific primer pair (HSP) as an endogenous control for relative quantification. As a result, the ΔCt (ΔCt=Ct[LCP]-Ct[HSP]) values of vaginal secretions (11 out of 12 samples) were significantly lower than those of saliva, semen and skin surface samples, and it was possible to discriminate between vaginal secretions and other body fluids. For the one remaining sample, it was confirmed that the predominant species in the microflora was not of the Lactobacillus genus. The ΔCt values in this study were calculated when the total DNA input used from the vaginal secretions was 10pg or more. Additionally, the ΔCt values of samples up to 6-months-old, which were kept at room temperature, remained unchanged. Thus, we concluded in this study that the simple ΔCt method by real time PCR is a useful tool for detecting the presence of vaginal secretions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Multilocus sequence typing method for identification and genotypic classification of pathogenic Leptospira species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machang'u Robert S

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leptospira are the parasitic bacterial organisms associated with a broad range of mammalian hosts and are responsible for severe cases of human Leptospirosis. The epidemiology of leptospirosis is complex and dynamic. Multiple serovars have been identified, each adapted to one or more animal hosts. Adaptation is a dynamic process that changes the spatial and temporal distribution of serovars and clinical manifestations in different hosts. Serotyping based on repertoire of surface antigens is an ambiguous and artificial system of classification of leptospiral agents. Molecular typing methods for the identification of pathogenic leptospires up to individual genome species level have been highly sought after since the decipherment of whole genome sequences. Only a few resources exist for microbial genotypic data based on individual techniques such as Multiple Locus Sequence Typing (MLST, but unfortunately no such databases are existent for leptospires. Results We for the first time report development of a robust MLST method for genotyping of Leptospira. Genotyping based on DNA sequence identity of 4 housekeeping genes and 2 candidate genes was analyzed in a set of 120 strains including 41 reference strains representing different geographical areas and from different sources. Of the six selected genes, adk, icdA and secY were significantly more variable whereas the LipL32 and LipL41 coding genes and the rrs2 gene were moderately variable. The phylogenetic tree clustered the isolates according to the genome-based species. Conclusion The main advantages of MLST over other typing methods for leptospires include reproducibility, robustness, consistency and portability. The genetic relatedness of the leptospires can be better studied by the MLST approach and can be used for molecular epidemiological and evolutionary studies and population genetics.

  6. A new time-frequency method for identification and classification of ball bearing faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attoui, Issam; Fergani, Nadir; Boutasseta, Nadir; Oudjani, Brahim; Deliou, Adel

    2017-06-01

    In order to fault diagnosis of ball bearing that is one of the most critical components of rotating machinery, this paper presents a time-frequency procedure incorporating a new feature extraction step that combines the classical wavelet packet decomposition energy distribution technique and a new feature extraction technique based on the selection of the most impulsive frequency bands. In the proposed procedure, firstly, as a pre-processing step, the most impulsive frequency bands are selected at different bearing conditions using a combination between Fast-Fourier-Transform FFT and Short-Frequency Energy SFE algorithms. Secondly, once the most impulsive frequency bands are selected, the measured machinery vibration signals are decomposed into different frequency sub-bands by using discrete Wavelet Packet Decomposition WPD technique to maximize the detection of their frequency contents and subsequently the most useful sub-bands are represented in the time-frequency domain by using Short Time Fourier transform STFT algorithm for knowing exactly what the frequency components presented in those frequency sub-bands are. Once the proposed feature vector is obtained, three feature dimensionality reduction techniques are employed using Linear Discriminant Analysis LDA, a feedback wrapper method and Locality Sensitive Discriminant Analysis LSDA. Lastly, the Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System ANFIS algorithm is used for instantaneous identification and classification of bearing faults. In order to evaluate the performances of the proposed method, different testing data set to the trained ANFIS model by using different conditions of healthy and faulty bearings under various load levels, fault severities and rotating speed. The conclusion resulting from this paper is highlighted by experimental results which prove that the proposed method can serve as an intelligent bearing fault diagnosis system.

  7. Empirical performance of a self-controlled cohort method: lessons for developing a risk identification and analysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Patrick B; Schuemie, Martijn J; Madigan, David

    2013-10-01

    Observational healthcare data offer the potential to enable identification of risks of medical products, but appropriate methodology has not yet been defined. The self-controlled cohort method, which compares the post-exposure outcome rate with the pre-exposure rate among an exposed cohort, has been proposed as a potential approach for risk identification but its performance has not been fully assessed. To evaluate the performance of the self-controlled cohort method as a tool for risk identification in observational healthcare data. The method was applied to 399 drug-outcome scenarios (165 positive controls and 234 negative controls across 4 health outcomes of interest) in 5 real observational databases (4 administrative claims and 1 electronic health record) and in 6 simulated datasets with no effect and injected relative risks of 1.25, 1.5, 2, 4, and 10, respectively. Method performance was evaluated through area under ROC curve (AUC), bias, and coverage probability. The self-controlled cohort design achieved strong predictive accuracy across the outcomes and databases under study, with the top-performing settings exceeding AUC >0.76 in all scenarios. However, the estimates generated were observed to be highly biased with low coverage probability. If the objective for a risk identification system is one of discrimination, the self-controlled cohort method shows promise as a potential tool for risk identification. However, if a system is intended to generate effect estimates to quantify the magnitude of potential risks, the self-controlled cohort method may not be suitable, and requires substantial calibration to be properly interpreted under nominal properties.

  8. Development of an automatical identification method in the CsI detectors; Develppement d`une method automatique d`identification dans les detecteurs CsI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourio, D. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Assenard, M.; Germain, M.; Reposeur, T.; Eudes, P.; Lautridou, P.; Laville, J.L.; Lebrun, C.; Rahmani, A. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et des Technologies Associees - SUBATECH, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 44 - Nantes (France)

    1997-10-01

    Achievement of multidetectors offers the possibility of measuring almost totally the particles produced in heavy ion reactions. Particularly, INDRA covers 90% of the solid angle and uses some 350 CsI detectors for the charged particle detection (Z {<=} 4). As the data yield from these multidetectors is huge we developed a first approach to automatically perform the identification procedure for light particle in a CsI scintillator. This is based on a pattern recognition with a final check assuring the consistency of the result

  9. FN-Identify: Novel Restriction Enzymes-Based Method for Bacterial Identification in Absence of Genome Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Mohamed; Ouda, Osama; El-Refy, Ali; El-Feky, Fawzy A; Mosa, Kareem A; Helmy, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing and restriction analysis of genes like 16S rRNA and HSP60 are intensively used for molecular identification in the microbial communities. With aid of the rapid progress in bioinformatics, genome sequencing became the method of choice for bacterial identification. However, the genome sequencing technology is still out of reach in the developing countries. In this paper, we propose FN-Identify, a sequencing-free method for bacterial identification. FN-Identify exploits the gene sequences data available in GenBank and other databases and the two algorithms that we developed, CreateScheme and GeneIdentify, to create a restriction enzyme-based identification scheme. FN-Identify was tested using three different and diverse bacterial populations (members of Lactobacillus, Pseudomonas, and Mycobacterium groups) in an in silico analysis using restriction enzymes and sequences of 16S rRNA gene. The analysis of the restriction maps of the members of three groups using the fragment numbers information only or along with fragments sizes successfully identified all of the members of the three groups using a minimum of four and maximum of eight restriction enzymes. Our results demonstrate the utility and accuracy of FN-Identify method and its two algorithms as an alternative method that uses the standard microbiology laboratories techniques when the genome sequencing is not available.

  10. A PCR-based method for identification of bifidobacteria from the human alimentary tract at the species level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venema, K.; Maathuis, A.J.H.

    2003-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method was developed for the identification of isolates of Bifidobacterium at the species level. Using two Bifidobacterium-specific primers directed against the 16S ribosomal gene (Bif164 and Bif662), a PCR product was obtained from the type strains of 12

  11. FN-Identify: Novel Restriction Enzymes-Based Method for Bacterial Identification in Absence of Genome Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Awad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sequencing and restriction analysis of genes like 16S rRNA and HSP60 are intensively used for molecular identification in the microbial communities. With aid of the rapid progress in bioinformatics, genome sequencing became the method of choice for bacterial identification. However, the genome sequencing technology is still out of reach in the developing countries. In this paper, we propose FN-Identify, a sequencing-free method for bacterial identification. FN-Identify exploits the gene sequences data available in GenBank and other databases and the two algorithms that we developed, CreateScheme and GeneIdentify, to create a restriction enzyme-based identification scheme. FN-Identify was tested using three different and diverse bacterial populations (members of Lactobacillus, Pseudomonas, and Mycobacterium groups in an in silico analysis using restriction enzymes and sequences of 16S rRNA gene. The analysis of the restriction maps of the members of three groups using the fragment numbers information only or along with fragments sizes successfully identified all of the members of the three groups using a minimum of four and maximum of eight restriction enzymes. Our results demonstrate the utility and accuracy of FN-Identify method and its two algorithms as an alternative method that uses the standard microbiology laboratories techniques when the genome sequencing is not available.

  12. Improved method for reliable HMW-GS identification by RP-HPLC and SDS-PAGE in common wheat cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    The accurate identification of alleles for high-molecular weight glutenins (HMW-GS) is critical for wheat breeding programs targeting end-use quality. RP-HPLC methods were optimized for separation of HMW-GS, resulting in enhanced resolution of 1By and 1Dx subunits. Statistically significant differe...

  13. Novel Optical Methods for Identification, Imaging, and Preservation of the Cavernous Nerves Responsible for Penile Erections during Prostate Cancer Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Novel Optical Methods for Identification, Imaging, and Preservation of the Cavernous Nerves Responsible for Penile Erections during Prostate...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Preservation of the Cavernous Nerves Responsible for Penile Erections During Prostate Cancer Surgery 5b. GRANT...understanding of the location of the cavernous nerves, which are responsible for erectile function. Advances in id entification and preservation of

  14. [Development of a real-time polymerase chain reaction method for the identification of Candida species].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ağca, Harun; Dalyan Cilo, Burcu; Özmerdiven, Gülşah Ece; Sağlam, Sezcan; Ener, Beyza

    2015-01-01

    created by cooling the producs at 50°C for 30 secs and then heating to 80°C at a rate of 0.1°C/sec measuring of the fluorescence simultaneously. For the quantitation of fungal DNA according to the standard curve, serial dilutions of C.albicans ATCC 10231 DNA from 3 x 10(5) to 3 x 10(2) ng/μl were used. All of the strains were also identified by conventional methods and sequence analysis in order to compare the results obtained by Rt-PCR. In our study, all patient and standard samples could be amplified, identified and quantitated by this developed Rt-PCR method. A total of 50 strains, of them 26 were C.parapsilosis, 15 were C.glabrata, 6 were C.albicans, and 3 were C.tropicalis have been detected and identified among patient samples. The results were completely concordant with the sequencing and conventional methods, so the sensitivity and specificity of this method were estimated as 100 percent. In conclusion, it was novel Rt-PCR developed and evaluated in this study is considered as a rapid, accurate, reproducible, sensitive and specific method for the detection, identification and quantitation of commonly observed Candida spp. strains.

  15. Proposal and evaluation of FASDIM, a Fast And Simple De-Identification Method for unstructured free-text clinical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazard, Emmanuel; Mouret, Capucine; Ficheur, Grégoire; Schaffar, Aurélien; Beuscart, Jean-Baptiste; Beuscart, Régis

    2014-04-01

    Medical free-text records enable to get rich information about the patients, but often need to be de-identified by removing the Protected Health Information (PHI), each time the identification of the patient is not mandatory. Pattern matching techniques require pre-defined dictionaries, and machine learning techniques require an extensive training set. Methods exist in French, but either bring weak results or are not freely available. The objective is to define and evaluate FASDIM, a Fast And Simple De-Identification Method for French medical free-text records. FASDIM consists in removing all the words that are not present in the authorized word list, and in removing all the numbers except those that match a list of protection patterns. The corresponding lists are incremented in the course of the iterations of the method. For the evaluation, the workload is estimated in the course of records de-identification. The efficiency of the de-identification is assessed by independent medical experts on 508 discharge letters that are randomly selected and de-identified by FASDIM. Finally, the letters are encoded after and before de-identification according to 3 terminologies (ATC, ICD10, CCAM) and the codes are compared. The construction of the list of authorized words is progressive: 12h for the first 7000 letters, 16 additional hours for 20,000 additional letters. The Recall (proportion of removed Protected Health Information, PHI) is 98.1%, the Precision (proportion of PHI within the removed token) is 79.6% and the F-measure (harmonic mean) is 87.9%. In average 30.6 terminology codes are encoded per letter, and 99.02% of those codes are preserved despite the de-identification. FASDIM gets good results in French and is freely available. It is easy to implement and does not require any predefined dictionary. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Empirical performance of a new user cohort method: lessons for developing a risk identification and analysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Patrick B; Schuemie, Martijn J; Gruber, Susan; Zorych, Ivan; Madigan, David

    2013-10-01

    Observational healthcare data offer the potential to enable identification of risks of medical products, but appropriate methodology has not yet been defined. The new user cohort method, which compares the post-exposure rate among the target drug to a referent comparator group, is the prevailing approach for many pharmacoepidemiology evaluations and has been proposed as a promising approach for risk identification but its performance in this context has not been fully assessed. To evaluate the performance of the new user cohort method as a tool for risk identification in observational healthcare data. The method was applied to 399 drug-outcome scenarios (165 positive controls and 234 negative controls across 4 health outcomes of interest) in 5 real observational databases (4 administrative claims and 1 electronic health record) and in 6 simulated datasets with no effect and injected relative risks of 1.25, 1.5, 2, 4, and 10, respectively. Method performance was evaluated through Area Under ROC Curve (AUC), bias, and coverage probability. The new user cohort method achieved modest predictive accuracy across the outcomes and databases under study, with the top-performing analysis near AUC >0.70 in most scenarios. The performance of the method was particularly sensitive to the choice of comparator population. For almost all drug-outcome pairs there was a large difference, either positive or negative, between the true effect size and the estimate produced by the method, although this error was near zero on average. Simulation studies showed that in the majority of cases, the true effect estimate was not within the 95 % confidence interval produced by the method. The new user cohort method can contribute useful information toward a risk identification system, but should not be considered definitive evidence given the degree of error observed within the effect estimates. Careful consideration of the comparator selection and appropriate calibration of the effect estimates

  17. Methods in laboratory investigation. Identification and evaluation of histopathology at microelectrode puncture sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, M A; Bernick, S; Puffer, H W; Warner, N E; Crawford, D W

    1983-11-01

    Tissue puncture techniques using microelectrodes for various measurements have been criticized for producing undetermined degrees of tissue damage. Therefore, a method permitting routine identification of puncture tracks was developed to determine local microelectrode-induced injury. Rabbits were anesthetized and the femoral arteries surgically exposed. A 3-ml mixture of saline-India ink suspension was introduced through an ear vein. Oxygen-sensitive (pO2) microcathodes were advanced into and through the arterial wall at 10- or 20-micron intervals using a stepping microdrive to 150 to 450 micron and then withdrawn. The arteries were fixed in 10% formalin and gelatin embedded, and serial frozen sections (less than or equal to 15 micron) of the microelectrode puncture area were made. We observed within 5 minutes of microcathode withdrawal a dark, punctate, microscopic discoloration within the arterial wall. Histologically, ink distribution within the arterial wall demonstrated an acute permeability change: puncture depths generally less than 300 micron showed ink-lined microelectrode tracks (generally less than 2 micron wide) in the media, and greater puncture depths showed local hemorrhage and focal laminar accumulation of ink which extended from the track. The immediate adjacent area to microelectrode puncture depths less than 300 micron showed an apparent intact internal elastic lamina and media. Therefore, microelectrode damage has been shown to be primarily limited to microelectrode tissue tracks.

  18. Identification of influential nodes in complex networks: Method from spreading probability viewpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Zhong-Kui; Ma, Chuang; Xiang, Bing-Bing; Zhang, Hai-Feng

    2017-02-01

    The problem of identifying influential nodes in complex networks has attracted much attention owing to its wide applications, including how to maximize the information diffusion, boost product promotion in a viral marketing campaign, prevent a large scale epidemic and so on. From spreading viewpoint, the probability of one node propagating its information to one other node is closely related to the shortest distance between them, the number of shortest paths and the transmission rate. However, it is difficult to obtain the values of transmission rates for different cases, to overcome such a difficulty, we use the reciprocal of average degree to approximate the transmission rate. Then a semi-local centrality index is proposed to incorporate the shortest distance, the number of shortest paths and the reciprocal of average degree simultaneously. By implementing simulations in real networks as well as synthetic networks, we verify that our proposed centrality can outperform well-known centralities, such as degree centrality, betweenness centrality, closeness centrality, k-shell centrality, and nonbacktracking centrality. In particular, our findings indicate that the performance of our method is the most significant when the transmission rate nears to the epidemic threshold, which is the most meaningful region for the identification of influential nodes.

  19. Methods for automated identification of informative behaviors in natural bioptic driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Gang; Peli, Eli

    2012-06-01

    Visually impaired people may legally drive if wearing bioptic telescopes in some developed countries. To address the controversial safety issue of the practice, we have developed a low-cost in-car recording system that can be installed in study participants' own vehicles to record their daily driving activities. We also developed a set of automated identification techniques of informative behaviors to facilitate efficient manual review of important segments submerged in the vast amount of uncontrolled data. Here, we present the methods and quantitative results of the detection performance for six types of driving maneuvers and behaviors that are important for bioptic driving: bioptic telescope use, turns, curves, intersections, weaving, and rapid stops. The testing data were collected from one normally sighted and two visually impaired subjects across multiple days. The detection rates ranged from 82% up to 100%, and the false discovery rates ranged from 0% to 13%. In addition, two human observers were able to interpret about 80% of targets viewed through the telescope. These results indicate that with appropriate data processing the low-cost system is able to provide reliable data for natural bioptic driving studies.

  20. A Modified Comprehensive Model for Piezoelectric Stack Actuators and Corresponding Parameter Identification Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haigen Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to accurately model the hysteresis and dynamic characteristics of piezoelectric stack actuators (PSAs, consider that a linear force and a hysteresis force will be generated by piezoelectric wafers under the voltage applied to a PSA, and the total force suffering from creep will result in the forced vibration of the two-degree-of-freedom mass-spring-damper system composed of the equivalent mass, stiffness, and damping of the piezoelectric wafers and the bonding layers. A modified comprehensive model for PSAs is put forward by using a linear function, an asymmetrical Bouc-Wen hysteresis operator, and a creep function to model the linear force, the hysteresis force, and the creep characteristics, respectively. In this way, the effect of the bonding layers on the hysteresis and dynamic characteristics of PSAs can be analyzed via the modified comprehensive model. The experimental results show that the modified comprehensive model for PSAs with the corresponding parameter identification method can accurately portray the hysteresis and dynamic characteristics of PSAs fabricated by different layering/stacking processes. Finally, the theoretical analyzing on utilizing the modified comprehensive model to linearize the hysteresis characteristics and design the dynamic characteristics of PSAs is given.

  1. Identification of irradiated spices by the use of thermoluminescence method (TL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharifzadeh, M.; Sohrabpour, M. (Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, Teheran (Iran, Islamic Republic of))

    In this paper the results of the investigation of identification of irradiated spices by the use of thermoluminescence method is reported. The materials used were black and red peppers, turmeric, cinnamon, and garlic powder. Gamma Cell 220 was used for irradiating samples at dose values of 2.5, 5, 7.5 and 10 kGy respectively. The TL intensity of the unirradiated spices as well as the fading characteristics of the irradiated samples having received a dose of 10 kGy have been measured. Post-irradiation temperature treatment of the irradiated (10 kGy) and unirradiated samples at 60[sup o]C and 100[sup o]C for 24 hours have also been performed. The results show that the TL intensities of unirradiated and irradiated samples from different batches of each spice are fairly distributed. A reasonable TL intensity versus dose has been observed in nearly all cases. Based on the observation made it is possible to distinguish irradiated spices after (4-9) months post-irradiation. (author).

  2. A computational method for the identification of new candidate carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Chu, Chen; Lu, Jing; Kong, Xiangyin; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2015-09-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of human death. Based on current knowledge, one of the causes of cancer is exposure to toxic chemical compounds, including radioactive compounds, dioxin, and arsenic. The identification of new carcinogenic chemicals may warn us of potential danger and help to identify new ways to prevent cancer. In this study, a computational method was proposed to identify potential carcinogenic chemicals, as well as non-carcinogenic chemicals. According to the current validated carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic chemicals from the CPDB (Carcinogenic Potency Database), the candidate chemicals were searched in a weighted chemical network constructed according to chemical-chemical interactions. Then, the obtained candidate chemicals were further selected by a randomization test and information on chemical interactions and structures. The analyses identified several candidate carcinogenic chemicals, while those candidates identified as non-carcinogenic were supported by a literature search. In addition, several candidate carcinogenic/non-carcinogenic chemicals exhibit structural dissimilarity with validated carcinogenic/non-carcinogenic chemicals.

  3. On the identification of quark and gluon jets using artificial neural network method

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Kun Shi

    2004-01-01

    The identification of quark and gluon jets produced in e^{+}e^{-} collisions using the artificial neural network method is addressed. The structure and the learning algorithm of the BP( back propagation) neural network model is studied. Three characteristic parameters-the average multiplicity and the average transverse momentum of jets and the average value of the angles opposite to the quark or gluon jets are taken as training parameters and are input to the BP network for repeated training. The learning process is ended when the output error of the neural network is less than a preset precision( sigma =0.005). The same training routine is repeated in each of the 8 energy bins ranging from 2.5-22.5 GeV, respectively. The finally updated weights and thresholds of the BP neural network are tested using the quark and gluon jet samples, getting from the nonsymmetric three-jet events produced by the Monte Carlo generator JETSET 7.4. Then the pattern recognition of the mixed sample getting from the combination of ...

  4. A Rapid and Simple LC-MS Method Using Collagen Marker Peptides for Identification of the Animal Source of Leather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumazawa, Yuki; Taga, Yuki; Iwai, Kenji; Koyama, Yoh-Ichi

    2016-08-03

    Identification of the animal source of leather is difficult using traditional methods, including microscopic observation and PCR. In the present study, a LC-MS method was developed for detecting interspecies differences in the amino acid sequence of type I collagen, which is a major component of leather, among six animals (cattle, horse, pig, sheep, goat, and deer). After a dechroming procedure and trypsin digestion, six tryptic peptides of type I collagen were monitored by LC-MS in multiple reaction monitoring mode for the animal source identification using the patterns of the presence or absence of the marker peptides. We analyzed commercial leathers from various production areas using this method, and found some leathers in which the commercial label disagreed with the identified animal source. Our method enabled rapid and simple leather certification and could be applied to other animals whether or not their collagen sequences are available in public databases.

  5. A Simple and Rapid Identification Method for Mycobacterium bovis BCG with Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Kouzaki

    Full Text Available Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG is widely used as a live attenuated vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is an agent for standard prophylaxis against the recurrence of bladder cancer. Unfortunately, it can cause severe infectious diseases, especially in immunocompromised patients, and the ability to immediately distinguish BCG from other M. tuberculosis complexes is therefore important. In this study, we developed a simple and easy-to-perform identification procedure using loop-mediated amplification (LAMP to detect deletions within the region of difference, which is deleted specifically in all M. bovis BCG strains. Reactions were performed at 64 °C for 30 min and successful targeted gene amplifications were detected by real-time turbidity using a turbidimeter and visual inspection of color change. The assay had an equivalent detection limit of 1.0 pg of genomic DNA using a turbidimeter whereas it was 10 pg with visual inspection, and it showed specificity against 49 strains of 44 pathogens, including M. tuberculosis complex. The expected LAMP products were confirmed through identical melting curves in real-time LAMP procedures. We employed the Procedure for Ultra Rapid Extraction (PURE kit to isolate mycobacterial DNA and found that the highest sensitivity limit with a minimum total cell count of mycobacterium (including DNA purification with PURE was up to 1 × 10(3 cells/reaction, based on color changes under natural light with FDA reagents. The detection limit of this procedure when applied to artificial serum, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples was also about 1 × 10(3 cells/reaction. Therefore, this substitute method using conventional culture or clinical specimens followed by LAMP combined with PURE could be a powerful tool to enable the rapid identification of M. bovis BCG as point-of-care testing. It is suitable for practical use not only in resource-limited situations, but also in any

  6. A novel method for the identification and characterization of magnetic sources in sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli, E.; Spassov, S.

    2003-04-01

    Two of the main tasks of environmental magnetism are the identification and the quantification of different magnetic phases in a sample, a procedure usually referred to as the unmixing of magnetic components. The multi-parameter approach is based on the measurement of different bulk magnetic properties, whereby characteristic values are assumed for each component. The analysis of magnetization curves does not need a knowledge of the magnetic properties of the individual components, nevertheless the identification of each component is based on arbitrary model functions, generally derived from logarithmic Gaussian distributions (Robertson and France, 1994). Egli (2003) developed a particular family of model functions, called skewed generalized Gauss functions (SGG) to fit the main properties of a magnetization curve. A novel method, which is based on the analysis of alternating field demagnetization curves of anhysteretic remanent magnetizations (ARM) and isothermal remanent magnetizations (IRM), has been developed to identify different magnetic components. The demagnetization curves are fitted using SGG functions, each of which represents a magnetic component and is described by 5 parameters: ARM/IRM, median destructive field MDF, dispersion parameter DP, DMDF and DDP. DMDF and DDP are the differences between the MDF and the DP of ARM and IRM. Many well-known rock magnetic diagrams (e.g. King plots, Fuller plots and the Lowrie-Fuller test) are related to these parameters. A wide variety of sediments and sedimetary rocks as well as some sources of magnetic particles have been analyzed using this technique, including sediments from rivers, lakes and oceans, recent soils, paleosols, loesses, red clays, limestones, atmospheric dust, urban pollution and magnetotactic bacteria. Distinct groups of magnetic particles with characteristic values of ARM/ IRM, MDF, DP, DMDF and DDP have been identified. Each group can be associated with a particular source of magnetic particles

  7. Simple Real-Time PCR and Amplicon Sequencing Method for Identification of Plasmodium Species in Human Whole Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefterova, Martina I; Budvytiene, Indre; Sandlund, Johanna; Färnert, Anna; Banaei, Niaz

    2015-07-01

    Malaria is the leading identifiable cause of fever in returning travelers. Accurate Plasmodium species identification has therapy implications for P. vivax and P. ovale, which have dormant liver stages requiring primaquine. Compared to microscopy, nucleic acid tests have improved specificity for species identification and higher sensitivity for mixed infections. Here, we describe a SYBR green-based real-time PCR assay for Plasmodium species identification from whole blood, which uses a panel of reactions to detect species-specific non-18S rRNA gene targets. A pan-Plasmodium 18S rRNA target is also amplified to allow species identification or confirmation by sequencing if necessary. An evaluation of assay accuracy, performed on 76 clinical samples (56 positives using thin smear microscopy as the reference method and 20 negatives), demonstrated clinical sensitivities of 95.2% for P. falciparum (20/21 positives detected) and 100% for the Plasmodium genus (52/52), P. vivax (20/20), P. ovale (9/9), and P. malariae (6/6). The sensitivity of the P. knowlesi-specific PCR was evaluated using spiked whole blood samples (100% [10/10 detected]). The specificities of the real-time PCR primers were 94.2% for P. vivax (49/52) and 100% for P. falciparum (51/51), P. ovale (62/62), P. malariae (69/69), and P. knowlesi (52/52). Thirty-three specimens were used to test species identification by sequencing the pan-Plasmodium 18S rRNA PCR product, with correct identification in all cases. The real-time PCR assay also identified two samples with mixed P. falciparum and P. ovale infection, which was confirmed by sequencing. The assay described here can be integrated into a malaria testing algorithm in low-prevalence areas, allowing definitive Plasmodium species identification shortly after malaria diagnosis by microscopy. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. A Direct Method of Hydraulic Conductivity Structure Identification for Subsurface Transport Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Jiao, J.

    2016-12-01

    Solute transport in aquifers is strongly influenced by the spatial distribution of subsurface hydraulic conductivity (K), while limited drilling in data-sparse environments typically results in lack of data characterizing both the K and the in-situ fluid flow boundary conditions (BC). To characterize such environments, we present an efficient direct inverse method to simultaneously identify aquifer K pattern, its values, and the flow field. The method ensures fluid flow continuity using local approximate solutions of the governing equation conditioned to limited hydraulic measurements, while physics of the flow is enforced making the inverse problem well-posed. A single system of equations is assembled and solved, from which parameters and BC can be simultaneously estimated. For problems with irregular and regular K distributions, inversion is demonstrated for different measurement types, quality, and quantity. When measurement error is increased, the estimated K pattern is largely insensitive to the error, although the inverted flow field suffers greater inaccuracy. Local conductivity and Darcy flux measurements are found to have similar information content, although subtle differences exist in the inverted flow fields when long-term contaminant release is simulated. Local conductivity measurements lead to better identification of conductivity pattern, values, and the hydraulic head field; Darcy flux measurements lead to more accurate estimation of the velocity field and thus improved transport predictions. Overall, the velocity fields estimated based on the hydraulic data can lead to reasonable predictions of contaminant migration and breakthrough under unknown aquifer BC. We further argue that the goal of pattern inversion is to recover a sufficient level of detail to make transport prediction approximately accurate. Depending on the desired accuracy, fine-scale heterogeneity can be recovered only at increased characterization cost. Future work will (1) evaluate

  9. Detection and Identification of Multiple Stationary Human Targets Via Bio-Radar Based on the Cross-Correlation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-wideband (UWB radar has been widely used for detecting human physiological signals (respiration, movement, etc. in the fields of rescue, security, and medicine owing to its high penetrability and range resolution. In these applications, especially in rescue after disaster (earthquake, collapse, mine accident, etc., the presence, number, and location of the trapped victims to be detected and rescued are the key issues of concern. Ample research has been done on the first issue, whereas the identification and localization of multi-targets remains a challenge. False positive and negative identification results are two common problems associated with the detection of multiple stationary human targets. This is mainly because the energy of the signal reflected from the target close to the receiving antenna is considerably stronger than those of the targets at further range, often leading to missing or false recognition if the identification method is based on the energy of the respiratory signal. Therefore, a novel method based on cross-correlation is proposed in this paper that is based on the relativity and periodicity of the signals, rather than on the energy. The validity of this method is confirmed through experiments using different scenarios; the results indicate a discernible improvement in the detection precision and identification of the multiple stationary targets.

  10. Cannabis cultivation in Quebec: between space-time hotspots and coldspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadillon-Farinacci, Véronique; Apparicio, Philippe; Morselli, Carlo

    2015-03-01

    Cannabis cultivation has become increasingly localized, whether soil-based or hydroponic growing methods are used. Characteristics of a given location, such as its climate and the equipment it requires may influence general accessibility or attract different types of offenders based on potential profits. The location of crops, especially hydroponic crops, suggests a certain proximity to the consumer market via semi-urban and urban environments, while making it possible to avoid detection. This article examines the cannabis market through its cultivation. The stability of temporal and spatial clusters of cannabis cultivation, hotspots, and coldspots between 2001 and 2009 in the province of Quebec, Canada, are addressed. Studying the geography of crime is not a new endeavor, but coldspots are rarely documented in drug market research. Using arrests and general population data, as well as Kulldorff's scan statistics, results show that the temporal distribution of cannabis cultivation is highly seasonal for soil-based methods. Hydroponic production shows adaptation to its soil-based counterpart. Stable patterns are found for both spatial distributions. Hotspots for soil-based cultivation are found near several urban centers and the Ontario border. For hydroponic cannabis cultivation, a new hotspot suggests the emergence of an American demand for Quebec-grown cannabis between 2007 and 2009. Curiously, the region surrounding Montreal, the largest urban center in Quebec, is a recurrent and stable coldspot for both methods of cultivation. For all periods, spatial clusters are stronger for soil-based methods than in the hydroponic context. Temporal differences and spatial similarities between soil-based cultivation and hydroponic cultivation are discussed. The role of the metropolis is also addressed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. EMQN Best Practice Guidelines for molecular and haematology methods for carrier identification and prenatal diagnosis of the haemoglobinopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traeger-Synodinos, Joanne; Harteveld, Cornelis L; Old, John M; Petrou, Mary; Galanello, Renzo; Giordano, Piero; Angastioniotis, Michael; De la Salle, Barbara; Henderson, Shirley; May, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Haemoglobinopathies constitute the commonest recessive monogenic disorders worldwide, and the treatment of affected individuals presents a substantial global disease burden. Carrier identification and prenatal diagnosis represent valuable procedures that identify couples at risk for having affected children, so that they can be offered options to have healthy offspring. Molecular diagnosis facilitates prenatal diagnosis and definitive diagnosis of carriers and patients (especially ‘atypical' cases who often have complex genotype interactions). However, the haemoglobin disorders are unique among all genetic diseases in that identification of carriers is preferable by haematological (biochemical) tests rather than DNA analysis. These Best Practice guidelines offer an overview of recommended strategies and methods for carrier identification and prenatal diagnosis of haemoglobinopathies, and emphasize the importance of appropriately applying and interpreting haematological tests in supporting the optimum application and evaluation of globin gene DNA analysis. PMID:25052315

  12. Screening method for Staphylococcus aureus identification in subclinical bovine mastitis from dairy farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natapol Pumipuntu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important contagious bacteria causing subclinical bovine mastitis. This bacterial infection is commonly identified by determine the pathogen in bovine milk samples through conventional technique including coagulase test. However, this test has several disadvantages as low sensitivity, risk of biohazard, cost expensive, and limited preparation especially in local area. Aim: Aim of this study was to compare and assess the screening method, Mannitol fermentation test (Mannitol salt agar [MSA], and deoxyribonuclease (DNase test, for S. aureus identification in milk samples. Materials and Methods: A total of 224 subclinical bovine mastitis milk samples were collected from four provinces of Thailand and determined S. aureus using conventional method and also subjected to the screening test, MSA and DNase test. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, and negative predictive value (NPV among both tests were analyzed and compared to the tube coagulase test (TCT, as reference method. Immunological test by latex agglutination and molecular assay by determined spa gene were also used to identify and differentiate S. aureus. Results: A total of 130 staphylococci were isolated by selective media, Gram-stain, and catalase test. The number of S. aureus which identified using TCT, MSA and DNase test were 32, 102, and 74 isolates, respectively. All TCT results were correlated to results of latex agglutination and spa gene which were 32 S. aureus. MSA showed 100% sensitivity, 28.57% specificity, 31.37% PPV, and 100% NPV, whereas DNase showed 53.13% sensitivity, 41.84% specificity, 22.97% PPV, and 73.21% NPV. DNase test showed higher specificity value than MSA but the test presented 26.79% false negative results whereas no false-negative result from MSA when comparing to TCT. Conclusion: MSA had a tendency to be a good preference for screening S. aureus because of its high sensitivity and

  13. The constitutive compatibility method for identification of material parameters based on full-field measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Moussawi, Ali

    2013-10-01

    We revisit here the concept of the constitutive relation error for the identification of elastic material parameters based on image correlation. An additional concept, so called constitutive compatibility of stress, is introduced defining a subspace of the classical space of statically admissible stresses. The key idea is to define stresses as compatible with the observed deformation field through the chosen class of constitutive equation. This makes possible the uncoupling of the identification of stress from the identification of the material parameters. As a result, the global cost of the identification is strongly reduced. This uncoupling also leads to parametrized solutions in cases where the solution is non-unique as demonstrated on 2D numerical examples. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Identification of Burkholderia spp. in the clinical microbiology laboratory: comparison of conventional and molecular methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. van Pelt (Cindy); C.M. Verduin (Cees); W.H.F. Goessens (Wil); M.C. Vos (Margreet); B. Tummler; C. Segonds; F. Reubsaet; A.F. van Belkum (Alex); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractCystic fibrosis (CF) predisposes patients to bacterial colonization and infection of the lower airways. Several species belonging to the genus Burkholderia are potential CF-related pathogens, but microbiological identification may be complicated. This

  15. Problems with rapid agglutination methods for identification of Staphylococcus aureus when Staphylococcus saprophyticus is being tested.

    OpenAIRE

    Gregson, D B; Low, D E; Skulnick, M; Simor, A E

    1988-01-01

    Six rapid agglutination tests for identification of Staphylococcus aureus were evaluated by using 62 strains of S. aureus, 63 strains of S. saprophyticus, and 67 strains of other coagulase-negative staphylococci. S. saprophyticus was responsible for 19 of 26 false-positive results and 20 uninterpretable reactions. Thus, urinary staphylococcal isolates that are positive by rapid agglutination tests may require other confirmatory tests for the identification of possible S. saprophyticus.

  16. Optimized genotyping method for identification of bacterial contaminants in pharmaceutical industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamatoski Borche

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbiological control is of crucial importance in the pharmaceutical industry regarding the possible bacterial contamination of the environment, water, raw materials and finished products. Molecular identification of bacterial contaminants based on DNA sequencing of the hypervariable 16SrRNA gene has been introduced recently. The aim of this study is to investigate the suitability of gene sequencing using our selection of PCR primers and conditions for rapid and accurate bacterial identification in pharmaceutical industry quality control.

  17. Generation of mutation hotspots in ageing bacterial colonies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sekowska, Agnieszka; Wendel, Sofie; Christian Fischer, Emil

    2016-01-01

    : most mutations were located in just a few hotspots in the genome, and over time, mutations increasingly were consistent with the involvement of 8-oxo-guanosine, formed exclusively on the transcribed strand. This work provides strong support for retromutagenesis as a general process creating adaptive...... mutations during ageing....

  18. Handwritten Character Classification using the Hotspot Feature Extraction Technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Surinta, Olarik; Schomaker, Lambertus; Wiering, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Feature extraction techniques can be important in character recognition, because they can enhance the efficacy of recognition in comparison to featureless or pixel-based approaches. This study aims to investigate the novel feature extraction technique called the hotspot technique in order to use it

  19. Are hotspots of evolutionary potential adequately protected in southern California?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandergast, A.G.; Bohonak, A.J.; Hathaway, S.A.; Boys, J.; Fisher, R.N.

    2008-01-01

    Reserves are often designed to protect rare habitats, or "typical" exemplars of ecoregions and geomorphic provinces. This approach focuses on current patterns of organismal and ecosystem-level biodiversity, but typically ignores the evolutionary processes that control the gain and loss of biodiversity at these and other levels (e.g., genetic, ecological). In order to include evolutionary processes in conservation planning efforts, their spatial components must first be identified and mapped. We describe a GIS-based approach for explicitly mapping patterns of genetic divergence and diversity for multiple species (a "multi-species genetic landscape"). Using this approach, we analyzed mitochondrial DNA datasets from 21 vertebrate and invertebrate species in southern California to identify areas with common phylogeographic breaks and high intrapopulation diversity. The result is an evolutionary framework for southern California within which patterns of genetic diversity can be analyzed in the context of historical processes, future evolutionary potential and current reserve design. Our multi-species genetic landscapes pinpoint six hotspots where interpopulation genetic divergence is consistently high, five evolutionary hotspots within which genetic connectivity is high, and three hotspots where intrapopulation genetic diversity is high. These 14 hotspots can be grouped into eight geographic areas, of which five largely are unprotected at this time. The multi-species genetic landscape approach may provide an avenue to readily incorporate measures of evolutionary process into GIS-based systematic conservation assessment and land-use planning.

  20. The problems with multi-species conservation: do hotspots, ideal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The investigation of six vertebrate taxa (viz freshwater fish, frogs, tortoises and terrapins, snakes, birds, and various mammal orders) at a national scale reveals that hotspots are not coincident within taxa. Centres of richness are concentrated in the north-eastern areas of the country, whereas endemism is concentrated in the ...

  1. Identifying biodiversity hotspots for threatened mammal species in Iran

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farashi, Azita; Shariati Najafabadi, Mitra; Hosseini, Mahshid

    2017-01-01

    Conservation biology has much more attention for biodiversity hot spots than before. In order to recognize the hotspots for Iranian terrestrial mammal species that are listed in any red list, nationally or globally, ten Species Distribution Models (SDMs) have been applied. The SDMs evaluation

  2. The making of a productivity hotspot in the coastal ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana K Wingfield

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Highly productive hotspots in the ocean often occur where complex physical forcing mechanisms lead to aggregation of primary and secondary producers. Understanding how hotspots persist, however, requires combining knowledge of the spatio-temporal linkages between geomorphology, physical forcing, and biological responses with the physiological requirements and movement of top predators. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we integrate remotely sensed oceanography, ship surveys, and satellite telemetry to show how local geomorphology interacts with physical forcing to create a region with locally enhanced upwelling and an adjacent upwelling shadow that promotes retentive circulation, enhanced year-round primary production, and prey aggregation. These conditions provide an area within the upwelling shadow where physiologically optimal water temperatures can be found adjacent to a region of enhanced prey availability, resulting in a foraging hotspot for loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta off the Baja California peninsula, Mexico. SIGNIFICANCE/CONCLUSIONS: We have identified the set of conditions that lead to a persistent top predator hotspot, which increases our understanding of how highly migratory species exploit productive regions of the ocean. These results will aid in the development of spatially and environmentally explicit management strategies for marine species of conservation concern.

  3. The Yellowstone hotspot, Greater Yellowstone ecosystem, and human geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Kenneth L.; Despain, D.G.; Morgan, Lisa A.; Good, John M.; Morgan Morzel, Lisa Ann

    2007-01-01

    Active geologic processes associated with the Yellowstone hotspot are fundamental in shaping the landscapes of the greater Yellowstone ecosystem (GYE), a high volcanic plateau flanked by a crescent of still higher mountainous terrain. The processes associated with the Yellowstone hotspot are volcanism, faulting, and uplift and are observed in the geology at the surface. We attribute the driving forces responsible for the northeastward progression of these processes to a thermal plume rising through the Earth’s mantle into the base of the southwest-moving North American plate. This progression began 16 million years ago (Ma) near the Nevada-Oregon border and arrived at Yellowstone about 2 Ma. Before arrival of the hotspot, an older landscape existed, particularly mountains created during the Laramide orogeny about 70–50 Ma and volcanic terrain formed by Absaroka andesitic volcanism mostly between 50–45 Ma. These landscapes were more muted than the present, hotspot-modified landscape because the Laramide-age mountains had worn down and an erosion surface of low relief had developed on the Absaroka volcanic terrain.

  4. Ideas from the global climate change hotspot research | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-05-09

    May 9, 2017 ... So what are the major findings from the research happening in the three climate change hotspot areas? In the semi-arid regions of Africa and Asia, the research confirms that vulnerability to climate stresses, and capacity to respond, is due to a mix of social, economic and political factors, closely coupled ...

  5. Identifying Spatio-Temporal Landslide Hotspots on North Island, New Zealand, by Analyzing Historical and Recent Aerial Photography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Hölbling

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Accurate mapping of landslides and the reliable identification of areas most affected by landslides are essential for advancing the understanding of landslide erosion processes. Remote sensing data provides a valuable source of information on the spatial distribution and location of landslides. In this paper we present an approach for identifying landslide-prone “hotspots” and their spatio-temporal variability by analyzing historical and recent aerial photography from five different dates, ranging from 1944 to 2011, for a study site near the town of Pahiatua, southeastern North Island, New Zealand. Landslide hotspots are identified from the distribution of semi-automatically detected landslides using object-based image analysis (OBIA, and compared to hotspots derived from manually mapped landslides. When comparing the overlapping areas of the semi-automatically and manually mapped landslides the accuracy values of the OBIA results range between 46% and 61% for the producer’s accuracy and between 44% and 77% for the user’s accuracy. When evaluating whether a manually digitized landslide polygon is only intersected to some extent by any semi-automatically mapped landslide, we observe that for the natural-color images the landslide detection rate is 83% for 2011 and 93% for 2005; for the panchromatic images the values are slightly lower (67% for 1997, 74% for 1979, and 72% for 1944. A comparison of the derived landslide hotspot maps shows that the distribution of the manually identified landslides and those mapped with OBIA is very similar for all periods; though the results also reveal that mapping landslide tails generally requires visual interpretation. Information on the spatio-temporal evolution of landslide hotspots can be useful for the development of location-specific, beneficial intervention measures and for assessing landscape dynamics.

  6. Separation and identification of various vulcanization agents and antioxidants in two types of rubber by chromatographic and spectrometric methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauveau, S; Hamon, M; Leleu, E

    1991-11-01

    The aim of this study was to separate and identify by chromatographic and spectrometric methods, the various allergenic vulcanization agents and antioxidants used in the manufacture of industrial rubber. Specimens of elastomers were manufactured specially for this study. The specificity of the gas chromatographic method developed allows separation of all the manufacturing additives in the selected rubber types after one injection only, even though they belong to extremely varied chemical categories. The GLC method was coupled with mass spectrometry, which permitted identification of the peaks obtained and the study of the fragmentation of the 4 reference products under various conditions. Separation by TLC was performed in parallel on the same extracts, allowing rapid identification of the products tested for, and showed new spots after vulcanization.

  7. The application of molecular methods in the identification of isolated strains of parainfluenza 3 virus of cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljović Lj.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bovine parainfluenza 3 virus (PI3 causes respiratory infections in cattle and sheep with great economic losses in livestock. The aim of this investigation was to determine the significance of molecular methods in the identification of isolated strains of PI3 virus. Twenty cattle nasal swabs were analyzed for the presence of PI3 using the standard virology method of virus isolation in MBDK cell line and virus neutralization test. The identification of isolated strains was confirmed by RT-PCR and method of direct sequencing with primers for PI3 fusion (F protein gene. PI3 virus was isolated and identified in four nasal swabs using the standard virology method and RT-PCR. The analysis of nucleotide sequences of isolated PI3 strains showed high similarity with sequences isolated from cattle in Asia. Our results showed that molecular methods are very useful in the diagnosis of PI3 infections as well as for the identification and characterization of PI3 strains in Serbia. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 31008 i br. 175073

  8. K-nearest neighbors based methods for identification of different gear crack levels under different motor speeds and loads: Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong

    2016-03-01

    Gears are the most commonly used components in mechanical transmission systems. Their failures may cause transmission system breakdown and result in economic loss. Identification of different gear crack levels is important to prevent any unexpected gear failure because gear cracks lead to gear tooth breakage. Signal processing based methods mainly require expertize to explain gear fault signatures which is usually not easy to be achieved by ordinary users. In order to automatically identify different gear crack levels, intelligent gear crack identification methods should be developed. The previous case studies experimentally proved that K-nearest neighbors based methods exhibit high prediction accuracies for identification of 3 different gear crack levels under different motor speeds and loads. In this short communication, to further enhance prediction accuracies of existing K-nearest neighbors based methods and extend identification of 3 different gear crack levels to identification of 5 different gear crack levels, redundant statistical features are constructed by using Daubechies 44 (db44) binary wavelet packet transform at different wavelet decomposition levels, prior to the use of a K-nearest neighbors method. The dimensionality of redundant statistical features is 620, which provides richer gear fault signatures. Since many of these statistical features are redundant and highly correlated with each other, dimensionality reduction of redundant statistical features is conducted to obtain new significant statistical features. At last, the K-nearest neighbors method is used to identify 5 different gear crack levels under different motor speeds and loads. A case study including 3 experiments is investigated to demonstrate that the developed method provides higher prediction accuracies than the existing K-nearest neighbors based methods for recognizing different gear crack levels under different motor speeds and loads. Based on the new significant statistical

  9. Identification of three common Loliginidae squid species in the South China Sea by analyzing hard tissues with geometric outline method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yue; Liu, Bilin; Li, Jianhua; Chen, Xinjun

    2017-10-01

    The hard tissues of squid can provide important information for species identification. In this study, we used statolith and beak to identify three squid species including Uroteuthis duvaucelii, Loliolus beka, and U. edulis in the South China Sea. Because of the highly overlapping habitat and similar body morphology of the three squid species, we explored four different ways to identify them, by using statolith, upper beak, lower beak and a combination of statolith and beak. An outline geometric morphometric method and stepwise discriminant analysis were used to evaluate the most suitable method for the identification. We found that the combination of statolith and beak had the highest cross validation rate that was 75.0%, 87.5% and 88.7% for U. duvaucelii, L. beka and U. edulis, respectively. Using two beaks had similar results and the lowest cross validation rate was 60.0%, 50.0%, and 73.7% for the upper beak, 46.9%, 58.5% and 75.3% for the lower beak of U. duvaucelii, L. beka and U. edulis, respectively. Analyzing with the statolith had moderate cross validation which was 72.2%, 80.0%, and 87.7% for U. duvaucelii, L. beka and U. edulis, respectively. From the results it is suggested when the entire body of a squid is available, a combination of statolith and beak should be used for the identification. When only one hard tissue is available, species identification can be subjected to large errors.

  10. Comparison of statistical methods for identification of Streptococcus thermophilus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Enterococcus faecium from randomly amplified polymorphic DNA patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschetti, G; Blaiotta, G; Villani, F; Coppola, S; Parente, E

    2001-05-01

    Thermophilic streptococci play an important role in the manufacture of many European cheeses, and a rapid and reliable method for their identification is needed. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR (RAPD-PCR) with two different primers coupled to hierarchical cluster analysis has proven to be a powerful tool for the classification and typing of Streptococcus thermophilus, Enterococcus faecium, and Enterococcus faecalis (G. Moschetti, G. Blaiotta, M. Aponte, P. Catzeddu, F. Villani, P. Deiana, and S. Coppola, J. Appl. Microbiol. 85:25-36, 1998). In order to develop a fast and inexpensive method for the identification of thermophilic streptococci, RAPD-PCR patterns were generated with a single primer (XD9), and the results were analyzed using artificial neural networks (Multilayer Perceptron, Radial Basis Function network, and Bayesian network) and multivariate statistical techniques (cluster analysis, linear discriminant analysis, and classification trees). Cluster analysis allowed the identification of S. thermophilus but not of enterococci. A Bayesian network proved to be more effective than a Multilayer Perceptron or a Radial Basis Function network for the identification of S. thermophilus, E. faecium, and E. faecalis using simplified RAPD-PCR patterns (obtained by summing the bands in selected areas of the patterns). The Bayesian network also significantly outperformed two multivariate statistical techniques (linear discriminant analysis and classification trees) and proved to be less sensitive to the size of the training set and more robust in the response to patterns belonging to unknown species.

  11. Phase identification of microfeatures using EPMA methods, especially high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love; Scott

    2001-02-01

    Methods of electron-probe microanalysis (EPMA), with some input from scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM/TEM), are applied for the identification of micro-scale constituents in a solid matrix. The subject of the study is a magnesium alloy composite, which contains silicon carbide-based fibres made by a liquid metal infiltration process. Backscattered electron imaging of the composite in the SEM showed that during composite manufacture, fibres were chemically attacked by the metal, many of the fibres exhibiting three distinct grey levels, indicative of different reaction zones, and others appearing uniformly black. EPMA measurements showed that each region contained approximately 12wt.% oxygen and that penetration of the fibre by magnesium was accompanied by a reduction in the concentration of silicon and carbon. From studying the position and shape of specific X-ray lines it was shown that magnesium penetration involved a chemical reaction with silicon oxycarbide, established in earlier EPMA studies as one of the fibre constituents. Also, in the outermost region, aluminium in the alloy reacted with free carbon in the fibre to form aluminium carbide and with magnesium to produce a Mg-Al intermetallic. The composition of black fibres was quite different from the grey ones, with negligible silicon and only a small amount of aluminium. Oxygen levels in black fibres were consistent with complete oxidation, indicating these fibres were subjected, locally, to severe oxidising conditions during composite manufacture. In the metal matrix itself, particles of a mixed magnesium/aluminium oxide, silicon carbide and magnesium silicide were observed, the latter two phases forming as silicon and carbon were ejected from fibres.

  12. Identification of imprinted genes using a novel screening method based on asynchronous DNA replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawame, H.; Hansen, R.S.; Gartler, S.M. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Genomic imprinting refers to the process of epigenetic change that occurs during germ cell development that results in either maternal- or paternal-specific gene expression. Identification of imprinted genes is of primary importance to the understanding of imprinting mechanisms and the role of specific imprinted genes in human disease. Recently, it has been established that chromosomal regions known to contain imprinted genes replicate asynchronously. We propose a novel screening method to identify imprinted genes based on replication asynchrony as a marker for imprinted domains. Dividing human cells were pulse-labeled with BrdU and separated into different fractions of S-phase by flow cytometry. A library of late-replicating inter-Alu sequences should be enriched in gene-associated sequences that replicate early on one chromosome and late on the other homologue. Clones were analyzed for replication timing by hybridization to inter-Alu replication profiles. Candidates for replication asynchrony exhibited broad or biphasic replication timing, and these were analyzed for chromosomal location by hybridizations to inter-Alu products from a hybrid mapping panel. Initial screening of 123 clones resulted in 3 asynchronously-replicating clones that localized to single chromosomes. Chromosome 17 and chromosome 19 candidates might be located in regions thought to be imprinted by synteny with mouse chromosomes. A chromosome 15 clone was further characterized because of its possible localization to the Prader-Willi/Angelman locus. This sequence was localized outside the region deleted in Prader-Willi patients, and was found to be expressed in human cell lines. Replication asynchrony for this sequence appears to be polymorphic because cells derived from some individuals indicated synchronous replication. This appears to be the first example of a polymorphism in replication asynchrony.

  13. Independent review of inappropriate identification, storage and treatment methods of polychlorinated biphenyl waste streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of the review was to evaluate incidents involving the inappropriate identification, storage, and treatment methods associated with polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) waste streams originating from the V-tank system at the Test Area North (TAN). The team was instructed to perform a comprehensive review of Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO`s) compliance programs related to these incidents to assess the adequacy and effectiveness of the management program in all respects including: adequacy of the waste management program in meeting all LMITCO requirements and regulations; adequacy of policies, plans, and procedures in addressing and implementing all federal and state requirements and regulations; and compliance status of LMITCO, LMITCO contract team members, and LMITCO contract/team member subcontractor personnel with established PCB management policies, plans, and procedures. The V-Tanks are part of an intermediate waste disposal system and are located at the Technical Support Facility (TSF) at TAN at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The IRT evaluated how a waste was characterized, managed, and information was documented; however, they did not take control of wastes or ensure followup was performed on all waste streams that may have been generated from the V-Tanks. The team has also subsequently learned that the Environmental Restoration (ER) program is revising the plans for the decontamination and decommissioning of the intermediate waste disposal system based on new information listed and PCB wastes. The team has not reviewed those in-process changes. The source of PCB in the V-Tank is suspected to be a spill of hydraulic fluid in 1968.

  14. Location and release time identification of pollution point source in river networks based on the Backward Probability Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghane, Alireza; Mazaheri, Mehdi; Mohammad Vali Samani, Jamal

    2016-09-15

    The pollution of rivers due to accidental spills is a major threat to environment and human health. To protect river systems from accidental spills, it is essential to introduce a reliable tool for identification process. Backward Probability Method (BPM) is one of the most recommended tools that is able to introduce information related to the prior location and the release time of the pollution. This method was originally developed and employed in groundwater pollution source identification problems. One of the objectives of this study is to apply this method in identifying the pollution source location and release time in surface waters, mainly in rivers. To accomplish this task, a numerical model is developed based on the adjoint analysis. Then the developed model is verified using analytical solution and some real data. The second objective of this study is to extend the method to pollution source identification in river networks. In this regard, a hypothetical test case is considered. In the later simulations, all of the suspected points are identified, using only one backward simulation. The results demonstrated that all suspected points, determined by the BPM could be a possible pollution source. The proposed approach is accurate and computationally efficient and does not need any simplification in river geometry and flow. Due to this simplicity, it is highly recommended for practical purposes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Assessment of landscape diversity and determination of landscape hotspots - a case of Slovenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perko, Drago; Ciglič, Rok; Hrvatin, Mauro

    2017-04-01

    Areas with high landscape diversity can be regarded as landscape hotspots, and vice versa areas with low landscape diversity can be marked as landscape coldspots. The main purpose of this paper is to use quantitative geoinformatical approach and identify parts of our test area (the country of Slovenia) that can be described as very diverse according to natural landscapes and natural elements. We used different digital raster data of natural elements and landscape classifications and defined landscape diversity and landscape hotspots. We defined diversity for each raster pixel by counting the number of different unique types of landscape elements and types of landscapes in its neighborhood. Namely, the method was used separately to define diversity according to natural elements (types of relief forms, rocks, and vegetation) and diversity according to existing geographical landscape classifications of Slovenia (types of landscapes). In both cases one-tenth of Slovenia's surface with the highest landscape diversity was defined as landscape hotspots. The same applies to the coldspots. Additionally we tested the same method of counting different types of landscapes in certain radius also for the area of Europe in order to find areas that are more diverse at continental level. By doing so we were able to find areas that have similar level of diversity as Slovenia according to different European landscape classifications. Areas with landscape diversity may have an advantage in economic development, especially in tourism. Such areas are also important for biodiversity, habitat, and species diversity. On the other hand, localities where various natural influences mix can also be areas where it is hard to transfer best practices from one place to another because of the varying responses of the landscapes to human intervention. Thus it is important to know where areas with high landscape diversity are.

  16. Phenotypic and Phylogenetic Identification of Coliform Bacteria Obtained Using 12 Coliform Methods Approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Ya; Hong, Pei-Ying; LeChevallier, Mark W; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2015-01-01

    The current definition of coliform bacteria is method dependent, and when different culture-based methods are used, discrepancies in results can occur and affect the accuracy of identification of true coliforms...

  17. Development of a rapid diagnostic method for identification of Staphylococcus aureus and antimicrobial resistance in positive blood culture bottles using a PCR-DNA-chromatography method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshiro, Takeya; Miyagi, Chihiro; Tamaki, Yoshikazu; Mizuno, Takuya; Ezaki, Takayuki

    2016-06-01

    Blood culturing and the rapid reporting of results are essential for infectious disease clinics to obtain bacterial information that can affect patient prognosis. When gram-positive coccoid cells are observed in blood culture bottles, it is important to determine whether the strain is Staphylococcus aureus and whether the strain has resistance genes, such as mecA and blaZ, for proper antibiotic selection. Previous work led to the development of a PCR method that is useful for rapid identification of bacterial species and antimicrobial susceptibility. However, that method has not yet been adopted in community hospitals due to the high cost and methodological complexity. We report here the development of a quick PCR and DNA-chromatography test, based on single-tag hybridization chromatography, that permits detection of S. aureus and the mecA and blaZ genes; results can be obtained within 1 h for positive blood culture bottles. We evaluated this method using 42 clinical isolates. Detection of S. aureus and the resistance genes by the PCR-DNA-chromatography method was compared with that obtained via the conventional identification method and actual antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Our method had a sensitivity of 97.0% and a specificity of 100% for the identification of the bacterial species. For the detection of the mecA gene of S. aureus, the sensitivity was 100% and the specificity was 95.2%. For the detection of the blaZ gene of S. aureus, the sensitivity was 100% and the specificity was 88.9%. The speed and simplicity of this PCR-DNA-chromatography method suggest that our method will facilitate rapid diagnoses. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A Decision Making Method for the Quality Identification of Wines Based on Fuzzy Soft Sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Wei Yang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Quality identification of wines is a crucial one for wine industry. The paper aims to give a decision making approach based on soft fuzzy sets for it. First, based on fuzzy soft sets, calculation steps are given to solve decision making problems. The grey relative coefficient between each alternative with the ideal alternative is calculated by grey relational analysis (GRA. Then, a relative relational degree is defined to determine ranking orders of all alternatives. Finally, an application of our proposed approach demonstrates its practicality and effectiveness in the quality identification of red wines.

  19. Differentiation and identification of fungi by ATR-FTIR method in a leather collection relating back to Seljuk period

    OpenAIRE

    Mohsen Mohammadi Achachluei; Hosseyn Ahmadi; Alireza Koochakzaei

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Biodegradation is one of the main degrading factors of leather artifacts. Determination of fungi and other microorganisms has vital importance for conservation of valuable objects made from organic materials. Usual classic techniques for identification of pathogens and fungi have some difficulties, but FTIR spectroscopy has been introduced as useful technique for characterization and determination of microorganisms. Materials and methods: In this study, historic leathers were re...

  20. Support vector machine for classification of meiotic recombination hotspots and coldspots in Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on codon composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Xiao

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meiotic double-strand breaks occur at relatively high frequencies in some genomic regions (hotspots and relatively low frequencies in others (coldspots. Hotspots and coldspots are receiving increasing attention in research into the mechanism of meiotic recombination. However, predicting hotspots and coldspots from DNA sequence information is still a challenging task. Results We present a novel method for classification of hot and cold ORFs located in hotspots and coldspots respectively in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using support vector machine (SVM, which relies on codon composition differences. This method has achieved a high classification accuracy of 85.0%. Since codon composition is a fusion of codon usage bias and amino acid composition signals, the ability of these two kinds of sequence attributes to discriminate hot ORFs from cold ORFs was also investigated separately. Our results indicate that neither codon usage bias nor amino acid composition taken separately performed as well as codon composition. Moreover, our SVM based method was applied to the full genome: We predicted the hot/cold ORFs from the yeast genome by using cutoffs of recombination rate. We found that the performance of our method for predicting cold ORFs is not as good as that for predicting hot ORFs. Besides, we also observed a considerable correlation between meiotic recombination rate and amino acid composition of certain residues, which probably reflects the structural and functional dissimilarity between the hot and cold groups. Conclusion We have introduced a SVM-based novel method to discriminate hot ORFs from cold ones. Applying codon composition as sequence attributes, we have achieved a high classification accuracy, which suggests that codon composition has strong potential to be used as sequence attributes in the prediction of hot and cold ORFs.

  1. A single-laboratory validated method for the generation of DNA barcodes for the identification of fish for regulatory compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handy, Sara M; Deeds, Jonathan R; Ivanova, Natalia V; Hebert, Paul D N; Hanner, Robert H; Ormos, Andrea; Weigt, Lee A; Moore, Michelle M; Yancy, Haile F

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is responsible for ensuring that the nation's food supply is safe and accurately labeled. This task is particularly challenging in the case of seafood where a large variety of species are marketed, most of this commodity is imported, and processed product is difficult to identify using traditional morphological methods. Reliable species identification is critical for both foodborne illness investigations and for prevention of deceptive practices, such as those where species are intentionally mislabeled to circumvent import restrictions or for resale as species of higher value. New methods that allow accurate and rapid species identifications are needed, but any new methods to be used for regulatory compliance must be both standardized and adequately validated. "DNA barcoding" is a process by which species discriminations are achieved through the use of short, standardized gene fragments. For animals, a fragment (655 base pairs starting near the 5' end) of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 mitochondrial gene has been shown to provide reliable species level discrimination in most cases. We provide here a protocol with single-laboratory validation for the generation of DNA barcodes suitable for the identification of seafood products, specifically fish, in a manner that is suitable for FDA regulatory use.

  2. An novel identification method of the environmental risk sources for surface water pollution accidents in chemical industrial parks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jianfeng; Song, Yonghui; Yuan, Peng; Xiao, Shuhu; Han, Lu

    2013-07-01

    The chemical industry is a major source of various pollution accidents. Improving the management level of risk sources for pollution accidents has become an urgent demand for most industrialized countries. In pollution accidents, the released chemicals harm the receptors to some extent depending on their sensitivity or susceptibility. Therefore, identifying the potential risk sources from such a large number of chemical enterprises has become pressingly urgent. Based on the simulation of the whole accident process, a novel and expandable identification method for risk sources causing water pollution accidents is presented. The newly developed approach, by analyzing and stimulating the whole process of a pollution accident between sources and receptors, can be applied to identify risk sources, especially on the nationwide scale. Three major types of losses, such as social, economic and ecological losses, were normalized, analyzed and used for overall consequence modeling. A specific case study area, located in a chemical industry park (CIP) along the Yangtze River in Jiangsu Province, China, was selected to test the potential of the identification method. The results showed that there were four risk sources for pollution accidents in this CIP. Aniline leakage in the HS Chemical Plant would lead to the most serious impact on the surrounding water environment. This potential accident would severely damage the ecosystem up to 3.8 km downstream of Yangtze River, and lead to pollution over a distance stretching to 73.7 km downstream. The proposed method is easily extended to the nationwide identification of potential risk sources.

  3. Application of radionuclides ratio method for identification of techno-genic soil contamination by natural radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarmoshenko, I.; Ekidin, A. [Institute of Industrial Ecology UB RAS (Russian Federation); Vasyanovich, M. [Ural Federal University named after the first President of Russia B.N. Yeltsin (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    Approach to identification of environmental surface contamination by TENORM is suggested. The investigation consists of analysis of ratio between activities of radionuclides from different natural radioactive series (method of radionuclides ratio). Approach includes investigation of correlations of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, {sup 238}U and {sup 40}K activity concentrations in the soil samples. Distortion of naturally formed radionuclide ratio is considered as an evidence of soil contamination and can be utilized for assessment of man-made contribution of radium, thorium and uranium. The soil contamination investigation using the approach based on radionuclide ratio analysis was performed at three sites: oil producing company, thorium storage facility and uranium processing facility. Activity concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, and {sup 40}K in soil samples were measured by gamma spectrometry in Marinelli geometry. The results of gamma-spectrometry analysis of these samples demonstrated: - excess of {sup 226}Ra in the soil samples taken at the oil-producing company site; - excess of {sup 232}Th in the soil samples taken near the monazite concentrate storage site; - excess of {sup 238}U in the soil samples taken around the uranium processing site. At oil-producing site technological processes of extraction and primary processing of oil lead to a shift of balance in the chains of natural radionuclides. Out of 49 samples gathered at oil producing company sites 8 were contaminated by {sup 226}Ra. Additional contamination doesn't exceed 92 Bq/kg. At monazite concentrate storage site {sup 232}Th soil contamination is associated with spillage of monazite with high content of the radionuclide. Contamination of soil by {sup 232}Th at the territory of monazite storage facility was determined for 6 samples out of 32 gathered. Uranium processing gives an additional contribution of {sup 238}U and {sup 235}U in natural soil samples. The data demonstrate

  4. Identification and classification of textile fibres using ATR-FT-IR spectroscopy with chemometric methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peets, Pilleriin; Leito, Ivo; Pelt, Jaan; Vahur, Signe

    2017-02-15

    The possibility of classification of single- and two-component textile materials using ATR-FT-IR spectra and chemometric methods, principal component analysis (PCA) and discriminant analysis, was assessed. Altogether 89 textile samples belonging to 26 different types (11 one- and 15 two-component textiles) were investigated. It was found that PCA classification using only two or three principal components (PCs) enables identifying different one- and two-component textiles, although with two important