WorldWideScience

Sample records for hot spot formation

  1. Hot spots

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nia, Amir M; Gassanov, Natig; Er, Fikret

    2014-01-01

    ..., several reddened skin lesions were observed. The obvious ''hot spots'' were located on both sides in the groin and above the bladder, with extension to the genital region, compli- cating the ability to catheterize the patient (Figure 1). The rest of the body surface was not affected, and no infectious source for the skin lesions was evident. After suc...

  2. An investigation of the hot spot formation mechanism for energetic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yao; Chen, Jun

    2017-11-01

    The shock-induced pore collapsing and hot spot formation processes of plastic bonded explosives are simulated by molecular dynamics. After shock loading, the temperature field, pressure field, particle velocity field, energy field, plastic work field, and plastic temperature field are calculated by using the virtual grid method. A set of microscopic parameters about the hot spot are evaluated, including the pore collapsing time, pore collapsing speed, plastic work, and hot spot radius. The physical models to describe the energy dissipation and temperature relaxation behaviors of the hot spot are developed. We find that the hot spot formation consists of three steps: pore collapsing, work-heat transition, and temperature relaxation. The pore collapsing speed is proportional to the piston speed, and the temperature relaxation time is proportional to the square of the hot spot radius.

  3. Computational analysis of hot-spot formation by quasi-steady deformation waves in porous explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, John; Chakravarthy, Sunada; Gonthier, Keith A.

    2013-05-01

    The impact and shock sensitivity of porous (granular) high-explosives is related to the formation of small mass regions of elevated temperature within the material called hot-spots by dissipative mechanisms such as plastic and friction work. Because of their small size, hot-spots are difficult to experimentally interrogate, particularly for high volumetric strain rates (ɛ˙V>10,000 s-1). In this study, simulations are performed for large ensembles of deformable particles (≈4000 particles) using a combined finite and discrete element technique to characterize statistical distributions of hot-spot intensity, geometry, and spatial proximity within and behind quasi-steady, piston supported uniaxial waves in granular HMX (C4H8N8O8). Emphasis is placed on examining how the material's initial particle packing density, characterized by its effective solid volume fraction ϕ¯s ,0, affects hot-spot statistics for pressure dominated waves corresponding to piston speeds within the range 300≤Up≤500 m /s. Predictions indicate that hot-spot intensity is only marginally affected by initial porosity (1-ϕ¯s ,0) for all piston speeds, whereas hot-spot size, number density, volume fraction, and volume specific surface area appreciably increase with porosity and exponentially increase with piston speed. Minor variations in particle shape are predicted to be largely inconsequential. Joint distributions of hot-spot intensity and size are combined with thermal explosion data to identify and examine critical hot-spots that quickly react behind waves. These results indicate that the observed increase in sensitivity with initial porosity for sustained loading is likely due to an increase in hot-spot size and number rather than intensity.

  4. Visualization of hot spot formation in energetic materials under periodic mechanical excitation using phosphor thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Alex; Fenoglio, Gabriel; Detrinidad, Humberto

    2017-06-01

    Under mechanical excitation, energy is known to localize within an energetic material resulting in `hot spot' formation. While many formation mechanisms have been proposed, additional insight to heat generation mechanisms, the effect of binder/crystal interfaces, and predication capabilities can be gained by quantifying the initiation and growth of the hot spots. Phosphor thermography is a well established temperature sensing technique wherein an object's temperature is obtained by collecting the temperature dependent luminescence of an optically excited phosphor. Herein, the phosphor thermography technique has been applied to Dow Corning Sylgard® 184/octahydro 1,3,5,7 tetranitro 1,3,5,7 tetrazocine (HMX) composite materials under mechanical excitation in order to visualize the evolution of the temperature field, and thus hot spot formation, within the binder. Funded by AFOSR. Supported by the Department of Defense (DoD) through the National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program.

  5. CFD analysis of hot spot formation through a fixed bed reactor of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Aligolzadeh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the interesting methods for conversion of synthesis gas to heavy hydrocarbons is Fischer–Tropsch process. The process has some bottlenecks, such as hot spot formation and low degree of conversion. In this work, computational fluid dynamics technique was used to simulate conversion of synthetic gas and product distribution. Also, hot spot formation in the catalytic fixed-bed reactor was investigated in several runs. Simulation results indicated that hot spot formation occurred more likely in the early and middle part of reactor due to high reaction rates. Based on the simulation results, the temperature of hot spots increased with increase in the inlet temperature as well as pressure. Among the many CFD runs conducted, it is found that the optimal temperature and pressure for Fischer–Tropsch synthesis are 565 K and 20 bar, respectively. As it seems that the reactor shall work very well under optimal conditions, the reaction rates and catalyst duration would simultaneously be maximum .

  6. Crack initiation and potential hot-spot formation around a cylindrical defect under dynamic compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao; Li, Xinguo; Zheng, Xianxu; Li, Kewu; Hu, Qiushi; Li, Jianling

    2017-11-01

    In recent decades, the hot-spot theory of condensed-phase explosives has been a compelling focus of scientific investigation attracting many researchers. The defect in the polymeric binder of the polymer-bonded explosive is called the intergranular defect. In this study, the real polymeric binder was substituted by poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as it is transparent and has similar thermodynamic properties to some binders. A set of modified split Hopkinson pressure bars equipped with a time-resolved shadowgraph was used to study the process of crack initiation and potential hot-spot formation around a cylindrical defect in PMMA. The new and significant phenomenon that the opening-mode crack emerged earlier than the shearing-mode crack from the cylindrical defect has been published for the first time in this paper. Furthermore, a two-dimensional numerical simulation was performed to show the evolution of both the stress field and the temperature field. The simulation results were in good agreement with the experiment. Finally, the law of potential hot-spot formation is discussed in detail.

  7. Hot spot formation on passenger car brake discs; Hotspotbildung bei Pkw-Bremsscheiben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffen, T.; Bruns, R. [Univ. der Bundeswehr, Hamburg (Germany). Lab. fuer Maschinenelemente und Foerderwesen

    1998-06-01

    Braking a passenger car from high speeds may, under certain circumstances, lead to the development of hot spots on the brake disc surface, causing the brake and steering systems to vibrate. Based on the findings of experiments carried out by the Laboratory of Mechanical Machine Components and Material Handling at the University of the Federal Armed Forces, Hamburg, a computational model has been developed to simulate the processes of hot spot formation. (orig.) [Deutsch] Das Abbremsen eines Pkw aus hohen Geschwindigkeiten bewirkt unter bestimmten Voraussetzungen Hitzeflecken auf der Bremsscheiben-Oberflaeche - die sogenannten Hotspots -, welche das Brems- und Lenksystem zu Schwingungen anregen. Aus den Erkenntnissen der am Laboratorium Maschinenelemente und Foerderwesen an der Universitaet der Bundeswehr Hamburg durchgefuehrten experimentellen Untersuchungen ist ein Rechenmodell entwickelt worden, mit dem die Vorgaenge der Hotspot-Bildung simuliert werden koennen. (orig.)

  8. Characterization of hot spots for natural chloroform formation: Relevance for groundwater quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Ole S.; Albers, Christian N.; Laier, Troels

    2015-04-01

    variability at 10 cm level. We suggest that the mechanism behind the formation of chloroform is an unspecific chlorination of organic matter, caused by microbial activity in the soil forming trichloroacetyl compounds. Laboratory measurements on intact soil cores have identified that the F and H horizons in the forest soil are the main producers of chloroform. Despite various attempts to identify the mechanisms responsible for the variability within a visually and chemically homogeneous area we have not yet succeeded. Parameters like soil respiration, inorganic and total organic chlorine, organic matter and soil structure were studied without any significant difference in favour of hot spots. By the use of 13C-isotopes we could identify the natural origin of the chloroform, and over a three years period we could conclude that the hot spots were permanent on the sites. At the same time a significant seasonal variation were measured depending on temperature and soil moisture.

  9. Nuclear Star Formation in the Hot-Spot Galaxy NGC 2903

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Herrero, A.; Ryder, S. D.; Knapen, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    We present high-resolution near-infrared imaging obtained using adaptive optics and HST/NICMOS and ground-based spectroscopy of the hot-spot galaxy NGC 2903. Our near-infrared resolution imaging enables us to resolve the infrared hot spots into individual young stellar clusters or groups of these. The spatial distribution of the stellar clusters is not coincident with that of the bright H II regions, as revealed by the HST/NICMOS Pace image. Overall, the circumnuclear star formation in NGC 2903 shows a ring-like morphology with an approximate diameter of 625 pc. The SF properties of the stellar clusters and H II regions have been studied using the photometric and spectroscopic information in conjunction with evolutionary synthesis models. The population of bright stellar clusters shows a very narrow range of ages, 4 to 7 x 10(exp 6) yr after the peak of star formation, or absolute ages 6.5 to 9.5 x 10(exp 6) yr (for the assumed short-duration Gaussian bursts), and luminosities similar to the clusters found in the Antennae interacting galaxy. This population of young stellar clusters accounts for some 7 - 12% of the total stellar mass in the central 625 pc of NGC 2903. The H II regions in the ring of star formation have luminosities close to that of the super-giant H II region 30 Doradus, they are younger than the stellar clusters, and will probably evolve into bright infrared stellar clusters similar to those observed today. We find that the star formation efficiency in the central regions of NGC 2903 is higher than in normal galaxies, approaching the lower end of infrared luminous galaxies.

  10. Hot spot formation of chloroform in forest soils caused pollution of groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Ole S.; Albers, Christian N.; Laier, Troels; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    High concentration of chloroform in groundwater is usually attributed to anthropogenic input, but we have found that the groundwater beneath some pristine areas contained chloroform from 1 - 10 µg/L. Groundwater containing chloroform that exceeds 1 µg/L could not be used for drinking water according to Danish regulations. The strict demands on groundwater quality may have to be taken into account when decisions are made regarding the change of land use in order to protect major recharge areas from pollution with nitrate and pesticides resulting from high-yield agriculture production. The terrestrial environment and especially hot spots in forest soils seem to be important contributors to apparent pollution of groundwater with chloroform. We performed a field study to investigate concentration and fluxes of chloroform to the groundwater from in four coniferous forests in order to increase knowledge on the hot spot formation and fate of natural chloroform. We investigated four stations over a period of several years in order to measure the net-formation of chloroform. Field measurements soil air concentrations of chloroform were monitored in five soil profiles down to the groundwater table. Meteorological data were recorded at all stations In the hotspots up to 120 ppbv was found in soil air under the spruce forest, to be compared to an ambient atmospheric concentration of 0.02 ppbv. The concentration of chloroform in soil air showed seasonal variation with a maximum in August-September. The chloroform concentration decreased with depth in all profiles during the summer half-year to about 20 % of concentration in the production layer. However, the concentration is still high enough to give an equilibrium concentration in the upper groundwater of 1-10 µg/L. Stable carbon isotopic analyses of chloroform from the uppermost groundwater in different parts of the forests and from soil water showed values from δ13C = -13 ‰ to -27 ‰, corresponding to the ratio in

  11. Controlled formation of intense hot spots in Pd@Ag core-shell nanooctapods for efficient photothermal conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Maochang; Yang, Yang; Li, Naixu; Du, Yuanchang; Song, Dongxing; Ma, Lijing; Wang, Yi; Zheng, Yiqun; Jing, Dengwei

    2017-08-01

    Plasmonic Ag nanostructures have been of great interest for such applications in cancer therapy and catalysis, etc. However, the relatively week Ag-Ag interaction and spontaneous atom diffusion make it very difficult to generate concaved or branched structures in Ag nanocrystals with sizes less than 100 nm, which has been considered very favorable for plasmonic effects. Herein, by employing a cubic Pd seed and a specific reducing agent to restrict the surface diffusion of Ag atoms, Pd@Ag core-shell nanooctapod structures where Ag atoms can be selectively deposited onto the corner sites of the Pd cubes were obtained. Such selective decoration enables us to precisely control the locations for the hot spot formation during light irradiation. We find that the branched nanooctapod structure shows strong absorption in the visible-light region and generates intense hot spots around the octapod arms of Ag. As such, the photothermal conversion efficiency could be significantly improved by more than 50% with a colloid solution containing only ppm-level nanooctapods compared with pure water. The reported nanostructure is expected to find extensive applications due to its controlled formation of light-induced hot spots at certain points on the crystal surface.

  12. Hot Spot Cosmic Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-11-01

    length of more than 3 million light-years, or no less than one-and-a-half times the distance from the Milky Way to the Andromeda galaxy, this structure is indeed gigantic. The region where the jets collide with the intergalactic medium are known as " hot spots ". Superposing the intensity contours of the radio emission from the southern "hot spot" on a near-infrared J-band (wavelength 1.25 µm) VLT ISAAC image ("b") shows three distinct emitting areas; they are even better visible on the I-band (0.9 µm) FORS1 image ("c"). This emission is obviously associated with the shock front visible on the radio image. This is one of the first times it has been possible to obtain an optical/near-IR image of synchrotron emission from such an intergalactic shock and, thanks to the sensitivity and image sharpness of the VLT, the most detailed view of its kind so far . The central area (with the strongest emission) is where the plasma jet from the galaxy centre hits the intergalactic medium. The light from the two other "knots", some 10 - 15,000 light-years away from the central "hot spot", is also interpreted as synchrotron emission. However, in view of the large distance, the astronomers are convinced that it must be caused by electrons accelerated in secondary processes at those sites . The new images thus confirm that electrons are being continuously accelerated in these "knots" - hence called "cosmic accelerators" - far from the galaxy and the main jets, and in nearly empty space. The exact physical circumstances of this effect are not well known and will be the subject of further investigations. The present VLT-images of the "hot spots" near 3C 445 may not have the same public appeal as some of those beautiful images that have been produced by the same instruments during the past years. But they are not less valuable - their unusual importance is of a different kind, as they now herald the advent of fundamentally new insights into the mysteries of this class of remote and active

  13. Hot spots of mutualistic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilarranz, Luis J; Sabatino, Malena; Aizen, Marcelo A; Bascompte, Jordi

    2015-03-01

    Incorporating interactions into a biogeographical framework may serve to understand how interactions and the services they provide are distributed in space. We begin by simulating the spatiotemporal dynamics of realistic mutualistic networks inhabiting spatial networks of habitat patches. We proceed by comparing the predicted patterns with the empirical results of a set of pollination networks in isolated hills of the Argentinian Pampas. We first find that one needs to sample up to five times as much area to record interactions as would be needed to sample the same proportion of species. Secondly, we find that peripheral patches have fewer interactions and harbour less nested networks - therefore potentially less resilient communities - compared to central patches. Our results highlight the important role played by the structure of dispersal routes on the spatial distribution of community patterns. This may help to understand the formation of biodiversity hot spots. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2014 British Ecological Society.

  14. Hot-spots in tapwaterleidingen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolferen, J. van; Sluis, S.M. van der

    2002-01-01

    ln opdracht van de VNI is een aantal berekeningen uitgevoerd voor het vaststellen van aanvullende richtlijnen in verband met hot-spots in tapwaterleidingen. Hierbij is deels voortgebouwd op berekeningen die reeds eerder in opdracht van Novem zijn uitgevoerd t.b.v. ISSO publicatie 55.1, Handleiding

  15. HotSpot Wizard: a web server for identification of hot spots in protein engineering

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pavelka, Antonin; Chovancova, Eva; Damborsky, Jiri

    2009-01-01

    HotSpot Wizard is a web server for automatic identification of 'hot spots' for engineering of substrate specificity, activity or enantioselectivity of enzymes and for annotation of protein structures...

  16. Protein determinants of meiotic DNA break hot spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Kyle R; Gutiérrez-Velasco, Susana; Martín-Castellanos, Cristina; Smith, Gerald R

    2013-03-07

    Meiotic recombination, crucial for proper chromosome segregation and genome evolution, is initiated by programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in yeasts and likely all sexually reproducing species. In fission yeast, DSBs occur up to hundreds of times more frequently at special sites, called hot spots, than in other regions of the genome. What distinguishes hot spots from cold regions is an unsolved problem, although transcription factors determine some hot spots. We report the discovery that three coiled-coil proteins-Rec25, Rec27, and Mug20-bind essentially all hot spots with great specificity even without DSB formation. These small proteins are components of linear elements, are related to synaptonemal complex proteins, and are essential for nearly all DSBs at most hot spots. Our results indicate these hot spot determinants activate or stabilize the DSB-forming protein Rec12 (Spo11 homolog) rather than promote its binding to hot spots. We propose a paradigm for hot spot determination and crossover control by linear element proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hot Spot Removal System: System description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    Hazardous wastes contaminated with radionuclides, chemicals, and explosives exist across the Department of Energy complex and need to be remediated due to environmental concerns. Currently, an opportunity is being developed to dramatically reduce remediation costs and to assist in the acceleration of schedules associated with these wastes by deploying a Hot Spot Removal System. Removing the hot spot from the waste site will remove risk driver(s) and enable another, more cost effective process/option/remedial alternative (i.e., capping) to be applied to the remainder of the site. The Hot Spot Removal System consists of a suite of technologies that will be utilized to locate and remove source terms. Components of the system can also be used in a variety of other cleanup activities. This Hot Spot Removal System Description document presents technologies that were considered for possible inclusion in the Hot Spot Removal System, technologies made available to the Hot Spot Removal System, industrial interest in the Hot Spot Removal System`s subsystems, the schedule required for the Hot Spot Removal System, the evaluation of the relevant technologies, and the recommendations for equipment and technologies as stated in the Plan section.

  18. Are hot-spots occluded from water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Irina Sousa; Ramos, Rui Miguel; Martins, Joao Miguel; Fernandes, Pedro Alexandrino; Ramos, Maria João

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are the basis of many biological processes and are governed by focused regions with high binding affinities, the warm- and hot-spots. It was proposed that these regions are surrounded by areas with higher packing density leading to solvent exclusion around them - "the O-ring theory." This important inference still lacks sufficient demonstration. We have used Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the validity of the O-ring theory in the context of the conformational flexibility of the proteins, which is critical for function, in general, and for interaction with water, in particular. The MD results were analyzed for a variety of solvent-accessible surface area (SASA) features, radial distribution functions (RDFs), protein-water distances, and water residence times. The measurement of the average solvent-accessible surface area features for the warm- and hot-spots and the null-spots, as well as data for corresponding RDFs, identify distinct properties for these two sets of residues. Warm- and hot-spots are found to be occluded from the solvent. However, it has to be borne in mind that water-mediated interactions have significant power to construct an extensive and strongly bonded interface. We observed that warm- and hot-spots tend to form hydrogen bond (H-bond) networks with water molecules that have an occupancy around 90%. This study provides strong evidence in support of the O-ring theory and the results show that hot-spots are indeed protected from the bulk solvent. Nevertheless, the warm- and hot-spots still make water-mediated contacts, which are also important for protein-protein binding.

  19. Inhibition of turbulence in inertial-confinement-fusion hot spots by viscous dissipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, C R; Clark, D S; Cook, A W; Busby, L E; Robey, H F

    2014-05-01

    Achieving ignition in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) requires the formation of a high-temperature (>10 keV) central hot spot. Turbulence has been suggested as a mechanism for degrading the hot-spot conditions by altering transport properties, introducing colder, mixed material, or reducing the conversion of radially directed kinetic energy to hot-spot heating. We show, however, that the hot spot is very viscous, and the assumption of turbulent conditions in the hot spot is incorrect. This work presents the first high-resolution, three-dimensional simulations of National Ignition Facility (NIF) implosion experiments using detailed knowledge of implosion dynamics and instability seeds and including an accurate model of physical viscosity. We find that when viscous effects are neglected, the hot spot can exhibit a turbulent kinetic energy cascade. Viscous effects, however, are significant and strongly damp small-scale velocity structures, with a hot-spot Reynolds number in the range of only 10-100.

  20. Hot-spot tectonics on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcewen, A. S.

    1985-01-01

    The thesis is that extensional tectonics and low-angle detachment faults probably occur on Io in association with the hot spots. These processes may occur on a much shorter timescale on Ion than on Earth, so that Io could be a natural laboratory for the study of thermotectonics. Furthermore, studies of heat and detachment in crustal extension on Earth and the other terresrial planets (especially Venus and Mars) may provide analogs to processes on Io. The geology of Io is dominated by volcanism and hot spots, most likely the result of tidal heating. Hot spots cover 1 to 2% of Io's surface, radiating at temperatures typically from 200 to 400 K, and occasionally up to 700K. Heat loss from the largest hot spots on Io, such as Loki Patera, is about 300 times the heat loss from Yellowstone, so a tremendous quantity of energy is available for volcanic and tectonic work. Active volcanism on Io results in a resurfacing rate as high as 10 cm per year, yet many structural features are apparent on the surface. Therefore, the tectonics must be highly active.

  1. Modeling Hot-Spot Contributions in Shocked High Explosives at the Mesoscale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrier, Danielle [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-12

    When looking at performance of high explosives, the defects within the explosive become very important. Plastic bonded explosives, or PBXs, contain voids of air and bonder between the particles of explosive material that aid in the ignition of the explosive. These voids collapse in high pressure shock conditions, which leads to the formation of hot spots. Hot spots are localized high temperature and high pressure regions that cause significant changes in the way the explosive material detonates. Previously hot spots have been overlooked with modeling, but now scientists are realizing their importance and new modeling systems that can accurately model hot spots are underway.

  2. KFC Server: interactive forecasting of protein interaction hot spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnell, Steven J; LeGault, Laura; Mitchell, Julie C

    2008-07-01

    The KFC Server is a web-based implementation of the KFC (Knowledge-based FADE and Contacts) model-a machine learning approach for the prediction of binding hot spots, or the subset of residues that account for most of a protein interface's; binding free energy. The server facilitates the automated analysis of a user submitted protein-protein or protein-DNA interface and the visualization of its hot spot predictions. For each residue in the interface, the KFC Server characterizes its local structural environment, compares that environment to the environments of experimentally determined hot spots and predicts if the interface residue is a hot spot. After the computational analysis, the user can visualize the results using an interactive job viewer able to quickly highlight predicted hot spots and surrounding structural features within the protein structure. The KFC Server is accessible at http://kfc.mitchell-lab.org.

  3. Meteorology of Jupiter's Equatorial Hot Spots and Plumes from Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, David Sanghun; Showman, Adam P.; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.

    2013-01-01

    We present an updated analysis of Jupiter's equatorial meteorology from Cassini observations. For two months preceding the spacecraft's closest approach, the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) onboard regularly imaged the atmosphere. We created time-lapse movies from this period in order to analyze the dynamics of equatorial hot spots and their interactions with adjacent latitudes. Hot spots are relatively cloud-free regions that emit strongly at 5 lm; improved knowledge of these features is crucial for fully understanding Galileo probe measurements taken during its descent through one. Hot spots are quasistable, rectangular dark areas on visible-wavelength images, with defined eastern edges that sharply contrast with surrounding clouds, but diffuse western edges serving as nebulous boundaries with adjacent equatorial plumes. Hot spots exhibit significant variations in size and shape over timescales of days and weeks. Some of these changes correspond with passing vortex systems from adjacent latitudes interacting with hot spots. Strong anticyclonic gyres present to the south and southeast of the dark areas appear to circulate into hot spots. Impressive, bright white plumes occupy spaces in between hot spots. Compact cirrus-like 'scooter' clouds flow rapidly through the plumes before disappearing within the dark areas. These clouds travel at 150-200 m/s, much faster than the 100 m/s hot spot and plume drift speed. This raises the possibility that the scooter clouds may be more illustrative of the actual jet stream speed at these latitudes. Most previously published zonal wind profiles represent the drift speed of the hot spots at their latitude from pattern matching of the entire longitudinal image strip. If a downward branch of an equatorially-trapped Rossby wave controls the overall appearance of hot spots, however, the westward phase velocity of the wave leads to underestimates of the true jet stream speed.

  4. Characterizing the Hot Spots Involved in RON-MSPβ Complex Formation Using In Silico Alanine Scanning Mutagenesis and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Zarei

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Implication of protein-protein interactions (PPIs in development of many diseases such as cancer makes them attractive for therapeutic intervention and rational drug design. RON (Recepteur d’Origine Nantais tyrosine kinase receptor has gained considerable attention as promising target in cancer therapy. The activation of RON via its ligand, macrophage stimulation protein (MSP is the most common mechanism of activation for this receptor. The aim of the current study was to perform in silico alanine scanning mutagenesis and to calculate binding energy for prediction of hot spots in protein-protein interface between RON and MSPβ chain (MSPβ. Methods: In this work the residues at the interface of RON-MSPβ complex were mutated to alanine and then molecular dynamics simulation was used to calculate binding free energy. Results: The results revealed that Gln193, Arg220, Glu287, Pro288, Glu289, and His424 residues from RON and Arg521, His528, Ser565, Glu658, and Arg683 from MSPβ may play important roles in protein-protein interaction between RON and MSP. Conclusion: Identification of these RON hot spots is important in designing anti-RON drugs when the aim is to disrupt RON-MSP interaction. In the same way, the acquired information regarding the critical amino acids of MSPβ can be used in the process of rational drug design for developing MSP antagonizing agents, the development of novel MSP mimicking peptides where inhibition of RON activation is required, and the design of experimental site directed mutagenesis studies.

  5. Photochemical modeling of emissions trading of highly reactive volatile organic compounds in Houston, Texas. 1. Reactivity based trading and potential for ozone hot spot formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linlin; Thompson, Tammy; McDonald-Buller, Elena C; Webb, Alba; Allen, David T

    2007-04-01

    As part of the State Implementation Plan for attaining the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for ozone, the Texas Commission of Environmental Quality has created a Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds (HRVOC) Emissions Cap and Trade Program for industrial point sources in the Houston/Galveston/Brazoria area. This program has a number of unique features, including its focus on a limited group of ozone precursors and its provisions for trading emissions based on atmospheric reactivity. This series of papers examines the potential air quality impacts of this new emission trading program through photochemical modeling of potential trading scenarios; this first paper in the series describes the air quality modeling methods used to assess potential trades, the potential for localized increases in ozone concentrations (ozone "hot spots") due to HRVOC emission trading, and the use of reactivity scales in the trading. When HRVOC emissions are traded on a mass basis, the simulations indicate that trading of HRVOC allowances between facilities resulted in less than 0.15 ppb (ozone concentrations, respectively. Maximum decreases in ozone concentrations associated with trading, as opposed to across-the-board reductions, were larger than the increases. All of these changes are small compared to the maximum changes in ozone concentrations due to the VOC emissions from these sources (up to 5-10 ppb for 8 h averages; up to 30 ppb for 1-h averages). When emissions of HRVOCs are traded for other, less reactive emissions, on a reactivity weighted basis, air quality simulations indicate that daily maximum ozone concentrations increased by less than 0.3%. Because these relatively small changes (ozone concentrations (all emissions traded into localized regions), the simulations indicate that the implementation of the trading program, as currently configured and possibly expanded, is unlikely to cause localized increases in ozone concentrations ("hot spots").

  6. The shock-triggered statistical hot spot model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Larry Glenn

    2012-03-01

    The standard statistical hot spot model (SHSM) assumes that all hot-spot-triggered burn waves initiate simultaneously within homogenized volume elements. In reality the shock passes through such elements, lighting burn waves in a phased manner. Simple simulations are employed to illustrate the resulting shock-triggered heterogeneous reaction topology. These show that the conventional continuum prescription may not be satisfied. An alternative strategy yields a robust continuum description, and enables an extended analytic SHSM that reduces to the standard model as the burn-front to shock-speed ratio, β, approaches zero. Keywords: Detonation, Hot Spots, Heterogeneous Reaction, Reactive Burn Modeling, Homogenization

  7. Impacts of Implosion Asymmetry And Hot Spot Shape On Ignition Capsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Baolian; Kwan, Thomas J. T.; Wang, Yi-Ming; Yi, S. Austin; Batha, Steve

    2017-10-01

    Implosion symmetry plays a critical role in achieving high areal density and internal energy at stagnation during hot spot formation in ICF capsules. Asymmetry causes hot spot irregularity and stagnation de-synchronization that results in lower temperatures and areal densities of the hot fuel. These degradations significantly affect the alpha heating process in the DT fuel as well as on the thermonuclear performance of the capsules. In this work, we explore the physical factors determining the shape of the hot spot late in the implosion and the effects of shape on Î+/-particle transport. We extend our ignition theory [1-4] to include the hot spot shape and quantify the effects of the implosion asymmetry on both the ignition criterion and capsule performance. We validate our theory with the NIF existing experimental data Our theory shows that the ignition criterion becomes more restrictive with the deformation of the hot spot. Through comparison with the NIF data, we demonstrate that the shape effects on the capsules' performance become more explicit as the self-heating and yield of the capsules increases. The degradation of the thermonuclear burn by the hot spot shape for high yield shots to date can be as high as 20%. Our theory is in good agreement with the NIF data. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36.

  8. Transportation conformity particulate matter hot-spot air quality modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    In light of the new development in particulate matter (PM) hot-spot regulations and Illinois Department : of Transportation (IDOT)s National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation requirements, : this project is intended to (1) perform and ...

  9. Drilling Into the Track of the Yellowstone Hot Spot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shervais, John W.; Evans, James P.; Schmitt, Douglas R.; Christiansen, Eric H.; Prokopenko, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    The Yellowstone supervolcano erupted roughly 640,000 years ago, covering much of North America in a thick coat of ash. Material ejected from the volcano devastated the surrounding area, and particles injected into the atmosphere changed the Earth's climate. Over the past 18 million years the Yellowstone hot spot has powered a series of similar eruptions. In southern Idaho, the 640-kilometer-long Snake River Plain traces the path of the Yellowstone hot spot over this period.

  10. On the burn topology of hot-spot-initiated reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Larry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zimmermann, Bjorn [WOLFRAM RESEARCH INC.; Nichols, Albert L [LLNL

    2009-01-01

    We determine the reaction progress function for an ideal hot spot model problem. The considered problem has an exact analytic solution that can derived from a reduction of Nichols statistical hot spot model. We perform numerical calculations to verify the analytic solution and to illustrate the error realized in real, finite systems. We show how the baseline problem, which does not distinguish between the reactant and product densities, can be scaled to handle general cases for which the two densities differ.

  11. Hot Spot Detection System Using Landsat 8/OLI Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, S.; Nakamura, R.; Oda, A.; Iijima, A.; Kouyama, T.; Iwata, T.

    2015-12-01

    We developed a simple algorithm and a Web-based visualizing system to detect hot spots using Landsat 8 OLI multispectral data as one of the applications of the real-time processing of Landsat 8 data. An empirical equation and radiometric and reflective thresholds were derived to detect hot spots using the OLI data at band 5 (0.865 μm) and band 7 (2.200 μm) based on the increase in spectral radiance at shortwave infrared (SWIR) region due to the emission from objects with high surface temperature. We surveyed typical patterns of surface spectra using the ASTER spectral library to delineate a threshold to distinguish hot spots from background surfaces. To adjust the empirical coefficients of our detection algorithm, we visually inspected the detected hot spots using 6593 Landsat 8 scenes, which cover eastern part of East Asia, taken from January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2014, displayed on a dedicated Web GIS system. Eventually we determined threshold equations which can theoretically detect hot spots at temperatures above 230 °C over isothermal pixels and hot spots as small as 1 m2 at temperatures of 1000 °C as the lowest temperature and the smallest subpixel coverage, respectively, for daytime scenes. The algorithm detected hot spots including wildfires, volcanos, open burnings and factories. 30-m spatial resolution of Landsat 8 enabled to detect wild fires and open burnings accompanied by clearer shapes of fire front lines than MODIS and VIIRS fire products. Although the 16-day revisit cycle of Landsat 8 is too long to effectively find unexpected wildfire or outbreak of eruption, the revisit cycle is enough to monitor temporally stable heat sources, such as continually erupting volcanos and factories. False detection was found over building rooftops, which have relatively smooth surfaces at longer wavelengths, when specular reflection occurred at the satellite overpass.

  12. Thermally-Driven Mantle Plumes Reconcile Hot-spot Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, D.; Davies, J.

    2008-12-01

    Hot-spots are anomalous regions of magmatism that cannot be directly associated with plate tectonic processes (e.g. Morgan, 1972). They are widely regarded as the surface expression of upwelling mantle plumes. Hot-spots exhibit variable life-spans, magmatic productivity and fixity (e.g. Ito and van Keken, 2007). This suggests that a wide-range of upwelling structures coexist within Earth's mantle, a view supported by geochemical and seismic evidence, but, thus far, not reproduced by numerical models. Here, results from a new, global, 3-D spherical, mantle convection model are presented, which better reconcile hot-spot observations, the key modification from previous models being increased convective vigor. Model upwellings show broad-ranging dynamics; some drift slowly, while others are more mobile, displaying variable life-spans, intensities and migration velocities. Such behavior is consistent with hot-spot observations, indicating that the mantle must be simulated at the correct vigor and in the appropriate geometry to reproduce Earth-like dynamics. Thermally-driven mantle plumes can explain the principal features of hot-spot volcanism on Earth.

  13. On the Burn Topology of Hot-Spot Initiated Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Larry; Zimmermann, Bjorn

    2009-06-01

    The bulk rate of heterogeneous reaction of an energetic material depends on both the decomposition chemistry and the physical microstructure. Simple thermal decomposition models and most detonation reactive burn models express the reaction rate as the product of two functions. One expresses the sensitivity of the rate to the thermodynamic state; the other expresses the effect of reactant depletion. For a homogeneous reaction, the depletion function structure depends on the reaction pathways (overall reaction order, autocatalysis, etc.). For a heterogeneous reaction, the depletion function also depends on the reaction topology (e.g., how reaction spreads from nucleation sites to consume the material). We numerically generate depletion functions for simultaneously initiated, randomly oriented hot spots, and compare the result to the analytic solution for regularly spaced hot spots. The effect of randomization is substantial. We also compare the depletion function for ideal randomly located hot spots to those employed by various reactive burn models that are calibrated to detonation experiments.

  14. Models and methods for hot spot safety work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vistisen, Dorte

    2002-01-01

    is the task of improving road safety through alterations of the geometrical and environmental characteristics of the existing road network. The presently applied models and methods in hot spot safety work on the Danish road network were developed about two decades ago, when data was more limited and software...... and statistical methods less developed. The purpose of this thesis is to contribute to improving "State of the art" in Denmark. Basis for the systematic hot spot safety work are the models describing the variation in accident counts on the road network. In the thesis hierarchical models disaggregated on time......Despite the fact that millions DKK each year are spent on improving roadsafety in Denmark, funds for traffic safety are limited. It is therefore vital to spend the resources as effectively as possible. This thesis is concerned with the area of traffic safety denoted "hot spot safety work", which...

  15. Integrating sustainable hunting in biodiversity protection in Central Africa: hot spots, weak spots, and strong spots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E Fa

    Full Text Available Wild animals are a primary source of protein (bushmeat for people living in or near tropical forests. Ideally, the effect of bushmeat harvests should be monitored closely by making regular estimates of offtake rate and size of stock available for exploitation. However, in practice, this is possible in very few situations because it requires both of these aspects to be readily measurable, and even in the best case, entails very considerable time and effort. As alternative, in this study, we use high-resolution, environmental favorability models for terrestrial mammals (N = 165 in Central Africa to map areas of high species richness (hot spots and hunting susceptibility. Favorability models distinguish localities with environmental conditions that favor the species' existence from those with detrimental characteristics for its presence. We develop an index for assessing Potential Hunting Sustainability (PHS of each species based on their ecological characteristics (population density, habitat breadth, rarity and vulnerability, weighted according to restrictive and permissive assumptions of how species' characteristics are combined. Species are classified into five main hunting sustainability classes using fuzzy logic. Using the accumulated favorability values of all species, and their PHS values, we finally identify weak spots, defined as high diversity regions of especial hunting vulnerability for wildlife, as well as strong spots, defined as high diversity areas of high hunting sustainability potential. Our study uses relatively simple models that employ easily obtainable data of a species' ecological characteristics to assess the impacts of hunting in tropical regions. It provides information for management by charting the geography of where species are more or less likely to be at risk of extinction from hunting.

  16. Jumping-droplet electronics hot-spot cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Junho; Birbarah, Patrick; Foulkes, Thomas; Yin, Sabrina L.; Rentauskas, Michelle; Neely, Jason; Pilawa-Podgurski, Robert C. N.; Miljkovic, Nenad

    2017-03-01

    Demand for enhanced cooling technologies within various commercial and consumer applications has increased in recent decades due to electronic devices becoming more energy dense. This study demonstrates jumping-droplet based electric-field-enhanced (EFE) condensation as a potential method to achieve active hot spot cooling in electronic devices. To test the viability of EFE condensation, we developed an experimental setup to remove heat via droplet evaporation from single and multiple high power gallium nitride (GaN) transistors acting as local hot spots (4.6 mm × 2.6 mm). An externally powered circuit was developed to direct jumping droplets from a copper oxide (CuO) nanostructured superhydrophobic surface to the transistor hot spots by applying electric fields between the condensing surface and the transistor. Heat transfer measurements were performed in ambient air (22-25 °C air temperature, 20%-45% relative humidity) to determine the effect of gap spacing (2-4 mm), electric field (50-250 V/cm) and applied heat flux (demonstrated to 13 W/cm2). EFE condensation was shown to enhance the heat transfer from the local hot spot by ≈200% compared to cooling without jumping and by 20% compared to non-EFE jumping. Dynamic switching of the electric field for a two-GaN system reveals the potential for active cooling of mobile hot spots. The opportunity for further cooling enhancement by the removal of non-condensable gases promises hot spot heat dissipation rates approaching 120 W/cm2. This work provides a framework for the development of active jumping droplet based vapor chambers and heat pipes capable of spatial and temporal thermal dissipation control.

  17. Climate hot spots: Generating knowledge for an uncertain future ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-10-26

    Oct 26, 2016 ... ... climate vulnerabilities, improves coping capacities locally and nationally, and informs climate change planning and practice. IDRC's work in this area aims to: Build knowledge on climate risks, vulnerability, and adaptation solutions in four climate change hot spots by bringing leading research institutions ...

  18. Variability of Jupiter's Five-Micron Hot Spot Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma A.; Orton, G. S.; Wakefield, L.; Rogers, J. H.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Boydstun, K.

    2012-01-01

    Global upheavals on Jupiter involve changes in the albedo of entire axisymmetric regions, lasting several years, with the last two occurring in 1989 and 2006. Against this backdrop of planetary-scale changes, discrete features such as the Great Red Spot (GRS), and other vortices exhibit changes on shorter spatial- and time-scales. We track the variability of the discrete equatorial 5-micron hot spots, semi-evenly spaced in longitude and confined to a narrow latitude band centered at 6.5degN (southern edge of the North Equatorial Belt, NEB), abundant in Voyager images. Tantalizingly similar patterns were observed in the visible (bright plumes and blue-gray regions), where reflectivity in the red is anti-correlated with 5-microns thermal radiance. Ortiz et al. (1998, GRL, 103) characterized the latitude and drift rates of the hot spots, including the descent of the Galileo probe at the southern edge of a 5-micron hot spot, as the superposition of equatorial Rossby waves, with phase speeds between 99 - 103m/s, relative to System III. We note that the high 5-micron radiances correlate well but not perfectly with high 8.57-micron radiances. Because the latter are modulated primarily by changes in the upper ammonia (NH3) ice cloud opacity, this correlation implies that changes in the ammonia ice cloud field may be responsible for the variability seen in the 5-m maps. During the NEB fade (2011 - early 2012), however, these otherwise ubiquitous features were absent, an atmospheric state not seen in decades. The ongoing NEB revival indicates nascent 5-m hot spots as early as April 2012, with corresponding visible dark spots. Their continuing growth through July 2012 indicates the possit.le re-establishment of Rossby waves. The South Equatorial Belt (SEB) and NEB revivals began similarly with an instability that developed into a major outbreak, and many similarities in the observed propagation of clear regions.

  19. RAS gene hot-spot mutations in canine neoplasias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, A; Murua Escobar, H; Günther, K; Soller, J T; Winkler, S; Nolte, I; Bullerdiek, J

    2005-01-01

    Point mutations in the cellular homologues HRAS, KRAS2, and NRAS of the viral Harvey and Kirsten rat sarcoma virus oncogenes are commonly involved in the onset of malignancies in humans and other species such as dog, mouse, and rat. Most often, three particular hot-spot codons are affected, with one amino acid exchange being sufficient for the induction of tumor growth. While RAS genes have been shown to play an important role in canine tumors such as non-small lung cell carcinomas, data about RAS mutations in canine fibrosarcomas as well as KRAS2 mutations in canine melanomas is sparse. To increase the number of tumors examined, we recently screened 13 canine fibrosarcomas and 11 canine melanomas for point mutations, particularly within the mutational hot spots. The results were compared to the already existing data from other studies about these tumors in dogs.

  20. Thermal imaging of hot spots in nanostructured microstripes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saidi, E; Lesueur, J; Aigouy, L [LPEM, CNRS UPR5, ESPCI, 10 rue Vauquelin, 75231 Paris Cedex 5 (France); Labeguerie-Egea, J; Mortier, M, E-mail: lionel.aigouy@espci.f [LCMCP, CNRS UMR 7574, ENSCP, 11 rue P. et M. Curie, 75005 Paris (France)

    2010-03-01

    By scanning thermal microscopy, we study the behavior of nanostructured metallic microstripes heated by Joule effect. Regularly spaced indentations have been made along the thin film stripe in order to create hot spots. For the designed stripe geometry, we observe that heat remains confined in the wire and in particular at shrinkage points within {approx}1{mu}m{sup 2}. Thermal maps have been obtained with a good lateral resolution (< 300nm) and a good temperature sensitivity ({approx}1K).

  1. Climate impacts on global hot spots of marine biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Francisco; Afán, Isabel; Davis, Lloyd S; Chiaradia, André

    2017-02-01

    Human activities drive environmental changes at scales that could potentially cause ecosystem collapses in the marine environment. We combined information on marine biodiversity with spatial assessments of the impacts of climate change to identify the key areas to prioritize for the conservation of global marine biodiversity. This process identified six marine regions of exceptional biodiversity based on global distributions of 1729 species of fish, 124 marine mammals, and 330 seabirds. Overall, these hot spots of marine biodiversity coincide with areas most severely affected by global warming. In particular, these marine biodiversity hot spots have undergone local to regional increasing water temperatures, slowing current circulation, and decreasing primary productivity. Furthermore, when we overlapped these hot spots with available industrial fishery data, albeit coarser than our estimates of climate impacts, they suggest a worrying coincidence whereby the world's richest areas for marine biodiversity are also those areas mostly affected by both climate change and industrial fishing. In light of these findings, we offer an adaptable framework for determining local to regional areas of special concern for the conservation of marine biodiversity. This has exposed the need for finer-scaled fishery data to assist in the management of global fisheries if the accumulative, but potentially preventable, effect of fishing on climate change impacts is to be minimized within areas prioritized for marine biodiversity conservation.

  2. Raman spectroelectrochemistry of molecules within individual electromagnetic hot spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shegai, Timur; Vaskevich, Alexander; Rubinstein, Israel; Haran, Gilad

    2009-10-14

    The role of chemical enhancement in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) remains a contested subject. We study SERS spectra of 4-mercaptopyridine molecules excited far from the molecular resonance, which are collected from individual electromagnetic hot spots at concentrations close to the single-molecule limit. The hot spots are created by depositing Tollen's silver island films on a transparent electrode incorporated within an electrochemical cell. Analysis of the intensity of the spectra relative to those obtained from individual rhodamine 6G molecules on the same surface provides a lower limit of approximately 3 orders of magnitude for the chemical enhancement. This large enhancement is likely to be due to a charge transfer resonance involving the transfer of an electron from the metal to an adsorbed molecule. Excitation at three different wavelengths, as well as variation of electrode potential from 0 to -1.2 V, lead to significant changes in the relative intensities of bands in the spectrum. It is suggested that while the bulk of the enhancement is due to an Albrecht A-term resonance Raman effect (involving the charge transfer transition), vibronic coupling provides additional enhancement which is sensitive to electrode potential. The measurement of potential-dependent SERS spectra from individual hot spots opens the way to a thorough characterization of chemical enhancement, as well to studies of redox phenomena at the single-molecule level.

  3. A pulsating auroral X-ray hot spot on Jupiter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladstone, G R; Waite, J H; Grodent, D; Lewis, W S; Crary, F J; Elsner, R F; Weisskopf, M C; Majeed, T; Jahn, J-M; Bhardwaj, A; Clarke, J T; Young, D T; Dougherty, M K; Espinosa, S A; Cravens, T E

    2002-02-28

    Jupiter's X-ray aurora has been thought to be excited by energetic sulphur and oxygen ions precipitating from the inner magnetosphere into the planet's polar regions. Here we report high-spatial-resolution observations that demonstrate that most of Jupiter's northern auroral X-rays come from a 'hot spot' located significantly poleward of the latitudes connected to the inner magnetosphere. The hot spot seems to be fixed in magnetic latitude and longitude and occurs in a region where anomalous infrared and ultraviolet emissions have also been observed. We infer from the data that the particles that excite the aurora originate in the outer magnetosphere. The hot spot X-rays pulsate with an approximately 45-min period, a period similar to that reported for high-latitude radio and energetic electron bursts observed by near-Jupiter spacecraft. These results invalidate the idea that jovian auroral X-ray emissions are mainly excited by steady precipitation of energetic heavy ions from the inner magnetosphere. Instead, the X-rays seem to result from currently unexplained processes in the outer magnetosphere that produce highly localized and highly variable emissions over an extremely wide range of wavelengths.

  4. Hot spots and hot moments in riparian zones: Potential for improved water quality management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe Vidon; Craig Allan; Douglas Burns; Tim P. Duval; Noel Gurwick; Shreeram Inamdar; Richard Lowrance; Judy Okay; Durelle Scott; Stephen Sebestyen

    2010-01-01

    Biogeochemical and hydrological processes in riparian zones regulate contaminant movement to receiving waters and often mitigate the impact of upland sources of contaminants on water quality. These heterogeneous processes have recently been conceptualized as "hot spots and moments" of retention, degradation, or production. Nevertheless, studies investigating...

  5. Current-Induced Forces and Hot Spots in Biased Nanojunctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Jing Tao; Christensen, Rasmus Bjerregaard; Wang, Jian-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the interplay of current-induced forces (CIFs), Joule heating, and heat transport inside a current-carrying nanoconductor. We find that the CIFs, due to the electron-phonon coherence, can control the spatial heat dissipation in the conductor. This yields a significant...... asymmetric concentration of excess heating (hot spot) even for a symmetric conductor. When coupled to the electrode phonons, CIFs drive different phonon heat flux into the two electrodes. First-principles calculations on realistic biased nanojunctions illustrate the importance of the effect....

  6. Microblog Hot Spot Mining Based on PAM Probabilistic Topic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Yaxin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microblogs are short texts carried with limited information, which will increase the difficulty of topic mining. This paper proposes the use of PAM (Pachinko Allocation Model probabilistic topic model to extract the generative model of text’s implicit theme for microblog hot spot mining. First, three categories of microblog and the main contribution of this paper are illustrated. Second, for there are four topic models which are respectively explained, the PAM model is introduced in detail in terms of how to generate a document, the accuracy of document classification and the topic correlation in PAM. Finally, MapReduce is described. For the number of microblogs is huge as well as the number of contactors, the totally number of words is relatively small. With MapReduce, microblogs data are split by contactor, document-topic count matrix and contactor-topic count matrix can be locally stored while the word-topic count matrix must be globally stored. Thus, the hot spot mining can be achieved on the basis of PAM probabilistic topic model.

  7. Lithospheric topography, tilted plumes, and the track of the Snake River-Yellowstone hot spot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shervais, John W.; Hanan, Barry B.

    2008-10-01

    The trace of the Snake River-Yellowstone hot spot is the world's best example of a mantle plume that has been overridden by continental lithosphere. The "standard model" calls for the plume head to rise under northern Nevada and be forced northward to form basalts of the Columbia Plateau; subsequent movement of North America to the southwest over the plume tail created a hot spot trace on the surface. We present a new conceptual model for the origin of this feature that resolves inconsistencies in the current standard model and explains the recent documentation of a thermal anomaly in the mantle below Yellowstone today that plunges ˜65° WNW. Our model implies that the plume tail was forced beneath thinned cratonic lithosphere to the SE along with part of the plume head and has remained in this orientation for the last 12 Ma. We infer that almost all of the volcanism in SE Oregon and SW Idaho prior to 12 Ma results from overriding the southern extension of the plume head, not the plume tail, and that a distinct plume tail hot spot track was not established until formation of the Bruneau-Jarbidge eruptive center around 12 Ma. The plume tail track may also be controlled by a preexisting structural boundary in lithosphere that is thinner than adjacent lithosphere. This model demonstrates the potential importance of lithospheric topography on controlling the surface manifestation of plume volcanism and the complexity that may arise when lithospheric thickness is nonuniform.

  8. Hot spin spots in the laser-induced demagnetization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Si

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Laser-induced femtosecond magnetism or femtomagnetism simultaneously relies on two distinctive contributions: (a the optical dipole interaction (ODI between a laser field and a magnetic system and (b the spin expectation value change (SEC between two transition states. Surprisingly, up to now, no study has taken both contributions into account simultaneously. Here we do so by introducing a new concept of the optical spin generator, a product of SEC and ODI between transition states. In ferromagnetic nickel, our first-principles calculation demonstrates that the larger the value of optical spin generator is, the larger the dynamic spin moment change is. This simple generator directly links the time-dependent spin moment change ΔMzk(t at every crystal-momentum k point to its intrinsic electronic structure and magnetic properties. Those hot spin spots are a direct manifestation of the optical spin generator, and should be the focus of future research.

  9. Geochronological constraints on a possible hot spot origin for Hess Rise and the Wentworth Seamount chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Malcolm S.; Dalrymple, G. Brent

    New 40Ar/39Ar age data are consistent with plume initiation/hot spot models for the origin of the Late Cretaceous Hess Rise and Wentworth Seamount chain, north-central Pacific Ocean. 40Ar/39Ar age spectra on two samples of highly altered trachyte from DSDP Site 465A are discordant, revealing only minimum ages of ca. 90-94 Ma. A better minimum age estimate for the formation of SE Hess Rise is the late Albian age of the overlying sedimentary rocks at Site 465A, ca. 98-100 Ma. Two unnamed seamounts on the Wentworth Seamount chain trending SE from Hess Rise have concordant 40Ar/39Ar whole rock and laser mineral fusion ages of 93.5±0.6 Ma and 86.4±0.6 Ma. The age progression along this lineament, ca. 70 km/m.y., is consistent with rates found for other co-polar Late Cretaceous hot spot tracks in the Musicians Seamounts and northern Line Islands. Samples from Wentworth Seamount itself are too altered to yield reliable 40Ar/39Ar ages, but are consistent with an age of about 90 Ma predicted by the observed age progression. The Hess Rise/Wentworth Seamount province deviates from the typical plume initiation/hot spot model in two important ways. First, no extensions of the Wentworth Seamount chain have been found south of the youngest seamount dated, and the hot spot track is only 14 m.y. long. Second, 40Ar/39Ar analysis of two plagioclase separates from alkalic basalts dredged from a seamount on SE Hess Rise have concordant ages of 92 and 87 Ma. Thus, active volcanism on Hess Rise continued at least 12 m.y. after the initial formation of the plateau, after the southern Hess Rise had begun to submerge, and after the site had drifted 800 km to the northwest of the proposed hot spot. Such continuing volcanism also has been observed for Ontong Java Plateau and may be characteristic of oceanic flood basalt provinces, even if they form by a mechanism consistent with the plume initiation model. Alterative hypotheses for the origin of Hess Rise and the Wentworth seamount chain

  10. Use of soil inventories to detect hot spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Mats

    2010-05-01

    The aim with this presentation is to show possibilities and limitations of SOC (Soil Organic Carbon) inventories for identification of sites with high SOC changes over time. Hot spots are here defined as sites expected to respond strongly to environmental or management changes in a manner that is likely to turn these ecosystems into sources of GHGs. The data used originate from the Swedish National Survey of Forest Soils and Vegetation. This survey is based on about 23 500 permanent sample plots in a stratified national grid system that were sampled 1983-1987 and resampled 1993-2002, and 2003-2012, and hence provides suitable conditions for evaluation of SOC changes over time, and their relation to selected site factors. In addition also the Biosoil project provides such possibilities, though with much fewer resampled sites. The analyses are restricted to upland mineral soils (naturally drained), mainly Podzols. Predominating trees are conifers. The soil organic C stock for the O horizon is in average about 70% higher in the southern part of the country than in the northern, and 50 % higher for slightly moist sites than for dry sites. The selected site conditions are 1) current SOC content, 2) soil moisture (dry-slightly moist) and 3) stand age. The survey used does not monitor changes in mineral soil bulk density over time. Furthermore, estimates of stone content are associated with big uncertainties. For these reasons the change in SOC content was not expressed as a stock for the entire soil, but as 1) change in O horizon SOC stock and 2) change in B horizon SOC concentration. It is suggested that these two parameters are satisfactory for hot spot identification.

  11. Barium transport in the hot spot region of fluorescent lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigeneger, F.; Rackow, K.; Uhrlandt, D.; Ehlbeck, J.; Lieder, G.

    2010-09-01

    The transport of barium atoms and ions in the vicinity of the hot spot in fluorescent lamps operating at 25 kHz is investigated by a combined experimental and theoretical approach. By laser-induced fluorescence, the particle densities of barium atoms and ions were measured time-resolved at different distances from the spot centre. In addition, the time-dependent cathode fall voltage was measured using an improved band method. The model combines a kinetic part for the electrons with a fluid part for the barium atoms and ions. Both parts are spatially resolved in spherically symmetric geometry. The space-dependent electron Boltzmann equation yields the electron density and the ionization rate coefficient of barium as functions of the cathode fall voltage. These results are used to solve the time-dependent particle balance equations of barium atoms and ions which include the ionization of barium as gain and loss terms, respectively. Good agreement between the measured and calculated particle densities of barium atoms is obtained. A sensitive dependence of the ionization frequency and of the barium particle densities on the cathode fall voltage was found.

  12. Barium transport in the hot spot region of fluorescent lamps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigeneger, F; Rackow, K; Uhrlandt, D; Ehlbeck, J; Lieder, G [INP Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2010-09-29

    The transport of barium atoms and ions in the vicinity of the hot spot in fluorescent lamps operating at 25 kHz is investigated by a combined experimental and theoretical approach. By laser-induced fluorescence, the particle densities of barium atoms and ions were measured time-resolved at different distances from the spot centre. In addition, the time-dependent cathode fall voltage was measured using an improved band method. The model combines a kinetic part for the electrons with a fluid part for the barium atoms and ions. Both parts are spatially resolved in spherically symmetric geometry. The space-dependent electron Boltzmann equation yields the electron density and the ionization rate coefficient of barium as functions of the cathode fall voltage. These results are used to solve the time-dependent particle balance equations of barium atoms and ions which include the ionization of barium as gain and loss terms, respectively. Good agreement between the measured and calculated particle densities of barium atoms is obtained. A sensitive dependence of the ionization frequency and of the barium particle densities on the cathode fall voltage was found.

  13. A feature-based approach to modeling protein-protein interaction hot spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyu-il; Kim, Dongsup; Lee, Doheon

    2009-05-01

    Identifying features that effectively represent the energetic contribution of an individual interface residue to the interactions between proteins remains problematic. Here, we present several new features and show that they are more effective than conventional features. By combining the proposed features with conventional features, we develop a predictive model for interaction hot spots. Initially, 54 multifaceted features, composed of different levels of information including structure, sequence and molecular interaction information, are quantified. Then, to identify the best subset of features for predicting hot spots, feature selection is performed using a decision tree. Based on the selected features, a predictive model for hot spots is created using support vector machine (SVM) and tested on an independent test set. Our model shows better overall predictive accuracy than previous methods such as the alanine scanning methods Robetta and FOLDEF, and the knowledge-based method KFC. Subsequent analysis yields several findings about hot spots. As expected, hot spots have a larger relative surface area burial and are more hydrophobic than other residues. Unexpectedly, however, residue conservation displays a rather complicated tendency depending on the types of protein complexes, indicating that this feature is not good for identifying hot spots. Of the selected features, the weighted atomic packing density, relative surface area burial and weighted hydrophobicity are the top 3, with the weighted atomic packing density proving to be the most effective feature for predicting hot spots. Notably, we find that hot spots are closely related to pi-related interactions, especially pi . . . pi interactions.

  14. Accurate prediction of hot spot residues through physicochemical characteristics of amino acid sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; Li, Jinyan; Wong, Limsoon; Kuwahara, Hiroyuki; Huang, Jianhua Z; Gao, Xin

    2013-08-01

    Hot spot residues of proteins are fundamental interface residues that help proteins perform their functions. Detecting hot spots by experimental methods is costly and time-consuming. Sequential and structural information has been widely used in the computational prediction of hot spots. However, structural information is not always available. In this article, we investigated the problem of identifying hot spots using only physicochemical characteristics extracted from amino acid sequences. We first extracted 132 relatively independent physicochemical features from a set of the 544 properties in AAindex1, an amino acid index database. Each feature was utilized to train a classification model with a novel encoding schema for hot spot prediction by the IBk algorithm, an extension of the K-nearest neighbor algorithm. The combinations of the individual classifiers were explored and the classifiers that appeared frequently in the top performing combinations were selected. The hot spot predictor was built based on an ensemble of these classifiers and to work in a voting manner. Experimental results demonstrated that our method effectively exploited the feature space and allowed flexible weights of features for different queries. On the commonly used hot spot benchmark sets, our method significantly outperformed other machine learning algorithms and state-of-the-art hot spot predictors. The program is available at http://sfb.kaust.edu.sa/pages/software.aspx. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Accurate prediction of hot spot residues through physicochemical characteristics of amino acid sequences

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Peng

    2013-07-23

    Hot spot residues of proteins are fundamental interface residues that help proteins perform their functions. Detecting hot spots by experimental methods is costly and time-consuming. Sequential and structural information has been widely used in the computational prediction of hot spots. However, structural information is not always available. In this article, we investigated the problem of identifying hot spots using only physicochemical characteristics extracted from amino acid sequences. We first extracted 132 relatively independent physicochemical features from a set of the 544 properties in AAindex1, an amino acid index database. Each feature was utilized to train a classification model with a novel encoding schema for hot spot prediction by the IBk algorithm, an extension of the K-nearest neighbor algorithm. The combinations of the individual classifiers were explored and the classifiers that appeared frequently in the top performing combinations were selected. The hot spot predictor was built based on an ensemble of these classifiers and to work in a voting manner. Experimental results demonstrated that our method effectively exploited the feature space and allowed flexible weights of features for different queries. On the commonly used hot spot benchmark sets, our method significantly outperformed other machine learning algorithms and state-of-the-art hot spot predictors. The program is available at http://sfb.kaust.edu.sa/pages/software.aspx. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Biofilm formation in a hot water system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagh, L.K.; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Arvin, Erik

    2002-01-01

    The biofilm formation rate was measured in situ in a hot water system in an apartment building by specially designed sampling equipment, and the net growth of the suspended bacteria was measured by incubation of water samples with the indigeneous bacteria. The biofilm formation rate reached......, in the sludge, or in the water from the distribution system was negligible. This indicated that bacterial growth took place on the inner surfaces in the hot water system and biofilm formation and detachment of bacteria could account for most of the suspended bacteria actually measured in hot water. Therefore...

  17. Bounds on geologically current rates of motion of groups of hot spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengzu; Gordon, Richard G.; Zhang, Tuo

    2017-06-01

    It is widely believed that groups of hot spots in different regions of the world are in relative motion at rates of 10 to 30 mm a-1 or more. Here we present a new method for analyzing geologically current motion between groups of hot spots beneath different plates. In an inversion of 56 globally distributed, equally weighted trends of hot spot tracks, the dispersion is dominated by differences in trend between different plates rather than differences within plates. Nonetheless the rate of hot spot motion perpendicular to the direction of absolute plate motion, vperp, differs significantly from zero for only 3 of 10 plates and then by merely 0.3 to 1.4 mm a-1. The global mean upper bound on |vperp| is 3.2 ± 2.7 mm a-1. Therefore, hot spots move slowly and can be used to define a global reference frame for plate motions.

  18. Experimental Study of Ignition by Hot Spot in Internal Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serruys, Max

    1938-01-01

    In order to carry out the contemplated study, it was first necessary to provide hot spots in the combustion chamber, which could be measured and whose temperature could be changed. It seemed difficult to realize both conditions working solely on the temperature of the cooling water in a way so as to produce hot spots on the cylinder wall capable of provoking autoignition. Moreover, in the majority of practical cases, autoignition is produced by the spark plug, one of the least cooled parts in the engine. The first procedure therefore did not resemble that which most generally occurs in actual engine operation. All of these considerations caused us to reproduce similar hot spots at the spark plugs. The hot spots produced were of two kinds and designated with the name of thermo-electric spark plug and of metallic hot spot.

  19. HotSpot Wizard 2.0: automated design of site-specific mutations and smart libraries in protein engineering

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bendl, Jaroslav; Stourac, Jan; Sebestova, Eva; Vavra, Ondrej; Musil, Milos; Brezovsky, Jan; Damborsky, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    HotSpot Wizard 2.0 is a web server for automated identification of hot spots and design of smart libraries for engineering proteins' stability, catalytic activity, substrate specificity and enantioselectivity...

  20. Methodology and software to detect viral integration site hot-spots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Namshin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modern gene therapy methods have limited control over where a therapeutic viral vector inserts into the host genome. Vector integration can activate local gene expression, which can cause cancer if the vector inserts near an oncogene. Viral integration hot-spots or 'common insertion sites' (CIS are scrutinized to evaluate and predict patient safety. CIS are typically defined by a minimum density of insertions (such as 2-4 within a 30-100 kb region, which unfortunately depends on the total number of observed VIS. This is problematic for comparing hot-spot distributions across data sets and patients, where the VIS numbers may vary. Results We develop two new methods for defining hot-spots that are relatively independent of data set size. Both methods operate on distributions of VIS across consecutive 1 Mb 'bins' of the genome. The first method 'z-threshold' tallies the number of VIS per bin, converts these counts to z-scores, and applies a threshold to define high density bins. The second method 'BCP' applies a Bayesian change-point model to the z-scores to define hot-spots. The novel hot-spot methods are compared with a conventional CIS method using simulated data sets and data sets from five published human studies, including the X-linked ALD (adrenoleukodystrophy, CGD (chronic granulomatous disease and SCID-X1 (X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency trials. The BCP analysis of the human X-linked ALD data for two patients separately (774 and 1627 VIS and combined (2401 VIS resulted in 5-6 hot-spots covering 0.17-0.251% of the genome and containing 5.56-7.74% of the total VIS. In comparison, the CIS analysis resulted in 12-110 hot-spots covering 0.018-0.246% of the genome and containing 5.81-22.7% of the VIS, corresponding to a greater number of hot-spots as the data set size increased. Our hot-spot methods enable one to evaluate the extent of VIS clustering, and formally compare data sets in terms of hot-spot overlap

  1. Association of poly-purine/poly-pyrimidine sequences with meiotic recombination hot spots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pitt Joel PW

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meiotic recombination events have been found to concentrate in 1–2.5 kilo base regions, but these recombination hot spots do not share a consensus sequence and why they occur at specific sites is not fully understood. Some previous evidence suggests that poly-purine/poly-pyrimidine (poly-pu/py tracts (PPTs, a class of sequence with distinctive biochemical properties, could be involved in recombination, but no general association of PPTs with meiotic recombination hot spots has previously been reported. Results We used computational methods to investigate in detail the relationship between PPTs and hot spots. We show statistical associations of PPT frequency with hot spots of meiotic recombination initiating lesions, double-strand breaks, in the genome of the yeast S. cerevisiae and with experimentally well characterized human meiotic recombination hot spots. Supporting a possible role of poly-pu/py-rich sequences in hot spot recombination, we also found that all three single nucleotide polymorphisms previously shown to be associated with human hot spot activity changes occur within sequence contexts of 14 bp or longer that are 85% or more poly-pu/py and at least 70% G/C. These polymorphisms are all close to the hot spot mid points. Comparing the sequences of experimentally characterized human hot spots with the orthologous regions of the chimpanzee genome previously shown not to contain hot spots, we found that in all five cases in which comparisons for the hot spot central regions are possible with publicly available sequence data, there are differences near the human hot spot mid points within sequences 14 bp or longer consisting of more than 80% poly-pu/py and at least 50% G/C. Conclusion Our results, along with previous evidence for the unique biochemical properties and recombination-stimulating potential of poly-pu/py-rich sequences, suggest that the possible functional involvement of this type of sequence in meiotic

  2. Sediment trapping by dams creates methane emission hot spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeck, Andreas; Delsontro, Tonya; McGinnis, Daniel F; Fischer, Helmut; Flury, Sabine; Schmidt, Mark; Fietzek, Peer; Lorke, Andreas

    2013-08-06

    Inland waters transport and transform substantial amounts of carbon and account for ∼18% of global methane emissions. Large reservoirs with higher areal methane release rates than natural waters contribute significantly to freshwater emissions. However, there are millions of small dams worldwide that receive and trap high loads of organic carbon and can therefore potentially emit significant amounts of methane to the atmosphere. We evaluated the effect of damming on methane emissions in a central European impounded river. Direct comparison of riverine and reservoir reaches, where sedimentation in the latter is increased due to trapping by dams, revealed that the reservoir reaches are the major source of methane emissions (∼0.23 mmol CH4 m(-2) d(-1) vs ∼19.7 mmol CH4 m(-2) d(-1), respectively) and that areal emission rates far exceed previous estimates for temperate reservoirs or rivers. We show that sediment accumulation correlates with methane production and subsequent ebullitive release rates and may therefore be an excellent proxy for estimating methane emissions from small reservoirs. Our results suggest that sedimentation-driven methane emissions from dammed river hot spot sites can potentially increase global freshwater emissions by up to 7%.

  3. Hot spot liver scan in focal nodular hyperplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piers, D.A. (Univ. Hospital, Groningen, Netherlands); Houthoff, H.J.; Krom, R.A.F.; Schuur, K.H.; Sikkens, H.; Weits, J.

    1980-12-01

    In scintigraphy of the liver with radiocolloid, space-occupying lesions generally are visualized as regions of decreased accumulation of radioactivity. Rarely focal areas of increased activity are depicted; most are related to altered vascular dynamics in the liver secondary to obstruction of the superior or inferior vena cava or the hepatic veins. There are reports of single cases of focally increased activity due to a hepatic hemangioma, hepatic venoocclusive disease, herniation of a part of the liver, and a liver hot spot found after radiocolloid injection via a malpositioned central venous catheter in one of the hepatic vein branches. In patients with focal nodular hyperplasia, liver scans with solitary defects as well as normal patterns are found. In some cases, increased uptake of colloid in the lesion has been documented. Pasquier and Dorta reported a patient with a palpable mass in the left liver lobe with increased accumulation of radioactivity on the radiocolloid liver scan. The histologic diagnosis was hamartoma, but reviewing the description and considering the confusion in the past concerning the nomenclature, this case is suggestive of focal nodular hyperplasia. We report a patient with focal nodular hyperplasia who had increased radiocolloid uptake in the lesion. The radionuclide studies are compared with angiography, sonography, and computed tomography. An explanation for the localized increased colloid accumulation based on histologic findings is suggested.

  4. On the generation of pre-trap hot spot tracks: history of La Réunion hot spot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, I.; Davaille, A. B.; Kurita, K.

    2012-12-01

    Recent observations made on La Réunion hot spot (Mahoney et al. EPSL 2002) documented the existence of a Réunion hotspot track before the Deccan traps. Based on the location, ages, and geochemical signatures of marine volcanic rocks preserved in the South Tethian suture zone of Pakistan, they suggested that the Réunion hotspot was active off northwestern Greater India well before the emplacement, far to the South, of the Deccan flood basalts. However, in the classical "Plume's head and tail" framework, the Deccan traps, emplaced 65-66 Myr ago, would represent the signature of the plume head reaching the lithosphere. A pre-trap track, i.e. a pre-head event, remains therefore to be explained. We show here that it could be generated by the filtering effect of the 660-km depth endothermic phase transition, which is expected to delay upwelling plumes and modify their morphology. We investigated experimentally the interaction of thermal starting plumes with a density boundary by using simultaneous visualizations of temperature, composition and velocity fields. In a tank initially stratified with two viscous fluids with different densities and viscosities, a thermal starting plume was generated by using a circular plate heater at the bottom of the tank. Its interaction mode with the inner interface depends on the local buoyancy number (BL: the ratio of the stabilizing chemical buoyancy to the plume thermal buoyancy at the interface), the Rayleigh number (Ra), the viscosity contrast between the chemical layers (γ), and the local viscosity ratio of the ambient material to the plume head (γp). For BL rises through the upper layer and reaches the top surface, since the plume head has a large thermal buoyancy compared to the stabilizing density contrast between the two layers. When BL > 0.6, the "Rebirth mode" occurs, where the thermal plume ponds and spreads under the chemical boundary and secondary thermal plumes are generated from the interface. Depending on the

  5. Prediction of protein interaction hot spots using rough set-based multiple criteria linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruoying; Zhang, Zhiwang; Wu, Di; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Xinyang; Wang, Yong; Shi, Yong

    2011-01-21

    Protein-protein interactions are fundamentally important in many biological processes and it is in pressing need to understand the principles of protein-protein interactions. Mutagenesis studies have found that only a small fraction of surface residues, known as hot spots, are responsible for the physical binding in protein complexes. However, revealing hot spots by mutagenesis experiments are usually time consuming and expensive. In order to complement the experimental efforts, we propose a new computational approach in this paper to predict hot spots. Our method, Rough Set-based Multiple Criteria Linear Programming (RS-MCLP), integrates rough sets theory and multiple criteria linear programming to choose dominant features and computationally predict hot spots. Our approach is benchmarked by a dataset of 904 alanine-mutated residues and the results show that our RS-MCLP method performs better than other methods, e.g., MCLP, Decision Tree, Bayes Net, and the existing HotSprint database. In addition, we reveal several biological insights based on our analysis. We find that four features (the change of accessible surface area, percentage of the change of accessible surface area, size of a residue, and atomic contacts) are critical in predicting hot spots. Furthermore, we find that three residues (Tyr, Trp, and Phe) are abundant in hot spots through analyzing the distribution of amino acids. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hot spots of wheat yield decline with rising temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asseng, Senthold; Cammarano, Davide; Basso, Bruno; Chung, Uran; Alderman, Phillip D; Sonder, Kai; Reynolds, Matthew; Lobell, David B

    2017-06-01

    Many of the irrigated spring wheat regions in the world are also regions with high poverty. The impacts of temperature increase on wheat yield in regions of high poverty are uncertain. A grain yield-temperature response function combined with a quantification of model uncertainty was constructed using a multimodel ensemble from two key irrigated spring wheat areas (India and Sudan) and applied to all irrigated spring wheat regions in the world. Southern Indian and southern Pakistani wheat-growing regions with large yield reductions from increasing temperatures coincided with high poverty headcounts, indicating these areas as future food security 'hot spots'. The multimodel simulations produced a linear absolute decline of yields with increasing temperature, with uncertainty varying with reference temperature at a location. As a consequence of the linear absolute yield decline, the relative yield reductions are larger in low-yielding environments (e.g., high reference temperature areas in southern India, southern Pakistan and all Sudan wheat-growing regions) and farmers in these regions will be hit hardest by increasing temperatures. However, as absolute yield declines are about the same in low- and high-yielding regions, the contributed deficit to national production caused by increasing temperatures is higher in high-yielding environments (e.g., northern India) because these environments contribute more to national wheat production. Although Sudan could potentially grow more wheat if irrigation is available, grain yields would be low due to high reference temperatures, with future increases in temperature further limiting production. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Localization of the hot spots in a pebble bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Leisheng; Lee, Wooram; Lee, Jaeyoung [Handong Global University, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The pebble bed reactor (PBR) is a candidate reactor type for the very high temperature reactor (VHTR), which is one of the Generation-IV reactor types. The HTGR design concept exhibits excellent safety features due to the low power density and the large amount of graphite present in the core which gives a large thermal inertia in an accident such as loss of coolant. The conclusions are made and may contribute to a better design of a PBR core and a closer inspection of the local hot spots to avoid destruction of pebbles from happening. Thermal field of a PBR core is investigated in this study. Specifically, experiments on measuring the pebbles' surface temperature are performed. It is found that the upper pebble has an overall higher temperature profile than the other pebbles and the stagnation zone under does not increase its surface's temperature. In addition, the temperature profile of the side pebble shows a concave form and it keeps decreasing from the contact point to the vertex in the lower pebble. Lastly, the maximum temperature difference among these points is 5.83 deg. C. These findings above are validated by CFX simulations under two different turbulence models (k-e, SST) and two contact areas (diameter of 6mm and 3.5mm). By contrasting the temperature variation trends of all simulation cases, it is concluded that SST turbulence model with 20% intensity shows a better agreement with the experiment result, nevertheless, slightly deviation is also found in terms of total temperature difference and the peak appears in position 17-19 in experiments.

  8. Potential air toxics hot spots in truck terminals and cabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Thomas J; Davis, Mary E; Hart, Jaime E; Blicharz, Andrew; Laden, Francine; Garshick, Eric

    2012-12-01

    Hot spots are areas where concentrations of one or more air toxics--organic vapors or particulate matter (PM)--are expected to be elevated. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA*) screening values for air toxics were used in our definition of hot spots. According to the EPA, a screening value "is used to indicate a concentration of a chemical in the air to which a person could be continually exposed for a lifetime ... and which would be unlikely to result in a deleterious effect (either cancer or noncancer health effects)" (U.S. EPA 2006). Our characterization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs; namely 18 hydrocarbons, methyl tert-butyl ether [MTBE], acetone, and aldehydes) was added onto our ongoing National Cancer Institute-funded study of lung cancer and particulate pollutant concentrations (PM with an aerodynamic diameter parks; downwind areas affected by upwind and terminal sources; and the loading docks and mechanic shops within terminal as well as the interior of cabs of trucks being driven on city, suburban, and rural streets and on highways. In Phase 1 of our study, 15 truck terminals across the United States were each visited for five consecutive days. During these site visits, sorbent tubes were used to collect 12-hour integrated samples of hydrocarbons and aldehydes from upwind and downwind fence-line locations as well as inside truck cabs. Meteorologic data and extensive site information were collected with each sample. In Phase 2, repeat visits to six terminals were conducted to test the stability of concentrations across time and judge the representativeness of our previous measurements. During the repeat site visits, the sampling procedure was expanded to include real-time sampling for total hydrocarbon (HC) and PM2.5 at the terminal upwind and downwind sites and inside the truck cabs, two additional monitors in the yard for four-quadrant sampling to better characterize the influence of wind, and indoor sampling in the loading dock and

  9. Hot Spots and Hot Times: Wildlife Road Mortality in a Regional Conservation Corridor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrah, Evelyn; Danby, Ryan K.; Eberhardt, Ewen; Cunnington, Glenn M.; Mitchell, Scott

    2015-10-01

    Strategies to reduce wildlife road mortality have become a significant component of many conservation efforts. However, their success depends on knowledge of the temporal and spatial patterns of mortality. We studied these patterns along the 1000 Islands Parkway in Ontario, Canada, a 37 km road that runs adjacent to the St. Lawrence River and bisects the Algonquin-to-Adirondacks international conservation corridor. Characteristics of all vertebrate road kill were recorded during 209 bicycle surveys conducted from 2008 to 2011. We estimate that over 16,700 vertebrates are killed on the road from April to October each year; most are amphibians, but high numbers of birds, mammals, and reptiles were also found, including six reptiles considered at-risk in Canada. Regression tree analysis was used to assess the importance of seasonality, weather, and traffic on road kill magnitude. All taxa except mammals exhibited distinct temporal peaks corresponding to phases in annual life cycles. Variations in weather and traffic were only important outside these peak times. Getis-Ord analysis was used to identify spatial clusters of mortality. Hot spots were found in all years for all taxa, but locations varied annually. A significant spatial association was found between multiyear hot spots and wetlands. The results underscore the notion that multi-species conservation efforts must account for differences in the seasonality of road mortality among species and that multiple years of data are necessary to identify locations where the greatest conservation good can be achieved. This information can be used to inform mitigation strategies with implications for conservation at regional scales.

  10. Identification of hot spots of malaria transmission for targeted malaria control.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousema, T.; Drakeley, C.; Gesase, S.; Hashim, R.; Magesa, S.; Mosha, F.; Otieno, S.; Carneiro, I.; Cox, J.; Msuya, E.; Kleinschmidt, I.; Maxwell, C.; Greenwood, B.; Riley, E.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Chandramohan, D.; Gosling, R.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Variation in the risk of malaria within populations is a frequently described but poorly understood phenomenon. This heterogeneity creates opportunities for targeted interventions but only if hot spots of malaria transmission can be easily identified. METHODS: We determined spatial

  11. Hot-spot mix in ignition-scale inertial confinement fusion targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, S P; Epstein, R; Hammel, B A; Suter, L J; Scott, H A; Barrios, M A; Bradley, D K; Callahan, D A; Cerjan, C; Collins, G W; Dixit, S N; Döppner, T; Edwards, M J; Farley, D R; Fournier, K B; Glenn, S; Glenzer, S H; Golovkin, I E; Haan, S W; Hamza, A; Hicks, D G; Izumi, N; Jones, O S; Kilkenny, J D; Kline, J L; Kyrala, G A; Landen, O L; Ma, T; MacFarlane, J J; MacKinnon, A J; Mancini, R C; McCrory, R L; Meezan, N B; Meyerhofer, D D; Nikroo, A; Park, H-S; Ralph, J; Remington, B A; Sangster, T C; Smalyuk, V A; Springer, P T; Town, R P J

    2013-07-26

    Mixing of plastic ablator material, doped with Cu and Ge dopants, deep into the hot spot of ignition-scale inertial confinement fusion implosions by hydrodynamic instabilities is diagnosed with x-ray spectroscopy on the National Ignition Facility. The amount of hot-spot mix mass is determined from the absolute brightness of the emergent Cu and Ge K-shell emission. The Cu and Ge dopants placed at different radial locations in the plastic ablator show the ablation-front hydrodynamic instability is primarily responsible for hot-spot mix. Low neutron yields and hot-spot mix mass between 34(-13,+50)  ng and 4000(-2970,+17 160)  ng are observed.

  12. Absence of ras-gene hot-spot mutations in canine fibrosarcomas and melanomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murua Escobar, Hugo; Günther, Kathrin; Richter, Andreas; Soller, Jan T; Winkler, Susanne; Nolte, Ingo; Bullerdiek, Jörn

    2004-01-01

    Point mutations within ras proto-oncogenes, particularly within the mutational hot-spot codons 12, 13 and 61, are frequently detected in human malignancies and in different types of experimentally-induced tumours in animals. So far little is known about ras mutations in naturally occurring canine fibrosarcomas or K-ras mutations in canine melanomas. To elucidate whether ras mutations exist in these naturally occurring tumours in dogs, in the present study we screened 13 canine fibrosarcomas, 2 feline fibrosarcomas and 11 canine melanomas for point mutations, particularly within the mutational hot-spots, making this the first study to investigate a large number of canine fibrosarcomas. None of the samples showed a K- or N-ras hot spot mutation. Thus, our data strongly suggest that ras mutations at the hot-spot loci are very rare and do not play a major role in the pathogenesis of the spontaneously occurring canine tumours investigated.

  13. Effects of Hot-Spot Geometry on Backscattering and Down-Scattering Neutron Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Z. L.; Mannion, O. M.; Forrest, C. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Anderson, K. S.; Radha, P. B.

    2017-10-01

    The measured neutron spectrum produced by a fusion experiment plays a key role in inferring observable quantities. One important observable is the areal density of an implosion, which is inferred by measuring the scattering of neutrons. This project seeks to use particle-transport simulations to model the effects of hot-spot geometry on backscattering and down-scattering neutron spectra along different lines of sight. Implosions similar to those conducted at the Laboratory of Laser Energetics are modeled by neutron transport through a DT plasma and a DT ice shell using the particle transport codes MCNP and IRIS. Effects of hot-spot geometry are obtained by ``detecting'' scattered neutrons along different lines of sight. This process is repeated for various hot-spot geometries representing known shape distortions between the hot spot and the shell. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  14. Controlling Surface-plasmon-polariton Launching with Hot Spot Cylindrical Waves in a Metallic Slit Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Wenjie; Chen, Jianjun; Gong, Qihuang

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures, which are used to generate surface plasmon polaritions (SPPs), always involve sharp corners where the charges can accumulate. This can result in strong localized electromagnetic fields at the metallic corners, forming hot spots. The influence of the hot spots on the propagating SPPs are investigated theoretically and experimentally in a metallic slit structure. It is found that the electromagnetic fields radiated from the hot spots, termed as the hot spot cylindrical wave (HSCW), can greatly manipulate the SPP launching in the slit structure. The physical mechanism behind the manipulation of the SPP launching with the HSCW is explicated by a semi-analytic model. By using the HSCW, unidirectional SPP launching is experimentally realized in an ultra-small metallic step-slit structure. The HSCW bridges the localized surface plasmons and the propagating surface plasmons in an integrated platform and thus may pave a new route to the design of plasmonic devices and circuits.

  15. A feature-based approach to modeling protein–protein interaction hot spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyu-il; Kim, Dongsup; Lee, Doheon

    2009-01-01

    Identifying features that effectively represent the energetic contribution of an individual interface residue to the interactions between proteins remains problematic. Here, we present several new features and show that they are more effective than conventional features. By combining the proposed features with conventional features, we develop a predictive model for interaction hot spots. Initially, 54 multifaceted features, composed of different levels of information including structure, sequence and molecular interaction information, are quantified. Then, to identify the best subset of features for predicting hot spots, feature selection is performed using a decision tree. Based on the selected features, a predictive model for hot spots is created using support vector machine (SVM) and tested on an independent test set. Our model shows better overall predictive accuracy than previous methods such as the alanine scanning methods Robetta and FOLDEF, and the knowledge-based method KFC. Subsequent analysis yields several findings about hot spots. As expected, hot spots have a larger relative surface area burial and are more hydrophobic than other residues. Unexpectedly, however, residue conservation displays a rather complicated tendency depending on the types of protein complexes, indicating that this feature is not good for identifying hot spots. Of the selected features, the weighted atomic packing density, relative surface area burial and weighted hydrophobicity are the top 3, with the weighted atomic packing density proving to be the most effective feature for predicting hot spots. Notably, we find that hot spots are closely related to π–related interactions, especially π · · · π interactions. PMID:19273533

  16. Avoiding Carbon Bed Hot Spots in Thermal Process Off-Gas Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nick Soelberg; Joe Enneking

    2011-05-01

    Mercury has had various uses in nuclear fuel reprocessing and other nuclear processes, and so is often present in radioactive and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes. Test programs performed in recent years have shown that mercury in off-gas streams from processes that treat radioactive wastes can be controlled using fixed beds of activated sulfur-impregnated carbon, to levels low enough to comply with air emission regulations such as the Hazardous Waste Combustor (HWC) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards. Carbon bed hot spots or fires have occurred several times during these tests, and also during a remediation of tanks that contained mixed waste. Hot spots occur when localized areas in a carbon bed become heated to temperatures where oxidation occurs. This heating typically occurs due to heat of absoption of gas species onto the carbon, but it can also be caused through external means such as external heaters used to heat the carbon bed vessel. Hot spots, if not promptly mitigated, can grow into bed fires. Carbon bed hot spots and fires must be avoided in processes that treat radioactive and mixed waste. Hot spots are detected by (a) monitoring in-bed and bed outlet gas temperatures, and (b) more important, monitoring of bed outlet gas CO concentrations. Hot spots are mitigated by (a) designing for appropriate in-bed gas velocity, for avoiding gas flow maldistribution, and for sufficient but not excessive bed depth, (b) appropriate monitoring and control of gas and bed temperatures and compositions, and (c) prompt implementation of corrective actions if bed hot spots are detected. Corrective actions must be implemented quickly if bed hot spots are detected, using a graded approach and sequence starting with corrective actions that are simple, quick, cause the least impact to the process, and are easiest to recover from.

  17. An automated decision-tree approach to predicting protein interaction hot spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnell, Steven J; Page, David; Mitchell, Julie C

    2007-09-01

    Protein-protein interactions can be altered by mutating one or more "hot spots," the subset of residues that account for most of the interface's binding free energy. The identification of hot spots requires a significant experimental effort, highlighting the practical value of hot spot predictions. We present two knowledge-based models that improve the ability to predict hot spots: K-FADE uses shape specificity features calculated by the Fast Atomic Density Evaluation (FADE) program, and K-CON uses biochemical contact features. The combined K-FADE/CON (KFC) model displays better overall predictive accuracy than computational alanine scanning (Robetta-Ala). In addition, because these methods predict different subsets of known hot spots, a large and significant increase in accuracy is achieved by combining KFC and Robetta-Ala. The KFC analysis is applied to the calmodulin (CaM)/smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK) interface, and to the bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2)/BMP receptor-type I (BMPR-IA) interface. The results indicate a strong correlation between KFC hot spot predictions and mutations that significantly reduce the binding affinity of the interface. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Understanding and controlling hot spots of crime: the importance of formal and informal social controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisburd, David; Groff, Elizabeth R; Yang, Sue-Ming

    2014-02-01

    Primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention programs that address opportunity or structural factors related to crime are usually delivered to entire cities, sections of cities or to specific neighborhoods, but our results indicate geographically targeting these programs to specific street segments may increase their efficacy. We link crime incidents to over 24,000 street segments (the two block faces on a street between two intersections) over a 16-year period, and identify distinct developmental patterns of crime at street segments using group-based trajectory analysis. One of these patterns, which we term chronic crime hot spots, includes just 1 % of street segments but is associated with 23 % of crime in the city during the study period. We then employ multinomial regression to identify the specific risk and protective factors that are associated with these crime hot spots. We find that both situational opportunities and social characteristics of places strongly distinguish chronic crime hot spots from areas with little crime. Our findings support recent efforts to decrease crime opportunities at crime hot spots through programs like hot spots policing, but they also suggest that social interventions directed at crime hot spots will be important if we are to do something about crime problems in the long run. We argue in concluding that micro level programs which focus crime prevention efforts on specific street segments have the potential to be less costly and more effective than those targeted at larger areas such as communities or neighborhoods.

  19. Short-lived and discontinuous intraplate volcanism in the South Pacific: Hot spots or extensional volcanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppers, Anthony A. P.; Staudigel, Hubert; Pringle, Malcolm S.; Wijbrans, Jan R.

    2003-10-01

    South Pacific intraplate volcanoes have been active since the Early Cretaceous. Their HIMU-EMI-EMII mantle sources can be traced back into the West Pacific Seamount Province (WPSP) using plate tectonic reconstructions, implying that these distinctive components are enduring features within the Earth's mantle for, at least, the last 120 Myr. These correlations are eminent on the scale of the WPSP and the South Pacific Thermal and Isotopic Anomaly (SOPITA), but the evolution of single hot spots emerges notably more complicated. Hot spots in the WPSP and SOPITA mantle regions typically display intermittent volcanic activity, longevities shorter than 40 Myr, superposition of hot spot volcanism, and motion relative to other hot spots. In this review, we use 40Ar/39Ar seamount ages and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic signatures to map out Cretaceous volcanism in the WPSP and to characterize its evolution with respect to the currently active hot spots in the SOPITA region. Our plate tectonic reconstructions indicate cessation of volcanism during the Cretaceous for the Typhoon and Japanese hot spots; whereas the currently active Samoan, Society, Pitcairn and Marquesas hot spots lack long-lived counterparts in the WPSP. These hot spots may have become active during the last 20 Myr only. The other WPSP seamount trails can be only "indirectly" reconciled with hot spots in the SOPITA region. Complex age distributions in the Magellan, Anewetak, Ralik and Ratak seamount trails would necessitate the superposition of multiple volcanic trails generated by the Macdonald, Rurutu and Rarotonga hot spots during the Cretaceous; whereas HIMU-type seamounts in the Southern Wake seamount trail would require 350-500 km of hot spot motion over the last 100 Myr following its origination along the Mangaia-Rurutu "hotline" in the Cook-Austral Islands. These observations, however, violate all assumptions of the classical Wilson-Morgan hot spot hypothesis, indicating that long-lived, deep and fixed mantle

  20. Prediction of hot spots in protein interfaces using a random forest model with hybrid features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Zhang, Xiang-Sun; Chen, Luonan

    2012-03-01

    Prediction of hot spots in protein interfaces provides crucial information for the research on protein-protein interaction and drug design. Existing machine learning methods generally judge whether a given residue is likely to be a hot spot by extracting features only from the target residue. However, hot spots usually form a small cluster of residues which are tightly packed together at the center of protein interface. With this in mind, we present a novel method to extract hybrid features which incorporate a wide range of information of the target residue and its spatially neighboring residues, i.e. the nearest contact residue in the other face (mirror-contact residue) and the nearest contact residue in the same face (intra-contact residue). We provide a novel random forest (RF) model to effectively integrate these hybrid features for predicting hot spots in protein interfaces. Our method can achieve accuracy (ACC) of 82.4% and Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.482 in Alanine Scanning Energetics Database, and ACC of 77.6% and MCC of 0.429 in Binding Interface Database. In a comparison study, performance of our RF model exceeds other existing methods, such as Robetta, FOLDEF, KFC, KFC2, MINERVA and HotPoint. Of our hybrid features, three physicochemical features of target residues (mass, polarizability and isoelectric point), the relative side-chain accessible surface area and the average depth index of mirror-contact residues are found to be the main discriminative features in hot spots prediction. We also confirm that hot spots tend to form large contact surface areas between two interacting proteins. Source data and code are available at: http://www.aporc.org/doc/wiki/HotSpot.

  1. APIS: accurate prediction of hot spots in protein interfaces by combining protrusion index with solvent accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jun-Feng; Zhao, Xing-Ming; Song, Jiangning; Huang, De-Shuang

    2010-04-08

    It is well known that most of the binding free energy of protein interaction is contributed by a few key hot spot residues. These residues are crucial for understanding the function of proteins and studying their interactions. Experimental hot spots detection methods such as alanine scanning mutagenesis are not applicable on a large scale since they are time consuming and expensive. Therefore, reliable and efficient computational methods for identifying hot spots are greatly desired and urgently required. In this work, we introduce an efficient approach that uses support vector machine (SVM) to predict hot spot residues in protein interfaces. We systematically investigate a wide variety of 62 features from a combination of protein sequence and structure information. Then, to remove redundant and irrelevant features and improve the prediction performance, feature selection is employed using the F-score method. Based on the selected features, nine individual-feature based predictors are developed to identify hot spots using SVMs. Furthermore, a new ensemble classifier, namely APIS (A combined model based on Protrusion Index and Solvent accessibility), is developed to further improve the prediction accuracy. The results on two benchmark datasets, ASEdb and BID, show that this proposed method yields significantly better prediction accuracy than those previously published in the literature. In addition, we also demonstrate the predictive power of our proposed method by modelling two protein complexes: the calmodulin/myosin light chain kinase complex and the heat shock locus gene products U and V complex, which indicate that our method can identify more hot spots in these two complexes compared with other state-of-the-art methods. We have developed an accurate prediction model for hot spot residues, given the structure of a protein complex. A major contribution of this study is to propose several new features based on the protrusion index of amino acid residues, which

  2. Joule heating hot spot at high latitudes in the afternoon sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, L.; Aikio, A. T.; Milan, S. E.

    2016-07-01

    The afternoon Joule heating hot spot has been studied statistically by using the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR) measurements at 75.4° Corrected Geomagnetic latitude (CGMLAT) and the OMNI solar wind data base. For a small subset of events, the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) field-aligned current distributions have been available. The main results are as follows. Afternoon Joule heating hot spots are associated with high values of ionospheric electric fields and slightly enhanced Pedersen conductances. The Joule heating hot spot values are larger in summer than in winter, which can be explained by the higher Pedersen conductances during summer than winter. The afternoon Joule heating hot spots are located close to the reversals of the large-scale field-aligned current systems. The most common location is close to the Region 1/Region 2 boundary and those events are associated with sunward convecting F region plasma. In a few cases, the hot spots take place close to the Region 1/Region 0 boundary and then the ionospheric plasma is convecting antisunward. The hot spots may occur both during slow (450 km/s) speed solar wind conditions. During slow-speed solar wind events, the dominant interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) direction is southward, which is the general requirement for the low-latitude magnetic merging at the dayside magnetopause. During high-speed solar wind, also northward IMF conditions appear, but those are associated with large values of the IMF |By| component, making again the dayside magnetopause merging possible. Finally, the measured afternoon hot spot Joule heating rates are not a linear function of the solar wind energy coupling function.

  3. Robust identification of binding hot spots using continuum electrostatics: application to hen egg-white lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, David H; Grove, Laurie E; Yueh, Christine; Ngan, Chi Ho; Kozakov, Dima; Vajda, Sandor

    2011-12-28

    Binding hot spots, protein regions with high binding affinity, can be identified by using X-ray crystallography or NMR spectroscopy to screen libraries of small organic molecules that tend to cluster at such hot spots. FTMap, a direct computational analogue of the experimental screening approaches, uses 16 different probe molecules for global sampling of the surface of a target protein on a dense grid and evaluates the energy of interaction using an empirical energy function that includes a continuum electrostatic term. Energy evaluation is based on the fast Fourier transform correlation approach, which allows for the sampling of billions of probe positions. The grid sampling is followed by off-grid minimization that uses a more detailed energy expression with a continuum electrostatics term. FTMap identifies the hot spots as consensus clusters formed by overlapping clusters of several probes. The hot spots are ranked on the basis of the number of probe clusters, which predicts their binding propensity. We applied FTMap to nine structures of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL), whose hot spots have been extensively studied by both experimental and computational methods. FTMap found the primary hot spot in site C of all nine structures, in spite of conformational differences. In addition, secondary hot spots in sites B and D that are known to be important for the binding of polysaccharide substrates were found. The predicted probe-protein interactions agree well with those seen in the complexes of HEWL with various ligands and also agree with an NMR-based study of HEWL in aqueous solutions of eight organic solvents. We argue that FTMap provides more complete information on the HEWL binding site than previous computational methods and yields fewer false-positive binding locations than the X-ray structures of HEWL from crystals soaked in organic solvents. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  4. Hot subdwarf formation: Confronting theory with observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geier S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The formation of hot subdwarf stars is still unclear. Both single-star and binary scenarios have been proposed to explain the properties of these evolved stars situated at the extreme blue end of the horizontal branch. The observational evidence gathered in the last decade, which revealed high fractions of binaries, shifted the focus from the single-star to the binary formation scenarios. Common envelope ejection, stable Roche lobe overflow and the merger of helium white dwarfs seemed to be sufficient to explain the formation of both the binary as well as the remaining single hot subdwarfs. However, most recent and rather unexpected observations challenge the standard binary evolution scenarios.

  5. Importance of nitrogen cycling hot spots in an alpine-subalpine ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrouzet-Nardi, A.; Bowman, W. D.

    2009-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) availability in soils is influenced by many microbially catalyzed reactions such as N fixation, denitrification, and N mineralization from soil organic matter (SOM). Reaction rates for these processes are heterogeneous across landscapes, often forming hot spots that have disproportionately high N cycling activity. N cycling hot spots have been documented in many ecosystems at hourly to weekly times scales; however, much less is known about the persistence and importance of N cycling hot spots over longer times scales. Furthermore, few studies have investigated multiple landscape-level measurements of different N cycling processes at the same site. Using a mathematical definition of hot spots, a time series of short-term measurements, ion exchange resins deployed for one year, and nitrogen isotopic signatures in SOM, we investigated the importance of hot spots over longer time scales in a 0.89 km2 alpine-subalpine ecosystem at the Niwot Ridge LTER site. Measurements of KCl-extractable inorganic N taken on multiple measurement dates showed that hot moments of N availabilty occurred in some but not all parts of the study site and at varying times throughout the season. Ion exchange resins deployed for one year showed that N availability hot spots were important though not completely dominant over one year (14% of values accounted for 58% of total resin-extractable inorganic N observed). In contrast, isotopic signatures in 219 SOM samples were well approximated by a normal distribution, suggesting that landscape-level N losses through leaching or gas efflux were more constrained. Denitrification was the possible exception: we saw evidence for several likely hot spots in the wetland areas of our study site. The results of this study suggest that short-term hot spots are important for plant ecological dynamics at our study site and for denitrification, but that long-term N cycling hot spots are less important for other parts of the soil N cycle such as N

  6. How to deal with the annoying Hot Spots in FEA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenninggaard, Jon

    2017-01-01

    How do we deal with the annoying ”Hot Spots” in our solid structure Finite Element Analysis (FEA) and how do we justify the stresses in those areas?......How do we deal with the annoying ”Hot Spots” in our solid structure Finite Element Analysis (FEA) and how do we justify the stresses in those areas?...

  7. EDF experience with {open_quotes}hot spot{close_quotes} management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guio, J.M. de [Blayais Nuclear Power Plant, St. Ciers (France)

    1995-03-01

    During the past few years, {open_quotes}hot spots{close_quotes} due to the presence of particles of metal activated during their migration through the reactor core, have been detected at several French pressurized water reactor (PWR) units. These {open_quotes}hot spots,{close_quotes} which generate very high dose rates (from about 10 Gy/h to 200 G/h) are a significant factor in increase occupational exposures during outrates. Of particular concern are the difficult cases which prolong outage duration and increase the volume of radiological waste. Confronted with this situation, Electricite de France (EDF) has set up a national research group, as part of its ALARA program, to establish procedures and techniques to avoid, detect, and eliminate of hot spots. In particular, specific processes have been developed to eliminate these hot spots which are most costly in terms of occupational exposure due to the need for reactor maintenance. This paper sets out the general approach adopted at EDF so far to cope with the problem of hot spots, illustrated by experience at Blayais 3 and 4.

  8. Protein binding hot spots prediction from sequence only by a new ensemble learning method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shan-Shan; Chen, Peng; Wang, Bing; Li, Jinyan

    2017-10-01

    Hot spots are interfacial core areas of binding proteins, which have been applied as targets in drug design. Experimental methods are costly in both time and expense to locate hot spot areas. Recently, in-silicon computational methods have been widely used for hot spot prediction through sequence or structure characterization. As the structural information of proteins is not always solved, and thus hot spot identification from amino acid sequences only is more useful for real-life applications. This work proposes a new sequence-based model that combines physicochemical features with the relative accessible surface area of amino acid sequences for hot spot prediction. The model consists of 83 classifiers involving the IBk (Instance-based k means) algorithm, where instances are encoded by important properties extracted from a total of 544 properties in the AAindex1 (Amino Acid Index) database. Then top-performance classifiers are selected to form an ensemble by a majority voting technique. The ensemble classifier outperforms the state-of-the-art computational methods, yielding an F1 score of 0.80 on the benchmark binding interface database (BID) test set. http://www2.ahu.edu.cn/pchen/web/HotspotEC.htm .

  9. Five-way smoking status classification using text hot-spot identification and error-correcting output codes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cohen, Aaron M

    2008-01-01

    .... Our submission included several techniques that we compared and studied, including hot-spot identification, zero-vector filtering, inverse class frequency weighting, error-correcting output codes...

  10. Detecting fluorescence hot-spots using mosaic maps generated from multimodal endoscope imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chenying; Soper, Timothy D.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2013-03-01

    Fluorescence labeled biomarkers can be detected during endoscopy to guide early cancer biopsies, such as high-grade dysplasia in Barrett's Esophagus. To enhance intraoperative visualization of the fluorescence hot-spots, a mosaicking technique was developed to create full anatomical maps of the lower esophagus and associated fluorescent hot-spots. The resultant mosaic map contains overlaid reflectance and fluorescence images. It can be used to assist biopsy and document findings. The mosaicking algorithm uses reflectance images to calculate image registration between successive frames, and apply this registration to simultaneously acquired fluorescence images. During this mosaicking process, the fluorescence signal is enhanced through multi-frame averaging. Preliminary results showed that the technique promises to enhance the detectability of the hot-spots due to enhanced fluorescence signal.

  11. Calculation methods study on hot spot stress of new girder structure detail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ping; Zhao, Renda; Jia, Yi; Wei, Xing

    2017-10-01

    To study modeling calculation methods of new girder structure detail's hot spot stress, based on surface extrapolation method among hot spot stress method, a few finite element analysis models of this welded detail were established by finite element software ANSYS. The influence of element type, mesh density, different local modeling methods of the weld toe and extrapolation methods was analyzed on hot spot stress calculation results at the toe of welds. The results show that the difference of the normal stress in the thickness direction and the surface direction among different models is larger when the distance from the weld toe is smaller. When the distance from the toe is greater than 0.5t, the normal stress of solid models, shell models with welds and non-weld shell models tends to be consistent along the surface direction. Therefore, it is recommended that the extrapolated point should be selected outside the 0.5t for new girder welded detail. According to the results of the calculation and analysis, shell models have good grid stability, and extrapolated hot spot stress of solid models is smaller than that of shell models. So it is suggested that formula 2 and solid45 should be carried out during the hot spot stress extrapolation calculation of this welded detail. For each finite element model under different shell modeling methods, the results calculated by formula 2 are smaller than those of the other two methods, and the results of shell models with welds are the largest. Under the same local mesh density, the extrapolated hot spot stress decreases gradually with the increase of the number of layers in the thickness direction of the main plate, and the variation range is within 7.5%.

  12. Evaluating hot spot-ridge interaction in the Atlantic from regional-scale seismic observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaherty, James B.; Dunn, Robert A.

    2007-05-01

    We probe variations in mantle temperature, composition, and fabric along hot spot-influenced sections of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), using surface waves from nearby ridge earthquakes recorded on broadband island-based seismic stations. We invert frequency-dependent phase delays from these events to estimate one-dimensional mean shear velocity and radial shear anisotropy profiles in the upper 200 km of the mantle within two seafloor age intervals: 5-10 Ma and 15-20 Ma. Mean shear velocity profiles correlate with apparent hot spot flux: lithosphere formed near the low-flux Ascension hot spot is characterized by high mantle velocities, while the MAR near the higher-flux Azores hot spot has lower velocities. The impact of the high-flux Iceland hot spot on mantle velocities along the nearby MAR is strongly asymmetric: the lithospheric velocities near the Kolbeinsey ridge are moderately slow, while velocities near the Reykjanes ridge estimated in previous studies are much slower. Within each region the increase in shear velocity with age is consistent with a half-space cooling model, and the velocity variations observed between Ascension, the Azores, and Kolbeinsey are consistent with approximately ±75° potential-temperature variation among these sites. In comparison, the Reykjanes lithosphere is too slow to result purely from half-space cooling of a high-temperature mantle source. We speculate that the anomalously low shear velocities within the lithosphere produced at the Reykjanes ridge result from high asthenospheric temperatures of +50-75 K combined with ˜12% (by volume) gabbro retained in the mantle due to the imbalance between high hot spot-influenced melt production and relatively inefficient melt extraction along the slow spreading Reykjanes. Radial shear anisotropy in the upper 150 km also indicates an apparent hot spot influence: mantle fabric near Ascension is quite weak, consistent with previous models of anisotropy produced by corner flow during slow

  13. Semi-automatic Epileptic Hot Spot Detection in ECD brain SPECT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Laszlo; Zuhayra, Maaz; Henze, Eberhard

    A method is proposed to process ECD brain SPECT images representing epileptic hot spots inside the brain. For validation 35 ictal —interictal patient image data were processed. The images were registered by a normalized mutual information method, then the separation of the suspicious and normal brain areas were performed by two threshold-based segmentations. Normalization between the images was performed by local normal brain mean values. Based on the validation made by two medical physicians, minimal human intervention in the segmentation parameters was necessary to detect all epileptic spots and minimize the number of false spots inside the brain.

  14. Semi-Supervised Transductive Hot Spot Predictor Working on Multiple Assumptions

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2014-05-23

    Protein-protein interactions are critically dependent on just a few residues (“hot spots”) at the interfaces. Hot spots make a dominant contribution to the binding free energy and if mutated they can disrupt the interaction. As mutagenesis studies require significant experimental efforts, there exists a need for accurate and reliable computational hot spot prediction methods. Compared to the supervised hot spot prediction algorithms, the semi-supervised prediction methods can take into consideration both the labeled and unlabeled residues in the dataset during the prediction procedure. The transductive support vector machine has been utilized for this task and demonstrated a better prediction performance. To the best of our knowledge, however, none of the transductive semi-supervised algorithms takes all the three semisupervised assumptions, i.e., smoothness, cluster and manifold assumptions, together into account during learning. In this paper, we propose a novel semi-supervised method for hot spot residue prediction, by considering all the three semisupervised assumptions using nonlinear models. Our algorithm, IterPropMCS, works in an iterative manner. In each iteration, the algorithm first propagates the labels of the labeled residues to the unlabeled ones, along the shortest path between them on a graph, assuming that they lie on a nonlinear manifold. Then it selects the most confident residues as the labeled ones for the next iteration, according to the cluster and smoothness criteria, which is implemented by a nonlinear density estimator. Experiments on a benchmark dataset, using protein structure-based features, demonstrate that our approach is effective in predicting hot spots and compares favorably to other available methods. The results also show that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art transductive learning methods.

  15. Non-equilibrium between ions and electrons inside hot spots from National Ignition Facility experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengfeng Fan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The non-equilibrium between ions and electrons in the hot spot can relax the ignition conditions in inertial confinement fusion [Fan et al., Phys. Plasmas 23, 010703 (2016], and obvious ion-electron non-equilibrium could be observed by our simulations of high-foot implosions when the ion-electron relaxation is enlarged by a factor of 2. On the other hand, in many shots of high-foot implosions on the National Ignition Facility, the observed X-ray enhancement factors due to ablator mixing into the hot spot are less than unity assuming electrons and ions have the same temperature [Meezan et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 062703 (2015], which is not self-consistent because it can lead to negative ablator mixing into the hot spot. Actually, this non-consistency implies ion-electron non-equilibrium within the hot spot. From our study, we can infer that ion-electron non-equilibrium exists in high-foot implosions and the ion temperature could be ∼9% larger than the equilibrium temperature in some NIF shots.

  16. Hot-Spot Engineering in 3D Multi-Branched Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chirumamilla, Manohar; Chirumamilla, Anisha; Roberts, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The detection of probe molecules at ultralow concentrations, even at the single-molecule level, can be addressed with the breakthrough concept of plasmonic hot-spot engineering. In view of that, the fabrication of nanostructures endowed with sub-10 nm gaps and extremely large near-field enhanceme...

  17. A novel approach to detect hot-spots in large-scale multivariate data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendrick Keith M

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Progressive advances in the measurement of complex multifactorial components of biological processes involving both spatial and temporal domains have made it difficult to identify the variables (genes, proteins, neurons etc. significantly changed activities in response to a stimulus within large data sets using conventional statistical approaches. The set of all changed variables is termed hot-spots. The detection of such hot spots is considered to be an NP hard problem, but by first establishing its theoretical foundation we have been able to develop an algorithm that provides a solution. Results Our results show that a first-order phase transition is observable whose critical point separates the hot-spot set from the remaining variables. Its application is also found to be more successful than existing approaches in identifying statistically significant hot-spots both with simulated data sets and in real large-scale multivariate data sets from gene arrays, electrophysiological recording and functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments. Conclusion In summary, this new statistical algorithm should provide a powerful new analytical tool to extract the maximum information from complex biological multivariate data.

  18. THE PROBLEM OF HOT-SPOTS IN MICROWAVE EQUIPMENT USED FOR PREPARATORY TECHNIQUES - THEORY AND PRACTICE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KOK, LP; BOON, ME; SMID, HM

    1993-01-01

    Electron microscopists who wants to use a microwave (MW) oven to stimulate preparatory processes are sooner or later confronted with the problem of hot spots. It soon becomes clear to the user of any MW oven that the energy distribution-thus the speed of absorbing energy, and hence warming up-varies

  19. X-ray Radiation Mechanisms and the Beaming Effect of Hot Spots ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Astr. (2011) 32, 193–196 c Indian Academy of Sciences. X-ray Radiation Mechanisms and the Beaming Effect of Hot Spots and Knots in AGN Jets. Jin Zhang1,∗. , Jin-Ming Bai2, Liang Chen2 & Enwei Liang3. 1College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Guangxi Teachers Education University,. Nanning 530001, China.

  20. Narrow-bandwidth high-order harmonics driven by long-duration hot spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, Maxim; Kfir, Ofer; Fleischer, Avner; Kaplan, Alex; Carmon, Tal; Schwefel, Harald G. L.; Bartal, Guy; Cohen, Oren

    2012-06-01

    We predict and investigate the emission of high-order harmonics by atoms that cross intense laser hot spots that last for a nanosecond or longer. An atom that moves through a nanometer-scale hot spot at characteristic thermal velocity can emit high-order harmonics in a similar fashion to an atom that is irradiated by a short-duration (picosecond-scale) laser pulse. We analyze the collective emission from a thermal gas and from a jet of atoms. In both cases, the line shape of a high-order harmonic exhibits a narrow spike with spectral width that is determined by the bandwidth of the driving laser. Finally, we discuss a scheme for producing long-duration laser hot spots with intensity in the range of the intensity threshold for high-harmonic generation. In the proposed scheme, the hot spot is produced by a long laser pulse that is consecutively coupled to a high-quality micro-resonator and a metallic nano-antenna. This system may be used for generating ultra-narrow bandwidth extreme-ultraviolet radiation through frequency up-conversion of a low-cost compact pump laser.

  1. A Machine Learning Approach for Hot-Spot Detection at Protein-Protein Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melo, Rita; Fieldhouse, Robert; Melo, André; Correia, João D G; Cordeiro, Maria Natália D S; Gümüş, Zeynep H; Costa, Joaquim; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; de Sousa Moreira, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Understanding protein-protein interactions is a key challenge in biochemistry. In this work, we describe a more accurate methodology to predict Hot-Spots (HS) in protein-protein interfaces from their native complex structure compared to previous published Machine Learning (ML) techniques. Our model

  2. Obtaining realistic exposure estimates around hot spots using probabilistic uncertainty analysis: An elk foraging model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appling, J.W.; Pye, L.H. [Woodward-Clyde Consultants, Denver, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Screening level risk assessments for both human health and ecological receptors conducted using chemical concentrations found at hot spots often overestimate exposure and risk when the exposure area is larger than the hot spot. Making reasonable remedial decisions is difficult when risk is overestimated. Alternate methods of estimating exposure concentrations such as averaging over the area of the site may over or underestimate exposure. The authors have developed a Monte Carlo application to simulate probable large herbivore exposures to stack emissions deposited on forage under different time scenarios. The method generates a distribution of probable exposure concentrations assuming the herbivore may wander off the unfenced site and combines this with literature-based distributions of forage intake and exposure area estimates. Application of the model to realistic data sets shows that under some circumstances, when hot spot concentration exceed trigger levels, it can be shown that actual exposures are not likely to exceed trigger levels, and that if exceedances occur, they are unlikely to have significant impacts on the exposed population. If risk is excessive, remedial alternatives can be evaluated to see if they achieve acceptable risk levels. The method potentially has wide application in human and ecological risk assessments when hot spots are smaller than exposure areas for either individuals or populations.

  3. The Physics of Long- and Intermediate-Wavelength Asymmetries of the Hot Spot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, A.; Betti, R.; Shvarts, D.

    2017-10-01

    The effect of asymmetries on the inertial confinement fusion implosion yield and stagnation pressure will be presented. The asymmetries are divided into low l and intermediate 6 modes by comparing the wavelength with the hot-spot radius. Long-wavelength modes introduce substantial nonradial motion, whereas intermediate-wavelength modes involve more cooling by thermal losses. It is found that for distorted hot spots, the measured neutron-averaged properties can be very different from the real hydrodynamic conditions. This is because mass ablation driven by thermal conduction introduces flows in the Rayleigh-Taylor bubbles that results in pressure variations, in addition to temperature variations between the bubbles and the neutron-producing region. The yield degradation-with respect to the symmetric case-results primarily from a reduction in the hot-spot pressure for low modes and from a reduction in burn volume for intermediate modes. A general expression is found relating the pressure degradation to the residual shell energy and the flow within the hot spot (i.e., the total residual energy). This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and by the LLNL under subcontract B614207.

  4. Protein binding hot spots and the residue-residue pairing preference: a water exclusion perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jinyan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A protein binding hot spot is a small cluster of residues tightly packed at the center of the interface between two interacting proteins. Though a hot spot constitutes a small fraction of the interface, it is vital to the stability of protein complexes. Recently, there are a series of hypotheses proposed to characterize binding hot spots, including the pioneering O-ring theory, the insightful 'coupling' and 'hot region' principle, and our 'double water exclusion' (DWE hypothesis. As the perspective changes from the O-ring theory to the DWE hypothesis, we examine the physicochemical properties of the binding hot spots under the new hypothesis and compare with those under the O-ring theory. Results The requirements for a cluster of residues to form a hot spot under the DWE hypothesis can be mathematically satisfied by a biclique subgraph if a vertex is used to represent a residue, an edge to indicate a close distance between two residues, and a bipartite graph to represent a pair of interacting proteins. We term these hot spots as DWE bicliques. We identified DWE bicliques from crystal packing contacts, obligate and non-obligate interactions. Our comparative study revealed that there are abundant unique bicliques to the biological interactions, indicating specific biological binding behaviors in contrast to crystal packing. The two sub-types of biological interactions also have their own signature bicliques. In our analysis on residue compositions and residue pairing preferences in DWE bicliques, the focus was on interaction-preferred residues (ipRs and interaction-preferred residue pairs (ipRPs. It is observed that hydrophobic residues are heavily involved in the ipRs and ipRPs of the obligate interactions; and that aromatic residues are in favor in the ipRs and ipRPs of the biological interactions, especially in those of the non-obligate interactions. In contrast, the ipRs and ipRPs in crystal packing are dominated by

  5. Protein binding hot spots and the residue-residue pairing preference: a water exclusion perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Li, Jinyan

    2010-05-12

    A protein binding hot spot is a small cluster of residues tightly packed at the center of the interface between two interacting proteins. Though a hot spot constitutes a small fraction of the interface, it is vital to the stability of protein complexes. Recently, there are a series of hypotheses proposed to characterize binding hot spots, including the pioneering O-ring theory, the insightful 'coupling' and 'hot region' principle, and our 'double water exclusion' (DWE) hypothesis. As the perspective changes from the O-ring theory to the DWE hypothesis, we examine the physicochemical properties of the binding hot spots under the new hypothesis and compare with those under the O-ring theory. The requirements for a cluster of residues to form a hot spot under the DWE hypothesis can be mathematically satisfied by a biclique subgraph if a vertex is used to represent a residue, an edge to indicate a close distance between two residues, and a bipartite graph to represent a pair of interacting proteins. We term these hot spots as DWE bicliques. We identified DWE bicliques from crystal packing contacts, obligate and non-obligate interactions. Our comparative study revealed that there are abundant unique bicliques to the biological interactions, indicating specific biological binding behaviors in contrast to crystal packing. The two sub-types of biological interactions also have their own signature bicliques. In our analysis on residue compositions and residue pairing preferences in DWE bicliques, the focus was on interaction-preferred residues (ipRs) and interaction-preferred residue pairs (ipRPs). It is observed that hydrophobic residues are heavily involved in the ipRs and ipRPs of the obligate interactions; and that aromatic residues are in favor in the ipRs and ipRPs of the biological interactions, especially in those of the non-obligate interactions. In contrast, the ipRs and ipRPs in crystal packing are dominated by hydrophilic residues, and most of the anti-ipRs of

  6. High-temperature hot spots on Io as seen by the Galileo solid state imaging (SSI) experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, A.S.; Simonelli, D.P.; Senske, D.R.; Klaasen, K.P.; Keszthelyi, L.; Johnson, T.V.; Geissler, P.E.; Carr, M.H.; Belton, M.J.S.

    1997-01-01

    High-temperature hot spots on Io have been imaged at ???50 km spatial resolution by Galileo's CCD imaging system (SSI). Images were acquired during eclipses (Io in Jupiter's shadow) via the SSI clear filter (???0.4-1.0 ??m), detecting emissions from both small intense hot spots and diffuse extended glows associated with Io's atmosphere and plumes. A total of 13 hot spots have been detected over ???70% of Io's surface. Each hot spot falls precisely on a low-albedo feature corresponding to a caldera floor and/or lava flow. The hot-spot temperatures must exceed ???700 K for detection by SSI. Observations at wavelengths longer than those available to SSI require that most of these hot spots actually have significantly higher temperatures (???1000 K or higher) and cover small areas. The high-temperature hot spots probably mark the locations of active silicate volcanism, supporting suggestions that the eruption and near-surface movement of silicate magma drives the heat flow and volcanic activity of Io. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Identification of a new genomic hot spot of evolutionary diversification of protein function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Winkelmann

    Full Text Available Establishment of phylogenetic relationships remains a challenging task because it is based on computational analysis of genomic hot spots that display species-specific sequence variations. Here, we identify a species-specific thymine-to-guanine sequence variation in the Glrb gene which gives rise to species-specific splice donor sites in the Glrb genes of mouse and bushbaby. The resulting splice insert in the receptor for the inhibitory neurotransmitter glycine (GlyR conveys synaptic receptor clustering and specific association with a particular synaptic plasticity-related splice variant of the postsynaptic scaffold protein gephyrin. This study identifies a new genomic hot spot which contributes to phylogenetic diversification of protein function and advances our understanding of phylogenetic relationships.

  8. Rapid experimental SAD phasing and hot-spot identification with halogenated fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph D. Bauman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Through X-ray crystallographic fragment screening, 4-bromopyrazole was discovered to be a `magic bullet' that is capable of binding at many of the ligand `hot spots' found in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT. The binding locations can be in pockets that are `hidden' in the unliganded crystal form, allowing rapid identification of these sites for in silico screening. In addition to hot-spot identification, this ubiquitous yet specific binding provides an avenue for X-ray crystallographic phase determination, which can be a significant bottleneck in the determination of the structures of novel proteins. The anomalous signal from 4-bromopyrazole or 4-iodopyrazole was sufficient to determine the structures of three proteins (HIV-1 RT, influenza A endonuclease and proteinase K by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD from single crystals. Both compounds are inexpensive, readily available, safe and very soluble in DMSO or water, allowing efficient soaking into crystals.

  9. Exploring User Acceptance Of Free Wireless Fidelity Public Hot Spots: An Emperical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezejiofo Patrick Udeh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Research regarding commercial and free wireless fidelity (Wi-Fi public hot spots acceptance and adoption is sketchy. Therefore, it has become imperative to understand the critical factors that affect their acceptance. The focus of this study is free Wi-Fi public hot spot users, with the objective to better understand their user acceptance. In doing so, this study integrated two well-established initial acceptance models, specifically, the technology acceptance model and the diffusion of innovation theory. This study was conducted using an on-line survey that collected data from 129 users. It uses the Partial Least Square (PLS technique to examine the relationship between variables. The results indicate that each critical factor has direct or indirect positive effects on current use and/or future use intention, which confirmed the majority of the proposed hypotheses. Relative advantage emerged as the only construct with a direct positive effect on both current use and future use intentions.

  10. Page 1 100 R K Rout and A Shyam (or lost) if hot spot expands ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    flow per unit area in longitudinal and radial direction, Bºy and 3rd are free-free and free-bound bremsstrahlung coefficients. nn, T, and In are hot spot density, temperature. (ion and electron temperatures are assumed to be equal) and current. qen = -2.5 k T. Jºſe (6) qar = % ha Th/dr (7). & = 3nak T. (8). Jah = 0, E-, + (pºd Tiſdz ...

  11. Analysis of Binding Site Hot Spots on the Surface of Ras GTPase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhrman, Greg; O; #8242; Connor, Casey; Zerbe, Brandon; Kearney, Bradley M.; Napoleon, Raeanne; Kovrigina, Elizaveta A.; Vajda, Sandor; Kozakov, Dima; Kovrigin, Evgenii L.; Mattos, Carla (NCSU); (MCW); (BU)

    2012-09-17

    We have recently discovered an allosteric switch in Ras, bringing an additional level of complexity to this GTPase whose mutants are involved in nearly 30% of cancers. Upon activation of the allosteric switch, there is a shift in helix 3/loop 7 associated with a disorder to order transition in the active site. Here, we use a combination of multiple solvent crystal structures and computational solvent mapping (FTMap) to determine binding site hot spots in the 'off' and 'on' allosteric states of the GTP-bound form of H-Ras. Thirteen sites are revealed, expanding possible target sites for ligand binding well beyond the active site. Comparison of FTMaps for the H and K isoforms reveals essentially identical hot spots. Furthermore, using NMR measurements of spin relaxation, we determined that K-Ras exhibits global conformational dynamics very similar to those we previously reported for H-Ras. We thus hypothesize that the global conformational rearrangement serves as a mechanism for allosteric coupling between the effector interface and remote hot spots in all Ras isoforms. At least with respect to the binding sites involving the G domain, H-Ras is an excellent model for K-Ras and probably N-Ras as well. Ras has so far been elusive as a target for drug design. The present work identifies various unexplored hot spots throughout the entire surface of Ras, extending the focus from the disordered active site to well-ordered locations that should be easier to target.

  12. Characterization of hot spots in microstructured reactors for fast and exothermic reactions in mixing regime

    OpenAIRE

    Haber, Julien; Kashid, Madhavanand N.; Borhani, Navid; Jiang, Bo; Maeder, Thomas; Thome, John Richard; Renken, Albert; Kiwi-Minsker, Lioubov

    2012-01-01

    The intensification of fast exothermic reactions can be achieved by using microstructured reactors (MSR) which provide improved mass & heat transfer rates leading to higher overall reaction kinetics. But for highly exothermic reactions the heat evacuation becomes not efficient enough and unwanted hot spots are formed. In this study, first the mixing in MSR is quantified for different geometries and then temperature profiles are measured using a novel quantitative IR-thermometry method. The re...

  13. Single-Molecule Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering: Can STEM/EELS Image Electromagnetic Hot Spots?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsaleh-Kohan, Nasrin; Iberi, Vighter; Simmons, Philip D; Bigelow, Nicholas W; Vaschillo, Alex; Rowland, Meng M; Best, Michael D; Pennycook, Stephen J; Masiello, David J; Guiton, Beth S; Camden, Jon P

    2012-08-16

    Since the observation of single-molecule surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SMSERS) in 1997, questions regarding the nature of the electromagnetic hot spots responsible for such observations still persist. For the first time, we employ electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) to obtain maps of the localized surface plasmon modes of SMSERS-active nanostructures, which are resolved in both space and energy. Single-molecule character is confirmed by the bianalyte approach using two isotopologues of Rhodamine 6G. Surprisingly, the STEM/EELS plasmon maps do not show any direct signature of an electromagnetic hot spot in the gaps between the nanoparticles. The origins of this observation are explored using a fully three-dimensional electrodynamics simulation of both the electron-energy-loss probability and the near-electric field enhancements. The calculations suggest that electron beam excitation of the hot spot is possible, but only when the electron beam is located outside of the junction region.

  14. Predictions of hot spot residues at protein-protein interfaces using support vector machines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Lise

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interactions are critically dependent on just a few 'hot spot' residues at the interface. Hot spots make a dominant contribution to the free energy of binding and they can disrupt the interaction if mutated to alanine. Here, we present HSPred, a support vector machine(SVM-based method to predict hot spot residues, given the structure of a complex. HSPred represents an improvement over a previously described approach (Lise et al, BMC Bioinformatics 2009, 10:365. It achieves higher accuracy by treating separately predictions involving either an arginine or a glutamic acid residue. These are the amino acid types on which the original model did not perform well. We have therefore developed two additional SVM classifiers, specifically optimised for these cases. HSPred reaches an overall precision and recall respectively of 61% and 69%, which roughly corresponds to a 10% improvement. An implementation of the described method is available as a web server at http://bioinf.cs.ucl.ac.uk/hspred. It is free to non-commercial users.

  15. The Uses and Impacts of Mobile Computing Technology in Hot Spots Policing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koper, Christopher S; Lum, Cynthia; Hibdon, Julie

    2015-12-01

    Recent technological advances have much potential for improving police performance, but there has been little research testing whether they have made police more effective in reducing crime. To study the uses and crime control impacts of mobile computing technology in the context of geographically focused "hot spots" patrols. An experiment was conducted using 18 crime hot spots in a suburban jurisdiction. Nine of these locations were randomly selected to receive additional patrols over 11 weeks. Researchers studied officers' use of mobile information technology (IT) during the patrols using activity logs and interviews. Nonrandomized subgroup and multivariate analyses were employed to determine if and how the effects of the patrols varied based on these patterns. Officers used mobile computing technology primarily for surveillance and enforcement (e.g., checking automobile license plates and running checks on people during traffic stops and field interviews), and they noted both advantages and disadvantages to its use. Officers did not often use technology for strategic problem-solving and crime prevention. Given sufficient (but modest) dosages, the extra patrols reduced crime at the hot spots, but this effect was smaller in places where officers made greater use of technology. Basic applications of mobile computing may have little if any direct, measurable impact on officers' ability to reduce crime in the field. Greater training and emphasis on strategic uses of IT for problem-solving and crime prevention, and greater attention to its behavioral effects on officers, might enhance its application for crime reduction. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Variability of Jupiter’s Five-Micron Hot Spot Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma A.; Orton, G. S.; Wakefield, L.; Rogers, J. H.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Boydstun, K.

    2012-10-01

    Global upheavals on Jupiter involve changes in the albedo of entire axisymmetric regions, lasting several years, with the last two occurring in 1989 and 2006. Against this backdrop of planetary-scale changes, discrete features such as the Great Red Spot (GRS), and other vortices exhibit changes on shorter spatial- and time-scales. We track the variability of the discrete equatorial 5-μm hot spots, semi-evenly spaced in longitude and confined to a narrow latitude band centered at 6.5°N (southern edge of the North Equatorial Belt, NEB), abundant in Voyager images. Tantalizingly similar patterns were observed in the visible (bright plumes and blue-gray regions), where reflectivity in the red is anti-correlated with 5-μm thermal radiance. Ortiz et al. (1998, GRL, 103) characterized the latitude and drift rates of the hot spots, including the descent of the Galileo probe at the southern edge of a 5-μm hot spot, as the superposition of equatorial Rossby waves, with phase speeds between 99 - 103m/s, relative to System III. We note that the high 5-μm radiances correlate well but not perfectly with high 8.57-μm radiances. Because the latter are modulated primarily by changes in the upper ammonia (NH3) ice cloud opacity, this correlation implies that changes in the ammonia ice cloud field may be responsible for the variability seen in the 5-μm maps. During the NEB fade (2011 - early 2012), however, these otherwise ubiquitous features were absent, an atmospheric state not seen in decades. The ongoing NEB revival indicates nascent 5-μm hot spots as early as April 2012, with corresponding visible dark spots. Their continuing growth through July 2012 indicates the possible re-establishment of Rossby waves. The South Equatorial Belt (SEB) and NEB revivals began similarly with an instability that developed into a major outbreak, and many similarities in the observed propagation of clear regions.

  17. Magma production rate along the Ninetyeast Ridge and its relationship to Indian plate motion and Kerguelen hot spot activity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sreejith, K.M.; Krishna, K.S.

    ., 1998; Krishna et al., 2001, 2009; Sager et al., 2013]. New geochronology data from core samples from the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Sites 216, 214, 254, and Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites 758, 756 along the NER suggest a linear age...; Krishna et al., 2012]. Magma production rate along the hot spot track is important for understanding the spatial and temporal behavior of mantle plumes, hot spot-spreading ridge interactions and variations in plume conduits [Mjelde et al., 2010...

  18. 'Double water exclusion': a hypothesis refining the O-ring theory for the hot spots at protein interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinyan; Liu, Qian

    2009-03-15

    The O-ring theory reveals that the binding hot spot at a protein interface is surrounded by a ring of residues that are energetically less important than the residues in the hot spot. As this ring of residues is served to occlude water molecules from the hot spot, the O-ring theory is also called 'water exclusion' hypothesis. We propose a 'double water exclusion' hypothesis to refine the O-ring theory by assuming the hot spot itself is water-free. To computationally model a water-free hot spot, we use a biclique pattern that is defined as two maximal groups of residues from two chains in a protein complex holding the property that every residue contacts with all residues in the other group. Given a chain pair A and B of a protein complex from the Protein Data Bank (PDB), we calculate the interatomic distance of all possible pairs of atoms between A and B. We then represent A and B as a bipartite graph based on these distance information. Maximal biclique subgraphs are subsequently identified from all of the bipartite graphs to locate biclique patterns at the interfaces. We address two properties of biclique patterns: a non-redundant occurrence in PDB, and a correspondence with hot spots when the solvent-accessible surface area (SASA) of a biclique pattern in the complex form is small. A total of 1293 biclique patterns are discovered which have a non-redundant occurrence of at least five, and which each have a minimum two and four residues at the two sides. Through extensive queries to the HotSprint and ASEdb databases, we verified that biclique patterns are rich of true hot residues. Our algorithm and results provide a new way to identify hot spots by examining proteins' structural data. The biclique mining algorithm is available at http://www.ntu.edu.sg/home/jyli/dwe.html. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  19. Predicting hot spots in protein interfaces based on protrusion index, pseudo hydrophobicity and electron-ion interaction pseudopotential features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Junfeng; Yue, Zhenyu; Di, Yunqiang; Zhu, Xiaolei; Zheng, Chun-Hou

    2016-04-05

    The identification of hot spots, a small subset of protein interfaces that accounts for the majority of binding free energy, is becoming more important for the research of drug design and cancer development. Based on our previous methods (APIS and KFC2), here we proposed a novel hot spot prediction method. For each hot spot residue, we firstly constructed a wide variety of 108 sequence, structural, and neighborhood features to characterize potential hot spot residues, including conventional ones and new one (pseudo hydrophobicity) exploited in this study. We then selected 3 top-ranking features that contribute the most in the classification by a two-step feature selection process consisting of minimal-redundancy-maximal-relevance algorithm and an exhaustive search method. We used support vector machines to build our final prediction model. When testing our model on an independent test set, our method showed the highest F1-score of 0.70 and MCC of 0.46 comparing with the existing state-of-the-art hot spot prediction methods. Our results indicate that these features are more effective than the conventional features considered previously, and that the combination of our and traditional features may support the creation of a discriminative feature set for efficient prediction of hot spots in protein interfaces.

  20. Resistance spot welding of galvanized steel: Part II. Mechanisms of spot weld nugget formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedeon, S. A.; Eagar, T. W.

    1986-12-01

    Dynamic inspection monitoring of the weld current, voltage, resistance, electrode displacement, and force was performed in conjunction with a detailed study of the effects of material variations and weld process parameter modifications on resistance spot welding of coated and uncoated steels. In order to determine the mechanisms of weld nugget formation and growth, scanning electron microscopy photos were taken of the developing nugget. These physical changes were then related to the dynamic inspection curves and the welding current lobe. The effects of material variations and weld process modifications, the results of which were presented in Part I, can be explained through an understanding of these mechanisms.

  1. A healthcare utilization analysis framework for hot spotting and contextual anomaly detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianying; Wang, Fei; Sun, Jimeng; Sorrentino, Robert; Ebadollahi, Shahram

    2012-01-01

    Patient medical records today contain vast amount of information regarding patient conditions along with treatment and procedure records. Systematic healthcare resource utilization analysis leveraging such observational data can provide critical insights to guide resource planning and improve the quality of care delivery while reducing cost. Of particular interest to providers are hot spotting: the ability to identify in a timely manner heavy users of the systems and their patterns of utilization so that targeted intervention programs can be instituted, and anomaly detection: the ability to identify anomalous utilization cases where the patients incurred levels of utilization that are unexpected given their clinical characteristics which may require corrective actions. Past work on medical utilization pattern analysis has focused on disease specific studies. We present a framework for utilization analysis that can be easily applied to any patient population. The framework includes two main components: utilization profiling and hot spotting, where we use a vector space model to represent patient utilization profiles, and apply clustering techniques to identify utilization groups within a given population and isolate high utilizers of different types; and contextual anomaly detection for utilization, where models that map patient's clinical characteristics to the utilization level are built in order to quantify the deviation between the expected and actual utilization levels and identify anomalies. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the framework using claims data collected from a population of 7667 diabetes patients. Our analysis demonstrates the usefulness of the proposed approaches in identifying clinically meaningful instances for both hot spotting and anomaly detection. In future work we plan to incorporate additional sources of observational data including EMRs and disease registries, and develop analytics models to leverage temporal relationships among

  2. Identifying pollution hot spots from polychlorinated biphenyl residues in birds of prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, Richard K; Osborn, Daniel; Shore, Richard F; Wienburg, Claire L; Wadsworth, Richard A

    2003-10-01

    Techniques for determining whether patterns of points are random, clustered, or dispersed are well established; however, when the magnitude of the attribute at each location is also important, the situation is more problematic. The concentration of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the livers of Eurasian sparrowhawks Accipiter nisus and common kestrels Falco tinnunculus has been determined for birds from all over Great Britain for several decades and forms a unique database. When mapped, there appears to be clusters of high values in some parts of the country. If these clusters are truly significant, then they may indicate pollution hot spots and possibly help identify undocumented sources of contamination. What constitutes a cluster is open to debate. We know something about the foraging behavior of birds of prey, but we do not know how many pollution sources (hot spots) there are, how long they persist, or over what area they may disperse PCBs. We used a Monte Carlo simulation approach to determine whether the visually prominent clusters of high PCB residues were significant features or merely illusions. The five largest nonoverlapping clusters (defined in terms of the total PCB concentration) were identified at a range of spatial scales. In addition to the total concentration and the number of observations, the weighted centroid of the clusters and which individual birds were involved were also recorded. This enabled us to determine the scale over which the candidate hot spot was stable. Comparing the magnitude of the observed clusters with those from the trial simulations determined the probability of nonrandomness in the original data set (at each spatial scale). Results showed that some clusters do exist but, in the majority of cases, apparent clusters identified by eye could not be considered an actual aggregation of high concentrations following spatial analysis.

  3. The physics of long- and intermediate-wavelength asymmetries of the hot spot: Compression hydrodynamics and energetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, A.; Betti, R.; Shvarts, D.; Woo, K. M.

    2017-10-01

    The effect of asymmetries on the performance of inertial confinement fusion implosions is investigated. A theoretical model is derived for the compression of distorted hot spots, and quantitative estimates are obtained using hydrodynamic simulations. The asymmetries are divided into low ( ℓ < 6 ) and intermediate ( 6 < ℓ < 40 ) modes by comparison of the mode wavelength with the hot-spot radius and the thermal-diffusion scale length. Long-wavelength modes introduce substantial nonradial motion, whereas intermediate-wavelength modes involve more cooling by thermal losses. It is found that for distorted hot spots, the measured neutron-averaged properties can be very different from the real hydrodynamic conditions. This is because mass ablation driven by thermal conduction introduces flows in the Rayleigh-Taylor bubbles that results in pressure variations, in addition to temperature variations between the bubbles and the neutron-producing region. The differences are less pronounced for long-wavelength asymmetries since the bubbles are relatively hot and sustain fusion reactions. The yield degradation—with respect to the symmetric case—results primarily from a reduction in the hot-spot pressure for low modes and from a reduction in burn volume for intermediate modes. A general expression is found relating the pressure degradation to the residual shell energy and the flow within the hot spot (i.e., the total residual energy).

  4. Studies of plasmonic hot-spot translation by a metal-dielectric layered superlens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoreson, Mark D.; Nielsen, Rasmus Bundgaard; West, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    optical nanoantennas as sources, we investigated the translation of these sources to the far side of a layered silver-silica superlens operating in the canalization regime. Using near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM), we have observed evidence of superlens-enabled enhanced-field translation...... at a wavelength of about 680 nm. Specifically, we discuss our recent experimental and simulation results on the translation of hot spots using a silver-silica layered superlens design. We compare the experimental results with our numerical simulations and discuss the perspectives and limitations of our approach....

  5. Hot spots of mercury methylation in northern peatlands : spatial and seasonal variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, C.P.J.; Branfireun, B.A. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Geography; Heyes, A. [Maryland Univ., Solomons, MD (United States). Center for Environmental Science, Chesapeake Biological Lab; Kolka, R.K. [USDA Forest Service, North Central Research Station, Grand Rapids, MN (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Studies have shown that peatlands are an important sources of methylmercury (MeHg) to downstream aquatic ecosystems at the watershed scale. Hot spots of overly high MeHg concentration have been found to occur periodically in zones of groundwater upwelling. However, the spatiotemporal distribution, size, and importance of these MeHg hot spots to peatland MeHg export are not currently understood. For that reason, peat pore waters were sampled extensively throughout 4 small, northern peatlands in order to assess the spatial patterns of total mercury (HgT) and MeHg. The transferability of findings among peatlands was also assessed. Sampling took place during the spring, mid-summer and fall of 2005 at 2 peatlands in north central Minnesota and 2 in northwestern Ontario. In addition to this spatial survey, 4 high-resolution sampling grids were also established at the Minnesota sites in order to investigate the size of hot spots and the effects of upland runoff. In all cases, spatial variability in pore water MeHg concentration was much higher than the variability in HgT concentration, with standard deviations typically exceeding mean values. The spatial pattern of pore water MeHg concentration was characterized into the following 2 distinct zones: (1) the upland-peatland interface, where MeHg concentrations higher than 2 ng/L occur consistently, (2) the peatland interior, where concentrations rarely exceed 0.5 ng/L. In addition, extremely high concentrations of up to 12 ng/L were only found at the upland-peatland interface. These values corresponded to MeHg:HgT ratios greater than 65 per cent, while these ratios rarely exceeded 5 to 10 per cent elsewhere. It was concluded that these hot spots can be attributed to the limited reactants in zones where the in-situ biogeochemical milieu is conducive to mercury methylation. The uniform patterns noted across the peatlands indicate that spatial patterns of HgT and MeHg are important for mechanistic modelling and landscape

  6. Detection of spatial hot spots and variation for the neon flying squid Ommastrephes bartramii resources in the northwest Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yongjiu; Chen, Xinjun; Liu, Yan

    2017-07-01

    With the increasing effects of global climate change and fishing activities, the spatial distribution of the neon flying squid ( Ommastrephes bartramii) is changing in the traditional fishing ground of 150°-160°E and 38°-45°N in the northwest Pacific Ocean. This research aims to identify the spatial hot and cold spots (i.e. spatial clusters) of O. bartramii to reveal its spatial structure using commercial fishery data from 2007 to 2010 collected by Chinese mainland squid-jigging fleets. A relatively strongly-clustered distribution for O. bartramii was observed using an exploratory spatial data analysis (ESDA) method. The results show two hot spots and one cold spot in 2007 while only one hot and one cold spots were identified each year from 2008 to 2010. The hot and cold spots in 2007 occupied 8.2% and 5.6% of the study area, respectively; these percentages for hot and cold spot areas were 5.8% and 3.1% in 2008, 10.2% and 2.9% in 2009, and 16.4% and 11.9% in 2010, respectively. Nearly half (>45%) of the squid from 2007 to 2009 reported by Chinese fleets were caught in hot spot areas while this percentage reached its peak at 68.8% in 2010, indicating that the hot spot areas are central fishing grounds. A further change analysis shows the area centered at 156°E/43.5°N was persistent as a hot spot over the whole period from 2007 to 2010. Furthermore, the hot spots were mainly identified in areas with sea surface temperature (SST) in the range of 15-20°C around warm Kuroshio Currents as well as with the chlorophyll- a (chl- a) concentration above 0.3 mg/m3. The outcome of this research improves our understanding of spatiotemporal hotspots and its variation for O. bartramii and is useful for sustainable exploitation, assessment, and management of this squid.

  7. A novel X-ray spectrometer for plasma hot spot diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jun; Guo, Yongchao; Xiao, Shali; Yang, Zuhua; Qian, Feng; Cao, LeiFeng; Gu, Yuqiu

    2017-09-01

    A novel X-ray spectrometer is designed to diagnose the different conditions in plasmas. It can provide both X-ray spectroscopy and plasma image information simultaneously. Two pairs of elliptical crystal analyzers are used to measure the X-ray spectroscopy in the range of 2-20 keV. The pinhole imaging system coupled with gated micro-channel plate(MCP) detectors are developed, which allows 20 images to be collected in a single individual experiment. The experiments of measuring spectra were conducted at "Shenguang-II upgraded laser" in China Academy of Engineering Physics to demonstrate the utility of the spectrometer. The X-ray spectroscopy information was obtained by the image plate(IP). The hot spot imaging experiments were carried out at "Shenguang-III prototype facility". We have obtained the hot sport images with the spectrometer, and the signal to noise ratio of 30 ∼ 40 is observed.

  8. Uranium Bioreduction Rates across Scales: Biogeochemical Hot Moments and Hot Spots during a Biostimulation Experiment at Rifle, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Chen; Wu, Hongfei; Li, Li; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Long, Philip E.; Williams, Kenneth H.

    2014-09-02

    We aim to understand the scale-dependent evolution of uranium bioreduction during a field experiment at a former uranium mill site near Rifle, Colorado. Acetate was injected to stimulate Fe-reducing bacteria (FeRB) and to immobilize aqueous U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). Bicarbonate was coinjected in half of the domain to mobilize sorbed U(VI). We used reactive transport modeling to integrate hydraulic and geochemical data and to quantify rates at the grid block (0.25 m) and experimental field scale (tens of meters). Although local rates varied by orders of magnitude in conjunction with biostimulation fronts propagating downstream, field-scale rates were dominated by those orders of magnitude higher rates at a few selected hot spots where Fe(III), U(VI), and FeRB were at their maxima in the vicinity of the injection wells. At particular locations, the hot moments with maximum rates negatively corresponded to their distance from the injection wells. Although bicarbonate injection enhanced local rates near the injection wells by a maximum of 39.4%, its effect at the field scale was limited to a maximum of 10.0%. We propose a rate-versus-measurement-length relationship (log R' = -0.63

  9. Uranium bioreduction rates across scales: biogeochemical hot moments and hot spots during a biostimulation experiment at Rifle, Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Chen; Wu, Hongfei; Li, Li; Newcomer, Darrell; Long, Philip E; Williams, Kenneth H

    2014-09-02

    We aim to understand the scale-dependent evolution of uranium bioreduction during a field experiment at a former uranium mill site near Rifle, Colorado. Acetate was injected to stimulate Fe-reducing bacteria (FeRB) and to immobilize aqueous U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). Bicarbonate was coinjected in half of the domain to mobilize sorbed U(VI). We used reactive transport modeling to integrate hydraulic and geochemical data and to quantify rates at the grid block (0.25 m) and experimental field scale (tens of meters). Although local rates varied by orders of magnitude in conjunction with biostimulation fronts propagating downstream, field-scale rates were dominated by those orders of magnitude higher rates at a few selected hot spots where Fe(III), U(VI), and FeRB were at their maxima in the vicinity of the injection wells. At particular locations, the hot moments with maximum rates negatively corresponded to their distance from the injection wells. Although bicarbonate injection enhanced local rates near the injection wells by a maximum of 39.4%, its effect at the field scale was limited to a maximum of 10.0%. We propose a rate-versus-measurement-length relationship (log R' = -0.63 log L - 2.20, with R' in μmol/mg cell protein/day and L in meters) for orders-of-magnitude estimation of uranium bioreduction rates across scales.

  10. SERS Assay for Copper(II) Ions Based on Dual Hot-Spot Model Coupling with MarR Protein: New Cu2+-Specific Biorecognition Element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yulong; Su, Zhenhe; Wang, Limin; Dong, Jinbo; Xue, Juanjuan; Yu, Jiao; Wang, Yuan; Hua, Xiude; Wang, Minghua; Zhang, Cunzheng; Liu, Fengquan

    2017-06-20

    We have developed a rapid and ultrasensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) assay for Cu2+ detection using the multiple antibiotic resistance regulator (MarR) as specific bridging molecules in a SERS hot-spot model. In the assay, Cu2+ induces formation of MarR tetramers, which provide Au nanoparticle (NP)-AuNP bridges, resulting in the formation of SERS hot spots. 4-Mercaptobenzoic acid (4-MBA) was used as a Raman reporter. The addition of Cu2+ increased the Raman intensity of 4-MBA. Use of a dual hot-spot signal-amplification strategy based on AuNP-AgNP heterodimers combined through antigen-antibody reactions increased the sensitivity of the sensing platform by 50-fold. The proposed method gave a linear response for Cu2+ detection in the range of 0.5-1000 nM, with a detection limit of 0.18 nM, which is 5 orders of magnitude lower than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency limit for Cu2+ in drinking water (20 μM). In addition, all analyses can be completed in less than 15 min. The high sensitivity, high specificity, and rapid detection capacity of the SERS assay therefore provide a combined advantage over current assays.

  11. Active thermal management of on-chip hot spots using EWOD-driven droplet microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, J.-T.; Chen, C.-L.

    2010-12-01

    In response to the rapid advances in microelectronics, novel cooling technologies are needed to meet increasing cooling requirements. As a paradigm-shifting technique, electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) uses electric potential to control the movement of a liquid droplet on a dielectric surface. In this work, we developed an EWOD-based microfluidic technique for active and adaptive thermal management of on-chip hot spots. A two-dimensional array of control electrodes was patterned on the chip surface for EWOD operations. By applying DC or AC voltages with appropriate sequence and timing to the electrode units, we were able to transport microdroplets of tens of μL along a programmable path. Without the need of external pumps and valves, the droplets were precisely delivered to cooling targets. With the driving voltage as low as 40 VAC, we demonstrate high heat flux (7.6 W/cm2) cooling on a hot spot. The EWOD-induced internal circulation within the droplets led to a time-averaged Nusselt number of ~45.

  12. Superconductivity mediated by quantum critical antiferromagnetic fluctuations: The rise and fall of hot spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Schattner, Yoni; Berg, Erez; Fernandes, Rafael M.

    2017-05-01

    In several unconventional superconductors, the highest superconducting transition temperature Tc is found in a region of the phase diagram where the antiferromagnetic transition temperature extrapolates to zero, signaling a putative quantum critical point. The elucidation of the interplay between these two phenomena—high-Tc superconductivity and magnetic quantum criticality—remains an important piece of the complex puzzle of unconventional superconductivity. In this paper, we combine sign-problem-free quantum Monte Carlo simulations and field-theoretical analytical calculations to unveil the microscopic mechanism responsible for the superconducting instability of a general low-energy model, called the spin-fermion model. In this approach, low-energy electronic states interact with each other via the exchange of quantum critical magnetic fluctuations. We find that even in the regime of moderately strong interactions, both the superconducting transition temperature and the pairing susceptibility are governed not by the properties of the entire Fermi surface, but instead by the properties of small portions of the Fermi surface called hot spots. Moreover, Tc increases with increasing interaction strength, until it starts to saturate at the crossover from hot-spots-dominated to Fermi-surface-dominated pairing. Our work provides not only invaluable insights into the system parameters that most strongly affect Tc, but also important benchmarks to assess the origin of superconductivity in both microscopic models and actual materials.

  13. The Red Queen model of recombination hot-spot evolution: a theoretical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latrille, Thibault; Duret, Laurent; Lartillot, Nicolas

    2017-12-19

    In humans and many other species, recombination events cluster in narrow and short-lived hot spots distributed across the genome, whose location is determined by the Zn-finger protein PRDM9. To explain these fast evolutionary dynamics, an intra-genomic Red Queen model has been proposed, based on the interplay between two antagonistic forces: biased gene conversion, mediated by double-strand breaks, resulting in hot-spot extinction, followed by positive selection favouring new PRDM9 alleles recognizing new sequence motifs. Thus far, however, this Red Queen model has not been formalized as a quantitative population-genetic model, fully accounting for the intricate interplay between biased gene conversion, mutation, selection, demography and genetic diversity at the PRDM9 locus. Here, we explore the population genetics of the Red Queen model of recombination. A Wright-Fisher simulator was implemented, allowing exploration of the behaviour of the model (mean equilibrium recombination rate, diversity at the PRDM9 locus or turnover rate) as a function of the parameters (effective population size, mutation and erosion rates). In a second step, analytical results based on self-consistent mean-field approximations were derived, reproducing the scaling relations observed in the simulations. Empirical fit of the model to current data from the mouse suggests both a high mutation rate at PRDM9 and strong biased gene conversion on its targets.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolutionary causes and consequences of recombination rate variation in sexual organisms'. © 2017 The Authors.

  14. Rapid experimental SAD phasing and hot-spot identification with halogenated fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauman, Joseph D.; Harrison, Jerry Joe E. K.; Arnold, Eddy

    2016-01-01

    Through X-ray crystallographic fragment screening, 4-bromopyrazole was discovered to be a `magic bullet' that is capable of binding at many of the ligand `hot spots' found in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). The binding locations can be in pockets that are `hidden' in the unliganded crystal form, allowing rapid identification of these sites forin silicoscreening. In addition to hot-spot identification, this ubiquitous yet specific binding provides an avenue for X-ray crystallographic phase determination, which can be a significant bottleneck in the determination of the structures of novel proteins. The anomalous signal from 4-bromopyrazole or 4-iodopyrazole was sufficient to determine the structures of three proteins (HIV-1 RT, influenza A endonuclease and proteinase K) by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) from single crystals. Both compounds are inexpensive, readily available, safe and very soluble in DMSO or water, allowing efficient soaking into crystals.

  15. Analysis and Visualization for Hot Spot Based Route Recommendation Using Short-Dated Taxi GPS Traces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Shen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Taxi GPS traces, which contain a great deal of valuable information as regards to human mobility and city traffic, can be extracted to improve the quality of our lives. Since the method of visualized analysis is believed to be an effective way to present information vividly, we develop our analysis and visualization method based on a city’s short-dated taxi GPS traces, which can provide recommendation to help cruising taxi drivers to find potential passengers with optimal routes. With our approach, hot spots for loading and unloading passenger(s are extracted using an improved DBSCAN algorithm after data preprocessing including cleaning and filtering. Then, this paper describes the start-end point-based similar trajectory method to get coarse-level trajectories clusters, together with the density-based ε distance trajectory clustering algorithm to identify recommended potential routes. A weighted tree is defined including such factors as driving time, velocity, distance and endpoint attractiveness for optimal route evaluation from vacant to occupied hot spots. An example is presented to show the effectiveness of our visualization method.

  16. Biofilm models for the food industry: hot spots for plasmid transfer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Meervenne, Eva; De Weirdt, Rosemarie; Van Coillie, Els; Devlieghere, Frank; Herman, Lieve; Boon, Nico

    2014-04-01

    Biofilms represent a substantial problem in the food industry, with food spoilage, equipment failure, and public health aspects to consider. Besides, biofilms may be a hot spot for plasmid transfer, by which antibiotic resistance can be disseminated to potential foodborne pathogens. This study investigated biomass and plasmid transfer in dual-species (Pseudomonas putida and Escherichia coli) biofilm models relevant to the food industry. Two different configurations (flow-through and drip-flow) and two different inoculation procedures (donor-recipient and recipient-donor) were tested. The drip-flow configuration integrated stainless steel coupons in the setup while the flow-through configuration included a glass flow cell and silicone tubing. The highest biomass density [10 log (cells cm-²)] was obtained in the silicone tubing when first the recipient strain was inoculated. High plasmid transfer ratios, up to 1/10 (transconjugants/total bacteria), were found. Depending on the order of inoculation, a difference in transfer efficiency between the biofilm models could be found. The ease by which the multiresistance plasmid was transferred highlights the importance of biofilms in the food industry as hot spots for the acquisition of multiresistance plasmids. This can impede the treatment of foodborne illnesses if pathogens acquire this multiresistance in or from the biofilm. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Hot Spot Hound: a novel robot-assisted platform for enhancing TMS performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennimpede, Giuseppe; Spedaliere, Luca; Formica, Domenico; Di Pino, Giovanni; Zollo, Loredana; Pellegrino, Giovanni; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Guglielmelli, Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive technique that produces excitatory depolarization in the neurons located in the cerebral cortex. In order to proficiently stimulate a specific cerebral area it is of main importance the correct positioning and maintaining of the magnetic coil, while avoiding the mismatch due to subject head-coil relative movement. Hot Spot Hound is a novel robot-assisted experimental platform for enhancing TMS stimulation performance. It integrates a commercial optoelectronic neuronavigation system (E.M.S. srl, Italy) for gathering data on the relative pose (position and orientation) of subject's scalp and TMS coil, and a service robotic arm designed for human interaction (LWR system by KUKA, Germany). Besides integrating and synchronizing different platform sub-systems, we implement a control strategy to center the stimulation point and compensate for involuntary subject movements. Specifically, the proposed control maintains constant over time the homogeneous transformation matrix between the pose of the coil and of the head. The value of position stiffness has been chosen in order to assure the better compromise between coil position and orientation error, and the safety of the experimental subject. In this paper we show that Hot Spot Hound can provide coil position and orientation errors well beyond the ones achieved by manual experimenter, while assuring safety in the physical interaction with the stimulated subject.

  18. Thermal analysis of continuous and patterned multilayer films in the presence of a nanoscale hot spot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Yang Juang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Thermal responses of multilayer films play essential roles in state-of-the-art electronic systems, such as photo/micro-electronic devices, data storage systems, and silicon-on-insulator transistors. In this paper, we focus on the thermal aspects of multilayer films in the presence of a nanoscale hot spot induced by near field laser heating. The problem is set up in the scenario of heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR, the next-generation technology to overcome the data storage density limit imposed by superparamagnetism. We characterized thermal responses of both continuous and patterned multilayer media films using transient thermal modeling. We observed that material configurations, in particular, the thermal barriers at the material layer interfaces crucially impact the temperature field hence play a key role in determining the hot spot geometry, transient response and power consumption. With a representative generic media model, we further explored the possibility of optimizing thermal performances by designing layers of heat sink and thermal barrier. The modeling approach demonstrates an effective way to characterize thermal behaviors of micro and nano-scale electronic devices with multilayer thin film structures. The insights into the thermal transport scheme will be critical for design and operations of such electronic devices.

  19. Identification of Hot Spots in Protein Structures Using Gaussian Network Model and Gaussian Naive Bayes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Jiang, Tao; Shan, Guogen

    2016-01-01

    Residue fluctuations in protein structures have been shown to be highly associated with various protein functions. Gaussian network model (GNM), a simple representative coarse-grained model, was widely adopted to reveal function-related protein dynamics. We directly utilized the high frequency modes generated by GNM and further performed Gaussian Naive Bayes (GNB) to identify hot spot residues. Two coding schemes about the feature vectors were implemented with varying distance cutoffs for GNM and sliding window sizes for GNB based on tenfold cross validations: one by using only a single high mode and the other by combining multiple modes with the highest frequency. Our proposed methods outperformed the previous work that did not directly utilize the high frequency modes generated by GNM, with regard to overall performance evaluated using F1 measure. Moreover, we found that inclusion of more high frequency modes for a GNB classifier can significantly improve the sensitivity. The present study provided additional valuable insights into the relation between the hot spots and the residue fluctuations.

  20. Active thermal management of on-chip hot spots using EWOD-driven droplet microfluidics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, J.T.; Chen, C.L. [Teledyne Scientific Company, Thousand Oaks, CA (United States)

    2010-12-15

    In response to the rapid advances in microelectronics, novel cooling technologies are needed to meet increasing cooling requirements. As a paradigm-shifting technique, electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) uses electric potential to control the movement of a liquid droplet on a dielectric surface. In this work, we developed an EWOD-based microfluidic technique for active and adaptive thermal management of on-chip hot spots. A two-dimensional array of control electrodes was patterned on the chip surface for EWOD operations. By applying DC or AC voltages with appropriate sequence and timing to the electrode units, we were able to transport microdroplets of tens of {mu}L along a programmable path. Without the need of external pumps and valves, the droplets were precisely delivered to cooling targets. With the driving voltage as low as 40 V{sub AC}, we demonstrate high heat flux (7.6 W/cm{sup 2}) cooling on a hot spot. The EWOD-induced internal circulation within the droplets led to a time-averaged Nusselt number of {proportional_to}45. (orig.)

  1. KFC2: a knowledge-based hot spot prediction method based on interface solvation, atomic density, and plasticity features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaolei; Mitchell, Julie C

    2011-09-01

    Hot spots constitute a small fraction of protein-protein interface residues, yet they account for a large fraction of the binding affinity. Based on our previous method (KFC), we present two new methods (KFC2a and KFC2b) that outperform other methods at hot spot prediction. A number of improvements were made in developing these new methods. First, we created a training data set that contained a similar number of hot spot and non-hot spot residues. In addition, we generated 47 different features, and different numbers of features were used to train the models to avoid over-fitting. Finally, two feature combinations were selected: One (used in KFC2a) is composed of eight features that are mainly related to solvent accessible surface area and local plasticity; the other (KFC2b) is composed of seven features, only two of which are identical to those used in KFC2a. The two models were built using support vector machines (SVM). The two KFC2 models were then tested on a mixed independent test set, and compared with other methods such as Robetta, FOLDEF, HotPoint, MINERVA, and KFC. KFC2a showed the highest predictive accuracy for hot spot residues (True Positive Rate: TPR = 0.85); however, the false positive rate was somewhat higher than for other models. KFC2b showed the best predictive accuracy for hot spot residues (True Positive Rate: TPR = 0.62) among all methods other than KFC2a, and the False Positive Rate (FPR = 0.15) was comparable with other highly predictive methods. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Imaging of spatially extended hot spots with coded apertures for intra-operative nuclear medicine applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaissas, I.; Papadimitropoulos, C.; Potiriadis, C.; Karafasoulis, K.; Loukas, D.; Lambropoulos, C. P.

    2017-01-01

    Coded aperture imaging transcends planar imaging with conventional collimators in efficiency and Field of View (FOV). We present experimental results for the detection of 141 keV and 122 keV γ-photons emitted by uniformly extended 99mTc and 57Co hot-spots along with simulations of uniformly and normally extended 99mTc hot-spots. These results prove that the method can be used for intra-operative imaging of radio-traced sentinel nodes and thyroid remnants. The study is performed using a setup of two gamma cameras, each consisting of a coded-aperture (or mask) of Modified Uniformly Redundant Array (MURA) of rank 19 positioned on top of a CdTe detector. The detector pixel pitch is 350 μm and its active area is 4.4 × 4.4 cm2, while the mask element size is 1.7 mm. The detectable photon energy ranges from 15 keV up to 200 keV with an energy resolution of 3-4 keV FWHM. Triangulation is exploited to estimate the 3D spatial coordinates of the radioactive spots within the system FOV. Two extended sources, with uniform distributed activity (11 and 24 mm in diameter, respectively), positioned at 16 cm from the system and with 3 cm distance between their centers, can be resolved and localized with accuracy better than 5%. The results indicate that the estimated positions of spatially extended sources lay within their volume size and that neighboring sources, even with a low level of radioactivity, such as 30 MBq, can be clearly distinguished with an acquisition time about 3 seconds.

  3. Detection of direct and indirect noise generated by synthetic hot spots in a duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Domenico, Francesca; Rolland, Erwan O.; Hochgreb, Simone

    2017-04-01

    Sound waves in a combustor are generated from fluctuations in the heat release rate (direct noise) or the acceleration of entropy, vorticity or compositional perturbations through nozzles or turbine guide vanes (indirect or entropy noise). These sound waves are transmitted downstream as well as reflected upstream of the acceleration point, contributing to the overall noise emissions, or triggering combustion instabilities. Previous experiments attempted to isolate indirect noise by generating thermoacoustic hot spots electrically and measuring the transmitted acoustic waves, yet there are no measurements on the backward propagating entropy and acoustic waves. This work presents the first measurements which clearly separate the direct and indirect noise contributions to pressure fluctuations upstream of the acceleration point. Synthetic entropy spots are produced by unsteady electrical heating of a grid of thin wires located in a tube. Compression waves (direct noise) are generated from this heating process. The hot spots are then advected with the mean flow and finally accelerated through an orifice plate located at the end of the tube, producing a strong acoustic signature which propagates upstream (indirect noise). The convective time is selected to be longer than the heating pulse length, in order to obtain a clear time separation between direct and indirect noise in the overall pressure trace. The contribution of indirect noise to the overall noise is shown to be non-negligible either in subsonic or sonic throat conditions. However, the absolute amplitude of direct noise is larger than the corresponding fraction of indirect noise, explaining the difficulty in clearly identifying the two contributions when they are merged. Further, the work shows the importance of using appropriate pressure transducer instrumentation and correcting for the respective transfer functions in order to account for low frequency effects in the determination of pressure fluctuations.

  4. A reactive burn model for shock initiation in a PBX: scaling and separability based on the hot spot concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Show, Milton S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    In the formulation of a reactive burn model for shock initiation, we endeavor to incorporate a number of effects based on the underlying physical concept of hot spot ignition followed by the growth of reaction due to diverging deflagration fronts. The passage of a shock front sets the initial condition for reaction, leading to a fraction of the hot spots that completely burn while others will quench. The form of the rate model is chosen to incorporate approximations based on the physical picture. In particular, the approximations imply scaling relations that are then used to mathematically separate various contributions. That is, the model is modular and refinements can be applied separately without changing the other contributions. For example, the effect of initial temperature, porosity, etc. predominantly enter the characterization of the non-quenching hot spot distribution. A large collection of velocity gauge data is shown to be well represented by the model with a very small number of parameters.

  5. Tree Coring as a Complement to Soil Gas Screening to Locate PCE and TCE Source Zones and Hot Spots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Algreen; Trapp, Stefan; Rehne Jensen, Pernille

    2015-01-01

    ) or trichloroethylene (TCE) to evaluate their ability to locate source zones and contaminant hot spots. One test site represented a relatively homogeneous sandy soil and aquifer, and the second a more heterogeneous geology with both sandy and less permeable clay till layers overlying a chalk aquifer. Tree cores from...... different tree species were sampled and analysed, and compared to soil gas measurements and existing soil gas data. Both methods were found useful as screening tools to locate hot spots of PCE and TCE in the shallow subsurface. Tree coring was found to be particularly beneficial as a complement to soil gas...... the feasibility of using tree coring to locate the hot spots. Moreover, a combination of the two methods can help to focus any subsequent investigations like soil or groundwater sampling. The use of tree coring to complement soil gas sampling for pre-screening is expected to result in higher certainty...

  6. Hot Spots Detection of Operating PV Arrays through IR Thermal Image Using Method Based on Curve Fitting of Gray Histogram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The overall efficiency of PV arrays is affected by hot spots which should be detected and diagnosed by applying responsible monitoring techniques. The method using the IR thermal image to detect hot spots has been studied as a direct, noncontact, nondestructive technique. However, IR thermal images suffer from relatively high stochastic noise and non-uniformity clutter, so the conventional methods of image processing are not effective. The paper proposes a method to detect hotspots based on curve fitting of gray histogram. The result of MATLAB simulation proves the method proposed in the paper is effective to detect the hot spots suppressing the noise generated during the process of image acquisition.

  7. Hot-spot application of biocontrol agents to replace pesticides in large scale commercial rose farms in Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gacheri, Catherine; Kigen, Thomas; Sigsgaard, Lene

    2015-01-01

    Rose (Rosa hybrida L.) is the most important ornamental crop in Kenya, with huge investments in pest management. We provide the first full-scale, replicated experiment comparing cost and yield of conventional two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae Koch) control with hot-spot applications...... of the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis (Acari: Phytoseidae) in large commercial rose greenhouses. Hot-spot treatments replaced acaricides except at high infestations and the two treatments were applied in seven greenhouses each. With the conventional treatment, acaricides were applied when T. urticae......-spot treatment. The cost of pest management was significantly lower in the hotspot- treated greenhouses than in the conventional treatment. However, there was no significant difference in the number of harvested stems from the two treatments. It can therefore be concluded that acaricides can be replaced by P...

  8. Assessing Statistically Significant Heavy-Metal Concentrations in Abandoned Mine Areas via Hot Spot Analysis of Portable XRF Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Min; Choi, Yosoon

    2017-06-18

    To develop appropriate measures to prevent soil contamination in abandoned mining areas, an understanding of the spatial variation of the potentially toxic trace elements (PTEs) in the soil is necessary. For the purpose of effective soil sampling, this study uses hot spot analysis, which calculates a z -score based on the Getis-Ord Gi* statistic to identify a statistically significant hot spot sample. To constitute a statistically significant hot spot, a feature with a high value should also be surrounded by other features with high values. Using relatively cost- and time-effective portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF) analysis, sufficient input data are acquired from the Busan abandoned mine and used for hot spot analysis. To calibrate the PXRF data, which have a relatively low accuracy, the PXRF analysis data are transformed using the inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) data. The transformed PXRF data of the Busan abandoned mine are classified into four groups according to their normalized content and z -scores: high content with a high z -score (HH), high content with a low z -score (HL), low content with a high z -score (LH), and low content with a low z -score (LL). The HL and LH cases may be due to measurement errors. Additional or complementary surveys are required for the areas surrounding these suspect samples or for significant hot spot areas. The soil sampling is conducted according to a four-phase procedure in which the hot spot analysis and proposed group classification method are employed to support the development of a sampling plan for the following phase. Overall, 30, 50, 80, and 100 samples are investigated and analyzed in phases 1-4, respectively. The method implemented in this case study may be utilized in the field for the assessment of statistically significant soil contamination and the identification of areas for which an additional survey is required.

  9. Assessing Statistically Significant Heavy-Metal Concentrations in Abandoned Mine Areas via Hot Spot Analysis of Portable XRF Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Min Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available To develop appropriate measures to prevent soil contamination in abandoned mining areas, an understanding of the spatial variation of the potentially toxic trace elements (PTEs in the soil is necessary. For the purpose of effective soil sampling, this study uses hot spot analysis, which calculates a z-score based on the Getis-Ord Gi* statistic to identify a statistically significant hot spot sample. To constitute a statistically significant hot spot, a feature with a high value should also be surrounded by other features with high values. Using relatively cost- and time-effective portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF analysis, sufficient input data are acquired from the Busan abandoned mine and used for hot spot analysis. To calibrate the PXRF data, which have a relatively low accuracy, the PXRF analysis data are transformed using the inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES data. The transformed PXRF data of the Busan abandoned mine are classified into four groups according to their normalized content and z-scores: high content with a high z-score (HH, high content with a low z-score (HL, low content with a high z-score (LH, and low content with a low z-score (LL. The HL and LH cases may be due to measurement errors. Additional or complementary surveys are required for the areas surrounding these suspect samples or for significant hot spot areas. The soil sampling is conducted according to a four-phase procedure in which the hot spot analysis and proposed group classification method are employed to support the development of a sampling plan for the following phase. Overall, 30, 50, 80, and 100 samples are investigated and analyzed in phases 1–4, respectively. The method implemented in this case study may be utilized in the field for the assessment of statistically significant soil contamination and the identification of areas for which an additional survey is required.

  10. ‘Double water exclusion’: a hypothesis refining the O-ring theory for the hot spots at protein interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinyan; Liu, Qian

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: The O-ring theory reveals that the binding hot spot at a protein interface is surrounded by a ring of residues that are energetically less important than the residues in the hot spot. As this ring of residues is served to occlude water molecules from the hot spot, the O-ring theory is also called ‘water exclusion’ hypothesis. We propose a ‘double water exclusion’ hypothesis to refine the O-ring theory by assuming the hot spot itself is water-free. To computationally model a water-free hot spot, we use a biclique pattern that is defined as two maximal groups of residues from two chains in a protein complex holding the property that every residue contacts with all residues in the other group. Methods and Results: Given a chain pair A and B of a protein complex from the Protein Data Bank (PDB), we calculate the interatomic distance of all possible pairs of atoms between A and B. We then represent A and B as a bipartite graph based on these distance information. Maximal biclique subgraphs are subsequently identified from all of the bipartite graphs to locate biclique patterns at the interfaces. We address two properties of biclique patterns: a non-redundant occurrence in PDB, and a correspondence with hot spots when the solvent-accessible surface area (SASA) of a biclique pattern in the complex form is small. A total of 1293 biclique patterns are discovered which have a non-redundant occurrence of at least five, and which each have a minimum two and four residues at the two sides. Through extensive queries to the HotSprint and ASEdb databases, we verified that biclique patterns are rich of true hot residues. Our algorithm and results provide a new way to identify hot spots by examining proteins' structural data. Availability: The biclique mining algorithm is available at http://www.ntu.edu.sg/home/jyli/dwe.html. Contact: jyli@ntu.edu.sg Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19179356

  11. Geostatistical risk estimation at waste disposal sites in the presence of hot spots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komnitsas, Kostas, E-mail: komni@mred.tuc.gr [Technical University Crete, Department of Mineral Resources Engineering, Chania 73100 (Greece); Modis, Kostas [National Technical University Athens, School of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, Zografos 15780 (Greece)

    2009-05-30

    The present paper aims to estimate risk by using geostatistics at the wider coal mining/waste disposal site of Belkovskaya, Tula region, in Russia. In this area the presence of hot spots causes a spatial trend in the mean value of the random field and a non-Gaussian data distribution. Prior to application of geostatistics, subtraction of trend and appropriate smoothing and transformation of the data into a Gaussian form were carried out; risk maps were then generated for the wider study area in order to assess the probability of exceeding risk thresholds. Finally, the present paper discusses the need for homogenization of soil risk thresholds regarding hazardous elements that will enhance reliability of risk estimation and enable application of appropriate rehabilitation actions in contaminated areas.

  12. The Role of Water Occlusion for the Definition of a Protein Binding Hot-Spot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Irina S

    2015-01-01

    Biological systems rely on the establishment of interactions between biomolecules, which take place in the aqueous environment of the cell. It was already demonstrated that a small set of residues at the interface, Hot-Spots(HS), contributes significantly to the binding free energy. However, these energetic determinants of affinity and specificity are still not fully understood. Moreover, the contribution of water to their HS character is also poorly characterized. In this review, we have focused on the structural data available that support the occlusion of HS from solvent, and therefore the "O-ring theory"not only on protein-protein but also on protein-DNA complexes. We also emphasized the use of Solvent Accessible Surface Area (SASA) features in a variety of machine-learning approaches that aim to detect binding HS.

  13. Microwave photonics filtering interrogation technique under coherent regime for hot spot detection on cascaded FBG fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervás, Javier; Barrera, David; Madrigal, Javier; Sales, Salvador

    2017-04-01

    An interrogation technique of cascaded FBGs sensors based on a Microwave Photonics filtering technique under coherent regime is presented. The sensing information of a 5m fiber coil with 500 weak FBGs with a similar central wavelength is retrieved. The principle of operation is based on the calculation of the impulsive response by recording the electrical frequency response of the system. Hot spot detection and temperature measurement are demonstrated through experimental measurements with a temperature sensitivity of 0.6dB/ºC. The resolution in the measurement is related to the bandwidth of the electrical measurement and we have obtained a resolution of 20 cm for an electrical bandwidth of 1 GHz and a SNR bigger than 16dB.

  14. Enhancing circular dichroism by super chiral hot spots from a chiral metasurface with apexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zeng; Teh, Bing Hong; Wang, Yue; Adamo, Giorgio; Teng, Jinghua; Sun, Handong

    2017-05-01

    Manipulating light spin (or circular polarization) is an important research field and may find broad applications from sensors, display technology, to quantum computing and communication. To this end, planar metasurfaces with larger circular dichroism are strongly demanded. However, current planar chiral metasurface structures suffer from either fabrication challenge, especially from near-infrared to visible spectrum, or insufficient circular dichroism. Here, we report a chiral metasurface composed of achiral nanoholes which allow for precisely creating apexes in the designed structure. Our investigation indicates that the apexes act as super chiral hot spots and enable the highly concentrated near-field optical chirality leading to a remarkable enhancement of circular dichroism in the far-field. A 4-fold enhancement of the circular dichroism and a strong optical activity of ˜15 degrees have been experimentally achieved. Besides the enhanced chirality, our design genuinely overcomes the nanofabrication challenge faced in existing planar chiral metasurfaces.

  15. Infrared characterization of hot spots in solar cells with high precision due to signal treatment processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminski, A.; Jouglar, J.; Mergui, M.; Jourlin, Y.; Bouille, A.; Vuillermoz, P.L.; Laugier, A. [Institute National des Sciences Appliquees, Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere-UMR, Villeurbanne (France)

    1998-02-27

    In this paper we show how to improve greatly the resolution of IR thermography by using two different signal treatment methods: a static treatment and a dynamical treatment. This signal processing allows the study of 100 cm{sup 2} cells under low-forward or reverse-polarization conditions. Static and dynamical methods have both good resolutions: static has the advantage of being fast, and dynamical method does not need any reference image nor cooling system. We have shown that IR thermography is an interesting method for investigating shunts in solar cells. Thermal maps and I-V characterization of the hot spots show that the origin and the behavior of the shunts are varied and their influence on the efficiency is probably more important than what is usually thought

  16. Whole-genome sequencing in autism identifies hot spots for de novo germline mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelson, Jacob J.; Shi, Yujian; Gujral, Madhusudan

    2012-01-01

    investigated global patterns of germline mutation by whole-genome sequencing of monozygotic twins concordant for ASD and their parents. Mutation rates varied widely throughout the genome (by 100-fold) and could be explained by intrinsic characteristics of DNA sequence and chromatin structure. Dense clusters...... of mutations within individual genomes were attributable to compound mutation or gene conversion. Hypermutability was a characteristic of genes involved in ASD and other diseases. In addition, genes impacted by mutations in this study were associated with ASD in independent exome-sequencing data sets. Our......De novo mutation plays an important role in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Notably, pathogenic copy number variants (CNVs) are characterized by high mutation rates. We hypothesize that hypermutability is a property of ASD genes and may also include nucleotide-substitution hot spots. We...

  17. An 40 Ar- 39 Ar study of the Cape Verde hot spot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Paul Martin; Grandvuinet, Tanja; Wilson, James Richard

    2008-01-01

    evolved in five stages: (1) poorly constrained early Miocene activity, (2) 16-14 Ma, (3) 12-8 Ma, (4) around 5.4 Ma, and (5) 1.1-0.6 Ma. São Vicente was constructed during three active periods: (1) >6.6-5.9 Ma, (2) 4.7-4.5 Ma, and (3) ~0.3 Ma. Sr isotope analyses of carbonates from Maio confirm an Early...... the northwestern and southwestern groups of islands. Young volcanism (0.3-0.1 Ma) throughout the northwestern group extends along a 150 km long NW-SE trending lineament. A relatively moderate average melting rate for the hot spot over the 22 Ma period is estimated at ~0.026 km3/a, corresponding to a total volume...

  18. Is the Juan Fernandez Ridge (nazca Plate) a Deep-Mantle Hot SPOT Trail?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, L. E.; Selles, D.; Díaz, A.; Piña-Gauthier, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Juan Fernández Ridge on the oceanic Nazca plate is thought to be a classic hot spot trail because of the apparent westward rejuvenation of the eruptive ages. Geochronological data is still scarce to prove this is the case, and other hypothesis should be taken into account. There are a few constrains, like the ca. 9 Ma Ar-Ar age of the O'Higgins seamount (115 km from the Chile-Perú trench), published K-Ar ages of ca. 3-4 Ma in Robinson Crusoe island (580 km from the trench) and ca. 1 Ma in Alejandro Selkirk (180 km further west). New reconnaissance K-Ar ages in Robinson Crusoe yield ca. 1-3 Ma, which partially overlap with the age of Alejandro Selkirk, breaking the expected age progression given that the Nazca plate moves eastwards at ca. 6-8 cm/yr. New geological mapping also shows a sharp unconformity between the older, strongly altered sequences and more recent, post-erosional volcanic piles, where only the vent facies have disappeared. A fixed deep-mantle plume origin for Pacific hot spots has been widely debated and concurrent phenomena arose as a possible explanation for non-linear age progressions and/or long-lived volcanic activity. In fact, intraplate regional tectonics, plume displacement, and mantle heterogeneities could be the main factor of the ridge architecture or the mask for a first-order linear trend. An ongoing mapping and dating effort is aimed to understand the evolution of the Juan Fernández Ridge, testing the main hypothesis. Fondecyt grant 110966 is acknowledged for financial support.

  19. Wafer hot spot identification through advanced photomask characterization techniques: part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yohan; Green, Michael; Cho, Young; Ham, Young; Lin, Howard; Lan, Andy; Yang, Richer; Lung, Mike

    2017-03-01

    Historically, 1D metrics such as Mean to Target (MTT) and CD Uniformity (CDU) have been adequate for mask end users to evaluate and predict the mask impact on the wafer process. However, the wafer lithographer's process margin is shrinking at advanced nodes to a point that classical mask CD metrics are no longer adequate to gauge the mask contribution to wafer process error. For example, wafer CDU error at advanced nodes is impacted by mask factors such as 3-dimensional (3D) effects and mask pattern fidelity on sub-resolution assist features (SRAFs) used in Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) models of ever-increasing complexity. To overcome the limitation of 1D metrics, there are numerous on-going industry efforts to better define wafer-predictive metrics through both standard mask metrology and aerial CD methods. Even with these improvements, the industry continues to struggle to define useful correlative metrics that link the mask to final device performance. In part 1 of this work, we utilized advanced mask pattern characterization techniques to extract potential hot spots on the mask and link them, theoretically, to issues with final wafer performance. In this paper, part 2, we complete the work by verifying these techniques at wafer level. The test vehicle (TV) that was used for hot spot detection on the mask in part 1 will be used to expose wafers. The results will be used to verify the mask-level predictions. Finally, wafer performance with predicted and verified mask/wafer condition will be shown as the result of advanced mask characterization. The goal is to maximize mask end user yield through mask-wafer technology harmonization. This harmonization will provide the necessary feedback to determine optimum design, mask specifications, and mask-making conditions for optimal wafer process margin.

  20. Cooling off health security hot spots: getting on top of it down under.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Kris A; Skerratt, Lee F; Speare, Rick; Ritchie, Scott; Smout, Felicity; Hedlefs, Robert; Lee, Jonathan

    2012-11-01

    Australia is free of many diseases, pests and weeds found elsewhere in the world due to its geographical isolation and relatively good health security practices. However, its health security is under increasing pressure due to a number of ecological, climatic, demographic and behavioural changes occurring globally. North Queensland is a high risk area (a health security hot spot) for Australia, due in part to its connection to neighbouring countries via the Torres Strait and the Indo-Papuan conduit, its high diversity of wildlife reservoirs and its environmental characteristics. Major outbreaks of exotic diseases, pests and weeds in Australia can cost in excess of $1 billion; however, most expenditure on health security is reactive apart from preventive measures undertaken for a few high profile diseases, pests and weeds. Large gains in health security could therefore be made by spending more on pre-emptive approaches to reduce the risk of outbreaks, invasion/spread and establishment, despite these gains being difficult to quantify. Although biosecurity threats may initially have regional impacts (e.g. Hendra virus), a break down in security in health security hot spots can have national and international consequences, as has been seen recently in other regions with the emergence of SARS and pandemic avian influenza. Novel approaches should be driven by building research and management capacity, particularly in the regions where threats arise, a model that is applicable both in Australia and in other regions of the world that value and therefore aim to improve their strategies for maintaining health security. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Observations of IO hot-spots at coastal sites with the combination of a mobile CE- and LP- DOAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöhler, D.; Horbanski, M.; Schmitt, S.; Anthofer, M.; Tschritter, J.; Platt, U.

    2012-04-01

    Reactive iodine species are emitted by seaweed in the intertidal zone of coastal sites during low tide. Beside their oxidation to iodine oxide (IO) and reduction of ozone, they act as precursors for particle formation and therefore have a potential impact on climate. A correlation between iodine oxide and particle formation could be observed in several field studies. However, modelling studies suggest that the so far observed mixing ratios of iodine oxide are too low to explain the observed particle formation. This may be caused by the so far applied measurement techniques which either average over a long measurement path of several km (LP-DOAS) or by immobile in-situ techniques (LIF or BB-CEAS) located typically few 10-100m of the intertidal area. Thus both techniques could not observe local "hot-spots", locations with locally elevated IO levels above the background with small spatial extend (e.g. above a source). We present a new developed Cavity Enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CE- DOAS) instrument for the direct identification of IO down to 1ppt. This technique gives the possibility to achieve long absorption light paths in a compact setup (research station Mace Head during MaCloud field campaign) to investigate the IO levels emitted by macro algae. During low tide the CE-DOAS instrument was regularly set-up directly in the intertidal area above the macro algae. Results of different coastal sites will be presented in detail. Elevated IO concentrations up to several 10ppt could be observed with the CE-DOAS instrument regularly, but LP-DOAS concentrations are typically more than an order of magnitude lower. The data will be discussed according to the IO "hot-spot" theory. Even at unfavorable meteorological conditions (clouds, strong wind) the CE-DOAS instrument could regularly observe enhanced IO levels. Different coastal sites show different IO emission strength and spatial distribution. The spatial distribution of IO at different coastal

  2. Standard Test Method for Hot Spot Protection Testing of Photovoltaic Modules

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method provides a procedure to determine the ability of a photovoltaic (PV) module to endure the long-term effects of periodic “hot spot” heating associated with common fault conditions such as severely cracked or mismatched cells, single-point open circuit failures (for example, interconnect failures), partial (or non-uniform) shadowing or soiling. Such effects typically include solder melting or deterioration of the encapsulation, but in severe cases could progress to combustion of the PV module and surrounding materials. 1.2 There are two ways that cells can cause a hot spot problem; either by having a high resistance so that there is a large resistance in the circuit, or by having a low resistance area (shunt) such that there is a high-current flow in a localized region. This test method selects cells of both types to be stressed. 1.3 This test method does not establish pass or fail levels. The determination of acceptable or unacceptable results is beyond the scope of this test method....

  3. Searching for biogeochemical hot spots in three dimensions: soil C and N cycling in hydropedologic settings in a northern hardwood forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.L. Morse; S.F. Werner; C.P. Gillin; C.L. Goodale; S.W. Bailey; K.J. McGuire; P.M. Groffman

    2014-01-01

    Understanding and predicting the extent, location, and function of biogeochemical hot spots at the watershed scale is a frontier in environmental science. We applied a hydropedologic approach to identify (1) biogeochemical differences among morphologically distinct hydropedologic settings and (2) hot spots of microbial carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling activity in a...

  4. Hot spots in animal agriculture, emerging federal environmental policies and the potential for efficiency and innovation offsets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wossink, G.A.A.; Wefering, F.

    2003-01-01

    In North America and Northern Europe, high livestock densities in concentrated areas (hot spots) have led to manure surpluses, which have resulted in water pollution problems. Using the emerging policy objectives for animal waste in the European Union and the USA as a backdrop, this paper discusses

  5. Localization of Temperature Using Plasmonic Hot Spots in Metal Nanostructures: The Nano-Optical Antenna Approach and Fano Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Khorashad, Larousse Khosravi; Valentine, Jason; Govorov, Alexander O

    2016-01-01

    It is challenging to strongly localize temperature in small volumes because heat transfer is a diffusive process. Here we show how to overcome this limitation using electrodynamic hot spots and interference effects in the regime of continuous-wave (CW) excitation. We introduce a set of figures of merit for the localization of temperature and for the efficiency of the plasmonic photo-thermal effect. Our calculations show that the temperature localization in a trimer nanoparticle assembly is a complex function of the geometry and sizes. Large nanoparticles in the trimer play the role of the nano-optical antenna whereas the small nanoparticle in the plasmonic hot spot acts as a nano-heater. Under the peculiar conditions, the temperature increase inside a nanoparticle trimer can be localized in a hot spot region at the small heater nanoparticle and, in this way, a thermal hot spot can be realized. However, the overall power efficiency of temperature generation in this trimer is much smaller than that of a single ...

  6. Spectral induced polarization as a tool to map subsurface biogeochemical hot spots: a first laboratory evaluation in the Fe-S system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordsiek, Sven; Gilfedder, Ben; Frei, Sven

    2017-04-01

    Zones of intense biogeochemical reactivity (hot spots) arise in the saturated subsurface at the interface between regions with oxidizing and reducing conditions. Hot spots are both sinks and sources of different chemical compounds, thus they are of particular importance for element cycling in the subsurface. However, the investigation of hot spot structures is difficult, because they are not directly identifiable from the surface and can only be investigated by invasive methods in the subsurface. Additionally, they often form in sensitive wetland ecosystems where only non-destructive measurements are applicable to avoid significant degradation of these sensitive environments. Under these circumstances, geophysical methods may provide useful tools to identify biogeochemically active regions. One of the most important biogeochemical reactions in wetlands is the reduction of sulphate and formation and accumulation of FexSy minerals (where x and y delineate mineral stoichiometry). These reactions only occur in specific hot spots where specific chemical and microbial conditions are met. Within a research project concerning biogeochemical transformations and turnover in wetlands, we investigate the applicability of the geoelectrical method of spectral induced polarization (SIP) to locate and monitor regions containing polarizing FexSy particles as indicator for biogeochemical hot spots. After developing and testing a sample holder and a set of non-polarizing electrodes for laboratory SIP measurements, we performed experiments on natural soil samples taken from the hyporheic zone of a local river channel. The collected material originates from a location known for biogeochemical activity. The sample contains a high percentage of dark grayish/black sediment interpreted as FexSy, and possibly pyrite (FeS2). The material was homogenized and split into four samples. The FexSy concentration was adjusted to three different levels by oxidation using H2O2. For all samples we

  7. Effects of high shock pressures and pore morphology on hot spot mechanisms in HMX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, H. K.; Tarver, C. M.; Bastea, S.

    2017-01-01

    The shock initiation and detonation behavior of heterogeneous solid explosives is governed by its microstructure and reactive properties. New additive manufacturing techniques offer unprecedented control of explosive microstructures previously impossible, enabling us to develop novel explosives with tailored shock sensitivity and detonation properties. Since microstructure-performance relationships are not well established for explosives, there is little material design guidance for these manufacturing techniques. In this study, we explore the effects of high shock pressures (15-38 GPa) with long shock durations and different pore morphologies on hot spot mechanisms in HMX. HMX is chosen as the model material because we have experimental data on many of the chemical-thermal-mechanical properties required for pore collapse simulations. Our simulations are performed using the multi-physics arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian finite element hydrocode, ALE3D, with Cheetah-based models for the unreacted and the product equation-of-states. We use a temperature-dependent specific heat with the unreacted equation-of-state and a temperature-dependent viscosity model to ensure accurate shock temperatures for subsequent chemistry. The Lindemann Law model is used for shock melting in HMX. In contrast to previous pore collapse studies at lower shock pressures (≤10 GPa) in HMX and shorter post-collapse burning times, our calculations show that shock melting occurs above 15 GPa due to higher bulk heating and a prominent elongated ("jet-like") hot spot region forms at later times. The combination of the elongated, post-collapse hot spot region and the higher bulk heating with increasing pressure dramatically increases the growth rate of reaction. Our calculations show that the reaction rate, dF/dt, increases with increasing shock pressure. We decompose the reaction rate into ignition ((dF/dt)ig) and growth ((dF/dt)gr) phases to better analyze our results. We define the ignition phase

  8. The Iceland Deep Drilling Project (IDDP): Obtaining Supercritical Geothermal Fluid from Hot Spot-Ridge Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridleifsson, G. O.; Elders, W. A.; Saito, S.

    2001-12-01

    The Iceland Deep Drilling Project (IDDP) plans to drill one or more boreholes deep enough to penetrate into the supercritical zones believed to be present beneath three currently exploited geothermal systems in oceanic ridge-type spreading centers in Iceland. The main aim is to produce much higher enthalpy fluids for power production than are currently being utilized. The IDDP is being funded by Deep Vision, a consortium of Icelandic energy companies. A feasibility study is currently under-way and is examining three candidate sites as well as the economics and engineering issues of drilling to greater depths and higher temperatures. Responding to the invitation of Deep Vision, a meeting funded by the International Scientific Continental Drilling Program (ICDP), was held in Reykjavik in June 2001, to help define the tasks for the feasibility study and to begin planning a scientific program to take advantage of the IDDP boreholes. A Science Applications Group of Advisors (SAGA) with both Icelandic and international membership has been formed to formulate and oversee these activities. An IDDP-ICDP science workshop on the IDDP will be held in Reykjavik in March 2002 with 50-75 participants to formulate a drilling and science plan. A second workshop is being considered for 2003 and drilling is expected to take place in 2004. Iceland is a particularly favorable location for research on very high enthalpy geothermal fluids and it is hoped that such fluids can be produced at high flow rates. In Iceland the repeated seismicity and volcanic activity in the rift environments above the hot spot create high permeability and high temperatures at drillable depths. Temperatures greater than 300oC are commonly encountered in wells drilled to depths of 2 km in high-temperature geothermal fields in Iceland. The likely existence of permeable regions in brittle basaltic rock at supercritical temperatures at still greater depths beneath the candidate geothermal fields is inferred from

  9. The critical spot eraser-a method to interactively control the correction of local hot and cold spots in IMRT planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süss, Philipp; Bortz, Michael; Küfer, Karl-Heinz; Thieke, Christian

    2013-03-21

    Common problems in inverse radiotherapy planning are localized dose insufficiencies like hot spots in organs at risk or cold spots inside targets. These are hard to correct since the optimization is based on global evaluations like maximum/minimum doses, equivalent uniform doses or dose-volume constraints for whole structures. In this work, we present a new approach to locally correct the dose of any given treatment plan. Once a treatment plan has been found that is acceptable in general but requires local corrections, these areas are marked by the planner. Then the system generates new plans that fulfil the local dose goals. Consequently, it is possible to interactively explore all plans between the locally corrected plans and the original treatment plan, allowing one to exactly adjust the degree of local correction and how the plan changes overall. Both the amount (in Gy) and the size of the local dose change can be navigated. The method is introduced formally as a new mathematical optimization setting, and is evaluated using a clinical example of a meningioma at the base of the skull. It was possible to eliminate a hot spot outside the target volume while controlling the dose changes to all other parts of the treatment plan. The proposed method has the potential to become the final standard step of inverse treatment planning.

  10. Prediction of hot spot residues at protein-protein interfaces by combining machine learning and energy-based methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pontil Massimiliano

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alanine scanning mutagenesis is a powerful experimental methodology for investigating the structural and energetic characteristics of protein complexes. Individual amino-acids are systematically mutated to alanine and changes in free energy of binding (ΔΔG measured. Several experiments have shown that protein-protein interactions are critically dependent on just a few residues ("hot spots" at the interface. Hot spots make a dominant contribution to the free energy of binding and if mutated they can disrupt the interaction. As mutagenesis studies require significant experimental efforts, there is a need for accurate and reliable computational methods. Such methods would also add to our understanding of the determinants of affinity and specificity in protein-protein recognition. Results We present a novel computational strategy to identify hot spot residues, given the structure of a complex. We consider the basic energetic terms that contribute to hot spot interactions, i.e. van der Waals potentials, solvation energy, hydrogen bonds and Coulomb electrostatics. We treat them as input features and use machine learning algorithms such as Support Vector Machines and Gaussian Processes to optimally combine and integrate them, based on a set of training examples of alanine mutations. We show that our approach is effective in predicting hot spots and it compares favourably to other available methods. In particular we find the best performances using Transductive Support Vector Machines, a semi-supervised learning scheme. When hot spots are defined as those residues for which ΔΔG ≥ 2 kcal/mol, our method achieves a precision and a recall respectively of 56% and 65%. Conclusion We have developed an hybrid scheme in which energy terms are used as input features of machine learning models. This strategy combines the strengths of machine learning and energy-based methods. Although so far these two types of approaches have mainly been

  11. Optical and mechanical manipulation of plasmonic hot spots on gold nanoparticle tips; Optische und mechanische Manipulation plasmonischer Heisspunkte an Goldnanopartikelspitzen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrelescu, Calin-Alexander

    2011-06-15

    in the present thesis hybride systems based on alternative nanoparticle morphologies were studied in view of their optical properties in order to remove extensively the known limitations and insufficiencies of the established nanoparticle systems and shapes like rod-shaped or spherical nanoparticles. Star-shaped gold nanoparticles and their special plasmonic properties are presented. By methods of the dark-field spectroscopy, the photoelectron emission spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy the near- and far-field properties of single nanostars and their morphologies are correlated. So the first experimental proof of the localization of optically excited hot spots on the tips of the single nanostars could be given. By suited choice of the polarization and wavelength hot spots on several or exclusively single tips of a nanostar are selectively excited and the detected plasmon resonances assigned to single nanostar tips only due to experimental data. Furthermore field amplification factors in the range of 58-79 are for the first time quantitatively determined. The high and for molecules easily accessible hot spots on the tips of the nanostars are applied in order to demonstrate the excellent amplification of the Raman scattering on the level of single nanostars. The Raman amplification factors of 10{sup 7} for the studied nanostars without use of plasmonic coupling effects mark the nanostars as important candidates for the application in complex dynamical environments. A further possibility of the use of the hot spots localized on tips offer nanopyramides. By manipulation with a scanning force microscope a positioning of the hot spots until 1 nm above the surface and on arbitrary places on a sample substrate can be reached. Nanoresonators of two nanopyramides can be mechanically fabricated in three adsorption configurations concerning the tips of the two nanoparticles directed to each other. By the mechanical change of the configuration of the nanoresonator

  12. Determining hot spot motion using a multi line-of-sight nToF analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatarik, Robert; Nora, Ryan; Spears, Brian; Eckart, Mark; Hartouni, Edward; Grim, Gary; Moore, Alastair; Schlossberg, David

    2017-10-01

    An important diagnostic value of a shot at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the resultant center-of mass motion of the imploding capsule as it contributes to the efficiency of converting LASER energy into plasma temperature. In the past the projection of this velocity onto a line-of-sight (LOS) for a given detector was determined by using a temperature model to determine the mean nergy of the emitted neutrons. With the addition of a fourth neutron time-of-flight LOS at the NIF, it is possible to determine a hot spot vector and mean velocity of the emitted neutron distribution. This entails analyzing all four LOS simultaneously and has the advantage of not relying on a temperature model. Results from recent NIF shots comparing this method with the traditional method will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. Spatial variation and hot-spots of district level diarrhea incidences in Ghana: 2010–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Badu Osei

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diarrhea is a public health menace, especially in developing countries. Knowledge of the biological and anthropogenic characteristics is abundant. However, little is known about its spatial patterns especially in developing countries like Ghana. This study aims to map and explore the spatial variation and hot-spots of district level diarrhea incidences in Ghana. Methods Data on district level incidences of diarrhea from 2010 to 2014 were compiled together with population data. We mapped the relative risks using empirical Bayesian smoothing. The spatial scan statistics was used to detect and map spatial and space-time clusters. Logistic regression was used to explore the relationship between space-time clustering and urbanization strata, i.e. rural, peri-urban, and urban districts. Results We observed substantial variation in the spatial distribution of the relative risk. There was evidence of significant spatial clusters with most of the excess incidences being long-term with only a few being emerging clusters. Space-time clustering was found to be more likely to occur in peri-urban districts than in rural and urban districts. Conclusion This study has revealed that the excess incidences of diarrhea is spatially clustered with peri-urban districts showing the greatest risk of space-time clustering. More attention should therefore be paid to diarrhea in peri-urban districts. These findings also prompt public health officials to integrate disease mapping and cluster analyses in developing location specific interventions for reducing diarrhea.

  14. Communally Nesting Migratory Birds Create Ecological Hot-Spots in Tropical Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J D Natusch

    Full Text Available Large numbers of metallic starlings (Aplonis metallica migrate annually from New Guinea to the rainforests of tropical Australia, where they nest communally in single emergent trees (up to 1,000 birds. These aggregations create dense and species-rich faunal "hot-spots", attracting a diverse assemblage of local consumers that utilise this seasonal resource. The starlings nested primarily in poison-dart trees (Antiaris toxicaria near the rainforest-woodland boundary. Surveys underneath these colonies revealed that bird-derived nutrients massively increased densities of soil invertebrates and mammals (primarily wild pigs beneath trees, year-round. Flying invertebrates, nocturnal birds, reptiles, and amphibians congregated beneath the trees when starlings were nesting (the wet-season. Diurnal birds (primarily cockatoos and bush turkeys aggregated beneath the trees during the dry-season to utilise residual nutrients when the starlings were not nesting. The abundance of several taxa was considerably higher (to > 1000-fold under colony trees than under nearby trees. The system strikingly resembles utilisation of bird nesting colonies by predators in other parts of the world but this spectacular system has never been described, emphasizing the continuing need for detailed natural-history studies in tropical Australia.

  15. Simulated impact of self-generated magnetic fields in the hot-spot of NIF implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partha, M. A.; Haan, S. W.; Koning, J.; Marinak, M. M.; Weber, C. R.; Clark, D. S.

    2016-10-01

    Deviations from sphericity in an imploded hot-spot result in magnetic fields generated by the Biermann battery effect. The magnetic field can reduce thermal conductivity, affect α transport, change instability growth, and cause magnetic pressure. Previous estimates of these effects have indicated that they are not of great consequence, but have suggested that they could plausibly affect NIF observables such as yield and ion temperature by 5-25%. Using the MHD capability in the Hydra code, we evaluated the impact of these processes in a post-shot model for a typical NIF implosion. Various implosion asymmetries were implemented, with the goal of surveying plausible implosion configurations to find the geometry in which the MHD effects were the most significant. Magnetic fields are estimated to approach 104 Tesla, and to affect conductivity locally by more than 50%, but global impact on observables is small in most cases. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. D.O.E. by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  16. A Machine Learning Approach for Hot-Spot Detection at Protein-Protein Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Melo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding protein-protein interactions is a key challenge in biochemistry. In this work, we describe a more accurate methodology to predict Hot-Spots (HS in protein-protein interfaces from their native complex structure compared to previous published Machine Learning (ML techniques. Our model is trained on a large number of complexes and on a significantly larger number of different structural- and evolutionary sequence-based features. In particular, we added interface size, type of interaction between residues at the interface of the complex, number of different types of residues at the interface and the Position-Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM, for a total of 79 features. We used twenty-seven algorithms from a simple linear-based function to support-vector machine models with different cost functions. The best model was achieved by the use of the conditional inference random forest (c-forest algorithm with a dataset pre-processed by the normalization of features and with up-sampling of the minor class. The method has an overall accuracy of 0.80, an F1-score of 0.73, a sensitivity of 0.76 and a specificity of 0.82 for the independent test set.

  17. Hot spot model of MagLIF implosions: Nernst term effect on magnetic flux losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Rubio, Fernando; Sanz Recio, Javier; Betti, Riccardo

    2016-10-01

    An analytical model of a collisional plasma being compressed by a cylindrical liner is proposed and solved in a magnetized liner inertial fusion-like context. The implosion is assumed to be isobaric, and the magnetic diffusion is confined to a thin layer near the liner. Both unmagnetized and magnetized plasma cases are considered. The model reduces to a system of two partial differential equations for temperature and magnetic field. Special attention is given to the effect of the Nernst term on the evolution of the magnetic field. Scaling laws for temperature, magnetic field, hot spot mass increase and magnetic field losses are obtained. The temperature and magnetic field spatial profiles tend to a self-similar state. It is found that when the Nernst term is taken into account, the magnetic field is advected towards the liner, and the magnetic flux losses are independent of the magnetic Lewis number. Research supported by the Spanish Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad, Project No. ENE2014-54960R. Acknowledgements to the Laboratory of Laser Energetics (Rochester) for its hospitality.

  18. Winter color polymorphisms identify global hot spots for evolutionary rescue from climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, L Scott; Bragina, Eugenia V; Kumar, Alexander V; Zimova, Marketa; Lafferty, Diana J R; Feltner, Jennifer; Davis, Brandon M; Hackländer, Klaus; Alves, Paulo C; Good, Jeffrey M; Melo-Ferreira, José; Dietz, Andreas; Abramov, Alexei V; Lopatina, Natalia; Fay, Kairsten

    2018-02-15

    Maintenance of biodiversity in a rapidly changing climate will depend on the efficacy of evolutionary rescue, whereby population declines due to abrupt environmental change are reversed by shifts in genetically driven adaptive traits. However, a lack of traits known to be under direct selection by anthropogenic climate change has limited the incorporation of evolutionary processes into global conservation efforts. In 21 vertebrate species, some individuals undergo a seasonal color molt from summer brown to winter white as camouflage against snow, while other individuals remain brown. Seasonal snow duration is decreasing globally, and fitness is lower for winter white animals on snowless backgrounds. Based on 2713 georeferenced samples of known winter coat color-from eight species across trophic levels-we identify environmentally driven clinal gradients in winter coat color, including polymorphic zones where winter brown and white morphs co-occur. These polymorphic zones, underrepresented by existing global protected area networks, indicate hot spots for evolutionary rescue in a changing climate. Copyright © 2018, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. Suppressing local hot spots due to eddy currents in magnetic coil systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhen; Shojinaga, Aaron; Wu, Yong; Shvartsman, Shmaryu; Eagan, Timothy; Chmielewski, Thomas; Brown, Robert

    2011-03-01

    A particular goal in magnetic field applications is to avoid eddy current heating in coils and shields. It is important, in MRI, for example, to avoid hot spots near the patient to be imaged as well as in the vicinity of soldering joints. We develop effective analytical formulas for the eddy current behavior of sources close to surrounding conductors, we verify these via numerical simulations, and we make successful comparisons to corresponding experimental temperature distributions. Optimized patterns of incisions made in the conductors are discovered for addressing particularly troublesome heating locations. The criteria include the need to minimize the number and length of the cuts. Theory and experiment are in agreement on the efficacy of this method for reducing steady-state temperatures. An example of results in the practical design of commercial coils and shields is that a single cut parallel to the long edge of rectangular conductors reduces the temperatures much more than making multiple cuts parallel to the short edge. Supported by Ohio Third Frontier Program

  20. Evidence for Two Hot-Jupiter Formation Paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Benjamin E.; Ford, Eric B.; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2017-09-01

    Disk migration and high-eccentricity migration are two well-studied theories to explain the formation of hot Jupiters. The former predicts that these planets can migrate up until the planet-star Roche separation ({a}{Roche}) and the latter predicts they will tidally circularize at a minimum distance of 2 {a}{Roche}. Considering long-running radial velocity and transit surveys have identified a couple hundred hot Jupiters to date, we can revisit the classic question of hot-Jupiter formation in a data-driven manner. We approach this problem using data from several exoplanet surveys (radial velocity, Kepler, HAT, and WASP) allowing for either a single population or a mixture of populations associated with these formation channels, and applying a hierarchical Bayesian mixture model of truncated power laws of the form {x}γ -1 to constrain the population-level parameters of interest (e.g., location of inner edges, γ, mixture fractions). Within the limitations of our chosen models, we find that the current radial velocity and Kepler sample of hot Jupiters can be well explained with a single truncated power-law distribution with a lower cutoff near 2 {a}{Roche}, a result that still holds after a decade, and γ =-0.51{+/- }0.200.19. However, the HAT and WASP data show evidence for multiple populations (Bayes factor ≈ {10}21). We find that 15{+/- }69 % reside in a component consistent with disk migration (γ =-0.04{+/- }1.270.53) and 85{+/- }96 % in one consistent with high-eccentricity migration (γ =-1.38{+/- }0.470.32). We find no immediately strong connections with some observed host star properties and speculate on how future exoplanet surveys could improve upon hot-Jupiter population inference.

  1. The Effect of Particle Properties on Hot Particle Spot Fire Ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Casey David

    The ignition of natural combustible material by hot metal particles is an important fire ignition pathway by which wildland and wildland-urban-interface spot fires are started. There are numerous cases reported of wild fires started by clashing power-lines or from sparks generated by machines or engines. Similarly there are many cases reported of fires caused by grinding, welding and cutting sparks. Up to this point, research on hot particle spot fire ignition has largely focused on particle generation and transport. A small number of studies have examined what occurs after a hot particle contacts a natural fuel bed, but until recently the process remained poorly understood. This work describes an investigation of the effect of particle size, temperature and thermal properties on the ability of hot particles to cause flaming ignition of cellulosic fuel beds. Both experimental and theoretical approaches are used, with a focus on understanding the physics underlying the ignition process. For the experimental study, spheres of stainless steel, aluminum, brass and copper are heated in a tube furnace and dropped onto a powdered cellulose fuel bed; the occurrence of flaming ignition or lack thereof is visually observed and recorded. This procedure is repeated a large number of times for each metal type, varying particle diameter from 2 to 11 mm and particle temperature between 575 and 1100°C. The results of these experiments are statistically analyzed to find approximate ignition boundaries and identify boundary trends with respect to the particle parameters of interest. Schlieren images recorded during the ignition experiments are also used to more accurately describe the ignition process. Based on these images, a simple theoretical model of hot particle spot fire ignition is developed and used to explore the experimental trends further. The model under-predicts the minimum ignition temperatures required for small spheres, but agrees qualitatively with the experimental

  2. “Rings of saturn-like” nanoarrays with high number density of hot spots for surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Zhigao; Liao, Lei; Wu, Wei; Guo, Shishang; Zhao, Xinyue; Li, Wei; Ren, Feng; Jiang, Changzhong, E-mail: xxh@whu.edu.cn, E-mail: czjiang@whu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and Center for Ion Beam Application, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Mei, Fei [Department of Physics, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and Center for Ion Beam Application, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Hubei University of Technology, Wuhan 430068 (China); Xiao, Xiangheng, E-mail: xxh@whu.edu.cn, E-mail: czjiang@whu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and Center for Ion Beam Application, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Fu, Lei; Wang, Jiao [College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2014-07-21

    The Ag nanoparticles (NPs) surrounding triangular nanoarrays (TNAs) with high number density of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) hot spots (SERS hot spots ring) are prepared by a combination of NPs deposition and subsequent colloid lithography processing. Owing to the SERS hot spots ring, the Ag NPs surrounding TNAs have been proved an excellent candidate for ultrasensitive molecular sensing for their high SERS signal enhancing capacity in experiments and theories. The Ag NPs surrounding TNAs can be readily used for the quick detection of low concentrations of molecules related to food safety; herein, detection of melamine is discussed.

  3. The role of hot spot mix in the low-foot and high-foot implosions on the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, T.; Patel, P. K.; Izumi, N.; Springer, P. T.; Key, M. H.; Atherton, L. J.; Barrios, M. A.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bionta, R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C. J.; Church, J. A.; Clark, D. S.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Dixit, S. N.; Döppner, T.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Field, J.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Glenn, S.; Glenzer, S. H.; Grim, G.; Guler, N.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hatarik, R.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hicks, D.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Hsing, W. W.; Hurricane, O. A.; Jones, O. S.; Kauffman, R.; Khan, S. F.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kline, J. L.; Kozioziemski, B.; Kritcher, A.; Kyrala, G. A.; Landen, O. L.; Lindl, J. D.; Le Pape, S.; MacGowan, B. J.; Mackinnon, A. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Meezan, N. B.; Merrill, F. E.; Moody, J. D.; Moses, E. I.; Nagel, S. R.; Nikroo, A.; Pak, A.; Parham, T.; Park, H.-S.; Ralph, J. E.; Regan, S. P.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Rosen, M. D.; Rygg, J. R.; Ross, J. S.; Salmonson, J. D.; Sater, J.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M. B.; Shaughnessy, D.; Sio, H.; Spears, B. K.; Smalyuk, V.; Suter, L. J.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P. J.; Volegov, P. L.; Wan, A.; Weber, S. V.; Widmann, K.; Wilde, C. H.; Yeamans, C.; Edwards, M. J.

    2017-05-01

    Hydrodynamic mix of the ablator into the DT fuel layer and hot spot can be a critical performance limitation in inertial confinement fusion implosions. This mix results in increased radiation loss, cooling of the hot spot, and reduced neutron yield. To quantify the level of mix, we have developed a simple model that infers the level of contamination using the ratio of the measured x-ray emission to the neutron yield. The principal source for the performance limitation of the "low-foot" class of implosions appears to have been mix. Lower convergence "high-foot" implosions are found to be less susceptible to mix, allowing velocities of >380 km/s to be achieved.

  4. Implementing a New Register Allocator for the Server Compiler in the Java HotSpot Virtual Machine

    OpenAIRE

    Adlertz, Niclas

    2015-01-01

    The Java HotSpot Virtual Machine currently uses two Just In Time compilers to increase the performance of Java code in execution. The client and server compilers, as they are named, serve slightly different purposes. The client compiler produces code fast, while the server compiler produces code of greater quality. Both are important, because in a runtime environment there is a tradeoff between compiling and executing code. However, maintaining two separate compilers leads to increased mainte...

  5. Mid-infrared Excess from the West Hot Spot of the Radio Galaxy Pictor A Unveiled by WISE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Naoki; Koyama, Shoko; Kino, Motoki; Wada, Takehiko; Nakagawa, Takao; Matsuhara, Hideo; Niinuma, Kotaro; Tashiro, Makoto

    2017-12-01

    Mid-infrared properties are reported of the west hot spot of the radio galaxy Pictor A with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). The mid-infrared counterpart to the hot spot, WISE J051926.26‑454554.1, is listed in the AllWISE source catalog. The source was detected in all four of the WISE photometric bands. A comparison between the WISE and radio images reinforces the physical association of the WISE source to the hot spot. The WISE flux density of the source was carefully evaluated. A close investigation of the multi-wavelength synchrotron spectral energy distribution from the object reveals a mid-infrared excess at the wavelength of λ =22 μm with a statistical significance of 4.8σ over the simple power-law extrapolation from the synchrotron radio spectrum. The excess is reinforced by single and double cutoff power-law modeling of the radio-to-optical spectral energy distribution. The synchrotron cutoff frequency of the main and excess components was evaluated as 7.1× {10}14 Hz and 5.5× {10}13 Hz, respectively. From the cutoff frequency, the magnetic field of the emission region was constrained as a function of the region size. In order to interpret the excess component, an electron population different from the main one dominating the observed radio spectrum is necessary. The excess emission is proposed to originate in a substructure within the hot spot, in which the magnetic field is a factor of a few stronger than that in the minimum-energy condition. The relation of the mid-infrared excess to the X-ray emission is briefly discussed.

  6. Formation and decay of a hot compound nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, B.V.; Dalmolin, F.T.; Dutra, M.; Santos, T.J., E-mail: brett@ita.br [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), Sao Jose dos Campos SP (Brazil); Souza, S.R. [Universidade Federal de Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), Porto Alegre RS, (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Donangelo, R. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de la Republica de Uruguay, Montevideo (Uruguay); Universidade Federal de Rio Grande do Sul (UFRS), Porto Alegre RS, (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The compound nucleus plays an important role in nuclear reactions over a wide range of projectile-target combinations and energies. The limits that angular momentum places on its formation and existence are, for the most part, well understood. The limits on its excitation energy are not as clear. Here we first analyze general geometrical and thermodynamical features of a hot compound nucleus. We then discuss the manners by which it can decay and close by speculating on the high energy limit to its formation and existence. (author)

  7. Prediction of hot spots in protein interfaces using extreme learning machines with the information of spatial neighbour residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Zhang, Wenjuan; Gao, Qiang; Xiong, Congcong

    2014-08-01

    The identification of hot spots, a small subset of protein interfaces that accounts for the majority of binding free energy, is becoming increasingly important for the research on protein-protein interaction and drug design. For each interface residue or target residue to be predicted, the authors extract hybrid features which incorporate a wide range of information of the target residue and its spatial neighbor residues, that is, the nearest contact residue in the other face (mirror-contact residue) and the nearest contact residue in the same face (intra-contact residue). Here, feature selection is performed using random forests to avoid over-fitting. Thereafter, the extreme learning machine is employed to effectively integrate these hybrid features for predicting hot spots in protein interfaces. By the 5-fold cross validation in the training set, their method can achieve accuracy (ACC) of 82.1% and Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.459, and outperforms some alternative machine learning methods in the comparison study. Furthermore, their method achieves ACC of 76.8% and MCC of 0.401 in the independent test set, and is more effective than the major existing hot spot predictors. Their prediction method offers a powerful tool for uncovering candidate residues in the studies of alanine scanning mutagenesis for functional protein interaction sites.

  8. Cooling water of power plant creates "hot spots" for tropical fishes and parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emde, Sebastian; Kochmann, Judith; Kuhn, Thomas; Dörge, Dorian D; Plath, Martin; Miesen, Friedrich W; Klimpel, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Thermally altered water bodies can function as "hot spots" where non-native species are establishing self-sustaining populations beyond their tropical and subtropical native regions. Whereas many tropical fish species have been found in these habitats, the introduction of non-native parasites often remains undetected. Here, n = 77 convict cichlids (Amatitlania nigrofasciata) were sampled by electro-fishing at two sites from a thermally altered stream in Germany and examined for parasite fauna and feeding ecology. Stomach content analysis suggests an opportunistic feeding strategy of A. nigrofasciata: while plant material dominated the diet at the warm water inlet (∼30 °C), relative contributions of insects, plants, and crustaceans were balanced 3 km downstream (∼27 °C). The most abundant non-native parasite species was the tropical nematode Camallanus cotti with P = 11.90 % and P = 80.00 % at the inlet and further downstream, respectively. Additionally, nematode larvae of Anguillicoloides crassus and one specimen of the subtropical species Bothriocephalus acheilognathi were isolated. A. nigrofasciata was also highly infected with the native parasite Acanthocephalus anguillae, which could be linked to high numbers of the parasite's intermediate host Asellus aquaticus. The aim of this study was to highlight the risk and consequences of the release and establishment of ornamental fish species for the introduction and spread of non-indigenous metazoan parasites using the convict cichlid as a model species. Furthermore, the spread of non-native parasites into adjacent fish communities needs to be addressed in the future as first evidence of Camallanus cotti in native fish species was also found.

  9. WiFi Hot Spot Service Business for the Automotive and Oil Industries: A Competitive Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-Francois PAU

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available While you refuel for gas, why not refuel for information or upload vehicle data, using a cheap wireless technology as WiFi? This paper analyzes in extensive detail the user segmentation by vehicle usage, service offering, and full business models from WiFi hot spot services delivered to and from vehicles (private, professional, public around gas stations. Are also analyzed the parties which play a role in such services: authorization, provisioning and delivery, with all the dependencies modelled by attributed digraphs. Account is made of WiFi base station technical capabilities and costs. Five year financial models (CAPEX, OPEX, and data pertain to two possible service suppliers: multi-service oil companies, and mobile service operators (or MVNOs. Model optimization on the return-on-investment (R.O.I. is carried out for different deployment scenarios, geographical coverage assumptions, as well as tariff structures. Comparison is also being made with public GPRS and 3G data services, as precursors to HSPA/LTE, and the effect of WiFi roaming is analyzed. Regulatory implications, including those dealing with public safety, are addressed. Analysis shows that due to manpower costs and marketing costs, suitable R.O.I. will not be achieved unless externalities are accounted for and innovative tariff structures are introduced. Open issues and further research are outlined. Further work is currently carried out with automotive electronics sector, wireless systems providers, wireless terminals platform suppliers, and vehicle manufacturers. Future relevance of this work is also discussed for the emerging electrical reloading grids for electrical vehicles.

  10. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutation hot spots in acute lymphoblastic leukemia and oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Yang Tang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH encodes a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate+-dependent enzyme for oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate and has an essential role in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Mutations of IDH1 and IDH2 have been identified in patients with glioma, leukemia, and other cancers. However, the incidence of IDH mutations in acute myeloid leukemia in Taiwan is much lower than that reported in Western countries. The reason for the difference is unknown and its clinical implications remain unclear. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is a heterogenous hematopoietic malignancy. Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC results from chronic carcinogen exposures and is highly prevalent in trucking workers, especially in southern Taiwan. Subtypes of both diseases require specific treatments, and molecular markers for developing tailored treatments are limited. High-resolution melting (HRM analysis is now a widely used methodology for rapid, accurate, and low-cost mutation scanning. In this study, 90 adults with OSC and 31 children with ALL were scanned by HRM analysis for IDH1 and IDH2 mutation hot spots. In ALL, the allele frequency was 3.23% in both IDH1 and IDH2. In OSCC, the allele frequency was 2.22% in IDH2. A synonymous mutation over pG313 (c.939A > G of IDH2 was found in both pediatric ALL and adult OSCC. Therefore, we concluded that mutations of IDH are uncommon in ALL and OSCC and are apparently not a major consideration when selecting treatment modalities.

  11. Hot Spots of Mercury Bioaccumulation in Amphibian Populations From the Conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bank, M. S.

    2008-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) contamination in the United States (U.S.) is well-documented and continues to be a public- health issue of great concern. Fish consumption advisories have been issued throughout much of the U.S. due to elevated levels of methylmercury (MeHg). Methylmercury contamination in the developing fetus and in young children is a major public health issue for certain sectors of the global human population. Moreover, identifying MeHg hot spots and the effects of MeHg pollution on environmental health and biodiversity are also considered a high priority for land managers, risk assessors, and conservation scientists. Despite their overall biomass and importance to aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, Hg and MeHg bioaccumulation dynamics and toxicity in amphibians are not well studied, especially when compared to other vertebrate taxa such as birds, mammals, and fish species. Population declines in amphibians are well documented and likely caused by synergistic and interacting, multiple stressors such as climate change, exposure to toxic pollutants, fungal pathogens, and habitat loss and ecosystem degradation. Protecting quality of terrestrial ecosystems in the U.S. has enormous ramifications for economic and public health of the nation's residents and is fundamental to maintaining the biotic integrity of surface waters, riparian zones, and environmental health of forested landscapes nationwide. Determining Hg concentration levels for terrestrial and surface water ecosystems also has important implications for protecting the nation's fauna. Here I present an overview of the National Amphibian Mercury Program and evaluate variation in MeHg hotspots, Hg bioaccumulation and distribution in freshwater and terrestrial habitats across a broad gradient of physical, climatic, biotic, and ecosystem settings to identify the environmental conditions and ecosystem types that are most sensitive to Hg pollution. The role of geography, disturbance mechanisms, and abiotic and biotic

  12. The research of the hot spot temperature of the dry-type reactor winding based on the inversed-heat conduction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wenqing; Luo, Hanwu; Li, Wenpeng; Cao, Yongdong; Ye, Ligang; Guo, Kai; Ding, Renjie; Wang, Yongqiang

    2017-10-01

    There is an important significance for the design and the life time evaluation of the dry-type reactor based on the hot-spot temperature. At present the methods of obtaining the reactor's hot-spot temperature are as follows: direct measurement and numerical calculation. Direct measurement can obtain winding hot spot temperature through the optical fiber temperature sensor or thermocouple; the numerical calculation mostly uses the finite element or finite difference method. This paper establishes the inversed-heat transfer calculation model of high and low voltage winding using the high-precision infrared sensor to acquire the temperature of the high voltage winding. Through calculation the temperature distribution of the low voltage winding has been obtained and the hottest spot temperature of the winding is much closed to the result obtained by the IEEE model in a certain range. It provides a new method for the acquisition of the hottest spot temperature of the dry-type reactor.

  13. A study of the long-term properties of Jovian hot spots from HST and ground-based observations between 1994 and 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arregui, E.; Rojas, J. F.; Sanchez-Lavega, A.; Lecacheux, J.; Colas, F.; Miyazaki, I.; Parker, D.

    2000-10-01

    We have used the HST-WFPC2 archived images of Jupiter in the period 1994-1998 together with a large set of CCD ground based images, to study the zonal distribution, long-term motions, lifetimes, interactions and other properties of the hot spot - plume regions at 7 degrees North. Red and near infrared filters covering the wavelength range 650 - 953 nm have been used since they show the hot spots with a high contrast. We have found that the hot spots have velocities ranging from 95 to 112 m/s and are grouped typically in families of three to six members. We do not found any correlation between their velocity and wavenumber. The long-term survey allowed us to identify mergers and splitting of the hot spots areas. The Spanish team was supported by Gobierno Vasco PI 034/97. The French team was supported by the "Programme National de Planetologie."

  14. Identification of the hot-spot areas for sickle cell disease using cord blood screening at a district hospital: an Indian perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Dixit, Sujata; Sahu, Pushpansu; Kar, Shantanu Kumar; Negi, Sapna

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD), a genetic disorder often reported late, can be identified early in life, and hot-spot areas may be identified to conduct genetic epidemiology studies. This study was undertaken to estimate prevalence and to identify hot spot area for SCD in Kalahandi district, by screening cord blood of neonates delivered at the district hospital as first-hand information. Kalahandi District Hospital selected for the study is predominated by tribal population with higher prevalence ...

  15. Identification of malaria hot spots for focused intervention in tribal state of India: a GIS based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Aruna; Nagpal, B N; Joshi, P L; Paliwal, J C; Dash, A P

    2009-05-20

    In India, presently malaria shows a declining trend whereas Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) cases show an up trend. In central India, specifically, Madhya Pradesh (M.P.) a forested and tribal area, control of malaria is logistically difficult and outbreaks are frequently recorded, reasons for this being inadequate surveillance, poor reporting, a time lag in reporting to decision makers and a lack of geo referenced information to pin point the trouble spots for a timely preventive action. An information management system based on Geographic Information System (GIS) using district and block wise malaria data, has been constructed for Madhya Pradesh for quick retrieval of info and dynamic generation of maps to highlight hot spots of malaria for formulating prompt and focused malaria control strategy. Out of total 48 districts consisting of 313 blocks, based on certain criteria GIS identified 58 blocks falling in 25 districts as Hot Spots. Malaria flares up from these pockets whenever favourable conditions for transmission occurs. It was suggested to National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme (NVBDCP) that focused malaria control in these hot pockets may be taken up on priority during the year 2007, it was implemented by State Health Authorities, M.P. under the directive of NVBDCP. Implementation of control measures were evaluated by NVBDCP. GIS mapping would make it easy to update information instantly and to identify the trouble spots at the village level within the district which is the lowest unit equipped with computer facilities and the information can reach instantly to state and the policy makers to formulate focused and cost effective malaria control strategy. This is the first time when GIS has been used in national control programme for tribal malaria.

  16. High-Density Spot Seeding for Tissue Model Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquette, Michele L. (Inventor); Sognier, Marguerite A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A model of tissue is produced by steps comprising seeding cells at a selected concentration on a support to form a cell spot, incubating the cells to allow the cells to partially attach, rinsing the cells to remove any cells that have not partially attached, adding culture medium to enable the cells to proliferate at a periphery of the cell spot and to differentiate toward a center of the cell spot, and further incubating the cells to form the tissue. The cells may be C2C12 cells or other subclones of the C2 cell line, H9c2(2-1) cells, L6 cells, L8 cells, QM7 cells, Sol8 cells, G-7 cells, G-8 cells, other myoblast cells, cells from other tissues, or stem cells. The selected concentration is in a range from about 1 x 10(exp 5) cells/ml to about 1 x 10(exp 6) cells/ml. The tissue formed may be a muscle tissue or other tissue depending on the cells seeded.

  17. Mapping Cultural Ecosystem Services in Vilnius using Hot-Spot Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Depellegrin, Daniel; Egarter-Vigl, Lukas; Oliva, Marc; Misiune, Ieva; Keesstra, Saskia; Estebaranz, Ferran; Cerda, Artemi

    2017-04-01

    Cultural services in urban areas are very important to promote tourism activities and develop the economy. These activities are fundamental for the sustainability of the urban areas since can represent an important monetary source. However, one of the major threats to the sustainability of cultural services is the high amount of visitants that can lead to a degradation of the services provided (Depellegrin et al., 2016). Mapping the potential of cultural ecosystems services is fundamental to assess the capacity that the territory have to provide it. Previous works used land use classification to identify the ecosystem services potential, and revealed to be a good methodology to attribute to each type of land use a specific capacity (Burkhard et al., 2008). The objective of this work is to map the cultural services in Vilnius area using a hot-spot analysis. Ecosystem services potential was assessed using the matrix developed by Burkhard et al. (2009), which ranks ES capacity from 0= no capacity to 5=very high relevant capacity to a different land use type. The results showed that with the exception of Cultural Heritage ecosystem services that had a random pattern (Z-score=0.62, pTourism (Z-score=4.02, pTourism ecosystem services had the maximum spatial correlation at the distance of 5125.12 m, Landscape Aesthetics at 3495.70 m, Knowledge Systems at 5218.66 m, Religious and Spiritual at 3495.70 m, Cultural Heritage at 6746.17 m and Natural Heritage at 6205.82 m. This showed that the cultural services studied have a different spatial correlation. References Burkhard B, Kroll F, Müller F, Windhorst W. 2009. Landscapes' capacities to provide ecosystem services- a concept for land-cover based assessments. Landscape Online. 15, 1-22. Depellegrin, D.A., Pereira, P., Misiune, I., Egarter-Vigl, L. Mapping Ecosystem Services potential in Lithuania. International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology, 23, 441-455.

  18. K-Ar dating of the cook-austral island chain: A test of the hot-spot hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Donald L.; Jarrard, Richard D.

    1982-05-01

    40K- 40Ar dating indicates that the Cook-Austral chain contains the island with the oldest exposed volcanic rocks on the Pacific plate (Mangaia, 19.3 ± 0.6 Ma B.P.). We have also determined ages from the previously undated islands of Atiu, Mitiaro, Mauke, and Rimatara and from Mangaia, Aitutaki and Rarotonga, for which only unlocated samples had been previously dated. Dated volcanism on Aitutaki spans an interval of at least 7 Ma. The ages from Aitutaki, Atiu, Mauke, Mitiaro, Rarotonga, and Rarutu are much younger than ages predicted by the "hot-spot" hypothesis, and ages from Rimatara may be older than predicted by the hot-spot hypothesis. However, both new and previously reported age data from Mangaia are consistent with the predicted age for this island. Virtually all age data from island and seamount chains on the Pacific plate are consistent with a "hot-line" hypothesis, which makes less specific age predictions than does the hotspot hypothesis.

  19. Diversification in a biodiversity hot spot: landscape correlates of phylogeographic patterns in the African spotted reed frog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Lucinda P

    2013-04-01

    The Eastern Afromontane Biodiversity Hotspot is known for microendemism and exceptional population genetic structure. The region's landscape heterogeneity is thought to limit gene flow between fragmented populations and create opportunities for regional adaptation, but the processes involved are poorly understood. Using a combination of phylogeographic analyses and circuit theory, I investigate how characteristics of landscape heterogeneity including regional distributions of slope, rivers and streams, habitat and hydrological basins (drainages) impact genetic distance among populations of the endemic spotted reed frog (Hyperolius substriatus), identifying corridors of connectivity as well as barriers to dispersal. Results show that genetic distance among populations is most strongly correlated to regional and local hydrologic structure and the distribution of suitable habitat corridors, not isolation by distance. Contrary to expectations, phylogeographic structure is not coincident with the two montane systems, but instead corresponds to the split between the region's two major hydrological basins (Zambezi and East Central Coastal). This results in a paraphyletic relationship for the Malawian Highlands populations with respect to the Eastern Arc Mountains and implies that the northern Malawian Highlands are the diversity centre for H. substriatus. Although the Malawian Highlands collectively hold the greatest genetic diversity, individual populations have lower diversity than their Eastern Arc counterparts, with an overall pattern of decreasing population diversity from north to south. Through the study of intraspecific differentiation across a mosaic of ecosystem and geographic heterogeneity, we gain insight into the processes of diversification and a broader understanding of the role of landscape in evolution. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Formation and function of the "Xestoleberis-spot" in Xestoleberis hanaii (Crustacea: Ostracoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shinnosuke

    2017-11-01

    The crescent sculpture of the so-called "Xestoleberis-spot" develops inside the calcified valve of the family Xestoleberididae. Electron microscopic observations on both, intermoult and postmoult stages of Xestoleberis species reveal that the "Xestoleberis-spot" system consists of three elements; two calcified chambers, a vesicle of electron-dense material and an uncalcified procuticle. The formation and function of the "Xestoleberis-spot" system are discussed. In conclusion, the "Xestoleberis-spot" system functions as the muscle attachment site for several antennal muscles, and provides the material for chitinous fibers in the exocuticle of outer lamella. The unique cuticular structures of the family Xestoleberididae are due to the "Xestoleberis-spot" system. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Finite volume analysis of temperature effects induced by active MRI implants: 2. Defects on active MRI implants causing hot spots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grönemeyer Dietrich HW

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Active magnetic resonance imaging implants, for example stents, stent grafts or vena cava filters, are constructed as wireless inductively coupled transmit and receive coils. They are built as a resonator tuned to the Larmor frequency of a magnetic resonance system. The resonator can be added to or incorporated within the implant. This technology can counteract the shielding caused by eddy currents inside the metallic implant structure. This may allow getting diagnostic information of the implant lumen (in stent stenosis or thrombosis for example. The electro magnetic rf-pulses during magnetic resonance imaging induce a current in the circuit path of the resonator. A by material fatigue provoked partial rupture of the circuit path or a broken wire with touching surfaces can set up a relatively high resistance on a very short distance, which may behave as a point-like power source, a hot spot, inside the body part the resonator is implanted to. This local power loss inside a small volume can reach ¼ of the total power loss of the intact resonating circuit, which itself is proportional to the product of the resonator volume and the quality factor and depends as well from the orientation of the resonator with respect to the main magnetic field and the imaging sequence the resonator is exposed to. Methods First an analytical solution of a hot spot for thermal equilibrium is described. This analytical solution with a definite hot spot power loss represents the worst case scenario for thermal equilibrium inside a homogeneous medium without cooling effects. Starting with this worst case assumptions additional conditions are considered in a numerical simulation, which are more realistic and may make the results less critical. The analytical solution as well as the numerical simulations use the experimental experience of the maximum hot spot power loss of implanted resonators with a definite volume during magnetic resonance imaging

  2. Temporary shielding of hot spots in the drainage areas of cutaneous melanoma improves accuracy of lymphoscintigraphic sentinel lymph node diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maza, S.; Valencia, R.; Geworski, L.; Zander, A.; Munz, D.L. [Clinic for Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Charite, Humboldt University of Berlin, Schumannstrasse 20-21, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Draeger, E.; Winter, H.; Sterry, W. [Clinic for Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, University Hospital Charite, Humboldt University of Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2002-10-01

    Detection of the ''true'' sentinel lymph nodes, permitting correct staging of regional lymph nodes, is essential for management and prognostic assessment in malignant melanoma. In this study, it was prospectively evaluated whether simple temporary shielding of hot spots in lymphatic drainage areas could improve the accuracy of sentinel lymph node diagnostics. In 100 consecutive malignant melanoma patients (45 women, 55 men; age 11-91 years), dynamic and static lymphoscintigraphy in various views was performed after strict intracutaneous application of technetium-99m nanocolloid (40-150 MBq; 0.05 ml/deposit) around the tumour (31 patients) or the biopsy scar (69 patients, safety distance 1 cm). The images were acquired with and without temporary lead shielding of the most prominent hot spots in the drainage area. In 33/100 patients, one or two additional sentinel lymph nodes that showed less tracer accumulation or were smaller (<1.5 cm) were detected after shielding. Four of these patients had metastases in the sentinel lymph nodes; the non-sentinel lymph nodes were tumour negative. In 3/100 patients, hot spots in the drainage area proved to be lymph vessels, lymph vessel intersections or lymph vessel ectasias after temporary shielding; hence, a node interpreted as a non-sentinel lymph node at first glance proved to be the real sentinel lymph node. In two of these patients, lymph node metastasis was histologically confirmed; the non-sentinel lymph nodes were tumour free. In 7/100 patients the exact course of lymph vessels could be mapped after shielding. In one of these patients, two additional sentinel lymph nodes (with metastasis) were detected. Overall, in 43/100 patients the temporary shielding yielded additional information, with sentinel lymph node metastases in 7%. In conclusion, when used in combination with dynamic acquisition in various views, temporary shielding of prominent hot spots in the drainage area of a malignant melanoma of the

  3. Bear Creek Valley Floodplain Hot Spot Removal Action Project Plan, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    The Bear Creek Valley Floodplain Hot Spot Removal Action Project Plan, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Y/ER-301) was prepared (1) to safely, cost-effectively, and efficiently evaluate the environmental impact of solid material in the two debris areas in the context of industrial land uses (as defined in the Bear Creek Valley Feasibility Study) to support the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Assessment and (2) to evaluate, define, and implement the actions to mitigate these impacts. This work was performed under Work Breakdown Structure 1.x.01.20.01.08.

  4. Global Diffusion Pattern and Hot SPOT Analysis of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Y.; Fan, F.; Zanoni, I. Holly; Li, Y.

    2017-10-01

    Spatial characteristics reveal the concentration of vaccine-preventable disease in Africa and the Near East and that disease dispersion is variable depending on disease. The exception is whooping cough, which has a highly variable center of concentration from year to year. Measles exhibited the only statistically significant spatial autocorrelation among all the diseases under investigation. Hottest spots of measles are in Africa and coldest spots are in United States, warm spots are in Near East and cool spots are in Western Europe. Finally, cases of measles could not be explained by the independent variables, including Gini index, health expenditure, or rate of immunization. Since the literature confirms that each of the selected variables is considered determinants of disease dissemination, it is anticipated that the global dataset of disease cases was influenced by reporting bias.

  5. Bering-Okhotsk Seal Survey (BOSS) Identified Hot Spots (2012-13)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — US surveys were conducted of the Bering Sea pack ice for bearded, spotted, ribbon, and ringed seals using digital cameras and thermal imagers mounted in the belly...

  6. Environmental hot spot analysis in agricultural life-cycle assessments – three case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Piringer

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Present-day agricultural technology is facing the challenge of limiting the environmental impacts of agricultural production – such as greenhouse gas emissions and demand for additional land – while meeting growing demands for agricultural products. Using the well-established method of life-cycle assessment (LCA, potential environmental impacts of agricultural production chains can be quantified and analyzed. This study presents three case studies of how the method can pinpoint environmental hot spots at different levels of agricultural production systems. The first case study centers on the tractor as the key source of transportation and traction in modern agriculture. A common Austrian tractor model was investigated over its life-cycle, using primary data from a manufacturer and measured load profiles for field work. In all but one of the impact categories studied, potential impacts were dominated by the operation phase of the tractor’s life-cycle (mainly due to diesel fuel consumption, with 84.4-99.6% of total impacts. The production phase (raw materials and final assembly caused between 0.4% and 12.1% of impacts, while disposal of the tractor was below 1.9% in all impact categories. The second case study shifts the focus to an entire production chain for a common biogas feedstock, maize silage. System boundaries incorporate the effect of auxiliary materials such as fertilizer and pesticides manufacturing and application. The operation of machinery in the silage production chain was found to be critical to its environmental impact. For the climate change indicator GWP100 (global warming potential, 100-year reference period, emissions from tractor operation accounted for 15 g CO2-eq per kg silage (64% of total GWP100, followed by field emissions during fertilizer (biogas digestate application with 6 g CO2-eq per kg silage (24% of total GWP100. At a larger system scale that includes a silage-fed biogas plant with electricity generated by

  7. Mesoscale dynamics in the Lofoten Basin - a sub-Arctic "hot spot" of oceanic variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, D. L.; Belonenko, T. V.; Foux, V. R.

    2012-12-01

    A sub-Arctic "hot spot" of intense mesoscale variability is observed in the Lofoten Basin (LB) - a topographic depression with a maximum depth of about 3250 m, located in the Norwegian Sea. The standard deviation of sea surface height (SSH), measured with satellite altimetry, reaches nearly 15 cm in the center of the basin (Figure 1a). Using a space-time lagged correlation analysis of altimetry data, we discover a cyclonic propagation of the mesoscale SSH anomalies around the center of the LB with time-averaged phase speeds of 2-4 km/day, strongly linked to bottom topography (Figure 1c). The fact that surface drifter trajectories do not exhibit cyclonic circulation in the LB (Figure 1b) suggests that, at least in the upper ocean, satellite altimetry observes only the propagation of form without the corresponding transfer of mass. Linearly propagating wavelike disturbances that do not trap fluid inside are related to planetary or Rossby waves. Variations in topography may lead to the concentration of wave energy in certain regions or wave trapping. The dispersion analysis suggests that the observed wavelike cyclonic propagation of SSH anomalies in the LB is the manifestation of baroclinic topographic Rossby waves, that we term "the basin waves" in order to distinguish them from the other types of topographic waves, such as shelf or trench waves. We identify two modes of basin waves in the LB: a di-pole mode and a quadri-pole mode. The wavelength of each mode is about 500 km. The frequency of these modes is not constant and the phase speed varies from about 2 to 8 km/day. We show that the cyclonically rotating basin waves are responsible for the observed amplification of SSH variability in the LB. Because the baroclinic basin waves in the LB are probably associated with large vertical displacements of the thermocline and due to possible wave breaking events, they can play an important role in the mixing of the inflowing Atlantic Water with ambient water masses

  8. Use of Spatial Epidemiology and Hot Spot Analysis to Target Women Eligible for Prenatal Women, Infants, and Children Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Christopher; Gradziel, Pat; Geraghty, Estella M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We used a geographic information system and cluster analyses to determine locations in need of enhanced Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Program services. Methods. We linked documented births in the 2010 California Birth Statistical Master File with the 2010 data from the WIC Integrated Statewide Information System. Analyses focused on the density of pregnant women who were eligible for but not receiving WIC services in California’s 7049 census tracts. We used incremental spatial autocorrelation and hot spot analyses to identify clusters of WIC-eligible nonparticipants. Results. We detected clusters of census tracts with higher-than-expected densities, compared with the state mean density of WIC-eligible nonparticipants, in 21 of 58 (36.2%) California counties (P Hot spot analyses provided a rigorous and objective approach to determine the locations of statistically significant clusters of WIC-eligible nonparticipants. Results helped inform WIC program and funding decisions, including the opening of new WIC centers, and offered a novel approach for targeting public health services. PMID:24354821

  9. Structure-selective hot-spot Raman enhancement for direct identification and detection of trace penicilloic acid allergen in penicillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liying; Jin, Yang; Mao, Hui; Zheng, Lei; Zhao, Jiawei; Peng, Yan; Du, Shuhu; Zhang, Zhongping

    2014-08-15

    Trace penicilloic acid allergen frequently leads to various fatal immune responses to many patients, but it is still a challenge to directly discriminate and detect its residue in penicillin by a chemosensing way. Here, we report that silver-coated gold nanoparticles (Au@Ag NPs) exhibit a structure-selective hot-spot Raman enhancement capability for direct identification and detection of trace penicilloic acid in penicillin. It has been demonstrated that penicilloic acid can very easily link Au@Ag NPs together by its two carboxyl groups, locating itself spontaneously at the interparticle of Au@Ag NPs to form strong Raman hot-spot. At the critical concentration inducing the nanoparticle aggregation, Raman-enhanced effect of penicilloic acid is ~60,000 folds higher than that of penicillin. In particular, the selective Raman enhancement to the two carboxyl groups makes the peak of carboxyl group at C6 of penicilloic acid appear as a new Raman signal due to the opening of β-lactam ring of penicillin. The surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticle sensor reaches a sensitive limit lower than the prescribed 1.0‰ penicilloic acid residue in penicillin. The novel strategy to examine allergen is more rapid, convenient and inexpensive than the conventional separation-based assay methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Identifying Hot Spots of Critical Forage Supply in Dryland Nomadic Pastoralist Areas: A Case Study for the Afar Region, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. G. J. S. Sonneveld

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study develops a methodology to identify hot spots of critical forage supply in nomadic pastoralist areas, using the Afar Region, Ethiopia, as a special case. It addresses two main problems. First, it makes a spatially explicit assessment of fodder supply and demand extracted from a data poor environment. Fodder supply is assessed by combining rainfall-based production functions and rule-based assessment for prevailing land use. Fodder demand is based on a data consistency check of livestock statistics concerning herd size, composition and geographical distribution. Second, individual herd movements have to be evaluated jointly in concurrent migration patterns to assess local pressures on fodder resources. We, therefore, apply a transition model that relates stock levels to seasonal migration routings for all Afar sub-clans jointly so as to localize the hot spots where feed demand exceeds forage supply. Critical areas come to the fore, especially, near fringes of Highlands and in the southern part of the Afar. A sensitivity test shows that ‘Baseline’ scenario is close to the ‘Best’ but under ‘Worst’, the Afar region would fall into despair. We conclude that the model is a useful tool to inform policy makers on critical areas in the Afar region.

  11. Resolving hot spots in the C-terminal dimerization domain that determine the stability of the molecular chaperone Hsp90.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Ciglia

    Full Text Available Human heat shock protein of 90 kDa (hHsp90 is a homodimer that has an essential role in facilitating malignant transformation at the molecular level. Inhibiting hHsp90 function is a validated approach for treating different types of tumors. Inhibiting the dimerization of hHsp90 via its C-terminal domain (CTD should provide a novel way to therapeutically interfere with hHsp90 function. Here, we predicted hot spot residues that cluster in the CTD dimerization interface by a structural decomposition of the effective energy of binding computed by the MM-GBSA approach and confirmed these predictions using in silico alanine scanning with DrugScore(PPI. Mutation of these residues to alanine caused a significant decrease in the melting temperature according to differential scanning fluorimetry experiments, indicating a reduced stability of the mutant hHsp90 complexes. Size exclusion chromatography and multi-angle light scattering studies demonstrate that the reduced stability of the mutant hHsp90 correlates with a lower complex stoichiometry due to the disruption of the dimerization interface. These results suggest that the identified hot spot residues can be used as a pharmacophoric template for identifying and designing small-molecule inhibitors of hHsp90 dimerization.

  12. Effects of basal-plane thermal conductivity and interface thermal conductance on the hot spot temperature in graphene electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, David; Poudel, Nirakar; Cronin, Stephen B.; Shi, Li

    2017-02-01

    Electrostatic force microscopy and scanning thermal microscopy are employed to investigate the electric transport and localized heating around defects introduced during transfer of graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition to an oxidized Si substrate. Numerical and analytical models are developed to explain the results based on the reported basal-plane thermal conductivity, κ, and interfacial thermal conductance, G, of graphene and to investigate their effects on the peak temperature. Irrespective of the κ values, increasing G beyond 4 × 107 W m-2 K-1 can reduce the peak temperature effectively for graphene devices made on sub-10 nm thick gate dielectric, but not for the measured device made on 300-nm-thick oxide dielectric, which yields a cross-plane thermal conductance (Gox) much smaller than the typical G of graphene. In contrast, for typical G values reported for graphene, increasing κ from 300 W m-1 K-1 toward 3000 W m-1 K-1 is effective in reducing the hot spot temperature for the 300-nm-thick oxide devices but not for the sub-10 nm gate dielectric case, because the heat spreading length (l) can be appreciably increased relative to the micron-scale localized heat generation spot size (r0) only when the oxide layer is sufficiently thick. As such, enhancement of κ increases the vertical heat transfer area above the gate dielectric only for the thick oxide case. In all cases considered, the hot spot temperature is sensitive to varying G and κ only when the G/Gox ratio and r0/l ratio are below about 5, respectively.

  13. Optimization of Resistance Spot Weld Condition for Single Lap Joint of Hot Stamped 22MnB5 by Taking Heating Temperature and Heating Time into Consideration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hong Seok; Kim, Byung Min; Park, Geun Hwan [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Woo Seung [Keimyung University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    In this study, optimization of the process parameters of the resistance spot welding of a sheet of aluminum-coated boron alloyed steel, 22MnB5, used in hot stamping has been performed by a Taguchi method to increase the strength of the weld joint. The process parameters selected were current, electrode force, and weld time. The heating temperature and heating time of 22MnB5 are considered to be noise factors. It was known that the variation in the thickness of the intermetallic compound layer between the aluminum-coated layer and the substrate, which influences on the formation of nugget, was generated due to the difference of diffusion reaction according to heating conditions. From the results of spot weld experiment, the optimum weld condition was determined to be when the current, electrode force, and weld time were 8kA, 4kN, and 18 cycles, respectively. The result of a test performed to verify the optimized weld condition showed that the tensile strength of the weld joint was over 32kN, which is considerably higher than the required strength, i.e., 23kN.

  14. Large format, small pixel pitch and hot detectors at SOFRADIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reibel, Y.; Rouvie, A.; Nedelcu, A.; Augey, T.; Pere-Laperne, N.; Rubaldo, L.; Billon-Lanfrey, D.; Gravrand, O.; Rothman, J.; Destefanis, G.

    2013-10-01

    Recently Sofradir joined a very small circle of IR detector manufacturers with expertise every aspect of the cooled and uncooled IR technologies, all under one roof by consolidating all IR technologies available in France. These different technologies are complementary and are used depending of the needs of the applications mainly concerning the detection range needs as well as their ability to detect in bad weather environmental conditions. SNAKE (InGaAs) and SCORPIO LW (MCT) expand Sofradir's line of small pixel pitch TV format IR detectors from the mid-wavelength to the short and long wavelengths. Our dual band MW-LW QWIP detectors (25μm, 384×288 pixels) benefit to tactical platforms giving an all-weather performance and increasing flexibility in the presence of battlefield obscurants. In parallel we have been pursuing further infrared developments on future MWIR detectors, such as the VGA format HOT detector that consumes 2W and the 10μm pitch IR detector which gives us a leading position in innovation. These detectors are designed for long-range surveillance equipment, commander or gunner sights, ground-to-ground missile launchers and other applications that require higher resolution and sensitivity to improve reconnaissance and target identification. This paper discusses the system level performance in each detector type.

  15. Deletion of exons 3-9 encompassing a mutational hot spot in the DMD gene presents an asymptomatic phenotype, indicating a target region for multiexon skipping therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Akinori; Fueki, Noboru; Shiba, Naoko; Motoki, Hirohiko; Miyazaki, Daigo; Nishizawa, Hitomi; Echigoya, Yusuke; Yokota, Toshifumi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2016-07-01

    Few cases of dystrophinopathy show an asymptomatic phenotype with mutations in the 5' (exons 3-7) hot spot in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene. Our patient showed increased serum creatine kinase levels at 12 years of age. A muscle biopsy at 15 years of age led to a diagnosis of Becker muscular dystrophy. The patient showed a slight decrease in cardiac function at the age of 21 years and was administered a β-blocker, but there was no muscle involvement even at the age of 27 years. A deletion of exons 3-9 encompassing a mutational hot spot in the DMD gene was detected, and dystrophin protein expression was ∼15% that of control level. We propose that in-frame deletion of exons 3-9 may produce a functional protein, and that multiexon skipping therapy targeting these exons may be feasible for severe dystrophic patients with a mutation in the 5' hot spot of the DMD gene.

  16. Jets, Mach cones, hot spots, ridges, harmonic flow, dihadron, and γ-hadron correlations in high-energy heavy-ion collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Guo-Liang; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2011-04-22

    Within the AMPT Monte Carlo model, fluctuations in the initial transverse parton density are shown to lead to harmonic flows. The net back-to-back dihadron azimuthal correlation after subtraction of contributions from harmonic flows still has a double peak that is independent of the initial geometric triangularity and unique to the jet-induced Mach cone and expanding hot spots distorted by radial flow. The longitudinal structure of hot spots also leads to a nearside ridge in dihadron correlation with a large rapidity gap. By successively randomizing the azimuthal angle of the transverse momenta and positions of initial partons, one can isolate the effects of jet-induced medium excitation and expanding hot spots on the dihadron azimuthal correlation. The double peaks in the net dihadron and γ-hadron correlation are quantitatively different since the later is caused only by jet-induced Mach cone.

  17. Pattern formation in polymerising actin flocks: spirals, spots and waves without nonlinear chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Goff, Thomas Le; Marenduzzo, Davide

    2016-01-01

    We propose a model solely based on actin treadmilling and polymerisation which describes many characteristic states of actin wave formation: spots, spirals and travelling waves. In our model, as in experiments on cell recovering motility following actin depolymerisation, we choose an isotropic low density initial condition; polymerisation of actin filaments then raises the density towards the Onsager threshold where they align. We show that this alignment, in turn, destabilizes the isotropic phase and generically induces transient actin spots or spirals as part of the dynamical pathway towards a polarized phase which can either be uniform or consist of a series of actin-wave trains (flocks). Our results uncover a universal route to actin wave formation in the absence of any system specific nonlinear biochemistry, and it may help understand the mechanism underlying the observation of actin spots and waves in vivo. They also suggest a minimal setup to design similar patterns in vitro.

  18. Professional- Amateur Astronomer Partnerships in Scientific Research: The Re-emergence of Jupiter's 5-Micron Hot Spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    The night sky, with all its delights and mysteries, enthrall professional and amateur astronomers alike. The discrete data sets acquired by professional astronomers via their approved observing programs at various national facilities are supplemented by the nearly daily observations of the same celestial object by amateur astronomers around the world. The emerging partnerships between professional and dedicated amateur astronomers rely on creating a niche for long timeline of multispectral remote sensing. "Citizen Astronomy" can be thought of as the paradigm shift transforming the nature of observational astronomy. In the past decade, it is the collective observations and their analyses by the ever-increasing global network of amateur astronomers that has discovered interesting phenomena and provided the reference backdrop for observations by ground-based professional astronomers and spacecraft missions. We shall present results from our collaborations to observe the recent global upheaval on Jupiter for the past five years and illustrate the strong synergy between the two groups. Global upheavals on Jupiter involve changes in the albedo of entire axisymmetric regions, lasting several years, with the last two occurring in 1989 and 2006. Against this backdrop of planetary-scale changes, discrete features such as the Great Red Spot (GRS), and other vortices exhibit changes on shorter spatial- and time-scales. One set of features we are currently tracking is the variability of the discrete equatorial 5-μm hot spots, semi-evenly spaced in longitude and confined to a narrow latitude band centered at 6.5°N (southern edge of the North Equatorial Belt, NEB), abundant in Voyager images (1980-1981). Tantalizingly similar patterns were observed in the visible (bright plumes and blue-gray regions), where reflectivity in the red is anti-correlated with 5-μm thermal radiance. During the recent NEB fade (2011 - early 2012), however, these otherwise ubiquitous features were

  19. Shock-drift particle acceleration in superluminal shocks - A model for hot spots in extragalactic radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.; Kirk, John G.

    1990-01-01

    Shock-drift acceleration at relativistic shock fronts is investigated using a fully relativistic treatment of both the microphysics of the shock-drift acceleration and the macrophysics of the shock front. By explicitly tracing particle trajectories across shocks, it is shown how the adiabatic invariance of a particle's magnetic moment breaks down as the upstream shock speed becomes relativistic, and is recovered at subrelativistic velocities. These calculations enable the mean increase in energy of a particle which encounters the shock with a given pitch angle to be calculated. The results are used to construct the downstream electron distribution function in terms of the incident distribution function and the bulk properties of the shock. The synchrotron emissivity of the transmitted distribution is calculated, and it is demonstrated that amplification factors are easily obtained which are more than adequate to explain the observed constrasts in surface brightness between jets and hot spots.

  20. Shock-drift particle acceleration in superluminal shocks - A model for hot spots in extragalactic radio sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begelman, M.C.; Kirk, J.G. (Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics, Boulder, CO (USA) Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Garching (Germany, F.R.))

    1990-04-01

    Shock-drift acceleration at relativistic shock fronts is investigated using a fully relativistic treatment of both the microphysics of the shock-drift acceleration and the macrophysics of the shock front. By explicitly tracing particle trajectories across shocks, it is shown how the adiabatic invariance of a particle's magnetic moment breaks down as the upstream shock speed becomes relativistic, and is recovered at subrelativistic velocities. These calculations enable the mean increase in energy of a particle which encounters the shock with a given pitch angle to be calculated. The results are used to construct the downstream electron distribution function in terms of the incident distribution function and the bulk properties of the shock. The synchrotron emissivity of the transmitted distribution is calculated, and it is demonstrated that amplification factors are easily obtained which are more than adequate to explain the observed constrasts in surface brightness between jets and hot spots. 72 refs.

  1. Fine-scale genetic variation and evolution of West Nile Virus in a transmission "hot spot" in suburban Chicago, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolotti, Luigi; Kitron, Uriel D; Walker, Edward D; Ruiz, Marilyn O; Brawn, Jeffrey D; Loss, Scott R; Hamer, Gabriel L; Goldberg, Tony L

    2008-05-10

    Mosquitoes and birds were sampled for West Nile virus (WNV) in suburban Chicago, USA, in a "hot spot" of arboviral transmission. Viral genetic diversity within this area was similar to that within Illinois and the United States. Diversity was higher among viruses from mosquitoes than from birds, higher among viruses from birds in urban "green spaces" than from birds in residential areas, but lower among viruses from mosquitoes in green spaces than from mosquitoes in residential areas. Viral transmission was distance-limited, as evidenced by decreasing autocorrelation of WNV sequences with increasing geographic separation. The evolutionary rate of WNV within the study area between 21 July and 4 October 2005 was ten times higher than that for WNV across North America between 2002 and 2005. These results indicate that WNV transmission and evolutionary dynamics can vary seasonally and in response to fine-scale environmental conditions and landscape characteristics related to urbanization.

  2. Exosomes surf on filopodia to enter cells at endocytic hot spots, traffic within endosomes, and are targeted to the ER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusermann, Wolf; Hean, Justin; Trojer, Dominic; Steib, Emmanuelle; von Bueren, Stefan; Graff-Meyer, Alexandra; Genoud, Christel; Martin, Katrin; Pizzato, Nicolas; Voshol, Johannes; Morrissey, David V; Andaloussi, Samir E L; Wood, Matthew J; Meisner-Kober, Nicole C

    2016-04-25

    Exosomes are nanovesicles released by virtually all cells, which act as intercellular messengers by transfer of protein, lipid, and RNA cargo. Their quantitative efficiency, routes of cell uptake, and subcellular fate within recipient cells remain elusive. We quantitatively characterize exosome cell uptake, which saturates with dose and time and reaches near 100% transduction efficiency at picomolar concentrations. Highly reminiscent of pathogenic bacteria and viruses, exosomes are recruited as single vesicles to the cell body by surfing on filopodia as well as filopodia grabbing and pulling motions to reach endocytic hot spots at the filopodial base. After internalization, exosomes shuttle within endocytic vesicles to scan the endoplasmic reticulum before being sorted into the lysosome as their final intracellular destination. Our data quantify and explain the efficiency of exosome internalization by recipient cells, establish a new parallel between exosome and virus host cell interaction, and suggest unanticipated routes of subcellular cargo delivery. © 2016 Heusermann et al.

  3. Prediction of Hot Spots at Myeloid Cell Leukemia-1-Inhibitors Interface using Energy Estimation and Alanine Scanning Mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marimuthu, Parthiban; Singaravelu, Kalaimathy

    2018-01-18

    Myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl1) is an anti-apoptotic protein that plays central role in apoptosis regulation. Also, Mcl1 has the potency to resist apoptotic cues resulting in up-regulation and cancer cell protection. A molecular probe that has the potential to specifically target Mcl1, and thereby provoke its down-regulatory activity is very essential. The aim of the current study is to probe the internal conformational dynamics of protein motions and potential binding mechanism in response to a series of picomolar range Mcl1 inhibitors using explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Subsequently, the domain cross-correlation and principal component analysis was performed on the snapshots obtained from the MD simulations. Our results showed significant differences in the internal conformational dynamics of Mcl1 w.r.t binding affinity values of inhibitors. Further, the binding free energy estimation -using three different samples- was performed on the MD simulations, which revealed the predicted energies (ΔGmmgbsa) were in good correlation with the experimental values (ΔGexpt). Also, the energies obtained using all sampling models were efficiently ranked. Subsequently, the decomposition energy analysis highlighted the major energy-contributing residues at the Mcl1 binding pocket. Computational alanine scanning performed on high energy-contributing residues predicted the hot spot residues. The dihedral angle analysis using MD snapshots on the predicted hot spot residue exhibited consistency in side chain conformational motion that ultimately led to contribute strong binding affinity values. The findings from the present study might provide valuable guidelines for the design of novel Mcl1 inhibitors that might significantly improve the specificity for new-generation chemotherapeutic agents.

  4. Turbulence influence on urban air pollution in a hot spot in Madrid: comparison of winter and summer field campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagüe, Carlos; Román-Cascón, Carlos; Sastre, Mariano; Maqueda, Gregorio; Arrillaga, Jon A.; Artiñano, Begoña; Díaz-Ramiro, Elías; Gómez-Moreno, Francisco J.; Borge, Rafael; Narros, Adolfo; Pérez, Javier; Quaassdorff, Christina

    2017-04-01

    Air pollution is a major problem in the city of Madrid during weak synoptic forcing, since the presence of atmospheric stability conditions often develops night surface-based thermal inversions and subsidence inversions during daytime for several consecutive days, reaching high levels of NOx and Particulate Matter (PM) concentration. In this context, the TECNAIRE-CM (Innovative technologies for the assessment and improvement of urban air quality) research project has developed two field campaigns along 2015 (winter and summer) in a hot spot in the city of Madrid (Fernández Ladreda square). This hot spot includes one important intersection of different streets and also the start of the A42 motorway, which crosses down the square through a tunnel of about 150 m length. Besides, the location has numerous traffic lights and a lot of pedestrians walking in the vicinity. In addition to direct measurements related to air quality, data from different meteorological variables were recorded in order to characterize the atmospheric conditions. Moreover, two sonic anemometers where deployed to carry out a micrometeorological assessment of physical processes that take place in the urban atmospheric surface layer (TKE, friction velocity and sensible heat flux were evaluated). The evolution of the turbulence will be analyzed and compared for both campaigns (winter and summer), searching for the key seasonal differences as well as the importance of the different scales influencing the diffusion of pollutants (from multi resolution flux decomposition -MRFD- analysis). Specific case studies corresponding to high levels of pollution will be studied in detailed, to understand local pollution dynamics under the influence of both high traffic density and low turbulence situations. This work has been financed by Madrid Regional Research Plan through TECNAIRE (P2013/MAE-2972).

  5. Screening and analysis of mutation hot-spots in deafness-associated genes among adolescents with hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Liu, Qizhen; Chen, Lihong

    2015-12-01

    The present study aimed to screen the hot-spot deafness gene mutations of adolescents with non‑syndromic hearing loss in Yongchuan, Chongqing (CQ-YC ANSHL), aiming to preliminarily understand the region's spectrum and occurrence frequency of deafness gene mutation hot‑spots. A total of 60 CQ‑YC ANSHL were selected from the Special Education School of Yongchuan, Chongqing and the nine most common mutations of four deafness genes among the Chinese population were detected and associated with the patients' medical history as well as family history of deafness. Deafness gene mutations were detected in 22 cases, among which the detection rates of GJB2, mitochondrial 12S ribosomal ribonucleic acid and SLC26A4 mutations were 23.73% (14/59), 10.17% (6/59) and 5.08% (3/59), respectively, while no GJB3 mutation was detected. The carrying rate of deafness gene mutations in CQ‑YC ANSHL was high; therefore, based on the deafness gene diagnosis, the combination of medication guidance, pre‑natal diagnosis and clinical interventions may be able to effectively reduce the incidence of deafness in this region.

  6. Weld nugget formation in resistance spot welding of new lightweight sandwich material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sagüés Tanco, J.; Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Chergui, Azeddine

    2015-01-01

    Weldability of a new lightweight sandwich material, LITECOR®, by resistance spot welding is analyzed by experiments and numerical simulations. The spot welding process is accommodated by a first pulse squeezing out the non-conductive polymer core of the sandwich material locally to allow metal......–metal contact. This is facilitated by the use of a shunt tool and is followed by a second pulse for the actual spot welding and nugget formation. A weldability lobe in the time-current space of the second pulse reveals a process window of acceptable size for automotive assembly lines. Weld growth curves...... are presented together with results of numerical simulations made in the finite element computer program SORPAS® 3D, which is based on an electro-thermo-mechanical formulation. The numerical models are presented together with the specific modeling conditions leading to numerical simulations in good agreement...

  7. WLAN Hot Spot services for the automotive and oil industries :a business analysis Or : "Refuel the car with petrol and information, both ways at the gas station"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L-F. Pau (Louis-François); M.H.P. Oremus

    2003-01-01

    textabstractWhile you refuel for gas ,why not refuel for information or download vehicle data ? This paper analyzes in extensive detail the user segmentation by vehicle usage , service offering , and full business models from WLAN hot spot services delivered to vehicles (private, professional ,

  8. A spatial analysis of population dynamics and climate change in Africa: potential vulnerability hot spots emerge where precipitation declines and demographic pressures coincide

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Carr, David; Pricope, Narcisa G.; Aukema, Juliann E.; Jankowska, Marta M.; Funk, Christopher C.; Husak, Gregory J.; Michaelsen, Joel C.

    2014-01-01

    We present an integrative measure of exposure and sensitivity components of vulnerability to climatic and demographic change for the African continent in order to identify “hot spots” of high potential population vulnerability. Getis-Ord Gi* spatial clustering analyses reveal statistically significant locations of spatio-temporal precipitation decline coinciding with high population density and increase. Statistically significant areas are evident, particularly across central, southern, and eastern Africa. The highly populated Lake Victoria basin emerges as a particularly salient hot spot. People located in the regions highlighted in this analysis suffer exceptionally high exposure to negative climate change impacts (as populations increase on lands with decreasing rainfall). Results may help inform further hot spot mapping and related research on demographic vulnerabilities to climate change. Results may also inform more suitable geographical targeting of policy interventions across the continent.

  9. Selecting optimal parallel microchannel configurations for active hot spot mitigation of multicore microprocessors in real time

    CERN Document Server

    Maganti, Lakshmi Sirisha; Sundararajan, T; Das, Sarit K

    2016-01-01

    Design of effective micro cooling systems to address the challenges of ever increasing heat flux from microdevices requires deep examination of real time problems and has been tackled in depth. The most common and apparently misleading assumption while designing micro cooling systems is that the heat flux generated by the device is uniform, but the reality is far from this. Detailed simulations have been performed by considering non uniform heat load employing the configurations U, I, Z for parallel microchannel systems with water and nanofluids as the coolants. An Intel Core i7 4770 3.40 GHz quad core processor has been mimicked using heat load data retrieved from a real microprocessor with non-uniform core activity. The study clearly demonstrates that there is a non-uniform thermal load induced temperature maldistribution along with the already existent flow maldistribution induced temperature maldistribution. The suitable configuration(s) for maximum possible overall heat removal for a hot zone while maxim...

  10. Void formation in ODS EUROFER produced by hot isostatic pressing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Y.; Monge, M.A.; Munoz, A.; Leguey, T.; Pareja, R. [Madrid Univ. Carlos-3, Dept. de Fisica (Spain); Castro, V. de [Oxford Univ., Dept. of Materials (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: An obstacle in the development of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels for structural applications in fusion reactors is the toughness lack of the material produced by powder metallurgy and consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). In particular, ODS EUROFER steel with Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles appears to exhibit poor impact properties. To asses the capabilities of this material, it is necessary elucidate if its failure is an inherent characteristic of the production process that can not be mitigated by normalizing and tempering treatments. In order to investigate this particular point, the evolution of the structural defects retained in the ODS material during isochronal annealing has been probed by positron annihilation spectroscopy. The present study has been performed on bail milled EUROFER powders consolidated by HIP, containing 0.25 wt % Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and without Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}. For comparison, un-milled EUROFER powder consolidated under identical conditions, and as-received EUROFER97 plate produced by Boehler AG have been also investigated. Samples from these four materials were isochronally annealed for 90 min up to 1323 K. Materials produced from milled powders had a longer positron lifetime than the one produced from un-milled powder or the EUROFER plate. In the material containing Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, i.e. in ODS EUROFER, annealing above 723 K produced a continuous increase in the mean positron lifetime <{tau}> up to reach a maximum value of 208 ps after annealing at 1223 K. A similar annealing behavior was observed for Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-free milled EUROFER (milled EUROFER), but the <{tau}> value steeply changed from {approx}160 ps at 823 K to {approx}200 ps after annealing at 1023 K. Subsequent anneals above this temperature produced meaningless changes in <{tau}>. The <{tau}> increase in milled EUROFER was accompanied by the intensity increase of a lifetime component of {approx}360 ps that is characteristic

  11. Online platform for applying space–time scan statistics for prospectively detecting emerging hot spots of dengue fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chou Chen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cases of dengue fever have increased in areas of Southeast Asia in recent years. Taiwan hit a record-high 42,856 cases in 2015, with the majority in southern Tainan and Kaohsiung Cities. Leveraging spatial statistics and geo-visualization techniques, we aim to design an online analytical tool for local public health workers to prospectively identify ongoing hot spots of dengue fever weekly at the village level. Methods A total of 57,516 confirmed cases of dengue fever in 2014 and 2015 were obtained from the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control (TCDC. Incorporating demographic information as covariates with cumulative cases (365 days in a discrete Poisson model, we iteratively applied space–time scan statistics by SaTScan software to detect the currently active cluster of dengue fever (reported as relative risk in each village of Tainan and Kaohsiung every week. A village with a relative risk >1 and p value <0.05 was identified as a dengue-epidemic area. Assuming an ongoing transmission might continuously spread for two consecutive weeks, we estimated the sensitivity and specificity for detecting outbreaks by comparing the scan-based classification (dengue-epidemic vs. dengue-free village with the true cumulative case numbers from the TCDC’s surveillance statistics. Results Among the 1648 villages in Tainan and Kaohsiung, the overall sensitivity for detecting outbreaks increases as case numbers grow in a total of 92 weekly simulations. The specificity for detecting outbreaks behaves inversely, compared to the sensitivity. On average, the mean sensitivity and specificity of 2-week hot spot detection were 0.615 and 0.891 respectively (p value <0.001 for the covariate adjustment model, as the maximum spatial and temporal windows were specified as 50% of the total population at risk and 28 days. Dengue-epidemic villages were visualized and explored in an interactive map. Conclusions We designed an online analytical tool for

  12. Juan Fernández Ridge (Nazca Plate): petrology and thermochronology of a rejuvenated hot spot trail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, J.; Lara, L. E.

    2012-04-01

    The Juan Fernández Ridge on the oceanic Nazca plate is thought to be a classic hot spot trail because of the apparent westward rejuvenation of the eruptive ages. However, geochronological data is still scarce and there are a few constrains to support this hypothesis like the ca. 9 Ma Ar-Ar age of the O'Higgins seamount (115 km from the Chile-Perú trench), some published K-Ar ages of ca. 3-4 Ma in Robinson Crusoe island (580 km from the trench) and ca. 1 Ma in Alejandro Selkirk (180 km further west). New reconnaissance K-Ar ages and specially the ongoing Ar-Ar dating effort in Robinson Crusoe define a ca. 1-4 Ma time span, which partially overlap with the age of Alejandro Selkirk, breaking the expected age progression given that the Nazca plate moves eastwards at ca. 6-8 cm/yr. In addition, new geological mapping shows a sharp unconformity between the older (ca. 4 Ma), strongly altered sequences and the more recent (ca. 1 Ma), post-erosional volcanic piles, where the proximal facies are still preserved. Petrological evidence also supports this evolution pattern. In fact, the partially altered older sequence is tholeiitic (Ba/Yb=12.70; La/Yb=8.12; Ba/Y=6.51; Ba/Zr=0.89). The shield stage (ca. 1-3 Ma) is transicional from tholeiitic to alkaline (Ba/Yb=18.07-8.32; La/Yb=4.59-9.84; Ba/Y=4.24-8.18; Ba/Zr=0.73-1.09) and the younger (ca. 1 Ma) is mostly alkaline (Ba/Yb=38.15; La/Yb=15.66; Ba/Y=20.27; Ba/Zr=2.31). A fixed deep-mantle plume origin for Pacific hot spots has been widely debated and concurrent phenomena arose as a possible explanation for non-linear age progressions and/or long-lived volcanic activity. In fact, intraplate regional tectonics, plume displacement, and mantle heterogeneities could be the main factor of the ridge architecture or the mask for a first-order linear trend. An ongoing mapping and dating effort is aimed to understand the evolution of the Juan Fernández Ridge, testing the main hypothesis. This research is supported by FONDECYT Project

  13. VOLCANISM OF HOT SPOTS ON THE RÉUNION AS THE EXAMPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Radovanović

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Réunion (French: La Réunion, formerly: Īle Bourbon is beside the Mauritius the largest and the youngest island on the Mascarene Plateau in the Indian Ocean. The island is of volcanic origin, formed through volcanic activity initiated by deeply settled “hot spot” inside the Earth’s mantle. It was formed within the last 2 million years from lava effusions whose volume is up to now nearly 75,000 km3. Only 3% of its volume is emergent and the total height from the sea floor is 6,500 m. The island is about 40 km in width with about 800,000 inhabitants. The capital city is St Denis. The nature of the island is impressive: active volcano, mountains above 3,000 m in height and deep canyon, frequently exceeding 2,000 m in depth. Since 2010, about 40% of its area is announced a National park and a UNESCO World Heritage site.

  14. Demonstration of 55 +/- 7-Gbar Hot-Spot Pressure in Direct-Drive Layered DT Cryogenic Implosions on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    Direct-drive ignition target designs for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) require hot-spot pressures in excess of 100 Gbar. Only one-third of the required pressure was inferred in earlier experimental campaigns conducted on the 60-beam, 30-kJ, 351-nm OMEGA laser with direct-drive implosions of layered DT cryogenic targets. Laser and target improvements were implemented on OMEGA to increase the stagnation pressure, including a set of phase plates to increase the laser irradiation uniformity on target and a purified fuel with isotope composition reaching a 50:50 DT ratio. Diagnostic improvements were made for a neutron burnwidth measurement with a 40-ps impulse response and a 16-channel Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope to measure gated (30-ps) x-ray images of the core near peak compression with 6- μm resolution. The inferred volume-averaged, peak pressure in the current campaign almost doubled to 55 +/- 7 Gbar with a neutron yield approaching 5 ×1013 . Further target performance improvements to reach hydrodynamic equivalence to ignition on OMEGA require mitigation of cross-beam energy transfer (CBET), which reduces the laser coupling. A proposed technique to reduce CBET by driving the spherical target with overlapping laser beams having individual focal spots smaller than the outside diameter of the target was investigated. The diameter of the target was discretely varied from 800 to 1000 μm, while the laser focal spot size was kept constant at 820 μm. The larger targets driven with up to 30 kJ of laser energy used dynamic bandwidth reduction, where the smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) is only applied to the pickets. The smaller targets driven with 26 kJ of laser energy had SSD on the entire pulse. This talk will summarize the results of this CBET mitigation campaign and describe a path forward to achieve ignition hydro-equivalence on OMEGA. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under

  15. Reactor modeling to simulate catalytic partial oxidation and steam reforming of methane. Comparison of temperature profiles and strategies for hot spot minimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrio, V.L.; Cambra, J.F.; Arias, P.L.; Gueemez, M.B. [School of Engineering (UPV/EHU), c/Alameda Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Schaub, G.; Rohde, M. [Engler-Bunte-Institut, Universitaet Karlsruhe, Engler-Bunte-Ring 1, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Rabe, S.; Vogel, F. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory for Energy and Materials Cycles, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2007-07-15

    Catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) reactions of methane in the presence of steam (low temperature CPO, LTCPO) over a noble metal catalyst were investigated. A quasi-homogeneous one-dimensional model was developed in order to model a lab-scale fixed-bed reactor to produce syngas. These model calculations can contribute to the optimization of the process with respect to the formation of important hot spots ({delta} T{>=}130 ). These useful data can enable the model development in order to study the influence of the space velocity, product composition and other variables. Furthermore, a feed splitting study was performed. In the heat balance an overall heat transport term was included to account for small heat losses/gains along the reactor. The agreement between simulations and the degree of detail in the model is appropriate for the amount and kind of experimental data available. Thus, this model can also assist in a pilot reactor design, materials and further scale-up. (author)

  16. Hot Spot Induced Cenozoic Volcanism in the Upper Rajang Valley, Sarawak - Is Borneo Rifting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taib, N.

    2010-12-01

    The Upper Rajang Valley covers a large area in the northern interior of the island of Borneo, in the Malaysian state of Sarawak . It is underlain by the Cretaceous to Late Eocene deep to shallow marine sediments of the Rajang Group. Within this area are several Cenozoic volcanic edifices, which to date have been sparsely studied. Two distinct episodes of volcanism are recognized - the first, dated early Eocene, consists of K-rich basalts, and is represented by the Bukit Mersing volcanics, which were erupted conformably onto deep water turbidites of the Rajang Group. The second, far more extensive, is dated Pliocene to Quaternary, and is bimodal, consisting mainly of early dacite and rhyodacite tuffs, with a smaller amount of later basalt, forming several volcanic plateaus and massifs (Hose Mountains, Usun Apau, Linau-Balui, Nieuwenhuis Mountains and others). They lie unconformably over pre-Miocene sediments, the Linau-Balui basalts having been erupted onto Quaternary river terraces. Mantle-normalized REE and incompatible trace element spider plots reveal that the Bukit Mersing basalts have geochemical affinity with Oceanic Island Basalts (OIB) and rift basalts, being enriched in LREEs and Most Incompatible Elements, and no Eu anomaly. Preliminary trace element data for several basalt samples from Usun Apau also show Oceanic Island/Rift affinity. Bimodal volcanism is most often associated with rift environments. Efforts are being made to radiometrically date the volcanics, in part to determine the possibility of future eruptions. The Upper Rajang Valley is remote, covered in tropical rainforest and is very sparsely populated. At this time, there is no information concerning signs of imminent volcanism, such as hot springs and microseismicity.

  17. Informing Policy and Management in New Zealand Agricultural Regions Using Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopes to Quantify Hot Spots and Hot Moments of Nitrate Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baisden, W. T.; Rissman, C.; Ellis, T.; Rayner, S.; Clough, T. J.; Moore, C.; Killick, M.; Rodway, E.; Horton, T. W.; Clark, M.; Matthews, A.; Roygard, J.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrate losses from agriculture have significant impacts on freshwater, and occur when runoff generation coincides with nitrogen excess in soil. Analysis of δ15N and δ18O in NO3 is well suited to characterize hot spots and hot moments when NO3 losses occur, by working back from impacted water to soil sources. New Zealand's lack of high δ18O atmospheric and fertilizer NO3 sources and the nation's intensive pastoral agriculture enable δ15N and δ18O in NO3 to differentiate soil and effluent sources, as well as processes linked to flow in different soil physiographic zones. This presentation reviews δ15N-NO3 and δ18O-NO3 results gathered across multiple catchments in three regions (Manawatu, Wairarapa, and Southland) with at least 100 measurements per region. River monitoring sites provide an integrated measure of sources, while fractionation associated with removal processes such as denitrification is largely lost. Within rivers, predominantly pastoral regions show a tight pattern along a 1:1 line where δ15N ranges between 4 and 8 ‰ and δ18O ranges between 0 and 4 ‰, in proportion to agricultural intensity. The δ15N of NO3 appears linked to the δ15N of soil organic matter. Exploration of catchments with higher proportions of crop-based agricultural land use, as well as highly intensive grazing with a decreased reliance on pastoral cover, show migration to lower δ15N values with no change in δ18O. This result was in contrast to expectations of greater evidence for effluents and denitrification, and is interpreted as breakthrough of urea fertilizer or animal urine inputs which have δ15N values close to 0 ‰. Drilling into the landscape using springs, drains and groundwater wells shows greater variability both in space and time. These data provide evidence for a range of sources, including urine, fertilizer and effluents, which breakthrough according to soil and physiographic attributes of landscapes that explain the magnitude and timing of processes

  18. From science into practice: modelling hot spots for corporate flood risk and emergency management with high-resolution digital terrain data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfurtscheller, Clemens; Vetter, Michael; Werthmann, Markus

    2010-05-01

    In times of increasing scarcity of private or public resources and uncertain changes in natural environment caused by climate variations, prevention and risk management against floods and coherent processes in mountainous regions, like debris flows or log jams, should be faced as a main challenge for globalised enterprises whose production facilities are located in flood-prone areas. From an entrepreneurial perspective, vulnerability of production facilities which causes restrictions or a total termination of production processes has to be optimised by means of cost-benefit-principles. Modern production enterprises are subject to globalisation and accompanying aspects, like short order and delivery periods, interlinking production processes and just-in-time manufacturing, so a breakdown of production provokes substantial financial impacts, unemployment and a decline of gross regional product. The aim of the presented project is to identify weak and critical points of the corporate emergency planning ("hot spots") and to assess possible losses triggered by mountainous flood processes using high-resolution digital terrain models (DTM) from airborne LiDAR (ALS). We derive flood-hot spots and model critical locations where the risk of natural hazards is very high. To model those hot spots a flood simulation based on an ALS-DTM has to be calculated. Based on that flood simulation, the flood heights of the overflowed locations which are lower than a threshold are mapped as flood-hot-spots. Then the corporate critical infrastructure, e.g. production facilities or lifelines, which are affected by the flooding, can be figured out. After the identification of hot spots and possible damage potential, the implementation of the results into corporate risk and emergency management guarantees the transdisciplinary approach involving stakeholders, risk and safety management officers and corporate fire brigade. Thus, the interdisciplinary analysis, including remote sensing

  19. Identifying and Mitigating Potential Nutrient and Sediment Hot Spots under a Future Scenario in the Missouri River Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, May [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Zhang, Zhonglong [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    clearly attributable to the conversion of a large amount of land to switchgrass. The Middle Lower Missouri River and Lower Missouri River were identified as hot regions. Further analysis identified four subbasins (10240002, 10230007, 10290402, and 10300200) as being the most vulnerable in terms of sediment, nitrogen, and phosphorus loadings. Overall, results suggest that increasing the amount of switchgrass acreage in the hot spots should be considered to mitigate the nutrient loads. The study provides an analytical method to support stakeholders in making informed decisions that balance biofuel production and water sustainability.

  20. Online platform for applying space-time scan statistics for prospectively detecting emerging hot spots of dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Chou; Teng, Yung-Chu; Lin, Bo-Cheng; Fan, I-Chun; Chan, Ta-Chien

    2016-11-25

    Cases of dengue fever have increased in areas of Southeast Asia in recent years. Taiwan hit a record-high 42,856 cases in 2015, with the majority in southern Tainan and Kaohsiung Cities. Leveraging spatial statistics and geo-visualization techniques, we aim to design an online analytical tool for local public health workers to prospectively identify ongoing hot spots of dengue fever weekly at the village level. A total of 57,516 confirmed cases of dengue fever in 2014 and 2015 were obtained from the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control (TCDC). Incorporating demographic information as covariates with cumulative cases (365 days) in a discrete Poisson model, we iteratively applied space-time scan statistics by SaTScan software to detect the currently active cluster of dengue fever (reported as relative risk) in each village of Tainan and Kaohsiung every week. A village with a relative risk >1 and p value dengue fever transmission on a weekly basis at the village level by using the routine surveillance data.

  1. Orographic rainfall hot spots in the Andes-Amazon transition according to the TRMM precipitation radar and in situ data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Steven P.; Takahashi, Ken

    2017-06-01

    The Andes-Amazon transition, along the eastern Peruvian Andes, features "hot spots" with strong precipitation. Using 15 years of Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission PR data we established a robust relation between terrain elevation and mean surface precipitation, with the latter peaking around 1000 m above sea level (asl), coinciding with the moisture flux peak of the South American Low Level Jet (SALLJ). There is strong diurnal variability, with afternoon (13-18 LT) convection in the Amazon plains, while on the eastern slopes (1000-2000 m asl), after the forcing associated with the thermal heating of the Andes subsides, convection grows during the night and surface precipitation peaks around 01-06 LT and organizes into mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). These then displace downslope to an terrain elevation of 700 m asl with stratiform regions spreading upslope and downslope and then decay during the remainder of the morning. The large MCSs contribute with at least 50% of daily rainfall (60% of the 01-06 LT rainfall). On synoptic scales, the large MCSs are more common in stronger SALLJ conditions, although subtropical cold surges are responsible for 16% of the cases.

  2. Satellite thermal monitoring of the 2010 - 2013 eruption of Kizimen volcano (Kamchatka) using MIROVA hot-spot detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimetti, Francesco; Coppola, Diego; Laiolo, Marco; Cigolini, Corrado

    2017-04-01

    After 81 years of rest, the Holocenic stratovolcano of Kizimen (Kamchatka, Russia) began a new eruptive phase on December 2010. The eruption was preceded by a year-long seismic unrest and fumarole activity, and persisted for 3 years showing a transition from explosive to effusive style. The initial explosive phase caused the partial disruption of the volcano summit and was followed by the effusion of andesitic lava flow along the eastern side of the edifice. Here we used an automatic hot-spot detection system named MIROVA (Middle InfraRed Observation of Volcanic Activity), in order to track the thermal evolution of the eruption and to understand the eruptive dynamic. MIROVA is based on the analysis IR images acquired by the MODIS sensor (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) and is able to provide thermal maps (1 km resolution) and Volcanic Radiative Power (VRP, in Watt) time series in near real time (1-4 hours from satellite overpass). Each image with a thermal alert has been classified, distinguishing different quality level of the data based on cloud cover, viewing geometry and coherence with the VRP trend. The analysis of VRP variation show different thermal phases that have been correlated with independent observations of KVERT (Kamchatka Volcanic Eruption Response Team). Finally, we show that the relation between total thermal energy radiated (VRE, in Joule) and erupted lava volume is consistent with the typical radiant density of an intermediate-silicic lava flow (Coppola et al., 2013).

  3. Changes in the location of biodiversity-ecosystem function hot spots across the seafloor landscape with increasing sediment nutrient loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrush, Simon F; Hewitt, Judi E; Kraan, Casper; Lohrer, A M; Pilditch, Conrad A; Douglas, Emily

    2017-04-12

    Declining biodiversity and loss of ecosystem function threatens the ability of habitats to contribute ecosystem services. However, the form of the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem function (BEF) and how relationships change with environmental change is poorly understood. This limits our ability to predict the consequences of biodiversity loss on ecosystem function, particularly in real-world marine ecosystems that are species rich, and where multiple ecosystem functions are represented by multiple indicators. We investigated spatial variation in BEF relationships across a 300 000 m 2 intertidal sandflat by nesting experimental manipulations of sediment pore water nitrogen concentration into sites with contrasting macrobenthic community composition. Our results highlight the significance of many different elements of biodiversity associated with environmental characteristics, community structure, functional diversity, ecological traits or particular species (ecosystem engineers) to important functions of coastal marine sediments (benthic oxygen consumption, ammonium pore water concentrations and flux across the sediment-water interface). Using the BEF relationships developed from our experiment, we demonstrate patchiness across a landscape in functional performance and the potential for changes in the location of functional hot and cold spots with increasing nutrient loading that have important implications for mapping and predicating change in functionality and the concomitant delivery of ecosystem services. © 2017 The Author(s).

  4. Septic systems as hot-spots of pollutants in the environment: Fate and mass balance of micropollutants in septic drainfields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun-Ya; Toor, Gurpal S; Wilson, P Chris; Williams, Clinton F

    2016-10-01

    Septic systems, a common type of onsite wastewater treatment systems, can be an important source of micropollutants in the environment. We investigated the fate and mass balance of 17 micropollutants, including wastewater markers, hormones, pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in the drainfield of a septic system. Drainfields were replicated in lysimeters (1.5m length, 0.9m width, 0.9m height) and managed similar to the field practice. In each lysimeter, a drip line dispersed 9L of septic tank effluent (STE) per day (equivalent to 32.29L/m(2) per day). Fourteen micropollutants in the STE and 12 in the leachate from drainfields were detected over eight months. Concentrations of most micropollutants in the leachate were low (85% of the added micropollutants except for sucralose were attenuated in the drainfield. We discovered that sorption was the key mechanism for retention of carbamazepine and partially for sulfamethoxazole, whereas microbial degradation likely attenuated acetaminophen in the drainfield. This data suggests that sorption and microbial degradation limited transport of micropollutants from the drainfields. However, the leaching of small amounts of micropollutants indicate that septic systems are hot-spots of micropollutants in the environment and a better understanding of micropollutants in septic systems is needed to protect groundwater quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Report on the 2nd International Consortium on Hallucination Research: evolving directions and top-10 "hot spots" in hallucination research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Flavie; Woods, Angela; Fernyhough, Charles

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a report on the 2nd meeting of the International Consortium on Hallucination Research, held on September 12th and 13th 2013 at Durham University, UK. Twelve working groups involving specialists in each area presented their findings and sought to summarize the available knowledge, inconsistencies in the field, and ways to progress. The 12 working groups reported on the following domains of investigation: cortical organisation of hallucinations, nonclinical hallucinations, interdisciplinary approaches to phenomenology, culture and hallucinations, subtypes of auditory verbal hallucinations, a Psychotic Symptoms Rating Scale multisite study, visual hallucinations in the psychosis spectrum, hallucinations in children and adolescents, Research Domain Criteria behavioral constructs and hallucinations, new methods of assessment, psychological therapies, and the Hearing Voices Movement approach to understanding and working with voices. This report presents a summary of this meeting and outlines 10 hot spots for hallucination research, which include the in-depth examination of (1) the social determinants of hallucinations, (2) translation of basic neuroscience into targeted therapies, (3) different modalities of hallucination, (4) domain convergence in cross-diagnostic studies, (5) improved methods for assessing hallucinations in nonclinical samples, (6) using humanities and social science methodologies to recontextualize hallucinatory experiences, (7) developmental approaches to better understand hallucinations, (8) changing the memory or meaning of past trauma to help recovery, (9) hallucinations in the context of sleep and sleep disorders, and (10) subtypes of hallucinations in a therapeutic context.

  6. Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing Reveals Hot Spots and Doubly Heterozygous Mutations in Chinese Patients with Familial Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As a common cardiac disease mainly caused by gene mutations in sarcomeric cytoskeletal, calcium-handling, nuclear envelope, desmosomal, and transcription factor genes, inherited cardiomyopathy is becoming one of the major etiological factors of sudden cardiac death (SCD and heart failure (HF. This disease is characterized by remarkable genetic heterogeneity, which makes it difficult to screen for pathogenic mutations using Sanger sequencing. In the present study, three probands, one with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHCM and two with familial dilated cardiomyopathy (FDCM, were recruited together with their respective family members. Using next-generation sequencing technology (NGS, 24 genes frequently known to be related to inherited cardiomyopathy were screened. Two hot spots (TNNI3-p.Arg145Gly, and LMNA-p.Arg190Trp and double (LMNA-p.Arg190Trp plus MYH7-p.Arg1045His heterozygous mutations were found to be highly correlated with familial cardiomyopathy. FDCM patients with doubly heterozygous mutations show a notably severe phenotype as we could confirm in our study; this indicates that the double mutations had a dose effect. In addition, it is proposed that genetic testing using NGS technology can be used as a cost-effective screening tool and help guide the treatment of patients with familial cardiomyopathy particularly regarding the risk of family members who are clinically asymptomatic.

  7. Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing Reveals Hot Spots and Doubly Heterozygous Mutations in Chinese Patients with Familial Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yue; Zhang, Yun-Mei; Ding, Xiao-Xue; Song, Yu-Zhu; Zhang, A-Mei; Liu, Li; Zhang, Hong; Ding, Jia-Huan; Xia, Xue-Shan

    2015-01-01

    As a common cardiac disease mainly caused by gene mutations in sarcomeric cytoskeletal, calcium-handling, nuclear envelope, desmosomal, and transcription factor genes, inherited cardiomyopathy is becoming one of the major etiological factors of sudden cardiac death (SCD) and heart failure (HF). This disease is characterized by remarkable genetic heterogeneity, which makes it difficult to screen for pathogenic mutations using Sanger sequencing. In the present study, three probands, one with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHCM) and two with familial dilated cardiomyopathy (FDCM), were recruited together with their respective family members. Using next-generation sequencing technology (NGS), 24 genes frequently known to be related to inherited cardiomyopathy were screened. Two hot spots (TNNI3-p.Arg145Gly, and LMNA-p.Arg190Trp) and double (LMNA-p.Arg190Trp plus MYH7-p.Arg1045His) heterozygous mutations were found to be highly correlated with familial cardiomyopathy. FDCM patients with doubly heterozygous mutations show a notably severe phenotype as we could confirm in our study; this indicates that the double mutations had a dose effect. In addition, it is proposed that genetic testing using NGS technology can be used as a cost-effective screening tool and help guide the treatment of patients with familial cardiomyopathy particularly regarding the risk of family members who are clinically asymptomatic. PMID:26199943

  8. CTCF cis-regulates trinucleotide repeat instability in an epigenetic manner: a novel basis for mutational hot spot determination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randell T Libby

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available At least 25 inherited disorders in humans result from microsatellite repeat expansion. Dramatic variation in repeat instability occurs at different disease loci and between different tissues; however, cis-elements and trans-factors regulating the instability process remain undefined. Genomic fragments from the human spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7 locus, containing a highly unstable CAG tract, were previously introduced into mice to localize cis-acting "instability elements," and revealed that genomic context is required for repeat instability. The critical instability-inducing region contained binding sites for CTCF -- a regulatory factor implicated in genomic imprinting, chromatin remodeling, and DNA conformation change. To evaluate the role of CTCF in repeat instability, we derived transgenic mice carrying SCA7 genomic fragments with CTCF binding-site mutations. We found that CTCF binding-site mutation promotes triplet repeat instability both in the germ line and in somatic tissues, and that CpG methylation of CTCF binding sites can further destabilize triplet repeat expansions. As CTCF binding sites are associated with a number of highly unstable repeat loci, our findings suggest a novel basis for demarcation and regulation of mutational hot spots and implicate CTCF in the modulation of genetic repeat instability.

  9. Improving the hot-spot pressure and demonstrating ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic deuterium tritium implosions on OMEGA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncharov, V. N. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Sangster, T. C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Betti, R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Boehly, T. R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Bonino, M. J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Collins, T. J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Craxton, R. S. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Delettrez, J. A. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Edgell, D. H. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Epstein, R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Follett, R. K. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Forrest, C. J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Froula, D. H. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Yu. Glebov, V. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Harding, D. R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Henchen, R. J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Hu, S. X. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Igumenshchev, I. V. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Janezic, R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Kelly, J. H. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Kessler, T. J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Kosc, T. Z. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Loucks, S. J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Marozas, J. A. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Marshall, F. J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Maximov, A. V. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; McCrory, R. L. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; McKenty, P. W. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Meyerhofer, D. D. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Michel, D. T. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Myatt, J. F. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Nora, R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Radha, P. B. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Regan, S. P. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Seka, W. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Shmayda, W. T. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Short, R.W. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Shvydky, A. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Skupsky, S. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Stoeckl, C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Yaakobi, B. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Frenje, J. A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Gatu-Johnson, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Petrasso, R. D. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Casey, D. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Reaching ignition in direct-drive (DD) inertial confinement fusion implosions requires achieving central pressures in excess of 100 Gbar. The OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] is used to study the physics of implosions that are hydrodynamically equivalent to the ignition designs on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)]. It is shown that the highest hot-spot pressures (up to 40 Gbar) are achieved in target designs with a fuel adiabat of α ≅ 4, an implosion velocity of 3.8 × 10⁷ cm/s, and a laser intensity of ~10¹⁵ W/cm². These moderate-adiabat implosions are well understood using two-dimensional hydrocode simulations. The performance of lower-adiabat implosions is significantly degraded relative to code predictions, a common feature between DD implosions on OMEGA and indirect-drive cryogenic implosions on the NIF. Simplified theoretical models are developed to gain physical understanding of the implosion dynamics that dictate the target performance. These models indicate that degradations in the shell density and integrity (caused by hydrodynamic instabilities during the target acceleration) coupled with hydrodynamics at stagnation are the main failure mechanisms in low-adiabat designs. To demonstrate ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic implosions on OMEGA, the target-design robustness to hydrodynamic instability growth must be improved by reducing laser-coupling losses caused by cross beam energy transfer.

  10. The IkappaBalpha/NF-kappaB complex has two hot spots, one at either end of the interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergqvist, Simon; Ghosh, Gourisankar; Komives, Elizabeth A

    2008-12-01

    IkappaBalpha binds to and inhibits the transcriptional activity of NF-kappaB family members via its ankyrin repeat (AR) domain. The binding affinity of IkappaBalpha with NF-kappaB(p50/p65) heterodimers and NF-kappaB(p65/65) homodimers is in the picomolar range, and in the cell, this results in long half-lives of the complexes. Direct binding experiments have been performed using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) on a series of truncations and mutations in order to understand what regions of the interface are most important for the tight binding affinity of this complex. We previously showed that interactions between residues 305 and 321 of NF-kappaB(p65) with the first AR of IkappaBalpha are critical for the binding energy. Interactions in this region are responsible for more than 7 kcal/mol of the binding energy. Here we show equally drastic consequences for the binding energy occur upon truncation of even a few residues at the C terminus of IkappaBalpha. Thus, the interface actually has two hot spots, one at either end of the elongated and large surface of interaction. These results suggest a "squeeze" mechanism that leads to the extremely high affinity of the IkappaBalpha*NF-kappaB complex through stabilization of the ankyrin repeat domain.

  11. Magnetic Axis Drift and Magnetic Spot Formation in Neutron Stars with Toroidal Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourgouliatos, Konstantinos N.; Hollerbach, Rainer

    2018-01-01

    We explore magnetic field configurations that lead to the formation of magnetic spots on the surface of neutron stars and the displacement of the magnetic dipole axis. We find that a toroidally dominated magnetic field is essential for the generation of a single spot with a strong magnetic field. Once a spot forms, it survives for several million years, even after the total magnetic field has decayed significantly. We find that the dipole axis is not stationary with respect to the neutron star’s surface and does not in general coincide with the location of the magnetic spot. This is due to non-axisymmetric instabilities of the toroidal field that displace the poloidal dipole axis at rates that may reach 0.°4 per century. A misaligned poloidal dipole axis with the toroidal field leads to more significant displacement of the dipole axis than the fully aligned case. Finally we discuss the evolution of neutron stars with such magnetic fields on the P{--}\\dot{P} diagram and the observational implications. We find that neutron stars spend a very short time before they cross the Death Line of the P{--}\\dot{P} diagram, compared to their characteristic ages. Moreover, the maximum intensity of their surface magnetic field is substantially higher than the dipole component of the field. We argue that SGR 0418+5729 could be an example of this type of behavior, having a weak dipole field, yet hosting a magnetic spot responsible for its magnetar behavior. The evolution on the pulse profile and braking index of the Crab pulsar, which are attributed to an increase of its obliquity, are compatible with the anticipated drift of the magnetic axis.

  12. Hot-spot residue in small heat-shock protein 22 causes distal motor neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irobi, Joy; Van Impe, Katrien; Seeman, Pavel; Jordanova, Albena; Dierick, Ines; Verpoorten, Nathalie; Michalik, Andrej; De Vriendt, Els; Jacobs, An; Van Gerwen, Veerle; Vennekens, Krist'l; Mazanec, Radim; Tournev, Ivailo; Hilton-Jones, David; Talbot, Kevin; Kremensky, Ivo; Van Den Bosch, Ludo; Robberecht, Wim; Van Vandekerckhove, Joël; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Gettemans, Jan; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2004-06-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathies are pure motor disorders of the peripheral nervous system resulting in severe atrophy and wasting of distal limb muscles. In two pedigrees with distal hereditary motor neuropathy type II linked to chromosome 12q24.3, we identified the same mutation (K141N) in small heat-shock 22-kDa protein 8 (encoded by HSPB8; also called HSP22). We found a second mutation (K141E) in two smaller families. Both mutations target the same amino acid, which is essential to the structural and functional integrity of the small heat-shock protein alphaA-crystallin. This positively charged residue, when mutated in other small heat-shock proteins, results in various human disorders. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed greater binding of both HSPB8 mutants to the interacting partner HSPB1. Expression of mutant HSPB8 in cultured cells promoted formation of intracellular aggregates. Our findings provide further evidence that mutations in heat-shock proteins have an important role in neurodegenerative disorders.

  13. A cancer-predisposing "hot spot" mutation of the fumarase gene creates a dominant negative protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzato, Annalisa; Olivero, Martina; Perro, Mario; Brière, Jean Jacques; Rustin, Pierre; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2008-02-15

    The Fumarase (Fumarate Hydratase, FH) is a tumor suppressor gene whose germline heterozygous mutations predispose to hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC). The FH gene encodes an enzyme of the Krebs cycle, functioning as a homotetramer and catalyzing the hydration of fumarate to malate. Among the numerous FH mutations reported so far, the R190H missense mutation is the most frequent in HLRCC patients. Here we show the functional analyses of the R190H, in comparison to the better characterized E319Q mutation. We first expressed wild-type and mutated proteins in FH deficient human skin fibroblasts, using lentiviral vectors. The wild-type transgene was able to restore the FH enzymatic activity in cells, while the R190H- and E319Q-FH were not. More interestingly, when the same transgenes were expressed in normal, FH-proficient cells, only the R190H-FH reduced the endogenous FH enzymatic activity. By enforcing the expression of equal amount of wild-type and R190H-FH in the same cell, we showed that the mutated FH protein directly inhibited enzymatic activity by nearly abrogating the FH homotetramer formation. These data demonstrate the dominant negative effect of the R190H missense mutation in the FH gene and suggest that the FH tumor-suppressing activity might be impaired in cells carrying a heterozygous mutation. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. The Satah Mountain and Baldface Mountain volcanic fields: Pleistocene hot spot volcanism in the Anahim Volcanic Belt, west-central British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, Christian; Guest, Bernard; Russell, James K.; Benowitz, Jeff A.

    2015-03-01

    The Satah Mountain and Baldface Mountain volcanic fields (SMVF, BMVF) comprise more than three dozen small volcanic centers and erosional remnants thereof. These fields are located in the Chilcotin Highland of west-central British Columbia, Canada, and are spatially associated with the Anahim Volcanic Belt (AVB), a linear feature of alkaline to peralkaline plutonic and volcanic centers of Miocene to Holocene ages. The AVB has been postulated to be the track of a hot spot passing beneath the westward moving Cordilleran lithosphere. We test the AVB hot spot model by applying whole-rock 40Ar/39Ar geochronology ( n = 24) and geochemistry. Whole-rock chemical compositions of volcanic rock samples ( n = 59) from these two fields suggest a strong geochemical affinity with the nearby Itcha Range shield volcano; however, SMVF and BMVF centers are mostly small in volume (<1 km3) and differ in composition from one another, even where they are in close spatial proximity. Trace element and REE patterns of mafic AVB lavas are similar to ocean island basalts (OIB), suggesting a mantle source for these lavas. The age ranges for the SMVF ( n = 11; ~2.21 to ~1.43 Ma) and BMVF ( n = 7; ~3.91 to ~0.91 Ma) are largely coeval with the Itcha Range. The distribution of volcanoes in these two volcanic fields is potentially consistent with the postulated AVB hot spot track. Eruption rates in the SMVF were high enough to build an elongated ridge that deviates from the E-W trend of the AVB by almost 90°. This deviation might reflect the mechanisms and processes facilitating magma generation and ascent through the lithosphere in this tectonically complex region and may also indicate interaction of the potential hot spot with (pre)existing fracture systems in vicinity of the Itcha Range.

  15. Do we miss the hot spots? – The use of very high resolution aerial photographs to quantify carbon fluxes in peatlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Becker

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Accurate determination of carbon balances in heterogeneous ecosystems often requires the extrapolation of point based measurements. The ground resolution (pixel size of the extrapolation base, e.g. a land-cover map, might thus influence the calculated carbon balance, in particular if biogeochemical hot spots are small in size. In this paper, we test the effects of varying ground resolution on the calculated carbon balance of a boreal peatland consisting of hummocks (dry, lawns (intermediate and flarks (wet surfaces. The generalizations in lower resolution imagery led to biased area estimates for individual micro-site types. While areas of lawns and hummocks were stable below a threshold resolution of ~60 cm, the maximum of the flark area was located at resolutions below 25 cm and was then decreasing with coarsening resolution. Using a resolution of 100 cm instead of 6 cm led to an overestimation of total CO2 uptake of the studied peatland area (approximately 14 600 m2 of ~5% and an underestimation of total CH4 emission of ~6%. To accurately determine the surface area of scattered and small-sized micro-site types in heterogeneous ecosystems (e.g. flarks in peatlands, a minimum ground resolution appears necessary. In our case this leads to a recommended resolution of 25 cm, which can be derived by conventional airborne imagery. The usage of high resolution imagery from commercial satellites, e.g. Quickbird, however, is likely to underestimate the surface area of biogeochemical hot spots. It is important to note that the observed resolution effect on the carbon balance estimates can be much stronger for other ecosystems than for the investigated peatland. In the investigated peatland the relative hot spot area of the flarks is very small and their hot spot characteristics with respect to CH4 and CO2 fluxes is rather modest.

  16. Plasmon Mapping in Metallic Nanostructures and its Application to Single Molecule Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering: Imaging Electromagnetic Hot-Spots and Analyte Location

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camden, Jon P. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2013-07-12

    A major component of this proposal is to elucidate the connection between optical and electron excitation of plasmon modes in metallic nanostructures. These accomplishments are reported: developed a routine protocol for obtaining spatially resolved, low energy EELS spectra, and resonance Rayleigh scattering spectra from the same nanostructures; correlated optical scattering spectra and plasmon maps obtained using STEM/EELS; and imaged electromagnetic hot spots responsible for single-molecule surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SMSERS).

  17. New geologic evidence for additional 16.5-15.5 Ma silicic calderas in northwest Nevada related to initial impingement of the Yellowstone hot spot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coble, Matthew A; Mahood, Gail A [Department Geological and Environmental Sciences, 450 Serra Mall, Bldg 320, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-3115 (United States)

    2008-10-01

    Three silicic calderas have been newly identified in northwest Nevada west of McDermitt caldera. This volcanism is interpreted to have formed during a short interval at 16.5-15.5 Ma, during the waning stage of Steens flood basalt volcanism after the initial impingement of the Yellowstone hot spot. New mapping demonstrates that the area affected by this mid-Miocene silicic volcanism is significantly larger than previously appreciated in the western U.S.

  18. The acetabular fossa hot spot on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT: epidemiology, natural history, and proposed etiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubicki, Shelby L. [Trinity University, San Antonio, TX (United States); Richardson, Michael L. [University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Martin, Thomas [X-Ray Associates of New Mexico, Department of Radiology, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rohren, Eric [The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Wei, Wei [The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Biostatistics, Houston, TX (United States); Amini, Behrang [The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Division of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-01-15

    To describe a benign focus of increased activity in the acetabular fossa (the acetabular fossa hot spot, AFHS) on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT that can mimic a neoplasm. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT images from four patient populations were examined. Group 1 (n = 13) was collected from a search of radiology reports and used to define the AFHS and for hypothesis generation. Group 2 (n = 1,150) was used for prevalence of AFHS. Group 3 (n = 1,213) had PET/CT and MRI pelvis within a week of each other and was used to correlate metabolic and anatomic findings. Group 4 (n = 100) was used to generate the control group. Data were collected on demographics, common comorbidities, underlying cancer diagnosis and status, and hip symptoms. Prevalence of AFHS was 0.36 % (95 % CI 0.10-0.91 %). None progressed to malignancy or was associated with cancer status. The majority (71 %) were on the left, and 6 % were bilateral. Mean SUV{sub max} of the AFHS was 4.8 (range, 2.7-7.8). Male patients were more likely to have the AFHS (OR = 8.69, 95 % CI 1.88-40.13). There was no difference with respect to other collected data, including hip symptoms. Average minimum duration of AFHS was 346 days (range, 50-1,010 days). Readers did not detect corresponding hip abnormalities on MRIs. AFHS is a benign finding that may be caused by subclinical ligamentum teres injury, focal synovitis, or degeneration of acetabular fossa fat. Despite uncertainty regarding its etiology, recognition of AFHS as a benign finding can prevent morbidity associated with unnecessary biopsy or initiation of therapy. (orig.)

  19. Opening the research agenda for selection of hot spots for human biomonitoring research in Belgium: a participatory research project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chovanova Hana

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to select priority hotspots for environment and health research in Flanders (Belgium, an open procedure was organized. Environment and health hotspots are strong polluting point sources with possible health effects for residents living in the vicinity of the hot spot. The selection procedure was part of the work of the Flemish Centre of Expertise for Environment and Health, which investigates the relation between environmental pollution and human health. The project is funded and steered by the Flemish government. Methods The involvement of other actors than merely experts is inspired by the 'analytical-deliberative' approach of the National Research Council in the United States and the extended peer community approach. These approaches stress the importance of involving different expert- and social perspectives in order to increase the knowledge base on complex issues. In the procedure used in the project a combination of expert and stakeholder input was essential. The final decision was supported by a multi-criteria analysis of expert assessment and stakeholder advice. Results The endeavour was challenging from the start because of the complicated ambition of including a diversity of actors, potential hotspots, concerns and assessment criteria, but nevertheless the procedure proved its value in both structuring and informing the decision-making process. Moreover the process gained the support of most actors participating in the process, even though the final selection could not satisfy all preferences. Conclusions Opening the research agenda exemplifies the value of inter- and transdisciplinary cooperation as well as the need for a well-structured and negotiated procedure that combines relevant factors and actors with pragmatism. The value of such a process also needs to prove itself in practice after the procedure has been completed: the tension between an ambition of openness on the one hand and a more closed

  20. Uplift, rupture, and rollback of the Farallon slab reflected in volcanic perturbations along the Yellowstone adakite hot spot track

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Victor E.; Ross, Martin E.; Duncan, Robert A.; Kimbrough, David L.

    2017-09-01

    Field, geochemical, and geochronological data show that the southern segment of the ancestral Cascades arc advanced into the Oregon back-arc region from 30 to 20 Ma. We attribute this event to thermal uplift of the Farallon slab by the Yellowstone mantle plume, with heat diffusion, decompression, and the release of volatiles promoting high-K calc-alkaline volcanism throughout the back-arc region. The greatest degree of heating is expressed at the surface by a broad ENE-trending zone of adakites and related rocks generated by melting of oceanic crust from the Farallon slab. A hiatus in eruptive activity began at ca. 22-20 Ma but ended abruptly at 16.7 Ma with renewed volcanism from slab rupture occurring in two separate regions. The eastern rupture resulted in the extrusion of Steens Basalt during the ascent and melting of a dry mantle (plume) source contaminated with depleted mantle. The contemporaneous western rupture resulted in renewed subduction, melting of a wet mantle source, and the rejuvenation of high-K calc-alkaline volcanism near the Nevada-California border at 16.7 Ma. Here the initiation of slab rollback is evident in the westward migration of arc volcanism at 7.8 km/Ma. Today, the uplifted slab is largely missing beneath the Oregon back-arc region, replaced instead by a seismic hole that is bound on the south by the adakite hot spot track. We attribute slab destruction to thermal uplift and mechanical dislocation that culminated in rapid tearing of the slab from 17-15 Ma and possible foundering and sinking of slab segments from 16 to 10 Ma.

  1. Sustainability of Public Health Interventions to Reduce the Risk of Dioxin Exposure at Severe Dioxin Hot Spots in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuyet-Hanh, Tran Thi; Vu-Anh, Le; Dunne, Michael; Toms, Leisa-Maree; Tenkate, Thomas; Harden, Fiona

    2015-08-01

    Severe dioxin contamination at Bien Hoa and Da Nang airbases, Vietnam is of international concern. Public Health risk reduction programs were implemented in Bien Hoa in 2007-2009 and in Da Nang in 2009-2011. In 2009 and 2011 we reported the encouraging results of these interventions in improving the knowledge, attitude and practices (KAP) of local residents in reducing the dioxin exposure risk through foods. In 2013 we revisited these dioxin hot spots, aimed to evaluate whether the results of the intervention were maintained and to identify factors affecting the sustainability of the programs. To assess this, 16 in-depth interviews, six focus group discussions, and pre and post intervention KAP surveys were undertaken. 800 respondents from six intervention wards and 200 respondents from Buu Long Ward (the control site) were randomly selected to participate in the surveys. The results showed that as of 2013, the programs were rated as "moderately sustained" with a score of 3.3 out of 5.0 (cut off points 2.5 to Bien Hoa, and "well sustained" with a score of 3.8 out of 5.0 (cut off points 3.5 to <4.5) for Da Nang. Most formal intervention program activities had ceased and dioxin risk communication activities were no longer integrated into local routine health education programs. However, the main outcomes were maintained and were better than that in the control ward. Migration, lack of official guidance from City People's Committees and local authorities as well as the politically sensitive nature of dioxin issues were the main challenges for the sustainability of the programs.

  2. Multi-Scale Multi-physics Methods Development for the Calculation of Hot-Spots in the NGNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downar, Thomas [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Seker, Volkan [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2013-04-30

    Radioactive gaseous fission products are released out of the fuel element at a significantly higher rate when the fuel temperature exceeds 1600°C in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). Therefore, it is of paramount importance to accurately predict the peak fuel temperature during all operational and design-basis accident conditions. The current methods used to predict the peak fuel temperature in HTGRs, such as the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), estimate the average fuel temperature in a computational mesh modeling hundreds of fuel pebbles or a fuel assembly in a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) or prismatic block type reactor (PMR), respectively. Experiments conducted in operating HTGRs indicate considerable uncertainty in the current methods and correlations used to predict actual temperatures. The objective of this project is to improve the accuracy in the prediction of local "hot" spots by developing multi-scale, multi-physics methods and implementing them within the framework of established codes used for NGNP analysis.The multi-scale approach which this project will implement begins with defining suitable scales for a physical and mathematical model and then deriving and applying the appropriate boundary conditions between scales. The macro scale is the greatest length that describes the entire reactor, whereas the meso scale models only a fuel block in a prismatic reactor and ten to hundreds of pebbles in a pebble bed reactor. The smallest scale is the micro scale--the level of a fuel kernel of the pebble in a PBR and fuel compact in a PMR--which needs to be resolved in order to calculate the peak temperature in a fuel kernel.

  3. Quantifying the evidence of climate change in the light of uncertainty exemplified by the Mediterranean hot spot region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paeth, Heiko; Vogt, Gernot; Paxian, Andreas; Hertig, Elke; Seubert, Stefanie; Jacobeit, Jucundus

    2017-04-01

    Climate change projections are subject to uncertainty arising from climate model deficiencies, unknown initial conditions and scenario assumptions. In the IPCC reports and many other publications climate changes and uncertainty ranges are usually displayed in terms of multi-model ensemble means and confidence intervals, respectively. In this study, we present a more quantitative assessment and statistical testing of climate change signals in the light of uncertainty. The approach is based on a two-way analysis of variance, referring to 24 climate models from the CMIP3 multi-model ensemble, and extents over the 21st century. The method also distinguishes between different climate variables, time scales and emission scenarios and is combined with a simple bias correction algorithm. The Mediterranean region has been chosen as a case study because it represents an assumed hot spot of future climate change, where temperature is projected to rise substantially and precipitation may decrease dramatically by the end of the 21st century. It is found that future temperature variations are mainly determined by radiative forcing, accounting for up to 60% of total variability, especially in the western Mediterranean Basin. In contrast, future precipitation variability is almost completely attributable to model uncertainty and model internal variability, both being important in more or less equal shares. This general finding is slightly depending on the prescribed emission scenario and strictly sensitive to the considered time scale. In contrast to precipitation, the temperature signal can be enhanced noticeably when bias-correcting the models' climatology during the 20th century: the greenhouse signal then accounts for up to 75% of total temperature variability in the regional mean.

  4. Improving the hot-spot pressure and demonstrating ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic deuterium–tritium implosions on OMEGA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Follett, R. K.; Forrest, C. J.; Froula, D. H.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; Henchen, R. J.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Janezic, R.; Kelly, J. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); and others

    2014-05-15

    Reaching ignition in direct-drive (DD) inertial confinement fusion implosions requires achieving central pressures in excess of 100 Gbar. The OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] is used to study the physics of implosions that are hydrodynamically equivalent to the ignition designs on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)]. It is shown that the highest hot-spot pressures (up to 40 Gbar) are achieved in target designs with a fuel adiabat of α ≃ 4, an implosion velocity of 3.8 × 10{sup 7} cm/s, and a laser intensity of ∼10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. These moderate-adiabat implosions are well understood using two-dimensional hydrocode simulations. The performance of lower-adiabat implosions is significantly degraded relative to code predictions, a common feature between DD implosions on OMEGA and indirect-drive cryogenic implosions on the NIF. Simplified theoretical models are developed to gain physical understanding of the implosion dynamics that dictate the target performance. These models indicate that degradations in the shell density and integrity (caused by hydrodynamic instabilities during the target acceleration) coupled with hydrodynamics at stagnation are the main failure mechanisms in low-adiabat designs. To demonstrate ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic implosions on OMEGA, the target-design robustness to hydrodynamic instability growth must be improved by reducing laser-coupling losses caused by cross beam energy transfer.

  5. Exploring spatial patterns of sudden cardiac arrests in the city of Toronto using Poisson kriging and Hot Spot analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Przybysz

    Full Text Available Our study looked at out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest events in the City of Toronto. These are relatively rare events, yet present a serious global clinical and public health problem. We report on the application of spatial methods and tools that, although relatively well known to geographers and natural resource scientists, need to become better known and used more frequently by health care researchers.Our data came from the population-based Rescu Epistry cardiac arrest database. We limited it to the residents of the City of Toronto who experienced sudden arrest in 2010. The data was aggregated at the Dissemination Area level, and population rates were calculated. Poisson kriging was carried out on one year of data using three different spatial weights. Kriging estimates were then compared in Hot Spot analyses.Spatial analysis revealed that Poisson kriging can yield reliable rates using limited data of high quality. We observed the highest rates of sudden arrests in the north and central parts of Etobicoke, western parts of North York as well as the central and southwestern parts of Scarborough while the lowest rates were found in north and eastern parts of Scarborough, downtown Toronto, and East York as well as east central parts of North York. Influence of spatial neighbours on the results did not extend past two rings of adjacent units.Poisson kriging has the potential to be applied to a wide range of healthcare research, particularly on rare events. This approach can be successfully combined with other spatial methods. More applied research, is needed to establish a wider acceptance for this method, especially among healthcare researchers and epidemiologists.

  6. "Hot spots" of N and C impact nitric oxide, nitrous oxide and nitrogen gas emissions from a UK grassland soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loick, Nadine; Dixon, Elizabeth; Abalos, Diego; Vallejo, Antonio; Matthews, Peter; McGeough, Karen; Watson, Catherine; Baggs, Elizabeth M; Cardenas, Laura M

    2017-11-01

    Agricultural soils are a major source of nitric- (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O), which are produced and consumed by biotic and abiotic soil processes. The dominant sources of NO and N2O are microbial nitrification and denitrification, and emissions of NO and N2O generally increase after fertiliser application. The present study investigated the impact of N-source distribution on emissions of NO and N2O from soil and the significance of denitrification, rather than nitrification, as a source of NO emissions. To eliminate spatial variability and changing environmental factors which impact processes and results, the experiment was conducted under highly controlled conditions. A laboratory incubation system (DENIS) was used, allowing simultaneous measurement of three N-gases (NO, N2O, N2) emitted from a repacked soil core, which was combined with (15)N-enrichment isotopic techniques to determine the source of N emissions. It was found that the areal distribution of N and C significantly affected the quantity and timing of gaseous emissions and (15)N-analysis showed that N2O emissions resulted almost exclusively from the added amendments. Localised higher concentrations, so-called hot spots, resulted in a delay in N2O and N2 emissions causing a longer residence time of the applied N-source in the soil, therefore minimising NO emissions while at the same time being potentially advantageous for plant-uptake of nutrients. If such effects are also observed for a wider range of soils and conditions, then this will have major implications for fertiliser application protocols to minimise gaseous N emissions while maintaining fertilisation efficiency.

  7. Identifying the hot spots of denitrification and nitrogen transformation across different land uses in the Silver Spring springshed, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, X.; Inglett, P.; Dobberfuhl, D. R.; Canion, A. K.

    2016-12-01

    Silver Springs is the largest of Florida's first magnitude springs and also likely the largest limestone spring in the United States. Land use in the springshed has changed from predominantly natural to urban/agricultural over the past 50 years, leading to more pollution for ground and surface water, and excess nitrate is considered as the major concern in restoring the Silver Springs. In this study, we investigated the effects of land uses on the nitrogen transformation by measuring the dissolved gases (e.g., dissolved N2, Ar, N2O, CH4) in the east and west vent of Silver Spring and ground water from 61 wells around the springshed. The dissolved CH4 and N2O in the ground water ranged from 0 to 106 µM, and 0 to 2.0 µM, respectively. Significantly higher dissolved N2O and CH4 were observed in the dry and wet season, respectively. In our study, significant positive correlation between N2O with dissolved oxygen and nitrate (P NO3-N concentration typically observed in the East vent. However, more denitrification (excess N2) seemed to present in the West vent with higher dissolve N2: Ar ratio. In general, higher dissolved N2O occurred in the land uses of agriculture and urban, whereas higher dissolved N2 and N2:Ar were measured in the land uses of forest and wetlands. Moreover, the principal component analysis based on the geochemical properties of the water showed that the West and East vent reflected the land use of forests and wetlands, and of agriculture and urban, respectively, further suggesting the hot spots for nitrification and denitrification.

  8. General implications for CpG hot spot mutations: methylation patterns of the human iduronate-2-sulfatase gene locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomatsu, Shunji; Orii, Koji O; Bi, Y; Gutierrez, Monica A; Nishioka, Tatsuo; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Kondo, Naomi; Orii, Tadao; Noguchi, Akihiko; Sly, William S

    2004-06-01

    The methylation pattern at CpG sites of a housekeeping gene correlates with the likelihood of mutation. Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type II, an X-linked disorder, results from the deficiency of iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS). In these patients, over 35% of independent point mutations at the IDS gene locus were found at CpG sites as transitional events. To gain insight into the relationship between methylation status and CpG hot spot mutations, we investigated patterns of cytosine methylation in the entire IDS gene, except for introns 4-8. Bisulfite genomic sequencing was performed on the normal leukocyte DNA. Our data show that: 1) cytosine methylation at the CpG sites was extensive, except for those present from the promoter region to a portion of intron 3; 2) a sharp boundary of methylated-nonmethylated regions was observed at the 5'-flanking region, whereas a gradual change in methylation was observed in the 2.0-kb segment in the 3'-flanking region; 3) the boundary of the 5'-flanking region contained multiple Sp1 sites and the TATA box; 4) the CpG sites in exons 1 and 2 were hypomethylated and were associated only with rare transitional mutations, while the CpG sites in exon 3 were also hypomethylated, yet were associated with a high rate of transitional mutations; 5) there was no striking sex difference in the methylation patterns in active alleles; and, 6) the methylation in both strands was symmetrical, except at the boundary of methylated-unmethylated regions. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. [Analysis of hot spots and trend of molecular pharmacognosy research based on project supported by National Natural Science Foundation of 1995-2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-Wen; Liu, Yang; Tong, Yuan-Yuan; Yang, Ce; Li, Hai-Yan

    2016-05-01

    This study collected 1995-2014 molecular pharmacognosy study, a total of 595 items, funded by Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC). TDA and Excel software were used to analyze the data of the projects about general situation, hot spots of research with rank analytic and correlation analytic methods. Supported by NSFC molecular pharmacognosy projects and funding a gradual increase in the number of, the proportion of funds for pharmaceutical research funding tends to be stable; mainly supported by molecular biology methods of genuine medicinal materials, secondary metabolism and Germplasm Resources Research; hot drugs including Radix Salviae Miltiorrhizae, Radix Rehmanniae, Cordyceps sinensis, hot contents including tanshinone biosynthesis, Rehmannia glutinosa continuous cropping obstacle. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  10. Void formation in ODS EUROFER produced by hot isostatic pressing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Y. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganes (Spain)], E-mail: yanicet@fis.ucm.es; Monge, M.A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganes (Spain); Castro, V. de [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Munoz, A.; Leguey, T.; Pareja, R. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganes (Spain)

    2009-04-30

    Positron annihilation experiments were performed on oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) and non-ODS EUROFER prepared by mechanical alloying and hot isostatic pressing. The results revealed the presence of small voids in these materials in the as-HIPed conditions. Their evolution under isochronal annealing experiments was investigated. The coincidence Doppler broadening spectra of ODS EUROFER exhibited a characteristic signature attributed to positron annihilation in Ar-decorated voids at the oxide particle/matrix interfaces. The variation of the positron annihilation parameters with the annealing temperature showed three stages: up to 623 K, between 823 and 1323 K, and above 1323 K. In the temperature range 823-1323 K void coarsening had effect. Above 1323 K some voids annealed out, but others, associated to oxide particles and small precipitates, survived to annealing at 1523 K. Transmission electron microscopy observations were also performed to verify the characteristics of the surviving defects after annealing at 1523 K.

  11. Crystal structure of type I ryanodine receptor amino-terminal [beta]-trefoil domain reveals a disease-associated mutation 'hot spot' loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amador, Fernando J.; Liu, Shuang; Ishiyama, Noboru; Plevin, Michael J.; Wilson, Aaron; MacLennan, David H.; Ikura, Mitsuhiko; (Toronto)

    2009-12-01

    Muscle contraction and relaxation is regulated by transient elevations of myoplasmic Ca{sup 2+}. Ca{sup 2+} is released from stores in the lumen of the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum (SER) to initiate formation of the Ca{sup 2+} transient by activation of a class of Ca{sup 2+} release channels referred to as ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and is pumped back into the SER lumen by Ca{sup 2+}-ATPases (SERCAs) to terminate the Ca{sup 2+} transient. Mutations in the type 1 ryanodine receptor gene, RYR1, are associated with 2 skeletal muscle disorders, malignant hyperthermia (MH), and central core disease (CCD). The evaluation of proposed mechanisms by which RyR1 mutations cause MH and CCD is hindered by the lack of high-resolution structural information. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal 210 residues of RyR1 (RyR{sub NTD}) at 2.5 {angstrom}. The RyR{sub NTD} structure is similar to that of the suppressor domain of type 1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3Rsup), but lacks most of the long helix-turn-helix segment of the 'arm' domain in IP3Rsup. The N-terminal {beta}-trefoil fold, found in both RyR and IP{sub 3}R, is likely to play a critical role in regulatory mechanisms in this channel family. A disease-associated mutation 'hot spot' loop was identified between strands 8 and 9 in a highly basic region of RyR1. Biophysical studies showed that 3 MH-associated mutations (C36R, R164C, and R178C) do not adversely affect the global stability or fold of RyRNTD, supporting previously described mechanisms whereby mutations perturb protein-protein interactions.

  12. Environmental health risk assessment of dioxin in foods at the two most severe dioxin hot spots in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuyet-Hanh, Tran Thi; Minh, Nguyen Hung; Vu-Anh, Le; Dunne, Michael; Toms, Leisa-Maree; Tenkate, Thomas; Thi, Minh-Hue Nguyen; Harden, Fiona

    2015-07-01

    Bien Hoa and Da Nang airbases were bulk storages for Agent Orange during the Vietnam War and currently are the two most severe dioxin hot spots. This study assesses the health risk of exposure to dioxin through foods for local residents living in seven wards surrounding these airbases. This study follows the Australian Environmental Health Risk Assessment Framework to assess the health risk of exposure to dioxin in foods. Forty-six pooled samples of commonly consumed local foods were collected and analyzed for dioxin/furans. A food frequency and Knowledge-Attitude-Practice survey was also undertaken at 1000 local households, various stakeholders were involved and related publications were reviewed. Total dioxin/furan concentrations in samples of local "high-risk" foods (e.g. free range chicken meat and eggs, ducks, freshwater fish, snail and beef) ranged from 3.8 pg TEQ/g to 95 pg TEQ/g, while in "low-risk" foods (e.g. caged chicken meat and eggs, seafoods, pork, leafy vegetables, fruits, and rice) concentrations ranged from 0.03 pg TEQ/g to 6.1 pg TEQ/g. Estimated daily intake of dioxin if people who did not consume local high risk foods ranged from 3.2 pg TEQ/kg bw/day to 6.2 pg TEQ/kg bw/day (Bien Hoa) and from 1.2 pg TEQ/kg bw/day to 4.3 pg TEQ/kg bw/day (Da Nang). Consumption of local high risk foods resulted in extremely high dioxin daily intakes (60.4-102.8 pg TEQ/kg bw/day in Bien Hoa; 27.0-148.0 pg TEQ/kg bw/day in Da Nang). Consumption of local "high-risk" foods increases dioxin daily intakes far above the WHO recommended TDI (1-4 pg TEQ/kg bw/day). Practicing appropriate preventive measures is necessary to significantly reduce exposure and health risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Size-segregated aerosol in a hot-spot pollution urban area: Chemical composition and three-way source apportionment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardoni, V; Elser, M; Valli, G; Valentini, S; Bigi, A; Fermo, P; Piazzalunga, A; Vecchi, R

    2017-08-24

    In this work, a comprehensive characterisation and source apportionment of size-segregated aerosol collected using a multistage cascade impactor was performed. The samples were collected during wintertime in Milan (Italy), which is located in the Po Valley, one of the main pollution hot-spot areas in Europe. For every sampling, size-segregated mass concentration, elemental and ionic composition, and levoglucosan concentration were determined. Size-segregated data were inverted using the program MICRON to identify and quantify modal contributions of all the measured components. The detailed chemical characterisation allowed the application of a three-way (3-D) receptor model (implemented using Multilinear Engine) for size-segregated source apportionment and chemical profiles identification. It is noteworthy that - as far as we know - this is the first time that three-way source apportionment is attempted using data of aerosol collected by traditional cascade impactors. Seven factors were identified: wood burning, industry, resuspended dust, regional aerosol, construction works, traffic 1, and traffic 2. Further insights into size-segregated factor profiles suggested that the traffic 1 factor can be associated to diesel vehicles and traffic 2 to gasoline vehicles. The regional aerosol factor resulted to be the main contributor (nearly 50%) to the droplet mode (accumulation sub-mode with modal diameter in the range 0.5-1 μm), whereas the overall contribution from the two factors related to traffic was the most important one in the other size modes (34-41%). The results showed that applying a 3-D receptor model to size-segregated samples allows identifying factors of local and regional origin while receptor modelling on integrated PM fractions usually singles out factors characterised by primary (e.g. industry, traffic, soil dust) and secondary (e.g. ammonium sulphate and nitrate) origin. Furthermore, the results suggested that the information on size

  14. Spatial and Temporal Hot Spots of Aedes albopictus Abundance inside and outside a South European Metropolitan Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manica, Mattia; Filipponi, Federico; D’Alessandro, Antonello; Screti, Alessia; Neteler, Markus; Rosà, Roberto; Solimini, Angelo; della Torre, Alessandra; Caputo, Beniamino

    2016-01-01

    Aedes albopictus is a tropical invasive species which in the last decades spread worldwide, also colonizing temperate regions of Europe and US, where it has become a public health concern due to its ability to transmit exotic arboviruses, as well as severe nuisance problems due to its aggressive daytime outdoor biting behaviour. While several studies have been carried out in order to predict the potential limits of the species expansions based on eco-climatic parameters, few studies have so far focused on the specific effects of these variables in shaping its micro-geographic abundance and dynamics. The present study investigated eco-climatic factors affecting Ae. albopictus abundance and dynamics in metropolitan and sub-urban/rural sites in Rome (Italy), which was colonized in 1997 and is nowadays one of the most infested metropolitan areas in Southern Europe. To this aim, longitudinal adult monitoring was carried out along a 70 km-transect across and beyond the most urbanized and densely populated metropolitan area. Two fine scale spatiotemporal datasets (one with reference to a 20m circular buffer around sticky traps used to collect mosquitoes and the second to a 300m circular buffer within each sampling site) were exploited to analyze the effect of climatic and socio-environmental variables on Ae. albopictus abundance and dynamics along the transect. Results showed an association between highly anthropized habitats and high adult abundance both in metropolitan and sub-urban/rural areas, with “small green islands” corresponding to hot spots of abundance in the metropolitan areas only, and a bimodal seasonal dynamics with a second peak of abundance in autumn, due to heavy rains occurring in the preceding weeks in association with permissive temperatures. The results provide useful indications to prioritize public mosquito control measures in temperate urban areas where nuisance, human-mosquito contact and risk of local arbovirus transmission are likely higher

  15. Modeling of cathode spot crater formation and development in vacuum arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Lijun; Jia, Shenli; Shmelev, D. L.

    2017-11-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) rotary axisymmetric model has been developed to describe the formation and development of cathode spot in vacuum arc. The model includes hydrodynamic equations and heat transfer equation which considers surface evaporation and Joule heating. Parameters used in this model, such as the distributions of pressure, energy flux density, and current density, come from experiments and other researchers’ work. In this model, cathode spot maintains 30 ns and during this time, all parameters are fixed. The simulation results show that when the energy flux density is 1.5–3  ×  1012 W, discharge current is 1–6 A and the pressure is 1–3  ×  108 Pa, the crater radius is 1.4–4.1 µm, the crater depth is 1.4–2.1 µm, the velocity of liquid metal is 154–428 m s‑1 and the maximum temperature is 2145–5342 K which is located in the area with radius 0.5–1.5 µm. Besides, on the chromium cathode, the maximum temperature is higher mainly because of the lower thermal conductivity.

  16. Molecular Determinants Underlying Binding Specificities of the ABL Kinase Inhibitors: Combining Alanine Scanning of Binding Hot Spots with Network Analysis of Residue Interactions and Coevolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Tse

    Full Text Available Quantifying binding specificity and drug resistance of protein kinase inhibitors is of fundamental importance and remains highly challenging due to complex interplay of structural and thermodynamic factors. In this work, molecular simulations and computational alanine scanning are combined with the network-based approaches to characterize molecular determinants underlying binding specificities of the ABL kinase inhibitors. The proposed theoretical framework unveiled a relationship between ligand binding and inhibitor-mediated changes in the residue interaction networks. By using topological parameters, we have described the organization of the residue interaction networks and networks of coevolving residues in the ABL kinase structures. This analysis has shown that functionally critical regulatory residues can simultaneously embody strong coevolutionary signal and high network centrality with a propensity to be energetic hot spots for drug binding. We have found that selective (Nilotinib and promiscuous (Bosutinib, Dasatinib kinase inhibitors can use their energetic hot spots to differentially modulate stability of the residue interaction networks, thus inhibiting or promoting conformational equilibrium between inactive and active states. According to our results, Nilotinib binding may induce a significant network-bridging effect and enhance centrality of the hot spot residues that stabilize structural environment favored by the specific kinase form. In contrast, Bosutinib and Dasatinib can incur modest changes in the residue interaction network in which ligand binding is primarily coupled only with the identity of the gate-keeper residue. These factors may promote structural adaptability of the active kinase states in binding with these promiscuous inhibitors. Our results have related ligand-induced changes in the residue interaction networks with drug resistance effects, showing that network robustness may be compromised by targeted mutations

  17. Molecular Determinants Underlying Binding Specificities of the ABL Kinase Inhibitors: Combining Alanine Scanning of Binding Hot Spots with Network Analysis of Residue Interactions and Coevolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Amanda; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying binding specificity and drug resistance of protein kinase inhibitors is of fundamental importance and remains highly challenging due to complex interplay of structural and thermodynamic factors. In this work, molecular simulations and computational alanine scanning are combined with the network-based approaches to characterize molecular determinants underlying binding specificities of the ABL kinase inhibitors. The proposed theoretical framework unveiled a relationship between ligand binding and inhibitor-mediated changes in the residue interaction networks. By using topological parameters, we have described the organization of the residue interaction networks and networks of coevolving residues in the ABL kinase structures. This analysis has shown that functionally critical regulatory residues can simultaneously embody strong coevolutionary signal and high network centrality with a propensity to be energetic hot spots for drug binding. We have found that selective (Nilotinib) and promiscuous (Bosutinib, Dasatinib) kinase inhibitors can use their energetic hot spots to differentially modulate stability of the residue interaction networks, thus inhibiting or promoting conformational equilibrium between inactive and active states. According to our results, Nilotinib binding may induce a significant network-bridging effect and enhance centrality of the hot spot residues that stabilize structural environment favored by the specific kinase form. In contrast, Bosutinib and Dasatinib can incur modest changes in the residue interaction network in which ligand binding is primarily coupled only with the identity of the gate-keeper residue. These factors may promote structural adaptability of the active kinase states in binding with these promiscuous inhibitors. Our results have related ligand-induced changes in the residue interaction networks with drug resistance effects, showing that network robustness may be compromised by targeted mutations of key mediating

  18. Mapping publication trends and identifying hot spots of research on Internet health information seeking behavior: a quantitative and co-word biclustering analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fan; Li, Min; Guan, Peng; Ma, Shuang; Cui, Lei

    2015-03-25

    The Internet has become an established source of health information for people seeking health information. In recent years, research on the health information seeking behavior of Internet users has become an increasingly important scholarly focus. However, there have been no long-term bibliometric studies to date on Internet health information seeking behavior. The purpose of this study was to map publication trends and explore research hot spots of Internet health information seeking behavior. A bibliometric analysis based on PubMed was conducted to investigate the publication trends of research on Internet health information seeking behavior. For the included publications, the annual publication number, the distribution of countries, authors, languages, journals, and annual distribution of highly frequent major MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) terms were determined. Furthermore, co-word biclustering analysis of highly frequent major MeSH terms was utilized to detect the hot spots in this field. A total of 533 publications were included. The research output was gradually increasing. There were five authors who published four or more articles individually. A total of 271 included publications (50.8%) were written by authors from the United States, and 516 of the 533 articles (96.8%) were published in English. The eight most active journals published 34.1% (182/533) of the publications on this topic. Ten research hot spots were found: (1) behavior of Internet health information seeking about HIV infection or sexually transmitted diseases, (2) Internet health information seeking behavior of students, (3) behavior of Internet health information seeking via mobile phone and its apps, (4) physicians' utilization of Internet medical resources, (5) utilization of social media by parents, (6) Internet health information seeking behavior of patients with cancer (mainly breast cancer), (7) trust in or satisfaction with Web-based health information by consumers, (8

  19. Forming Different Planetary Architectures. I. The Formation Efficiency of Hot Jupiters from High-eccentricity Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Zhou, Ji-lin; hui-gen, Liu; Meng, Zeyang

    2017-10-01

    Exoplanets discovered over the past decades have provided a new sample of giant exoplanets: hot Jupiters. For lack of enough materials in the current locations of hot Jupiters, they are perceived to form outside the snowline. Then, they migrate to the locations observed through interactions with gas disks or high-eccentricity mechanisms. We examined the efficiencies of different high-eccentricity mechanisms for forming hot Jupiters in near-coplanar multi-planet systems. These mechanisms include planet-planet scattering, the Kozai-Lidov mechanism, coplanar high-eccentricity migration, and secular chaos, as well as other two new mechanisms that we present in this work, which can produce hot Jupiters with high inclinations even in retrograde. We find that the Kozai-Lidov mechanism plays the most important role in producing hot Jupiters among these mechanisms. Secular chaos is not the usual channel for the formation of hot Jupiters due to the lack of an angular momentum deficit within {10}7{T}{in} (periods of the inner orbit). According to comparisons between the observations and simulations, we speculate that there are at least two populations of hot Jupiters. One population migrates into the boundary of tidal effects due to interactions with the gas disk, such as ups And b, WASP-47 b, and HIP 14810 b. These systems usually have at least two planets with lower eccentricities, and remain dynamically stable in compact orbital configurations. Another population forms through high-eccentricity mechanisms after the excitation of eccentricity due to dynamical instability. These kinds of hot Jupiters usually have Jupiter-like companions in distant orbits with moderate or high eccentricities.

  20. Study on unified fatigue strength assessment method for welded structure. Hot spot stress evaluating method for various combinations of plate thickness and weld leg length; Yosetsu kozo no toitsutekina hiro kyodo hyokaho ni kansuru kenkyu. Itaatsu to yosetsu ashinaga no kumiawase ni taisuru hot spot oryoku sanshutsu ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nihei, K.; Inamura, F.; Koe, S. [Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Kobe (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    There has been tried to apply unified assessment method using hot spot stress, which is effective to evaluate fatigue strength of fillet welded structures for ships and marine structures. This method can be applied to complicated structures and is independent of welding processes. In this study, first, stress analysis has been conducted for two-dimensional fillet welded joint models with various combinations of plate thickness and weld leg length of general fillet structures by means of boundary element method. Then, critical position, which is not affected by local stress concentration due to bead, was determined from the detailed stress distribution in the vicinity of weld toe. As a result, a general equation has been proposed to estimate the hot spot stress by one-point representative method. Second, the fatigue tests of typical fillet welded joints have been conducted by applying this method. Consequently, it was demonstrated that the unified fatigue strength can be evaluated by the S-N data based on hot spot stress range determined from the proposed equation, independent of structural stress concentration. 22 refs., 14 figs.

  1. User-driven development of an inquiry-based learning platform: Formative evaluations in weSPOT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bedek, Michael; Firssova, Olga; Stefanova, Eliza; Prinsen, Fleur; Chamala, Foteini

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the formative evaluation activities that were designed and implemented during the development of the weSPOT inquiry based learning platform. With the ambition to provide a platform that supports a broad range of inquiry activities in accordance with end-users needs, an

  2. Validation of the DIFFAL, HPAC and HotSpot Dispersion Models Using the Full-Scale Radiological Dispersal Device (FSRDD) Field Trials Witness Plate Deposition Dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, Murray; Parkes, David

    2016-05-01

    Three atmospheric dispersion models--DIFFAL, HPAC, and HotSpot--of differing complexities have been validated against the witness plate deposition dataset taken during the Full-Scale Radiological Dispersal Device (FSRDD) Field Trials. The small-scale nature of these trials in comparison to many other historical radiological dispersion trials provides a unique opportunity to evaluate the near-field performance of the models considered. This paper performs validation of these models using two graphical methods of comparison: deposition contour plots and hotline profile graphs. All of the models tested are assessed to perform well, especially considering that previous model developments and validations have been focused on larger-scale scenarios. Of the models, HPAC generally produced the most accurate results, especially at locations within ∼100 m of GZ. Features present within the observed data, such as hot spots, were not well modeled by any of the codes considered. Additionally, it was found that an increase in the complexity of the meteorological data input to the models did not necessarily lead to an improvement in model accuracy; this is potentially due to the small-scale nature of the trials.

  3. Creating a GIS-based model of marine debris "hot spots" to improve efficiency of a lobster trap debris removal program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Justin; Huntington, Brittany E

    2012-05-01

    Debris removal programs are combatting the accumulation of derelict fishing gear and other debris in marine habitats. We analyzed 5 years of lobster trap debris removal data in Biscayne National Park, Florida to assess removal efficiency and develop spatially-explicit mapping tools to guide future removals. We generated and validated debris "hot spots" maps that combined remotely-sensed data (i.e. benthic habitat type and bathymetry) with 862 locations of previous debris collection. Our hot spot models spatially depict regions of likely debris accumulation, reducing the search area by 95% (from 332 km(2) to 18 km(2)) and encompassing 100% of the validation sites. Our analyses indicate removal contractors using sub-surface towed divers enhanced debris recovery. Additionally, the quantity of debris removed did not decrease with increased efforts, suggesting that debris supply in situ exceeds removal efforts. We conclude with the importance of coupling analysis of ongoing debris removal programs with GIS technology to improve removal efforts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification of the hot-spot areas for sickle cell disease using cord blood screening at a district hospital: an Indian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Sujata; Sahu, Pushpansu; Kar, Shantanu Kumar; Negi, Sapna

    2015-10-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD), a genetic disorder often reported late, can be identified early in life, and hot-spot areas may be identified to conduct genetic epidemiology studies. This study was undertaken to estimate prevalence and to identify hot spot area for SCD in Kalahandi district, by screening cord blood of neonates delivered at the district hospital as first-hand information. Kalahandi District Hospital selected for the study is predominated by tribal population with higher prevalence of SCD as compared to other parts of Odisha. Cord blood screening of SCD was carried out on 761 newborn samples of which 13 were screened to be homozygous for SCD. Information on area of parent's residence was also collected. Madanpur Rampur area was found to be with the highest prevalence of SCD (10.52 %) and the gene distribution did not follow Hardy-Weinberg Equation indicating un-natural selection. The approach of conducting neonatal screening in a district hospital for identification of SCD is feasible and appropriate for prioritizing area for the implementation of large-scale screening and planning control measures thereof.

  5. The mechanism of hot crack formation in Ti-6A1-4V during cold crucible continuous casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongsheng DING

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Hot crack is one of common defects in castings, which often results in failure of castings. This work studies the formation of hot cracks during cold crucible continous casting by means of experiments and thoretical analysis. The results show that the hot crack occurs on the surface and in the circumference of ingots, where the solidified shell and solidification front meet each other. The tendency of hot cracking decreases with the increase of withdrawal velocities in some extent. The hot crack is caused mainly by friction force between the shell and the crucible inner wall, and it takes place when the stress resulting from friction exceeds the tensile strength of the shell. The factors affecting the hot cracks are analyzed and verified. In order to decrease the tendency of hot cracks, technical parameters should be optimized.

  6. Exploring the spatial variation in quality-adjusted rental prices and identifying hot spots in Berlin’s residential property market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meulen, Philipp an de; Mitze, Timo Friedel

    2014-01-01

    find that districts’ net in-migration balances are positively correlated with quality-adjusted rental price levels for higher quantiles of the distribution, thereby potentially proxying the price dynamics of underlying gentrification processes. Using statistical tests from the explanatory spatial data...... of quality-adjusted rental prices for apartments across the residential locations within the city of Berlin. The resulting pattern of ‘residual’ rental prices with a growing concentration of hot spots in central districts of Berlin can be interpreted as the tenants’ valorization of apartments in geographic...... proximity to the city centre compared to similar properties in Berlin’s periphery once we control for the properties’ physical characteristics. The observed temporal evolution of the rental price distribution between 2008 and 2013 thereby hints at an ongoing gentrification process in Germany’s capital...

  7. BOREAS Level-3S SPOT Imagery: Scaled At-Sensor Radiance in LGSOWG Format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For BOREAS, the level-3s SPOT data, along with the other remotely sensed images,were collected in order to provide spatially extensive information over the primary...

  8. Identification of 'carbon hot-spots' and quantification of GHG intensities in the biodiesel supply chain using hybrid LCA and structural path analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquaye, Adolf A; Wiedmann, Thomas; Feng, Kuishang; Crawford, Robert H; Barrett, John; Kuylenstierna, Johan; Duffy, Aidan P; Koh, S C Lenny; McQueen-Mason, Simon

    2011-03-15

    It is expected that biodiesel production in the EU will remain the dominant contributor as part of a 10% minimum binding target for biofuel in transportation fuel by 2020 within the 20% renewable energy target in the overall EU energy mix. Life cycle assessments (LCA) of biodiesel to evaluate its environmental impacts have, however, remained questionable, mainly because of the adoption of a traditional process analysis approach resulting in system boundary truncation and because of issues regarding the impacts of land use change and N(2)O emissions from fertilizer application. In this study, a hybrid LCA methodology is used to evaluate the life cycle CO(2) equivalent emissions of rape methyl ester (RME) biodiesel. The methodology uses input-output analysis to estimate upstream indirect emissions in order to complement traditional process LCA in a hybrid framework. It was estimated that traditional LCA accounted for 2.7 kg CO(2)-eq per kg of RME or 36.6% of total life cycle emissions of the RME supply chin. Further to the inclusion of upstream indirect impacts in the LCA system (which accounted for 23% of the total life cycle emissions), emissions due to direct land use change (6%) and indirect land use change (16.5%) and N(2)O emissions from fertilizer applications (17.9%) were also calculated. Structural path analysis is used to decompose upstream indirect emissions paths of the biodiesel supply chain in order to identify, quantify, and rank high carbon emissions paths or 'hot-spots' in the biodiesel supply chain. It was shown, for instance, that inputs from the 'Other Chemical Products' sector (identified as phosphoric acid, H(3)PO(4)) into the biodiesel production process represented the highest carbon emission path (or hot-spot) with 5.35% of total upstream indirect emissions of the RME biodiesel supply chain.

  9. Experimental evaluation on the use of capillary tube and thermostatic expansion valve with heat recovery hot spot water heater in air source refrigeration system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Azridjal; Mainil, Rahmat Iman; Mainil, Afdhal Kurniawan; Saputra, Eko

    2017-01-01

    The present experimental evaluation has been carried out to investigate the use of capillary tube (CT) and thermostatic expansion valve (TEV) with heat recovery hot spot water heater (HRHSWH) in air source compression refrigeration system. CT and TEV are the two basic types of refrigerant expansion devices that most frequently used in compression refrigeration system, but the identified about HRHSWH in extant literature are limited. The HRHSWH is modified from residential refrigeration system. The heat exchanger coil as HRHSWH was bonded with the compressor discharge pipe line as counter-flow heat exchanger, then insulated and placed them into transparent acrylic box. Water from storage tank with 50L capacity is pumped using circulation pump to the HRHSWH and heating the water in storage tank. The system performance of those two expansion devices in compression refrigeration system are evaluated and compared between with or without modified using HRHSWH. Results show that refrigeration system using TEV performs better performance than CT using HRHSWH compared to standard refrigeration system (without HRHSWH). The use of TEV device in HRHSWH causes a slight decrease in compressor power 0.0198 kW (4%), where the COP increases around 20% higher than the CT device. The finding indicates that the use of HRHSWH generates free hot water for TEV and CT with temperature around 54.06°C and 55.78°C, respectively. In general, HRHSWH give better perfomance than standar refrigeration system.

  10. Evaluation of Caspofungin Susceptibility Testing by the New Vitek 2 AST-YS06 Yeast Card Using a Unique Collection of FKS Wild-Type and Hot Spot Mutant Isolates, Including the Five Most Common Candida Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astvad, Karen M; Perlin, David S; Johansen, Helle K

    2013-01-01

    susceptibility card to correctly identify the fks mutants from wt isolates and compared the performance to those of the CLSI and EUCAST reference methods. A collection of 98 Candida isolates, including 31 fks hot spot mutants, were included. Performance was evaluated using the FKS genotype as the "gold standard...

  11. Investigating the origin of cyclical wind variability in hot massive stars - II. Hydrodynamical simulations of corotating interaction regions using realistic spot parameters for the O giant ξ Persei

    Science.gov (United States)

    David-Uraz, A.; Owocki, S. P.; Wade, G. A.; Sundqvist, J. O.; Kee, N. D.

    2017-09-01

    OB stars exhibit various types of spectral variability historically associated with wind structures, including the apparently ubiquitous discrete absorption components (DACs). These features have been proposed to be caused either by magnetic fields or non-radial pulsations. In this second paper of this series, we revisit the canonical phenomenological hydrodynamical modelling used to explain the formation of DACs by taking into account modern observations and more realistic theoretical predictions. Using constraints on putative bright spots located on the surface of the O giant ξ Persei derived from high precision space-based broad-band optical photometry obtained with the Microvariability and Oscillations of Stars (MOST) space telescope, we generate 2D hydrodynamical simulations of corotating interaction regions in its wind. We then compute synthetic ultraviolet (UV) resonance line profiles using Sobolev Exact Integration and compare them with historical timeseries obtained by the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) to evaluate if the observed behaviour of ξ Persei's DACs is reproduced. Testing three different models of spot size and strength, we find that the classical pattern of variability can be successfully reproduced for two of them: the model with the smallest spots yields absorption features that are incompatible with observations. Furthermore, we test the effect of the radial dependence of ionization levels on line driving, but cannot conclusively assess the importance of this factor. In conclusion, this study self-consistently links optical photometry and UV spectroscopy, paving the way to a better understanding of cyclical wind variability in massive stars in the context of the bright spot paradigm.

  12. A new assessment of combined geothermal electric generation and desalination in western Saudi Arabia: targeted hot spot development

    KAUST Repository

    Missimer, Thomas M.

    2014-07-17

    High heat flow associated with the tectonic spreading of the Red Sea make western Saudi Arabia a region with high potential for geothermal energy development. The hydraulic properties of the Precambrian-age rocks occurring in this region are not conducive to direct production of hot water for heat exchange, which will necessitate use of the hot dry rock (HDR) heat harvesting method. This would require the construction of coupled deep wells; one for water injection and the other for steam recovery. There are some technological challenges in the design, construction, and operation of HDR geothermal energy systems. Careful geotechnical evaluation of the heat reservoir must be conducted to ascertain the geothermal gradient at the chosen site to allow pre-design modeling of the system for assessment of operational heat flow maintenance. Also, naturally occurring fractures or faults must be carefully evaluated to make an assessment of the potential for induced seismicity. It is anticipated that the flow heat exchange capacity of the system will require enhancement by the use of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing in the injection well with the production well drilled into the fracture zone to maximum water recovery efficiency and reduce operating pressure. The heated water must be maintained under pressure and flashed to steam at surface to produce to the most effective energy recovery. Most past evaluations of geothermal energy development in this region have been focused on the potential for solely electricity generation, but direct use of produced steam could be coupled with thermally driven desalination technologies such as multi-effect distillation, adsorption desalination, and/or membrane distillation to provide a continuous source of heat to allow very efficient operation of the plants. © 2014 © 2014 Balaban Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.

  13. Formation of Outburst Structure in Hot Dip Galvannealed Coatings on IF Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kollárová, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Outburst structure in two industrially produced hot dip galvanized interstitial free steel sheets for automotive industry after additional annealing has been examined. Ti IF steel was found to form weak outburst structure in the early stage of annealing, followed by frontal growth of Fe-Zn phases during further heating. The high reactivity of this steel was confirmed by rapid G-phase formation. Under the same conditions, Ti-Nb-P IF steel exhibited frontal growth of Fe-Zn compounds without G-phase formation due to relatively high phosphorous content, which is known as inhibitor of Fe-Zn reaction, but simultaneously significant occurrence of undesired outburst structures was recorded. It was assumed that the phosphorous content was insufficient and/or ferrite grain was very fine.

  14. Influence of "hot" and "cold" spots on structure of the Southeast Indian ridge (numerical and physical modeling)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokhan, Andrey; Dubinin, Evgeny; Grokholsky, Andrey

    2017-04-01

    The study is dedicated to changes of bottom topography, segmentation and deep structure along the Southeast Indian ridge (SEIR) under influence of "hot" and "cold" zones of mantle. Mantle temperature anomalies correspond to areas of Amsterdam-St. Paul and Kerguelen hotspots ("hot" zone) and Australian-Antarctic discordance ("cold" zone) in the west and in the east of the studied section of the ridge correspondingly. For the study we analyze published data and apply morphostructural analyses, numerical and analogous experimental modeling. Analyses of published data show a set of peculiarities testifying for decrease of magmatic activity in the rift zone of SEIR in the eastern direction. They are the following: increase of axial depths, depth amplitudes along the axes of 3rd order segments, gravity anomalies in Bouger reduction, Na8 values of dredged basalts; decrease of 3rd order segments lengths and crustal thickness. Eastwards axial highs are replaced by rift valleys through the area of transit morphology. Highs are overlain by axial magmatic chambers, areas of transit morphology have fragmentary axial magmatic chambers, valleys are absent of them. All these signatures testify for decrease of mantle temperature. Using published estimates of mantle temperature and crustal thickness and known values of spreading rate we conducted numerical modeling of thermal and rheological state of subaxial lithosphere of the ridge. Modeling showed that thickness of the layer with brittle deformations increases eastwards from 1-2.5 km in the vicinity of Amsterdam-St. Paul hotspot to 3-5 km in the area of Australo-Antarctic discordance. Modeling showed progressive changes of geometry and depth of axial magmatic chambers of subaxial lithosphere with increase of distance from hotspot. Thus, changes of mantle temperature control extent of magmatism, geometry of axial magmatic chambers, thermo-rheological properties of subaxial lithosphere and deep and surficial structure of the axial

  15. The dark nemesis of galaxy formation: why hot haloes trigger black hole growth and bring star formation to an end

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Richard G.; Schaye, Joop; Frenk, Carlos S.; Theuns, Tom; Schaller, Matthieu; Crain, Robert A.; McAlpine, Stuart

    2017-02-01

    Galaxies fall into two clearly distinct types: `blue-sequence' galaxies which are rapidly forming young stars, and `red-sequence' galaxies in which star formation has almost completely ceased. Most galaxies more massive than 3 × 1010 M⊙ follow the red sequence, while less massive central galaxies lie on the blue sequence. We show that these sequences are created by a competition between star formation-driven outflows and gas accretion on to the supermassive black hole at the galaxy's centre. We develop a simple analytic model for this interaction. In galaxies less massive than 3 × 1010 M⊙, young stars and supernovae drive a high-entropy outflow which is more buoyant than any tenuous corona. The outflow balances the rate of gas inflow, preventing high gas densities building up in the central regions. More massive galaxies, however, are surrounded by an increasingly hot corona. Above a halo mass of ˜1012 M⊙, the outflow ceases to be buoyant and star formation is unable to prevent the build-up of gas in the central regions. This triggers a strongly non-linear response from the black hole. Its accretion rate rises rapidly, heating the galaxy's corona, disrupting the incoming supply of cool gas and starving the galaxy of the fuel for star formation. The host galaxy makes a transition to the red sequence, and further growth predominantly occurs through galaxy mergers. We show that the analytic model provides a good description of galaxy evolution in the EAGLE hydrodynamic simulations. So long as star formation-driven outflows are present, the transition mass scale is almost independent of subgrid parameter choice.

  16. Hot-spot analysis applied to the identification of potential high and low regulating, providing and cultural ecosystem services in Vilnius Region (Lithuania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Daniel, Depellegrin; Egarter-Vigl, Lukas; Cerda, Artemi; Estebaranz, Ferran; Misiune, Ieva

    2017-04-01

    Ecosystem services (ES) potential assessment is crucial for a correct territorial planning at different scales of analysis (Depellegrin et al., 2016). In urban and peri-urban areas, sprawl, grazing and unsustainable agriculture practices contributed to land degradation and de decrease of the quality and quantity of the services provided by these areas (Eldridge and Delgado-Baquerizo, 2017; Favretto et al., 2017). In order to understand the spatial pattern of these impacts, mapping ES potential is key to understand the areas that need to be restored and protected for an unsustainable use (Brevik et al., 2016; Egarter-Vigl et al., 2017; Pereira et al., 2017). Hot-spot analysis is a good method to identify clusters of areas with high and low capacity for ES capacity. This analysis is very useful to detect homogeneous areas, where ES have high or low quality. The objective of this work is to apply a hot-spot analysis to detect areas with high/low capacity for Regulating, Provision, Cultural and Total ES in Vilnius region. ES potential was carried out based on the matrix developed by Burkhard et al. (2009), which ranks ES capacity from 0= no capacity to 5=very high relevant capacity to a different land use type. The results showed that regulating, providing and cultural and total ES have a significant dispersed (low-clustered) pattern: Regulating (Z-score=-19.28, pJournal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology, 23, 441-455. Egarter-Vigl, L., Depellegrin, D., Pereira, P., De Groot, D., Tappeiner, U. (2017) Mapping the ecosystem service delivery chain: Capacity, flow, and demand pertaining to aesthetic experiences in mountain landscapes, Science of the Total Environment, 574, 442-436. Eldridge, D.J., Delgado-Baquerizo, M. (2017) Continental-scale impacts of livestock grazing on ecosystem supporting and regulating services. Land Degradation and Development. DOI: 10.1002/ldr.2668 Favretto, N., Lueding, E., Stringer, L., Dougill, A.J. (2017) Valuing ecosystem services

  17. Nitrate as a probe of cytochrome c surface : crystallographic identification of crucial "hot spots" for protein-protein recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De March, Matteo; Demitri, Nicola; De Zorzi, Rita; Casini, Angela; Gabbiani, Chiara; Guerri, Annalisa; Messori, Luigi; Geremia, Silvano

    The electrostatic surface of cytochrome c and its changes with the iron oxidation state are involved in the docking and undocking processes of this protein to its biological partners in the mitochondrial respiratory pathway. To investigate the subtle mechanisms of formation of productive

  18. Genome-wide profiling of HPV integration in cervical cancer identifies clustered genomic hot spots and a potential microhomology-mediated integration mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Zheng; Zhu, Da; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) integration is a key genetic event in cervical carcinogenesis1. By conducting whole-genome sequencing and high-throughput viral integration detection, we identified 3,667 HPV integration breakpoints in 26 cervical intraepithelial neoplasias, 104 cervical carcinomas and ...... that fusion between viral and human DNA may have occurred by microhomology-mediated DNA repair pathways2. Our data provide insights into HPV integration-driven cervical carcinogenesis....... and five cell lines. Beyond recalculating frequencies for the previously reported frequent integration sites POU5F1B (9.7%), FHIT (8.7%), KLF12 (7.8%), KLF5 (6.8%), LRP1B (5.8%) and LEPREL1 (4.9%), we discovered new hot spots HMGA2 (7.8%), DLG2 (4.9%) and SEMA3D (4.9%). Protein expression from FHIT and LRP......1B was downregulated when HPV integrated in their introns. Protein expression from MYC and HMGA2 was elevated when HPV integrated into flanking regions. Moreover, microhomologous sequence between the human and HPV genomes was significantly enriched near integration breakpoints, indicating...

  19. Soils of a Mediterranean hot spot of biodiversity and endemism (Sardinia, Tyrrhenian Islands) are inhabited by pan-European, invasive species of Hypocrea/Trichoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migheli, Quirico; Balmas, Virgilio; Komoñ-Zelazowska, Monika; Scherm, Barbara; Fiori, Stefano; Kopchinskiy, Alexey G; Kubicek, Christian P; Druzhinina, Irina S

    2009-01-01

    We have used a Mediterranean hot spot of biodiversity (the Island of Sardinia) to investigate the impact of abiotic factors on the distribution of species of the common soil fungus Trichoderma. To this end, we isolated 482 strains of Hypocrea/Trichoderma from 15 soils comprising undisturbed and disturbed environments (forest, shrub lands and undisturbed or extensively grazed grass steppes respectively). Isolates were identified at the species level by the oligonucleotide BarCode for Hypocrea/Trichoderma (TrichOKEY), sequence similarity analysis (Trichoblast) and phylogenetic inferences. The majority of the isolates were positively identified as pan-European and/or pan-global Hypocrea/Trichoderma species from sections Trichoderma and Pachybasium, comprising H. lixii/T. harzianum, T. gamsii, T. spirale, T. velutinum, T. hamatum, H. koningii/T. koningii, H. virens/T. virens, T. tomentosum, H. semiorbis, H. viridescens/T. viridescens, H. atroviridis/T. atroviride, T. asperellum, H. koningiopsis/T. koningiopsis and Trichoderma sp. Vd2. Only one isolate represented a new, undescribed species belonging to the Harzianum-Catoptron Clade. Internal transcribed spacer sequence analysis revealed only one potentially endemic internal transcribed spacer 1 allele of T. hamatum. All other species exhibited genotypes that were already found in Eurasia or in other continents. Only few cases of correlation of species occurrence with abiotic factors were recorded. The data suggest a strong reduction of native Hypocrea/Trichoderma diversity, which was replaced by extensive invasion of species from Eurasia, Africa and the Pacific Basin.

  20. Land Use Change and Agricultural Land Fragmentation due to Anthropogenic Activities in an Hot Spot Area: A Case Study for Thrace Region of Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altürk, Bahadır; Konukcu, Fatih

    2017-04-01

    Agricultural lands that supply food, energy and ecosystem services for human life have been lost due to anthropogenic activities such as construction of roads, urban and industry areas. The significant reasons for the increase of artificial surfaces were poorly planned economic decisions by the government and internal migration due to this poorly planning. Unplanned urban sprawl also give rise to land fragmentation. Fragmentation of agricultural land affects both the agricultural production capacity and rural sustainable employment. In this study: i) Land use changes between 1990-2014 period were assessed using remotely sensed data and ii) Spatial and temporal agricultural land fragmentation were investigated using landscape pattern indice (effective mesh size), Morphological Spatial Pattern Analysis (MSPA) and Entropy method for 25 years period. The selected"hot spot" study area is located on east Thrace region of Turkey, being the service and industrial development zone where agricultural activities, water resources and natural habitat have been damaged due to rapid urban and industrial development for about 25 years. The results showed that agricultural lands decreased 6.44%, urban areas increased 111.68% and industry areas increased 251.19% during this 25 years period. Additionally, fragmentation analyses demonstrated that core agricultural areas sharply decreased and relative fragmentation (effective mesh size) increased from 50.68% to 56.77% during 1990 and 2014.

  1. Biomagnetic monitoring of particulate matter (PM through leaves of an invasive alien plant Lantana camara in an Indo-Burma hot spot region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhat Kumar Rai

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Present study was performed in urban forests of Aizawl, Mizoram, North East India falling under an Indo-Burma hot spot region of existing ecological relevance and pristine environment. Phyto-sociolology of invasive weeds has been performed and results revealed that Lantana camara was the most dominant invasive weed. Further, the air quality studies revealed high suspended particulate matter (SPM as well as respirable suspended particulate matter (RSPM in ambient air of Aizawl, Mizoram, North East India. Bio-magnetic monitoring through plant leaves has been recognised as recent thrust area in the field of particulate matter (PM science. We aimed to investigate that whether magnetic properties of Lantana camara leaves may act as proxy of PM pollution and hence an attempt towards it's sustainable management. Magnetic susceptibility (χ, Anhyste reticremanent magnetization (ARM and Saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM of Lantana camara plant leaves were assessed and concomitantly correlated these magnetic properties with ambient PM in order to screen this invasive plant which may act as proxy for ambient PM concentrations. Results revealed high χ, ARM, SIRM of Lantana camara leaves and moreover, these parameters were having significant and positive correlation with ambient SPM as well as RSPM. Therefore, present study recommended the use of Lantana camara as bio-magnetic monitor which may further have sustainable management implications of an invasive plant.

  2. Transformation from "Carbon Valley" to a "Post-Carbon Society" in a Climate Change Hot Spot: the Coalfields of the Hunter Valley, New South Wales, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey R. Evans

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the possibilities for transformation of a climate-change hot spot - the coal-producing Hunter Region of New South Wales, Australia - using complex adaptive systems (CAS theory. It uses CAS theory to understand the role of coal in the region's history and efforts to strengthen the ecological, economic, and social resilience of the region's coal industry in the face of demands for a shift from fossil fuel dependency to clean, renewable energy and genuine resilience and sustainability. It uses CAS theory to understand ways in which the resilience of two alternative futures, labeled "Carbon Valley" and "Post-Carbon Society" (Heinberg 2004, might evolve. The paper discusses ways in which changes implemented through the efforts of local communities at local, smaller scales of the nested systems seek to influence the evolution of adaptive cycles of the system at the local, national, and global scales. It identifies the influences of "attractors," defined as factors driving the evolution of the system, that are influential across the panarchy. These include climate change threats, markets, regulatory regimes, political alliances, and local concerns about the environmental and social impacts of the Hunter's coal dependency. These factors are weakening the apparent resilience of the coal industry, which is being propped up by the coal industry corporations, labor unions, and governments to maintain coal dependency in the Carbon Valley. Moreover, they are creating an alternative basin of attraction in which a Post-Carbon Society might emerge from the system's evolutionary processes.

  3. Effect of Composition on the Formation of Delta Ferrite in 304L Austenitic Stainless Steels During Hot Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleymani, S.; Ojo, O. A.; Richards, N.

    2015-01-01

    Four different AISI 304L austenitic stainless steels with chromium equivalent-to-nickel equivalent (Creq/Nieq) ratios of 1.57, 1.59, 1.62, and 1.81 were chosen for this study. The influence of chemical composition on solid-state formation of delta ferrite phase during hot deformation was investigated. Compression tests were performed at temperature, strain, and strain rate ranges of 1200 to 1300 °C, 10 to 70%, and 0.1 to 10 s-1, respectively. Increasing the temperature, strain, and strain rate led to increased formation of delta ferrite. The results show that the formation of delta ferrite during hot deformation is also strongly dependent on chemical composition. The higher the Creq/Nieq ratio, the higher the tendency for the formation of delta ferrite. The observed behavior may be attributed to plastic deformation-induced formation of crystallographic defects such as dislocations affecting the diffusion rate.

  4. Rainstorm-induced shallow landslides process and evaluation – a case study from three hot spots, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiyue Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The critical stage in the evaluation of rainfall-induced landslide failure is in formulating reasonable models to better simulate spatiotemporal changes of slopes in the hilly terrains. A physically based model can take into account the contribution of rainfall infiltration and shear strength of saturated soil layer, and therefore help revealing the landslide formation mechanisms. This paper presents a physically based approach to simulate the landslide process triggered by rainstorm. On the basis of previous solutions, we select the simplified infiltration model Slope-Infiltration-Distributed Equilibrium (SLIDE to illustrate the dynamical relations between factor of safety (FS and accumulation of rainfall over time. This model is tested with three representative landslide events in the southwest, southeast, and south central of China during rainstorm. Results show that the time of landslide failure predicted from the SLIDE model is consistent with the reality. Meanwhile, this paper illustrates the differences of FS among the different slope gradients in the vicinity of same soil texture and relationship between FS and rainfall accumulation. This work formulates a methodology of rainstorm-induced landslide evaluation and improves upon the existing landslide prediction methods.

  5. Improved Diagnostic Accuracy of SPECT Through Statistical Analysis and the Detection of Hot Spots at the Primary Sensorimotor Area for the Diagnosis of Alzheimer Disease in a Community-Based Study: "The Osaki-Tajiri Project".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneta, Tomohiro; Nakatsuka, Masahiro; Nakamura, Kei; Seki, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Meguro, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    SPECT is an important diagnostic tool for dementia. Recently, statistical analysis of SPECT has been commonly used for dementia research. In this study, we evaluated the accuracy of visual SPECT evaluation and/or statistical analysis for the diagnosis (Dx) of Alzheimer disease (AD) and other forms of dementia in our community-based study "The Osaki-Tajiri Project." Eighty-nine consecutive outpatients with dementia were enrolled and underwent brain perfusion SPECT with 99mTc-ECD. Diagnostic accuracy of SPECT was tested using 3 methods: visual inspection (SPECT Dx), automated diagnostic tool using statistical analysis with easy Z-score imaging system (eZIS Dx), and visual inspection plus eZIS (integrated Dx). Integrated Dx showed the highest sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy, whereas eZIS was the second most accurate method. We also observed that a higher than expected rate of SPECT images indicated false-negative cases of AD. Among these, 50% showed hypofrontality and were diagnosed as frontotemporal lobar degeneration. These cases typically showed regional "hot spots" in the primary sensorimotor cortex (ie, a sensorimotor hot spot sign), which we determined were associated with AD rather than frontotemporal lobar degeneration. We concluded that the diagnostic abilities were improved by the integrated use of visual assessment and statistical analysis. In addition, the detection of a sensorimotor hot spot sign was useful to detect AD when hypofrontality is present and improved the ability to properly diagnose AD.

  6. Formation Flight Control System for In-Flight Sweet Spot Estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brodecki, M.; Subbarao, K.; Chu, Q.P.

    2013-01-01

    A formation flight control system has been designed that addresses the unique environment encountered by aircraft flying in formation and in the upwash of the leading aircraft. In order to test the control system a simulation environment has been created that adequately represents the aerodynamic

  7. Ag Nanoparticle-Grafted PAN-Nanohump Array Films with 3D High-Density Hot Spots as Flexible and Reliable SERS Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongbo; Meng, Guowen; Huang, Qing; Hu, Xiaoye; He, Xuan; Tang, Haibin; Wang, Zhiwei; Li, Fadi

    2015-10-28

    A facile fabrication approach of large-scale flexible films is reported, with one surface side consisting of Ag-nanoparticle (Ag-NP) decorated polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanohump (denoted as Ag-NPs@PAN-nanohump) arrays. This is achieved via molding PAN films with ordered nanohump arrays on one side and then sputtering much smaller Ag-NPs onto each of the PAN-nanohumps. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity of the Ag-NPs@PAN-nanohump array films can be improved by curving the flexible PAN film with ordered nanohump arrays during the Ag-sputtering process to increase the density of the Ag-NPs on the sidewalls of the PAN-nanohumps. More 3D hot spots are thus achieved on a large-scale. The Ag-NPs@PAN-nanohump array films show high SERS activity with good Raman signal reproducibility for Rhodamine 6G probe molecules. To trial their practical application, the Ag-NPs@PAN-nanohump array films are employed as SERS substrates for trace detection of trinitrotoluene and a congener of polychlorinated biphenyls. A lower detection limit of 10(-12) m and 10(-5) m can be achieved, respectively. Furthermore, the flexible Ag-NPs@PAN-nanohump array films can also be utilized as swabs to probe traces of methyl parathion on the surface of fruits such as apples. The as-fabricated SERS substrates therefore have promising potential for applications in rapid safety inspection and environmental protection. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. DnaK as Antibiotic Target: Hot Spot Residues Analysis for Differential Inhibition of the Bacterial Protein in Comparison with the Human HSP70.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Chiappori

    Full Text Available DnaK, the bacterial homolog of human Hsp70, plays an important role in pathogens survival under stress conditions, like antibiotic therapies. This chaperone sequesters protein aggregates accumulated in bacteria during antibiotic treatment reducing the effect of the cure. Although different classes of DnaK inhibitors have been already designed, they present low specificity. DnaK is highly conserved in prokaryotes (identity 50-70%, which encourages the development of a unique inhibitor for many different bacterial strains. We used the DnaK of Acinetobacter baumannii as representative for our analysis, since it is one of the most important opportunistic human pathogens, exhibits a significant drug resistance and it has the ability to survive in hospital environments. The E.coli DnaK was also included in the analysis as reference structure due to its wide diffusion. Unfortunately, bacterial DnaK and human Hsp70 have an elevated sequence similarity. Therefore, we performed a differential analysis of DnaK and Hsp70 residues to identify hot spots in bacterial proteins that are not present in the human homolog, with the aim of characterizing the key pharmacological features necessary to design selective inhibitors for DnaK. Different conformations of DnaK and Hsp70 bound to known inhibitor-peptides for DnaK, and ineffective for Hsp70, have been analysed by molecular dynamics simulations to identify residues displaying stable and selective interactions with these peptides. Results achieved in this work show that there are some residues that can be used to build selective inhibitors for DnaK, which should be ineffective for the human Hsp70.

  9. Hunting for right and left parietal hot spots using single-pulse TMS: modulation of visuospatial perception during line bisection judgment in the healthy brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salatino, Adriana; Poncini, Marisa; George, Mark S; Ricci, Raffaella

    2014-01-01

    A series of studies have consistently reproduced left neglect-like bias on line length estimation tasks in healthy participants by applying transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the right posterior parietal cortex (PPC), while no significant changes have been reported when stimulating the left PPC. However, a notable inter-individual variability in the right parietal site where TMS modulates visuospatial perception can be observed, and no general agreement exists on how to identify the optimal parietal site of stimulation. In the present study, we propose a new site-finding TMS protocol to easily identify the optimum parietal location, or "hot spot," where TMS may modulate visuospatial perception on a line length estimation task (the Landmark task). Single-pulse TMS at 115% of motor threshold was applied 150 ms after the visual stimulus onset over nine different sites of a 3 cm × 3 cm grid, centred over right or left PPC (P4 and P3 according to the 10-20 EEG system, respectively) in eight healthy participants. Stimulation of right PPC induced a significant left neglect-like bias, when the coil was applied over the most posterior and dorso-posterior sites. Unexpectedly, TMS over left PPC also produced left neglect-like bias. However, in this case significant effects were found when targeting the most anterior and dorso-anterior portions of the grid. These results are discussed in relation to recent findings on neural networks underlying spatial cognition. The hunting protocol we propose might offer an economical and easy-to-use tool to functionally identify the optimal parietal site where TMS can modulate visuospatial perception, in healthy subjects and possibly in post-stroke patients undergoing repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation treatment.

  10. Spectrum of Molecular Defects in 216 Chinese Families With Hemophilia A: Identification of Noninversion Mutation Hot Spots and 42 Novel Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhiping; Yang, Linhua; Qin, Xiuyu; Liu, Xiue; Zhang, Yaofang

    2018-01-01

    Hemophilia A (HA) is an X-linked bleeding disorder caused by heterogeneous mutations in the factor VIII gene ( F8). Our aim is to identify the causative mutations in a large HA cohort from China. We studied 216 unrelated HA families. Molecular analyses of F8 were performed using a combination of molecular techniques, including polymerase chain reaction, direct sequencing, and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. The deleterious consequences of the unreported missense mutations were evaluated using various bioinformatics approaches. Causative mutations in F8 were identified in 209 families, intron 22 inversion (Inv22) was identified in 89 severe families, and intron 1 inversion (Inv1) was positive in 5 severe families; 95 mutations were detected among 115 noninversion families, of which 42 were novel, including 29 null variations and 13 missense mutations for which causality was demonstrated via bioinformatics. Among the 53 previously reported mutations, more nonsense (5 of 9) and missense (10 of 26) mutation sites were found to occur at Arginine (Arg) sites and multiple small deletions/insertions (5 of 10) located within the poly-A runs of the B domain. The majority of these sequence variants frequently recurred in the database. The odds ratios for the likelihood of developing inhibitors significantly increased in the presence of nonsense mutation. Our F8 defect spectrum was heterogeneous. Small deletions/insertions in the poly-A runs of the B domain and nonsense and missense mutations at Arg sites were identified as mutation hot spots. Nonsense mutation increased the risk of developing inhibitors.

  11. Hot Spot Temperature and Grey Target Theory-Based Dynamic Modelling for Reliability Assessment of Transformer Oil-Paper Insulation Systems: A Practical Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lefeng Cheng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a novel dynamic correction method for the reliability assessment of large oil-immersed power transformers. First, with the transformer oil-paper insulation system (TOPIS as the target of evaluation and the winding hot spot temperature (HST as the core point, an HST-based static ageing failure model is built according to the Weibull distribution and Arrhenius reaction law, in order to describe the transformer ageing process and calculate the winding HST for obtaining the failure rate and life expectancy of TOPIS. A grey target theory based dynamic correction model is then developed, combined with the data of Dissolved Gas Analysis (DGA in power transformer oil, in order to dynamically modify the life expectancy calculated by the built static model, such that the corresponding relationship between the state grade and life expectancy correction coefficient of TOPIS can be built. Furthermore, the life expectancy loss recovery factor is introduced to correct the life expectancy of TOPIS again. Lastly, a practical case study of an operating transformer has been undertaken, in which the failure rate curve after introducing dynamic corrections can be obtained for the reliability assessment of this transformer. The curve shows a better ability of tracking the actual reliability level of transformer, thus verifying the validity of the proposed method and providing a new way for transformer reliability assessment. This contribution presents a novel model for the reliability assessment of TOPIS, in which the DGA data, as a source of information for the dynamic correction, is processed based on the grey target theory, thus the internal faults of power transformer can be diagnosed accurately as well as its life expectancy updated in time, ensuring that the dynamic assessment values can commendably track and reflect the actual operation state of the power transformers.

  12. User-driven Development of an Inquiry-Based Learning Platform: Qualitative Formative Evaluations in weSPOT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Bedek

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the formative evaluation activities that were designed and implemented during the development of the weSPOT1 inquiry based learning platform. With the ambition to provide a platform that supports a broad range of inquiry activities in accordance with end-users needs, an agile software development approach was followed as a process of co-design between practitioners, researchers and developers. The paper focuses on the design of end-user centric evaluation activities for fully exploiting the potential of agile development. A detailed overview of several case studies is presented to demonstrate how implementing a continuous evaluation cycle allowed to pinpoint and help resolve arising issues in a process of collaboration between technology development and pedagogy.

  13. Morphology and Kinetics of Interfacial Layer Formation during Continuous Hot-Dip Galvanizing and Galvannealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L.; Fourmentin, R.; Mc Dermid, J. R.

    2008-09-01

    A galvanizing simulator with rapid spot cooling was used to obtain a well-characterized reaction times as short as 2 seconds in order to study the short-time microstructural development and kinetics of the galvanizing and galvannealing interfacial reaction layer. It was determined that the incubation and nucleation events of the interfacial layer formation were completed by the 2-second reaction time in all cases. For a 0.20 wt pct dissolved Al bath, FeAl3 nucleates and grows during the initial stages of interfacial layer formation followed by Fe2Al5Zn X formation by diffusion-controlled transformation and growth. The final microstructure of the interfacial layer consisted of Fe2Al5Zn X in a two-layer arrangement comprising a fine-grained, compact lower layer with a coarser, noncompact upper layer. The Al content of the interfacial layer increased with reaction time and reaction temperature. Both of the Fe-Al phases formed exhibited a strong preferential crystallographic orientation with respect to the substrate surface. The evolution of the interfacial layer formed in a 0.13 wt pct dissolved Al bath was the result of competing processes. Fe-Al phases formed and grew during the reaction times explored, per the preceding mechanism. However, Fe-Zn phases also nucleated and grew during the reaction times explored via the process of inhibition breakdown, with these phases dominating the interfacial layer microstructures at longer reaction times. In this case, the Al content of the interfacial layer increased for all reaction times explored, but decreased with increasing reaction temperature, due to the more rapid initiation of inhibition breakdown. A model to describe the interfacial layer growth kinetics as a function of reaction time, bath temperature, and inhibition layer microstructure for the case of the 0.20 wt pct dissolved Al bath was proposed. It indicated that the development of microstructure of the interfacial layer had significant influence on the

  14. Hot spring siliceous stromatolites from Yellowstone National Park: assessing growth rate and laminae formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berelson, W M; Corsetti, F A; Pepe-Ranney, C; Hammond, D E; Beaumont, W; Spear, J R

    2011-09-01

    Stromatolites are commonly interpreted as evidence of ancient microbial life, yet stromatolite morphogenesis is poorly understood. We apply radiometric tracer and dating techniques, molecular analyses and growth experiments to investigate siliceous stromatolite morphogenesis in Obsidian Pool Prime (OPP), a hot spring in Yellowstone National Park. We examine rates of stromatolite growth and the environmental and/or biologic conditions that affect lamination formation and preservation, both difficult features to constrain in ancient examples. The "main body" of the stromatolite is composed of finely laminated, porous, light-dark couplets of erect (surface normal) and reclining (surface parallel) silicified filamentous bacteria, interrupted by a less-distinct, well-cemented "drape" lamination. Results from dating studies indicate a growth rate of 1-5 cm year(-1) ; however, growth is punctuated. (14)C as a tracer demonstrates that stromatolite cyanobacterial communities fix CO(2) derived from two sources, vent water (radiocarbon dead) and the atmosphere (modern (14)C). The drape facies contained a greater proportion of atmospheric CO(2) and more robust silica cementation (vs. the main body facies), which we interpret as formation when spring level was lower. Systematic changes in lamination style are likely related to environmental forcing and larger scale features (tectonic, climatic). Although the OPP stromatolites are composed of silica and most ancient forms are carbonate, their fine lamination texture requires early lithification. Without early lithification, whether silica or carbonate, it is unlikely that a finely laminated structure representing an ancient microbial mat would be preserved. In OPP, lithification on the nearly diurnal time scale is likely related to temperature control on silica solubility. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. "Ladies and Gentlemen, start your engines!" Analysis codes waiting for the first JIRAM-Juno data of Jupiter hot-spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Davide; Sindoni, Giuseppe; D'Aversa, Emiliano; Oliva, Fabrizio; Filacchione, Gianrico; Adriani, Alberto; Mura, Alessandro; Moriconi, Maria Luisa; Noschese, Raffaella; Cicchetti, Andrea; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Ignatiev, Nikolai; Maestri, Tiziano

    2016-04-01

    In this contribution, we detail the retrieval scheme that has been developed in the last few years for the analysis of the spectral data expected from the JIRAM experiment on board of the Juno NASA mission [1], beginning from the second half of 2016. Our focus is on the analysis of the thermal radiation in the 5 micron transparency window, in regions of lesser cloud opacity (namely, hot-spots). Moving from the preliminary analysis presented in Grassi et al., 2010 [2], a retrieval scheme has been developed and implemented as a complete end-to-end processing software. Performances in terms of fit quality and retrieval errors are discussed from tests on simulated spectra. Few examples of usage on VIMS-Cassini flyby data are also presented. Following the suggestion originally presented in Irwin et al., 1998 [3] for the analysis of the NIMS data, the state vector to be retrieved has been drastically simplified on physically sounding basis, aiming mostly to distinguish between the 'deep' content of minor gaseous component (water, ammonia, phosphine) and their relative humidity or fractional scale height in the upper troposphere. The retrieval code is based on a Bayesian scheme [4], complemented by a Metropolis algorithm plus simulated thermal annealing [5] for most problematic cases. The key parameters retrievable from JIRAM individual spectra are the ammonia and phosphine deep content, the water vapour relative humidity as well as the total aerosol opacity. We discuss in extent also the technical aspects related to the forward radiative transfer scheme: completeness of line databases used to generate correlated-k tables, comparison of different schemes for the treatment of aerosol scattering, assumption on clouds radiative properties and issues related to the analysis of dayside data. This work has been funded through ASI grants: I/010/10/0 and 2014-050-R.0. [1] Adriani et al., 2008 doi:10.1089/ast.2007.0167 [2] Grassi et al., 2010, doi: 10.1016/j.pss.2010.05.003 [3

  16. Field and laboratory studies of the nitrogen and oxygen isotopic composition of N2O: Corona discharge production, biomass burning, and ocean and "Arctic hot spot" emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boering, K. A.

    2016-12-01

    While inverse modeling studies of atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) concentrations have narrowed uncertainties in the magnitudes, geographic distribution, and timing of N2O fluxes to the atmosphere that are needed to understand and to mitigate the rising concentration of this greenhouse gas and ozone depleting substance in the atmosphere, significant uncertainties remain, including accounting for the return of N2O-depleted air from the stratosphere. Measurements of the average and site-specific nitrogen and the oxygen isotopic compositions of N2O can provide an additional means to attribute observed N2O variations to its various sources or stratospheric sink [e.g., Park et al., 2012]. In this presentation, we will highlight recent laboratory work determining the isotopic composition of N2O produced in a corona discharge (the process that produces N2O in thunderstorms), showing it has an isotopic fingerprint that is distinct from that for soil and ocean emissions, for biomass burning, and for the return of air from the stratosphere. Although N2O produced by lightning is only a small fraction of the global annual source of N2O to the atmosphere, the large and unique isotopic signature of corona discharge N2O now characterized completes the array needed to identify the origin, for example, of the unexplained N2O enhancements measured in the tropical and subtropical upper troposphere during the 2009 HIPPO mission [Wofsy 2011]. Such N2O enhancements may also be consistent with inverse modeling studies [e.g., Hirsch et al., 2006; Huang et al., 2008] suggesting tropical N2O source(s) must be larger than expected from bottom-up inventories, so identifying the source of these enhancements is critical. Isotope compositions of N2O in a biomass burning plume in the tropical upper troposphere, from a Southern Ocean ship cruise, and from an Arctic peat circle `hot spot' will also be briefly compared and contrasted with the corona discharge results. Hirsch, A.I., et al., Glob

  17. Converter Compressor Building, SWMU 089, Hot Spot Areas 1, 2, and 5 Operations, Maintenance, and Monitoring Report, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Deborah M.

    2015-01-01

    This Operations, Maintenance, and Monitoring Report (OMMR) presents the findings, observations, and results from operation of the air sparging (AS) interim measure (IM) for Hot Spot (HS) Areas 1, 2, and 5 at the Converter Compressor Building (CCB) located at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida. The objective of the IM at CCB HS Areas 1, 2, and 5 is to decrease concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in groundwater in the treatment zones via AS to levels that will enable a transition to a monitored natural attenuation (MNA) phase. This OMMR presents system operations and maintenance (O&M) information and performance monitoring results since full-scale O&M began in June 2014 (2 months after initial system startup in April 2014), including quarterly performance monitoring events in July and October 2014 and January and May 2015. Based on the results to date, the AS system is operating as designed and is meeting the performance criteria and IM objective. The performance monitoring network is adequately constructed for assessment of IM performance at CCB HS Areas 1, 2, and 5. At the March 2014 KSC Remediation Team (KSCRT) Meeting, team consensus was reached for the design prepared for expansion of the system to treat the HS 4 area, and at the November 2014 KSCRT Meeting, team consensus was reached that HS 3 was adequately delineated horizontally and vertically and for selection of AS for the remedial approach for HS 3. At the July 2015 KSCRT meeting, team consensus was reached to continue IM operations in all zones until HSs 3 and 4 is operational, once HS 3 and 4 zones are operational discontinue operations in HS 1, 2, and 5 zones where concentrations are less than GCTLs to observe whether rebounding conditions occur. Team consensus was also reached to continue quarterly performance monitoring to determine whether operational zones achieve GCTLs and to continue annual IGWM of CCB-MW0012, CCBMW0013, and CCB-MW0056, located south of the treatment area. The

  18. Finding malaria hot-spots in northern Angola: the role of individual, household and environmental factors within a meso-endemic area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Ricardo J Soares; Langa, Antonio; Sousa-Figueiredo, José Carlos; Clements, Archie C A; Nery, Susana Vaz

    2012-11-22

    Identifying and targeting hyper-endemic communities within meso-endemic areas constitutes an important challenge in malaria control in endemic countries such like Angola. Recent national and global predictive maps of malaria allow the identification and quantification of the population at risk of malaria infection in Angola, but their small-scale accuracy is surrounded by large uncertainties. To observe the need to develop higher resolution malaria endemicity maps a predictive risk map of malaria infection for the municipality of Dande (a malaria endemic area in Northern Angola) was developed and compared to existing national and global maps, the role of individual, household and environmental risk factors for malaria endemicity was quantified and the spatial variation in the number of children at-risk of malaria was estimated. Bayesian geostatistical models were developed to predict small-scale spatial variation using data collected during a parasitological survey conducted from May to August 2010. Maps of the posterior distributions of predicted prevalence were constructed in a geographical information system. Malaria infection was significantly associated with maternal malaria awareness, households with canvas roofing, distance to health care centre and distance to rivers. The predictive map showed remarkable spatial heterogeneity in malaria risk across the Dande municipality in contrast to previous national and global spatial risk models; large high-risk areas of malaria infection (prevalence >50%) were found in the northern and most eastern areas of the municipality, in line with the observed prevalence. There is remarkable spatial heterogeneity of malaria burden which previous national and global spatial modelling studies failed to identify suggesting that the identification of malaria hot-spots within seemingly mesoendemic areas may require the generation of high resolution malaria maps. Individual, household and hydrological factors play an important role

  19. Developing an automatic classification system of vegetation anomalies for early warning with the ASAP (Anomaly hot Spots of Agricultural Production) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meroni, M.; Rembold, F.; Urbano, F.; Lemoine, G.

    2016-12-01

    Anomaly maps and time profiles of remote sensing derived indicators relevant to monitor crop and vegetation stress can be accessed online thanks to a rapidly growing number of web based portals. However, timely and systematic global analysis and coherent interpretation of such information, as it is needed for example for SDG 2 related monitoring, remains challenging. With the ASAP system (Anomaly hot Spots of Agricultural Production) we propose a two-step analysis to provide monthly warning of production deficits in water-limited agriculture worldwide. The first step is fully automated and aims at classifying each administrative unit (1st sub-national level) into a number of possible warning levels, ranging from "none" to "watch" and up to "extended alarm". The second step involves the verification of the automatic warnings and integration into a short national level analysis by agricultural analysts. In this paper we describe the methodological development of the automatic vegetation anomaly classification system. Warnings are triggered only during the crop growing season, defined by a remote sensing based phenology. The classification takes into consideration the fraction of the agricultural and rangelands area for each administrative unit that is affected by a severe anomaly of two rainfall-based indicators (the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI), computed at 1 and 3-month scale) and one biophysical indicator (the cumulative NDVI from the start of the growing season). The severity of the warning thus depends on the timing, the nature and the number of indicators for which an anomaly is detected. The prototype system is using global NDVI images of the METOP sensor, while a second version is being developed based on 1km Modis NDVI with temporal smoothing and near real time filtering. Also a specific water balance model is under development to include agriculture water stress information in addition to the SPI. The monthly warning classification and crop

  20. Regional scale analysis of nitrous oxide emissions within the U.S. Corn Belt and the potential role of episodic hot spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffis, T. J.; Lee, X.; Baker, J. M.; Russelle, M.; Zhang, X.; Millet, D. B.; Venterea, R. T.

    2012-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a long-lived greenhouse gas that has the third largest radiative forcing on the Earth-Atmosphere system and has become the most important stratospheric ozone depleting substance of the 21st century. The rapid increase in N2O concentrations over the last century is primarily attributed to the Haber-Bosch process and the green revolution. Predicting future concentrations and developing mitigation strategies for N2O is a critical environmental challenge as pressure mounts on agricultural ecosystems to deliver more products to a burgeoning population. Bottom-up (process/inventory) and top-down (global) strategies are used to constrain the global N2O budget, but have been inadequately tested by data collected at the appropriate spatial and temporal scales. Two-years of tall tower (regional-scale) high-frequency N2O concentration data and boundary layer budget techniques were used to quantify the regional budget and assess bottom-up and top-down emission factors within the U.S. Corn Belt. Here we show that regional flux estimates were 2 to 9-fold greater than bottom-up emission estimates provided by the EDGAR, IPCC, and GEIA assessments. Using our regional flux data we derived "internal" and "external" emission factors that relate directly to the bottom-up and top-down perspectives on constraining the global N2O cycle. The internal and external emission factors were 4.0 and 5.6%, respectively, and significantly larger than that derived from bottom-up approaches. It is hypothesized that this bias is caused by episodic leakage mechanisms that can only be accounted for at the appropriate spatial and temporal scales.N2O emission hot spots from agricultural drainage ditches are shown to exceed 60 nmol m-2 s-1 and, at times, are about 60-fold greater than typical field-scale fluxes. Our data and analyses suggest that many field-scale studies that quantify greenhouse gas emissions will significantly underestimate the true net radiative forcing of

  1. Detection of neural activity in the brains of Japanese honeybee workers during the formation of a "hot defensive bee ball".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Ugajin

    Full Text Available Anti-predator behaviors are essential to survival for most animals. The neural bases of such behaviors, however, remain largely unknown. Although honeybees commonly use their stingers to counterattack predators, the Japanese honeybee (Apis cerana japonica uses a different strategy to fight against the giant hornet (Vespa mandarinia japonica. Instead of stinging the hornet, Japanese honeybees form a "hot defensive bee ball" by surrounding the hornet en masse, killing it with heat. The European honeybee (A. mellifera ligustica, on the other hand, does not exhibit this behavior, and their colonies are often destroyed by a hornet attack. In the present study, we attempted to analyze the neural basis of this behavior by mapping the active brain regions of Japanese honeybee workers during the formation of a hot defensive bee ball. First, we identified an A. cerana homolog (Acks = Apis cerana kakusei of kakusei, an immediate early gene that we previously identified from A. mellifera, and showed that Acks has characteristics similar to kakusei and can be used to visualize active brain regions in A. cerana. Using Acks as a neural activity marker, we demonstrated that neural activity in the mushroom bodies, especially in Class II Kenyon cells, one subtype of mushroom body intrinsic neurons, and a restricted area between the dorsal lobes and the optic lobes was increased in the brains of Japanese honeybee workers involved in the formation of a hot defensive bee ball. In addition, workers exposed to 46°C heat also exhibited Acks expression patterns similar to those observed in the brains of workers involved in the formation of a hot defensive bee ball, suggesting that the neural activity observed in the brains of workers involved in the hot defensive bee ball mainly reflects thermal stimuli processing.

  2. Detection of neural activity in the brains of Japanese honeybee workers during the formation of a "hot defensive bee ball".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugajin, Atsushi; Kiya, Taketoshi; Kunieda, Takekazu; Ono, Masato; Yoshida, Tadaharu; Kubo, Takeo

    2012-01-01

    Anti-predator behaviors are essential to survival for most animals. The neural bases of such behaviors, however, remain largely unknown. Although honeybees commonly use their stingers to counterattack predators, the Japanese honeybee (Apis cerana japonica) uses a different strategy to fight against the giant hornet (Vespa mandarinia japonica). Instead of stinging the hornet, Japanese honeybees form a "hot defensive bee ball" by surrounding the hornet en masse, killing it with heat. The European honeybee (A. mellifera ligustica), on the other hand, does not exhibit this behavior, and their colonies are often destroyed by a hornet attack. In the present study, we attempted to analyze the neural basis of this behavior by mapping the active brain regions of Japanese honeybee workers during the formation of a hot defensive bee ball. First, we identified an A. cerana homolog (Acks = Apis cerana kakusei) of kakusei, an immediate early gene that we previously identified from A. mellifera, and showed that Acks has characteristics similar to kakusei and can be used to visualize active brain regions in A. cerana. Using Acks as a neural activity marker, we demonstrated that neural activity in the mushroom bodies, especially in Class II Kenyon cells, one subtype of mushroom body intrinsic neurons, and a restricted area between the dorsal lobes and the optic lobes was increased in the brains of Japanese honeybee workers involved in the formation of a hot defensive bee ball. In addition, workers exposed to 46°C heat also exhibited Acks expression patterns similar to those observed in the brains of workers involved in the formation of a hot defensive bee ball, suggesting that the neural activity observed in the brains of workers involved in the hot defensive bee ball mainly reflects thermal stimuli processing.

  3. Confirmation of Neozygites floridana azygospore formation in two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae) in strains from tropical and temperature regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neozygites floridana is an obligate fungal pathogen of mites in the family Tetranychidae and is an important natural enemy of the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae). Until now, information about the formation of azygospores remained to be fully confirmed. In this study, we document the fo...

  4. Modeling DBPs formation in drinking water in residential plumbing pipes and hot water tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Shakhawat; Rodriguez, Manuel J; Sadiq, Rehan; Serodes, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in municipal supply water are a concern because of their possible risks to human health. Risk assessment studies often use DBP data in water distribution systems (WDS). However, DBPs in tap water may be different because of stagnation of the water in plumbing pipes (PP) and heating in hot water tanks (HWT). This study investigated occurrences and developed predictive models for DBPs in the PP and the HWT of six houses from three municipal water systems in Quebec (Canada) in a year-round study. Trihalomethanes (THMs) in PP and HWT were observed to be 1.4-1.8 and 1.9-2.7 times the THMs in the WDS, respectively. Haloacetic acid (HAAs) in PP and HWT were observed to be variable (PP/WDS = 0.23-2.24; HWT/WDS = 0.53-2.61). Using DBPs occurrence data from these systems, three types of linear models (main factors; main factors, interactions and higher orders; logarithmic) and two types of nonlinear models (three parameters Logistic and four parameters Weibull) were investigated to predict DBPs in the PP and HWT. Significant factors affecting DBPs formation in the PP and HWT were identified through numerical and graphical techniques. The R(2) values of the models varied between 0.77 and 0.96, indicating excellent predictive ability for THMs and HAAs in the PP and the HWT. The models were found to be statistically significant. The models were validated using additional data. These models can be used to predict DBPs increase from WDS (water entry point of house) to the PP and HWT, and could thereby help gain a better understanding of human exposure to DBPs and their associated risks. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Mechanism of formation of oil by the hot aqueous alkaline digestion of cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molten, P.M.; Miller, R.K.; Donovan, J.M.; Demmitt, T.F.

    1977-01-01

    The overall mechanism of cellulose converson in hot aqueous alkali appears to be one of degradation through glucose to low molecular weight saccharinic acids, dihydroxybutyric acid, glycolic acid, and carbonyl products such as acetone, acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, and similar compounds. Although the products identified in the present report were fairly complex furans, carbocyclic ketones, unsaturated hydrocarbons, and aromatic compounds, nevertheless, in most cases, they could have been formed from simple carbonyl compounds through a series of condensations involving carbanion intermediates. It is conceivable that residual alkali in the oil during acetone extraction could have given rise to diacetone alcohol as an artifact. This is refuted by examination of an aqueous residue which was extracted with diethyl ether and which was never exposed to any acetone: Compounds derived from diacetone alcohol (such as mesityl oxide or 4-methyl-3-penten-2-one) were also identified in the diethyl ether extract of the aqueous phase. Other compounds were identified in the oil acetone extract which could not have been derived from acetone or diacetone alcohol, but which could have been formed from other carbonyl compounds by the same mechanism. Hence, diacetone alcohol is a genuine product of cellulose conversion although apparently not an intermediate in further synthesis of other products. The further reaction of the postulated cyclic intermediates, and the route to formation of unsaturated hydrocarbons of high molecular weight is intended to be the next subject of investigation in the current work. The fundamental difference in the mechanism of cellulose conversion to oil by pyrolysis and by aqueous alkaline digestion predicted by theory is therefore confirmed. Pyrolysis products may be explained generally by carbonium ion and free radical reactions (in fact, cellulose decomposition is acid-catalyzed), while in aqueous alkali, nucleophilic carbanion reactions are favored.

  6. Laboratory Simulation of Haze/Aerosol formation in warm and hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharib-Nezhad, Ehsan; Lyons, James R.; Wright, David P.

    2016-10-01

    During the transit of an exoplanet across its host star, transmitted starlight through exoplanet atmosphere is absorbed and scattered, and the recorded transit spectra reveal important chemical information. There are many detected exoplanets in which hazes/aerosols obscure the incident photons, and consequently, fewer photons are transmitted through the atmosphere, contributing to a flat/nearly flat transit spectrum. Here, we have carried out two complementary approaches to address haze formation. First, laboratory simulations of haze condensation in exoplanet atmospheres are carried out using an electric discharge tube. A mixture of likely gas species (i.e. H2, He, H2O, CH4, N2 and H2S) is inserted into a glass manifold on a vacuum line, at a pressure ~100-10 mbar, and depending on the exoplanet category (e.g., warm or hot Jupiters), the temperature is set. Applying a few kilovolts produces plasma in the discharge tube, and as a result, particles are formed. We use spectroscopic ellipsometry to measure the optical constants (complex refractive index) of the collected laboratory hazes. Then, chemical characterization is made using RBS (Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy) and XPS (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy). Second, we developed a transit modeling code by which the transit spectra are generated using observational and laboratory data as an input. The model accounts for Mie scattering from haze particles in the vis-NIR spectral region, and Rayleigh scattering which comes from gases and particles (effective in UV-vis). The measured refractive indexes (real and imaginary part) describe the absorption and scattering in the vis-NIR transmission region, and, by generating transit spectra close to the observed ones from exoplanets, constraints on atmospheric chemical characterization can be revealed. Our laboratory results show that haze particles formed in the presence of water and with the solar C/O ratio = 0.5. The other outcome of our experiment is that

  7. Regulation of the Mts1-Mts2-Dependent ade6-M26 Meiotic Recombination Hot Spot and Developmental Decisions by the Spc1 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase of Fission Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Kon, Ning; Schroeder, Stephanie C.; KRAWCHUK, MICHELLE D.; Wahls, Wayne P.

    1998-01-01

    The M26 meiotic recombination hot spot in the ade6 gene of Schizosaccharomyces pombe is activated by the heterodimeric M26 binding protein Mts1-Mts2. The individual Mts1 (Atf1, Gad7) and Mts2 (Pcr1) proteins are also transcription factors involved in developmental decisions. We report that the Mts proteins are key effectors of at least two distinct classes of developmental decisions regulated by the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade. The first class (osmoregulation, spore viabili...

  8. On a Solar Blowout Jet: Driving Mechanism and the Formation of Cool and Hot Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yuandeng; Liu, Ying D.; Su, Jiangtao; Qu, Zhining; Tian, Zhanjun

    2017-12-01

    We present observations of a blowout jet that experienced two distinct ejection stages. The first stage started from the emergence of a small positive magnetic polarity, which was cancelled by the nearby negative magnetic field and caused the rising of a mini-filament and its confining loops. This further resulted in a small jet due to the magnetic reconnection between the rising confining loops and the overlying open field. The second ejection stage was mainly due to successive removal of the confining field by reconnection: the filament erupted, and the erupting cool filament material directly combined with the hot jet that originated form the reconnection region and therefore formed the cool and hot components of the blowout jet. During the two ejection stages, cool Hα jets are also observed cospatial with their coronal counterparts, but their appearance times are earlier by a few minutes than those of the hot coronal jets. The hot coronal jets are therefor possibly caused by the heating of the cool Hα jets or the rising of the reconnection height from the chromosphere to the corona. The scenario that magnetic reconnection occurred between the confining loops and the overlying open loops is supported by many observational facts, including the bright patches on both sides of the mini-filament, hot plasma blobs along the jet body, and periodic metric radio type III bursts at the very beginnings of the two stages. The evolution and characteristics of these features show the detailed nonlinear process in magnetic reconnection.

  9. Ecoturismo e “hotspots” de biodiversidade aviária no Mato Grosso, que relações espaciais ? Eco turisme et hot spots de bio diversité aviaire au Mato Grosso, quelles relations spatiales ? Eco-tourism and Avian bio diversity hot spots Mato Grosso, which spatial relations ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Moura de Paulo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available O ecoturismo é uma pratica destinada à promover a descoberta do meio “natural” aos turistas, minimizando os impactos ecológicos das visitas e permitindo um desenvolvimento econômico local. A riqueza da biodiversidade é, normalmente, um dos argumentos utilizados para propor a implantação de um sistema de ecoturismo. Este estudo mostra que os centro de ecoturismo no Mato Grosso são extremamente diversos e inegavelmente preocupados com os seus impactos ecológicos. Os “hot spots” da biodiversidade não estão associados aos locais ecoturísticos os mais respeitosos do meio ambiente, mas aos lugares não turísticos e muito antropizados, os parques e jardins dos estabelecimentos agrícolas.L’éco tourisme est une pratique destinée à faire découvrir un milieu “naturel” à des touristes en minimisant les impacts écologiques des visites et en permettant un développement économique profitable au niveau local. La richesse de la biodiversité est souvent un des arguments utilisés pour proposer la mise en place d’un système d’écotourisme. Cette étude montre que les centres d’éco tourisme au Mato Grosso sont très divers et inégalement soucieux de leurs impacts écologiques. Les hot spot de la bio diversité ne sont pas associées au site éco touristiques les plus respectueux de l’environnement, mais à des lieux non touristiques et très anthropisés, les parcs et jardins des exploitations agricoles.Eco tourism is a two folded activity. It is supposed to allow tourists to discover and appreciate natural landscapes without leaving any ecological inprints. It is also supposed to help local developpement for local people and local culture. Biodiversity is often taken as a argument to promote eco tourism in a definite place: a high biodiversity is seen as attractive. This paper, which studies some eco tourism sites in Mato Grosso shows that biodiversity is not at its peak in all eco tourism establishment. It is, in

  10. Microstructural Formations and Phase Transformation Pathways in Hot Isostatically Pressed Tantalum Carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    is seen in the top-down solidification approaches, such as vacuum plasma spray and arc melting [12]. In hot isostatic pressing (HIP), the constituent...per specimen. The powders were placed into tantalum HIP cans using an inert-gas glove box and the tantalum cans were then evacuated and welded closed...CLASSIFICATION OF: A series of XTa:(1 X)C (0.5 < X < 1) compositions have been fabricated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) of Ta and TaC powder blends

  11. On the chemical ladder of esters. Detection and formation of ethyl formate in the W51 e2 hot molecular core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivilla, V. M.; Beltrán, M. T.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Fontani, F.; Caselli, P.; Cesaroni, R.

    2017-03-01

    Context. In recent years, the detection of organic molecules with increasing complexity and potential biological relevance is opening the possibility to understand the formation of the building blocks of life in the interstellar medium. One of the families of molecules of substantial astrobiological interest are the esters. The simplest ester, methyl formate (CH3OCHO), is rather abundant in star-forming regions. The next step in the chemical complexity of esters is ethyl formate, C2H5OCHO. Despite the increase in sensitivity of current telescopes, the detection of complex molecules with more than ten atoms such as C2H5OCHO is still a challenge. Only two detections of this species have been reported so far, which strongly limits our understanding of how complex molecules are formed in the interstellar medium. New detections towards additional sources with a wide range of physical conditions are crucial to differentiate between competing chemical models based on dust grain surface and gas-phase chemistry. Aims: We have searched for ethyl formate towards the W51 e2 hot molecular core, one of the most chemically rich sources in the Galaxy and one of the most promising regions to study prebiotic chemistry, especially after the recent discovery of the P-O bond, key in the formation of DNA. Methods: We have analyzed a spectral line survey towards the W51 e2 hot molecular core, which covers 44 GHz in the 1, 2 and 3 mm bands, carried out with the IRAM 30 m telescope. Results: We report the detection of the trans and gauche conformers of ethyl formate. A local thermodynamic equilibrium analysis indicates that the excitation temperature is 78 ± 10 K and that the two conformers have similar source-averaged column densities of (2.0 ± 0.3) × 10-16 cm-2 and an abundance of 10-8. We compare for the first time the observed molecular abundances of ethyl formate with different competing chemical models based on grain surface and gas-phase chemistry. Conclusions: We propose that

  12. Identification of Intermetallic Compounds and Its Formation Mechanism in Boron Steel Hot-Dipped in Al-7 wt.% Mn Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Yun Kwak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In laser welding and hot stamping Al-Si-coated boron steel, there is a problem that the strength of the joint is lowered due to ferrite formation in the fusion zone. The purpose of this study is to develop an Al-7 wt.% Mn hot-dip coating in which Mn, an austenite stabilizing element, replaces the ferrite stabilizing element Si. The nucleation and formation mechanism of the reaction layer was studied in detail by varying the dipping time between 0 and 120 s at 773 °C. The microstructure and phase constitution of the reaction layer were investigated by various observational methods. Phase formation is discussed using a phase diagram calculated by Thermo-CalcTM. Under a 30 s hot-dipping process, no reaction occurred due to the formation of a Fe3O4 layer on the steel surface. The Fe3O4 layer decomposed by a reduction reaction with Al-Mn molten alloy, constituent elements of steel dissolved into a liquid, and the reaction-layer nucleus was formed toward the liquid phase. A coated layer consists of a solidified layer of Al and Al6Mn and a reactive layer formed beneath it. The reaction layer is formed mainly by inter-diffusion of Al and Fe in the solid state, which is arranged on the steel in the order of Al11Mn4 → FeAl3 (θ → Fe2Al5 (η phases, and the Fe3AlC (κ in several nm bands formed at the interface between the η-phase and steel.

  13. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy of Dye and Thiol Molecules Adsorbed on Triangular Silver Nanostructures: A Study of Near-Field Enhancement, Localization of Hot-Spots, and Passivation of Adsorbed Carbonaceous Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel R. Gonçalves

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS of thiols and dye molecules adsorbed on triangular silver nanostructures was investigated. The SERS hot-spots are localized at the edges and corners of the silver triangular particles. AFM and SEM measurements permit to observe many small clusters formed at the edges of triangular particles fabricated by nanosphere lithography. Finite-element calculations show that near-field enhancements can reach values of more than 200 at visible wavelengths, in the gaps between small spherical particles and large triangular particles, although for the later no plasmon resonance was found at the wavelengths investigated. The regions near the particles showing strong near-field enhancement are well correlated with spatial localization of SERS hot-spots done by confocal microscopy. Silver nanostructures fabricated by thermal evaporation present strong and fast fluctuating SERS activity, due to amorphous carbon contamination. Thiols and dye molecules seem to be able to passivate the undesired SERS activity on fresh evaporated silver.

  14. Formation and Fate of Fermentation Products in Hot Spring Cyanobacterial Mats

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Karen L.; Tayne, Timothy A.; Ward, David M.

    1987-01-01

    The fate of representative fermentation products (acetate, propionate, butyrate, lactate, and ethanol) in hot spring cyanobacterial mats was investigated. The major fate during incubations in the light was photoassimilation by filamentous bacteria resembling Chloroflexus aurantiacus. Some metabolism of all compounds occurred under dark aerobic conditions. Under dark anaerobic conditions, only lactate was oxidized extensively to carbon dioxide. Extended preincubation under dark anaerobic condi...

  15. Spot Markets Indices as Benchmarks of Formation of Future Price Trends in the Power Exchanges of Eastern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polikevych Nataliya I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is concerned with a theoretical generalization of the use of indices for electric power at the European spot exchanges and elaborating proposals on establishment of a similar spot index for the Ukrainian power exchange. 16 indices that are published daily by the power exchanges BSP Regional Energy Exchange, Power Exchange Central Europe, Polish Power Exchange and Opcom have been analyzed. It has been indicated that these indices are used for electricity price forecasting and monitoring the situation in the power market. The article examines the way spot indices are calculated by power exchanges, based on the value of the arithmetic average of market prices «day ahead». Imperfection of such way of calculation for price index values has been substantiated. The key characteristics of the future price index for Ukrainian spot market as benchmarks within the introduction of futures contracts for electricity have been identified.

  16. Core Flooding Experiments and Reactive Transport Modeling of Seasonal Heat Storage in the Hot Deep Gassum Sandstone Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmslykke, Hanne D.; Kjøller, Claus; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2017-01-01

    Seasonal storage of excess heat in hot deep aquifers is considered to optimize the usage of commonly available energy sources. The chemical effects of heating the Gassum Sandstone Formation to up to 150 degrees C is investigated by combining laboratory core flooding experiments with petrographic...... process at 150 degrees C, resulting in a significant increase in the aqueous silicium concentration. At temperatures,100 degrees C, the silicium concentration was controlled by a quasi-stationary state between feldspar dissolution and kaolinite precipitation whereas the concentration was kinetically...

  17. In-situ Investigation of Lead-free Solder Alloy Formation Using a Hot-plate Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, René; Tang, Peter Torben; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2007-01-01

    This work presents the advantages of using a hot-plate microscope for investigation of new (high-temperature) lead- free solders as in-situ analysis tool and preparation equipment. A description of the equipment and the preparation method is given and some examples are outlined. The formation...... of small AuSn-based, homogeneous and un-oxidized solder spheres will be demonstrated. Moreover the possibility of using this equipment as a sample preparation method to further investigation is shown. As example the equipment was used to produce samples for Vickers microhardness measurement of important...

  18. High resolution melting curve analysis targeting the HBB gene mutational hot-spot offers a reliable screening approach for all common as well as most of the rare beta-globin gene mutations in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Tarikul; Sarkar, Suprovath Kumar; Sultana, Nusrat; Begum, Mst Noorjahan; Bhuyan, Golam Sarower; Talukder, Shezote; Muraduzzaman, A K M; Alauddin, Md; Islam, Mohammad Sazzadul; Biswas, Pritha Promita; Biswas, Aparna; Qadri, Syeda Kashfi; Shirin, Tahmina; Banu, Bilquis; Sadya, Salma; Hussain, Manzoor; Sarwardi, Golam; Khan, Waqar Ahmed; Mannan, Mohammad Abdul; Shekhar, Hossain Uddin; Chowdhury, Emran Kabir; Sajib, Abu Ashfaqur; Akhteruzzaman, Sharif; Qadri, Syed Saleheen; Qadri, Firdausi; Mannoor, Kaiissar

    2018-01-02

    Bangladesh lies in the global thalassemia belt, which has a defined mutational hot-spot in the beta-globin gene. The high carrier frequencies of beta-thalassemia trait and hemoglobin E-trait in Bangladesh necessitate a reliable DNA-based carrier screening approach that could supplement the use of hematological and electrophoretic indices to overcome the barriers of carrier screening. With this view in mind, the study aimed to establish a high resolution melting (HRM) curve-based rapid and reliable mutation screening method targeting the mutational hot-spot of South Asian and Southeast Asian countries that encompasses exon-1 (c.1 - c.92), intron-1 (c.92 + 1 - c.92 + 130) and a portion of exon-2 (c.93 - c.217) of the HBB gene which harbors more than 95% of mutant alleles responsible for beta-thalassemia in Bangladesh. Our HRM approach could successfully differentiate ten beta-globin gene mutations, namely c.79G > A, c.92 + 5G > C, c.126_129delCTTT, c.27_28insG, c.46delT, c.47G > A, c.92G > C, c.92 + 130G > C, c.126delC and c.135delC in heterozygous states from the wild type alleles, implying the significance of the approach for carrier screening as the first three of these mutations account for ~85% of total mutant alleles in Bangladesh. Moreover, different combinations of compound heterozygous mutations were found to generate melt curves that were distinct from the wild type alleles and from one another. Based on the findings, sixteen reference samples were run in parallel to 41 unknown specimens to perform direct genotyping of the beta-thalassemia specimens using HRM. The HRM-based genotyping of the unknown specimens showed 100% consistency with the sequencing result. Targeting the mutational hot-spot, the HRM approach could be successfully applied for screening of beta-thalassemia carriers in Bangladesh as well as in other countries of South Asia and Southeast Asia. The approach could be a useful supplement of hematological and

  19. Self-assembly of various Au nanocrystals on functionalized water-stable PVA/PEI nanofibers: a highly efficient surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates with high density of "hot" spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Han; Du, MingLiang; Zhang, Ming; Wang, Pan; Bao, ShiYong; Zou, Meiling; Fu, YaQin; Yao, JuMing

    2014-04-15

    We have demonstrated a facile approach for the fabrication of flexible and reliable sulfydryl functionalized PVA/PEI nanofibers with excellent water stability for the self-assembly of Au nanocrystals, such as Au nanoparticles (AuNPs), Au nanoflowers (AuNFs) and Au nanorods (AuNRs), used as the highly efficient surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates for the detection of rhodamine B (RhB). Various methods were employed to cross-link the PVA nanofibers with better morphology and porous structures after immersing in water for desired times. Various SERS-active Au nanocrystals, such as AuNPs, AuNFs, and AuNRs have been successfully synthesized. After the grafting of MPTES on the cross-linked PVA/PEI nanofibers, the Au nanocrystals can easily be self-assembled on the surfaces of the nanofibers because of the strong interactions of the Au-S chemical bondings. The Au nanocrystals self-assembled throughout the PVA/PEI nanofibers used as SERS substrates all exhibit enhanced SERS signals of RhB compared with their individual nanocrystals. It is mainly due to the close interparticle distance, mutual orientation and high density of "hot" spots, that can strongly affect the overall optical response and the SERS enhancement. By changing the amounts of the self-assembled AuNFs on the nanofibers, we can control the density of the "hot" spots. With the increased amounts of the AuNFs throughout the nanofibers, the SERS substrates show enhanced Raman signals of the RhB, indicating that the increased density of "hot" spots can directly lead to the SERS enhancement. The AuNFs/(PVA/PEI) SERS substrates show good sensitivity, reliability and low detection limit (10(-9) M). The presented approach can be broadly applicable to the assembly of different types of plasmonic nanostructures and these novel materials with strong SERS enhancement can be applied in bioanalysis and biosensors. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Effect of Annealed Oxides on the Formation of Inhibition Layer During Hot-Dip Galvanizing of 590Mpa Trip Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Hwan; Huh, Joo Youl [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Suk Kyu; Park, Rho Bum; Kim, Jong Sang [POSCO Technical Research Laboratories, Gwangyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    The selective surface oxidation of a transformation-induced-plasticity (TRIP) steel containing 1.6 wt.% Mn and 1.5 wt.% Si during annealing at 800 .deg. C was investigated for its influence on the formation of an inhibition layer during hot-dip galvanizing. The selective oxidation of the alloying elements and the oxide morphology were significantly influenced by the annealing atmosphere. The pure N{sub 2} atmosphere with a dew point -40 .deg. C promoted the selective oxidation of Mn as a crystalline Mn{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} phase, whereas the N{sub 2} + 10% H{sub 2} atmosphere with the same dew point -40 .deg. C promoted the selective oxidation of Si as an amorphous Si-rich oxide phase. During hot-dip galvanizing, the Mn{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} phase was reduced more readily by Al in the Zn bath than the Si-rich oxide phase. Consequently, the pure N{sub 2} atmosphere resulted in a higher formation rate of Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} particles at the Zn/steel interface and better galvanizability than the N{sub 2} + 10% H{sub 2} atmosphere.

  1. Age Spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hands Age Spots Aging Skin Birthmarks Burn Scars Cellulite Crow's Feet Droopy Eyelids Excess Fat Excessive Sweating ... Hands Age Spots Aging Skin Birthmarks Burn Scars Cellulite Crow's Feet Droopy Eyelids Excess Fat Excessive Sweating ...

  2. Reaction kinetics of the formation of intermetallic Fe – Zn during hot - dip galvanizing of steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pokorny

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This review article mainly describes the composition of intermetallic Fe - Zn, i.e. zeta (ζ, delta (δ1k + δ1p, gamma1 (Γ1 and gamma (Γ on galvanized steel during low temperature galvanization (t ~ 450 °C. It gives detailed the formation, growth of individual phases during galvanization and their interaction. In terms of the kinetics, the formation of the coating is defined by a parabolic kinetic equation of the growth of different intermetallic phases under ideal conditions. From the available literature the rate constants of the formation of individual intermetallic phases and also for the total coating are cited. The composition of the intermetallic phases, iron content, crystal structure, and group symmetry in which the surface of galvanized steel forms.

  3. Origin of hot Super-Earths and the vortex-assisted mode of planet formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyra, Wladimir

    In spite of steady advances, planet formation remains, by and large, a mystery. Although a relatively consistent theory has been developed in the past two decades, its application to the observed distribution of exoplanets has not fared too well. If the statistics of discovered exoplanets suggest that planets form efficiently, there are still fundamental unsolved problems, such as excessive inward drift of grains in protoplanetary disks during planet formation. State-of-the-art theories invoke dust traps to overcome this problem, and recent high-resolution observations of protoplanetary disks show a highcontrast crescent-shaped emission on one side of the star, originating from millimetersized grains. The favored hypothesis borrows from the planet formation literature by suggesting that this asymmetry is the result of dust trapping in giant anticyclonic vortices. This idea, however, is not without problems. Vortices have been extensively studied, and some of their understood properties conflict with them being the culprit of the observed asymmetries. Understanding these conflicts will provide constraints for the theory and advance our interpretation of the observations. In this proposal, we aim to show that vortex trapping is a viable mechanism for planet formation. This is possible because 1) large-scale vortices are expected at turbulent/quiescent transitions in the disk 2) vortices are expected in the laminar zones 3) vortices should be excellent traps for grains and thus planet formation sites; 4) grain drift from outer radii brings more planet building blocks to the vortex; and 5) The turbulent/laminar zone boundary is also a migration stopping point. We propose a set of hydrodynamical simulations including embedded solid particles to decisively demonstrate the efficiency of vortex-assisted planet formation.

  4. Formation and fate of fermentation products in hot spring cyanobacterial mats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, K.L.; Tayne, T.A.; Ward, D.M.

    1987-10-01

    The fate of representative fermentation products (acetate, propionate, butyrate, lactate, and ethanol) in hot spring cyanobacterial mats was investigated. The major fate during incubations in the light was photoassimilation by filamentous bacteria resembling Chloroflexus aurantiacus. Some metabolism of all compounds occurred under dark aerobic conditions. Under dark anaerobic conditions, only lactate was oxidized extensively to carbon dioxide. Extended preincubation under dark anaerobic conditions did not enhance anaerobic catabolism of acetate, propionate, or ethanol. Acetogenesis of butyrate was suggested by the hydrogen sensitivity of butyrate conversion to acetate and by the enrichment of butyrate-degrading acetogenic bacteria. Accumulation of fermentation products which were not catabolized under dark anaerobic conditions revealed their importance. Acetate and propionate were the major fermentation products which accumulated in samples collected at temperatures ranging from 50 to 70/sup 0/C. Other organic acids and alcohols accumulated to a much lesser extent. Fermentation occurred mainly in the top 4 mm of the mat. Exposure to light decreased the accumulation of acetate and presumably of other fermentation products. The importance of interspecies hydrogen transfer was investigated by comparing fermentation product accumulation at a 65/sup 0/C site, with naturally high hydrogen levels, and a 55/sup 0/C site, where active methanogenesis prevented significant hydrogen accumulation. There was a greater relative accumulation of reduced products, notably ethanol, in the 65/sup 2/C mat.

  5. Distribution of HIV-1 and HSV-2 epidemics in Chad revealing HSV-2 hot-spot in regions of high-risk HIV spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpentier, Charlotte; Koyalta, Donato; Ndinaromtan, Montana; Tchobkréo, Bagamla; Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; Day, Nesrine; Si-Mohamed, Ali; Weiss, Helen; Bélec, Laurent

    2011-02-01

    Herpes Simplex Virus-2 (HSV-2) is known to be a potent co-factor of Human Immunodeficiency type 1 virus (HIV-1) heterosexual transmission. We were interested in assessing the distribution of HIV-1 and HSV-2 epidemics at the national level in Chad. In 2007, a population-based anonymous serosurvey for HIV-1 and HSV-2 infections, using dried blood spots, was conducted. The study included 548 adults living in 15 regions of Chad. After specimen elution, serological testing for HIV and HSV-2 infections was performed. Countrywide, the HIV-1 and HSV-2 seroprevalences were 11.1% and 15.7%, respectively. A positive correlation was observed with the highest HIV-1 prevalence seen in regions of the highest HSV-2 prevalence, especially in two conflict-affected eastern provinces of Darfur. Urgent public health interventions are needed in regions of Chad where high HSV-2 prevalence may be increasing the risk of HIV propagation.

  6. Heavy-metal, extreme chemistry and puzzling pulsation: ultraviolet clues to the formation of hot subdwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, C.

    2014-10-01

    Subdwarf B stars are low-mass core-helium burning stars with a very thin hydrogen envelope; in most cases, surface helium and light elements are depleted, heavy elements are enhanced by a factor ten. It is argued that normal He-poor sdB stars evolve from giants which have been stripped almost to the core to reveal helium-enriched material. As the star ignites helium and contracts to the extreme horizontal branch, radiative processes re-stratify the internal chemistry of the atmosphere and the helium sinks. When does this happen, how long does it take, and what does it look like? A small number of sdB stars have intermediate helium abundances (He-sdB) and a few have extraordinary surface compositions. The pulsating "zirconium" star LS IV-14 116 shows a four dex overabundance of zirconium, yttrium and strontium. Two other He-sdBs show a four dex overabundace of lead. Such stars are almost completely unexplored in the space ultraviolet.We will observe the ultraviolet spectrum of LS IV-14 116 and two other chemically peculiar hot subdwarfs in order to determine:(a) the impact of extraordinary composition on their overall flux distribution and hence on measurements of their effective temperatures,(b) the degree of stratification in the atmosphere (how thick is the enhanced layer?), and(c) the abundances of species not observable in the visible.(d) the ultraviolet lightcurve due to the principle pulsation modes of LS IV-14 116.The observations will allow us to explore the processes that lead to heavily stratified atmospheres and to the transformation of red giants with helium-enriched surface into horizontal-branch stars with helium-poor surfaces.

  7. Apatite Formation and Biocompatibility of a Low Young's Modulus Ti-Nb-Sn Alloy Treated with Anodic Oxidation and Hot Water.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetatsu Tanaka

    Full Text Available Ti-6Al-4V alloy is widely prevalent as a material for orthopaedic implants because of its good corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. However, the discrepancy in Young's modulus between metal prosthesis and human cortical bone sometimes induces clinical problems, thigh pain and bone atrophy due to stress shielding. We designed a Ti-Nb-Sn alloy with a low Young's modulus to address problems of stress disproportion. In this study, we assessed effects of anodic oxidation with or without hot water treatment on the bone-bonding characteristics of a Ti-Nb-Sn alloy. We examined surface analyses and apatite formation by SEM micrographs, XPS and XRD analyses. We also evaluated biocompatibility in experimental animal models by measuring failure loads with a pull-out test and by quantitative histomorphometric analyses. By SEM, abundant apatite formation was observed on the surface of Ti-Nb-Sn alloy discs treated with anodic oxidation and hot water after incubation in Hank's solution. A strong peak of apatite formation was detected on the surface using XRD analyses. XPS analysis revealed an increase of the H2O fraction in O 1s XPS. Results of the pull-out test showed that the failure loads of Ti-Nb-Sn alloy rods treated with anodic oxidation and hot water was greater than those of untreated rods. Quantitative histomorphometric analyses indicated that anodic oxidation and hot water treatment induced higher new bone formation around the rods. Our findings indicate that Ti-Nb-Sn alloy treated with anodic oxidation and hot water showed greater capacity for apatite formation, stronger bone bonding and higher biocompatibility for osteosynthesis. Ti-Nb-Sn alloy treated with anodic oxidation and hot water treatment is a promising material for orthopaedic implants enabling higher osteosynthesis and lower stress disproportion.

  8. Apatite Formation and Biocompatibility of a Low Young's Modulus Ti-Nb-Sn Alloy Treated with Anodic Oxidation and Hot Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hidetatsu; Mori, Yu; Noro, Atsushi; Kogure, Atsushi; Kamimura, Masayuki; Yamada, Norikazu; Hanada, Shuji; Masahashi, Naoya; Itoi, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Ti-6Al-4V alloy is widely prevalent as a material for orthopaedic implants because of its good corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. However, the discrepancy in Young's modulus between metal prosthesis and human cortical bone sometimes induces clinical problems, thigh pain and bone atrophy due to stress shielding. We designed a Ti-Nb-Sn alloy with a low Young's modulus to address problems of stress disproportion. In this study, we assessed effects of anodic oxidation with or without hot water treatment on the bone-bonding characteristics of a Ti-Nb-Sn alloy. We examined surface analyses and apatite formation by SEM micrographs, XPS and XRD analyses. We also evaluated biocompatibility in experimental animal models by measuring failure loads with a pull-out test and by quantitative histomorphometric analyses. By SEM, abundant apatite formation was observed on the surface of Ti-Nb-Sn alloy discs treated with anodic oxidation and hot water after incubation in Hank's solution. A strong peak of apatite formation was detected on the surface using XRD analyses. XPS analysis revealed an increase of the H2O fraction in O 1s XPS. Results of the pull-out test showed that the failure loads of Ti-Nb-Sn alloy rods treated with anodic oxidation and hot water was greater than those of untreated rods. Quantitative histomorphometric analyses indicated that anodic oxidation and hot water treatment induced higher new bone formation around the rods. Our findings indicate that Ti-Nb-Sn alloy treated with anodic oxidation and hot water showed greater capacity for apatite formation, stronger bone bonding and higher biocompatibility for osteosynthesis. Ti-Nb-Sn alloy treated with anodic oxidation and hot water treatment is a promising material for orthopaedic implants enabling higher osteosynthesis and lower stress disproportion.

  9. Strain signatures associated to the formation of hot cracks during laser beam welding of aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenlocher, Christian; Stritt, Peter; Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    The local surface displacement during the laser beam welding process of MgSi alloyed aluminum sheets (AA6014) in overlap configuration was optically determined near the weld seam by means of digital correlation of images recorded with a high-speed video camera. The analysis allowed the time- and space-resolved determination of the plane strain in the immediate vicinity of the solidification zone behind the weld pool. The observations revealed characteristic signatures in the temporal evolution of the strain that are related to the formation of centerline cracks in laser beam welding.

  10. Size Effects in Residual Stress Formation during Quenching of Cylinders Made of Hot-Work Tool Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Schemmel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work investigates the residual stress formation and the evolution of phase fractions during the quenching process of cylindrical specimens of different sizes. The cylinders are made of hot-work tool steel grade X36CrMoV5-1. A phase transformation kinetic model in combination with a thermomechanical model is used to describe the quenching process. Two phase transformations are considered for developing a modelling scheme: the austenite-to-martensite transformation and the austenite-to-bainite transformation. The focus lies on the complex austenite-to-bainite transformation which can be observed at low cooling rates. For an appropriate description of the phase transformation behaviour nucleation and growth of bainite are taken into account. The thermomechanical model contains thermophysical data and flow curves for each phase. Transformation induced plasticity (TRIP is modelled by considering phase dependent Greenwood-Johnson parameters for martensite and bainite, respectively. The influence of component size on residual stress formation is investigated by the finite element package Abaqus. Finally, for one cylinder size the simulation results are validated by X-ray stress measurements.

  11. Secular dynamics of multiplanet systems: implications for the formation of hot and warm Jupiters via high-eccentricity migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamers, Adrian S.; Antonini, Fabio; Lithwick, Yoram; Perets, Hagai B.; Portegies Zwart, Simon F.

    2017-01-01

    Hot Jupiters (HJs) are Jupiter-like planets that reside very closely to their host star, within ˜0.1 au. Their formation is not well understood. It is generally believed that they cannot have formed in situ, implying that some form of migration must have occurred after their initial formation. We study the production of HJs through secular evolution in multiplanet systems with three to five planets. In this variant of high-e migration, the eccentricity of the orbit of the innermost planet is excited on secular time-scales, triggering orbital migration due to tidal dissipation. We use a secular dynamics code and carry out a population synthesis study. We find that HJs are only produced if the viscous time-scale is short (≈0.014 yr). In contrast, in up to ≈0.3 of systems, the innermost planet is tidally disrupted. The orbital period distribution is peaked around 5 d, consistent with observations. The median HJ mass is 1 MJ with a maximum of ≈2 MJ, similar to observed HJs. Approximately 0.1 of the HJs have retrograde orbits with respect to the stellar spin. We do not find a significant population of warm Jupiters in our simulations, I.e. planets with semimajor axes between 0.1 and 1 au.

  12. Cold streams in early massive hot haloes as the main mode of galaxy formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekel, A; Birnboim, Y; Engel, G; Freundlich, J; Goerdt, T; Mumcuoglu, M; Neistein, E; Pichon, C; Teyssier, R; Zinger, E

    2009-01-22

    Massive galaxies in the young Universe, ten billion years ago, formed stars at surprising intensities. Although this is commonly attributed to violent mergers, the properties of many of these galaxies are incompatible with such events, showing gas-rich, clumpy, extended rotating disks not dominated by spheroids. Cosmological simulations and clustering theory are used to explore how these galaxies acquired their gas. Here we report that they are 'stream-fed galaxies', formed from steady, narrow, cold gas streams that penetrate the shock-heated media of massive dark matter haloes. A comparison with the observed abundance of star-forming galaxies implies that most of the input gas must rapidly convert to stars. One-third of the stream mass is in gas clumps leading to mergers of mass ratio greater than 1:10, and the rest is in smoother flows. With a merger duty cycle of 0.1, three-quarters of the galaxies forming stars at a given rate are fed by smooth streams. The rarer, submillimetre galaxies that form stars even more intensely are largely merger-induced starbursts. Unlike destructive mergers, the streams are likely to keep the rotating disk configuration intact, although turbulent and broken into giant star-forming clumps that merge into a central spheroid. This stream-driven scenario for the formation of discs and spheroids is an alternative to the merger picture.

  13. 5 Ways to Spot a Fad Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Change – Your Personal Plan Hot Topics Breast Exams Sexual Harassment and Sexual Bullying Prescription Drug Abuse ... 5 Ways to Spot a Fad Diet Lots of today's popular diets take advantage of our desire to drop weight quickly. Unfortunately, ...

  14. Sequence and kinetic analyses of streptokinase from two group G streptococci with high fibrin-dependent plasminogen activities and the identification of novel altered amino acids as potential hot spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keramati, Malihe; Aslani, Mohammad Mehdi; Khatami, Shohreh; Roohvand, Farzin

    2017-06-01

    To gain insights on the degree of heterogeneity and kinetic differences of streptokinase (SK) from group G (SKG) Streptococci compared with standard SK from group C (SKC) and identification of potentially contributing critical residues (hotspots). DNA and sequencing analyses confirmed the proper construction of all SK encoding vectors (two SKGs and one standard SKC). SDS-PAGE and western blot analyses confirmed the expression and proper purification of the recombinant SKs from E.coli with the expected size of 47 kDa. Kinetic analyses of two SKGs, compared with SKC, showed higher levels of specific [(×103 IU/mg) of 725 and 715 vs. 536] and fibrin-dependent proteolytic activities [Kcat/KM (min-1/µM) of 37 and 30 vs. 23], accompanied by declined fibrin-independent amidolytic activities [Kcat/KM (min-1/mM) of 109 and 84 vs. 113], respectively. Sequence alignments identified 10 novel residual substitutions scattered in SKα (I33F, R45Q, SKG132, A47D, and G55 N), SKβ (N228 K, F287I), and SKγ domains (L335 V, V396A, T403S) of SKGs, as potential hotspots. The residue substitutions identified might critically contribute as hot spots to different kinetic parameters of SKGs and might assist in further elucidation of structure/function relations and rational design of SKs with improved (fibrin-dependent) therapeutic properties.

  15. On the formation of hot and warm Jupiters via secular high-eccentricity migration in stellar triples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamers, Adrian S.

    2017-04-01

    Hot Jupiters (HJs) are Jupiter-like planets orbiting their host star in tight orbits of a few days. They are commonly believed not to have formed in situ, requiring inwards migration towards the host star. One of the proposed migration scenarios is secular high-eccentricity or high-e migration, in which the orbit of the planet is perturbed to high eccentricity by secular processes, triggering strong tidal evolution and orbital migration. Previous theoretical studies have considered secular excitation in stellar binaries. Recently, a number of HJs have been observed in stellar triple systems. In the latter, the secular dynamics are much richer compared to stellar binaries, and HJs could potentially be formed more efficiently. Here, we investigate this possibility by modelling the secular dynamical and tidal evolution of planets in two hierarchical configurations in stellar triple systems. We find that the HJ formation efficiency is higher compared to stellar binaries, but only by at most a few tens of per cent. The orbital properties of the HJs formed in the simulations are very similar to HJs formed in stellar binaries, and similarly to studies of the latter we find no significant number of warm Jupiters. HJs are only formed in our simulations for triples with specific orbital configurations, and our constraints are approximately consistent with current observations. In future, this allows us to rule out high-e migration in stellar triples if a HJ is detected in a triple grossly violating these constraints.

  16. Hot cracking during laser welding of steel: influence of the welding parameters and prevention of cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Marcel; Kessler, Steffen; Scheible, Philipp; Speker, Nicolai; Harrer, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    In continuous wave keyhole-mode laser welding of high strength steel alloys hot cracking can occur. The hot crack susceptibility depends on the mutual interaction of several factors like the welding parameters, the alloy composition and the weld fixturing. In this paper we focus on the influence of the welding parameters and investigate the dependency of the laser power, the welding speed and the laser wavelength on the crack formation. X-ray images are used to visualize the hot crack patterns, which exhibit a pronounced periodicity. To influence the hot crack formation, the incident energy input into the process was adapted. For specific welding parameters, we show exemplarily the prevention of hot cracking by the use of a twin-spot optics.

  17. Spotted Lanternfly

    OpenAIRE

    Sisti, Phillip A.; Pfeiffer, Douglas G.; Day, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    Describes the Spotted Lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula), its life cycle, and potential for invasive spread in North America. At present this species is known in the US only from four counties in Pennsylvania, where there is a quarantine.

  18. Different morphologic formation patterns of dark patches in the black-spotted frog (Pelophylax nigromaculata) and the Asiatic toad (Bufo gargarizans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guangming, Gan; Tao, Zhao; Chao, Li; Moyan, Zhao

    2017-01-01

    The black-spotted frog (Pelophylax nigromaculata) and Asiatic toad (Bufo gargarizans), two relatively distantly related species, live in different habitats with different adaptive dark patches. To explain the formation of dark patches, the distribution patterns of melanin granules were examined with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Melanin granules were produced and gathered into the "cap" structures on top of the nuclei in most epidermal cells. The "cap" structures may play a role in forming the dorsal dark patches coupled with three-layer melanophores, which can give rise to three layers of interconnected melanin networks in the dorsal dermis in P. nigromaculata. Epidermal melanocytes are rare and do not have a definitive role in forming dorsal dark patches in either P. nigromaculata or B. gargarizans. In B. gargarizans, the dermal melanophores only give rise to a single-layered melanin network, which hardly results in dark patches in the dorsal skin. However, the dermal melanophores migrate twice and form into pseudostratified networks, leading to dark patch formation in the ventral skin in B. gargarizans. The melanin granules precisely coregulate dark patches in the dermis and/or epidermis in P. nigromaculata and B. gargarizans. The dark patch formation depends on melanin granules in the epidermis or/and dermis in P. nigromaculata and B. gargarizans.

  19. Confirmation of Neozygites floridana azygospore formation in two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae) in strains from tropical and temperate regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westrum, Karin; Duarte, Vanessa S; Humber, Richard A; Delalibera, Italo; Klingen, Ingeborg

    2014-10-01

    Neozygites floridana is an obligate fungal pathogen of mites in the family Tetranychidae and is an important natural enemy of the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae). Until now, information about the formation of azygospores remained to be fully confirmed. In this study, we document the formation of azygospores by a Brazilian N. floridana strain and the formation of azygospores and zygospores by a Norwegian N. floridana strain, both in the host T. urticae. Evidence of both zygosporogenesis and azygosporogenesis was also found in the same individual in the Norwegian stains. Further we report the presence of immature azygospores with 1-3 nuclei for the Norwegian strains, immature resting spores (probably azygospores) with 1-8 nuclei for the Brazilian strain, and mature resting spores with 2 nuclei for both the Norwegian and the Brazilian strains (azygo- or zygospores). Our observations suggest that the immature resting spore (prespore) of both strains begins in a multinucleate condition but that the nuclear number is reduced during maturation until mature resting spore is binucleate regardless of its origin as a zygospore or azygospore. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Detection of Neural Activity in the Brains of Japanese Honeybee Workers during the Formation of a “Hot Defensive Bee Ball”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugajin, Atsushi; Kiya, Taketoshi; Kunieda, Takekazu; Ono, Masato; Yoshida, Tadaharu; Kubo, Takeo

    2012-01-01

    Anti-predator behaviors are essential to survival for most animals. The neural bases of such behaviors, however, remain largely unknown. Although honeybees commonly use their stingers to counterattack predators, the Japanese honeybee (Apis cerana japonica) uses a different strategy to fight against the giant hornet (Vespa mandarinia japonica). Instead of stinging the hornet, Japanese honeybees form a “hot defensive bee ball” by surrounding the hornet en masse, killing it with heat. The European honeybee (A. mellifera ligustica), on the other hand, does not exhibit this behavior, and their colonies are often destroyed by a hornet attack. In the present study, we attempted to analyze the neural basis of this behavior by mapping the active brain regions of Japanese honeybee workers during the formation of a hot defensive bee ball. First, we identified an A. cerana homolog (Acks = Apis cerana kakusei) of kakusei, an immediate early gene that we previously identified from A. mellifera, and showed that Acks has characteristics similar to kakusei and can be used to visualize active brain regions in A. cerana. Using Acks as a neural activity marker, we demonstrated that neural activity in the mushroom bodies, especially in Class II Kenyon cells, one subtype of mushroom body intrinsic neurons, and a restricted area between the dorsal lobes and the optic lobes was increased in the brains of Japanese honeybee workers involved in the formation of a hot defensive bee ball. In addition, workers exposed to 46°C heat also exhibited Acks expression patterns similar to those observed in the brains of workers involved in the formation of a hot defensive bee ball, suggesting that the neural activity observed in the brains of workers involved in the hot defensive bee ball mainly reflects thermal stimuli processing. PMID:22431987

  1. Microbial diversity and iron oxidation at Okuoku-hachikurou Onsen, a Japanese hot spring analog of Precambrian iron formations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, L M; Idei, A; Terajima, S; Kakegawa, T; Fischer, W W; McGlynn, S E

    2017-11-01

    Banded iron formations (BIFs) are rock deposits common in the Archean and Paleoproterozoic (and regionally Neoproterozoic) sedimentary successions. Multiple hypotheses for their deposition exist, principally invoking the precipitation of iron via the metabolic activities of oxygenic, photoferrotrophic, and/or aerobic iron-oxidizing bacteria. Some isolated environments support chemistry and mineralogy analogous to processes involved in BIF deposition, and their study can aid in untangling the factors that lead to iron precipitation. One such process analog system occurs at Okuoku-hachikurou (OHK) Onsen in Akita Prefecture, Japan. OHK is an iron- and CO2 -rich, circumneutral hot spring that produces a range of precipitated mineral textures containing fine laminae of aragonite and iron oxides that resemble BIF fabrics. Here, we have performed 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing of microbial communities across the range of microenvironments in OHK to describe the microbial diversity present and to gain insight into the cycling of iron, oxygen, and carbon in this ecosystem. These analyses suggest that productivity at OHK is based on aerobic iron-oxidizing Gallionellaceae. In contrast to other BIF analog sites, Cyanobacteria, anoxygenic phototrophs, and iron-reducing micro-organisms are present at only low abundances. These observations support a hypothesis where low growth yields and the high stoichiometry of iron oxidized per carbon fixed by aerobic iron-oxidizing chemoautotrophs like Gallionellaceae result in accumulation of iron oxide phases without stoichiometric buildup of organic matter. This system supports little dissimilatory iron reduction, further setting OHK apart from other process analog sites where iron oxidation is primarily driven by phototrophic organisms. This positions OHK as a study area where the controls on primary productivity in iron-rich environments can be further elucidated. When compared with geological data, the metabolisms and mineralogy at

  2. Effect of strip temperature on the formation of an Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} inhibition layer during hot-dip galvanizing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Monojit [R and D Division, Tata Steel Ltd., Jamshedpur 831001 (India)], E-mail: monoron@yahoo.com; Singh, Shiv Brat [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2009-04-15

    The theory of nucleation has been employed to derive expressions for the formation of an Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} layer during commercial strip galvanizing. This is then used to show the effect of the strip entry temperature on the nucleation of the Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} layer. An attempt was also made to verify this effect through controlled experiments in a hot-dip galvanizing simulator and electron microscopic characterization of a few samples.

  3. Nugget formation and its mechanism of resistance spot welded joints in DP600 dual-phase and DC54D ultralow carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ci; Yuan, Xinjian; Wu, Kanglong; Wang, Haodong; Hu, Zhan; Pan, Xueyu

    2017-05-01

    Resistance spot welded joints in different configurations of DP600 and DC54D were investigated to elucidate the nugget formation process and mechanical properties of the resultant joints. Results show that, when the welding time was less than 4 cycles, the fusion zone (FZ) was not formed, but the heat-affected zone (HAZ) occurred with a "butterfly" shape. In 4 cycles, the FZ in dissimilar sheets occurred with an "abnormal butterfly" shape because of nugget shift. When the welding time increased to 14 cycles, the FZ exhibited a "bread loaf" shape and the weld shifted to "dog bones." The nugget can be divided into three regions, namely, FZ, HAZ1, and HAZ2, and the FZ consisted of lath martensite. The micro hardness of DP600 FZ was lower than that of HAZ because of the dilution of DC54D. The failure mode of B changed from interfacial failure to plug failure during the nugget formation process. The tensile-shear load of sound weld is 6.375, 6.016, and 19.131 kN.

  4. Cloning of the Papaya Chromoplast-Specific Lycopene β-Cyclase, CpCYC-b, Controlling Fruit Flesh Color Reveals Conserved Microsynteny and a Recombination Hot Spot1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blas, Andrea L.; Ming, Ray; Liu, Zhiyong; Veatch, Olivia J.; Paull, Robert E.; Moore, Paul H.; Yu, Qingyi

    2010-01-01

    Carotenoid pigments in fruits are indicative of the ripening process and potential nutritional value. Papaya (Carica papaya) fruit flesh color is caused by the accumulation of lycopene or β-carotenoids in chromoplasts. It is a distinct feature affecting nutritional composition, fruit quality, shelf life, and consumer preference. To uncover the molecular basis of papaya flesh color, we took map-based cloning and candidate gene approaches using integrated genetic and physical maps. A DNA marker tightly linked to flesh color colocalized on a contig of the physical map with a cDNA probe of the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) chromoplast-specific lycopene β-cyclase, CYC-b. Candidate gene sequences were obtained from amplified fragments and verified by sequencing two bacterial artificial chromosomes containing the two alleles. Sequence comparison revealed a 2-bp insertion in the coding region of the recessive red flesh allele resulting in a frame-shift mutation and a premature stop codon. A color complementation test in bacteria confirmed that the papaya CpCYC-b is the gene controlling fruit flesh color. Sequence analysis of wild and cultivated papaya accessions showed the presence of this frame-shift mutation in all red flesh accessions examined. Evaluation of DNA markers near CpCYC-b revealed a recombination hot spot, showing that CpCYC-b is located in a gene-rich region with a recombination rate at 3.7 kb per centimorgan, more than 100-fold higher than the genome average at 400 kb per centimorgan. Conserved microsynteny of the CpCYC-b region is indicated by colinearity of two to four genes between papaya, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), grape (Vitis vinifera), and tomato. Our results enhanced our understanding of papaya flesh color inheritance and generated new tools for papaya improvement. PMID:20181753

  5. Evaluation of CLSI M44-A2 disk diffusion and associated breakpoint testing of caspofungin and micafungin using a well-characterized panel of wild-type and fks hot spot mutant Candida isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Park, Steven; Brown, Steven; Pfaller, Michael; Perlin, David S

    2011-05-01

    Disk diffusion testing has recently been standardized by the CLSI, and susceptibility breakpoints have been established for several antifungal compounds. For caspofungin, 5-μg disks are approved, and for micafungin, 10-μg disks are under evaluation. We evaluated the performances of caspofungin and micafungin disk testing using a panel of Candida isolates with and without known FKS echinocandin resistance mechanisms. Disk diffusion and microdilution assays were performed strictly according to CLSI documents M44-A2 and M27-A3. Eighty-nine clinical Candida isolates were included: Candida albicans (20 isolates/10 mutants), C. glabrata (19 isolates/10 mutants), C. dubliniensis (2 isolates/1 mutant), C. krusei (16 isolates/3 mutants), C. parapsilosis (14 isolates/0 mutants), and C. tropicalis (18 isolates/4 mutants). Quality control strains were C. parapsilosis ATCC 22019 and C. krusei ATCC 6258. The correlations between zone diameters and MIC results were good for both compounds, with identical susceptibility classifications for 93.3% of the isolates by applying the current CLSI breakpoints. However, the numbers of fks hot spot mutant isolates misclassified as being susceptible (S) (very major errors [VMEs]) were high (61% for caspofungin [S, ≥11 mm] and 93% for micafungin [S, ≥14 mm]). Changing the disk diffusion breakpoint to S at ≥22 mm significantly improved the discrimination. For caspofungin, 1 VME was detected (a C. tropicalis isolate with an F76S substitution) (3.5%), and for micafungin, 10 VMEs were detected, the majority of which were for C. glabrata (8/10). The broadest separation between zone diameter ranges for wild-type (WT) and mutant isolates was seen for caspofungin (6 to 12 mm versus -4 to 7 mm). In conclusion, caspofungin disk diffusion testing with a modified breakpoint led to excellent separation between WT and mutant isolates for all Candida species.

  6. Evaluation of CLSI M44-A2 Disk Diffusion and Associated Breakpoint Testing of Caspofungin and Micafungin Using a Well-Characterized Panel of Wild-Type and fks Hot Spot Mutant Candida Isolates▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Park, Steven; Brown, Steven; Pfaller, Michael; Perlin, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Disk diffusion testing has recently been standardized by the CLSI, and susceptibility breakpoints have been established for several antifungal compounds. For caspofungin, 5-μg disks are approved, and for micafungin, 10-μg disks are under evaluation. We evaluated the performances of caspofungin and micafungin disk testing using a panel of Candida isolates with and without known FKS echinocandin resistance mechanisms. Disk diffusion and microdilution assays were performed strictly according to CLSI documents M44-A2 and M27-A3. Eighty-nine clinical Candida isolates were included: Candida albicans (20 isolates/10 mutants), C. glabrata (19 isolates/10 mutants), C. dubliniensis (2 isolates/1 mutant), C. krusei (16 isolates/3 mutants), C. parapsilosis (14 isolates/0 mutants), and C. tropicalis (18 isolates/4 mutants). Quality control strains were C. parapsilosis ATCC 22019 and C. krusei ATCC 6258. The correlations between zone diameters and MIC results were good for both compounds, with identical susceptibility classifications for 93.3% of the isolates by applying the current CLSI breakpoints. However, the numbers of fks hot spot mutant isolates misclassified as being susceptible (S) (very major errors [VMEs]) were high (61% for caspofungin [S, ≥11 mm] and 93% for micafungin [S, ≥14 mm]). Changing the disk diffusion breakpoint to S at ≥22 mm significantly improved the discrimination. For caspofungin, 1 VME was detected (a C. tropicalis isolate with an F76S substitution) (3.5%), and for micafungin, 10 VMEs were detected, the majority of which were for C. glabrata (8/10). The broadest separation between zone diameter ranges for wild-type (WT) and mutant isolates was seen for caspofungin (6 to 12 mm versus −4 to 7 mm). In conclusion, caspofungin disk diffusion testing with a modified breakpoint led to excellent separation between WT and mutant isolates for all Candida species. PMID:21357293

  7. 3-(imidazo[1,2-a:5,4-b']dipyridin-2-yl)aniline inhibits pestivirus replication by targeting a hot spot drug binding pocket in the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musiu, Simone; Leyssen, Pieter; Froeyen, Mathy; Chezal, Jean-Michel; Neyts, Johan; Paeshuyse, Jan

    2016-05-01

    The compound 3-(imidazo[1,2-a:5,4-b']dipyridin-2-yl)aniline (CF02334) was identified as a selective inhibitor of the cytopathic effect (CPE) caused by bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) in a virus-cell-based assay. The EC50-values for inhibition of CPE, viral RNA synthesis and the production of infectious virus progeny were 13.0 ± 0.6 μM, 2.6 ± 0.9 μM and 17.8 ± 0.6 μM, respectively. CF02334 was found to be inactive in the hepatitis C subgenomic replicon system. CF02334-resistant BVDV was obtained and was found to carry the N264D mutation in the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). Molecular modeling revealed that N264D is located in a small cavity near the fingertip domain of the pestivirus polymerase. CF02334-resistant BVDV was proven to be cross-resistant to BPIP, AG110 and LZ37, inhibitors that have previously been described to target the same region of the BVDV RdRp. CF02334 did not inhibit the in vitro activity of recombinant BVDV RdRp, but did inhibit the activity of BVDV replication complexes. Taken together, these observations indicate that CF02334 likely interacts with the fingertip of the pestivirus RdRp at the same position as BPIP, AG110 and LZ37, which marks this region of the viral polymerase as a "hot spot" for inhibition of pestivirus replication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Transformation from 'Carbon Valley' to a 'Post-Carbon Society' in a Climate Change Hot Spot: the Coalfields of the Hunter Valley, New South Wales, Australia - article no. 39

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, G.R. [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW (Australia)

    2008-07-01

    This paper examines the possibilities for transformation of a climate - change hot spot - the coal-producing Hunter Region of New South Wales, Australia-using complex adaptive systems (CAS) theory. It uses CAS theory to understand the role of coal in the region's history and efforts to strengthen the ecological, economic, and social resilience of the region's coal industry in the face of demands for a shift from fossil fuel dependency to clean, renewable energy and genuine resilience and sustainability. It uses CAS theory to understand ways in which the resilience of two alternative futures, labeled 'Carbon Valley' and 'Post-Carbon Society', might evolve. The paper discusses ways in which changes implemented through the efforts of local communities at local, smaller scales of the nested systems seek to influence the evolution of adaptive cycles of the system at the local, national, and global scales. It identifies the influences of 'attractors,' defined as factors driving the evolution of the system, that are influential across the panarchy. These include climate change threats, markets, regulatory regimes, political alliances, and local concerns about the environmental and social impacts of the Hunter's coal dependency. These factors are weakening the apparent resilience of the coal industry, which is being propped up by the coal industry corporations, labor unions, and governments to maintain coal dependency in the Carbon Valley. Moreover, they are creating an alternative basin of attraction in which a Post-Carbon Society might emerge from the system's evolutionary processes.

  9. Word Spotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen, James

    1996-01-01

    Summarizes the use of word-spotting in psycholinguistic research. Notes that listeners hear a list of nonsense words, some of which contain embedded real words, and they detect those embedded words, a task designed to study the segmentation of continuous speech. Describes the task and summarizes its advantages and disadvantages. (12 references)…

  10. Hot spots of Phytophthora in commercial nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corina Junker; Patrick Goff; Stefan Wagner; Sabine Werres

    2017-01-01

    Studies have shown that nurseries are an important source for the spread of Phytophthora. Most surveys and studies focusing on the epidemiology of these pathogens in nurseries are based on sampling of symptomatic plants or on samples like water of different sources used for irrigation. There is little knowledge, however, on the survival and...

  11. Two CpG mutational hot spots in the X-linked interleukin-2 receptor gamma chain gene (IL2RG) may cause 15% of all human severe combined immunodeficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepper, A.E.; Puck, J.M. [National Center for Human Genome Research, Bethseda, MD (United States); Liu, X. [Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a syndrome of profoundly impaired cellular and humoral immune function, is caused by various autosomal gene defects, including adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency, as well as mutations in the X-linked IL2RG gene encoding the gamma chain of the lymphocyte receptor for IL-2. Mutational analysis of IL2RG was performed using genomic DNA from males with SCID referred from genetics and immunology centers. Single strand conformation polymorphisms (SSCP) were sought by PCR amplification of each of the 8 IL2RG exons using labelled flanking primers. Sequence of exons with aberrant SSCP detected a majority of unique deleterious IL2RG mutations in 30 unrelated SCID patients. However, multiple mutations were seen at CpG dinucleotides, known to be C{yields}T transversion sites. cDNA 690-691 in exon 5 was mutated in 4 patients, 1 patient with each of the C{sub 690}{yields}T causing an Arg{yields}Cys substitution, and 1 with G{sub 691}{yields}A causing Arg{yields}His. Two other patients had SCID caused by a single mutation in IL2RG exon 7. This C{sub 879}{yields}T, also in a CpG, changed an Arg to STOP, resulting in loss of the SH2-related intracellular domain. In addition to our patients, 1 patient with each of the C{sub 690} and the C{sub 879} mutations have been reported by others, giving an overall incidence of 20% from our lab and 21% from all reported IL2RG SCID mutations. While ADA defects account for approximately 15% of SCID, a striking male SCID predominance suggest up to 70% of the cases are X-linked, due to IL2RG mutation. Thus, screening for mutations at the 2 CpG hot spots we have found in IL2RG can identify the genotype of as many SCID cases as are found by ADA testing.

  12. The Meridional Secondary Circulation of 3D Vortices in Rotating, Stratified, Shear and its Role in Astrophysical Flows: from a Newly Pale Great Red Spot to Planet Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, P. S.; Hassanzadeh, P.

    2012-12-01

    The interest in understanding the physics of 3D, compact baroclinic vortices in rotating, stratified shear is growing. This is partly due to the fact that vortices in protoplanetary disks attract dust and may be key in planetesimal formation. The interest is also fueled by the unanswered questions about vortices of Jupiter and Saturn and the recent changes of the Jovian vortices. Examples are the appearance of the Red Oval BA in 2005, and the very recent color-change of the Great Red Spot to pale orange, which was observed in July 2012. While the dynamics of 3D baroclinic vortices in rotating stratified flows, even without shear, is poorly understood, the presence of horizontal shear strongly influences their dynamics and further complicates the problem. Studying the physics of planetary vortices and their interaction with the environment requires high-resolution 3D simulations. Ignoring the vertical direction, neglecting the vertical motion (as has been done in almost all published numerical simulations of Jovian vortices because most studies have assumed vertical hydrostatic equilibrium), or the lack of enough resolution eliminates or changes important physical processes such as the secondary circulation. This secondary, ageostrophic flow within the vortices is essential in dust accumulation and agglomeration in vortices in protoplanetary disks. The secondary circulation has been shown to be important in determining the color and cloud patterns in Jovian vortices. For example, the recent color change of the Great Red Spot can be explained by changes in its secondary circulation. It has also been suggested that the persistent rings around the Jovian anticyclones are produces by this secondary circulation. We show that the lifetimes of Jovian vortices depend upon their ability to merge with and absorb smaller vortices and also on the secondary circulations within vortices. The main dissipation mechanism for most astrophysical vortices is thermal radiation rather

  13. Cloud formation in metal-rich atmospheres of hot super-Earths like 55 Cnc e and CoRoT7b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, G.; Helling, Ch.; Miguel, Y.

    2017-11-01

    Clouds form in the atmospheres of planets where they can determine the observable spectra, the albedo and phase curves. Cloud properties are determined by the local thermodynamical and chemical conditions of an atmospheric gas. A retrieval of gas abundances requires a comprehension of the cloud formation mechanisms under varying chemical conditions. With the aim of studying cloud formation in metal-rich atmospheres, we explore the possibility of clouds in evaporating exoplanets like CoRoT-7b and 55 Cancri e (55 Cnc e) in comparison to a generic set of solar abundances and the metal-rich gas giant HD 149026b. We assess the impact of metal-rich, non-solar element abundances on the gas-phase chemistry, and apply our kinetic, non-equilibrium cloud formation model to study cloud structures and their details. We provide an overview of global cloud properties in terms of material compositions, maximum particle formation rates and average cloud particle sizes for various sets of rocky element abundances. Our results suggest that the conditions on 55 Cnc e and HD 149026b should allow the formation of mineral clouds in their atmosphere. The high temperatures on some hot rocky super-Earths (e.g. the day side of CoRoT-7b) result in an ionized atmospheric gas, and they prevent gas condensation, making cloud formation unlikely on its day side.

  14. Regional warming of hot extremes accelerated by surface energy fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donat, M. G.; Pitman, A. J.; Seneviratne, S. I.

    2017-07-01

    Strong regional differences exist in how hot temperature extremes increase under global warming. Using an ensemble of coupled climate models, we examine the regional warming rates of hot extremes relative to annual average warming rates in the same regions. We identify hot spots of accelerated warming of model-simulated hot extremes in Europe, North America, South America, and Southeast China. These hot spots indicate where the warm tail of a distribution of temperatures increases faster than the average and are robust across most Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 models. Exploring the conditions on the specific day when the hot extreme occurs demonstrates that the hot spots are explained by changes in the surface energy fluxes consistent with drying soils. However, the model-simulated accelerated warming of hot extremes appears inconsistent with observations, except over Europe. The simulated acceleration of hot extremes may therefore be unreliable, a result that necessitates a reevaluation of how climate models resolve the relevant terrestrial processes.

  15. Sweet spot identification in underexplored shales using multidisciplinary reservoir characterization and key performance indicators : Example of the Posidonia Shale Formation in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Heege, Jan; Zijp, Mart; Nelskamp, Susanne; Douma, Lisanne; Verreussel, Roel; Ten Veen, Johan; de Bruin, Geert; Peters, Rene

    2015-01-01

    Sweet spot identification in underexplored shale gas basins needs to be based on a limited amount of data on shale properties in combination with upfront geological characterization and modelling, because actual production data is usually absent. Multidisciplinary reservoir characterization and

  16. Sweet spot identification in underexplored shales using multidisciplinary reservoir characterization and key performance indicators: example of the Posidonia Shale Formation in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heege, J.H. ter; Zijp, M.H.A.A.; Nelskamp, S.; Douma, L.A.N.R.; Verreussel, R.M.C.H.; Veen, J.H. ten; Bruin, G. de; Peters, M.C.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Sweet spot identification in underexplored shale gas basins needs to be based on a limited amount of data on shale properties in combination with upfront geological characterization and modelling, because actual production data is usually absent. Multidisciplinary reservoir characterization and

  17. Mongolian spots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mongolian spots (MS are birthmarks that are present at birth and their most common location is sacrococcygeal or lumbar area. Lesions may be single or multiple and usually involve < 5% total body surface area. They are macular and round, oval or irregular in shape. The color varies from blue to greenish, gray, black or a combination of any of the above. The size varies from few to more than 20 centimetres. Pigmentation is most intense at the age of one year and gradually fades thereafter. It is rarely seen after the age of 6 years. Aberrant MS over occiput, temple, mandibular area, shoulders and limbs may be confused with other dermal melanocytoses and bruises secondary to child abuse, thus necessitating documentation at birth. Although regarded as benign, recent data suggest that MS may be associated with inborn errors of metabolism and neurocristopathies. Mongolian spots usually resolve by early childhood and hence no treatment is generally needed if they are located in the sacral area. However, sometimes it may be required for extrasacral lesions for cosmesis.

  18. Some like it hot: Linking diffuse X-ray luminosity, baryonic mass, and star formation rate in compact groups of galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desjardins, Tyler D.; Gallagher, Sarah C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis [Laboratory for X-ray Astrophysics, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mulchaey, John S. [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Walker, Lisa May; Johnson, Kelsey E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Brandt, William N.; Charlton, Jane C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We present an analysis of the diffuse X-ray emission in 19 compact groups (CGs) of galaxies observed with Chandra. The hottest, most X-ray luminous CGs agree well with the galaxy cluster X-ray scaling relations in L{sub X} -T and L{sub X} -σ, even in CGs where the hot gas is associated with only the brightest galaxy. Using Spitzer photometry, we compute stellar masses and classify Hickson CGs 19, 22, 40, and 42, and RSCGs 32, 44, and 86 as fossil groups using a new definition for fossil systems that includes a broader range of masses. We find that CGs with total stellar and H I masses ≳ 10{sup 11.3} M{sub ☉} are often X-ray luminous, while lower-mass CGs only sometimes exhibit faint, localized X-ray emission. Additionally, we compare the diffuse X-ray luminosity against both the total UV and 24 μm star formation rates of each CG and optical colors of the most massive galaxy in each of the CGs. The most X-ray luminous CGs have the lowest star formation rates, likely because there is no cold gas available for star formation, either because the majority of the baryons in these CGs are in stars or the X-ray halo, or due to gas stripping from the galaxies in CGs with hot halos. Finally, the optical colors that trace recent star formation histories of the most massive group galaxies do not correlate with the X-ray luminosities of the CGs, indicating that perhaps the current state of the X-ray halos is independent of the recent history of stellar mass assembly in the most massive galaxies.

  19. [Clinical value of cupping spot effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Chang-Chun; Huang, Li-Ping; Yang, Gai-Qin; Zhao, Jing-Yu; Zou, Wei; Guo, Xiao-Chuan; Liu, Shao-Ming

    2014-12-01

    The cupping spot is considered as one kind of skin change due to cupping treatment. With literature regarding cupping spot, the influencing factors and value of cupping spot in clinical diagnosis and treatment were analyzed, which could make a further exploration on the action mechanism of cupping treatment. The literature showed that the formation of cupping spot was related with cupping temperature, pressure, cup-retaining time, cupping area, individual difference and health condition, etc; cupping spot had the ability to assist diagnosis, prevent disease, cure disease and evaluate clinical efficacy. Previous studies on cupping spot have already made some progress, and played a positive significance on finding cupping rule and studying its mechanism. However, the research for this area is still in the primary stage, which needed deeper study to reveal scientific connotations of cupping spot.

  20. Study on the Formation of Reaction Phase to Si Addition in Boron Steel Hot-Dipped in Al–7Ni Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Gil Yun

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce the intermetallic compounds formed during the application of an Al–7Ni wt % hot-dip multifunctional coating on boron steel, developed for Tailor Welded Blanks (TWB and hot stamping, 2–6 wt % Si was added to the coating to change the reaction layer. The coating was run at 690 °C for 120 s. Al9FeNi phases were formed on the steel interface, Fe2Al5 was formed on the steel, FeAl3 was generated between the existing layers, and flake-type Al2Fe3Si3 was formed in the Fe2Al5 phase, depending on the Si content. In addition, as Si was added to the coating, the thickness of the Fe2Al5 phase decreased and the thickness of the Al9FeNi phase and Al2Fe3Si3 increased. The decrease in the thickness of the Fe2Al5 phase was mainly due to the effect of the Si solid solution and the Al2Fe3Si3 formation in the Fe2Al5 phase. The reason for the growth of Al9FeNi is that the higher the Si content in the coating, the more the erosion of the interface of the steel material due to the coating solution. Therefore, the outflow of Fe into the coating liquid increased.

  1. The Pore Collapse “Hot-Spots” Model Coupled with Brittle Damage for Solid Explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. R. Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the building of a numerical pore collapse model with “hot-spots” formation for the impacted damage explosives. According to damage mechanical evolution of brittle material, the one-dimensional elastic-viscoplastic collapse model was improved to incorporate the impact damage during the dynamic collapse of pores. The damage of explosives was studied using the statistical crack mechanics (SCRAM. The effects of the heat conduction and the chemical reaction were taken into account in the formation of “hot-spots.” To verify the improved model, numerical simulations were carried out for different pressure states and used to model a multiple-impact experiment. The results show that repeated weak impacts can lead to the collapse of pores and the “hot-spots” may occur due to the accumulation of internal defects accompanied by the softening of explosives.

  2. Detailed studies on the formation of piezoelectric β-phase of PVDF at different hot-stretching conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anjana; Kumar S., Jayanth; Mahapatra, D. Roy; Kumar, H. H.

    2010-04-01

    The β-phase of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) is well known for its piezoelectric properties. PVDF films have been developed using solvent cast method. The films thus produced are in β-phase . The β-phase films are transformed to piezoelectric β-phase , when films are hot-stretched at different temperature, and with different stretching factors. Films are characterized for structural, tensile and surface morphological changes during the transformation from α- to β-phase by using X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimeter, Raman spectra, Infrared spectra, tensile testing, and scanning electron microscopy. The films showed increased crystallinity with stretching up to 80oC. The optimum conditions to achieve β-phase have been discussed in detail. The fabricated PVDF sensors have been tested for free vibration and impact on plate structure, and its response is compared with conventional piezoelectric wafer type sensor. The resonant and anti-resonant peaks in the frequency response of PVDF sensor match well with that of PZT.

  3. Recombination does not hinder formation or detection of ecological species of Synechococcus inhabiting a hot spring cyanobacterial mat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Crystal Melendrez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies of bacterial speciation have claimed to support the biological species concept—that reduced recombination is required for bacterial populations to diverge into species. This conclusion has been reached from the discovery that ecologically distinct clades show lower rates of recombination than that which occurs among closest relatives. However, these previous studies did not attempt to determine whether the more-rapidly recombining close relatives within the clades studied may also have diversified ecologically, without benefit of sexual isolation. Here we have measured the impact of recombination on ecological diversification within and between two ecologically distinct clades (A and B´ of Synechococcus in a hot spring microbial mat in Yellowstone National Park, using a cultivation-free, multi-locus approach. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC libraries were constructed from mat samples collected at 60°C and 65°C. Analysis of multiple linked loci near Synechococcus 16S rRNA genes showed little evidence of recombination between the A and B´ lineages, but a record of recombination was apparent within each lineage. Recombination and mutation rates within each lineage were of similar magnitude, but recombination had a somewhat greater impact on sequence diversity than mutation, as also seen in many other bacteria and archaea. Despite recombination within the A and B´ lineages, there was evidence of ecological diversification within each lineage. The algorithm Ecotype Simulation identified sequence clusters consistent with ecologically distinct populations (ecotypes, and several hypothesized ecotypes were distinct in their habitat associations and in their adaptations to different microenvironments. We conclude that sexual isolation is more likely to follow ecological divergence than to precede it. Thus, an ecology-based model of speciation appears more appropriate than the biological species concept for bacterial and archaeal

  4. Formation and decay of hot nuclei in 475 MeV, 2 GeV proton- and 2 GeV He-3-induced reactions on Ag, Bi, An, and U

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ledoux, [No Value; Bohlen, HG; Cugnon, J; Fuchs, H; Galin, J; Gatty, B; Gebauer, B; Guerreau, D; Hilscher, D; Jacquet, D; Jahnke, U; Josset, M; Leray, S; Lott, B; Morjean, M; Quednau, BM; Roschert, G; Rossner, H; Peghaire, A; Pienkowski, L; Siemssen, RH; Stephan, C

    The formation and decay of hot nuclei generated in the interaction of light projectiles (475 MeV and 2 GeV protons and 2 GeV He-3) on a series of targets (Ag-107, Au-197, Bi-209, and U-238) are studied with an apparatus combining the efficient detection of neutrons in 4 pi sr and an accurate

  5. Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1990-01-01

    The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic

  6. The formation and evolution of Titan's winter polar vortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teanby, Nicholas A; Bézard, Bruno; Vinatier, Sandrine; Sylvestre, Melody; Nixon, Conor A; Irwin, Patrick G J; de Kok, Remco J; Calcutt, Simon B; Flasar, F Michael

    2017-11-21

    Saturn's largest moon Titan has a substantial nitrogen-methane atmosphere, with strong seasonal effects, including formation of winter polar vortices. Following Titan's 2009 northern spring equinox, peak solar heating moved to the northern hemisphere, initiating south-polar subsidence and winter polar vortex formation. Throughout 2010-2011, strengthening subsidence produced a mesospheric hot-spot and caused extreme enrichment of photochemically produced trace gases. However, in 2012 unexpected and rapid mesospheric cooling was observed. Here we show extreme trace gas enrichment within the polar vortex dramatically increases mesospheric long-wave radiative cooling efficiency, causing unusually cold temperatures 2-6 years post-equinox. The long time-frame to reach a stable vortex configuration results from the high infrared opacity of Titan's trace gases and the relatively long atmospheric radiative time constant. Winter polar hot-spots have been observed on other planets, but detection of post-equinox cooling is so far unique to Titan.

  7. Hot Flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Risk factors Not all women who go through menopause have hot flashes, and it's not clear why some women do have them. Factors that may increase your risk include: Smoking. Women who smoke are more likely to get hot flashes. Obesity. A high body mass index (BMI) is associated ...

  8. Hot flushes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    without thermoregulatory homeostatic mechanisms, such as sweating, being triggered. Small fluctuations in core body. Abstract. Vasomotor symptoms, such as hot flushes and night sweats, are considered to be the cardinal symptoms of menopause, and are experienced by most women. The physiology of hot flushes is not ...

  9. DIFFICULTY IN THE FORMATION OF COUNTER-ORBITING HOT JUPITERS FROM NEAR-COPLANAR HIERARCHICAL TRIPLE SYSTEMS: A SUB-STELLAR PERTURBER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Yuxin; Suto, Yasushi, E-mail: yuxin@utap.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2016-03-20

    Among 100 transiting planets with a measured projected spin–orbit angle λ, several systems are suggested to be counter-orbiting. While these cases may be due to the projection effect, the mechanism that produces a counter-orbiting planet has not been established. A promising scenario for counter-orbiting planets is the extreme eccentricity evolution in near-coplanar hierarchical triple systems with eccentric inner and outer orbits. We examine this scenario in detail by performing a series of systematic numerical simulations, and consider the possibility of forming hot Jupiters (HJs), especially a counter-orbiting one under this mechanism with a distant sub-stellar perturber. We incorporate quadrupole and octupole secular gravitational interaction between the two orbits, and also short-range forces (correction for general relativity, star and inner planetary tide, and rotational distortion) simultaneously. We find that most systems are tidally disrupted and that a small fraction of the surviving planets turn out to be prograde. The formation of counter-orbiting HJs in this scenario is possible only in a very restricted parameter region, and thus is very unlikely in practice.

  10. Examination of the Mg-Zn phase formation in hot-dip galvanized steel sheet; Untersuchung der Mg-Zn-Phasenbildung in feuerverzinktem Stahlblech

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zywitzki, Olaf; Modes, Thomas; Scheffel, Bert; Metzner, Christoph [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Elektronenstrahl- und Plasmatechnik, Dresden (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Zinc-magnesium layers have been produced by a combination of conventional hot-dip galvanizing and PVD magnesium coating. A subsequent short heat treatment causes the diffusion of magnesium into the zinc layer. The influence of the maximum temperature of the heat treatment on the diffusion of magnesium and on the type and distribution of the formed intermetallic Mg-Zn phases has been examined in detail in a temperature range from 300 to 400 C by means of X-ray phase analyses and metallographic cross sections. With increasing temperature a sequential intermetallic Mg-Zn phase formation has been detected. At 300 C, an initial magnesium rich, intermetallic MgZn{sub 2} surface layer is formed, which, at higher temperatures from 335 to 379 C, is progressively transformed into a zinc rich Mg{sub 2}Zn{sub 11} layer by interdiffusion. In this context, the nucleation of the Mg{sub 2}Zn{sub 11} phase takes place on the interface between the MgZn{sub 2} and the Zn phase. Above the peritectic temperature of 381 C, the microstructure is composed of a zinc matrix in which precipitated MgZn{sub 2} is dispersed. (orig.)

  11. Martensite reversion and texture formation in 17Mn-0.06C TRIP/TWIP steel after hot cold rolling and annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Pérez Escobar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available High Mn steels with Si and Al present great plasticity when deformed due to the TRIP/TWIP effect. This work evaluated the microstructural evolution and texture formation of a 17Mn-0.06C steel after hot rolling, cold rolling to 45% of thickness reduction and annealing at 700 °C for different times. The microstructural analysis was performed by means of dilatometry, X-ray diffraction (XRD, optical (OM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, electron backscattering diffraction EBSD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. It was found that during the cooling process, after the steel is annealed, the athermal ɛ and α′ martensites are formed. Tensile test results showed that the steel exhibits yield and tensile strength around 650 and 950 MPa with a total elongation around 45%. The austenite texture contains brass, copper and Goss components while the α′ and ɛ martensites textures contain rotated cube and prismatic and pyramidal fibers, respectively.

  12. The decay of hot nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretto, L.G.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1988-11-01

    The formation of hot compound nuclei in intermediate-energy heavy ion reactions is discussed. The statistical decay of such compound nuclei is responsible for the abundant emission of complex fragments and high energy gamma rays. 43 refs., 23 figs.

  13. Hot Soak

    OpenAIRE

    Goldwater, H.

    2005-01-01

    The DVD is documentation of Hot Soak, as performed at the Queen’s Hotel, Penzance, Cornwall in an en suite bathroom, for Tract: Live Art Festival, 2006, curated by Art Surgery/ Newlyn Art Gallery. Hot Soak was originally made for home, London, 2005. This piece marries an everyday environment (bathroom) with extraordinary materials (ice cubes/ dress bleeding red into water) creating the surreal. Sontag’s understanding of camp as a love of the unnatural, artifice and exaggeration, can be ci...

  14. Dark spots along slowly scaling chains of plasmonic nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Zito, Gianluigi; Sasso, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    We numerically investigate the optical response of slowly scaling linear chains of mismatched silver nanoparticles. Hybridized plasmon chain resonances manifest unusual local field distributions around the nanoparticles that result from symmetry breaking of the geometry. Importantly, we find localization patterns characterized by bright hot-spots alternated by what we term \\textit{dark} spots. A dark spot is associated to dark plasmons that have collinear and antiparallel dipole moments along the chain. As a result, the field amplification in the dark interjunction gap is extinguished for incident polarization parallel to the chain axis. Despite the strong plasmonic coupling, the nanoparticles on the sides of this dark gap experience a dramatic asymmetric field amplification with amplitude gain contrast $> 2 \\times 10^2$. Remarkably, also for polarization orthogonal to the axis, gap hot-spots form on resonance.

  15. Thickness of the oceanic crust, the lithosphere, and the mantle transition zone in the vicinity of the Tristan da Cunha hot spot estimated from ocean-bottom and ocean-island seismometer receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Wolfram H.; Jokat, Wilfried; Jegen, Marion; Baba, Kiyoshi

    2017-10-01

    The most prominent hotspot in the South Atlantic is Tristan da Cunha, which is widely considered to be underlain by a mantle plume. But the existence, location and size of this mantle plume have not been established due to the lack of regional geophysical observations. A passive seismic experiment using ocean bottom seismometers aims to investigate the lithosphere and upper mantle structure beneath the hotspot. Using the Ps receiver function method we calculate a thickness of 5 to 8 km for the oceanic crust at 17 ocean-bottom stations deployed around the islands. Within the errors of the method the thickness of the oceanic crust is very close to the global mean. The Tristan hotspot seems to have contributed little additional magmatic material or heat to the melting zone at the mid-oceanic ridge, which could be detected as thickened oceanic crust. Magmatic activity on the archipelago and surrounding seamounts seems to have only affected the crustal thickness locally. Furthermore, we imaged the mantle transition zone discontinuities by analysing receiver functions at the permanent seismological station TRIS and surrounding OBS stations. Our observations provide evidence for a thickened (cold) mantle transition zone west and northwest of the islands, which excludes the presence of a deep-reaching mantle plume. We have some indications of a thinned, hot mantle transition zone south of Tristan da Cunha inferred from sparse and noisy observations, which might indicate the location of a Tristan mantle plume at mid-mantle depths. Sp receiver functions image the base of lithosphere at about 60 to 75 km beneath the islands, which argues for a compositionally controlled seismological lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary beneath the study area.

  16. The sweet spot of a baseball bat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Rod

    1998-09-01

    The sweet spot of a baseball bat, like that of a tennis racket, can be defined either in terms of a vibration node or a centre of percussion. In order to determine how each of the sweet spots influences the "feel" of the bat, measurements were made of the impact forces transmitted to the hands. Measurements of the bat velocity, and results for a freely suspended bat, were also obtained in order to assist in the interpretation of the force waveforms. The results show that both sweet spots contribute to the formation of a sweet spot zone where the impact forces on the hands are minimised. The free bat results are also of interest since they provided particularly elegant examples of wave excitation and propagation, suitable for a student demonstration or experiment.

  17. Formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehmann, Ulrich

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the following, a new conceptual framework for investigating nowadays’ “technical” phenomena shall be introduced, that of formats. The thesis is that processes of formatting account for our recent conditions of life, and will do so in the very next future. It are processes whose foundations have been laid in modernity and which will further unfold for the time being. These processes are embedded in the format of the value chain, a circumstance making them resilient to change. In addition, they are resilient in themselves since forming interconnected systems of reciprocal causal circuits.Which leads to an overall situation that our entire “Lebenswelt” became formatted to an extent we don’t fully realize, even influencing our very percep-tion of it.

  18. Formation of bioactive N-doped TiO2 on Ti with visible light-induced antibacterial activity using NaOH, hot water, and subsequent ammonia atmospheric heat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashita, Masakazu; Endo, Naoko; Watanabe, Tomoaki; Miyazaki, Toshiki; Furuya, Maiko; Yokota, Kotoe; Abiko, Yuki; Kanetaka, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2016-09-01

    Titanium (Ti) treated with NaOH and hot water, and heated in an ammmonia (NH3) gas atmosphere for 1 or 3h exhibited in vitro apatite formation within 7days when soaked in simulated body fluid (SBF). Moreover, the treated Ti decomposed methylene blue and showed excellent bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli under visible light irradiation. The surface treatment resulted in the formation of a fine network of N-doped anatase-type titania (TiO2-xNx) on the Ti surface, which was responsible for both the apatite formation in SBF and the visible light-induced antibacterial activity. These preliminary results highlight the efficacy of our simple method for producing novel bioactive Ti with visible light-induced antibacterial activity, which could be applied to orthopaedic and dental implants without the risk of infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. HOT 2017

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Sara Stefansen

    HOT er en kvalitativ undersøgelse, der hvert år diskuterer og undersøger en lille udvalgt skare af danskkyndige fagpersoners bud på, hvad de er optagede af på literacyområdet her og nu – altså hvilke emner, de vil vurdere som aktuelle at forholde sig til i deres nuværende praksis....

  20. A development of the method of the control signal formation for the hot plate mill automation systems to improve the flatness of the finish plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voronin Stanislav S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes how to control of the hot plate mill automation system to improve the quality metrics if the final strip. Based on the data of the modern hot rolling mills the classification of the cage equipment was designed. Depending on the degree of influence on the magnitude of reduction, the equipment was divided into categories. The functioning of every system including the main and the vertical cages was described. The conditions of electrical and hydraulic mechanisms was marked. The developed algorithm allows to improve defects based on the finite number of the thickness measurements given by special non-contact sensors. The example of regulators signals calculating was shown. The result of the algorithm operating was illustrated.

  1. Mononucleosis spot test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monospot test; Heterophile antibody test; Heterophile agglutination test; Paul-Bunnell test; Forssman antibody test ... The mononucleosis spot test is done when symptoms of mononucleosis are ... Fatigue Fever Large spleen (possibly) Sore throat Tender ...

  2. Spotted Seal Distribution Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains GIS layers that depict the known spatial distributions (i.e., ranges) and reported breeding areas of spotted seals (Phoca largha). It was...

  3. Concerning seed spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. A. Larsen; R. J. Smith

    1913-01-01

    In connection with the sowing of Yellow pine, White pine and Western larch on The Blackfeet National Forest during the sea sons of 1911 and 1912, seventeen and one-half acres were sowed directly in seed spots.

  4. The satellite-based remote sensing of particulate matter (PM) in support to urban air quality: PM variability and hot spots within the Cordoba city (Argentina) as revealed by the high-resolution MAIAC-algorithm retrievals applied to a ten-years dataset (2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Ceca, Lara Sofia; Carreras, Hebe A.; Lyapustin, Alexei I.; Barnaba, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    some areas of the city (hot spots). These hot spots were put in relation with changes in vehicular traffic flows after the construction of new roads in the urban area. The monthly-resolved analysis showed a marked seasonal cycle, evidencing the influence of both meteorological conditions and season-dependent sources on the AOD parameter. For instance, in the Cordoba rural area an increase of AOD is observed during March-April, which is the soybean harvesting period, the main agricultural activity in the region. Furthermore, higher AOD signals were observed in the vicinity of main roads during summer months (December to February), likely related to the increase in vehicular traffic flow due to tourism. Long-range transport is also shown to play a role at the city scale, as high AODs throughout the study area are observed between August and November. In fact, this is the biomass-burning season over the Amazon region and over most of South America, with huge amounts of fire-related particles injected into the atmosphere and transported across the continent [4]. References [1] WHO, 2013; REVIHAAP, Project Technical Report [2] Lyapustin et al., 2011; doi: 10.1029/2010JD014986 [3] Holben et al., 1998, doi:10.1016/S0034-4257(98)00031-5 [4] Castro et al., 2013; doi:10.1016/j.atmosres.2012.10.026

  5. Dynamic formation of a hot field reversed configuration with improved confinement by supersonic merging of two colliding high-β compact toroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binderbauer, M W; Guo, H Y; Tuszewski, M; Putvinski, S; Sevier, L; Barnes, D; Rostoker, N; Anderson, M G; Andow, R; Bonelli, L; Brandi, F; Brown, R; Bui, D Q; Bystritskii, V; Ceccherini, F; Clary, R; Cheung, A H; Conroy, K D; Deng, B H; Dettrick, S A; Douglass, J D; Feng, P; Galeotti, L; Garate, E; Giammanco, F; Glass, F J; Gornostaeva, O; Gota, H; Gupta, D; Gupta, S; Kinley, J S; Knapp, K; Korepanov, S; Hollins, M; Isakov, I; Jose, V A; Li, X L; Luo, Y; Marsili, P; Mendoza, R; Meekins, M; Mok, Y; Necas, A; Paganini, E; Pegoraro, F; Pousa-Hijos, R; Primavera, S; Ruskov, E; Qerushi, A; Schmitz, L; Schroeder, J H; Sibley, A; Smirnov, A; Song, Y; Sun, X; Thompson, M C; Van Drie, A D; Walters, J K; Wyman, M D

    2010-07-23

    A hot stable field-reversed configuration (FRC) has been produced in the C-2 experiment by colliding and merging two high-β plasmoids preformed by the dynamic version of field-reversed θ-pinch technology. The merging process exhibits the highest poloidal flux amplification obtained in a magnetic confinement system (over tenfold increase). Most of the kinetic energy is converted into thermal energy with total temperature (T{i}+T{e}) exceeding 0.5 keV. The final FRC state exhibits a record FRC lifetime with flux confinement approaching classical values. These findings should have significant implications for fusion research and the physics of magnetic reconnection.

  6. East Asian seas: A hot spot of pelagic microplastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Atsuhiko; Uchida, Keiichi; Tokai, Tadashi; Iwasaki, Shinsuke

    2015-12-30

    To investigate concentrations of pelagic micro- (5mm) in the East Asian seas around Japan, field surveys using two vessels were conducted concurrently in summer 2014. The total particle count (pieces km(-2)) was computed based on observed concentrations (pieces m(-3)) of small plastic fragments (both micro- and mesoplastics) collected using neuston nets. The total particle count of microplastics within the study area was 1,720,000 pieces km(-2), 16 times greater than in the North Pacific and 27 times greater than in the world oceans. The proportion of mesoplastics increased upstream of the northeastward ocean currents, such that the small plastic fragments collected in the present surveys were considered to have originated in the Yellow Sea and East China Sea southwest of the study area. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. E4 True and false color hot spot mosaic

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    True and false color views of Jupiter from NASA's Galileo spacecraft show an equatorial 'hotspot' on Jupiter. These images cover an area 34,000 kilometers by 11,000 kilometers (about 21,100 by 6,800 miles). The top mosaic combines the violet and near infrared continuum filter images to create an image similar to how Jupiter would appear to human eyes. Differences in coloration are due to the composition and abundances of trace chemicals in Jupiter's atmosphere. The bottom mosaic uses Galileo's three near-infrared wavelengths displayed in red, green, and blue) to show variations in cloud height and thickness. Bluish clouds are high and thin, reddish clouds are low, and white clouds are high and thick. The dark blue hotspot in the center is a hole in the deep cloud with an overlying thin haze. The light blue region to the left is covered by a very high haze layer. The multicolored region to the right has overlapping cloud layers of different heights. Galileo is the first spacecraft to distinguish cloud layers on Jupiter.North is at the top. The mosaic covers latitudes 1 to 10 degrees and is centered at longitude 336 degrees west. The smallest resolved features are tens of kilometers in size. These images were taken on December 17, 1996, at a range of 1.5 million kilometers (about 930,000 miles) by the Solid State Imaging camera system aboard Galileo. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at: http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at: http:/ /www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo.

  8. Delineation of potential hot spots for hyperthermia treatment planning optimisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersma, J.; van Wieringen, N.; Crezee, H.; van Dijk, J. D. P.

    2007-01-01

    The optimal feed parameters of the generators for a complex-phased hyperthermia array system consisting of 4, 8 or even more applicators cannot be found using only the expertise of the treatment staff or using the limited amount of field and temperature data obtained during treatment. A number of

  9. Oceanic Hot Spots - Internal Tides in the Global Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) showing internal waves propagat- ing toward Palawan Island in the Sulu Sea between Borneo and...image obtained by the Moderate Resolution Imag- ing Spectroradiometer (MODIS) over the Sulu Sea near Borneo . The surface tide sloshing through the...Sibutu Passage at the bottom of the image generates internal tides that propagate toward Palawan Island in the northwest of the image. The surface

  10. Climate impacts on global hot spots of marine biodiversity

    OpenAIRE

    Ram?rez, Francisco; Af?n, Isabel; Davis, Lloyd S.; Chiaradia, Andr?

    2017-01-01

    Human activities drive environmental changes at scales that could potentially cause ecosystem collapses in the marine environment. We combined information on marine biodiversity with spatial assessments of the impacts of climate change to identify the key areas to prioritize for the conservation of global marine biodiversity. This process identified six marine regions of exceptional biodiversity based on global distributions of 1729 species of fish, 124 marine mammals, and 330 seabirds. Overa...

  11. Climate impacts on global hot spots of marine biodiversity.

    OpenAIRE

    Ram?rez, F.; Af?n, I.; Davis, L.S.; Chiaradia, A.

    2017-01-01

    Human activities drive environmental changes at scales that could potentially cause ecosystem collapses in the marine environment. We combined information on marine biodiversity with spatial assessments of the impacts of climate change to identify the key areas to prioritize for the conservation of global marine biodiversity. This process identified six marine regions of exceptional biodiversity based on global distributions of 1729 species of fish, 124 marine mammals, and 330 seabirds. Overa...

  12. Sediment trapping by dams creates methane emission hot spots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maeck, A.; Delsontro, T.; McGinnis, Daniel F.

    2013-01-01

    Inland waters transport and transform substantial amounts of carbon and account for similar to 18% of global methane emissions. Large reservoirs with higher areal methane release rates than natural waters contribute significantly to freshwater emissions. However, there are millions of small dams...... worldwide that receive and trap high loads of organic carbon and can therefore potentially emit significant amounts of methane to the atmosphere. We evaluated the effect of damming on methane emissions in a central European impounded river. Direct comparison of riverine and reservoir reaches, where...... reservoirs or rivers. We show that sediment accumulation correlates with methane production and subsequent ebullitive release rates and may therefore be an excellent proxy for estimating methane emissions from small reservoirs. Our results suggest that sedimentation-driven methane emissions from dammed river...

  13. Dendritic cell-based vaccine efficacy: aiming for hot spots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Andrea Pizzurro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Many approaches for cancer immunotherapy have targeted dendritic cells (DC, directly or indirectly, for the induction of antitumor immune responses. DC-based vaccines have been developed using a wide variety of ex vivo DC culture conditions, antigen source and loading strategies, maturation agents and routes of vaccination. Adjuvants are used to activate innate immune cells at the vaccine injection site, to promote antigen transport to the draining lymph nodes (LNs and to model adaptive immune responses. Despite years of effort, the effective induction of strong and durable antitumor T cell responses in vaccinated patients remains a challenge. The study of vaccine interactions with other immune cells in the LNs and, more recently, in the injection site has opened new doors for understanding antitumor effector T cell licensing and function. In this review, we will briefly discuss the relevant sites and up-to-date facts regarding possible targets for antitumor vaccine refinement. We will focus on the processes taking place at the injection site, adjuvant combinations and their role in DC-based vaccines LN homing and modeling vaccine-induced immune responses capable of controlling tumor growth and generating immune memory.

  14. Synthesis study of an erosion hot spot, Ocean Beach, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Patrick L.; Hansen, Jeff E.; Erikson, Li H.

    2012-01-01

    A synthesis of multiple coastal morphodynamic research efforts is presented to identify the processes responsible for persistent erosion along a 1-km segment of 7-km-long Ocean Beach in San Francisco, California. The beach is situated adjacent to a major tidal inlet and in the shadow of the ebb-tidal delta at the mouth of San Francisco Bay. Ocean Beach is exposed to a high-energy wave climate and significant alongshore variability in forcing introduced by varying nearshore bathymetry, tidal forcing, and beach morphology (e.g., beach variably backed by seawall, dunes, and bluffs). In addition, significant regional anthropogenic factors have influenced sediment supply and tidal current strength. A variety of techniques were employed to investigate the erosion at Ocean Beach, including historical shoreline and bathymetric analysis, monthly beach topographic surveys, nearshore and regional bathymetric surveys, beach and nearshore grain size analysis, two surf-zone hydrodynamic experiments, four sets of nearshore wave and current experiments, and several numerical modeling approaches. Here, we synthesize the results of 7 years of data collection to lay out the causes of persistent erosion, demonstrating the effectiveness of integrating an array of data sets covering a huge range of spatial scales. The key findings are as follows: anthropogenic influences have reduced sediment supply from San Francisco Bay, leading to pervasive contraction (i.e., both volume and area loss) of the ebb-tidal delta, which in turn reduced the regional grain size and modified wave focusing patterns along Ocean Beach, altering nearshore circulation and sediment transport patterns. In addition, scour associated with an exposed sewage outfall pipe causes a local depression in wave heights, significantly modifying nearshore circulation patterns that have been shown through modeling to be key drivers of persistent erosion in that area.

  15. Copepod carcasses as microbial hot spots for pelagic denitrification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glud, Ronnie N.; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Larsen, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Copepods are exposed to a high non-predatory mortality and their decomposing carcasses act as microniches with intensified microbial activity. Sinking carcasses could thereby represent anoxic microenvironment sustaining anaerobic microbial pathways in otherwise oxic water columns. Using non-invasive....... The importance of carcass associated denitrification could be highly significant in O2 depleted environments such as Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZ...

  16. COMPUTER MODELING IN DEFORM-3D FOR ANALYSIS OF PLASTIC FLOW IN HIGH-SPEED HOT EXTRUSION OF BIMETALLIC FORMATIVE PARTS OF DIE TOOLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Kachanov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The modern development of industrial production is closely connected with the use of science-based and high technologies to ensure competitiveness of the manufactured products on the world market. There is also much tension around an energy- and resource saving problem which can be solved while introducing new technological processes and  creation of new materials that provide productivity increase through automation and improvement of tool life. Development and implementation of such technologies are rather often considered as time-consuming processes  which are connected with complex calculations and experimental investigations. Implementation of a simulation modelling for materials processing using modern software products serves an alternative to experimental and theoretical methods of research.The aim of this paper is to compare experimental results while obtaining bimetallic samples of a forming tool through the method of speed hot extrusion and the results obtained with the help of computer simulation using DEFORM-3D package and a finite element method. Comparative analysis of plastic flow of real and model samples has shown that the obtained models provide high-quality and reliable picture of plastic flow during high-speed hot extrusion. Modeling in DEFORM-3D make it possible to eliminate complex calculations and significantly reduce a number of experimental studies while developing new technological processes.

  17. Pattern of the Occurrence of Tomato spotted wilt virus in Jeonnam Province

    OpenAIRE

    Sug-Ju Ko; Beom-Ryong Kang; Duck-Soo Choi; Do-Ik Kim; Gwan-Seok Lee; Chang-Seok Kim; Hong-Soo Choi

    2013-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) was occurred at 8 areas including Naju, Suncheon, Younggwang, Youngam, and Shinan in Jeonnam province and the crops of Younggwang were severely damaged by TSWV. The hot pepper (Capsicum annuum), bell pepper (Capsicum annuum v ar. angulosum) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicon) in greenhouse and hot pepper in open field were infected by TSWV. Especially, hot pepper was severely damaged by TSWV infection. The survey data indicated that 1.1−30% in the nu...

  18. SpotADAPT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaulakiene, Dalia; Thomsen, Christian; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    2015-01-01

    Having constantly increasing amounts of data, the analysis of it is often entrusted for a MapReduce framework. The execution of an analytical workload can be cheapened by adopting cloud computing resources, and in particular by using spot instances (cheap, fluctuating price instances) offered...

  19. Cold Spots in Neonatal Incubators Are Hot Spots for Microbial Contamination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Goffau, Marcus C.; Bergman, Klasien A.; de Vries, Hendrik J.; Meessen, Nico E. L.; Degener, John E.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Thermal stability is essential for the survival and well-being of preterm neonates. This is achieved in neonatal incubators by raising the ambient temperature and humidity to sufficiently high levels. However, potentially pathogenic microorganisms also can thrive in such warm and humid environments.

  20. Hot or Not: The Role of Instructor Quality and Gender on the Formation of Positive Illusions among Students Using RateMyProfessors.com

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine C. Theyson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Existing literature indicates that physical attractiveness positively affects variables such as income, perceived employee quality and performance evaluations. Similarly, in the academic arena, studies indicate instructors who are better looking receive better teaching evaluations from their students. Previous analysis of the website RateMyProfessors.com confirms this, indicating that instructors who are viewed by students as - hot- receive higher - quality- ratings than those who are - not.- However, psychology literature indicates that perceptions of attractiveness are influenced by positive illusions, a property whereby individuals with higher quality relationships view each other more positively than objective observers. This paper uses data from Rate My Professors to investigate the existence of positive illusions in the instructor-student relationship. It finds that positive illusions exist, suggesting that existing literature overestimates the premium associated with physical attractiveness. Furthermore, the source of these illusions varies significantly between male and female instructors with important implications for the role of gender in workplace evaluations, hiring, promotion, and tenure.

  1. Poisson Spot with Magnetic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Matthew; Everhart, Michael; D'Arruda, Jose

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we describe a unique method for obtaining the famous Poisson spot without adding obstacles to the light path, which could interfere with the effect. A Poisson spot is the interference effect from parallel rays of light diffracting around a solid spherical object, creating a bright spot in the center of the shadow.

  2. Blind spot crashes.

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Crashes involving lorries turning right and cyclists going straight ahead usually have very serious consequences for the cyclist. The cyclist, who has right of way, is often overlooked by the lorry driver. For his part, the cyclist is often unaware that the lorry driver has not seen him or that the driver wants to turn right. Despite a variety of measures, this type of blind spot crashes continues to occur. Each year they still cause approximately ten fatalities. This number could be reduced ...

  3. Effects of initial hardness on heat crack formation of die steel for hot working; Netsukan kakoyo kanagatako no heat crack keisei ni oyobosu shoki katasa no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otani, N.; Tanaka, Y. [Muroran Institute of Technology, Hokkaido (Japan)

    1997-09-25

    An investigation was made on the effects of initial hardness on heat crack formation in die steel during a diecasting process. Reduction in the life of a diecast die is caused by heat crack at more than 70% attributable to thermal fatigue as a result of the quick heating and cooling cycles. Conventional simplified testing methods do not make necessarily clear their relation with actual operations. Modeling on the diecasting process, a test piece with a notch is immersed directly into Al alloy melt and quenched in water as a thermal fatigue test to discuss the relationship between heat cracks in the die steel SKD61 and the initial hardness. High-temperature tensile strength of the SKD61 largely affects crack formation. The tensile strength increases linearly at 573 K or lower as the hardness increases. However, at 673 K or higher, the tensile strength shows a nearly proportional relationship up to HRC50 with increasing hardness, but decreases at higher hardness with HRC50 as a maximum value. Raising the initial hardness up to near HRC50 presents effect in suppressing generation and propagation of heat cracks. However, raising it further will result in an inverse effect. 11 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Resolution-independent modelling of environmental effects in semi-analytic models of galaxy formation that include ram-pressure stripping of both hot and cold gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yu; Kang, Xi; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Fu, Jian

    2016-05-01

    The quenching of star formation in satellite galaxies is observed over a wide range of dark matter halo masses and galaxy environments. In the recent Guo et al. and Fu et al. semi-analytic + N-body models, the gaseous environment of the satellite galaxy is governed by the properties of the dark matter subhalo in which it resides. This quantity depends of the resolution of the N-body simulation, leading to a divergent fraction of quenched satellites in high- and low-resolution simulations. Here, we incorporate an analytic model to trace the subhaloes below the resolution limit. We demonstrate that we then obtain better converged results between the Millennium I and II simulations, especially for the satellites in the massive haloes (log Mhalo = [14, 15]). We also include a new physical model for the ram-pressure stripping of cold gas in satellite galaxies. However, we find very clear discrepancies with observed trends in quenched satellite galaxy fractions as a function of stellar mass at fixed halo mass. At fixed halo mass, the quenched fraction of satellites does not depend on stellar mass in the models, but increases strongly with mass in the data. In addition to the overprediction of low-mass passive satellites, the models also predict too few quenched central galaxies with low stellar masses, so the problems in reproducing quenched fractions are not purely of environmental origin. Further improvements to the treatment of the gas-physical processes regulating the star formation histories of galaxies are clearly necessary to resolve these problems.

  5. The Spotting Distribution of Wildfires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Martin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In wildfire science, spotting refers to non-local creation of new fires, due to downwind ignition of brands launched from a primary fire. Spotting is often mentioned as being one of the most difficult problems for wildfire management, because of its unpredictable nature. Since spotting is a stochastic process, it makes sense to talk about a probability distribution for spotting, which we call the spotting distribution. Given a location ahead of the fire front, we would like to know how likely is it to observe a spot fire at that location in the next few minutes. The aim of this paper is to introduce a detailed procedure to find the spotting distribution. Most prior modelling has focused on the maximum spotting distance, or on physical subprocesses. We will use mathematical modelling, which is based on detailed physical processes, to derive a spotting distribution. We discuss the use and measurement of this spotting distribution in fire spread, fire management and fire breaching. The appendix of this paper contains a comprehensive review of the relevant underlying physical sub-processes of fire plumes, launching fire brands, wind transport, falling and terminal velocity, combustion during transport, and ignition upon landing.

  6. Hydrologic indicators of hot spots and hot moments of mercury methylation potential along river corridors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Michael B.; Harrison, Lee R.; Donovan, Patrick M.; Blum, Joel D.; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    The biogeochemical cycling of metals and other contaminants in river-floodplain corridors is controlled by microbial activity responding to dynamic redox conditions. Riverine flooding thus has the potential to affect speciation of redox-sensitive metals such as mercury (Hg). Therefore, inundation history over a period of decades potentially holds information on past production of bioavailable Hg. We investigate this within a Northern California river system with a legacy of landscape-scale 19th century hydraulic gold mining. We combine hydraulic modeling, Hg measurements in sediment and biota, and first-order calculations of mercury transformation to assess the potential role of river floodplains in producing monomethylmercury (MMHg), a neurotoxin which accumulates in local and migratory food webs. We identify frequently inundated floodplain areas, as well as floodplain areas inundated for long periods. We quantify the probability of MMHg production potential (MPP) associated with hydrology in each sector of the river system as a function of the spatial patterns of overbank inundation and drainage, which affect long-term redox history of contaminated sediments. Our findings identify river floodplains as periodic, temporary, yet potentially important, loci of biogeochemical transformation in which contaminants may undergo change during limited periods of the hydrologic record. We suggest that inundation is an important driver of MPP in river corridors and that the entire flow history must be analyzed retrospectively in terms of inundation magnitude and frequency in order to accurately assess biogeochemical risks, rather than merely highlighting the largest floods or low-flow periods. MMHg bioaccumulation within the aquatic food web in this system may pose a major risk to humans and waterfowl that eat migratory salmonids, which are being encouraged to come up these rivers to spawn. There is a long-term pattern of MPP under the current flow regime that is likely to be accentuated by increasingly common large floods with extended duration.

  7. Hot spots and hot moments in riparian zones: potential for improved water quality management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite considerable heterogeneity over space and time, biogeochemical and hydrological processes in riparian zones regulate contaminant movement to receiving waters and often mitigate the impact of upland sources of contaminants on water quality. Recently, these heterogeneous processes have been co...

  8. Detection of Hot Halo Gets Theory Out of Hot Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    Scientists using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory have detected an extensive halo of hot gas around a quiescent spiral galaxy. This discovery is evidence that galaxies like our Milky Way are still accumulating matter from the gradual inflow of intergalactic gas. "What we are likely witnessing here is the ongoing galaxy formation process," said Kristian Pedersen of the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, and lead author of a report on the discovery. Chandra observations show that the hot halo extends more than 60,000 light years on either side of the disk of the galaxy known as NGC 5746. The detection of such a large halo alleviates a long-standing problem for the theory of galaxy formation. Spiral galaxies are thought to form from enormous clouds of intergalactic gas that collapse to form giant, spinning disks of stars and gas. Chandra X-ray Image of NGC 5746 Chandra X-ray Image of NGC 5746 One prediction of this theory is that large spiral galaxies should be immersed in halos of hot gas left over from the galaxy formation process. Hot gas has been detected around spiral galaxies in which vigorous star formation is ejecting matter from the galaxy, but until now hot halos due to infall of intergalactic matter have not been detected. "Our observations solve the mystery of the missing hot halos around spiral galaxies," said Pedersen. "The halos exist, but are so faint that an extremely sensitive telescope such as Chandra is needed to detect them." DSS Optical Image of NGC 5746 DSS Optical Image of NGC 5746 NGC 5746 is a massive spiral galaxy about a 100 million light years from Earth. Its disk of stars and gas is viewed almost edge-on. The galaxy shows no signs of unusual star formation, or energetic activity from its nuclear region, making it unlikely that the hot halo is produced by gas flowing out of the galaxy. "We targeted NGC 5746 because we thought its distance and orientation would give us the best chance to detect a hot halo caused by the infall of

  9. Barefoot on Hot Ground: Formation Temperatures of Plio-Pleistocene Soil Carbonates in East Africa Based on the Clumped Isotope in Carbonate (Δ47) Thermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passey, B. H.; Eiler, J. M.; Levin, N. E.; Cerling, T. E.

    2008-12-01

    We utilize the carbonate clumped isotope thermometer to investigate paleoenvironments of human evolution in the Turkana Basin of northern Kenya and southern Ethiopia. Analyses were made using a new automated online peripheral that reduces the human workload and improves the success rate of this analysis. Paleotemperatures for Plio-Pleistocene soil carbonates that formed >50cm below the paleosurface range between ~30°C and 40°C; some of this temperature variation is temporally systematic and coherent across depositional facies. Present day mean annual temperature in this region averages 29°C, and there is very little seasonal variation in average monthly temperature (50 cm depth are strongly buffered against diurnal and short-term (i.e., weeks) temperature variations. Possible explanations for these high temperatures include 1) much higher mean annual or mean seasonal air temperatures during parts of the Plio-Pleistocene, 2) a temporal bias of soil carbonate formation towards short-lived extreme temperature events, 3) nonequilibrium or diagenetic isotope effects, and 4) persistent elevation of soil temperatures relative to air temperatures. A brief deployment of remote temperature sensors near Lake Turkana revealed that soil temperatures were considerably higher than air temperatures. Temperatures at 50 cm depth were stable between 35°C and 37°C; those at 10 cm ranged diurnally between 44°C (day) and 33°C (night). Air temperatures in the shade ranged between 37°C (day) and 26°C (night). These study localities were sparsely vegetated, and the elevated soil temperatures are consistent with surface heating by solar radiation. A survey of previous data reveals that temperatures well above 45°C are common for surfaces receiving direct solar radiation. The relevant boundary condition for soil temperature is therefore surface soil temperature, and not air temperature as might be assumed. The Turkana Basin today is one of the hottest regions on Earth; our results

  10. Black-spot poison ivy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schram, Sarah E; Willey, Andrea; Lee, Peter K; Bohjanen, Kimberly A; Warshaw, Erin M

    2008-01-01

    In black-spot poison ivy dermatitis, a black lacquerlike substance forms on the skin when poison ivy resin is exposed to air. Although the Toxicodendron group of plants is estimated to be the most common cause of allergic contact dermatitis in the United States, black-spot poison ivy dermatitis is relatively rare.

  11. Neptune's Wandering Hot Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Glenn; Fletcher, Leigh; Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma; Geballe, Tom; Hammel, Heidi; Fujiyoshi, Takuya; Encrenaz, Therese; Hofstadter, Mark; Mousis, Olivier; Fuse, Tetsuharu

    2010-05-01

    Images of stratospheric emission from Neptune obtained in 2006 at ESO's Very Large Telescope (Orton et al., 2007, A&A 473, L5) revealed a near-polar hot spot near 70 deg. S latitude that was detectable in different filters sampling both methane (~7-micron) and ethane (~12-micron) emission from Neptune's stratosphere. Such a feature was not present in 2003 Keck and 2005 Gemini North observations: these showed only a general warming trend towards Neptune's pole that was longitudinally homogeneous. Because of the paucity of longitudinal sampling in the 2003, 2005 and 2006 images, it was not clear whether the failure to see this phenomenon in 2003 and 2005 was simply the result of insufficient longitudinal sampling or whether the phenomenon was truly variable in time. To unravel these two possibilities, we proposed for time on large telescopes that were capable of resolving Neptune at these wavelengths. We were granted time at Gemini South in 2007 using T-Recs, Subaru time in 2008 using the COMICS instrument and VLT time in 2008 and 2009 using VISIR. Two serendipitous T-Recs images of Neptune were also obtained in 2007 using a broad-band N (8-14 micron) filter, whose radiance is dominated by 12-micron ethane emission, and whose primary purpose was navigation of N-band spectroscopy. The feature was re-observed (i) in 2007 in the T-Recs N-band filter and (ii) in 2008 with COMICS in a 12.5-micron image. Unfortunately, none of the telescope time granted was sufficient to sample all longitudes over the 12-hour period of this latitude, and so no definitive separation of the two possibilities was obtained. However, considering the ensemble of images as a random sample of longitudes, it is likely that the phenomenon is ephemeral in time, as it was observed only twice among 9 independent observing epochs. We will continue to request observations to sample all longitudes systematically, but our current sample argues that the phenomenon is truly ephemera, because we most likely

  12. Turbulent Region Near Jupiter's Great Red Spot

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    True and false color mosaics of the turbulent region west of Jupiter's Great Red Spot. The Great Red Spot is on the planetary limb on the right hand side of each mosaic. The region west (left) of the Great Red Spot is characterized by large, turbulent structures that rapidly change in appearance. The turbulence results from the collision of a westward jet that is deflected northward by the Great Red Spot into a higher latitude eastward jet. The large eddies nearest to the Great Red Spot are bright, suggesting that convection and cloud formation are active there.The top mosaic combines the violet (410 nanometers) and near infrared continuum (756 nanometers) filter images to create a mosaic similar to how Jupiter would appear to human eyes. Differences in coloration are due to the composition and abundance of trace chemicals in Jupiter's atmosphere. The lower mosaic uses the Galileo imaging camera's three near-infrared (invisible) wavelengths (756 nanometers, 727 nanometers, and 889 nanometers displayed in red, green, and blue) to show variations in cloud height and thickness. Light blue clouds are high and thin, reddish clouds are deep, and white clouds are high and thick. Purple most likely represents a high haze overlying a clear deep atmosphere. Galileo is the first spacecraft to distinguish cloud layers on Jupiter.The mosaic is centered at 16.5 degrees south planetocentric latitude and 85 degrees west longitude. The north-south dimension of the Great Red Spot is approximately 11,000 kilometers. The smallest resolved features are tens of kilometers in size. North is at the top of the picture. The images used were taken on June 26, 1997 at a range of 1.2 million kilometers (1.05 million miles) by the Solid State Imaging (SSI) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech

  13. Hot tearing of aluminum-copper B206 alloys with iron and silicon additions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kamguo Kamga, H; Larouche, D; Bournane, M; Rahem, A

    2010-01-01

    ...) to investigate the combined effect of these additions on hot tear resistance. Susceptibility to hot tearing was found to increase gradually with iron content when the conditions were favorable to the formation of the β(FeCu) phase...

  14. Cilia Train Spotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhns, Stefanie; Blacque, Oliver E

    2016-06-06

    Cilium formation depends on intraflagellar transport trains that move bidirectionally along ciliary microtubules. Reporting in Science, Stepanek and Pigino (2016) employ correlative light and electron microscopy in algae to determine the ultrastructure of anterograde and retrograde trains and discover that these trains avoid collision by running on B- and A-tubules, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Coring in deep hardrock formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1988-08-01

    The United States Department of Energy is involved in a variety of scientific and engineering feasibility studies requiring extensive drilling in hard crystalline rock. In many cases well depths extend from 6000 to 20,000 feet in high-temperature, granitic formations. Examples of such projects are the Hot Dry Rock well system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico and the planned exploratory magma well near Mammoth Lakes, California. In addition to these programs, there is also continuing interest in supporting programs to reduce drilling costs associated with the production of geothermal energy from underground sources such as the Geysers area near San Francisco, California. The overall progression in these efforts is to drill deeper holes in higher temperature, harder formations. In conjunction with this trend is a desire to improve the capability to recover geological information. Spot coring and continuous coring are important elements in this effort. It is the purpose of this report to examine the current methods used to obtain core from deep wells and to suggest projects which will improve existing capabilities. 28 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. BIPOLAR MAGNETIC SPOTS FROM DYNAMOS IN STRATIFIED SPHERICAL SHELL TURBULENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabbari, Sarah; Brandenburg, Axel; Kleeorin, Nathan; Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Rogachevskii, Igor, E-mail: sarahjab@kth.se [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-06-01

    Recent work by Mitra et al. (2014) has shown that in strongly stratified forced two-layer turbulence with helicity and corresponding large-scale dynamo action in the lower layer, and nonhelical turbulence in the upper, a magnetic field occurs in the upper layer in the form of sharply bounded bipolar magnetic spots. Here we extend this model to spherical wedge geometry covering the northern hemisphere up to 75° latitude and an azimuthal extent of 180°. The kinetic helicity and therefore also the large-scale magnetic field are strongest at low latitudes. For moderately strong stratification, several bipolar spots form that eventually fill the full longitudinal extent. At early times, the polarity of spots reflects the orientation of the underlying azimuthal field, as expected from Parker’s Ω-shaped flux loops. At late times their tilt changes such that there is a radial field of opposite orientation at different latitudes separated by about 10°. Our model demonstrates the spontaneous formation of spots of sizes much larger than the pressure scale height. Their tendency to produce filling factors close to unity is argued to be reminiscent of highly active stars. We confirm that strong stratification and strong scale separation are essential ingredients behind magnetic spot formation, which appears to be associated with downflows at larger depths.

  17. Theory and simulation of anode spots in low pressure plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiner, Brett; Barnat, Edward V.; Baalrud, Scott D.; Hopkins, Matthew M.; Yee, Benjamin T.

    2017-11-01

    When electrodes are biased above the plasma potential, electrons accelerated through the associated electron sheath can dramatically increase the ionization rate of neutrals near the electrode surface. It has previously been observed that if the ionization rate is great enough, a double layer separates a luminous high-potential plasma attached to the electrode surface (called an anode spot or fireball) from the bulk plasma. Here, results of the first 2D particle-in-cell simulations of anode spot formation are presented along with a theoretical model describing the formation process. It is found that ionization leads to the build-up of an ion-rich layer adjacent to the electrode, forming a narrow potential well near the electrode surface that traps electrons born from ionization. It is shown that anode spot onset occurs when a quasineutral region is established in the potential well and the density in this region becomes large enough to violate the steady-state Langmuir condition, which is a balance between electron and ion fluxes across the double layer. A model for steady-state properties of the anode spot is also presented, which predicts values for the anode spot size, double layer potential drop, and form of the sheath at the electrode by considering particle, power, and current balance. These predictions are found to be consistent with the presented simulation and previous experiments.

  18. Hot interstellar matter in elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Dong-Woo

    2012-01-01

    Based on a number of new discoveries resulting from 10 years of Chandra and XMM-Newton observations and corresponding theoretical works, this is the first book to address significant progress in the research of the Hot Interstellar Matter in Elliptical Galaxies. A fundamental understanding of the physical properties of the hot ISM in elliptical galaxies is critical, because they are directly related to the formation and evolution of elliptical galaxies via star formation episodes, environmental effects such as stripping, infall, and mergers, and the growth of super-massive black holes. Thanks to the outstanding spatial resolution of Chandra and the large collecting area of XMM-Newton, various fine structures of the hot gas have been imaged in detail and key physical quantities have been accurately measured, allowing theoretical interpretations/predictions to be compared and tested against observational results. This book will bring all readers up-to-date on this essential field of research.

  19. Identification of black spots for traffic injury in road intersections dependence of injury definition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund Hansen, Dennis; Lauritsen, Jens M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Introduction In Denmark it is common practice that road administrations use black spot identification methods in planning. Assumed black spots are further reviewed based on traffic volume, modes of transportation and other considerations. For our region hospital based geo-located traffic...... injury information has been available for about 20 years and in the current project the aim was to investigate whether different definitions of black spots (hot spots) would point at different intersections for further scrutiny. During the years 2002 to 2007 all 29 719 patient contacts due to traffic...... defined as The upper decile of injury generating intersections. Intersections with at least one death or hospitalised patient. The intersections covering the upper decile of injuries. Results The three definitions in combination identified 295 injury burdened intersections. Only three intersections were...

  20. Development of a test method for determining the cracking susceptibility of resistance spot welded high strength steel sheets

    OpenAIRE

    Rethmeier, Michael; Suwala, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    In this study a test method for determining the cracking susceptibility of resistance spot welded high strength steel sheets was investigated. The development of a suitable test procedure is based on the External-Loaded Hot Crack Test (PVC-Test). The test modification for resistance spot welding contains a constant tensile force load. The test method for determining the cracking susceptibility was experimentally verified for a high strength steel, a transformation induced plasticity steel (TR...

  1. Hot-pressed geopolymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranjbar, Navid; Mehrali, Mohammad; Maheri, Mahmoud R.

    2017-01-01

    /FA, duration of hot-pressing and sodium concentration are studied. Together with detailed experimental studies, our results reveal that the most dominant factor is the induced pressure. The main results indicated that the highest compressive strength of the geopolymer (134 MPa) could be obtained by employing...... the hot pressing, temperature and duration of 41.4 MPa, 350 °C and 20 min, respectively. The microstructure of the hot-pressed specimens showed more developed geopolymer matrix compared with conventional ones leading to higher compressive strength in much shortest time. The improved mechanical properties...

  2. Is this Red Spot the Blue Spot (locus ceruleum)?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Won Sick; Lee, Yu Kyung; Lee, Min Kyung; Hwang, Kyung Hoon [Gachon University Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    The authors report brain images of 18F-FDG-PET in a case of schizophrenia. The images showed strikingly increased bilateral uptake in the locus ceruleum. The locus ceruleum is called the blue spot and known to be a center of the norepinephrinergic system.

  3. Vocal complexity and sociality in spotted paca (Cuniculus paca)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The evolution of sociality is related to many ecological factors that act on animals as selective forces, thus driving the formation of groups. Group size will depend on the payoffs of group living. The Social Complexity Hypothesis for Communication (SCHC) predicts that increases in group size will be related to increases in the complexity of the communication among individuals. This hypothesis, which was confirmed in some mammal societies, may be useful to trace sociality in the spotted paca (Cuniculus paca), a Neotropical caviomorph rodent reported as solitary. There are, however, sightings of groups in the wild, and farmers easily form groups of spotted paca in captivity. Thus, we aimed to describe the acoustic repertoire of captive spotted paca to test the SCHC and to obtain insights about the sociability of this species. Moreover, we aimed to verify the relationship between group size and acoustic repertoire size of caviomorph rodents, to better understand the evolution of sociality in this taxon. We predicted that spotted paca should display a complex acoustic repertoire, given their social behavior in captivity and group sightings in the wild. We also predicted that in caviomorph species the group size would increase with acoustic repertoire, supporting the SCHC. We performed a Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) based on acoustic parameters of the vocalizations recorded. In addition, we applied an independent contrasts approach to investigate sociality in spotted paca following the social complexity hypothesis, independent of phylogeny. Our analysis showed that the spotted paca’s acoustic repertoire contains seven vocal types and one mechanical signal. The broad acoustic repertoire of the spotted paca might have evolved given the species’ ability to live in groups. The relationship between group size and the size of the acoustic repertoires of caviomorph species was confirmed, providing additional support for the SCHC in yet another group of diverse

  4. China's 'Hot Money' Problems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martin, Michael F; Morrison, Wayne M

    2008-01-01

    .... The recent large inflow of financial capital into China, commonly referred to as "hot money," has led some economists to warn that such flows may have a destabilizing effect on China's economy...

  5. Hot Weather Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hot, heavy meals and don’t use the oven. Monitor medications: Find out if the person’s medications ... nia.nih.gov Photo: By High Contrast (Own work) [CC BY 3.0 de ( http://creativecommons.org/ ...

  6. Really Hot Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-04-01

    galaxy, another has been found in the nearby galaxy IC 1613, and five others are situated in the Magellanic Clouds. Astronomers have also detected the presence of HeII ions in a number of remote galaxies undergoing a phase of intense star formation ("starburst galaxies") and in the vicinity of ultraluminous X-ray sources in very distant galaxies. What is going on in those remote objects in the early Universe? Do we see the action of young and very hot stars or is something unknown going on? What can the existence of those hot nebulae in young galaxies tell about the evolution of our own Milky Way? Searching for the energy source We would like to know, but those distant nebulae are unfortunately too faint to be studied in any reasonable detail, even by means of the largest available telescopes. The only way forward is therefore to look closer at the nearest ones in the hope that they will provide clues about the processes leading to the observed high excitation and thus help to better understand their cousins in those distant galaxies. There appears to be three possible answers to the basic question about the nature of the energetic sources that heat these strange emission nebulae: * very fast particles: if there is in the area a fast-moving gas (more than 100 km/s), the shock created by the impact of this material is able to heat the ambient interstellar medium sufficiently to produce a HeII nebula. * ultraviolet emission from massive stars: according to the most recent model calculations, even the most massive O-type stars do not emit enough ultraviolet light to ionize a sufficient number of helium atoms in the surrounding nebula to produce a detectable HeII nebula. However, some of the hottest stars of the so-called Wolf-Rayet (W-R) type (that are the evolved descendants of O-stars) may produce enough high energy emission to completely ionize the helium atoms in their surroundings. * intense X-ray emission: close binary stars in which one component is a "compact

  7. Kepler constraints on planets near hot Jupiters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Jason H; Ragozzine, Darin; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Carter, Joshua A; Ford, Eric B; Holman, Matthew J; Rowe, Jason F; Welsh, William F; Borucki, William J; Boss, Alan P; Ciardi, David R; Quinn, Samuel N

    2012-05-22

    We present the results of a search for planetary companions orbiting near hot Jupiter planet candidates (Jupiter-size candidates with orbital periods near 3 d) identified in the Kepler data through its sixth quarter of science operations. Special emphasis is given to companions between the 21 interior and exterior mean-motion resonances. A photometric transit search excludes companions with sizes ranging from roughly two-thirds to five times the size of the Earth, depending upon the noise properties of the target star. A search for dynamically induced deviations from a constant period (transit timing variations) also shows no significant signals. In contrast, comparison studies of warm Jupiters (with slightly larger orbits) and hot Neptune-size candidates do exhibit signatures of additional companions with these same tests. These differences between hot Jupiters and other planetary systems denote a distinctly different formation or dynamical history.

  8. Kepler constraints on planets near hot Jupiters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffen, Jason H.; /Fermilab; Ragozzine, Darin; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; /UC, Santa Cruz, Astron. Astrophys.; Carter, Joshua A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Ford, Eric B.; /Florida U.; Holman, Matthew J.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Rowe, Jason F.; /NASA, Ames; Welsh, William F.; /San Diego State U., Astron. Dept.; Borucki, William J.; /NASA, Ames; Boss, Alan P.; /Carnegie Inst., Wash., D.C., DTM; Ciardi, David R.; /Caltech /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2012-05-01

    We present the results of a search for planetary companions orbiting near hot Jupiter planet candidates (Jupiter-size candidates with orbital periods near 3 d) identified in the Kepler data through its sixth quarter of science operations. Special emphasis is given to companions between the 2:1 interior and exterior mean-motion resonances. A photometric transit search excludes companions with sizes ranging from roughly two-thirds to five times the size of the Earth, depending upon the noise properties of the target star. A search for dynamically induced deviations from a constant period (transit timing variations) also shows no significant signals. In contrast, comparison studies of warm Jupiters (with slightly larger orbits) and hot Neptune-size candidates do exhibit signatures of additional companions with these same tests. These differences between hot Jupiters and other planetary systems denote a distinctly different formation or dynamical history.

  9. SPOT 4 North American Data Buy

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS has contracted with SPOT Image Corporation to acquire and provide Satellite Pour l'Observation de la Terre (SPOT) satellite data for calendar years 2010 and...

  10. SPOT- 4 North American Data Buy

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS has contracted with SPOT Image Corporation to acquire and provide Satellite Pour l'Observation de la Terre (SPOT) satellite data for calendar years 2010 and...

  11. SPOT- 5 North American Data Buy

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS has contracted with SPOT Image Corporation to acquire and provide Satellite Pour l'Observation de la Terre (SPOT) satellite data for calendar years 2010 and...

  12. SPOT 5 North American Data Buy

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS has contracted with SPOT Image Corporation to acquire and provide Satellite Pour l'Observation de la Terre (SPOT) satellite data for calendar years 2010 and...

  13. Laser Pyrometer For Spot Temperature Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elleman, D. D.; Allen, J. L.; Lee, M. C.

    1988-01-01

    Laser pyrometer makes temperature map by scanning measuring spot across target. Scanning laser pyrometer passively measures radiation emitted by scanned spot on target and calibrated by similar passive measurement on blackbody of known temperature. Laser beam turned on for active measurements of reflectances of target spot and reflectance standard. From measurements, temperature of target spot inferred. Pyrometer useful for non-contact measurement of temperature distributions in processing of materials.

  14. IR Hot Wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, T. B.

    2010-04-01

    The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace is a breakthrough heat treatment system for manufacturing metal components. Near-infrared (IR) radiant energy combines with IR convective heating for heat treating. Heat treatment is an essential process in the manufacture of most components. The controlled heating and cooling of a metal or metal alloy alters its physical, mechanical, and sometimes chemical properties without changing the object's shape. The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace offers the simplest, quickest, most efficient, and cost-effective heat treatment option for metals and metal alloys. Compared with other heat treatment alternatives, the IR Hot Wave{trademark} system: (1) is 3 to 15 times faster; (2) is 2 to 3 times more energy efficient; (3) is 20% to 50% more cost-effective; (4) has a {+-}1 C thermal profile compared to a {+-}10 C thermal profile for conventional gas furnaces; and (5) has a 25% to 50% smaller footprint.

  15. Managing Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minniear, Timothy D; Buckingham, Steven C

    2009-11-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is caused by the tick-borne bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii. Symptoms range from moderate illness to severe illness, including cardiovascular compromise, coma and death. The disease is prevalent in most of the USA, especially during warmer months. The trademark presentation is fever and rash with a history of tick bite, although tick exposure is unappreciated in over a third of cases. Other signature symptoms include headache and abdominal pain. The antibiotic therapy of choice for R. rickettsii infection is doxycycline. Preventive measures for Rocky Mountain spotted fever and other tick-borne diseases include: wearing long-sleeved, light colored clothing; checking for tick attachment and removing attached ticks promptly; applying topical insect repellent; and treating clothing with permethrin.

  16. Sweet Spots and Door Stops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael; Tsui, Stella; Leung, Chi Fan

    2011-01-01

    A sweet spot is referred to in sport as the perfect place to strike a ball with a racquet or bat. It is the point of contact between bat and ball where maximum results can be produced with minimal effort from the hand of the player. Similar physics can be applied to the less inspiring examples of door stops; the perfect position of a door stop is…

  17. Justifications shape ethical blind spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittarello, Andrea; Leib, Margarita; Gordon-Hecker, Tom; Shalvi, Shaul

    2015-06-01

    To some extent, unethical behavior results from people's limited attention to ethical considerations, which results in an ethical blind spot. Here, we focus on the role of ambiguity in shaping people's ethical blind spots, which in turn lead to their ethical failures. We suggest that in ambiguous settings, individuals' attention shifts toward tempting information, which determines the magnitude of their lies. Employing a novel ambiguous-dice paradigm, we asked participants to report the outcome of the die roll appearing closest to the location of a previously presented fixation cross on a computer screen; this outcome would determine their pay. We varied the value of the die second closest to the fixation cross to be either higher (i.e., tempting) or lower (i.e., not tempting) than the die closest to the fixation cross. Results of two experiments revealed that in ambiguous settings, people's incorrect responses were self-serving. Tracking participants' eye movements demonstrated that people's ethical blind spots are shaped by increased attention toward tempting information. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Spot-to-Beam Procedure

    CERN Document Server

    Seidov, Zakir F; Yahalom, Asher

    2004-01-01

    We describe the interactive "STB" (spot_to_beam) MATHEMATICA procedure for a) approximating the spot image at the screen as ellipse, b) getting five parameters of the elliptic beam (two diameters, center coordinates, and orientation angle). The basic idea is to "map" the reference holes at screen onto the X-Y plane normal to the beam direction (Z-axis). All distortions of the image, e.g., due to camera-screen disposition can be, in principle, taken into account,assuming that the hole positions at screen and the orientation of the screen are known. With the non-linear LMS fitting, the "curved-coordinate-system" of the holes at image is transferred to the Cartesian coordinate system at XY-plane. Then the fitting ellipse is found in this latter system, by solving the system of N linear equations for 5 unknown parameters of beam ellipse, where N>5 is a number of reference points on edge of spot image. The examples of the real measurements at various screens will be demonstrated. The accuracy of beam diameters is ...

  19. White-spot Lesions and Gingivitis Microbiotas in Orthodontic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, A.C.R.; Sonis, A.L.; Lif Holgerson, P.; Starr, J.R.; Nunez, Y.; Kressirer, C.A.; Paster, B.J.; Johansson, I.

    2012-01-01

    White-spot lesions (WSL) associated with orthodontic appliances are a cosmetic problem and increase risk for cavities. We characterized the microbiota of WSL, accounting for confounding due to gingivitis. Participants were 60 children with fixed appliances, aged between 10 and 19 yrs, half with WSL. Plaque samples were assayed by a 16S rRNA-based microarray (HOMIM) and by PCR. Mean gingival index was positively associated with WSL (p = 0.018). Taxa associated with WSL by microarray included Granulicatella elegans (p = 0.01), Veillonellaceae sp. HOT 155 (p gingivitis by microarray included: Gemella sanguinis (p = 0.002), Actinomyces sp. HOT 448 (p = 0.003), Prevotella cluster IV (p = 0.021), and Streptococcus sp. HOT 071/070 (p = 0.023); and levels of S. mutans (p = 0.02) and Bifidobacteriaceae (p = 0.012) by qPCR. Species’ associations with WSL were minimally changed with adjustment for gingivitis level. Partial least-squares discriminant analysis yielded good discrimination between children with and those without WSL. Granulicatella, Veillonellaceae and Bifidobacteriaceae, in addition to S. mutans and S. wiggsiae, were associated with the presence of WSL in adolescents undergoing orthodontic treatment. Many taxa showed a stronger association with gingivitis than with WSL. PMID:22837552

  20. Diffractive optics for reduction of hot cracking in pulsed mode Nd:YAG laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olesen, Søren; Roos, Sven-Olov

    2001-01-01

    In order to reduce the susceptibility to hot cracking in pulsed mode laser welding of austenitic stainless steel, an optical system for reduction of the cooling rate is sought developed. Based on intensive numerical simulations, an optical system producing three focused spots is made. In a number...

  1. A multispecies approach reveals hot spots and cold spots of diversity and connectivity in invertebrate species with contrasting dispersal modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Abigail E; De Jode, Aurélien; Dubois, Sophie; Bouzaza, Zoheir; Aurelle, Didier; Boissin, Emilie; Chabrol, Olivier; David, Romain; Egea, Emilie; Ledoux, Jean-Baptiste; Mérigot, Bastien; Weber, Alexandra Anh-Thu; Chenuil, Anne

    2017-12-01

    Genetic diversity is crucial for species' maintenance and persistence, yet is often overlooked in conservation studies. Species diversity is more often reported due to practical constraints, but it is unknown if these measures of diversity are correlated. In marine invertebrates, adults are often sessile or sedentary and populations exchange genes via dispersal of gametes and larvae. Species with a larval period are expected to have more connected populations than those without larval dispersal. We assessed the relationship between measures of species and genetic diversity, and between dispersal ability and connectivity. We compiled data on genetic patterns and life history traits in nine species across five phyla. Sampling sites spanned 600 km in the northwest Mediterranean Sea and focused on a 50-km area near Marseilles, France. Comparative population genetic approaches yielded three main results. (i) Species without larvae showed higher levels of genetic structure than species with free-living larvae, but the role of larval type (lecithotrophic or planktotrophic) was negligible. (ii) A narrow area around Marseilles, subject to offshore advection, limited genetic connectivity in most species. (iii) We identified sites with significant positive contributions to overall genetic diversity across all species, corresponding with areas near low human population densities. In contrast, high levels of human activity corresponded with a negative contribution to overall genetic diversity. Genetic diversity within species was positively and significantly linearly related to local species diversity. Our study suggests that local contribution to overall genetic diversity should be taken into account for future conservation strategies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Experience with hot catchpots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1945-02-02

    The first part of this report was actually a letter regarding the question, ''could the hot circulating pump be omitted when processing pitch at 700 atm.'' It had been stated that the hot circulation pump could be omitted if the quantity of cold letdown was correspondingly increased. The latest experiences with the catchpot at Poelitz showed the following. When running pitch, tar, or petroleum in the liquid-phase stalls, frequent trouble with the hot catchpot was encountered due to the coking. This coking was caused by irregular letdown yield, which could not be avoided due to small temperature fluctuations in the stall. This caused interruption of the uniform flow in the hot catchpot and the deposition of the solids contained in the letdown, largely catalyst solids, due to the asphalt content. Coking of the product was initiated by this concentration of catalyst solids. A perforated double jacket was inserted in the conical part of the catchpot through which about 3000 m/sup 3/ per hour of cold gas was blown in continuously. By this agitation and cooling in the lowest part of the catchpot, catalyst deposits were prevented from forming and the product received a continuous added supply of hydrogen. Another letter was given discussing the same question and an alternate solution. This second letter described Welheim's design for the hot catchpot. It featured introduction of 5000 to 6000 m/sup 3//hr of cold circulating gas into the lower part of the catchpot, and withdrawal of letdown from a point above the gas inlet. The advantages were continued agitation and cooling of the sludge and constant retention of some cold sludge in the catchpot (which evened out throughput and content fluctuations)

  3. Dark Dune Spots: possible biomarkers on Mars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gánti, Tibor; Horváth, András; Bérczi, Szaniszló; Gesztesi, Albert; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2003-10-01

    Dark Dune Spots (DDSs) are transitional geomorphologic formations in the frost-covered polar regions of Mars. Our analysis of the transformations and arrangements of subsequent stages of DDSs into time sequence revealed their: (i) hole-like characteristics, (ii) development and formation from the bottom of the frosted layer till the disapperance of the latter, (iii) repeated (seasonal and annual) appearance in a pattern of multiple DDSs on the surface, and (iv) probable origin. We focused our studies on a model in which DDSs were interpreted as objects triggered by biological activity involved in the frosting and melting processes. We discuss two competing interpretations of DDSs: development by defrosting alone, and by defrosting and melting enhanced by the activity of Martian Surface Organisms (MSOs). MSOs are hypothetical Martian photosynthetic surface organisms thought to absorb sunlight. As a result they warm up by late winter and melt the ice around them, whereby their growth and reproduction become possible. The ice cover above the liquid water lens harbouring the MSOs provides excellent heat and UV insulation, prevents fast evaporation, and sustains basic living conditions until the ice cover exists. When the frost cover disappears MSOs go to a dormant, desiccated state. We propose further studies to be carried out by orbiters and landers travelling to Mars and by analysis of partial analogues on earth.

  4. Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) is one of the largest hot cells dedicated to radioactive materials research at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The nation's...

  5. Watermarking spot colors in packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Alastair; Filler, TomáÅ.¡; Falkenstern, Kristyn; Bai, Yang

    2015-03-01

    In January 2014, Digimarc announced Digimarc® Barcode for the packaging industry to improve the check-out efficiency and customer experience for retailers. Digimarc Barcode is a machine readable code that carries the same information as a traditional Universal Product Code (UPC) and is introduced by adding a robust digital watermark to the package design. It is imperceptible to the human eye but can be read by a modern barcode scanner at the Point of Sale (POS) station. Compared to a traditional linear barcode, Digimarc Barcode covers the whole package with minimal impact on the graphic design. This significantly improves the Items per Minute (IPM) metric, which retailers use to track the checkout efficiency since it closely relates to their profitability. Increasing IPM by a few percent could lead to potential savings of millions of dollars for retailers, giving them a strong incentive to add the Digimarc Barcode to their packages. Testing performed by Digimarc showed increases in IPM of at least 33% using the Digimarc Barcode, compared to using a traditional barcode. A method of watermarking print ready image data used in the commercial packaging industry is described. A significant proportion of packages are printed using spot colors, therefore spot colors needs to be supported by an embedder for Digimarc Barcode. Digimarc Barcode supports the PANTONE spot color system, which is commonly used in the packaging industry. The Digimarc Barcode embedder allows a user to insert the UPC code in an image while minimizing perceptibility to the Human Visual System (HVS). The Digimarc Barcode is inserted in the printing ink domain, using an Adobe Photoshop plug-in as the last step before printing. Since Photoshop is an industry standard widely used by pre-press shops in the packaging industry, a Digimarc Barcode can be easily inserted and proofed.

  6. Visualizing Cosmological Concepts Using the Analog of a Hot Liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusofi, E.; Mohsenzadeh, M.

    We have used the expansion process of hot milk, which has similarities with the cosmic expansion, to facilitate easier and better visualization and teaching of cosmological concepts. Observations of the milk are used to illustrate phenomena related to the Planck era, the standard hot big bang model, cosmic inflation, problems with the formation of structure, and other subjects. This innovative and easily implemented demonstration can enhance the learning of cosmological concepts.

  7. The hot chocolate effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, Frank S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1982-05-01

    The "hot chocolate effect" was investigated quantitatively, using water. If a tall glass cylinder is filled nearly completely with water and tapped on the bottom with a softened mallet one can detect the lowest longitudinal mode of the water column, for which the height of the water column is one quarter wavelength. If the cylinder is rapidly filled with hot tap water containing dissolved air the pitch of that mode may descend by nearly three octaves during the first few seconds as the air comes out of solution and forms bubbles. Then the pitch gradually rises as the bubbles float to the top. A simple theoretical expression for the pitch ratio is derived and compared with experiment. The agreement is good to within the ten percent accuracy of the experiments.

  8. Persistence of forage fish ‘hot spots’ and its association with foraging Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) in southeast Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gende, Scott M.; Sigler, Michael F.

    2006-02-01

    Whereas primary and secondary productivity at oceanic 'hotspots' may be a function of upwelling and temperature fronts, the aggregation of higher-order vertebrates is a function of their ability to search for and locate these areas. Thus, understanding how predators aggregate at these productive foraging areas is germane to the study of oceanic hot spots. We examined the spatial distribution of forage fish in southeast Alaska for three years to better understand Steller sea lion ( Eumetopias jubatus) aggregations and foraging behavior. Energy densities (millions KJ/km 2) of forage fish were orders of magnitude greater during the winter months (November-February), due to the presence of schools of overwintering Pacific herring ( Clupea pallasi). Within the winter months, herring consistently aggregated at a few areas, and these areas persisted throughout the season and among years. Thus, our study area was characterized by seasonally variable, highly abundant but highly patchily distributed forage fish hot spots. More importantly, the persistence of these forage fish hot spots was an important characteristic in determining whether foraging sea lions utilized them. Over 40% of the variation in the distribution of sea lions on our surveys was explained by the persistence of forage fish hot spots. Using a simple spatial model, we demonstrate that when the density of these hot spots is low, effort necessary to locate these spots is minimized when those spots persist through time. In contrast, under similar prey densities but lower persistence, effort increases dramatically. Thus an important characteristic of pelagic hot spots is their persistence, allowing predators to predict their locations and concentrate search efforts accordingly.

  9. Disinfection byproduct formation resulting from settled, filtered, and finished water treated by titanium dioxide photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Brooke K; Daugherty, Erin; Abbaszadegan, Morteza

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated strategies targeting disinfection byproduct (DBP) mitigation using TiO2 photocatalysis with varying influent water quality. A Purifics Photo-CAT Lab reactor was used to assess total trihalomethane (TTHM) and haloacetic acid (HAA) formation as a function of photocatalytic treatment using water from a conventional coagulation/flocculation/sedimentation process, granular activated carbon filtration, and a DBP hot spot in the water distribution system. Regardless of influent water quality, photocatalysis reduced DBP precursors; however, low-energy limited photocatalysis (photocatalysis is not a suitable option when TTHMs and HAA5s are a concern, regardless of the level of pretreatment. Limited photocatalysis yields incomplete oxidation, wherein larger, more aromatic, humic organic compounds are broken into smaller molecular weight, less aromatic, and less humic moieties, which have considerable potential to produce DBPs. More complete mineralization of DBP precursors is obtained using extended photocatalysis (80-160 kW h m(-3)), which substantially decreases DBP precursors as well as TTHM and HAA5 concentrations. In order to balance DBP mitigation, energy, and chemical usage, targeted use of TiO2 photocatalysis is necessary in a water treatment train (e.g., extended photocatalysis at a distribution system hot spot, where the volumetrically high energy requirements may be justifiable). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Solar Hot Water Heater

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The solar panels pictured below, mounted on a Moscow, Idaho home, are part of a domestic hot water heating system capable of providing up to 100 percent of home or small business hot water needs. Produced by Lennox Industries Inc., Marshalltown, Iowa, the panels are commercial versions of a collector co-developed by NASA. In an effort to conserve energy, NASA has installed solar collectors at a number of its own facilities and is conducting research to develop the most efficient systems. Lewis Research Center teamed with Honeywell Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota to develop the flat plate collector shown. Key to the collector's efficiency is black chrome coating on the plate developed for use on spacecraft solar cells, the coating prevents sun heat from "reradiating," or escaping outward. The design proved the most effective heat absorber among 23 different types of collectors evaluated in a Lewis test program. The Lennox solar domestic hot water heating system has three main components: the array of collectors, a "solar module" (blue unit pictured) and a conventional water heater. A fluid-ethylene glycol and water-is circulated through the collectors to absorb solar heat. The fluid is then piped to a double-walled jacket around a water tank within the solar module.

  11. Role of Al in Zn bath on the formation of the inhibition layer during hot-dip galvanizing for a 1.2Si-1.5Mn transformation-induced plasticity steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kuang-Kuo; Hsu, Chiung-Wen; Chang, Liuwen; Gan, Dershin; Yang, Kuo-Cheng

    2013-11-01

    This study investigated the interaction between the Al in the Zn bath and the surface oxides formed by selective oxidation on a 1.2Si-1.5Mn TRIP steel during hot-dip galvanizing. XPS and TEM were employed for characterization. The results indicated that the amorphous xMnO·SiO2 oxide could react with Al to form a Si-Mn-Al-containing oxide. The crystalline MnSiO3 and Mn2SiO4 oxides could be largely reduced by Al to form holes in the oxide film. Consequently, the steel covered by a layer of mixed xMnO·SiO2 and MnSiO3 could form a continuous Fe2Al5 inhibition layer and showed the highest galvanizability among the three samples examined.

  12. Finding hot-spots and hot- moments of DOC concentrations in two streams feeding a drinking water reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterwoud, Marieke; Musolff, Andreas; Fleckenstein, Jan H.

    2014-05-01

    The flux of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) derived from soils is a significant term in terrestrial carbon budgets and as a result a dominant link between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Since surface waters are a main source of drinking water, increasing DOC concentrations are a cause of concern across Europe. As they can transport contaminants and negatively affect drinking water treatment processes. Downstream DOC concentrations are the sum of headwater inputs, in combination with progressive downstream alterations by inflowing water with its own DOC concentrations. Better knowledge of spatial and temporal delivery of DOC in catchments is required to understand the mechanisms behind reported long term changes in DOC fluxes from soils to surface waters. The aim of this study is to identify where and when increased DOC concentrations occur within two catchments in the Harz-mountains, having different land-use, feeding a drinking water reservoir. The Hassel and Rappbode catchments are approximately equal in size. However, they differ in their land-use. The Hassel catchment has a considerable contribution of arable land compared to the Rappbode catchment which is mainly forested. We combined both standard synoptic sampling (biweekly) with high frequency UV-Vis analysis of DOC concentrations and its chemical composition in streams waters during one complete hydrological year. Through the synoptic sampling we obtain spatially detailed information about the (sub)catchments DOC export, whereas, the continuous UV-Vis measurements provided detailed information on the DOC-discharge behavior during different hydrological conditions. Results from the sampling and monitoring will be presented. We found DOC exports to be largest in the agricultural dominated catchment. However, temporal variability in DOC export was higher than the spatial variability within both catchments. We presume that it is likely that DOC exports are mainly driven by inputs from the riparian soils which are present along the entire stream reach. The DOC-discharge relationships show a fast increase in DOC concentrations in response to a hydrological event. Although, after several consecutive small discharge events we found a depletion of the DOC released to the stream. Furthermore, the DOC-concentration relationships revealed different patterns during snowmelt and summer high flow. Melting of snow first leads to a rapid increase in DOC concentration, followed by a dilution and again an increase in DOC concentrations as a result of thawing which enables leaching from the soil. During summer high flow situation, soil wetting leads to leaching followed by depletion.

  13. Nuclear fragmentation for Xe+Au and Xe+Ag systems at an energy of 44 A.MeV, formation and decay of hot nuclei; Etude de la fragmentation nucleaire pour les systemes XE+AU et XE+AG a 44 A.MeV, production et decroissance de noyaux chauds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meslin, C.

    1995-01-01

    A study of the formation and the decay of hot nuclear fragments produced in the reactions Xe+Au and Xe+Ag at an energy of 44 A.MeV is presented in this thesis. The 4{pi} experimental setup consisted of four multidetectors -two for the detection of the fragments (Z>7; DELF and XYZT) and two for the detection of the charged particles (Z<6; MUR and TONNEAU) and allowed an analysis using ``complete events`` (80 % of the total charge and the total parallel linear momentum of the entrance channel) to be carried out. The reaction mechanism is binary with as observed at low energy an almost complete relaxation of the incident energy. The collision results in two hot fragments at the beginning of the exit channel which decay by evaporation and/or fragmentation. In addition of these two body events, we have identified a new dynamic mechanism where we detect a small fragment, called the neck, coming form the overlap of the nuclei during the interaction, in coincidence with a projectile-like fragment and a target-like fragment. For the most dissipative collisions, the deep inelastic collision have allowed an estimation of the lifetime of the hot nuclear fragments to be made. This is possible using proximity effects and fragment-fragment space-time correlations of the decay of one or two primary partners from the deep inelastic collisions. This method is seen to reach its limits in the case of the reactions studied here. (authors). 61 refs.

  14. Cosmicflows-3: Cold Spot Repeller?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtois, Hélène M.; Tully, R. Brent; Hoffman, Yehuda; Pomarède, Daniel; Graziani, Romain; Dupuy, Alexandra

    2017-09-01

    The three-dimensional gravitational velocity field within z ˜ 0.1 has been modeled with the Wiener filter methodology applied to the Cosmicflows-3 compilation of galaxy distances. The dominant features are a basin of attraction and two basins of repulsion. The major basin of attraction is an extension of the Shapley concentration of galaxies. One basin of repulsion, the Dipole Repeller, is located near the anti-apex of the cosmic microwave background dipole. The other basin of repulsion is in the proximate direction toward the “Cold Spot” irregularity in the cosmic microwave background. It has been speculated that a vast void might contribute to the amplitude of the Cold Spot from the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect.

  15. Cosmicflows-3: Cold Spot Repeller?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtois, Hélène M.; Graziani, Romain; Dupuy, Alexandra [University of Lyon, UCB Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, IPN, Lyon (France); Tully, R. Brent [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Hoffman, Yehuda [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Pomarède, Daniel [Institut de Recherche sur les Lois Fondamentales de l’Univers, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2017-09-20

    The three-dimensional gravitational velocity field within z ∼ 0.1 has been modeled with the Wiener filter methodology applied to the Cosmicflows-3 compilation of galaxy distances. The dominant features are a basin of attraction and two basins of repulsion. The major basin of attraction is an extension of the Shapley concentration of galaxies. One basin of repulsion, the Dipole Repeller, is located near the anti-apex of the cosmic microwave background dipole. The other basin of repulsion is in the proximate direction toward the “Cold Spot” irregularity in the cosmic microwave background. It has been speculated that a vast void might contribute to the amplitude of the Cold Spot from the integrated Sachs–Wolfe effect.

  16. Geothermal Exploration in Hot Springs, Montana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toby McIntosh, Jackola Engineering

    2012-09-26

    The project involves drilling deeper in the Camp Aqua well dri lled in June 1982 as part of an effort to develop an ethanol plant. The purpose of the current drill ing effort is to determine if water at or above 165°F exists for the use in low temperature resource power generation. Previous geothermal resource study efforts in and around Hot Springs , MT and the Camp Aqua area (NE of Hot Springs) have been conducted through the years. A confined gravel aquifer exists in deep alluvium overlain by approximately 250 of si lt and c lay deposits from Glacial Lake Missoula. This gravel aquifer overlies a deeper bedrock aquifer. In the Camp Aqua area several wel l s exist in the gravel aquifer which receives hot water f rom bedrock fractures beneath the area. Prior to this exploration, one known well in the Camp Aqua area penetrated into the bedrock without success in intersecting fractures transporting hot geothermal water. The exploration associated with this project adds to the physical knowledge database of the Camp Aqua area. The dri l l ing effort provides additional subsurface information that can be used to gain a better understanding of the bedrock formation that i s leaking hot geothermal water into an otherwise cold water aquifer. The exi s t ing well used for the explorat ion is located within the center of the hottest water within the gravel aquifer. This lent i t sel f as a logical and economical location to continue the exploration within the existing well. Faced with budget constraints due to unanticipated costs, changing dril l ing techniques stretched the limited project resources to maximize the overa l l well depth which f e l l short of original project goals. The project goal of finding 165°F or hotter water was not achieved; however the project provides additional information and understanding of the Camp Aqua area that could prove valuable in future exploration efforts

  17. Metallography of Battery Resistance Spot Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, J. E.; Johannes, L. B.; Gonzalez, D.; Yayathi, S.; Figuered, J. M.; Darcy, E. C.; Bilc, Z. M.

    2015-01-01

    Li-ion cells provide an energy dense solution for systems that require rechargeable electrical power. However, these cells can undergo thermal runaway, the point at which the cell becomes thermally unstable and results in hot gas, flame, electrolyte leakage, and in some cases explosion. The heat and fire associated with this type of event is generally violent and can subsequently cause damage to the surrounding system or present a dangerous risk to the personnel nearby. The space flight environment is especially sensitive to risks particularly when it involves potential for fire within the habitable volume of the International Space Station (ISS). In larger battery packs such as Robonaut 2 (R2), numerous Li-ion cells are placed in parallel-series configurations to obtain the required stack voltage and desired run-time or to meet specific power requirements. This raises a second and less obvious concern for batteries that undergo certification for space flight use: the joining quality at the resistance spot weld of battery cells to component wires/leads and battery tabs, bus bars or other electronic components and assemblies. Resistance spot welds undergo materials evaluation, visual inspection, conductivity (resistivity) testing, destructive peel testing, and metallurgical examination in accordance with applicable NASA Process Specifications. Welded components are cross-sectioned to ensure they are free of cracks or voids open to any exterior surface. Pore and voids contained within the weld zone but not open to an exterior surface, and are not determined to have sharp notch like characteristics, shall be acceptable. Depending on requirements, some battery cells are constructed of aluminum canisters while others are constructed of steel. Process specific weld schedules must be developed and certified for each possible joining combination. The aluminum canisters' positive terminals were particularly difficult to weld due to a bi-metal strip that comes ultrasonically

  18. The biology of the California spotted owl

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.J. Gutiérrez; Douglas J. Tempel; M. Zachariah Peery

    2017-01-01

    The spotted owl (Strix occidentalis) is one of the most studied raptors in the world (Lõmus 2004) because forest management throughout its range has the potential to negatively affect owl populations. Information on the California spotted owl (S. o. occidentalis) has been summarized in several literature reviews (e.g.,...

  19. Front blind spot crashes in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuk Ki; Wong, Koon Hung; Tao, Chi Hang; Tam, Cheok Ning; Tam, Yiu Yan; Tsang, Cheuk Nam

    2016-09-01

    In 2012-2014, our laboratory had investigated a total of 9 suspected front blind spot crashes, in which the medium and heavy goods vehicles pulled away from rest and rolled over the pedestrians, who were crossing immediately in front of the vehicles. The drivers alleged that they did not see any pedestrians through the windscreens or the front blind spot mirrors. Forensic assessment of the goods vehicles revealed the existence of front blind spot zones in 3 out of these 9 accident vehicles, which were attributed to the poor mirror adjustments or even the absence of a front blind spot mirror altogether. In view of this, a small survey was devised involving 20 randomly selected volunteers and their goods vehicles and 5 out of these vehicles had blind spots at the front. Additionally, a short questionnaire was conducted on these 20 professional lorry drivers and it was shown that most of them were not aware of the hazards of blind spots immediately in front of their vehicles, and many did not use the front blind spot mirrors properly. A simple procedure for quick measurements of the coverage of front blind spot mirrors using a coloured plastic mat with dimensional grids was also introduced and described in this paper. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Charles R

    2013-04-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is typically undifferentiated from many other infections in the first few days of illness. Treatment should not be delayed pending confirmation of infection when Rocky Mountain spotted fever is suspected. Doxycycline is the drug of choice even for infants and children less than 8 years old. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.