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Sample records for hot-wire cvd preprint

  1. A new tubular hot-wire CVD for diamond coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motahari, Hamid; Bellah, Samad Moemen; Malekfar, Rasoul

    2017-06-01

    A new tubular hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) system using a tubular quartz vacuum chamber has been fabricated. The filaments in this system can heat the substrate and act as a gas activator and thermally activator for gas species at the same time. The nano- and microcrystalline diamond coatings on the surface of steel AISI 316 substrates have been grown. To assess the results, SEM and FESEM images and Raman spectroscopy investigations have been applied. The results reveal that micro- and nanocrystalline diamond structures have been formed in the coatings, but the disordered diamond and some non-diamond phases, such as graphitic carbons, are also present in the coating layers. The analytical measurements show the growth of diamond films with well-faceted crystals in (111) direction. However, intrinsic stress, secondary nucleation, and poor adhesion are the main issues of future research for this new designed HWCVD.

  2. Novel Gas Barrier SiOC Coating to PET Bottles through a Hot Wire CVD Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Nakaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to enhance the gas barrier enhancement of plastic containers such as poly(ethylene terephthalate bottles, a novel method was found using a hot wire CVD technique, where tantalum wire is heated and exposed to a gas flow of vinyl silane. The resultant SiOC thin film was confirmed to characteristically contain Si-Si bonds in its surface and demonstrate a remarkably and highly practical decrease of the permeation of various gas through poly(ethylene terephthalate bottles.

  3. EBSD analysis of tungsten-filament carburization during the hot-wire CVD of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oliphant, CJ

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Filament condition during hot-wire chemical vapor deposition conditions of multi-walled carbon nanotubes is a major concern for a stable deposition process. We report on the novel application of electron backscatter diffraction to characterize...

  4. The influence of precursor gas pressure on structure and properties of fluoropolymer coatings by hot wire CVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safonov Alexey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigated the deposition process of the fluoropolymer coatings by the method of Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition. The dependence of precursor gas pressure on deposition rate, structure and properties of the formed film was investigated. The study has shown that the increasing of precursor gas pressure leads to change of the film structure from porous to continuous with globules and further to solid that have different wettability. Depending on the mode of deposition was obtained the fluoropolymer coating with different structure: the wetting angle changed from 60 to 170°. A mechanism of the formation of fluoropolymer coating was discussed.

  5. The influence of precursor gas pressure on structure and properties of fluoropolymer coatings by hot wire CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safonov, Alexey; Sulyaeva, Veronica; Kubrak, Konstantin; Starinsky, Sergey; Timoshenko, Nikolay

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we investigated the deposition process of the fluoropolymer coatings by the method of Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition. The dependence of precursor gas pressure on deposition rate, structure and properties of the formed film was investigated. The study has shown that the increasing of precursor gas pressure leads to change of the film structure from porous to continuous with globules and further to solid that have different wettability. Depending on the mode of deposition was obtained the fluoropolymer coating with different structure: the wetting angle changed from 60 to 170°. A mechanism of the formation of fluoropolymer coating was discussed.

  6. Uniformity study of amorphous and microcrystalline silicon thin films deposited on 10cm x 10 cm glass substrate using hot wire CVD technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frigeri, P.A.; Nos, O.; Carreras, P.; Roldan, R.; Asensi, J.M.; Bertomeu, J. [Dept. de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona (Spain); Calvo, J.D. [Dept. de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de Chiriqui, Chiriqui (Panama)

    2010-04-15

    The scaling up of the Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HW-CVD) technique to large deposition area can be done using a catalytic net of equal spaced parallel filaments. The large area deposition limit is defined as the limit whenever a further increment of the catalytic net area does not affect the properties of the deposited film. This is the case when a dense catalytic net is spread on a surface considerably larger than that of the film substrate. To study this limit, a system able to hold a net of twelve wires covering a surface of about 20 cm x 20 cm was used to deposit amorphous (a-Si:H) and microcrystalline ({mu} c-Si:H) silicon over a substrate of 10 cm x 10 cm placed at a filament-substrate distance ranging from 1 to 2 cm. The uniformity of the film thickness d and optical constants, n (x, {lambda}) and {alpha} (x, {Dirac_h}{omega}), was studied via transmission measurements. The thin film uniformity as a function of the filament-substrate distance was studied. The experimental thickness profile was compared with the theoretical result obtained solving the diffusion equations. The optimization of the filament-substrate distance allowed obtaining films with inhomogeneities lower than {+-}2.5% and deposition rates higher than 1 nm/s and 4.5 nm/s for ({mu} c-Si:H) and (a-Si:H), respectively. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Hot-wire assisted ALD of tungsten films: In-situ study of the interplay between CVD, etching, and ALD modes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Mengdi; Aarnink, Antonius A.I.; Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; Wolters, Robertus A.M.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we investigated an approach of hot-wire assisted ALD (HWALD), utilizing a hot (up to 2000 8C) tungsten (W) wire. Tungsten films were deposited by this method using alternating pulses of WF6 gas and atomic hydrogen (at-H). The latter was generated by catalytic dissociation of molecular

  8. Hot Wire CVD for thin film triple junction cells and for ultrafast deposition of the SiN passivation layer on polycrystalline Si solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schropp, R.E.I.; Franken, R.H.; Goldbach, H.D.; Houweling, Z.S.; Li, H. B. T.; Rath, J.K.; Schuttauf, J.A.; Stolk, R.L.; Verlaan, V.; van der Werf, C.H.M.

    2008-01-01

    We present recent progress on hot-wire deposited thin film solar cells and applications of silicon nitride. The cell efficiency reached for μc-Si:H n–i–p solar cells on textured Ag/ZnO presently is 8.5%, in line with the state-of-the-art level for μc-Si:H n–i–p's for any method of deposition. Such

  9. Improvement of the efficiency of triple junction n–i–p solar cells with hot-wire CVD proto- and microcrystalline silicon absorber layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, R.L.; Li, H. B. T.; Franken, R.H.; Schuttauf, J.A.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2008-01-01

    Hot-wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD) was applied for the deposition of intrinsic protocrystalline (proto-Si:H) and microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) absorber layers in thin film solar cells. For a single junction μc-Si:H n–i–p cell on a Ag/ZnO textured back reflector (TBR) with a 2.0 μm

  10. Synthesis of γ-WO{sub 3} thin films by hot wire-CVD and investigation of its humidity sensing properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jadkar, Vijaya; Waykar, Ravindra; Jadhavar, Ashok [School of Energy Studies, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411 007 (India); Pawbake, Amit [School of Energy Studies, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411 007 (India); Physical and Material Chemistry Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411 008 (India); Date, Abhijit [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, RMIT University, Plenty Road, Bundoora, Melbourne VIC 3083 (Australia); Late, Dattatray [Physical and Material Chemistry Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411 008 (India); Pathan, Habib; Gosavi, Suresh; Jadkar, Sandesh [Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2017-05-15

    In this study, monoclinic tungsten oxide (γ-WO{sub 3}) have been grown in a single step using HW-CVD method by resistively heating W filaments in a constant O{sub 2} pressure. The formation of γ-WO{sub 3} was confirmed using low angle-XRD and Raman spectroscopy analysis. Low angle-XRD analysis revealed that as-deposited WO{sub 3} film are highly crystalline and the crystallites have preferred orientation along the (002) direction. HRTEM analysis and SAED pattern also show the highly crystalline nature of WO{sub 3} with d spacing of ∝ 0.38 nm, having an orientation along the (002) direction. Surface topography investigated by SEM analysis shows the formation of a uniform and homogeneous cauliflower like morphology throughout the substrate surface without flaws and cracks. A humidity sensing device incorporating WO{sub 3} is also fabricated, which shows a maximum humidity sensitivity factor of ∝ 3954% along with a response time of ∝14 s and a recovery time of ∝25 s. The obtained results demonstrate that it is possible to synthesize WO{sub 3} in a single step by HW-CVD method and to fabricate a humidity sensor by using it. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Hot wire chemical vapor deposition: recent progress, present state of the art and competitive opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schropp, R.E.I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072502584

    2009-01-01

    Hot Wire CVD (also called Catalytic CVD or initiated CVD) is an elegant low pressure deposition technique for the deposition of functional films, both inorganic and organic, based on the decomposition of precursor sources at a heated metallic surface. The conformal deposition of thin films on rigid

  12. Ultrafast deposition of silicon nitride and semiconductor silicon thin films by Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schropp, R.E.I.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Verlaan, V.; Rath, J.K.; Li, H. B. T.

    2009-01-01

    The technology of Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HWCVD) or Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition (Cat-CVD) has made great progress during the last couple of years. This review discusses examples of significant progress. Specifically, silicon nitride deposition by HWCVD (HW-SiNx) is highlighted,

  13. On the Humidity Sensitivity of Hot-Wire Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Søren Ejling; Busch, N. E.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of humidity changes on hot-wire measurements is discussed. Indications are that the humidity sensitivity parameters obtained by the authors in an earlier paper should be changed. This means, however, that the agreement between predicted and measured sensitivities ceases to exist...

  14. Hot-wire calibration in subsonic/transonic flow regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagabushana, K. A.; Ash, Robert L.

    1995-01-01

    A different approach for calibrating hot-wires, which simplifies the calibration procedure and reduces the tunnel run-time by an order of magnitude was sought. In general, it is accepted that the directly measurable quantities in any flow are velocity, density, and total temperature. Very few facilities have the capability of varying the total temperature over an adequate range. However, if the overheat temperature parameter, a(sub w), is used to calibrate the hot-wire then the directly measurable quantity, voltage, will be a function of the flow variables and the overheat parameter i.e., E = f(u,p,a(sub w), T(sub w)) where a(sub w) will contain the needed total temperature information. In this report, various methods of evaluating sensitivities with different dependent and independent variables to calibrate a 3-Wire hot-wire probe using a constant temperature anemometer (CTA) in subsonic/transonic flow regimes is presented. The advantage of using a(sub w) as the independent variable instead of total temperature, t(sub o), or overheat temperature parameter, tau, is that while running a calibration test it is not necessary to know the recovery factor, the coefficients in a wire resistance to temperature relationship for a given probe. It was deduced that the method employing the relationship E = f (u,p,a(sub w)) should result in the most accurate calibration of hot wire probes. Any other method would require additional measurements. Also this method will allow calibration and determination of accurate temperature fluctuation information even in atmospheric wind tunnels where there is no ability to obtain any temperature sensitivity information at present. This technique greatly simplifies the calibration process for hot-wires, provides the required calibration information needed in obtaining temperature fluctuations, and reduces both the tunnel run-time and the test matrix required to calibrate hotwires. Some of the results using the above techniques are presented

  15. On the possibility to grow zinc oxide-based transparent conducting oxide films by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrutis, Adulfas, E-mail: adulfas.abrutis@chf.vu.lt; Silimavicus, Laimis; Kubilius, Virgaudas; Murauskas, Tomas; Saltyte, Zita; Kuprenaite, Sabina; Plausinaitiene, Valentina [Faculty of Chemistry, Vilnius University, Naugarduko 24, LT-03225 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2014-03-15

    Hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HW-CVD) was applied to grow zinc oxide (ZnO)-based transparent conducting oxide (TCO) films. Indium (In)-doped ZnO films were deposited using a cold wall pulsed liquid injection CVD system with three nichrome wires installed at a distance of 2 cm from the substrate holder. The wires were heated by an AC current in the range of 0–10 A. Zn and In 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionates dissolved in 1,2-dimethoxyethane were used as precursors. The hot wires had a marked effect on the growth rates of ZnO, In-doped ZnO, and In{sub 2}O{sub 3} films; at a current of 6–10 A, growth rates were increased by a factor of ≈10–20 compared with those of traditional CVD at the same substrate temperature (400 °C). In-doped ZnO films with thickness of ≈150 nm deposited on sapphire-R grown at a wire current of 9 A exhibited a resistivity of ≈2 × 10{sup −3} Ωcm and transparency of >90% in the visible spectral range. These initial results reveal the potential of HW-CVD for the growth of TCOs.

  16. Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition Of Polycrystalline Silicon : From Gas Molecule To Solar Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veenendaal, P. A. T. T.

    2002-10-01

    Although the effort to investigate the use of renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar energy, has increased, their contribution to the total energy consumption remains insignificant. The conversion of solar energy into electricity through solar cells is one of the most promising techniques, but the use of these cells is limited by the high cost of electricity. The major contributions to these costs are the material and manufacturing costs. Over the past decades, the development of silicon based thin film solar cells has received much attention, because the fabrication costs are low. A promising material for use in thin film solar cells is polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si:H). A relatively new technique to deposit poly-Si:H is Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (Hot-Wire CVD), in which the reactant gases are catalytically decomposed at the surface of a hot filament, mainly tungsten and tantalum. The main advantages of Hot-Wire CVD over PE-CVD are absence of ion bombardment, high deposition rate, low equipment cost and high gas utilization. This thesis deals with the full spectrum of deposition, characterization and application of poly-Si:H thin films, i.e. from gas molecule to solar cell. Studies on the decomposition of silane on the filament showed that the process is catalytic of nature and that silane is decomposed into Si and 4H. The dominant gas phase reaction is the reaction of Si and H with silane, resulting in SiH3, Si2H6, Si3H6 and H2SiSiH2. The film growth precursors are Si, SiH3 and Si2H4. Also, XPS results on used tantalum and tungsten filaments are discussed. The position dependent measurements show larger silicon contents at the ends of the tungsten filament, as compared to the middle, due to a lower filament temperature. This effect is insignificant for a tantalum filament. Deposition time dependent measurements show an increase in silicon content of the tungsten filament with time, while the silicon content on the tantalum filament saturates

  17. Application of hot-wire technique at unconventional conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebiga, V. A.; Pak, A. Yu.; Zinoviev, V. N.; Mironov, D. S.

    2017-10-01

    The problems of using the hot-wire method for studying fluctuations in flows are considered when standard approaches and conventional modes cannot be used due to constraints caused either by the flow parameters or by the characteristics and conditions of the experiments. Examples of measurements under conditions of extremely low pressures and beyond the limits of the continuity of the medium in the CO2-laser are given; The use of data of hot-wire measurements for the determination of sources of disturbances in test sections of high-speed wind tunnels is shown; the design of a probe for measurement of concentration of components of the binary gas mixture is described, etc.

  18. Doped zinc oxide films grown by hot-wire chemical vapour deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrutis, A., E-mail: adulfas.abrutis@chf.vu.lt; Silimavicius, L.; Kubilius, V.; Murauskas, T.; Saltyte, Z.; Plausinaitiene, V.

    2015-02-02

    Hot-wire chemical vapour deposition (CVD) was applied to grow zinc oxide (ZnO)-based transparent conducting oxide films. Indium (In)-, gallium (Ga)-, and aluminium (Al)-doped ZnO films were deposited at 400 °C on sapphire-R, Si (100) and glass substrates using a cold wall pulsed liquid injection CVD system containing nichrome wires installed in front of the substrate holder. Zn, In, Al 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionates, and Ga 3,5-pentanedionate dissolved in 1,2-dimethoxyethane were used as precursors. Hall measurements were performed to evaluate the resistivity, carrier concentration, and carrier mobility in doped ZnO films grown on sapphire substrates at wire currents of 6 A and 9 A. The influence of the dopant type, doping level, substrate, and wire heating current on crystallinity and the electrical and optical properties of the films was investigated and discussed. The best electrical properties were obtained for Al- and Ga-doped films grown at 9 A wire current (resistivity ≈ 1 × 10{sup −3} Ωcm, carrier mobility ≈ 50 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} and carrier concentration ≈ 1 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3}). The films exhibited a high transmittance in the mid-infrared region (≈ 90% at 2.5 μm). Additional annealing of the films at 400 °C in a mixture of Ar and hydrogen (10%) resulted in the increase in carrier concentration and mobility and in the reduction of film resistivity. - Highlights: • Hot-wire CVD process was applied for the growth of In-, Ga-, and Al-doped ZnO films. • Electrical and optical properties of as-deposited and annealed films were investigated. • Significant influence of film orientation on electrical properties was observed. • Films exhibited high carrier mobility (50–60 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}) and low resistivity (≤ 10{sup −3} Ωcm). • Films had high transmittance (~ 90%) in the mid-IR spectral range (at 2.5 μm)

  19. Hot wire deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahan, A.H.; Iwaniczko, E.; Nelson, B.P.; Reedy, R.C. Jr.; Crandall, R.S. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-05-01

    This paper details the results of a study in which low H content, high deposition rate hot wire (HW) deposited amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) has been incorporated into a substrate solar cell. The authors find that the treatment of the top surface of the HW i layer while it is being cooled from its high deposition temperature is crucial to device performance. They present data concerning these surface treatments, and correlate these treatments with Schottky device performance. The authors also present first generation HW n-i-p solar cell efficiency data, where a glow discharge (GD) {mu}c-Si(p) layer was added to complete the partial devices. No light trapping layer was used to increase the device Jsc. Their preliminary investigations have yielded efficiencies of up to 6.8% for a cell with a 4000 {Angstrom} thick HW i-layer, which degrade less than 10% after a 900 hour light soak. The authors suggest avenues for further improvement of their devices.

  20. Hot wire and spark pyrolysis as simple new routes to silicon nanoparticle synthesis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scriba, MR

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available gases, silane and diborane or silane and phosphine were used. While hot wire pyrolysis always results in multifaceted particles, those produced by spark pyrolysis are spherical. Electrical resistance measurements of compressed powders showed that boron...

  1. Hot-wire accuracy in supersonic turbulence from comparisons with laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Pamela; Bershader, Daniel; Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    A hot-wire anemometer and a new, nonintrusive, laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique are used to survey a turbulent boundary layer in a supersonic channel flow at Mach no. 2.06. The purpose is to test the accuracy of using the hot wire to measure the fluctuation amplitudes of static temperature and density in a compressible turbulent flow by comparing the results with independent and direct LIF measurements. Several methods of hot-wire calibration and analysis are applied. With each method, the hot-wire response can be related primarily to fluctuations of mass flux and total temperature, from which fluctuations of static temperature and density are calculated. However, these calculations are shown to be valid only if the fluctuations in static pressure are negligible. The acquisition and the analysis of the hot-wire data are often simplified further by neglecting the effects of fluctuations in total temperature. Comparisons of the fluctuation amplitudes of temperature and density obtained by hot-wire and LIF measurements demonstrate that such assumptions might not always be warranted, even in apparently simple flows.

  2. Application of Hot-wire Method for Measuring Thermal Conductivity of Fine Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shangxi WANG

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic substrate is preferred in high density packaging due to its high electrical resistivity and moderate expansion coefficient. The thermal conductivity is a key parameter for packaging substrates. There are two common methods to measure the thermal conductivity, which are the hot-wire method and the laser-flash method. Usually, the thermal conductivities of porcelain is low and meet the measurement range of hot-wire method, and the measured value by hot-wire method has little difference with that by laser-flash method. In recent years, with the requirement of high-powered LED lighting, some kinds of ceramic substrates with good thermal conductivity have been developed and their thermal conductivity always measured by the means of laser flash method, which needs expensive instrument. In this paper, in order to detect the thermal conductivity of fine ceramic with convenience and low cost, the feasibility of replacing the laser flash method with hot wire method to measure thermal conductivity of ceramic composites was studied. The experiment results showed that the thermal conductivity value of fine ceramics measured by the hot-wire method is severely lower than that by the laser-flash method. However, there is a positive relationship between them. It is possible to measure the thermal conductivity of fine ceramic workpiece instantly by hot-wire method via a correction formula.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.4.12543

  3. Synthesis of wo3 nanogranular thin films by hot-wire CVD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houweling, Z.S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/251874486; Geus, J.W.; Schropp, R.E.I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072502584

    2010-01-01

    By resistively heating tungsten filaments in a constant air flow under a reduced pressure, nanogranular amorphous WO3 thin films are deposited on glassy carbon substrates. The substrate surface temperature is monitored by a thermocouple. For deposition times of 15 min and longer, the films show

  4. Thin Film Organic / Inorganic Multilayer Gas Barriers by Hot-Wire and Initiated CVD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spee, D.A.

    2013-01-01

    A very attractive property for many optoelectronic devices, such as solar cells and organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), is light weight and mechanical flexibility. This will open new technological opportunities, such as thin flexible lighting, lightweight conformable solar cells, and rollable

  5. Hot wire CVD deposition of nanocrystalline silicon solar cells on rough substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, H. B. T.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2009-01-01

    In silicon thin film solar cell technology, frequently rough or textured substrates are used to scatter the light and enhance its absorption. The important issue of the influence of substrate roughness on silicon nanocrystal growth has been investigated through a series of nc-Si:H single junction

  6. Modelling and operation of sub-miniature constant temperature hot-wire anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samie, M.; Watmuff, J. H.; Van Buren, T.; Hutchins, N.; Marusic, I.; Hultmark, M.; Smits, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    High-Reynolds number flows are very common in technological applications and in nature, and hot-wire anemometry is the preferred method for measuring the time-series of fluctuating velocity in such flows. However, measurement of very high-Reynolds number flows requires hot-wires with higher temporal and spatial resolution than is available with conventional probes. Much effort has therefore been devoted to decreasing the size of the hot-wire probes and this has led to associated challenges with operation. It is this latter operation problem which is the focus of this paper. To this end, an existing theoretical model of constant-temperature hot-wire anemometers (Perry 1982 Hot-Wire Anemometry (New York: Oxford University Press), Watmuff 1995 Exp. Therm. Fluid Sci. 11 117-34) is applied, and its accuracy is tested for the first time by comparison to measurements using an in-house constant temperature anemometer (CTA) for both conventional 5~μ m-diameter wires and sub-miniature hot-wires. With the aid of this model, we propose modifications to the CTA design and demonstrate successful operation of the CTA with the Princeton nano-scale thermal anemometry probe (NSTAP) (Bailey et al 2010 J. Fluid Mech. 663 160-79). It is also shown that the transfer function obtained from the model can be utilized to estimate the true frequency response and cut-off frequency of a hot-wire-CTA system to the velocity fluctuations, which is essential in accurate measurements of energy spectrum and higher order statistics of turbulent flows.

  7. Uncertainties in hot-wire measurements of compressible turbulent flows implied by comparisons with laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckenzie, R. L.; Logan, P.

    1986-01-01

    A hot-wire anemometer and a new nonintrusive laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique are used to survey a Mach 2 turbulent boundary layer. The hot-wire anemometer's ability to accurately measure mass flux, temperature, and density fluctuations in a compressible flow is examined by comparing its results with those obtained using LIF. Several methods of hot-wire calibration are used, and the uncertainties in their measurements of various fluctuating flow parameters are determined. The results show that although a hot-wire operated at high overheat can measure mass flux fluctuations, temperature and density fluctuations are not determined accurately from such measurements. However, a hot-wire operated at multiple overheats can be used to measure static and total temperature fluctuations. The presence of pressure fluctuations and their correlation with density can prevent the use of hot-wire data to determine density fluctuations.

  8. Basic ideas and concepts in hot wire anemometry: an experimental approach for introductory physics students

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Abed, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of hot wire anemometry is to measure the speed of an air stream. The classical method is based on the measure of the value of a temperature dependant resistor inserted in a Wheatstone bridge (Lomas 1986 Fundamentals of Hot Wire Anemometry (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press)). In this paper we exhibit the physics behind this method and show that by using a wire whose resistance does not vary on the field of temperature explored (from 20 °C to 200 °C), it is however possible to make accurate measurements. Finally, limitations of the method are discussed.

  9. Growth Process Conditions of Tungsten Oxide Thin Films Using Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houweling, Z.S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/251874486; Geus, J.W.; de Jong, M.; Harks, P.P.R.M.L.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Schropp, R.E.I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072502584

    2011-01-01

    We report the growth conditions of nanostructured tungsten oxide (WO3−x) thin films using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD). Two tungsten filaments were resistively heated to various temperatures and exposed to an air flow at various subatmospheric pressures. The oxygen partial pressure was

  10. Optoelectronic properties of hot-wire silicon layers deposited at 100 °C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinza, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304823325; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Rath, J.K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304830585; Schropp, R.E.I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072502584

    2008-01-01

    Hot-wire chemical vapor deposition is employed for the deposition of amorphous and microcrystalline silicon layers at substrate temperature kept below 100 °C with the aid of active cooling of the substrate holder. The hydrogen dilution is varied in order to investigate films at the

  11. Electrically active, doped monocrystalline silicon nanoparticles produced by hot wire thermal catalytic pyrolysis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scriba, MR

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Doped silicon nanoparticles have successfully been produced by hot wire thermal catalytic pyrolysis at 40 mbar and a filament temperature of 1800 °C, using a mixture of silane and diborane or phosphine. All particles are monocrystalline with shapes...

  12. Composition and crystallinity of silicon nanoparticles synthesised by hot wire thermal catalytic pyrolysis at different pressures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scriba, MR

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of pressure on the structure and composition of silicon nanoparticles synthesized by hot wire thermal catalytic pyrolysis (HW-TCP) of pure silane has been investigated. Light brown powders were produced at silane pressures of 10 and 50...

  13. A thermo-electro-mechanical simulation model for hot wire cutting of EPS foam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petkov, Kiril; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    A one-dimensional thermo-electro-mechanical mathematical model describing the effects taking place within a Ni-Cr20% wire used in a hot-wire cutting process for free forming and rapid prototyping of expanded polystyrene (EPS) is investigated and simulated. The model implements and solves three se...

  14. Rethinking the participatory web : A history of HotWired's 'new publishing paradigm,' 1994-1997

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevenson, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This article critically interrogates key assumptions in popular web discourse by revisiting an early example of web “participation.” Against the claim that Web 2.0 technologies ushered in a new paradigm of participatory media, I turn to the history of HotWired, Wired magazine’s ambitious web-only

  15. Experimental investigation of near-wall effects on hot-wire measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durst, F.; Zanoun, E.S. [Institute of Fluid Mechanics, Friedrich-Alexander-University, Erlangen-Nuernberg Cauerstr. 4, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    Hot-wire anemometry is a well-established measuring technique in modern fluid mechanics and is widely used to study laminar and turbulent flows. However, unsolved problems still exist when measurements are carried out close to heat-conducting or heat-insulating walls. Additional heat losses occur because of the presence of the wall that are usually not accounted for in the calibration of the wire. Because of this, erroneous fluid velocity measurements result with hot wires if the presence of the wall is not taken into account. The present paper investigates the effect that the wall material has on these additional heat losses from hot wires for walls of different heat conductivities. Similarity analysis of various aspects of the problem, verified by experimental and numerical results, is presented for wall materials of different heat conductivities, and the results are compared with available data in the literature. The data confirm the expected increase in heat losses with increasing wall heat conductivity. For heat-insulating materials the authors' results show that a wall-thickness influence exists. Additional data are provided to show that the heat loss from hot wires increases with increasing wire overheating, and the influence of the wire diameter is also clarified. (orig.)

  16. A Hot-Wire Method Based Thermal Conductivity Measurement Apparatus for Teaching Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, S.; Marin, E.; Juarez, A. G.; Calderon, A.; Ivanov, R.

    2012-01-01

    The implementation of an automated system based on the hot-wire technique is described for the measurement of the thermal conductivity of liquids using equipment easily available in modern physics laboratories at high schools and universities (basically a precision current source and a voltage meter, a data acquisition card, a personal computer…

  17. Tandem solar cells deposited using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, M.K. van

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis, the application of the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) technique for the deposition of silicon thin films is described. The HWCVD technique is based on the dissociation of silicon-containing gasses at the catalytic surface of a hot filament. Advantages of this technique

  18. Silicon nitride at high growth rate using hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, V.

    2008-01-01

    Amorphous silicon nitride (SiNx) is a widely studied alloy with many commercial applications. This thesis describes the application of SiNx deposited at high deposition rate using hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) for solar cells and thin film transistors (TFTs). The deposition process of

  19. Measurement of the Arithmetic Mean Velocity of a Pulsating Flow of High Velocity by the Hot-Wire Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    1946-04-01

    8217 . . those resulting from the heat $ ransfer chara?-- a" teristics .of the hot..wire ar,eedesired andltiakes it possible, in combination.trith the basid...Wires at Constant-Resistance Operation If constant resistance of the hot- wire, or zero rate of increase of heat energy -in the wire,- dH/dt = 0, is...assumed, the balance of energies supplied to, and dissipated by, the hot wire may be expressed by King’s equation (references 1 and 2). NACA TX

  20. Turbulence measurements in a swirling confined jet flowfield using a triple hot-wire probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjua, S. I.; Mclaughlin, D. K.

    1982-01-01

    An axisymmetric swirling confined jet flowfield, similar to that encountered in gas turbine combustors was investigated using a triple hot-wire probe. The raw data from the three sensors were digitized using ADC's and stored on a Tektronix 4051 computer. The data were further reduced on the computer to obtain time-series for the three instantaneous velocity components in the flowfield. The time-mean velocities and the turbulence quantities were deduced. Qualification experiments were performed and where possible results compared with independent measurements. The major qualification experiments involved measurements performed in a non-swirling flow compared with conventional X-wire measurements. In the swirling flowfield, advantages of the triple wire technique over the previously used multi-position single hot-wire method are noted. The measurements obtained provide a data base with which the predictions of turbulence models in a recirculating swirling flowfield can be evaluated.

  1. Study of Flow Deformation around Wind-Vane Mounted Three-Dimensional Hot-Wire Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rømer Rasmussen, K.; Larsen, Søren Ejling; Jørgensen, F. E.

    1981-01-01

    Open wind tunnel tests on several different sensor systems consisting of triaxial hot-wire probes mounted on wind vanes (DISA and Riso vanes) have shown that flow deformation around the hot-wire sensor introduces errors in the measured velocity components. Though changes in the horizontal...... components proved to be negligible, flow deformation resulted in an overestimation of the vertical component from 1.1 to 1.5, depending on the direction of the vertical component. Turbulence and mean value data were adjusted by use of a linear correction derived from the wind tunnel tests. Wind vane...... construction must strike a compromise between minor flow disturbance and sufficient probe support. The final version of the DISA vane resulted in an acceptable vertical correction of about 10%....

  2. High Reynolds Number Effects on Multi-Hole Probes and Hot Wire Anemometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, N.; Smith, A.; Gerry, G.; Kauffman, W.

    1995-01-01

    The paper reports on the results from an experimental investigation of the response of multi-hole and hot wire probes at high flow Reynolds numbers (Re approx. 10(exp 6)). The limited results available in literature for 5-hole probes are restricted to Re approx. 10(exp 4). The experiment aims to investigate the probe response (in terms of dimensionless pressure ratios, characterizing pitch, and yaw angles and the total and static pressures) at high Re values and to gauge their effect on the calculated velocity vector. Hot wire calibrations were also undertaken with a parametric variation of the flow pressure, velocity and temperature. Different correction and calibration schemes are sought to be tested against the acquired data set. The data is in the analysis stage at the present time. The test provided good benchmark quality data that can be used to test future calibration and testing methods.

  3. Investigation on Characterizing Heated Pulsating Flows with Hot Wire Anemometers - A Hands-On Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Alexandru PANAIT

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The pulsating heated flows are traditionally a difficult subject to treat with conventional hot wire or film methods. Special factors that complicate matters are flow reversal and non linear flow effects of vortices and wire probe wake disturbances on the heat transfer to the hot film or wire sensor in heated pulsating flows. The presence of these strongly nonlinear and unknown terms leads to great difficulties in calibration of hot film probes in this particular regime. The paper analyses the current state of matters in the field and reports a series of solutions that have been practically tested in a case of a high speed pulsated heated flow. Normally such measurements are made in a non-contact fashion using a LDV system or various visualization techniques but there have been recent attempts to use a constant temperature hot wire anemometer system (CTA.To obtain meaningful calibration for hot wire films in hot pulsating flows, a comparison system on other principles (LDV was used, as well as a specially designed nozzle to replace the calibrator unit that could not be operated with heated fluid due to structural integrity reasons. The method as described below works well for the expected speed range that could be generated using the special nozzle.

  4. Hot wire chemical vapor deposition chemistry in the gas phase and on the catalyst surface with organosilicon compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yujun

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD), also referred to as catalytic CVD (Cat-CVD), has been used to produce Si-containing thin films, nanomaterials, and functional polymer coatings that have found wide applications in microelectronic and photovoltaic devices, in automobiles, and in biotechnology. The success of HWCVD is largely due to its various advantages, including high deposition rate, low substrate temperatures, lack of plasma-induced damage, and large-area uniformity. Film growth in HWCVD is induced by reactive species generated from primary decomposition on the metal wire or from secondary reactions in the gas phase. In order to achieve a rational and efficient optimization of the process, it is essential to identify the reactive species and to understand the chemical kinetics that govern the production of these precursor species for film growth. In this Account, we report recent progress in unraveling the complex gas-phase reaction chemistry in the HWCVD growth of silicon carbide thin films using organosilicon compounds as single-source precursors. We have demonstrated that laser ionization mass spectrometry is a powerful diagnostic tool for studying the gas-phase reaction chemistry when combined with the methods of isotope labeling and chemical trapping. The four methyl-substituted silane molecules, belonging to open-chain alkylsilanes, dissociatively adsorb on W and Ta filaments to produce methyl radical and H2 molecule. Under the typical deposition pressures, with increasing number of methyl substitution, the dominant chemistry occurring in the gas phase switches from silylene/silene reactions to free-radical short chain reactions. This change in dominant reaction intermediates from silylene/silene to methyl radicals explains the observation from thin film deposition that silicon carbide films become more C-rich with a decreasing number of Si-H bonds in the four precursor molecules. In the case of cyclic monosilacyclobutanes, we have

  5. A strategy to eliminate all nonlinear effects in constant-voltage hot-wire anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berson, Arganthaël; Blanc-Benon, Philippe; Comte-Bellot, Geneviève

    2009-04-01

    A constant-voltage anemometer is subject to nonlinear effects when the operating hot wire is exposed to large velocity fluctuations in the incident flow. This results in the generation of undesirable higher harmonics, just as in the two classic systems, constant-current and constant-temperature anemometers, for which no attempts are normally made to correct the nonlinearities. The present investigation shows that these undesirable higher harmonics can be suppressed in the case of a constant-voltage anemometer. A new approach to process experimental data is proposed. It is based on three explicit equations established and solved with all terms included, i.e., without linearization. These are (1) the first-order differential equation that describes the electronic circuit of a constant-voltage anemometer—this equation permits to deduce the instantaneous resistance of the hot wire from the output voltage of the anemometer; (2) the first-order differential equation that expresses the thermal lag behavior of the hot wire when used in a constant-voltage mode—this equation permits to restore the instantaneous resistance that an ideal wire would have without thermal inertia in the same flow conditions; and (3) the algebraic relation that expresses the heat-transfer law of an ideal wire, according to King's law, a look-up table, or a polynomial fit—this relation permits to deduce the instantaneous flow velocity from the instantaneous resistance of the ideal wire. The proposed method is easily implemented on a personal computer and permits odd turbulence moments, such as skewness factors, to be obtained satisfactorily.

  6. Hot-Wire Calibration at Low Velocities: Revisiting the Vortex Shedding Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab S. Sattarzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The necessity to calibrate hot-wire probes against a known velocity causes problems at low velocities, due to the inherent inaccuracy of pressure transducers at low differential pressures. The vortex shedding calibration method is in this respect a recommended technique to obtain calibration data at low velocities, due to its simplicity and accuracy. However, it has mainly been applied in a low and narrow Reynolds number range known as the laminar vortex shedding regime. Here, on the other hand, we propose to utilize the irregular vortex shedding regime and show where the probe needs to be placed with respect to the cylinder in order to obtain unambiguous calibration data.

  7. Creation of subsonic macro-and microjets facilities and automated measuring system (AMS-2) for the spatial - temporal hot - wire anemometric visualization of jet flow field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, A. M.; Grek, G. R.; Gilev, V. M.; Zverkov, I. D.

    2017-10-01

    Macro-and microjets facilities for generation of the round and plane subsonic jets are designed and fabricated. Automated measuring system (AMS - 2) for the spatial - temporal hot - wire anemometric visualization of jet flow field is designed and fabricated. Coordinate device and unit of the measurement, collecting, storage and processing of hot - wire anemometric information were integrated in the AMS. Coordinate device is intended for precision movement of the hot - wire probe in jet flow field according to the computer program. At the same time accuracy of the hot - wire probe movement is 5 microns on all three coordinates (x, y, z). Unit of measurement, collecting, storage and processing of hot - wire anemometric information is intended for the hot - wire anemometric measurement of the jet flow field parameters (registration of the mean - U and fluctuation - u' characteristics of jet flow velocity), their accumulation and preservation in the computer memory, and also carries out their processing according to certain programms.

  8. Further elucidation of nanofluid thermal conductivity measurement using a transient hot-wire method apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Donghoon; Lee, Joohyun; Lee, Byeongchan; Kwon, Suyong; Koo, Junemo

    2017-08-01

    The Transient Hot-Wire Method (THWM) was developed to measure the absolute thermal conductivity of gases, liquids, melts, and solids with low uncertainty. The majority of nanofluid researchers used THWM to measure the thermal conductivity of test fluids. Several reasons have been suggested for the discrepancies in these types of measurements, including nanofluid generation, nanofluid stability, and measurement challenges. The details of the transient hot-wire method such as the test cell size, the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) and the sampling number are further investigated to improve the accuracy and consistency of the measurements of different researchers. It was observed that smaller test apparatuses were better because they can delay the onset of natural convection. TCR values of a coated platinum wire were measured and statistically analyzed to reduce the uncertainty in thermal conductivity measurements. For validation, ethylene glycol (EG) and water thermal conductivity were measured and analyzed in the temperature range between 280 and 310 K. Furthermore, a detailed statistical analysis was conducted for such measurements, and the results confirmed the minimum number of samples required to achieve the desired resolution and precision of the measurements. It is further proposed that researchers fully report the information related to their measurements to validate the measurements and to avoid future inconsistent nanofluid data.

  9. Further elucidation of nanofluid thermal conductivity measurement using a transient hot-wire method apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Donghoon; Lee, Joohyun; Lee, Byeongchan; Kwon, Suyong; Koo, Junemo

    2018-02-01

    The Transient Hot-Wire Method (THWM) was developed to measure the absolute thermal conductivity of gases, liquids, melts, and solids with low uncertainty. The majority of nanofluid researchers used THWM to measure the thermal conductivity of test fluids. Several reasons have been suggested for the discrepancies in these types of measurements, including nanofluid generation, nanofluid stability, and measurement challenges. The details of the transient hot-wire method such as the test cell size, the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) and the sampling number are further investigated to improve the accuracy and consistency of the measurements of different researchers. It was observed that smaller test apparatuses were better because they can delay the onset of natural convection. TCR values of a coated platinum wire were measured and statistically analyzed to reduce the uncertainty in thermal conductivity measurements. For validation, ethylene glycol (EG) and water thermal conductivity were measured and analyzed in the temperature range between 280 and 310 K. Furthermore, a detailed statistical analysis was conducted for such measurements, and the results confirmed the minimum number of samples required to achieve the desired resolution and precision of the measurements. It is further proposed that researchers fully report the information related to their measurements to validate the measurements and to avoid future inconsistent nanofluid data.

  10. Hot-Film and Hot-Wire Anemometry for a Boundary Layer Active Flow Control Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenahan, Keven C.; Schatzman, David M.; Wilson, Jacob Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Unsteady active flow control (AFC) has been used experimentally for many years to minimize bluff-body drag. This technology could significantly improve performance of rotorcraft by cleaning up flow separation. It is important, then, that new actuator technologies be studied for application to future vehicles. A boundary layer wind tunnel was constructed with a 1ft-x-3ft test section and unsteady measurement instrumentation to study how AFC manipulates the boundary layer to overcome adverse pressure gradients and flow separation. This unsteady flow control research requires unsteady measurement methods. In order to measure the boundary layer characteristics, both hot-wire and hot-film Constant Temperature Anemometry is used. A hot-wire probe is mounted in the flow to measure velocity while a hot-film array lays on the test surface to measure skin friction. Hot-film sensors are connected to an anemometer, a Wheatstone bridge circuit with an output that corresponds to the dynamic flow response. From this output, the time varying flow field, turbulence, and flow reversal can be characterized. Tuning the anemometers requires a fan test on the hot-film sensors to adjust each output. This is a delicate process as several variables drastically affect the data, including control resistance, signal input, trim, and gain settings.

  11. Determination of the heat transfer for a hot-wire with the use of the Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebiga, V. A.; Zinoviev, V. N.; Pak, A. Yu.; Zharov, I. R.

    2017-10-01

    The modeling of the Couette flow in a circular gap between coaxial cylinders is considered, including rarefied gas conditions at large Knudsen numbers. When developing the experimental facility for this purpose, the geometric sizes were determined taking into account minimum deviation of the velocity profile in the gap from the linear one in the case of laminar flow regime, and also to prevent the formation of Taylor-Görtler vortices with the chosen flow parameters. A series of tests was performed using the hot-wire at atmospheric pressure. It was cofirmed the operability of the facility itself and satisfactory matching of the hot-wire calibration data using the proposed method in the Couette flow and standard data obtained in the DISA calibration wind tunnel. Preliminary data for influence the Knudsen number on the heat transfer between the hot-wire probe and flow.

  12. Hot wire anemometer measurements in the unheated air flow tests of the SRB nozzle-to-case joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, N.

    1988-01-01

    Hot-Wire Anemometer measurements made in the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) nozzle-to-case joint are discussed. The study was undertaken to glean additional information on the circumferential flow induced in the SRB nozzle joint and the effect of this flow on the insulation bonding flaws. The tests were conducted on a full-scale, 2-D representation of a 65-in long segment of the SRB nozzle joint, with unheated air as the working fluid. Both the flight Mach number and Reynolds number were matched simultaneously and different pressure gradients imposed along the joint face were investigated. Hot-wire anemometers were used to obtain velocity data for different joint gaps and debond configurations. The procedure adopted for hot-wire calibration and use is outlined and the results from the tests summarized.

  13. Applying hot-wire anemometry to directly measure the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Shakhshir, Saher; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Berning, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    In order to better understand and more accurately measure the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell, our group has recently proposed to apply hot wire anemometry in the fuel cell's anode outlet. It was theoretically shown that the electrical signal obtained from the hot wire sensor...... can be directly converted into the fuel cell water balance. In this work an ex-situ experimental investigation is performed to examine the effect of the wire diameter and the outlet pipe diameter on the voltage signal. For a laboratory fuel cell where the mass flow rate the anode outlet is small......, it is found important to use a small output pipe diameter to obtain a sufficiently strong convection effect and hence clear voltage readings. Depending on the hot wire diameter and the inner pipe diameter, the resulting values for the exponent of the Reynolds number Re in the determination of the Nusselt...

  14. Thermally Induced Nano-Structural and Optical Changes of nc-Si:H Deposited by Hot-Wire CVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muller TFG

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on the thermally induced changes of the nano-structural and optical properties of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon in the temperature range 200–700 °C. The as-deposited sample has a high crystalline volume fraction of 53% with an average crystallite size of ~3.9 nm, where 66% of the total hydrogen is bonded as ≡Si–H monohydrides on the nano-crystallite surface. A growth in the native crystallite size and crystalline volume fraction occurs at annealing temperatures ≥400 °C, where hydrogen is initially removed from the crystallite grain boundaries followed by its removal from the amorphous network. The nucleation of smaller nano-crystallites at higher temperatures accounts for the enhanced porous structure and the increase in the optical band gap and average gap.

  15. Thermally induced nano-structural and optical changes of nc-Si:H deposited by hot-wire CVD

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Arendse, CJ

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available temperature in the tube furnace, while maintaining the N2 flow rate. Thereafter the required analytical techniques were performed. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectra were collected in transmission geometry from 400 – 4000 cm-1 with a... 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 15 [26] D. Stryahilev, F. Diehl, B. Schroeder, J. Non-Cryst. Solids 266–269, 166 (2000) [27] M. H. Brodsky, M. Cardona, and J. J. Cuomo, Phys. Rev. B 16. 3556 (1977) [28] H. Shanks, C. J. Fang, L. Ley...

  16. Formation of isolated carbon nanofibers with hot-wire CVD using nanosphere lithography as catalyst patterning technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houweling, Z.S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/251874486; Verlaan, V.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831727; ten Grotenhuis, G.T.; Schropp, R.E.I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072502584

    2008-01-01

    Recently the site-density control of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has attracted much attention as this has become critical for its many applications. To obtain an ordered array of catalyst nanoparticles with good monodispersity nanosphere lithography (NSL) is used. These nanoparticles are tested as

  17. Heat transfer monitoring by means of the hot wire technique and finite element analysis software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Wong, J; Suarez, V; Guarachi, J; Calderón, A; Rojas-Trigos, J B; Juárez, A G; Marín, E

    2014-01-01

    It is reported the study of the radial heat transfer in a homogeneous and isotropic substance with a heat linear source in its axial axis. For this purpose, the hot wire characterization technique has been used, in order to obtain the temperature distribution as a function of radial distance from the axial axis and time exposure. Also, the solution of the transient heat transport equation for this problem was obtained under appropriate boundary conditions, by means of finite element technique. A comparison between experimental, conventional theoretical model and numerical simulated results is done to demonstrate the utility of the finite element analysis simulation methodology in the investigation of the thermal response of substances. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Landing Gear Components Noise Study - PIV and Hot-Wire Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Burley, Casey L.; Stead, Daniel J.; Becker, Lawrence E.; Price, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    PIV and hot-wire measurements of the wake flow from rods and bars are presented. The test models include rods of different diameters and cross sections and a rod juxtaposed to a plate. The latter is representative of the latch door that is attached to an aircraft landing gear when the gear is deployed, while the single and multiple rod configurations tested are representative of some of the various struts and cables configuration present on an aircraft landing gear. The test set up is described and the flow measurements are presented. The effect of model surface treatment and freestream turbulence on the spanwise coherence of the vortex shedding is studied for several rod and bar configurations.

  19. A Thermal Analysis of a Hot-Wire Probe for Icing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struk, Peter M.; Rigby, David L.; Venkataraman, Krishna

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a steady-state thermal model of a hot-wire instrument applicable to atmospheric measurement of water content in clouds. In this application, the power required to maintain the wire at a given temperature is used to deduce the water content of the cloud. The model considers electrical resistive heating, axial conduction, convection to the flow, radiation to the surroundings, as well as energy loss due to the heating, melting, and evaporation of impinging liquid and or ice. All of these parameters can be varied axially along the wire. The model further introduces a parameter called the evaporation potential which locally gauges the maximum fraction of incoming water that evaporates. The primary outputs of the model are the steady-state power required to maintain a spatially-average constant temperature as well as the variation of that temperature and other parameters along the wire. The model is used to understand the sensitivity of the hot-wire performance to various flow and boundary conditions including a detailed comparison of dry air and wet (i.e. cloud-on) conditions. The steady-state power values are compared to experimental results from a Science Engineering Associates (SEA) Multi-Element probe, a commonly used water-content measurement instrument. The model results show good agreement with experiment for both dry and cloud-on conditions with liquid water content. For ice, the experimental measurements under read the actual water content due to incomplete evaporation and splashing. Model results, which account for incomplete evaporation, are still higher than experimental results where the discrepancy is attributed to splashing mass-loss which is not accounted in the model.

  20. Extension of the lifetime of tantalum filaments in the hot-wire (Cat) 3 Chemical Vapor Deposition process

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Knoesen, D

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the prime components of a hot-wire (Cat) Chemical Vapor Deposition system is the filament used to pyro-catalytically crack the gases like silane. Burnt out tantalum filaments were studied to determine the possible improvement of lifetime...

  1. Effect of wall-mounted cylinders on a turbulent boundary layer: hot wire measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Dueñas, Cecilia; Ryan, Mitchell; Longmire, Ellen

    2010-11-01

    Wall-mounted cylinders with height-to-diameter ratio H/D = 2 and large enough to protrude into the logarithmic region, H^+= 200, are used to alter a turbulent boundary layer with Reτ=1150 in an attempt to affect the organization of the coherent vortical structures. Hot-wire measurements, including velocity profiles and frequency spectra, were acquired downstream of a single cylinder and spanwise arrays of cylinders. The single cylinder yielded a momentum deficit that extended from z^+=20 to 200, and a redistribution of the streamwise rms velocity towards the half cylinder height with a corresponding increase in the power spectral density over a broad frequency range. Cylinder arrays with 3D spanwise spacing yielded significant wake interactions. The largest mean streamwise velocity deficits and rms values occurred in the log region at mid-span between cylinders. More detail on the effect of cylinder spacing will be provided in the talk. The results suggest that turbulence within the boundary layer leads to broader spanwise interactions than those occurring in wakes of cylinder arrays in uniform cross flow.

  2. Low temperature deposition of crystalline silicon on glass by hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yung-Bin; Park, Hyung-Ki; Lee, Dong-Kwon; Jo, Wook; Song, Jean-Ho; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Hwang, Nong-Moon

    2011-07-01

    Although the deposition of crystalline silicon on a glass substrate has been pursued using hot wire chemical vapor deposition or plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition for applications in flat panel displays and solar cells, the process has been only partly successful because of the inevitable formation of an amorphous incubation layer on a glass substrate. Currently, the crystalline silicon films are prepared by depositing an amorphous silicon film on a glass substrate and then crystallizing it by excimer laser annealing (ELA), metal induced crystallization or rapid thermal annealing (RTA). Here we report a new process, which can remove the amorphous incubation layer and thereby deposit crystalline silicon directly on glass using HCl. The intrinsic crystalline silicon film has a conductivity of 3.7×10 -5 Scm -1 and the n-type doped crystalline silicon film has the Hall mobility of 15.8 cm 2V -1 s -1, whose values are comparable to those prepared by ELA and RTA, respectively.

  3. USING HOT WIRE TECHNIQUE FOR MEASURING THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF INFUSIONS OF ORGANIC AND CONVENTIONAL COFFEE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Gordillo-Delgado

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The technique of hot wire, a versatile method of low cost and high accuracy for measuring the thermal conductivity of fluids through the increasing temperature of a wire that is immersed into the liquid and between its ends a potential difference is abruptly applied. Using well-known conductivity liquids: water, ethylene glycol and glycerine, the system was tested and calibrated. In this work, this procedure was used to measure the thermal conductivity of the infusion samples of organic and conventional coffee. The same roast degree of the beans was verified with a colorimeter and the preparation was made by pressing 22g of coffee powder in 110mL of water. The obtained data were subjected to Analysis of Variance (ANOVA and this confirmed that the differences in the thermophysical parameter in the two samples are significant with a confidence level of 95\\%. On this way, it was proved that the thermal conductivity value of the coffee infusion allows differentiate between organic and conventional coffee.

  4. Laser Hot Wire Process: A Novel Process for Near-Net Shape Fabrication for High-Throughput Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottman, Michael; Zhang, Shenjia; McGuffin-Cawley, James; Denney, Paul; Narayanan, Badri K.

    2015-03-01

    The laser hot wire process has gained considerable interest for additive manufacturing applications, leveraging its high deposition rate, low dilution, thermal stability, and general metallurgical control including the ability to introduce and preserve desired meta-stable phases. Recent advancements in closed-loop process control and laser technology have increased productivity, process stability, and control of deposit metallurgy. The laser hot wire process has shown success in several applications: repairing and rejuvenating casting dies, depositing a variety of alloys including abrasion wear-resistant overlays with solid and tubular wires, and producing low-dilution (<5%) nickel alloy overlays for corrosion applications. The feasibility of fabricating titanium buildups is being assessed for aerospace applications.

  5. Employing Hot Wire Anemometry to Directly Measure the Water Balance of a Commercial Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Stack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shakhshir, Saher Al; Berning, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    and increased degradation rates. Clearly, a fundamental understanding of all aspects of water management in PEMFC is imperative. This includes the fuel cell water balance, i.e. which fraction of the product water leaves the fuel cell via the anode channels versus the cathode channel. Our research group...... is currently developing a novel technique to obtain an ad-hoc and real time electrical signal of the fuel cell water balance by employing hot wire anemometry. In this work, the hot wire sensor is placed in the anode outlet of a commercial air-cooled fuel cell stack by Ballard Power Systems, and the voltage......Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC’s) are currently being commercialized for various applications ranging from automotive (e.g. the Toyota Mirai) to stationary such as powering telecom backup units. In PEMFC’s, oxygen from air is internally combined with hydrogen to form water and produce...

  6. Measurements of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of hen egg-white lysozyme crystals using a short hot wire method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Seiji; Maki, Syou; Tanaka, Seiichi; Maekawa, Ryunosuke; Masuda, Tomoki; Hagiwara, Masayuki

    2017-07-01

    Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) crystals were examined by using the transient short hot wire method. This method is based on the conventional hot wire method, but improved by using a wire that is much shorter than conventional ones. The magneto-Archimedes levitation technique was utilized to attach the HEWL crystals onto the wire. Owing to the upward magnetic force, the HEWL crystals were deposited at the air-liquid interface of the protein buffer solution where the short hot wire was preliminarily fixed. In situ observation clarified that the wire was completely buried into the HEWL crystals. By means of these techniques, the measurement of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of HEWL crystals was realized for the first time. Gadolinium chloride (a paramagnetic subject) was used as a precipitant agent of crystallization. Crystal growth was carried out over 20 h at 17.2 °C. The applied magnetic field was 4 T. Measurements were conducted during the crystal growth at two different times. The thermal conductivity and diffusivity of the HEWL crystals were determined to be 0.410 W/(m.K) and 3.77×10-8 m2/s at 14 h after, and 0.438 W/(m.K) and 5.18×10-8 m2/s at 20 h after, respectively. We emphasize that this method is versatile and applicable for other protein crystals.

  7. An in-situ calibration technique for four-wire hot-wire probe in conjunction for atmospheric studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadr, Reza; Singha, Arindam

    2011-11-01

    There is an increasing need to resolve the small-scales of atmospheric turbulence in order to estimate the higher order statistics of the turbulent flow. Sonic anemometers are commonly used in atmospheric research; however their application can only provide data with low special and temporal resolution. Hot-wire (HW) probes are still the best tool to obtain turbulent statistics with high temporal and spatial resolution. But HW probes are rarely used for atmospheric measurement due to the intricacy and logistical difficulties associated with the calibration and applications of the required probes for this flow field. In the present study, an in-situ method of calibration of a four-wire hot-wire anemometer is proposed, which bypasses the need for prior calibration. A proper data reduction algorithm has been developed to be used in conjunction with the four-wire probe. The proposed methodology enables one to use the hot-wire anemometer for atmospheric measurement to obtain three dimensional velocity information, at high spatial and temporal resolution, without the necessity of going through extensive calibration procedure. The feasibility of this method has been tested in laboratory and Monte Carlo simulation has been used to establish the stability and sensitivity of the data reduction algorithm.

  8. Structural evolution of a Ta-filament during hot-wire chemical vapour deposition of Silicon investigated by electron backscatter diffraction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oliphant, CJ

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigate the structural changes of a burnt-out tantalum filament that was operated at typical hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon synthesis conditions in our hot-wire chemical vapour deposition chamber. Scanning electron...

  9. Preprinting Microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The field of microbiology has experienced significant growth due to transformative advances in technology and the influx of scientists driven by a curiosity to understand how microbes sustain myriad biochemical processes that maintain Earth. With this explosion in scientific output, a significant bottleneck has been the ability to rapidly disseminate new knowledge to peers and the public. Preprints have emerged as a tool that a growing number of microbiologists are using to overcome this bottleneck. Posting preprints can help to transparently recruit a more diverse pool of reviewers prior to submitting to a journal for formal peer review. Although the use of preprints is still limited in the biological sciences, early indications are that preprints are a robust tool that can complement and enhance peer-reviewed publications. As publishing moves to embrace advances in Internet technology, there are many opportunities for preprints and peer-reviewed journals to coexist in the same ecosystem. PMID:28536284

  10. Preprinting Microbiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick D. Schloss

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The field of microbiology has experienced significant growth due to transformative advances in technology and the influx of scientists driven by a curiosity to understand how microbes sustain myriad biochemical processes that maintain Earth. With this explosion in scientific output, a significant bottleneck has been the ability to rapidly disseminate new knowledge to peers and the public. Preprints have emerged as a tool that a growing number of microbiologists are using to overcome this bottleneck. Posting preprints can help to transparently recruit a more diverse pool of reviewers prior to submitting to a journal for formal peer review. Although the use of preprints is still limited in the biological sciences, early indications are that preprints are a robust tool that can complement and enhance peer-reviewed publications. As publishing moves to embrace advances in Internet technology, there are many opportunities for preprints and peer-reviewed journals to coexist in the same ecosystem.

  11. Preprinting Microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloss, Patrick D

    2017-05-23

    The field of microbiology has experienced significant growth due to transformative advances in technology and the influx of scientists driven by a curiosity to understand how microbes sustain myriad biochemical processes that maintain Earth. With this explosion in scientific output, a significant bottleneck has been the ability to rapidly disseminate new knowledge to peers and the public. Preprints have emerged as a tool that a growing number of microbiologists are using to overcome this bottleneck. Posting preprints can help to transparently recruit a more diverse pool of reviewers prior to submitting to a journal for formal peer review. Although the use of preprints is still limited in the biological sciences, early indications are that preprints are a robust tool that can complement and enhance peer-reviewed publications. As publishing moves to embrace advances in Internet technology, there are many opportunities for preprints and peer-reviewed journals to coexist in the same ecosystem. Copyright © 2017 Schloss.

  12. Airflow Measurement of the Car HVAC Unit Using Hot-wire Anemometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fojtlín Miloš

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal environment in a vehicular cabin significantly influence drivers’ fatigue and passengers’ thermal comfort. This environment is traditionally managed by HVAC cabin system that distributes air and modifies its properties. In order to simulate cabin thermal behaviour, amount of the air led through car vents must be determined. The aim of this study was to develop methodology to measure airflow from the vents, and consequently calculate corresponding air distribution coefficients. Three climatic cases were selected to match European winter, summer, and spring / fall conditions. Experiments were conducted on a test vehicle in a climatic chamber. The car HVAC system was set to automatic control mode, and the measurements were executed after the system stabilisation—each case was independently measured three times. To be able to evaluate precision of the method, the airflow was determined at the system inlet (HVAC suction and outlet (each vent, and the total airflow values were compared. The airflow was calculated by determining a mean value of the air velocity multiplied by an area of inlet / outlet cross-section. Hot-wire anemometry was involved to measure the air velocity. Regarding the summer case, total airflow entering the cabin was around 57 l s-1 with 60 % of the air entering the cabin through dashboard vents; no air was supplied to the feet compartment. The remaining cases had the same total airflow of around 42 l s-1, and the air distribution was focused mainly on feet and windows. The inlet and outlet airflow values show a good match with a maximum mass differential of 8.3 %.

  13. Airflow Measurement of the Car HVAC Unit Using Hot-wire Anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fojtlín, Miloš; Planka, Michal; Fišer, Jan; Pokorný, Jan; Jícha, Miroslav

    2016-03-01

    Thermal environment in a vehicular cabin significantly influence drivers' fatigue and passengers' thermal comfort. This environment is traditionally managed by HVAC cabin system that distributes air and modifies its properties. In order to simulate cabin thermal behaviour, amount of the air led through car vents must be determined. The aim of this study was to develop methodology to measure airflow from the vents, and consequently calculate corresponding air distribution coefficients. Three climatic cases were selected to match European winter, summer, and spring / fall conditions. Experiments were conducted on a test vehicle in a climatic chamber. The car HVAC system was set to automatic control mode, and the measurements were executed after the system stabilisation—each case was independently measured three times. To be able to evaluate precision of the method, the airflow was determined at the system inlet (HVAC suction) and outlet (each vent), and the total airflow values were compared. The airflow was calculated by determining a mean value of the air velocity multiplied by an area of inlet / outlet cross-section. Hot-wire anemometry was involved to measure the air velocity. Regarding the summer case, total airflow entering the cabin was around 57 l s-1 with 60 % of the air entering the cabin through dashboard vents; no air was supplied to the feet compartment. The remaining cases had the same total airflow of around 42 l s-1, and the air distribution was focused mainly on feet and windows. The inlet and outlet airflow values show a good match with a maximum mass differential of 8.3 %.

  14. A hot-wire method based thermal conductivity measurement apparatus for teaching purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, S.; Marín, E.; Juárez, A. G.; Calderón, A.; Ivanov, R.

    2012-07-01

    The implementation of an automated system based on the hot-wire technique is described for the measurement of the thermal conductivity of liquids using equipment easily available in modern physics laboratories at high schools and universities (basically a precision current source and a voltage meter, a data acquisition card, a personal computer and a high purity platinum wire). The wire, which is immersed in the investigated sample, is heated by passing a constant electrical current through it, and its temperature evolution, ΔT, is measured as a function of time, t, for several values of the current. A straightforward methodology is then used for data processing in order to obtain the liquid thermal conductivity. The start point is the well known linear relationship between ΔT and ln(t) predicted for long heating times by a model based on a solution of the heat conduction equation for an infinite lineal heat source embedded in an infinite medium into which heat is conducted without convective and radiative heat losses. A criterion is used to verify that the selected linear region is the one that matches the conditions imposed by the theoretical model. As a consequence the method involves least-squares fits in linear, semi-logarithmic (semi-log) and log-log graphs, so that it becomes attractive not only to teach about heat transfer and thermal properties measurement techniques, but also as a good exercise for students of undergraduate courses of physics and engineering learning about these kinds of mathematical functional relationships between variables. The functionality of the experiment was demonstrated by measuring the thermal conductivity in samples of liquids with well known thermal properties.

  15. ROBUST hot wire probe efficiency for total water content measurements in glaciated conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Delphine; Lilie, Lyle; Weber, Marc; Schwarzenboeck, Alfons; Strapp, J. Walter

    2017-04-01

    During the two High Altitude Ice Crystals (HAIC, Dezitter et al. 2013)/High Ice Water Content (HIWC, Strapp et al., 2016a) international flight campaigns that investigated deep convection in the tropics, the French Falcon 20 research aircraft was equipped with two different devices measuring the Total Water Content (TWC): - the IKP-2 (Isokinetic Probe, Davison et al. 2008, 2016), - and the hot wire ROBUST probe (Strapp et al. 2008; Grandin et al. 2014). The IKP-2 probe is an evaporator that has been specifically designed to measure high ice water content (Strapp et al. 2016b) with a collection efficiency near unity. It has undergone extensive performance assessment in liquid and glaciated conditions in several wind tunnels. The Robust probe was initially developed by Science Engineering Associates to estimate high ice water content in a high speed wind tunnel, in harsh conditions where other hot-wires had been observed to suffer failures. It was known at the outset that, like other hot-wire TWC probes, it would measure only a quasi-constant fraction of the true ice water content. Early wind tunnel and flight experience with the ROBUST probe revealed that this fraction was the order of 40% for ice crystals. During the HAIC/HIWC campaigns (Leroy et al. 2016, 2017), supercooled liquid water conditions were documented according to a detailed analysis of a Rosemount Ice detector (RICE) and a Cloud Droplet Probe (CDP) measurements, and were found to be rare. Thus, the HAIC/HIWC dataset represents a unique opportunity to study in more detail the ROBUST efficiency in glaciated conditions, using the IKP-2 values as a comparative reference. Comparison of IKP-2 and ROBUST measurements will show that the ROBUST behavior differs between low (below 1.5 g/m3) and high (above 2 g/m3) ice content conditions and is also sensitive to temperature. The sensitivity of the ROBUST collection efficiency to ice particles size could also be explored as optical imaging probes were part of the

  16. Employing Hot Wire Anemometry to Directly Measure the Water Balance of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shakhshir, Saher Al; Berning, Torsten

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC’s) are currently being commercialized for various applications ranging from automotive to stationary such as powering telecom back-up units. In PEMFC’s, oxygen from air is internally combined with hydrogen to form water and produce electricity and waste...... in hot wire anemometry is the description of the Nusselt number as function of the Reynolds number and the Prandtl number, and in the current application it can be shown it is essential to employ a power-law equation instead of the commonly employed Churchill Bernstein equation. It will be shown...

  17. Tandem solar cells deposited using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veen, M. K.

    2003-05-01

    In this thesis, the application of the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) technique for the deposition of silicon thin films is described. The HWCVD technique is based on the dissociation of silicon-containing gasses at the catalytic surface of a hot filament. Advantages of this technique are the high deposition rate, the low equipment costs, and the scalability. The main goal of this thesis is the optimization of the material properties of both hydrogenated amorphous silicon and microcrystalline silicon, so that these materials can be incorporated as the absorbing layers in tandem solar cells. Firstly, the influence of specific deposition parameters on the material quality of hydrogenated amorphous silicon was investigated. With the use of tantalum filaments, the deposition temperature could be decreased to moderate temperatures, while the (electronic) properties of the amorphous silicon were improved. However, at these low filament temperatures the silicide formation at the filaments was enhanced, resulting in a decrease in the deposition rate and a deterioration of the material quality over time. For extensive silicide formation, even epitaxial growth on crystalline wafers was observed. By preheating the filaments at elevated temperature before deposition, the influence of silicide formation could be minimized, which resulted in an improvement in the reproducibility of the material quality. Solar cells, in which the absorbing layer was made at moderate temperature, had high open-circuit voltages and high fill factors. The best n-i-p structured cell on plain stainless steel had an initial efficiency of 7.2 %. The incorporation of amorphous silicon in p-i-n structured cells with a textured front contact resulted in a higher short-circuit current density and a higher efficiency. Occasionally, many n-i-p structured cells showed shunting problems. The number of working cells was directly correlated to the age of the filaments. The presence of silicides on the

  18. A hot-wire probe for thermal measurements of nanowires and nanotubes inside a transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dames, C; Chen, S; Harris, C T; Huang, J Y; Ren, Z F; Dresselhaus, M S; Chen, G

    2007-10-01

    A hot wire probe has been developed for use inside a transmission electron microscope to measure the thermal resistance of individual nanowires, nanotubes, and their contacts. No microfabrication is involved. The probe is made from a platinum Wollaston wire and is pretensioned to minimize the effects of thermal expansion, intrinsic thermal vibrations, and Lorentz forces. An in situ nanomanipulator is used to select a particular nanowire or nanotube for measurement, and contacts are made with liquid metal droplets or by electron-beam induced deposition. Detailed thermal analysis shows that for best sensitivity, the thermal resistance of the hot-wire probe should be four times that of the sample, but a mismatch of more than two orders of magnitude may be acceptable. Data analysis using the ratio of two ac signals reduces the experimental uncertainty. The range of detectable sample thermal resistances spans from approximately 10(3) to 10(9) KW. The probe can also be adapted for measurements of the electrical conductance and Seebeck coefficient of the same sample. The probe was used to study a multiwalled carbon nanotube with liquid Ga contacts. The measured thermal resistance of 3.3 x 10(7) KW had a noise level of approximately +/-3% and was repeatable to within +/-10% upon breaking and re-making the contact.

  19. Numerical and experimental determination of the minimum and maximum measuring times for the hot wire parallel technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos W. N. dos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The hot wire technique is considered to be an effective and accurate means of determining the thermal conductivity of ceramic materials. However, specifically for materials of high thermal diffusivity, the appropriate time interval to be considered in calculations is a decisive factor for getting accurate and consistent results. In this work, a numerical simulation model is proposed with the aim of determining the minimum and maximum measuring time for the hot wire parallel technique. The temperature profile generated by this model is in excellent agreement with that one experimentally obtained by this technique, where thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat are simultaneously determined from the same experimental temperature transient. Eighteen different specimens of refractory materials and polymers, with thermal diffusivities ranging from 1x10-7 to 70x10-7 m²/s, in shape of rectangular parallelepipeds, and with different dimensions were employed in the experimental programme. An empirical equation relating minimum and maximum measuring times and the thermal diffusivity of the sample is also obtained.

  20. Design and implementation of a hot-wire probe for simultaneous velocity and vorticity vector measurements in boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, S.; Morrill-Winter, C.; Klewicki, J.

    2017-10-01

    A multi-sensor hot-wire probe for simultaneously measuring all three components of velocity and vorticity in boundary layers has been designed, fabricated and implemented in experiments up to large Reynolds numbers. The probe consists of eight hot-wires, compactly arranged in two pairs of orthogonal ×-wire arrays. The ×-wire sub-arrays are symmetrically configured such that the full velocity and vorticity vectors are resolved about a single central location. During its design phase, the capacity of this sensor to accurately measure each component of velocity and vorticity was first evaluated via a synthetic experiment in a set of well-resolved DNS fields. The synthetic experiments clarified probe geometry effects, allowed assessment of various processing schemes, and predicted the effects of finite wire length and wire separation on turbulence statistics. The probe was subsequently fabricated and employed in large Reynolds number experiments in the Flow Physics Facility wind tunnel at the University of New Hampshire. Comparisons of statistics from the actual probe with those from the simulated sensor exhibit very good agreement in trend, but with some differences in magnitude. These comparisons also reveal that the use of gradient information in processing the probe data can significantly improve the accuracy of the spanwise velocity measurement near the wall. To the authors' knowledge, the present are the largest Reynolds number laboratory-based measurements of all three vorticity components in boundary layers.

  1. Employing Hot Wire Anemometry to Directly Measure the Water Balance in a Proton Exchange membrane Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shakhshir, Saher Al; Hussain, Nabeel; Berning, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    Water management in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC’s) remains a critical problem for their durability, cost, and performance. Because the anode side of this fuel cell has the tendency to become dehydrated, measuring the water balance can be an important diagnosis tool during fuel cell...... operation. The water balance indicates how much of the product water leaves at the anode side versus the cathode side. Previous methods of determining the fuel cell water balance often relied on condensing the water in the exhaust gas streams and weighing the accumulated mass which is a time consuming...... process that has limited accuracy. Currently, our group is developing a novel method to accurately determine the water balance in a PEMFC in real time by employing hot-wire anemometry. The amount of heat transferred from the wire to the anode exhaust stream can be translated into a voltage signal which...

  2. Highly Sensitive Hot-Wire Anemometry Based on Macro-Sized Double-Walled Carbon Nanotube Strands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dingqu; Xiong, Wei; Zhou, Zhaoying; Zhu, Rong; Yang, Xing; Li, Weihua; Jiang, Yueyuan; Zhang, Yajun

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a highly sensitive flow-rate sensor with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as sensing elements. The sensor uses micro-size centimeters long double-walled CNT (DWCNT) strands as hot-wires to sense fluid velocity. In the theoretical analysis, the sensitivity of the sensor is demonstrated to be positively related to the ratio of its surface. We assemble the flow sensor by suspending the DWCNT strand directly on two tungsten prongs and dripping a small amount of silver glue onto each contact between the DWCNT and the prongs. The DWCNT exhibits a positive TCR of 1980 ppm/K. The self-heating effect on the DWCNT was observed while constant current was applied between the two prongs. This sensor can evidently respond to flow rate, and requires only several milliwatts to operate. We have, thus far, demonstrated that the CNT-based flow sensor has better sensitivity than the Pt-coated DWCNT sensor.

  3. Single and multijunction silicon based thin film solar cells on a flexible substrate with absorber layers made by hot-wire CVD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Hongbo

    2007-01-01

    With the worldwide growing concern about reliable energy supply and the environmental problems of fossil and nuclear energy production, the need for clean and sustainable energy sources is evident. Solar energy conversion, such as in photovoltaic systems, can play a major role in the urgently needed

  4. Metallic Tungsten Nanostructures and Highly Nanostructured Thin Films by Deposition of Tungsten Oxide and Subsequent Reduction in a Single Hot-Wire CVD Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harks, P.P.R.M.L.; Houweling, Z.S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/251874486; de Jong, M.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325844208; Kuang, Y; Geus, J.W.; Schropp, R.E.I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072502584

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis of metallic tungsten nanostructures and highly nanostructured thin films is presented. Crystalline tungsten oxide nanostructures are deposited on glassy carbon substrates kept at 700 100 8C by oxidizing resistively heated tungsten filaments in an air flow under subatmospheric

  5. Dual catalytic purpose of the tungsten filament during the synthesis of single-helix carbon microcoils by hot-wire CVD

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oliphant, CJ

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available post-deposition annealing. Tungsten, originating from the heated tungsten filament, is identified as the catalyst material responsible for the growth of the microcoils. High-resolution transmission spectroscopy, combined with Raman spectroscopy, confirm...

  6. The Laser Welding with Hot Wire of 316LN Thick Plate Applied on ITER Correction Coil Case

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Chao; Wu, Weiyue; Wei, Jing; Zhang, Shuquan; Li, Hongwei; Dolgetta, N; Libeyre, P; Cormany, C; Sgobba, S

    2014-01-01

    ITER correction coil (CC) cases have characteristics of small cross section, large dimensions, and complex structure. The cases are made of heavy thick (20 mm), high strength and high toughness austenitic stainless steel 316LN. The multi-pass laser welding with hot wire technology is used for the case closure welding, due to its low heat input and deformation. In order to evaluate the reliability of this welding technology, 20 mm welding samples with the same groove structure and welding depth as the cases were welded. High purity argon was used as the shielding gas to prevent oxidation because of the narrowness and depth of the weld. In this paper investigation of, microstructure characteristics and mechanical properties of welded joints using optimized welding parameters are presented. The results show that the base metal, fusion metal, and heat affected zone (HAZ) are all have fully austenitic microstructure, and that the grain size of fusion metal was finer than that of the base metal. The welding resulte...

  7. Thermal conductivity of amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon films prepared by hot-wire chemical-vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jugdersuren, B.; Kearney, B. T.; Queen, D. R.; Metcalf, T. H.; Culbertson, J. C.; Chervin, C. N.; Stroud, R. M.; Nemeth, W.; Wang, Q.; Liu, Xiao

    2017-07-01

    We report 3..omega.. thermal conductivity measurements of amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon thin films from 85 to 300 K prepared by hot-wire chemical-vapor deposition, where the crystallinity of the films is controlled by the hydrogen dilution during growth. The thermal conductivity of the amorphous silicon film is in agreement with several previous reports of amorphous silicon prepared by a variety of deposition techniques. The thermal conductivity of the as-grown nanocrystalline silicon film is 70% higher and increases 35% more after an anneal at 600 degrees C. They all have similarly weak temperature dependence. Structural analysis shows that the as-grown nanocrystalline silicon is approximately 60% crystalline, nanograins and grain boundaries included. The nanograins, averaging 9.1 nm in diameter in the as-grown film, are embedded in an amorphous matrix. The grain size increases to 9.7 nm upon annealing, accompanied by the disappearance of the amorphous phase. We extend the models of grain boundary scattering of phonons with two different non-Debye dispersion relations to explain our result of nanocrystalline silicon, confirming the strong grain size dependence of heat transport for nanocrystalline materials. However, the similarity in thermal conductivity between amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon suggests the heat transport mechanisms in both structures may not be as dissimilar as we currently understand.

  8. Design and Development of Embedded System for the Measurement of Thermal Conductivity of Liquids by Transient Hot Wire Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagamani GOSALA

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermal conductivity of polymers is an important property for both polymer applications and processing industry. The successful application of thermal insulating fluids in the last several years has demonstrated that such fluids can effectively control the heat loss. Understanding and controlling the thermal environment for oilfield operations has been a concern and research topic. As a consequence of this trend, there is huge demand for new methods of instrumentation to evaluate the performance of material properties and characterization. The main aim of the present study is the development of hardware and software for measuring the thermal conductivity of liquids using transient hot wire method. Because of the relatively short experimental times and large amounts of parametric data involved in the measurement process, embedded control of the measurement is essential. The experimental implementation requires a suitable temperature sensing, automatic control, data acquisition, and data analysis systems accomplished using an embedded system that has been built around the ARM LPC 2103 mixed signal controller.

  9. Simplified Transient Hot-Wire Method for Effective Thermal Conductivity Measurement in Geo Materials: Microstructure and Saturation Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Merckx

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal conductivity measurement by a simplified transient hot-wire technique is applied to geomaterials in order to show the relationships which can exist between effective thermal conductivity, texture, and moisture of the materials. After a validation of the used “one hot-wire” technique in water, toluene, and glass-bead assemblages, the investigations were performed (1 in glass-bead assemblages of different diameters in dried, water, and acetone-saturated states in order to observe the role of grain sizes and saturation on the effective thermal conductivity, (2 in a compacted earth brick at different moisture states, and (3 in a lime-hemp concrete during 110 days following its manufacture. The lime-hemp concrete allows the measurements during the setting, desiccation and carbonation steps. The recorded Δ/ln( diagrams allow the calculation of one effective thermal conductivity in the continuous and homogeneous fluids and two effective thermal conductivities in the heterogeneous solids. The first one measured in the short time acquisitions (<1 s mainly depends on the contact between the wire and grains and thus microtexture and hydrated state of the material. The second one, measured for longer time acquisitions, characterizes the mean effective thermal conductivity of the material.

  10. Preprinting Microbiology

    OpenAIRE

    Schloss, Patrick D.; Cavanaugh, Colleen M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The field of microbiology has experienced significant growth due to transformative advances in technology and the influx of scientists driven by a curiosity to understand how microbes sustain myriad biochemical processes that maintain Earth. With this explosion in scientific output, a significant bottleneck has been the ability to rapidly disseminate new knowledge to peers and the public. Preprints have emerged as a tool that a growing number of microbiologists are using to overcome ...

  11. Applying hot-wire anemometry to directly measure the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell for a pre-humidified hydrogen stream

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Shakhshir, Saher Al

    2016-01-01

    In a recent publication it has been shown how the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell can be determined employing hot wire anemometry. The hot wire sensor has to be placed into the anode outlet pipe of the operating fuel cell, and the voltage signal E that is read from the sensor....... Finally, it will be shown how previously developed dew point diagrams for the anode side in a fuel cell can be corrected for a humidified hydrogen inlet stream....... has to be divided by a pre-determined voltage signal E0 that has been obtained for a stream of dry hydrogen where the molar flow rate corresponds to a total current I of the fuel cell stack and a stoichiometric flow ratio, ξ. Because the last two properties are usually continuously known in fuel cell...

  12. Impact of microcrystalline silicon carbide growth using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition on crystalline silicon surface passivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomaska, M., E-mail: m.pomaksa@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich, IEK5-Photovoltaics, Wilhelm-Johnen-Strasse, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Beyer, W. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Silicon Photovoltaics, Kekuléstrasse 5, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Neumann, E. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, PGI-8-PT, Wilhelm-Johnen-Strasse, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Finger, F.; Ding, K. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, IEK5-Photovoltaics, Wilhelm-Johnen-Strasse, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2015-11-30

    Highly crystalline microcrystalline silicon carbide (μc-SiC:H) with excellent optoelectronic material properties is a promising candidate as highly transparent doped layer in silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells. These high quality materials are usually produced using hot wire chemical vapor deposition under aggressive growth conditions giving rise to the removal of the underlying passivation layer and thus the deterioration of the crystalline silicon (c-Si) surface passivation. In this work, we introduced the n-type μc-SiC:H/n-type μc-SiO{sub x}:H/intrinsic a-SiO{sub x}:H stack as a front layer configuration for p-type SHJ solar cells with the μc-SiO{sub x}:H layer acting as an etch-resistant layer against the reactive deposition conditions during the μc-SiC:H growth. We observed that the unfavorable expansion of micro-voids at the c-Si interface due to the in-diffusion of hydrogen atoms through the layer stack might be responsible for the deterioration of surface passivation. Excellent lifetime values were achieved under deposition conditions which are needed to grow high quality μc-SiC:H layers for SHJ solar cells. - Highlights: • High surface passivation quality was preserved after μc-SiC:H deposition. • μc-SiC:H/μc-SiO{sub x}:H/a-SiO{sub x}:H stack a promising front layer configuration • Void expansion at a-SiO{sub x}:H/c-Si interface for deteriorated surface passivation • μc-SiC:H provides a high transparency and electrical conductivity.

  13. Study of structural and electronic environments of hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbonitride (a-SiCN:H) films deposited by hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Bibhu P.; Hwang, Nong M.

    2008-06-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbon nitride (a-SiCN:H) thin films were deposited by hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) using SiH 4, CH 4, NH 3 and H 2 as precursors. The effects of the H 2 dilution on structural and chemical bonding of a-SiCN:H has been investigated by Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Increasing the H 2 flow rate in the precursor gas more carbon is introduced into the a-SiCN:H network resulting in decrease of silicon content in the film from 41 at.% to 28.8 at.% and sp 2 carbon cluster increases when H 2 flow rate is increased from 0 to 20 sccm.

  14. Study of structural and electronic environments of hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbonitride (a-SiCN:H) films deposited by hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swain, Bibhu P. [National Research Laboratory of Charged Nanoparticles, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: swain@snu.ac.kr; Hwang, Nong M. [National Research Laboratory of Charged Nanoparticles, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-30

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbon nitride (a-SiCN:H) thin films were deposited by hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) using SiH{sub 4}, CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2} as precursors. The effects of the H{sub 2} dilution on structural and chemical bonding of a-SiCN:H has been investigated by Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Increasing the H{sub 2} flow rate in the precursor gas more carbon is introduced into the a-SiCN:H network resulting in decrease of silicon content in the film from 41 at.% to 28.8 at.% and sp{sup 2} carbon cluster increases when H{sub 2} flow rate is increased from 0 to 20 sccm.

  15. Note: effect of the tilting angle of the wire on the onset of natural convection in the transient hot wire method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Hyun; Jang, Seok Pil

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, numerical and experimental investigations are systematically performed to identify the effect of the tilting angle of the wire on the onset of natural convection in the transient hot wire method (THWM), a widely accepted technique for measuring the thermal conductivity of various media, especially nanofluids. To validate our numerical simulation code, the numerical results are compared with theoretical solutions as well as with experimental results. Based on the results, we show that the onset time of natural convection in THWM decreases rapidly with the increase of the wire's tilting angle from vertical position. Also, we systematically show the effect of the wire's tilting angle on the linear region, which is a suitable measurement interval, and on the measurement error of THWM.

  16. Gas doping ratio effects on p-type hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon thin films grown by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, P.Q. [Solar Energy Institute, Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China)], E-mail: robt@sjtu.edu.cn; Zhou, Z.B. [Solar Energy Institute, Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China)], E-mail: zbzhou@sjtu.edu.cn; Chan, K.Y. [Thin Film Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, Jalan Multimedia, Cyberjaya 63100, Selangor (Malaysia); Tang, D.Y.; Cui, R.Q.; Dou, X.M. [Solar Energy Institute, Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2008-12-30

    Hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) grown by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) has recently drawn significant attention in the area of thin-film large area optoelectronics due to possibility of high deposition rate. We report on the effects of diborane (B{sub 2}H{sub 6}) doping ratio on the microstructural and optoelectrical properties of the p-type nc-Si:H thin films grown by HWCVD at low substrate temperature of 200 deg. C and with high hydrogen dilution ratio of 98.8%. An attempt has been made to elucidate the boron doping mechanism of the p-type nc-Si:H thin films deposited by HWCVD and the correlation between the B{sub 2}H{sub 6} doping ratio, crystalline volume fraction, optical band gap and dark conductivity.

  17. Measurements of Thermal Conductivity and Thermal Diffusivity of Hen Egg-White Lysozyme Crystals and Its Solution Using the Transient Short Hot Wire Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Seiji; Maki, Syou; Maekawa, Ryunosuke; Tanaka, Seiichi; Hagiwara, Masayuki

    2017-08-01

    Protein crystals are an essentially important biological sample to advance the analysis of X-ray structure, but their thermophysical properties, especially thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity, have not been studied sufficiently. This current situation can be attributed to various kinds of technical problems; e.g., the fragility of protein crystals and the difficulty of nucleation control. Ideally speaking, protein crystallization should be carried out under a " containerless condition" to eliminate any mechanical distortion of the crystals from the walls. To realize the condition, we have developed an original crystallization method by means of the magneto-Archimedes effect. In this paper, a transient short hot wire method was combined with the technique of magneto-Archimedes effect to realize simultaneous measurement of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) crystals. As the results, thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of HEWL crystals were found to be 0.410-0.438 \\hbox {W}\\cdot \\hbox {m}^{-1}\\cdot \\hbox {K}^{-1} and 3.77-5.18× 10^{-8} \\hbox {m}2\\cdot \\hbox {s}^{-1}, respectively. We clarified by the crystallizing process of HEWL that the crystals were magnetically levitated at the air-liquid interface and the short hot wire was completely buried into them as the crystals grew. We also measured the HEWL solution by the same methods. The thermal conductivity of the solution had almost the same value as that of water and had little dependency on the concentration of HEWL, but the thermal diffusivity was unclear.

  18. Development of scientific and technological basis for the fabrication of thin film solar cells on the basis of a-Si:H and {mu}c-Si:H using the 'hot-wire' deposition technique. Final report; Entwicklung wissenschaftlicher und technischer Grundlagen fuer die Herstellung von Duennschichtsolarzellen auf der Basis des a-Si:H und {mu}c-Si:H mit der 'Hot-Wire'-Depositionstechnik. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, B.

    2002-01-22

    Two new deposition systems were realized enabling the entire and respectively, large area deposition of a-Si:H based solar cells using the so called 'hot-wire' (HW) CVD. The deposition conditions for appropriate n- and p-doped a-Si:H and {mu}c-Si:H layers have been developed. For the first time in the world a-Si:H based pin solar cells were entirely deposited by the HWCVD method. A maximum initial conversion efficiency of {eta}{sub initial}=8.9% was obtained. After the development of a suitable p/n-tunnel/recombination junction pin-pin tandem structures with a-Si:H absorbers could be entirely fabricated by the HWCVD for the first time in the world, too. A conversion efficiency of {eta}=7% was measured for the tandem cell, after some structural degradation took place. In general, the stability of the HWCVD solar cells is not satisfactory, what could be attributed to a structural instability of the HWCVD-p-layers. For the first time we have deposited nip solar cells on stainless steel substrates entirely by HWCVD ({eta}{sub initial}>6%). The incorporation of {mu}c-Si:H absorber layers by HWCVD or ECWR-PECVD into pin solar cells was not successfull until now. Large area deposition of a-Si:H films has been performed in a simple vacuum vessel. Under consideration of appropriate filament and gas supply geometry as well as simulation calculations a good electronic quality and a film thickness uniformity of {delta}d={+-}2.5% of the material was obtained. i-layers for small area solar cells on an area of 20 x 20 cm{sup 2} have been deposited which could be completed to solar cells with very uniform conversion efficiencies of {eta}{sub initial} = 6,1{+-}0.2%. This result represents a proof of concept for the large area deposition of a-Si:H based solar cells using the HWCVD. Also for the first time the HWCVD was used for the deposition of emitter layers on c-Si-wafers to realize hetero solar cells. Hetero solar cells with amorphous, microcrystalline and epitaxial n

  19. Nanocrystalline Si/SiO{sub 2} core-shell network with intense white light emission fabricated by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Y., E-mail: ymatsumo@cinvestav.mx; Dutt, A. [SEES, Electrical Engineering Department, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Cinvestav-IPN, Mexico, D.F. 07360 (Mexico); Santana-Rodríguez, G. [Institute of Material Research, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Coyoacán 04510 (Mexico); Santoyo-Salazar, J. [Department of Physics, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Cinvestav-IPN, Mexico, D.F. 07360 (Mexico); Aceves-Mijares, M. [Departament of Electronics, Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica Óptica y Electrónica, Tonantzintla, Puebla 72000 (Mexico)

    2015-04-27

    We report the fabrication of a stable Si/SiO{sub 2} core-shell network using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition on a silicon substrate at a relatively low substrate temperature of 200 °C. Structural investigations using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction confirm the presence of nanocrystalline silicon and silicon dioxide quantum dots in the form of a core-shell network embedded in the amorphous SiO{sub x} matrix, while selected area electron diffraction confirms the formation of a core-shell structure. The core-shell structure exhibits a bright white emission that can be seen with the unaided eye at room temperature without any post-annealing treatments, and the observed photoemission does not alter in color or intensity after prolonged laser exposure. Additional measurements are performed while varying the laser power and optical gain is found in the as-deposited material. Intense stable white luminescence is observed and shows the prospective for various optical and biological applications in the future.

  20. The influence of charge effect on the growth of hydrogenated amorphous silicon by the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Q.; Nelson, B.P.; Iwaniczko, E.; Mahan, A.H.; Crandall, R.S.; Benner, J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-09-01

    The authors observe at lower substrate temperatures that the scatter in the dark conductivity on hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films grown on insulating substrates (e.g., Corning 7059 glass) by the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition technique (HWCVD) can be five orders of magnitude or more. This is especially true at deposition temperatures below 350 C. However, when the authors grow the same materials on substrates with a conductive grid, virtually all of their films have acceptable dark conductivity (< 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} S/cm) at all deposition temperatures below 425 C. This is in contrast to only about 20% of the materials grown in this same temperature range on insulating substrates having an acceptable dark conductivity. The authors estimated an average energy of 5 eV electrons reaching the growing surface in vacuum, and did additional experiments to see the influence of both the electron flux and the energy of the electrons on the film growth. Although these effects do not seem to be important for growing a-Si:H by HWCVD on conductive substrates, they help better understand the important parameters for a-Si:H growth, and thus, to optimize these parameters in other applications of HWCVD technology.

  1. A micro-scale hot wire anemometer based on low stress (Ni/W) multi-layers deposited on nano-crystalline diamond for air flow sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbi, A.; Gimeno, L.; Gerbedoen, J.-C.; Viard, R.; Soltani, A.; Mortet, V.; Preobrazhensky, V.; Merlen, A.; Pernod, P.

    2015-12-01

    A linear array of microscale thermal anemometers has been designed, fabricated and characterized. The sensitive element consists of a self-compensated-stress multilayer (Ni/W) patterned to form a wire with length, width, and thickness close to 200 μm, 5 μm and 2 μm respectively. The wire is deposited and supported by prongs made of nano-crystalline diamond (NCD) of about 2 μm in thickness. Due to its high Young’s modulus, NCD allows a very high mechanical toughness without the need for thicker support for the hot wire. Also, depending on grain size, the NCD is able to present thermal conductivity smaller than 10 W mK-1, providing good thermal insulation from the substrate and less conductive end losses to the prongs. The sensor was characterized experimentally. Its electrical and thermal properties were obtained first in the absence of fluid flow. The results confirm the effectiveness of thermal insulation and the mechanical robustness of the structure. The fluidic characterizations were performed and analysed in the case of an airflow with velocities of up to 30 m s-1.

  2. From amorphous to nanocrystalline: the effect of nanograins in an amorphous matrix on the thermal conductivity of hot-wire chemical-vapor deposited silicon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, B. T.; Jugdersuren, B.; Queen, D. R.; Metcalf, T. H.; Culbertson, J. C.; Desario, P. A.; Stroud, R. M.; Nemeth, W.; Wang, Q.; Liu, Xiao

    2018-02-01

    We have measured the thermal conductivity of amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon films with varying crystalline content from 85 K to room temperature. The films were prepared by the hot-wire chemical-vapor deposition, where the crystalline volume fraction is determined by the hydrogen (H2) dilution ratio to the processing silane gas (SiH4), R  =  H2/SiH4. We varied R from 1 to 10, where the films transform from amorphous for R  conductivities of the two amorphous silicon films are similar and consistent with the most previous reports with thicknesses no larger than a few μm deposited by a variety of techniques. The thermal conductivities of the three nanocrystalline silicon films are also similar, but are about 50–70% higher than those of their amorphous counterparts. The heat conduction in nanocrystalline silicon films can be understood as the combined contribution in both amorphous and nanocrystalline phases, where increased conduction through improved nanocrystalline percolation path outweighs increased interface scattering between silicon nanocrystals and the amorphous matrix.

  3. From Amorphous to Nanocrystalline: The Effect of Nanograins in Amorphous Matrix on the Thermal Conductivity of Hot-Wire Chemical-Vapor Deposited Silicon Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemeth, William M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kearney, B. T. [Naval Research Laboratory; Jugdersuren, B. [Sotera Defense Solutions Inc.; Queen, D. R. [Naval Research Laboratory; Metcalf, Thomas H. [Naval Research Laboratory; Culbertson, J. C. [Naval Research Laboratory; Desario, P. A. [Naval Research Laboratory; Stroud, R. M. [Naval Research Laboratory; Wang, Q. [Formerly NREL; Liu, Xiao [Naval Research Laboratory

    2017-12-28

    We have measured the thermal conductivity of amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon films with varying crystalline content from 85K to room temperature. The films were prepared by the hot-wire chemical-vapor deposition, where the crystalline volume fraction is determined by the hydrogen (H2) dilution ratio to the processing silane gas (SiH4), R=H2/SiH4. We varied R from 1 to 10, where the films transform from amorphous for R < 3 to mostly nanocrystalline for larger R. Structural analyses show that the nanograins, averaging from 2 to 9nm in sizes with increasing R, are dispersed in the amorphous matrix. The crystalline volume fraction increases from 0 to 65% as R increases from 1 to 10. The thermal conductivities of the two amorphous silicon films are similar and consistent with the most previous reports with thicknesses no larger than a few um deposited by a variety of techniques. The thermal conductivities of the three nanocrystalline silicon films are also similar, but are about 50-70% higher than those of their amorphous counterparts. The heat conduction in nanocrystalline silicon films can be understood as the combined contribution in both amorphous and nanocrystalline phases, where increased conduction through improved nanocrystalline percolation path outweighs increased interface scattering between silicon nanocrystals and the amorphous matrix.

  4. Hot-wire air flow meter for gasoline fuel-injection system. Calculation of air mass in cylinder during transient condition; Gasoline funsha system yo no netsusenshiki kuki ryuryokei. Kato untenji no cylinder juten kukiryo no keisan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyama, Y. [Hitachi Car Engineering, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Nishimura, Y.; Osuga, M.; Yamauchi, T. [Hitachi, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    Air flow characteristics of hot-wire air flow meters for gasoline fuel-injection systems with supercharging and exhaust gas recycle during transient conditions were investigated to analyze a simple method for calculating air mass in cylinder. It was clarified that the air mass in cylinder could be calculated by compensating for the change of air mass in intake system by using aerodynamic models of intake system. 3 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. KISS KEK Information Service System for Preprints

    CERN Document Server

    KEK Library preprint database. Contains bibliographic records of preprints and technical reports held in the KEK library with links to the full text images of close to 100,000 items in their collection.

  6. Improvement of μc-Si:H n–i–p cell efficiency with an i-layer made by hot-wire CVD by reverse H2-profiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, H. B. T.; Franken, R.H.; Stolk, R.L.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2008-01-01

    The technique of maintaining a proper crystalline ratio in microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) layers along the thickness direction by decreasing the H2 dilution ratio during deposition (H2 profiling) was introduced by several laboratories while optimizing either n–i–p or p–i–n μc-Si:H cells made by

  7. Evaluation of an experimental chemistry preprint server.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warr, Wendy A

    2003-01-01

    A preprint is a research article made publicly available prior to formal publication. A preprint server is a freely available archive and distribution medium for preprints, allowing rapid dissemination and use of multimedia and supporting files. Electronic eprints have been widely adopted in certain fields (notably high energy physics), but, until recently, the preprint concept has not been received with enthusiasm by most chemists. Despite the fact that preprints have the advantage of rapid publication, chemists have been reluctant to produce them because they could be viewed as "unallowable" for research assessment or tenure exercises or for publication in certain prestigious journals. In theory, preprints, together with version control and online discussion, could be a useful compromise: rapid prepublication followed by open peer review, before publication in a traditional journal. This paper constitutes a preliminary evaluation of a Chemistry Preprint Server in its second year of operation and summarizes the lessons that can be learned from the experiment to date.

  8. search.bioPreprint: a discovery tool for cutting edge, preprint biomedical research articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwema, Carrie L; LaDue, John; Zack, Angela; Chattopadhyay, Ansuman

    2016-01-01

    The time it takes for a completed manuscript to be published traditionally can be extremely lengthy. Article publication delay, which occurs in part due to constraints associated with peer review, can prevent the timely dissemination of critical and actionable data associated with new information on rare diseases or developing health concerns such as Zika virus. Preprint servers are open access online repositories housing preprint research articles that enable authors (1) to make their research immediately and freely available and (2) to receive commentary and peer review prior to journal submission. There is a growing movement of preprint advocates aiming to change the current journal publication and peer review system, proposing that preprints catalyze biomedical discovery, support career advancement, and improve scientific communication. While the number of articles submitted to and hosted by preprint servers are gradually increasing, there has been no simple way to identify biomedical research published in a preprint format, as they are not typically indexed and are only discoverable by directly searching the specific preprint server websites. To address this issue, we created a search engine that quickly compiles preprints from disparate host repositories and provides a one-stop search solution. Additionally, we developed a web application that bolsters the discovery of preprints by enabling each and every word or phrase appearing on any web site to be integrated with articles from preprint servers. This tool, search.bioPreprint, is publicly available at http://www.hsls.pitt.edu/resources/preprint.

  9. Time resolved investigations on flow field and quasi wall shear stress of an impingement configuration with pulsating jets by means of high speed PIV and a surface hot wire array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janetzke, Timm [Berlin Institute of Technology, Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Chair of Aerodynamics, Marchstr. 12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: Timm.Janetzke@ILR.TU-Berlin.de; Nitsche, Wolfgang [Berlin Institute of Technology, Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Chair of Aerodynamics, Marchstr. 12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-10-15

    The effects of jet pulsation on flow field and quasi wall shear stress of an impingement configuration were investigated experimentally. The excitation Strouhal number and amplitude were varied as the most influential parameters. A line-array with three submerged air jets, and a confining plate were used. The flow field analysis by means of time resolved particle image velocimetry shows that the controlled excitation can considerably affect the near-field flow of an impinging jet array. These effects are visualized as organization of the coherent flow structures. Augmentation of the Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices in the jet shear layer depends on the Strouhal number and pulsation magnitude and can be associated with pairing of small scale vortices in the jet. A total maximum of vortex strength was observed when exciting with Sr = 0.82 and coincident high amplitudes. Time resolved interaction between impinging vortices and impingement plate boundary layer due to jet excitation was verified by using an array of 5 {mu}m surface hot wires. Corresponding to the global flow field modification due to periodic jet pulsation, the impact of the vortex rings on the wall boundary layer is highly influenced by the above mentioned excitation parameters and reaches a maximum at Sr = 0.82.

  10. search.bioPreprint: a discovery tool for cutting edge, preprint biomedical research articles [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie L. Iwema

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The time it takes for a completed manuscript to be published traditionally can be extremely lengthy. Article publication delay, which occurs in part due to constraints associated with peer review, can prevent the timely dissemination of critical and actionable data associated with new information on rare diseases or developing health concerns such as Zika virus. Preprint servers are open access online repositories housing preprint research articles that enable authors (1 to make their research immediately and freely available and (2 to receive commentary and peer review prior to journal submission. There is a growing movement of preprint advocates aiming to change the current journal publication and peer review system, proposing that preprints catalyze biomedical discovery, support career advancement, and improve scientific communication. While the number of articles submitted to and hosted by preprint servers are gradually increasing, there has been no simple way to identify biomedical research published in a preprint format, as they are not typically indexed and are only discoverable by directly searching the specific preprint server websites. To address this issue, we created a search engine that quickly compiles preprints from disparate host repositories and provides a one-stop search solution. Additionally, we developed a web application that bolsters the discovery of preprints by enabling each and every word or phrase appearing on any web site to be integrated with articles from preprint servers. This tool, search.bioPreprint, is publicly available at http://www.hsls.pitt.edu/resources/preprint.

  11. Citation Patterns to Traditional and Electronic Preprints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Hsiu Fu

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available A preprint or an e-print is a research article made publicly available prior to formal publication in a peer-reviewed journal. It is a new form of scholarly communication. To understand how preprint and e-print are used, this paper examined their citation patterns. This research searched the “cited work” field in the SciSearch database. The results showed that more than 657,713 preprints were cited from 1974 to 2003. As to e-print, 109,492 citations to 15 arXiv.org archives from 1991 to 2003 were found. Since1991, the number of citations to preprints had been decreasing, while the e-prints cited had increased. The peak e-print citation rate of 3 years observed was comparable to that of print journals.[Article content in Chinese

  12. Citation Patterns to Traditional and Electronic Preprints in the Published Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngen, Gregory K.

    1998-01-01

    Identifies the growing importance of electronic preprints in the published literature of physics and astronomy and address several areas of concern regarding the future role of electronic preprints in scientific communication. Topics include a history of preprints in astronomy and physics; inaccuracies in preprint citations; and archival issues.…

  13. Hot-wire synthesis of Si nanoparticles

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scriba, MR

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available sccm and with a tungsten filament maintained at 1650ºC. The as-prepared powder varies in colour from yellowish to dark brown and is deposited on all surfaces inside the reaction chamber. The material is a highly porous agglomeration of nanoparticles...

  14. Delaminated Transfer of CVD Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavijo, Alexis; Mao, Jinhai; Tilak, Nikhil; Altvater, Michael; Andrei, Eva

    Single layer graphene is commonly synthesized by dissociation of a carbonaceous gas at high temperatures in the presence of a metallic catalyst in a process known as Chemical Vapor Deposition or CVD. Although it is possible to achieve high quality graphene by CVD, the standard transfer technique of etching away the metallic catalyst is wasteful and jeopardizes the quality of the graphene film by contamination from etchants. Thus, development of a clean transfer technique and preservation of the parent substrate remain prominent hurdles to overcome. In this study, we employ a copper pretreatment technique and optimized parameters for growth of high quality single layer graphene at atmospheric pressure. We address the transfer challenge by utilizing the adhesive properties between a polymer film and graphene to achieve etchant-free transfer of graphene films from a copper substrate. Based on this concept we developed a technique for dry delamination and transferring of graphene to hexagonal boron nitride substrates, which produced high quality graphene films while at the same time preserving the integrity of the copper catalyst for reuse. DOE-FG02-99ER45742, Ronald E. McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program.

  15. Método de fio quente na determinação das propriedades térmicas de polímeros Hot wire technique in the determination of thermal properties of polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson N. dos Santos

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A técnica de fio quente paralelo normalizada para a determinação da condutividade térmica de materiais cerâmicos foi empregada na determinação das propriedades térmicas de polímeros. As amostras foram preparadas em forma de paralelepípedos retangulares, com dimensões de (230x80x30mm. Neste trabalho, a condutividade térmica e o calor específico foram simultaneamente determinados a partir do mesmo transiente térmico experimental e a difusividade térmica foi calculada a partir dessas duas propriedades. Cinco diferentes polímeros com diferentes estruturas a temperatura ambiente foram selecionados neste trabalho. Os cálculos foram feitos utilizando-se um método de ajuste por regressão não linear, de tal maneira que todos os pontos experimentais obtidos são considerados nos cálculos dessas propriedades térmicas. O equipamento utilizado neste trabalho é totalmente automatizado. A reprodutibilidade dos resultados foi muito boa com respeito à condutividade térmica, obtendo-se um desvio máximo de apenas 0,5% entre os valores máximo e mínimo para todas as amostras ensaiadas, mesmo introduzindo propositadamente alguns defeitos no arranjo experimental, em relação ao modelo teórico. Todavia, pequenos desvios do modelo teórico podem causar drásticas influências nos valores de calor específico, obtendo-se desvios de até 32% em relação ao arranjo experimental correto. Os resultados experimentais foram então comparados com aqueles encontrados na literatura. As discrepâncias observadas entre alguns desses valores podem estar associadas ao grau de cristalinidade ou à história térmica da amostra, ficando assim mostrada a aplicabilidade desta técnica na determinação das propriedades térmicas de polímeros.The hot wire parallel technique standardized for determining thermal conductivity of ceramic materials was employed in the determination of thermal properties of polymers. Samples were prepared in shape of rectangular

  16. The Role of the Preprint in Communication among Scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Ruth

    This paper examines the preprint as a medium of information in the communication process among scientists. The proliferation of scientific research since World War II has increased the prevalence of preprints as a means of coping with the volume of science literature worldwide. This project collected data via a search of publications during the…

  17. The Role of Electronic Preprints in Chemical Communication: Analysis of Citation, Usage, and Acceptance in the Journal Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Cecelia

    2003-01-01

    Characterizes the use and acceptance of electronic preprints in chemistry literature based on a survey of authors of preprints appearing in the Chemistry Preprint Server (CPS). Shows that preprints are convenient for disseminating research findings and for receiving feedback before submitting to a peer-review journal, but that reception of…

  18. CVD diamond for nuclear detection applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bergonzo, P; Tromson, D; Mer, C; Guizard, B; Marshall, R D; Foulon, F

    2002-01-01

    Chemically vapour deposited (CVD) diamond is a remarkable material for the fabrication of radiation detectors. In fact, there exist several applications where other standard semiconductor detectors do not fulfil the specific requirements imposed by corrosive, hot and/or high radiation dose environments. The improvement of the electronic properties of CVD diamond has been under intensive investigations and led to the development of a few applications that are addressing specific industrial needs. Here, we report on CVD diamond-based detector developments and we describe how this material, even though of a polycrystalline nature, is readily of great interest for applications in the nuclear industry as well as for physics experiments. Improvements in the material synthesis as well as on device fabrication especially concern the synthesis of films that do not exhibit space charge build up effects which are often encountered in CVD diamond materials and that are highly detrimental for detection devices. On a pre-i...

  19. Fermented dairy food and CVD risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapsell, Linda C

    2015-04-01

    Fermented dairy foods such as yoghurt and cheese are commonly found in the Mediterranean diet. Recent landmark research has confirmed the effect of the Mediterranean diet on reducing the CVD risk, but the relative contributions of fermented dairy foods have not been fully articulated. The present study provides a review of the relationship between fermented dairy foods consumption and CVD risk in the context of the whole diet. Studies show that people who eat healthier diets may be more likely to consume yoghurt, so there is a challenge in attributing separate effects to yoghurt. Analyses from large population studies list yoghurt as the food most negatively associated with the risk of weight gain (a problem that may lead to CVD). There is some suggestion that fermented dairy foods consumption (yoghurt or cheese) may be associated with reduced inflammatory biomarkers associated with the development of CVD. Dietary trials suggest that cheese may not have the same effect on raising LDL-cholesterol levels as butter with the same saturated fat content. The same might be stated for yoghurt. The use of different probiotic cultures and other aspects of study design remain a problem for research. Nevertheless, population studies from a range of countries have shown that a reduced risk of CVD occurs with the consumption of fermented dairy foods. A combination of evidence is necessary, and more research is always valuable, but indications remain that fermented dairy foods such as cheese and yoghurt are integral to diets that are protective against CVD.

  20. Estudo do Processo TIG Hot-Wire com Material de Adição AISI-316L Analisando o Efeito do Sopro Magnético do Arco sobre a Diluição do Cordão de Solda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick Alejandro González Olivares

    Full Text Available Resumo: O processo TIG com adição de arame quente (HotWire é considerado um processo altamente produtivo em comparação ao processo TIG convencional com arame frio (ColdWire, sendo possível alcançar grandes taxas de deposição e baixas porcentagens de diluição, características essas que permitem ao processo ser uma ótima alternativa para aplicações de revestimentos. Existem variadas opções em configurações de circuitos elétricos para aquecer o arame de adição no processo TIG Hot-Wire, entre elas podemos destacar a utilização da corrente contínua pulsada e a corrente alternada. No presente trabalho foi utilizada a corrente contínua constante e foram estudadas duas configurações do circuito elétrico para aquecer o material de adição, as quais em teoria provocam diferentes comportamentos no arco voltaico e, portanto, nas propriedades geométricas do cordão de solda. Uma primeira análise realizada sobre o arco voltaico demonstra que se forma um sopro mágnetico constante ao se aquecer o arame com corrente contínua constante. Segundo os ensaios realizados, a direção do sopro magnético depende da polaridade da corrente para aquecer o arame. Uma análise macrográfica dos cordões de solda obtidos demonstraram que os melhores resultados foram para os ensaios feitos com Hot-Wire, conseguindo diluições de até um 2% aproximadamente para uma velocidade de arame de 7,5 m/min, 1 kW de potência de aquecimento do arame e usando uma velocidade de soldagem de 30 cm/min.

  1. The Charge Collection Properties of CVD Diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Behnke, T; Oh, A; Steuerer, J; Wagner, A; Zeuner, W; Behnke, Ties; Hüntemeyer, Petra; Oh, Alexander; Steuerer, Johannes; Wagner, Albrecht; Zeuner, Wolfram

    1998-01-01

    The charge collection properties of CVD diamond have been investigated with ionising radiation. In this study two CVD diamond samples, prepared with electrical contacts have been used as solid state ionisation chambers. The diamonds have been studied with beta particles and 10 keV photons, providing a homogeneous ionisation density and with protons and alpha particles which are absorbed in a thin surface layer. For the latter case a strong decrease of the signal as function of time is observed, which is attributed to polarisation effects inside the diamond. Spatially resolved measurements with protons show a large variation of the charge collection efficiency, whereas for photons and minimum ionising particles the response is much more uniform and in the order of 18%. These results indicate that the applicability of CVD diamond as a position sensitive particle detector depends on the ionisation type and appears to be promising for homogeneous ionisation densities as provided by relativistic charged particles.

  2. Preprint server seeks way to halt plagiarists

    CERN Multimedia

    Giles, J

    2003-01-01

    "An unusual case of plagiarism has struck ArXiv, the popular physics preprint server at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, resulting in the withdrawal of 22 papers...The plagiarism case traces its origins to June 2002, when Yasushi Watanabe, a high-energy physicist at the Tokyo Insitute of Technology, was contacted by Ramy Noboulsi, who said he was a mathematical physicist" (1 page)

  3. CVD: a condition of underestimated severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattimer, C R

    2014-06-01

    Chronic venous disease (CVD) affects approximately a quarter of the adult population and causes a considerable burden on the health of these patients. The true extent of the severity of the disease is hampered because of reduced public awareness, operational difficulties in diagnosis, and the perception that varicose veins are mainly a cosmetic inconvenience. Consequently the disease receives little attention in public health care systems which focus on life threatening conditions and those which cause obvious morbidity like cancer, cardiac disease and stroke. This review aims to correct these misconceptions by addressing the full scope of CVD, including the post-thrombotic syndrome and venous ulceration. The severity of conditions like telangectasiae and edema and the symptoms they cause are frequently underestimated, especially if varicose veins are not present to alert the patient or doctor. The definition, diagnosis, scope, epidemiology, progression and cost of CVD are discussed with evidence to explain how these underestimate the severity of the disease. It is anticipated that once CVD achieves greater recognition this will open up greater opportunities for treatment. These include surgery, endovenous ablation, stenting, compression, venoactive drugs like micronized purified flavonoid fraction and other drugs such as sulodexide and pentoxifylline.

  4. CVD diamond pixel detectors for LHC experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedenig, R.; Adam, W.; Bauer, C.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K.K.; Gheeraert, E.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Karl, C.; Kass, R.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Manfredi, P.F.; Manfredotti, C.; Marshall, R.D.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Oh, A.; Pan, L.S.; Palmieri, V.G.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Pirollo, S.; Polesello, P.; Pretzl, K.; Procario, M.; Re, V.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Roff, D.; Rudge, A.; Runolfsson, O.; Russ, J.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Speziali, V.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R.J.; Tesarek, R.; Trawick, M.; Trischuk, W.; Vittone, E.; Wagner, A.; Walsh, A.M.; Weilhammer, P.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Ziock, H.; Zoeller, M.; Blanquart, L.; Breugnion, P.; Charles, E.; Ciocio, A.; Clemens, J.C.; Dao, K.; Einsweiler, K.; Fasching, D.; Fischer, P.; Joshi, A.; Keil, M.; Klasen, V.; Kleinfelder, S.; Laugier, D.; Meuser, S.; Milgrome, O.; Mouthuy, T.; Richardson, J.; Sinervo, P.; Treis, J.; Wermes, N

    1999-08-01

    This paper reviews the development of CVD diamond pixel detectors. The preparation of the diamond pixel sensors for bump-bonding to the pixel readout electronics for the LHC and the results from beam tests carried out at CERN are described.

  5. CVD diamond pixel detectors for LHC experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Wedenig, R; Bauer, C; Berdermann, E; Bergonzo, P; Bogani, F; Borchi, E; Brambilla, A; Bruzzi, Mara; Colledani, C; Conway, J; Dabrowski, W; Delpierre, P A; Deneuville, A; Dulinski, W; van Eijk, B; Fallou, A; Fizzotti, F; Foulon, F; Friedl, M; Gan, K K; Gheeraert, E; Grigoriev, E; Hallewell, G D; Hall-Wilton, R; Han, S; Hartjes, F G; Hrubec, Josef; Husson, D; Kagan, H; Kania, D R; Kaplon, J; Karl, C; Kass, R; Knöpfle, K T; Krammer, Manfred; Lo Giudice, A; Lü, R; Manfredi, P F; Manfredotti, C; Marshall, R D; Meier, D; Mishina, M; Oh, A; Pan, L S; Palmieri, V G; Pernicka, Manfred; Peitz, A; Pirollo, S; Polesello, P; Pretzl, Klaus P; Procario, M; Re, V; Riester, J L; Roe, S; Roff, D G; Rudge, A; Runólfsson, O; Russ, J; Schnetzer, S R; Sciortino, S; Speziali, V; Stelzer, H; Stone, R; Suter, B; Tapper, R J; Tesarek, R J; Trawick, M L; Trischuk, W; Vittone, E; Wagner, A; Walsh, A M; Weilhammer, Peter; White, C; Zeuner, W; Ziock, H J; Zöller, M

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of CVD diamond pixel detectors. The preparation of the diamond pixel sensors for bump-bonding to the pixel readout electronics for the LHC and the results from beam tests carried out at CERN are described. (9 refs).

  6. Los Alamos loses physics archive as preprint pioneer heads east

    CERN Multimedia

    Butler, D

    2001-01-01

    The Los Alamos preprint server is to move to Cornell University. Paul Ginsparg who created the server cites a lack of enthusiasm among senior staff at LANL as a major reason for his departure (1/2 page).

  7. On Geometric Variational Models for Inpainting Surface Holes (PREPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    ON GEOMETRIC VARIATIONAL MODELS FOR INPAINTING SURFACE HOLES By Vicent Caselles Gloria Haro Guillermo Sapiro and Joan Verdera IMA Preprint Series...TITLE AND SUBTITLE On Geometric Variational Models for Inpainting Surface Holes (PREPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...Geometric Variational Models for Inpainting Surface Holes V.Caselles1, G.Haro,1,2 G.Sapiro,3 and J.Verdera1 Corresponding author: Gloria Haro Full

  8. CVD calibration light systems specifications. Rev. 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcllwain, A. K. [Analytical Science Branch, Whiteshell Laboratories, AECL Research Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada)

    1992-04-15

    Two prototype Cerenkov Viewing Device Calibration Light systems for the Mark IV CVD have been fabricated. They consist of a maintenance unit that will be used by the IAEA maintenance staff and a field unit that will be used by IAEA inspectors. More detailed information on the design of the calibration units can be obtained from the document SSP-39 and additional information on the Mark IV CVD can be obtained from the operating manual published as Canadian Safeguards Support Program document CSSP 6. The specifications refer to the prototype units which will be demonstrated to the IAEA in 1992 May. Based upon the feedback from the IAEA, the instruments will be changed in the final production models to provide devices that more closely satisfy the needs of the end users.

  9. Recent results with CVD diamond trackers

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, W; Berdermann, E; Bergonzo, P; Bogani, F; Borchi, E; Brambilla, A; Bruzzi, Mara; Colledani, C; Conway, J; Dabrowski, W; Delpierre, P A; Deneuville, A; Dulinski, W; van Eijk, B; Fallou, A; Fizzotti, F; Foulon, F; Friedl, M; Gan, K K; Gheeraert, E; Grigoriev, E; Hallewell, G D; Hall-Wilton, R; Han, S; Hartjes, F G; Hrubec, Josef; Husson, D; Kagan, H; Kania, D R; Kaplon, J; Karl, C; Kass, R; Knöpfle, K T; Krammer, Manfred; Lo Giudice, A; Lü, R; Manfredi, P F; Manfredotti, C; Marshall, R D; Meier, D; Mishina, M; Oh, A; Pan, L S; Palmieri, V G; Pernicka, Manfred; Peitz, A; Pirollo, S; Polesello, P; Pretzl, Klaus P; Procario, M; Re, V; Riester, J L; Roe, S; Roff, D G; Rudge, A; Runólfsson, O; Russ, J; Schnetzer, S R; Sciortino, S; Speziali, V; Stelzer, H; Stone, R; Suter, B; Tapper, R J; Tesarek, R J; Trawick, M L; Trischuk, W; Vittone, E; Walsh, A M; Wedenig, R; Weilhammer, Peter; White, C; Ziock, H J; Zöller, M

    1999-01-01

    We present recent results on the use of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond microstrip detectors for charged particle tracking. A series of detectors was fabricated using 1*1 cm/sup 2/ diamonds. Good signal-to-noise ratios were observed using both slow and fast readout electronics. For slow readout electronics, 2 mu s shaping time, the most probable signal-to-noise ratio was 50 to 1. For fast readout electronics, 25 ns peaking time, the most probable signal-to-noise ratio was 7 to 1. Using the first 2*4 cm/sup 2/ diamond from a production CVD reactor with slow readout electronics, the most probable signal-to-noise ratio was 23 to 1. The spatial resolution achieved for the detectors was consistent with the digital resolution expected from the detector pitch. (6 refs).

  10. High electrical resistivity of CVD-diamond

    OpenAIRE

    Manca, Jean; Nesladek, Milos; Neelen, M; QUAEYHAEGENS, Carl; De Schepper, Luc; de Ceuninck, Ward

    1999-01-01

    Due to its combination of excellent thermo-mechanical properties and electrical properties such as the high electrical resistivity and high dielectric strength, diamond seems a promising material for specialized dielectric applications. Due to the great advances in the growth technology of diamond films by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on e.g. Si-substrates, new applications can be expected in microelectronics. An important technological result for dielectric applications is that high elec...

  11. Family history of cardiovascular disease (CVD), perceived CVD risk, and health-related behavior: A review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imes, Christopher C.; Lewis, Frances Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Background Over 82 million Americans have one or more forms of cardiovascular disease (CVD), accounting for 32.8% of all deaths in the United States. Although the evidence for the familial aggregation of CVD is strong, the relationship between family history (FH) of CVD, perceived risk for CVD and their relationship to health-related behavior is poorly understood. Objective The objective of this article is to review and summarize the published research on the relationship between a FH of CVD, an individual’s perceived risk, and health-related behavior in order to make recommendations for clinical practice and future research. Methods A literature search was conducted using PubMed, CINAHL Plus, and PsycINFO to identify articles that examined the relationship between a FH of CVD, perceived CVD risk, and health-promoting behaviors. A total of 263 unique articles were reviewed. Two hundred thirty-eight were excluded, resulting in a total of 25 articles included in the paper. Results There was a positive relationship between a reported FH of CVD and perceived risk. However, the relationship between a FH of CVD and health-related behavior change and perceived risk and behavior change was inconsistent. Conclusions A person’s awareness of their FH of CVD or their own risk for CVD is not a sufficient predictor of changes in their health-related behavior. Future studies are needed to better explain the processes by which perceived CVD risk or FH of CVD can be used to affect health-related behavior changes. It appears that both FH and perceived personal risk for CVD are necessary but not sufficient conditions to change health-related behavior in high-risk populations. Future studies should also test interventions that help individuals with a FH of CVD attribute increased personal risk to themselves for developing CVD, while providing lifestyle management options to minimize their risk. PMID:23321782

  12. Polycrystallinity and stacking in CVD graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsen, Adam W; Brown, Lola; Havener, Robin W; Park, Jiwoong

    2013-10-15

    Graphene, a truly two-dimensional hexagonal lattice of carbon atoms, possesses remarkable properties not seen in any other material, including ultrahigh electron mobility, high tensile strength, and uniform broadband optical absorption. While scientists initially studied its intrinsic properties with small, mechanically exfoliated graphene crystals found randomly, applying this knowledge would require growing large-area films with uniform structural and physical properties. The science of graphene has recently experienced revolutionary change, mainly due to the development of several large-scale growth methods. In particular, graphene synthesis by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on copper is a reliable method to obtain films with mostly monolayer coverage. These films are also polycrystalline, consisting of multiple graphene crystals joined by grain boundaries. In addition, portions of these graphene films contain more than one layer, and each layer can possess a different crystal orientation and stacking order. In this Account, we review the structural and physical properties that originate from polycrystallinity and stacking in CVD graphene. To begin, we introduce dark-field transmission electron microscopy (DF-TEM), a technique which allows rapid and accurate imaging of key structural properties, including the orientation of individual domains and relative stacking configurations. Using DF-TEM, one can easily identify "lateral junctions," or grain boundaries between adjacent domains, as well as "vertical junctions" from the stacking of graphene multilayers. With this technique, we can distinguish between oriented (Bernal or rhombohedral) and misoriented (twisted) configurations. The structure of lateral junctions in CVD graphene is sensitive to growth conditions and is reflected in the material's electrical and mechanical properties. In particular, grain boundaries in graphene grown under faster reactant flow conditions have no gaps or overlaps, unlike more

  13. The PrePRINT Network: A New Dynamic in Information Access from the U.S. Department of Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traylor, Terry Dennis

    2001-01-01

    Describes the PrePRINT Network, initiated by the Department of Energy to provide access to online preprints and reprints in the sciences and some areas of technological development. Discusses posting preprints on the Internet to improve scientific communication; and explains other Web-based products created to provide scientists with professional…

  14. Comparative evaluation of CVD diamond technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony, T.R. [General Electric Corporate Research & Development Center, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of diamonds occurs from hydrogen-hydrocarbon gas mixtures in the presence of atomic hydrogen at subatmospheric pressures. Most CVD methods are based on different means of generating and transporting atomic hydrogen in a particular system. Evaluation of these different techniques involves their capital costs, material costs, energy costs, labor costs and the type and quality of diamond that they produce. Currently, there is no universal agreement on which is the best technique and technique selection has been largely driven by the professional background of the user as well as the particular application of interest. This article discusses the criteria for evaluating a process for low-pressure deposition of diamond. Next, a brief history of low-pressure diamond synthesis is reviewed. Several specific processes are addressed, including the hot filament process, hot filament electron-assisted chemical vapor deposition, and plasma generation of atomic hydrogen by glow discharge, microwave discharge, low pressure radio frequency discharge, high pressure DC discharge, high pressure microwave discharge jets, high pressure RF discharge, and high and low pressure flames. Other types of diamond deposition methods are also evaluated. 101 refs., 15 figs.

  15. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes Array by CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, S.; Su, C.; Cochrane, J. C.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Muntele, I.; Ila, D.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Since the properties of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) are superior in many devices such as electronics and sensors, many efforts have been involved in synthesizing particular structural or dimensional MWCNT. Uniform aligned MWCNT array is one of the prototype structures for devices such as filed emission device and microelectromechanical systems in which a large length to diameter ratio may also be required. Most aligned MWCNT recently synthesized by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) have cone shaped structures. This presentation will illustrate aligned MWCNT array synthesized on silicon substrates using thermal CVD that could produce MWCNT with uniform diameter. An array of nickel particles was used as catalyst for MWCNT growth. A thin Ti or Au buffer layer was coated on the substrate prior to depositing nickel particles. Because the MWCNT size depends on the catalyst particle size, the nickel particle size annealed at various temperatures was investigated. MWCNT were grown on the substrate in the temperature range of 700 C - 1000 C and the pressure range of 1 to 300 torr. Methane and hydrogen gases with methane content of 1 - 10 % were used for the MWCNT synthesis. Morphology, length and diameter of MWCNT were determined by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The detailed results of synthesis and characterizations will be discussed in the presentation.

  16. Mo-C Multilayered CVD Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sagalovych

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Production processes of multi-layered Mo-C coatings by the method of chemical vapor deposition (CVD with the use of organometallic compounds were developed. Coatings are applied on technical purpose steel DIN 1.2379 (H12F1 and DIN 1.7709 (25H2MF (ÉI10 heat-treated ball with the high class of surface roughness (> 10. The average deposition rate was 50 μm / h. The optimal conditions of deposition coatings for different technological schemas were defined. Metallographic investigations of the obtained coatings were carried out. Tribological studies of the friction and wear characteristics of sliding friction in conditions of boundary lubrication of Ï-S multilayered CVD coatings shows, that coatings have low friction coefficients (0075-0095 at loads up to 2.0 kN, showed high resistance to wear and are effective in increasing the stability of the pair for precision friction pairs of hydraulical units.

  17. TSC response of irradiated CVD diamond films

    CERN Document Server

    Borchi, E; Bucciolini, M; Guasti, A; Mazzocchi, S; Pirollo, S; Sciortino, S

    1999-01-01

    CVD diamond films have been irradiated with electrons, sup 6 sup 0 Co photons and protons in order to study the dose response to exposure to different particles and energies and to investigate linearity with dose. The Thermally Stimulated Current (TSC) has been studied as a function of the dose delivered to polymethilmetacrilate (PMMA) in the range from 1 to 12 Gy with 20 MeV electrons from a linear accelerator. The TSC spectrum has revealed the presence of two components with peak temperatures of about 470 and 520 K, corresponding to levels lying in the diamond band gap with activation energies of the order of 0.7 - 1 eV. After the subtraction of the exponential background the charge emitted during the heating scan has been evaluated and has been found to depend linearly on the dose. The thermally emitted charge of the CVD diamond films has also been studied using different particles. The samples have been irradiated with the same PMMA dose of about 2 Gy with 6 and 20 MeV electrons from a Linac, sup 6 sup 0 ...

  18. Has the time come for preprints in biology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Needhi

    2016-04-15

    Preprints, non-peer-reviewed drafts of manuscripts available on the Internet, have been used in conjunction with peer review and publication in journals in the physical sciences for almost 25 years. Recently, more scientists have been discussing whether preprints can play a similar role in biological and biomedical research. Here, I discuss my excitement and concerns about the role that preprints can play in disseminating research findings in the life sciences. © 2016 Bhalla. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  19. Scientific publishing. Chemists toy with the preprint future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Service, R F

    2000-09-01

    Last week, the giant publishing house Elsevier Science launched the first electronic archive for chemistry preprints through its ChemWeb subsidiary. The new site (preprint.chemweb.com) will be a common repository for reports on a wide range of chemistry topics and a forum for authors and readers to discuss the results. But ChemWeb could face an uphill battle in convincing authors to post their papers on the site, as many of the field's premier journals decline to accept papers that have already been posted on the Web.

  20. Controlled Chemical Synthesis in CVD Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongtao; Liu, Yunqi

    2017-04-01

    Due to the unique properties of graphene, single layer, bilayer or even few layer graphene peeled off from bulk graphite cannot meet the need of practical applications. Large size graphene with quality comparable to mechanically exfoliated graphene has been synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The main development and the key issues in controllable chemical vapor deposition of graphene has been briefly discussed in this chapter. Various strategies for graphene layer number and stacking control, large size single crystal graphene domains on copper, graphene direct growth on dielectric substrates, and doping of graphene have been demonstrated. The methods summarized here will provide guidance on how to synthesize other two-dimensional materials beyond graphene.

  1. CVD diamond detectors for ionizing radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Friedl, M; Bauer, C; Berfermann, E; Bergonzo, P; Bogani, F; Borchi, E; Brambilla, A; Bruzzi, Mara; Colledani, C; Conway, J; Dabrowski, W; Delpierre, P A; Deneuville, A; Dulinski, W; van Eijk, B; Fallou, A; Fizzotti, F; Foulon, F; Gan, K K; Gheeraert, E; Grigoriev, E; Hallewell, G D; Hall-Wilton, R; Han, S; Hartjes, F G; Hrubec, Josef; Husson, D; Kagan, H; Kania, D R; Kaplon, J; Karl, C; Kass, R; Knöpfle, K T; Krammer, Manfred; Lo Giudice, A; Lü, R; Manfredi, P F; Manfredotti, C; Marshall, R D; Meier, D; Mishina, M; Oh, A; Pan, L S; Palmieri, V G; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Peitz, A; Pirollo, S; Polesello, P; Pretzl, Klaus P; Re, V; Riester, J L; Roe, S; Roff, D G; Rudge, A; Schnetzer, S R; Sciortino, S; Speziali, V; Stelzer, H; Stone, R; Tapper, R J; Tesarek, R J; Thomson, G B; Trawick, M L; Trischuk, W; Vittone, E; Walsh, A M; Wedenig, R; Weilhammer, Peter; Ziock, H J; Zöller, M

    1999-01-01

    In future HEP accelerators, such as the LHC (CERN), detectors and electronics in the vertex region of the experiments will suffer from extreme radiation. Thus radiation hardness is required for both detectors and electronics to survive in this harsh environment. CVD diamond, which is investigated by the RD42 Collaboration at CERN, can meet these requirements. Samples of up to 2*4 cm/sup 2/ have been grown and refined for better charge collection properties, which are measured with a beta source or in a test beam. A large number of diamond samples has been irradiated with hadrons to fluences of up to 5*10/sup 15/ cm/sup -2/ to study the effects of radiation. Both strip and pixel detectors were prepared in various geometries. Samples with strip metallization have been tested with both slow and fast readout electronics, and the first diamond pixel detector proved fully functional with LHC electronics. (16 refs).

  2. Aplicação da técnica de fio quente na determinação das propriedades térmicas de polímeros fundidos Hot wire technique in the determination of thermal properties of melt polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson N. dos Santos

    2005-11-01

    properties of a material that are needed for heat transfer calculations. Reliable thermal properties values are essential for polymers, both in steady and non-steady state situations. Nowadays, several different techniques for the determination of the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity may be found in the literature. In this work, the hot wire parallel technique is employed in the experimental determination of the thermal properties of polymers. Three semi-crystalline polymers (HDPE, LDPE and PP, and two amorphous polymers (PS and HIPS were selected for this work. Samples are prepared through the extrusion process starting from the powder or pellets of the solid polymer. A special mould of stainless steel in the shape of a rectangular parallelepiped provided with ceramic insulators between the hot wire, thermocouple and the mould is employed to store the melt extruded polymer whose thermal properties will be measured. Measurements are carried out from room temperature up to approximately 50 ºC above the melting point. Experimental results obtained are checked against data found in literature and those ones furnished by the manufacturers. A critical analysis of this method shows the advantages and disadvantages of this technique when compared with the laser flash technique.

  3. Test report for prototype CVD calibration light systems. Rev. 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-03-15

    Two prototype Cerenkov Viewing Device Calibration Light systems for the Mark IV CVD1 have been fabricated based upon a design report previously published. This document describes the tests that were run on the prototype maintenance and field CVD light calibration systems and compares the results to the data given in the specifications document.

  4. Influence of melt treatments and polished CVD diamond coated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Performances of the turning inserts (uncoated and polished CVD diamond coated) were evaluated in machining Al–7Si and Al–7Si–2.5Cu cast alloys under dry environment using a lathe. The polished CVD diamond coated insert outperformed the uncoated cutting insert which suffered from sizeable edge buildup leading to ...

  5. Exploring a New Model for Preprint Server: A Case Study of CSPO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Changping; Zhang, Yaokun; Chen, Guo

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the introduction of an open-access preprint server in China covering 43 disciplines. The system includes mandatory deposit for state-funded research and reports on the repository and its effectiveness and outlines a novel process of peer-review of preprints in the repository, which can be incorporated into the established…

  6. Biopolymer Nanocomposite-Based Electromagnetic Interference shielding (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-27

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0493 BIOPOLYMER NANOCOMPOSITE-BASED ELECTROMAGNETIC INTERFERENCE SHIELDING (PREPRINT) Yu Zang, Charles Rogers...Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release: distribution unlimited. (STINFO COPY) AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY MATERIALS AND...MANUFACTURING DIRECTORATE WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, OH 45433-7750 AIR FORCE MATERIEL COMMAND UNITED STATES AIR FORCE REPORT DOCUMENTATION

  7. Increasing Electric Field Strength of Polymer Capacitors (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-31

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0496 INCREASING ELECTRIC FIELD STRENGTH OF POLYMER CAPACITORS (PREPRINT) Fahima Ouchen KBRWyle James Grote...COVERED (From - To) 31 October 2017 Interim 24 January 2014 – 30 September 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE INCREASING ELECTRIC FIELD STRENGTH OF...ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) Increased electric field breakdown in several polymer-based capacitor dielectrics, including biaxially oriented

  8. Managing Reprints and Preprints in an Observatory Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sarah S.

    An on-going project of cross-referencing reprint and preprint series distributed by observatories to the collection of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory is described. Reprints available in the library's journal collection were removed after cross-indexing and referencing was accomplished. If the reprint was not available through the journal…

  9. CVD carbon powders modified by ball milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazmierczak Tomasz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon powders produced using a plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD methods are an interesting subject of research. One of the most interesting methods of synthesizing these powders is using radio frequency plasma. This method, originally used in deposition of carbon films containing different sp2/sp3 ratios, also makes possible to produce carbon structures in the form of powder. Results of research related to the mechanical modification of these powders have been presented. The powders were modified using a planetary ball mill with varying parameters, such as milling speed, time, ball/powder mass ratio and additional liquids. Changes in morphology and particle sizes were measured using scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Phase composition was analyzed using Raman spectroscopy. The influence of individual parameters on the modification outcome was estimated using statistical method. The research proved that the size of obtained powders is mostly influenced by the milling speed and the amount of balls. Powders tend to form conglomerates sized up to hundreds of micrometers. Additionally, it is possible to obtain nanopowders with the size around 100 nm. Furthermore, application of additional liquid, i.e. water in the process reduces the graphitization of the powder, which takes place during dry milling.

  10. CVD-Graphene-Based Flexible, Thermoelectrochromic Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Januszko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main idea behind this work was demonstrated in a form of a new thermoelectrochromic sensor on a flexible substrate using graphene as an electrically reconfigurable thermal medium (TEChrom™. Our approach relies on electromodulation of thermal properties of graphene on poly(ethylene terephthalate (PET via mechanical destruction of a graphene layer. Graphene applied in this work was obtained by chemical vapor deposition (CVD technique on copper substrate and characterized by Raman and scanning tunneling spectroscopy. Electrical parameters of graphene were evaluated by the van der Pauw method on the transferred graphene layers onto SiO2 substrates by electrochemical delamination method. Two configurations of architecture of sensors, without and with the thermochromic layer, were investigated, taking into account the increase of voltage from 0 to 50 V and were observed by thermographic camera to define heat energy. Current-voltage characteristics obtained for the sensor with damaged graphene layer are linear, and the resistivity is independent from the current applied. The device investigated under 1000 W/m2 exhibited rise of resistivity along with increased temperature. Flexible thermoelectrochromic device with graphene presented here can be widely used as a sensor for both the military and civil monitoring.

  11. Dry-transferred CVD graphene for inverted spin valve devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drögeler, Marc; Banszerus, Luca; Volmer, Frank; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Beschoten, Bernd; Stampfer, Christoph

    2017-10-01

    Integrating high-mobility graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) into spin transport devices is one of the key tasks in graphene spintronics. We use a van der Waals pick-up technique to transfer CVD graphene by hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) from the copper growth substrate onto predefined Co/MgO electrodes to build inverted spin valve devices. Two approaches are presented: (i) a process where the CVD-graphene/hBN stack is first patterned into a bar and then transferred by a second larger hBN crystal onto spin valve electrodes and (ii) a direct transfer of a CVD-graphene/hBN stack. We report record high spin lifetimes in CVD graphene of up to 1.75 ns at room temperature. Overall, the performances of our devices are comparable to devices fabricated from exfoliated graphene also revealing nanosecond spin lifetimes. We expect that our dry transfer methods pave the way towards more advanced device geometries not only for spintronic applications but also for CVD-graphene-based nanoelectronic devices in general where patterning of the CVD graphene is required prior to the assembly of final van der Waals heterostructures.

  12. Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by Plasma CVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Kato

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research in plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD for single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT growth has achieved low-temperature synthesis, individually freestanding formation, and structure control of diameter, chirality, and length. Detailed growth kinetics of SWNTs are revealed using a combination of techniques for plasma control and nanomaterial analysis. Plasma CVD also allows tube metallicity to be controlled by tuning the mean diameter of SWNTs. This plasma CVD progress contributes to the next stage of nanotube fabrication, which is required for practical use of SWNTs in a variety of applications.

  13. Dry-transferred CVD graphene for inverted spin valve devices

    OpenAIRE

    Drögeler, Marc; Banszerus, Luca; Volmer, Frank; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Beschoten, Bernd; Stampfer, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Integrating high-mobility graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) into spin transport devices is one of the key tasks in graphene spintronics. We use a van der Waals pickup technique to transfer CVD graphene by hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) from the copper growth substrate onto predefined Co/MgO electrodes to build inverted spin valve devices. Two approaches are presented: (i) a process where the CVD-graphene/hBN stack is first patterned into a bar and then transferred by a second l...

  14. Thermal stability of hot-wire deposited amorphous silicon

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Arendse, CJ

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available of vacancy clustering at 400 -C, caused by the alignment of unterminated Si dangling-bonds that consequently results in an increase in the defect size, concentration or both. Raman scattering shows evidence that no crystallization is induced at 400 -C...

  15. Hot wire needle probe for thermal conductivity detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condie, Keith Glenn; Rempe, Joy Lynn; Knudson, Darrell lee; Daw, Joshua Earl; Wilkins, Steven Curtis; Fox, Brandon S.; Heng, Ban

    2015-11-10

    An apparatus comprising a needle probe comprising a sheath, a heating element, a temperature sensor, and electrical insulation that allows thermal conductivity to be measured in extreme environments, such as in high-temperature irradiation testing. The heating element is contained within the sheath and is electrically conductive. In an embodiment, the heating element is a wire capable of being joule heated when an electrical current is applied. The temperature sensor is contained within the sheath, electrically insulated from the heating element and the sheath. The electrical insulation electrically insulates the sheath, heating element and temperature sensor. The electrical insulation fills the sheath having electrical resistance capable of preventing electrical conduction between the sheath, heating element, and temperature sensor. The control system is connected to the heating element and the temperature sensor.

  16. Hot-wire chemical vapour deposition of carbon nanotubes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cummings, FR

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Owing entirely to their structure, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) possess some of the most remarkable chemical and physical properties. More specifically, they exhibit exceptional strength and toughness, chemical inertness, magnetism, and electrical...

  17. CVD facility electrical system captor/dapper study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SINGH, G.

    1999-10-28

    Project W-441, CVD Facility Electrical System CAPTOWDAPPER Study validates Meier's hand calculations. This study includes Load flow, short circuit, voltage drop, protective device coordination, and transient motor starting (TMS) analyses.

  18. CVD graphene films and its application in organic photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Lewis; Zhang, Yi; Schlenker, Cody; Ryu, Koungmin; Thompson, Mark; Zhou, Chongwu

    2010-03-01

    In this work, CVD of graphene was used as a simple, scalable and cost-efficient method to prepare single and few-layer graphene films over large areas. CVD-G was characterized by Raman spectroscopy and TEM. Back-gated thin-film transistors were used to evaluate transport properties of the synthesized films. In addition, CVD graphene films were transferred to transparent substrates for photovoltaic cell fabrication. Solar cells obtained from the synthesized graphene films showed comparable performance to those fabricated with the standard indium tin oxide film (ITO) and showed superior performance under bending conditions due to the high flexibility of graphene. CVD Graphene constitutes a significant advance towards the production of transparent conductive films of graphene at large scale and has great implications for future graphene-related electronic devices.

  19. Study of defects in CVD and ultradisperse diamond

    OpenAIRE

    Iakoubovskii, K; Adriaenssens, G.J.; MEYKENS, Kristien; Nesladek, Milos; Vul, AY; Osipov, VY

    1999-01-01

    Characterization of defects in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and detonation synthesis ultradisperse diamond (UDD) is reported. Electron Spin Resonance, Raman, and photothermal deflection spectroscopies show that sp(2)-bonded carbon is a dominant defect in UDD diamond. Although UDD was made from trinitrotoluene, no substitutional nitrogen was detected. Photoluminescence (PL) from CVD films showed narrow lines at 1.68, 1.945 and 2.156 eV, in addition to broad red and green bands, while only a...

  20. CVD Diamond Sensors In Detectors For High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00334150; Trischuk, William

    At the end of the next decade an upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) is planned which requires the development of new radiation tolerant sensor technology. Diamond is an interesting material for use as a particle detector in high radiation environments. The large band gap ($5.47\\,\\text{eV}$) and the large displacement energy suggest that diamond is a radiation tolerant detector material. In this Thesis the capability of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond as such a sensor technology is investigated. The radiation damage constant for $800\\,\\text{MeV}$ protons is measured using single crystalline CVD (scCVD) and polycrystalline CVD (pCVD) diamonds irradiated to particle fluences up to $12 \\times 10^{15}\\,\\text{p/cm}^2$. In addition the signal response of a pCVD diamond detector after an irradiation to $12 \\times 10^{15}\\,\\text{p/cm}^2$ is investigated to determine if such a detector can be operated efficiently in the expected HL-LHC environment. By using electrodes em...

  1. Ion beam figuring of CVD silicon carbide mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gailly, P.; Collette, J.-P.; Fleury Frenette, K.; Jamar, C.

    2017-11-01

    Optical and structural elements made of silicon carbide are increasingly found in space instruments. Chemical vapor deposited silicon carbide (CVD-SiC) is used as a reflective coating on SiC optics in reason of its good behavior under polishing. The advantage of applying ion beam figuring (IBF) to CVD-SiC over other surface figure-improving techniques is discussed herein. The results of an IBF sequence performed at the Centre Spatial de Liège on a 100 mm CVD-SiC mirror are reported. The process allowed to reduce the mirror surface errors from 243 nm to 13 nm rms . Beside the surface figure, roughness is another critical feature to consider in order to preserve the optical quality of CVD-SiC . Thus, experiments focusing on the evolution of roughness were performed in various ion beam etching conditions. The roughness of samples etched at different depths down to 3 ≠m was determined with an optical profilometer. These measurements emphasize the importance of selecting the right combination of gas and beam energy to keep roughness at a low level. Kaufman-type ion sources are generally used to perform IBF but the performance of an end-Hall ion source in figuring CVD-SiC mirrors was also evaluated in this study. In order to do so, ion beam etching profiles obtained with the end-Hall source on CVD-SiC were measured and used as a basis for IBF simulations.

  2. The prehistory of biology preprints: A forgotten experiment from the 1960s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Matthew

    2017-11-01

    In 1961, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) began to circulate biological preprints in a forgotten experiment called the Information Exchange Groups (IEGs). This system eventually attracted over 3,600 participants and saw the production of over 2,500 different documents, but by 1967, it was effectively shut down following the refusal of journals to accept articles that had been circulated as preprints. This article charts the rise and fall of the IEGs and explores the parallels with the 1990s and the biomedical preprint movement of today.

  3. DNA based Frequency Selective Electromagnetic Interference Shielding (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-03

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0495 DNA -BASED FREQUENCY SELECTIVE ELECTROMAGNETIC INTERFERENCE SHIELDING (PREPRINT) Fahima Ouchen, Eric Kreit...To) 31 October 2017 Interim 24 January 2014 – 30 September 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE DNA -BASED FREQUENCY SELECTIVE ELECTROMAGNETIC INTERFERENCE...92008 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18 DNA -based frequency selective electromagnetic interference shielding

  4. Porosity Evolution in a Creeping Single Crystal (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    mechanism. Our analyses focus on the role of stress state on deformation and void growth in ductile single crystals in the dislocation creep regime. We also...orientation effects on void growth and coalescence in fcc single crystals . International Journal of Plasticity, 22, 921-942. [27] Kysar J.W., Gan Y.X...AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2012-0373 POROSITY EVOLUTION IN A CREEPING SINGLE CRYSTAL (PREPRINT) A. Srivastava and A. Needleman University of North

  5. Σχεδιασμός, ανάπτυξη και κατασκευή διάταξης ανεμομέτρου θερμαινόμενου σύρματος (Hot wire anemometry)

    OpenAIRE

    Κωνσταντίνου, Κωνσταντίνος

    2014-01-01

    Η παρούσα εργασία πραγματεύεται τη μελέτη και κατασκευή μιας μονάδας ανεμομέτρου θερμού σύρματος (Hot wire anemometer). Η εργασία αυτή εκπονήθηκε στο Εργαστήριο Θερμοκινητήρων του Τμήματος Μηχανολόγων και Αεροναυπηγών Μηχανικών της Πολυτεχνικής Σχολής του Πανεπιστημίου Πατρών. Σκοπός είναι η μελέτη, σχεδιασμός, κατασκευή και δοκιμή μιας μονοκάναλης μονάδας θερμού σύρματος σταθερής θερμοκρασίας (constant temperature anemometer CTA). Η μέθοδος του Hot wire anemometer χρησιμοποιείται για την...

  6. Synthesis of CVD-graphene on rapidly heated copper foils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Min; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Kwang-Seop; Hwangbo, Yun; Yoon, Jong-Hyuk; Lee, Eun-Kyu; Ryu, Jaechul; Lee, Hak-Joo; Cho, Seungmin; Lee, Seung-Mo

    2014-05-07

    Most chemical vapor deposition (CVD) systems used for graphene growth mainly employ convection and radiation heat transfer between the heating source and the metal catalyst in order to reach the activation temperature of the reaction, which in general leads to a long synthesis time and poor energy efficiency. Here, we report a highly time- and energy-efficient CVD setup, in which the metal catalyst (Cu) is designed to be physically contacted with a heating source to give quick heat transfer by conduction. The induced conduction heating enabled the usual effects of the pretreatment and annealing of Cu (i.e., annihilation of surface defects, impurities and contaminants) to be achieved in a significantly shorter time compared to conventional CVD. Notably, the rapid heating was observed to lead to larger grains of Cu with high uniformity as compared to the Cu annealed by conventional CVD, which are believed to be beneficial for the growth of high quality graphene. Through this CVD setup, bundles of high quality (∼252 Ω per square) and large area (over 16 inch) graphenes were able to be readily synthesized in 40 min in a significantly efficient way. When considering ease of scalability, high energy effectiveness and considerable productivity, our method is expected to be welcomed by industrialists.

  7. Lipids, atherosclerosis and CVD risk: is CRP an innocent bystander?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, B G; Zacho, J

    2009-01-01

    are consistently associated with CVD risk. A recent study showed that aggressive statin treatment caused reductions of 50% in LDL cholesterol, 37% in CRP, 44% in CVD events, and 20% in total mortality, and that the highest treatment benefits were obtained in those with the lowest achieved levels of both LDL......AIM: To evaluate recent human studies with respect to the interpretation of whether elevated plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) cause cardiovascular disease (CVD), or whether elevated CRP levels more likely is an innocent bystander. DATA SYNTHESIS: Elevated CRP concentrations...... cholesterol and CRP. However, a reduction in CRP levels after statin treatment could be secondary to the reduced LDL cholesterol levels, and thereby less inflammation in atherosclerotic plaques. We recently performed 4 large Mendelian randomization studies, studies that demonstrated that elevated CRP...

  8. Investigation on the priming effect of a CVD diamond microdosimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Lu Rong Rong; Jiang Da; Li Xiao Lin; Zhu Jie Qing

    2002-01-01

    CVD diamond microdosimeter is an ideal substitute of common Si, GaAs detector for extremely strong radiation experimental environmental due to its high band gap energy, fast charge collection, low dielectric constant and hardness. In order to improve its character, a CVD diamond microdosimeter was irradiated by a proton dose of 46 Gy, and a lateral micro-ion beam induced charge (IBIC) technique was utilized to characterize it in low beam current (approx fA). It was clearly shown that charge collection efficiency and energy resolution were greatly improved after proton irradiation of that dose. Moreover, the homogeneities of both its counting performance and collection efficiency were enhanced. Proton irradiation of 46 Gy has been proved to be an effective way to prime a CVD diamond

  9. Present limitations of CVD diamond detectors for IMRT applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Angelis, C. [Dipartimento di Tecnologie e Salute, Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN, Viale regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy)], E-mail: cinzia.deangelis@iss.it; Casati, M. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia dell' Universita and INFN, Florence (Italy); Bruzzi, M. [Dipartimento di Energetica dell' Universita and INFN, Florence (Italy); Onori, S. [Dipartimento di Tecnologie e Salute, Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN, Viale regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Bucciolini, M. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia dell' Universita and INFN, Florence (Italy)

    2007-12-11

    The aim of the work was to test the suitability of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond detectors for dosimetry in IMRT fields. We used in-house CVD detectors prepared with state-of-the-art polycrystalline diamond films (Element Six Ltd., UK). The parameters considered were time stability, dynamic response, dose-rate dependence and energy dependence. Output factors and TPR were measured in conventional photon fields and dose measurements were performed in IMRT fields using the step-and-shoot technique. Results prove that CVD diamond detectors are suitable for dosimetry in conventional treatments, but they still do not fit the IMRT dosimetry requirements, mainly because of their slow dynamic response. In particular, the slow dynamics affects linearity at low Monitor Units and renders it impossible to follow the sharp transients of IMRT fields. Time stability and dose-rate dependence as well must be improved to reduce their influence on dose assessment.

  10. Real-Time Measurement of Process Efficiency during Inertia Friction Welding (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-20

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0532 REAL-TIME MEASUREMENT OF PROCESS EFFICIENCY DURING INERTIA FRICTION WELDING (PREPRINT...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE REAL-TIME MEASUREMENT OF PROCESS EFFICIENCY DURING INERTIA FRICTION WELDING (PREPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER IN-HOUSE...200 words) Process efficiency is a crucial parameter for inertia friction welding (IFW) that is largely unknown at the present time. A new method

  11. Confined Photovoltaic Fields in a Photo-Responsive Liquid Crystal Test Cell (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-11

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0428 CONFINED PHOTOVOLTAIC FIELDS IN A PHOTO- RESPONSIVE LIQUID CRYSTAL TEST CELL (PREPRINT) Atefeh...TITLE AND SUBTITLE CONFINED PHOTOVOLTAIC FIELDS IN A PHOTO- RESPONSIVE LIQUID CRYSTAL TEST CELL (PREPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-16-D...hybridized photo responsive liquid crystal test cells are reported, where iron doped lithium niobate substrates were used to photo generate electric

  12. Binary Ternary Based Nanolaminates Fabricated By Multi Stationary Target PLD (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-04

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0306 BINARY- TERNARY BASED NANOLAMINATES FABRICATED BY MULTI-STATIONARY TARGET PLD (PREPRINT) Steven R. Smith...December 2013 – 15 July 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE BINARY- TERNARY BASED NANOLAMINATES FABRICATED BY MULTI-STATIONARY TARGET PLD (PREPRINT) 5a...energy of 450 mJ per pulse, a galvanometer mirror system and a background pressure of oxygen. Trends in material properties were identified by

  13. Simulation of Prestressed Concrete Sandwich Panels Subjected to Blast Loads (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    AFRL-RX-TY-TP-2010-0014 PREPRINT SIMULATION OF PRESTRESSED CONCRETE SANDWICH PANELS SUBJECTED TO BLAST LOADS Charles M. Newberry and...NUMBER (Include area code) 01-FEB-2010 Conference Paper PREPRINT 01-JAN-2009-- 31-DEC-2009 Simulation of Prestressed Concrete Sandwich Panels Subjected... concrete , sandwich panels, simulation, LS-DYNA, blast, tilt-up panels U U U UU 14 Paul Sheppard Reset Simulation of Prestressed Concrete Sandwich

  14. Modeling Environmental Degradation of SiC/BN/SiC CMCs (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-28

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0308 MODELING ENVIRONMENTAL DEGRADATION OF SIC/BN/SIC CMCS (PREPRINT) Craig Przybyla and Michael K Cinibulk...2017 Interim 22 July 2013 – 6 January 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE MODELING ENVIRONMENTAL DEGRADATION OF SIC/BN/SIC CMCS (PREPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT...91360 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18 Modeling environmental degradation of SiC/BN/SiC CMCs Triplicane A

  15. Preprints, Impact Factors, and Unethical Behavior, but also Lots of Good News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gölitz, Peter

    2016-10-24

    Preprints as well? There is already the Accepted Article (published directly after refereeing and author revision), the Early-View/ASAP-Version (after refereeing, editing and proofing), and the final Version of Record. The problems with preprints are discussed in this Editorial along with the undeclared resubmission of previously rejected manuscripts: publication times, color costs, and Angewandte Symposia are further topics. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Métodos transientes de troca de calor na determinação das propriedades térmicas de materiais cerâmicos: II - o método do fio quente Thermal properties of ceramic materials by the non-steady techniques: II - the hot wire technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. N. dos Santos

    2005-12-01

    diffusivity is important in non-steady heat transfer calculations. The specific heat is also a decisive property of ceramic materials in high temperature applications, and it is associated with heat consumption during the heating process. Normally these properties are determined separately by individual techniques and apparatus. Nowadays, several different techniques for the determination of the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity may be found in the literature. Recently, transient techniques have become the preferable way for measuring thermal properties of materials. In this work it is presented a description as well as a critical analysis of one experimental technique employed worldwide for thermal properties measurements of ceramic materials: the hot wire technique. With this technique it is possible to determine simultaneously from the same temperature transient the three thermal properties. Numerical results are also presented.

  17. The extended growth of graphene oxide flakes using ethanol CVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jingfeng; Larisika, Melanie; Fam, W H Derrick; He, Qiyuan; Nimmo, Myra A; Nowak, Christoph; Tok, I Y Alfred

    2013-04-07

    We report the extended growth of Graphene Oxide (GO) flakes using atmospheric pressure ethanol Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). GO was used to catalyze the deposition of carbon on a substrate in the ethanol CVD with Ar and H2 as carrier gases. Raman, SEM, XPS and AFM characterized the growth to be a reduced GO (RGO) of layers. This newly grown RGO possesses lower defect density with larger and increased distribution of sp(2) domains than chemically reduced RGO. Furthermore this method without optimization reduces the relative standard deviation of electrical conductivity between chips, from 80.5% to 16.5%, enabling RGO to be used in practical electronic devices.

  18. Growth of microcrystals by CVD method. CVD ho ni yoru bikessho no seicho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motojima, S. (Gifu University, Gifu (Japan). Faculty of Engineering)

    1991-12-01

    The growth of microcrysials of a ceramic by the chemical vapor deposition(CVD) method to make a single crystal was presented. Since this method uses a gas phase as the atomosphere, the single crystal having many kinds of configuration can be obtained by controlling the growing conition. A modified filament method was devised as a method by which a considerably large single srystal could simply by grown from the gas phase. An about 7mm size single TiC crystal of pyramidal configuration could be obtained by making the heating filament part hemperature higher so as not to deposite crystals, and on the other hand, by holding the central part temperature of filament a little lower to produce one to two crystal nuclei. When a SUS 410 type stainless steel sheet was silicified by a crystal growing method (diffusion method) using the difference of diffusion rate between Si atoms in silicate film on a substrate and Si atoms in the gas phase, a hollow single crystal of (Cr,Fe){sub 5}Si{sub 3}grew and this film showed superior anti-corrosion property to SUS 310 type stainless steel. A coil-like carbon fiber grown in a gas phase of acethylene could also by obtained by pyrolyzing acetylene gas. Single crystals of chromium boride, chromium phosphide and chromium silicide were also presented. 21 figs.

  19. PRN: a preprint service for catalyzing R-fMRI and neuroscience related studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chao-Gan; Li, Qingyang; Gao, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Sharing drafts of scientific manuscripts on preprint hosting services for early exposure and pre-publication feedback is a well-accepted practice in fields such as physics, astronomy, or mathematics. The field of neuroscience, however, has yet to adopt the preprint model. A reason for this reluctance might partly be the lack of central preprint services for the field of neuroscience. To address this issue, we announce the launch of Preprints of the R-fMRI Network (PRN), a community funded preprint hosting service. PRN provides free-submission and free hosting of manuscripts for resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI) and neuroscience related studies. Submitted articles are openly discussed and receive feedback from readers and a panel of invited consultants from the R-fMRI Network. All manuscripts and feedback are freely accessible online with citable permanent URL for open-access. The goal of PRN is to supplement the peer reviewed journal publication system - by more rapidly communicating the latest research achievements throughout the world. We hope PRN would help the field to embrace the preprint model and thus further accelerate R-fMRI and neuroscience related studies, eventually enhancing human mental health.

  20. The role of inorganic nitrate and nitrite in CVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jacklyn; Patterson, Amanda J; MacDonald-Wicks, Lesley; McEvoy, Mark

    2017-12-01

    CVD is the leading cause of death worldwide, a consequence of mostly poor lifestyle and dietary behaviours. Although whole fruit and vegetable consumption has been consistently shown to reduce CVD risk, the exact protective constituents of these foods are yet to be clearly identified. A recent and biologically plausible hypothesis supporting the cardioprotective effects of vegetables has been linked to their inorganic nitrate content. Approximately 60-80 % inorganic nitrate exposure in the human diet is contributed by vegetable consumption. Although inorganic nitrate is a relatively stable molecule, under specific conditions it can be metabolised in the body to produce NO via the newly discovered nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway. NO is a major signalling molecule in the human body, and has a key role in maintaining vascular tone, smooth muscle cell proliferation, platelet activity and inflammation. Currently, there is accumulating evidence demonstrating that inorganic nitrate can lead to lower blood pressure and improved vascular compliance in humans. The aim of this review is to present an informative, balanced and critical review of the current evidence investigating the role of inorganic nitrate and nitrite in the development, prevention and/or treatment of CVD. Although there is evidence supporting short-term inorganic nitrate intakes for reduced blood pressure, there is a severe lack of research examining the role of long-term nitrate intakes in the treatment and/or prevention of hard CVD outcomes, such as myocardial infarction and cardiovascular mortality. Epidemiological evidence is needed in this field to justify continued research efforts.

  1. Novel Batch Titanium Nitride CVD Process for Advanced Metal Electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zagwijn, P.M.; Verweij, W.; Pierreux, D.; Noureddine, A.; Bankras, R.; Oosterlaken, E.; Snijders, G.J.; Van den Hout, M.; Fischer, P.; Wilhelm, R.; Knapp, M.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a novel CVD process for TiN films developed in a 300 mm Vertical Furnace. We have solved Chlorine incorporation at low temperature inside the TiN layer while at the same time the batch process yields a 3 times higher throughput per dual reactor system compared to a single

  2. High mobility dry-transferred CVD bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Michael; Engels, Stephan; Banszerus, Luca; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Stampfer, Christoph; Beschoten, Bernd

    2017-06-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of high-quality chemical vapor-deposited (CVD) bilayer graphene (BLG). In particular, we demonstrate that CVD-grown BLG can be detached mechanically from the copper foil by a hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) crystal after oxidation of the copper-to-BLG interface. Confocal Raman spectroscopy reveals an AB-stacking order of the BLG crystals and a high structural quality. From transport measurements on fully encapsulated hBN/BLG/hBN Hall bar devices, we extract charge carrier mobilities up to 180 000 cm2/(Vs) at 2 K and up to 40 000 cm2/(Vs) at 300 K, outperforming state-of-the-art CVD bilayer graphene devices. Moreover, we show an on-off ratio of more than 10 000 and a band gap opening with values of up to 15 meV for a displacement field of 0.2 V/nm in such CVD grown BLG.

  3. Atmospheric pressure CVD of SNO2 and ZNO:AL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelen, J. van; Kniknie, B.J.; Steijvers, H.L.A.H.; Mannie, G.; Thune, P.; Illiberi, A.

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure CVD (APCVD) is a highly cost effective method of depositing transparent conductive oxides (TCOs). In this work, insights in alcohol addition in the widely applied SnO2 process are discussed, including high resolution TEM images. Furthermore, the APCVD process of ZnO:Al was

  4. PRINTS and its automatic supplement, prePRINTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attwood, T K; Bradley, P; Flower, D R; Gaulton, A; Maudling, N; Mitchell, A L; Moulton, G; Nordle, A; Paine, K; Taylor, P; Uddin, A; Zygouri, C

    2003-01-01

    The PRINTS database houses a collection of protein fingerprints. These may be used to assign uncharacterised sequences to known families and hence to infer tentative functions. The September 2002 release (version 36.0) includes 1800 fingerprints, encoding approximately 11 000 motifs, covering a range of globular and membrane proteins, modular polypeptides and so on. In addition to its continued steady growth, we report here the development of an automatic supplement, prePRINTS, designed to increase the coverage of the resource and reduce some of the manual burdens inherent in its maintenance. The databases are accessible for interrogation and searching at http://www.bioinf.man.ac.uk/dbbrowser/PRINTS/.

  5. Multiwalled carbon nanotube CVD synthesis, modification, and composite applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Dali

    Well-aligned carbon multiwall nanotube (MWNT) arrays have been continuously synthesized by a floating catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method involving the pyrolysis of xylene-ferrocene mixtures. The CVD parameters have been studied to selectively synthesize nanotubes with required dimensions. A mixed tip-root growth model has been proposed for the floating catalytic CVD synthesis. Coarsening of the catalyst particle at the root end promoted MWNT wall coarsening (addition of new concentric graphene shells), while the smaller catalyst particle at the tip contributed to MWNT elongation. A two-step process in which ferrocene was fed for only five minutes to nucleate the DTs was developed to understand if a continuous supply of catalyst was necessary for continued growth. The results show that the ferrocene was only necessary for initial nucleation. To simplify the CVD process further, another two-step synthesis method was developed in which the ferrocene was pre-decomposed so that the nanotube nucleation could be isolated from the growth, enabling quantification of growth mechanisms and kinetics. Mass spectra and hydrocarbon analyses of the CVD reactor tail gas were performed to understand the pyrolysis chemistry. Well-aligned N-doped and Ru-doped MWNT arrays have been produced by pyrolysis of pyridine ferrocene mixtures and xylene-ferrocene-ruthenocene mixtures, respectively. Various material characterization techniques were used to measure the dopant distributions and correlate the catalyst phase with the novel nanotube structures. High-temperature annealing has been shown to be a viable means to remove both the catalyst particles and certain microstructural defects within the CVD-derived DTs. The phase transformation of catalyst during annealing has also been studied. Homogeneous distribution of MWNTs in polystyrene matrices was achieved by an ultrasonic assisted solution-evaporation method. Addition of only 1 wt % DTs to polystyrene increased the polymer

  6. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF RISK FACTORS FOR CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE (CVD) IN GENETICALLY PREDISPOSED RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodent CVD models are increasingly used for understanding individual differences in susceptibility to environmental stressors such as air pollution. We characterized pathologies and a number of known human risk factors of CVD in genetically predisposed, male young adult Spontaneo...

  7. Performance of irradiated CVD diamond micro-strip sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, W; Bergonzo, P; Bertuccio, G; Bogani, F; Borchi, E; Brambilla, A; Bruzzi, Mara; Colledani, C; Conway, J; D'Angelo, P; Dabrowski, W; Delpierre, P A; Deneuville, A; Dulinski, W; van Eijk, B; Fallou, A; Fizzotti, F; Foulon, F; Friedl, M; Gan, K K; Gheeraert, E; Hallewell, G D; Han, S; Hartjes, F G; Hrubec, Josef; Husson, D; Kagan, H; Kania, D R; Kaplon, J; Kass, R; Koeth, T W; Krammer, Manfred; Lo Giudice, A; Lü, R; MacLynne, L; Manfredotti, C; Meier, D; Mishina, M; Moroni, L; Noomen, J; Oh, A; Pan, L S; Pernicka, Manfred; Peitz, A; Perera, L P; Pirollo, S; Procario, M; Riester, J L; Roe, S; Rousseau, L; Rudge, A; Russ, J; Sala, S; Sampietro, M; Schnetzer, S R; Sciortino, S; Stelzer, H; Stone, R; Suter, B; Tapper, R J; Tesarek, R J; Trischuk, W; Tromson, D; Vittone, E; Walsh, A M; Wedenig, R; Weilhammer, Peter; Wetstein, M; White, C; Zeuner, W; Zöller, M

    2002-01-01

    CVD diamond detectors are of interest for charged particle detection and tracking due to their high radiation tolerance. In this article we present, for the first time, beam test results from recently manufactured CVD diamond strip detectors and their behavior under low doses of electrons from a $\\beta$-source and the performance before and after intense ($>10^{15}/{\\rm cm^2}$) proton- and pion-irradiations. We find that low dose irradiations increase the signal-to-noise ratio (pumping of the signal) and slightly deteriorate the spatial resolution. Intense irradiations with protons ($2.2\\times 10^{15}~p/{\\rm cm^2}$) lowers the signal-to-noise ratio slightly. Intense irradiation with pions ($2.9\\times 10^{15}~\\pi/{\\rm cm^2}$) lowers the signal-to-noise ratio more. The spatial resolution of the diamond sensors improves after irradiations.

  8. Designed CVD growth of graphene via process engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Kai; Fu, Lei; Peng, Hailin; Liu, Zhongfan

    2013-10-15

    Graphene, the atomic thin carbon film with honeycomb lattice, holds great promise in a wide range of applications, due to its unique band structure and excellent electronic, optical, mechanical, and thermal properties. Scientists are researching this star material because of the development of various emerging preparation techniques, among which chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has received the fastest advances in the past few years. For the CVD growth of graphene, the ultimate goal is to achieve the highest quality in the largest scale and lowest cost with a precise control of layer thickness, stacking order, and crystallinity. To meet this goal, researchers need a comprehensive understanding and effective controlling of the growth process, especially to its elementary steps. In this Account, we focus on our recent progresses toward the controlled surface growth of graphene and its two-dimensional (2D) hybrids via rational designs of CVD elementary processes, namely, process engineering. A typical CVD process consists of four main elementary steps: (A) adsorption and catalytic decomposition of precursor gas, (B) diffusion and dissolution of decomposed carbon species into bulk metal, (C) segregation of dissolved carbon atoms onto the metal surface, and finally, (D) surface nucleation and growth of graphene. Absence or enhancement of each elementary step would lead to significant changes in the whole growth process. Metals with certain carbon solubility, such as nickel and cobalt, involve all four elementary steps in a typical CVD process, thus providing us an ideal system for process engineering. The elementary segregation process can be completely blocked if molybdenum is introduced into the system as an alloy catalyst, yielding perfect monolayer graphene almost independent of growth parameters. On the other hand, the segregation-only process of predissolved solid carbons is also capable of high-quality graphene growth. By using a synergetic Cu-Ni alloy, we are

  9. Crystal growth of CVD diamond and some of its peculiarities

    CERN Document Server

    Piekarczyk, W

    1999-01-01

    Experiments demonstrate that CVD diamond can form in gas environments that are carbon undersaturated with respect to diamond. This fact is, among others, the most serious violation of principles of chemical thermodynamics. In this $9 paper it is shown that none of the principles is broken when CVD diamond formation is considered not a physical process consisting in growth of crystals but a chemical process consisting in accretion of macro-molecules of polycyclic $9 saturated hydrocarbons belonging to the family of organic compounds the smallest representatives of which are adamantane, diamantane, triamantane and so forth. Since the polymantane macro-molecules are in every respect identical with $9 diamond single crystals with hydrogen-terminated surfaces, the accretion of polymantane macro- molecules is a process completely equivalent to the growth of diamond crystals. However, the accretion of macro-molecules must be $9 described in a way different from that used to describe the growth of crystals because so...

  10. YBCO coated conductor by multiple-stage CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashima, N. [Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., Kitasekiyama, Ohdaka-cho, Midori-ku, Nagoya 459-8522 (Japan)]. E-mail: kashima.naoji@chuden.co.jp; Niwa, T. [Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., Kitasekiyama, Ohdaka-cho, Midori-ku, Nagoya 459-8522 (Japan); Mori, M. [Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., Kitasekiyama, Ohdaka-cho, Midori-ku, Nagoya 459-8522 (Japan); Nagaya, S. [Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., Kitasekiyama, Ohdaka-cho, Midori-ku, Nagoya 459-8522 (Japan); Muroga, T. [ISTEC-SRL, 2-4-1 Mutsuno, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya 456-8567 (Japan); Miyata, S. [ISTEC-SRL, 2-4-1 Mutsuno, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya 456-8567 (Japan); Watanabe, T. [ISTEC-SRL, 2-4-1 Mutsuno, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya 456-8567 (Japan); Yamada, Y. [ISTEC-SRL, 2-4-1 Mutsuno, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya 456-8567 (Japan); Izumi, T. [ISTEC-SRL, 1-10-13, Shinonome, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0062 (Japan); Shiohara, Y. [ISTEC-SRL, 1-10-13, Shinonome, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0062 (Japan)

    2005-10-01

    A high speed deposition technique for YBCO coated conductors has been required from the viewpoint of cost reduction for second generation wire. The multiple-stage chemical vapor deposition technique was employed for making YBCO coated conductors with a high deposition rate. In our earlier research, over 2.0 MA/cm{sup 2} of J {sub c} was confirmed on IBAD (PLD-CeO{sub 2}/IBAD-Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}/Hastelloy) substrates with a maximum deposition rate of 25 m/h using the six-stage CVD system. To evaluate the availability of the multiple-stage CVD technique for making a longer YBCO tape, we have fabricated a 200 m-long YBCO tape on a non-textured silver substrate. Deposition rate was 10 m/h, and number of passing was two times. Total deposition time was 40 h (20 h x 2). During the deposition of a YBCO layer, the CVD system was quite stable. J {sub c} was measured at a voltage tap interval of 10 m with criterion of 1 {mu}V/cm. J {sub c} of the YBCO tape remained in the order of 10{sup 4} A/cm{sup 2} due to the non-textured microstructure. However, J {sub c} distribution of the tape showed a good uniformity. A 210 m-long YBCO/(Ag + IBAD) tape was also prepared. A 210 m-long substrate combined with IBAD and Ag was used. I {sub c} of 60-78 A was obtained on the IBAD substrates part. This result suggested that the multiple-stage CVD technique was very useful to making a long YBCO tape.

  11. Electrochemical characterization on semiconductors p-type CVD diamond electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, N.G.; Silva, L. L. G.; Corat, E. J.; Trava-Airoldi, V. J.; K. Iha

    1999-01-01

    Semiconductor boron-doped CVD diamond films were prepared on Si substrates by the hot filament technique. The surface morphology analysis by SEM presented continuous and well faceted films. The samples were grown with different boron concentrations by controlling the B/C ratio in the feeding gas. Raman results showed a drastic change of diamond films for different doping levels. The characteristic line at 1332 cm-1decreases and shifts to lower energy as a function of the film resistivity. It ...

  12. Influence of melt treatments and polished CVD diamond coated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    At present, the cemented carbide inserts alone or with. TiN, TiC or TiN + .... Carbide grade. Uncoated insert-K-10: 94%WC + 6%CO. Polished CVD diamond coated, Ra, 0⋅14–0⋅16 μm the present work and geometry of the inserts are given in table 3. .... duces a chip and plastic deformation of the chip and the workpiece ...

  13. Mass production of CNTs using CVD multi-quartz tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousef, Samy; Mohamed, Alaa [Dept. of Production Engineering and Printing Technology, Akhbar Elyom Academy, Giza (Egypt)

    2016-11-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have become the backbone of modern industries, including lightweight and heavy-duty industrial applications. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is considered as the most common method used to synthesize high yield CNTs. This work aims to develop the traditional CVD for the mass production of more economical CNTs, meeting the growing CNT demands among consumers by increasing the number of three particular reactors. All reactors housing is connected by small channels to provide the heat exchange possibility between the chambers, thereby decreasing synthesis time and reducing heat losses inside the ceramic body of the furnace. The novel design is simple and cheap with a lower reacting time and heat loss compared with the traditional CVD design. Methane, hydrogen, argon, and catalyzed iron nanoparticles were used as a carbon source and catalyst during the synthesis process. In addition, CNTs were produced using only a single quartz tube for comparison. The produced samples were examined using XRD, TEM, SEM, FTIR, and TGA. The results showed that the yield of CNTs increases by 287 % compared with those synthesized with a single quartz tube. Moreover, the total synthesis time of CNTs decreases by 37 % because of decreased heat leakage.

  14. Nitrogen and hydrogen related infrared absorption in CVD diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titus, E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 (Portugal)]. E-mail: elby@mec.ua.pt; Ali, N. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 (Portugal); Cabral, G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 (Portugal); Madaleno, J.C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 (Portugal); Neto, V.F. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 (Portugal); Gracio, J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 (Portugal); Ramesh Babu, P [Materials Ireland, Polymer research Centre, School of Physics, Dublin (Ireland); Sikder, A.K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Bombay (India); Okpalugo, T.I. [Northern Ireland Bio-Engineering Centre, NIBEC, University of Ulster (United Kingdom); Misra, D.S. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Bombay (India)

    2006-09-25

    In this paper, we investigate on the presence of hydrogen and nitrogen related infrared absorptions in chemical vapour deposited (CVD) diamond films. Investigations were carried out in cross sections of diamond windows, deposited using hot filament CVD (HFCVD). The results of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy carried out in a cross section of self-standing diamond sheets are presented. The FTIR spectra showed several features that have not been reported before. In order to confirm the frequency of nitrogen related vibrations, ab-initio calculations were carried out using GAMESS program. The investigations showed the presence of several C-N related peaks in one-phonon (1000-1333 cm{sup -1}). The deconvolution of the spectra in the three-phonon region (2700-3150 cm{sup -1}) also showed a number of vibration modes corresponding to sp {sup m}CH {sub n} phase of carbon. Elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) was employed to compare the H content measured using FTIR technique. Using these measurements we point out that the oscillator strength of the different IR modes varies depending upon the structure and H content of CVD diamond sheets.

  15. Optimizing the design of preprinted orders for ambulatory chemotherapy: combining oncology, human factors, and graphic design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jennifer; White, Rachel E; Hunt, Richard G; Cassano-Piché, Andrea L; Easty, Anthony C

    2012-03-01

    To establish a set of guidelines for developing ambulatory chemotherapy preprinted orders. Multiple methods were used to develop the preprinted order guidelines. These included (A) a comprehensive literature review and an environmental scan; (B) analyses of field study observations and incident reports; (C) critical review of evidence from the literature and the field study observation analyses; (D) review of the draft guidelines by a clinical advisory group; and (E) collaboration with graphic designers to develop sample preprinted orders, refine the design guidelines, and format the resulting content. The Guidelines for Developing Ambulatory Chemotherapy Preprinted Orders, which consist of guidance on the design process, content, and graphic design elements of ambulatory chemotherapy preprinted orders, have been established. Health care is a safety critical, dynamic, and complex sociotechnical system. Identifying safety risks in such a system and effectively addressing them often require the expertise of multiple disciplines. This study illustrates how human factors professionals, clinicians, and designers can leverage each other's expertise to uncover commonly overlooked patient safety hazards and to provide health care professionals with innovative, practical, and user-centered tools to minimize those hazards.

  16. Optimizing the Design of Preprinted Orders for Ambulatory Chemotherapy: Combining Oncology, Human Factors, and Graphic Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jennifer; White, Rachel E.; Hunt, Richard G.; Cassano-Piché, Andrea L.; Easty, Anthony C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To establish a set of guidelines for developing ambulatory chemotherapy preprinted orders. Methods: Multiple methods were used to develop the preprinted order guidelines. These included (A) a comprehensive literature review and an environmental scan; (B) analyses of field study observations and incident reports; (C) critical review of evidence from the literature and the field study observation analyses; (D) review of the draft guidelines by a clinical advisory group; and (E) collaboration with graphic designers to develop sample preprinted orders, refine the design guidelines, and format the resulting content. Results: The Guidelines for Developing Ambulatory Chemotherapy Preprinted Orders, which consist of guidance on the design process, content, and graphic design elements of ambulatory chemotherapy preprinted orders, have been established. Conclusion: Health care is a safety critical, dynamic, and complex sociotechnical system. Identifying safety risks in such a system and effectively addressing them often require the expertise of multiple disciplines. This study illustrates how human factors professionals, clinicians, and designers can leverage each other's expertise to uncover commonly overlooked patient safety hazards and to provide health care professionals with innovative, practical, and user-centered tools to minimize those hazards. PMID:23077436

  17. Increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) with age in HIV-positive men: a comparison of the D:A:D CVD risk equation and general population CVD risk equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petoumenos, K.; Reiss, P.; Ryom, L.; Rickenbach, M.; Sabin, C. A.; El-Sadr, W.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Phillips, A. N.; de Wit, S.; Kirk, O.; Dabis, F.; Pradier, C.; Lundgren, J. D.; Law, M. G.; Powderly, B.; Shortman, N.; Moecklinghoff, C.; Reilly, G.; Franquet, X.; Kamara, D.; Smith, C.; Phillips, A.; Mocroft, A.; Tverland, J.; Mansfeld, M.; Nielsen, J.; Raben, D.; Brandt, R. Salbøl; Fanti, I.; Krum, E.; Hillebregt, M.; Geffard, S.; Sundström, A.; Delforge, M.; Fontas, E.; Torres, F.; McManus, H.; Wright, S.; Kjær, J.; Sjøl, A.; Meidahl, P.; Helweg- Larsen, J.; Iversen, J. Schmidt; Ross, M.; Fux, C. A.; Morlat, P.; Moranne, O.; Kesselring, A. M.; Kamara, D. A.; Weber, R.; Friis-Møller, N.; Kowalska, J.; Sabin, C.; Law, M.; Bruyand, M.; Bower, M.; Fätkenheuer, G.; Donald, A.; Grulich, A.; Zaheri, S.; Gras, L.; Prins, J. M.; Kuijpers, T. W.; Scherpbier, H. J.; van der Meer, J. T. M.; Wit, F. W. M. N.; Godfried, M. H.; van der Poll, T.; Nellen, F. J. B.; Lange, J. M. A.; Geerlings, S. E.; van Vugt, M.; Pajkrt, D.; Bos, J. C.; van der Valk, M.; Grijsen, M. L.; Wiersinga, W. J.; Goorhuis, A.; Hovius, J. W. R.; Lowe, S.; Oude Lashof, A.; Posthouwer, D.; Pronk, M. J. H.; Ammerlaan, H. S. M.; van der Ende, M. E.; de Vries-Sluijs, T. E. M. S.; Schurink, C. A. M.; Nouwen, J. L.; Verbon, A.; Rijnders, B. J. A.; van Gorp, E. C. M.; van der Feltz, M.; Driessen, G. J. A.; van, A. M. C.; Branger, J.; Haag, Den; Schippers, E. F.; van Nieuwkoop, C.; van Elzakker, E. P.; Groeneveld, P. H. P.; Bouwhuis, J. W.; Soetekouw, R.; ten Kate, R. W.; Kroon, F. P.; van Dissel, J. T.; Arend, S. M.; de Boer, M. G. J.; Jolink, H.; Vollaard, H. J. M. ter; Bauer, M. P.; den Hollander, J. G.; Pogany, K.; van Twillert, G.; Kortmann, W.; Cohen Stuart, J. W. T.; Diederen, B. M. W.; Leyten, E. M. S.; Gelinck, L. B. S.; Kootstra, G. J.; Delsing, C. E.; Brinkman, K.; Blok, W. L.; Frissen, P. H. J.; Schouten, W. E. M.; van den Berk, G. E. L.; van Kasteren, M. E. E.; Brouwer, A. E.; Veenstra, J.; Lettinga, K. D.; Mulder, J. W.; Vrouenraets, S. M. E.; Lauw, F. N.; van Goyen, N. N.; van Eeden, A.; Verhagen, D. W. M.; Sprenger, H. G.; Doedens, R.; Scholvinck, E. H.; van, S.; Bierman, W. F. W.; Koopmans, P. P.; Keuter, M.; van der Ven, A. J. A. M.; ter Hofstede, H. J. M.; Dofferhoff, A. S. M.; Warris, A.; van Crevel, R.; Hoepelman, A. I. M.; Mudrikova, T.; Schneider, M. M. E.; Ellerbroek, P. M.; Oosterheert, J. J.; Arends, J. E.; Wassenberg, M. W. M.; Barth, R. E.; van Agtmael, M. A.; Perenboom, R. M.; Claessen, F. A. P.; Bomers, M.; Peters, E. J. G.; Geelen, S. P. M.; Wolfs, T. F. W.; Bont, L. J.; Richter, C.; van der Berg, J. P.; Gisolf, E. H.; van den Berge, M.; Stegeman, A.; van Vonderen, M. G. A.; van Houte, D. P. F.; Weijer, S.; el Moussaoui, R.; Winkel, C.; Muskiet, F.; Voigt, R.; Chêne, G.; Lawson-Ayayi, S.; Thiébaut, R.; Bonnal, F.; Bonnet, F.; Bernard, N.; Caunègre, L.; Cazanave, C.; Ceccaldi, J.; Chambon, D.; Chossat, I.; Dauchy, F. A.; de Witte, S.; Dupon, M.; Duffau, P.; Dutronc, H.; Farbos, S.; Gaborieau, V.; Gemain, M. C.; Gerard, Y.; Greib, C.; Hessamfar, M.; Lacoste, D.; Lataste, P.; Lafarie, S.; Lazaro, E.; Malvy, D.; Meraud, J. P.; Mercié, P.; Monlun, E.; Neau, D.; Ochoa, A.; Pellegrin, J. L.; Pistone, T.; Ragnaud, J. M.; Receveur, M. C.; Tchamgoué, S.; Vandenhende, M. A.; Viallard, J. F.; Moreau, J. F.; Pellegrin, I.; Fleury, H.; Lafon, M. E.; Masquelier, B.; Trimoulet, P.; Breilh, D.; Haramburu, F.; Miremont-Salamé, G.; Blaizeau, M. J.; Decoin, M.; Delaune, J.; Delveaux, S.; D'Ivernois, C.; Hanapier, C.; Leleux, O.; Uwamaliya-Nziyumvira, B.; Sicard, X.; Palmer, G.; Touchard, D.; Bendall, C.; Moore, R.; Edwards, S.; Hoy, J.; Watson, K.; Roth, N.; Nicholson, J.; Bloch, M.; Franic, T.; Baker, D.; Vale, R.; Carr, A.; Cooper, D.; Chuah, J.; Ngieng, M.; Nolan, D.; Skett, J.; Calvo, G.; Mateu, S.; Domingo, P.; A, M.; Gatell, J.; del Cacho, E.; Cadafalch, J.; Fuster, M.; Codina, C.; Sirera, G.; Vaqué, A.; Clumeck, N.; Necsoi, C.; Gennotte, A. F.; Gerard, M.; Kabeya, K.; Konopnicki, D.; Libois, A.; Martin, C.; Payen, M. C.; Semaille, P.; van Laethem, Y.; Neaton, J.; Bartsch, G.; El-Sadr, W. M.; Thompson, G.; Wentworth, D.; Luskin-Hawk, R.; Telzak, E.; Abrams, D. I.; Cohn, D.; Markowitz, N.; Arduino, R.; Mushatt, D.; Friedland, G.; Perez, G.; Tedaldi, E.; Fisher, E.; Gordin, F.; Crane, L. R.; Sampson, J.; Baxter, J.; Lundgren, J.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; Grint, D.; Podlekareva, D.; Peters, L.; Reekie, J.; Fischer, A. H.; Losso, M.; Elias, C.; Ramos, J. M.; Vetter, N.; Zangerle, R.; Karpov, I.; Vassilenko, A.; Mitsura, V. M.; Suetnov, O.; Colebunders, R.; Vandekerckhove, L.; Hadziosmanovic, V.; Kostov, K.; Begovac, J.; Machala, L.; Jilich, D.; Sedlacek, D.; Kronborg, G.; Benfield, T.; Larsen, M.; Gerstoft, J.; Katzenstein, T.; Hansen, A. -B. E.; Skinhøj, P.; Pedersen, C.; Ostergaard, L.; Zilmer, K.; Smidt, J.; Ristola, M.; Katlama, C.; Viard, J. -P.; Girard, P. -M.; Livrozet, J. M.; Vanhems, P.; Bernard, Claude; Rockstroh, J.; Schmidt, R.; van Lunzen, J.; Degen, O.; Stellbrink, H. J.; Staszewski, S.; Goethe, J. W.; Bickel, M.; Kosmidis, J.; Gargalianos, P.; Xylomenos, G.; Perdios, J.; Panos, G.; Filandras, A.; Karabatsaki, E.; Sambatakou, H.; Banhegyi, D.; Mulcahy, F.; Yust, I.; Turner, D.; Burke, M.; Pollack, S.; Hassoun, G.; Maayan, S.; Vella, S.; Esposito, R.; Mazeu, I.; Mussini, C.; Arici, C.; Pristera, R.; Mazzotta, F.; Gabbuti, A.; Vullo, V.; Lichtner, M.; Chirianni, A.; Montesarchio, E.; Gargiulo, M.; Cotugno, A. D.; Antonucci, G.; Testa, A.; Narciso, P.; Vlassi, C.; Zaccarelli, M.; Lazzarin, A.; Castagna, A.; Gianotti, N.; Galli, M.; Ridolfo, A.; Sacco, L.; Rozentale, B.; Zeltina, I.; Chaplinskas, S.; Hemmer, R.; Staub, T.; Ormaasen, V.; Maeland, A.; Bruun, J.; Knysz, B.; Gasiorowski, J.; Horban, A.; Bakowska, E.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Flisiak, R.; Boron- Kaczmarska, A.; Pynka, M.; Parczewski, M.; Beniowski, M.; Mularska, E.; Trocha, H.; Jablonowska, E.; Malolepsza, E.; Wojcik, K.; Antunes, F.; Doroana, M.; Caldeira, L.; Mansinho, K.; Maltez, F.; Duiculescu, D.; Rakhmanova, A.; Zakharova, N.; Buzunova, S.; Jevtovic, D.; Mokráš, M.; Staneková, D.; Tomazic, J.; González-Lahoz, J.; Soriano, V.; Labarga, P.; Medrano, J.; Moreno, S.; Rodriguez, J. M.; Clotet, B.; Jou, A.; Paredes, R.; Tural, C.; Puig, J.; Bravo, I.; Gatell, J. M.; M, J.; Gutierrez, M.; Mateo, G.; Sambeat, M. A.; Karlsson, A.; Flamholc, L.; Ledergerber, B.; Francioli, P.; Cavassini, M.; Hirschel, B.; Boffi, E.; Furrer, H.; Battegay, M.; Elzi, L.; Kravchenko, E.; Chentsova, N.; Frolov, V.; Kutsyna, G.; Servitskiy, S.; Krasnov, M.; Barton, S.; Johnson, A. M.; Mercey, D.; Johnson, M. A.; Murphy, M.; Weber, J.; Scullard, G.; Fisher, M.; Leen, C.; Morfeldt, L.; Thulin, G.; Åkerlund, B.; Koppel, K.; Håkangård, C.; Moroni, M.; Angarano, G.; Antinori, A.; Armignacco, O.; Castelli, F.; Cauda, R.; Di Perri, G.; Iardino, R.; Ippolito, G.; Perno, C. F.; von Schloesser, F.; Viale, P.; Ceccherini-Silberstein, F.; Girardi, E.; Lo Caputo, S.; Puoti, M.; Andreoni, M.; Ammassari, A.; d'rminio Monforte, A.; Balotta, C.; Bonfanti, P.; Bonora, S.; Borderi, M.; Capobianchi, M. R.; Cingolani, A.; Cinque, P.; de Luca, A.; Di Biagio, A.; Gori, A.; Guaraldi, G.; Lapadula, G.; Caputo, S. Lo; Madeddu, G.; Maggiolo, F.; Marchetti, G.; Marcotullio, S.; Monno, L.; Roldan, E. Quiros; Rusconi, S.; Cicconi, P.; Formenti, T.; Galli, L.; Lorenzini, P.; Giacometti, A.; Costantini, A.; Santoro, C.; Suardi, C.; Vanino, E.; Verucchi, G.; Quiros Roldan, E.; Minardi, C.; Quirino, T.; Abeli, C.; Manconi, P. E.; Piano, P.; Vecchiet, J.; Falasca, K.; Sighinolfi, L.; Segala, D.; Cassola, G.; Viscoli, G.; Alessandrini, A.; Piscopo, R.; Mazzarello, G.; Mastroianni, C.; Belvisi, V.; Caramma, I.; Castelli, A. P.; Rizzardini, G.; Ridolfo, A. L.; Piolini, R.; Salpietro, S.; Carenzi, L.; Moioli, M. C.; Puzzolante, C.; Abrescia, N.; Guida, M. G.; Onofrio, M.; Baldelli, F.; Francisci, D.; Parruti, G.; Ursini, T.; Magnani, G.; Ursitti, M. A.; d'Avino, A.; Gallo, L.; Nicastri, E.; Acinapura, R.; Capozzi, M.; Libertone, R.; Tebano, G.; Cattelan, A.; Mura, M. S.; Caramello, P.; Orofino, G. C.; Sciandra, M.; Pellizzer, G.; Manfrin, V.; Caissotti, C.; Dellamonica, P.; Bernard, E.; Cua, E.; de Salvador-Guillouet, F.; Durant, J.; Ferrando, S.; Mondain-Miton, V.; Naqvi, A.; Perbost, I.; Prouvost-Keller, B.; Pillet, S.; Pugliese, P.; Rahelinirina, V.; Roger, P. M.; Dollet, K.; Aubert, V.; Barth, J.; Bernasconi, E.; Böni, J.; Bucher, H. C.; Burton-Jeangros, C.; Calmy, A.; Egger, M.; Fehr, J.; Fellay, J.; Gorgievski, M.; Günthard, H.; Haerry, D.; Hasse, B.; Hirsch, H. H.; Hösli, I.; Kahlert, C.; Kaiser, L.; Keiser, O.; Klimkait, T.; Kovari, H.; Martinetti, G.; de Tejada, B. Martinez; Metzner, K.; Müller, N.; Nadal, D.; Pantaleo, G.; Rauch, A.; Regenass, S.; Rudin, C.; Schmid, P.; Schultze, D.; Schöni-Affolter, F.; Schüpbach, J.; Speck, R.; Taffé, P.; Tarr, P.; Telenti, A.; Trkola, A.; Vernazza, P.; Yerly, S.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to statistically model the relative increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) per year older in Data collection on Adverse events of anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D) and to compare this with the relative increased risk of CVD per year older in general population risk equations.

  18. On the origin of nonequivalent states: How we can talk about preprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neylon, Cameron; Pattinson, Damian; Bilder, Geoffrey; Lin, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly, preprints are at the center of conversations across the research ecosystem. But disagreements remain about the role they play. Do they "count" for research assessment? Is it ok to post preprints in more than one place? In this paper, we argue that these discussions often conflate two separate issues, the history of the manuscript and the status granted it by different communities. In this paper, we propose a new model that distinguishes the characteristics of the object, its "state", from the subjective "standing" granted to it by different communities. This provides a way to discuss the difference in practices between communities, which will deliver more productive conversations and facilitate negotiation, as well as sharpening our focus on the role of different stakeholders on how to collectively improve the process of scholarly communications not only for preprints, but other forms of scholarly contributions.

  19. Novel Batch Titanium Nitride CVD Process for Advanced Metal Electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Zagwijn, P.M.; Verweij, W.; Pierreux, D.; Noureddine, A.; Bankras, R.; Oosterlaken, E.; Snijders, G.J.; Van den Hout, M.; Fischer, P.; Wilhelm, R.; Knapp, M.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a novel CVD process for TiN films developed in a 300 mm Vertical Furnace. We have solved Chlorine incorporation at low temperature inside the TiN layer while at the same time the batch process yields a 3 times higher throughput per dual reactor system compared to a single wafer system with 3 chambers.We show process results for load sizes ranging from 5 to as much as 100 wafers that prove filler wafers are only required to a minimum. Applications of the developed TiN pr...

  20. The Mediterranean diet in relation to mortality and CVD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tognon, G.; Lissner, L.; Saebye, D.

    2014-01-01

    related to potential CVD pathways, such as blood lipids, blood pressure and weight change after 11 years of follow-up. In a Danish cohort, the MDS was inversely associated with total mortality and with cardiovascular and MI incidence and mortality, but not with stroke incidence or mortality....... trends and determinants of Cardiovascular disease) population study, whose diet was assessed by means of a validated 7d food record. The adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern was calculated by three different scores: one based on a classification excluding ingredients from mixed dishes and recipes...

  1. Ultrahydrophobicity of ZnO modified CVD diamond films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, YiZhou; Wang, ChuanXi; Li, HongDong; Lin, Quan

    2013-04-01

    Chemical vapor deposited (CVD) polycrystalline diamond films with an ultrahydrophobic surface were fabricated by constructing a hierarchical structure through sputtering a ZnO layer on diamond grains, with a growth step feature. Under optimized conditions, the combined original diamond with a step structure of the ZnO can achieve a water contact angle (WCA) of as high as 141° ± 1°. It is proved that WCA decreases as the roughness of ZnO/PDF reduced. It can be concluded that the step structure of diamond grains and ZnO nuclei size have a great influence on the variation of WCA.

  2. Improved CVD Techniques for Depositing Passivation Layers of ICs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-10-01

    Gases. ... 216 Effects of Substrate Surface . . . . . . eco . yt . . . . . 216 Applicability of Results to Other CVD Reco ytms .. . 216 Post-Deposition...October 11, - eCo .,1,Nolp.4,ardNok, ZE6 1970). 193) 363. D. S. Zoroglu and L. E. Cak EE~rf5 358, Staff Article, "How Phosphorus Abets IC Destruc- Eeto...lmghthroghpt, b sipleIn these reactors, thke substrate wafers are placed and qafv to operate, and easy to maintainl. Tile captal cst o theo lkptlnt

  3. Photoionization cross-section of dominant defects in CVD diamond

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa, J.; Vanecek, M.; Nesladek, Milos; STALS, Lambert

    1999-01-01

    Main defects in the gap of free standing optical-quality CVD diamond have been investigated with the help of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and the constant photocurrent method (CPM). The EPR and CPM measurements reveal well-defined substitutional nitrogen defect state in the gap with a photoionization energy E-i = 2.2 eV. Another set of defect states comes from the presence of hydrogen. CPM shows a significant effect of the hydrogenation, which generates a bulk defect with a photoioni...

  4. Organic solar cells using CVD-grown graphene electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hobeom; Bae, Sang-Hoon; Han, Tae-Hee; Lim, Kyung-Geun; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2014-01-01

    We report on the development of flexible organic solar cells (OSCs) incorporating graphene sheets synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) as transparent conducting electrodes on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates. A key barrier that must be overcome for the successful fabrication of OSCs with graphene electrodes is the poor-film properties of water-based poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiphene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) when coated onto hydrophobic graphene surfaces. To form a uniform PEDOT:PSS film on a graphene surface, we added perfluorinated ionomers (PFI) to pristine PEDOT:PSS to create ‘GraHEL’, which we then successfully spin coated onto the graphene surface. We systematically investigated the effect of number of layers in layer-by-layer stacked graphene anode of an OSC on the performance parameters including the open-circuit voltage (Voc), short-circuit current (Jsc), and fill factor (FF). As the number of graphene layers increased, the FF tended to increase owing to lower sheet resistance, while Jsc tended to decrease owing to the lower light absorption. In light of this trade-off between sheet resistance and transmittance, we determined that three-layer graphene (3LG) represents the best configuration for obtaining the optimal power conversion efficiency (PCE) in OSC anodes, even at suboptimal sheet resistances. We finally developed efficient, flexible OSCs with a PCE of 4.33%, which is the highest efficiency attained so far by an OSC with CVD-grown graphene electrodes to the best of our knowledge.

  5. Mobility enhancement of CVD graphene by spatially correlated charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turyanska, Lyudmila; Makarovsky, Oleg; Eaves, Laurence; Patanè, Amalia; Mori, Nobuya

    2017-06-01

    We present a strategy for enhancing the carrier mobility of single layer CVD graphene (CVD SLG) based on spatially correlated charges. Our Monte Carlo simulations, numerical modeling and the experimental results confirm that spatial correlation between defects with opposite charges can provide a means to control independently the carrier concentration and mobility of planar field effect transistors in which graphene is decorated with a layer of colloidal quantum dots (QDs). We show that the spatial correlation between electrically charged scattering centres close to the graphene/SiO2 interface and the localised charges in a QD layer can smooth out the electrostatic potential landscape, thus reducing scattering and enhancing the carrier mobility. The QD capping molecules influence the distribution and correlation of electrical charges in the vicinity of SLG and provide a means of tuning the carrier concentration and increasing the carrier mobility in graphene. These results represent a significant conceptual advance and provide a novel strategy for control of the electronic properties of 2D materials that could accelerate their utilization in optoelectronic devices.

  6. CVD-graphene growth on different polycrystalline transition metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Lavin-Lopez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical vapor deposition (CVD graphene growth on two polycrystalline transition metals (Ni and Cu was investigated in detail using Raman spectroscopy and optical microscopy as a way to synthesize graphene of the highest quality (i.e. uniform growth of monolayer graphene, which is considered a key issue for electronic devices. Key CVD process parameters (reaction temperature, CH4/H2flow rate ratio, total flow of gases (CH4+H2, reaction time were optimized for both metals in order to obtain the highest graphene uniformity and quality. The conclusions previously reported in literature about the performance of low and high carbon solubility metals in the synthesis of graphene and their associated reaction mechanisms, i.e. surface depositionand precipitation on cooling, respectively, was not corroborated by the results obtained in this work. Under the optimal reaction conditions, a large percentage of monolayer graphene was obtained over the Ni foil since the carbon saturation was not complete, allowing carbon atoms to be stored in the bulk metal, which could diffuse forming high quality monolayer graphene at the surface. However, under the optimal reaction conditions, the formation of a non-uniform mixture of few layers and multilayer graphene on the Cu foil was related to the presence of an excess of active carbon atoms on the Cu surface.

  7. Transfer of CVD-grown monolayer graphene onto arbitrary substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, Ji Won; Kitt, Alexander; Magnuson, Carl W; Hao, Yufeng; Ahmed, Samir; An, Jinho; Swan, Anna K; Goldberg, Bennett B; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2011-09-27

    Reproducible dry and wet transfer techniques were developed to improve the transfer of large-area monolayer graphene grown on copper foils by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The techniques reported here allow transfer onto three different classes of substrates: substrates covered with shallow depressions, perforated substrates, and flat substrates. A novel dry transfer technique was used to make graphene-sealed microchambers without trapping liquid inside. The dry transfer technique utilizes a polydimethylsiloxane frame that attaches to the poly(methyl methacrylate) spun over the graphene film, and the monolayer graphene was transferred onto shallow depressions with 300 nm depth. The improved wet transfer onto perforated substrates with 2.7 μm diameter holes yields 98% coverage of holes covered with continuous films, allowing the ready use of Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy to study the intrinsic properties of CVD-grown monolayer graphene. Additionally, monolayer graphene transferred onto flat substrates has fewer cracks and tears, as well as lower sheet resistance than previous transfer techniques. Monolayer graphene films transferred onto glass had a sheet resistance of ∼980 Ω/sq and a transmittance of 97.6%. These transfer techniques open up possibilities for the fabrication of various graphene devices with unique configurations and enhanced performance. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  8. Epitaxial nucleation of CVD bilayer graphene on copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yenan; Zhuang, Jianing; Song, Meng; Yin, Shaoqian; Cheng, Yu; Zhang, Xuewei; Wang, Miao; Xiang, Rong; Xia, Yang; Maruyama, Shigeo; Zhao, Pei; Ding, Feng; Wang, Hongtao

    2016-12-08

    Bilayer graphene (BLG) has emerged as a promising candidate for next-generation electronic applications, especially when it exists in the Bernal-stacked form, but its large-scale production remains a challenge. Here we present an experimental and first-principles calculation study of the epitaxial chemical vapor deposition (CVD) nucleation process for Bernal-stacked BLG growth on Cu using ethanol as a precursor. Results show that a carefully adjusted flow rate of ethanol can yield a uniform BLG film with a surface coverage of nearly 90% and a Bernal-stacking ratio of nearly 100% on ordinary flat Cu substrates, and its epitaxial nucleation of the second layer is mainly due to the active CH 3 radicals with the presence of a monolayer-graphene-covered Cu surface. We believe that this nucleation mechanism will help clarify the formation of BLG by the epitaxial CVD process, and lead to many new strategies for scalable synthesis of graphene with more controllable structures and numbers of layers.

  9. Management of Hypertension and Other CVD Risk Factors in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa A. Abolfotouh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the knowledge and practice of PHC physicians toward the detection and management of hypertension (HTN and other CVD risk factors. Methods. A cross-sectional study of all primary health care physicians of the FHU of three rural districts of Egypt was conducted. Each physician was subjected to a prevalidated interview questionnaire on the WHO-CVD risk management package for low and medium resources, and a checklist of observation of daily practices. Results. Hypertension was a priority problem in about two-thirds (62.9% of physicians, yet only 19% have guidelines for HTN patients. Clinical history recording system for HNT was available for 50% of physicians. Levels of knowledge varied with regard to definition of HTN (61.3%, fair, procedures for BP measurement (43.5%, poor, indications for referral (43.5%, poor, patient counseling (61.3%, fair, patient treatment (59.8%, fair. Availability of clinical history recording system for HNT was a significant predictor for physician's level of knowledge (P=0.001. Overall level of practice was fair (68.5%. Conclusion. PHC physicians have unsatisfactory knowledge and practice on hypertension. There is a need of more continuing medical education. Local and international manuals, workshops, and seminars on how to make use of these guidelines would improve doctors' performance.

  10. Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Iron Aluminide by CVD Coated Powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asit Biswas Andrew J. Sherman

    2006-09-25

    This I &I Category2 program developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of iron, aluminum and aluminum oxide coated iron powders and the availability of high temperature oxidation, corrosion and erosion resistant coating for future power generation equipment and can be used for retrofitting existing fossil-fired power plant equipment. This coating will provide enhanced life and performance of Coal-Fired Boilers components such as fire side corrosion on the outer diameter (OD) of the water wall and superheater tubing as well as on the inner diameter (ID) and OD of larger diameter headers. The program also developed a manufacturing route for readily available thermal spray powders for iron aluminide coating and fabrication of net shape component by powder metallurgy route using this CVD coated powders. This coating can also be applid on jet engine compressor blade and housing, industrial heat treating furnace fixtures, magnetic electronic parts, heating element, piping and tubing for fossil energy application and automotive application, chemical processing equipment , heat exchanger, and structural member of aircraft. The program also resulted in developing a new fabrication route of thermal spray coating and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron aluminide composites enabling more precise control over material microstructures.

  11. VOx effectively doping CVD-graphene for transparent conductive films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Qinghua; Shi, Liangjing; Zhang, Qinghong; Wang, Weiqi; Zheng, Huifeng; Zhang, Yuzhi; Liu, Yangqiao; Sun, Jing

    2016-11-01

    Chemical vapor deposition(CVD)-synthesized graphene is potentially an alternative for tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) transparent conductive films (TCFs), however its sheet resistance is still too high to meet many demands. Vanadium oxide has been widely applied as smart window materials, however, no study has been reported to use it as dopant to improve the conductivity of graphene TCFs. In this study, we firstly reported that VOx doping can effectively lower the sheet resistance of CVD-graphene films while keeping its good optical properties, whose transmittance is as high as 86-90%. The optimized VOx-doped graphene exhibits a sheet resistance as low as 176 Ω/□, which decreases by 56% compared to the undoped graphene films. The doping process is convenient, stable, economical and easy to operate. What is more, VOx can effectively increase the work function(WF) of the film, making it more appropriate for use in solar cells. The evolution of the VOx species annealed at different temperatures below 400 °C has been detailed studied for the first time, based on which the doping mechanism is proposed. The prepared VOx doped graphene is expected to be a promising candidate for transparent conductive film purposes.

  12. Reproducibility of CVD diamond detectors for radiotherapy dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzel, G. T.; Lansley, S. P.; McKay, D.; Meyer, J.

    2012-11-01

    Three in-house X-ray detectors based on diamond chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from the same manufactured batch of single crystal films were investigated for their reproducibility. Leakage current, priming dose, response dynamics, dose linearity, dependence on dose rate and angular dependence were used to evaluate differences between detectors. Slight differences were seen in leakage currents before (rise and fall times of 2 s were found for all three detectors. Sensitivities differed by up to 10%. Dependence on dose rate were similar (∆=0.92-0.94). Angular dependence was minimal (97-102% avg.). Differences in detector performance appeared to be primarily due to film thickness, which can significantly change sensitivities (nC Gy-1) and applied fields (V μm-1) for detectors with small sensitive volumes. Results suggest that preselection of CVD diamond films according to thickness in addition to material quality would be required to avoid individual calibration, which is performed for commercially available natural diamond detectors.

  13. A directly patternable click-active polymer film via initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Sung Gap; Kim, Byeong-Su; Tenhaeff, Wyatt E.; Hammond, Paula T. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Gleason, Karen K., E-mail: kkg@mit.ed [Department of Chemical Engineering and Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2009-04-30

    A new 'click chemistry' active functional polymer film was directly obtained from a commercially available monomer of propargyl acrylate (PA) via easy, one-step process of initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra confirmed that significant amount of the click-active acetylene functional group was retained after the iCVD process. The degree of crosslinking could be controlled by intentionally adding crosslinker, such as ethylene glycol diacrylate (EGDA) that was polymerized with PA to form click-active, completely insoluble copolymer. The formed iCVD polymers could also be grafted on various inorganic substrates with silane coupling agents. These crosslinking and grafting techniques give iCVD polymers chemical and mechanical stability, which allows iCVD polymers applicable to various click chemistry without any modification of reaction conditions. Pre-patterned iCVD polymer could be obtained via photolithography and an azido-functionalized dye molecule was also successfully attached on iCVD polymer via click chemistry. Moreover, pPA film demonstrated sensitivity to e-beam irradiation, which enabled clickable substrates having nanometer scale patterns without requiring the use of an additional e-beam resist. Direct e-beam exposure of this multifunctional iCVD layer, a 200 nm pattern, and QD particles were selectively conjugated on the substrates via click chemistry. Thus, iCVD pPA has shown dual functionality as of 'clickable' e-beam sensitive material.

  14. How the scientific community reacts to newly submitted preprints: article downloads, Twitter mentions, and citations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Xin; Pepe, Alberto; Bollen, Johan

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the online response to the preprint publication of a cohort of 4,606 scientific articles submitted to the preprint database arXiv.org between October 2010 and May 2011. We study three forms of responses to these preprints: downloads on the arXiv.org site, mentions on the social media site Twitter, and early citations in the scholarly record. We perform two analyses. First, we analyze the delay and time span of article downloads and Twitter mentions following submission, to understand the temporal configuration of these reactions and whether one precedes or follows the other. Second, we run regression and correlation tests to investigate the relationship between Twitter mentions, arXiv downloads, and article citations. We find that Twitter mentions and arXiv downloads of scholarly articles follow two distinct temporal patterns of activity, with Twitter mentions having shorter delays and narrower time spans than arXiv downloads. We also find that the volume of Twitter mentions is statistically correlated with arXiv downloads and early citations just months after the publication of a preprint, with a possible bias that favors highly mentioned articles.

  15. How the scientific community reacts to newly submitted preprints: article downloads, Twitter mentions, and citations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Shuai

    Full Text Available We analyze the online response to the preprint publication of a cohort of 4,606 scientific articles submitted to the preprint database arXiv.org between October 2010 and May 2011. We study three forms of responses to these preprints: downloads on the arXiv.org site, mentions on the social media site Twitter, and early citations in the scholarly record. We perform two analyses. First, we analyze the delay and time span of article downloads and Twitter mentions following submission, to understand the temporal configuration of these reactions and whether one precedes or follows the other. Second, we run regression and correlation tests to investigate the relationship between Twitter mentions, arXiv downloads, and article citations. We find that Twitter mentions and arXiv downloads of scholarly articles follow two distinct temporal patterns of activity, with Twitter mentions having shorter delays and narrower time spans than arXiv downloads. We also find that the volume of Twitter mentions is statistically correlated with arXiv downloads and early citations just months after the publication of a preprint, with a possible bias that favors highly mentioned articles.

  16. Conference on Child Language (Chicago, Illinois, November 22-24, 1971). Preprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laval Univ., Quebec (Quebec). International Center for Research on Bilingualism.

    Preprints of 24 papers presented at a conference, the subject of which was "The Learning of Two or More Languages or Dialects by Young Children, Especially between the Ages of Three and Eight, with Particular Attention to the Social Setting," comprise this report. The six sections of the conference were: Home and Preschool Language Learning;…

  17. How the Scientific Community Reacts to Newly Submitted Preprints: Article Downloads, Twitter Mentions, and Citations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Xin; Pepe, Alberto; Bollen, Johan

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the online response to the preprint publication of a cohort of 4,606 scientific articles submitted to the preprint database arXiv.org between October 2010 and May 2011. We study three forms of responses to these preprints: downloads on the arXiv.org site, mentions on the social media site Twitter, and early citations in the scholarly record. We perform two analyses. First, we analyze the delay and time span of article downloads and Twitter mentions following submission, to understand the temporal configuration of these reactions and whether one precedes or follows the other. Second, we run regression and correlation tests to investigate the relationship between Twitter mentions, arXiv downloads, and article citations. We find that Twitter mentions and arXiv downloads of scholarly articles follow two distinct temporal patterns of activity, with Twitter mentions having shorter delays and narrower time spans than arXiv downloads. We also find that the volume of Twitter mentions is statistically correlated with arXiv downloads and early citations just months after the publication of a preprint, with a possible bias that favors highly mentioned articles. PMID:23133597

  18. Application of HOPG and CVD graphene as ion beam detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozubek, Roland; Ochedowski, Oliver; Zagoranskiy, Igor [Fakultät für Physik und CeNIDE, Universität Duisburg-Essen, 47048 Duisburg (Germany); Karlušić, Marko [Fakultät für Physik und CeNIDE, Universität Duisburg-Essen, 47048 Duisburg (Germany); Ruđer Bošković Institute, Bijenička 54, Zagreb (Croatia); Schleberger, Marika, E-mail: marika.schleberger@uni-due.de [Fakultät für Physik und CeNIDE, Universität Duisburg-Essen, 47048 Duisburg (Germany)

    2014-12-01

    Highly ordered pyrolytic graphite and graphene created via chemical vapor deposition have been irradiated with high energetic I{sup 6+} ions. By Raman mapping an increase of the I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio could be identified which arises from the ion induced defects. This ratio grows with increasing fluence. Using this as a tool, HOPG and graphene can be utilized to determine the ion beam spot size and its homogeneity. Both systems seem to be suitable for size determination of the spot. But due to the much higher sensitivity of graphene to ion irradiation, more detailed information regarding the homogeneity of the beam can only be derived using this 2D system. By comparison of both systems we conclude, that CVD graphene is more suitable as an ion beam detector, while HOPG is sufficient for a rough spot size analysis.

  19. Interfaces in nano-/microcrystalline multigrade CVD diamond coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Flávia A; Salgueiredo, Ermelinda; Oliveira, Filipe J; Silva, Rui F; Baptista, Daniel L; Peripolli, Suzana B; Achete, Carlos A

    2013-11-27

    The interfaces of multilayered CVD diamond films grown by the hot-filament technique were characterized with high detail using HRTEM, STEM-EDX, and EELS. The results show that at the transition from micro- (MCD) to nanocrystalline diamond (NCD), a thin precursor graphitic film is formed, irrespectively of the NCD gas chemistry used (with or without argon). On the contrary, the transition of the NCD to MCD grade is free of carbon structures other than diamond, the result of a higher substrate temperature and more abundant atomic H in the gas chemistry. At those transitions WC nanoparticles could be found due to contamination from the filament, being also present at the first interface of the MCD layer with the silicon nitride substrate.

  20. Growth of polycrystalline phosphorous-doped CVD diamond layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazea, A.; Mortet, V.; D'Haen, J.; Geithner, P.; Ristein, J.; D'Olieslaeger, M.; Haenen, K.

    2008-03-01

    Microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (MW PE CVD) growth conditions for preparation of polycrystalline phosphorous-doped diamond layers are presented. The incorporation of substitutional phosphorous was confirmed by low temperature photocurrent (PC) and cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements. The topographical characteristics of the films and the relation between the substrate and P-doped film grain orientation were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD). The growth process for P-doped layers on (1 1 0) oriented polycrystalline diamond was optimised and the best set of parameters differs significantly from the standard conditions used for P-doping of single crystalline (1 1 1) oriented diamond surfaces.

  1. CVD synthesis of carbon-based metallic photonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Zakhidov, A A; Baughman, R H; Iqbal, Z

    1999-01-01

    Three-dimensionally periodic nanostructures on the scale of hundreds of nanometers, known as photonic crystals, are attracting increasing interest because of a number of exciting predicted properties. In particular, interesting behavior should be obtainable for carbon- based structures having a dimensional scale larger than fullerenes and nanotubes, but smaller than graphitic microfibers. We show here how templating of porous opals by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) allows us to obtain novel types of graphitic nanostructures. We describe the synthesis of new cubic forms of carbon having extended covalent connectivity in three dimensions, which provide high electrical conductivity and unit cell dimensions comparable to optical wavelengths. Such materials are metallic photonic crystals that show intense Bragg diffraction. (14 refs).

  2. Polycrystalline CVD diamond device level modeling for particle detection applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozzi, A.; Passeri, D.; Kanxheri, K.; Servoli, L.; Lagomarsino, S.; Sciortino, S.

    2016-12-01

    Diamond is a promising material whose excellent physical properties foster its use for radiation detection applications, in particular in those hostile operating environments where the silicon-based detectors behavior is limited due to the high radiation fluence. Within this framework, the application of Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) simulation tools is highly envisaged for the study, the optimization and the predictive analysis of sensing devices. Since the novelty of using diamond in electronics, this material is not included in the library of commercial, state-of-the-art TCAD software tools. In this work, we propose the development, the application and the validation of numerical models to simulate the electrical behavior of polycrystalline (pc)CVD diamond conceived for diamond sensors for particle detection. The model focuses on the characterization of a physically-based pcCVD diamond bandgap taking into account deep-level defects acting as recombination centers and/or trap states. While a definite picture of the polycrystalline diamond band-gap is still debated, the effect of the main parameters (e.g. trap densities, capture cross-sections, etc.) can be deeply investigated thanks to the simulated approach. The charge collection efficiency due to β -particle irradiation of diamond materials provided by different vendors and with different electrode configurations has been selected as figure of merit for the model validation. The good agreement between measurements and simulation findings, keeping the traps density as the only one fitting parameter, assesses the suitability of the TCAD modeling approach as a predictive tool for the design and the optimization of diamond-based radiation detectors.

  3. CVD diamond Brewster window: feasibility study by FEM analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaccaro A.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Chemical vapor deposition (CVD diamond windows are a crucial component in heating and current drive (H&CD applications. In order to minimize the amount of reflected power from the diamond disc, its thickness must match the desired beam wavelength, thus proper targeting of the plasma requires movable beam reflectors. This is the case, for instance, of the ITER electron cyclotron H&CD system. However, looking at DEMO, the higher heat loads and neutron fluxes could make the use of movable parts close to the plasma difficult. The issue might be solved by using gyrotrons able to tune the beam frequency to the desired resonance, but this concept requires transmission windows that work in a given frequency range, such as the Brewster window. It consists of a CVD diamond disc brazed to two copper cuffs at the Brewster angle. The brazing process is carried out at about 800°C and then the temperature is decreased down to room temperature. Diamond and copper have very different thermal expansion coefficients, therefore high stresses build up during the cool down phase that might lead to failure of the disc. Considering also the complex geometry of the window with the skewed position of the disc, analyses are required in the first place to check its feasibility. The cool down phase was simulated by FEM structural analyses for several geometric and constraint configurations of the window. A study of indirect cooling of the window by water was also performed considering a HE11 mode beam. The results are here reported.

  4. Universal Design: Supporting Students with Color Vision Deficiency (CVD) in Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Lisa M.; Jain, Neera R.; Herzer, Kurt R.

    2016-01-01

    Color Vision Deficiency (CVD) is a commonly occurring condition in the general population. For medical students, it has the potential to create unique challenges in the classroom and clinical environments. Few studies have provided medical educators with comprehensive recommendations to assist students with CVD. This article presents a focused…

  5. Simulation and experimental study of CVD process for low temperature nanocrystalline silicon carbide coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaushal, Amit; Prakash, Jyoti, E-mail: jprakash@barc.gov.in; Dasgupta, Kinshuk; Chakravartty, Jayanta K.

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Parametric simulation was carried out for specially designed CVD reactor. • Effect of fluid velocity, heat flow and concentration were studied in CVD reactor. • Coating study carried out using low temperature and environmental safe CVD process. • Dense and uniform nanocrystalline SiC film was coated on zircaloy substrate. - Abstract: There is a huge requirement for development of a coating technique in nuclear industry, which is environmentally safe, economical and applicable to large scale components. In this view, simulation of gas-phase behavior in specially designed CVD reactor was carried out using computational tool, COMSOL. There were two important zones in CVD reactor first one is precursor vaporization zone and second one is coating zone. Optimized parameters for coating were derived from the simulation of gas phase dynamics in both zone of CVD reactor. The overall effect of fluid velocity, heat flow and concentration profile showed that Re = 54 is the optimum reaction condition for uniform coating in CVD system. In CVD coating experiments a synthesized halogen free, non-toxic and non-corrosive silicon carbide precursor was used. Uniform coating of SiC was obtained on zircaloy substrate at 900 °C using as synthesized organosilicon precursor. The X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy analysis show that dense nano crystalline SiC film was deposited on zircaloy substrate.

  6. Dosimetric characterization of CVD diamonds in photon, electron and proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirrone, G.A.P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali dei Sud, Catania (Italy); Cuttone, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali dei Sud, Catania (Italy); Lo Nigro, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Catania, Italia (Italy); Mongelli, V. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali dei Sud, Catania (Italy); Raffaele, L. [Istituto di Radiologia, Universita degli Studi di Catania (Italy); Sabini, M.G. [Rem Radioterapia S.r.l., Catania (Italy)

    2006-01-15

    The purpose of this work is the characterization, in an on line configuration, of the dosimetric response of a commercial CVD diamond. The study shows the possibility of using CVD diamond for dosimetric purposes with clinical, high-energy electron (4-15 MeV), photon (6-15 MV) and proton (62 MeV) beams.

  7. Computation of flow and thermal fields in a model CVD reactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Computation of flow and thermal fields in a model CVD reactor. VISHWADEEP SAXENA, K MURALIDHAR and V ... been numerically studied. This configuration is encountered during the modelling of flow and heat transfer in CVD .... carried out on a P-III, 600 MHz machine with 512 MB RAM. Typical CPU times required.

  8. Origin, state of the art and some prospects of the diamond CVD

    CERN Document Server

    Spitsyn, B V; Alexenko, A E

    2000-01-01

    A short review on the diamond CVD origin, together with its state of the art and some prospects was given. New hybrid methods of the diamond CVD permit to gain 1.2 to 6 times of growth rate in comparison with ordinary diamond CVD's. Recent results on n-type diamond film synthesis through phosphorus doping in the course of the CVD process are briefly discussed. In comparison with high-pressure diamond synthesis, the CVD processes open new facets of the diamond as ultimate crystal for science and technology evolution. It was stressed that, mainly on the basis of new CVDs of diamond, the properties of natural diamond are not only reproduced, but can be surpassed. As examples, mechanical (fracture resistance), physical (thermal conductivity), and chemical (oxidation stability) properties are mentioned. Some present issues in the field are considered.

  9. CVD and obesity in transitional Syria: a perspective from the Middle East

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baaj MK

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Hani Barakat1, Hanniya Barakat1, Mohamad K Baaj21Kalamoon Private University Medical School, Deir Attieh, Syria; 2Aleppo University Medical School, Aleppo, SyriaPurpose: Syria is caught in the middle of a disruptive nutritional transition. Its healthcare system is distracted by challenges and successes in other areas while neglecting to address the onslaught of Syria's cardiovascular disease (CVD epidemic. Despite the official viewpoint touting improvement in health indicators, current trends jeopardize population health, and several surveys in the Syrian population signal the epidemic spreading far and wide. The goal is to counteract the indifference towards obesity as a threat to Syrian's health, as the country is slowly becoming a leader in CVD mortality globally.Methods: PubMed, World Health Organization, and official government websites were searched for primary surveys in Syria related to CVD morbidity, mortality, and risk factors. Inclusion criteria ensured that results maximized relevance while producing comparable studies. Statistical analysis was applied to detect the most common risk factor and significant differences in risk factor prevalence and CVD rates.Results: Obesity remained the prevailing CVD risk factor except in older Syrian men, where smoking and hypertension were more common. CVD mortality was more common in males due to coronary disease, while stroke dominated female mortality. The young workforce is especially impacted, with 50% of CVD mortality occurring before age 65 years and an 81% prevalence of obesity in women over 45 years.Conclusion: Syria can overcome its slow response to the CVD epidemic and curb further deterioration by reducing obesity and, thus, inheritance and clustering of risk factors. This can be achieved via multilayered awareness and intensive parental and familial involvement. Extinguishing the CVD epidemic is readily achievable as demonstrated in other countries.Keywords: Syria, CVD, obesity, risk

  10. A Fast CVD Diamond Beam Loss Monitor for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Griesmayer, E; Dobos, D; Effinger, E; Pernegger, H

    2011-01-01

    Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) diamond detectors were installed in the collimation area of the CERN LHC to study their feasibility as Fast Beam Loss Monitors in a high-radiation environment. The detectors were configured with a fast, radiation-hard pre-amplifier with a bandwidth of 2 GHz. The readout was via an oscilloscope with a bandwidth of 1 GHz and a sampling rate of 5 GSPS. Despite the 250 m cable run from the detectors to the oscilloscope, single MIPs were resolved with a 2 ns rise time, a pulse width of 10 ns and a time resolution of less than 1 ns. Two modes of operation were applied. For the analysis of unexpected beam aborts, the loss profile was recorded in a 1 ms buffer and, for nominal operation, the histogram of the time structure of the losses was recorded in synchronism with the LHC period of 89.2 μs. Measurements during the LHC start-up (February to December 2010) are presented. The Diamond Monitors gave an unprecedented insight into the time structure of the beam losses resolving the 400...

  11. Carbon Nanotubes Grown By CVD in Various Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, S.; Su, C.; Cochrane, J. C.; Lehoczky. S. L.; Muntele, I.; Ila, D.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Since the superior properties of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) could be used in numerous devices such as electronics and sensors, many efforts have been engaged in synthesizing particular structural or dimensional MWCNT. This presentation will illustrate MWCNT synthesized on silicon substrates by thermal CVD. On the substrate, an array of catalysts is coated using sputtering deposition. A thin Ti buffer layer is also coated on some Si substrates prior to depositing catalyst particles. Nickel, cobalt or iron transition metals are used as catalysts for the MWCNT growth. Since the diameter of MWCNT depends on the size of catalyst particles, the catalyst particle size is investigated after annealed at various temperatures. MWCNT are grown on the substrate in the temperature range of 700 to 1000 C and the pressure range of 100 torr to one atmosphere. Methane and hydrogen gases with methane content of 10% to 100% are used for the MWCNT synthesis. Morphology, length and diameter of these MWCNT are determined by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The detailed results of syntheses and characterizations will be discussed in the presentation.

  12. Characterization of high-density plasma CVD USG film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Zheng, Jia Z.; Sudijuno, John; Yap, Hoon L.; Fam, Kok S.; Leong, Catherine; Liao, Marvin D.; Lin, Yih S.

    1997-09-01

    The HDP-CVD oxide deposition process has been fully investigated with the change of gas flow and RF power up to +/- 20%. The film quality is very stable with a wet etch rate ratio (WERR) of 1.5 relative to thermal oxide. The uniformity for both sputter and deposition are all below 3%, and the D/S ratio is only sensitively affected by bias RF power and side SiH4 flow. Three important factors, namely bias-RF, backside He flow and O2/SiH4 ratio, which affect strongly on the film quality, are studied in detail by measurement of film refractive index, stress, water absorption, WERR, and by pressure cook test (PCT). Lower backside He pressure as well as higher bias-RF power result in higher wafer temperature and better film quality. After PCT, the films do not show any increase in the silanol content and WERR. A liner process with lower bias-RF power is discussed to protect corner sputtering and plasma charging.

  13. High Efficiency CVD Graphene-lead (Pb) Cooper Pair Splitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borzenets, I V; Shimazaki, Y; Jones, G F; Craciun, M F; Russo, S; Yamamoto, M; Tarucha, S

    2016-03-14

    Generation and manipulation of quantum entangled electrons is an important concept in quantum mechanics, and necessary for advances in quantum information processing; but not yet established in solid state systems. A promising device is a superconductor-two quantum dots Cooper pair splitter. Early nanowire based devices, while efficient, are limited in scalability and further electron manipulation. We demonstrate an optimized, high efficiency, CVD grown graphene-based Cooper pair splitter. Our device is designed to induce superconductivity in graphene via the proximity effect, resulting in both a large superconducting gap Δ = 0.5 meV, and coherence length ξ = 200 nm. The flat nature of the device lowers parasitic capacitance, increasing charging energy EC. Our design also eases geometric restrictions and minimizes output channel separation. As a result we measure a visibility of up to 86% and a splitting efficiency of up to 62%. This will pave the way towards near unity efficiencies, long distance splitting, and post-splitting electron manipulation.

  14. Carbon Nanotubes Growth by CVD on Graphite Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Cochrane, J. C.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Muntele, I.; Ila, D.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Due to the superior electrical and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNT), synthesizing CNT on various substances for electronics devices and reinforced composites have been engaged in many efforts for applications. This presentation will illustrate CNT synthesized on graphite fibers by thermal CVD. On the fiber surface, iron nanoparticles as catalysts for CNT growth are coated. The growth temperature ranges from 600 to 1000 C and the pressure ranges from 100 Torr to one atmosphere. Methane and hydrogen gases with methane content of 10% to 100% are used for the CNT synthesis. At high growth temperatures (greater than or equal to 900 C), the rapid inter-diffusion of the transition metal iron on the graphite surface results in the rough fiber surface without any CNT grown on it. When the growth temperature is relative low (650-800 C), CNT with catalytic particles on the nanotube top ends are fabricated on the graphite surface. (Methane and hydrogen gases with methane content of 10% to 100% are used for the CNT synthesis.) (By measuring the samples) Using micro Raman spectroscopy in the breath mode region, single-walled or multi-walled CNT (MWCNT), depending on growth concentrations, are found. Morphology, length and diameter of these MWCNT are determined by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The detailed results of syntheses and characterizations will be discussed in the presentation.

  15. Behavioral Counseling to Promote a Healthful Diet and Physical Activity for CVD Prevention in Adults with Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What is cardiovascular disease? What are cardiovascular disease risk factors? Cardiovascular disease (CVD) includes heart disease and stroke. CVD ... and obesity, diabetes or pre-diabetes. Facts About Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Diet and Physical Activity Counseling Heart disease ...

  16. Development of Micro and Nano Crystalline CVD Diamond TL/OSL Radiation Detectors for Clinical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboza-Flores, Marcelino

    2015-03-01

    Modern radiotherapy methods requires the use of high photon radiation doses delivered in a fraction to small volumes of cancer tumors. An accurate dose assessment for highly energetic small x-ray beams in small areas, as in stereotactic radiotherapy, is necessary to avoid damage to healthy tissue surrounding the tumor. Recent advances on the controlled synthesis of CVD diamond have demonstrated the possibility of using high quality micro and nano crystalline CVD as an efficient detector and dosimeter suitable for high energy photons and energetic particle beams. CVD diamond is a very attractive material for applications in ionizing radiation dosimetry, particularly in the biomedical field since the radiation absorption by a CVD diamond is very close to that of soft tissue. Furthermore, diamond is stable, non-toxic and radiation hard. In the present work we discuss the CVD diamond properties and dosimeter performance and discuss its relevance and advantages of various dosimetry methods, including thermally stimulated luminescence (TL) as well as optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). The recent CVD improved method of growth allows introducing precisely controlled impurities into diamond to provide it with high dosimetry sensitivity. For clinical dosimetry applications, high accuracy of dose measurements, low fading, high sensitivity, good reproducibility and linear dose response characteristics are very important parameters which all are found in CVD diamonds specimens. In some cases, dose linearity and reproducibility in CVD diamond have been found to be higher than standard commercial TLD materials like LiF. In the present work, we discuss the state-of-the art developments in dosimetry applications using CVD diamond. The financial support from Conacyt (Mexico) is greatly acknowledged

  17. Dosimetric characterization of CVD diamonds irradiated with 62 MeV proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirrone, G.A.P. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania (Italy)]. E-mail: cirrone@lns.infn.it; Cuttone, G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania (Italy); Lo Nigro, S. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Universita di Catania (Italy); CSFNSM Centro Siciliano di Fisica Nucleare e Struttura della MAteria, Catania (Italy); Mongelli, V. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania (Italy); Scuola di Specializzazione in Fisica Sanitaria, Universita di Catania (Italy); CSFNSM Centro Siciliano di Fisica Nucleare e Struttura della MAteria, Catania (Italy); Raffaele, L. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania (Italy); Sabini, M.G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliera Cannizzaro, Catania (Italy); Valastro, L. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania (Italy); Scuola di Specializzazione in Fisica Sanitaria, Universita di Catania (Italy); Bucciolini, M. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita di Florence (Italy); Onori, S. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy)

    2005-10-21

    Diamond is potentially a very suitable material for use as on-line radiation dosimeter. Recent advances in the synthesis of polycrystalline diamond by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques have produced material with electronic properties suitable for dosimetry applications. In this work the possibility to use a segmented commercial CVD detector in the dosimetry of proton beams has been investigated. The response as function of dose, dose rate, the priming and the rise time have been investigated thoroughly. This study shows the suitability of CVD diamond for dosimetry of clinical 62 MeV proton beams.

  18. Are your patients with risk of CVD getting the viscous soluble fiber they need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamliyan, Tatyana A; Jacobs, David R; Raatz, Susan K; Nordstrom, David L; Keenan, Joseph M

    2006-09-01

    A diet that includes 5 to 10 g/d of viscous soluble fiber reduces cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and death independent of baseline risk. Consuming foods rich in viscous soluble fiber reduces low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) blood levels 10% to 15% with expected reduction in CVD events by 10% to 15%. Routinely counsel adults at risk of CVD to promote a healthy diet: assess dietary fiber consumption; recommend specific foods rich in viscous soluble fiber; monitor LDL-C levels and encourage increased dietary fiber intake at follow-up visits; motivate patients to comply with recommendations.

  19. Cutting characteristics of dental diamond burs made with CVD technology Características de corte de pontas odontológicas diamantadas obtidas pela tecnologia CVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Monti Lima

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the cutting ability of chemical vapor deposition (CVD diamond burs coupled to an ultrasonic dental unit handpiece for minimally invasive cavity preparation. One standard cavity was prepared on the mesial and distal surfaces of 40 extracted human third molars either with cylindrical or with spherical CVD burs. The cutting ability was compared regarding type of substrate (enamel and dentin and direction of handpiece motion. The morphological characteristics, width and depth of the cavities were analyzed and measured using scanning electron micrographs. Statistical analysis using the Kruskal-Wallis test (p O objetivo deste estudo foi determinar a habilidade de corte das pontas de diamante obtidas pelo processo de deposição química a vapor (CVD associadas ao aparelho de ultra-som no preparo cavitário minimamente invasivo. Uma cavidade padronizada foi preparada nas faces mesial e distal de 40 terceiros molares, utilizando-se pontas de diamante CVD cilíndrica e esférica. A habilidade de corte foi comparada quanto ao tipo de substrato (esmalte e dentina e quanto à direção do movimento realizado com a ponta. As características morfológicas, a largura e profundidade das cavidades foram analisadas e medidas em microscopia eletrônica de varredura. A análise estatística pelo teste de Kruskal-Wallis (p < 0,05 revelou que a largura e profundidade das cavidades foram significativamente maiores em dentina. Cavidades mais largas foram obtidas quando se utilizou a ponta de diamante CVD cilíndrica, e mais profundas quando a ponta esférica foi empregada. A direção do movimento da ponta não influenciou o tamanho das cavidades, sendo os cortes produzidos pelas pontas de diamante CVD precisos e conservadores.

  20. On the origin of nonequivalent states: How we can talk about preprints [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Neylon

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly, preprints are at the center of conversations across the research ecosystem. But disagreements remain about the role they play. Do they “count” for research assessment? Is it ok to post preprints in more than one place? In this paper, we argue that these discussions often conflate two separate issues, the history of the manuscript and the status granted it by different communities. In this paper, we propose a new model that distinguishes the characteristics of the object, its “state”, from the subjective “standing” granted to it by different communities. This provides a way to discuss the difference in practices between communities, which will deliver more productive conversations and facilitate negotiation, as well as sharpening our focus on the role of different stakeholders on how to collectively improve the process of scholarly communications not only for preprints, but other forms of scholarly contributions.

  1. Raman spectroscopic investigation of polycrystalline structures of CVD-grown graphene by isotope labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengnan; Suzuki, Satoru; Hibino, Hiroki

    2014-11-21

    Topological defects, such as point defects, dislocations and grain boundaries, have a dramatic influence on the chemical and physical properties of large-scale graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Here we demonstrate the Raman visualization of polycrystalline structures in an isotopically modified CVD graphene. By means of the reversible reaction of methane on a copper catalyst, the etching of (12)C-lattice and surface deposition of (13)C-atoms occur in CVD graphene by sequentially introducing hydrogen and isotopic methane after standard growth of graphene with full monolayer coverage. Spatial Raman spectroscopic mapping on labeled graphene reveals pronounced network-like (13)C-rich regions, which are further identified to exist along the grain boundaries of graphene by low-energy electron microscopy. The structural defects inside the graphene grains are also targeted in the isotope labeling process. Our work opens a new way to investigate multiple grain structures in CVD graphene with a simple spectroscopic technique.

  2. Laser-Directed CVD 3D Printing of Refractory Metal Rocket Propulsion Hardware Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this project, Ultramet will develop a three-dimensional (3D) laser-directed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) additive manufacturing system to build free-form...

  3. Role of biomarkers in predicting CVD risk in the setting of HIV infection?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worm, Signe W; Hsue, Priscilla

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to present recent results on biomarkers and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the general population and to review studies of biomarkers among individuals with HIV infection. RECENT FINDINGS: Several inflammatory as well as lipid biomarkers are associated...... with risk of CVD. Biomarkers associated with inflammation such as C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 have been suggested to improve risk stratification among intermediate-risk persons; however, their routine use is not recommended in the general population. Both biomarkers have recently been reported...... elevated in patients with HIV. Additionally, interleukin-6 and D-dimer have been reported to predict overall mortality among individuals with HIV. However, the utility of other biomarkers to predict CVD among individuals with HIV infection is not clear. SUMMARY: The risk of CVD is increasing in the HIV...

  4. Substrate Deformation Curvatures Due to Film Mismatch Strain for Spatially Varying Substrate and Film Thicknesses (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-13

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0338 SUBSTRATE DEFORMATION CURVATURES DUE TO FILM MISMATCH STRAIN FOR SPATIALLY VARYING SUBSTRATE AND FILM ...22 July 2013 – 13 March 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE SUBSTRATE DEFORMATION CURVATURES DUE TO FILM MISMATCH STRAIN FOR SPATIALLY VARYING SUBSTRATE...AND FILM THICKNESSES (PREPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER IN-HOUSE 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 1) Craig P

  5. Comparison of Residual Stress Characterization Techniques Using an Interference Fit Sample (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-06

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0329 COMPARISON OF RESIDUAL STRESS CHARACTERIZATION TECHNIQUES USING AN INTERFERENCE FIT SAMPLE (PREPRINT...To) 3 April 2017 Interim 19 March 2014 – 3 March 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE COMPARISON OF RESIDUAL STRESS CHARACTERIZATION TECHNIQUES USING AN...work. 14. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) Residual stress in an engineering component induced from processing is pervasive and can impact the

  6. Analytical Assessment of the Blast Resistance of Precast, Prestressed Concrete Components (PREPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    AFRL-ML-TY-TP-2007-4529 PREPRINT ANALYTICAL ASSESSMENT OF THE BLAST RESISTANCE OF PRECAST, PRESTRESSED CONCRETE COMPONENTS Nicholas...Precast, Prestressed Concrete Components Nicholas Cramsey1 and Clay Naito2 SYNOPSIS Four blast tests were performed on 30-ft (9.1-m) tall precast... prestressed concrete wall panels. Two conventional sandwich panels and a control panel were examined and shown to perform adequately under the blast

  7. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of uranium for alpha spectrometry; Deposicion quimica de vapor (CVD) de uranio para espectrometria alfa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez V, M. L.; Rios M, C.; Ramirez O, J.; Davila R, J. I.; Mireles G, F., E-mail: luisalawliet@gmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    The uranium determination through radiometric techniques as alpha spectrometry requires for its proper analysis, preparation methods of the source to analyze and procedures for the deposit of this on a surface or substrate. Given the characteristics of alpha particles (small penetration distance and great loss of energy during their journey or its interaction with the matter), is important to ensure that the prepared sources are thin, to avoid problems of self-absorption. The routine methods used for this are the cathodic electro deposition and the direct evaporation, among others. In this paper the use of technique of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for the preparation of uranium sources is investigated; because by this, is possible to obtain thin films (much thinner than those resulting from electro deposition or evaporation) on a substrate and comprises reacting a precursor with a gas, which in turn serves as a carrier of the reaction products to achieve deposition. Preliminary results of the chemical vapor deposition of uranium are presented, synthesizing and using as precursor molecule the uranyl acetylacetonate, using oxygen as carrier gas for the deposition reaction on a glass substrate. The uranium films obtained were found suitable for alpha spectrometry. The variables taken into account were the precursor sublimation temperatures and deposition temperature, the reaction time and the type and flow of carrier gas. Of the investigated conditions, two depositions with encouraging results that can serve as reference for further work to improve the technique presented here were selected. Alpha spectra obtained for these depositions and the characterization of the representative samples by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction are also presented. (Author)

  8. Modelling and analysis of CVD processes in porous media for ceramic composite preparation

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Y S; Burggraaf, A.J.; Burggraaf, Anthonie

    1991-01-01

    A continuum phenomenological model is presented to describe chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of solid product inside porous substrate media for the preparation of reinforced ceramic-matrix composites [by the chemical vapour infiltration (CVI) process] and ceramic membrane composites (by a modified CVD process). The chemical reaction, intrapore diffusion, non-isobaric viscous flow and variation of substrate pore geometry during deposition are considered in the model which is readily solved by ...

  9. Deposition and micro electrical discharge machining of CVD-diamond layers incorporated with silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, R.; Berger, T.; Prieske, M.; Börner, R.; Hackert-Oschätzchen, M.; Zeidler, H.; Schubert, A.

    2017-10-01

    In metal forming, lubricants have to be used to prevent corrosion or to reduce friction and tool wear. From an economical and ecological point of view, the aim is to avoid the usage of lubricants. For dry deep drawing of aluminum sheets it is intended to apply locally micro-structured wear-resistant carbon based coatings onto steel tools. One type of these coatings are diamond layers prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Due to the high strength of diamond, milling processes are unsuitable for micro-structuring of these layers. In contrast to this, micro electrical discharge machining (micro EDM) is a suitable process for micro-structuring CVD-diamond layers. Due to its non-contact nature and its process principle of ablating material by melting and evaporating, it is independent of the hardness, brittleness or toughness of the workpiece material. In this study the deposition and micro electrical discharge machining of silicon incorporated CVD-diamond (Si-CVD-diamond) layers were presented. For this, 10 µm thick layers were deposited on molybdenum plates by a laser-induced plasma CVD process (LaPlas-CVD). For the characterization of the coatings RAMAN- and EDX-analyses were conducted. Experiments in EDM were carried out with a tungsten carbide tool electrode with a diameter of 90 µm to investigate the micro-structuring of Si-CVD-diamond. The impact of voltage, discharge energy and tool polarity on process speed and resulting erosion geometry were analyzed. The results show that micro EDM is a suitable technology for micro-structuring of silicon incorporated CVD-diamond layers.

  10. A facile process for soak-and-peel delamination of CVD graphene from substrates using water

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Priti; Dongare, Pratiksha D.; Grover, Sameer; Dubey, Sudipta; Mamgain, Hitesh; Bhattacharya, Arnab; Deshmukh, Mandar M.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple technique to transfer chemical vapour deposited (CVD) graphene from copper and platinum substrates using a soak-and-peel delamination technique utilizing only hot deionized water. The lack of chemical etchants results in cleaner CVD graphene films minimizing unintentional doping, as confirmed by Raman and electrical measurements. The process allows the reuse of substrates and hence can enable the use of oriented substrates for growth of higher quality graphene, and is ...

  11. Simulation of a perfect CVD diamond Schottky diode steep forward current–voltage characteristic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukushkin, V.A., E-mail: vakuk@appl.sci-nnov.ru [Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Science, 46 Ulyanov St., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Nizhny Novgorod State University named after N.I. Lobachevsky, 23 Gagarin pr., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-01

    The kinetic equation approach to the simulation of the perfect CVD diamond Schottky diode current–voltage characteristic is considered. In result it is shown that the latter has a significantly steeper forward branch than that of perfect devices of such a type on usual semiconductors. It means that CVD diamond-based Schottky diodes have an important potential advantage over analogous devices on conventional materials.

  12. Dietary Choline and Betaine and Risk of CVD: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie A. Meyer

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies implicate choline and betaine metabolite trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO in cardiovascular disease (CVD. We conducted a systematic review and random-effects meta-analysis to quantify a summary estimated effect of dietary choline and betaine on hard CVD outcomes (incidence and mortality. Eligible studies were prospective studies in adults with comprehensive diet assessment and follow-up for hard CVD endpoints. We identified six studies that met our criteria, comprising 18,076 incident CVD events, 5343 CVD deaths, and 184,010 total participants. In random effects meta-analysis, incident CVD was not associated with choline (relative risk (RR: 1.00; 95% CI: 0.98, 1.02 or betaine (RR: 0.99; 95% CI: 0.98, 1.01 intake. Results did not vary by study outcome (incident coronary heart disease, stroke, total CVD and there was no evidence for heterogeneity among studies. Only two studies provided data on phosphatidylcholine and CVD mortality. Random effects meta-analysis did not support an association between choline and CVD mortality (RR: 1.09, 95% CI: 0.89, 1.35, but one study supported a positive association and there was significant heterogeneity (I2 = 84%, p-value < 0.001. Our findings do not support an association between dietary choline/betaine with incident CVD, but call for further research into choline and CVD mortality.

  13. Fish consumption and its motives in households with versus without self-reported medical history of CVD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pieniak, Zuzanna; Verbeke, Wim; Perez-Cueto, Federico

    2008-01-01

    Background - The purpose of this study was to explore the cross-cultural differences in the frequency of fish intake and in motivations for fish consumption between people from households with (CVD+) or without (CVD-) medical history of cardiovascular disease, using data obtained in five European...... in the household. Results - Individuals from households in the CVD+ group consumed fish more frequently in Belgium and in Denmark as compared to those in the CVD- group. The consumption of fatty fish, which is the main sources of omega-3 PUFA associated with prevention of cardiovascular diseases, was on the same...... a number of differences between CVD- and CVD+ subjects with respect to their frequency of fish intake are uncovered, the findings suggest that fish consumption traditions and habits - rather than a medical history of CVD - account for large differences between the countries, particularly in fatty fish...

  14. Recent Results from Beam Tests of 3D and Pad pCVD Diamond Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Wallny, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Results from prototypes of a detector using chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond with embedded resistive electrodes in the bulk forming a 3D diamond device are presented. A detector system consisting of 3D devices based on poly-crystalline CVD (pCVD) diamond was connected to a multi-channel readout and successfully tested in a 120 GeV/c proton beam at CERN proving for the first time the feasibility of the 3D detector concept in pCVD for particle tracking applications. We also present beam test results on the dependence of signal size on incident particle rate in charged particle detectors based on poly-crystalline CVD diamond. The detectors were tested in a 260 MeV/c pion beam over a range of particle fluxes from 2 kHz/cm2 to 10 MHz/cm2 . The pulse height of the sensors was measured with pad readout electronics at a peaking time of 7 ns. Our data from the 2015 beam tests at PSI indicate that the pulse height of poly-crystalline CVD diamond sensor irradiated to 5×1014 neq/cm2 is independent of particle flux...

  15. Characterisation of CVD diamond detectors used for fast neutron flux monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Foulon, F; Amosov, V N; Kaschuck, Y; Frunze, V; Tromson, D; Brambilla, A

    2002-01-01

    Natural diamond detectors (NDD) have been successfully used for fast neutron spectrometry on various fusion installations in plasma diagnostics. These detectors can work at high temperature, are radiation hard and exhibit a high energy resolution. However, the use of NDD is limited by the availability of IIa type diamonds exhibiting high electronic properties. With the recent advance in the growth of high quality chemically vapour deposited (CVD) diamond at LETI, CVD diamond appears to be a very promising material for plasma diagnostics. We present here for the first time results of the use of CVD diamond detectors for fast neutron flux monitoring on a neutron generator. The characteristics of CVD diamond detectors are compared with that of high quality NDD made by TRINITI. Pulse height spectra have been measured with CVD detectors and NDD under both 5.5 MeV alpha particles and 14.1 MeV neutrons. The quality of CVD diamond enables the recording of structured spectra allowing the distinction between the differ...

  16. Effects of Incomplete Ionization on Ga2O3 Power Device: Unintentional Donor with Energy 110 meV (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0367 EFFECTS OF INCOMPLETE IONIZATION ON Β-Ga2O3 POWER DEVICE: UNINTENTIONAL DONOR WITH ENERGY 110 meV (PREPRINT...EFFECTS OF INCOMPLETE IONIZATION ON Β-Ga2O3 POWER DEVICE: UNINTENTIONAL DONOR WITH ENERGY 110 meV (PREPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-11-D-5801...found to have a donor energy of 110 meV. The existence of the unintentional donor is confirmed by temperature dependent admittance spectroscopy

  17. Micro-Slotting Technique for Reliable Measurement of Sub-Surface Residual Stress in Ti-6Al-4V (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-28

    Kang KJ, Yao N, He MY, et al. A method for in situ measurement of the residual stress in thin films by using the focused ion beam. Thin Solid Films...AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0446 MICRO-SLOTTING TECHNIQUE FOR RELIABLE MEASUREMENT OF SUB-SURFACE RESIDUAL STRESS IN Ti-6AL-4V (PREPRINT... MEASUREMENT OF SUB-SURFACE RESIDUAL STRESS IN Ti-6AL-4V (PREPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-06-2-5211 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  18. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) event rates in HIV-positive persons at high predicted CVD and CKD risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, Mark A; Mocroft, Amanda; Ryom, Lene

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D) study has developed predictive risk scores for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD, defined as confirmed estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] ≤ 60 ml/min/1.73 m2) events in HIV-positive peo...

  19. New 3D Stereoconfigurated cis Tris (Fluorenylphenylamino) Benzene with Large Steric Hindrance to Minimize Stacking in Hybrid Light Emitting Devices (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-31

    STACKING IN HYBRID LIGHT -EMITTING DEVICES (PREPRINT) Chang-Lyoul Lee Gwangju Institute Nam-Goo Kang, Ken Min Wang, Lawrence Wolf, and Long...HINDRANCE TO MINIMIZE Π–Π STACKING IN HYBRID LIGHT -EMITTING DEVICES (PREPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-15-D-5405-0002 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...contact of light -harvesting fluorene moieties from each other that should minimize the self-quenching effect. By the fact of close matching

  20. Beamforming and Reconfiguration of a Structurally Embedded Vascular Antenna Array (SEVA2) in Both Multi-Layer and Complex Curved Composites (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-20

    summarizes the potential of designing complex SEVA structure. Pressure driven flow of EGaIn (liquid metal ) can be used to attain frequency reconfigurable...AND COMPLEX CURVED COMPOSITES (PREPRINT) Darren J. Hartl UTC Jeffery W. Baur AFRL/RX Geoffrey J. Frank, Robyn Bradford, David Phillips...SEVA2) IN BOTH MULTI-LAYER AND COMPLEX CURVED COMPOSITES (PREPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-11-D-5800-0012 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  1. Tribosystems based on multilayered micro/nanocrystalline CVD diamond coatings =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, Mohammadmehdi

    A combinacao das caracteristicas do diamante microcristalino (MCD) e nanocristalino (NCD), tais como elevada adesao do MCD e a baixa rugosidade superficial e baixo coeficiente de atrito do NCD, e ideal para aplicacoes tribologicas exigentes. Deste modo, o presente trabalho centrou-se no desenvolvimento de revestimentos em multicamada MCD/NCD. Filmes com dez camadas foram depositados em amostras de cerâmicos de Si3N4 pela tecnica de deposicao quimica em fase vapor assistida por filamento quente (HFCVD). A microestrutura, qualidade do diamante e adesao foram investigadas usando tecnicas como SEM, AFM, espectroscopia Raman, DRX, indentacao Brale e perfilometria otica 3D. Diversas geometrias para aplicacoes distintas foram revestidas: discos e esferas para testes tribologicos a escala laboratorial, e para testes em servico, aneis de empanques mecânicos e pastilhas de corte para torneamento. Nos ensaios tribologicos esfera-sobre-plano em movimento reciproco, sob 10-90% de humidade relativa (RH), os valores medios dos coeficientes de atrito maximo e em estado estacionario sao de 0,32 e 0,09, respetivamente. Em relacao aos coeficientes de desgaste, observou-se um valor minimo de cerca de 5,2x10-8 mm3N-1m-1 para valores intermedios de 20-25% de RH. A humidade relativa tem um forte efeito sobre o valor da carga critica que triplica a partir de 40 N a 10% RH para 120 N a 90% de RH. No intervalo de temperaturas 50-100 °C, as cargas criticas sao semelhantes as obtidas em condicoes de baixa RH ( 10-25%). A vida util das ferramentas com revestimento de dez camadas alternadas MCD/NCD e 24 mum de espessura total no torneamento de um composito de matriz metalica Al- 15 vol% Al2O3 (Al-MMC) e melhor do que a maioria das ferramentas de diamante CVD encontradas na literatura, e semelhante a maioria das ferramentas de diamante policristalino (PCD). A formacao de cratera ocorre por desgaste sucessivo das varias camadas, atrasando a delaminacao total do revestimento de diamante do

  2. Cardiovascular disease (CVD and chronic kidney disease (CKD event rates in HIV-positive persons at high predicted CVD and CKD risk: A prospective analysis of the D:A:D observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Boyd

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D study has developed predictive risk scores for cardiovascular disease (CVD and chronic kidney disease (CKD, defined as confirmed estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] ≤ 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 events in HIV-positive people. We hypothesized that participants in D:A:D at high (>5% predicted risk for both CVD and CKD would be at even greater risk for CVD and CKD events.We included all participants with complete risk factor (covariate data, baseline eGFR > 60 ml/min/1.73 m2, and a confirmed (>3 months apart eGFR 1%-5%, >5% and fitted Poisson models to assess whether CVD and CKD risk group effects were multiplicative. A total of 27,215 participants contributed 202,034 person-years of follow-up: 74% male, median (IQR age 42 (36, 49 years, median (IQR baseline year of follow-up 2005 (2004, 2008. D:A:D risk equations predicted 3,560 (13.1% participants at high CVD risk, 4,996 (18.4% participants at high CKD risk, and 1,585 (5.8% participants at both high CKD and high CVD risk. CVD and CKD event rates by predicted risk group were multiplicative. Participants at high CVD risk had a 5.63-fold (95% CI 4.47, 7.09, p < 0.001 increase in CKD events compared to those at low risk; participants at high CKD risk had a 1.31-fold (95% CI 1.09, 1.56, p = 0.005 increase in CVD events compared to those at low risk. Participants' CVD and CKD risk groups had multiplicative predictive effects, with no evidence of an interaction (p = 0.329 and p = 0.291 for CKD and CVD, respectively. The main study limitation is the difference in the ascertainment of the clinically defined CVD endpoints and the laboratory-defined CKD endpoints.We found that people at high predicted risk for both CVD and CKD have substantially greater risks for both CVD and CKD events compared with those at low predicted risk for both outcomes, and compared to those at high predicted risk for only CVD or CKD events. This suggests that CVD and

  3. PRN: a preprint service for catalyzing R-fMRI and neuroscience related studies [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4ws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaogan Yan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sharing drafts of scientific manuscripts on preprint hosting services for early exposure and pre-publication feedback is a well-accepted practice in fields such as physics, astronomy, or mathematics. The field of neuroscience, however, has yet to adopt the preprint model. A reason for this reluctance might partly be the lack of central preprint services for the field of neuroscience. To address this issue, we announce the launch of Preprints of the R-fMRI Network (PRN, a community funded preprint hosting service. PRN provides free-submission and free hosting of manuscripts for resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI and neuroscience related studies. Submissions will be peer viewed and receive feedback from readers and a panel of invited consultants of the R-fMRI Network. All manuscripts and feedback will be freely available online with citable permanent URL for open-access. The goal of PRN is to supplement the “peer reviewed” journal publication system – by more rapidly communicating the latest research achievements throughout the world. We hope PRN will help the field to embrace the preprint model and thus further accelerate R-fMRI and neuroscience related studies, eventually enhancing human mental health.

  4. Movers and stayers: The geography of residential mobility and CVD hospitalisations in Auckland, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exeter, Daniel J; Sabel, Clive E; Hanham, Grant; Lee, Arier C; Wells, Susan

    2015-05-01

    The association between area-level disadvantage and health and social outcomes is unequivocal. However, less is known about the health impact of residential mobility, particularly at intra-urban scales. We used an encrypted National Health Index (eNHI) number to link individual-level data recorded in routine national health databases to construct a cohort of 641,532 participants aged 30+ years to investigate the association between moving and CVD hospitalisations in Auckland, New Zealand. Residential mobility was measured for participants according to changes in the census Meshblock of usual residence, obtained from the Primary Health Organisation (PHO) database for every calendar quarter between 1/1/2006 and 31/12/2012. The NZDep2006 area deprivation score at the start and end of a participant's inclusion in the study was used to measure deprivation mobility. We investigated the relative risk of movers being hospitalised for CVD relative to stayers using multi-variable binomial regression models, controlling for age, gender, deprivation and ethnicity. Considered together, movers were 1.22 (1.19-1.26) times more likely than stayers to be hospitalised for CVD. Using the 5×5 deprivation origin-destination matrix to model a patient's risk of CVD based on upward, downward or sideways deprivation mobility, movers within the least deprived (NZDep2006 Quintile 1) areas were 10% less likely than stayers to be hospitalised for CVD, while movers within the most deprived (NZDep2006 Q5) areas were 45% more likely than stayers to have had their first CVD hospitalisation in 2006-2012 (RR: 1.45 [1.35-1.55]). Participants who moved upward also had higher relative risks of having a CVD event, although their risk was less than those observed for participants experiencing downward deprivation mobility. This research suggests that residential mobility is an important determinant of CVD in Auckland. Further investigation is required to determine the impact moving has on the risk of

  5. Metal oxide growth, spin precession measurements and Raman spectroscopy of CVD graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubayashi, Akitomo

    The focus of this dissertation is to explore the possibility of wafer scale graphene-based spintronics. Graphene is a single atomic layer of sp 2 bonded carbon atoms that has attracted much attention as a new type of electronic material due to its high carrier mobilities, superior mechanical properties and extremely high thermal conductivity. In addition, it has become an attractive material for use in spintronic devices owing to its long electron spin relaxation time at room temperature. This arises in part from its low spin-orbit coupling and negligible nuclear hyperfine interaction. In order to realize wafer scale graphene spintronics, utilization of CVD grown graphene is crytical due to its scalability. In this thesis, a unique fabrication method of the metal oxide layers on CVD graphene is presented. This is motivated by theoretical work showing that an ultra thin metal oxide film used as a tunnel barrier improves the spin injection efficiency. Introducing a titanium seed layer prior to the aluminum oxide growth showed improved surface and film uniformity and resulted in a completely oxidized film. Utilizing this unique metal oxide film growth process, lateral spin valve devices using CVD graphene as a channel are successfully fabricated. Hanle spin precession measurements are demonstrated on these CVD graphene spin devices. A non-local Hanle voltage model based upon the diffusive spin transport in a solid is utilized to find the spin diffusion length and spin relaxation time of CVD graphene. The measured spin relaxation times in CVD graphene were compatible with the values found in the literature. However, they are an order of magnitude shorter than the theoretical values expected in graphene. To investigate possible origins of this order of magnitude shorter spin relaxation time in graphene, crystal and electrical modifications in CVD graphene are studied throughout the entire device fabrication process. Raman spectroscopy is utilized to track CVD graphene

  6. Investigation of multilayer domains in large-scale CVD monolayer graphene by optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yuanfang; Li, Zhenzhen; Wang, Wenhui; Guo, Xitao; Jiang, Jie; Nan, Haiyan; Ni, Zhenhua

    2017-03-01

    CVD graphene is a promising candidate for optoelectronic applications due to its high quality and high yield. However, multi-layer domains could inevitably form at the nucleation centers during the growth. Here, we propose an optical imaging technique to precisely identify the multilayer domains and also the ratio of their coverage in large-scale CVD monolayer graphene. We have also shown that the stacking disorder in twisted bilayer graphene as well as the impurities on the graphene surface could be distinguished by optical imaging. Finally, we investigated the effects of bilayer domains on the optical and electrical properties of CVD graphene, and found that the carrier mobility of CVD graphene is seriously limited by scattering from bilayer domains. Our results could be useful for guiding future optoelectronic applications of large-scale CVD graphene. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61422503, 61376104), the Open Research Funds of Key Laboratory of MEMS of Ministry of Education (SEU, China), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities.

  7. Spin transport in two-layer-CVD-hBN/graphene/hBN heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurram, M.; Omar, S.; Zihlmann, S.; Makk, P.; Li, Q. C.; Zhang, Y. F.; Schönenberger, C.; van Wees, B. J.

    2018-01-01

    We study room-temperature spin transport in graphene devices encapsulated between a layer-by-layer-stacked two-layer-thick chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) tunnel barrier, and a few-layer-thick exfoliated-hBN substrate. We find mobilities and spin-relaxation times comparable to that of SiO2 substrate-based graphene devices, and we obtain a similar order of magnitude of spin relaxation rates for both the Elliott-Yafet and D'Yakonov-Perel' mechanisms. The behavior of ferromagnet/two-layer-CVD-hBN/graphene/hBN contacts ranges from transparent to tunneling due to inhomogeneities in the CVD-hBN barriers. Surprisingly, we find both positive and negative spin polarizations for high-resistance two-layer-CVD-hBN barrier contacts with respect to the low-resistance contacts. Furthermore, we find that the differential spin-injection polarization of the high-resistance contacts can be modulated by dc bias from -0.3 to +0.3 V with no change in its sign, while its magnitude increases at higher negative bias. These features point to the distinctive spin-injection nature of the two-layer-CVD-hBN compared to the bilayer-exfoliated-hBN tunnel barriers.

  8. Can surface preparation with CVD diamond tip influence on bonding to dental tissues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparecido Kawaguchi, Fernando; Brossi Botta, Sergio; Nilo Vieira, Samuel; Steagall Júnior, Washington; Bona Matos, Adriana

    2008-04-01

    This study evaluated the influence of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) tips surface treatments of enamel and dentin on bonding resistance of two adhesive systems. Thirty embedded samples were divided in 12 groups ( n = 10), according to factors: substrate (enamel and dentin), adhesive system [etch-and-rinse (SB) and self-etch]; and the surface treatments (paper discs, impact CVD tips and tangential CVD tip). When CVD tip was used in the impact mode the tip was applied perpendicular to dental surface, while at tangential mode, the tip worked parallel to dental surface. Specimens were tested in tension after 24 h at 0.5 mm/min of cross-head speed. ANOVA results, in MPa showed that in enamel, only adhesive system factor was statistically significant ( p = 0.015) under tested conditions, with higher bond strength observed for SB groups. However, in dentin the best bonding performance was obtained in SE groups ( p = 0.00). In both tested substrates, results did not show statistically significant difference for factors treatment and its interactions. ConclusionsIt may be concluded that CVD-tip surface treatment, in both tested modes, did not influence on adhesion to enamel and dentin. But, it is important to choose adhesive system according to the tissue available to bonding.

  9. Medicare Star excludes diabetes patients with poor CVD risk factor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmittdiel, Julie; Raebel, Marsha; Dyer, Wendy; Steiner, John; Goodrich, Glenn; Karter, Andy; Nichols, Gregory

    2014-12-01

    CMS recently added medication adherence to antihypertensives, antihyperlipidemics, and oral antihyperglycemics to its Medicare Star quality measures. These CMS metrics exclude patients with Star adherence metrics and assessed the relationship of both Star-defined adherence and exclusion from Star metrics with CVD risk factor control. Cross-sectional, population-based analysis of 129,040 patients with diabetes aged ≥65 years in 2010 from 3 Kaiser Permanente regions. We estimated adjusted risk ratios to assess the relationship between achieving Star adherence and being excluded from Star adherence metrics, with CVD risk factor control (glycated hemoglobin [A1C]Star metrics excluded 27% of patients with diabetes prescribed oral medications. Star-defined nonadherence was negatively associated with CVD risk factor control (risk ratio [RR], 0.95, 0.84, 0.96 for A1C, LDL-C, and SBP control, respectively; PStar metrics due to early nonadherence was also strongly associated with poor control (RR, 0.83, 0.56, 0.87 for A1C, LDL-C, and SBP control, respectively; PStar adherence measures underestimate the prevalence of medication nonadherence in diabetes and exclude patients at high risk for poor CVD outcomes. Up to 3 million elderly patients with diabetes may be excluded from these measures nationally. Quality measures designed to encourage effective medication use should focus on all patients treated for CVD risk.

  10. Applicability of the Existing CVD Risk Assessment Tools to Type II Diabetics in Oman: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulhakeem Al-Rawahi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with type II diabetes (T2DM have an elevated risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD, and it is considered to be a leading cause of morbidity and premature mortality in these patients. Many traditional risk factors such as age, male sex, hypertension, dyslipidemia, glycemic control, diabetes duration, renal dysfunction, obesity, and smoking have been studied and identified as independent factors for CVD. Quantifying the risk of CVD among diabetics using the common risk factors in order to plan the treatment and preventive measures is important in the management of these patients as recommended by many clinical guidelines. Therefore, several risk assessment tools have been developed in different parts of the world for this purpose. These include the tools that have been developed for general populations and considered T2DM as a risk factor, and the tools that have been developed for T2DM populations specifically. However, due to the differences in sociodemographic factors and lifestyle patterns, as well as the differences in the distribution of various CVD risk factors in different diabetic populations, the external applicability of these tools on different populations is questionable. This review aims to address the applicability of the existing CVD risk models to the Omani diabetic population.

  11. Scattering of low-energetic atoms and molecules from a boron-doped CVD diamond surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allenbach, M.; Neuland, M. B.; Riedo, A.; Wurz, P.

    2018-01-01

    For the detection of low energetic neutral atoms for the remote sensing of space plasmas, charge state conversion surfaces are used to ionize the neutrals for their subsequent measurement. We investigated a boron-doped Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond sample for its suitability to serve as a conversion surface on future space missions, such as NASA's Interstellar Mapping and Acceleration Probe. For H and O atoms incident on conversion surface with energies ranging from 195 to 1000 eV and impact angles from 6° to 15° we measured the angular scattering distributions and the ionization yields. Atomic force microscope and laser ablation ionization mass spectrometry analyses were applied to further characterize the sample. Based on a figure-of-merit, which included the ionization yield and angular scatter distribution, the B-doped CVD surface was compared to other, previously characterized conversion surfaces, including e.g. an undoped CVD diamond with a metallized backside. For particle energies below 390 eV the performance of the B-doped CVD conversion surfaces is comparable to surfaces studied before. For higher energies the figure-of-merit indicates a superior performance. From our studies we conclude that the B-doped CVD diamond sample is well suited for its application on future space missions.

  12. Non-classical crystallization of thin films and nanostructures in CVD and PVD processes

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Nong Moon

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to a recently-developed approach to the growth mechanism of thin films and nanostructures via chemical vapour deposition (CVD). Starting from the underlying principles of the low pressure synthesis of diamond films, it is shown that diamond growth occurs not by individual atoms but by charged nanoparticles. This newly-discovered growth mechanism turns out to be general to many CVD and some physical vapor deposition (PVD) processes. This non-classical crystallization is a new paradigm of crystal growth, with active research taking place on growth in solution, especially in biomineralization processes. Established understanding of the growth of thin films and nanostructures is based around processes involving individual atoms or molecules. According to the author’s research over the last two decades, however, the generation of charged gas phase nuclei is shown to be the rule rather than the exception in the CVD process, and charged gas phase nuclei are actively ...

  13. Targeted quantitation of CVD-linked plasma proteins for biomarker verification and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percy, Andrew J; Byrns, Simon; Chambers, Andrew G; Borchers, Christoph H

    2013-12-01

    Despite significant advances in treatment, cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in developed and developing countries. Judicious monitoring of common risk factors has been unable to control this global epidemic, necessitating novel biomarkers for improved screening and earlier disease detection and management. Although numerous plasma proteins have been associated with CVD, only a few of these potential biomarkers have been validated for clinical use. Here we review the quantitative proteomic methods used to verify and validate new biomarker candidates in human plasma. These methods center on a bottom-up approach involving multiple or selected reaction monitoring, for targeted detection, with stable isotope-labeled standards, for peptide normalization. Also included are a discussion of future strategies for improved CVD protein biomarker verification and validation, recommendations for method translation to the clinic, and future projections for protein biomarker research.

  14. Cold Vacuum Dryer (CVD) Facility Fire Protection System Design Description (SYS 24)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SINGH, G.

    2000-10-17

    This system design description (SDD) addresses the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility fire protection system (FPS). The primary features of the FPS for the CVD are a fire alarm and detection system, automatic sprinklers, and fire hydrants. The FPS also includes fire extinguishers located throughout the facility and fire hydrants to assist in manual firefighting efforts. In addition, a fire barrier separates the operations support (administrative) area from the process bays and process bay support areas. Administrative controls to limit combustible materials have been established and are a part of the overall fire protection program. The FPS is augmented by assistance from the Hanford Fire Department (HED) and by interface systems including service water, electrical power, drains, instrumentation and controls. This SDD, when used in conjunction with the other elements of the definitive design package, provides a complete picture of the FPS for the CVD Facility.

  15. Development of CVD Diamond for Industrial Applications Final Report CRADA No. TC-2047-02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caplan, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Olstad, R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Jory, H. [Communications and Power Industries, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Vikharov, A. L. [Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-09-08

    This project was a collaborative effort to develop and demonstrate a new millimeter microwave assisted chemical vapor deposition(CVD) process for manufacturing large diamond disks with greatly reduced processing times and costs from those now available. In the CVD process, carbon based gases (methane) and hydrogen are dissociated into plasma using microwave discharge and then deposited layer by layer as polycrystalline diamond onto a substrate. The available low frequency (2.45GHz) microwave sources used elsewhere (De Beers) result in low density plasmas and low deposition rates: 4 inch diamond disks take 6-8 weeks to process. The new system developed in this project uses a high frequency 30GHz Gyrotron as the microwave source and a quasi-optical CVD chamber resulting in a much higher density plasma which greatly reduced the diamond processing times (1-2 weeks)

  16. Influence of surface morphology and microstructure on performance of CVD tungsten coating under fusion transient thermal loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian, Youyun, E-mail: lianyy@swip.ac.cn [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu (China); Liu, Xiang; Wang, Jianbao; Feng, Fan [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu (China); Lv, Yanwei; Song, Jiupeng [China National R& D Center for Tungsten Technology, Xiamen Tungsten Co. Ltd, 361026 Xiamen (China); Chen, Jiming [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu (China)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Thick CVD-W coatingswere deposited at a rapid growth rate. • The polished CVD-W coatings have highly textured structure and exhibited a very strong preferred orientation. • The polished CVD tungsten coatings show superior thermal shock resistance as compared with that of the as-deposited coatings. • The crack formation of the polished CVD-W was almost suppressed at an elevated temperature. - Abstract: Thick tungsten coatings have been deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at a rapid growth rate. A series of tungsten coatings with different thickness and surface morphology were prepared. The surface morphology, microstructure and preferred orientation of the CVD tungsten coatings were investigated. Thermal shock analyses were performed by using an electron beam facility to study the influence of the surface morphology and the microstructure on the thermal shock resistance of the CVD tungsten coatings. Repetitive (100 pulses) ELMs-like thermal shock loads were applied at various temperatures between room temperature and 600 °C with pulse duration of 1 ms and an absorbed power density of up to 1 GW/m{sup 2}. The results of the tests demonstrated that the specific surface morphology and columnar crystal structure of the CVD tungsten have significant influence on the surface cracking threshold and crack propagation of the materials. The CVD tungsten coatings with a polished surface show superior thermal shock resistance as compared with that of the as-deposited coatings with a rough surface.

  17. Thermoluminescent properties of CVD diamond: applications to ionising radiation dosimetry; Proprietes thermoluminescentes du diamant CVD: applications a la dosimetrie des rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petitfils, A

    2007-09-15

    Remarkable properties of synthetic diamond (human soft tissue equivalence, chemical stability, non-toxicity) make this material suitable for medical application as thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD). This work highlights the interest of this material as radiotherapy TLD. In the first stage of this work, we looked after thermoluminescent (TL) and dosimetric properties of polycrystalline diamond made by Chemically Vapor Deposited (CVD) synthesis. Dosimetric characteristics are satisfactory as TLD for medical application. Luminescence thermal quenching on diamond has been investigated. This phenomenon leads to a decrease of dosimetric TL peak sensitivity when the heating rate increases. The second part of this work analyses the use of synthetic diamond as TLD in radiotherapy. Dose profiles, depth dose distributions and the cartography of an electron beam obtained with our samples are in very good agreement with results from an ionisation chamber. It is clearly shown that CVD) diamond is of interest to check beams of treatment accelerators. The use of these samples in a control of treatment with Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy underlines good response of synthetic diamond in high dose gradient areas. These results indicate that CVD diamond is a promising material for radiotherapy dosimetry. (author)

  18. Association of BMI with risk of CVD mortality and all-cause mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kee, Chee Cheong; Sumarni, Mohd Ghazali; Lim, Kuang Hock; Selvarajah, Sharmini; Haniff, Jamaiyah; Tee, Guat Hiong Helen; Gurpreet, Kaur; Faudzi, Yusoff Ahmad; Amal, Nasir Mustafa

    2017-05-01

    To determine the relationship between BMI and risk of CVD mortality and all-cause mortality among Malaysian adults. Population-based, retrospective cohort study. Participants were followed up for 5 years from 2006 to 2010. Mortality data were obtained via record linkages with the Malaysian National Registration Department. Multiple Cox regression was applied to compare risk of CVD and all-cause mortality between BMI categories adjusting for age, gender and ethnicity. Models were generated for all participants, all participants the first 2 years of follow-up, healthy participants, healthy never smokers, never smokers, current smokers and former smokers. All fourteen states in Malaysia. Malaysian adults (n 32 839) aged 18 years or above from the third National Health and Morbidity Survey. Total follow-up time was 153 814 person-years with 1035 deaths from all causes and 225 deaths from CVD. Underweight (BMI<18·5 kg/m2) was associated with a significantly increased risk of all-cause mortality, while obesity (BMI ≥30·0 kg/m2) was associated with a heightened risk of CVD mortality. Overweight (BMI=25·0-29·9 kg/m2) was inversely associated with risk of all-cause mortality. Underweight was significantly associated with all-cause mortality in all models except for current smokers. Overweight was inversely associated with all-cause mortality in all participants. Although a positive trend was observed between BMI and CVD mortality in all participants, a significant association was observed only for severe obesity (BMI≥35·0 kg/m2). Underweight was associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality and obesity with increased risk of CVD mortality. Therefore, maintaining a normal BMI through leading an active lifestyle and healthy dietary habits should continue to be promoted.

  19. AB006. Erectile dysfunction (ED) as a marker for cardiovascular diseases (CVD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Luiz Otavio

    2015-01-01

    In 1973 V. Michal, a vascular surgeon said “Erectile dysfunction (ED) is related to diseases of the vascular bed”. And this makes sense since ED and cardiovascular diseases (CVD) share many risk factors like aging, obesity, inactivity, smoking, depression, dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes/insuline resistance. These conditions may lead to an oxidative stress which ultimately can promote vasoconstriction, thrombosis, atherosclerosis and finally ED and CVD. One of the most accepted Idea is that small vessels plug earlier, it means, small arteries when have for example 50% of obstruction will probably have a clinical manifestation before bigger arteries!

  20. A facile process for soak-and-peel delamination of CVD graphene from substrates using water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Priti; Dongare, Pratiksha D.; Grover, Sameer; Dubey, Sudipta; Mamgain, Hitesh; Bhattacharya, Arnab; Deshmukh, Mandar M.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple technique to transfer chemical vapour deposited (CVD) graphene from copper and platinum substrates using a soak-and-peel delamination technique utilizing only hot deionized water. The lack of chemical etchants results in cleaner CVD graphene films minimizing unintentional doping, as confirmed by Raman and electrical measurements. The process allows the reuse of substrates and hence can enable the use of oriented substrates for growth of higher quality graphene, and is an inherently inexpensive and scalable process for large-area production. PMID:24457558

  1. Recubrimientos depositados por cvd-fbr para protección a alta temperatura

    OpenAIRE

    Jose Luddey Marulanda-Arevalo; Saul Castañeda-Quintana; Aduljay Remolina-Millan

    2013-01-01

    La deposición química de vapor por lecho fl uidizado (CVD-FBR) es una variante de la técnica de deposición química de vapor; que combina las ventajas de la activación térmica por calentamiento y el lecho fl uidizado. Los recubrimientos mediante CVD-FBR son ampliamente investigados y usados debido a la necesidad de proteger superfi cialmente los componentes que operan a altas temperaturas, el cual ha aumentado perceptiblemente. Además, tiene la ventaja de ser una técnica de bajo costo, puede c...

  2. A facile process for soak-and-peel delamination of CVD graphene from substrates using water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Priti; Dongare, Pratiksha D; Grover, Sameer; Dubey, Sudipta; Mamgain, Hitesh; Bhattacharya, Arnab; Deshmukh, Mandar M

    2014-01-24

    We demonstrate a simple technique to transfer chemical vapour deposited (CVD) graphene from copper and platinum substrates using a soak-and-peel delamination technique utilizing only hot deionized water. The lack of chemical etchants results in cleaner CVD graphene films minimizing unintentional doping, as confirmed by Raman and electrical measurements. The process allows the reuse of substrates and hence can enable the use of oriented substrates for growth of higher quality graphene, and is an inherently inexpensive and scalable process for large-area production.

  3. System for the growth of bulk SiC crystals by modified CVD techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckl, Andrew J.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this program was the development of a SiC CVD growth of films thick enough to be useful as pseudo-substrates. The cold-walled CVD system was designed, assembled, and tested. Extrapolating from preliminary evaluation of SiC films grown in the system at relatively low temperatures indicates that the growth rate at the final temperatures will be high enough to make our approach practical. Modifications of the system to allow high temperature growth and cleaner growth conditions are in progress. This program was jointly funded by Wright Laboratory, Materials Directorate and NASA LeRC and monitored by NASA.

  4. Preferred oriented ZnO films growth on nonoriented substrates by CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abduev, A.; Akhmedov, A.; Asvarov, A.; Omaev, A.

    2012-02-01

    The processes of CVD synthesis of ZnO layers with different preferred orientation on non-crystalline substrates where studied. Synthesis was carried out in a hydrogen atmosphere on substrates with ZnO buffer layers with various preferred orientation, namely in the plane perpendicular as well as parallel to plane of the substrate. ZnO buffer layers were synthesized by magnetron sputtering of ZnO ceramic targets. Conditions for the ZnO layers formation by CVD with (002), (100), (110) preferred orientations and mixed (100) - (110) orientations were determined.

  5. Proton irradiation of CVD diamond detectors for high-luminosity experiments at the LHC

    OpenAIRE

    Meier, D.; Adam, W.; Adam, W.; Bauer, C; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P; Bogani, F; Borchi, E.; Bruzzi, M; Colledani, C; Conway, J; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W

    1998-01-01

    CVD diamond shows promising properties for use as a position sensitive detector for experiments in the highest radiation areas at the Large Hadron Collider. In order to study the radiation hardn ess of diamond we exposed CVD diamond detector samples to 24~GeV/$c$ and 500~MeV protons up to a fluence of $5\\times 10^{15}~p/{\\rm cm^2}$. We measured the charge collection distance, the ave rage distance electron hole pairs move apart in an external electric field, and leakage currents before, durin...

  6. Hot-wire chemical vapour deposition at low substrate temperatures for optoelectronic applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304826677

    2010-01-01

    The need for large quantities of rapidly and cheaply produced electronic devices has increased rapidly over the past decades. The transistors and diodes that are used to build these devices are predominantly made of crystalline silicon. Since crystalline silicon is very expensive to produce on a

  7. Hot-wire measurements of a single lateral jet injected into swirling crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, D. G.; Ong, L. H.; Mcmurry, C. B.

    1986-01-01

    In the present experiments documenting the time-mean and turbulent flowfield of a deflected turbulent jet in a combined, swirling crossflow, attention is given to a jet-to-crossflow velocity ratio of 4 at swirler vane angles of 45 and 70 deg. The results obtained are presented in the form of r-x plots in order to aid in three-dimensional flowfield visualization. The time-mean velocity measurements were found to closely correspond to pitot-probe data obtained in identical flow conditions. The lateral jet was found to deflect the axis of the precessing vortex core.

  8. Hot wire production of single-wall and multi-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Anne C.; Mahan, Archie H.; Alleman, Jeffrey L.

    2010-10-26

    Apparatus (210) for producing a multi-wall carbon nanotube (213) may comprise a process chamber (216), a furnace (217) operatively associated with the process chamber (216), and at least one filament (218) positioned within the process chamber (216). At least one power supply (220) operatively associated with the at least one filament (218) heats the at least one filament (218) to a process temperature. A gaseous carbon precursor material (214) operatively associated with the process chamber (216) provides carbon for forming the multi-wall carbon nanotube (213). A metal catalyst material (224) operatively associated with the process (216) catalyzes the formation of the multi-wall carbon nanotube (213).

  9. Hot wire boiling in conditions of reduced gravity; Sieden am Heizdraht unter reduzierter Schwerkraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micko, S.

    2000-08-01

    The start of the space age in the late fifties was also the start of analysis into the effects of gravity on the boiling process. The investigations describe experiments for the design of power supply systems for spacecraft in zero gravity. Technical problems concerning global heat transfer in two-phase systems and the question whether gravity is necessary for directional forces stabilizing heat transfer were gone into. [German] Der Beginn des Raumfahrtzeitalters Ende der fuenfziger Jahre markiert auch den Startpunkt der Analyse des Gravitationseinflusses auf den Siedeprozess. Ziel dieser Untersuchungen war es, eine experimentelle Absicherung fuer die Auslegung von Energieversorgungsanlagen fuer den schwerefreien Einsatz in Flugsystemen zu erhalten. Die technischen Unsicherheiten in Bezug auf die globalen Waermeuebergangsveeiten in Bezug auf die globalen Waermeuebergangsverhaeltnisse in zweiphasigen Systemen und die Fragestellung, ob die Schwerkraft notwendig ist um eine richtungsgebundene Krafteinwirkung zur Stabilisierung des Waermetransports auszuueben, galt es dabei auszuraeumen. (orig.)

  10. Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition Of Polycrystalline Silicon : From Gas Molecule To Solar Cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenendaal, P.A.T.T. van

    2002-01-01

    Although the effort to investigate the use of renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar energy, has increased, their contribution to the total energy consumption remains insignificant. The conversion of solar energy into electricity through solar cells is one of the most promising techniques,

  11. Hot Wire Anemometer Turbulence Measurements in the wind Tunnel of LM Wind Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Andreas

    Flow measurements were carried out in the wind tunnel of LM Wind Power A/S with a Dantec Streamline CTA system to characterize the flow turbulence. Besides the free tunnel flow with empty test section we also investigated the tunnel flow when two grids with different mesh size were introduced...... measured with the triple sensor probe. The turbulence intensity as well as the mean flow velocity downstream of the grids were not homogeneous in space. The grid with the finer mesh size created higher turbulence intensity. For both grids we found a functional form of the power spectral density...

  12. Acquisition of Turbulence Data Using the DST Group Constant-Temperature Hot-Wire Anemometer System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    leads form one arm of a Wheatstone bridge . The wire, which is heated by passing an electric current through it, has a high frequency response and is...to keep the Wheatstone bridge balanced, so that the wire has a constant resistance and hence constant temperature. An offset voltage is applied to...when the wire is operating will be (6 x 2) + 0.7, i.e. 12.7 Ω. To balance the Wheatstone bridge , it is necessary to adjust balance resistors in

  13. Mixed and dynamic response of hot wires and cold wires and measurements of turbulence statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Søren Ejling; Højstrup, Jørgen; Fairall, C. W.

    1986-01-01

    . The influence of the transfer characteristics on measurements of turbulence statistics is discussed; it is shown that the nonideal response behavior influences, most strongly, statistics involving the correlation between velocity and temperature and, most seriously, parameters involving small-scale turbulence...

  14. An economic CVD technique for pure SnO2 thin films deposition ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A modified new method of CVD for formation of pure layers of tin oxide films was developed. This method is very simple and inexpensive and produces films with good electrical properties. The effect of substrate temperature on the sheet resistance, resistivity, mobility, carrier concentration and transparency of the films has ...

  15. Control of Reaction Surface in Low Temperature CVD to Enhance Nucleation and Conformal Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Navneet

    2009-01-01

    The Holy Grail in CVD community is to find precursors that can afford the following: good nucleation on a desired substrate and conformal deposition in high AR features. Good nucleation is not only necessary for getting ultra-thin films at low thicknesses; it also offers films that are smooth at higher thickness values. On the other hand,…

  16. Modelling and analysis of CVD processes in porous media for ceramic composite preparation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Y.S.; Lin, Y.S.; Burggraaf, A.J.; Burggraaf, Anthonie

    1991-01-01

    A continuum phenomenological model is presented to describe chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of solid product inside porous substrate media for the preparation of reinforced ceramic-matrix composites [by the chemical vapour infiltration (CVI) process] and ceramic membrane composites (by a modified

  17. CVD of solid oxides in porous substrates for ceramic membrane modification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Y.S.; Lin, Y.S.; Burggraaf, Anthonie; Burggraaf, A.J.

    1992-01-01

    The deposition of yttria-doped zirconia has been experimented systematically in various types of porous ceramic substrates by a modified chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process operating in an opposing reactant geometry using water vapor and corresponding metal chloride vapors as reactants. The

  18. Hexagonal Boron Nitride assisted transfer and encapsulation of large area CVD graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shautsova, Viktoryia; Gilbertson, Adam M.; Black, Nicola C. G.; Maier, Stefan A.; Cohen, Lesley F.

    2016-07-01

    We report a CVD hexagonal boron nitride (hBN-) assisted transfer method that enables a polymer-impurity free transfer process and subsequent top encapsulation of large-area CVD-grown graphene. We demonstrate that the CVD hBN layer that is utilized in this transfer technique acts as a buffer layer between the graphene film and supporting polymer layer. We show that the resulting graphene layers possess lower doping concentration, and improved carrier mobilities compared to graphene films produced by conventional transfer methods onto untreated SiO2/Si, SAM-modified and hBN covered SiO2/Si substrates. Moreover, we show that the top hBN layer used in the transfer process acts as an effective top encapsulation resulting in improved stability to ambient exposure. The transfer method is applicable to other CVD-grown 2D materials on copper foils, thereby facilitating the preparation of van der Waals heterostructures with controlled doping.

  19. Long tape processing for coated conductors by multiple-stage CVD method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashima, N.; Niwa, T.; Nagaya, S.; Onabe, K.; Saito, T.; Muroga, T.; Miyata, S.; Watanabe, T.; Yamada, Y

    2004-10-01

    The multiple-stage CVD method is the promising technology, which can be realized for rapid and long formation of YBCO tape. In earlier researches, we have fabricated the six-stage CVD system, and successfully developed 100 m long YBCO tape at the deposition rate of 10 m/h. However, over 500 m long wires are required for the practical applications. In order to achieve this, we have studied the multi-coating of YBCO layer at further high-speed deposition. Five layers of YBCO tape were fabricated on roll milled non-textured Ag substrate directly. Each layer was deposited by the six-stage CVD system at deposition rate of 25 m/h. After each deposition, temperature of YBCO tape went down to room temperature. The distribution of J{sub c} was within 25% and its value is the same as single coating one. No significant degradation of J{sub c} was observed. From these results, it was indicated that the multiple-stage CVD system, which equips more reactors serially, is effective way for making longer YBCO tapes.

  20. Exploring and rationalising effective n-doping of large area CVD-graphene by NH3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, G V; Losurdo, M; Giangregorio, M M; Capezzuto, P; Bruno, G

    2014-02-28

    Despite the large number of papers on the NH3 doping of graphene, the achievement of stable n-doped large area CVD (chemical vapor deposition) graphene, which is intrinsically p-doped, is still challenging. A control of the NH3 chemisorption and of the N-bond configuration is still needed. The feasibility of a room temperature high pressure NH3 treatment of CVD graphene to achieve n-type doping is shown here. We use and correlate data for (a) sheet resistance, R(sh), and the Hall coefficient, R(H), in van der Pauw configuration, acquired in real time during the NH3 doping of CVD-graphene on a glass substrate, (b) optical measurements of the effect of doping on the graphene Van Hove singularity point at 4.6 eV in the dielectric function spectra by spectroscopic ellipsometry, and of (c) N-bond configuration by XPS to better understand and, finally, control the NH3 doping of graphene. The discussion is focused on the thermal and time stability of the n-doping after air exposure. A chemical rationale is provided for the NH3 n-doping based on the interaction of (i) NH3 with intrinsic oxygen functionalities and defects of CVD graphene and of (ii) C-NH2 doping centers with acceptor species present in the air.

  1. PaxVax CVD 103-HgR single-dose live oral cholera vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Myron M; Chen, Wilbur H; Kaper, James B; Lock, Michael; Danzig, Lisa; Gurwith, Marc

    2017-03-01

    Cholera remains a problem in developing countries and a risk for travelers. Hypochlorhydria, blood group O, cardiac and renal disease increase the risk of developing cholera gravis. Oral vaccines containing inactivated Vibrio cholerae and requiring two doses are available in some countries. No cholera vaccine had been available for U.S. travelers for decades until 2016 when CVD 103-HgR (VAXCHORA™), an oral live attenuated vaccine, was licensed by the U.S. FDA. Areas covered: Enduring protection following wild-type cholera provided the rationale to develop a single-dose live oral vaccine. CVD 103-HgR is well-tolerated and protects against cholera caused by V. cholerae O1 of either serotype (Inaba, Ogawa) and biotype (El Tor, Classical). Since 90% vaccine efficacy is evident 10 days post-ingestion of a single dose, CVD 103-HgR can rapidly protect travelers. Vibriocidal antibody seroconversion correlates with protection; >90% of U.S. adult (including elderly) vaccinees seroconvert. The U.S. Public Health Service's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends CVD 103-HgR for U.S. travelers to areas of ongoing cholera transmission. Expert commentary: Next steps include evaluations in children, post-licensure safety and effectiveness monitoring, diminishing cold chain constraints, optimizing a 'high-dose' formulation for developing countries, and diminishing/eliminating the need for water to administer a dose.

  2. Zinc Oxide Grown by CVD Process as Transparent Contact for Thin Film Solar Cell Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faÿ, S.; Shah, A.

    Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of ZnO films (MOCVD) [1] started to be comprehensively investigated in the 1980s, when thin film industries were looking for ZnO deposition processes especially useful for large-scale coatings at high growth rates. Later on, when TCO for thin film solar cells started to be developed, another advantage of growing TCO films by the CVD process has been highlighted: the surface roughness. Indeed, a large number of studies on CVD ZnO revealed that an as-grown rough surface cn be obtained with this deposition process [2-4]. A rough surface induces a light scattering effect, which can significantly improve light trapping (and therefore current photo-generation) within thin film silicon solar cells. The CVD process, indeed, directly leads to as-grown rough ZnO films without any post-etching step (the latter is often introduced to obtain a rough surface, when working with as-deposited flat sputtered ZnO). This fact could turn out to be a significant advantage when upscaling the manufacturing process for actual commercial production of thin film solar modules. The zinc and oxygen sources for CVD growth of ZnO films are given in Table 6.1.

  3. The integration of epigenetics and genetics in nutrition research for CVD risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is increasing evidence documenting gene-by-environment (G x E) interactions for CVD related traits. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. DNA methylation may represent one of such potential mechanisms. The objective of this review paper is to summarise the current evidence supp...

  4. Childhood diet, overweight, and CVD risk factors: the Healthy Start project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Christine L; Strobino, Barbara A

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors can be identified in children and tracked over time. We studied 519 children (mean age, 3.9 years) and reevaluated CVD risk factors 4 years later. Baseline and follow-up (FU) measures included height, weight, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure level, blood lipid values, and 24-hour dietary intake. Nutritional predictors of CVD risk factors (lipid levels and BMI) were identified using regression analysis at follow-up. Energy intake at baseline and FU, as well as increasing BMI over time, were directly associated with total cholesterol levels. Dietary intake of monounsaturated fat and dietary fiber were significant predictors of total cholesterol level at follow-up (inverse associations). Increasing BMI, waist circumference at FU, and intake of sucrose at FU were inversely associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels at FU. Waist circumference and BMI at FU were associated with higher triglyceride levels, while percent energy from monounsaturated fat was associated with lower values. This study provides further evidence that dietary intake influences CVD risk factors in childhood.

  5. The effect of percentage carbonon the CVD coating of plain carbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two steels En 3 and En 39 were given a TiC-TiN CVD coating in the carburized and uncarburized conditions. The continuity of the coatings and their adherance to the substrate were examined. The thickness of the deposited coatings were also measured, their adherence to the substrate and their thickness was off ected by ...

  6. Salivary Biomarkers of Chronic Psychosocial Stress and CVD Risks: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Kyungeh; Salyer, Jeanne; Brown, Roy E; Kao, Hsueh-Fen Sabrina; Starkweather, Angela; Shim, Insop

    2016-05-01

    The use of salivary biomarkers in stress research is increasing, and the precision and accuracy with which researchers are able to measure these biomarkers have dramatically improved. Chronic psychosocial stress is often linked to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Salivary biomarkers represent a noninvasive biological method of characterizing the stress phenomenon that may help to more fully describe the mechanism by which stress contributes to the pathogenesis and outcomes of CVD. We conducted a systematic review of 40 research articles to identify the salivary biomarkers researchers have most commonly used to help describe the biological impact of chronic psychosocial stress and explore its associations with CVD risk. We address strengths and weaknesses of specimen collection and measurement. We used PubMed, CINAHL, EBSCOhost, Web of Science, BIOSIS Previews, Biological Sciences (ProQuest), and Dissertations/Theses (ProQuest) to retrieve 387 initial articles. Once we applied our inclusion/exclusion criteria to specifically target adult human studies dealing with chronic stress rather than acute/laboratory-induced stress, 40 studies remained, which we synthesized using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses criteria. Cortisol was the biomarker used most frequently. Sources of psychosocial stress included job strain, low socioeconomic status, and environmental factors. Overall, psychosocial stress was associated with CVD risks such as vascular pathology (hypertension, blood pressure fluctuation, and carotid artery plaque) as well as metabolic factors such as abnormal blood glucose, dyslipidemia, and elevated cardiac enzymes. Diverse salivary biomarkers have been useful in stress research, particularly when linked to CVD risks. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Superhydrophobic aluminium-based surfaces: Wetting and wear properties of different CVD-generated coating types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, M.; Streller, F.; Simon, F.; Frenzel, R.; White, A. J.

    2013-10-01

    In view of generating superhydrophobic aluminium-based surfaces, this work presents further results for the combination of anodic oxidation as the primary pretreatment method and chemical vapour deposition (CVD) variants for chemical modification producing coatings of 250-1000 nm thickness. In detail, CVD involved the utilisation of i - hexafluoropropylene oxide as precursor within the hot filament CVD process for the deposition of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) coatings at alternative conditions (PTFE-AC) and ii - 1,3,5-trivinyltrimethylcyclotrisiloxane for the deposition of polysiloxane coatings (PSi) by initiated CVD. The substrate material was Al Mg1 subjected to usual or intensified sulphuric acid anodisation pretreatments (SAAu, SAAi, respectively) affording various degrees of surface micro-roughness (SAAu standardised artificial weathering and/or mild wear testing. Superhydrophobicity (SH) was observed with the system SAAi + PTFE-AC similarly to former findings with the standard hot filament CVD PTFE coating variant (SAAi + PTFE-SC). The results indicated that the specific coating morphology made an important contribution to the water-repellency, because even some of the SAAu-based samples tended to reveal SH. Subjecting samples to weathering treatment resulted in a general worsening of the wetting behaviour, primarily limited to the receding contact angles. These tendencies were correlated with the chemical composition of the sample surfaces as analysed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The wear tests showed, as evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and contact angle measurement, that the PTFE coatings were relatively sensitive to friction. This was connected with a dramatic deterioration of the water-repelling properties. PSi-coated surfaces generally showed rather poor water-repellency, but this coating type was surprisingly resistant towards the applied friction test. From these findings it may be concluded that the combination of hydrophobic fluorine

  8. Correlates of CVD and discussing sexual issues with physicians among male military veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Goltz, Heather Honoré; Motlagh, Audry S; Ahn, SangNam; Bergeron, Caroline D; Ory, Marcia G

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to identify socio-demographic and health behavior factors associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) diagnosis and patient-physician communication concerning sexual issues among older Veterans. Cross-sectional data were collected from 635 male Veterans over age 55 years as part of the 2010 National Social Life, Health and Aging Project, a nationally-representative, population-based study of community-dwelling older Americans. Two independent logistic regression analyses were performed. Over 33% of Veterans were aged 75 years or older. Over one-half of participants reported having a CVD diagnosis (58%) and sexual intercourse within the previous year (58%); over one-third (37%) reported having one or more sexual dysfunctions and discussing sexual issues with their physician (42%). Veterans diagnosed with CVD were significantly more likely to self-identify as racial/ethnic minorities (OR=1.89, P=0.021), have more chronic disease comorbidities (OR=1.23, P=0.041), and have more sexual dysfunctions (OR=1.19, P=0.028). Veterans diagnosed with CVD were significantly less likely to report having sex within the previous year (OR=0.53, P=0.005). Veterans who reported discussing sexual issues with a physician were significantly more likely to be ≥75 years (OR=1.79, P=0.010), and report more than a high school education (OR=1.62, P=0.016), CVD diagnosis (OR=1.59, P=0.015), sex within the previous year (OR=1.69, P=0.033), and trouble achieving/maintaining an erection (OR=3.39, Pracial/ethnic minorities and those less-educated, may benefit from VA and community-based aging and sexual health/counseling services. These services should promote increased patient-physician communication as well as referrals between physicians and sex health/counseling specialists. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Perceived value of providing peer reviewers with abstracts and preprints of related published and unpublished papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, C L; Goodman, S N

    1998-07-15

    Many journals provide peer reviewers with written instructions regarding review criteria, such as the originality of results, but little research has been done to investigate ways to improve or facilitate the peer review task. To assess the value that peer reviewers place on receipt of supplemental materials (eg, abstracts of related papers and preprints of related unpublished manuscripts). Questionnaire survey sent to all 733 peer reviewers recruited by the Journal of the National Cancer Institute to review 356 manuscripts consecutively sent out for review from February 24, 1997, through January 16, 1998. The inclusion of supplemental materials with manuscript review packages was optional. The peer reviewers' assessment of the actual or potential usefulness of supplemental materials on the performance of peer review. A total of 481 (66%) of 733 questionnaires were returned. Of the 471 respondents' questionnaires that could be used, 217 (46%) indicated that they received abstracts, and 44 (10%) of 458 respondents indicated that they received preprints. Higher proportions of peer reviewers who received supplemental materials than those who had not received them felt that they were (or would be) useful to them when reviewing the manuscript (63% [95% confidence interval (CI), 57%-69%] vs 45% [95% CI, 38%-52%]; P<.001) and to the peer review process in general (80% [95% CI, 75%-85%] vs 64% [95% CI, 58%-70%]; P<.001). The majority of respondents indicated that supplemental materials helped (or would have helped) them evaluate manuscripts and valued them more highly when they actually received them.

  10. Mindfulness-Based Interventions for Weight Loss and CVD Risk Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulwiler, Carl; Brewer, Judson A; Sinnott, Sinead; Loucks, Eric B

    2015-10-01

    Obesity affects more than one-third of U.S. adults and is a major cause of preventable morbidity and mortality, primarily from cardiovascular disease. Traditional behavioral interventions for weight loss typically focus on diet and exercise habits and often give little attention to the role of stress and emotions in the initiation and maintenance of unhealthy behaviors, which may account for their modest results and considerable variability in outcomes. Stress eating and emotional eating are increasingly recognized as important targets of weight loss interventions. Mindfulness-based interventions were specifically developed to promote greater self-efficacy in coping with stress and negative emotions, and appear to be effective for a variety of conditions. In recent years researchers have begun to study mindfulness interventions for weight loss and CVD risk management. This review describes the rationale for the use of mindfulness in interventions for weight loss and CVD risk management, summarizes the research to date, and suggests priorities for future research.

  11. Recubrimientos depositados por CVD-FBR para protección a alta temperatura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luddey Marulanda-Arevalo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available La deposición química de vapor por lecho fluidizado (CVD-FBR es una variante de la técnica de deposición química de vapor; que combina las ventajas de la activación térmica por calentamiento y el lecho fluidizado. Los recubrimientos mediante CVD-FBR son ampliamente investigados y usados debido a la necesidad de proteger superficialmente los componentes que operan a altas temperaturas, el cual ha aumentado perceptiblemente. Además, tiene la ventaja de ser una técnica de bajo costo, puede controlar con relativa facilidad la composición del material depositado, permitiendo realizar recubrimientos con una orientación preferente que permite la obtención de intercaras con propiedades anisotrópicas; estos son depositados a bajas temperaturas y a la presión atmosférica.

  12. The effect of three different diets on risk factors for CVD. With focus on whole grain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Tenna

    2009-01-01

    Background: More intervention studies are needed to clarify the effect of diets different in types and amounts of fats and carbohydrates on risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), as well as to clarify a possible beneficial effect of whole grain (WG) intake. Objective: The aim was to inves......Background: More intervention studies are needed to clarify the effect of diets different in types and amounts of fats and carbohydrates on risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), as well as to clarify a possible beneficial effect of whole grain (WG) intake. Objective: The aim...... of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, from January 2004-2007. WG intake was estimated based on collected information of WG content of the foods, consumed during the 6 month. Results: The MUFA diet resulted in a sigificantly improvement of fasting insulin levels (p=0.027) and insulin resistance...

  13. Systematic study of pre-irradiation effects in high efficiency CVD diamond nuclear particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Marinelli, M; Milani, E; Paoletti, A; Pillon, M; Tucciarone, A; Verona-Rinati, G

    2002-01-01

    Many outstanding properties of diamond can, in principle, lead to the development of radiation detectors with interesting capabilities. In particular, diamond-based nuclear particle detectors are good candidates to replace silicon-based detectors in several fields, e.g. in high-flux applications such as next generation particle-accelerator experiments or beam monitoring. However, the high concentration of defects (grain boundaries, impurities) in synthetic diamond films can strongly limit the detector's performance. A significant increase in the efficiency of CVD diamond detectors is achieved by means of pre-irradiation (pumping) with beta particles. We report here on a systematic study of the effects of pumping in high-quality microwave CVD diamond films. The efficiency (eta) and charge collection distance (CCD) of nuclear particle detectors based on these films depend on the methane content in the growth gas mixture and on the film thickness. Both efficiency and CCD behave in a markedly different way in the...

  14. Diameter Tuning of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes by Diffusion Plasma CVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Kato

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have realized a diameter tuning of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs by adjusting process gas pressures with plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD. Detailed photoluminescence measurements reveal that the diameter distribution of SWNTs clearly shifts to a large-diameter region with an increase in the pressure during plasma CVD, which is also confirmed by Raman scattering spectroscopy. Based on the systematical investigation, it is found that the main diameter of SWNTs is determined by the pressure during the heating in an atmosphere of hydrogen and the diameter distribution is narrowed by adjusting the pressure during the plasma generation. Our results could contribute to an application of SWNTs to high-performance thin-film transistors, which requires the diameter-controlled semiconductor-rich SWNTs.

  15. Electrochemical delamination of CVD-grown graphene film: toward the recyclable use of copper catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Zheng, Yi; Xu, Xiangfan; Dubuisson, Emilie; Bao, Qiaoliang; Lu, Jiong; Loh, Kian Ping

    2011-12-27

    The separation of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene from the metallic catalyst it is grown on, followed by a subsequent transfer to a dielectric substrate, is currently the adopted method for device fabrication. Most transfer techniques use a chemical etching method to dissolve the metal catalysts, thus imposing high material cost in large-scale fabrication. Here, we demonstrate a highly efficient, nondestructive electrochemical route for the delamination of CVD graphene film from metal surfaces. The electrochemically delaminated graphene films are continuous over 95% of the surface and exhibit increasingly better electronic quality after several growth cycles on the reused copper catalyst, due to the suppression of quasi-periodical nanoripples induced by copper step edges. The electrochemical delamination process affords the advantages of high efficiency, low-cost recyclability, and minimal use of etching chemicals.

  16. A Review of the Properties and CVD Synthesis of Coiled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejes, Dóra; Hernádi, Klára

    2010-01-01

    The CVD route for carbon nanotube production has become a popular method to make large amounts of multiwall carbon nanotubes. The structure, morphology and size of carbon materials depend critically on the catalyst preparation and deposition conditions. According to current knowledge, CVD method is the only process which can produce carbon nanocoils. These nanocoils are perfect candidates for nanotechnology applications. One might indeed hope that these coils would have the extraordinary stiffness displayed by straight nanotubes. Based on theoretical studies, regular coiled nanotubes exhibit exceptional mechanical, electrical, and magnetic properties due to the combination of their peculiar helical morphology and the fascinating properties of nanotubes. In spite of its technological interest, relatively low attention has been paid to this special field. In this paper we attempt to summarize results obtained until now.

  17. Temperature dependence of stress in CVD diamond films studied by Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dychalska Anna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of residual stress and its components with increasing temperature in chemical vapor deposited (CVD diamond films has a crucial impact on their high temperature applications. In this work we investigated temperature dependence of stress in CVD diamond film deposited on Si(100 substrate in the temperature range of 30 °C to 480 °C by Raman mapping measurement. Raman shift of the characteristic diamond band peaked at 1332 cm-1 was studied to evaluate the residual stress distribution at the diamond surface. A new approach was applied to calculate thermal stress evolution with increasing tempera­ture by using two commonly known equations. Comparison of the residts obtained from the two methods was presented. The intrinsic stress component was calculated from the difference between average values of residual and thermal stress and then its temperature dependence was discussed.

  18. Board diversity and corporate voluntary disclosure (CVD in the annual reports of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Abdur Rouf

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This is an exploratory study designed to investigate the extant and nature of corporate voluntary disclosure (CVD in corporate annual reports of Bangladesh. Specifically, examine the relationship between board diversity and corporate voluntary disclosures. The paper is based on a sample of 106 listed non-financial companies in Dhaka Stock Exchanges (DSE from the period 2007-2011 and all the companies are selected by Judgment Sampling. The study is used ordinary least squares regression model to examine the relationship between explanatory variables and voluntary disclosure. Using an unweighted relative disclosure index for measuring voluntary disclosure, the empirical results indicate that Percentage Female Director (PFD, Board Leadership Structure (BLS and Total Assets (TA are positively association with corporate voluntary disclosure (CVD. In contrast, the extent of corporate voluntary disclosure is negatively associated with a Percentage of equity owned by the insiders to all equity of the firm higher management ownership

  19. Pulse-height defect in single-crystal CVD diamond detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beliuskina, O.; Imai, N. [The University of Tokyo, Center for Nuclear Study, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Strekalovsky, A.O.; Aleksandrov, A.A.; Aleksandrova, I.A.; Ilich, S.; Kamanin, D.V.; Knyazheva, G.N.; Kuznetsova, E.A.; Mishinsky, G.V.; Pyatkov, Yu.V.; Strekalovsky, O.V.; Zhuchko, V.E. [JINR, Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Devaraja, H.M. [Manipal University, Manipal Centre for Natural Sciences, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Heinz, C. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, Giessen (Germany); Heinz, S. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, Giessen (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Hofmann, S.; Kis, M.; Kozhuharov, C.; Maurer, J.; Traeger, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Pomorski, M. [CEA, LIST, Diamond Sensor Laboratory, CEA/Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2017-02-15

    The pulse-height versus deposited energy response of a single-crystal chemical vapor deposition (scCVD) diamond detector was measured for ions of Ti, Cu, Nb, Ag, Xe, Au, and of fission fragments of {sup 252} Cf at different energies. For the fission fragments, data were also measured at different electric field strengths of the detector. Heavy ions have a significant pulse-height defect in CVD diamond material, which increases with increasing energy of the ions. It also depends on the electrical field strength applied at the detector. The measured pulse-height defects were explained in the framework of recombination models. Calibration methods known from silicon detectors were modified and applied. A comparison with data for the pulse-height defect in silicon detectors was performed. (orig.)

  20. Scalable ZnO nanotube arrays grown on CVD-graphene films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Park

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We report the growth of wafer-scale arrays of individually position-controlled and vertically aligned ZnO nanotube arrays on graphene deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD-graphene. Introducing two-dimensional layered materials such as graphene as a growth buffer has recently been suggested for growing nanomaterials on traditionally incompatible substrates. However, their growth has been restricted to small areas or had limited controllability. Here, we study the distinct growth behavior of ZnO on CVD-graphene that makes the selective area growth of individual nanostructures on its surface difficult, and propose a set of methods to overcome this. The resulting nanotube arrays, as examined by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, exhibited uniform morphologies and high structural quality over a large area and could be prepared on a broad variety of substrates, including amorphous, metallic, or flexible substrates.

  1. Scalable ZnO nanotube arrays grown on CVD-graphene films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. B.; Oh, H.; Park, J.; Kim, N.-J.; Yoon, H.; Yi, G.-C.

    2016-10-01

    We report the growth of wafer-scale arrays of individually position-controlled and vertically aligned ZnO nanotube arrays on graphene deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD-graphene). Introducing two-dimensional layered materials such as graphene as a growth buffer has recently been suggested for growing nanomaterials on traditionally incompatible substrates. However, their growth has been restricted to small areas or had limited controllability. Here, we study the distinct growth behavior of ZnO on CVD-graphene that makes the selective area growth of individual nanostructures on its surface difficult, and propose a set of methods to overcome this. The resulting nanotube arrays, as examined by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, exhibited uniform morphologies and high structural quality over a large area and could be prepared on a broad variety of substrates, including amorphous, metallic, or flexible substrates.

  2. A Review of the Properties and CVD Synthesis of Coiled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dóra Fejes

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The CVD route for carbon nanotube production has become a popular method to make large amounts of multiwall carbon nanotubes. The structure, morphology and size of carbon materials depend critically on the catalyst preparation and deposition conditions. According to current knowledge, CVD method is the only process which can produce carbon nanocoils. These nanocoils are perfect candidates for nanotechnology applications. One might indeed hope that these coils would have the extraordinary stiffness displayed by straight nanotubes. Based on theoretical studies, regular coiled nanotubes exhibit exceptional mechanical, electrical, and magnetic properties due to the combination of their peculiar helical morphology and the fascinating properties of nanotubes. In spite of its technological interest, relatively low attention has been paid to this special field. In this paper we attempt to summarize results obtained until now.

  3. Chip-level CMP Modeling and Smart Dummy for HDP and Conformal CVD Films

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, George Yong; Zhang, Ray F.; Hsu, Kelvin; Camilletti, Lawrence

    2000-01-01

    Chip-level CMP modeling is investigated to obtain the post-CMP film profile thickness across a die from its design layout file and a few film deposition and CMP parameters. The work covers both HDP and conformal CVD film. The experimental CMP results agree well with the modeled results. Different algorithms for filling of dummy structure are compared. A smart algorithm for dummy filling is presented, which achieves maximal pattern-density uniformity and CMP planarity.

  4. Greater flavonoid intake is associated with improved CVD risk factors in US adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kijoon; Vance, Terrence M; Chun, Ock K

    2016-04-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported that diets high in flavonoids are associated with a reduced risk of CVD. However, evidence on the association of dietary flavonoid intake with CVD risk factors is still scarce. The present study aimed to investigate the association of dietary flavonoid intake with CVD risk factors among US adults in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007-2012. A total of 4042 US adults aged 19 years and older from the NHANES 2007-2012 participated in this cross-sectional, population-based study. Intakes of total and individual flavonoids were estimated from 2-d 24-h diet recall data by matching with the expanded US Department of Agriculture flavonoid, isoflavone and proanthocyanidin databases. After adjusting for covariates, increased HDL-cholesterol was associated with higher total flavonoid intake (0·54 % change). TAG and TAG:HDL-cholesterol ratio were inversely associated with anthocyanidin (-1·25 % change for TAG; -1·60 % change for TAG:HDL-cholesterol ratio) and total flavonoid intakes (-1·31 % change for TAG; -1·83 % change for TAG:HDL-cholesterol ratio), respectively. Insulin and homoeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were inversely associated with flavone (for insulin, -3·18 % change; 95 % CI -5·85, -0·44; for HOMA-IR, -3·10 % change; 95 % CI -5·93, -0·19) and isoflavone intakes (for insulin, -3·11 % change; 95 % CI -5·46, -0·70; for HOMA-IR, -4·01 % change; 95 % CI -6·67, -1·27). BMI was negatively associated with anthocyanidin intake (-0·60 % change). This study showed that higher flavonoid intake was associated with improved CVD risk factors. Further research is warranted to confirm the findings from this study as these associations were moderate in strength.

  5. Micro Raman investigation of graphene synthesized by atmospheric pressure CVD on copper foil from decane

    OpenAIRE

    Komissarov, I. V.; Kovalchuk, N. G.; Kolesov, E. A.; Tivanov, M. S.; Korolik, O. V.; Mazanik, A. V.; Shaman, Yu. P.; Basaev, A. S.; Labunov, V. A.; Prischepa, S. L.; Kargin, N. I.; Ryzhuk, R. V.; Shostachenko, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    In this article we present the results of micro-Raman studies of graphene grown on copper foil surface by atmospheric pressure CVD using decane as precursor, nitrogen as carrier gas with zero flow of hydrogen. Analysis of Raman spectroscopy data showed that film contains spots with single layer thick graphene. We observed significant blue shift of 2D and G bands positions for mono-atomically thick graphene on copper foil. Following literature we relate this shift to the strain induce...

  6. A 3D tomographic EBSD analysis of a CVD diamond thin film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Liu, Dierk Raabe and Stefan Zaefferer

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the nucleation and growth processes in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD diamond film using a tomographic electron backscattering diffraction method (3D EBSD. The approach is based on the combination of a focused ion beam (FIB unit for serial sectioning in conjunction with high-resolution EBSD. Individual diamond grains were investigated in 3-dimensions particularly with regard to the role of twinning.

  7. Photochemical CVD of Ru on functionalized self-assembled monolayers from organometallic precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kelsea R.; Arevalo Rodriguez, Paul; Brewer, Christopher R.; Brannaka, Joseph A.; Shi, Zhiwei; Yang, Jing; Salazar, Bryan; McElwee-White, Lisa; Walker, Amy V.

    2017-02-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is an attractive technique for the metallization of organic thin films because it is selective and the thickness of the deposited film can easily be controlled. However, thermal CVD processes often require high temperatures which are generally incompatible with organic films. In this paper, we perform proof-of-concept studies of photochemical CVD to metallize organic thin films. In this method, a precursor undergoes photolytic decomposition to generate thermally labile intermediates prior to adsorption on the sample. Three readily available Ru precursors, CpRu(CO)2Me, (η3-allyl)Ru(CO)3Br, and (COT)Ru(CO)3, were employed to investigate the role of precursor quantum yield, ligand chemistry, and the Ru oxidation state on the deposition. To investigate the role of the substrate chemistry on deposition, carboxylic acid-, hydroxyl-, and methyl-terminated self-assembled monolayers were used. The data indicate that moderate quantum yields for ligand loss (φ ≥ 0.4) are required for ruthenium deposition, and the deposition is wavelength dependent. Second, anionic polyhapto ligands such as cyclopentadienyl and allyl are more difficult to remove than carbonyls, halides, and alkyls. Third, in contrast to the atomic layer deposition, acid-base reactions between the precursor and the substrate are more effective for deposition than nucleophilic reactions. Finally, the data suggest that selective deposition can be achieved on organic thin films by judicious choice of precursor and functional groups present on the substrate. These studies thus provide guidelines for the rational design of new precursors specifically for selective photochemical CVD on organic substrates.

  8. Development of long YBCO coated conductors by multiple-stage CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, M. [Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., 20-1 Kitasekiyama, Ohdaka-cho, Midori-ku, Nagoya 459-8522 (Japan)]. E-mail: Mori.Masami2@chuden.co.jp; Watanabe, T. [Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., 20-1 Kitasekiyama, Ohdaka-cho, Midori-ku, Nagoya 459-8522 (Japan); Kashima, N. [Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., 20-1 Kitasekiyama, Ohdaka-cho, Midori-ku, Nagoya 459-8522 (Japan); Nagaya, S. [Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., 20-1 Kitasekiyama, Ohdaka-cho, Midori-ku, Nagoya 459-8522 (Japan); Muroga, T. [ISTEC-SRL, 2-4-1 Mutsuno, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya 456-8567 (Japan); Miyata, S. [ISTEC-SRL, 2-4-1 Mutsuno, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya 456-8567 (Japan); Yamada, Y. [ISTEC-SRL, 2-4-1 Mutsuno, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya 456-8567 (Japan); Izumi, T. [ISTEC-SRL, 1-10-13, Shinonome, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0062 (Japan); Shiohara, Y. [ISTEC-SRL, 1-10-13, Shinonome, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0062 (Japan)

    2006-10-01

    We have developed YBCO coated conductors by Multiple-Stage Chemical Vapor Deposition (MS-CVD) technique, which can make YBCO layer with high deposition rate and easy to scale up by increasing the number of reactors. We confirmed that the high speed production by the twelve-stage CVD equipment, which was designed to scale up CVD process, did not affect the property of YBCO coated conductors and that the YBCO coated conductors with I {sub c} of 100 A-class could be fabricated by the high speed production of 10 m/h. In order to demonstrate the advantage of the MS-CVD technique for longer YBCO coated conductors, we have also fabricated the 92-m-long YBCO conductor on an IBAD substrate. The YBCO conductor was fabricated with a tape moving at the speed of 25 m/h and was deposited several times to control the thickness of the YBCO films. The end-to-end I {sub c} of the 92-m-long YBCO tape was measured by criterion of 1 {mu}V/cm and was 96 A (J {sub c} of 1.9 MA/cm{sup 2}). We have successfully realized the fabrication of the YBCO coated conductor with the practical properties of 100 A-class in I {sub c} and 100 m-class in length. Recently, we have also obtained high I {sub c} of 227 A (J {sub c} of 2.3 MA/cm{sup 2}) in a short sample of a YBCO conductor on IBAD substrates by optimization of the fabrication process.

  9. Exploiting dietary supplementation trials to assess the impact of the prenatal environment on CVD risk.

    OpenAIRE

    Hawkesworth, S.

    2008-01-01

    Animal studies have demonstrated that altering the maternal diet during pregnancy affects offspring disease risk. Data from human subjects on the early-life determinants of disease have been derived primarily from birth-weight associations; studies of the impact of the maternal diet are scarce and inconsistent. Investigating CVD risk factors in the offspring of women who have participated in maternal supplementation trials provides a useful resource in this research field, by virtue of employ...

  10. Characteristic defects in CVD diamond: optical and electron paramagnetic resonance study

    OpenAIRE

    Nesladek, Milos; MEYKENS, Kristien; Haenen, Ken; Navratil, Jiri; QUAEYHAEGENS, Carl; STALS, Lambert; Stesmans, A.; Iakoubovskij, K; Adriaensens, Peter; Rosa, J.; Vanecek, M.

    1999-01-01

    Constant photocurrent method (CPM), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and infra-red optical absorption (FTIR) techniques are used to study characteristic defects in the gap of free-standing optical-quality CVD diamond. It is shown that the gap density of states (DOS) is very sensitive to oxidation, hydrogenation and annealing treatments. The room-temperature (RT) EPR and CPM measurements reveal a well-defined single substitutional nitrogen defect (P1). The photoionization energy of this ...

  11. Fabricating Large-Area Sheets of Single-Layer Graphene by CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronikowski, Michael; Manohara, Harish

    2008-01-01

    This innovation consists of a set of methodologies for preparing large area (greater than 1 cm(exp 2)) domains of single-atomic-layer graphite, also called graphene, in single (two-dimensional) crystal form. To fabricate a single graphene layer using chemical vapor deposition (CVD), the process begins with an atomically flat surface of an appropriate substrate and an appropriate precursor molecule containing carbon atoms attached to substituent atoms or groups. These molecules will be brought into contact with the substrate surface by being flowed over, or sprayed onto, the substrate, under CVD conditions of low pressure and elevated temperature. Upon contact with the surface, the precursor molecules will decompose. The substituent groups detach from the carbon atoms and form gas-phase species, leaving the unfunctionalized carbon atoms attached to the substrate surface. These carbon atoms will diffuse upon this surface and encounter and bond to other carbon atoms. If conditions are chosen carefully, the surface carbon atoms will arrange to form the lowest energy single-layer structure available, which is the graphene lattice that is sought. Another method for creating the graphene lattice includes metal-catalyzed CVD, in which the decomposition of the precursor molecules is initiated by the catalytic action of a catalytic metal upon the substrate surface. Another type of metal-catalyzed CVD has the entire substrate composed of catalytic metal, or other material, either as a bulk crystal or as a think layer of catalyst deposited upon another surface. In this case, the precursor molecules decompose directly upon contact with the substrate, releasing their atoms and forming the graphene sheet. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) can also be used. In this method, a substrate surface at low temperature is covered with exactly one monolayer of precursor molecules (which may be of more than one type). This is heated up so that the precursor molecules decompose and form one

  12. Energy Barriers and Driving Forces Associated with the Dynamic Transformation of Ti-6Al-4V (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-11

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0516 ENERGY BARRIERS AND DRIVING FORCES ASSOCIATED WITH THE DYNAMIC TRANSFORMATION OF TI-6AL-4V (PREPRINT) S.L...TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 11 December 2017 Interim 19 March 2014 – 11 November 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ENERGY BARRIERS AND DRIVING FORCES...The energy barriers and driving forces associated with dynamic transformation in Ti-6Al-4V are evaluated. It is shown that the stored energy is less

  13. An Automated Multi-Modal Serial Sectioning System for Characterization of Grain-Scale Microstructures in Engineering Materials (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ENGINEERING MATERIALS (PREPRINT) Michael Uchic, Michael Groeber , and Jonathan Spowart Metals Branch Metals, Ceramics & Nondestructive Evaluation...AUTHOR(S) Michael Uchic, Michael Groeber , and Jonathan Spowart (AFRL/RXLM) Megna Shah and Michael Scott (UES Inc.) Patrick Callahan (Carnegie...3D microstructural characterization of nickel superalloys via serial- sectioning using a dual beam FIB-SEM. Scripta Materialia 55:23-28 [7] Groeber MA

  14. On the Effect of Antimony Segregation to the Electronic Properties of InAs/InAsSb Superlattices (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-03

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0231 ON THE EFFECT OF ANTIMONY SEGREGATION TO THE ELECTRONIC PROPERTIES OF INAS/INASSB SUPERLATTICES (PREPRINT...18 1 On the effect of antimony segregation to the electronic properties of InAs/InAsSb Superlattices H. J. Haugan * , F. Szmulowicz, J. J...optimized and study how Sb segregation affects the electronic properties of Ga-free SLs. The advantages and disadvantages of utilizing the Ga-free over

  15. Development of the Enhanced Load-Tree Apparatus for Structural Resistance Measurement of Modern Load-Bearing Construction Techniques (PREPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-15

    CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES (PREPRINT) David Brett Blazer Jacobs Technology 1020 Titan Court Fort Walton Beach, FL 32547 Charles Michael Newberry...Newberry* David Brett Blazer# Casey O’Laughlin ^ *RTL Networks Inc., 1391 Speer Blvd #850, Denver, CO 80204 #Jacobs Technology ASG, 1020 Titan...Engineer Center and has been involved in the study of several types of modern structural and non-structural systems, including cold-formed steel stud

  16. Use of a Novel Infrared Wavelength-Tunable Mueller-Matrix Polarimeteric Scatterometer to Measure Nanostructured Optical Materials (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    NANOSTRUCTURED OPTICAL MATERIALS (PREPRINT) Michael R. Benson AFRL/RX Jason C. Vap, Stephen E. Nauyoks, and Michael A. Marciniak Air Force Institute...COPY) AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY MATERIALS AND MANUFACTURING DIRECTORATE WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, OH 45433-7750 AIR FORCE MATERIEL...Directorate for Information Operations and Reports (0704-0188), 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway , Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202-4302. Respondents should be

  17. Substrate-induced strain and charge doping in CVD-grown monolayer MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Woo Hyun; Cain, Jeffrey D.; Hanson, Eve D.; Murthy, Akshay A.; Dravid, Vinayak P.

    2017-10-01

    Due to its electronic-grade quality and potential for scalability, two-dimensional (2D) MoS2 synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been widely explored for electronic/optoelectronic applications. As 2D MoS2 can be considered a 100% surface, its unique intrinsic properties are inevitably altered by the substrate upon which it is grown. However, systematic studies of substrate-layer interactions in CVD-grown MoS2 are lacking. In this study, we have analyzed built-in strain and charge doping using Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy in 2D MoS2 grown by CVD on four unique substrates: SiO2/Si, sapphire, Muscovite mica, and hexagonal boron nitride. We observed decreasing strain and charge doping in grown MoS2 as the substrates become less rough and more chemically inert. The possible origin of strain was investigated through atomic force microscopy roughness measurements of the as-grown layer and substrate. Our results provide direction for device optimization through careful selection of the growth substrate and pave the way for further investigations to unravel the complex nature of the 2D monolayer-substrate interface.

  18. Which population groups are most unaware of CVD risks associated with sitting time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Mitch J; Gilson, Nicholas; Vandelanotte, Corneel

    2014-08-01

    Prolonged sitting is an emerging risk factor for poor health yet few studies have examined awareness of the risks associated with sitting behaviours. This study identifies the population subgroups with the highest levels of unawareness regarding the cardiovascular disease (CVD) risks associated with sitting behaviours. Adults (n=1256) living in Queensland, Australia completed a telephone-based survey in 2011, analysis conducted in 2013. The survey assessed participant's socio-demographic characteristics, physical activity, sitting behaviours and awareness of CVD risks associated with three sitting behaviours: 1) sitting for prolonged periods, 2), sitting for prolonged periods whilst also engaging in regular physical activity, and 3) breaking up periods of prolonged sitting with short activity breaks. Population sub-groups with the highest levels of unawareness were identified based on socio-demographic and behavioural characteristics using signal detection analysis. Unawareness ranged from 23.3% to 67.0%. Age was the most important variable in differentiating awareness levels; younger adults had higher levels of unawareness. Body mass index, physical activity, TV viewing, employment status and time spent at work also identified population sub-groups. Unawareness of CVD risk for prolonged sitting was moderately high overall. Younger adults had high levels of unawareness on all of the outcomes examined. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Proton Irradiation of CVD Diamond Detectors for High Luminosity Experiments at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Meier, D; Bauer, C; Berdermann, E; Bergonzo, P; Bogani, F; Borchi, E; Bruzzi, Mara; Colledani, C; Conway, J; Dabrowski, W; Delpierre, P A; Deneuville, A; Dulinski, W; van Eijk, B; Fallou, A; Foulon, F; Friedl, M; Gan, K K; Gheeraert, E; Grigoriev, E A; Hallewell, G D; Hall-Wilton, R; Han, S; Hartjes, F G; Hrubec, Josef; Husson, D; Jany, C; Kagan, H; Kania, D R; Kaplon, J; Kass, R; Knöpfle, K T; Krammer, Manfred; Manfredi, P F; Marshall, R D; Mishina, M; Le Normand, F; Pan, L S; Palmieri, V G; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Peitz, A; Pirollo, S; Pretzl, Klaus P; Re, V; Riester, J L; Roe, S; Roff, D G; Rudge, A; Schnetzer, S R; Sciortino, S; Speziali, V; Stelzer, H; Stone, R; Tapper, R J; Tesarek, R J; Thomson, G B; Trawick, M L; Trischuk, W; Turchetta, R; Walsh, A M; Wedenig, R; Weilhammer, Peter; Ziock, H J; Zöller, M

    1999-01-01

    CVD diamond shows promising properties for use as a position sensitive detector for experiments in the highest radiation areas at the Large Hadron Collider. In order to study the radiation hardn ess of diamond we exposed CVD diamond detector samples to 24~GeV/$c$ and 500~MeV protons up to a fluence of $5\\times 10^{15}~p/{\\rm cm^2}$. We measured the charge collection distance, the ave rage distance electron hole pairs move apart in an external electric field, and leakage currents before, during, and after irradiation. The charge collection distance remains unchanged up to $1\\ times 10^{15}~p/{\\rm cm^2}$ and decreases by $\\approx$40~\\% at $5\\times 10^{15}~p/{\\rm cm^2}$. Leakage currents of diamond samples were below 1~pA before and after irradiation. The particle indu ced currents during irradiation correlate well with the proton flux. In contrast to diamond, a silicon diode, which was irradiated for comparison, shows the known large increase in leakage curren t. We conclude that CVD diamond detectors are radia...

  20. A CVD Diamond Detector for (n,a) Cross-Section Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, Christina; Griesmayer, Erich; Guerrero, Carlos

    A novel detector based on the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond technology has been developed in the framework of this PhD, for the experimental determination of (n,a) cross-sections at the neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF at CERN. The 59Ni(n,a)56Fe cross-section, which is relevant for astrophysical questions as well as for risk-assessment studies in nuclear technology, has been measured in order to validate the applicability of the detector for such experiments. The thesis is divided in four parts. In the introductory part the motivation for measuring (n,a) cross-sections, the experimental challenges for such measurements and the reasons for choosing the CVD diamond technology for the detector are given. This is followed by the presentation of the n_TOF facility, an introduction to neutron-induced nuclear reactions and a brief summary of the interaction of particles with matter. The CVD diamond technology and the relevant matters related to electronics are given as well in this first part of the t...

  1. Radio Frequency Transistors and Circuits Based on CVD MoS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanne, Atresh; Ghosh, Rudresh; Rai, Amritesh; Yogeesh, Maruthi Nagavalli; Shin, Seung Heon; Sharma, Ankit; Jarvis, Karalee; Mathew, Leo; Rao, Rajesh; Akinwande, Deji; Banerjee, Sanjay

    2015-08-12

    We report on the gigahertz radio frequency (RF) performance of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) monolayer MoS2 field-effect transistors (FETs). Initial DC characterizations of fabricated MoS2 FETs yielded current densities exceeding 200 μA/μm and maximum transconductance of 38 μS/μm. A contact resistance corrected low-field mobility of 55 cm(2)/(V s) was achieved. Radio frequency FETs were fabricated in the ground-signal-ground (GSG) layout, and standard de-embedding techniques were applied. Operating at the peak transconductance, we obtain short-circuit current-gain intrinsic cutoff frequency, fT, of 6.7 GHz and maximum intrinsic oscillation frequency, fmax, of 5.3 GHz for a device with a gate length of 250 nm. The MoS2 device afforded an extrinsic voltage gain Av of 6 dB at 100 MHz with voltage amplification until 3 GHz. With the as-measured frequency performance of CVD MoS2, we provide the first demonstration of a common-source (CS) amplifier with voltage gain of 14 dB and an active frequency mixer with conversion gain of -15 dB. Our results of gigahertz frequency performance as well as analog circuit operation show that large area CVD MoS2 may be suitable for industrial-scale electronic applications.

  2. CVD graphene as interfacial layer to engineer the organic donor-acceptor heterojunction interface properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Shu; Zhong, Jian Qiang; Mao, Hong Ying; Wang, Rui; Wang, Yu; Qi, Dong Chen; Loh, Kian Ping; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen; Chen, Zhi Kuan; Chen, Wei

    2012-06-27

    We demonstrate the use of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) graphene as an effective indium-tin-oxide (ITO) electrode surface modifier to engineer the organic donor-acceptor heterojunction interface properties in an inverted organic solar cell device configuration. As revealed by in situ near-edge X-ray adsorption fine structure measurement, the organic donor-acceptor heterojunction, comprising copper-hexadecafluoro-phthalocyanine (F16CuPc) and copper phthalocyanine (CuPc), undergoes an obvious orientation transition from a standing configuration (molecular π-plane nearly perpendicular to the substrate surface) on the bare ITO electrode to a less standing configuration with the molecular π-plane stacking adopting a large projection along the direction perpendicular to the electrode surface on the CVD graphene-modified ITO electrode. Such templated less-standing configuration of the organic heterojunction could significantly enhance the efficiency of charge transport along the direction perpendicular to the electrode surface in the planar heterojunction-based devices. Compared with the typical standing organic-organic heterojunction on the bare ITO electrode, our in situ ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy experiments reveal that the heterojunction on the CVD graphene modified ITO electrode possesses better aligned energy levels with respective electrodes, hence facilitating effective charge collection.

  3. Graphene CVD growth on copper and nickel: role of hydrogen in kinetics and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losurdo, Maria; Giangregorio, Maria Michela; Capezzuto, Pio; Bruno, Giovanni

    2011-12-14

    Understanding the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) kinetics of graphene growth is important for advancing graphene processing and achieving better control of graphene thickness and properties. In the perspective of improving large area graphene quality, we have investigated in real-time the CVD kinetics using CH(4)-H(2) precursors on both polycrystalline copper and nickel. We highlighted the role of hydrogen in differentiating the growth kinetics and thickness of graphene on copper and nickel. Specifically, the growth kinetics and mechanism is framed in the competitive dissociative chemisorption of H(2) and dehydrogenating chemisorption of CH(4), and in the competition of the in-diffusion of carbon and hydrogen, being hydrogen in-diffusion faster in copper than nickel, while carbon diffusion is faster in nickel than copper. It is shown that hydrogen acts as an inhibitor for the CH(4) dehydrogenation on copper, contributing to suppress deposition onto the copper substrate, and degrades quality of graphene. Additionally, the evidence of the role of hydrogen in forming C-H out of plane defects in CVD graphene on Cu is also provided. Conversely, resurfacing recombination of hydrogen aids CH(4) decomposition in the case of Ni. Understanding better and providing other elements to the kinetics of graphene growth is helpful to define the optimal CH(4)/H(2) ratio, which ultimately can contribute to improve graphene layer thickness uniformity even on polycrystalline substrates.

  4. Electronic properties of embedded graphene: doped amorphous silicon/CVD graphene heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arezki, Hakim; Boutchich, Mohamed; Alamarguy, David; Madouri, Ali; Alvarez, José; Cabarrocas, Pere Roca i.; Kleider, Jean-Paul; Yao, Fei; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-10-01

    Large-area graphene film is of great interest for a wide spectrum of electronic applications, such as field effect devices, displays, and solar cells, among many others. Here, we fabricated heterostructures composed of graphene (Gr) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on copper substrate and transferred to SiO2/Si substrates, capped by n- or p-type doped amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Using Raman scattering we show that despite the mechanical strain induced by the a-Si:H deposition, the structural integrity of the graphene is preserved. Moreover, Hall effect measurements directly on the embedded graphene show that the electronic properties of CVD graphene can be modulated according to the doping type of the a-Si:H as well as its phase i.e. amorphous or nanocrystalline. The sheet resistance varies from 360 Ω sq-1 to 1260 Ω sq-1 for the (p)-a-Si:H/Gr (n)-a-Si:H/Gr, respectively. We observed a temperature independent hole mobility of up to 1400 cm2 V-1 s-1 indicating that charge impurity is the principal mechanism limiting the transport in this heterostructure. We have demonstrated that embedding CVD graphene under a-Si:H is a viable route for large scale graphene based solar cells or display applications.

  5. Mechanics-driven patterning of CVD graphene for roll-based manufacturing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Min; Jang, Bongkyun; Jo, Kyungmin; Kim, Donghyuk; Lee, Jihye; Kim, Kyung-Shik; Lee, Seung-Mo; Lee, Hak-Joo; Han, Seung Min; Kim, Jae-Hyun

    2017-06-01

    Graphene is considered as a promising material for flexible and transparent electrodes due to its outstanding electrical, optical, and mechanical properties. Efforts to mass-produce graphene electrodes led to the development of roll-to-roll chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene growth and transfer, and the only remaining obstacle to the mass-production of CVD graphene electrodes is a cost-effective patterning technique that is compatible with the roll-to-roll manufacturing. Herein, we propose a mechanics-driven technique for patterning graphene synthesized on copper foil (commonly used in roll-to-roll manufacturing). The copper foil is exposed to high temperature for a prolonged period during the CVD growth of graphene, and thus can result in recrystallization and grain growth of the copper foil and thereby reducing to the yield strength. This softening behavior of the copper was carefully controlled to allow simple stamp patterning of the graphene. The strength of the underlying substrate was controlled for the accuracy of the residual patterns. The proposed stamp patterning technique is mask-less and photoresist-free, and can be performed at room temperature without high-energy sources such as lasers or plasma. To demonstrate the capability of this process to produce a continuous electrode, a transparent in-plane supercapacitor was fabricated using the proposed patterning technique.

  6. Increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) with age in HIV-positive men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petoumenos, K; Reiss, P; Ryom, L

    2014-01-01

    equations. METHODS: We analysed three endpoints: myocardial infarction (MI), coronary heart disease (CHD: MI or invasive coronary procedure) and CVD (CHD or stroke). We fitted a number of parametric age effects, adjusting for known risk factors and antiretroviral therapy (ART) use. The best-fitting age...... effect was determined using the Akaike information criterion. We compared the ageing effect from D:A:D with that from the general population risk equations: the Framingham Heart Study, CUORE and ASSIGN risk scores. RESULTS: A total of 24 323 men were included in analyses. Crude MI, CHD and CVD event...... rates per 1000 person-years increased from 2.29, 3.11 and 3.65 in those aged 40-45 years to 6.53, 11.91 and 15.89 in those aged 60-65 years, respectively. The best-fitting models included inverse age for MI and age + age(2) for CHD and CVD. In D:A:D there was a slowly accelerating increased risk of CHD...

  7. Study of CVD diamond layers with amorphous carbon admixture by Raman scattering spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dychalska Anna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy is a most often used standard technique for characterization of different carbon materials. In this work we present the Raman spectra of polycrystalline diamond layers of different quality, synthesized by Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition method (HF CVD. We show how to use Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of the Raman bands to determine the structure of diamond films as well as the structure of amorphous carbon admixture. Raman spectroscopy has become an important technique for the analysis of CVD diamond films. The first-order diamond Raman peak at ca. 1332 cm−1 is an unambiguous evidence for the presence of diamond phase in the deposited layer. However, the existence of non-diamond carbon components in a CVD diamond layer produces several overlapping peaks in the same wavenumber region as the first order diamond peak. The intensities, wavenumber, full width at half maximum (FWHM of these bands are dependent on quality of diamond layer which is dependent on the deposition conditions. The aim of the present work is to relate the features of diamond Raman spectra to the features of Raman spectra of non-diamond phase admixture and occurrence of other carbon structures in the obtained diamond thin films.

  8. Effects of hydroxytyrosol-enriched sunflower oil consumption on CVD risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Velasco, Miguel; Esperanza Díaz, Ligia; Lucas, Rocío; Gómez-Martínez, Sonia; Bastida, Sara; Marcos, Ascensión; Sánchez-Muniz, Francisco J

    2011-05-01

    Inclusion of biophenols in traditional foods transforms them into functional foods that may help to decrease CVD risk. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the consumption of hydroxytyrosol-enriched sunflower oil (HSO) improves certain CVD biomarker values. A total of twenty-two healthy volunteers participated in a cross-over study involving two 3-week periods, separated by a 2-week washout period, in which volunteers consumed 800-1275 μg/d [corrected] of either HSO (45-50 mg/d of hydroxytyrosol) or non-enriched (control) sunflower oil. Total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, arylesterase activity, oxidised LDL and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule (sVCAM-1) levels were measured in the plasma obtained at the beginning and at the end of each treatment period. The HSO group displayed a significantly higher level (P < 0·01) of arylesterase activity and significantly lower levels of oxidised LDL and sVCAM-1 (both P < 0·05) than the control group. These results suggest that HSO may help prevent CVD.

  9. Direct CVD Graphene Growth on Semiconductors and Dielectrics for Transfer-Free Device Fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huaping; Yu, Gui

    2016-07-01

    Graphene is the most broadly discussed and studied two-dimensional material because of its preeminent physical, mechanical, optical, and thermal properties. Until now, metal-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been widely employed for the scalable production of high-quality graphene. However, in order to incorporate the graphene into electronic devices, a transfer process from metal substrates to targeted substrates is inevitable. This process usually results in contamination, wrinkling, and breakage of graphene samples - undesirable in graphene-based technology and not compatible with industrial production. Therefore, direct graphene growth on desired semiconductor and dielectric substrates is considered as an effective alternative. Over the past years, there have been intensive investigations to realize direct graphene growth using CVD methods without the catalytic role of metals. Owing to the low catalytic activity of non-metal substrates for carbon precursor decomposition and graphene growth, several strategies have been designed to facilitate and engineer graphene fabrication on semiconductors and insulators. Here, those developed strategies for direct CVD graphene growth on semiconductors and dielectrics for transfer-free fabrication of electronic devices are reviewed. By employing these methods, various graphene-related structures can be directly prepared on desired substrates and exhibit excellent performance, providing versatile routes for varied graphene-based materials fabrication. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Use of microcirculatory parameters to evaluate clinical treatments of chronic venous disorder (CVD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascasas-Porto, Carmen Lucia; Milhomens, Ana Letícia M; Virgini-Magalhães, Carlos Eduardo; Fernandes, Fabiano F A; Sicuro, Fernando L; Bouskela, Eliete

    2008-05-01

    To evaluate changes on cutaneous microangiopathy in chronic venous disorder (CVD) after use of Cirkan [venotonic drug containing Ruscus aculeatus (plant extract), hesperidine methylchalcone (flavonoid) and vitamin C], elastic compression stockings (ECS) or no treatment for four weeks. Fifty-five female patients (85 legs), 25 to 57 years, with at least one limb classified as C2,s or C2,3,s (CEAP classification), were allocated consecutively, according to entrance order, in these three groups. Ten healthy women age-matched were also investigated. Using orthogonal polarization spectral technique (noninvasive method), measurements of functional capillary density (FCD, number of capillaries with flowing red blood cells/mm(2)), capillary morphology (CM, % of abnormal capillaries/mm(2)) and diameters (mum) of dermal papilla (DDP), capillary bulk (DCB) and capillary limb (CD) were obtained on the medial perimalleolar region and later analyzed using CapImage software. CVD patients showed significant changes on CD and CM compared to healthy subjects in agreement with our previous findings (J Vasc Surg 43:1037-1044, 2006). On Cirkan-treated patients, after 4 weeks, CD decreased on both limbs and CM improved on the left one, suggesting an amelioration of the chronic venous hypertension. No significant changes could be detected on other patient groups. These results confirm the existence of microcirculatory dysfunction in early stages of CVD, probably due to post-capillary hypertension, and further support the venotonic action of Cirkan.

  11. Freedom poverty: a new tool to identify the multiple disadvantages affecting those with CVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callander, Emily J; Schofield, Deborah J; Shrestha, Rupendra N

    2013-06-20

    It is recognised that CVD affects an individual's financial situation, placing them in income poverty. However, recent developments in poverty measurement practice recognises other forms of disadvantage other than low income, such as poor health and insufficient education also affect living standards. Using the Freedom Poverty Measure, the multiple forms of disadvantage experienced by those with no health condition, heart disease, other diseases of the circulatory system, and all other health conditions was assessed using data on the adult Australian population contained in the 2003 Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers. 24% of those with heart disease and 23% of those with other diseases of the circulatory system were in freedom poverty, suffering from multiple forms of disadvantage. Those with heart disease and those with other diseases of the circulatory system were around three times more likely to be in freedom poverty (OR 3.02, 95% CI: 2.29-3.99, p<.0001; OR 2.78, 95% CI: 1.94-3.98, p<.0001) than those with no health condition. Recognising the multiple forms of disadvantage suffered by those with CVD provides a clearer picture of their living standards than just looking at their income alone and the high proportion of individuals with CVD that are suffering from multiple forms of disadvantage should make them a target for policy makers wishing to improve living standards. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Coffee consumption is not associated with prevalent subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) or the risk of CVD events, in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: Results from the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherosclerosis and its clinical sequelae represent the leading cause of mortality among patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). While epidemiologic data support the hepatoprotective benefits of coffee in NAFLD, whether coffee improves NAFLD-associated Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) ri...

  13. Superhydrophobic aluminium-based surfaces: Wetting and wear properties of different CVD-generated coating types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thieme, M., E-mail: michael.thieme@tu-dresden.de [Technische Universität Dresden, Institute of Materials Science, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Streller, F., E-mail: streller@seas.upenn.edu [Technische Universität Dresden, Institute of Materials Science, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Simon, F., E-mail: frsimon@ipfdd.de [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden, Postfach 120 411, 01005 Dresden (Germany); Frenzel, R., E-mail: frenzelr@ipfdd.de [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden, Postfach 120 411, 01005 Dresden (Germany); White, A.J. [GVD Corporation, 45 Spinelli Place, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    In view of generating superhydrophobic aluminium-based surfaces, this work presents further results for the combination of anodic oxidation as the primary pretreatment method and chemical vapour deposition (CVD) variants for chemical modification producing coatings of 250–1000 nm thickness. In detail, CVD involved the utilisation of i – hexafluoropropylene oxide as precursor within the hot filament CVD process for the deposition of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) coatings at alternative conditions (PTFE-AC) and ii – 1,3,5-trivinyltrimethylcyclotrisiloxane for the deposition of polysiloxane coatings (PSi) by initiated CVD. The substrate material was Al Mg1 subjected to usual or intensified sulphuric acid anodisation pretreatments (SAAu, SAAi, respectively) affording various degrees of surface micro-roughness (SAAu < SAAi) to the oxidic layers. Performance characteristics were evaluated in the original as-coated states and after standardised artificial weathering and/or mild wear testing. Superhydrophobicity (SH) was observed with the system SAAi + PTFE-AC similarly to former findings with the standard hot filament CVD PTFE coating variant (SAAi + PTFE-SC). The results indicated that the specific coating morphology made an important contribution to the water-repellency, because even some of the SAAu-based samples tended to reveal SH. Subjecting samples to weathering treatment resulted in a general worsening of the wetting behaviour, primarily limited to the receding contact angles. These tendencies were correlated with the chemical composition of the sample surfaces as analysed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The wear tests showed, as evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and contact angle measurement, that the PTFE coatings were relatively sensitive to friction. This was connected with a dramatic deterioration of the water-repelling properties. PSi-coated surfaces generally showed rather poor water-repellency, but this coating type was surprisingly

  14. Note on: Considering the Case for Biodiversity Cycles: Reexamining the Evidence for Periodicity in the Fossil Record, by Lieberman and Melott, arXiv preprint 0704.2896

    CERN Document Server

    Omerbashich, M

    2007-01-01

    Lieberman and Melott built their recent arXiv preprint 0704.2896 on my published paper and (a preprint of) a subsequent comment by Liebermans associate Cornette. But had this group waited for the Cornette comment to actually appear in print together with the expected Reply, they would have learned that his comment exposes Cornettes confusion that likely was due to journal misprint of my figure. Thus 0704.2896 is baseless. Despite receiving the extended Reply with Errata, these authors still fail to recognize that detrending of paleontological records-which they erroneously promote as a must-is an arbitrary rather than a universal operation.

  15. Analysis of the interface characteristics of CVD-grown monolayer MoS2by noise measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Young; Song, Younggul; Cho, Kyungjune; Amani, Matin; Ho Ahn, Geun; Kim, Jae-Keun; Pak, Jinsu; Chung, Seungjun; Javey, Ali; Lee, Takhee

    2017-04-07

    We investigated the current-voltage and noise characteristics of two-dimensional (2D) monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ) synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). A large number of trap states were produced during the CVD process of synthesizing MoS 2 , resulting in a disordered monolayer MoS 2 system. The interface trap density between CVD-grown MoS 2 and silicon dioxide was extracted from the McWhorter surface noise model. Notably, generation-recombination noise which is attributed to charge trap states was observed at the low carrier density regime. The relation between the temperature and resistance following the power law of a 2D inverted-random void model supports the idea that disordered CVD-grown monolayer MoS 2 can be analyzed using a percolation theory. This study can offer a viewpoint to interpret synthesized low-dimensional materials as highly disordered systems.

  16. Some Properties of Platinum and Palladium Modified Aluminide Coatings Deposited by CVD Method on Nickel-Base Superalloys

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zagula-Yavorska, M; Sieniawski, J; Gancarczyk, T

    2012-01-01

    In the paper some functional properties (hardness and oxidation resistance) of platinum and palladium modified aluminide coatings deposited by the CVD method on a nickel-based superalloy were determined...

  17. Elevated leptin levels in subjects with familial combined hyperlipidemia are associated with the increased risk for CVD.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vleuten, G.M. van der; Veerkamp, M.J.; Tits, L.J.H. van; Toenhake, H.; Heijer, M. den; Stalenhoef, A.F.H.; Graaf, J. de

    2005-01-01

    Familial combined hyperlipidemia (FCH) is characterized by hypercholesterolemia and/or hypertriglyceridemia and is associated with premature cardiovascular disease (CVD). Other features of FCH are obesity and insulin resistance. Serum leptin levels have been associated with obesity, insulin

  18. Industrial science and technology research and development project of university cooperative type in fiscal 2000. Report on achievements in semiconductor device manufacturing processes using Cat-CVD method (Semiconductor device manufacturing processes using Cat-CVD method); 2000 nendo daigaku renkeigata sangyo kagaku gijutsu kenkyu kaihatsu project. Cat-CVD ho ni yoru handotai device seizo process seika hokokusho (Cat-CVD ho ni yoru handotai device seizo process)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    The catalytic chemical vapor deposition (Cat-CVD) method is a low-temperature thin film depositing technology that can achieve improvement in quality of semiconductor thin films and can perform inexpensive film deposition in a large area. The present project is composed of the basic research and development theme and the demonstrative research and development theme for the Cat-CVD method. This report summarizes the achievements in fiscal 2000 centering on the former theme. Discussions were given on the following five areas: 1) simulation on film thickness distribution in the Cat-CVD method, 2) life extension by preventing the catalyst converting into silicide and development of a catalyst integrated shear head, 3) vapor diagnosis in the film forming process by the Cat-CVD method using silane, hydrogen and ammonia, 4) a technology for high-speed deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films for solar cells using the Cat-CVD method, and the low-temperature silicon oxide nitriding technology using heated catalysts, and 5) discussions on compatibility of transparent oxide electrode materials to the process of manufacturing thin-film silicon-based solar cells by using the Cat-CVD method. (NEDO)

  19. Developments of low cost coated conductors by multi-stage CVD process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashima, N. [Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., 20-1 Kitasekiyama, Ohdaka-cho, Midori-ku, Nagoya 459-8522 (Japan)], E-mail: Kashima.Naoji@chuden.co.jp; Watanabe, T.; Mori, M.; Suda, N.; Nagaya, S. [Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., 20-1 Kitasekiyama, Ohdaka-cho, Midori-ku, Nagoya 459-8522 (Japan); Miyata, S.; Ibi, A.; Yamada, Y. [ISTEC-SRL, 2-4-1 Mutsuno, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya 456-8567 (Japan); Izumi, T.; Shiohara, Y. [ISTEC-SRL, 1-10-13, Shinonome, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0062 (Japan)

    2007-10-01

    A low cost and a high-speed production process must be required for a realization of a YBCO coated conductor, especially in the electric power field applications. A multi-stage CVD is one of the most promising processes for manufacturing a coated conductor with a low cost and a high-speed production. Recent progress in developments of long YBCO coated conductors by multi-stage MO-CVD process and their properties would be described. The 203-m-long IBAD substrate (PLD-CeO{sub 2}/IBAD-GZO/HastelloyC) was used for preparing the long YBCO tape. The tape traveling speed at the each passing was 50 m/h and number of passing was 14 times. We applied a 12-stage CVD hot-wall chamber system for preparing YBCO layer. As a result, the end-to-end I{sub c} of 92.8 A (77 K self-field, 1 {mu}V/cm criteria) was obtained. The I{sub c}(A) x L(m) value corresponded to 18.8 kA. The n-value of the tape remained 15.5. Then we measured the I{sub c} distribution for longitudinal direction at 0.5 m intervals. The obtained data showed us that the average I{sub c} was roughly 140-150 A, however, we confirmed some low I{sub c} regions, which is about 65-100 A. The origin of the low I{sub c} regions was summarized. Concerning a high performance YBCO development, we achieved I{sub c} of 294 A/cm by introducing a multi-temperature and composition control process.

  20. The effect of alkaline doped catalysts on the CVD synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nemeth, Krisztian; Nemeth, Zoltan; Fejes, Dora

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop new doped catalysts for chemical vapour deposition (CVD) synthesis in order to increase the quantity and quality of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Doping compounds such as CsBr, CsCl, KBr and KCl were used to reach higher carbon deposit and carbon yield. The amount o...... of the dopant alkali compounds varied from 1 to 5%. As prepared CNTs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X‐ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman microscopy. Results revealed that both carbon yield and deposit could be increased over doped catalysts....

  1. Deposition of polysilicon as an example of a pyrolytic CVD process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korec, Jacek

    1980-07-01

    A model of a CVD process based on a pyrolytic reaction is presented. Various types of growth rate control by different elementary physical processes occuring during the deposition of the layer are discussed. The experimental data published for the deposition of polysilicon on amorphous SiO 2 by pyrolysis of SiH 4 in N 2 serves as an experimental verification of the theory. A formula describing the growth rate dependence on process parameters and conclusion concerning the definition of the diffusive region given by the model are in good agreement with the experiment.

  2. Use of Kelvin probe force microscopy for identification of CVD grown graphene flakes on copper foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Mehta, B. R.; Kanjilal, D.

    2017-05-01

    Graphene flakes have been grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method on Cu foils. The obtained graphene flakes have been characterized by optical microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and Raman spectroscopy. The graphene flakes grown on Cu foil comprise mainly single layer graphene and confirm that the nucleation for graphene growth starts very quickly. Moreover, KPFM has been found to be a valuable technique to differentiate between covered and uncovered portion of Cu foil by graphene flakes deposited for shorter duration. The results show that KPFM can be a very useful technique in understanding the mechanism of graphene growth.

  3. Piezoresistive pressure sensors in CVD diamond for high-temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otterbach, Ralf; Hilleringmann, Ulrich

    2003-09-01

    The fabrication of piezo-resistive pressure sensors for high temperature applications by the selective removal of CVD-diamond is limited due to the jutting physical properties of this material, which result in insufficient etching rates. A novel technique with distinctly increased etching rates due to a modified sample arrangement inside of a commercially available reactive ion etching (RIE) reactor overcomes this limitation by a restricted plasma volume. Rates up to 334 nm/min imply an increase of more than one order of magnitude in comparison with additional measurements utilizing a standard etching technique. Furthermore, the electrical response of a fabricated sensor on pressure is demonstrated.

  4. Deposition conditions for the growth of textured ZnO thin films by aerosol CVD process

    OpenAIRE

    Deschanvres, J.-L.; Bochu, B.; Joubert, J.-C.

    1993-01-01

    The crystalline orientation of ZnO thin films deposited by an aerosol CVD process is studied with regard to the experimental conditions. The quality of the C-axis oriented growth depended on the substrate temperature, on the deposition rate and also on the hygrometric degree of the carrier gas. The quality of the gold sublayer influenced also the quality of the ZnO textured growth. Under a dry gas mixture N2-O2 at 495°C and with a deposition rate of 35Å/mn, the texture ratio was less than -3....

  5. High-Resolution Energy and Intensity Measurements with CVD Diamond at REX-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Griesmayer, E; Dobos, D; Wenander, F; Bergoz, J; Bayle, H; Frais-Kölbl, H; Leinweber, J; Aumeyr, T; CERN. Geneva. BE Department

    2009-01-01

    A novel beam instrumentation device for the HIE-REX (High In-tensity and Energy REX) upgrade has been developed and tested at the On-Line Isotope Mass Separator ISOLDE, located at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN). This device is based on CVD diamond detector technology and is used for measuring the beam intensity, particle counting and measuring the energy spectrum of the beam. An energy resolution of 0.6% was measured at a carbon ion energy of 22.8 MeV. This corresponds to an energy spread of ± 140 keV.

  6. On the CVD Growth of C Nanotubes Over Fe-Loaded Montmorillonite Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saveria Santangelo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs by chemical vapor deposition (CVD of isobutane (i-C4H10 over sodium-exchanged K10-montmorillonite based iron-catalysts is investigated. By studying the influence of iron-addition (5–25 wt% on the catalyst performances, at 700°C, an empirical relationship is derived relating the mass of CNTs synthesized with the exposed surface of loaded iron, as resulting from simultaneous change of number, size and dispersion of Fe-nanoparticles available for the growth.

  7. Characteristics of epitaxial garnets grown by CVD using single metal alloy sources. [Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, P. J.; Hamilton, T. N.; Mee, J. E.; Stermer, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Single metal alloys have been explored as the cation source in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of iron garnets. Growth of good quality single crystal garnet films containing as many as five different cations has been achieved over a wide range of deposition conditions. The relationship of film composition to alloy compositions and deposition conditions has been determined for several materials. By proper choice of the alloy composition and the deposition conditions, uncrazed deposits were grown on (111) gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) substrates. Data on physical, magnetic and optical properties of representative films is presented and discussed.

  8. CVD solutions for new directions in SiC and GaN epitaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xun

    2015-01-01

    This thesis aims to develop a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process for the new directions in both silicon carbon (SiC) and gallium nitride (GaN) epitaxial growth. The properties of the grown epitaxial layers are investigated in detail in order to have a deep understanding. SiC is a promising wide band gap semiconductor material which could be utilized for fabricating high-power and high-frequency devices. 3C-SiC is the only polytype with a cubic structure and has superior physical properti...

  9. Joint association of physical activity/screen time and diet on CVD risk factors in 10-year-old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenowatz, Clemens; Carlson, Joseph J; Pfeiffer, Karin A; Eisenmann, Joey C

    2012-12-01

    The increasing prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity has been associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). While several studies examined the effect of single behaviors such as physical activity (PA), sedentary behavior or diet on CVD risk, there is a lack of research on combined associations, specifically in children. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the joint association of PA or screen time (ST) and diet on CVD risk factors in children. PA, STand diet were assessed via questionnaire in 210 fifth grade students (age: 10.6 ± 0.4 years). The healthy eating index (HEI) was subsequently calculated as indicator for diet quality. Height, weight, % body fat, and resting blood pressure were measured according to standard procedures and blood samples obtained via fingerprick were assayed for blood lipids. Total cholesterol HDL ratio (TC:HDL), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and % body fat were used as indicators of CVD risk. 55% of children did not meet current PA recommendations on at least 5 days/week and 70% exceeded current recommendations for ST. Further, only 2.5% possessed a "good" diet (HEI> 80). There was no significant association of PA or STand diet on CVD risk score. Neither TC:HDL, MAP, and % body fat nor the total CVD risk score was significantly correlated with diet, PA, or ST. Children in the high PA group, however, had significantly better diet scores. Despite the fact that self-reported PA, ST, or dietary intake were not directly related to CVD risk in this sample, higher activity levels were associated with a healthier diet and lower ST indicating an overall healthier lifestyle of this subgroup.

  10. Twenty-Fifth Annual Audio-Visual Aids Conference, Wednesday 9th to Friday 11th July 1975, Whitelands College, Putney SW15. Conference Preprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Committee for Audio-Visual Aids in Education, London (England).

    Preprints of papers to be presented at the 25th annual Audio-Visual Aids Conference are collected along with the conference program. Papers include official messages, a review of the conference's history, and presentations on photography in education, using school broadcasts, flexibility in the use of television, the "communications…

  11. Influence of tungsten on the carbon nanotubes growth by CVD process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar, Mariano [Instituto de Fisicoquimica de Materiales, Ambiente y Energia, CONICET-UBA, Pabellon II, Ciudad Universitaria (1428) Bs As (Argentina); LP and MC, Dep. De Fisica, FCEyN-UBA, Pabellon 1, Ciudad Universitaria (1428) Bs As (Argentina)], E-mail: mescobar@qi.fcen.uba.ar; Rubiolo, Gerardo H. [LP and MC, Dep. De Fisica, FCEyN-UBA, Pabellon 1, Ciudad Universitaria (1428) Bs As (Argentina); Unidad de Actividad Materiales, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, San Martin (1650), Bs As (Argentina); Moreno, M. Sergio [Centro Atomico Bariloche, (8400) S.C. de Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Goyanes, Silvia [LP and MC, Dep. De Fisica, FCEyN-UBA, Pabellon 1, Ciudad Universitaria (1428) Bs As (Argentina); Candal, Roberto [Instituto de Fisicoquimica de Materiales, Ambiente y Energia, CONICET-UBA, Pabellon II, Ciudad Universitaria (1428) Bs As (Argentina)

    2009-06-24

    The effect of tungsten (W) on the growth of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) using the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process over a metal Fe-W catalyst incorporated into a silica matrix is reported. A W molar content in Fe/SiO{sub 2} up to 10% was studied. The incorporation of only 2% of W substantially modifies the crystalline phases and the crystalline degree of the catalyst during the MWNTs synthesis. This fact seems to have a strong influence on the type and yield of the carbonaceous species obtained by the CVD of acetylene, at 600 deg. C and 180 Torr, over each catalyst. Tungsten interacts with iron within the matrix, diminishing the catalytic activity of the metal nanoparticles, and both, carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers, are obtained when tungsten is present. The results obtained support the hypothesis of a base growth model for carbon nanotubes indicating a strong interaction between silica matrix and Fe/W nanoparticles, independently of the content of W.

  12. High-speed roll-to-roll manufacturing of graphene using a concentric tube CVD reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsen, Erik S.; McNerny, Daniel Q.; Viswanath, B.; Pattinson, Sebastian W.; John Hart, A.

    2015-05-01

    We present the design of a concentric tube (CT) reactor for roll-to-roll chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on flexible substrates, and its application to continuous production of graphene on copper foil. In the CTCVD reactor, the thin foil substrate is helically wrapped around the inner tube, and translates through the gap between the concentric tubes. We use a bench-scale prototype machine to synthesize graphene on copper substrates at translation speeds varying from 25 mm/min to 500 mm/min, and investigate the influence of process parameters on the uniformity and coverage of graphene on a continuously moving foil. At lower speeds, high-quality monolayer graphene is formed; at higher speeds, rapid nucleation of small graphene domains is observed, yet coalescence is prevented by the limited residence time in the CTCVD system. We show that a smooth isothermal transition between the reducing and carbon-containing atmospheres, enabled by injection of the carbon feedstock via radial holes in the inner tube, is essential to high-quality roll-to-roll graphene CVD. We discuss how the foil quality and microstructure limit the uniformity of graphene over macroscopic dimensions. We conclude by discussing means of scaling and reconfiguring the CTCVD design based on general requirements for 2-D materials manufacturing.

  13. Electrical and thermal conductivity of low temperature CVD graphene: the effect of disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlassiouk, Ivan; Smirnov, Sergei; Ivanov, Ilia; Fulvio, Pasquale F; Dai, Sheng; Meyer, Harry; Chi, Miaofang; Hensley, Dale; Datskos, Panos; Lavrik, Nickolay V

    2011-07-08

    In this paper we present a study of graphene produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) under different conditions with the main emphasis on correlating the thermal and electrical properties with the degree of disorder. Graphene grown by CVD on Cu and Ni catalysts demonstrates the increasing extent of disorder at low deposition temperatures as revealed by the Raman peak ratio, IG/ID. We relate this ratio to the characteristic domain size, La, and investigate the electrical and thermal conductivity of graphene as a function of La. The electrical resistivity, ρ, measured on graphene samples transferred onto SiO2/Si substrates shows linear correlation with La(-1). The thermal conductivity, K, measured on the same graphene samples suspended on silicon pillars, on the other hand, appears to have a much weaker dependence on La, close to K∼La1/3. It results in an apparent ρ∼K3 correlation between them. Despite the progressively increasing structural disorder in graphene grown at lower temperatures, it shows remarkably high thermal conductivity (10(2)-10(3) W K(-1) m(-1)) and low electrical (10(3)-3×10(5) Ω) resistivities suitable for various applications.

  14. Effect of a Balanced Concentration of Hydrogen on Graphene CVD Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Chaitoglou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The extraordinary properties of graphene make it one of the most interesting materials for future applications. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD is the synthetic method that permits obtaining large areas of monolayer graphene. To achieve this, it is important to find the appropriate conditions for each experimental system. In our CVD reactor working at low pressure, important factors appear to be the pretreatment of the copper substrate, considering both its cleaning and its annealing before the growing process. The carbon precursor/hydrogen flow ratio and its modification during the growth are significant in order to obtain large area graphene crystals with few defects. In this work, we have focused on the study of the methane and the hydrogen flows to control the production of single layer graphene (SLG and its growth time. In particular, we observe that hydrogen concentration increases during a usual growing process (keeping stable the methane/hydrogen flow ratio resulting in etched domains. In order to balance this increase, a modification of the hydrogen flow results in the growth of smooth hexagonal SLG domains. This is a result of the etching effect that hydrogen performs on the growing graphene. It is essential, therefore, to study the moderated presence of hydrogen.

  15. Acetylene-sourced CVD-synthesised catalytically active graphene for electrochemical biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osikoya, Adeniyi Olugbenga; Parlak, Onur; Murugan, N Arul; Dikio, Ezekiel Dixon; Moloto, Harry; Uzun, Lokman; Turner, Anthony Pf; Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2017-03-15

    In this study, we have demonstrated the use of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown-graphene to develop a highly-ordered graphene-enzyme electrode for electrochemical biosensing. The graphene sheets were deposited on 1.00mm thick copper sheet at 850°C using acetylene (C 2 H 2 ) as carbon source in an argon (Ar) and nitrogen (N 2 ) atmosphere. An anionic surfactant was used to increase wettability and hydrophilicity of graphene; thereby facilitating the assembly of biomolecules on the electrode surface. Meanwhile, the theoretical calculations confirmed the successful modification of hydrophobic nature of graphene through the anionic surface assembly, which allowed high-ordered immobilisation of glucose oxidase (GOx) on the graphene. The electrochemical sensing activities of the graphene-electrode was explored as a model for bioelectrocatalysis. The bioelectrode exhibited a linear response to glucose concentration ranging from 0.2 to 9.8mM, with sensitivity of 0.087µA/µM/cm 2 and a detection limit of 0.12µM (S/N=3). This work sets the stage for the use of acetylene-sourced CVD-grown graphene as a fundamental building block in the fabrication of electrochemical biosensors and other bioelectronic devices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Surface structure deduced differences of copper foil and film for graphene CVD growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Junjun [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Hu, Baoshan, E-mail: hubaoshan@cqu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Wei, Zidong; Jin, Yan [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Luo, Zhengtang [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Hongkong University of Science and Technology, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Xia, Meirong [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Pan, Qingjiang [Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry, Ministry of Education, Heilongjiang University, Harbin 150080 (China); Liu, Yunling [State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • We demonstrate the significant differences between Cu foil and film in the surface morphology and crystal orientation distribution. • The different surface structure leads to the distinctive influences of the CH₄ and H₂ concentrations on the thickness and quality of as-grown graphene. • Nucleation densities and growth rate differences at the initial growth stages on the Cu foil and film were investigated and discussed. Abstract: Graphene was synthesized on Cu foil and film by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with CH₄ as carbon source. Electron backscattered scattering diffraction (EBSD) characterization demonstrates that the Cu foil surface after the H₂-assisted pre-annealing was almost composed of Cu(1 0 0) crystal facet with larger grain size of ~100 μm; meanwhile, the Cu film surface involved a variety of crystal facets of Cu(1 1 1), Cu(1 0 0), and Cu(1 1 0), with the relatively small grain size of ~10 μm. The different surface structure led to the distinctive influences of the CH₄ and H₂ concentrations on the thickness and quality of as-grown graphene. Further data demonstrate that the Cu foil enabled more nucleation densities and faster growth rates at the initial growth stages than the Cu film. Our results are beneficial for understanding the relationship between the metal surface structure and graphene CVD growth.

  17. High-speed roll-to-roll manufacturing of graphene using a concentric tube CVD reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsen, Erik S; McNerny, Daniel Q; Viswanath, B; Pattinson, Sebastian W; John Hart, A

    2015-05-21

    We present the design of a concentric tube (CT) reactor for roll-to-roll chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on flexible substrates, and its application to continuous production of graphene on copper foil. In the CTCVD reactor, the thin foil substrate is helically wrapped around the inner tube, and translates through the gap between the concentric tubes. We use a bench-scale prototype machine to synthesize graphene on copper substrates at translation speeds varying from 25 mm/min to 500 mm/min, and investigate the influence of process parameters on the uniformity and coverage of graphene on a continuously moving foil. At lower speeds, high-quality monolayer graphene is formed; at higher speeds, rapid nucleation of small graphene domains is observed, yet coalescence is prevented by the limited residence time in the CTCVD system. We show that a smooth isothermal transition between the reducing and carbon-containing atmospheres, enabled by injection of the carbon feedstock via radial holes in the inner tube, is essential to high-quality roll-to-roll graphene CVD. We discuss how the foil quality and microstructure limit the uniformity of graphene over macroscopic dimensions. We conclude by discussing means of scaling and reconfiguring the CTCVD design based on general requirements for 2-D materials manufacturing.

  18. Influence of duration time of CVD process on emissive properties of carbon nanotubes films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stępinska Izabela

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper various types of films made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs are presented. These films were prepared on different substrates (Al2O3, Si n-type by the two-step method. The two-step method consists of physical vapor deposition step, followed by chemical vapor deposition step (PVD/CVD. Parameters of PVD process were the same for all initial films, while the duration times of the second step - the CVD process, were different (15, 30 min.. Prepared films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and field emission (FE measurements. The I-E and F-N characteristics of electron emission were discussed in terms of various forms of CNT films. The value of threshold electric field ranged from few V/μm (for CNT dispersed rarely on the surface of the film deposited on Si up to ~20 V/μm (for Al2O3 substrate.

  19. Development of a CVD diamond Beam Condition Monitor for CMS at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández-Hernando, L; Gray, R; Ilgner, C; MacPherson, A; Oh, A; Pritchard, T; Stone, R; Worm, S

    2005-01-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will store 2808 bunches per colliding beam, with each bunch consisting of 1011 protons at an energy of 7 TeV. If there is a failure in an element of the accelerator, the resulting beam losses could cause damage not only to the machine but also to the experiments. A Beam Condition Monitor (BCM) is foreseen to monitor fast increments of particle fluxes near the interaction point and, if necessary, to generate an abort signal to the LHC accelerator control to dump the beams. The system is being developed initially for the CMS experiment but it is sufficiently general to find potential applications elsewhere. Due to its high radiation hardness, CVD diamond was chosen for investigation as the BCM sensor. Various samples of CVD diamond have been characterized extensively with both a 90Sr source and in high-intensity test beams in order to assess the capabilities of such sensors and to study whether this detector technology is suitable for a BCM system. A selection of results fro...

  20. Estimation of magnetic relaxation property for CVD processed YBCO-coated conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Y.; Kiuchi, M.; Otabe, E.S. [Faculty of Computer Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, 680-4 Kawazu, Iizuka, Fukuoka 820-8502 (Japan); Matsushita, T., E-mail: matusita@cse.kyutech.ac.j [Faculty of Computer Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, 680-4 Kawazu, Iizuka, Fukuoka 820-8502 (Japan); Shikimachi, K.; Watanabe, T.; Kashima, N.; Nagaya, S. [Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., 20-1, Kitasekiyama, Ohdaka-cho, Midori-ku, Nagoya 459-8522 (Japan)

    2010-11-01

    Ion Beam Assist Deposition/Chemical Vapor Deposition(IBAD/CVD)-processed YBCO-coated conductors with high critical current density J{sub c} at high magnetic fields are expected to be applied to superconducting equipments such as superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES). For application to superconducting magnet in SMES one of the most important properties for superconductors is the relaxation property of superconducting current. In this paper, the relaxation property is investigated for IBAD/CVD-processed YBCO-coated conductors of the superconducting layer in the range of 0.18-0.90 {mu}m. This property can be quantitatively characterized by the apparent pinning potential, U{sub 0}*. It is found that U{sub 0}* takes a smaller value due to the two-dimensional pinning mechanism at high magnetic fields for conductor with thinner superconducting layer. Although U{sub 0}* decreases with increasing thickness at low magnetic fields at 20 K, it increases at high magnetic fields. The results are theoretically explained by the model of the flux creep and flow based on the dimensionality of flux pinning. Scaling analysis is examined for the dependence of U{sub 0}{sup *} on the magnetic field, temperature and the layer thickness.

  1. Large scale integration of CVD-graphene based NEMS with narrow distribution of resonance parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjmandi-Tash, Hadi; Allain, Adrien; (Vitto Han, Zheng; Bouchiat, Vincent

    2017-06-01

    We present a novel method for the fabrication of the arrays of suspended micron-sized membranes, based on monolayer pulsed-CVD graphene. Such devices are the source of an efficient integration of graphene nano-electro-mechanical resonators, compatible with production at the wafer scale using standard photolithography and processing tools. As the graphene surface is continuously protected by the same polymer layer during the whole process, suspended graphene membranes are clean and free of imperfections such as deposits, wrinkles and tears. Batch fabrication of 100 μm-long multi-connected suspended ribbons is presented. At room temperature, mechanical resonance of electrostatically-actuated devices show narrow distribution of their characteristic parameters with high quality factor and low effective mass and resonance frequencies, as expected for low stress and adsorbate-free membranes. Upon cooling, a sharp increase of both resonant frequency and quality factor is observed, enabling to extract the thermal expansion coefficient of CVD graphene. Comparison with state-of-the-art graphene NEMS is presented.

  2. A large-scale NEMS light-emitting array based on CVD graphene (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyungsik; Kim, Young Duck; Lee, Changhyuk; Lee, Sunwoo; Seo, Dong-jea; Jerng, Sahng-Kyoon; Chun, Seung-Hyun; Hone, James; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2017-02-01

    Graphene has received much interest from optical communities largely owing to its photon-like linear energy band structure called Dirac cone. While majority of the recent research has dealt with plasmon and polariton of the two-dimensional material, a recently reported graphene light emitter could render a new dimension of applications, particularly in high-speed optical communication. Moreover chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth technique for graphene is available today providing means for scalable high quality graphene. The reported graphene emitter provides broadband light emission from visible to mid-infrared which could be instrumental in multi-color display units and optical communications, however a truly large scale implementation has not previously been achieved. Here we demonstrate a CMOS-compatible 262,144 light-emitting pixels array (10 x 10 mm2) based on suspended CVD graphene nano-electro-mechanical systems (GNEMS). A single photoemission area is 19.6 µm2 and a unit pixel is consisting of 512 photoemission devices (16 x 16) where a multiplexer and a digital to analog converter (DAC) are used to control each pixel. This work clearly demonstrates scalability of multi-channel GNEMS light-emitting array, an atomically thin electro-optical module, and further paves a path for its commercial implementation transparent display or high-speed optical communication.

  3. Cardiovascular friendly natural products: a promising approach in the management of CVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Santosh K; Gupta, Shipra; Ojha, Shreesh K; Sharma, Suman B

    2010-05-01

    Natural products play an important role as nutritional supplements and provide potential health benefits in cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Compiling data from experimental, epidemiological and clinical studies indicates that dietary nutrients have profound cardioprotective effects in the primary as well as secondary prevention of coronary heart disease, hence they are considered as cardiovascular friendly natural products. The mechanism of cardioprotection produced by dietary nutritional supplements such as flavonoids (citrus fruits, pulses, red wine, tea and cocoa), olive oil, omega-3 (omega-3) fatty acids (fish oil and fish-based products), lycopene (tomato and tomato-based products), resveratrol (grapes and red wine), coffee, and soy in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disorders have been discussed in the present review, with the emphasis of epidemiological and clinical studies. Based on the intriguing results of various studies, prophylactic and therapeutic potential of cardiovascular friendly natural products have been suggested. The supplementation of cardiovascular friendly natural products needs to be considered in all populations who have high prevalence of CVD.

  4. LaCoO3 nanosystems by a hybrid CVD/sol-gel approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armelao, Lidia; Barreca, Davide; Bottaro, Gregorio; Gasparotto, Alberto; Maragno, Cinzia; Tondello, Eugenio; Sada, Cinzia

    2005-05-01

    LaCoO3 nanosystems are receiving increasing attention for the development of innovative fuel cells and heterogeneous catalysts. In this report, we describe the synthesis of nanophasic LaCoO3 thin films by a hybrid chemical vapor deposition (CVD)/sol-gel (SG) approach. The adopted strategy consists in the CVD of La-O-based systems on SG cobalt oxide xerogels CoOx(OH)y at temperatures as low as 200 degrees C and in the subsequent thermal treatment in air (400-800 degrees C, 2-8 h). In this context, particular attention is devoted to achieving an intimate La/Co intermixing already in the as-prepared systems, in order to favor reactions yielding a single La-Co-O phase with uniform composition. The obtained results point out to the formation of pure and structurally homogeneous LaCoO3 nanosystems after annealing at 700 degrees C, 2 h, with a typical grain-like morphology. More severe thermal treatment resulted in the thermal decomposition of LaCoO3 nanocrystallites.

  5. Heparin free coating on PLA membranes for enhanced hemocompatibility via iCVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Shi, Xiao; Gao, Ailin; Lin, Haibo; Chen, Yongliang; Ye, Yumin; He, Jidong; Liu, Fu; Deng, Gang

    2018-03-01

    In the present work, we report one-step immobilization of nano-heparin coating on PLA membranes via initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) for enhanced hemocompatibility. The nano-coating introduced onto the membrane surface via the crosslinking of P(MAA-EGDA) was confirmed by the FTIR, SEM and weight measurement respectively. The negative carboxyl groups could form the hydration interaction with the protein and platelets and electrostatic interaction with amide groups of thrombin by the mediation of antithrombin, which is similar but different with heparin. The P(MAA-EGDA) coated membranes showed suppressed platelet adhesion and prolonged clotting time (APTTs increased to 59 s, PTs increased to 20.4 s, TTs increased to 17.5 s, and the FIBs declined by 30 mg/dL). Moreover, the complement activation tests demonstrated the formation of C3a and C5a was inhibited. All results demonstrated that the nano-coating of P(MAA-EGDA) via iCVD significantly enhanced the hemocompatibility of PLA membranes, which is also applicable for various membranes.

  6. Simultaneous synthesis of nanodiamonds and graphene via plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MW PE-CVD) on copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Steven; Wöhrl, Nicolas; Schulz, Stephan; Buck, Volker

    2016-01-01

    The simultaneous growth of both nanodiamonds and graphene on copper samples is described for the first time. A PE-CVD process is used to synthesize graphene layers and nanodiamond clusters from a hydrogen/methane gas mixture as it is typically done successfully in thermal CVD processes for graphene synthesis. However, the standard thermal CVD process is not without problems since the deposition of graphene is affected by the evaporation of a notable amount of copper caused by the slow temperature increase typical for thermal CVD resulting in a long process time. In sharp contrast, the synthesis of graphene by PE-CVD can circumvent this problem by substantially shortening the process time at holding out the prospect of a lower substrate temperature. The reduced thermal load and the possibility to industrially scale-up the PE-CVD process makes it a very attractive alternative to the thermal CVD process with respect to the graphene production in the future. Nanodiamonds are synthesized in PE-CVD reactors for a long time because these processes offer a high degree of control over the film's nanostructure and simultaneously providing a significant high deposition rate. To model the co-deposition process, the three relevant macroscopic parameters (pressure, gas mixture and microwave power) are correlated with three relevant process properties (plasma ball size, substrate temperature and C2/Hα-ratio) and the influence on the quality of the deposited carbon allotropes is investigated. For the evaluation of the graphene as well as the nanodiamond quality, Raman spectroscopy used whereas the plasma properties are measured by optical methods. It is found that the diamond nucleation can be influenced by the C2/Hα-ratio in the plasma, while the graphene quality remains mostly unchanged by this parameter. Moreover it is derived from the experimental data that the direct plasma contact with the copper surface is beneficial for the nucleation of the diamond while the growth and

  7. Coffee consumption is not associated with prevalent subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) or the risk of CVD events, in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: results from the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Tracey G; Trejo, Maria Esther Perez; Zeb, Irfan; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C; McClelland, Robyn L; Chung, Raymond T; Budoff, Matthew J

    2017-10-01

    Atherosclerosis and its clinical sequelae represent the leading cause of mortality among patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). While epidemiologic data support the hepatoprotective benefits of coffee in NAFLD, whether coffee improves NAFLD-associated CVD risk is unknown. We examined 3710 ethnically-diverse participants from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) cohort, without history of known liver disease, and with available coffee data from a validated 120-item food frequency questionnaire. All participants underwent baseline non-contrast cardiac CT from which NAFLD was defined by liver:spleen ratio (L:S0. Major CVD events were defined by the first occurrence of myocardial infarction, cardiac arrest, angina, stroke, or CVD death. We used log-binomial regression to calculate the adjusted prevalence ratio (PR) for CAC>0 by coffee intake and NAFLD status, and events were compared between groups using frequency of events within adjusted Cox proportional hazard regression models. Seventeen percent (N=637) of participants met criteria for NAFLD. NAFLD participants were more likely to have elevated BMI (mean 31.1±5.5kg/m 2 vs. 28.0±5.2kg/m 2 , pcoffee consumption (p=0.97). Among NAFLD participants, coffee consumption was not associated with prevalent, baseline CAC>0 (PR=1.02 [0.98-1.07]). Over 12.8years of follow-up, 93 NAFLD and 415 non-NAFLD participants experienced a CV event. However, coffee intake was not associated with incident CVD events, in either NAFLD (HR=1.05 [0.91-1.21]) or non-NAFLD participants (HR=1.03 [0.97-1.11]). In a large, population-based cohort, coffee consumption was not associated with the prevalence of subclinical CVD, nor did coffee impact the future risk of major CVD events, regardless of underlying NAFLD status. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Significance of vapor phase chemical reactions on CVD rates predicted by chemically frozen and local thermochemical equilibrium boundary layer theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper investigates the role played by vapor-phase chemical reactions on CVD rates by comparing the results of two extreme theories developed to predict CVD mass transport rates in the absence of interfacial kinetic barrier: one based on chemically frozen boundary layer and the other based on local thermochemical equilibrium. Both theories consider laminar convective-diffusion boundary layers at high Reynolds numbers and include thermal (Soret) diffusion and variable property effects. As an example, Na2SO4 deposition was studied. It was found that gas phase reactions have no important role on Na2SO4 deposition rates and on the predictions of the theories. The implications of the predictions of the two theories to other CVD systems are discussed.

  9. Study on Mechanical Behavior of CVD-SiC Coated C/SiC Composites under Simulated Space Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiang; Feng, Cao; Yi, Wang; Guang-de, Li; Jie, Cao

    2017-10-01

    SiC coating was prepared on the surface of C/SiC composites by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, and then mechanical behavior of CVD-SiC coated C/SiC composites under cold and thermal cycling had been investigated. Specimens were thermally cycled between the temperatures of -100 °C and 100 °C for up to 200 cycles, respectively. The coating was characterized by XRD, SEM and EDS. The results showed that there were no significant changes in the flexural property. CVD-SiC coated C/SiC composites had good mechanical stability in above simulated space environments. While great changes occurred on both elements and structure of the coating, from homogeneous single-phase of SiC into the inner layer of SiC and the outer of C, which caused the change of the bending strength.

  10. Treatment with liraglutide may improve markers of CVD reflected by reduced levels of apoB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrechtsen, L; Lundgren, J; Wewer Albrechtsen, N J; Mahendran, Y; Iepsen, E W; Finocchietto, P; Jonsson, A E; Madsbad, S; Holst, J J; Vestergaard, H; Hansen, T; Torekov, S S

    2017-12-01

    Dislipidaemia and increased levels of apolipoprotein B (apoB) in individuals with obesity are risk factors for development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of weight loss and weight maintenance with and without liraglutide treatment on plasma lipid profiles and apoB. Fifty-eight individuals with obesity (body mass index 34.5 ± 3.0 kg/m 2 [mean ± SD]) were included in this study. After 8 weeks on a very low-calorie diet (800 kcal/day), participants were randomized to weight maintenance with meal replacements with or without liraglutide (1.2 mg daily) for 1 year. Plasma samples from before and after weight loss and after 1 year of weight maintenance were subjected to nuclear magnetic resonance-based lipidomics analysis. After an 8-week low-calorie diet, study participants lost 12.0 ± 2.9 kg (mean ± SD) of their body weight, which was reflected in their lipid profiles (80 out of 124 lipids changed significantly), including reduced levels of apoB, total cholesterol, free cholesterol, remnant cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein and very low-density lipoprotein subclasses. After 1 year of maintained weight loss, the majority of the lipids had returned to pre-weight loss levels even though weight loss was successfully maintained in both groups. Interestingly, apoB levels remained low in the liraglutide treated group (apoB change: 0.03 ± 0.02 mmol/L, p = 0.4) in contrast to an increase in the control group (apoB change: 0.06 ± 0.07 mmol/L, p = 0.02). An 8-week low-calorie diet, in individuals with obesity, reduced plasma levels of lipids and the atherogenic marker apoB. After 1 year of weight maintenance, only study participants treated with liraglutide maintained reduced levels of apoB, despite similar body weight maintenance. Treatment with liraglutide may therefore reduce apoB levels and thus reflect lower CVD risk. Including apoB measurements in clinical practice when

  11. Projected impact of a sodium consumption reduction initiative in Argentina: an analysis from the CVD policy model--Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konfino, Jonatan; Mekonnen, Tekeshe A; Coxson, Pamela G; Ferrante, Daniel; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in adults in Argentina. Sodium reduction policies targeting processed foods were implemented in 2011 in Argentina, but the impact has not been evaluated. The aims of this study are to use Argentina-specific data on sodium excretion and project the impact of Argentina's sodium reduction policies under two scenarios - the 2-year intervention currently being undertaken or a more persistent 10 year sodium reduction strategy. We used Argentina-specific data on sodium excretion by sex and projected the impact of the current strategy on sodium consumption and blood pressure decrease. We assessed the projected impact of sodium reduction policies on CVD using the Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) Policy Model, adapted to Argentina, modeling two alternative policy scenarios over the next decade. Our study finds that the initiative to reduce sodium consumption currently in place in Argentina will have substantial impact on CVD over the next 10 years. Under the current proposed policy of 2-year sodium reduction, the mean sodium consumption is projected to decrease by 319-387 mg/day. This decrease is expected to translate into an absolute reduction of systolic blood pressure from 0.93 mmHg to 1.81 mmHg. This would avert about 19,000 all-cause mortality, 13,000 total myocardial infarctions, and 10,000 total strokes over the next decade. A more persistent sodium reduction strategy would yield even greater CVD benefits. The impact of the Argentinean initiative would be effective in substantially reducing mortality and morbidity from CVD. This paper provides evidence-based support to continue implementing strategies to reduce sodium consumption at a population level.

  12. Projected Impact of a Sodium Consumption Reduction Initiative in Argentina: An Analysis from the CVD Policy Model – Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konfino, Jonatan; Mekonnen, Tekeshe A.; Coxson, Pamela G.; Ferrante, Daniel; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in adults in Argentina. Sodium reduction policies targeting processed foods were implemented in 2011 in Argentina, but the impact has not been evaluated. The aims of this study are to use Argentina-specific data on sodium excretion and project the impact of Argentina’s sodium reduction policies under two scenarios - the 2-year intervention currently being undertaken or a more persistent 10 year sodium reduction strategy. Methods We used Argentina-specific data on sodium excretion by sex and projected the impact of the current strategy on sodium consumption and blood pressure decrease. We assessed the projected impact of sodium reduction policies on CVD using the Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) Policy Model, adapted to Argentina, modeling two alternative policy scenarios over the next decade. Results Our study finds that the initiative to reduce sodium consumption currently in place in Argentina will have substantial impact on CVD over the next 10 years. Under the current proposed policy of 2-year sodium reduction, the mean sodium consumption is projected to decrease by 319–387 mg/day. This decrease is expected to translate into an absolute reduction of systolic blood pressure from 0.93 mmHg to 1.81 mmHg. This would avert about 19,000 all-cause mortality, 13,000 total myocardial infarctions, and 10,000 total strokes over the next decade. A more persistent sodium reduction strategy would yield even greater CVD benefits. Conclusion The impact of the Argentinean initiative would be effective in substantially reducing mortality and morbidity from CVD. This paper provides evidence-based support to continue implementing strategies to reduce sodium consumption at a population level. PMID:24040085

  13. A Conceptual Framework for Barriers to the Recruitment and Retention of Rural CVD Participants in Behavior Intervention Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lufei; Montgomery, Melody; Barnason, Sue; Schmidt, Cindy; Do, Van

    2015-08-01

    Rural residents diagnosed with cardiovascular disease (CVD) or with CVD-related risks are underrepresented in behavioral intervention trials based on an extensive review of published studies. The low participation rate of rural residents weakens both the internal and external validity of published studies. Moreover, compared to urban residents, limited research exists to describe the unique barriers that limit the participation of rural residents in behavioral intervention trials. The purpose of this review is to identify a conceptual framework (CF) underpinning common barriers faced by rural CVD patients to enroll in behavioral intervention trials. We conducted a literature review using several electronic databases to obtain a representative sample of research articles, synthesized the evidence, and developed a CF to explain the barriers that may affect the research participation rate of rural residents with CVD or related risks. We found our evidence-based CF well explained the barriers for rural CVD patients to take part in behavioral intervention trials. Besides contextual factors (i.e. patient, community and research levels), other common factors impacting rural patients' intent to enroll are lack of awareness and understanding about behavioral trials, limited support from their healthcare providers and social circles, unfavorable attitudes, and the lack of opportunity to participating research. The findings demonstrate the evidence-based model consisting of interlinked multi-level factors may help our understanding of the barriers encountered by rural CVD patients participating interventions to promote behavioral change. The implication for researchers is that identifying and developing strategies to overcome the barriers precedes conducting studies in rural communities.

  14. The impact of substituting SFA in dairy products with MUFA or PUFA on CVD risk: evidence from human intervention studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, Katherine M; Lovegrove, Julie A; Givens, D Ian

    2012-12-01

    With the substantial economic and social burden of CVD, the need to modify diet and lifestyle factors to reduce risk has become increasingly important. Milk and dairy products, being one of the main contributors to SFA intake in the UK, are a potential target for dietary SFA reduction. Supplementation of the dairy cow's diet with a source of MUFA or PUFA may have beneficial effects on consumers' CVD risk by partially replacing milk SFA, thus reducing entry of SFA into the food chain. A total of nine chronic human intervention studies have used dairy products, modified through bovine feeding, to establish their effect on CVD risk markers. Of these studies, the majority utilised modified butter as their primary test product and used changes in blood cholesterol concentrations as their main risk marker. Of the eight studies that measured blood cholesterol, four reported a significant reduction in total and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) following chronic consumption of modified milk and dairy products. Data from one study suggested that a significant reduction in LDL-C could be achieved in both the healthy and hypercholesterolaemic population. Thus, evidence from these studies suggests that consumption of milk and dairy products with modified fatty acid composition, compared with milk and dairy products of typical milk fat composition, may be beneficial to CVD risk in healthy and hypercholesterolaemic individuals. However, current evidence is insufficient and further work is needed to investigate the complex role of milk and cheese in CVD risk and explore the use of novel markers of CVD risk.

  15. Hi-Nicalon(trademark)-S SiC Fiber Strength after Low pO2 Oxidation (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-04

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0357 HI -NICALONTM-S SIC FIBER STRENGTH AFTER LOW pO2 OXIDATION (PREPRINT) Randall S. Hay AFRL/RX T.A...DD-MM-YY) 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 17 May 2017 Interim 22 July 2013 – 17 April 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE HI -NICALONTM-S SIC...and has the right to use, modify, reproduce, release, perform, display, or disclose the work. 14. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) Hi -NicalonTM-S SiC

  16. A systematic review and meta-analysis of nut consumption and incident risk of CVD and all-cause mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Alexandra J; de Souza, Russell J; Meyre, David; Anand, Sonia S; Mente, Andrew

    2016-01-28

    Dietary patterns containing nuts are associated with a lower risk of CVD mortality, and increased nut consumption has been shown to have beneficial effects on CVD risk factors including serum lipid levels. Recent studies have reported on the relationship between nut intake and CVD outcomes and mortality. Our objective was to systematically review the literature and quantify associations between nut consumption and CVD outcomes and all-cause mortality. Five electronic databases (through July 2015), previous reviews and bibliographies of qualifying articles were searched. In the twenty included prospective cohort studies (n 467 389), nut consumption was significantly associated with a lower risk of all-cause mortality (ten studies; risk ratio (RR) 0·81; 95 % CI 0·77, 0·85 for highest v. lowest quantile of intake, P het=0·04, I 2=43 %), CVD mortality (five studies; RR 0·73; 95 % CI 0·68, 0·78; P het=0·31, I 2=16 %), all CHD (three studies; RR 0·66; 95 % CI 0·48, 0·91; P het=0·0002, I 2=88 %) and CHD mortality (seven studies; RR 0·70; 95 % CI 0·64, 0·76; P het=0·65, I 2=0 %), as well as a statistically non-significant reduction in the risk of non-fatal CHD (three studies; RR 0·71; 95 % CI 0·49, 1·03; P het=0·03, I 2=72 %) and stroke mortality (three studies; RR 0·83; 95 % CI 0·69, 1·00; P het=0·54, I 2=0 %). No evidence of association was found for total stroke (two studies; RR 1·05; 95 % CI 0·69, 1·61; P het=0·04, I 2=77 %). Data on total CVD and sudden cardiac death were available from one cohort study, and they were significantly inversely associated with nut consumption. In conclusion, we found that higher nut consumption is associated with a lower risk of all-cause mortality, total CVD, CVD mortality, total CHD, CHD mortality and sudden cardiac death.

  17. Strain analysis of plasma CVD graphene for roll-to-roll production by scanning transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Ryuichi; Koga, Yoshinori; Matsuishi, Kiyoto; Hasegawa, Masataka

    2017-03-01

    The establishment of the roll-to-roll CVD is one of the key factors for realizing the commercial application of graphene. The strain in graphene synthesized by high-throughput plasma CVD using two different conditions related to growth rate and tension to the substrate is analyzed by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The compressive strain generated during the growth by the tension to the substrate and the difference in thermal expansion coefficient between the graphene and the copper substrate is observed, which affects electrical conductivity. It was confirmed by STEM observation that no particularly large strain was accumulated at grain boundaries and their surroundings.

  18. A first principles study on the CVD graphene growth on copper surfaces: A carbon atom incorporation to graphene edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Nobuo; Kaneko, Tomoaki; Nara, Jun; Ohno, Takahisa

    2016-11-01

    Carbon atom reactions in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes for graphene production on copper surfaces have been studied by first principles molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at a typical CVD growth temperature. This study focuses on the processes of a carbon atom incorporation to graphene edges. The energy barriers of these carbon atom incorporation reactions have been calculated as ~ 1 eV, which are comparable or slightly larger than the barriers of carbon atom dimerization. We have also found that the surface copper atoms form step like structures to terminate the carbon dangling bonds at graphene edges, which are markedly different from the graphene-copper interactions observed in static calculations.

  19. System for the growth of bulk SiC crystals by modified CVD techniques. Final report, December 1993-December 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steckl, A.J.

    1994-12-01

    The goal of this program was the development of a SiC CVD growth of films thick enough to be useful as pseudo-substrates. The cold-walled CVD system was designed, assembled, and tested. Extrapolating from preliminary evaluation of SiC films grown in the system at relatively low temperatures indicates that the growth rate at the final temperatures will be high enough to make this approach practical. Modifications of the system to allow high temperature growth and cleaner growth conditions are in progress. This program was jointly funded by Wright Laboratory, Materials Directorate and NASA LeRC and monitored by NASA.

  20. Study of the triton-burnup process in different JET scenarios using neutron monitor based on CVD diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemtsev, G., E-mail: g.nemtsev@iterrf.ru; Amosov, V.; Meshchaninov, S.; Rodionov, R. [Institution “Project center ITER,” Moscow (Russian Federation); Popovichev, S. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Collaboration: EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    We present the results of analysis of triton burn-up process using the data from diamond detector. Neutron monitor based on CVD diamond was installed in JET torus hall close to the plasma center. We measure the part of 14 MeV neutrons in scenarios where plasma current varies in a range of 1-3 MA. In this experiment diamond neutron monitor was also able to detect strong gamma bursts produced by runaway electrons arising during the disruptions. We can conclude that CVD diamond detector will contribute to the study of fast particles confinement and help predict the disruption events in future tokamaks.

  1. Fast method for reactor and feature scale coupling in ALD and CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanguas-Gil, Angel; Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2017-08-08

    Transport and surface chemistry of certain deposition techniques is modeled. Methods provide a model of the transport inside nanostructures as a single-particle discrete Markov chain process. This approach decouples the complexity of the surface chemistry from the transport model, thus allowing its application under general surface chemistry conditions, including atomic layer deposition (ALD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Methods provide for determination of determine statistical information of the trajectory of individual molecules, such as the average interaction time or the number of wall collisions for molecules entering the nanostructures as well as to track the relative contributions to thin-film growth of different independent reaction pathways at each point of the feature.

  2. [The interaction between nerve cells and carbon nanotube networks made by CVD process investigation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrinetskiĭ, I I; Seleznev, A S; Gaĭduchenko, I A; Fedorov, G E; Domantovskiĭ, A G; Presniakov, M Iu; Podcherniaeva, R Ia; Mikhaĭlova, G R; Suetina, I A

    2013-01-01

    In this research we investigate neuroblastoma cells cultivated on single-walled carbon nanotubes networks made by CVD method on silicon substrates. The complex analysis of grown cells made by atomic force, electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy was carried out and the effect of nanotube growth process on proliferation factor was investigated. It is shown that despite of a weak decrease in proliferation, cell morphology remains unchanged and no physical or chemical interaction between carbon nanotubes and cells is observed. The results of the research can be used to investigate the interaction between conductive nanomaterials and cells for the development of neural replacement implants. Also they can be useful in bio-electronic interface investigation of signal propagation in neurons.

  3. OSL and TL dosimeter characterization of boron doped CVD diamond films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, J. A. N.; Sandonato, G. M.; Meléndrez, R.; Chernov, V.; Pedroza-Montero, M.; De la Rosa, E.; Rodríguez, R. A.; Salas, P.; Barboza-Flores, M.

    2005-04-01

    Natural diamond is an exceptional prospect for clinical radiation dosimetry due to its tissue-equivalence properties and being chemically inert. The use of diamond in radiation dosimetry has been halted by the high market price; although recently the capability of growing high quality CVD diamond has renewed the interest in using diamond films as radiation dosimeters. In the present work we have characterized the dosimetric properties of diamond films synthesized by the HFCVD method. The thermoluminescence and the optically stimulated luminescence of beta exposed diamond sample containing a B/C 4000 ppm doping presents excellent properties suitable for dosimetric applications with β-ray doses up to 3.0 kGy. The observed OSL and TL performance is reasonable appropriate to justify further investigation of diamond films as dosimeters for ionizing radiation, specially in the radiotherapy field where very well localized and in vivo and real time radiation dose applications are essential.

  4. Synthesis and Optimization of MWCNTs on Co-Ni/MgO by Thermal CVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ryu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were prepared by the thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD technique. Monometallic and bimetallic Co and Ni combinations were used as a catalyst on MgO support. The mixer of H2/C2H2 was used as a carbon source. The prepared CNTs were found to possess different shapes, morphologies, and sizes. Maximum yield was found for 50% Co (MgO: 50% and Ni: 0% catalyst at 600°C. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM techniques were used for structural analysis. Raman spectra were taken to investigate the quality and crystalline perfection of the prepared CNTs. The ratio of D- and G-bands (ID/IG was measured from these spectra.

  5. E’’ Raman Mode in Thermal Strain-Fractured CVD-MoS2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Wu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2 has recently attracted considerable interests due to its unique properties and potential applications. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD method is used widely to grow large-area and high-quality MoS2 single crystals. Here, we report our investigation on thermal strain-fractured (SF single crystalline MoS2, oxidation-fractured MoS2, and normal MoS2 by atomic force microscopy (AFM, Raman and photoluminescence (PL measurements. Several new Raman modes are observed for SF-MoS2. The band gap of SF-MoS2 is enlarged by 150 meV and the PL intensity is reduced substantially. These results imply that a structural transformation occurs in SF-MoS2. Our findings here are useful for the design of MoS2-based nanocatalysts with relative high catalytic activity.

  6. Randschicht- und durchgreifendes Härten von 42CrMo4 nach CVD-Beschichtung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantleon, Karen; Kessler, Olaf; Hoffmann, Franz

    1999-01-01

    The properties of hard coatings deposited using CVD-processes are usually excellent. However, high deposition temperatures may negativelly influence the properties of the steel substrates, especially in the case of low alloyed steels. Therefore, a subsequent heat treatment is necessary to restore...... the properties of steel substrates ready for operation. Bulk hardening and induction surface hardening as two different post-deposition heat treatments are applied on TiN-coated 42CrMo4 (AISI 4140) substrates. The results show great advantages of induction surface hardening because only low distortion appear...... and the properties of the steel substrates are improved without loosing good coating properties. Thereby, the properties of the steel substrates can be influenced by the parameters of induction heating in a wide range....

  7. Synthesis of low leakage current chemical vapour deposited (CVD) diamond films for particle detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacci, T.; Borchi, E.; Bruzzi, M.; Meier, D.; Santoro, M.; Sciortino, S.

    1998-02-01

    We report on synthesis of diamond films by direct current glow discharge chemical vapour deposition (CVD) prepared at different deposition conditions, for application in high energy physics. The syntesis apparatus is briefly described. Continuous undoped diamond samples have been grown onto Mo substrates with a deposition area up to 1 cm 2 and an electrical resistivity as high as 10 13 Ωcm. The deposition parameters are related to the material properties of the diamonds, investigated by optical spectroscopy, electron microscopy and diffraction analysis. Decreasing the linear growth rate results in good quality films with small remnants of graphite-like phases. The high crystalline quality and phase purity of the films are related to very low values of leakage currents. The particle induced conductivity of these samples is also studied and preliminary results on charge collection efficiency are presented.

  8. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Operations Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    2000-02-03

    This document provides the Operations Manual for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). The Manual was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-002, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of the Processing Systems (Garvin 1998) and, the HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-002, 1997, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, Rev. 3a. The Operations Manual contains general descriptions of all the process, safety and facility systems in the CVDF, a general CVD operations sequence, and has been developed for the spent nuclear fuel project (SNFP) Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

  9. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Operations Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1999-07-02

    This document provides the Operations Manual for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). The Manual was developed in conjunction with HNF-553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report Annex B--Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. The HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-002, 1999, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, Rev. 4, and the CVDF Final Design Report. The Operations Manual contains general descriptions of all the process, safety and facility systems in the CVDF, a general CVD operations sequence and references to the CVDF System Design Descriptions (SDDs). This manual has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

  10. CVD fabrication of carbon nanotubes on electrodeposited flower-like Fe nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanganeh, Saeid, E-mail: SAZ@engr.uconn.ed [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Connecticut, 371 Fairfield Way, U-2157 Storrs, CT 06269-2157 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Center of Excellence for Production of Advanced Materials, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Torabi, Morteza [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 16845-161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Center of Excellence for Production of Advanced Materials, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kajbafvala, Amir [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, 911 Partner' s Way, Raleigh, NC 27695-7907 (United States); Zanganeh, Navid [Chemical Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bayati, M.R.; Molaei, Roya; Zargar, H.R. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 16845-161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadrnezhaad, S.K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Center of Excellence for Production of Advanced Materials, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} The latest results obtained about production of flower-like nanostructured Fe catalysts deposited electrochemically on platinum electrodes (as a suitable catalyst for synthesis of carbon nanotubes) are presented in this paper. {yields} CVD is used as a convenient way of deposition of CNTs on the flower-like Fe catalyst substrate. - Abstract: Galvanostatic method was used to electrodeposit Fe nanostructures on platinum electrodes as catalysts. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed flower-like Fe deposits with high surface area. Carbon nanotubes were grown on flower-like Fe nanostructures by chemical vapor deposition. The structure of the synthesized carbon nanotubes was investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. According to X-ray diffraction patterns, Fe was the only detected constituent of the deposited coating. The carbon nanotubes had small wall-thickness and wide hollow core.

  11. Low temperature growth of carbon nanotubes with aligned multiwalls by microwave plasma-CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ajay; Das, Debajyoti

    2017-05-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MW-CNTs) have been prepared in a microwave-plasma enhanced CVD (MW-PECVD) tubular system at a low temperature ˜300 °C from CH4-H2 plasma with the addition of CO2 using as a week oxidant to selectively remove the amorphous carbon component and promote the CNT growth. CNTs are typically with outer diameter ˜20 nm, inner diameter ˜10 nm of several μm in length and are grown via the tip growth process, bearing Fe catalyst nano-particles at the tip. The presence of CO2 as a weak oxidant in the plasma may influence in reducing the size of the support catalyst nano-particles and narrowing the CNTs with aligned multiwalls.

  12. Incorporation of small BN domains in graphene during CVD using methane, boric acid and nitrogen gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bepete, George; Voiry, Damien; Chhowalla, Manish; Chiguvare, Zivayi; Coville, Neil J

    2013-07-21

    Chemical doping of graphene with small boron nitride (BN) domains has been shown to be an effective way of permanently modulating the electronic properties in graphene. Herein we show a facile method of growing large area graphene doped with small BN domains on copper foils using a single step CVD route with methane, boric acid powder and nitrogen gas as the carbon, boron and nitrogen sources respectively. This facile and safe process avoids the use of boranes and ammonia. Optical microscopy confirmed that continuous films were grown and Raman spectroscopy confirmed changes in the electronic structure of the grown BN doped graphene. Using XPS studies we find that both B and N can be substituted into the graphene structure in the form of small BN domains to give a B-N-C system. A novel structure for the BN doped graphene is proposed.

  13. Electronic structure of polycrystalline CVD-graphene revealed by Nano-ARPES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chaoyu; Avila, José; Asensio, Maria C.

    2017-06-01

    The ability to explore electronic structure and their role in determining material’s macroscopic behaviour is essential to explain and engineer functions of material and device. Since its debut in 2004, graphene has attracted global research interest due to its unique properties. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has emerged as an important method for the massive preparation and production of graphene for various applications. Here by employing angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with nanoscale spatial resolution ∼ 100 nm (Nano-ARPES), we describe the approach to measure the electronic structure of polycrystalline graphene on copper foils, demonstrating the power of Nano-ARPES to detect the electronic structure of microscopic single crystalline domains, being fully compatible with conventional ARPES. Similar analysis could be employed to other microscopic materials

  14. Characterization of ultra-short pulsed discharge plasma for CVD processing. [Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, Akira (Toyohashi Univ. of Technology (Japan). Dept. of Ecological Engineering); Okazaki, Ken (Tokyo Inst. of Technology (Japan). Research Center for Carbon Recycling and Utilization); Takekoshi, Takashi (Mitsubishi Kasei Co., Okayama (Japan). Mizushima Works); Tobe, Ryoki (Anelva Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Research Development Center)

    Characteristics of pulsed discharge plasma of methane-hydrogen gas mixture and Ar gas have been studied for active control of plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processing. Voltage-current characteristics, time-lag of the current pulse, and the photon emission intensity profile have been investigated using high-voltage pulses of 50-1000 ns duration. In such a pulse discharge, voltages much higher than those in a dc glow discharge can be applied without any plasma nonuniformity or arcing because voltage amplitude falls to zero before glow to arc transition. A current value of more than 10[sup 3] times those in a glow discharge can be established. Very high photon emission intensity from CH radicals and H ions have been observed near the anode in a pulsed plasma. This is different in dc plasma, where the negative glow region near the cathode is the brightest.

  15. Growth of Boron-Rich Nanowires by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Kleebe

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available B-rich nanowires are grown on Ni coated oxidized Si(111 substrate using diborane as the gas precursor in a CVD process at 20 torr and 900C∘. These nanowires have diameters around 20–100 nanometers and lengths up to microns. Icosahedron B12 is shown to be the basic building unit forming the amorphous B-rich nanowires as characterized by EDAX, XRD, XPS, and Raman spectroscopies. The gas chemistry at low [B2H6]/ [N2] ratio is monitored by the in situ mass spectroscopy, which identified N2 as an inert carrier gas leading to formation of the B-rich compounds. A nucleation controlled growth mechanism is proposed to explain the rugged nanowire growth of boron. The role of the Ni catalyst in the synthesis of the B-rich nanostructures is also discussed.

  16. Growth and properties of ZnO films grown by the ultrasonic spray-assisted CVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aiji; Chen, He; Chen, Tingfang; Wu, Zhenglong; Li, Yongliang; Wang, Yinshu

    2014-05-01

    ZnO films were successfully grown on the glass substrates employing an ultrasonic spray-assisted CVD method at 573-673 K. The optical properties, electrical characteristics and crystalline structures of the films were characterized. Effects of the growth temperatures on the film properties were studied. The film growth mode, morphology, transmittance, conductivity and emission properties are very sensitive to the growth temperatures. Growing at lower temperatures would improve both the preferential growth along c-axis and smoothness of the films. The conductivity and transmittance of the films grown at 573 K are also superior to that grown at higher temperatures. All films exhibit strong emission in the visible region and weak emission in UV region. However, the relative intensity of the UV emission to visible emission of the film grown at 573 K is obviously stronger than that grown at higher temperatures.

  17. Carbon-coated hexagonal magnetite nanoflakes production by spray CVD of alcohols in mixture with water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Reyes, Marisol; Hernández-Arriaga, Daniel; López-Sandoval, Román

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we report a successful technique for synthesizing magnetite hexagonal nanoflakes coated with carbon layers using spray thermal decomposition, which is a reproducible method that is easy to scale up. We investigated the effects of mixing different volumes of deionized (DI) water with alcohol on the population and quality of single-crystalline Fe3O4 hexagonal nanoflakes. Methanol and ethanol were used as the carbon and oxygen source, while ferrocene was mainly used as the Fe source. To obtain a large quantity of hexagonal structures, a strongly oxidative atmosphere was required. The DI water was used to enhance the oxidative environment during the reaction and was an important component for obtaining well-shaped hexagonal magnetite crystalline nanoflakes. The use of alcohols, water and the spray chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method make this procedure easy to use. In addition, this method provides a one-step process for synthesizing carbon-coated hexagonal Fe3O4 nanocrystals.

  18. Tantalum Coating of Steel, Copper, Aluminum, and Titanium by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik; Bjerrum, Niels

    1998-01-01

    Tantalum coatings ranging from 0.5 to 120 mm has been deposited by CVD at 625-1000 C using tantalum pentachloride as precursor. Deposition rates range from 1 to 80mm/h and an activation energy of 103 kJ/mole is calculated. Well adhering deposits has been obtained on stainless steel, carbon steels......, nickel, copper, titanium and aluminum. Calculation of the equilibrium composition of Ta-Cl-H-systems at 1000 K and 1100 K shows that TaCl4 and TaCl3 are stable at the deposition conditions and that a high yield (>90%) of tantalum is theoretically obtainable at low pressure (5 mbar) and moderate precursor...

  19. Superconductivity and low temperature electrical transport in B-doped CVD nanocrystalline diamond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milos Nesladek, Jiri J. Mares, Dominique Tromson, Christine Mer, Philippe Bergonzo, Pavel Hubik and Jozef Kristofik

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we report on superconductivity (SC found in thin B-doped nanocrystalline diamond films, prepared by the PE-CVD technique. The thickness of the films varies from about 100 to 400 nm, the films are grown on low-alkaline glass at substrate temperatures of about 500–700 °C. The SIMS measurements show that films can be heavily doped with boron in concentrations in the range of 3×1021 cm−3. The Raman spectra show Fano resonances, confirming the substitutional B-incorporation. The low temperature magnetotransport measurements reveal a positive magnetoresistance. The SC transition is observed at about Tc=1.66 K. A simple theory exploiting the concept of weak localization accounting for this transition is proposed.

  20. Low temperature growth of diamond films on optical fibers using Linear Antenna CVD system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficek, M.; Drijkoningen, S.; Karczewski, J.; Bogdanowicz, R.; Haenen, K.

    2016-01-01

    It is not trivial to achieve a good quality diamond-coated fibre interface due to a large difference in the properties and composition of the diamond films (or use coating even) and the optical fibre material, i.e. fused silica. One of the biggest problems is the high temperature during the deposition which influences the optical fibre or optical fibre sensor structure (e.g. long-period gratings (LPG)). The greatest advantage of a linear antenna microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system (LA MW CVD) is the fact that it allows to grow the diamond layers at low temperature (below 300°C) [1]. High quality nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films with thicknesses ranging from 70 nm to 150 nm, were deposited on silicon, glass and optical fibre substrates [2]. Substrates pretreatment by dip-coating and spin coating process with a dispersion consisting of detonation nanodiamond (DND) in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) has been applied. During the deposition process the continuous mode of operation of the LA MW CVD system was used, which produces a continuous wave at a maximum power of 1.9 kW (in each antenna). Diamond films on optical fibres were obtained at temperatures below 350°C, providing a clear improvement of results compared to our earlier work [3]. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging to investigate the morphology of the nanocrystalline diamond films. The film growth rate, film thickness, and optical properties in the VIS-NIR range, i.e. refractive index and extinction coefficient will be discussed based on measurements on reference quartz plates by using spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE).

  1. Prediction of the properties of PVD/CVD coatings with the use of FEM analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śliwa, Agata; Mikuła, Jarosław; Gołombek, Klaudiusz; Tański, Tomasz; Kwaśny, Waldemar; Bonek, Mirosław; Brytan, Zbigniew

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the results of the prediction of the properties of PVD/CVD coatings with the use of finite element method (FEM) analysis. The possibility of employing the FEM in the evaluation of stress distribution in multilayer Ti/Ti(C,N)/CrN, Ti/Ti(C,N)/(Ti,Al)N, Ti/(Ti,Si)N/(Ti,Si)N, and Ti/DLC/DLC coatings by taking into account their deposition conditions on magnesium alloys has been discussed in the paper. The difference in internal stresses in the zone between the coating and the substrate is caused by, first of all, the difference between the mechanical and thermal properties of the substrate and the coating, and also by the structural changes that occur in these materials during the fabrication process, especially during the cooling process following PVD and CVD treatment. The experimental values of stresses were determined based on X-ray diffraction patterns that correspond to the modelled values, which in turn can be used to confirm the correctness of the accepted mathematical model for testing the problem. An FEM model was established for the purpose of building a computer simulation of the internal stresses in the coatings. The accuracy of the FEM model was verified by comparing the results of the computer simulation of the stresses with experimental results. A computer simulation of the stresses was carried out in the ANSYS environment using the FEM method. Structure observations, chemical composition measurements, and mechanical property characterisations of the investigated materials has been carried out to give a background for the discussion of the results that were recorded during the modelling process.

  2. PREVALENCE OF CARDIO-VASCULAR DISEASE (CVD RISK FACTORS AMONG AUTO-RICKSHAW DRIVERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailendra Chaudhary

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Research question: What is the prevalence of some cardio-vascular disease (CVD risk factors among auto-rickshaw drivers (ARDs working in Nagpur city of India? Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted from June 2007 to December 2008 at the auto-rickshaw stand of Nagpur railway station. Out of total 6000 auto-rickshaw drivers (ARDs of Nagpur city, 296 were studied. Results: Mean age of ARDs was 41.70±9.05 years. Their mean length of occupation was 17 years and average daily working was 11½ hours. 40.20% subjects had habit of tobacco chewing; while 35.14% were smokers and 34.12% were alcohol consumers. Only 16.89% subjects were engaged in regular physical exercise. 27.36% subjects had ‘moderate’ or ‘severe’ self reported stress. Mean weight of these auto-rickshaw drivers was 58.59±9.25 kg; while their mean body mass index (BMI was 21.95±3.48 kg/m2. 14.86% subjects were overweight and another 3.38% had obesity. 37.16% subjects had pre-hypertension; while 104 (35.14% subjects had hypertension. 4.73% of the ARDs also had a family history of hypertension. Conclusions: As the prevalence of various CVD risk factors is high; there is an urgent need of regular health check-ups and appropriate preventive and promotive interventions among these auto-rickshaw drivers.

  3. Effect of CVD-diamond coatings on the tribological performance of cemented tungsten carbide substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaleem Ahmad Najar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A comparison has been documented between nanocrystalline diamond (NCD and microcrystalline diamond (MCD coatings deposited on cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co substrates with architectures of WC-Co/NCD & WC-Co/MCD, using hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD technique. In the present work, the frictional characteristics were studied using ball-on-disc type linear reciprocating micro-tribometer, under the application of 1–10N normal loads, when sliding against smooth alumina (Al2O3 ceramic ball for the total duration of 15min, under dry sliding conditions. Nanoindentation tests were also conducted using Berkovich nanoindenter for the purpose of measurement of hardness and elastic modulus values. The average coefficients of friction of MCD and NCD coatings decrease from 0.37 – 0.32 and 0.3 – 0.27 respectively, when the load is increased from 1–10N. However, for conventional WC-Co substrate the average coefficient of friction increases from 0.60–0.75, under the same input operating conditions. The wear tracks formed on the surfaces of CVD-diamond coatings and WC-Co substrate, after friction measurement were characterised using Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM techniques. However, the compositional analysis for the formation of tribo-layer observed on the wear tracks of CVD-diamond coatings was confirmed using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS technique. Therefore, maintaining an appropriate level of normal load and using appropriate type of diamond coating, friction may be kept to some lower value to improve mechanical processes.

  4. Structural and optical properties of CdO nanostructures prepared by atmospheric-pressure CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terasako, T., E-mail: terasako.tomoaki.mz@ehime-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University, 3 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Fujiwara, T. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University, 3 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Nakata, Y.; Yagi, M. [Kagawa National College of Technology, 551 Koda, Takuma-cho, Mitoyo 769-1192 (Japan); Shirakata, S. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University, 3 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan)

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium oxide (CdO) nanostructures of various shapes were successfully grown on gold (Au) nanocolloid coated c-plane sapphire substrates by atmospheric-pressure CVD using Cd powder and H{sub 2}O as source materials. CdO nanorods (NRs) exhibited tapered shapes and the degree of the tapering became larger with increasing substrate temperature. One of the possible reasons for the tapering behavior is the competition between the axial growth due to the vapor–liquid–solid (VLS) mechanism and the radial growth due to the vapor–solid (VS) mechanism. The influence of the competition between the two different growth mechanisms was also confirmed on the appearance of “seaweed-like” NRs. Moreover, we cannot neglect the influence of the shrinkage of catalyst particles during the growth process on the tapering behavior. In addition, there is a possibility that the temporal evolution of catalyst particles, such as diffusion, splitting, migration and coalescence, contributes not only to the disappearance of catalyst particles on the tips of the NRs, resulting in the enhancement of the radial growth relative to the axial growth, but also to the formation of nanobelts (NBs) and nanotrees (NTs). Photoacoustic measurements revealed that the absorption edge shifts towards lower energies and the absorption band below the absorption edge becomes larger with increasing T{sub S}. This tendency may be due to the increase of intrinsic defects and/or the decrease in residual impurities. - Highlights: ► Various shapes of CdO nanostructures were grown by AP-CVD using Cd and H{sub 2}O. ► This diversity is due to the competition between VLS and VS mechanisms. ► The temporal evolution of Au catalyst particles also contributes to the diversity. ► Photoacoustic spectra were changed, depending on the substrate temperature. ► This is probably related to the intrinsic defects and/or residual impurities.

  5. CVD growth of graphene under exfoliated hexagonal boron nitride for vertical hybrid structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Min [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT) (Korea, Republic of); Center for Human Interface Nanotechnology (HINT) (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Sung Kyu [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT) (Korea, Republic of); Song, Young Jae [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT) (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sungjoo, E-mail: leesj@skku.edu [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT) (Korea, Republic of); Center for Human Interface Nanotechnology (HINT) (Korea, Republic of); College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Graphical abstract: We have demonstrated a novel yet simple method for fabricating graphene-based vertical hybrid structures by performing the CVD growth of graphene at an h-BN/Cu interface. Our systematic Raman measurements combined with plasma etching process indicate that a graphene film is grown under exfoliated h-BN rather than on its top surface, and that an h-BN/graphene vertical hybrid structure has been fabricated. Electrical transport measurements of this h-BN/graphene, transferred on SiO2, show the carrier mobility up to approximately 2250 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}. The developed method would enable the exploration of the possibility of novel hybrid structure integration with two-dimensional material systems. - Abstract: We have demonstrated a novel yet simple method for fabricating graphene-based vertical hybrid structures by performing the CVD growth of graphene at an h-BN/Cu interface. Our systematic Raman measurements combined with plasma etching process indicate that a graphene film is grown under exfoliated h-BN rather than on its top surface, and that an h-BN/graphene vertical hybrid structure has been fabricated. Electrical transport measurements of this h-BN/graphene, transferred on SiO{sub 2}, show the carrier mobility up to approximately 2250 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}. The developed method would enable the exploration of the possibility of novel hybrid structure integration with two-dimensional material systems.

  6. Si3N4 recubierto con diamante CVD mediante filamento caliente y plasma generado por microondas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belmonte, M.

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Silicon nitride substrates have been diamond coated by hot-filament (home made and microwave plasma (commercial CVD reactors. The importance of Si3N4 as substrate relies on its favoured adhesion to the diamond film, as required in wear applications. Diamond coatings have been characterized by μ-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The diamond film/substrate adhesion has been evaluated by performing Brale indentations at different loads. The diamond films grown by hot filament matched those grown by microwave plasma in terms of morphology and diamond quality, only loosing in uniformity. Spherical substrates have also been used to compare the films coated by both techniques.Se han depositado películas de diamante CVD sobre substratos de nitruro de silicio empleando un reactor experimental de filamento caliente y un reactor comercial que utiliza un plasma generado por microondas. La importancia del Si3N4 como substrato reside en que favorece una buena adhesión con el diamante para ser utilizado en aplicaciones de desgaste. Los recubrimientos obtenidos han sido caracterizados mediante espectroscopía μ-Raman, difracción de Rayos-X, microscopía electrónica de barrido y microscopía de fuerza atómica. El grado de adhesión entre la película y el substrato ha sido determinado realizando una serie de indentaciones con una punta Brale a diferentes cargas. Las películas depositadas mediante filamento caliente son similares, en términos de calidad del diamante y morfología, a las conseguidas con plasma inducido por microondas, aunque presentan problemas de uniformidad. Se han utilizado también substratos con geometría esférica para comparar los recubrimientos obtenidos por ambas técnicas.

  7. CVD-associated non-coding RNA, ANRIL, modulates expression of atherogenic pathways in VSMC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Congrains, Ada; Kamide, Kei [Department of Geriatric Medicine and Nephrology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Katsuya, Tomohiro [Clinical Gene Therapy, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Yasuda, Osamu [Department of Cardiovascular Clinical and Translational Research, Kumamoto University Hospital (Japan); Oguro, Ryousuke; Yamamoto, Koichi [Department of Geriatric Medicine and Nephrology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Ohishi, Mitsuru, E-mail: ohishi@geriat.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Geriatric Medicine and Nephrology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Rakugi, Hiromi [Department of Geriatric Medicine and Nephrology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan)

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ANRIL maps in the strongest susceptibility locus for cardiovascular disease. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silencing of ANRIL leads to altered expression of tissue remodeling-related genes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effects of ANRIL on gene expression are splicing variant specific. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ANRIL affects progression of cardiovascular disease by regulating proliferation and apoptosis pathways. -- Abstract: ANRIL is a newly discovered non-coding RNA lying on the strongest genetic susceptibility locus for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the chromosome 9p21 region. Genome-wide association studies have been linking polymorphisms in this locus with CVD and several other major diseases such as diabetes and cancer. The role of this non-coding RNA in atherosclerosis progression is still poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the implication of ANRIL in the modulation of gene sets directly involved in atherosclerosis. We designed and tested siRNA sequences to selectively target two exons (exon 1 and exon 19) of the transcript and successfully knocked down expression of ANRIL in human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (HuAoVSMC). We used a pathway-focused RT-PCR array to profile gene expression changes caused by ANRIL knock down. Notably, the genes affected by each of the siRNAs were different, suggesting that different splicing variants of ANRIL might have distinct roles in cell physiology. Our results suggest that ANRIL splicing variants play a role in coordinating tissue remodeling, by modulating the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, extra-cellular matrix remodeling and inflammatory response to finally impact in the risk of cardiovascular disease and other pathologies.

  8. SU-E-T-157: Reproducibility of CVD Diamond Detectors for Radiotherapy Dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzel, G; Lansley, S; McKay, D; Meyer, J

    2012-06-01

    Three diamond x-ray detectors fabricated in-house using films from the same batch of commercially-available chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond were investigated for performance inter-comparability under clinically relevant conditions. Detectors were based on single-crystal CVD diamond films (0.5 × 3 × 3 mm̂3) with 0.4 mm^3 sensitive volumes, which were encapsulated with PMMA. Detectors were placed in a (30 × 30 × 30 cm̂3) PTW water phantom. Six-MV photons from an Elekta Synergy linac were measured using an SSD of 90 cm and 10 cm phantom depth with a 10 × 10 cm̂2 field size in the central axis of the beam. Data acquisition was performed using a PTW UNIDOS E electrometer. Leakage current, priming dose, response dynamics, dose linearity, dependence on dose rate and angular dependence were used to evaluate differences between diamond detectors. Differences were seen in leakage currents before (rise and fall times of 2 s were found for all three detectors. Sensitivities differed by up to 10%. Dependence on dose rate was similar (Fowler fitting parameter, delta = 0.92-0.94). Angular dependence was minimal (97-102% average). Differences in detector performance appeared to be primarily due to film thickness, which can significantly change sensitivities and applied fields for detectors with small sensitive volumes. Although films were sourced from the same manufactured batch, small deviations were seen between detectors such that correction factors may be required much like natural diamonds used in existing commercial detectors. Differences in sensitivity and dependence on dose rate most likely originate from variation in film thickness due to manufactured tolerances. Preselecting films by thickness is important to help eliminate variability in detector response where small sensitive volumes are used. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  9. Effect of mixture ratios and nitrogen carrier gas flow rates on the morphology of carbon nanotube structures grown by CVD

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Malgas, GF

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by thermal Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) and investigates the effects of nitrogen carrier gas flow rates and mixture ratios on the morphology of CNTs on a silicon substrate by vaporizing...

  10. Advances in the Development of a WCl6 CVD System for Coating UO2 Powders with Tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mireles, Omar R.; Tieman, Alyssa; Broadway, Jeramie; Hickman, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Demonstrated viability and utilization of: a) Fluidized powder bed. b) WCl6 CVD process. c) Coated spherical particles with tungsten. The highly corrosive nature of the WCl6 solid reagent limits material of construction. Indications that identifying optimized process variables with require substantial effort and will likely vary with changes in fuel requirements.

  11. Lateral gas phase diffusion length of boron atoms over Si/B surfaces during CVD of pure boron layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadi, V.; Nihtianov, S.

    2016-01-01

    The lateral gas phase diffusion length of boron atoms, LB, along silicon and boron surfaces during chemical vapor deposition(CVD) using diborane (B2H6) is reported. The value of LB is critical for reliable and uniform boron layer coverage. The presented information was obtained experimentally and

  12. Life Prediction Model for Grid-Connected Li-ion Battery Energy Storage System: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Kandler A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Saxon, Aron R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Keyser, Matthew A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lundstrom, Blake R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cao, Ziwei [SunPower Corporation; Roc, Albert [SunPower Corp.

    2017-08-25

    Life Prediction Model for Grid-Connected Li-ion Battery Energy Storage System: Preprint Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries are being deployed on the electrical grid for a variety of purposes, such as to smooth fluctuations in solar renewable power generation. The lifetime of these batteries will vary depending on their thermal environment and how they are charged and discharged. To optimal utilization of a battery over its lifetime requires characterization of its performance degradation under different storage and cycling conditions. Aging tests were conducted on commercial graphite/nickel-manganese-cobalt (NMC) Li-ion cells. A general lifetime prognostic model framework is applied to model changes in capacity and resistance as the battery degrades. Across 9 aging test conditions from 0oC to 55oC, the model predicts capacity fade with 1.4 percent RMS error and resistance growth with 15 percent RMS error. The model, recast in state variable form with 8 states representing separate fade mechanisms, is used to extrapolate lifetime for example applications of the energy storage system integrated with renewable photovoltaic (PV) power generation.

  13. OS049. Exome sequencing identifies likely functional variantsinfluencing preeclampsia and CVD risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M; Løset, M; Brennecke, S; Peralta, J; Dyer, T; East, C; Pennell, C; Huang, R-C; Mori, T; Beilin, L; Blangero, J; Moses, E

    2012-07-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) in family-based study designs will be pivotal in unlocking the missing heritability of common complex diseases. Whilst our prior linkage- and association-based positional cloning studies in family- and population-based Australian cohorts, respectively, have discovered novel preeclampsia candidate genes (INHBB,ACVR2A,LCT,LRP1B,RND3,GCA,ERAP2,TNFSF13B), the full complement of causal genetic variation remains largely unknown. We have now sequenced the exomes of two Australian preeclampsia families in another step forward to unlocking preeclampsia's complex allelic architecture. Identify family-specific exon-centric loci segregating in preeclamptic women only. The exomes of 18 women (7 preeclamptics,11 controls) from two Australian families contributing to our chromosome 5q (Family 1) and 13q (Family 2) susceptibility loci, respectively, were sequenced using Illumina's TruSeq Exome Enrichment assay and NGS technology. Sequence alignments, quality control assessment and variant calling were conducted on our 8000 parallel processor compute server, MEDUSA. As a first pass, we prioritized exome sequence data to non-synonymous variants within the 1-LOD drop intervals of our 5q and 13q loci. Prioritized exonic variants were also genotyped in the Western Australian Pregnancy (Raine) Cohort to assess their significance against a plethora of cardiovascular disease (CVD) related traits. In Family 1 we identified two missense SNPs and in Family 2 we identified one missense SNP to segregate in the preeclamptic women but not in the unaffected women. The first SNP in Family 1 (rs62375061) resides within the LYSMD3 gene, is predicted to "possibly" damage the focal protein and the only public record of this SNP is within the Watson genome. The second SNP in Family 1 (rs111033530) resides within the GPR98 gene, is predicted to "probably" damage the focal protein and is rare (1.7% population prevalence). The SNP in Family 2 (rs1805388) resides within the

  14. Thermal conductivity of giant mono- to few-layered CVD graphene supported on an organic substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Tianyu; Xu, Shen; Yuan, Pengyu; Xu, Xu; Wang, Xinwei

    2016-05-01

    The thermal conductivity (k) of supported graphene is a critical property that reflects the graphene-substrate interaction, graphene structure quality, and is needed for thermal design of a graphene device. Yet the related k measurement has never been a trivial work and very few studies are reported to date, only at the μm level. In this work, for the first time, the k of giant chemical vapor decomposition (CVD) graphene supported on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) is characterized using our transient electro-thermal technique based on a differential concept. Our graphene size is ~mm, far above the samples studied in the past. This giant graphene measurement eliminates the thermal contact resistance problems and edge phonon scattering encountered in μm-scale graphene k measurement. Such mm-scale measurement is critical for device/system-level thermal design since it reflects the effect of abundant grains in graphene. The k of 1.33-layered, 1.53-layered, 2.74-layered and 5.2-layered supported graphene is measured as 365 W m-1 K-1, 359 W m-1 K-1, 273 W m-1 K-1 and 33.5 W m-1 K-1, respectively. These values are significantly lower than the k of supported graphene on SiO2, and are about one order of magnitude lower than the k of suspended graphene. We speculate that the abundant C atoms in the PMMA promote more ready energy and momentum exchange with the supported graphene, and give rise to more phonon scattering than the SiO2 substrate. This leads to a lower k of CVD graphene on PMMA than that on SiO2. We attribute the existence of disorder in the sp2 domain, graphene oxide (GO) and stratification in the 5.2-layered graphene to its more k reduction. The Raman linewidth (G peak) of the 5.2-layered graphene is also twice larger than that of the other three kinds of graphene, indicating the much more phonon scattering and shorter phonon lifetime in it. Also the electrical conductivity of the 5.2-layered graphene is about one-fifth of that for the other three. This

  15. Thermal conductivity of giant mono- to few-layered CVD graphene supported on an organic substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Tianyu; Xu, Shen; Yuan, Pengyu; Xu, Xu; Wang, Xinwei

    2016-05-21

    The thermal conductivity (k) of supported graphene is a critical property that reflects the graphene-substrate interaction, graphene structure quality, and is needed for thermal design of a graphene device. Yet the related k measurement has never been a trivial work and very few studies are reported to date, only at the μm level. In this work, for the first time, the k of giant chemical vapor decomposition (CVD) graphene supported on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) is characterized using our transient electro-thermal technique based on a differential concept. Our graphene size is ∼mm, far above the samples studied in the past. This giant graphene measurement eliminates the thermal contact resistance problems and edge phonon scattering encountered in μm-scale graphene k measurement. Such mm-scale measurement is critical for device/system-level thermal design since it reflects the effect of abundant grains in graphene. The k of 1.33-layered, 1.53-layered, 2.74-layered and 5.2-layered supported graphene is measured as 365 W m(-1) K(-1), 359 W m(-1) K(-1), 273 W m(-1) K(-1) and 33.5 W m(-1) K(-1), respectively. These values are significantly lower than the k of supported graphene on SiO2, and are about one order of magnitude lower than the k of suspended graphene. We speculate that the abundant C atoms in the PMMA promote more ready energy and momentum exchange with the supported graphene, and give rise to more phonon scattering than the SiO2 substrate. This leads to a lower k of CVD graphene on PMMA than that on SiO2. We attribute the existence of disorder in the sp(2) domain, graphene oxide (GO) and stratification in the 5.2-layered graphene to its more k reduction. The Raman linewidth (G peak) of the 5.2-layered graphene is also twice larger than that of the other three kinds of graphene, indicating the much more phonon scattering and shorter phonon lifetime in it. Also the electrical conductivity of the 5.2-layered graphene is about one-fifth of that for the

  16. CVD-MPFA full pressure support, coupled unstructured discrete fracture-matrix Darcy-flux approximations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Raheel; Edwards, Michael G.; Lamine, Sadok; Huisman, Bastiaan A. H.; Pal, Mayur

    2017-11-01

    Two novel control-volume methods are presented for flow in fractured media, and involve coupling the control-volume distributed multi-point flux approximation (CVD-MPFA) constructed with full pressure support (FPS), to two types of discrete fracture-matrix approximation for simulation on unstructured grids; (i) involving hybrid grids and (ii) a lower dimensional fracture model. Flow is governed by Darcy's law together with mass conservation both in the matrix and the fractures, where large discontinuities in permeability tensors can occur. Finite-volume FPS schemes are more robust than the earlier CVD-MPFA triangular pressure support (TPS) schemes for problems involving highly anisotropic homogeneous and heterogeneous full-tensor permeability fields. We use a cell-centred hybrid-grid method, where fractures are modelled by lower-dimensional interfaces between matrix cells in the physical mesh but expanded to equi-dimensional cells in the computational domain. We present a simple procedure to form a consistent hybrid-grid locally for a dual-cell. We also propose a novel hybrid-grid for intersecting fractures, for the FPS method, which reduces the condition number of the global linear system and leads to larger time steps for tracer transport. The transport equation for tracer flow is coupled with the pressure equation and provides flow parameter assessment of the fracture models. Transport results obtained via TPS and FPS hybrid-grid formulations are compared with the corresponding results of fine-scale explicit equi-dimensional formulations. The results show that the hybrid-grid FPS method applies to general full-tensor fields and provides improved robust approximations compared to the hybrid-grid TPS method for fractured domains, for both weakly anisotropic permeability fields and very strong anisotropic full-tensor permeability fields where the TPS scheme exhibits spurious oscillations. The hybrid-grid FPS formulation is extended to compressible flow and the

  17. Optimization of a Wcl6 CVD System to Coat UO2 Powder with Tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belancik, Grace A.; Barnes, Marvin W.; Mireles, Omar; Hickman, Robert

    2015-01-01

    In order to achieve deep space exploration via Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP), Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is developing W-UO2 CERMET fuel elements, with focus on fabrication, testing, and process optimization. A risk of fuel loss is present due to the CTE mismatch between tungsten and UO2 in the W-60vol%UO2 fuel element, leading to high thermal stresses. This fuel loss can be reduced by coating the spherical UO2 particles with tungsten via H2/WCl6 reduction in a fluidized bed CVD system. Since the latest incarnation of the inverted reactor was completed, various minor modifications to the system design were completed, including an inverted frit sublimer. In order to optimize the parameters to achieve the desired tungsten coating thickness, a number of trials using surrogate HfO2 powder were performed. The furnace temperature was varied between 930 C and 1000degC, and the sublimer temperature was varied between 140 C and 200 C. Each trial lasted 73-82 minutes, with one lasting 205 minutes. A total of 13 trials were performed over the course of three months, two of which were re-coatings of previous trials. The powder samples were weighed before and after coating to roughly determine mass gain, and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) data was also obtained. Initial mass results indicated that the rate of layer deposition was lower than desired in all of the trials. SEM confirmed that while a uniform coating was obtained, the average coating thickness was 9.1% of the goal. The two re-coating trials did increase the thickness of the tungsten layer, but only to an average 14.3% of the goal. Therefore, the number of CVD runs required to fully coat one batch of material with the current configuration is not feasible for high production rates. Therefore, the system will be modified to operate with a negative pressure environment. This will allow for better gas mixing and more efficient heating of the substrate material, yielding greater tungsten coating per trial.

  18. Electrocatalysts with platinum, cobalt and nickel preparations by mechanical alloyed and CVD for the reaction of oxygen reduction; Electrocatalizadores a base de platino, cobalto y niquel preparados por aleado mecanico y CVD para la reaccion de reduccion de oxigeno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia C, M. A. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    In this research, the molecular oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was investigated on electrocatalysts of Co, Ni, Pt and their alloys CoNi, PtCo, PtNi and PtCoNi by using H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} 0.5 and KOH 0.5 M solutions as electrolytes. The electrocatalysts were synthesized by Mechanical Alloying (MA) and Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) processes. For MA, metallic powders were processed during 20 h of milling in a high energy SPEX 8000 mill. For CVD, a hot-wall reactor was utilized and Co, Ni and Pt acetilactetonates were used as precursors. Films were deposited at a total pressure of 1 torr and temperatures of 400-450 C. Electrocatalysts were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS). Electrocatalysts prepared by mechanical alloying showed a homogeneously dispersed agglomeration of particles with nano metric size. Electrocatalysts obtained by CVD showed, in some cases, non uniform films, with particles of nano metric size, as well. The electrocatalytic performance was evaluated by using the Rotating Disk Electrode technique (RDE). Electrocatalysts prepared by MA showed higher activity than those obtained by CVD. All electrocatalysts were evaluated in alkaline media. Only electrocatalysts containing Pt were evaluated in acid media, because those materials with Co, Ni and their alloys showed instability in acidic media. Most electrocatalysts followed a mechanism for the ORR producing a certain proportion of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. All electrocatalysts, exhibited a fair or good electrocatalytic activity in comparison with other similar reported materials. It was found that MA and CVD are appropriate processes to prepare electrocatalysts for the ORR with particles of nano metric size and performing with an acceptable catalytic activity. PtCoNi 70-23-7% by MA and PtCoNi-CVD electrocatalysts showed the highest activity in alkaline media, while in acidic

  19. Fish consumption and its motives in households with versus without self-reported medical history of CVD: A consumer survey from five European countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunsø Karen

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to explore the cross-cultural differences in the frequency of fish intake and in motivations for fish consumption between people from households with (CVD+ or without (CVD- medical history of cardiovascular disease, using data obtained in five European countries. Methods A cross-sectional consumer survey was carried out in November-December 2004 with representative household samples from Belgium, the Netherlands, Denmark, Poland and Spain. The sample consisted of 4,786 respondents, aged 18–84 and who were responsible for food purchasing and cooking in the household. Results Individuals from households in the CVD+ group consumed fish more frequently in Belgium and in Denmark as compared to those in the CVD- group. The consumption of fatty fish, which is the main sources of omega-3 PUFA associated with prevention of cardiovascular diseases, was on the same level for the two CVD groups in the majority of the countries, except in Belgium where CVD+ subjects reported to eat fatty fish significantly more frequently than CVD- subjects. All respondents perceived fish as a very healthy and nutritious food product. Only Danish consumers reported a higher subjective and objective knowledge related to nutrition issues about fish. In the other countries, objective knowledge about fish was on a low level, similar for CVD+ as for CVD- subjects, despite a higher claimed use of medical information sources about fish among CVD+ subjects. Conclusion Although a number of differences between CVD- and CVD+ subjects with respect to their frequency of fish intake are uncovered, the findings suggest that fish consumption traditions and habits – rather than a medical history of CVD – account for large differences between the countries, particularly in fatty fish consumption. This study exemplifies the need for nutrition education and more effective communication about fish, not only to the people facing chronic

  20. Basic AC loss properties of IBAD/CVD-YBCO tapes for pancake-type coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funaki, K. [Research Institute of Superconductor Science and Systems, Kyushu University, 744 Moto-oka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)], E-mail: funaki@sc.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Sueyoshi, T.; Iwakuma, M. [Research Institute of Superconductor Science and Systems, Kyushu University, 744 Moto-oka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Shikimachi, K.; Hirano, N.; Nagaya, S. [Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., 20-1 Kitasekiyama, Ohdaka-cho, Midori-ku, Nagoya 459-8522 (Japan)

    2008-09-15

    We are experimentally studying basic AC loss properties of IBAD/CVD-YBCO coated conductors with a copper layer for stabilizing, especially the temperature dependence of perpendicular field loss in alternating electromagnetic environments. We prepared two types of short specimens with and without a copper layer and measured AC losses by a saddle-shaped pickup coil in an alternating magnetic field perpendicular to the wide surfaces at liquid helium temperature. In the ranges of the amplitude up to 4 T and the frequency up to 0.2 Hz, the AC losses both of the two specimens are hardly dependent upon the frequency. The results show that hysteresis loss is a major component of the AC loss in the specimens and the effects of the copper layer can be negligible. We also measured AC losses for the specimens with the copper layer at liquid nitrogen temperature to estimate the dependence on measurement temperature. The results suggested that the AC loss vs. the amplitude of applied field can be scaled by a critical current at a zero magnetic field.

  1. A combined heat-transfer analysis of a single-fiber CVD reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassemi, M.; Gokoglu, S.A.; Panzarella, C.H.; Veitch, L.C. (NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States))

    1993-10-01

    In high-temperature applications, structural fibers such as SiC are currently being considered for reinforcement of both ceramic and intermetallic matrices. A combined-conjugated heat-transfer and fluid-flow analysis is presented for coating fibers by CVD in a vertical cylindrical quartz reactor. The numerical model focuses on radiation and natural convection. Three case studies are performed, and the wall temperature predictions are compared to experimental measurements. In the first case, the flowing gas is hydrogen, and conduction is more important than both radiation and convection, in which case measured and predicted wall temperatures agree excellently. In the second, hydrogen is replaced by argon, thus making radiation heat transfer more important than the previous situation. Three radiation models with increasing degrees of sophistication are compared: an approximate nongray model (no wavelength dependence of emissivity), an approximate semigray model, and a rigorous semigray model with view factor calculations. Comparison with experiments suggest that a semigray radiative analysis is needed for correct determination of wall temperatures. The third involves argon at a lower flow rate, where natural convection effects are more pronounced. Checking the validity of the Boussinesq approximation by incorporating the explicit dependence of density on temperature in the model shows a slight difference between the velocity fields predicted using the Boussinesq approximation and those obtained using the explicit dependence of density on temperature. However, there is negligible difference between the temperature fields predicted in the two cases.

  2. LOW-TEMPERATURE GRAPHENE GROWTH ON COPPER FOIL CATALYST BY CHEMICAL VAPOUR DEPOSITION (CVD METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasman Kasman

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Graphene growth at low temperatures (below 500 oC on copper catalyst by CVD method was studied. The goal of this study is to determine a minimum growth temperature for growing graphene with high quality. In this study, the catalyst used for growing graphene was copper foil (Sigma-Aldrich, code: 1001328641, 25 µm in thickness, 99.98% trace metals basis, cut into 2x1 cm2 in size  annealed at 900 oC , while the precursor used was poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA heated at 140 oC. In graphene growth, two different growth temperatures of 350 oC and 450 oC were varied. The graphene films grown on copper foil catalyst were characterised using SEM and Raman spectroscopy. While, the films transferred onto quartz/glass/grid substrates were characterised by using SEM, Raman spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, four point probe and TEM. Results of this study showed that the 450 oC-grown samples produce a better quality graphene film compared to the 350 oC-grown samples. In other words, the minimum temperature of graphene growth is at least 450 oC for a Cu foil, since this temperature has to be sufficiently high to activate carbon diffusion and rearrangement on the catalyst surface..

  3. Nitrogen-doped twisted graphene grown on copper by atmospheric pressure CVD from a decane precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan V. Komissarov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present Raman studies of graphene films grown on copper foil by atmospheric pressure CVD with n-decane as a precursor, a mixture of nitrogen and hydrogen as the carrier gas, under different hydrogen flow rates. A novel approach for the processing of the Raman spectroscopy data was employed. It was found that in particular cases, the various parameters of the Raman spectra can be assigned to fractions of the films with different thicknesses. In particular, such quantities as the full width at half maximum of the 2D peak and the position of the 2D graphene band were successfully applied for the elaborated approach. Both the G- and 2D-band positions of single layer fractions were blue-shifted, which could be associated with the nitrogen doping of studied films. The XPS study revealed the characteristics of incorporated nitrogen, which was found to have a binding energy around 402 eV. Moreover, based on the statistical analysis of spectral parameters and the observation of a G-resonance, the twisted nature of the double-layer fraction of graphene grown with a lower hydrogen feeding rate was demonstrated. The impact of the varied hydrogen flow rate on the structural properties of graphene and the nitrogen concentration is also discussed.

  4. Macroscopic Graphene Fibers Directly Assembled from CVD-Grown Fiber-Shaped Hollow Graphene Tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Dai, Liming

    2015-12-01

    Using a copper wire as the substrate for the CVD growth of a hollow multilayer graphene tube, we prepared a macroscopic porous graphene fiber by removing the copper in an aqueous mixture solution of iron chloride (FeCl3, 1 M) and hydrochloric acid (HCl, 3 M) and continuously drawing the newly released graphene tube out of the liquid. The length of the macroscopic graphene fiber thus produced is determined mainly by the length of the copper wire used. The resultant macroscopic graphene fiber with the integrated graphene structure exhibited a high electrical conductivity (127.3 S cm(-1)) and good flexibility over thousands bending cycles, showing great promise as flexible electrodes for wearable optoelectronics and energy devices-exemplified by its use as a flexible conductive wire for lighting a LED and a cathode in a fiber-shaped dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) with one of the highest energy conversion efficiencies (3.25%) among fiber-shaped DSSCs. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Nitrogen-doped twisted graphene grown on copper by atmospheric pressure CVD from a decane precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komissarov, Ivan V; Kovalchuk, Nikolai G; Labunov, Vladimir A; Girel, Ksenia V; Korolik, Olga V; Tivanov, Mikhail S; Lazauskas, Algirdas; Andrulevičius, Mindaugas; Tamulevičius, Tomas; Grigaliūnas, Viktoras; Meškinis, Šarunas; Tamulevičius, Sigitas; Prischepa, Serghej L

    2017-01-01

    We present Raman studies of graphene films grown on copper foil by atmospheric pressure CVD with n-decane as a precursor, a mixture of nitrogen and hydrogen as the carrier gas, under different hydrogen flow rates. A novel approach for the processing of the Raman spectroscopy data was employed. It was found that in particular cases, the various parameters of the Raman spectra can be assigned to fractions of the films with different thicknesses. In particular, such quantities as the full width at half maximum of the 2D peak and the position of the 2D graphene band were successfully applied for the elaborated approach. Both the G- and 2D-band positions of single layer fractions were blue-shifted, which could be associated with the nitrogen doping of studied films. The XPS study revealed the characteristics of incorporated nitrogen, which was found to have a binding energy around 402 eV. Moreover, based on the statistical analysis of spectral parameters and the observation of a G-resonance, the twisted nature of the double-layer fraction of graphene grown with a lower hydrogen feeding rate was demonstrated. The impact of the varied hydrogen flow rate on the structural properties of graphene and the nitrogen concentration is also discussed.

  6. Preparation of tantalum-based alloys by a unique CVD process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, W. A.; Meier, G. H.

    1975-01-01

    The paper describes a sequential pulsing technique for deposition of refractory alloys and evaluates the technique for the deposition of the tantalum-base alloys Ta-10W (Ta-10 st% W) and T-111 (Ta-8 wt% W-2 wt% Hf). The deposition cycle for Ta-10W was chosen as alternate injections of TaCl5 plus hydrogen and WCl6 plus hydrogen. The cycle for T-111 was chosen as injections of TaCl5 plus hydrogen interspersed with injections of WCl6 plus hydrogen. A temperature range of 900-1300 C was chosen for both alloys. The ability of the pulse process to blanket a uniformly heated section of substrate with a mixture of gases, whose composition varies not with position on the substrate but instead with time of residence in the reactor, allows metal of uniform thickness to be deposited. It is shown that Ta and W can be deposited at high temperature with the formation of a dense columnar grain structure, so that the feasibility of preparing uniformly thick deposits of these elements by a 'pulsing' modification of CVD is demonstrated. A similar attempt to deposit T-111 was unsuccessful due to the difficulty in reducing HfCl4.

  7. Growth of high quality AlN films on CVD diamond by RF reactive magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang-xian; Liu, Hao; Liu, Sheng; Li, Cheng-ming; Wang, Yi-chao; An, Kang; Hua, Chen-yi; Liu, Jin-long; Wei, Jun-jun; Hei, Li-fu; Lv, Fan-xiu

    2018-02-01

    A highly oriented AlN layer has been successfully grown along the c-axis on a polycrystalline chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond by RF reactive magnetron sputtering. Structural, morphological and mechanical properties of the heterostructure were investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Nano-indentation and Four-probe meter. A compact AlN film was demonstrated on the diamond layer, showing columnar grains and a low surface roughness of 1.4 nm. TEM results revealed a sharp AlN/diamond interface, which was characterized by the presence of a distinct 10 nm thick buffer layer resulting from the initial AlN growth stage. The FWHM of AlN (002) diffraction peak and its rocking curve are as low as 0.41° and 3.35° respectively, indicating a highly preferred orientation along the c-axis. AlN sputtered films deposited on glass substrates show a higher bulk resistivity (up to 3 × 1012 Ω cm), compared to AlN films deposited on diamond (∼1010 Ω cm). Finally, the film hardness and Young's modulus of AlN films on diamond are 25.8 GPa and 489.5 GPa, respectively.

  8. Flexible low-power RF nanoelectronics in the GHz regime using CVD MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogeesh, Maruthi

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have attracted substantial interest for flexible nanoelectronics due to the overall device mechanical flexibility and thickness scalability for high mechanical performance and low operating power. In this work, we demonstrate the first MoS2 RF transistors on flexible substrates based on CVD-grown monolayers, featuring record GHz cutoff frequency (5.6 GHz) and saturation velocity (~1.8×106 cm/s), which is significantly superior to contemporary organic and metal oxide thin-film transistors. Furthermore, multicycle three-point bending results demonstrated the electrical robustness of our flexible MoS2 transistors after 10,000 cycles of mechanical bending. Additionally, basic RF communication circuit blocks such as amplifier, mixer and wireless AM receiver have been demonstrated. These collective results indicate that MoS2 is an ideal advanced semiconducting material for low-power, RF devices for large-area flexible nanoelectronics and smart nanosystems owing to its unique combination of large bandgap, high saturation velocity and high mechanical strength.

  9. Passivation of textured crystalline silicon surfaces by catalytic CVD silicon nitride films and catalytic phosphorus doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohdaira, Keisuke; Cham, Trinh Thi; Matsumura, Hideki

    2017-10-01

    Silicon nitride (SiN x ) films formed by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (Cat-CVD) and phosphorus (P)-doped layers formed by catalytic impurity doping (Cat-doping) are applied for the passivation of pyramid-shaped textured crystalline Si (c-Si) surfaces formed by anisotropic etching in alkaline solution. Lower surface recombination velocities (SRVs) tend to be obtained when smaller pyramids are formed on c-Si surfaces. P Cat-doping is effective for reducing the SRV of textured c-Si surfaces as in the case of flat c-Si surfaces. We realize SRVs of textured c-Si surfaces of ∼8.0 and ∼6.7 cm/s for only SiN x passivation and for the combination of SiN x and P Cat-doping, respectively. These structures also have high optical transparency and low Auger recombination loss, and are of great worth in application for the surface passivation of interdigitated back-contact c-Si solar cells.

  10. Parametric optimization during machining of AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel using CVD coated DURATOMIC cutting insert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kaladhar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, Taguchi method is applied to determine the optimum process parameters for turning of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel on CNC lathe. A Chemical vapour deposition (CVD coated cemented carbide cutting insert is used which is produced by DuratomicTM technology of 0.4 and 0.8 mm nose radii. The tests are conducted at four levels of Cutting speed, feed and depth of cut. The influence of these parameters are investigated on the surface roughness and material removal rate (MRR. The Analysis Of Variance (ANOVA is also used to analyze the influence of cutting parameters during machining. The results revealed that cutting speed significantly (46.05% affected the machined surface roughness values followed by nose radius (23.7%. The influence of the depth of cut (61.31% in affecting material removal rate (MRR is significantly large. The cutting speed (20.40% is the next significant factor. Optimal range and optimal level of parameters are also predicted for responses.

  11. The High performance of nanocrystalline CVD diamond coated hip joints in wear simulator test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maru, M M; Amaral, M; Rodrigues, S P; Santos, R; Gouvea, C P; Archanjo, B S; Trommer, R M; Oliveira, F J; Silva, R F; Achete, C A

    2015-09-01

    The superior biotribological performance of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coatings grown by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method was already shown to demonstrate high wear resistance in ball on plate experiments under physiological liquid lubrication. However, tests with a close-to-real approach were missing and this constitutes the aim of the present work. Hip joint wear simulator tests were performed with cups and heads made of silicon nitride coated with NCD of ~10 μm in thickness. Five million testing cycles (Mc) were run, which represent nearly five years of hip joint implant activity in a patient. For the wear analysis, gravimetry, profilometry, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy techniques were used. After 0.5 Mc of wear test, truncation of the protruded regions of the NCD film happened as a result of a fine-scale abrasive wear mechanism, evolving to extensive plateau regions and highly polished surface condition (Racracking, grain pullouts or delamination of the coatings. A steady state volumetric wear rate of 0.02 mm(3)/Mc, equivalent to a linear wear of 0.27 μm/Mc favorably compares with the best performance reported in the literature for the fourth generation alumina ceramic (0.05 mm(3)/Mc). Also, squeaking, quite common phenomenon in hard-on-hard systems, was absent in the present all-NCD system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Successful comeback of the single-dose live oral cholera vaccine CVD 103-HgR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Effective and easy to administer cholera vaccines are in need more than ever, for at risk populations and travellers alike. In many parts of the world cholera is still endemic, causing outbreaks and constituting repeatedly serious public health problems. The oral live cholera vaccine CVD 103-HgR (Orochol, Mutachol), the first genetically modified organism (GMO) used as vaccine, was in its time (launched 1993, Switzerland) the ideal cholera vaccine: single-dose, protective efficacy of 80-100% against moderate to severe cholera, acting within 8 days and exhibiting excellent safety, indiscernible from placebo. However, there were strong headwinds: In the 1990s the indication for cholera vaccines was generally downplayed by experts and in 1997 the European Commission called for a moratorium of GMOs which blocked the registration in the European Union. Thus, demand for this vaccine remained low and in 2003 it was taken off the market for economic reasons. After a decade in obscurity it (Vaxchora) has resurfaced again, now produced in the U.S. and equipped with a U.S. FDA license (June 10, 2016). What had happened? This commentary gives a critical account of an almost unbelievable string of misadventures, emerging adverse circumstances and man-made failures which nearly killed this single-dose live oral cholera vaccine. The good news is that patience and persistence lead to success in the end, allowing good science to prevail for the benefit of those in need. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of organosilicon compounds as novel precursors for CVD processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermakova, E.N.; Sysoev, S.V.; Nikulina, L.D. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Acad. Lavrentiev Ave. 3, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Tsyrendorzhieva, I.P.; Rakhlin, V.I. [Favorskii Institute of Chemistry, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Favorskii Str. 1, Irkutsk 664033 (Russian Federation); Kosinova, M.L., E-mail: marina@niic.nsc.ru [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Acad. Lavrentiev Ave. 3, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-20

    Highlights: • The temperature dependences of vapor pressure of four precursors have been measured. • The experimental data were used to calculate standard thermodynamic functions. • The thermodynamic modelling of SiC{sub x}N{sub y} films formation has been performed. - Abstract: Chemical vapor deposition using single-source organosilicon precursors is one of the most effective ways to produce multifunctional SiC{sub x}N{sub y} films. It is worth mentioning that the precursor molecule design affects both the composition and properties of films. Four organosilicon compounds containing a phenyl substituent (namely, trimethylphenylsilane, trimethyl(phenylamino) silane, trimethyl(benzylamino)silane and bis(trimethylsilyl)phenylamine) have been synthesized and characterized as potential CVD precursors for SiC{sub x}N{sub y} films synthesis. The compounds have been shown to be volatile and stable enough to be used in chemical vapor deposition of SiC{sub x}N{sub y} films. Thermodynamic modeling of the film deposition from the gaseous mixture of trimethylphenylsilane and ammonia in Si–C–N–H system has demonstrated that SiC{sub x}N{sub y} films can be deposited, and there is an opportunity to determine the area of appropriate deposition conditions.

  14. Pulsed laser CVD investigations of single-wall carbon nanotube growth dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Styers-Barnett, D. J.; Puretzky, A. A.; Rouleau, C. M.; Yuan, D.; Ivanov, I. N.; Xiao, K.; Liu, J.; Geohegan, D. B.

    2008-12-01

    The nucleation and rapid growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were explored by pulsed-laser assisted chemical vapor deposition (PLA-CVD). A special high-power, Nd:YAG laser system with tunable pulse width (>0.5 ms) was implemented to rapidly heat (>3×104°C/s) metal catalyst-covered substrates to different growth temperatures for very brief (sub-second) and controlled time periods as measured by in situ optical pyrometry. Utilizing growth directly on transmission electron microscopy grids, exclusively SWNTs were found to grow under rapid heating conditions, with a minimum nucleation time of >0.1 s. By measuring the length of nanotubes grown by single laser pulses, extremely fast growth rates (up to 100 microns/s) were found to result from the rapid heating and cooling induced by the laser treatment. Subsequent laser pulses were found not to incrementally continue the growth of these nanotubes, but instead activate previously inactive catalyst nanoparticles to grow new nanotubes. Localized growth of nanotubes with variable density was demonstrated through this process and was applied for the reliable direct-write synthesis of SWNTs onto pre-patterned, catalyst-covered metal electrodes for the synthesis of SWNT field-effect transistors.

  15. Pulsed Laser CVD Investigations of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Growth Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Liu, Zuqin [ORNL; Styers-Barnett, David J [ORNL; Puretzky, Alexander A [ORNL; Rouleau, Christopher M [ORNL; Yuan, Dongning [Duke University; Ivanov, Ilia N [ORNL; Xiao, Kai [ORNL; Liu, Jie [Duke University

    2008-01-01

    The nucleation and rapid growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were explored by pulsed-laser assisted chemical vapor deposition (PLA-CVD). A special high-power, Nd:YAG laser system with tunable pulse width (> 0.5 ms) was implemented to rapidly heat (>30,000 C/s) metal catalyst-covered substrates to different growth temperatures for very brief (sub-second) and controlled time periods as measured by in situ optical pyrometry. Utilizing growth directly on transmission electron microscopy grids, exclusively SWNTs were found to grow under rapid heating conditions, with a minimum nucleation time of >0.10 s. By measuring the length of nanotubes grown by single laser pulses, extremely fast growth rates (up to 100 microns/s) were found to result from the rapid heating and cooling induced by the laser treatment. Subsequent laser pulses were found not to incrementally continue the growth of these nanotubes, but instead activate previously inactive catalyst nanoparticles to grow new nanotubes. Localized growth of nanotubes with variable density was demonstrated through this process, and was applied for the reliable direct-write synthesis of SWNTs onto pre-patterned, catalyst-covered metal electrodes for the synthesis of SWNT field-effect transistors.

  16. Aid of Raman spectroscopy in diagnostics of MWCNT synthesised by Fe-catalysed CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donato, M G [INFM, Dipartimento di Meccanica e Materiali, Facolta di Ingegneria, Universita ' Mediterranea' , Localita Feo di Vito, 89060 Reggio Calabria (Italy); Messina, G [INFM, Dipartimento di Meccanica e Materiali, Facolta di Ingegneria, Universita ' Mediterranea' , Localita Feo di Vito, 89060 Reggio Calabria (Italy); Santangelo, S [INFM, Dipartimento di Meccanica e Materiali, Facolta di Ingegneria, Universita ' Mediterranea' , Localita Feo di Vito, 89060 Reggio Calabria (Italy); Galvagno, S [Dipartimento di Chimica Industriale e Ingegneria dei Materiali, Facolta di Ingegneria, Universita di Messina, Contrada di Dio, 98166 Messina (Italy); Milone, C [Dipartimento di Chimica Industriale e Ingegneria dei Materiali, Facolta di Ingegneria, Universita di Messina, Contrada di Dio, 98166 Messina (Italy); Pistone, A [Dipartimento di Chimica Industriale e Ingegneria dei Materiali, Facolta di Ingegneria, Universita di Messina, Contrada di Dio, 98166 Messina (Italy)

    2007-04-15

    This work shows that a set of quality indicators (QI), able to reliably monitor the basic characteristics of carbon nanotubes (CNT) grown by of Fe-catalysed chemical vapour deposition (CVD), can be derived from Raman spectroscopy (RS) measurements. Multi-walled nanotubes, prepared at 750 deg. C in C{sub 2}H{sub 6}+H{sub 2} mixture over 20%Fe/SiO{sub 2} catalyst, are demonstratively considered. By quantitatively analysing the spectra measured in the 100-3100 cm{sup -1} range, information is obtained on level of defectiveness and degree of smoothness of C deposits, as well as, on relative amount of Fe-nanoparticles incorporated. The effect of the growth atmosphere composition on the quality of synthesis products is investigated. Indications provided by RS are confirmed by the results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) analyses. Raman QI agreeably correlate with the average growth rate of the carbonaceous species.

  17. Luminescence and conductivity studies on CVD diamond exposed to UV light

    CERN Document Server

    Bizzarri, A; Bruzzi, M; Sciortino, S

    1999-01-01

    The photoluminescence (PL), thermoluminescence (TL) and thermally stimulated currents (TSC) of four high-quality CVD diamond films have been investigated in the range of temperatures between 300 and 700 K. The sample excitation has been carried out by means of an UV xenon lamp and UV laser lines. The features of the signals have been found equal to those obtained from particle excitation. The TL analysis shows the existence of several deep traps with activation energies between 0.6 and 1.0 eV. The contribution to the TL signal from different traps has been singled out by means of successive annealing processes. The TL results are in good agreement with those obtained from TSC measurements. The combined use of the two techniques allows a precise determination of the trap parameters. The spectral content of the TL response has also been compared with the PL signal in order to investigate the recombination process. This analysis shows that, in this temperature range, the TL signal is likely due to recombination ...

  18. Design of a CVD reactor for the deposition of diamond in a microgravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Languell, Michael L.; Davidson, J. L.; Strauss, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    There is a growing body of theoretical and experimental evidence suggesting that the uniformity, rate, adhesion, quality, and other key properties of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond coatings are influenced by the gas mixing kinetics in the thermal plasma environment of the reaction chamber. The implementation of, for example, Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (MPECVD) process in microgravity has, thus, been suggested. Such a diamond deposition system, which overcomes the limitations of present systems and which is distiguishable from them by the use of high pressure MPECVD and recirculation of the would be effluent hydrogen and carbon, is described. Given the key fact that there is nothing in the effluent of the MPECVD process that is truly a byproduct or 'waste', the system can, at least in principle, lend itself to being closed loop yet dynamic. The exhaust contains hydrogen and carbon species which can be recirculated to the plasma reactor, that is, since there are no unusable reaction byproducts, the effluent can be fed back to the reaction chamber with no detriment, thus allowing deployment in a microgravity environment.

  19. Associations between pre-diabetes, by three different diagnostic criteria, and incident CVD differ in South Asians and Europeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, Sophie V; Tillin, Therese; Sattar, Naveed; Forouhi, Nita G; Hughes, Alun D; Chaturvedi, Nish

    2016-01-01

    Objective We examined longitudinal associations between pre-diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD) (coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke) in Europeans and South Asians. Research design and methods UK cohort study of 1,336 Europeans and 1,139 South Asians, aged 40-69 years at baseline (1988-91). Assessment included blood pressure, blood tests, anthropometry and questionnaires. Pre-diabetes was determined by OGTT or HbA1c, using either International Expert Committee (IEC, HbA1c 6.0-6.5% (42-48 mmol/mol)) or American Diabetes Association (ADA, HbA1c 5.7-6.5% (39-48 mmol/mol)) cut-points. Incident CHD and stroke were established at 20 years from death certification, hospital admission, primary care record review and participant report. Results Compared to normoglycaemic individuals, IEC-defined pre-diabetes was related to both CHD and CVD risk in Europeans but not South Asians (sub-hazards ratio[95% CI]: CHD;1.68[1.19,2.37] vs. 0.99[0.74,1.33], ethnicity interaction p=0.008, CVD; 1.49[1.08,2.07] vs. 1.03[0.79,1.36], ethnicity interaction p=0.04). Conversely, IEC-defined pre-diabetes was associated with stroke risk in South Asians but not Europeans (1.75 [1.04,2.93] vs. 0.85[0.45,1.64], ethnicity interaction p=0.11). Risks were adjusted for age, sex, smoking, total/HDL-cholesterol ratio, waist/hip ratio, systolic blood pressure and anti-hypertensive use. . Associations were weaker for OGTT or ADA-defined pre-diabetes. Conversion from pre-diabetes to diabetes was greater in South Asians, but accounting for time to conversion did not account for these ethnic differences. Conclusions Associations between pre-diabetes and CVD differed by pre-diabetes diagnostic criterion, type of CVD and ethnicity, with associations being present for overall CVD in Europeans but not South Asians. Substantiation of these findings and investigation of potential explanations are required. PMID:26486189

  20. Thermal stability of the optical band gap and structural order in hot-wire-deposited amorphous silicon

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Arendse, CJ

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The material properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) have been known to change when exposed to elevated temperatures. In this work researchers report on the thermal stability of the optical band gap and structural disorder in hot...

  1. Growth kinetics of nc-Si:H deposited at 200 °C by hot-wire chemical vapour deposition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oliphant, CJ

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available to the absorption characteristics of the material. Surface diffusion determines the growth in the amorphous regime, whereas competing reactions between silicon etching by atomic hydrogen and precursor deposition govern the film growth at the highdilution regime...

  2. From analog timers to the era of machine learning: The case of the transient hot-wire technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assael, Yannis M.; Antoniadis, Konstantinos D.; Assael, Marc J.

    2017-07-01

    In this work, we demonstrate how interdisciplinary knowledge can provide solutions to elusive challenges and advance science. As an example, we used the application of the THW in the measurement of the thermal conductivity of solids. To obtain a solution of the equations by FEM, about 10 h were required. By employing tools from the field of machine learning and computer science like a) automating the manual pipeline using a custom framework, b) using efficiently, Bayesian Optimisation to estimate the optimal thermal properties value, and c) applying further task specific optimisations, this time was reduced to 3 min, which is acceptable, and thus the technique can be easier used.

  3. Applying hot wire anemometry to directly measure the water balance in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell - Part 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Al Shakhshir, Saher

    2015-01-01

    In order to accurately determine the water balance of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell it has recently been suggested to employ constant temperature anemometry (CTA), a frequently used method to measure the velocity of a fluid stream. CTA relies on convective heat transfer around a heated wire...... the equations required to calculate the heat transfer coefficient and the resulting voltage signal as function of the fuel cell water balance. The most critical and least understood part is the determination of the Nusselt number to calculate the heat transfer between the wire and the gas stream. Different...... for all current densities. Therefore, only one curve-fit equation will be required. The voltage curve E0 is an arbitrary calibration curve, and this can be conveniently chosen to be the voltage signal for a dry hydrogen stream at a given temperature and various flow rates which can be easily measured....

  4. The use of predefined diet quality scores in the context of CVD risk during urbanization in the South African Prospective Urban and Rural Epidemiological (PURE) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolman, Robin C; Wentzel-Viljoen, Edelweiss; Jerling, Johann C; Feskens, Edith Jm; Kruger, Annamarie; Pieters, Marlien

    2014-08-01

    Urbanization is generally associated with increased CVD risk and accompanying dietary changes. Little is known regarding the association between increased CVD risk and dietary changes using approaches such as diet quality. The relevance of predefined diet quality scores (DQS) in non-Western developing countries has not yet been established. The association between dietary intakes and CVD risk factors was investigated using two DQS, adapted to the black South African diet. Dietary intake data were collected using a quantitative FFQ. CVD risk was determined by analysing known CVD risk factors. Urban and rural areas in North West Province, South Africa. Apparently healthy volunteers from the South African Prospective Urban and Rural Epidemiological (PURE) study population (n 1710). CVD risk factors were significantly increased in the urban participants, especially women. Urban men and women had significantly higher intakes of both macro- and micronutrients with macronutrient intakes well within the recommended CVD guidelines. While micronutrient intakes were generally higher in the urban groups than in the rural groups, intakes of selected micronutrients were low in both groups. Both DQS indicated improved diet quality in the urban groups and good agreement was shown between the scores, although they seemed to measure different aspects of diet quality. The apparent paradox between improved diet quality and increased CVD risk in the urban groups can be explained when interpreting the cut-offs used in the scores against the absolute intakes of individual nutrients. Predefined DQS as well as current guidelines for CVD prevention should be interpreted with caution in non-Western developing countries.

  5. Deposition and Characterization of CVD-Grown Ge-Sb Thin Film Device for Phase-Change Memory Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Huang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Germanium antimony (Ge-Sb thin films with tuneable compositions have been fabricated on SiO2/Si, borosilicate glass, and quartz glass substrates by chemical vapour deposition (CVD. Deposition takes place at atmospheric pressure using metal chloride precursors at reaction temperatures between 750 and 875°C. The compositions and structures of these thin films have been characterized by micro-Raman, scanning electron microscope (SEM with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX and X-ray diffraction (XRD techniques. A prototype Ge-Sb thin film phase-change memory device has been fabricated and reversible threshold and phase-change switching demonstrated electrically, with a threshold voltage of 2.2–2.5 V. These CVD-grown Ge-Sb films show promise for applications such as phase-change memory and optical, electronic, and plasmonic switching.

  6. Co-morbid depression is associated with poor work outcomes in persons with cardiovascular disease (CVD: A large, nationally representative survey in the Australian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Neil Adrienne

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Co-morbid major depressive disorder (MDD and cardiovascular disease (CVD is associated with poor clinical and psychological outcomes. However, the full extent of the burden of, and interaction between, this co-morbidity on important vocational outcomes remains less clear, particularly at the population level. We examine the association of co-morbid MDD with work outcomes in persons with and without CVD. Methods This study utilised cross-sectional, population-based data from the 2007 Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing (n = 8841 to compare work outcomes of individuals with diagnostically-defined MDD and CVD, MDD but not CVD, CVD but not MDD, with a reference group of "healthy" Australians. Workforce participation was defined as being in full- or part-time employment. Work functioning was measured using a WHO Disability Assessment Schedule item. Absenteeism was assessed using the 'days out of role' item. Results Of the four groups, those with co-morbid MDD and CVD were least likely to report workforce participation (adj OR:0.4, 95% CI: 0.3-0.6. Those with MDD only (adj OR:0.8, 95% CI:0.7-0.9 and CVD only (adj OR:0.8, 95% CI: 0.6-0.9 also reported significantly reduced odds of participation. Employed individuals with co-morbid MDD and CVD were 8 times as likely to experience impairments in work functioning (adj OR:8.1, 95% CI: 3.8- 17.3 compared with the reference group. MDD was associated with a four-fold increase in impaired functioning. Further, individuals with co-morbid MDD and CVD reported greatest likelihood of workplace absenteeism (adj. OR:3.0, 95% CI: 1.4-6.6. Simultaneous exposure to MDD and CVD conferred an even greater likelihood of poorer work functioning. Conclusions Co-morbid MDD and CVD is associated with significantly poorer work outcomes. Specifically, the effects of these conditions on work functioning are synergistic. The development of specialised treatment programs for those with co

  7. Design and Development of an Acoustic Levitation System for Use in CVD Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qasem, Amal ali

    The most widely used methods for growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) arc discharge, laser ablation, and chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Some of these methods have difficulties, such as controlling the quality and straightness of the nanotube in the synthesis of CNTs from substrates. Also, the enhanced plasma chemical vapor deposition method with the catalyst on a substrate produces straighter, larger diameter nanotubes by the tip growth method, but they are short. The difficulty in the floating catalyst method is that the nanotubes stay in the growth furnace for short times limiting growth to about one mm length; this method also leaves many catalyst impurities. One factor that limits CNT growth in these methods is the difficulty of getting enough carbon atoms to the growth catalyst to grow long nanotubes. The motivation of this work is that longer, higher quality nanotubes could be grown by increasing growth time and by increasing carbon atom movement to catalyst. The goal of this project is to use acoustic levitation to assist chemical vapor deposition growth by trapping and vibrating the growing CNTs for better properties. Our levitation system consists of a piezoelectric transducer attached to an aluminum horn and quartz rod extending into the growth furnace. The most important elements of our methods to achieve the acoustic levitation are as follows. 1. Using COMSOL Multi-physic Simulation software to determine the length of quartz rod needed to excite standing waves for levitation in the tube furnace. 2. Determining the resonance frequency of different transducers and horns. 3. Using ultrasound measurement to determine the time of flight, velocity of sound and sound wavelength of different horns. 4. Making Aluminum horns with the appropriate lengths. 5. Using ultrasound measurement to determine the changing of quartz rod velocity of sound and length in the furnace. 6. Mounting the transducer to booster horn and aluminum cylindrical horn above a reflector to

  8. Preparación de tamices moleculares de carbono por CVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manso, R.

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon molecular sieves (CMS have been prepared by chemical vapour deposition (CVD of carbon from the pyrolysis of benzene molecules on activated carbon surfaces. The pyrolysis of benzene at temperatures in the range 650-850 ºC restricts the accessibility of the micropores due to the creation of constrictions on the microporous network. Temperatures higher than 850 ºC (temperature of carbonisation add difficulties due to decomposition and sinterization processes. Low flows of nitrogen (30 mL min-1 and high benzene content (13 % produce a more uniform carbon deposition and wider micropore size distributions. The CVD process on carbons activated to different burn-offs, using temperatures below 850 ºC, flows of 150 mL min-1 and benzene content of 1 %, gives rise to microporous materials which exhibit micropore volumes around 0,25 cm3 g-1 and narrow micropore size distributions: below 0,33 nm, between 0,33-0,41 nm or between 0,41-0,54 nm. The burn-off of the activated carbon has a relative little influence on the textural properties of the CMS that mainly depend on the degree of filling originated by the carbon deposition.

    Se han preparado tamices moleculares de carbono (CMS mediante el depósito de átomos de carbono, por pirólisis de benceno, sobre la superficie de carbones activados. La pirólisis de benceno a temperaturas comprendidas entre 650-850 ºC genera el cierre progresivo de los microporos debido a la creación de constricciones en la red microporosa que limitan la accesibilidad de determinadas moléculas. El uso de temperaturas superiores a la temperatura de carbonización del precursor (850 ºC introduce complicaciones debido a la descomposición y sinterización parcial del sólido. Flujos bajos de nitrógeno (30 mL min-1 con alto contenido en benceno (13 % producen un depósito homogéneo a lo largo de las paredes y los materiales presentan distribuciones microporosas mas anchas. El depósito de carbono sobre carbones

  9. Atom-Thick Interlayer Made of CVD-Grown Graphene Film on Separator for Advanced Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhenzhen; Guo, Chengkun; Wang, Linjun; Hu, Ajuan; Jin, Song; Zhang, Taiming; Jin, Hongchang; Qi, Zhikai; Xin, Sen; Kong, Xianghua; Guo, Yu-Guo; Ji, Hengxing; Wan, Li-Jun

    2017-12-20

    Lithium-sulfur batteries are widely seen as a promising next-generation energy-storage system owing to their ultrahigh energy density. Although extensive research efforts have tackled poor cycling performance and self-discharge, battery stability has been improved at the expense of energy density. We have developed an interlayer consisting of two-layer chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown graphene supported by a conventional polypropylene (PP) separator. Unlike interlayers made of discrete nano-/microstructures that increase the thickness and weight of the separator, the CVD-graphene is an intact film with an area of 5 × 60 cm2 and has a thickness of ∼0.6 nm and areal density of ∼0.15 μg cm-2, which are negligible to those of the PP separator. The CVD-graphene on PP separator is the thinnest and lightest interlayer to date and is able to suppress the shuttling of polysulfides and enhance the utilization of sulfur, leading to concurrently improved specific capacity, rate capability, and cycle stability and suppressed self-discharge when assembled with cathodes consisting of different sulfur/carbon composites and electrolytes either with or without LiNO3 additive.

  10. Enhanced B doping in CVD-grown GeSn:B using B δ-doping layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohen, David; Vohra, Anurag; Loo, Roger; Vandervorst, Wilfried; Bhargava, Nupur; Margetis, Joe; Tolle, John

    2018-02-01

    Highly doped GeSn material is interesting for both electronic and optical applications. GeSn:B is a candidate for source-drain material in future Ge pMOS device because Sn adds compressive strain with respect to pure Ge, and therefore can boost the Ge channel performances. A high B concentration is required to obtain low contact resistivity between the source-drain material and the metal contact. To achieve high performance, it is therefore highly desirable to maximize both the Sn content and the B concentration. However, it has been shown than CVD-grown GeSn:B shows a trade-off between the Sn incorporation and the B concentration (increasing B doping reduces Sn incorporation). Furthermore, the highest B concentration of CVD-grown GeSn:B process reported in the literature has been limited to below 1 × 1020 cm-3. Here, we demonstrate a CVD process where B δ-doping layers are inserted in the GeSn layer. We studied the influence of the thickness between each δ-doping layers and the δ-doping layers process conditions on the crystalline quality and the doping density of the GeSn:B layers. For the same Sn content, the δ-doping process results in a 4-times higher B doping than the co-flow process. In addition, a B doping concentration of 2 × 1021 cm-3 with an active concentration of 5 × 1020 cm-3 is achieved.

  11. Characterization of inductively coupled RF plasmas for plasma-assisted mist CVD of ZnO films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Kosuke; Okumura, Yusuke; Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2012-08-01

    A plasma-assisted mist chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system with a high-density inductivity coupled RF plasma (ICP) source has been developed for low-temperature and high-rate deposition of zinc oxide films. In this paper, characterization of an ICP for plasma-assisted mist CVD is reported. It was found that the plasma density measured with a cylindrical Langmuir probe was as high as 1.2 × 1011 cm-3 and the electron temperature was 1.0 - 2.5 eV for an Ar plasma. The gas temperature in the ICP determined from molecular optical emission spectroscopy was 1450 K at an RF power of 1000 W for an Ar/air plasma. These results demonstrate that a plasma sustained by an inductively coupled RF plasma source has sufficient enthalpy for vaporization of mists and also has a high density for efficient dissociation of precursors and generation of oxygen radials during ZnO film deposition using plasma-assisted mist CVD.

  12. Functional materials - Study of process for CVD SiC/C composite material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Doo Jin; Wang, Chae Chyun; Lee, Young Jin; Oh, Byung Jun [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    The CVD SiC coating techniques are the one of high functional material manufactures that improve the thermal, wear, oxidization and infiltration resistance of the surface of raw materials and extend the life of material. Silicon carbide films have been grown onto graphite substrates by low pressure chemical vapor deposition using MTS(CH{sub 3}SiCl{sub 3}) as a source precursor and H{sub 2} or N{sub 2} as a diluent gas. The experiments for temperature and diluent gas addition changes were performed. The effect of temperature from 900 deg. C to 1350 deg. C and the alteration of diluent gas species on the growth rate and structure of deposits have been studied. The experimental results showed that the deposition rate increased with increasing deposition temperature irrespective of diluent gases and reactant depletion effect increased especially at H{sub 2} diluent gas ambient. As the diluent gas added, the growth rate decreased parabolically. For N{sub 2} addition, surface morphology of leaf-like structure appeared, and for H{sub 2}, faceted structure at 1350 deg. C. The observed features were involved by crystalline phase of {beta}-SiC and surface composition with different gas ambient. We also compared the experimental results of the effect of partial pressure on the growth rate with the results of theoretical approach based on the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model. C/SiC composites were prepared by isothermal chemical vapor infiltration (ICVI). In order to fabricate the more dense C/SiC composites, a novel process of the in-situ whisker growing and filling during ICVI was devised, which was manipulated by alternating dilute gas species. The denser C/SiC composites were successfully prepared by the novel process comparing with the conventional ICVI process. 64 refs., 36 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  13. Improving Post-Discharge Medication Adherence in Patients with CVD: A Pilot Randomized Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo D. Oliveira-Filho

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Effective interventions to improve medication adherence are usually complex and expensive. Objective: To assess the impact of a low-cost intervention designed to improve medication adherence and clinical outcomes in post-discharge patients with CVD. Method: A pilot RCT was conducted at a teaching hospital. Intervention was based on the four-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-4. The primary outcome measure was medication adherence assessed using the eight-item MMAS at baseline, at 1 month post hospital discharge and re-assessed 1 year after hospital discharge. Other outcomes included readmission and mortality rates. Results: 61 patients were randomized to intervention (n = 30 and control (n = 31 groups. The mean age of the patients was 61 years (SD 12.73, 52.5% were males, and 57.4% were married or living with a partner. Mean number of prescribed medications per patient was 4.5 (SD 3.3. Medication adherence was correlated to intervention (p = 0.04 and after 1 month, 48.4% of patients in the control group and 83.3% in the intervention group were considered adherent. However, this difference decreased after 1 year, when adherence was 34.8% and 60.9%, respectively. Readmission and mortality rates were related to low adherence in both groups. Conclusion: The intervention based on a validated patient self-report instrument for assessing adherence is a potentially effective method to improve adherent behavior and can be successfully used as a tool to guide adherence counseling in the clinical visit. However, a larger study is required to assess the real impact of intervention on these outcomes.

  14. Fabrication of sensitive bioelectrode based on atomically thin CVD grown graphene for cancer biomarker detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijay K; Kumar, Saurabh; Pandey, Sumit Kumar; Srivastava, Saurabh; Mishra, Monu; Gupta, Govind; Malhotra, B D; Tiwari, R S; Srivastava, Anchal

    2018-05-15

    Motivation behind the present work is to fabricate a cost effective and scalable biosensing platform for an easy and reliable detection of cancer biomarker Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Here, we report the sensitive and selective detection of CEA using graphene based bio-sensing platform. Large sized (~ 2.5 × 1.0cm 2 ), uniform, continuous, single and few layers graphene films have been grown on copper (Cu) substrate employing chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique using hexane as a liquid precursor. Functional group has been created over Graphene/Cu substrate through π-π stacking of 1- pyrenebutanoic acid succinimidyl ester (PBSE). Further, to make the sensor specific to CEA, antibody of CEA (anti-CEA) has been covalently immobilized onto PBSE/Graphene/Cu electrode. Selective and sensitive detection of CEA is achieved by anti-CEA/PBSE/Graphene/Cu electrode through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. Under optimal condition, the fabricated sensor shows linear response in the physiological range 1.0-25.0ngmL -1 (normal value ~ 5.0ngmL -1 ), revealing sensitivity 563.4Ωng -1 mLcm -2 with a correlation coefficient of 0.996 and limit of detection (LOD) 0.23ngmL -1 . In this way, one step electrode fabrication with high specific surface area provides a light weight, low cost, reliable and scalable novel biosensing platform for sensitive and selective detection of CEA. We believe that this bioelectrode equipped with specific recognition elements could be utilized for detection of other biomolecules too. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Interlayers Applied to CVD Diamond Deposition on Steel Substrate: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djoille Denner Damm

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Academics and industry have sought after combining the exceptional properties of diamonds with the toughness of steel. Since the early 1990s several partial solutions have been found but chemical vapor deposition (CVD diamond deposition on steel substrate continues to be a persistent problem. The main drawbacks are the high carbon diffusion from gas phase into substrate, the transition metals on the material surface that catalyze sp2 bond formation, instead of sp3 bonds, and the high thermal expansion coefficient (TEC mismatch between diamond and steels. An intermediate layer has been found necessary to increase diamond adhesion. Literature has proposed many efficient intermediate layers as a diffusion barrier for both, carbon and iron, but most intermediate layers shown have not solved TEC mismatch. In this review, we briefly discuss the solutions that exclusively work as diffusion barrier and discuss in a broader way the ones that also solve, or may potentially solve, the TEC mismatch problem. We examine some multilayers, the iron borides, the chromium carbides, and vanadium carbides. We go through the most relevant results of the last two and a half decades, including recent advances in our group. Vanadium carbide looks promising since it has shown excellent diffusion barrier properties, its TEC is intermediary between diamond and steel and, it has been thickened to manage thermal stress relief. We also review a new deposition technique to set up intermediate layers: laser cladding. It is promising because of its versatility in mixing different materials and fusing and/or sintering them on a steel surface. We conclude by remarking on new perspectives.

  16. High-speed deposition of titanium carbide coatings by laser-assisted metal–organic CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Yansheng [Faculty of Materials Science and Chemistry, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Tu, Rong, E-mail: turong@whut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Material Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Goto, Takashi [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Aoba-ku, 2-1-1 Katahira, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A semiconductor laser was first used to prepare wide-area LCVD-TiC{sub x} coatings. • The effect of laser power for the deposition of TiC{sub x} coatings was discussed. • TiC{sub x} coatings showed a columnar cross section and a dense surface texture. • TiC{sub x} coatings had a 1–4 order lower laser density than those of previous reports. • This study gives the possibility of LCVD applying on the preparation of TiC{sub x} coating. - Abstract: A semiconductor laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) of titanium carbide (TiC{sub x}) coatings on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate using tetrakis (diethylamido) titanium (TDEAT) and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} as source materials were investigated. The influences of laser power (P{sub L}) and pre-heating temperature (T{sub pre}) on the microstructure and deposition rate of TiC{sub x} coatings were examined. Single phase of TiC{sub x} coatings were obtained at P{sub L} = 100–200 W. TiC{sub x} coatings had a cauliflower-like surface and columnar cross section. TiC{sub x} coatings in the present study had the highest R{sub dep} (54 μm/h) at a relative low T{sub dep} than those of conventional CVD-TiC{sub x} coatings. The highest volume deposition rate (V{sub dep}) of TiC{sub x} coatings was about 4.7 × 10{sup −12} m{sup 3} s{sup −1}, which had 3–10{sup 5} times larger deposition area and 1–4 order lower laser density than those of previous LCVD using CO{sub 2}, Nd:YAG and argon ion laser.

  17. Adherence to nutrition guidelines in patients with cardiovascular diseases (CVD) as a secondary prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniak, Agnieszka; Krótki, Monika; Anyżewska, Anna; Górnicka, Magdalena; Wawrzyniak, Agata

    The appropriate nutrition is an important component of the secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) The aim of the study was to investigate if the patients with cardiovascular disease were informed of the role of appropriate nutrition in prevention or received nutrition guidelines and to assess the dietary intake compared to recommendations for patients with cardiovascular disease who received or not nutrition guidelines The study was conducted among patients with cardiovascular disease (n = 127) of cardiological hospital clinic, aged 62 ± 11. The questionnaire was used to obtain personal and anthropometric details, information if patients had received nutrition guidelines. The method of 3-day food records was used for dietary assessment 20% of subjects had not received nutrition guidelines and almost 40% of subjects did not recognize the nutrition effect on cardiovascular disease development. Compared to the diets of the subjects who had not received nutrition guidelines, the diets of those who had received them were of significantly lower intake of: energy from saturated fatty acids (15%, p = 0.006), cholesterol (21%, p = 0.012) and higher intake (14-26%) of potassium (p = 0,003), sodium (p = 0.013), phosphorus (p = 0.044), magnesium (p = 0.003), iron (p = 0.005), copper (p = 0.001), zinc (p = 0.046). Among the patients who had received nutrition guidelines, percentage of the subjects whose intake of nutrients was consistent with recommendations was higher Not all subjects had received nutrition guidelines. Diets of those who had received them were more balanced, but in neither group nutrition guidelines were complied with

  18. Cost-effectiveness of salt reduction to prevent hypertension and CVD: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorling, Elisabeth; Niebuhr, Dea; Kroke, Anja

    2017-08-01

    To analyse and compare the cost-effectiveness of different interventions to reduce salt consumption. A systematic review of published cost-effectiveness analyses (CEA) and cost-utility analyses (CUA) was undertaken in the databases EMBASE, MEDLINE (PubMed), Cochrane and others until July 2016. Study selection was limited to CEA and CUA conducted in member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) in English, German or French, without time limit. Outcomes measures were life years gained (LYG), disability-adjusted life years (DALY) and quality-adjusted life years (QALY). Relevant aspects in modelling were analysed and compared. Quality assessments were conducted using the Drummond and Jefferson/British Medical Journal checklist. OECD member countries. Mainly adults. Fourteen CEA and CUA were included in the review which analysed different strategies: salt reduction or substitution in processed foods, taxes, labelling, awareness campaigns and targeted dietary advice. Fifty-nine out of sixty-two scenarios were cost-saving. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio in international dollars (Intl.$; 2015) was particularly low for taxes, a salt reduction by food manufacturers and labelling (303 900 Intl.$/DALY). However, only six studies analysed cost-effectiveness from a societal perspective and quality assessments showed flaws in conducting and a lack of transparency in reporting. A population-wide salt reduction could be cost-effective in prevention of hypertension and CVD in OECD member countries. However, comparability between study results is limited due to differences in modelling, applied perspectives and considered data.

  19. Nanostructured thin films for multiband-gap silicon triple junction solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schropp, R.E.I.; Li, H. B. T.; Franken, R.H.; Rath, J.K.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Schuttauf, J.A.; Stolk, R.L.

    2008-01-01

    By implementing nanostructure in multiband-gap proto-Si/proto-SiGe/nc-Si:H triple junction n–i–p solar cells, a considerable improvement in performance has been achieved. The unalloyed active layers in the top and bottom cell of these triple junction cells are deposited by Hot-Wire CVD. A

  20. Deposition and Investigation of Hydrophobic Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safonov Aleksey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The fluoropolymer coatings of different morphologies are deposited by the HWCVD (Hot Wire CVD method. The effect of activator filament temperature on the structure of fluoropolymer coating is shown. The results of studying the hydrophobic fluoropolymer coatings with different structures, deposited by the HWCVD method, are presented.

  1. FTP-Server for exchange, interpretation, and database-search of ion mobility spectra, literature, preprints and software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumbach, J. I.; Vonirmer, A.

    1995-01-01

    To assist current discussion in the field of ion mobility spectrometry, at the Institut fur Spectrochemie und angewandte Spektroskopie, Dortmund, start with 4th of December, 1994 work of an FTP-Server, available for all research groups at univerisities, institutes and research worker in industry. We support the exchange, interpretation, and database-search of ion mobility spectra through data format JCAMP-DS (Joint Committee on Atomic and Molecular Physical Data) as well as literature retrieval, pre-print, notice, and discussion board. We describe in general lines the entrance conditions, local addresses, and main code words. For further details, a monthly news report will be prepared for all common users. Internet email address for subscribing is included in document.

  2. Association between total, processed, red and white meat consumption and all-cause, CVD and IHD mortality: a meta-analysis of cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abete, Itziar; Romaguera, Dora; Vieira, Ana Rita; Lopez de Munain, Adolfo; Norat, Teresa

    2014-09-14

    An association between processed and red meat consumption and total mortality has been reported by epidemiological studies; however, there are many controversial reports regarding the association between meat consumption and CVD and IHD mortality. The present meta-analysis was carried out to summarise the evidence from prospective cohort studies on the association between consumption of meat (total, red, white and processed) and all-cause, CVD and IHD mortality. Cohort studies were identified by searching the PubMed and ISI Web of Knowledge databases. Risk estimates for the highest v. the lowest consumption category and dose-response meta-analysis were calculated using a random-effects model. Heterogeneity among the studies was also evaluated. A total of thirteen cohort studies were identified (1 674 272 individuals). Subjects in the highest category of processed meat consumption had 22 and 18 % higher risk of mortality from any cause and CVD, respectively. Red meat consumption was found to be associated with a 16 % higher risk of CVD mortality, while no association was found for total and white meat consumption. In the dose-response meta-analysis, an increase of 50 g/d in processed meat intake was found to be positively associated with all-cause and CVD mortality, while an increase of 100 g/d in red meat intake was found to be positively associated with CVD mortality. No significant associations were observed between consumption of any type of meat and IHD mortality. The results of the present meta-analysis indicate that processed meat consumption could increase the risk of mortality from any cause and CVD, while red meat consumption is positively but weakly associated with CVD mortality. These results should be interpreted with caution due to the high heterogeneity observed in most of the analyses as well as the possibility of residual confounding.

  3. Self-supporting CVD diamond charge state conversion surfaces for high resolution imaging of low-energy neutral atoms in space plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuland, M.B., E-mail: neuland@space.unibe.ch; Riedo, A.; Scheer, J.A.; Wurz, P.

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • We investigate two CVD diamond surfaces for their applicability as charge state conversion surfaces. • We measure angular scattering and ionisation efficiency for hydrogen and oxygen. • Results are compared, amongst others, to the data of the IBEX conversion surface. • The CVD diamond surface has great potential as conversion surface material for future space missions. - Abstract: Two polycrystalline diamond surfaces, manufactured by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technique, are investigated regarding their applicability as charge state conversion surfaces (CS) for use in a low energy neutral atom imaging instrument in space research. The capability of the surfaces for converting neutral atoms into negative ions via surface ionisation processes was measured for hydrogen and oxygen with particle energies in the range from 100 eV to 1 keV and for angles of incidence between 6° and 15°. We observed surface charging during the surface ionisation processes for one of the CVD samples due to low electrical conductivity of the material. Measurements on the other CVD diamond sample resulted in ionisation efficiencies of ∼2% for H and up to 12% for O. Analysis of the angular scattering revealed very narrow and almost circular scattering distributions. Comparison of the results with the data of the CS of the IBEX-Lo sensor shows that CVD diamond has great potential as CS material for future space missions.

  4. Moisture-Induced Delayed Alumina Scale Spallation on a Ni(Pt)Al Coating (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    with increase in p(H2O) [21,35 Janakiraman 1999, Maris- Sida 2003]. However the same effect was not especially evident for the more oxidation resistant...Tolpygo 2007, Maris- sida 2003). Crystallographically aligned surface striations and pits are also evident, presumably an artifact of the CVD...A similar but less severe effect was reported for the same coating on Rene´N5 (35 Maris- Sida , 2003), exhibiting a loss of 1 mg/cm2 in wet air

  5. Carbon fiber CVD coating by carbon nanostructured for space materials protection against atomic oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Roberto; Bueno Morles, Ramon; Micheli, Davide

    2016-07-01

    , by the purpose to integrate the carbon nanostructures in the carbon fibers by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, in order to develop the basic substrate of advanced carbon-based nanocomposite for atomic oxygen protection. The nanostructures grown onto the carbon fibers can be used to create multiscale hybrid carbon nanotube/carbon fiber composites where individual carbon fibers, which are several microns in diameter, are surrounded by nanotubes. The present objective is the setting-up of the CVD parameters for a reliable growth of carbon nanostructures on carbon fiber surface; after that, the results of a preliminary characterization related to atomic oxygen effects testing by means of a ground LEO simulation facility are reported and discussed.

  6. Scientific basis of fat requirement for Indians and recent trends in CVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Ahamed Ibrahim

    2014-11-01

    properties of  unique non glyceride components of some of the  commonly consumed edible oils. From the data generated, the quantity and combination of visible fats, foods to be preferred so as to increase ‘healthy fats', foods to be avoided/restricted to reduce ‘unhealthy fats' have  been worked out. Ensuring optimal intake of fat (quantity and quality throughout life-span may contribute to the widely prevalent nutrition and health problems in India (low birth weight, chronic energy deficiency and diet-related chronic diseases.The rapid increase in prevalence of diet-related chronic diseases including type 2 diabetes, obesity and hypertension worldwide possess an immense public health and medical challenge for the implementation of successful preventive and treatment strategies.  Insulin resistance is an important risk factor for type 2 diabetes and is often associated with other metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular risk factors. Moreover it is also an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVD.  Obesity when associated with abdominal adiposity is an important determinant of insulin resistance and represents the most important risk factor for type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome.  The explanation for the explosion of the epidemic of chronic diseases involve changes in dietary habits and or / increasing the sedentary life style, since our genetic pool remained stable.  Poor control of the life style risk factors results in metabolic dysregulation, endothelial dysfunction and increased adiposity which in turn together lead to dyslipidemia, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, systemic inflammation, thrombosis and risk of arrhythmia (1.  The ultimate result is sub clinical and then clinically apparent CVD including coronary heart disease (CHD, cardiac arrhythmia, heart failure and stroke.  The best way of preventing chronic diseases is to take a balanced diet that does not provide excess calories along with regular physical activity.  Over the past

  7. Defect studies in 4H- Silicon Carbide PVT grown bulk crystals, CVD grown epilayers and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrappa, Shayan M.

    Silicon Carbide [SiC] which exists as more than 200 different polytypes is known for superior high temperature and high power applications in comparison to conventional semiconductor materials like Silicon and Germanium. The material finds plethora of applications in a diverse fields due to its unique properties like large energy bandgap, high thermal conductivity and high electric breakdown field. Though inundated with superior properties the potential of this material has not been utilized fully due to impeding factors such as defects especially the crystalline ones which limit their performance greatly. Lots of research has been going on for decades to reduce these defects and there has been subsequent improvement in the quality as the diameter of SiC commercial wafers has reached 150mm from 25mm since its inception. The main focus of this thesis has been to study yield limiting defect structures in conjunction with several leading companies and national labs using advanced characterization tools especially the Synchrotron source. The in depth analysis of SiC has led to development of strategies to reduce or eliminate the density of defects by studying how the defects nucleate, replicate and interact in the material. The strategies discussed to reduce defects were proposed after careful deliberation and analysis of PVT grown bulk crystals and CVD grown epilayers. Following are some of the results of the study: [1] Macrostep overgrowth mechanism in SiC was used to study the deflection of threading defects onto the basal plane resulting in stacking faults. Four types of stacking faults associated with deflection of c/c+a threading defects have been observed to be present in 76mm, 100mm and 150mm diameter wafers. The PVT grown bulk crystals and CVD grown epilayers in study were subjected to contrast studies using synchrotron white beam X-ray topography [SWBXT]. The SWBXT image contrast studies of these stacking faults with comparison of calculated phase shifts for

  8. Preprints na comunicação científica da Física de Altas Energias: análise das submissões no repositório arXiv (2010-2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Rubén Alvarez

    Full Text Available RESUMO A circulação de preprints na Física de Altas Energias (FAE remonta a mais de meio século, tendo como objetivos principais acelerar o processo de comunicação científica entre os pares e estimular o acesso livre à literatura especializada da área. O artigo analisa o conjunto de preprints submetidos às diferentes categorias FAE do repositório temático especializado arXiv no período 2010-2015 que foram posteriormente publicados em revistas peer review. Os indicadores bibliométricos demonstram a potencialidade dos preprints como canal precursor de difusão de resultados científicos visto que 70% das submissões foram em seguida absorvidas pelas principais revistas da FAE. Conclui que o êxito alcançado pelas iniciativas Open Access arXiv e INSPIRE-HEP favoreceu o intercâmbio de informações e conhecimentos entre os pesquisadores. O modelo proposto pela FAE pode incentivar cientistas de áreas com características similares a instalarem repositórios e bancos de dados de preprints para suas disciplinas com o intuito de fortalecer a comunicação das descobertas científicas.

  9. Combined sonochemical/CVD method for preparation of nanostructured carbon-doped TiO{sub 2} thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasoulnezhad, Hossein [Semiconductor Department, Materials and Energy Research Center (MERC), Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kavei, Ghassem, E-mail: kaveighassem@gmail.com [Semiconductor Department, Materials and Energy Research Center (MERC), Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ahmadi, Kamran [Semiconductor Department, Materials and Energy Research Center (MERC), Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahimipour, Mohammad Reza [Ceramic Department, Materials and Energy Research Center (MERC), Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-06-30

    Highlights: • Combination of sonochemical and CVD methods for preparation of nanostructured carbon-doped TiO{sub 2} thin film on glass substrate, for the first time. • High transparency, monodispersity and homogeneity of the prepared thin films. • Preparation of the carbon-doped TiO{sub 2} thin films with nanorod and nanosphere morphologies. - Abstract: The present work reports the successful synthesis of the nanostructured carbon-doped TiO{sub 2} thin films on glass substrate by combination of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and ultrasonic methods, for the first time. In this method the ultrasound waves act as nebulizer for converting of sonochemically prepared TiO{sub 2} sol to the mist particles. These mist particles were thermally decomposed in subsequent CVD chamber at 320 °C to produce the carbon-doped TiO{sub 2} thin films. The obtained thin films were characterized by means of X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The results show that the prepared thin films have anatase crystal structure and nanorod morphology, which calcination of them at 800 °C results in the conversion of nanorods to nanoparticles. In addition, the prepared samples have high transparency, monodispersity and homogeneity. The presence of the carbon element in the structure of the thin films causes the narrowing of the band-gap energy of TiO{sub 2} to about 2.8 eV, which results in the improvement of visible light absorption capabilities of the thin film.

  10. Roll-to-Roll Green Transfer of CVD Graphene onto Plastic for a Transparent and Flexible Triboelectric Nanogenerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrashekar, Bananakere Nanjegowda; Deng, Bing; Smitha, Ankanahalli Shankaregowda; Chen, Yubin; Tan, Congwei; Zhang, Haixia; Peng, Hailin; Liu, Zhongfan

    2015-09-16

    A novel roll-to-roll, etching-free, clean transfer of CVD-grown graphene from copper to plastic using surface-energy-assisted delamination in hot deionized water is reported. The delamination process is realized by water penetration between the hydrophobic graphene and a hydrophilic native oxide layer on a copper foil.The transferred graphene on plastic is used as a high-output flexible and transparent triboelectric nanogenerator. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Thulium-doped all-fiber laser mode-locked by CVD-graphene/PMMA saturable absorber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobon, Grzegorz; Sotor, Jaroslaw; Pasternak, Iwona; Krajewska, Aleksandra; Strupinski, Wlodek; Abramski, Krzysztof M

    2013-05-20

    We report an all-fiber Tm-doped fiber laser mode-locked by graphene saturable absorber. The laser emits 1.2 ps pulses at 1884 nm center wavelength with 4 nm of bandwidth and 20.5 MHz mode spacing. The graphene layers were grown on copper foils by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and transferred onto the fiber connector end. Up to date this is the shortest reported pulse duration achieved from a Tm-doped laser mode-locked by graphene saturable absorber. Such cost-effective and stable fiber lasers might be considered as sources for mid-infrared spectroscopy and remote sensing.

  12. Few layers isolated graphene domains grown on copper foils by microwave surface wave plasma CVD using camphor as a precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram Aryal, Hare; Adhikari, Sudip; Uchida, Hideo; Wakita, Koichi; Umeno, Masayoshi

    2016-03-01

    Few layers isolated graphene domains were grown by microwave surface wave plasma CVD technique using camphor at low temperature. Graphene nucleation centers were suppressed on pre-annealed copper foils by supplying low dissociation energy. Scanning electron microscopy study of time dependent growth reveals that graphene nucleation centers were preciously suppressed, which indicates the possibility of controlled growth of large area single crystal graphene domains by plasma processing. Raman spectroscopy revealed that the graphene domains are few layered which consist of relatively low defects.

  13. The effects of incident electron current density and temperature on the total electron emission yield of polycrystalline CVD diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belhaj, M; Tondu, T; Inguimbert, V [ONERA/DESP 2, Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse Cedex (France); Barroy, Pierre; Silva, Francois; Gicquel, Alix, E-mail: Mohamed.Belhaj@onera.f [LIMHP, Universite Paris 13, CNRS Institut Galilee, 99 Avenue Jean-Baptiste Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)

    2010-04-07

    The effects of temperature and incident electron current density on the total electron emission yield (TEEY) of polycrystalline diamond deposited by the chemical vapour deposition technique (CVD) were investigated at low electron beam fluence. It was found that the TEEY reversibly increases with the temperature and reversibly decreases with the current density. This behaviour is explained on the basis of a dynamic competition between the accumulation of holes (positive space charge), which internally reduces the secondary electron emission, and the thermally activated conductivity that tends to reduce the space charge formation.

  14. High efficiency epitaxial GaAs/GaAs and GaAs/Ge solar cell technology using OM/CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K. L.; Yeh, Y. C. M.; Stirn, R. J.; Swerdling, S.

    1980-01-01

    A technology for fabricating high efficiency, thin film GaAs solar cells on substrates appropriate for space and/or terrestrial applications was developed. The approach adopted utilizes organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OM-CVD) to form a GaAs layer epitaxially on a suitably prepared Ge epi-interlayer deposited on a substrate, especially a light weight silicon substrate which can lead to a 300 watt per kilogram array technology for space. The proposed cell structure is described. The GaAs epilayer growth on single crystal GaAs and Ge wafer substrates were investigated.

  15. High-photosensitivity a-SiGe: H films prepared by RF glow discharge plasma CVD method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Fangqing (Dept. of Physics, Lanzhou Univ. (China)); Song Zhizhong (Dept. of Physics, Lanzhou Univ. (China)); Guo Yongping (Dept. of Physics, Lanzhou Univ. (China)); Chen Guanghua (Dept. of Physics, Lanzhou Univ. (China))

    1993-04-01

    Highly photosensitive and narrow band gap a-SiGe:H films have been prepared by the RF glow discharge plasma CVD method. The photosensitivity was 2.01x10[sup 5] for the film with an optical band gap of E[sub g]=1.47 eV. H[sub 2] dilution and a relatively high RF power are attributed to the improving of the optoelectrical properties. Thermally induced changes of the a-SiGe:H films have been also investigated. (orig.)

  16. Effect of surface irradiation during the photo-CVD deposition of a-Si:H thin films. Hikari CVD ho ni yoru amorphous silicon sakuseiji no kiban hikari reiki koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasaka, K.; Doering, H.; Hashimoto, K.; Fujishima, A. (The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-12-06

    This paper shows the impact of the irradiation from an additional light source during the deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon by photo-CVD deposition. Using a mercury sensitized photo-CVD process from Disilan (Si {sub 2} H {sub 6}) and hydrogen, silicon was deposited. A 40W low pressure mercury lamp was applied as the light source. A portion of the substrate was in addition irradiated using an Xg-He lamp through a thermal filter. Irradiation of the substrate using only Xg-He lamp produced no deposition, since this light has a wavelength which is too long to produce the SiH {sub 3}-radicals needed for Si deposition. The additional Xg-He light source was discovered to cause an increased thickness of deposited a-Si:H film and a transmission of the band structure. The reasons of these are considered that the influence of irradiation is not limited to film thickness, but that irradiation also impacts the composition of the a-Si:H film so as to cause a reduction in the hydrogen content. 10 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Orientation-specific transgranular fracture behavior of CVD-grown monolayer MoS2 single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Song; Yang, Bingchu; Gao, Yongli

    2017-04-01

    In recent times, there has been a rapidly growing interest in fracture behavior of two-dimensional materials since it is crucial for device performances. Here, we report an orientation-specific transgranular fracture behavior of a CVD-grown monolayer MoS2 single crystal investigated by various means. The underlying mechanism proposed that micro-cracks nucleated at sulfur vacancies propagate along the energy-favored zigzag directions upon fast quenching induced thermal strain, which results in an orientation-specific fracture behavior. The corresponding photoluminescence characteristic peaks undergo a blue-shift by ˜165 meV, suggesting compressive strain resided, in sharp contrast to tensile strain in a normal CVD-grown MoS2 single crystal. In addition, the combined photoemission electron microscopy and kelvin force microscopy results show the obvious surface potential variation between fractured MoS2 microflakes in some regions, ascribed to inhomogeneous interactions between MoS2 and the underlying substrate. The results reported here deepen the understanding of the fracture behavior of monolayer single crystalline MoS2, which is also adoptable in other transition metal dichalcogenide materials.

  18. Urchin-like artificial gallium oxide nanowires grown by a novel MOCVD/CVD-based route for random laser application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, Ronaldo P. de [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências de Materiais, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife (Brazil); Colégio Militar do Recife, Exército Brasileiro, Recife PE 50730-120 (Brazil); Oliveira, Nathalia Talita C. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências de Materiais, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife (Brazil); Dominguez, Christian Tolentino; Gomes, Anderson S. L.; Araújo, Cid B. de [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife (Brazil); Falcão, Eduardo H. L.; Alves, Severino; Luz, Leonis L. da [Departamento de Química Fundamental, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife (Brazil); Chassagnon, Remi [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Université de Bourgogne, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Sacilotti, Marco [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife (Brazil); Nanoform Group, Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, Université de Bourgogne, Dijon (France)

    2016-04-28

    A novel procedure based on a two-step method was developed to obtain β-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowires by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The first step consists in the gallium micro-spheres growth inside a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition environment, using an organometallic precursor. Nanoscale spheres covering the microspheres were obtained. The second step involves the CVD oxidization of the gallium micro-spheres, which allow the formation of β-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowires on the micro-sphere surface, with the final result being a nanostructure mimicking nature's sea urchin morphology. The grown nanomaterial is characterized by several techniques, including X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray, transmission electron microscopy, and photoluminescence. A discussion about the growth mechanism and the optical properties of the β-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} material is presented considering its unknown true bandgap value (extending from 4.4 to 5.68 eV). As an application, the scattering properties of the nanomaterial are exploited to demonstrate random laser emission (around 570 nm) when it is permeated with a laser dye liquid solution.

  19. High-order Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman generation in monoisotopic CVD {sup 12}C-diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminskii, Alexander A. [Institute of Crystallography, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lux, Oliver; Rhee, Hanjo; Eichler, Hans J. [Institute of Optics and Atomic Physics, Technische Universitaet Berlin (Germany); Ralchenko, Victor G.; Bolshakov, Andrey P. [General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Shirakawa, Akira; Yoneda, Hitoki [Institute for Laser Science, University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    We determined, for the first time, the room temperature phonon energy related to the F{sub 2g} vibration mode (ω{sub SRS(12C)} ∝ 1333.2 cm{sup -1}) in a mono-crystalline single-isotope CVD {sup 12}C-diamond crystal by means of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) spectroscopy. Picosecond one-micron excitation using a Nd{sup 3+}:Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}-laser generates a nearly two-octave spanning SRS frequency comb (∝12000 cm{sup -1}) consisting of higher-order Stokes and anti-Stokes components. The spacing of the spectral lines was found to differ by Δω{sub SRS} ∝ 0.9 cm{sup -1} from the comb spacing (ω{sub SRS(natC)} ∝ 1332.3 cm{sup -1}) when pumping a conventional CVD diamond crystal with a natural composition of the two stable carbon isotopes {sup 12}C (98.93%) and {sup 13}C (1.07%). (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Deposition of TiC film on titanium for abrasion resistant implant material by ion-enhanced triode plasma CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Yuhe, E-mail: zyh1120@hotmail.co.jp [School of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shen Yang (China); Wang Wei; Jia Xingya [School of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shen Yang (China); Akasaka, Tsukasa [Department of Health Science, School of Dental Medicine Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Liao, Susan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Watari, Fumio [Department of Health Science, School of Dental Medicine Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deposition of Titanium Carbide (TiC) layer on titanium (Ti) surface has been demonstrated by an ion-enhanced triode plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Vickers hardness of surface carbide was more than 2000, which confirmed its high abrasion resistance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physical and mechanical properties of the deposited TiC film on Ti were investigated to examine its potential application as an abrasion resistant implant material. - Abstract: Deposition of titanium carbide (TiC) layer on titanium (Ti) surface has been demonstrated by an ion-enhanced triode plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method using a TiCl{sub 4} + CH{sub 4} + H{sub 2} gas mixture. Physical and mechanical properties of the deposited TiC film on Ti were investigated to examine its potential application as an abrasion resistant implant material. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that the specimen was consisted of TiC and Ti. Carbide layer of about 6 {mu}m thickness was observed on the cross section of the specimen by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The Vickers hardness of surface carbide was more than 2000, which confirmed its high abrasion resistance.